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Sample records for correct mitotic segregation

  1. PICH promotes mitotic chromosome segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Thomas Friberg; Hickson, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    PICH is an SNF2-family DNA translocase that appears to play a role specifically in mitosis. Characterization of PICH in human cells led to the initial discovery of "ultra-fine DNA bridges" (UFBs) that connect the 2 segregating DNA masses in the anaphase of mitosis. These bridge structures, which...

  2. A dynamic, mitotic-like mechanism for bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Michael A; Waldor, Matthew K

    2006-12-01

    The mechanisms that mediate chromosome segregation in bacteria are poorly understood. Despite evidence of dynamic movement of chromosome regions, to date, mitotic-like mechanisms that act on the bacterial chromosome have not been demonstrated. Here we provide evidence that the Vibrio cholerae ParAI and ParBI proteins are components of an apparatus that pulls the origin region of the large V. cholerae chromosome to the cell pole and anchors it there. ParBI interacts with a conserved origin-proximal, centromere-like site (parSI) that, following chromosome replication, segregates asymmetrically from one pole to the other. While segregating, parSI stretches far away from neighboring chromosomal loci. ParAI forms a dynamic band that extends from the pole to the segregating ParBI/parSI complex. Movement of ParBI/parSI across the cell occurs in concert with ParAI retraction. Deletion of parAI disrupts proper origin localization and segregation dynamics, and parSI no longer separates from nearby regions. These data suggest that ParAI forms a dynamic structure that pulls the ParBI-bound chromosome to the pole in a process analogous to anaphase of eukaryotic mitosis.

  3. Mitotic nuclear pore complex segregation involves Nup2 in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Subbulakshmi; Markossian, Sarine; Osmani, Aysha H; Osmani, Stephen A

    2017-09-04

    Transport through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) during interphase is facilitated by the nucleoporin Nup2 via its importin α- and Ran-binding domains. However, Aspergillus nidulans and vertebrate Nup2 also locate to chromatin during mitosis, suggestive of mitotic functions. In this study, we report that Nup2 is required for mitotic NPC inheritance in A. nidulans Interestingly, the role of Nup2 during mitotic NPC segregation is independent of its importin α- and Ran-binding domains but relies on a central targeting domain that is necessary for localization and viability. To test whether mitotic chromatin-associated Nup2 might function to bridge NPCs with chromatin during segregation, we provided an artificial link between NPCs and chromatin via Nup133 and histone H1. Using this approach, we bypassed the requirement of Nup2 for NPC segregation. This indicates that A. nidulans cells ensure accurate mitotic NPC segregation to daughter nuclei by linking mitotic DNA and NPC segregation via the mitotic specific chromatin association of Nup2. © 2017 Suresh et al.

  4. Spindle checkpoint-independent inhibition of mitotic chromosome segregation by Drosophila Mps1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Friederike; Karess, Roger E; Lehner, Christian F

    2012-06-01

    Monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) is essential for the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which prevents anaphase onset in the presence of misaligned chromosomes. Moreover, Mps1 kinase contributes in a SAC-independent manner to the correction of erroneous initial attachments of chromosomes to the spindle. Our characterization of the Drosophila homologue reveals yet another SAC-independent role. As in yeast, modest overexpression of Drosophila Mps1 is sufficient to delay progression through mitosis during metaphase, even though chromosome congression and metaphase alignment do not appear to be affected. This delay in metaphase depends on the SAC component Mad2. Although Mps1 overexpression in mad2 mutants no longer causes a metaphase delay, it perturbs anaphase. Sister kinetochores barely move apart toward spindle poles. However, kinetochore movements can be restored experimentally by separase-independent resolution of sister chromatid cohesion. We propose therefore that Mps1 inhibits sister chromatid separation in a SAC-independent manner. Moreover, we report unexpected results concerning the requirement of Mps1 dimerization and kinase activity for its kinetochore localization in Drosophila. These findings further expand Mps1's significance for faithful mitotic chromosome segregation and emphasize the importance of its careful regulation.

  5. Kinesin 5B (KIF5B is required for progression through female meiosis and proper chromosomal segregation in mitotic cells.

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    Dawit Kidane

    Full Text Available The fidelity of chromosomal segregation during cell division is important to maintain chromosomal stability in order to prevent cancer and birth defects. Although several spindle-associated molecular motors have been shown to be essential for cell division, only a few chromosome arm-associated motors have been described. Here, we investigated the role of Kinesin 5b (Kif5b during female mouse meiotic cell development and mitotic cell division. RNA interference (RNAi-mediated silencing of Kif5b in mouse oocytes induced significant delay in germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD and failure in extrusion of the first polar body (PBE. In mitotic cells, knockdown of Kif5b leads to centrosome amplification and a chromosomal segregation defect. These data suggest that KIF5B is critical in suppressing chromosomal instability at the early stages of female meiotic cell development and mitotic cell division.

  6. Kinesin 5B (KIF5B) is required for progression through female meiosis and proper chromosomal segregation in mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidane, Dawit; Sakkas, Denny; Nottoli, Timothy; McGrath, James; Sweasy, Joann B

    2013-01-01

    The fidelity of chromosomal segregation during cell division is important to maintain chromosomal stability in order to prevent cancer and birth defects. Although several spindle-associated molecular motors have been shown to be essential for cell division, only a few chromosome arm-associated motors have been described. Here, we investigated the role of Kinesin 5b (Kif5b) during female mouse meiotic cell development and mitotic cell division. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of Kif5b in mouse oocytes induced significant delay in germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and failure in extrusion of the first polar body (PBE). In mitotic cells, knockdown of Kif5b leads to centrosome amplification and a chromosomal segregation defect. These data suggest that KIF5B is critical in suppressing chromosomal instability at the early stages of female meiotic cell development and mitotic cell division.

  7. DEAD-box RNA helicase Belle/DDX3 and the RNA interference pathway promote mitotic chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pek, Jun Wei; Kai, Toshie

    2011-07-19

    During mitosis, faithful inheritance of genetic material is achieved by chromosome segregation, as mediated by the condensin I and II complexes. Failed chromosome segregation can result in neoplasm formation, infertility, and birth defects. Recently, the germ-line-specific DEAD-box RNA helicase Vasa was demonstrated to promote mitotic chromosome segregation in Drosophila by facilitating robust chromosomal localization of Barren (Barr), a condensin I component. This mitotic function of Vasa is mediated by Aubergine and Spindle-E, which are two germ-line components of the Piwi-interacting RNA pathway. Faithful segregation of chromosomes should be executed both in germ-line and somatic cells. However, whether a similar mechanism also functions in promoting chromosome segregation in somatic cells has not been elucidated. Here, we present evidence that belle (vasa paralog) and the RNA interference pathway regulate chromosome segregation in Drosophila somatic cells. During mitosis, belle promotes robust Barr chromosomal localization and chromosome segregation. Belle's localization to condensing chromosomes depends on dicer-2 and argonaute2. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that Belle interacts with Barr and Argonaute2 and is enriched at endogenous siRNA (endo-siRNA)-generating loci. Our results suggest that Belle functions in promoting chromosome segregation in Drosophila somatic cells via the endo-siRNA pathway. DDX3 (human homolog of belle) and DICER function in promoting chromosome segregation and hCAP-H (human homolog of Barr) localization in HeLa cells, indicating a conserved function for those proteins in human cells. Our results suggest that the RNA helicase Belle/DDX3 and the RNA interference pathway perform a common role in regulating chromosome segregation in Drosophila and human somatic cells.

  8. Spindle pole bodies exploit the mitotic exit network in metaphase to drive their age-dependent segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, Manuel; Leisner, Christian; Chen, Daici; Manatschal, Cristina; Wegleiter, Thomas; Ouellet, Jimmy; Lindstrom, Derek; Gottschling, Dan E; Vogel, Jackie; Barral, Yves

    2012-03-02

    Like many asymmetrically dividing cells, budding yeast segregates mitotic spindle poles nonrandomly between mother and daughter cells. During metaphase, the spindle positioning protein Kar9 accumulates asymmetrically, localizing specifically to astral microtubules emanating from the old spindle pole body (SPB) and driving its segregation to the bud. Here, we show that the SPB component Nud1/centriolin acts through the mitotic exit network (MEN) to specify asymmetric SPB inheritance. In the absence of MEN signaling, Kar9 asymmetry is unstable and its preference for the old SPB is disrupted. Consistent with this, phosphorylation of Kar9 by the MEN kinases Dbf2 and Dbf20 is not required to break Kar9 symmetry but is instead required to maintain stable association of Kar9 with the old SPB throughout metaphase. We propose that MEN signaling links Kar9 regulation to SPB identity through biasing and stabilizing the age-insensitive, cyclin-B-dependent mechanism of symmetry breaking. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Amitozyn impairs chromosome segregation and induces apoptosis via mitotic checkpoint activation.

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    Bastien Hermant

    Full Text Available Amitozyn (Am is a semi-synthetic drug produced by the alkylation of major celandine (Chelidonium majus L. alkaloids with the organophosphorous compound N,N'N'-triethylenethiophosphoramide (ThioTEPA. We show here that the treatment of living cells with Am reversibly perturbs the microtubule cytoskeleton, provoking a dose-dependent cell arrest in the M phase. Am changed the dynamics of tubulin polymerization in vitro, promoted the appearance of aberrant mitotic phenotypes in HeLa cells and induced apoptosis by the activation of caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP, without inducing DNA breaks. Am treatment of HeLa cells induced changes in the phosphorylation of the growth suppressor pRb that coincided with maximum mitotic index. The dose-dependent and reversible anti-proliferative effect of Am was observed in several transformed cell lines. Importantly, the drug was also efficient against multidrug-resistant, paclitaxel-resistant or p53-deficient cells. Our results thus open the way to further pre-clinical evaluation of Am.

  10. Amitozyn Impairs Chromosome Segregation and Induces Apoptosis via Mitotic Checkpoint Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potopalsky, Anatoly I.; Chroboczek, Jadwiga; Tcherniuk, Sergey O.

    2013-01-01

    Amitozyn (Am) is a semi-synthetic drug produced by the alkylation of major celandine (Chelidonium majus L.) alkaloids with the organophosphorous compound N,N’N’-triethylenethiophosphoramide (ThioTEPA). We show here that the treatment of living cells with Am reversibly perturbs the microtubule cytoskeleton, provoking a dose-dependent cell arrest in the M phase. Am changed the dynamics of tubulin polymerization in vitro, promoted the appearance of aberrant mitotic phenotypes in HeLa cells and induced apoptosis by the activation of caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP, without inducing DNA breaks. Am treatment of HeLa cells induced changes in the phosphorylation of the growth suppressor pRb that coincided with maximum mitotic index. The dose-dependent and reversible anti-proliferative effect of Am was observed in several transformed cell lines. Importantly, the drug was also efficient against multidrug-resistant, paclitaxel-resistant or p53-deficient cells. Our results thus open the way to further pre-clinical evaluation of Am. PMID:23505430

  11. Balanced Activity of Three Mitotic Motors Is Required for Bipolar Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation

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    Roy G.H.P. van Heesbeen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar spindle assembly requires force to organize the microtubule network. Here, we show that three motor proteins, namely Eg5, Kif15, and dynein, act together to produce the right force balance in the spindle. Excessive inward force results in monopolar spindle formation, while excessive outward force generation results in unstable spindles with splayed spindle poles. Blocking activity of all three motors prevents bipolar spindle formation, but established bipolar spindles are refractory to loss of all motor activity. Further analysis shows that although these preformed spindles remain bipolar, outward force generation is required to establish sufficient tension on kinetochores and to accomplish successful chromosome segregation. Together, these results show how Eg5, Kif15, and dynein work together to build a bipolar spindle and reveal an important role for antagonistic motors in chromosome segregation.

  12. Misato Controls Mitotic Microtubule Generation by Stabilizing the TCP-1 Tubulin Chaperone Complex [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Valeria; Pellacani, Claudia; Heesom, Kate J; Rogala, Kacper B; Deane, Charlotte M; Mottier-Pavie, Violaine; Gatti, Maurizio; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Wakefield, James G

    2015-06-29

    Mitotic spindles are primarily composed of microtubules (MTs), generated by polymerization of α- and β-Tubulin hetero-dimers. Tubulins undergo a series of protein folding and post-translational modifications in order to fulfill their functions. Defects in Tubulin polymerization dramatically affect spindle formation and disrupt chromosome segregation. We recently described a role for the product of the conserved misato (mst) gene in regulating mitotic MT generation in flies, but the molecular function of Mst remains unknown. Here, we use affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS) to identify interacting partners of Mst in the Drosophila embryo. We demonstrate that Mst associates stoichiometrically with the hetero-octameric Tubulin Chaperone Protein-1 (TCP-1) complex, with the hetero-hexameric Tubulin Prefoldin complex, and with proteins having conserved roles in generating MT-competent Tubulin. We show that RNAi-mediated in vivo depletion of any TCP-1 subunit phenocopies the effects of mutations in mst or the Prefoldin-encoding gene merry-go-round (mgr), leading to monopolar and disorganized mitotic spindles containing few MTs. Crucially, we demonstrate that Mst, but not Mgr, is required for TCP-1 complex stability and that both the efficiency of Tubulin polymerization and Tubulin stability are drastically compromised in mst mutants. Moreover, our structural bioinformatic analyses indicate that Mst resembles the three-dimensional structure of Tubulin monomers and might therefore occupy the TCP-1 complex central cavity. Collectively, our results suggest that Mst acts as a co-factor of the TCP-1 complex, playing an essential role in the Tubulin-folding processes required for proper assembly of spindle MTs.

  13. Mitotic spindle assembly: May the force be with you

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesbeen, R.G.H.P. van

    2015-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is focused on multiple pathways required for assembly of a bipolar mitotic spindle. Proper assembly of a bipolar mitotic spindle is essential for the generation of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments and correct segregation of the sister chromatids. Defec

  14. Defining the Role of ATP Hydrolysis in Mitotic Segregation of Bacterial Plasmids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ah-Seng, Yoan; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David; Bouet, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolysis of ATP by partition ATPases, although considered a key step in the segregation mechanism that assures stable inheritance of plasmids, is intrinsically very weak. The cognate centromere-binding protein (CBP), together with DNA, stimulates the ATPase to hydrolyse ATP and to undertake the relocation that incites plasmid movement, apparently confirming the need for hydrolysis in partition. However, ATP-binding alone changes ATPase conformation and properties, making it difficult to rigorously distinguish the substrate and cofactor roles of ATP in vivo. We had shown that mutation of arginines R36 and R42 in the F plasmid CBP, SopB, reduces stimulation of SopA-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis without changing SopA-SopB affinity, suggesting the role of hydrolysis could be analyzed using SopA with normal conformational responses to ATP. Here, we report that strongly reducing SopB-mediated stimulation of ATP hydrolysis results in only slight destabilization of mini-F, although the instability, as well as an increase in mini-F clustering, is proportional to the ATPase deficit. Unexpectedly, the reduced stimulation also increased the frequency of SopA relocation over the nucleoid. The increase was due to drastic shortening of the period spent by SopA at nucleoid ends; average speed of migration per se was unchanged. Reduced ATP hydrolysis was also associated with pronounced deviations in positioning of mini-F, though time-averaged positions changed only modestly. Thus, by specifically targeting SopB-stimulated ATP hydrolysis our study reveals that even at levels of ATPase which reduce the efficiency of splitting clusters and the constancy of plasmid positioning, SopB still activates SopA mobility and plasmid positioning, and sustains near wild type levels of plasmid stability. PMID:24367270

  15. Defining the role of ATP hydrolysis in mitotic segregation of bacterial plasmids.

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    Yoan Ah-Seng

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of ATP by partition ATPases, although considered a key step in the segregation mechanism that assures stable inheritance of plasmids, is intrinsically very weak. The cognate centromere-binding protein (CBP, together with DNA, stimulates the ATPase to hydrolyse ATP and to undertake the relocation that incites plasmid movement, apparently confirming the need for hydrolysis in partition. However, ATP-binding alone changes ATPase conformation and properties, making it difficult to rigorously distinguish the substrate and cofactor roles of ATP in vivo. We had shown that mutation of arginines R36 and R42 in the F plasmid CBP, SopB, reduces stimulation of SopA-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis without changing SopA-SopB affinity, suggesting the role of hydrolysis could be analyzed using SopA with normal conformational responses to ATP. Here, we report that strongly reducing SopB-mediated stimulation of ATP hydrolysis results in only slight destabilization of mini-F, although the instability, as well as an increase in mini-F clustering, is proportional to the ATPase deficit. Unexpectedly, the reduced stimulation also increased the frequency of SopA relocation over the nucleoid. The increase was due to drastic shortening of the period spent by SopA at nucleoid ends; average speed of migration per se was unchanged. Reduced ATP hydrolysis was also associated with pronounced deviations in positioning of mini-F, though time-averaged positions changed only modestly. Thus, by specifically targeting SopB-stimulated ATP hydrolysis our study reveals that even at levels of ATPase which reduce the efficiency of splitting clusters and the constancy of plasmid positioning, SopB still activates SopA mobility and plasmid positioning, and sustains near wild type levels of plasmid stability.

  16. Mitotic dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐孝威

    1996-01-01

    A new model for mitotic dynamics of eukaryotic cells is proposed. In the kinetochore mo-tor-midzone motor model two kinds of motors, the kinetochore motors and the midzone motors, play important roles in chromosome movement. Using this model the chromosome congression during prometaphase, the chromosome oscillation during metaphase and the chromatid segregation during anaphase are described in a unified way.

  17. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes: altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werken, C; Avo Santos, M; Laven, J S E; Eleveld, C; Fauser, B C J M; Lens, S M A; Baart, E B

    2015-10-01

    regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal phosphorylation dynamics of histone H2A at T120 (H2ApT120) by Bub1 kinase and subsequent recruitment of Shugoshin. However, phosphorylation of histone H3 at threonine 3 (H3pT3) by Haspin kinase failed to show the expected centromeric enrichment on metaphase chromosomes in the zygote, but not at later stages. Inhibition of Haspin revealed this activity to be essential for proper mitotic checkpoint complex activation in human zygotes, thus demonstrating an active mitotic checkpoint under normal conditions. Abolishment of H3pT3 during zygotic prometaphase further shows that centromeric H2ApT120 alone is not sufficient for proper shugoshin and CPC localization. As the removal of H3pT3 from the chromosome arms during prometaphase normally contributes to further centromeric enrichment of the CPC in somatic cells, CPC targeting may be less accurate in human zygotes. Owing to ethical limitations, tripronuclear zygotes were used in functional experiments. Although these represent the best available models, it is unknown if they are completely representative for dipronuclear zygotes. In addition, further research is needed to determine to what extent the differences we observed in H3T3 phosphorylation dynamics and CPC localization affect chromosome attachment. In the zygote, paternal and maternal chromosomes coming from two separate pronuclei, and with contrasting epigenetic signatures, need to be aligned on a single metaphase plate. Our results suggest that adaptations in mechanisms regulating CPC targeting exist in the human zygote, to ensure symmetric recruitment despite the epigenetic asymmetry between maternal and paternal chromosomes. This adaptation may come at a price regarding chromosome segregation fidelity. This study was funded by the Portuguese Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research. The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans cyclin B3 is required for multiple mitotic processes including alleviation of a spindle checkpoint-dependent block in anaphase chromosome segregation.

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    Gary M R Deyter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The master regulators of the cell cycle are cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks, which influence the function of a myriad of proteins via phosphorylation. Mitotic Cdk1 is activated by A-type, as well as B1- and B2-type, cyclins. However, the role of a third, conserved cyclin B family member, cyclin B3, is less well defined. Here, we show that Caenorhabditis elegans CYB-3 has essential and distinct functions from cyclin B1 and B2 in the early embryo. CYB-3 is required for the timely execution of a number of cell cycle events including completion of the MII meiotic division of the oocyte nucleus, pronuclear migration, centrosome maturation, mitotic chromosome condensation and congression, and, most strikingly, progression through the metaphase-to-anaphase transition. Our experiments reveal that the extended metaphase delay in CYB-3-depleted embryos is dependent on an intact spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC and results in salient defects in the architecture of holocentric metaphase chromosomes. Furthermore, genetically increasing or decreasing dynein activity results in the respective suppression or enhancement of CYB-3-dependent defects in cell cycle progression. Altogether, these data reveal that CYB-3 plays a unique, essential role in the cell cycle including promoting mitotic dynein functionality and alleviation of a SAC-dependent block in anaphase chromosome segregation.

  19. Mitotic spindle defects and chromosome mis-segregation induced by LDL/cholesterol-implications for Niemann-Pick C1, Alzheimer's disease, and atherosclerosis.

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    Antoneta Granic

    Full Text Available Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol is a risk factor for both Alzheimer's disease (AD and Atherosclerosis (CVD, suggesting a common lipid-sensitive step in their pathogenesis. Previous results show that AD and CVD also share a cell cycle defect: chromosome instability and up to 30% aneuploidy-in neurons and other cells in AD and in smooth muscle cells in atherosclerotic plaques in CVD. Indeed, specific degeneration of aneuploid neurons accounts for 90% of neuronal loss in AD brain, indicating that aneuploidy underlies AD neurodegeneration. Cell/mouse models of AD develop similar aneuploidy through amyloid-beta (Aß inhibition of specific microtubule motors and consequent disruption of mitotic spindles. Here we tested the hypothesis that, like upregulated Aß, elevated LDL/cholesterol and altered intracellular cholesterol homeostasis also causes chromosomal instability. Specifically we found that: 1 high dietary cholesterol induces aneuploidy in mice, satisfying the hypothesis' first prediction, 2 Niemann-Pick C1 patients accumulate aneuploid fibroblasts, neurons, and glia, demonstrating a similar aneugenic effect of intracellular cholesterol accumulation in humans 3 oxidized LDL, LDL, and cholesterol, but not high-density lipoprotein (HDL, induce chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy in cultured cells, including neuronal precursors, indicating that LDL/cholesterol directly affects the cell cycle, 4 LDL-induced aneuploidy requires the LDL receptor, but not Aß, showing that LDL works differently than Aß, with the same end result, 5 cholesterol treatment disrupts the structure of the mitotic spindle, providing a cell biological mechanism for its aneugenic activity, and 6 ethanol or calcium chelation attenuates lipoprotein-induced chromosome mis-segregation, providing molecular insights into cholesterol's aneugenic mechanism, specifically through its rigidifying effect on the cell membrane, and potentially explaining why ethanol

  20. Binomial mitotic segregation of MYCN-carrying double minutes in neuroblastoma illustrates the role of randomness in oncogene amplification.

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    Gisela Lundberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amplification of the oncogene MYCN in double minutes (DMs is a common finding in neuroblastoma (NB. Because DMs lack centromeric sequences it has been unclear how NB cells retain and amplify extrachromosomal MYCN copies during tumour development. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that MYCN-carrying DMs in NB cells translocate from the nuclear interior to the periphery of the condensing chromatin at transition from interphase to prophase and are preferentially located adjacent to the telomere repeat sequences of the chromosomes throughout cell division. However, DM segregation was not affected by disruption of the telosome nucleoprotein complex and DMs readily migrated from human to murine chromatin in human/mouse cell hybrids, indicating that they do not bind to specific positional elements in human chromosomes. Scoring DM copy-numbers in ana/telophase cells revealed that DM segregation could be closely approximated by a binomial random distribution. Colony-forming assay demonstrated a strong growth-advantage for NB cells with high DM (MYCN copy-numbers, compared to NB cells with lower copy-numbers. In fact, the overall distribution of DMs in growing NB cell populations could be readily reproduced by a mathematical model assuming binomial segregation at cell division combined with a proliferative advantage for cells with high DM copy-numbers. CONCLUSION: Binomial segregation at cell division explains the high degree of MYCN copy-number variability in NB. Our findings also provide a proof-of-principle for oncogene amplification through creation of genetic diversity by random events followed by Darwinian selection.

  1. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the P...

  2. Speech Segregation based on Pitch Track Correction and Music-Speech Classification

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    KIM, H.-G.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach for pitch track correction and music-speech classification is proposed in order to improve the performance of the speech segregation system. The proposed pitch track correction method adjusts unreliable pitch estimates from adjacent reliable pitch streaks, in contrast to the previous approach using a single pitch streak which is the longest among the reliable pitch streaks in a sentence. The proposed music and speech classification method finds continuous pitch streaks of the mixture, and labels each streak as music-dominant or speech-dominant based on the observation that music pitch seldom changes in a short-time period whereas speech pitch fluctuates a lot. The speech segregation results for mixtures of speech and various competing sound sources demonstrated that the proposed methods are superior to the conventional method, especially for mixtures of speech and music signals.

  3. Ascertainment correction for Markov chain Monte Carlo segregation and linkage analysis of a quantitative trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianzhong; Amos, Christopher I; Warwick Daw, E

    2007-09-01

    Although extended pedigrees are often sampled through probands with extreme levels of a quantitative trait, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for segregation and linkage analysis have not been able to perform ascertainment corrections. Further, the extent to which ascertainment of pedigrees leads to biases in the estimation of segregation and linkage parameters has not been previously studied for MCMC procedures. In this paper, we studied these issues with a Bayesian MCMC approach for joint segregation and linkage analysis, as implemented in the package Loki. We first simulated pedigrees ascertained through individuals with extreme values of a quantitative trait in spirit of the sequential sampling theory of Cannings and Thompson [Cannings and Thompson [1977] Clin. Genet. 12:208-212]. Using our simulated data, we detected no bias in estimates of the trait locus location. However, in addition to allele frequencies, when the ascertainment threshold was higher than or close to the true value of the highest genotypic mean, bias was also found in the estimation of this parameter. When there were multiple trait loci, this bias destroyed the additivity of the effects of the trait loci, and caused biases in the estimation all genotypic means when a purely additive model was used for analyzing the data. To account for pedigree ascertainment with sequential sampling, we developed a Bayesian ascertainment approach and implemented Metropolis-Hastings updates in the MCMC samplers used in Loki. Ascertainment correction greatly reduced biases in parameter estimates. Our method is designed for multiple, but a fixed number of trait loci.

  4. A variable age of onset segregation model for linkage analysis, with correction for ascertainment, applied to glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiangqing; Vengoechea, Jaime; Elston, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We propose a 2-step model-based approach, with correction for ascertainment, to linkage analysis of a binary trait with variable age of onset and apply it to a set of multiplex pedigrees segregating for adult glioma.......We propose a 2-step model-based approach, with correction for ascertainment, to linkage analysis of a binary trait with variable age of onset and apply it to a set of multiplex pedigrees segregating for adult glioma....

  5. Bacterial mitotic machineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Kenn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ebersbach, Gitte;

    2004-01-01

    Here, we review recent progress that yields fundamental new insight into the molecular mechanisms behind plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotic cells. In particular, we describe how prokaryotic actin homologs form mitotic machineries that segregate DNA before cell division. Thus, the Par......M protein of plasmid R1 forms F actin-like filaments that separate and move plasmid DNA from mid-cell to the cell poles. Evidence from three different laboratories indicate that the morphogenetic MreB protein may be involved in segregation of the bacterial chromosome....

  6. The Drosophila microtubule-associated protein mars stabilizes mitotic spindles by crosslinking microtubules through its N-terminal region.

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    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs.

  7. Regulation of mitotic progression by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lischetti, Tiziana; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Equal segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis requires that pairs of kinetochores establish proper attachment to microtubules emanating from opposite poles of the mitotic spindle. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protects against errors in segregation by delaying sister separation...

  8. Both asymmetric mitotic segregation and cell-to-cell invasion are required for stable germline transmission of Wolbachia in filarial nematodes

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    Frédéric Landmann

    2012-04-01

    Parasitic filarial nematodes that belong to the Onchocercidae family live in mutualism with Wolbachia endosymbionts. We developed whole-mount techniques to follow the segregation patterns of Wolbachia through the somatic and germline lineages of four filarial species. These studies reveal multiple evolutionarily conserved mechanisms that are required for Wolbachia localization to the germline. During the initial embryonic divisions, Wolbachia segregate asymmetrically such that they concentrate in the posteriorly localized P2 blastomere, a precursor to the adult germline and hypodermal lineages. Surprisingly, in the next division they are excluded from the germline precursor lineage. Rather, they preferentially segregate to the C blastomere, a source of posterior hypodermal cells. Localization to the germline is accomplished by a distinct mechanism in which Wolbachia invade first the somatic gonadal cells close to the ovarian distal tip cell, the nematode stem cell niche, from the hypodermis. This tropism is associated with a cortical F-actin disruption, suggesting an active engulfment. Significantly, germline invasion occurs only in females, explaining the lack of Wolbachia in the male germline. Once in the syncytial environment of the ovaries, Wolbachia rely on the rachis to multiply and disperse into the germ cells. The utilization of cell-to-cell invasion for germline colonization may indicate an ancestral mode of horizontal transfer that preceded the acquisition of the mutualism.

  9. 76 FR 78182 - Application of the Segregation Rules to Small Shareholders; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ...-149625-10) that was published in the Federal Register on Wednesday, November 23, 2011 (76 FR 72362... of proposed rulemaking (REG- 149625-10), which was the subject of FR Doc. 2011-30290, is corrected as... Shareholders; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Correction to a notice...

  10. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eYokoyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP, produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  11. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Maia André F; Vader Gerben; Lens Susanne MA

    2008-01-01

    Abstract During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension). In ...

  12. Profiling DNA damage response following mitotic perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    S Pedersen, Ronni; Karemore, Gopal; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2016-01-01

    Genome integrity relies on precise coordination between DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Whereas replication stress attracted much attention, the consequences of mitotic perturbations for genome integrity are less understood. Here, we knockdown 47 validated mitotic regulators to show...... phenotypes. To demonstrate the potential of this resource, we show that DNA breakage after cytokinesis failure is preceded by replication stress, which mounts during consecutive cell cycles and coincides with decreased proliferation. Together, our results provide a resource to gauge the magnitude...

  13. Evaluation of associations between common variation in mitotic regulatory pathways and risk of overall and high grade breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kristen N; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V Shane; Cerhan, James; Vachon, Celine M; Olson, Janet E; Couch, Fergus J

    2011-09-01

    Mitotic regulatory pathways insure proper timing of mitotic entry, sister chromatid cohesion and separation, and cytokinesis. Disruption of this process results in inappropriate chromosome segregation and aneuploidy, and appears to contribute to cancer. Specifically, disregulation and somatic mutation of mitotic regulators has been observed in human cancers, and overexpression of mitotic regulators is common in aggressive and late stage tumors. However, the role of germline variation in mitotic pathways and risk of cancer is not well understood. We tested 1,084 haplotype-tagging and functional variants from 164 genes in mitotic regulatory pathways in 791 Caucasian women with breast cancer and 843 healthy controls for association with risk of overall and high grade breast cancer. Sixty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 40 genes were associated (P risk of breast cancer in a log-additive model. In addition, 60 SNPs were associated (P risk of high grade breast cancer. However, none of these associations were significant after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. In gene-level analyses, CDC25C, SCC1/RAD21, TLK2, and SMC6L1 were associated (P risk, CDC6, CDC27, SUMO3, RASSF1, KIF2, and CDC14A were associated with high grade breast cancer risk, and EIF3S10 and CDC25A were associated with both. Further investigation in breast and other cancers are needed to understand the influence of inherited variation in mitotic genes on tumor grade and cancer risk.

  14. Towards understanding the molecular basis of bacterial DNA segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonard, Thomas A.; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Löwe, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bacteria ensure the fidelity of genetic inheritance by the coordinated control of chromosome segregation and cell division. Here, we review the molecules and mechanisms that govern the correct subcellular positioning and rapid separation of newly replicated chromosomes and plasmids towards the cell...... poles and, significantly, the emergence of mitotic-like machineries capable of segregating plasmid DNA. We further describe surprising similarities between proteins involved in DNA partitioning (ParA/ParB) and control of cell division (MinD/MinE), suggesting a mechanism for intracellular positioning...... common to the two processes. Finally, we discuss the role that the bacterial cytoskeleton plays in DNA partitioning and the missing link between prokaryotes and eukaryotes that is bacterial mechano-chemical motor proteins. Udgivelsesdato: Mar 29...

  15. Evidence that Aurora B is implicated in spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction

    OpenAIRE

    Santaguida, Stefano; Vernieri, Claudio; Villa, Fabrizio; Ciliberto, Andrea; Musacchio, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Fidelity of chromosome segregation is ensured by a tension-dependent error correction system that prevents stabilization of incorrect chromosome–microtubule attachments. Unattached or incorrectly attached chromosomes also activate the spindle assembly checkpoint, thus delaying mitotic exit until all chromosomes are bioriented. The Aurora B kinase is widely recognized as a component of error correction. Conversely, its role in the checkpoint is controversial. Here, we report an analysis of the...

  16. Identification of Conserved MEL-28/ELYS Domains with Essential Roles in Nuclear Assembly and Chromosome Segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Gómez-Saldivar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoporins are the constituents of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs and are essential regulators of nucleocytoplasmic transport, gene expression and genome stability. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS plays a critical role in post-mitotic NPC reassembly through recruitment of the NUP107-160 subcomplex, and is required for correct segregation of mitotic chromosomes. Here we present a systematic functional and structural analysis of MEL-28 in C. elegans early development and human ELYS in cultured cells. We have identified functional domains responsible for nuclear envelope and kinetochore localization, chromatin binding, mitotic spindle matrix association and chromosome segregation. Surprisingly, we found that perturbations to MEL-28's conserved AT-hook domain do not affect MEL-28 localization although they disrupt MEL-28 function and delay cell cycle progression in a DNA damage checkpoint-dependent manner. Our analyses also uncover a novel meiotic role of MEL-28. Together, these results show that MEL-28 has conserved structural domains that are essential for its fundamental roles in NPC assembly and chromosome segregation.

  17. Mitotic spindle proteomics in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kate Bonner

    Full Text Available Mitosis is a fundamental process in the development of all organisms. The mitotic spindle guides the cell through mitosis as it mediates the segregation of chromosomes, the orientation of the cleavage furrow, and the progression of cell division. Birth defects and tissue-specific cancers often result from abnormalities in mitotic events. Here, we report a proteomic study of the mitotic spindle from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cells. Four different isolations of metaphase spindles were subjected to Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT analysis and tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 1155 proteins and used Gene Ontology (GO analysis to categorize proteins into cellular component groups. We then compared our data to the previously published CHO midbody proteome and identified proteins that are unique to the CHO spindle. Our data represent the first mitotic spindle proteome in CHO cells, which augments the list of mitotic spindle components from mammalian cells.

  18. Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Cromer, Deborah; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.].......[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.]....

  19. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  20. Chromosome Segregation: Organizing Overlap at the Midzone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janson, M.E.; Tran, P.T.

    2008-01-01

    Sets of overlapping microtubules support the segregation of chromosomes by linking the poles of mitotic spindles. Recent work examines the effect of putting these linkages under pressure by the activation of dicentric chromosomes and sheds new light on the structural role of several well-known spind

  1. Temporal and compartment-specific signals coordinate mitotic exit with spindle position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Khmelinskii, Anton; Duenas-Sanchez, Rafael; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Knop, Michael; Pereira, Gislene

    2017-01-24

    The spatiotemporal control of mitotic exit is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In budding yeast, the mitotic exit network (MEN) drives cells out of mitosis, whereas the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) blocks MEN activity when the anaphase spindle is mispositioned. How the SPOC operates at a molecular level remains unclear. Here, we report novel insights into how mitotic signalling pathways orchestrate chromosome segregation in time and space. We establish that the key function of the central SPOC kinase, Kin4, is to counterbalance MEN activation by the cdc fourteen early anaphase release (FEAR) network in the mother cell compartment. Remarkably, Kin4 becomes dispensable for SPOC function in the absence of FEAR. Cells lacking both FEAR and Kin4 show that FEAR contributes to mitotic exit through regulation of the SPOC component Bfa1 and the MEN kinase Cdc15. Furthermore, we uncover controls that specifically promote mitotic exit in the daughter cell compartment.

  2. Cell cycle regulation of the activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a human protein kinase implicated in mitotic spindle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsteyn, R M; Mundt, K E; Fry, A M; Nigg, E A

    1995-06-01

    Correct assembly and function of the mitotic spindle during cell division is essential for the accurate partitioning of the duplicated genome to daughter cells. Protein phosphorylation has long been implicated in controlling spindle function and chromosome segregation, and genetic studies have identified several protein kinases and phosphatases that are likely to regulate these processes. In particular, mutations in the serine/threonine-specific Drosophila kinase polo, and the structurally related kinase Cdc5p of Saccharomyces cerevisae, result in abnormal mitotic and meiotic divisions. Here, we describe a detailed analysis of the cell cycle-dependent activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a recently identified human protein kinase with extensive sequence similarity to both Drosophila polo and S. cerevisiae Cdc5p. With the aid of recombinant baculoviruses, we have established a reliable in vitro assay for Plk1 kinase activity. We show that the activity of human Plk1 is cell cycle regulated, Plk1 activity being low during interphase but high during mitosis. We further show, by immunofluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy, that human Plk1 binds to components of the mitotic spindle at all stages of mitosis, but undergoes a striking redistribution as cells progress from metaphase to anaphase. Specifically, Plk1 associates with spindle poles up to metaphase, but relocalizes to the equatorial plane, where spindle microtubules overlap (the midzone), as cells go through anaphase. These results indicate that the association of Plk1 with the spindle is highly dynamic and that Plk1 may function at multiple stages of mitotic progression. Taken together, our data strengthen the notion that human Plk1 may represent a functional homolog of polo and Cdc5p, and they suggest that this kinase plays an important role in the dynamic function of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation.

  3. MEN, destruction and separation: mechanistic links between mitotic exit and cytokinesis in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, Foong May; Lim, Hong Hwa; Surana, Uttam

    2002-07-01

    Cellular events must be executed in a certain sequence during the cell division in order to maintain genome integrity and hence ensure a cell's survival. In M phase, for instance, chromosome segregation always precedes mitotic exit (characterized by mitotic kinase inactivation via cyclin destruction); this is then followed by cytokinesis. How do cells impose this strict order? Recent findings in budding yeast have suggested a mechanism whereby partitioning of chromosomes into the daughter cell is a prerequisite for the activation of mitotic exit network (MEN). So far, however, a regulatory scheme that would temporally link the initiation of cytokinesis to the execution of mitotic exit has not been determined. We propose that the requirement of MEN components for cytokinesis, their translocation to the mother-daughter neck and triggering of this translocation by inactivation of the mitotic kinase may be the three crucial elements that render initiation of cytokinesis dependent on mitotic exit.

  4. Mitotic spindle perturbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tame, Mihoko Amy

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are major components of the cytoskeleton and form the bipolar spindle apparatus during mitosis. The mitotic spindle consists of highly dynamic microtubule polymers that are under constant modulation, controlled by multiple motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins. This tight s

  5. APC/C-Cdh1-dependent anaphase and telophase progression during mitotic slippage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toda Kazuhiro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC inhibits anaphase progression in the presence of insufficient kinetochore-microtubule attachments, but cells can eventually override mitotic arrest by a process known as mitotic slippage or adaptation. This is a problem for cancer chemotherapy using microtubule poisons. Results Here we describe mitotic slippage in yeast bub2Δ mutant cells that are defective in the repression of precocious telophase onset (mitotic exit. Precocious activation of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C-Cdh1 caused mitotic slippage in the presence of nocodazole, while the SAC was still active. APC/C-Cdh1, but not APC/C-Cdc20, triggered anaphase progression (securin degradation, separase-mediated cohesin cleavage, sister-chromatid separation and chromosome missegregation, in addition to telophase onset (mitotic exit, during mitotic slippage. This demonstrates that an inhibitory system not only of APC/C-Cdc20 but also of APC/C-Cdh1 is critical for accurate chromosome segregation in the presence of insufficient kinetochore-microtubule attachments. Conclusions The sequential activation of APC/C-Cdc20 to APC/C-Cdh1 during mitosis is central to accurate mitosis. Precocious activation of APC/C-Cdh1 in metaphase (pre-anaphase causes mitotic slippage in SAC-activated cells. For the prevention of mitotic slippage, concomitant inhibition of APC/C-Cdh1 may be effective for tumor therapy with mitotic spindle poisons in humans.

  6. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-07-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss - in light of these recent insights - the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles.

  7. Responses of chromosome segregation machinery to mechanical perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itabashi, Takeshi; Takagi, Jun; Suzuki, Kazuya; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    For genome stability, the proper segregation of chromosomes is required. The exquisite process of chromosome segregation has charmed a lot of cell- and molecular biologists into watching what happens inside a mitotic cell and how each molecule contributes to this process for the accomplishment of accurate cell division1. The process to partition the duplicated genome to the daughter cells in each cell division is mediated by a self-organized structure called the mitotic spindle. It is well known that the mitotic spindle is a multi-component macromolecular machine composed of microtubules, molecular motors (kinesins, cytoplasmic dynein), and other regulatory molecules (microtubule-associated proteins, kinases, etc.). In recent years, most of the protein components of the mitotic spindle have been identified and the functions of these proteins have been characterized using molecular perturbations2,3. Thus, the mechanisms for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation are being revealed rapidly. However, the chromosome segregation machinery is poorly understood from the mechanical point of view, such as how the mitotic spindle within a cell responds to a variety of mechanical forces, originating from cell-cell interactions or environmental fluctuations. Recent advances in the controlled mechanical perturbation have indicated that the mitotic spindle possesses a structural pliability, size adaptability to the applied external forces, and a strong self-organizing ability. Mechanical perturbations revealed also the mechanochemical regulation of chromosome segregation machinery, which responds to the applied forces. Here, we discuss the current progress in the biophysical research on the architectural and functional dynamics of the mitotic spindle.

  8. Whole genome functional analysis identifies novel components required for mitotic spindle integrity in human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rines, Daniel R; Gomez-Ferreria, Maria Ana; Zhou, Yingyao; DeJesus, Paul; Grob,Seanna; Batalov, Serge; Labow, Marc; Huesken, Dieter; Mickanin, Craig; Hall, Jonathan; Reinhardt, Mischa; Natt, Francois; Lange, Joerg; Sharp, David J.; Chanda, Sumit K.

    2008-01-01

    Background The mitotic spindle is a complex mechanical apparatus required for accurate segregation of sister chromosomes during mitosis. We designed a genetic screen using automated microscopy to discover factors essential for mitotic progression. Using a RNA interference library of 49,164 double-stranded RNAs targeting 23,835 human genes, we performed a loss of function screen to look for small interfering RNAs that arrest cells in metaphase. Results Here we report the identification of gene...

  9. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamariola, Linda; Tiang, Choon Lin; De Storme, Nico; Pawlowski, Wojtek; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved. PMID:24987397

  10. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  11. CLASP1, astrin and Kif2b form a molecular switch that regulates kinetochore-microtubule dynamics to promote mitotic progression and fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Amity L; Bakhoum, Samuel F; Maffini, Stefano; Correia-Melo, Clara; Maiato, Helder; Compton, Duane A

    2010-10-20

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis requires precise coordination of various processes, such as chromosome alignment, maturation of proper kinetochore-microtubule (kMT) attachments, correction of erroneous attachments, and silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). How these fundamental aspects of mitosis are coordinately and temporally regulated is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the temporal regulation of kMT attachments by CLASP1, astrin and Kif2b is central to mitotic progression and chromosome segregation fidelity. In early mitosis, a Kif2b-CLASP1 complex is recruited to kinetochores to promote chromosome movement, kMT turnover, correction of attachment errors, and maintenance of SAC signalling. However, during metaphase, this complex is replaced by an astrin-CLASP1 complex, which promotes kMT stability, chromosome alignment, and silencing of the SAC. We show that these two complexes are differentially recruited to kinetochores and are mutually exclusive. We also show that other kinetochore proteins, such as Kif18a, affect kMT attachments and chromosome movement through these proteins. Thus, CLASP1-astrin-Kif2b complex act as a central switch at kinetochores that defines mitotic progression and promotes fidelity by temporally regulating kMT attachments.

  12. The NIMA Kinase Is Required To Execute Stage-Specific Mitotic Functions after Initiation of Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraghavan, Meera; Lad, Alisha A.

    2014-01-01

    The G2-M transition in Aspergillus nidulans requires the NIMA kinase, the founding member of the Nek kinase family. Inactivation of NIMA results in a late G2 arrest, while overexpression of NIMA is sufficient to promote mitotic events independently of cell cycle phase. Endogenously tagged NIMA-GFP has dynamic mitotic localizations appearing first at the spindle pole body and then at nuclear pore complexes before transitioning to within nuclei and the mitotic spindle and back at the spindle pole bodies at mitotic exit, suggesting that it functions sequentially at these locations. Since NIMA is indispensable for mitotic entry, it has been difficult to determine the requirement of NIMA for subaspects of mitosis. We show here that when NIMA is partially inactivated, although mitosis can be initiated, a proportion of cells fail to successfully generate two daughter nuclei. We further define the mitotic defects to show that normal NIMA function is required for the formation of a bipolar spindle, nuclear pore complex disassembly, completion of chromatin segregation, and the normal structural rearrangements of the nuclear envelope required to generate two nuclei from one. In the remaining population of cells that enter mitosis with inadequate NIMA, two daughter nuclei are generated in a manner dependent on the spindle assembly checkpoint, indicating highly penetrant defects in mitotic progression without sufficient NIMA activity. This study shows that NIMA is required not only for mitotic entry but also sequentially for successful completion of stage-specific mitotic events. PMID:24186954

  13. The reversibility of mitotic exit in vertebrate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapova, Tamara A; Daum, John R; Pittman, Bradley D; Hudson, Joanna R; Jones, Tara N; Satinover, David L; Stukenberg, P Todd; Gorbsky, Gary J

    2006-04-13

    A guiding hypothesis for cell-cycle regulation asserts that regulated proteolysis constrains the directionality of certain cell-cycle transitions. Here we test this hypothesis for mitotic exit, which is regulated by degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activator, cyclin B. Application of chemical Cdk1 inhibitors to cells in mitosis induces cytokinesis and other normal aspects of mitotic exit, including cyclin B degradation. However, chromatid segregation fails, resulting in entrapment of chromatin in the midbody. If cyclin B degradation is blocked with a proteasome inhibitor or by expression of non-degradable cyclin B, Cdk inhibitors will nonetheless induce mitotic exit and cytokinesis. However, if after mitotic exit, the Cdk1 inhibitor is washed free from cells in which cyclin B degradation is blocked, the cells can revert back to M phase. This reversal is characterized by chromosome recondensation, nuclear envelope breakdown, assembly of microtubules into a mitotic spindle, and in most cases, dissolution of the midbody, reopening of the cleavage furrow, and realignment of chromosomes at the metaphase plate. These findings demonstrate that proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclin B provides directionality for the M phase to G1 transition.

  14. A Brief History of Research on Mitotic Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, J. Richard; Hays, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes in summary form some of the most important research on chromosome segregation, from the discovery and naming of mitosis in the nineteenth century until around 1990. It gives both historical and scientific background for the nine chapters that follow, each of which provides an up-to-date review of a specific aspect of mitotic mechanism. Here, we trace the fruits of each new technology that allowed a deeper understanding of mitosis and its underlying mechanisms. We describe how light microscopy, including phase, polarization, and fluorescence optics, provided descriptive information about mitotic events and also enabled important experimentation on mitotic functions, such as the dynamics of spindle fibers and the forces generated for chromosome movement. We describe studies by electron microscopy, including quantitative work with serial section reconstructions. We review early results from spindle biochemistry and genetics, coupled to molecular biology, as these methods allowed scholars to identify key molecular components of mitotic mechanisms. We also review hypotheses about mitotic mechanisms whose testing led to a deeper understanding of this fundamental biological event. Our goal is to provide modern scientists with an appreciation of the work that has laid the foundations for their current work and interests. PMID:28009830

  15. Plasmid and chromosome segregation in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Gerdes, Kenn

    2000-01-01

    Recent major advances in the understanding of prokaryotic DNA segregation have been achieved by using fluorescence microscopy to visualize the localization of cellular components. Plasmids and bacterial chromosomes are partitioned in a highly dynamic fashion, suggesting the presence of a mitotic......-like apparatus in prokaryotes. The identification of chromosomal homologues of the well-characterized plasmid partitioning genes indicates that there could be a general mechanism of bacterial DNA partitioning. Udgivelsesdato: July 1...

  16. Bub3-BubR1-dependent sequestration of Cdc20Fizzy at DNA breaks facilitates the correct segregation of broken chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derive, Nicolas; Landmann, Cedric; Montembault, Emilie; Claverie, Marie-Charlotte; Pierre-Elies, Priscillia; Goutte-Gattat, Damien; Founounou, Nabila; McCusker, Derek; Royou, Anne

    2015-11-09

    The presence of DNA double-strand breaks during mitosis is particularly challenging for the cell, as it produces broken chromosomes lacking a centromere. This situation can cause genomic instability resulting from improper segregation of the broken fragments into daughter cells. We recently uncovered a process by which broken chromosomes are faithfully transmitted via the BubR1-dependent tethering of the two broken chromosome ends. However, the mechanisms underlying BubR1 recruitment and function on broken chromosomes were largely unknown. We show that BubR1 requires interaction with Bub3 to localize on the broken chromosome fragments and to mediate their proper segregation. We also find that Cdc20, a cofactor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), accumulates on DNA breaks in a BubR1 KEN box-dependent manner. A biosensor for APC/C activity demonstrates a BubR1-dependent local inhibition of APC/C around the segregating broken chromosome. We therefore propose that the Bub3-BubR1 complex on broken DNA inhibits the APC/C locally via the sequestration of Cdc20, thus promoting proper transmission of broken chromosomes.

  17. Correction

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Tile Calorimeter modules stored at CERN. The larger modules belong to the Barrel, whereas the smaller ones are for the two Extended Barrels. (The article was about the completion of the 64 modules for one of the latter.) The photo on the first page of the Bulletin n°26/2002, from 24 July 2002, illustrating the article «The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter gets into shape» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.

  18. Correction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photo on the second page of the Bulletin n°48/2002, from 25 November 2002, illustrating the article «Spanish Visit to CERN» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.   The Spanish delegation, accompanied by Spanish scientists at CERN, also visited the LHC superconducting magnet test hall (photo). From left to right: Felix Rodriguez Mateos of CERN LHC Division, Josep Piqué i Camps, Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology), Juan Antonio Rubio, ETT Division Leader at CERN, Manuel Aguilar-Benitez, Spanish Delegate to Council, Manuel Delfino, IT Division Leader at CERN, and Gonzalo León, Secretary-General of Scientific Policy to the Minister.

  19. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Gorelik, G., & Shackelford, T.K. (2011. Human sexual conflict from molecules to culture. Evolutionary Psychology, 9, 564–587: The authors wish to correct an omission in citation to the existing literature. In the final paragraph on p. 570, we neglected to cite Burch and Gallup (2006 [Burch, R. L., & Gallup, G. G., Jr. (2006. The psychobiology of human semen. In S. M. Platek & T. K. Shackelford (Eds., Female infidelity and paternal uncertainty (pp. 141–172. New York: Cambridge University Press.]. Burch and Gallup (2006 reviewed the relevant literature on FSH and LH discussed in this paragraph, and should have been cited accordingly. In addition, Burch and Gallup (2006 should have been cited as the originators of the hypothesis regarding the role of FSH and LH in the semen of rapists. The authors apologize for this oversight.

  20. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Tagler, M. J., and Jeffers, H. M. (2013. Sex differences in attitudes toward partner infidelity. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 821–832: The authors wish to correct values in the originally published manuscript. Specifically, incorrect 95% confidence intervals around the Cohen's d values were reported on page 826 of the manuscript where we reported the within-sex simple effects for the significant Participant Sex × Infidelity Type interaction (first paragraph, and for attitudes toward partner infidelity (second paragraph. Corrected values are presented in bold below. The authors would like to thank Dr. Bernard Beins at Ithaca College for bringing these errors to our attention. Men rated sexual infidelity significantly more distressing (M = 4.69, SD = 0.74 than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 4.32, SD = 0.92, F(1, 322 = 23.96, p < .001, d = 0.44, 95% CI [0.23, 0.65], but there was little difference between women's ratings of sexual (M = 4.80, SD = 0.48 and emotional infidelity (M = 4.76, SD = 0.57, F(1, 322 = 0.48, p = .29, d = 0.08, 95% CI [−0.10, 0.26]. As expected, men rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.44, SD = 0.70 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.66, SD = 1.37, F(1, 322 = 120.00, p < .001, d = 1.12, 95% CI [0.85, 1.39]. Although women also rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.40, SD = 0.62 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.09, SD = 1.10, this difference was not as large and thus in the evolutionary theory supportive direction, F(1, 322 = 72.03, p < .001, d = 0.77, 95% CI [0.60, 0.94].

  1. Nuclear Chk1 prevents premature mitotic entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Makoto; Goto, Hidemasa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kawakami, Yoshitaka; Nakanishi, Makoto; Kiyono, Tohru; Goshima, Naoki; Inagaki, Masaki

    2011-07-01

    Chk1 inhibits the premature activation of the cyclin-B1-Cdk1. However, it remains controversial whether Chk1 inhibits Cdk1 in the centrosome or in the nucleus before the G2-M transition. In this study, we examined the specificity of the mouse monoclonal anti-Chk1 antibody DCS-310, with which the centrosome was stained. Conditional Chk1 knockout in mouse embryonic fibroblasts reduced nuclear but not centrosomal staining with DCS-310. In Chk1(+/myc) human colon adenocarcinoma (DLD-1) cells, Chk1 was detected in the nucleus but not in the centrosome using an anti-Myc antibody. Through the combination of protein array and RNAi technologies, we identified Ccdc-151 as a protein that crossreacted with DCS-310 on the centrosome. Mitotic entry was delayed by expression of the Chk1 mutant that localized in the nucleus, although forced immobilization of Chk1 to the centrosome had little impact on the timing of mitotic entry. These results suggest that nuclear but not centrosomal Chk1 contributes to correct timing of mitotic entry.

  2. Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In the article by Quintavalle et al (Quintavalle C, Anselmi CV, De Micco F, Roscigno G, Visconti G, Golia B, Focaccio A, Ricciardelli B, Perna E, Papa L, Donnarumma E, Condorelli G, Briguori C. Neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin and contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2015;8:e002673. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.115.002673.), which published online September 2, 2015, and appears in the September 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed. On page 1, the institutional affiliation for Elvira Donnarumma, PhD, “SDN Foundation,” has been changed to read, “IRCCS SDN, Naples, Italy.” The institutional affiliation for Laura Papa, PhD, “Institute for Endocrinology and Experimental Oncology, National Research Council, Naples, Italy,” has been changed to read, “Institute of Genetics and Biomedical Research, Milan Unit, Milan, Italy” and “Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Italy.” The authors regret this error.

  3. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia André F

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension. In the process of doing so, the chromosomal passenger complex generates unattached chromosomes, a specific situation that is known to promote checkpoint activity. However, several studies have implicated an additional, more direct role for the chromosomal passenger complex in enforcing the mitotic arrest imposed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. In this review, we discuss the different roles played by the chromosomal passenger complex in ensuring proper mitotic checkpoint function. Additionally, we discuss the possibility that besides monitoring the presence of unattached kinetochores, the spindle assembly checkpoint may also be capable of responding to chromosome-microtubule interactions that do not generate tension and we propose experimental set-ups to study this.

  4. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vader, Gerben; Maia, André F; Lens, Susanne Ma

    2008-05-28

    During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension). In the process of doing so, the chromosomal passenger complex generates unattached chromosomes, a specific situation that is known to promote checkpoint activity. However, several studies have implicated an additional, more direct role for the chromosomal passenger complex in enforcing the mitotic arrest imposed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. In this review, we discuss the different roles played by the chromosomal passenger complex in ensuring proper mitotic checkpoint function. Additionally, we discuss the possibility that besides monitoring the presence of unattached kinetochores, the spindle assembly checkpoint may also be capable of responding to chromosome-microtubule interactions that do not generate tension and we propose experimental set-ups to study this.

  5. Hsp70 protects mitotic cells against heat-induced centrosome damage and division abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, HMJ; Kampinga, HH; Sibon, OCM

    2005-01-01

    The effect of heat shock on centrosomes has been mainly studied in interphase cells. Centrosomes play a key role in proper segregation of DNA during mitosis. However, the direct effect and consequences of heat shock on mitotic cells and a possible cellular defense system against proteotoxic stress d

  6. Hsp70 protects mitotic cells against heat-induced centrosome damage and division abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, HMJ; Kampinga, HH; Sibon, OCM

    The effect of heat shock on centrosomes has been mainly studied in interphase cells. Centrosomes play a key role in proper segregation of DNA during mitosis. However, the direct effect and consequences of heat shock on mitotic cells and a possible cellular defense system against proteotoxic stress

  7. Perceptual-binding and persistent surface segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Farshad; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2004-11-01

    Visual input is segregated in the brain into subsystems that process different attributes such as motion and color. At the same time, visual information is perceptually segregated into objects and surfaces. Here we demonstrate that perceptual segregation of visual entities based on a transparency cue precedes and affects perceptual binding of attributes. Adding an irrelevant transparency cue paradoxically improved the pairing of color and motion for rapidly alternating surfaces. Subsequent experiments show: (1) Attributes are registered over the temporal window defined by the perceptual persistence of segregation, resulting in asynchrony in binding, and (2) attention is necessary for correct registration of attributes in the presence of ambiguity.

  8. Heats of Segregation and Segregation Profiles of BCC Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian S.; Bozzolo, Guillermo

    2002-01-01

    The composition of metal alloy surfaces is often different from that of the bulk. Some alloys exhibit surface segregation, where one or more species reside preferentially at or near the surface. A detailed understanding of this behavior is necessary to correctly model such phenomena as adhesion or catalysis. Several phenomenological approaches to the problem have been put forward, falling into two broad categories: Thermodynamic approaches, where the equilibrium distribution of chemical species is computed. Atomistic approaches, where the tendency of a species to segregate is determined by computation of the energies of single atoms of that species in bulk and surface environments.

  9. Smurf2 as a novel mitotic regulator: From the spindle assembly checkpoint to tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Finola E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The execution of the mitotic program with high fidelity is dependent upon precise spatiotemporal regulation of posttranslational protein modifications. For example, the timely polyubiquitination of critical mitotic regulators by Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C is essential for the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents unscheduled activity of APC/C-Cdc20 in early mitosis, allowing bipolar attachment of kinetochores to mitotic spindle and facilitating equal segregation of sister chromatids. The critical effector of the spindle checkpoint, Mitotic arrest deficient 2 (Mad2, is recruited to unattached kinetochores forming a complex with other regulatory proteins to efficiently and cooperatively inhibit APC/C-Cdc20. A weakened and/or dysfunctional spindle checkpoint has been linked to the development of genomic instability in both cell culture and animal models, and evidence suggests that aberrant regulation of the spindle checkpoint plays a critical role in human carcinogenesis. Recent studies have illuminated a network of both degradative and non-degradative ubiquitination events that regulate the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. Within this context, our recent work showed that the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-terminus-family E3 ligase Smurf2 (Smad specific ubiquitin regulatory factor 2, known as a negative regulator of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling, is required for a functional spindle checkpoint by promoting the functional localization and stability of Mad2. Here we discuss putative models explaining the role of Smurf2 as a new regulator in the spindle checkpoint. The dynamic mitotic localization of Smurf2 to the centrosome and other critical mitotic structures provides implications about mitotic checkpoint control dependent on various ubiquitination events. Finally, deregulated Smurf2 activity may contribute to carcinogenesis by

  10. Centrosomes and the art of mitotic spindle maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchcliffe, Edward H

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of a bipolar spindle lies at the heart of mitotic chromosome segregation. In animal somatic cells, the process of spindle assembly involves multiple complex interactions between various cellular compartments, including an emerging antiparallel microtubule network, microtubule-associated motor proteins and spindle assembly factors, the cell's cortex, and the chromosomes themselves. The result is a dynamic structure capable of aligning pairs of sister chromatids, sensing chromosome misalignment, and generating force to segregate the replicated genome into two daughters. Because the centrosome lies at the center of the array of microtubule minus-ends, and the essential one-to-two duplication of the centrosome prior to mitosis is linked to cell cycle progression, this organelle has long been implicated as a device to generate spindle bipolarity. However, this classic model for spindle assembly is challenged by observations and experimental manipulations demonstrating that acentrosomal cells can and do form bipolar spindles, both mitotic and meiotic. Indeed, recent comprehensive proteomic analysis of centrosome-dependent versus independent mitotic spindle assembly mechanisms reveals a large, common set of genes required for both processes, with very few genes needed to differentiate between the two. While these studies cast doubt on an absolute role for the centrosome in establishing spindle polarity, it is clear that having too few or too many centrosomes results in abnormal chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. Here we review the case both for and against the role of the centrioles and centrosomes in ensuring proper assembly of a bipolar spindle, an essential element in the maintenance of genomic stability.

  11. Investigating the regulation of stem and progenitor cell mitotic progression by in situ imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Abigail R; Ryan, Joël; Vallée-Trudeau, Julie-Nathalie; Dorn, Jonas F; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Maddox, Paul S

    2015-05-01

    Genome stability relies upon efficacious chromosome congression and regulation by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). The study of these fundamental mitotic processes in adult stem and progenitor cells has been limited by the technical challenge of imaging mitosis in these cells in situ. Notably, how broader physiological changes, such as dietary intake or age, affect mitotic progression in stem and/or progenitor cells is largely unknown. Using in situ imaging of C. elegans adult germlines, we describe the mitotic parameters of an adult stem and progenitor cell population in an intact animal. We find that SAC regulation in germline stem and progenitor cells is distinct from that found in early embryonic divisions and is more similar to that of classical tissue culture models. We further show that changes in organismal physiology affect mitotic progression in germline stem and progenitor cells. Reducing dietary intake produces a checkpoint-dependent delay in anaphase onset, and inducing dietary restriction when the checkpoint is impaired increases the incidence of segregation errors in mitotic and meiotic cells. Similarly, developmental aging of the germline stem and progenitor cell population correlates with a decline in the rate of several mitotic processes. These results provide the first in vivo validation of models for SAC regulation developed in tissue culture systems and demonstrate that several fundamental features of mitotic progression in adult stem and progenitor cells are highly sensitive to organismal physiological changes.

  12. Analysis of mitotic phosphorylation of Borealin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Date Dipali A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main role of the chromosomal passenger complex is to ensure that Aurora B kinase is properly localized and activated before and during mitosis. Borealin, a member of the chromosomal passenger complex, shows increased expression during G2/M phases and is involved in targeting the complex to the centromere and the spindle midzone, where it ensures proper chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Borealin has a consensus CDK1 phosphorylation site, threonine 106 and can be phosphorylated by Aurora B Kinase at serine 165 in vitro. Results Here, we show that Borealin is phosphorylated during mitosis in human cells. Dephosphorylation of Borealin occurs as cells exit mitosis. The phosphorylated form of Borealin is found in an INCENP-containing complex in mitosis. INCENP-containing complexes from cells in S phase are enriched in the phosphorylated form suggesting that phosphorylation may encourage entry of Borealin into the chromosomal passenger complex. Although Aurora B Kinase is found in complexes that contain Borealin, it is not required for the mitotic phosphorylation of Borealin. Mutation of T106 or S165 of Borealin to alanine does not alter the electrophoretic mobility shift of Borealin. Experiments with cyclohexamide and the phosphatase inhibitor sodium fluoride suggest that Borealin is phosphorylated by a protein kinase that can be active in interphase and mitosis and that the phosphorylation may be regulated by a short-lived phosphatase that is active in interphase but not mitosis. Conclusion Borealin is phosphorylated during mitosis. Neither residue S165, T106 nor phosphorylation of Borealin by Aurora B Kinase is required to generate the mitotic, shifted form of Borealin. Suppression of phosphorylation during interphase is ensured by a labile protein, possibly a cell cycle regulated phosphatase.

  13. Mechanisms for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouet, Jean-Yves; Stouf, Mathieu; Lebailly, Elise; Cornet, François

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria face the problem of segregating their gigantic chromosomes without a segregation period restricted in time and space, as Eukaryotes do. Segregation thus involves multiple activities, general or specific of a chromosome region and differentially controlled. Recent advances show that these various mechanisms conform to a “pair and release” rule, which appears as a general rule in DNA segregation. We describe the latest advances in segregation of bacterial chromosomes with emphasis on the different pair and release mechanisms.

  14. Prevention and correction mechanisms behind anaphase synchrony: implications for the genesis of aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, I; Maiato, H

    2011-01-01

    The perpetuation of the species' genomic identity strongly depends on the accurate maintenance of chromosome number through countless cell generations. The synchronous entry and progression of all chromosomes through anaphase is fundamental for the quality of mitosis and is guaranteed by error prevention and correction mechanisms that ultimately certify the bipolar attachment of chromosomes to the mitotic spindle, the uniform distribution of forces amongst different chromosomes, and the simultaneity of sister-chromatid separation. The existence of a kinetochore-attachment checkpoint (KAC; also known as spindle-assembly checkpoint) ensures a delay in anaphase onset if any kinetochore remains unattached or devoid of a proper complement of microtubules. The stochastic nature of microtubule-kinetochore interactions predisposes the mitotic process to mistakes, but different molecular players cooperate by detecting and releasing incorrect attachments and thus delaying checkpoint satisfaction. Conversely, correct microtubule-kinetochore interactions become selectively stabilized. Once anaphase onset is triggered, the segregation velocities achieved by each chromosome should be similar, so that none of the chromosomes is lagged behind. This reflects the uniformity of forces acting on the different chromosomes and relies on a conspicuous mitotic spindle property known as microtubule poleward flux. Importantly, not all incorrect attachments are detected and resolved prior to anaphase leading to asynchronous chromosome segregation, but several mechanisms are in place to prevent aneuploidy. One of these mechanisms relies on anaphase spindle forces and another, known as the NoCut checkpoint, delays cell cleavage during cytokinesis until chromosomes can free the spindle mid-region. In this review we discuss how these different mechanisms act in concert to ensure the fidelity of the mitotic process.

  15. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko [Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Omori, Hiroko [Central Instrumentation Laboratory Research Institute for Microbial Diseases (BIKEN), Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ueda, Keiji, E-mail: kueda@virus.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy–electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. - Highlights: • This is the first report showing LANA dots on mitotic chromosomes by fluorescent microscopy followed by electron microscopy. • LANA dots localized randomly on condensed chromosomes other than centromere/pericentromere and telomere/peritelomre. • Cellular mitotic checkpoint should not be always involved in the segregation of KSHV genomes in the latency.

  16. Myosin-10 independently influences mitotic spindle structure and mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandquist, Joshua C; Larson, Matthew E; Hine, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    The iconic bipolar structure of the mitotic spindle is of extreme importance to proper spindle function. At best, spindle abnormalities result in a delayed mitosis, while worse outcomes include cell death or disease. Recent work has uncovered an important role for the actin-based motor protein myosin-10 in the regulation of spindle structure and function. Here we examine the contribution of the myosin tail homology 4 (MyTH4) domain of the myosin-10 tail to the protein's spindle functions. The MyTH4 domain is known to mediate binding to microtubules and we verify the suspicion that this domain contributes to myosin-10's close association with the spindle. More surprisingly, our data demonstrate that some but not all of myosin-10's spindle functions require microtubule binding. In particular, myosin-10's contribution to spindle pole integrity requires microtubule binding, whereas its contribution to normal mitotic progression does not. This is demonstrated by the observation that dominant negative expression of the wild-type MyTH4 domain produces multipolar spindles and an increased mitotic index, whereas overexpression of a version of the MyTH4 domain harboring point mutations that abrogate microtubule binding results in only the mitotic index phenotype. Our data suggest that myosin-10 helps to control the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells independent of microtubule binding. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mitotic Dysfunction Associated with Aging Hallmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Joana Catarina; Vaz, Sara; Logarinho, Elsa

    2017-01-01

    Aging is a biological process characterized by the progressive deterioration of physiological functions known to be the main risk factor for chronic diseases and declining health. There has been an emerging connection between aging and aneuploidy, an aberrant number of chromosomes, even though the molecular mechanisms behind age-associated aneuploidy remain largely unknown. In recent years, several genetic pathways and biochemical processes controlling the rate of aging have been identified and proposed as aging hallmarks. Primary hallmarks that cause the accumulation of cellular damage include genomic instability, telomere attrition, epigenetic alterations and loss of proteostasis (López-Otín et al., Cell 153:1194-1217, 2013). Here we review the provocative link between these aging hallmarks and the loss of chromosome segregation fidelity during cell division, which could support the correlation between aging and aneuploidy seen over the past decades. Secondly, we review the systemic impacts of aneuploidy in cell physiology and emphasize how these include some of the primary hallmarks of aging. Based on the evidence, we propose a mutual causality between aging and aneuploidy, and suggest modulation of mitotic fidelity as a potential means to ameliorate healthy lifespan.

  18. Identification of Drosophila mitotic genes by combining co-expression analysis and RNA interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Patrizia Somma

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available RNAi screens have, to date, identified many genes required for mitotic divisions of Drosophila tissue culture cells. However, the inventory of such genes remains incomplete. We have combined the powers of bioinformatics and RNAi technology to detect novel mitotic genes. We found that Drosophila genes involved in mitosis tend to be transcriptionally co-expressed. We thus constructed a co-expression-based list of 1,000 genes that are highly enriched in mitotic functions, and we performed RNAi for each of these genes. By limiting the number of genes to be examined, we were able to perform a very detailed phenotypic analysis of RNAi cells. We examined dsRNA-treated cells for possible abnormalities in both chromosome structure and spindle organization. This analysis allowed the identification of 142 mitotic genes, which were subdivided into 18 phenoclusters. Seventy of these genes have not previously been associated with mitotic defects; 30 of them are required for spindle assembly and/or chromosome segregation, and 40 are required to prevent spontaneous chromosome breakage. We note that the latter type of genes has never been detected in previous RNAi screens in any system. Finally, we found that RNAi against genes encoding kinetochore components or highly conserved splicing factors results in identical defects in chromosome segregation, highlighting an unanticipated role of splicing factors in centromere function. These findings indicate that our co-expression-based method for the detection of mitotic functions works remarkably well. We can foresee that elaboration of co-expression lists using genes in the same phenocluster will provide many candidate genes for small-scale RNAi screens aimed at completing the inventory of mitotic proteins.

  19. Distinct Kinesin-14 mitotic mechanisms in spindle bipolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Dimitre R; Kenny, Katelyn; Seo, Lan; Moyer, Amanda; Allen, Jessica; Paluh, Janet L

    2009-11-01

    Kinesin-like proteins are integral to formation and function of a conserved mitotic spindle apparatus that directs chromosome segregation and precedes cell division. Ubiquitous to the mechanism of spindle assembly and stability are balanced Kinesin-5 promoting and Kinesin-14 opposing forces. Distinct Kinesin-14 roles in bipolarity in eukaryotes have not been shown, but are suggested by gamma-tubulin-based pole interactions that affect establishment and by microtubule cross-linking and sliding that maintain bipolarity and spindle length. Distinct roles also imply specialized functional domains. By cross-species analysis of compatible mechanisms in establishing mitotic bipolarity we demonstrate that Kinesin-14 human HSET (HsHSET) functionally replaces Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pkl1 and its action is similarly blocked by mutation in a Kinesin-14 binding site on gamma-tubulin. Drosophila DmNcd localizes preferentially to bundled interpolar microtubules in fission yeast and does not replace SpPkl1. Analysis of twenty-six Kinesin-14 derivatives, including Tail, Stalk or Neck-Motor chimeras, for spindle localization, spindle assembly and mitotic progression defined critical domains. The Tail of SpPkl1 contains functional elements enabling its role in spindle assembly that are distinct from but transferable to DmNcd, whereas HsHSET function utilizes both Tail and Stalk features. Our analysis is the first to demonstrate distinct mechanisms between SpPkl1 and DmNcd, and reveal that HsHSET shares functional overlap in spindle pole mechanisms.

  20. Spatial reorganization of the endoplasmic reticulum during mitosis relies on mitotic kinase cyclin A in the early Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zane J; Mclaurin, Justin D; Eritano, Anthony S; Johnson, Brittany M; Sims, Amanda Q; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope.

  1. Spatial Reorganization of the Endoplasmic Reticulum during Mitosis Relies on Mitotic Kinase Cyclin A in the Early Drosophila Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zane J.; Mclaurin, Justin D.; Eritano, Anthony S.; Johnson, Brittany M.; Sims, Amanda Q.; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope. PMID:25689737

  2. Prokaryotic DNA segregation by an actin-like filament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Bugge Jensen, Rasmus; Löwe, Jan;

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for prokaryotic DNA segregation are largely unknown. The partitioning locus (par) encoded by the Escherichia coli plasmid R1 actively segregates its replicon to daughter cells. We show here that the ParM ATPase encoded by par forms dynamic actin-like filaments with prop......The mechanisms responsible for prokaryotic DNA segregation are largely unknown. The partitioning locus (par) encoded by the Escherichia coli plasmid R1 actively segregates its replicon to daughter cells. We show here that the ParM ATPase encoded by par forms dynamic actin-like filaments...... point for ParM polymerization. Hence, we provide evidence for a simple prokaryotic analogue of the eukaryotic mitotic spindle apparatus....

  3. Homolog pairing and segregation in Drosophila meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, B D

    2009-01-01

    Pairing of homologous chromosomes is fundamental to their reliable segregation during meiosis I and thus underlies sexual reproduction. In most eukaryotes homolog pairing is confined to prophase of meiosis I and is accompanied by frequent exchanges, known as crossovers, between homologous chromatids. Crossovers give rise to chiasmata, stable interhomolog connectors that are required for bipolar orientation (orientation to opposite poles) of homologs during meiosis I. Drosophila is unique among model eukaryotes in exhibiting regular homolog pairing in mitotic as well as meiotic cells. I review the results of recent molecular studies of pairing in both mitosis and meiosis in Drosophila. These studies show that homolog pairing is continuous between pre-meiotic mitosis and meiosis but that pairing frequencies and patterns are altered during the mitotic-meiotic transition. They also show that, with the exception of X-Y pairing in male meiosis, which is mediated specifically by the 240-bp rDNA spacer repeats, chromosome pairing is not restricted to specific sites in either mitosis or meiosis. Instead, virtually all chromosome regions, both heterochromatic and euchromatic, exhibit autonomous pairing capacity. Mutations that reduce the frequencies of both mitotic and meiotic pairing have been recently described, but no mutations that abolish pairing completely have been discovered, and the genetic control of pairing in Drosophila remains to be elucidated.

  4. BRCA1 interaction of centrosomal protein Nlp is required for successful mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shunqian; Gao, Hua; Mazzacurati, Lucia; Wang, Yang; Fan, Wenhong; Chen, Qiang; Yu, Wei; Wang, Mingrong; Zhu, Xueliang; Zhang, Chuanmao; Zhan, Qimin

    2009-08-21

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 is implicated in the control of mitotic progression, although the underlying mechanism(s) remains to be further defined. Deficiency of BRCA1 function leads to disrupted mitotic machinery and genomic instability. Here, we show that BRCA1 physically interacts and colocalizes with Nlp, an important molecule involved in centrosome maturation and spindle formation. Interestingly, Nlp centrosomal localization and its protein stability are regulated by normal cellular BRCA1 function because cells containing BRCA1 mutations or silenced for endogenous BRCA1 exhibit disrupted Nlp colocalization to centrosomes and enhanced Nlp degradation. Its is likely that the BRCA1 regulation of Nlp stability involves Plk1 suppression. Inhibition of endogenous Nlp via the small interfering RNA approach results in aberrant spindle formation, aborted chromosomal segregation, and aneuploidy, which mimic the phenotypes of disrupted BRCA1. Thus, BRCA1 interaction of Nlp might be required for the successful mitotic progression, and abnormalities of Nlp lead to genomic instability.

  5. Mitotic fidelity requires transgenerational action of a testis-restricted HP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Mia T; Vander Wende, Helen M; Malik, Harmit S

    2015-07-07

    Sperm-packaged DNA must undergo extensive reorganization to ensure its timely participation in embryonic mitosis. Whereas maternal control over this remodeling is well described, paternal contributions are virtually unknown. In this study, we show that Drosophila melanogaster males lacking Heterochromatin Protein 1E (HP1E) sire inviable embryos that undergo catastrophic mitosis. In these embryos, the paternal genome fails to condense and resolve into sister chromatids in synchrony with the maternal genome. This delay leads to a failure of paternal chromosomes, particularly the heterochromatin-rich sex chromosomes, to separate on the first mitotic spindle. Remarkably, HP1E is not inherited on mature sperm chromatin. Instead, HP1E primes paternal chromosomes during spermatogenesis to ensure faithful segregation post-fertilization. This transgenerational effect suggests that maternal control is necessary but not sufficient for transforming sperm DNA into a mitotically competent pronucleus. Instead, paternal action during spermiogenesis exerts post-fertilization control to ensure faithful chromosome segregation in the embryo.

  6. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein engages but does not abrogate the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yueyang [Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Munger, Karl, E-mail: kmunger@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis by censoring kinetochore-microtubule interactions. It is frequently rendered dysfunctional during carcinogenesis causing chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. There are conflicting reports whether the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein drives chromosomal instability by abolishing the SAC. Here we report that degradation of mitotic cyclins is impaired in cells with HPV16 E7 expression. RNAi-mediated depletion of Mad2 or BubR1 indicated the involvement of the SAC, suggesting that HPV16 E7 expression causes sustained SAC engagement. Mutational analyses revealed that HPV16 E7 sequences that are necessary for retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein binding as well as sequences previously implicated in binding the nuclear and mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and in delocalizing dynein from the mitotic spindle contribute to SAC engagement. Importantly, however, HPV16 E7 does not markedly compromise the SAC response to microtubule poisons.

  7. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2016-07-14

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs.

  8. Ki-67 acts as a biological surfactant to disperse mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuylen, Sara; Blaukopf, Claudia; Politi, Antonio Z; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Neumann, Beate; Poser, Ina; Ellenberg, Jan; Hyman, Anthony A; Gerlich, Daniel W

    2016-07-14

    Eukaryotic genomes are partitioned into chromosomes that form compact and spatially well-separated mechanical bodies during mitosis. This enables chromosomes to move independently of each other for segregation of precisely one copy of the genome to each of the nascent daughter cells. Despite insights into the spatial organization of mitotic chromosomes and the discovery of proteins at the chromosome surface, the molecular and biophysical bases of mitotic chromosome structural individuality have remained unclear. Here we report that the proliferation marker protein Ki-67 (encoded by the MKI67 gene), a component of the mitotic chromosome periphery, prevents chromosomes from collapsing into a single chromatin mass after nuclear envelope disassembly, thus enabling independent chromosome motility and efficient interactions with the mitotic spindle. The chromosome separation function of human Ki-67 is not confined within a specific protein domain, but correlates with size and net charge of truncation mutants that apparently lack secondary structure. This suggests that Ki-67 forms a steric and electrostatic charge barrier, similar to surface-active agents (surfactants) that disperse particles or phase-separated liquid droplets in solvents. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy showed a high surface density of Ki-67 and dual-colour labelling of both protein termini revealed an extended molecular conformation, indicating brush-like arrangements that are characteristic of polymeric surfactants. Our study thus elucidates a biomechanical role of the mitotic chromosome periphery in mammalian cells and suggests that natural proteins can function as surfactants in intracellular compartmentalization.

  9. Bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possoz, Christophe; Junier, Ivan; Espeli, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Dividing cells have mechanisms to ensure that their genomes are faithfully segregated into daughter cells. In bacteria, the description of these mechanisms has been considerably improved in the recent years. This review focuses on the different aspects of bacterial chromosome segregation that can be understood thanks to the studies performed with model organisms: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Caulobacter crescentus and Vibrio cholerae. We describe the global positionning of the nucleoid in the cell and the specific localization and dynamics of different chromosomal loci, kinetic and biophysic aspects of chromosome segregation are presented. Finally, a presentation of the key proteins involved in the chromosome segregation is made.

  10. Association between polymorphisms in segregation genes BUB1B and TTK and gastric cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudler Petra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Malignant transformation of normal gastric cells is a complex and multistep process, resulting in development of heterogeneous tumours. Susceptible genetic background, accumulation of genetic changes, and environmental factors play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in mitotic segregation genes could be responsible for inducing the slow process of accumulation of genetic changes, leading to genome instability.

  11. Mitochondrial genome regulates mitotic fidelity by maintaining centrosomal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Brahmbhatt, Meera; Pannu, Vaishali; Rida, Padmashree C G; Ramarathinam, Sujatha; Ogden, Angela; Cheng, Alice; Singh, Keshav K; Aneja, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    Centrosomes direct spindle morphogenesis to assemble a bipolar mitotic apparatus to enable error-free chromosome segregation and preclude chromosomal instability (CIN). Amplified centrosomes, a hallmark of cancer cells, set the stage for CIN, which underlies malignant transformation and evolution of aggressive phenotypes. Several studies report CIN and a tumorigenic and/or aggressive transformation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted cells. Although several nuclear-encoded proteins are implicated in centrosome duplication and spindle organization, the involvement of mtDNA encoded proteins in centrosome amplification (CA) remains elusive. Here we show that disruption of mitochondrial function by depletion of mtDNA induces robust CA and mitotic aberrations in osteosarcoma cells. We found that overexpression of Aurora A, Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4), and Cyclin E was associated with emergence of amplified centrosomes. Supernumerary centrosomes in rho0 (mtDNA-depleted) cells resulted in multipolar mitoses bearing "real" centrosomes with paired centrioles at the multiple poles. This abnormal phenotype was recapitulated by inhibition of respiratory complex I in parental cells, suggesting a role for electron transport chain (ETC) in maintaining numeral centrosomal homeostasis. Furthermore, rho0 cells displayed a decreased proliferative capacity owing to a G 2/M arrest. Downregulation of nuclear-encoded p53 in rho0 cells underscores the importance of mitochondrial and nuclear genome crosstalk and may perhaps underlie the observed mitotic aberrations. By contrast, repletion of wild-type mtDNA in rho0 cells (cybrid) demonstrated a much lesser extent of CA and spindle multipolarity, suggesting partial restoration of centrosomal homeostasis. Our study provides compelling evidence to implicate the role of mitochondria in regulation of centrosome duplication, spindle architecture, and spindle pole integrity.

  12. Mechanical design principles of a mitotic spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan J; Roque, Hélio; Antony, Claude; Nédélec, François

    2014-12-18

    An organised spindle is crucial to the fidelity of chromosome segregation, but the relationship between spindle structure and function is not well understood in any cell type. The anaphase B spindle in fission yeast has a slender morphology and must elongate against compressive forces. This 'pushing' mode of chromosome transport renders the spindle susceptible to breakage, as observed in cells with a variety of defects. Here we perform electron tomographic analyses of the spindle, which suggest that it organises a limited supply of structural components to increase its compressive strength. Structural integrity is maintained throughout the spindle's fourfold elongation by organising microtubules into a rigid transverse array, preserving correct microtubule number and dynamically rescaling microtubule length.

  13. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  14. Cell biology of mitotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides high-fidelity DNA repair throughout all domains of life. Live cell fluorescence microscopy offers the opportunity to image individual recombination events in real time providing insight into the in vivo biochemistry of the involved proteins and DNA molecules...... of this review include the stoichiometry and dynamics of recombination complexes in vivo, the choreography of assembly and disassembly of recombination proteins at sites of DNA damage, the mobilization of damaged DNA during homology search, and the functional compartmentalization of the nucleus with respect...... as well as the cellular organization of the process of homologous recombination. Herein we review the cell biological aspects of mitotic homologous recombination with a focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells, but will also draw on findings from other experimental systems. Key topics...

  15. Cdc14 Early Anaphase Release, FEAR, Is Limited to the Nucleus and Dispensable for Efficient Mitotic Exit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Yellman

    Full Text Available Cdc14 phosphatase is a key regulator of exit from mitosis, acting primarily through antagonism of cyclin-dependent kinase, and is also thought to be important for meiosis. Cdc14 is released from its sequestration site in the nucleolus in two stages, first by the non-essential Cdc Fourteen Early Anaphase Release (FEAR pathway and later by the essential Mitotic Exit Network (MEN, which drives efficient export of Cdc14 to the cytoplasm. We find that Cdc14 is confined to the nucleus during early mitotic anaphase release, and during its meiosis I release. Proteins whose degradation is directed by Cdc14 as a requirement for mitotic exit (e.g. the B-type cyclin, Clb2, remain stable during mitotic FEAR, a result consistent with Cdc14 being restricted to the nucleus and not participating directly in mitotic exit. Cdc14 released by the FEAR pathway has been proposed to have a wide variety of activities, all of which are thought to promote passage through anaphase. Proposed functions of FEAR include stabilization of anaphase spindles, resolution of the rDNA to allow its segregation, and priming of the MEN so that mitotic exit can occur promptly and efficiently. We tested the model for FEAR functions using the FEAR-deficient mutation net1-6cdk. Our cytological observations indicate that, contrary to the current model, FEAR is fully dispensable for timely progression through a series of anaphase landmarks and mitotic exit, although it is required for timely rDNA segregation. The net1-6cdk mutation suppresses temperature-sensitive mutations in MEN genes, suggesting that rather than activating mitotic exit, FEAR either inhibits the MEN or has no direct effect upon it. One interpretation of this result is that FEAR delays MEN activation to ensure that rDNA segregation occurs before mitotic exit. Our findings clarify the distinction between FEAR and MEN-dependent Cdc14 activities and will help guide emerging quantitative models of this cell cycle transition.

  16. Cdc14 Early Anaphase Release, FEAR, Is Limited to the Nucleus and Dispensable for Efficient Mitotic Exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellman, Christopher M; Roeder, G Shirleen

    2015-01-01

    Cdc14 phosphatase is a key regulator of exit from mitosis, acting primarily through antagonism of cyclin-dependent kinase, and is also thought to be important for meiosis. Cdc14 is released from its sequestration site in the nucleolus in two stages, first by the non-essential Cdc Fourteen Early Anaphase Release (FEAR) pathway and later by the essential Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), which drives efficient export of Cdc14 to the cytoplasm. We find that Cdc14 is confined to the nucleus during early mitotic anaphase release, and during its meiosis I release. Proteins whose degradation is directed by Cdc14 as a requirement for mitotic exit (e.g. the B-type cyclin, Clb2), remain stable during mitotic FEAR, a result consistent with Cdc14 being restricted to the nucleus and not participating directly in mitotic exit. Cdc14 released by the FEAR pathway has been proposed to have a wide variety of activities, all of which are thought to promote passage through anaphase. Proposed functions of FEAR include stabilization of anaphase spindles, resolution of the rDNA to allow its segregation, and priming of the MEN so that mitotic exit can occur promptly and efficiently. We tested the model for FEAR functions using the FEAR-deficient mutation net1-6cdk. Our cytological observations indicate that, contrary to the current model, FEAR is fully dispensable for timely progression through a series of anaphase landmarks and mitotic exit, although it is required for timely rDNA segregation. The net1-6cdk mutation suppresses temperature-sensitive mutations in MEN genes, suggesting that rather than activating mitotic exit, FEAR either inhibits the MEN or has no direct effect upon it. One interpretation of this result is that FEAR delays MEN activation to ensure that rDNA segregation occurs before mitotic exit. Our findings clarify the distinction between FEAR and MEN-dependent Cdc14 activities and will help guide emerging quantitative models of this cell cycle transition.

  17. Nup2 requires a highly divergent partner, NupA, to fulfill functions at nuclear pore complexes and the mitotic chromatin region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markossian, Sarine; Suresh, Subbulakshmi; Osmani, Aysha H; Osmani, Stephen A

    2015-02-15

    Chromatin and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) undergo dramatic changes during mitosis, which in vertebrates and Aspergillus nidulans involves movement of Nup2 from NPCs to the chromatin region to fulfill unknown functions. This transition is shown to require the Cdk1 mitotic kinase and be promoted prematurely by ectopic expression of the NIMA kinase. Nup2 localizes with a copurifying partner termed NupA, a highly divergent yet essential NPC protein. NupA and Nup2 locate throughout the chromatin region during prophase but during anaphase move to surround segregating DNA. NupA function is shown to involve targeting Nup2 to its interphase and mitotic locations. Deletion of either Nup2 or NupA causes identical mitotic defects that initiate a spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC)-dependent mitotic delay and also cause defects in karyokinesis. These mitotic problems are not caused by overall defects in mitotic NPC disassembly-reassembly or general nuclear import. However, without Nup2 or NupA, although the SAC protein Mad1 locates to its mitotic locations, it fails to locate to NPCs normally in G1 after mitosis. Collectively the study provides new insight into the roles of Nup2 and NupA during mitosis and in a surveillance mechanism that regulates nucleokinesis when mitotic defects occur after SAC fulfillment.

  18. Citron kinase - renaissance of a neglected mitotic kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avino, Pier Paolo

    2017-05-15

    Cell division controls the faithful segregation of genomic and cytoplasmic materials between the two nascent daughter cells. Members of the Aurora, Polo and cyclin-dependent (Cdk) kinase families are known to regulate multiple events throughout cell division, whereas another kinase, citron kinase (CIT-K), for a long time has been considered to function solely during cytokinesis, the last phase of cell division. CIT-K was originally proposed to regulate the ingression of the cleavage furrow that forms at the equatorial cortex of the dividing cell after chromosome segregation. However, studies in the last decade have clarified that this kinase is, instead, required for the organization of the midbody in late cytokinesis, and also revealed novel functions of CIT-K earlier in mitosis and in DNA damage control. Moreover, CIT-K mutations have recently been linked to the development of human microcephaly, and CIT-K has been identified as a potential target in cancer therapy. In this Commentary, I describe and re-evaluate the functions and regulation of CIT-K during cell division and its involvement in human disease. Finally, I offer my perspectives on the open questions and future challenges that are necessary to address, in order to fully understand this important and yet unjustly neglected mitotic kinase. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. MreB actin-mediated segregation of a specific region of a bacterial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitai, Zemer; Dye, Natalie Anne; Reisenauer, Ann; Wachi, Masaaki; Shapiro, Lucy

    2005-02-11

    Faithful chromosome segregation is an essential component of cell division in all organisms. The eukaryotic mitotic machinery uses the cytoskeleton to move specific chromosomal regions. To investigate the potential role of the actin-like MreB protein in bacterial chromosome segregation, we first demonstrate that MreB is the direct target of the small molecule A22. We then demonstrate that A22 completely blocks the movement of newly replicated loci near the origin of replication but has no qualitative or quantitative effect on the segregation of other loci if added after origin segregation. MreB selectively interacts, directly or indirectly, with origin-proximal regions of the chromosome, arguing that the origin-proximal region segregates via an MreB-dependent mechanism not used by the rest of the chromosome.

  20. Structure of a Blinkin-BUBR1 complex reveals an interaction crucial for kinetochore-mitotic checkpoint regulation via an unanticipated binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M; Lischetti, Tiziana; Matak-Vinković, Dijana

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic stability relies on the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which ensures accurate chromosome segregation by delaying the onset of anaphase until all chromosomes are properly bioriented and attached to the mitotic spindle. BUB1 and BUBR1 kinases are central for this proc...

  1. Whole genome functional analysis identifies novel components required for mitotic spindle integrity in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rines, Daniel R; Gomez-Ferreria, Maria Ana; Zhou, Yingyao; DeJesus, Paul; Grob, Seanna; Batalov, Serge; Labow, Marc; Huesken, Dieter; Mickanin, Craig; Hall, Jonathan; Reinhardt, Mischa; Natt, Francois; Lange, Joerg; Sharp, David J; Chanda, Sumit K; Caldwell, Jeremy S

    2008-01-01

    Background The mitotic spindle is a complex mechanical apparatus required for accurate segregation of sister chromosomes during mitosis. We designed a genetic screen using automated microscopy to discover factors essential for mitotic progression. Using a RNA interference library of 49,164 double-stranded RNAs targeting 23,835 human genes, we performed a loss of function screen to look for small interfering RNAs that arrest cells in metaphase. Results Here we report the identification of genes that, when suppressed, result in structural defects in the mitotic spindle leading to bent, twisted, monopolar, or multipolar spindles, and cause cell cycle arrest. We further describe a novel analysis methodology for large-scale RNA interference datasets that relies on supervised clustering of these genes based on Gene Ontology, protein families, tissue expression, and protein-protein interactions. Conclusion This approach was utilized to classify functionally the identified genes in discrete mitotic processes. We confirmed the identity for a subset of these genes and examined more closely their mechanical role in spindle architecture. PMID:18302737

  2. Genome-wide analysis demonstrates conserved localization of messenger RNAs to mitotic microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Michael D; Feric, Elma; Weis, Karsten; Heald, Rebecca

    2007-12-31

    RNA localization is of critical importance in many fundamental cell biological and developmental processes by regulating the spatial control of gene expression. To investigate how spindle-localized RNAs might influence mitosis, we comprehensively surveyed all messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that bound to microtubules during metaphase in both Xenopus laevis egg extracts and mitotic human cell extracts. We identify conserved classes of mRNAs that are enriched on microtubules in both human and X. laevis. Active mitotic translation occurs on X. laevis meiotic spindles, and a subset of microtubule-bound mRNAs (MT-mRNAs) associate with polyribosomes. Although many MT-mRNAs associate with polyribosomes, we find that active translation is not required for mRNA localization to mitotic microtubules. Our results represent the first genome-wide survey of mRNAs localized to a specific cytoskeletal component and suggest that microtubule localization of specific mRNAs is likely to function in mitotic regulation and mRNA segregation during cell division.

  3. A spindle-like apparatus guides bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptacin, Jerod L; Lee, Steven F; Garner, Ethan C; Toro, Esteban; Eckart, Michael; Comolli, Luis R; Moerner, W E; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-08-01

    Until recently, a dedicated mitotic apparatus that segregates newly replicated chromosomes into daughter cells was believed to be unique to eukaryotic cells. Here we demonstrate that the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus segregates its chromosome using a partitioning (Par) apparatus that has surprising similarities to eukaryotic spindles. We show that the C. crescentus ATPase ParA forms linear polymers in vitro and assembles into a narrow linear structure in vivo. The centromere-binding protein ParB binds to and destabilizes ParA structures in vitro. We propose that this ParB-stimulated ParA depolymerization activity moves the centromere to the opposite cell pole through a burnt bridge Brownian ratchet mechanism. Finally, we identify the pole-specific TipN protein as a new component of the Par system that is required to maintain the directionality of DNA transfer towards the new cell pole. Our results elucidate a bacterial chromosome segregation mechanism that features basic operating principles similar to eukaryotic mitotic machines, including a multivalent protein complex at the centromere that stimulates the dynamic disassembly of polymers to move chromosomes into daughter compartments.

  4. RNAi pathway participates in chromosome segregation in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuan; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Xu; Cao, Shuhuan; Shan, Ge

    2015-01-01

    The RNAi machinery is a mighty regulator in a myriad of life events. Despite lines of evidence that small RNAs and components of the RNAi pathway may be associated with structure and behavior of mitotic chromosomes in diverse organisms, a direct role of the RNAi pathway in mammalian mitotic chromosome segregation remains elusive. Here we report that Dicer and AGO2, two central components of the mammalian RNAi pathway, participate in the chromosome segregation. Knockdown of Dicer or AGO2 results in a higher incidence of chromosome lagging, and this effect is independent from microRNAs as examined with DGCR8 knockout cells. Further investigation has revealed that α-satellite RNA, a noncoding RNA derived from centromeric repeat region, is managed by AGO2 under the guidance of endogenous small interference RNAs (ASAT siRNAs) generated by Dicer. Furthermore, the slicer activity of AGO2 is essential for the chromosome segregation. Level and distribution of chromosome-associated α-satellite RNA have crucial regulatory effect on the localization of centromeric proteins such as centromere protein C1 (CENPC1). With these results, we also provide a paradigm in which the RNAi pathway participates in vital cellular events through the maintenance of level and distribution of noncoding RNAs in cells.

  5. Commentary: Genger Segregation in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccoby, Eleanor E.

    1994-01-01

    Provides an overview of the preceding articles in this journal issue. Considers the timing of gender segregation, compatibility between play styles and gender segregation, possible physiological processes underlying gender segregation in play, children's cognitive knowledge about gender, and the consequences of gender segregation. (BAC)

  6. Analysis of interchromosomal mitotic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, C B; Shafer, B K; Higgins, D R; Strathern, J N

    1990-07-01

    A novel synthetic locus is described that provides a simple assay system for characterizing mitotic recombinants. The locus consists of the TRP1 and HIS3 genes inserted into chromosome III of S. cerevisiae between the CRY1 and MAT loci. Defined trp1 and his3 alleles have been generated that allow the selection of interchromosomal recombinants in this interval. Trp+ or His+ recombinants can be divided into several classes based on coupling of the other alleles in the interval. The tight linkage of the CRY1 and MAT loci, combined with the drug resistance and cell type phenotypes that they respectively control, facilitates the classification of the recombinants without resorting to tetrad dissection. We present the distribution of spontaneous recombinants among the classes defined by this analysis. The data suggest that the recombination intermediate can have regions of symmetric strand exchange and that co-conversion tracts can extend over 1-3 kb. Continuous conversion tracts are favored over discontinuous tracts. The distribution among the classes defined by this analysis is altered in recombinants induced by UV irradiation.

  7. The Consequences of Chromosome Segregation Errors in Mitosis and Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Potapova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mistakes during cell division frequently generate changes in chromosome content, producing aneuploid or polyploid progeny cells. Polyploid cells may then undergo abnormal division to generate aneuploid cells. Chromosome segregation errors may also involve fragments of whole chromosomes. A major consequence of segregation defects is change in the relative dosage of products from genes located on the missegregated chromosomes. Abnormal expression of transcriptional regulators can also impact genes on the properly segregated chromosomes. The consequences of these perturbations in gene expression depend on the specific chromosomes affected and on the interplay of the aneuploid phenotype with the environment. Most often, these novel chromosome distributions are detrimental to the health and survival of the organism. However, in a changed environment, alterations in gene copy number may generate a more highly adapted phenotype. Chromosome segregation errors also have important implications in human health. They may promote drug resistance in pathogenic microorganisms. In cancer cells, they are a source for genetic and phenotypic variability that may select for populations with increased malignance and resistance to therapy. Lastly, chromosome segregation errors during gamete formation in meiosis are a primary cause of human birth defects and infertility. This review describes the consequences of mitotic and meiotic errors focusing on novel concepts and human health.

  8. Understanding Segregation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Elizabeth

    There is growing consensus that living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty increases the likelihood of social problems such as teenage parenthood, drug and alcohol use, crime victimization, and chronic unemployment. Neighborhood inequality is also implicated in studies of enduring race/ethnic health disparities, and there are recent moves to broaden the definition of health care policy to policies targeting social inequality (Mechanic 2007). Residential segregation affects health outcomes in several different ways. First, income, education, and occupation are all strongly related to health (Adler and Newman 2002). Segregation is a key mechanism through which socioeconomic inequality is perpetuated and reinforced, as it hinders the upward mobility of disadvantaged groups by limiting their educational and employment opportunities. Second, segregation increases minority exposure to unhealthy neighborhood environments. Residential segregation creates areas with concentrated poverty and unemployment, both of which are key factors that predict violence and create racial differences in homicide (Samson and Wilson 1995). Neighborhood characteristics, such as exposure to environmental hazards, fear of violence, and access to grocery stores, affect health risks and health behaviors (Cheadle et al. 1991). Tobacco and alcohol industries also advertise their products disproportionately in poor, minority areas (Moore, Williams, and Qualls 1996). Finally, residential segregation leads to inequalitie in health care resources, which contributes to disparities in quality of treatment (Smedley, Stith, and Nelson 2002).

  9. The influence of fixation delay on mitotic activity and flow cytometric cell cycle variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergers, E; Jannink, I; van Diest, P I; Cuesta, M A; Meyer, S; van Mourik, J C; Baak, J P

    1997-01-01

    Proliferation variables such as mitotic activity and the percentage of S-phase cells have been shown to be of prognostic value in many tumors, especially in breast cancer. However, some studies reported a decrease in mitotic activity caused by delay in fixation of the tissue. In contrast, other studies showed that the identifiability of mitotic figures decreases after fixation delay, but the total number of mitotic figures and also the percentage of S-phase cells remain unchanged. Most studies have been done on small numbers of experimental tumors, thus introducing the risk of selection bias. The aim of this study was to reinvestigate the influence of fixation delay on mitotic activity and cell cycle variables assessed by flow cytometry in an adequate number of resected human tissues to reach firmer conclusions. Resection specimens of 19 and 21 cases, respectively, for the mitotic activity estimate and the flow cytometric percentage of S-phase calculation were collected directly from the operating theater using lung, breast, and intestinal cancers and normal intestinal mucosa. The tissues were cut in pieces, and from each specimen, pieces were fixed in 4% buffered formaldehyde (for mitosis counting) as well as snap frozen (for flow cytometry) immediately after excision, as well as after a fixation delay of 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 18, and 24 hours. Moreover, during the fixation delay, one series from each specimen was kept in the refrigerator and the second at room temperature. Thus, a total of 304 (19 X 16) and 336 (21 X 16) specimens were investigated for the mitotic activity estimate and the percentage of S-phase cells calculation, respectively. With regard to the estimation of the mitotic activity, both clear and doubtful mitotic figures were registered separately, obtaining an "uncorrected" and "corrected" (for doubtful mitotic figures) mitotic activity estimate. The percentage of S-phase cells was obtained by cell cycle analysis of flow cytometric DNA-histograms. The

  10. Measuring Inequality and Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Roberto, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I introduce the Divergence Index, a conceptually intuitive and methodologically rigorous measure of inequality and segregation. The index measures the difference between a distribution of interest and another empirical, theoretical, or normative distribution. The Divergence Index provides flexibility in specifying a theoretically meaningful basis for evaluating inequality. It evaluates how surprising an empirical distribution is given a theoretical distribution that represents equality. I demonstrate the unique features of the new measure, as well as deriving its mathematical equivalence with Theil's Inequality Index and the Information Theory Index. I compare the dynamics of the measures using simulated data, and an empirical analysis of racial residential segregation in the Detroit, MI, metro area. The Information Theory Index has become the gold standard for decomposition analyses of segregation. I show that although the Information Theory Index can be decomposed for subareas, it is misleadi...

  11. Mitotic Protein CSPP1 Interacts with CENP-H Protein to Coordinate Accurate Chromosome Oscillation in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lijuan; Wang, Zhikai; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Chunli; Hua, Shasha; Su, Zeqi; Brako, Larry; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva; Ye, Mingliang; Wei, Xuan; Zou, Hanfa; Ding, Xia; Liu, Lifang; Liu, Xing; Yao, Xuebiao

    2015-11-06

    Mitotic chromosome segregation is orchestrated by the dynamic interaction of spindle microtubules with the kinetochores. During chromosome alignment, kinetochore-bound microtubules undergo dynamic cycles between growth and shrinkage, leading to an oscillatory movement of chromosomes along the spindle axis. Although kinetochore protein CENP-H serves as a molecular control of kinetochore-microtubule dynamics, the mechanistic link between CENP-H and kinetochore microtubules (kMT) has remained less characterized. Here, we show that CSPP1 is a kinetochore protein essential for accurate chromosome movements in mitosis. CSPP1 binds to CENP-H in vitro and in vivo. Suppression of CSPP1 perturbs proper mitotic progression and compromises the satisfaction of spindle assembly checkpoint. In addition, chromosome oscillation is greatly attenuated in CSPP1-depleted cells, similar to what was observed in the CENP-H-depleted cells. Importantly, CSPP1 depletion enhances velocity of kinetochore movement, and overexpression of CSPP1 decreases the speed, suggesting that CSPP1 promotes kMT stability during cell division. Specific perturbation of CENP-H/CSPP1 interaction using a membrane-permeable competing peptide resulted in a transient mitotic arrest and chromosome segregation defect. Based on these findings, we propose that CSPP1 cooperates with CENP-H on kinetochores to serve as a novel regulator of kMT dynamics for accurate chromosome segregation.

  12. Bacterial scaffold directs pole-specific centromere segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptacin, Jerod L; Gahlmann, Andreas; Bowman, Grant R; Perez, Adam M; von Diezmann, Alexander R S; Eckart, Michael R; Moerner, W E; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-05-13

    Bacteria use partitioning systems based on the ParA ATPase to actively mobilize and spatially organize molecular cargoes throughout the cytoplasm. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses a ParA-based partitioning system to segregate newly replicated chromosomal centromeres to opposite cell poles. Here we demonstrate that the Caulobacter PopZ scaffold creates an organizing center at the cell pole that actively regulates polar centromere transport by the ParA partition system. As segregation proceeds, the ParB-bound centromere complex is moved by progressively disassembling ParA from a nucleoid-bound structure. Using superresolution microscopy, we show that released ParA is recruited directly to binding sites within a 3D ultrastructure composed of PopZ at the cell pole, whereas the ParB-centromere complex remains at the periphery of the PopZ structure. PopZ recruitment of ParA stimulates ParA to assemble on the nucleoid near the PopZ-proximal cell pole. We identify mutations in PopZ that allow scaffold assembly but specifically abrogate interactions with ParA and demonstrate that PopZ/ParA interactions are required for proper chromosome segregation in vivo. We propose that during segregation PopZ sequesters free ParA and induces target-proximal regeneration of ParA DNA binding activity to enforce processive and pole-directed centromere segregation, preventing segregation reversals. PopZ therefore functions as a polar hub complex at the cell pole to directly regulate the directionality and destination of transfer of the mitotic segregation machine.

  13. Semaphorin-Plexin Signaling Controls Mitotic Spindle Orientation during Epithelial Morphogenesis and Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jingjing; Swiercz, Jakub M.; Bañón-Rodríguez, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenesis, homeostasis, and regeneration of epithelial tissues rely on the accurate orientation of cell divisions, which is specified by the mitotic spindle axis. To remain in the epithelial plane, symmetrically dividing epithelial cells align their mitotic spindle axis with the plane. Here, we...... show that this alignment depends on epithelial cell-cell communication via semaphorin-plexin signaling. During kidney morphogenesis and repair, renal tubular epithelial cells lacking the transmembrane receptor Plexin-B2 or its semaphorin ligands fail to correctly orient the mitotic spindle, leading...... to severe defects in epithelial architecture and function. Analyses of a series of transgenic and knockout mice indicate that Plexin-B2 controls the cell division axis by signaling through its GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and Cdc42. Our data uncover semaphorin-plexin signaling as a central...

  14. Bub3 is a spindle assembly checkpoint protein regulating chromosome segregation during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Li

    Full Text Available In mitosis, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC prevents anaphase onset until all chromosomes have been attached to the spindle microtubules and aligned correctly at the equatorial metaphase plate. The major checkpoint proteins in mitosis consist of mitotic arrest-deficient (Mad1-3, budding uninhibited by benzimidazole (Bub1, Bub3, and monopolar spindle 1(Mps1. During meiosis, for the formation of a haploid gamete, two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation occur with only one round of DNA replication. To pull homologous chromosomes to opposite spindle poles during meiosis I, both sister kinetochores of a homologue must face toward the same pole which is very different from mitosis and meiosis II. As a core member of checkpoint proteins, the individual role of Bub3 in mammalian oocyte meiosis is unclear. In this study, using overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi approaches, we analyzed the role of Bub3 in mouse oocyte meiosis. Our data showed that overexpressed Bub3 inhibited meiotic metaphase-anaphase transition by preventing homologous chromosome and sister chromatid segregations in meiosis I and II, respectively. Misaligned chromosomes, abnormal polar body and double polar bodies were observed in Bub3 knock-down oocytes, causing aneuploidy. Furthermore, through cold treatment combined with Bub3 overexpression, we found that overexpressed Bub3 affected the attachments of microtubules and kinetochores during metaphase-anaphase transition. We propose that as a member of SAC, Bub3 is required for regulation of both meiosis I and II, and is potentially involved in kinetochore-microtubule attachment in mammalian oocytes.

  15. Bub3 is a spindle assembly checkpoint protein regulating chromosome segregation during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mo; Li, Sen; Yuan, Ju; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2009-11-02

    In mitosis, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) prevents anaphase onset until all chromosomes have been attached to the spindle microtubules and aligned correctly at the equatorial metaphase plate. The major checkpoint proteins in mitosis consist of mitotic arrest-deficient (Mad)1-3, budding uninhibited by benzimidazole (Bub)1, Bub3, and monopolar spindle 1(Mps1). During meiosis, for the formation of a haploid gamete, two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation occur with only one round of DNA replication. To pull homologous chromosomes to opposite spindle poles during meiosis I, both sister kinetochores of a homologue must face toward the same pole which is very different from mitosis and meiosis II. As a core member of checkpoint proteins, the individual role of Bub3 in mammalian oocyte meiosis is unclear. In this study, using overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) approaches, we analyzed the role of Bub3 in mouse oocyte meiosis. Our data showed that overexpressed Bub3 inhibited meiotic metaphase-anaphase transition by preventing homologous chromosome and sister chromatid segregations in meiosis I and II, respectively. Misaligned chromosomes, abnormal polar body and double polar bodies were observed in Bub3 knock-down oocytes, causing aneuploidy. Furthermore, through cold treatment combined with Bub3 overexpression, we found that overexpressed Bub3 affected the attachments of microtubules and kinetochores during metaphase-anaphase transition. We propose that as a member of SAC, Bub3 is required for regulation of both meiosis I and II, and is potentially involved in kinetochore-microtubule attachment in mammalian oocytes.

  16. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-09-25

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin(-/-) mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division.

  17. A Question of Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quedas, Fátima; Ponte, João; Trindade, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    than 40 per cent of breads were indeed over the labelling threshold, and should be labelled. This includes GM maize that is not cultivated in the EU and enters the supply chain via international trade. We conclude that the realisation of coexistence and segregation requires involvement of the full...

  18. Plasmid segregation mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersbach, Gitte; Gerdes, Kenn; Charbon, Gitte Ebersbach

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids encode partitioning (par) loci that ensure ordered plasmid segregation prior to cell division. par loci come in two types: those that encode actin-like ATPases and those that encode deviant Walker-type ATPases. ParM, the actin-like ATPase of plasmid R1, forms dynamic filaments ...

  19. Towards a quantitative understanding of mitotic spindle assembly and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogilner, Alex; Craig, Erin

    2010-10-15

    The 'simple' view of the mitotic spindle is that it self-assembles as a result of microtubules (MTs) randomly searching for chromosomes, after which the spindle length is maintained by a balance of outward tension exerted by molecular motors on the MTs connecting centrosomes and chromosomes, and compression generated by other motors on the MTs connecting the spindle poles. This picture is being challenged now by mounting evidence indicating that spindle assembly and maintenance rely on much more complex interconnected networks of microtubules, molecular motors, chromosomes and regulatory proteins. From an engineering point of view, three design principles of this molecular machine are especially important: the spindle assembles quickly, it assembles accurately, and it is mechanically robust--yet malleable. How is this design achieved with randomly interacting and impermanent molecular parts? Here, we review recent interdisciplinary studies that have started to shed light on this question. We discuss cooperative mechanisms of spindle self-assembly, error correction and maintenance of its mechanical properties, speculate on analogy between spindle and lamellipodial dynamics, and highlight the role of quantitative approaches in understanding the mitotic spindle design.

  20. MISP is a novel Plk1 substrate required for proper spindle orientation and mitotic progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mei; Settele, Florian; Kotak, Sachin; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Ehret, Lena; Ponting, Chris P.; Gönczy, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Precise positioning of the mitotic spindle determines the correct cell division axis and is crucial for organism development. Spindle positioning is mediated through a cortical machinery by capturing astral microtubules, thereby generating pushing/pulling forces at the cell cortex. However, the molecular link between these two structures remains elusive. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized protein, MISP (C19orf21), as a substrate of Plk1 that is required for correct mitotic spindle positioning. MISP is an actin-associated protein throughout the cell cycle. MISP depletion led to an impaired metaphase-to-anaphase transition, which depended on phosphorylation by Plk1. Loss of MISP induced mitotic defects including spindle misorientation accompanied by shortened astral microtubules. Furthermore, we find that MISP formed a complex with and regulated the cortical distribution of the +TIP binding protein p150glued, a subunit of the dynein–dynactin complex. We propose that Plk1 phosphorylates MISP, thus stabilizing cortical and astral microtubule attachments required for proper mitotic spindle positioning. PMID:23509069

  1. Applied Thermodynamics: Grain Boundary Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Lejček

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of interfaces—free surfaces and grain boundaries—is generally described by the Langmuir–McLean segregation isotherm controlled by Gibbs energy of segregation. Various components of the Gibbs energy of segregation, the standard and the excess ones as well as other thermodynamic state functions—enthalpy, entropy and volume—of interfacial segregation are derived and their physical meaning is elucidated. The importance of the thermodynamic state functions of grain boundary segregation, their dependence on volume solid solubility, mutual solute–solute interaction and pressure effect in ferrous alloys is demonstrated.

  2. Mitotic activity index in interval breast cancers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, R.P.R.; Bult, P.; Noppen, C.M.; Boetes, C.; Ruers, T.J.M.; Wobbes, Th.

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: The Mitotic Activity Index (MAI) is a strong prognostic factor for disease free survival in breast cancer. The MAI is lower in screen detected tumours, correlating with less aggressive biological behaviour in this group. In this study the MAI is compared between screen detected, interval and s

  3. Disruption of Mitotic Progression by Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    States, J Christopher

    2015-07-01

    Arsenic is an enigmatic xenobiotic that causes a multitude of chronic diseases including cancer and also is a therapeutic with promise in cancer treatment. Arsenic causes mitotic delay and induces aneuploidy in diploid human cells. In contrast, arsenic causes mitotic arrest followed by an apoptotic death in a multitude of virally transformed cells and cancer cells. We have explored the hypothesis that these differential effects of arsenic exposure are related by arsenic disruption of mitosis and are differentiated by the target cell's ability to regulate or modify cell cycle checkpoints. Functional p53/CDKN1A axis has been shown to mitigate the mitotic block and to be essential to induction of aneuploidy. More recent preliminary data suggest that microRNA modulation of chromatid cohesion also may play a role in escape from mitotic block and in generation of chromosomal instability. Other recent studies suggest that arsenic may be useful in treatment of solid tumors when used in combination with other cytotoxic agents such as cisplatin.

  4. SELECTIVE EXTRACTION OF ISOLATED MITOTIC APPARATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibring, Thomas; Baxandall, Jane

    1971-01-01

    Mitotic apparatus isolated from sea urchin eggs has been treated with meralluride sodium under conditions otherwise resembling those of its isolation. The treatment causes a selective morphological disappearance of microtubules while extracting a major protein fraction, probably consisting of two closely related proteins, which constitutes about 10% of mitotic apparatus protein. Extraction of other cell particulates under similar conditions yields much less of this protein. The extracted protein closely resembles outer doublet microtubule protein from sea urchin sperm tail in properties considered typical of microtubule proteins: precipitation by calcium ion and vinblastine, electrophoretic mobility in both acid and basic polyacrylamide gels, sedimentation coefficient, molecular weight, and, according to a preliminary determination, amino acid composition. An antiserum against a preparation of sperm tail outer doublet microtubules cross-reacts with the extract from mitotic apparatus. On the basis of these findings it appears that microtubule protein is selectively extracted from isolated mitotic apparatus by treatment with meralluride, and is a typical microtubule protein. PMID:5543404

  5. Nur1 dephosphorylation confers positive feedback to mitotic exit phosphatase activation in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Godfrey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Substrate dephosphorylation by the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk-opposing phosphatase, Cdc14, is vital for many events during budding yeast mitotic exit. Cdc14 is sequestered in the nucleolus through inhibitory binding to Net1, from which it is released in anaphase following Net1 phosphorylation. Initial Net1 phosphorylation depends on Cdk itself, in conjunction with proteins of the Cdc14 Early Anaphase Release (FEAR network. Later on, the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN signaling cascade maintains Cdc14 release. An important unresolved question is how Cdc14 activity can increase in early anaphase, while Cdk activity, that is required for Net1 phosphorylation, decreases and the MEN is not yet active. Here we show that the nuclear rim protein Nur1 interacts with Net1 and, in its Cdk phosphorylated form, inhibits Cdc14 release. Nur1 is dephosphorylated by Cdc14 in early anaphase, relieving the inhibition and promoting further Cdc14 release. Nur1 dephosphorylation thus describes a positive feedback loop in Cdc14 phosphatase activation during mitotic exit, required for faithful chromosome segregation and completion of the cell division cycle.

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibitors promote glioma cell death by G2 checkpoint abrogation leading to mitotic catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornago, M; Garcia-Alberich, C; Blasco-Angulo, N; Vall-Llaura, N; Nager, M; Herreros, J; Comella, J X; Sanchis, D; Llovera, M

    2014-10-02

    Glioblastoma multiforme is resistant to conventional anti-tumoral treatments due to its infiltrative nature and capability of relapse; therefore, research efforts focus on characterizing gliomagenesis and identifying molecular targets useful on therapy. New therapeutic strategies are being tested in patients, such as Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) either alone or in combination with other therapies. Here two HDACi included in clinical trials have been tested, suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) and valproic acid (VPA), to characterize their effects on glioma cell growth in vitro and to determine the molecular changes that promote cancer cell death. We found that both HDACi reduce glioma cell viability, proliferation and clonogenicity. They have multiple effects, such as inducing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activating the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, nevertheless cell death is not prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh. Importantly, we found that HDACi alter cell cycle progression by decreasing the expression of G2 checkpoint kinases Wee1 and checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1). In addition, HDACi reduce the expression of proteins involved in DNA repair (Rad51), mitotic spindle formation (TPX2) and chromosome segregation (Survivin) in glioma cells and in human glioblastoma multiforme primary cultures. Therefore, HDACi treatment causes glioma cell entry into mitosis before DNA damage could be repaired and to the formation of an aberrant mitotic spindle that results in glioma cell death through mitotic catastrophe-induced apoptosis.

  7. Spindle pole mechanics studied in mitotic asters: dynamic distribution of spindle forces through compliant linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlebois, Blake D; Kollu, Swapna; Schek, Henry T; Compton, Duane A; Hunt, Alan J

    2011-04-06

    During cell division, chromosomes must faithfully segregate to maintain genome integrity, and this dynamic mechanical process is driven by the macromolecular machinery of the mitotic spindle. However, little is known about spindle mechanics. For example, spindle microtubules are organized by numerous cross-linking proteins yet the mechanical properties of those cross-links remain unexplored. To examine the mechanical properties of microtubule cross-links we applied optical trapping to mitotic asters that form in mammalian mitotic extracts. These asters are foci of microtubules, motors, and microtubule-associated proteins that reflect many of the functional properties of spindle poles and represent centrosome-independent spindle-pole analogs. We observed bidirectional motor-driven microtubule movements, showing that microtubule linkages within asters are remarkably compliant (mean stiffness 0.025 pN/nm) and mediated by only a handful of cross-links. Depleting the motor Eg5 reduced this stiffness, indicating that Eg5 contributes to the mechanical properties of microtubule asters in a manner consistent with its localization to spindle poles in cells. We propose that compliant linkages among microtubules provide a mechanical architecture capable of accommodating microtubule movements and distributing force among microtubules without loss of pole integrity-a mechanical paradigm that may be important throughout the spindle.

  8. PKR is activated by cellular dsRNAs during mitosis and acts as a mitotic regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoosik; Lee, Jung Hyun; Park, Jong-Eun; Cho, Jun; Yi, Hyerim; Kim, V Narry

    2014-06-15

    dsRNA-dependent protein kinase R (PKR) is a ubiquitously expressed enzyme well known for its roles in immune response. Upon binding to viral dsRNA, PKR undergoes autophosphorylation, and the phosphorylated PKR (pPKR) regulates translation and multiple signaling pathways in infected cells. Here, we found that PKR is activated in uninfected cells, specifically during mitosis, by binding to dsRNAs formed by inverted Alu repeats (IRAlus). While PKR and IRAlu-containing RNAs are segregated in the cytosol and nucleus of interphase cells, respectively, they interact during mitosis when nuclear structure is disrupted. Once phosphorylated, PKR suppresses global translation by phosphorylating the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α). In addition, pPKR acts as an upstream kinase for c-Jun N-terminal kinase and regulates the levels of multiple mitotic factors such as cyclins A and B and Polo-like kinase 1 and phosphorylation of histone H3. Disruption of PKR activation via RNAi or expression of a transdominant-negative mutant leads to misregulation of the mitotic factors, delay in mitotic progression, and defects in cytokinesis. Our study unveils a novel function of PKR and endogenous dsRNAs as signaling molecules during the mitosis of uninfected cells.

  9. PP1-mediated moesin dephosphorylation couples polar relaxation to mitotic exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunda, Patricia; Rodrigues, Nelio T L; Moeendarbary, Emadaldin; Liu, Tao; Ivetic, Aleksandar; Charras, Guillaume; Baum, Buzz

    2012-02-01

    Animal cells undergo dramatic actin-dependent changes in shape as they progress through mitosis; they round up upon mitotic entry and elongate during chromosome segregation before dividing into two [1-3]. Moesin, the sole Drosophila ERM-family protein [4], plays a critical role in this process, through the construction of a stiff, rounded metaphase cortex [5-7]. At mitotic exit, this rigid cortex must be dismantled to allow for anaphase elongation and cytokinesis through the loss of the active pool of phospho-Thr559moesin from cell poles. Here, in an RNA interference (RNAi) screen for phosphatases involved in the temporal and spatial control of moesin, we identify PP1-87B RNAi as having elevated p-moesin levels and reduced cortical compliance. In mitosis, RNAi-induced depletion of PP1-87B or depletion of a conserved noncatalytic PP1 phosphatase subunit Sds22 leads to defects in p-moesin clearance from cell poles at anaphase, a delay in anaphase elongation, together with defects in bipolar anaphase relaxation and cytokinesis. Importantly, similar cortical defects are seen at anaphase following the expression of a constitutively active, phosphomimetic version of moesin. These data reveal a new role for the PP1-87B/Sds22 phosphatase, an important regulator of the metaphase-anaphase transition, in coupling moesin-dependent cell shape changes to mitotic exit.

  10. The novel combination of chlorpromazine and pentamidine exerts synergistic antiproliferative effects through dual mitotic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Margaret S; Johansen, Lisa; Zhang, Yanzhen; Wilson, Amy; Keegan, Mitchell; Avery, William; Elliott, Peter; Borisy, Alexis A; Keith, Curtis T

    2007-12-01

    Combination therapy has proven successful in treating a wide variety of aggressive human cancers. Historically, combination treatments have been discovered through serendipity or lengthy trials using known anticancer agents with similar indications. We have used combination high-throughput screening to discover the unexpected synergistic combination of an antiparasitic agent, pentamidine, and a phenothiazine antipsychotic, chlorpromazine. This combination, CRx-026, inhibits the growth of tumor cell lines in vivo more effectively than either pentamidine or chlorpromazine alone. Here, we report that CRx-026 exerts its antiproliferative effect through synergistic dual mitotic action. Chlorpromazine is a potent and specific inhibitor of the mitotic kinesin KSP/Eg5 and inhibits tumor cell proliferation through mitotic arrest and accumulation of monopolar spindles. Pentamidine treatment results in chromosomal segregation defects and delayed progression through mitosis, consistent with inhibition of the phosphatase of regenerating liver family of phosphatases. We also show that CRx-026 synergizes in vitro and in vivo with the microtubule-binding agents paclitaxel and vinorelbine. These data support a model where dual action of pentamidine and chlorpromazine in mitosis results in synergistic antitumor effects and show the importance of systematic screening for combinations of targeted agents.

  11. Evidence that Aurora B is implicated in spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaguida, Stefano; Vernieri, Claudio; Villa, Fabrizio; Ciliberto, Andrea; Musacchio, Andrea

    2011-04-20

    Fidelity of chromosome segregation is ensured by a tension-dependent error correction system that prevents stabilization of incorrect chromosome-microtubule attachments. Unattached or incorrectly attached chromosomes also activate the spindle assembly checkpoint, thus delaying mitotic exit until all chromosomes are bioriented. The Aurora B kinase is widely recognized as a component of error correction. Conversely, its role in the checkpoint is controversial. Here, we report an analysis of the role of Aurora B in the spindle checkpoint under conditions believed to uncouple the effects of Aurora B inhibition on the checkpoint from those on error correction. Partial inhibition of several checkpoint and kinetochore components, including Mps1 and Ndc80, strongly synergizes with inhibition of Aurora B activity and dramatically affects the ability of cells to arrest in mitosis in the presence of spindle poisons. Thus, Aurora B might contribute to spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction. Our results support a model in which Aurora B is at the apex of a signalling pyramid whose sensory apparatus promotes the concomitant activation of error correction and checkpoint signalling pathways.

  12. Source Segregation and Collection of Source-Segregated Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Segregation of individual material fractions at the waste source and keeping the fractions separate for collection is one of the key issues in modern waste management. In most cases the waste is just kept segregated from other waste according to certain criteria that improve the possibility...... the more important it is to consider source segregation of the waste, since the amount of waste links to the possibility of obtaining manageable amounts of segregated waste with reasonable logistics as well as to the manpower that can be allocated at the source to perform source segregation of waste....... Therefore, source segregation usually makes most sense in industry, where the waste often also is more well defined and cleaner, while residential waste containing relatively small amounts of each material fraction is a bigger and much more difficult challenge. This chapter describes the main issues...

  13. Patterns of Residential Segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Louf

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of income shapes the structure and organisation of cities and its understanding has broad societal implications. Despite an abundant literature, many issues remain unclear. In particular, all definitions of segregation are implicitely tied to a single indicator, usually rely on an ambiguous definition of income classes, without any consensus on how to define neighbourhoods and to deal with the polycentric organization of large cities. In this paper, we address all these questions within a unique conceptual framework. We avoid the challenge of providing a direct definition of segregation and instead start from a definition of what segregation is not. This naturally leads to the measure of representation that is able to identify locations where categories are over- or underrepresented. From there, we provide a new measure of exposure that discriminates between situations where categories co-locate or repel one another. We then use this feature to provide an unambiguous, parameter-free method to find meaningful breaks in the income distribution, thus defining classes. Applied to the 2014 American Community Survey, we find 3 emerging classes-low, middle and higher income-out of the original 16 income categories. The higher-income households are proportionally more present in larger cities, while lower-income households are not, invalidating the idea of an increased social polarisation. Finally, using the density-and not the distance to a center which is meaningless in polycentric cities-we find that the richer class is overrepresented in high density zones, especially for larger cities. This suggests that density is a relevant factor for understanding the income structure of cities and might explain some of the differences observed between US and European cities.

  14. Correcting improper chromosome-spindle attachments during cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampson, Michael A; Renduchitala, Kishore; Khodjakov, Alexey; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2004-03-01

    For accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division, microtubule fibres must attach sister kinetochores to opposite poles of the mitotic spindle (bi-orientation). Aurora kinases are linked to oncogenesis and have been implicated in the regulation of chromosome-microtubule attachments. Although loss of Aurora kinase activity causes an accumulation of mal-orientated chromosomes in dividing cells, it is not known how the active kinase corrects improper chromosome attachments. The use of reversible small-molecule inhibitors allows activation of protein function in living vertebrate cells with temporal control. Here we show that by removal of small-molecule inhibitors, controlled activation of Aurora kinase during mitosis can correct chromosome attachment errors by selective disassembly of kinetochore-microtubule fibres, rather than by alternative mechanisms involving initial release of microtubules from either kinetochores or spindle poles. Observation of chromosomes and microtubule dynamics with real-time high-resolution microscopy showed that mal-orientated, but not bi-orientated, chromosomes move to the spindle pole as both kinetochore-microtubule fibres shorten, followed by alignment at the metaphase plate. Our results provide direct evidence for a mechanism required for the maintenance of genome integrity during cell division.

  15. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex. Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell. Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis. In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial. Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division. In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation.

  16. The Golgi mitotic checkpoint is controlled by BARS-dependent fission of the Golgi ribbon into separate stacks in G2

    OpenAIRE

    Colanzi, Antonino; Carcedo, Cristina Hidalgo; Persico, Angela; Cericola, Claudia; Turacchio, Gabriele; Bonazzi, Matteo; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela

    2007-01-01

    The Golgi ribbon is a complex structure of many stacks interconnected by tubules that undergo fragmentation during mitosis through a multistage process that allows correct Golgi inheritance. The fissioning protein CtBP1-S/BARS (BARS) is essential for this, and is itself required for mitotic entry: a block in Golgi fragmentation results in cell-cycle arrest in G2, defining the ‘Golgi mitotic checkpoint'. Here, we clarify the precise stage of Golgi fragmentation required for mitotic entry and t...

  17. Chromosome Segregation in Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran, R.; Jha, J.; Chattoraj, DK

    2014-01-01

    The study of chromosome segregation is currently one of the most exciting research frontiers in cell biology. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of the chromosome segregation process in Vibrio cholerae, based primarily on findings from fluorescence microscopy experiments. This bacterium is of special interest because of its eukaryotic feature of having a divided genome, a feature shared with 10% of known bacteria. We also discuss how the segregation mechanisms of V. cholerae com...

  18. The transforming parasite Theileria co-opts host cell mitotic and central spindles to persist in continuously dividing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad von Schubert

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Theileria inhabits the host cell cytoplasm and possesses the unique capacity to transform the cells it infects, inducing continuous proliferation and protection against apoptosis. The transforming schizont is a multinucleated syncytium that resides free in the host cell cytoplasm and is strictly intracellular. To maintain transformation, it is crucial that this syncytium is divided over the two daughter cells at each host cell cytokinesis. This process was dissected using different cell cycle synchronization methods in combination with the targeted application of specific inhibitors. We found that Theileria schizonts associate with newly formed host cell microtubules that emanate from the spindle poles, positioning the parasite at the equatorial region of the mitotic cell where host cell chromosomes assemble during metaphase. During anaphase, the schizont interacts closely with host cell central spindle. As part of this process, the schizont recruits a host cell mitotic kinase, Polo-like kinase 1, and we established that parasite association with host cell central spindles requires Polo-like kinase 1 catalytic activity. Blocking the interaction between the schizont and astral as well as central spindle microtubules prevented parasite segregation between the daughter cells during cytokinesis. Our findings provide a striking example of how an intracellular eukaryotic pathogen that evolved ways to induce the uncontrolled proliferation of the cells it infects usurps the host cell mitotic machinery, including Polo-like kinase 1, one of the pivotal mitotic kinases, to ensure its own persistence and survival.

  19. "Artificial mitotic spindle" generated by dielectrophoresis and protein micropatterning supports bidirectional transport of kinesin-coated beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppalapati, Maruti; Huang, Ying-Ming; Aravamuthan, Vidhya; Jackson, Thomas N; Hancock, William O

    2011-01-01

    The mitotic spindle is a dynamic assembly of microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins that controls the directed movement of chromosomes during cell division. Because proper segregation of the duplicated genome requires that each daughter cell receives precisely one copy of each chromosome, numerous overlapping mechanisms have evolved to ensure that every chromosome is transported to the cell equator during metaphase. However, due to the inherent redundancy in this system, cellular studies using gene knockdowns or small molecule inhibitors have an inherent limit in defining the sufficiency of precise molecular mechanisms as well as quantifying aspects of their mechanical performance. Thus, there exists a need for novel experimental approaches that reconstitute important aspects of the mitotic spindle in vitro. Here, we show that by microfabricating Cr electrodes on quartz substrates and micropatterning proteins on the electrode surfaces, AC electric fields can be used to assemble opposed bundles of aligned and uniformly oriented microtubules as found in the mitotic spindle. By immobilizing microtubule ends on each electrode, analogous to anchoring at centrosomes, solutions of motor or microtubule binding proteins can be introduced and their resulting dynamics analyzed. Using this "artificial mitotic spindle" we show that beads functionalized with plus-end kinesin motors move in an oscillatory manner analogous to the movements of chromosomes and severed chromosome arms during metaphase. Hence, features of directional instability, an established characteristic of metaphase chromosome dynamics, can be reconstituted in vitro using a pair of uniformly oriented microtubule bundles and a plus-end kinesin functionalized bead.

  20. Mio depletion links mTOR regulation to Aurora A and Plk1 activation at mitotic centrosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platani, Melpomeni; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Porter, Michael; Jeyaprakash, A Arockia; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-07-06

    Coordination of cell growth and proliferation in response to nutrient supply is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. In this study, we report that Mio, a highly conserved member of the SEACAT/GATOR2 complex necessary for the activation of mTORC1 kinase, plays a critical role in mitotic spindle formation and subsequent chromosome segregation by regulating the proper concentration of active key mitotic kinases Plk1 and Aurora A at centrosomes and spindle poles. Mio-depleted cells showed reduced activation of Plk1 and Aurora A kinase at spindle poles and an impaired localization of MCAK and HURP, two key regulators of mitotic spindle formation and known substrates of Aurora A kinase, resulting in spindle assembly and cytokinesis defects. Our results indicate that a major function of Mio in mitosis is to regulate the activation/deactivation of Plk1 and Aurora A, possibly by linking them to mTOR signaling in a pathway to promote faithful mitotic progression. © 2015 by The Rockefeller University Press.

  1. Secretion of invertase in mitotic yeast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Makarow, M

    1988-01-01

    In mammalian cells intracellular transport is inhibited during mitosis. Here we show that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae secretion continues uninterrupted during mitosis. S. cerevisiae cells were arrested in mitosis by treating wild-type cells with the microtubule-inhibitor nocodazole, or by incubating a temperature-sensitive cell division cycle mutant (cdc16) at the restrictive temperature. Secretion of invertase into the periplasmic space was equally efficient in mitotic and in unsyn...

  2. Chromosome segregation in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Revathy; Jha, Jyoti; Chattoraj, Dhruba K

    2014-01-01

    The study of chromosome segregation is currently one of the most exciting research frontiers in cell biology. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of the chromosome segregation process in Vibrio cholerae, based primarily on findings from fluorescence microscopy experiments. This bacterium is of special interest because of its eukaryotic feature of having a divided genome, a feature shared with 10% of known bacteria. We also discuss how the segregation mechanisms of V. cholerae compare with those in other bacteria, and highlight some of the remaining questions regarding the process of bacterial chromosome segregation.

  3. The flavonoid eupatorin inactivates the mitotic checkpoint leading to polyploidy and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmela, Anna-Leena [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Medical Biotechnology, P.O. Box 106, Turku (Finland); Turku Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Turku (Finland); Turku Centre for Biotechnology, P.O. Box 123, University of Turku (Finland); Pouwels, Jeroen; Kukkonen-Macchi, Anu [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Medical Biotechnology, P.O. Box 106, Turku (Finland); Waris, Sinikka; Toivonen, Pauliina [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, P.O. Box 123, University of Turku (Finland); Jaakkola, Kimmo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Medical Biotechnology, P.O. Box 106, Turku (Finland); Maeki-Jouppila, Jenni [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Medical Biotechnology, P.O. Box 106, Turku (Finland); Turku Centre for Biotechnology, P.O. Box 123, University of Turku (Finland); Drug Discovery Graduate School, University of Turku (Finland); Kallio, Lila, E-mail: lila.kallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Medical Biotechnology, P.O. Box 106, Turku (Finland); Kallio, Marko J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Medical Biotechnology, P.O. Box 106, Turku (Finland); Turku Centre for Biotechnology, P.O. Box 123, University of Turku (Finland); Centre of Excellence for Translational Genome-Scale Biology, P.O. Box 106, Academy of Finland (Finland)

    2012-03-10

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a conserved mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome distribution in mitosis by preventing anaphase onset until the correct bipolar microtubule-kinetochore attachments are formed. Errors in SAC function may contribute to tumorigenesis by inducing numerical chromosome anomalies (aneuploidy). On the other hand, total disruption of SAC can lead to massive genomic imbalance followed by cell death, a phenomena that has therapeutic potency. We performed a cell-based high-throughput screen with a compound library of 2000 bioactives for novel SAC inhibitors and discovered a plant-derived phenolic compound eupatorin (3 Prime ,5-dihydroxy-4 Prime ,6,7-trimethoxyflavone) as an anti-mitotic flavonoid. The premature override of the microtubule drug-imposed mitotic arrest by eupatorin is dependent on microtubule-kinetochore attachments but not interkinetochore tension. Aurora B kinase activity, which is essential for maintenance of normal SAC signaling, is diminished by eupatorin in cells and in vitro providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed forced mitotic exit. Eupatorin likely has additional targets since eupatorin treatment of pre-mitotic cells causes spindle anomalies triggering a transient M phase delay followed by impaired cytokinesis and polyploidy. Finally, eupatorin potently induces apoptosis in multiple cancer cell lines and suppresses cancer cell proliferation in organotypic 3D cell culture model.

  4. The flavonoid eupatorin inactivates the mitotic checkpoint leading to polyploidy and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Pouwels, Jeroen; Kukkonen-Macchi, Anu; Waris, Sinikka; Toivonen, Pauliina; Jaakkola, Kimmo; Mäki-Jouppila, Jenni; Kallio, Lila; Kallio, Marko J

    2012-03-10

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a conserved mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome distribution in mitosis by preventing anaphase onset until the correct bipolar microtubule-kinetochore attachments are formed. Errors in SAC function may contribute to tumorigenesis by inducing numerical chromosome anomalies (aneuploidy). On the other hand, total disruption of SAC can lead to massive genomic imbalance followed by cell death, a phenomena that has therapeutic potency. We performed a cell-based high-throughput screen with a compound library of 2000 bioactives for novel SAC inhibitors and discovered a plant-derived phenolic compound eupatorin (3',5-dihydroxy-4',6,7-trimethoxyflavone) as an anti-mitotic flavonoid. The premature override of the microtubule drug-imposed mitotic arrest by eupatorin is dependent on microtubule-kinetochore attachments but not interkinetochore tension. Aurora B kinase activity, which is essential for maintenance of normal SAC signaling, is diminished by eupatorin in cells and in vitro providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed forced mitotic exit. Eupatorin likely has additional targets since eupatorin treatment of pre-mitotic cells causes spindle anomalies triggering a transient M phase delay followed by impaired cytokinesis and polyploidy. Finally, eupatorin potently induces apoptosis in multiple cancer cell lines and suppresses cancer cell proliferation in organotypic 3D cell culture model.

  5. Chromosome mis-segregation and cytokinesis failure in trisomic human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Joshua M; Macedo, Joana C; Mattingly, Aaron J; Wangsa, Darawalee; Camps, Jordi; Lima, Vera; Gomes, Ana M; Dória, Sofia; Ried, Thomas; Logarinho, Elsa; Cimini, Daniela

    2015-05-05

    Cancer cells display aneuploid karyotypes and typically mis-segregate chromosomes at high rates, a phenotype referred to as chromosomal instability (CIN). To test the effects of aneuploidy on chromosome segregation and other mitotic phenotypes we used the colorectal cancer cell line DLD1 (2n = 46) and two variants with trisomy 7 or 13 (DLD1+7 and DLD1+13), as well as euploid and trisomy 13 amniocytes (AF and AF+13). We found that trisomic cells displayed higher rates of chromosome mis-segregation compared to their euploid counterparts. Furthermore, cells with trisomy 13 displayed a distinctive cytokinesis failure phenotype. We showed that up-regulation of SPG20 expression, brought about by trisomy 13 in DLD1+13 and AF+13 cells, is sufficient for the cytokinesis failure phenotype. Overall, our study shows that aneuploidy can induce chromosome mis-segregation. Moreover, we identified a trisomy 13-specific mitotic phenotype that is driven by up-regulation of a gene encoded on the aneuploid chromosome.

  6. Human Zwint-1 Specifies Localization of Zeste White 10 to Kinetochores and Is Essential for Mitotic Checkpoint Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongmeiWang; XiaoyuHu; XiaDing; ZhenDou; ZhihongYank; AndrewW.Shaw; MaikunTcng; DonW.Cleveland; MichaelL.Goldberg; LiwenNiu; XucbiaoYao

    2005-01-01

    Chromosome segregation in mitosis is orchestrated by dynamic interaction between spindle microtubules and the kinetochore, a multiprotein complex assembled onto centromeric DNA of the chromosome. Here we show that Zwint-1 is required and is sufficient for kinetochore localization of Zestc White 10 (ZW10) in HeLa cells. Zwint-1 specifies the kinetochore association of ZW10 by interacting with its N-terminal domain. Suppression of synthesis of Zwint-1 by small interfering RNA abolishes the localization of ZW10 to the kinetochore, demonstrating the requirement of Zwint-1 for ZWl0 kinetochore localization. In addition, dcplction of Zwint-1 affects no mitotic arrest but causes aberrant premature chromo. some segregation. These Zwint-l-suppressed cells dis. play chromosome bridge phenotype with sister chromatids inter-connected. Moreover, Zwint-1 is required for stable association of CENP.F and dynamitin but not BUB1 with the kinetochore. Finally, our studies showthat Zwint-1 is a new component of the mitotic check. point, as cells lacking Zwint-1 fail to arrest in mitosis when exposed to microtubule inhibitors, yielding inter. phase cells with multinuclei. As ZWl0 and Zwint.1 are absent from yeast, we reasoned that metazoans evolved an elaborate spindle checkpoint machinery to ensure faithful chromosome segregation in mitosis.

  7. Patterns of residential segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Louf, Rémi

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of income shapes the structure and organisation of cities and its understanding has broad societal implications. Despite an abundant literature, many issues remain however unclear: there is no clear definition of what segregation is, no unambiguous definition of income classes, no clear way to identify neighborhoods, and no method to deal with the polycentric organization of large cities. In this paper, we address all these questions within a unique theoretical framework. We assume that households belonging to the same class tend to live close to each other, and households from different classes tend to avoid one another. Applied to the US 2000 Census Income data, 3 distinct classes emerge from the clustering of the original 16 income classes. Using these unambiguously defined classes, we cluster together contiguous similar areas and find that the number of clusters for each category scales with the city population, an effect that is more pronounced for rich households. Finally, using...

  8. Shaping Segregation: Convexity vs. concavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, S.; Windows-Yule, C.R.; Luding, S.; Parker, D.J.; Thornton, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Controlling segregation is both a practical and a theoretical challenge. In this Letter we demonstrate a manner in which rotation-induced segregation may be controlled by altering the geometry of the rotating containers in which granular systems are housed. Using a novel drum design comprising conca

  9. The dynamics of signal amplification by macromolecular assemblies for the control of chromosome segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semin eLee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The control of chromosome segregation relies on the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, a complex regulatory system that ensures the high fidelity of chromosome segregation in higher organisms by delaying the onset of anaphase until each chromosome is properly bi-oriented on the mitotic spindle. Central to this process is the establishment of multiple yet specific protein-protein interactions in a narrow time-space window. Here we discuss the highly dynamic nature of multi-protein complexes that control chromosome segregation in which an intricate network of weak but cooperative interactions modulate signal amplification to ensure a proper SAC response. We also discuss the current structural understanding of the communication between the SAC and the kinetochore; how transient interactions can regulate the assembly and disassembly of the SAC as well as the challenges and opportunities for the definition and the manipulation of the flow of information in SAC signaling.

  10. Surface segregation energies in transition-metal alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1999-01-01

    We present a database of 24 x 24 surface segregation energies of single transition metal impurities in transition-metal hosts obtained by a Green's-function linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method in conjunction with the coherent potential and atomic sphere approximations including a multipole correction...

  11. Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Regulate Biased DNA Segregation in Response to Cell Adhesion Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Freida

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Biased DNA segregation is a mitotic event in which the chromatids carrying the original template DNA strands and those carrying the template copies are not segregated randomly into the two daughter cells. Biased segregation has been observed in several cell types, but not in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs, and the factors affecting this bias have yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated cell adhesion geometries as a potential parameter by plating hMSCs from healthy donors on fibronectin-coated micropatterns. On symmetric micropatterns, the segregation of sister chromatids to the daughter cells appeared random. In contrast, on asymmetric micropatterns, the segregation was biased. This sensitivity to asymmetric extracellular cues was reproducible in cells from all donors but was not observed in human skin-derived fibroblasts or in a fibroblastic cell line used as controls. We conclude that the asymmetry of cell adhesion is a major factor in the regulation of biased DNA segregation in hMSCs.

  12. Antagonistic spindle motors and MAPs regulate metaphase spindle length and chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Fu, Chuanhai; Tran, Phong T

    2013-12-02

    Metaphase describes a phase of mitosis where chromosomes are attached and oriented on the bipolar spindle for subsequent segregation at anaphase. In diverse cell types, the metaphase spindle is maintained at characteristic constant length [1-3]. Metaphase spindle length is proposed to be regulated by a balance of pushing and pulling forces generated by distinct sets of spindle microtubules (MTs) and their interactions with motors and MT-associated proteins (MAPs). Spindle length is further proposed to be important for chromosome segregation fidelity, as cells with shorter- or longer-than-normal metaphase spindles, generated through deletion or inhibition of individual mitotic motors or MAPs, showed chromosome segregation defects. To test the force-balance model of spindle length control and its effect on chromosome segregation, we applied fast microfluidic temperature control with live-cell imaging to monitor the effect of deleting or switching off different combinations of antagonistic force contributors in the fission yeast metaphase spindle. We show that the spindle midzone proteins kinesin-5 cut7p and MT bundler ase1p contribute to outward-pushing forces and that the spindle kinetochore proteins kinesin-8 klp5/6p and dam1p contribute to inward-pulling forces. Removing these proteins individually led to aberrant metaphase spindle length and chromosome segregation defects. Removing these proteins in antagonistic combination rescued the defective spindle length and in some combinations also partially rescued chromosome segregation defects.

  13. Perichromosomal protein Ki67 supports mitotic chromosome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Masatoshi; Natsume, Toyoaki; Kanemaki, Masato T; Imamoto, Naoko

    2016-10-01

    Although the condensin complexes and topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα) are the central players in mitotic chromosome formation, they are insufficient for its completion, and additional factors involved in the process have been extensively sought. In this study, we examined the possibility that Ki67, a perichromosomal protein widely used as a cell proliferation marker, is one such factor. Using a combination of auxin-inducible degron and CRISPR-Cas9-based gene editing technologies, we generated a human HCT116 cell line in which Ki67 is rapidly depleted in a few hours. The removal of Ki67 before mitotic entry did not impact the early mitotic chromosome assembly observed in prophase but subsequently resulted in the formation of misshapen mitotic chromosomes. When Ki67 was removed after mitotic entry, preassembled rod-shaped mitotic chromosomes became disorganized. In addition, we show that Ki67 and TopoIIα are reciprocally coimmunoprecipitated from mitotic cell extracts. These observations indicate that Ki67 aids the finalization of mitotic chromosome formation and helps maintain rod-shaped chromosome architecture, likely in collaboration with TopoIIα. Together, these findings represent a new model in which mitotic chromosome architecture is supported both internally and externally. © 2016 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Evidence of variation in segregation patterns within a Cedrus population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallour, D; Fady, B; Lefèvre, F

    2001-01-01

    We used horizontal starch-gel electrophoresis for a genetic analysis of isozymes within one French Cedrus atlantica stand. Eleven to 29 megagametophytes per tree from 186 trees were assayed. Among the 33 enzyme systems tested, 15 correctly resolved and 8 appeared variable in at least one zone of activity: ACP, GOT, IDH, LAP, MDH, MNR, PGI, and SKDH. They were coded by at least 12 polymorphic loci which were described and tested for Mendelian segregation and linkage. Segregation patterns and linkage relationships were variable in the population. We detected homogeneous segregation distortion for loci Idh, Acp-c, and Got-a over the whole set of segregating progeny. We also found segregation distortions in a significant proportion of progeny for loci Got-b, Mdh-c, Pgi-b, and SKDH: The Acp-c and Got-b loci were linked with an overall map distance of 17 cM, but distance varied drastically among progeny. Both segregation distortions and heterogeneity of recombination frequencies indicate the occurrence of a genetic load in this population.

  15. The N-terminal domain of DDA3 regulates the spindle-association of the microtubule depolymerase Kif2a and controls the mitotic function of DDA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Chang-Young; Fang, Guowei

    2009-10-01

    DDA3 is a microtubule-associated protein that controls chromosome congression and segregation by regulating the dynamics of the mitotic spindle. Depletion of DDA3 alters spindle structure, generates unaligned chromosomes at metaphase, and delays the mitotic progression. DDA3 interacts with the microtubule depolymerase Kif2a and controls the association of Kif2a to the mitotic spindle and the dynamic turnover of microtubules in the spindle. To understand the function and regulation of DDA3, we analyzed its domain structure and found that the C-terminal domain of DDA3 directly binds to microtubules in vitro and associates with the mitotic spindle in vivo. The N-terminal domain of DDA3 does not interact with microtubules, but acts dominant negatively over the wild-type protein. Ectopic expression of this domain prevents the endogenous DDA3 from association with the spindle and results in a high frequency of unaligned chromosomes in metaphase cells, a phenotype similar to that in metaphase cells depleted of DDA3. Mechanistically, expression of N-terminal DDA3 reduces the amount of spindle-associated Kif2a and increases the spindle microtubule density, pheno-copying those in DDA3-depleted cells. We conclude that DDA3 has a distinct domain structure. The C-terminal domain confers its ability to associate with the mitotic spindle, while the regulatory N-terminal domain controls the microtubule-binding by the C-terminal domain and determines the cellular activity of the DDA3 protein.

  16. Mitotically active cellular fibroma of ovary should be differentiated from fibrosarcoma: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Lin; Lin, Ming; Fan, Xinmin

    2014-01-01

    The clinicopathologic characteristic of mitotically active cellular fibroma is significantly different from the malignant behavior of ovarian fibrosarcoma. Therefore, it's very important to differentiate mitotically active cellular fibroma from ovarian fibrosarcoma. We report a case in which a 39-year-old woman was found with an ovarian tumor measuring 105 × 71 × 47 mm. The tumor ruptured and adhered to the peritoneum. Microscopic examination showed densely cellular spindle-shaped tumor cells. The cellular atypia was mild. The Ki-67 proliferation index was approximately 10%. The patient remained free of tumor for more than 66 months without any adjuvant chemotherapy after operation. After reviewing the literature, we diagnosed this case as mitotically active cellular fibroma rather than ovarian fibrosarcoma. It is very important to differentiate these two tumors because of the marked differences in treatment modalities and prognosis between them. The ovarian fibrous tumors with mitotic figures ≥ 4 per 10 high-power fields but no severe nuclear atypia should be mostly diagnosed as mitotically active cellular fibroma of ovary. The correct diagnosis is the key to avoid excessive treatments.

  17. Source Segregation and Collection of Source-Segregated Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    of optimal handling of the waste. But in a few cases, the waste must also be separated at source, for example removing the protective plastic cover from a commercial advertisement received by mail, prior to putting the advertisement into the waste collection bin for recyclable paper. These issues are often......The Segregation of individual material fractions at the waste source and keeping the fractions separate for collection is one of the key issues in modern waste management. In most cases the waste is just kept segregated from other waste according to certain criteria that improve the possibility...... termed source separation or sorting at source. Here the word segregation has been chosen to indicate the importance of keeping the waste fractions apart by sorting waste and by separating waste into segregated materials as it is generated. The more waste that a physically defined source generates...

  18. Mitotic recombination of chromosome 17 in astrocytomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, C.D.; Carlbom, E.; Nordenskjold, M.; Collins, V.P.; Cavenee, W.K. (Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Montreal (Canada))

    1989-04-01

    Allelic combinations at seven loci on human chromosome 17 defined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms were determined in tumor and normal tissues from 35 patients with gliomas. Loss of constitutional heterozygosity at one or more of these loci was observed in 8 of the 24 tumors displaying astrocytic differentiation and in the single primitive neuroectodermal tumor examined. The astrocytomas showing these losses included examples of each adult malignancy grade of the disease, including glioblastoma (malignancy grade IV), and seven of them demonstrated concurrent maintenance of heterozygosity for at least one chromosome 17 locus. Determination of allele dosage together with the genotypic data indicated that the tumor chromosomes 17 were derived by mitotic recombination in 7 of the 9 cases with shared homozygosity of the region 17p11.2-ptr in all cases. In contrast, tumors of oligodendrocytic, ependymal, or mixed cellular differentiation did not exhibit loss of alleles at any of the loci examined. These data suggest that the somatic attainment of homozygosity for loci on chromosome 17p is frequently associated with the oncogenesis of central nervous system tumors, particularly those showing solely astrocytic differentiation, and that mitotic recombination mapping is a useful approach towards the subregional localization of a locus whose rearrangement is involved in this disease.

  19. Inherent Segregation in Granular Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Guzmán J.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A study of the inherent segregation within granular media due to the relative size of the different particles is presented. A numerical model is used to simulate granular structures. For both simulation and granular structures evaluations, probability theory is widely used. Particles are idealized by disks (2D model and spheres (3D model. Strictly uniform grain size materials, bimodal (two particle sizes and continuous are simulated. Two variables representing segregation and allowing appreciating the grain-size parameters effects are considered. In uniform materials, the presence of spontaneous structuring is observed. In bimodal and continuous materials, inherent segregation mainly depends on the ratio between maximum and minimum diameters of particle. Some practical implications of inherent segregation in geotechnical problems and other disciplines are remarked.

  20. Can topology reshape segregation patterns?

    CERN Document Server

    Gandica, Yerali; Carletti, Timoteo

    2015-01-01

    We consider a metapopulation version of the Schelling model of segregation over several complex networks and lattice. We show that the segregation process is topology independent and hence it is intrinsic to the individual tolerance. The role of the topology is to fix the places where the segregation patterns emerge. In addition we address the question of the time evolution of the segregation clusters, resulting from different dynamical regimes of a coarsening process, as a function of the tolerance parameter. We show that the underlying topology may alter the early stage of the coarsening process, once large values of the tolerance are used, while for lower ones a different mechanism is at work and it results to be topology independent.

  1. Sound source localization and segregation with internally coupled ears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bee, Mark A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic signaling plays key roles in mediating many of the reproductive and social behaviors of anurans (frogs and toads). Moreover, acoustic signaling often occurs at night, in structurally complex habitats, such as densely vegetated ponds, and in dense breeding choruses characterized by high...... to their correct sources (sound source segregation). Here, we review anatomical, biophysical, neurophysiological, and behavioral studies aimed at identifying how the internally coupled ears of frogs contribute to sound source localization and segregation. Our review focuses on treefrogs in the genus Hyla...

  2. Helicobacter pylori CagA causes mitotic impairment and induces chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Mayumi; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Saito, Yasuhiro; Ohba, Yusuke; Takahashi, Masayuki; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2009-08-14

    Infection with cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for the development of gastric carcinoma. The cagA gene product CagA, which is delivered into gastric epithelial cells, specifically binds to and aberrantly activates SHP-2 oncoprotein. CagA also interacts with and inhibits partitioning-defective 1 (PAR1)/MARK kinase, which phosphorylates microtubule-associated proteins to destabilize microtubules and thereby causes epithelial polarity defects. In light of the notion that microtubules are not only required for polarity regulation but also essential for the formation of mitotic spindles, we hypothesized that CagA-mediated PAR1 inhibition also influences mitosis. Here, we investigated the effect of CagA on the progression of mitosis. In the presence of CagA, cells displayed a delay in the transition from prophase to metaphase. Furthermore, a fraction of the CagA-expressing cells showed spindle misorientation at the onset of anaphase, followed by chromosomal segregation with abnormal division axis. The effect of CagA on mitosis was abolished by elevated PAR1 expression. Conversely, inhibition of PAR1 kinase elicited mitotic delay similar to that induced by CagA. Thus, CagA-mediated inhibition of PAR1, which perturbs microtubule stability and thereby causes microtubule-based spindle dysfunction, is involved in the prophase/metaphase delay and subsequent spindle misorientation. Consequently, chronic exposure of cells to CagA induces chromosomal instability. Our findings reveal a bifunctional role of CagA as an oncoprotein: CagA elicits uncontrolled cell proliferation by aberrantly activating SHP-2 and at the same time induces chromosomal instability by perturbing the microtubule-based mitotic spindle. The dual function of CagA may cooperatively contribute to the progression of multistep gastric carcinogenesis.

  3. Mitotic Catastrophe in BC3H1 Cells following Yessotoxin Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsnes, Mónica Suárez; Korsnes, Reinert

    2017-01-01

    The marine toxin yessotoxin (YTX) can cause various cytotoxic effects depending on cell type and cell line. It is well known to trigger distinct mechanisms for programmed cell death which may overlap or cross-talk. The present contribution provides the first evidence that YTX can cause genotoxicity and induce mitotic catastrophe which can lead to different types of cell death. This work also demonstrates potential information gain from non-intrusive computer-based tracking of many individual cells during long time. Treatment of BC3H1 cells at their exponential growth phase causes atypical nuclear alterations and formation of giant cells with multiple nuclei. These are the most prominent morphological features of mitotic catastrophe. Giant cells undergo slow cell death in a necrosis-like manner. However, apoptotic-like cell death is also observed in these cells. Electron microscopy of treated BC3H1 cells reveal uncondensed chromatin and cells with double nuclei. Activation of p-p53, p-H2AX, p-Chk1, p-ATM, and p-ATR and down-regulation of p-Chk2 indicate DNA damage response and cell cycle deregulation. Micronuclei formation further support this evidence. Data from tracking single cells reveal that YTX treatment suppresses a second round of cell division in BC3H1 cells. These findings suggest that YTX can induce genomic alterations or imperfections in chromosomal segregation leading to permanent mitotic failure. This understanding extends the list of effects from YTX and which are of interest to control cancer and tumor progression.

  4. DNA topoisomerase 2 mutant allele mildly delays the mitotic progression and activates the checkpoint protein kinase Chk1 in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sudhanshu; Verma, Sumit Kumar; Ahmed, Shakil

    2011-08-01

    DNA topoisomerases are specialized nuclear enzymes that perform topological modifications on double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and hence are essential for DNA metabolism such as replication, transcription, recombination, condensation and segregation. In a genetic screen, we identified a temperature-sensitive mutant allele of topoisomerase 2 that exhibits conditional synthetic lethality with a chk1 knockout strain. The mutant allele of topoisomerase 2 is defective in chromosome segregation at a non-permissive temperature and there was increase in chromosome segregation defects in the double mutant of top2-10 and chk1 delete at a non-permissive temperature. More importantly, topoisomearse 2 mutant cells mildly delay the mitotic progression at non-permissive temperature that is mediated by checkpoint protein kinase Chk1. Additionally, top2-10 mutant cells also activate the Chk1 at a non-permissive temperature and this activation of Chk1 takes place at the time of mitosis. Interestingly, top2-10 mutant cells retain their viability at a non-permissive temperature if the cells are not allowed to enter into mitosis. Taking together our results, we speculate that in the top2-10 mutant, the segregation of entangled chromatids during mitosis could result in delaying the mitotic progression through the activation of Chk1 kinase.

  5. Therapeutic potential of mitotic interaction between the nucleoporin Tpr and aurora kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Akiko; Hashizume, Chieko; Dowaki, Takayuki; Wong, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Spindle poles are defined by centrosomes; therefore, an abnormal number or defective structural organization of centrosomes can lead to loss of spindle bipolarity and genetic integrity. Previously, we showed that Tpr (translocated promoter region), a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), interacts with Mad1 and dynein to promote proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Tpr also associates with p53 to induce autophagy. Here, we report that Tpr depletion induces mitotic catastrophe and enhances the rate of tetraploidy and polyploidy. Mechanistically, Tpr interacts, via its central domain, with Aurora A but not Aurora B kinase. In Tpr-depleted cells, the expression levels, centrosomal localization and phosphorylation of Aurora A were all reduced. Surprisingly, an Aurora A inhibitor, Alisertib (MLN8237), also disrupted centrosomal localization of Tpr and induced mitotic catastrophe and cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Strikingly, over-expression of Aurora A disrupted Tpr centrosomal localization only in cells with supernumerary centrosomes but not in bipolar cells. Our results highlight the mutual regulation between Tpr and Aurora A and further confirm the importance of nucleoporin function in spindle pole organization, bipolar spindle assembly, and mitosis; functions that are beyond the conventional nucleocytoplasmic transport and NPC structural roles of nucleoporins. Furthermore, the central coiled-coil domain of Tpr binds to and sequesters extra Aurora A to safeguard bipolarity. This Tpr domain merits further investigation for its ability to inhibit Aurora kinase and as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer treatment.

  6. DNA Lesions Induced by Replication Stress Trigger Mitotic Aberration and Tetraploidy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijima, Yosuke; Yoshioka, Ken-ichi; Yoshioka, Yoshiko; Shinohe, Keitaro; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Unno, Junya; Takagi, Masatoshi; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Mizutani, Shuki; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2010-01-01

    During tumorigenesis, cells acquire immortality in association with the development of genomic instability. However, it is still elusive how genomic instability spontaneously generates during the process of tumorigenesis. Here, we show that precancerous DNA lesions induced by oncogene acceleration, which induce situations identical to the initial stages of cancer development, trigger tetraploidy/aneuploidy generation in association with mitotic aberration. Although oncogene acceleration primarily induces DNA replication stress and the resulting lesions in the S phase, these lesions are carried over into the M phase and cause cytokinesis failure and genomic instability. Unlike directly induced DNA double-strand breaks, DNA replication stress-associated lesions are cryptogenic and pass through cell-cycle checkpoints due to limited and ineffective activation of checkpoint factors. Furthermore, since damaged M-phase cells still progress in mitotic steps, these cells result in chromosomal mis-segregation, cytokinesis failure and the resulting tetraploidy generation. Thus, our results reveal a process of genomic instability generation triggered by precancerous DNA replication stress. PMID:20098673

  7. DNA lesions induced by replication stress trigger mitotic aberration and tetraploidy development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Ichijima

    Full Text Available During tumorigenesis, cells acquire immortality in association with the development of genomic instability. However, it is still elusive how genomic instability spontaneously generates during the process of tumorigenesis. Here, we show that precancerous DNA lesions induced by oncogene acceleration, which induce situations identical to the initial stages of cancer development, trigger tetraploidy/aneuploidy generation in association with mitotic aberration. Although oncogene acceleration primarily induces DNA replication stress and the resulting lesions in the S phase, these lesions are carried over into the M phase and cause cytokinesis failure and genomic instability. Unlike directly induced DNA double-strand breaks, DNA replication stress-associated lesions are cryptogenic and pass through cell-cycle checkpoints due to limited and ineffective activation of checkpoint factors. Furthermore, since damaged M-phase cells still progress in mitotic steps, these cells result in chromosomal mis-segregation, cytokinesis failure and the resulting tetraploidy generation. Thus, our results reveal a process of genomic instability generation triggered by precancerous DNA replication stress.

  8. Cdc7p-Dbf4p regulates mitotic exit by inhibiting Polo kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles T Miller

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cdc7p-Dbf4p is a conserved protein kinase required for the initiation of DNA replication. The Dbf4p regulatory subunit binds Cdc7p and is essential for Cdc7p kinase activation, however, the N-terminal third of Dbf4p is dispensable for its essential replication activities. Here, we define a short N-terminal Dbf4p region that targets Cdc7p-Dbf4p kinase to Cdc5p, the single Polo kinase in budding yeast that regulates mitotic progression and cytokinesis. Dbf4p mediates an interaction with the Polo substrate-binding domain to inhibit its essential role during mitosis. Although Dbf4p does not inhibit Polo kinase activity, it nonetheless inhibits Polo-mediated activation of the mitotic exit network (MEN, presumably by altering Polo substrate targeting. In addition, although dbf4 mutants defective for interaction with Polo transit S-phase normally, they aberrantly segregate chromosomes following nuclear misorientation. Therefore, Cdc7p-Dbf4p prevents inappropriate exit from mitosis by inhibiting Polo kinase and functions in the spindle position checkpoint.

  9. The role of centrosomal Nlp in the control of mitotic progression and tumourigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Zhan, Q

    2011-05-10

    The human centrosomal ninein-like protein (Nlp) is a new member of the γ-tubulin complexes binding proteins (GTBPs) that is essential for proper execution of various mitotic events. The primary function of Nlp is to promote microtubule nucleation that contributes to centrosome maturation, spindle formation and chromosome segregation. Its subcellular localisation and protein stability are regulated by several crucial mitotic kinases, such as Plk1, Nek2, Cdc2 and Aurora B. Several lines of evidence have linked Nlp to human cancer. Deregulation of Nlp in cell models results in aberrant spindle, chromosomal missegregation and multinulei, and induces chromosomal instability and renders cells tumourigenic. Overexpression of Nlp induces anchorage-independent growth and immortalised primary cell transformation. In addition, we first demonstrate that the expression of Nlp is elevated primarily due to NLP gene amplification in human breast cancer and lung carcinoma. Consistently, transgenic mice overexpressing Nlp display spontaneous tumours in breast, ovary and testicle, and show rapid onset of radiation-induced lymphoma, indicating that Nlp is involved in tumourigenesis. This review summarises our current knowledge of physiological roles of Nlp, with an emphasis on its potentials in tumourigenesis.

  10. Mitotic Control of Planar Cell Polarity by Polo-like Kinase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Rezma; Little, Katherine A; Tamayo, Joel V; Li, Wenyang; Perlman, David H; Devenport, Danelle

    2015-06-08

    During cell division, polarized epithelial cells employ mechanisms to preserve cell polarity and tissue integrity. In dividing cells of the mammalian skin, planar cell polarity (PCP) is maintained through the bulk internalization, equal segregation, and polarized recycling of cortical PCP proteins. The dramatic redistribution of PCP proteins coincides precisely with cell-cycle progression, but the mechanisms coordinating PCP and mitosis are unknown. Here we identify Plk1 as a master regulator of PCP dynamics during mitosis. Plk1 interacts with core PCP component Celsr1 via a conserved polo-box domain (PBD)-binding motif, localizes to mitotic endosomes, and directly phosphorylates Celsr1. Plk1-dependent phosphorylation activates the endocytic motif specifically during mitosis, allowing bulk recruitment of Celsr1 into endosomes. Inhibiting Plk1 activity blocks PCP internalization and perturbs PCP asymmetry. Mimicking dileucine motif phosphorylation is sufficient to drive Celsr1 internalization during interphase. Thus, Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Celsr1 ensures that PCP redistribution is precisely coordinated with mitotic entry.

  11. Chk2 prevents mitotic exit when the majority of kinetochores are unattached.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsalaki, Eleni; Zachos, George

    2014-05-12

    The spindle checkpoint delays exit from mitosis in cells with spindle defects. In this paper, we show that Chk2 is required to delay anaphase onset when microtubules are completely depolymerized but not in the presence of relatively few unattached kinetochores. Mitotic exit in Chk2-deficient cells correlates with reduced levels of Mps1 protein and increased Cdk1-tyrosine 15 inhibitory phosphorylation. Chk2 localizes to kinetochores and is also required for Aurora B-serine 331 phosphorylation in nocodazole or unperturbed early prometaphase. Serine 331 phosphorylation contributed to prometaphase accumulation in nocodazole after partial Mps1 inhibition and was required for spindle checkpoint establishment at the beginning of mitosis. In addition, expression of a phosphomimetic S331E mutant Aurora B rescued chromosome alignment or segregation in Chk2-deficient cells. We propose that Chk2 stabilizes Mps1 and phosphorylates Aurora B-serine 331 to prevent mitotic exit when most kinetochores are unattached. These results highlight mechanisms of an essential function of Chk2 in mitosis.

  12. Physical determinants of bipolar mitotic spindle assembly and stability in fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Sweezy-Schindler, Oliver; Lamson, Adam; Gergely, Zachary R.; O’Toole, Eileen; Crapo, Ammon; Hough, Loren E.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2017-01-01

    Mitotic spindles use an elegant bipolar architecture to segregate duplicated chromosomes with high fidelity. Bipolar spindles form from a monopolar initial condition; this is the most fundamental construction problem that the spindle must solve. Microtubules, motors, and cross-linkers are important for bipolarity, but the mechanisms necessary and sufficient for spindle assembly remain unknown. We describe a physical model that exhibits de novo bipolar spindle formation. We began with physical properties of fission-yeast spindle pole body size and microtubule number, kinesin-5 motors, kinesin-14 motors, and passive cross-linkers. Our model results agree quantitatively with our experiments in fission yeast, thereby establishing a minimal system with which to interrogate collective self-assembly. By varying the features of our model, we identify a set of functions essential for the generation and stability of spindle bipolarity. When kinesin-5 motors are present, their bidirectionality is essential, but spindles can form in the presence of passive cross-linkers alone. We also identify characteristic failed states of spindle assembly—the persistent monopole, X spindle, separated asters, and short spindle, which are avoided by the creation and maintenance of antiparallel microtubule overlaps. Our model can guide the identification of new, multifaceted strategies to induce mitotic catastrophes; these would constitute novel strategies for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28116355

  13. Cell death by mitotic catastrophe: a molecular definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castedo, M.; Perfettini, J.-L.; Roumier, T.; Andreau, K.; Medema, R.H.; Kroemer, G.

    2004-01-01

    The current literature is devoid of a clearcut definition of mitotic catastrophe, a type of cell death that occurs during mitosis. Here, we propose that mitotic catastrophe results from a combination of deficient cell-cycle checkpoints (in particular the DNA structure checkpoints and the spindle ass

  14. On the Spatial Configuration of the Mitotic Spindle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Weijia; Sun, Limin; Lu, Kunquan; Tang, Xiaowei

    1995-03-01

    An experimental simulation using electrorheological (ER) fluid is developed to investigate the spatial configuration of the mitotic spindle. In the presence of two different kinds of electric field, the structures of particle arrangement in ER fluid are similar to the configuration of the mitotic spindle of the animal and plant cells respectively.

  15. Mitotic chromosome compaction via active loop extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim; Marko, John; Mirny, Leonid; MIT-Northwestern Team

    During cell division, two copies of each chromosome are segregated from each other and compacted more than hundred-fold into the canonical X-shaped structures. According to earlier microscopic observations and the recent Hi-C study, chromosomes are compacted into arrays of consecutive loops of ~100 kilobases. Mechanisms that lead to formation of such loop arrays are largely unknown. Here we propose that, during cell division, chromosomes can be compacted by enzymes that extrude loops on chromatin fibers. First, we use computer simulations and analytical modeling to show that a system of loop-extruding enzymes on a chromatin fiber self-organizes into an array of consecutive dynamic loops. Second, we model the process of loop extrusion in 3D and show that, coupled with the topo II strand-passing activity, it leads to robust compaction and segregation of sister chromatids. This mechanism of chromosomal condensation and segregation does not require additional proteins or specific DNA markup and is robust against variations in the number and properties of such loop extruding enzymes. Work at NU was supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1206868 and MCB-1022117, and by the NIH through Grants GM105847 and CA193419. Work at MIT was supported by the NIH through Grants GM114190 R01HG003143.

  16. Random mitotic activities across human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Q.; Duggan, R.; Dasa, S.; Li, F.; Chen, L. (Biosciences Division)

    2010-08-01

    A systemic and quantitative study was performed to examine whether different levels of mitotic activities, assessed by the percentage of S-phase cells at any given time point, existed at different physical regions of human embryonic stem (hES) cell colonies at 2, 4, 6 days after cell passaging. Mitotically active cells were identified by the positive incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) within their newly synthesized DNA. Our data indicated that mitotically active cells were often distributed as clusters randomly across the colonies within the examined growth period, presumably resulting from local deposition of newly divided cells. This latter notion was further demonstrated by the confined growth of enhanced green florescence protein (EGFP) expressing cells amongst non-GFP expressing cells. Furthermore, the overall percentage of mitotically active cells remained constantly at about 50% throughout the 6-day culture period, indicating mitotic activities of hES cell cultures were time-independent under current growth conditions.

  17. Controlling segregation speed of entangled polymers by the shapes: A simple model for eukaryotic chromosome segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yuji; Tachikawa, Masashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi

    2016-10-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the segregation of two overlapping polymers motivated by chromosome segregation in biological cells. We investigate the relationship between polymer shapes and segregation dynamics and show that elongation and compaction make entangled polymers segregate rapidly. This result suggests that eukaryotic chromosomes take such a characteristic rod-shaped structure, which is induced by condensins, to achieve rapid segregation.

  18. Arabidopsis COPPER MODIFIED RESISTANCE1/PATRONUS1 is essential for growth adaptation to stress and required for mitotic onset control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraniec, Michal; Heyman, Jefri; Schubert, Veit; Salis, Pietrino; De Veylder, Lieven; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint (MC) guards faithful sister chromatid segregation by monitoring the attachment of spindle microtubules to the kinetochores. When chromosome attachment errors are detected, MC delays the metaphase-to-anaphase transition through the inhibition of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase. In contrast to yeast and mammals, our knowledge on the proteins involved in MC in plants is scarce. Transient synchronization of root tips as well as promoter-reporter gene fusions were performed to analyze temporal and spatial expression of COPPER MODIFIED RESISTANCE1/PATRONUS1 (CMR1/PANS1) in developing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Functional analysis of the gene was carried out, including CYCB1;2 stability in CMR1/PANS1 knockout and overexpressor background as well as metaphase-anaphase chromosome status. CMR1/PANS1 is transcriptionally active during M phase. Its deficiency provokes premature cell cycle exit and in consequence a rapid consumption of the number of meristematic cells in particular under stress conditions that are known to affect spindle microtubules. Root growth impairment is correlated with a failure to delay the onset of anaphase, resulting in anaphase bridges and chromosome missegregation. CMR1/PANS1 overexpression stabilizes the mitotic CYCB1;2 protein. Likely, CMR1/PANS1 coordinates mitotic cell cycle progression by acting as an APC/C inhibitor and plays a key role in growth adaptation to stress.

  19. Functional analysis of phosphorylation of the mitotic centromere-associated kinesin by Aurora B kinase in human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Andreas; Sanhaji, Mourad; Friemel, Alexandra; Roth, Susanne; Rolle, Udo; Louwen, Frank; Yuan, Juping

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) is the best characterized member of the kinesin-13 family and plays important roles in microtubule dynamics during mitosis. Its activity and subcellular localization is tightly regulated by an orchestra of mitotic kinases, such as Aurora B. It is well known that serine 196 of MCAK is the major phosphorylation site of Aurora B in Xenopus leavis extracts and that this phosphorylation regulates its catalytic activity and subcellular localization. In the current study, we have addressed the conserved phosphorylation site serine 192 in human MCAK to characterize its function in more depth in human cancer cells. Our data confirm that S192 is the major phosphorylation site of Aurora B in human MCAK and that this phosphorylation has crucial roles in regulating its catalytic activity and localization at the kinetochore/centromere region in mitosis. Interfering with this phosphorylation leads to a delayed progression through prometa- and metaphase associated with mitotic defects in chromosome alignment and segregation. We show further that MCAK is involved in directional migration and invasion of tumor cells, and interestingly, interference with the S192 phosphorylation affects this capability of MCAK. These data provide the first molecular explanation for clinical observation, where an overexpression of MCAK was associated with lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis in gastric and colorectal cancer patients.

  20. Mitotic Catastrophe的研究进展%Progress in Mitotic Catastrophe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张博; 周平坤

    2007-01-01

    细胞死亡是多细胞生物生命过程中重要的生理或病理现象,可分为坏死和程序性细胞死亡,而后者根据死亡细胞的形态学和发生机制的不同又可分为凋亡、自吞噬和mitotic catastrophe,其中mitotic catastrophe是近年来才被揭示报道,是指细胞在有丝分裂过程中死亡的现象,是一种发生在细胞有丝分裂期由于异常的细胞分裂而导致的细胞死亡,它常常伴随着细胞有丝分裂检查点的异常和基因或纺锤体结构的损伤而发生.现对mitotic catastrophe及相关的调控机制进行综述.

  1. Identification of a novel mitotic phosphorylation motif associated with protein localization to the mitotic apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Luo, Quanzhou; Kelly, Ryan T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Brinkley, William R.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2007-11-16

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) is a critical regulator of chromosome, cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics during mitosis. Here, we identified phosphopeptides and phosphoprotein complexes recognized by a phosphorylation specific antibody that labels the CPC using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A mitotic phosphorylation motif (PX{G/T/S}{L/M}[pS]P or WGL[pS]P) was identified in 11 proteins including Fzr/Cdh1 and RIC-8, two proteins with potential links to the CPC. Phosphoprotein complexes contained known CPC components INCENP, Aurora-B and TD-60, as well as SMAD2, 14-3-3 proteins, PP2A, and Cdk1, a likely kinase for this motif. Protein sequence analysis identified phosphorylation motifs in additional proteins including SMAD2, Plk3 and INCENP. Mitotic SMAD2 and Plk3 phosphorylation was confirmed using phosphorylation specific antibodies, and in the case of Plk3, phosphorylation correlates with its localization to the mitotic apparatus. A mutagenesis approach was used to show INCENP phosphorylation is required for midbody localization. These results provide evidence for a shared phosphorylation event that regulates localization of critical proteins during mitosis.

  2. Identification of a novel mitotic phosphorylation motif associated with protein localization to the mitotic apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Camp, David G; Gritsenko, Marina A; Luo, Quanzhou; Kelly, Ryan T; Clauss, Therese R W; Brinkley, William R; Smith, Richard D; Stenoien, David L

    2007-11-15

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) is a crucial regulator of chromosome, cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics during mitosis. Here, using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we identified phosphopeptides and phosphoprotein complexes recognized by a phosphorylation-specific antibody that labels the CPC. A mitotic phosphorylation motif {PX[G/T/S][L/M]S(P) P or WGLS(P) P} was identified by MS in 11 proteins, including FZR1 (Cdh1) and RIC8A-two proteins with potential links to the CPC. Phosphoprotein complexes contained the known CPC components INCENP, Aurora-B (Aurkb) and TD-60 (Rcc2, RCC1-like), as well as SMAD2, 14-3-3 proteins, PP2A and Cdk1 (Cdc2a), a probable kinase for this motif. Protein sequence analysis identified phosphorylation motifs in additional proteins, including SMAD2, PLK3 and INCENP. Mitotic SMAD2 and PLK3 phosphorylation was confirmed using phosphorylation-specific antibodies, and, in the case of Plk3, phosphorylation correlated with its localization to the mitotic apparatus and the midbody. A mutagenesis approach was used to show that INCENP phosphorylation is required for its localization to the midbody. These results provide evidence for a shared phosphorylation event that regulates localization of crucial proteins during mitosis.

  3. Mitotic activity and specification of fibrocyte subtypes in the developing rat cochlear lateral wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutai, H; Nagashima, R; Fujii, M; Matsunaga, T

    2009-11-10

    Spiral ligament fibrocytes (SLFs) in the mammalian cochlear lateral wall participate in K(+) recycling; they are classified into five subtypes based on their morphology, distribution, and function. Regeneration of SLFs is a potential therapeutic strategy for correcting several types of hearing loss, prompting us to investigate how SLF subtypes are established during development. We compared transitional SLF-type marker expression with mitotic activity to evaluate proliferation-differentiation relationships in SLFs from postnatal rat cochleae. I.p. injection of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) demonstrated that the overall mitotic activity of SLFs decreased significantly between postnatal day 7 (P7) and P10. For all developmental periods, BrdU incorporation was weakest in the area where type I SLFs reside. The onset of expression of markers for type II/IV SLFs followed the reduced mitotic activity of the cells, whereas that of aquaporin-1, a marker for type III SLFs, was already detectable at P7, when the type III SLFs were still proliferating vigorously. Distribution of BrdU(+) cells increased in the area of type I SLFs between P7 and P10, suggesting migration of SLFs from adjacent areas. We conclude that the time course of development of SLFs is subtype-specific.

  4. Molecular mechanism of APC/C activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suyang; Chang, Leifu; Alfieri, Claudio; Zhang, Ziguo; Yang, Jing; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, Mark; Barford, David

    2016-05-12

    In eukaryotes, the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C, also known as the cyclosome) regulates the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of specific cell-cycle proteins to coordinate chromosome segregation in mitosis and entry into the G1 phase. The catalytic activity of the APC/C and its ability to specify the destruction of particular proteins at different phases of the cell cycle are controlled by its interaction with two structurally related coactivator subunits, Cdc20 and Cdh1. Coactivators recognize substrate degrons, and enhance the affinity of the APC/C for its cognate E2 (refs 4-6). During mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) and polo-like kinase (Plk) control Cdc20- and Cdh1-mediated activation of the APC/C. Hyperphosphorylation of APC/C subunits, notably Apc1 and Apc3, is required for Cdc20 to activate the APC/C, whereas phosphorylation of Cdh1 prevents its association with the APC/C. Since both coactivators associate with the APC/C through their common C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs, the mechanism underlying this differential regulation is unclear, as is the role of specific APC/C phosphorylation sites. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we define the molecular basis of how phosphorylation of human APC/C allows for its control by Cdc20. An auto-inhibitory segment of Apc1 acts as a molecular switch that in apo unphosphorylated APC/C interacts with the C-box binding site and obstructs engagement of Cdc20. Phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment displaces it from the C-box-binding site. Efficient phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment, and thus relief of auto-inhibition, requires the recruitment of Cdk-cyclin in complex with a Cdk regulatory subunit (Cks) to a hyperphosphorylated loop of Apc3. We also find that the small-molecule inhibitor, tosyl-l-arginine methyl ester, preferentially suppresses APC/C(Cdc20) rather than APC/C(Cdh1), and interacts with the binding sites of both the C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs. Our

  5. [Effect of suboptimal temperature on the mitotic regime].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltovaskaia, M N

    1977-02-01

    A two-hour treatment of Chinese hamster cells with a suboptimal temperature of 21 degrees C leads to a decrease of the mitotic index and to a delay in division at the metaphase. Cooling causes a sharp rise of the pathological mitosis, represented mainly by the forms of pathology connected with the disorganization of the mitotic apparatus, such as C-mitosis and dispersion of chromosomes in the metaphase. After being transferred to the optimal temperature conditions the cells completely restored their mitotic regimen in one hour, the amount of the pathological mitosis during that time still being much higher than the control level.

  6. Grain Boundary Segregation in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Lejcek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Grain boundaries are important structural components of polycrystalline materials used in the vast majority of technical applications. Because grain boundaries form a continuous network throughout such materials, their properties may limit their practical use. One of the serious phenomena which evoke these limitations is the grain boundary segregation of impurities. It results in the loss of grain boundary cohesion and consequently, in brittle fracture of the materials. The current book deals with fundamentals of grain boundary segregation in metallic materials and its relationship to the grain boundary structure, classification and other materials properties.

  7. Tailings philosophies : to segregate or not to segregate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, P.S. [Suncor Energy, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Traditional technologies for treating oil sands tailings include the segregation of of tailings when discharged into water-filled ponds. The coarser tailings form long beaches. However, the percentage of silts and clays that remain suspended within the water column pose significant challenges to oil sands operators, and contribute to water losses and increases in storage volume. This paper discussed new technologies developed to identify the tailings materials that contribute to the problem and methods designed to isolate and treat the materials. Treatment material balances, process water balances, and material handling requirements for the technologies were evaluated and compared. Three scenarios were considered: (1) a sub-aqueous beaching scenario where tailings were produced by extraction and pumped to a beach storage area for dewatering through self-drainage; (2) a non-segregated tailings (NST) scenario that used mature fine tailings (MFT) drying; (3) and a segregated stream scenario where MFT drying was used where tailings were deposited in traditional tailings ponds. Results of the study showed that the segregated stream tailings treatment system was preferred to NST treatment system. Options for sub-aerial NST deposition may overcome the volume discrepancies between treating fines as well as the required volumes of coarser materials. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  8. A Subpopulation of the K562 Cells Are Killed by Curcumin Treatment after G2/M Arrest and Mitotic Catastrophe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Castillo, Macario; Bonilla-Moreno, Raul; Aleman-Lazarini, Leticia; Meraz-Rios, Marco Antonio; Orozco, Lorena; Cedillo-Barron, Leticia; Cordova, Emilio J.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is extensively investigated as a good chemo-preventive agent in the development of many cancers and particularly in leukemia, including treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and it has been proposed as an adjuvant for leukemia therapies. Human chronic myeloid leukemia cells (K562), were treated with 20 μM of curcumin, and we found that a subpopulation of these cells were arrested and accumulate in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Characterization of this cell subpopulation showed that the arrested cells presented nuclear morphology changes resembling those described for mitotic catastrophe. Mitotic cells displayed abnormal chromatin organization, collapse of the mitotic spindle and abnormal chromosome segregation. Then, these cells died in an apoptosis dependent manner and showed diminution in the protein levels of BCL-2 and XIAP. Moreover, our results shown that a transient activation of the nuclear factor κB (NFκB) occurred early in these cells, but decreased after 6 h of the treatment, explaining in part the diminution of the anti-apoptotic proteins. Additionally, P73 was translocated to the cell nuclei, because the expression of the C/EBPα, a cognate repressor of the P73 gene, was decreased, suggesting that apoptosis is trigger by elevation of P73 protein levels acting in concert with the diminution of the two anti-apoptotic molecules. In summary, curcumin treatment might produce a P73-dependent apoptotic cell death in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells (K562), which was triggered by mitotic catastrophe, due to sustained BAX and survivin expression and impairment of the anti-apoptotic proteins BCL-2 and XIAP. PMID:27832139

  9. Mitotic defects lead to pervasive aneuploidy and accompany loss of RB1 activity in mouse LmnaDhe dermal fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Herbert Pratt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lamin A (LMNA is a component of the nuclear lamina and is mutated in several human diseases, including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD; OMIM ID# 181350 and the premature aging syndrome Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS; OMIM ID# 176670. Cells from progeria patients exhibit cell cycle defects in both interphase and mitosis. Mouse models with loss of LMNA function have reduced Retinoblastoma protein (RB1 activity, leading to aberrant cell cycle control in interphase, but how mitosis is affected by LMNA is not well understood. RESULTS: We examined the cell cycle and structural phenotypes of cells from mice with the Lmna allele, Disheveled hair and ears (Lmna(Dhe. We found that dermal fibroblasts from heterozygous Lmna(Dhe (Lmna(Dhe/+ mice exhibit many phenotypes of human laminopathy cells. These include severe perturbations to the nuclear shape and lamina, increased DNA damage, and slow growth rates due to mitotic delay. Interestingly, Lmna(Dhe/+ fibroblasts also had reduced levels of hypophosphorylated RB1 and the non-SMC condensin II-subunit D3 (NCAP-D3, a mitosis specific centromere condensin subunit that depends on RB1 activity. Mitotic check point control by mitotic arrest deficient-like 1 (MAD2L1 also was perturbed in Lmna(Dhe/+ cells. Lmna(Dhe/+ fibroblasts were consistently aneuploid and had higher levels of micronuclei and anaphase bridges than normal fibroblasts, consistent with chromosome segregation defects. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that RB1 may be a key regulator of cellular phenotype in laminopathy-related cells, and suggest that the effects of LMNA on RB1 include both interphase and mitotic cell cycle control.

  10. Activation of JNK triggers release of Brd4 from mitotic chromosomes and mediates protection from drug-induced mitotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Akira; Dey, Anup; Tamura, Tomohiko; Ko, Minoru; Ozato, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    Some anti-cancer drugs, including those that alter microtubule dynamics target mitotic cells and induce apoptosis in some cell types. However, such drugs elicit protective responses in other cell types allowing cells to escape from drug-induced mitotic inhibition. Cells with a faulty protective mechanism undergo defective mitosis, leading to genome instability. Brd4 is a double bromodomain protein that remains on chromosomes during mitosis. However, Brd4 is released from mitotic chromosomes when cells are exposed to anti-mitotic drugs including nocodazole. Neither the mechanisms, nor the biological significance of drug-induced Brd4 release has been fully understood. We found that deletion of the internal C-terminal region abolished nocodazole induced Brd4 release from mouse P19 cells. Furthermore, cells expressing truncated Brd4, unable to dissociate from chromosomes were blocked from mitotic progression and failed to complete cell division. We also found that pharmacological and peptide inhibitors of the c-jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) pathway, but not inhibitors of other MAP kinases, prevented release of Brd4 from chromosomes. The JNK inhibitor that blocked Brd4 release also blocked mitotic progression. Further supporting the role of JNK in Brd4 release, JNK2-/- embryonic fibroblasts were defective in Brd4 release and sustained greater inhibition of cell growth after nocodazole treatment. In sum, activation of JNK pathway triggers release of Brd4 from chromosomes upon nocodazole treatment, which mediates a protective response designed to minimize drug-induced mitotic stress.

  11. STAG2 promotes error correction in mitosis by regulating kinetochore-microtubule attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleyman, Marianna; Kabeche, Lilian; Compton, Duane A

    2014-10-01

    Mutations in the STAG2 gene are present in ∼20% of tumors from different tissues of origin. STAG2 encodes a subunit of the cohesin complex, and tumors with loss-of-function mutations are usually aneuploid and display elevated frequencies of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Lagging chromosomes are a hallmark of chromosomal instability (CIN) arising from persistent errors in kinetochore-microtubule (kMT) attachment. To determine whether the loss of STAG2 increases the rate of formation of kMT attachment errors or decreases the rate of their correction, we examined mitosis in STAG2-deficient cells. STAG2 depletion does not impair bipolar spindle formation or delay mitotic progression. Instead, loss of STAG2 permits excessive centromere stretch along with hyperstabilization of kMT attachments. STAG2-deficient cells display mislocalization of Bub1 kinase, Bub3 and the chromosome passenger complex. Importantly, strategically destabilizing kMT attachments in tumor cells harboring STAG2 mutations by overexpression of the microtubule-destabilizing enzymes MCAK (also known as KIF2C) and Kif2B decreased the rate of lagging chromosomes and reduced the rate of chromosome missegregation. These data demonstrate that STAG2 promotes the correction of kMT attachment errors to ensure faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis.

  12. Escape from Mitotic Arrest: An Unexpected Connection Between Microtubule Dynamics and Epigenetic Regulation of Centromeric Chromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Anuja A; Walworth, Nancy C

    2015-12-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation is necessary to ensure genomic integrity. Segregation depends on the proper functioning of the centromere, kinetochore, and mitotic spindle microtubules and is monitored by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, defects in Dis1, a microtubule-associated protein that influences microtubule dynamics, lead to mitotic arrest as a result of an active SAC and consequent failure to grow at low temperature. In a mutant dis1 background (dis1-288), loss of function of Msc1, a fission yeast homolog of the KDM5 family of proteins, suppresses the growth defect and promotes normal mitosis. Genetic analysis implicates a histone deacetylase (HDAC)-linked pathway in suppression because HDAC mutants clr6-1, clr3∆, and sir2∆, though not hos2∆, also promote normal mitosis in the dis1-288 mutant. Suppression of the dis phenotype through loss of msc1 function requires the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2 and is limited by the presence of the heterochromatin-associated HP1 protein homolog Swi6. We speculate that alterations in histone acetylation promote a centromeric chromatin environment that compensates for compromised dis1 function by allowing for successful kinetochore-microtubule interactions that can satisfy the SAC. In cells arrested in mitosis by mutation of dis1, loss of function of epigenetic determinants such as Msc1 or specific HDACs can promote cell survival. Because the KDM5 family of proteins has been implicated in human cancers, an appreciation of the potential role of this family of proteins in chromosome segregation is warranted.

  13. Mitotic spindle proteomics in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonner, Mary Kate; Poole, Daniel S; Xu, Tao; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, 3rd, John R; Skop, Ahna R

    2011-01-01

    .... Here, we report a proteomic study of the mitotic spindle from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Four different isolations of metaphase spindles were subjected to Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology...

  14. Immunochemical studies of 22S protein from isolated mitotic apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibring, T; Baxandall, J

    1969-05-01

    Evidence is presented that the "22S protein" of mitotic apparatus isolated from sea urchin eggs is not microtubule protein. An antibody preparation active against 22S protein is described, and immunochemical studies of the distribution of 22S protein in various cellular fractions and among morphological features of mitotic apparatus are reported. The protein is ubiquitous in the metaphase egg fractions that were tested but is not found in sperm flagella. It is immunologically distinct from proposed microtubule protein isolated from mitotic apparatus by the method of Sakai, and from proposed microtubule protein obtained after extraction with mild acid. It exists in nontubule material of isolated mitotic apparatus but is not detectable in microtubules.

  15. Sexual orientation, prejudice and segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plug, E.; Webbink, D.; Martin, N.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines whether gay and lesbian workers sort into tolerant occupations. With information on sexual orientation, prejudice, and occupational choice taken from Australian Twin Registers, we find that gays and lesbians shy away from prejudiced occupations. We show that our segregation res

  16. Nonequilibrium Segregation in Petroleum Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1999-01-01

    We analyse adsorption of a multicomponent mixture at high pressure on the basis of the potential theory of adsorption. The adsorbate is considered as a segregated mixture in the external field produced by a solid adsorbent. we derive an analytical equation for the thickness of a multicomponent fi...

  17. Back to the roots: segregation of univalent sex chromosomes in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabig, Gunar; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Paliulis, Leocadia V

    2016-06-01

    In males of many taxa, univalent sex chromosomes normally segregate during the first meiotic division, and analysis of sex chromosome segregation was foundational for the chromosome theory of inheritance. Correct segregation of single or multiple univalent sex chromosomes occurs in a cellular environment where every other chromosome is a bivalent that is being partitioned into homologous chromosomes at anaphase I. The mechanics of univalent chromosome segregation vary among animal taxa. In some, univalents establish syntelic attachment of sister kinetochores to the spindle. In others, amphitelic attachment is established. Here, we review how this problem of segregation of unpaired chromosomes is solved in different animal systems. In addition, we give a short outlook of how mechanistic insights into this process could be gained by explicitly studying model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans.

  18. Stimulation of mitotic recombination in Dictyostelium discoideum by ultraviolet irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.S.; Newell, P.C. (Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1982-01-01

    Studies were carried out to find an agent that would induce mitotic recombination in D. discoideum. The results indicate that most of the known chemical recombinogens have no effect on the mitotic recombination frequency in D. discoideum but that UV irradiation can significantly increase it by up to 100-fold at doses that have only a small effect on the haploidisation and mutation rates under the conditions employed.

  19. Mitotic apparatus: the selective extraction of protein with mild acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibring, T; Baxandall, J

    1968-07-26

    The treatment of isolated mitotic apparatus with mild (pH 3) hydrochloric acid results in the extraction of less than 10 percent of its protein, accompanied by the selective morphological disappearance of the microtubules. The same extraction can be shown to dissolve outer doublet microtubules from sperm flagella. A protein with points of similarity to the flagellar microtubule protein is the major component of the extract from mitotic apparatus.

  20. A stochastic model of kinetochore-microtubule attachment accurately describes fission yeast chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Guillaume; Courtheoux, Thibault; Reyes, Céline; Tournier, Sylvie; Gachet, Yannick

    2012-03-19

    In fission yeast, erroneous attachments of spindle microtubules to kinetochores are frequent in early mitosis. Most are corrected before anaphase onset by a mechanism involving the protein kinase Aurora B, which destabilizes kinetochore microtubules (ktMTs) in the absence of tension between sister chromatids. In this paper, we describe a minimal mathematical model of fission yeast chromosome segregation based on the stochastic attachment and detachment of ktMTs. The model accurately reproduces the timing of correct chromosome biorientation and segregation seen in fission yeast. Prevention of attachment defects requires both appropriate kinetochore orientation and an Aurora B-like activity. The model also reproduces abnormal chromosome segregation behavior (caused by, for example, inhibition of Aurora B). It predicts that, in metaphase, merotelic attachment is prevented by a kinetochore orientation effect and corrected by an Aurora B-like activity, whereas in anaphase, it is corrected through unbalanced forces applied to the kinetochore. These unbalanced forces are sufficient to prevent aneuploidy.

  1. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Hayden, James; Speicher, David; Gotter, Anthony L; Yen, Tim; Lieberman, Paul M

    2011-05-06

    The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim) associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1). Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication.

  2. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaraju Dheekollu

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1. Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication.

  3. 18 CFR 401.113 - Segregable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Segregable materials. 401.113 Section 401.113 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... Segregable materials. Any reasonably segregable portion of a record shall be provided to any person...

  4. International perspectives on countering school segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.T.A.; Denessen, E.J.P.G.; Peters, T.J.M.; Walraven, G.

    2010-01-01

    School segregation is perceived as an unyielding problem worldwide, which is manifest along both ethnic and socio-economic lines. With this edited volume we aim to share information about school segregation and policies focused on countering school segregation from an international perspective. Many

  5. Sequential stream segregation of voiced and unvoiced speech sounds based on fundamental frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Marion; Lavandier, Mathieu; Grimault, Nicolas; Oxenham, Andrew J

    2017-02-01

    Differences in fundamental frequency (F0) between voiced sounds are known to be a strong cue for stream segregation. However, speech consists of both voiced and unvoiced sounds, and less is known about whether and how the unvoiced portions are segregated. This study measured listeners' ability to integrate or segregate sequences of consonant-vowel tokens, comprising a voiceless fricative and a vowel, as a function of the F0 difference between interleaved sequences of tokens. A performance-based measure was used, in which listeners detected the presence of a repeated token either within one sequence or between the two sequences (measures of voluntary and obligatory streaming, respectively). The results showed a systematic increase of voluntary stream segregation as the F0 difference between the two interleaved sequences increased from 0 to 13 semitones, suggesting that F0 differences allowed listeners to segregate speech sounds, including the unvoiced portions. In contrast to the consistent effects of voluntary streaming, the trend towards obligatory stream segregation at large F0 differences failed to reach significance. Listeners were no longer able to perform the voluntary-streaming task reliably when the unvoiced portions were removed from the stimuli, suggesting that the unvoiced portions were used and correctly segregated in the original task. The results demonstrate that streaming based on F0 differences occurs for natural speech sounds, and that the unvoiced portions are correctly assigned to the corresponding voiced portions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. γ-tubulin is differentially expressed in mitotic and non-mitotic cardiomyocytes in the regenerating zebrafish heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Sallin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This data article contains complementary figures related to the research article entitled, “ A dual epimorphic and compensatory mode of heart regeneration” ([10], http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2014.12.002, which presents a spatial and temporal characterization of cardiomyocyte proliferation and dedifferentiation after cryoinjury-induced myocardial infarction. This study demonstrated that mitotic divisions occur in cardiac cells at distinct differentiation status, namely in dedifferentiated cells at the injury border as well as in mature cardiac cells within the remaining intact myocardium. One of the important aspects supporting our conclusions is a characterization of proteins that are upregulated during mitosis in the regenerating hearts. The data presented here reveal a dynamic change in the expression level and in the subcellular distribution of γ-tubulin between mitotic and non-mitotic cardiac cells. We report that in the non-mitotic cells, γ-tubulin expression is restricted to the centrosome. By contrast, during the mitosis, γ-tubulin strongly expands its localization within the spindle apparatus that interacts with the condensed chromosomes. We demonstrated that the differential distribution of γ-tubulin in non-mitotic and mitotic cells requires adjusted image processing for the appropriate visualization of both expression patterns in the same histological specimens.

  7. Chromatids segregate without centrosomes during Caenorhabditis elegans mitosis in a Ran- and CLASP-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahaboo, Wallis; Zouak, Melissa; Askjaer, Peter; Delattre, Marie

    2015-06-01

    During mitosis, chromosomes are connected to a microtubule-based spindle. Current models propose that displacement of the spindle poles and/or the activity of kinetochore microtubules generate mechanical forces that segregate sister chromatids. Using laser destruction of the centrosomes during Caenorhabditis elegans mitosis, we show that neither of these mechanisms is necessary to achieve proper chromatid segregation. Our results strongly suggest that an outward force generated by the spindle midzone, independently of centrosomes, is sufficient to segregate chromosomes in mitotic cells. Using mutant and RNAi analysis, we show that the microtubule-bundling protein SPD-1/MAP-65 and BMK-1/kinesin-5 act as a brake opposing the force generated by the spindle midzone. Conversely, we identify a novel role for two microtubule-growth and nucleation agents, Ran and CLASP, in the establishment of the centrosome-independent force during anaphase. Their involvement raises the interesting possibility that microtubule polymerization of midzone microtubules is continuously required to sustain chromosome segregation during mitosis.

  8. Vegetative compatibility and parasexual segregation in Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, a fungal pathogen of the common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Prado, M A A; Querol, C B; Sant'Anna, J R; Miyamoto, C T; Franco, C C S; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S

    2007-09-30

    The heterokaryotic and vegetative diploid phases of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum are described using nutritional and biochemical markers. Nitrate non-utilizing mutants (nit), derived from R2047, R89, R73, R65, and R23 isolates, were paired in all possible combinations to obtain heterokaryons. Although pairings R2047/R89, R2047/R73, R65/R73, and R73/R23 showed complete vegetative incompatibility, prototrophic heterokaryons were obtained from pairings R2047/R65, R2047/R23, R65/R89, R65/R23, R73/R89, R89/R23, R2047/R2047, R65/R65, R89/R89, R73/R73, and R23/R23. Heterokaryons gave rise to spontaneous mitotic segregants which carried markers corresponding to one or the other of the parental strains. Heterokaryons spontaneously produced prototrophic fast-growing sectors too, characterized as diploid segregants. Diploids would be expected to yield auxotrophic segregants following haploidization in basal medium or in the presence of benomyl. Parental haploid segregants were in fact recovered from diploid colonies growing in basal medium and basal medium containing the haploidizing agent. Although barriers to the formation of heterokaryons in some crosses were detected, the results demonstrate the occurrence of parasexuality among vegetative compatible mutants of C. lindemuthianum.

  9. Mitotic chromosome biorientation in fission yeast is enhanced by dynein and a minus-end-directed, kinesin-like protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Spiridonov, Ilia S; McIntosh, J Richard

    2007-06-01

    Chromosome biorientation, the attachment of sister kinetochores to sister spindle poles, is vitally important for accurate chromosome segregation. We have studied this process by following the congression of pole-proximal kinetochores and their subsequent anaphase segregation in fission yeast cells that carry deletions in any or all of this organism's minus end-directed, microtubule-dependent motors: two related kinesin 14s (Pkl1p and Klp2p) and dynein. None of these deletions abolished biorientation, but fewer chromosomes segregated normally without Pkl1p, and to a lesser degree without dynein, than in wild-type cells. In the absence of Pkl1p, which normally localizes to the spindle and its poles, the checkpoint that monitors chromosome biorientation was defective, leading to frequent precocious anaphase. Ultrastructural analysis of mutant mitotic spindles suggests that Pkl1p contributes to error-free biorientation by promoting normal spindle pole organization, whereas dynein helps to anchor a focused bundle of spindle microtubules at the pole.

  10. [Disruption of organization of mitotic microtubules in root meristem cells of Allium cepa induced by chloral hydrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, E A; Svetlitskaia, O M; Chentsov, Iu S

    2002-01-01

    Data are presented on the effect of chlorahydrate on microtubule organization in the root meristem of Allium cepa. Our studies show that an incomplete preprophase band commonly appears during G2-prophase transition, yet the major effect is the lack of perinuclear microtubules, leading to inhibition of the prophase spindle formation and transition to C-mitosis. Upon chloralhydrate treatment of metaphase cells, we found cells with chromosomes regularly aligned within the metaphase plate and differently disorganized mitotic spindles. Concurrently, C-metaphase cells with remnants of kinetochore fibers were present. In addition, normal bipolar and abnormal irregular types of chromosome segregation were detected, this representing multipolar and diffuse anaphases. The major difference between them is the presence of polar microtubules during multipolar anaphase, and their lacking during diffuse anaphase. Alternatively, microtubule clusters between segregated groups of chromosomes are typical for cells with diffuse anaphase. During bipolar anaphase, excessive aster-like microtubules emanate from the spindle poles, and in telophase accessory phragmoplasts are observed at the cell periphery. The formation of incomplete phragmoplasts was observed after normal bipolar and abnormal chromosome segregation. We conclude that chloralhydrate may affect the nuclear surface capability to initiate the growth of perinuclear microtubules, thus blocking the prophase spindle formation. It also disturbs the spatial interaction between microtubules, which is crucial for the formation and functioning of various microtubular systems (preprophase band, spindle and phragmoplast).

  11. Prognostic differences of World Health Organization - assessed mitotic activity index and mitotic impression by quick scanning in invasive ductal breast cancer patients younger than 55 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skaland, Ivar; van Diest, Paul J.; Janssen, Emiel A. M.; Gudlaugsson, Einar; Baak, Jan P. A.

    2008-01-01

    The proliferation marker mitotic activity index is the strongest prognostic indicator in lymph node-negative breast cancer. The World Health Organization (WHO) 2003-defined procedure for determining WHO-mitotic activity index is often replaced by a quick scan mitotic impression. We evaluated the pro

  12. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation.

  13. Mcl-1 dynamics influence mitotic slippage and death in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloss, Olivia; Topham, Caroline; Diez, Maria; Taylor, Stephen

    2016-02-02

    Microtubule-binding drugs such as taxol are frontline treatments for a variety of cancers but exactly how they yield patient benefit is unclear. In cell culture, inhibiting microtubule dynamics prevents spindle assembly, leading to mitotic arrest followed by either apoptosis in mitosis or slippage, whereby a cell returns to interphase without dividing. Myeloid cell leukaemia-1 (Mcl-1), a pro-survival member of the Bcl-2 family central to the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, is degraded during a prolonged mitotic arrest and may therefore act as a mitotic death timer. Consistently, we show that blocking proteasome-mediated degradation inhibits taxol-induced mitotic apoptosis in a Mcl-1-dependent manner. However, this degradation does not require the activity of either APC/C-Cdc20, FBW7 or MULE, three separate E3 ubiquitin ligases implicated in targeting Mcl-1 for degradation. This therefore challenges the notion that Mcl-1 undergoes regulated degradation during mitosis. We also show that Mcl-1 is continuously synthesized during mitosis and that blocking protein synthesis accelerates taxol induced death-in-mitosis. Modulating Mcl-1 levels also influences slippage; overexpressing Mcl-1 extends the time from mitotic entry to mitotic exit in the presence of taxol, while inhibiting Mcl-1 accelerates it. We suggest that Mcl-1 competes with Cyclin B1 for binding to components of the proteolysis machinery, thereby slowing down the slow degradation of Cyclin B1 responsible for slippage. Thus, modulating Mcl-1 dynamics influences both death-in-mitosis and slippage. However, because mitotic degradation of Mcl-1 appears not to be under the control of an E3 ligase, we suggest that the notion of network crosstalk is used with caution.

  14. PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restall, Ian J; Parolin, Doris A E; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Hanson, Jennifer E L; Simard, Manon A; Fitzpatrick, Megan E; Kumar, Ritesh; Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a tumor suppressor mechanism where cells enter a permanent growth arrest following cellular stress. Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is induced in non-malignant cells following the expression of an oncogene or inactivation of a tumor suppressor. Previously, we have shown that protein kinase C iota (PKCι) depletion induces cellular senescence in glioblastoma cells in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Here we demonstrate that senescent glioblastoma cells exhibit an aberrant centrosome morphology. This was observed in basal levels of senescence, in p21-induced senescence, and in PKCι depletion-induced senescence. In addition, senescent glioblastoma cells are polyploid, Ki-67 negative and arrest at the G1/S checkpoint, as determined by expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins. These markers are all consistent with cells that have undergone mitotic slippage. Failure of the spindle assembly checkpoint to function properly can lead to mitotic slippage, resulting in the premature exit of mitotic cells into the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Although in G1, these cells have the replicated DNA and centrosomal phenotype of a cell that has entered mitosis and failed to divide. Overall, we demonstrate that PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma cells. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of markers of mitotic slippage directly in senescent cells by co-staining for senescence-associated β-galactosidase and immunofluorescence markers in the same cell population. We suggest that markers of mitotic slippage be assessed in future studies of senescence to determine the extent of mitotic slippage in the induction of cellular senescence.

  15. CDE-1 affects chromosome segregation through uridylation of CSR-1-bound siRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wolfswinkel, Josien C; Claycomb, Julie M; Batista, Pedro J; Mello, Craig C; Berezikov, Eugene; Ketting, René F

    2009-10-02

    We have studied the function of a conserved germline-specific nucleotidyltransferase protein, CDE-1, in RNAi and chromosome segregation in C. elegans. CDE-1 localizes specifically to mitotic chromosomes in embryos. This localization requires the RdRP EGO-1, which physically interacts with CDE-1, and the Argonaute protein CSR-1. We found that CDE-1 is required for the uridylation of CSR-1 bound siRNAs, and that in the absence of CDE-1 these siRNAs accumulate to inappropriate levels, accompanied by defects in both meiotic and mitotic chromosome segregation. Elevated siRNA levels are associated with erroneous gene silencing, most likely through the inappropriate loading of CSR-1 siRNAs into other Argonaute proteins. We propose a model in which CDE-1 restricts specific EGO-1-generated siRNAs to the CSR-1 mediated, chromosome associated RNAi pathway, thus separating it from other endogenous RNAi pathways. The conserved nature of CDE-1 suggests that similar sorting mechanisms may operate in other animals, including mammals.

  16. Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation Requires Central Spindle Proteins in Drosophila Oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arunika; Shah, Shital J.; Fan, Bensen; Paik, Daniel; DiSanto, Daniel J.; Hinman, Anna Maria; Cesario, Jeffry M.; Battaglia, Rachel A.; Demos, Nicole; McKim, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    Oocytes segregate chromosomes in the absence of centrosomes. In this situation, the chromosomes direct spindle assembly. It is still unclear in this system which factors are required for homologous chromosome bi-orientation and spindle assembly. The Drosophila kinesin-6 protein Subito, although nonessential for mitotic spindle assembly, is required to organize a bipolar meiotic spindle and chromosome bi-orientation in oocytes. Along with the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), Subito is an important part of the metaphase I central spindle. In this study we have conducted genetic screens to identify genes that interact with subito or the CPC component Incenp. In addition, the meiotic mutant phenotype for some of the genes identified in these screens were characterized. We show, in part through the use of a heat-shock-inducible system, that the Centralspindlin component RacGAP50C and downstream regulators of cytokinesis Rho1, Sticky, and RhoGEF2 are required for homologous chromosome bi-orientation in metaphase I oocytes. This suggests a novel function for proteins normally involved in mitotic cell division in the regulation of microtubule–chromosome interactions. We also show that the kinetochore protein, Polo kinase, is required for maintaining chromosome alignment and spindle organization in metaphase I oocytes. In combination our results support a model where the meiotic central spindle and associated proteins are essential for acentrosomal chromosome segregation. PMID:26564158

  17. Bacterial Chromosome Organization and Segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Toro, Esteban; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are generally ∼1000 times longer than the cells in which they reside, and concurrent replication, segregation, and transcription/translation of this crowded mass of DNA poses a challenging organizational problem. Recent advances in cell-imaging technology with subdiffraction resolution have revealed that the bacterial nucleoid is reliably oriented and highly organized within the cell. Such organization is transmitted from one generation to the next by progressive segrega...

  18. Regulation of AURORA B function by mitotic checkpoint protein MAD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandilya, Jayasha; Medler, Kathryn F; Roberts, Stefan G E

    2016-08-17

    Cell cycle checkpoint signaling stringently regulates chromosome segregation during cell division. MAD2 is one of the key components of the spindle and mitotic checkpoint complex that regulates the fidelity of cell division along with MAD1, CDC20, BUBR1, BUB3 and MAD3. MAD2 ablation leads to erroneous attachment of kinetochore-spindle fibers and defective chromosome separation. A potential role for MAD2 in the regulation of events beyond the spindle and mitotic checkpoints is not clear. Together with active spindle assembly checkpoint signaling, AURORA B kinase activity is essential for chromosome condensation as cells enter mitosis. AURORA B phosphorylates histone H3 at serine 10 and serine 28 to facilitate the formation of condensed metaphase chromosomes. In the absence of functional AURORA B cells escape mitosis despite the presence of misaligned chromosomes. In this study we report that silencing of MAD2 results in a drastic reduction of metaphase-specific histone H3 phosphorylation at serine 10 and serine 28. We demonstrate that this is due to mislocalization of AURORA B in the absence of MAD2. Conversely, overexpression of MAD2 concentrated the localization of AURORA B at the metaphase plate and caused hyper-phosphorylation of histone H3. We find that MAD1 plays a minor role in influencing the MAD2-dependent regulation of AURORA B suggesting that the effects of MAD2 on AURORA B are independent of the spindle checkpoint complex. Our findings reveal that, in addition to its role in checkpoint signaling, MAD2 ensures chromosome stability through the regulation of AURORA B.

  19. Automated high-throughput quantification of mitotic spindle positioning from DIC movies of Caenorhabditis embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cluet

    Full Text Available The mitotic spindle is a microtubule-based structure that elongates to accurately segregate chromosomes during anaphase. Its position within the cell also dictates the future cell cleavage plan, thereby determining daughter cell orientation within a tissue or cell fate adoption for polarized cells. Therefore, the mitotic spindle ensures at the same time proper cell division and developmental precision. Consequently, spindle dynamics is the matter of intensive research. Among the different cellular models that have been explored, the one-cell stage C. elegans embryo has been an essential and powerful system to dissect the molecular and biophysical basis of spindle elongation and positioning. Indeed, in this large and transparent cell, spindle poles (or centrosomes can be easily detected from simple DIC microscopy by human eyes. To perform quantitative and high-throughput analysis of spindle motion, we developed a computer program ACT for Automated-Centrosome-Tracking from DIC movies of C. elegans embryos. We therefore offer an alternative to the image acquisition and processing of transgenic lines expressing fluorescent spindle markers. Consequently, experiments on large sets of cells can be performed with a simple setup using inexpensive microscopes. Moreover, analysis of any mutant or wild-type backgrounds is accessible because laborious rounds of crosses with transgenic lines become unnecessary. Last, our program allows spindle detection in other nematode species, offering the same quality of DIC images but for which techniques of transgenesis are not accessible. Thus, our program also opens the way towards a quantitative evolutionary approach of spindle dynamics. Overall, our computer program is a unique macro for the image- and movie-processing platform ImageJ. It is user-friendly and freely available under an open-source licence. ACT allows batch-wise analysis of large sets of mitosis events. Within 2 minutes, a single movie is processed

  20. Cell division patterns and chromosomal segregation defects in oral cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseb, Hatem O; Lewis, Dale W; Saunders, William S; Gollin, Susanne M

    2016-09-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a serious public health problem caused primarily by smoking and alcohol consumption or human papillomavirus. The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory posits that CSCs show unique characteristics, including self-renewal and therapeutic resistance. Examining biomarkers and other features of CSCs is critical to better understanding their biology. To this end, the results show that cellular SOX2 immunostaining correlates with other CSC biomarkers in OSCC cell lines and marks the rare CSC population. To assess whether CSC division patterns are symmetrical, resulting in two CSC, or asymmetrical, leading to one CSC and one cancer cell, cell size and fluorescence intensity of mitotic cells stained with SOX2 were analyzed. Asymmetrical SOX2 distribution in ≈25% of the mitoses analyzed was detected. Chromosomal instability, some of which is caused by chromosome segregation defects (CSDs), is a feature of cancer cells that leads to altered gene copy numbers. We compare chromosomal instability (as measured by CSDs) between CSCs (SOX2+) and non-CSCs (SOX2-) from the same OSCC cell lines. CSDs were more common in non-CSCs (SOX2-) than CSCs (SOX2+) and in symmetrical CSC (SOX2+) mitotic pairs than asymmetrical CSC (SOX2+/SOX2-) mitotic pairs. CSCs showed fewer and different types of CSDs after ionizing radiation treatment than non-CSCs. Overall, these data are the first to demonstrate both symmetrical and asymmetrical cell divisions with CSDs in OSCC CSC. Further, the results suggest that CSCs may undergo altered behavior, including therapeutic resistance as a result of chromosomal instability due to chromosome segregation defects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Mitotic activity in cells of the wool follicle bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynd, P I; Schlink, A C; Phillips, P M; Scobie, D R

    1986-01-01

    Mitotic activity in the cells of the germinative region of wool follicle bulbs was quantified by using small (0.1-0.5 ml) intradermal doses of colchicine and selective staining of the metaphase-blocked nuclei using either crystal violet, iodine and eosin or haematoxylin and eosin. The number of metaphase nuclei present 3 h after colchicine administration increased with colchicine dose from 0 to 1 microgram and thereafter remained relatively constant up to 200 micrograms colchicine. The accumulation of metaphase nuclei was linear for up to 6 h after intradermal colchicine. The metaphase-blocking effect of intradermal colchicine was confined to a radius of less than 5 cm from the injection site, allowing a number of estimates of mitotic rates to be made over a small area of skin. Such estimates revealed little variation in mitotic activity over the midside region of the sheep, although there were substantial differences in follicle activity at different sites over the body. The technique is simple, allows serial or concurrent estimates of mitotic activity to be made in the same animal, and eliminates problems associated with intravenous colchicine administration. It was used to derive the relationship between follicle activity and fibre production after nutritional changes, and to define the time course of mitotic events after administration of the antimitotic defleecing agent cyclophosphamide.

  2. Mitotic Exit Control as an Evolved Complex System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosl, W; Li, R

    2005-04-25

    The exit from mitosis is the last critical decision a cell has to make during a division cycle. A complex regulatory system has evolved to evaluate the success of mitotic events and control this decision. Whereas outstanding genetic work in yeast has led to rapid discovery of a large number of interacting genes involved in the control of mitotic exit, it has also become increasingly difficult to comprehend the logic and mechanistic features embedded in the complex molecular network. Our view is that this difficulty stems in part from the attempt to explain mitotic exit control using concepts from traditional top-down engineering design, and that exciting new results from evolutionary engineering design applied to networks and electronic circuits may lend better insights. We focus on four particularly intriguing features of the mitotic exit control system: the two-stepped release of Cdc14; the self-activating nature of Tem1 GTPase; the spatial sensor associated with the spindle pole body; and the extensive redundancy in the mitotic exit network. We attempt to examine these design features from the perspective of evolutionary design and complex system engineering.

  3. Mechanical control of mitotic progression in single animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattin, Cedric J; Düggelin, Marcel; Martinez-Martin, David; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J; Stewart, Martin P

    2015-09-08

    Despite the importance of mitotic cell rounding in tissue development and cell proliferation, there remains a paucity of approaches to investigate the mechanical robustness of cell rounding. Here we introduce ion beam-sculpted microcantilevers that enable precise force-feedback-controlled confinement of single cells while characterizing their progression through mitosis. We identify three force regimes according to the cell response: small forces (∼5 nN) that accelerate mitotic progression, intermediate forces where cells resist confinement (50-100 nN), and yield forces (>100 nN) where a significant decline in cell height impinges on microtubule spindle function, thereby inhibiting mitotic progression. Yield forces are coincident with a nonlinear drop in cell height potentiated by persistent blebbing and loss of cortical F-actin homogeneity. Our results suggest that a buildup of actomyosin-dependent cortical tension and intracellular pressure precedes mechanical failure, or herniation, of the cell cortex at the yield force. Thus, we reveal how the mechanical properties of mitotic cells and their response to external forces are linked to mitotic progression under conditions of mechanical confinement.

  4. The Golgi mitotic checkpoint is controlled by BARS-dependent fission of the Golgi ribbon into separate stacks in G2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colanzi, Antonino; Hidalgo Carcedo, Cristina; Persico, Angela; Cericola, Claudia; Turacchio, Gabriele; Bonazzi, Matteo; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela

    2007-05-16

    The Golgi ribbon is a complex structure of many stacks interconnected by tubules that undergo fragmentation during mitosis through a multistage process that allows correct Golgi inheritance. The fissioning protein CtBP1-S/BARS (BARS) is essential for this, and is itself required for mitotic entry: a block in Golgi fragmentation results in cell-cycle arrest in G2, defining the 'Golgi mitotic checkpoint'. Here, we clarify the precise stage of Golgi fragmentation required for mitotic entry and the role of BARS in this process. Thus, during G2, the Golgi ribbon is converted into isolated stacks by fission of interstack connecting tubules. This requires BARS and is sufficient for G2/M transition. Cells without a Golgi ribbon are independent of BARS for Golgi fragmentation and mitotic entrance. Remarkably, fibroblasts from BARS-knockout embryos have their Golgi complex divided into isolated stacks at all cell-cycle stages, bypassing the need for BARS for Golgi fragmentation. This identifies the precise stage of Golgi fragmentation and the role of BARS in the Golgi mitotic checkpoint, setting the stage for molecular analysis of this process.

  5. Phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) influences spindle assembly and chromosome segregation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfang; Beauchemin, Myriam; Bertrand, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Functional analysis of a series of phosphorylation mutants reveals that Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) influences cell entry into anaphase and mitotic exit in taxol-exposed cells compared with cells expressing wild-type Bcl-xL or a series of other phosphorylation mutants, an effect that appears to be independent of its anti-apoptotic activity. During normal mitosis progression, Bcl-xL(Ser62) is strongly phosphorylated by PLK1 and MAPK14/SAPKp38α at the prometaphase, metaphase, and the anaphase boundaries, while it is de-phosphorylated at telophase and cytokinesis. Phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) localizes in centrosomes with γ-tubulin and in the mitotic cytosol with some spindle-assembly checkpoint signaling components, including PLK1, BubR1, and Mad2. In taxol- and nocodazole-exposed cells, phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) also binds to Cdc20- Mad2-, BubR1-, and Bub3-bound complexes, while Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) does not. Silencing Bcl-xL expression and expressing the phosphorylation mutant Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) lead to an increased number of cells harboring mitotic spindle defects including multipolar spindle, chromosome lagging and bridging, aneuploidy with micro-, bi-, or multi-nucleated cells, and cells that fail to resolve undergo mitosis within 6 h. Together, the data indicate that during mitosis, Bcl-xL(Ser62) phosphorylation impacts on spindle assembly and chromosome segregation, influencing chromosome stability. Observations of mitotic cells harboring aneuploidy with micro-, bi-, or multi-nucleated cells, and cells that fail to resolve undergo mitosis within 6 h were also made with cells expressing the phosphorylation mutant Bcl-xL(Ser49Ala) and dual mutant Bcl-xL(Ser49/62Ala).

  6. Targeting the mitotic checkpoint for cancer therapy with NMS-P715, an inhibitor of MPS1 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Riccardo; Caldarelli, Marina; Mennecozzi, Milena; Giorgini, Maria Laura; Sola, Francesco; Cappella, Paolo; Perrera, Claudia; Depaolini, Stefania Re; Rusconi, Luisa; Cucchi, Ulisse; Avanzi, Nilla; Bertrand, Jay Aaron; Bossi, Roberto Tiberio; Pesenti, Enrico; Galvani, Arturo; Isacchi, Antonella; Colotta, Francesco; Donati, Daniele; Moll, Jürgen

    2010-12-15

    MPS1 kinase is a key regulator of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a mitotic mechanism specifically required for proper chromosomal alignment and segregation. It has been found aberrantly overexpressed in a wide range of human tumors and is necessary for tumoral cell proliferation. Here we report the identification and characterization of NMS-P715, a selective and orally bioavailable MPS1 small-molecule inhibitor, which selectively reduces cancer cell proliferation, leaving normal cells almost unaffected. NMS-P715 accelerates mitosis and affects kinetochore components localization causing massive aneuploidy and cell death in a variety of tumoral cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in preclinical cancer models. Inhibiting the SAC could represent a promising new approach to selectively target cancer cells.

  7. Sexual segregation in foraging giraffe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mramba, Rosemary Peter; Mahenya, Obeid; Siyaya, Annetjie; Mathisen, Karen Marie; Andreassen, Harry Peter; Skarpe, Christina

    2017-02-01

    Sexual segregation in giraffe is known to vary between savannas. In this study, we compared sexual segregation in giraffe in one nutrient-rich savanna, the Serengeti National Park, one nutrient-poor, Mikumi National Park, and one medium rich savanna, Arusha National Park, (from here on referred to just by name) based on effects of sexual size dimorphism and related hypotheses. Data were collected in the wet and dry seasons, by driving road transects and making visual observations of browsing giraffe. Additional data were collected from literature (plant chemistry; mammal communities). There was a noticeable difference in browsing by females and males and in browsing between the three savannas. Females browsed a higher diversity of tree species in Serengeti whereas males browsed a higher diversity in Arusha, while the diversity of species browsed in Mikumi was high and about the same in both sexes. Females selected for high concentrations of nitrogen and low concentrations of tannins and phenolics compared to males in Serengeti but selection in Mikumi was more complex. Males browsed higher in the canopy than females in all sites, but the browsing height was generally higher in Serengeti than Mikumi and Arusha. Season had an effect on the browsing height independent of sex in Mikumi, where giraffes browsed higher in the dry season compared to the wet season. Males spent more time browsing per tree compared to females in all three sites; however, browsing time in Mikumi was also affected by season, where giraffes had longer browsing bouts in the wet season compared to the dry season. We suggest that sexual differences in forage requirement and in foraging interacts with differences in tree chemistry and in competing herbivore communities between nutrient rich and nutrient poor savanna in shaping the sexual segregation.

  8. Failure to observe mitotic rhythmicity in Allium meristems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, S.M.; Hillman, W.S.

    1976-01-01

    Circadian rhythms clearly affect cell division in certain microorganisms and some animal tissue, but reports on mitotic rhythmicity in higher plants are contradictory, even for Allium cepa, the most widely studied material. Mitotic index was determined on root and shoot meristems of seedlings of one cultivar, and on roots of bulbs of another. Various times with respect to 24-h cycles of alternating light and darkness, or light-high temperature and darkness-low temperature were investigated. No evidence for rhythmicity was obtained.

  9. Premitotic assembly of human CENPs -T and -W switches centromeric chromatin to a mitotic state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Prendergast

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are differentiated chromatin domains, present once per chromosome, that direct segregation of the genome in mitosis and meiosis by specifying assembly of the kinetochore. They are distinct genetic loci in that their identity in most organisms is determined not by the DNA sequences they are associated with, but through specific chromatin composition and context. The core nucleosomal protein CENP-A/cenH3 plays a primary role in centromere determination in all species and directs assembly of a large complex of associated proteins in vertebrates. While CENP-A itself is stably transmitted from one generation to the next, the nature of the template for centromere replication and its relationship to kinetochore function are as yet poorly understood. Here, we investigate the assembly and inheritance of a histone fold complex of the centromere, the CENP-T/W complex, which is integrated with centromeric chromatin in association with canonical histone H3 nucleosomes. We have investigated the cell cycle regulation, timing of assembly, generational persistence, and requirement for function of CENPs -T and -W in the cell cycle in human cells. The CENP-T/W complex assembles through a dynamic exchange mechanism in late S-phase and G2, is required for mitosis in each cell cycle and does not persist across cell generations, properties reciprocal to those measured for CENP-A. We propose that the CENP-A and H3-CENP-T/W nucleosome components of the centromere are specialized for centromeric and kinetochore activities, respectively. Segregation of the assembly mechanisms for the two allows the cell to switch between chromatin configurations that reciprocally support the replication of the centromere and its conversion to a mitotic state on postreplicative chromatin.

  10. The budding yeast nuclear envelope adjacent to the nucleolus serves as a membrane sink during mitotic delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkin, Keren L; Chong, Yolanda; Shao, Sichen; Webster, Micah T; Lahiri, Sujoy; Walters, Alison D; Lee, Brandon; Koh, Judice L Y; Prinz, William A; Andrews, Brenda J; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2012-06-19

    The mechanisms that dictate nuclear shape are largely unknown. Here we screened the budding yeast deletion collection for mutants with abnormal nuclear shape. A common phenotype was the appearance of a nuclear extension, particularly in mutants in DNA repair and chromosome segregation genes. Our data suggest that these mutations led to the abnormal nuclear morphology indirectly, by causing a checkpoint-induced cell-cycle delay. Indeed, delaying cells in mitosis by other means also led to the appearance of nuclear extensions, whereas inactivating the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in a DNA repair mutant reduced the fraction of cells with nuclear extensions. Formation of a nuclear extension was specific to a mitotic delay, because cells arrested in S or G2 had round nuclei. Moreover, the nuclear extension always coincided with the nucleolus, while the morphology of the DNA mass remained largely unchanged. Finally, we found that phospholipid synthesis continued unperturbed when cells delayed in mitosis, and inhibiting phospholipid synthesis abolished the formation of nuclear extensions. Our data suggest a mechanism that promotes nuclear envelope expansion during mitosis. When mitotic progression is delayed, cells sequester the added membrane to the nuclear envelope associated with the nucleolus, possibly to avoid disruption of intranuclear organization.

  11. Entropy as the driver of chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Suckjoon; Wright, Andrew

    2010-08-01

    We present a new physical biology approach to understanding the relationship between the organization and segregation of bacterial chromosomes. We posit that replicated Escherichia coli daughter strands will spontaneously demix as a result of entropic forces, despite their strong confinement within the cell; in other words, we propose that entropy can act as a primordial physical force which drives chromosome segregation under the right physical conditions. Furthermore, proteins implicated in the regulation of chromosome structure and segregation may in fact function primarily in supporting such an entropy-driven segregation mechanism by regulating the physical state of chromosomes. We conclude that bacterial chromosome segregation is best understood in terms of spontaneous demixing of daughter strands. Our concept may also have important implications for chromosome segregation in eukaryotes, in which spindle-dependent chromosome movement follows an extended period of sister chromatid demixing and compaction.

  12. Stathmin inhibition enhances okadaic acid-induced mitotic arrest: a potential role for stathmin in mitotic exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, S J; Atweh, G F

    2001-08-17

    Stathmin is a microtubule-destabilizing phosphoprotein that plays a critical role in the regulation of mitosis. The microtubule-depolymerizing activity of stathmin is lost upon phosphorylation in mitosis. Although the role of phosphorylation of stathmin by p34(cdc2) kinase in the assembly of the mitotic spindle is well established, the role of dephosphorylation of stathmin in mitosis is unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that dephosphorylation of stathmin may be critically important for the depolymerization of the mitotic spindle and the exit from mitosis. We compared the effects of okadaic acid, a specific inhibitor of serine/threonine protein phosphatases, on different parameters of mitotic progression in the presence or absence of stathmin deficiency. Because okadaic acid prevents dephosphorylation of stathmin and results in accumulation of the inactive phosphorylated form, exposure to okadaic acid would be expected to have a more profound effect on mitosis in the presence of relative stathmin deficiency. We found that inhibition of stathmin expression results in increased sensitivity to the antimitotic effects of okadaic acid. This was reflected by increased growth inhibition associated with mitotic arrest. A vast majority of the stathmin-inhibited cells were found to be arrested in late metaphase/anaphase and had severe mitotic spindle abnormalities. Exposure to okadaic acid also resulted in a bigger ratio of polymerized/unpolymerized tubulin in stathmin-inhibited cells relative to control cells. Because the only difference between the control and the stathmin-inhibited cells is the deficiency of stathmin in the latter, the increased susceptibility of the stathmin-inhibited cells to okadaic acid-induced mitotic arrest implies a role for stathmin in the later stages of mitosis.

  13. Perceptual-binding and persistent surface segregation

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Visual input is segregated in the brain into subsystems that process different attributes such as motion and color. At the same time, visual information is perceptually segregated into objects and surfaces. Here we demonstrate that perceptual segregation of visual entities based on a transparency cue precedes and affects perceptual binding of attributes. Adding an irrelevant transparency cue paradoxically improved the pairing of color and motion for rapidly alternating surfaces. Subsequent ex...

  14. The effects of X-rays on the mitotic activity of mouse epidermis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, N.P. Jr.; Hempelmann, L.H.; Hoffman, J.G.

    1949-04-19

    This report describes a simplified technique of obtaining the mitotic index of mouse skin and indicates the surprising sensitivity of the mitotic activity of mouse epithelium to the effects of x-rays.

  15. Housing Systems and Ethnic Spatial Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Skifter; Andersson, Roger; Wessel, Terje

    Residential spatial segregation is related to housing markets and housing policies. In this paper, ethnic segregation is compared across four Nordic capitals and explanations for the differences are examined by comparing the housing markets and housing policies of the countries. The housing markets...... of neighbourhoods. Ethnic segmentation of housing tenures thus contributes to segregation, but the effect is much dependent on how tenures are distributed across space. In one of the cities, the policy of neighbourhood tenure mix has resulted in a relatively low degree of segregation in spite of high concentrations...

  16. From particle segregation to the granular clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambiotte, R. [Physique Statistique, Plasmas et Optique Non-lineaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Boulevard du Triomphe, Code Postal 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: rlambiot@ulb.ac.be; Salazar, J.M. [Universite De Bougogne-LRRS UMR-5613 CNRS, Faculte des Sciences Mirande, 9 Av. Alain Savary, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jmarcos@u-bourgogne.fr; Brenig, L. [Physique Statistique, Plasmas et Optique Non-lineaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Boulevard du Triomphe, Code Postal 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: lbrenig@ulb.ac.be

    2005-08-01

    Recently several authors studied the segregation of particles for a system composed of mono-dispersed inelastic spheres contained in a box divided by a wall in the middle. The system exhibited a symmetry breaking leading to an overpopulation of particles in one side of the box. Here we study the segregation of a mixture of particles composed of inelastic hard spheres and fluidized by a vibrating wall. Our numerical simulations show a rich phenomenology: horizontal segregation and periodic behavior. We also propose an empirical system of ODEs representing the proportion of each type of particles and the segregation flux of particles. These equations reproduce the major features observed by the simulations.

  17. The DEAD-box RNA helicase Vasa functions in embryonic mitotic progression in the sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Mamiko; Wessel, Gary M

    2011-06-01

    Vasa is a broadly conserved ATP-dependent RNA helicase that functions in the germ line of organisms from cnidarians to mammals. Curiously, Vasa is also present in the somatic cells of many animals and functions as a regulator of multipotent cells. Here, we report a mitotic function of Vasa revealed in the sea urchin embryo. We found that Vasa protein is present in all blastomeres of the early embryo and that its abundance oscillates with the cell cycle. Vasa associates with the spindle and the separating sister chromatids at metaphase, and then quickly disappears after telophase. Inhibition of Vasa protein synthesis interferes with proper chromosome segregation, arrests cells at M-phase, and delays overall cell cycle progression. Cdk activity is necessary for the proper localization of Vasa, implying that Vasa is involved in the cyclin-dependent cell cycle network, and Vasa is required for the efficient translation of cyclinB mRNA. Our results suggest an evolutionarily conserved role of Vasa that is independent of its function in germ line determination.

  18. The Plk1 target Kizuna stabilizes mitotic centrosomes to ensure spindle bipolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshimori, Naoki; Ohsugi, Miho; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2006-10-01

    Formation of a bipolar spindle is essential for faithful chromosome segregation at mitosis. Because centrosomes define spindle poles, defects in centrosome number and structural organization can lead to a loss of bipolarity. In addition, microtubule-mediated pulling and pushing forces acting on centrosomes and chromosomes are also important for bipolar spindle formation. Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a highly conserved Ser/Thr kinase that has essential roles in the formation of a bipolar spindle with focused poles. However, the mechanism by which Plk1 regulates spindle-pole formation is poorly understood. Here, we identify a novel centrosomal substrate of Plk1, Kizuna (Kiz), depletion of which causes fragmentation and dissociation of the pericentriolar material from centrioles at prometaphase, resulting in multipolar spindles. We demonstrate that Kiz is critical for establishing a robust mitotic centrosome architecture that can endure the forces that converge on the centrosomes during spindle formation, and suggest that Plk1 maintains the integrity of the spindle poles by phosphorylating Kiz.

  19. DNA Cross-Bridging Shapes a Single Nucleus from a Set of Mitotic Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwer, Matthias; Schneider, Maximilian W G; Hoefler, Rudolf; Schmalhorst, Philipp S; Jude, Julian G; Zuber, Johannes; Gerlich, Daniel W

    2017-08-24

    Eukaryotic cells store their chromosomes in a single nucleus. This is important to maintain genomic integrity, as chromosomes packaged into separate nuclei (micronuclei) are prone to massive DNA damage. During mitosis, higher eukaryotes disassemble their nucleus and release individualized chromosomes for segregation. How numerous chromosomes subsequently reform a single nucleus has remained unclear. Using image-based screening of human cells, we identified barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) as a key factor guiding membranes to form a single nucleus. Unexpectedly, nuclear assembly does not require BAF's association with inner nuclear membrane proteins but instead relies on BAF's ability to bridge distant DNA sites. Live-cell imaging and in vitro reconstitution showed that BAF enriches around the mitotic chromosome ensemble to induce a densely cross-bridged chromatin layer that is mechanically stiff and limits membranes to the surface. Our study reveals that BAF-mediated changes in chromosome mechanics underlie nuclear assembly with broad implications for proper genome function. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cdc20 control of cell fate during prolonged mitotic arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The fate of cells arrested in mitosis by antimitotic compounds is complex but is influenced by competition between pathways promoting cell death and pathways promoting mitotic exit. As components of both of these pathways are regulated by Cdc20-dependent degradation, I hypothesize that variations...

  1. BIFURCATION ANALYSIS OF A MITOTIC MODEL OF FROG EGGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕金虎; 张子范; 张锁春

    2003-01-01

    The mitotic model of frog eggs established by Borisuk and Tyson is qualitatively analyzed. The existence and stability of its steady states are further discussed. Furthermore, the bifurcation of above model is further investigated by using theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. At the same time, the numerical results of Tyson are verified by theoretical analysis.

  2. Mitotic lamin disassembly is triggered by lipid-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Moritz; Walter, Thomas; Gorjánácz, Mátyás; Davidson, Iain F; Nga Ly-Hartig, Thi Bach; Ellenberg, Jan; Mattaj, Iain W

    2012-09-17

    Disassembly of the nuclear lamina is a key step during open mitosis in higher eukaryotes. The activity of several kinases, including CDK1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1) and protein kinase C (PKC), has been shown to trigger mitotic lamin disassembly, yet their precise contributions are unclear. In this study, we develop a quantitative imaging assay to study mitotic lamin B1 disassembly in living cells. We find that CDK1 and PKC act in concert to mediate phosphorylation-dependent lamin B1 disassembly during mitosis. Using ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi), we showed that diacylglycerol (DAG)-dependent PKCs triggered rate-limiting steps of lamin disassembly. RNAi-mediated depletion or chemical inhibition of lipins, enzymes that produce DAG, delayed lamin disassembly to a similar extent as does PKC inhibition/depletion. Furthermore, the delay of lamin B1 disassembly after lipin depletion could be rescued by the addition of DAG. These findings suggest that lipins activate a PKC-dependent pathway during mitotic lamin disassembly and provide evidence for a lipid-mediated mitotic signaling event.

  3. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  4. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  5. Cytotoxic effects of cylindrospermopsin in mitotic and non-mitotic Vicia faba cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garda, Tamás; Riba, Milán; Vasas, Gábor; Beyer, Dániel; M-Hamvas, Márta; Hajdu, Gréta; Tándor, Ildikó; Máthé, Csaba

    2015-02-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a cyanobacterial toxin known as a eukaryotic protein synthesis inhibitor. We aimed to study its effects on growth, stress responses and mitosis of a eukaryotic model, Vicia faba (broad bean). Growth responses depended on exposure time (3 or 6d), cyanotoxin concentration, culture conditions (dark or continuous light) and V. faba cultivar ("Standard" or "ARC Egypt Cross"). At 6d of exposure, CYN had a transient stimulatory effect on root system growth, roots being possibly capable of detoxification. The toxin induced nucleus fragmentation, blebbing and chromosomal breaks indicating double stranded DNA breaks and programmed cell death. Root necrotic tissue was observed at 0.1-20 μg mL(-1) CYN that probably impeded toxin uptake into vascular tissue. Growth and cell death processes observed were general stress responses. In lateral root tip meristems, lower CYN concentrations (0.01-0.1 μg mL(-1)) induced the stimulation of mitosis and distinct mitotic phases, irrespective of culture conditions or the cultivar used. Higher cyanotoxin concentrations inhibited mitosis. Short-term exposure of hydroxylurea-synchronized roots to 5 μg mL(-1) CYN induced delay of mitosis that might have been related to a delay of de novo protein synthesis. CYN induced the formation of double, split and asymmetric preprophase bands (PPBs), in parallel with the alteration of cell division planes, related to the interference of cyanotoxin with protein synthesis, thus it was a plant- and CYN specific alteration.

  6. Segregation as Splitting, Segregation as Joining: Schools, Housing, and the Many Modes of Jim Crow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highsmith, Andrew R.; Erickson, Ansley T.

    2015-01-01

    Popular understandings of segregation often emphasize the Jim Crow South before the 1954 "Brown" decision and, in many instances, explain continued segregation in schooling as the result of segregated housing patterns. The case of Flint, Michigan, complicates these views, at once illustrating the depth of governmental commitment to…

  7. File list: His.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: His.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. THE INFLUENCE OF CAFFEINE ON MITOTIC DIVISION AT CAPSICUM ANNUUM L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rosu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents, the caffeine effects in mitotic division at Capsicum annuum L.. The treatment has determined the lessening of the mitotic index (comparative with the control variant, until mitotic division total inhibition, as well as an growth frequency of division aberation in anaphase and telophase.

  13. File list: Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  17. File list: Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. Screening of medicinal plants for induction of somatic segregation activity in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Ruiz, A; De la Torre, R A; Alonso, N; Villaescusa, A; Betancourt, J; Vizoso, A

    1996-07-05

    Knowledge about mutagenic properties of plants commonly used in traditional medicine is limited. A screening for genotoxic activity was carried out in aqueous or alcoholic extracts prepared from 13 medicinal plants widely used as folk medicine in Cuba: Lepidium virginicum L. (Brassicaceae): Plantago major L. and Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae); Ortosiphon aristatus Blume, Mentha x piperita L., Melissa officinalis L. and Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Lamiaceae); Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf (Poaceae); Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloraceae); Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae); Piper auritum HBK. (Piperaceae); Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Anacardeaceae) and Momordica charantia L. (Cucurbitaceae). A plate incorporation assay with Aspergillus nidulans was employed, allowing detection of somatic segregation as a result of mitotic crossing-over, chromosome malsegregation or clastogenic effects. Aspergillus nidulans D-30, a well-marked strain carrying four recessive mutations for conidial color in heterozygosity, which permitted the direct visual detection of segregants, was used throughout this study. As a result, only in the aqueous extract of one of the plants screened (Momordica charantia) a statistical significant increase in the frequency of segregant sectors per colony was observed, and consequently, a genotoxic effect is postulated.

  15. Phallacidin stains the kinetochore region in the mitotic spindle of the green algae Oedogonium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, K; Pickett-Heaps, J D

    2001-01-01

    We found previously that in living cells of Oedogonium cardiacum and O. donnellii, mitosis is blocked by the drug cytochalasin D (CD). We now report on the staining observed in these spindles with fluorescently actin-labeling reagents, particularly Bodipy FL phallacidin. Normal mitotic cells exhibited spots of staining associated with chromosomes; frequently the spots appeared in pairs during prometaphase-metaphase. During later anaphase and telophase, the staining was confined to the region between chromosomes and poles. The texture of the staining appeared to be somewhat dispersed by CD treatment but it was still present, particularly after shorter (Oedogonium spp. The previous observations on living cells suggest that it is a functional component of the kinetochore-MT complex involved in the correct attachment of chromosomes to the spindle.

  16. Comparisons between different techniques for measuring mass segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    We examine the performance of four different methods which are used to measure mass segregation in star-forming regions: the radial variation of the mass function $\\mathcal{M}_{\\rm MF}$; the minimum spanning tree-based $\\Lambda_{\\rm MSR}$ method; the local surface density $\\Sigma_{\\rm LDR}$ method; and the $\\Omega_{\\rm GSR}$ technique, which isolates groups of stars and determines whether the most massive star in each group is more centrally concentrated than the average star. All four methods have been proposed in the literature as techniques for quantifying mass segregation, yet they routinely produce contradictory results as they do not all measure the same thing. We apply each method to synthetic star-forming regions to determine when and why they have shortcomings. When a star-forming region is smooth and centrally concentrated, all four methods correctly identify mass segregation when it is present. However, if the region is spatially substructured, the $\\Omega_{\\rm GSR}$ method fails because it arbitra...

  17. Ising, Schelling and Self-Organising Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Stauffer, D

    2007-01-01

    The similarities between phase separation in physics and residential segregation by preference in the Schelling model of 1971 are reviewed. Also, new computer simulations of asymmetric interactions different from the usual Ising model are presented, showing spontaneous magnetisation (= self-organising segregation) and in one case a sharp phase transition.

  18. Ising, Schelling and self-organising segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, D.; Solomon, S.

    2007-06-01

    The similarities between phase separation in physics and residential segregation by preference in the Schelling model of 1971 are reviewed. Also, new computer simulations of asymmetric interactions different from the usual Ising model are presented, showing spontaneous magnetisation (=self-organising segregation) and in one case a sharp phase transition.

  19. Progressive segregation of the Escherichia coli chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2006-01-01

    We have followed the fate of 14 different loci around the Escherichia coli chromosome in living cells at slow growth rate using a highly efficient labelling system and automated measurements. Loci are segregated as they are replicated, but with a marked delay. Most markers segregate in a smooth...

  20. On the evolutionary stability of Mendelian segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Francisco; Haig, David

    2005-07-01

    We present a model of a primary locus subject to viability selection and an unlinked locus that causes sex-specific modification of the segregation ratio at the primary locus. If there is a balanced polymorphism at the primary locus, a population undergoing Mendelian segregation can be invaded by modifier alleles that cause sex-specific biases in the segregation ratio. Even though this effect is particularly strong if reciprocal heterozygotes at the primary locus have distinct viabilities, as might occur with genomic imprinting, it also applies if reciprocal heterozygotes have equal viabilities. The expected outcome of the evolution of sex-specific segregation distorters is all-and-none segregation schemes in which one allele at the primary locus undergoes complete drive in spermatogenesis and the other allele undergoes complete drive in oogenesis. All-and-none segregation results in a population in which all individuals are maximally fit heterozygotes. Unlinked modifiers that alter the segregation ratio are unable to invade such a population. These results raise questions about the reasons for the ubiquity of Mendelian segregation.

  1. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David W S; Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2011-06-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual's segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehensive approach in evaluating segregation beyond the residential space. The entire activity spaces of individuals are taken into account with individuals serving as the building blocks of the analysis. The measurement principle is based upon the exposure dimension of segregation. The proposed measure reflects the exposure of individuals of a referenced group in a neighborhood to the populations of other groups that are found within the activity spaces of individuals in the referenced group. Using the travel diary data collected from the tri-county area in southeast Florida and the imputed racial-ethnic data, this paper demonstrates how the proposed segregation measurement approach goes beyond just measuring population distribution patterns in the residential space and can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of segregation by considering various socio-geographical spaces.

  2. Losing Ground: School Segregation in Massachuestts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayscue, Jennifer B.; Greenberg, Alyssa

    2013-01-01

    Though once a leader in school integration, Massachusetts has regressed over the last two decades as its students of color have experienced intensifying school segregation. This report investigates trends in school segregation in Massachusetts by examining concentration, exposure, and evenness measures by both race and class. First, the report…

  3. Occupational Segregation by Sex: Trends and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Francine D.; Hendricks, Wallace E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates postwar trends in occupational segregation. Finds segregation increased slightly between 1950-60 as predominantly female clerical/professional jobs increased. Occupation mix changes (1960-70) were neutral in impact, but male inflow into female professions and female inflow into male sales/clerical jobs produced modest segregation…

  4. Cyclin B1: conductor of mitotic symphony orchestra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huijuan Yu; Xuebiao Yao

    2008-01-01

    @@ The inheritance of human genome through mitosis is precisely regulated by a series of tightly orchestrated events such as chromosome condensation, biorientated spindle formation, chromosome congression, segregation and cytokinesis.

  5. Chromosome replication and segregation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; Nicolas, Emilien; Sherratt, David J

    2012-01-01

    In dividing cells, chromosome duplication once per generation must be coordinated with faithful segregation of newly replicated chromosomes and with cell growth and division. Many of the mechanistic details of bacterial replication elongation are well established. However, an understanding of the complexities of how replication initiation is controlled and coordinated with other cellular processes is emerging only slowly. In contrast to eukaryotes, in which replication and segregation are separate in time, the segregation of most newly replicated bacterial genetic loci occurs sequentially soon after replication. We compare the strategies used by chromosomes and plasmids to ensure their accurate duplication and segregation and discuss how these processes are coordinated spatially and temporally with growth and cell division. We also describe what is known about the three conserved families of ATP-binding proteins that contribute to chromosome segregation and discuss their inter-relationships in a range of disparate bacteria.

  6. The Spatial Context of Residential Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Roberto, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Scholars have engaged in a longstanding debate about how best to measure residential segregation, and scores of indexes have been developed in response. However, the methods commonly employed are aspatial -- they summarize the characteristics of segregation patterns, such as concentration or clustering, but ignore their spatial features, such as how neighborhoods are spatially arranged. As a consequence, many studies find the same level of segregation whether a city has a patchwork of racial and ethnic enclaves, or is divided into large areas with little or no diversity. New methods have been developed to capture the spatial proximity of neighborhoods and the geographic scale of clustering. However, they lack a realistic measure of distance and do not accurately represent how segregation varies within cities. In this paper, I introduce a new method for studying the spatial context of residential segregation. I measure the distance between locations along city roads rather than in a straight line. Road distanc...

  7. An FEGSTEM Study of Grain Boundary Segregation of Phosphorus during Quenching in a 2.25Cr-1Mo Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shenhua SONG; Luqian WENG

    2005-01-01

    Quenching-induced phosphorus segregation to prior austenite grain boundaries in a 0.077 wt pct P-doped 2.25Cr1Mo steel is examined using field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM). A phosphorus level of around 1.56 at. pct is observed for the water-quenched sample. In recognition of insufficiently high spatial resolution of the technique for grain boundary composition analysis, the measured results are corrected by an analytical convolution method. The corrected phosphorus segregation level may be up to about 4.7 at. pct. The quenchinginduced phosphorus segregation is nonequilibrium segregation and the migration of vacancy-phosphorus complexes plays an important role in the kinetic process. For such a reason, the mechanism for migration of the complexes is discussed in some detail.

  8. Meiotic recombination intermediates are resolved with minimal crossover formation during return-to-growth, an analogue of the mitotic cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Dayani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes of different parental origin (homologs during the first division of meiosis (meiosis I requires inter-homolog crossovers (COs. These are produced at the end of meiosis I prophase, when recombination intermediates that contain Holliday junctions (joint molecules, JMs are resolved, predominantly as COs. JM resolution during the mitotic cell cycle is less well understood, mainly due to low levels of inter-homolog JMs. To compare JM resolution during meiosis and the mitotic cell cycle, we used a unique feature of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, return to growth (RTG, where cells undergoing meiosis can be returned to the mitotic cell cycle by a nutritional shift. By performing RTG with ndt80 mutants, which arrest in meiosis I prophase with high levels of interhomolog JMs, we could readily monitor JM resolution during the first cell division of RTG genetically and, for the first time, at the molecular level. In contrast to meiosis, where most JMs resolve as COs, most JMs were resolved during the first 1.5-2 hr after RTG without producing COs. Subsequent resolution of the remaining JMs produced COs, and this CO production required the Mus81/Mms4 structure-selective endonuclease. RTG in sgs1-ΔC795 mutants, which lack the helicase and Holliday junction-binding domains of this BLM homolog, led to a substantial delay in JM resolution; and subsequent JM resolution produced both COs and NCOs. Based on these findings, we suggest that most JMs are resolved during the mitotic cell cycle by dissolution, an Sgs1 helicase-dependent process that produces only NCOs. JMs that escape dissolution are mostly resolved by Mus81/Mms4-dependent cleavage that produces both COs and NCOs in a relatively unbiased manner. Thus, in contrast to meiosis, where JM resolution is heavily biased towards COs, JM resolution during RTG minimizes CO formation, thus maintaining genome integrity and minimizing loss of heterozygosity.

  9. Caspase-3-mediated degradation of condensin Cap-H regulates mitotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S-K; Wong, C-H; Lee, Y-P; Li, H-Y

    2011-06-01

    Mitotic death is a major form of cell death in cancer cells that have been treated with chemotherapeutic drugs. However, the mechanisms underlying this form of cell death is poorly understood. Here, we report that the loss of chromosome integrity is an important determinant of mitotic death. During prolonged mitotic arrest, caspase-3 is activated and it cleaves Cap-H, a subunit of condensin I. The depletion of Cap-H results in the loss of condensin I complex at the chromosomes, thus affecting the integrity of the chromosomes. Consequently, DNA fragmentation by caspase-activated DNase is facilitated, thus driving the cell towards mitotic death. By expressing a caspase-resistant form of Cap-H, mitotic death is abrogated and the cells are able to reenter interphase after a long mitotic delay. Taken together, we provide new insights into the molecular events that occur during mitotic death.

  10. Modeling density segregation in granular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongyi; Lueptow, Richard; Umbanhowar, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A recently developed continuum-based model accurately predicts segregation in flows of granular mixtures varying in particle size by considering the interplay of advection, diffusion and segregation. In this research, we extend the domain of the model to include density driven segregation. Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations of density bidisperse flows of mono-sized particles in a quasi-2D bounded heap were performed to determine the dependence of the density driven segregation velocity on local shear rate, particle concentration, and a segregation length which scales with the particle size and the logarithm of the density ratio. With these inputs, the model yields theoretical predictions of density segregation patterns that quantitatively match the DEM simulations over a range of density ratios (1.11-3.33) and flow rates (19.2-113.6 cm3/s). Matching experiments with various combinations of glass, steel and ceramic particles were also performed which reproduced the segregation patterns obtained in both the simulations and the theory.

  11. CRM1 and chromosomal passenger complex component survivin are essential to normal mitosis progress and to preserve keratinocytes from mitotic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarrade, F; Botto, J-M; Domloge, N

    2016-10-01

    Human epidermis provides the body a barrier against environmental assaults. To assume this function, the epidermis needs the renewal of keratinocytes allowed by constant mitosis, which replace the exfoliating corneocytes. Keratinocyte stem cells (KSCs) located in the basal epidermis are mitotically active, self-renewing and govern the epithelial stratification by producing renewed source of keratinocytes. Protein complex such as the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) allows the correct development of this process. The CPC is composed of four members: INCENP, survivin, borealin and aurora kinase B, and the disruption of the CPC during cell division induces mitotic spindle defects and improper repartition of chromosomes. The aim of our study was to investigate the implication of CRM1 and survivin in the progress of mitosis in skin keratinocytes. Cultured human keratinocytes and skin biopsies were used in this study. KSCs-enriched population of keratinocytes was isolated from total keratinocytes by differential attachment to a type IV collagen matrix. Survivin and CRM1 expression levels were assessed by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. Specific siRNAs for each CPC member and for CRM1 were used to determine the relationship between these proteins. Survivin-specific siRNA was used to induce the apparition of mitotic abnormalities in cultured keratinocytes. We demonstrated the ability of our compound 'IV08.009' to modulate the expression level of survivin and CRM1 in keratinocytes and in skin biopsies. We observed that members of the CPC are interdependent: siRNA-induced inhibition of one component caused a decrease in the expression of all other CPC members. Downregulation of survivin or CRM1 induced mitotic abnormalities in keratinocytes. However, decreased number of mitotic abnormalities was observed in keratinocytes after 'IV08.009' application. Basal keratinocytes may divide frequently during skin lifespan, and signs of deterioration could appear such as loss

  12. Mitotic activity in dorsal epidermis of Rana pipiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Arce, H.; Mizell, S.

    1972-01-01

    Study of statistically significant rhythms of mitotic division in dorsal epidermis of frogs, Rana pipiens, exposed to a 12:12 light:dark environment for 14 days. The results include the findings that (1) male animals have a primary period of 22 hr in summer and 18 hr in winter, (2) female animals have an 18 hr period, and (3) parapinealectomy and blinding abolish the rhythm.

  13. Towards a quantitative understanding of mitotic spindle assembly and mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Mogilner, Alex; Craig, Erin

    2010-01-01

    The ‘simple’ view of the mitotic spindle is that it self-assembles as a result of microtubules (MTs) randomly searching for chromosomes, after which the spindle length is maintained by a balance of outward tension exerted by molecular motors on the MTs connecting centrosomes and chromosomes, and compression generated by other motors on the MTs connecting the spindle poles. This picture is being challenged now by mounting evidence indicating that spindle assembly and maintenance rely on much m...

  14. Mitotic death: a mechanism of survival? A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cragg M S

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mitotic death is a delayed response of p53 mutant tumours that are resistant to genotoxic damage. Questions surround why this response is so delayed and how its mechanisms serve a survival function. After uncoupling apoptosis from G1 and S phase arrests and adapting these checkpoints, p53 mutated tumour cells arrive at the G2 compartment where decisions regarding survival and death are made. Missed or insufficient DNA repair in G1 and S phases after severe genotoxic damage results in cells arriving in G2 with an accumulation of point mutations and chromosome breaks. Double strand breaks can be repaired by homologous recombination during G2 arrest. However, cells with excessive chromosome lesions either directly bypass the G2/M checkpoint, starting endocycles from G2 arrest, or are subsequently detected by the spindle checkpoint and present with the features of mitotic death. These complex features include apoptosis from metaphase and mitosis restitution, the latter of which can also facilitate transient endocycles, producing endopolyploid cells. The ability of cells to initiate endocycles during G2 arrest and mitosis restitution most likely reflects their similar molecular environments, with down-regulated mitosis promoting factor activity. Resulting endocycling cells have the ability to repair damaged DNA, and although mostly reproductively dead, in some cases give rise to mitotic progeny. We conclude that the features of mitotic death do not simply represent aberrations of dying cells but are indicative of a switch to amitotic modes of cell survival that may provide additional mechanisms of genotoxic resistance.

  15. Cyto-3D-print to attach mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castroagudin, Michelle R; Zhai, Yujia; Li, Zhi; Marnell, Michael G; Glavy, Joseph S

    2016-08-01

    The Cyto-3D-print is an adapter that adds cytospin capability to a standard centrifuge. Like standard cytospinning, Cyto-3D-print increases the surface attachment of mitotic cells while giving a higher degree of adaptability to other slide chambers than available commercial devices. The use of Cyto-3D-print is cost effective, safe, and applicable to many slide designs. It is durable enough for repeated use and made of biodegradable materials for environment-friendly disposal.

  16. Veil: A Wall of Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Nowrouzi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Moving behind the confines of the race has been the continuous efforts of African-Americans so as to reveal and confirm their true humanity and abilities to white race as well as their own race. African-Americans, Dubois posited, are shut out of the white America, inhabiting behind a vast veil which creates a deep division between the races. Veil is made of the fabric of racism interwoven thread by thread and imposed by white world. It is thrown discourteously and forcibly to the African-Americans whom their distorted images are imposed on them and their true humanity and identity are hidden behind the veil. This study overtakes to present how Loraine Hansberry, in her first and the most outstanding drama, A Raisin in the Sun examines the world within the veil. She demonstrated that Duboisian metaphoric veil is operating in the racist American society so that not only African-Americans are segregated physically and psychologically from the rest of the world but also are inflicted with obscurity of vision that are neither able to see themselves clearly nor be seen truly. On the other hand, it presents how the veil provides blacks with the second sight to observe and comprehend the racist nature of whites which is hidden and incomprehensible for them.

  17. Genes that bias Mendelian segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Grognet

    Full Text Available Mendel laws of inheritance can be cheated by Meiotic Drive Elements (MDs, complex nuclear genetic loci found in various eukaryotic genomes and distorting segregation in their favor. Here, we identify and characterize in the model fungus Podospora anserina Spok1 and Spok2, two MDs known as Spore Killers. We show that they are related genes with both spore-killing distorter and spore-protecting responder activities carried out by the same allele. These alleles act as autonomous elements, exert their effects independently of their location in the genome and can act as MDs in other fungi. Additionally, Spok1 acts as a resistance factor to Spok2 killing. Genetical data and cytological analysis of Spok1 and Spok2 localization during the killing process suggest a complex mode of action for Spok proteins. Spok1 and Spok2 belong to a multigene family prevalent in the genomes of many ascomycetes. As they have no obvious cellular role, Spok1 and Spok2 Spore Killer genes represent a novel kind of selfish genetic elements prevalent in fungal genome that proliferate through meiotic distortion.

  18. Genes that bias Mendelian segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grognet, Pierre; Lalucque, Hervé; Malagnac, Fabienne; Silar, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Mendel laws of inheritance can be cheated by Meiotic Drive Elements (MDs), complex nuclear genetic loci found in various eukaryotic genomes and distorting segregation in their favor. Here, we identify and characterize in the model fungus Podospora anserina Spok1 and Spok2, two MDs known as Spore Killers. We show that they are related genes with both spore-killing distorter and spore-protecting responder activities carried out by the same allele. These alleles act as autonomous elements, exert their effects independently of their location in the genome and can act as MDs in other fungi. Additionally, Spok1 acts as a resistance factor to Spok2 killing. Genetical data and cytological analysis of Spok1 and Spok2 localization during the killing process suggest a complex mode of action for Spok proteins. Spok1 and Spok2 belong to a multigene family prevalent in the genomes of many ascomycetes. As they have no obvious cellular role, Spok1 and Spok2 Spore Killer genes represent a novel kind of selfish genetic elements prevalent in fungal genome that proliferate through meiotic distortion.

  19. A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhai, Ioan Sebastian; van der Leij, Marco

    We develop a social network model of occupational segregation between different social groups, generated by the existence of positive inbreeding bias among individuals from the same group. If network referrals are important for job search, then expected homophily in the contact network structure...... induces different career choices for individuals from different social groups. This further translates into stable occupational segregation equilibria in the labor market. We derive the conditions for wage and unemployment inequality in the segregation equilibria and characterize first and second best...

  20. Segregation of Polymers in Confined Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ya

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the motion of two overlapping polymers with self-avoidance confined in a narrow 2d box. A statistical model is constructed using blob free-energy arguments. We find spontaneous segregation under the condition: $L > R_{//}$, and mixing under $L < R_{//}$, where L is the length of the box, and $R_{//}$ the polymer extension in an infinite slit. Segregation time scales are determined by solving a mean first-passage time problem, and by performing Monte Carlo simulations. Predictions of the two methods show good agreement. Our results may elucidate a driving force for chromosomes segregation in bacteria.

  1. Regulation of microtubule stability and mitotic progression by survivin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giodini, Alessandra; Kallio, Marko J; Wall, Nathan R; Gorbsky, Gary J; Tognin, Simona; Marchisio, Pier Carlo; Symons, Marc; Altieri, Dario C

    2002-05-01

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) gene family, which has been implicated in both preservation of cell viability and regulation of mitosis in cancer cells. Here, we show that HeLa cells microinjected with a polyclonal antibody to survivin exhibited delayed progression in prometaphase (31.5 +/- 6.9 min) and metaphase (126.8 +/- 73.8 min), as compared with control injected cells (prometaphase, 21.5 +/- 3.3 min; metaphase, 18.9 +/- 4.5 min; P mitotic spindles severely depleted of microtubules and occasionally underwent apoptosis without exiting the mitotic block or thereafter. Forced expression of survivin in HeLa cells profoundly influenced microtubule dynamics with reduction of pole-to-pole distance at metaphase (8.57 +/- 0.21 microm versus 10.58 +/- 0.19 microm; P microtubules against nocodazole-induced depolymerization in vivo. These data demonstrate that survivin functions at cell division to control microtubule stability and assembly of a normal mitotic spindle. This pathway may facilitate checkpoint evasion and promote resistance to chemotherapy in cancer.

  2. Trichomonas vaginalis: chromatin and mitotic spindle during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Conde, E; Mena-López, R; Hernández-Jaúregui, P; González-Camacho, M; Arroyo, R

    2000-11-01

    The mitotic phases and the changes that the chromatin and mitotic microtubules undergo during mitosis in the sexually transmitted parasite Trichomonas vaginalis are described. Parasites arrested in the gap 2 phase of the cell cycle by nutrient starvation were induced to mitosis by addition of fresh whole medium. [(3)H] Thymidine labeling of trichomonad parasites for 24 h showed that parasites have at least four synchronic duplications after mitosis induction. Fixed or live and acridine orange (AO)-stained trichomonads analyzed at different times during mitosis by epifluorescence microscopy showed that mitosis took about 45 min and is divided into five stages: prophase, metaphase, early and late anaphase, early and late telophase, and cytokinesis. The AO-stained nucleus of live trichomonads showed green (DNA) and orange (RNA) fluorescence, and the nucleic acid nature was confirmed by DNase and RNase treatment, respectively. The chromatin appeared partially condensed during interphase. At metaphase, it appeared as six condensed chromosomes, as recently reported, which decondensed at anaphase and migrated to the nuclear poles at telophase. In addition, small bundles of microtubules (as hemispindles) were detected only in metaphase with the polyclonal antibody anti-Entamoeba histolytica alpha-tubulin. This antibody showed that the hemispindle and an atractophore-like structure seem to duplicate and polarize during metaphase. In conclusion, T. vaginalis mitosis involves five mitotic phases in which the chromatin undergoes different degrees of condensation, from chromosomes to decondensed chromatin, and two hemispindles that are observed only in the metaphase stage.

  3. A membrane-specific tyrosinase chelate: the mitotic regulator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharasch, J A

    1987-06-01

    Cancer's random, reversible, unstable transitions to "normal" structures imply their functional relation. Similar random, continuous, reversible oncogene "mutational transformation" also lacks a consistent hybrid. Positing cancer's "mutationally altered genotype" leads to medically foreign causes, qualities, inducers, suppressors, immune proteins, and viruses. Its random variation, however, opposes the functionally discrete, ordered, stable, irreversible hybrid variation and single-valued transforms of molecular genetics. There, "causal mutational operators" remain unspecified; only consistent single-valued DNA base and amino acid change, as "transform operand", are made explicit. A mitotically "blocked" (normal) and "unblocked" (malignant) stem cell "phenotype", operationally constructed from microscopic data, is therefore viewed within the homeostatic context of open-system enzyme-regulatory equilibrium. This functional, stochastic field distribution between "structurally bound" and "freely dividing" stem cell number discloses their putative regulatory mitotic-blocking factor. A tyrosinase complex, interacting by Cu2+-Fe2+ chelation with a proline hydroxylase divisional enzyme near stem cell ribosomes, maintains steady-state mitotic equilibrium. Based upon familiar medical, biochemical, and energy principles this confronts cancer's pigmentary-depigmentary signs, glycolytic metabolism, elevated serum tyrosinase, defective collagen production, exposed membrane binding sites, and tyrosine's recent growth control role.

  4. A roller coaster ride with the mitotic cyclins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Tsz Kan; Poon, Randy Y C

    2005-06-01

    Cyclins are discovered as proteins that accumulate progressively through interphase and disappear abruptly at mitosis during each cell cycle. In mammalian cells, cyclin A accumulates from late G1 phase and is destroyed before metaphase, and cyclin B is destroyed slightly later at anaphase. The abundance of the mitotic cyclins is mainly regulated at the levels of transcription and proteolysis. Transcription is stimulated and repressed by several transcription factors, including B-MYB, E2F, FOXM1, and NF-Y. Elements in the promoter, including CCRE/CDE and CHR, are in part responsible for the cell cycle oscillation of transcription. Destruction of the mitotic cyclins is carried out by the ubiquitin ligases APC/C(CDC20) and APC/C(CDH1). Central to our knowledge is the understanding of how APC/C is turned on from anaphase to early G1 phase, and turned off from late G1 till the spindle-assembly checkpoint is deactivated in metaphase. Reciprocal actions of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) on APC/C, as well as on the SCF complexes ensure that the mitotic cyclins are destroyed only at the proper time.

  5. Carbamazepine induces mitotic arrest in mammalian Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Martin, J.M.; Fernandez Freire, P.; Labrador, V. [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Hazen, M.J. [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: mariajose.hazen@uam.es

    2008-01-01

    We reported recently that the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine, at supratherapeutic concentrations, exerts antiproliferative effects in mammalian Vero cells, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. This motivates us to examine rigorously whether growth arrest was associated with structural changes in cellular organization during mitosis. In the present work, we found that exposure of the cells to carbamazepine led to an increase in mitotic index, mainly due to the sustained block at the metaphase/anaphase boundary, with the consequent inhibition of cell proliferation. Indirect immunofluorescence, using antibodies directed against spindle apparatus proteins, revealed that mitotic arrest was associated with formation of monopolar spindles, caused by impairment of centrosome separation. The final consequence of the spindle defects induced by carbamazepine, depended on the duration of cell cycle arrest. Following the time course of accumulation of metaphase and apoptotic cells during carbamazepine treatments, we observed a causative relationship between mitotic arrest and induction of cell death. Conversely, cells released from the block of metaphase by removal of the drug, continued to progress through mitosis and resume normal proliferation. Our results show that carbamazepine shares a common antiproliferative mechanism with spindle-targeted drugs and contribute to a better understanding of the cytostatic activity previously described in Vero cells. Additional studies are in progress to extend these initial findings that define a novel mode of action of carbamazepine in cultured mammalian cells.

  6. Role of senescence and mitotic catastrophe in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Yogeshwer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Senescence and mitotic catastrophe (MC are two distinct crucial non-apoptotic mechanisms, often triggered in cancer cells and tissues in response to anti-cancer drugs. Chemotherapeuticals and myriad other factors induce cell eradication via these routes. While senescence drives the cells to a state of quiescence, MC drives the cells towards death during the course of mitosis. The senescent phenotype distinguishes tumor cells that survived drug exposure but lost the ability to form colonies from those that recover and proliferate after treatment. Although senescent cells do not proliferate, they are metabolically active and may secrete proteins with potential tumor-promoting activities. The other anti-proliferative response of tumor cells is MC that is a form of cell death that results from abnormal mitosis and leads to the formation of interphase cells with multiple micronuclei. Different classes of cytotoxic agents induce MC, but the pathways of abnormal mitosis differ depending on the nature of the inducer and the status of cell-cycle checkpoints. In this review, we compare the two pathways and mention that they are activated to curb the growth of tumors. Altogether, we have highlighted the possibilities of the use of senescence targeting drugs, mitotic kinases and anti-mitotic agents in fabricating novel strategies in cancer control.

  7. Daxx regulates mitotic progression and prostate cancer predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Pak Shing; Lau, Chi Chiu; Chiu, Yung Tuen; Man, Cornelia; Liu, Ji; Tang, Kai Dun; Wong, Yong Chuan; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2013-04-01

    Mitotic progression of mammalian cells is tightly regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase promoting complex (APC)/C. Deregulation of APC/C is frequently observed in cancer cells and is suggested to contribute to chromosome instability and cancer predisposition. In this study, we identified Daxx as a novel APC/C inhibitor frequently overexpressed in prostate cancer. Daxx interacts with the APC/C coactivators Cdc20 and Cdh1 in vivo, with the binding of Cdc20 dependent on the consensus destruction boxes near the N-terminal of the Daxx protein. Ectopic expression of Daxx, but not the D-box deleted mutant (DaxxΔD-box), inhibited the degradation of APC/Cdc20 and APC/Cdh1 substrates, leading to a transient delay in mitotic progression. Daxx is frequently upregulated in prostate cancer tissues; the expression level positively correlated with the Gleason score and disease metastasis (P = 0.027 and 0.032, respectively). Furthermore, ectopic expression of Daxx in a non-malignant prostate epithelial cell line induced polyploidy under mitotic stress. Our data suggest that Daxx may function as a novel APC/C inhibitor, which promotes chromosome instability during prostate cancer development.

  8. SUMOylation inhibits FOXM1 activity and delays mitotic transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatt, S S; Kongsema, M; Man, C W-Y; Kelly, D J; Gomes, A R; Khongkow, P; Karunarathna, U; Zona, S; Langer, J K; Dunsby, C W; Coombes, R C; French, P M; Brosens, J J; Lam, E W-F

    2014-08-21

    The forkhead box transcription factor FOXM1 is an essential effector of G2/M-phase transition, mitosis and the DNA damage response. As such, it is frequently deregulated during tumorigenesis. Here we report that FOXM1 is dynamically modified by SUMO1 but not by SUMO2/3 at multiple sites. We show that FOXM1 SUMOylation is enhanced in MCF-7 breast cancer cells in response to treatment with epirubicin and mitotic inhibitors. Mutation of five consensus conjugation motifs yielded a SUMOylation-deficient mutant FOXM1. Conversely, fusion of the E2 ligase Ubc9 to FOXM1 generated an auto-SUMOylating mutant (FOXM1-Ubc9). Analysis of wild-type FOXM1 and mutants revealed that SUMOylation inhibits FOXM1 activity, promotes translocation to the cytoplasm and enhances APC/Cdh1-mediated ubiquitination and degradation. Further, expression of the SUMOylation-deficient mutant enhanced cell proliferation compared with wild-type FOXM1, whereas the FOXM1-Ubc9 fusion protein resulted in persistent cyclin B1 expression and slowed the time from mitotic entry to exit. In summary, our findings suggest that SUMOylation attenuates FOXM1 activity and causes mitotic delay in cytotoxic drug response.

  9. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in {gamma} irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina [Latvian Biomedicine Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Cragg, Mark S. [Tenovus Laboratory, Cancer Sciences Division, Southampton University School of Medicine, General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD (United Kingdom); Salmina, Kristine [Latvian Biomedicine Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Hausmann, Michael [Kirchhoff Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Scherthan, Harry, E-mail: scherth@web.de [Inst. fuer Radiobiologie der Bundeswehr in Verbindung mit der Univ. Ulm, D-80937 Munich (Germany); MPI for Molec. Genetics, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  10. Cbx2 stably associates with mitotic chromosomes via a PRC2- or PRC1-independent mechanism and is needed for recruiting PRC1 complex to mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Chao Yu; Duc, Huy Nguyen; Kokotovic, Marko; Phiel, Christopher J; Ren, Xiaojun

    2014-11-15

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic transcriptional factors that repress key developmental regulators and maintain cellular identity through mitosis via a poorly understood mechanism. Using quantitative live-cell imaging in mouse ES cells and tumor cells, we demonstrate that, although Polycomb repressive complex (PRC) 1 proteins (Cbx-family proteins, Ring1b, Mel18, and Phc1) exhibit variable capacities of association with mitotic chromosomes, Cbx2 overwhelmingly binds to mitotic chromosomes. The recruitment of Cbx2 to mitotic chromosomes is independent of PRC1 or PRC2, and Cbx2 is needed to recruit PRC1 complex to mitotic chromosomes. Quantitative fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis indicates that PRC1 proteins rapidly exchange at interphasic chromatin. On entry into mitosis, Cbx2, Ring1b, Mel18, and Phc1 proteins become immobilized at mitotic chromosomes, whereas other Cbx-family proteins dynamically bind to mitotic chromosomes. Depletion of PRC1 or PRC2 protein has no effect on the immobilization of Cbx2 on mitotic chromosomes. We find that the N-terminus of Cbx2 is needed for its recruitment to mitotic chromosomes, whereas the C-terminus is required for its immobilization. Thus these results provide fundamental insights into the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance.

  11. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization.

  12. Possible segregation caused by centrifugal titanium casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Kanatani, M; Nakano, S; Miyakawa, O; Kobayashi, M

    1996-12-01

    The possibility of the segregation under solidification process using a centrifugal casting machine was investigated using an electron probe microanalyzer with elemental distribution map, line analysis and quantitative analysis. When a very small quantity of platinum was added to local molten titanium during the casting process, macroscopic segregation was observed under conditions of density difference of 0.1 g/cm3 at the most, confirming that the centrifugal force of the casting machine is extremely strong. When a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was cast, however, no macroscopic segregation was observed. The centrifugal force of the casting machine examined in the present study hardly results in the body-force segregation in this titanium alloy.

  13. Entropy as the driver of chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Suckjoon; Wright, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    We present a new physical biology approach to understanding the relationship between the organization and segregation of bacterial chromosomes. We posit that replicated Escherichia coli daughter strands will spontaneously demix as a result of entropic forces, despite their strong confinement within the cell; in other words, we propose that entropy can act as a primordial physical force which drives chromosome segregation under the right physical conditions. Furthermore, proteins implicated in...

  14. The active form of the metabolic sensor: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) directly binds the mitotic apparatus and travels from centrosomes to the spindle midzone during mitosis and cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Menendez, Javier A

    2009-08-01

    The metabolic rheostat AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is unexpectedly required for proper cell division and faithful chromosomal segregation during mitosis. Although it is conceptually attractive to assume that AMPK-interpreted microenvironmental bioenergetics may strictly engage cell's energy status, cell grow, and cell division to avoid that energy stresses trigger cell death, the ultimate framework of AMPK activity towards chromosomal and cytoskeletal mitotic regulation is a question that remains unanswered. We herein reveal that the active form of the alpha-catalytic AMPK subunit (P-AMPKalpha(Thr172))-but not its total form (AMPKalpha)-transiently associates with several mitotic structures including centrosomes, spindle poles, the central spindle midzone and the midbody throughout all of the mitotic stages and cytokinesis in human cancer-derived epithelial cells. At prophase, P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) associates with the two asters of microtubules that begin to nucleate from mature centrosomes. The overlapping localization of P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) with the mitotic centrosomal Aurora-A kinase is also apparent on the microtubules near the spindle poles in metaphase and in early anaphase. This Aurora A-like centrosomal localization of P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) cannot be detected following chromatid separation following anaphase-telophase transition. Rather, toward the end of anaphase and in telophase P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) reactivity exhibited a similar but not identical localization to that occupied by the bona fide chromosomal passenger proteins INCENCP and Aurora-B. This localization of P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) at the central spindle and midbody persisted during the furrowing process and, at the completion of telophase, staining of P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) as doublet was apparent on either side of the midbody within the intercellular cytokinetic bridge. An identical mitotic geography of P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) was observed in cancer cells lacking the AMPK kinase LKB1, in non

  15. Transport analogy for segregation and granular rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siying; McCarthy, Joseph J.

    2017-08-01

    Here, we show a direct connection between density-based segregation and granular rheology that can lead to insight into both problems. Our results exhibit a transition in the rate of segregation during simple shear that occurs at I ˜0.5 and mimics a coincident regime change in flow rheology. We propose scaling arguments that support a packing fraction criterion for this transition that can both explain our segregation results as well as unify existing literature studies of granular rheology. By recasting a segregation model in terms of rheological parameters, we establish an approach that not only collapses results for a wide range of conditions, but also yields a direct relationship between the coordination number z and the segregation velocity. Moreover, our approach predicts the precise location of the observed regime change or saturation. This suggests that it is possible to rationally design process operating conditions that lead to significantly lower segregation extents. These observations can have a profound impact on both the study of granular flow or mixing as well as industrial practice.

  16. Microcystin-LR, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, induces alterations in mitotic chromatin and microtubule organization leading to the formation of micronuclei in Vicia faba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Dániel; Tándor, Ildikó; Kónya, Zoltán; Bátori, Róbert; Roszik, Janos; Vereb, György; Erdodi, Ferenc; Vasas, Gábor; M-Hamvas, Márta; Jambrovics, Károly; Máthé, Csaba

    2012-09-01

    Microcystin-LR (MCY-LR) is a cyanobacterial toxin, a specific inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A) with significant impact on aquatic ecosystems. It has the potential to alter regulation of the plant cell cycle. The aim of this study was improved understanding of the mitotic alterations induced by cyanotoxin in Vicia faba, a model organism for plant cell biology studies. Vicia faba seedlings were treated over the long and short term with MCY-LR purified in our laboratory. Short-term treatments were performed on root meristems synchronized with hydroxylurea. Sections of lateral root tips were labelled for chromatin, phosphorylated histone H3 and β-tubulin via histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Mitotic activity and the occurrence of mitotic alterations were detected and analysed by fluorescence microscopy. The phosphorylation state of histone H3 was studied by Western blotting. Long-term MCY-LR exposure of lateral root tip meristems increased the percentage of either early or late mitosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We observed hypercondensed chromosomes and altered sister chromatid segregation (lagging chromosomes) leading to the formation of micronuclei, accompanied by the formation of disrupted, multipolar and monopolar spindles, disrupted phragmoplasts and the hyperphosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10. Short-term MCY-LR treatment of synchronized cells showed that PP1 and PP2A inhibition delayed the onset of anaphase at 1 µg mL(-1) MCY-LR, accelerated cell cycle at 10 µg mL(-1) MCY-LR and induced the formation of lagging chromosomes. In this case mitotic microtubule alterations were not detected, but histone H3 was hyperphosphorylated. MCY-LR delayed metaphase-anaphase transition. Consequently, it induced aberrant chromatid segregation and micronucleus formation that could be associated with both H3 hyperphosphorylation and altered microtubule organization. However, these two phenomena seemed to be independent

  17. Gender Segregation in the Spanish Labor Market: An Alternative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rio, Coral; Alonso-Villar, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study occupational segregation by gender in Spain, which is a country where occupational segregation explains a large part of the gender wage gap. As opposed to previous studies, this paper measures not only overall segregation, but also the segregation of several population subgroups. For this purpose, this paper uses…

  18. A Model of DNA Repeat-Assembled Mitotic Chromosomal Skeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences) in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing), into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem r...

  19. Sequential phosphorylation of GRASP65 during mitotic Golgi disassembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danming Tang

    2012-09-01

    GRASP65 phosphorylation during mitosis and dephosphorylation after mitosis are required for Golgi disassembly and reassembly during the cell cycle. At least eight phosphorylation sites on GRASP65 have been identified, but whether they are modified in a coordinated fashion during mitosis is so far unknown. In this study, we raised phospho-specific antibodies that recognize phosphorylated T220/T224, S277 and S376 residues of GRASP65, respectively. Biochemical analysis showed that cdc2 phosphorylates all three sites, while plk1 enhances the phosphorylation. Microscopic studies using these antibodies for double and triple labeling demonstrate sequential phosphorylation and dephosphorylation during the cell cycle. S277 and S376 are phosphorylated from late G2 phase through metaphase until telophase when the new Golgi is reassembled. T220/224 is not modified until prophase, but is highly modified from prometaphase to anaphase. In metaphase, phospho-T220/224 signal localizes on both Golgi haze and mitotic Golgi clusters that represent dispersed Golgi vesicles and Golgi remnants, respectively, while phospho-S277 and S376 labeling is more concentrated on mitotic Golgi clusters. Expression of a phosphorylation-resistant GRASP65 mutant T220A/T224A inhibited mitotic Golgi fragmentation to a much larger extent than the expression of the S277A and S376A mutants. In cytokinesis, T220/224 dephosphorylation occurs prior to that of S277, but after S376. This study provides evidence that GRASP65 is sequentially phosphorylated and dephosphorylated during mitosis at different sites to orchestrate Golgi disassembly and reassembly during cell division, with phosphorylation of the T220/224 site being most critical in the process.

  20. DEK over-expression promotes mitotic defects and micronucleus formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrka, Marie C; Hennigan, Robert F; Kappes, Ferdinand; DeLay, Monica L; Lambert, Paul F; Aronow, Bruce J; Wells, Susanne I

    2015-01-01

    The DEK gene encodes a nuclear protein that binds chromatin and is involved in various fundamental nuclear processes including transcription, RNA splicing, DNA replication and DNA repair. Several cancer types characteristically over-express DEK at the earliest stages of transformation. In order to explore relevant mechanisms whereby DEK supports oncogenicity, we utilized cancer databases to identify gene transcripts whose expression patterns are tightly correlated with that of DEK. We identified an enrichment of genes involved in mitosis and thus investigated the regulation and possible function of DEK in cell division. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed that DEK dissociates from DNA in early prophase and re-associates with DNA during telophase in human keratinocytes. Mitotic cell populations displayed a sharp reduction in DEK protein levels compared to the corresponding interphase population, suggesting DEK may be degraded or otherwise removed from the cell prior to mitosis. Interestingly, DEK overexpression stimulated its own aberrant association with chromatin throughout mitosis. Furthermore, DEK co-localized with anaphase bridges, chromosome fragments, and micronuclei, suggesting a specific association with mitotically defective chromosomes. We found that DEK over-expression in both non-transformed and transformed cells is sufficient to stimulate micronucleus formation. These data support a model wherein normal chromosomal clearance of DEK is required for maintenance of high fidelity cell division and chromosomal integrity. Therefore, the overexpression of DEK and its incomplete removal from mitotic chromosomes promotes genomic instability through the generation of genetically abnormal daughter cells. Consequently, DEK over-expression may be involved in the initial steps of developing oncogenic mutations in cells leading to cancer initiation.

  1. Detection of mitotic figures in thin melanomas--immunohistochemistry does not replace the careful search for mitotic figures in hematoxylin-eosin stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Karl; Tronnier, Michael; Mitteldorf, Christina

    2015-10-01

    The mitotic rate is an important prognostic criterion in patients with thin melanoma ≤ 1 mm. The aim of this study was to investigate the reproducibility of the mitotic rate in thin melanoma in hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) stain and compare it with the detection of mitotic figures by immunohistochemistry. The number of mitoses stated in the routine diagnostic report in 190 pT1 melanomas was compared with the number gained from re-evaluation of H&E sections and the number detected after staining with the mitotic marker, phosphohistone H3 (PHH3). Two different approaches were used for choosing the "hot spot" for evaluation (dermal vs epidermal/dermal). Comparing routine H&E-stained slides with re-evaluation slides, the number of mitotic figures was slightly variable. However, findings did not result in a change of the tumor stage. In 34% of the tumors with dermal mitotic figures on H&E, mitoses could not be found in the corresponding PHH3 slide anymore. In 4% of the cases, stage relevant mitoses could only be found by PHH3 immunohistochemistry. This is a single center study. Immunohistochemical staining for mitotic figures does not replace a careful evaluation of H&E-stained slides. Immunohistochemical detection of mitosis is only an additional tool; the time-saving effect is therefore negligible. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Control of the mitotic exit network during meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Attner, Michelle A.; Amon, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic exit network (MEN) is an essential GTPase signaling pathway that triggers exit from mitosis in budding yeast. We show here that during meiosis, the MEN is dispensable for exit from meiosis I but contributes to the timely exit from meiosis II. Consistent with a role for the MEN during meiosis II, we find that the signaling pathway is active only during meiosis II. Our analysis further shows that MEN signaling is modulated during meiosis in several key ways. Whereas binding of MEN c...

  3. Connections between microtubules and endoplasmic reticulum in mitotic spindle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Tarkowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dividing endosperm cells of Haemanthus katherinae Bak. were treated with an 0.025 per cent aqueous solution of an oleander glycosides mixture which produces severe disturtaances in the mitotic spindle and high hypertrophy of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER in the whole cells. There appear between the kinetochore microtubules (MTs numerous elongated and narrow ER cisterns, particularly well visible when the number of kinetochore MTs is reduced. Both these structures (MTs and ER are frequently connected by cross-bridges. The presumable role of these connections is discused.

  4. Microtubule Dynamics and Oscillating State for Mitotic Spindle

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid-Shomali, Safura

    2010-01-01

    We present a physical mechanism that can cause the mitotic spindle to oscillate. The driving force for this mechanism emerges from the polymerization of astral microtubules interacting with the cell cortex. We show that Brownian ratchet model for growing microtubules reaching the cell cortex, mediate an effective mass to the spindle body and therefore force it to oscillate. We compare the predictions of this mechanism with the previous mechanisms which were based on the effects of motor proteins. Finally we combine the effects of microtubules polymerization and motor proteins, and present the detailed phase diagram for possible oscillating states.

  5. Mitotically unstable polyploids in the yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinner, U; Böttcher, F

    1992-01-01

    Attempts to obtain triploids or tetraploids of P. guilliermondii by sexual hybridization led to mitotically stable hybrids. However, their DNA content per cell was not higher than in diploids. The results of random spore analysis demonstrate that these hybrids were in fact aneuploids which obviously suffered drastic chromosome losses immediately after mating. This phenomenon could have been caused either by aneuploidy already present in the parental strains or it might have been due to a general inability of P. guilliermondii to maintain a polyploid genome.

  6. RAD52 Facilitates Mitotic DNA Synthesis Following Replication Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhowmick, Rahul; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Hickson, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is necessary to counteract DNA replication stress. Common fragile site (CFS) loci are particularly sensitive to replication stress and undergo pathological rearrangements in tumors. At these loci, replication stress frequently activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis....... This mitotic DNA synthesis, termed MiDAS, requires the MUS81-EME1 endonuclease and a non-catalytic subunit of the Pol-delta complex, POLD3. Here, we examine the contribution of HR factors in promoting MiDAS in human cells. We report that RAD51 and BRCA2 are dispensable for MiDAS but are required to counteract...

  7. Cdk1 phosphorylation of the kinetochore protein Nsk1 prevents error-prone chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Song; Lu, Lucy X; Ohi, Melanie D; Creamer, Kevin M; English, Chauca; Partridge, Janet F; Ohi, Ryoma; Gould, Kathleen L

    2011-11-14

    Cdk1 controls many aspects of mitotic chromosome behavior and spindle microtubule (MT) dynamics to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. In this paper, we characterize a new kinetochore substrate of fission yeast Cdk1, Nsk1, which promotes proper kinetochore-MT (k-MT) interactions and chromosome movements in a phosphoregulated manner. Cdk1 phosphorylation of Nsk1 antagonizes Nsk1 kinetochore and spindle localization during early mitosis. A nonphosphorylatable Nsk1 mutant binds prematurely to kinetochores and spindle, cementing improper k-MT attachments and leading to high rates of lagging chromosomes that missegregate. Accordingly, cells lacking nsk1 exhibit synthetic growth defects with mutations that disturb MT dynamics and/or kinetochore structure, and lack of proper phosphoregulation leads to even more severe defects. Intriguingly, Nsk1 is stabilized by binding directly to the dynein light chain Dlc1 independently of the dynein motor, and Nsk1-Dlc1 forms chainlike structures in vitro. Our findings establish new roles for Cdk1 and the Nsk1-Dlc1 complex in regulating the k-MT interface and chromosome segregation.

  8. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Melissa [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1234 Notre Dame Avenue, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States); Peddibhotla, Sirisha [Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, John P. McGovern Campus, NABS-0250, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); McHenry, Peter [Department of Biology, Southwestern Adventist University, 100 W. Hillcrest, Keene, TX 76059 (United States); Chang, Peggy; Yochum, Zachary; Park, Ko Un; Sears, James Cooper; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy, E-mail: vargo-gogola.1@nd.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1234 Notre Dame Avenue, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States)

    2012-04-25

    Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis.

  9. Structures of actin-like ParM filaments show architecture of plasmid-segregating spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Murshudov, Garib N; Sachse, Carsten; Löwe, Jan

    2015-07-02

    Active segregation of Escherichia coli low-copy-number plasmid R1 involves formation of a bipolar spindle made of left-handed double-helical actin-like ParM filaments. ParR links the filaments with centromeric parC plasmid DNA, while facilitating the addition of subunits to ParM filaments. Growing ParMRC spindles push sister plasmids to the cell poles. Here, using modern electron cryomicroscopy methods, we investigate the structures and arrangements of ParM filaments in vitro and in cells, revealing at near-atomic resolution how subunits and filaments come together to produce the simplest known mitotic machinery. To understand the mechanism of dynamic instability, we determine structures of ParM filaments in different nucleotide states. The structure of filaments bound to the ATP analogue AMPPNP is determined at 4.3 Å resolution and refined. The ParM filament structure shows strong longitudinal interfaces and weaker lateral interactions. Also using electron cryomicroscopy, we reconstruct ParM doublets forming antiparallel spindles. Finally, with whole-cell electron cryotomography, we show that doublets are abundant in bacterial cells containing low-copy-number plasmids with the ParMRC locus, leading to an asynchronous model of R1 plasmid segregation.

  10. Continuous utility factor in segregation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Parna; Sen, Parongama

    2016-02-01

    We consider the constrained Schelling model of social segregation in which the utility factor of agents strictly increases and nonlocal jumps of the agents are allowed. In the present study, the utility factor u is defined in a way such that it can take continuous values and depends on the tolerance threshold as well as the fraction of unlike neighbors. Two models are proposed: in model A the jump probability is determined by the sign of u only, which makes it equivalent to the discrete model. In model B the actual values of u are considered. Model A and model B are shown to differ drastically as far as segregation behavior and phase transitions are concerned. In model A, although segregation can be achieved, the cluster sizes are rather small. Also, a frozen state is obtained in which steady states comprise many unsatisfied agents. In model B, segregated states with much larger cluster sizes are obtained. The correlation function is calculated to show quantitatively that larger clusters occur in model B. Moreover for model B, no frozen states exist even for very low dilution and small tolerance parameter. This is in contrast to the unconstrained discrete model considered earlier where agents can move even when utility remains the same. In addition, we also consider a few other dynamical aspects which have not been studied in segregation models earlier.

  11. Racial Segregation and the American Foreclosure Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugh, Jacob S; Massey, Douglas S

    2010-10-01

    Although the rise in subprime lending and the ensuing wave of foreclosures was partly a result of market forces that have been well-identified in the literature, in the United States it was also a highly racialized process. We argue that residential segregation created a unique niche of poor minority clients who were differentially marketed risky subprime loans that were in great demand for use in mortgage-backed securities that could be sold on secondary markets. We test this argument by regressing foreclosure actions in the top 100 U.S. metropolitan areas on measures of black, Hispanic, and Asian segregation while controlling for a variety of housing market conditions, including average creditworthiness, the extent of coverage under the Community Reinvestment Act, the degree of zoning regulation, and the overall rate of subprime lending. We find that black residential dissimilarity and spatial isolation are powerful predictors of foreclosures across U.S. metropolitan areas. In order to isolate subprime lending as the causal mechanism whereby segregation influences foreclosures, we estimate a two-stage least squares model that confirms the causal effect of black segregation on the number and rate of foreclosures across metropolitan areas. In the United States segregation was an important contributing cause of the foreclosure crisis, along with overbuilding, risky lending practices, lax regulation, and the bursting of the housing price bubble.

  12. Neurotransmitter segregation: functional and plastic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sámano, Cynthia; Cifuentes, Fredy; Morales, Miguel Angel

    2012-06-01

    Synaptic cotransmission is the ability of neurons to use more than one transmitter to convey synaptic signals. Cotransmission was originally described as the presence of a classic transmitter, which conveys main signal, along one or more cotransmitters that modulate transmission, later on, it was found cotransmission of classic transmitters. It has been generally accepted that neurons store and release the same set of transmitters in all their synaptic processes. However, some findings that show axon endings of individual neurons storing and releasing different sets of transmitters, are not in accordance with this assumption, and give support to the hypothesis that neurons can segregate transmitters to different synapses. Here, we review the studies showing segregation of transmitters in invertebrate and mammalian central nervous system neurons, and correlate them with our results obtained in sympathetic neurons. Our data show that these neurons segregate even classic transmitters to separated axons. Based on our data we suggest that segregation is a plastic phenomenon and responds to functional synaptic requirements, and to 'environmental' cues such as neurotrophins. We propose that neurons have the machinery to guide the different molecules required in synaptic transmission through axons and sort them to different axon endings. We believe that transmitter segregation improves neuron interactions during cotransmission and gives them selective and better control of synaptic plasticity.

  13. On the Origin of Mass Segregation in NGC 3603

    CERN Document Server

    Pang, Xiaoying; Allison, Richard J; Goodwin, Simon P; Altmann, Martin; Harbeck, Daniel; Moffat, Anthony F J; Drissen, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 photometry of the young HD 97950 star cluster in the giant H {\\sc ii} region NGC 3603. The data were obtained in 1997 and 2007 permitting us to derive membership based on proper motions of the stars. Our data are consistent with an age of 1 Myr for the HD 97950 cluster. A possible age spread, if present in the cluster, appears to be small. The global slope of the incompleteness-corrected mass function for member stars within 60$"$ is $\\rm \\Gamma=-0.88\\pm0.15$, which is flatter than the value of a Salpeter slope of -1.35. The radially varying mass function shows pronounced mass segregation ranging from slopes of $-0.26 \\pm 0.32$ in the inner $5"$ to $-0.94\\pm 0.36$ in the outermost annulus ($40"$ -- $60"$). Stars more massive than 50 M$_{\\odot}$ are found only in the cluster center. The $\\Lambda$ minimum spanning tree technique confirms significant mass segregation down to 30 M$_{\\odot}$. The dependence of $\\Lambda$ on mass, i.e., that hi...

  14. Mitotic regulation of the anaphase-promoting complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D J; Dawlaty, M M; Galardy, P; van Deursen, J M

    2007-03-01

    Orderly progression through mitosis is regulated by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a large multiprotein E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets key mitotic regulators for destruction by the proteasome. APC/C has two activating subunits, Cdc20 and Cdh1. The well-established view is that Cdc20 activates APC/C from the onset of mitosis through the metaphase-anaphase transition, and that Cdh1 does so from anaphase through G1. Recent work, however, indicates that Cdh1 also activates APC/C in early mitosis and that this APC/C pool targets the anaphase inhibitor securin. To prevent premature degradation of securin, the nuclear transport factors Nup98 and Rae1 associate with APC/C(Cdh1)-securin complexes. In late metaphase, when all kinetochores are attached to spindle microtubules and the spindle assembly checkpoint is satisfied, Nup98 and Rae1 are released from these complexes, thereby allowing for prompt ubiquitination of securin by APC/C(Cdh1). This, and other mechanisms by which the catalytic activity of APC/C is tightly regulated to ensure proper timing of degradation of each of its mitotic substrates, are highlighted.

  15. Integrin-linked kinase regulates interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Lim

    Full Text Available Integrin-linked kinase (ILK localizes to both focal adhesions and centrosomes in distinct multiprotein complexes. Its dual function as a kinase and scaffolding protein has been well characterized at focal adhesions, where it regulates integrin-mediated cell adhesion, spreading, migration and signaling. At the centrosomes, ILK regulates mitotic spindle organization and centrosome clustering. Our previous study showed various spindle defects after ILK knockdown or inhibition that suggested alteration in microtubule dynamics. Since ILK expression is frequently elevated in many cancer types, we investigated the effects of ILK overexpression on microtubule dynamics. We show here that overexpressing ILK in HeLa cells was associated with a shorter duration of mitosis and decreased sensitivity to paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent that suppresses microtubule dynamics. Measurement of interphase microtubule dynamics revealed that ILK overexpression favored microtubule depolymerization, suggesting that microtubule destabilization could be the mechanism behind the decreased sensitivity to paclitaxel, which is known to stabilize microtubules. Conversely, the use of a small molecule inhibitor selective against ILK, QLT-0267, resulted in suppressed microtubule dynamics, demonstrating a new mechanism of action for this compound. We further show that treatment of HeLa cells with QLT-0267 resulted in higher inter-centromere tension in aligned chromosomes during mitosis, slower microtubule regrowth after cold depolymerization and the presence of a more stable population of spindle microtubules. These results demonstrate that ILK regulates microtubule dynamics in both interphase and mitotic cells.

  16. Inhibition of mitotic-specific histone phophorylation by sodium arsenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobo, J.M. [Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Valdez, J.G.; Gurley, L.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Synchronized cultures of Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) were used to measure the effects of 10{mu}M sodium arsenite on histone phosphorylation. This treatment caused cell proliferation to be temporarily arrested, after which the cells spontaneously resumed cell proliferation in a radiomimetric manner. Immediately following treatment, it was found that sodium arsenite affected only mitotic-specific HI and H3 phosphorylations. Neither interphase, nor mitotic, H2A and H4 phosphorylations were affected, nor was interphase HI Phosphorylation affected. The phosphorylation of HI was inhibited only in mitosis, reducing HI phosphorylation to 38.1% of control levels, which was the level of interphase HI phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of both H3 variants was inhibited in mitosis, the less hydrophobic H3 to 19% and the more hydrophobic H3 to 24% of control levels. These results suggest that sodium arsenite may inhibite cell proliferation by interfering with the cyclin B/p34{sup cdc2} histone kinase activity which is thought to play a key role in regulating the cell cycle. It has been proposed by our laboratory that HI and H3 phosphorylations play a role in restructuring interphase chromatin into metaphase chromosomes. Interference of this process by sodium arsenite may lead to structurally damaged chromosomes resulting in the increased cancer risks known to be produced by arsenic exposure from the environment.

  17. Segregation of Niobium During Electroslag Remelting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yan-wu; JIANG Zhou-hua; LI Zheng-bang

    2009-01-01

    Experiment was carried out after the process parameters were calculated by the model previously established.The relationship between interdendritic spacing and local solidification time (LST) mainly determined by process parameters was exposed.Furthermore,the extent of segregation was studied.The results indicate that LST and interdendritic spacing are the largest and the amount of Laves phase as a result of the niobium segregation is the highest in the center of the ingot,whereas the opposite results are obtained at the edge of ingot.The extent of element segregation and the amount of Laves phase can be reduced when appropriate parameters are used.Therefore,the duration of subsequent homogenization treatments for 718 is shortened and the alloy quality is improved.

  18. School Segregation and Racial Academic Achievement Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean F. Reardon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although it is clear that racial segregation is linked to academic achievement gaps, the mechanisms underlying this link have been debated since James Coleman published his eponymous 1966 report. In this paper, I examine sixteen distinct measures of segregation to determine which is most strongly associated with academic achievement gaps. I find clear evidence that one aspect of segregation in particular—the disparity in average school poverty rates between white and black students’ schools—is consistently the single most powerful correlate of achievement gaps, a pattern that holds in both bivariate and multivariate analyses. This implies that high-poverty schools are, on average, much less effective than lower-poverty schools and suggests that strategies that reduce the differential exposure of black, Hispanic, and white students to poor schoolmates may lead to meaningful reductions in academic achievement gaps.

  19. Segregating complex sound sources through temporal coherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Krishnan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new approach for the segregation of monaural sound mixtures is presented based on the principle of temporal coherence and using auditory cortical representations. Temporal coherence is the notion that perceived sources emit coherently modulated features that evoke highly-coincident neural response patterns. By clustering the feature channels with coincident responses and reconstructing their input, one may segregate the underlying source from the simultaneously interfering signals that are uncorrelated with it. The proposed algorithm requires no prior information or training on the sources. It can, however, gracefully incorporate cognitive functions and influences such as memories of a target source or attention to a specific set of its attributes so as to segregate it from its background. Aside from its unusual structure and computational innovations, the proposed model provides testable hypotheses of the physiological mechanisms of this ubiquitous and remarkable perceptual ability, and of its psychophysical manifestations in navigating complex sensory environments.

  20. Chemical segregation and self polarisation in ferroelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard E. Watts

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical partitioning or segregation is commonly encountered in solid-state syntheses. It is driven by compositional, thermal and electric field gradients. These phenomena can be quite extreme in thin films and lead to notable effects on the electrical properties of ferroelectrics. The segregation in ferroelectric thin films will be illustrated and the mechanisms explained in terms of diffusion processes driven by a potential gradient of the oxygen. The hypothesis can also explain self polarisation and imprint in ferroelectric hysteresis.

  1. Housing Systems and Ethnic Spatial Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Skifter; Andersson, Roger; Wessel, Terje

    in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden are ethnically segmented with high concentrations of immigrants in some forms of tenures (especially social/public housing) and low concentrations in others. The paper shows that the spatial distribution of immigrants is strongly connected with the tenure composition...... of immigrants in social/public housing.......Residential spatial segregation is related to housing markets and housing policies. In this paper, ethnic segregation is compared across four Nordic capitals and explanations for the differences are examined by comparing the housing markets and housing policies of the countries. The housing markets...

  2. Flow and segregation in sheared granular slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barentin, C.; Azanza, E.; Pouligny, B.

    2004-04-01

    We study the behaviour of a granular slurry, i.e., a very concentrated suspension of heavy (denser than the fluid) and polydisperse particles sheared between two parallel-plane circular disks. For small gaps, the slurry behaves as a 2d system with a characteristic radial size segregation of particles. For large gaps, the slurry responds as a 3d system, with considerable vertical segregation and a concomitant 2-phase (fluid, solid) flow structure. The thickness ζ of the fluid phase is the 2d-3d gap crossover. Surprisingly, ζ is found to be nearly unaffected by very large changes in the particle size distribution.

  3. Mitotic activity and delay in fixation of tumour tissue. The influence of delay in fixation on mitotic activity of a human osteogenic sarcoma grown in athymic nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graem, N; Helweg-Larsen, K

    1979-09-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the effect of delay in fixation on the mitotic activity in tumour tissue. A human osteogenic sarcoma, especially suitable for counting of mitoses, grown in athymic nude mice, was fixed with varying delay and the mitotic, prophase, metaphase and ana-telophase indices were determined. An almost exponential decline of the mitotic index was observed with a reduction to 49.4% and 15.0% after respectively 60 and 180 minutes. The proportional incidence of prophases, metaphases and ana-telophases changed so that a relative accummulation of advanced phases occured during the 180 minutes of observation. It is concluded that delay in fixation of a magnitude, which is not uncommon in routine surgical pathology, may allow the majority of mitoses to terminate, resulting in unreliable assessments of mitotic activity.

  4. Three Different Pathways Prevent Chromosome Segregation in the Presence of DNA Damage or Replication Stress in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Palou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A surveillance mechanism, the S phase checkpoint, blocks progression into mitosis in response to DNA damage and replication stress. Segregation of damaged or incompletely replicated chromosomes results in genomic instability. In humans, the S phase checkpoint has been shown to constitute an anti-cancer barrier. Inhibition of mitotic cyclin dependent kinase (M-CDK activity by Wee1 kinases is critical to block mitosis in some organisms. However, such mechanism is dispensable in the response to genotoxic stress in the model eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show here that the Wee1 ortholog Swe1 does indeed inhibit M-CDK activity and chromosome segregation in response to genotoxic insults. Swe1 dispensability in budding yeast is the result of a redundant control of M-CDK activity by the checkpoint kinase Rad53. In addition, our results indicate that Swe1 is an effector of the checkpoint central kinase Mec1. When checkpoint control on M-CDK and on Pds1/securin stabilization are abrogated, cells undergo aberrant chromosome segregation.

  5. Inhibition of mitotic kinase Aurora suppresses Akt-1 activation and induces apoptotic cell death in all-trans retinoid acid-resistant acute promyelocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Zi-Jie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aurora kinase ensures accurate chromosome segregation during cell cycle, maintaining genetic integrity in cell division. VX-680, a small-molecule Aurora kinase inhibitor, interferes with mitotic entry and formation of bipolar spindles. Here, we evaluated VX-680 as a potential agent for treatment of all-trans retinoid acid (ATRA-resistant acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in vitro. Methods CD11b expression was utilized to assess cell differentiation by flow cytometry. Immunofluorescence staining was conducted to analyze formation of cell monopolar spindle. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. Sub-G1 population and Annexin V/PI staining were used to measure cell apoptosis. Hoechst 33342 staining was applied for identifying morphological changes in nucleus of apoptotic cell. Aurora-A (Aur-A activation and the signaling pathways involved in apoptosis were detected by Western blot. JC-1 probe was employed to measure mitochondrial depolarization. Results VX-680 inhibited Aur-A by reducing autophosphorylation at the activation site, Thr288, accompanied by producing monopolar mitotic spindles in APL cell line NB4-R2 that was resistant to ATRA. In addition, we found that VX-680 inhibited cell proliferation as assessed by MTT assay. Flow cytometry showed that VX-680 led to apoptotic cell death in both dose- and time-dependent manners by either Sub-G1 or Annexin V/PI analysis. Hoechst 33342 staining represented typical apoptotic cells with nuclear fragmentation in VX-680 treated cells. Importantly, VX-680 inhibition of Aurora kinase suppressed Akt-1 activation and induced mitochondrial depolarization, which eventually resulted in apoptosis by activation of caspase pathway, as indicated by increasing proteolytic cleavage of procaspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP in NB4-R2 cells. Conclusions Our study suggested potential clinical use of mitotic Aurora kinase inhibitor in targeting ATRA-resistant leukemic cells.

  6. Ect2/Pbl acts via Rho and polarity proteins to direct the assembly of an isotropic actomyosin cortex upon mitotic entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, André; Vlassaks, Evi; Pichaud, Franck; Baum, Buzz

    2015-03-09

    Entry into mitosis is accompanied by profound changes in cortical actomyosin organization. Here, we delineate a pathway downstream of the RhoGEF Pbl/Ect2 that directs this process in a model epithelium. Our data suggest that the release of Pbl/Ect2 from the nucleus at mitotic entry drives Rho-dependent activation of Myosin-II and, in parallel, induces a switch from Arp2/3 to Diaphanous-mediated cortical actin nucleation that depends on Cdc42, aPKC, and Par6. At the same time, the mitotic relocalization of these apical protein complexes to more lateral cell surfaces enables Cdc42/aPKC/Par6 to take on a mitosis-specific function-aiding the assembly of a relatively isotropic metaphase cortex. Together, these data reveal how the repolarization and remodeling of the actomyosin cortex are coordinated upon entry into mitosis to provide cells with the isotropic and rigid form they need to undergo faithful chromosome segregation and division in a crowded tissue environment. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Overexpression of partner of numb induces asymmetric distribution of the PI4P 5-Kinase Skittles in mitotic sensory organ precursor cells in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina N L R Perdigoto

    Full Text Available Unequal segregation of cell fate determinants at mitosis is a conserved mechanism whereby cell fate diversity can be generated during development. In Drosophila, each sensory organ precursor cell (SOP divides asymmetrically to produce an anterior pIIb and a posterior pIIa cell. The Par6-aPKC complex localizes at the posterior pole of dividing SOPs and directs the actin-dependent localization of the cell fate determinants Numb, Partner of Numb (Pon and Neuralized at the opposite pole. The plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 regulates the plasma membrane localization and activity of various proteins, including several actin regulators, thereby modulating actin-based processes. Here, we have examined the distribution of PIP2 and of the PIP2-producing kinase Skittles (Sktl in mitotic SOPs. Our analysis indicates that both Sktl and PIP2 reporters are uniformly distributed in mitotic SOPs. In the course of this study, we have observed that overexpression of full-length Pon or its localization domain (LD fused to the Red Fluorescent Protein (RFP::Pon(LD results in asymmetric distribution of Sktl and PIP2 reporters in dividing SOPs. Our observation that Pon overexpression alters polar protein distribution is relevant because RFP::Pon(LD is often used as a polarity marker in dividing progenitors.

  8. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purrington, Kristen S; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymor...

  9. Indispensable pre-mitotic endocycles promote aneuploidy in the Drosophila rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Kevin P; Montague, Ruth A; Paramore, Sarah V; Lennox, Ashley L; Mahowald, Anthony P; Fox, Donald T

    2014-09-01

    The endocycle is a modified cell cycle that lacks M phase. Endocycles are well known for enabling continued growth of post-mitotic tissues. By contrast, we discovered pre-mitotic endocycles in precursors of Drosophila rectal papillae (papillar cells). Unlike all known proliferative Drosophila adult precursors, papillar cells endocycle before dividing. Furthermore, unlike diploid mitotic divisions, these polyploid papillar divisions are frequently error prone, suggesting papillar structures may accumulate long-term aneuploidy. Here, we demonstrate an indispensable requirement for pre-mitotic endocycles during papillar development and also demonstrate that such cycles seed papillar aneuploidy. We find blocking pre-mitotic endocycles disrupts papillar morphogenesis and causes organismal lethality under high-salt dietary stress. We further show that pre-mitotic endocycles differ from post-mitotic endocycles, as we find only the M-phase-capable polyploid cells of the papillae and female germline can retain centrioles. In papillae, this centriole retention contributes to aneuploidy, as centrioles amplify during papillar endocycles, causing multipolar anaphase. Such aneuploidy is well tolerated in papillae, as it does not significantly impair cell viability, organ formation or organ function. Together, our results demonstrate that pre-mitotic endocycles can enable specific organ construction and are a mechanism that promotes highly tolerated aneuploidy. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Gamma-actin is involved in regulating centrosome function and mitotic progression in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po'uha, Sela T; Kavallaris, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton during mitosis is crucial for regulating cell division. A functional role for γ-actin in mitotic arrest induced by the microtubule-targeted agent, paclitaxel, has recently been demonstrated. We hypothesized that γ-actin plays a role in mitosis. Herein, we investigated the effect of γ-actin in mitosis and demonstrated that γ-actin is important in the distribution of β-actin and formation of actin-rich retraction fibers during mitosis. The reduced ability of paclitaxel to induce mitotic arrest as a result of γ-actin depletion was replicated with a range of mitotic inhibitors, suggesting that γ-actin loss reduces the ability of broad classes of anti-mitotic agents to induce mitotic arrest. In addition, partial depletion of γ-actin enhanced centrosome amplification in cancer cells and caused a significant delay in prometaphase/metaphase. This prolonged prometaphase/metaphase arrest was due to mitotic defects such as uncongressed and missegregated chromosomes, and correlated with an increased presence of mitotic spindle abnormalities in the γ-actin depleted cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate a previously unknown role for γ-actin in regulating centrosome function, chromosome alignment and maintenance of mitotic spindle integrity.

  11. Timely Endocytosis of Cytokinetic Enzymes Prevents Premature Spindle Breakage during Mitotic Exit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheen Fei Chin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytokinesis requires the spatio-temporal coordination of membrane deposition and primary septum (PS formation at the division site to drive acto-myosin ring (AMR constriction. It has been demonstrated that AMR constriction invariably occurs only after the mitotic spindle disassembly. It has also been established that Chitin Synthase II (Chs2p neck localization precedes mitotic spindle disassembly during mitotic exit. As AMR constriction depends upon PS formation, the question arises as to how chitin deposition is regulated so as to prevent premature AMR constriction and mitotic spindle breakage. In this study, we propose that cells regulate the coordination between spindle disassembly and AMR constriction via timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes, Chs2p, Chs3p, and Fks1p. Inhibition of endocytosis leads to over accumulation of cytokinetic enzymes during mitotic exit, which accelerates the constriction of the AMR, and causes spindle breakage that eventually could contribute to monopolar spindle formation in the subsequent round of cell division. Intriguingly, the mitotic spindle breakage observed in endocytosis mutants can be rescued either by deleting or inhibiting the activities of, CHS2, CHS3 and FKS1, which are involved in septum formation. The findings from our study highlight the importance of timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes at the division site in safeguarding mitotic spindle integrity during mitotic exit.

  12. Proteins in the nutrient-sensing and DNA damage checkpoint pathways cooperate to restrain mitotic progression following DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S Searle

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Checkpoint pathways regulate genomic integrity in part by blocking anaphase until all chromosomes have been completely replicated, repaired, and correctly aligned on the spindle. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA damage and mono-oriented or unattached kinetochores trigger checkpoint pathways that bifurcate to regulate both the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The sensor-associated kinase, Mec1, phosphorylates two downstream kinases, Chk1 and Rad53. Activation of Chk1 and Rad53 prevents anaphase and causes inhibition of the mitotic exit network. We have previously shown that the PKA pathway plays a role in blocking securin and Clb2 destruction following DNA damage. Here we show that the Mec1 DNA damage checkpoint regulates phosphorylation of the regulatory (R subunit of PKA following DNA damage and that the phosphorylated R subunit has a role in restraining mitosis following DNA damage. In addition we found that proteins known to regulate PKA in response to nutrients and stress either by phosphorylation of the R subunit or regulating levels of cAMP are required for the role of PKA in the DNA damage checkpoint. Our data indicate that there is cross-talk between the DNA damage checkpoint and the proteins that integrate nutrient and stress signals to regulate PKA.

  13. Proteins in the Nutrient-Sensing and DNA Damage Checkpoint Pathways Cooperate to Restrain Mitotic Progression following DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Jennifer S.; Wood, Matthew D.; Kaur, Mandeep; Tobin, David V.; Sanchez, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    Checkpoint pathways regulate genomic integrity in part by blocking anaphase until all chromosomes have been completely replicated, repaired, and correctly aligned on the spindle. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA damage and mono-oriented or unattached kinetochores trigger checkpoint pathways that bifurcate to regulate both the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The sensor-associated kinase, Mec1, phosphorylates two downstream kinases, Chk1 and Rad53. Activation of Chk1 and Rad53 prevents anaphase and causes inhibition of the mitotic exit network. We have previously shown that the PKA pathway plays a role in blocking securin and Clb2 destruction following DNA damage. Here we show that the Mec1 DNA damage checkpoint regulates phosphorylation of the regulatory (R) subunit of PKA following DNA damage and that the phosphorylated R subunit has a role in restraining mitosis following DNA damage. In addition we found that proteins known to regulate PKA in response to nutrients and stress either by phosphorylation of the R subunit or regulating levels of cAMP are required for the role of PKA in the DNA damage checkpoint. Our data indicate that there is cross-talk between the DNA damage checkpoint and the proteins that integrate nutrient and stress signals to regulate PKA. PMID:21779180

  14. The GTPase Gem and its partner Kif9 are required for chromosome alignment, spindle length control, and mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieu, Guillaume; Quaranta, Muriel; Leprince, Corinne; Hatzoglou, Anastassia

    2012-12-01

    Within the Ras superfamily, Gem is a small GTP-binding protein that plays a role in regulating Ca(2+) channels and cytoskeletal remodeling in interphase cells. Here, we report for the first time that Gem is a spindle-associated protein and is required for proper mitotic progression. Functionally, loss of Gem leads to misaligned chromosomes and prometaphase delay. On the basis of different experimental approaches, we demonstrate that loss of Gem by RNA interference induces spindle elongation, while its enforced expression results in spindle shortening. The spindle length phenotype is generated through deregulation of spindle dynamics on Gem depletion and requires the expression of its downstream effector, the kinesin Kif9. Loss of Kif9 induces spindle abnormalities similar to those observed when Gem expression is repressed by siRNA. We further identify Kif9 as a new regulator of spindle dynamics. Kif9 depletion increases the steady-state levels of spindle α-tubulin by increasing the rate of microtubule polymerization. Overall, this study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which Gem contributes to the mitotic progression by maintaining correct spindle length through the kinesin Kif9.

  15. On generating cell exemplars for detection of mitotic cells in breast cancer histopathology images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloraidi, Nada A; Sirinukunwattana, Korsuk; Khan, Adnan M; Rajpoot, Nasir M

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic activity is one of the main criteria that pathologists use to decide the grade of the cancer. Computerised mitotic cell detection promises to bring efficiency and accuracy into the grading process. However, detection and classification of mitotic cells in breast cancer histopathology images is a challenging task because of the large intra-class variation in the visual appearance of mitotic cells in various stages of cell division life cycle. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that cells in histopathology images can be effectively represented using cell exemplars derived from sub-images of various kinds of cells in an image for the purposes of mitotic cell classification. We compare three methods for generating exemplar cells. The methods have been evaluated in terms of classification performance on the MITOS dataset. The experimental results demonstrate that eigencells combined with support vector machines produce reasonably high detection accuracy among all the methods.

  16. Microtubule organization within mitotic spindles revealed by serial block face scanning electron microscopy and image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Faye M; Honnor, Thomas R; Clarke, Nicholas I; Starling, Georgina P; Beckett, Alison J; Johansen, Adam M; Brettschneider, Julia A; Prior, Ian A; Royle, Stephen J

    2017-05-15

    Serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) is a powerful method to analyze cells in 3D. Here, working at the resolution limit of the method, we describe a correlative light-SBF-SEM workflow to resolve microtubules of the mitotic spindle in human cells. We present four examples of uses for this workflow that are not practical by light microscopy and/or transmission electron microscopy. First, distinguishing closely associated microtubules within K-fibers; second, resolving bridging fibers in the mitotic spindle; third, visualizing membranes in mitotic cells, relative to the spindle apparatus; and fourth, volumetric analysis of kinetochores. Our workflow also includes new computational tools for exploring the spatial arrangement of microtubules within the mitotic spindle. We use these tools to show that microtubule order in mitotic spindles is sensitive to the level of TACC3 on the spindle. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Human KIAA1018/FAN1 nuclease is a new mitotic substrate of APC/CCdh1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenju Lai; Kaishun Hu; Yuanzhong Wu; Jianjun Tang; Yi Sang; Jingying Cao; Tiebang Kang

    2012-01-01

    A recently identified protein,FAN1 (FANCD2-associated nuclease 1,previously known as KIAA1018),is a novel nuclease associated with monoubiquitinated FANCD2 that is required for cellular resistance against DNA interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agents.The mechanisms of FAN1 regulation have not yet been explored.Here,we provide evidence that FAN1 is degraded during mitotic exit,suggesting that FAN1 may be a mitotic substrate of the anaphase-promoting cyclosome complex (APC/C).Indeed,.Cdh1,but not Cdc20,was capable of regulating the protein level of FAN1 through the KEN box and the D-box.Moreover,the up- and down-regulation of FAN1 affected the progression to mitotic exit.Collectively,these data suggest that FAN1 may be a new mitotic substrate of APC/CCdh1 that plays a key role during mitotic e xit.

  18. Structural and Numerical Chromosome Changes in Colon Cancer Develop through Telomere-Mediated Anaphase Bridges, Not through Mitotic Multipolarity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ylva Stewénius; Ludmila Gorunova; Tord Jonson; Nina Larsson; Mattias Höglund; Nils Mandahl; Fredrik Mertens; Felix Mitelman; David Gisselsson; Bert Vogelstein

    2005-01-01

    ... have been little explored. We show here that abnormally short telomeres lead to a wide spectrum of mitotic disturbances in colorectal cancer cell lines, including anaphase bridging, whole-chromosome lagging, and mitotic multipolarity...

  19. A stochastic model of kinetochore–microtubule attachment accurately describes fission yeast chromosome segregation

    OpenAIRE

    Gay, Guillaume; Courtheoux, Thibault; Reyes, Céline; Tournier, Sylvie; Gachet, Yannick

    2012-01-01

    In fission yeast, erroneous attachments of spindle microtubules to kinetochores are frequent in early mitosis. Most are corrected before anaphase onset by a mechanism involving the protein kinase Aurora B, which destabilizes kinetochore microtubules (ktMTs) in the absence of tension between sister chromatids. In this paper, we describe a minimal mathematical model of fission yeast chromosome segregation based on the stochastic attachment and detachment of ktMTs. The model accurately reproduce...

  20. A Social Network Analysis of Occupational Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhai, Ioan Sebastian; van der Leij, Marco

    We develop a social network model of occupational segregation between different social groups, generated by the existence of positive inbreeding bias among individuals from the same group. If network referrals are important for job search, then expected homophily in the contact network structure...

  1. Field induced phase segregation in ferrofluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst S.; Galca, A.C.; Poelsema, Bene

    2008-01-01

    We study the phase segregation in magnetite ferrofluids under the influence of an external magnetic field. A phase with lower nanoparticle density and corresponding higher optical transmission is formed in the bottom of a glass cell in the presence of only a very modest magnetic field gradient (smal

  2. Size segregation in a granular bore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, A. N.; Vriend, N. M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effect of particle-size segregation in an upslope propagating granular bore. A bidisperse mixture of particles, initially normally graded, flows down an inclined chute and impacts with a closed end. This impact causes the formation of a shock in flow thickness, known as a granular bore, to travel upslope, leaving behind a thick deposit. This deposit imprints the local segregated state featuring both pure and mixed regions of particles as a function of downstream position. The particle-size distribution through the depth is characterized by a thin purely small-particle layer at the base, a significant linear transition region, and a thick constant mixed-particle layer below the surface, in contrast to previously observed S-shaped steady-state concentration profiles. The experimental observations agree with recent progress that upward and downward segregation of large and small particles respectively is asymmetric. We incorporate the three-layer, experimentally observed, size-distribution profile into a depth-averaged segregation model to modify it accordingly. Numerical solutions of this model are able to match our experimental results and therefore motivate the use of a more general particle-size distribution profile.

  3. Why Are English Secondary Schools Socially Segregated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldron, John; Cripps, Caroline; Shipton, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    This paper seeks an explanation for the persistent social phenomenon of segregated schooling in England whereby children from families with broadly the same characteristics of wealth, education and social networks are more likely to be educated together and therefore separate from children from more socially distant groups. The paper outlines the…

  4. 17 CFR 31.12 - Segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... convenience be commingled with other leverage customer funds and deposited in the same account or accounts....12 Segregation. (a) Any person that accepts leverage customer funds from a leverage customer to enter into or maintain a leverage contract shall treat and deal with such leverage customer funds...

  5. Segregation analysis of urothelial cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aben, K.K.H.; Baglietto, L.; Baffoe-Bonnie, A.B.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Bailey-Wilson, J.E.; Trink, B.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Schoenberg, M.P.; Witjes, J.A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    A family history of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) confers an almost two-fold increased risk of developing UCC. It is unknown whether (part of) this aggregation of UCC has a Mendelian background. We performed complex segregation analyses on 1193 families ascertained through a proband with UCC of th

  6. Calcifying Sorting and Segregating: "Brown" at 60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Cristina Santamaria; Kozleski, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The 2007 "Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1". Supreme Court 5:4 decision suggests that the Court is divided in its interpretation of "Brown" and its intent in addressing racial segregation. Although "Brown" intended equal educational opportunities through desegregation practices,…

  7. Mammalian chromosomes contain cis-acting elements that control replication timing, mitotic condensation, and stability of entire chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Mathew J

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies indicate that mammalian chromosomes contain discrete cis-acting loci that control replication timing, mitotic condensation, and stability of entire chromosomes. Disruption of the large non-coding RNA gene ASAR6 results in late replication, an under-condensed appearance during mitosis, and structural instability of human chromosome 6. Similarly, disruption of the mouse Xist gene in adult somatic cells results in a late replication and instability phenotype on the X chromosome. ASAR6 shares many characteristics with Xist, including random mono-allelic expression and asynchronous replication timing. Additional "chromosome engineering" studies indicate that certain chromosome rearrangements affecting many different chromosomes display this abnormal replication and instability phenotype. These observations suggest that all mammalian chromosomes contain "inactivation/stability centers" that control proper replication, condensation, and stability of individual chromosomes. Therefore, mammalian chromosomes contain four types of cis-acting elements, origins, telomeres, centromeres, and "inactivation/stability centers", all functioning to ensure proper replication, condensation, segregation, and stability of individual chromosomes.

  8. Cytoplasmic flows as signatures for the mechanics of mitotic positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The proper positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for asymmetric cell division and generating cell diversity during development. Proper position in the single-cell embryo of Caenorhabditis elegans is achieved initially by the migration and rotation of the pronuclear complex (PNC) and its two associated centrosomal arrays of microtubules (MTs). We present here the first systematic theoretical study of how these $O(1000)$ centrosomal microtubules (MTs) interact through the immersing cytoplasm, the cell periphery and PNC, and with each other, to achieve proper position. This study is made possible through our development of a highly efficient and parallelized computational framework that accounts explicitly for long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) between the MTs, while also capturing their flexibility, dynamic instability, and interactions with molecular motors and boundaries. First, we show through direct simulation that previous estimates of the PNC drag coefficient, based on either ignoring or ...

  9. Aurora A's functions during mitotic exit: the Guess Who game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eReboutier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the knowledge of Aurora A kinase functions during mitosis was limited to pre-metaphase events, particularly centrosome maturation, G2/M transition, and mitotic spindle assembly. However, an involvement of Aurora A in post-metaphase events was also suspected, but not clearly demonstrated due to the technical difficulty to perform the appropriate experiments. Recent developments of both an analog specific version of Aurora A, and of small molecule inhibitors have led to the first demonstration that Aurora A is required for the early steps of cytokinesis. As in pre-metaphase, Aurora A plays diverse functions during anaphase, essentially participating in astral microtubules dynamics and central spindle assembly and functioning. The present review describes the experimental systems used to decipher new functions of Aurora A during late mitosis and situate these functions into the context of cytokinesis mechanisms.

  10. Asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Miseon; Chang, Jaerak; Chang, Sunghoe; Lee, Kyung S; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2014-02-21

    CPAP is an essential component for centriole formation. Here, we report that CPAP is also critical for symmetric spindle pole formation during mitosis. We observed that pericentriolar material between the mitotic spindle poles were asymmetrically distributed in CPAP-depleted cells even with intact numbers of centrioles. The length of procentrioles was slightly reduced by CPAP depletion, but the length of mother centrioles was not affected. Surprisingly, the young mother centrioles of the CPAP-depleted cells are not fully matured, as evidenced by the absence of distal and subdistal appendage proteins. We propose that the selective absence of centriolar appendages at the young mother centrioles may be responsible for asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted cells. Our results suggest that the neural stem cells with CPAP mutations might form asymmetric spindle poles, which results in premature initiation of differentiation.

  11. Modeling size segregation of granular materials: the roles of segregation, advection and diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yi; Umbanhowar, Paul B; Ottino, Julio M; Lueptow, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Predicting segregation of granular materials composed of different-sized particles is a challenging problem. In this paper, we develop and implement a theoretical model that captures the interplay between advection, segregation, and diffusion in size bidisperse granular materials. The fluxes associated with these three driving factors depend on the underlying kinematics, whose characteristics play key roles in determining particle segregation configurations. Unlike previous models for segregation, our model uses parameters based on kinematic measures from discrete element method simulations instead of arbitrarily adjustable fitting parameters, and it achieves excellent quantitative agreement with both experimental and simulation results when applied to quasi-two-dimensional bounded heaps. The model yields two dimensionless control parameters, both of which are only functions of physically control parameters (feed rate, particle sizes, and system size) and kinematic parameters (diffusion coefficient, flowing l...

  12. Computer simulations predict that chromosome movements and rotations accelerate mitotic spindle assembly without compromising accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Raja; Wollman, Roy; Silkworth, William T; Nardi, Isaac K; Cimini, Daniela; Mogilner, Alex

    2009-09-15

    The mitotic spindle self-assembles in prometaphase by a combination of centrosomal pathway, in which dynamically unstable microtubules search in space until chromosomes are captured, and a chromosomal pathway, in which microtubules grow from chromosomes and focus to the spindle poles. Quantitative mechanistic understanding of how spindle assembly can be both fast and accurate is lacking. Specifically, it is unclear how, if at all, chromosome movements and combining the centrosomal and chromosomal pathways affect the assembly speed and accuracy. We used computer simulations and high-resolution microscopy to test plausible pathways of spindle assembly in realistic geometry. Our results suggest that an optimal combination of centrosomal and chromosomal pathways, spatially biased microtubule growth, and chromosome movements and rotations is needed to complete prometaphase in 10-20 min while keeping erroneous merotelic attachments down to a few percent. The simulations also provide kinetic constraints for alternative error correction mechanisms, shed light on the dual role of chromosome arm volume, and compare well with experimental data for bipolar and multipolar HT-29 colorectal cancer cells.

  13. Control on Housing Segregation:Housing Modes and Public Policies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>1. Housing segregation:advocating or controlling?The phenomenon of housing segregation has become more and more obvious in Chinese cities in recent years; however, there is no agreement on whether it should

  14. File list: Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Mitotic cycle 8-9 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 DNase-seq Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/DNS.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  4. File list: NoD.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 No description Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 All antigens Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 SR...X647436,SRX647437,SRX647441,SRX647443,SRX647442,SRX647440 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 dm3 No description Embryo Mitotic cycle 11-13 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 TFs and others Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 ...SRX647436,SRX647437 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 dm3 Unclassified Embryo Mitotic cycle 11-13 ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Unc.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 dm3 TFs and others Embryo Mitotic cycle 7-9 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9.bed ...

  10. File list: InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 dm3 Input control Embryo Mitotic cycle 8-9 http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Mitotic cycle 7-9 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 Input control Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  13. File list: NoD.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 dm3 No description Embryo Mitotic cycle 11-13 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 Input control Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  15. File list: InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 Input control Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  16. File list: DNS.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 DNase-seq Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/DNS.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13 dm3 Input control Embryo Mitotic cycle 13 SRX7500...81,SRX750070 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13.bed ...

  18. File list: InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12 dm3 Input control Embryo Mitotic cycle 12 SRX7500...69 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12.bed ...

  19. File list: InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_14 dm3 Input control Embryo Mitotic cycle 14 SRX6451...40,SRX750075,SRX645139 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_14.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Mitotic cycle 8-9 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 Unclassified Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Unc.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 Unclassified Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 Histone Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 SRX6474...40,SRX647442,SRX647441,SRX647443 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 TFs and others Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 ...SRX084384 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 dm3 Histone Embryo Mitotic cycle 11-13 SRX6451...30,SRX645124,SRX645116,SRX645108,SRX645127,SRX645112,SRX645120 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 dm3 Histone Embryo Mitotic cycle 11-13 SRX6451...30,SRX645124,SRX645116,SRX645108,SRX645127,SRX645112,SRX645120 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Mitotic cycle 7-9 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 dm3 TFs and others Embryo Mitotic cycle 11-13 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 dm3 Histone Embryo Mitotic cycle 7-9 SRX645111,S...RX645115,SRX645103,SRX645123,SRX645107,SRX645099,SRX645119 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 DNase-seq Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/DNS.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 All antigens Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 SR...X084384 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 Input control Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  15. File list: DNS.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 dm3 DNase-seq Embryo Mitotic cycle 11-13 http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/DNS.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 Unclassified Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 dm3 All antigens Embryo Mitotic cycle 8-9 SRX084...383 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 Histone Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 SRX6474...41,SRX647443,SRX647442,SRX647440 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 dm3 TFs and others Embryo Mitotic cycle 8-9 SRX0...84383 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9.bed ...

  1. File list: NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 No description Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 dm3 TFs and others Embryo Mitotic cycle 11-13 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 All antigens Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 SR...X647436,SRX647440,SRX647442,SRX647441,SRX647443,SRX647437 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  4. File list: Unc.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 Unclassified Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Unc.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 dm3 Histone Embryo Mitotic cycle 7-9 SRX645103,S...RX645115,SRX645099,SRX645107,SRX645111,SRX645119,SRX645123 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 dm3 No description Embryo Mitotic cycle 7-9 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 All antigens Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 SR...X084384 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13 dm3 DNase-seq Embryo Mitotic cycle 11-13 http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/DNS.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_11-13.bed ...

  9. File list: NoD.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 No description Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 Histone Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 http://...dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  11. File list: NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 dm3 No description Embryo Mitotic cycle 7-9 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 All antigens Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 SR...X647436,SRX647437,SRX647440,SRX647442,SRX647441,SRX647443 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 dm3 All antigens Embryo Mitotic cycle 8-9 SRX084...383 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 dm3 Histone Embryo Mitotic cycle 7-9 SRX645103,S...RX645115,SRX645111,SRX645119,SRX645123,SRX645107,SRX645099 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 TFs and others Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 ...SRX647436,SRX647437 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 All antigens Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 SR...X084384 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.20.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  17. File list: NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 dm3 No description Embryo Mitotic cycle 8-9 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9 dm3 All antigens Embryo Mitotic cycle 8-9 SRX084...383 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_8-9.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 Histone Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 http://...dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14 dm3 TFs and others Embryo Mitotic cycle 12-14 ...SRX647436,SRX647437 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_12-14.bed ...

  1. File list: NoD.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9 dm3 No description Embryo Mitotic cycle 7-9 http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Emb.05.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_7-9.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 dm3 All antigens Embryo Mitotic cycle 13-14 SR...X084384 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Mitotic_cycle_13-14 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. Functional characterization of kinetochore protein, Ctf19 in meiosis I: an implication of differential impact of Ctf19 on the assembly of mitotic and meiotic kinetochores in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Gunjan D; Agarwal, Meenakshi; Ghosh, Santanu K

    2014-03-01

    Meiosis is a specialized cell division process through which chromosome numbers are reduced by half for the generation of gametes. Kinetochore, a multiprotein complex that connects centromeres to microtubules, plays essential role in chromosome segregation. Ctf19 is the key central kinetochore protein that recruits all the other non-essential proteins of the Ctf19 complex in budding yeast. Earlier studies have shown the role of Ctf19 complex in enrichment of cohesin around the centromeres both during mitosis and meiosis, leading to sister chromatid cohesion and meiosis II disjunction. Here we show that Ctf19 is also essential for the proper execution of the meiosis I specific unique events, such as non-homologous centromere coupling, homologue pairing, chiasmata resolution and proper orientation of homologues and sister chromatids with respect to the spindle poles. Additionally, this investigation reveals that proper kinetochore function is required for faithful chromosome condensation in meiosis. Finally, this study suggests that absence of Ctf19 affects the integrity of meiotic kinetochore differently than that of the mitotic kinetochore. Consequently, absence of Ctf19 leads to gross chromosome missegregation during meiosis as compared with mitosis. Hence, this study reports for the first time the differential impact of a non-essential kinetochore protein on the mitotic and meiotic kinetochore ensembles and hence chromosome segregation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. 46 CFR 151.13-5 - Cargo segregation-tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo segregation-tanks. 151.13-5 Section 151.13-5... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Cargo Segregation § 151.13-5 Cargo segregation—tanks. (a... symbols used in lines 1 and 2, in order, under the tank segregation column of Table 151.05....

  19. Residential segregation of socioeconomic variables and health indices in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Saeed Hashemi Nazari

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Correlation of segregation of determinants of socioeconomic status with segregation of health indices is an indicator of existence of hot zones of health problems across some provinces. Further studies using multilevel modeling and individual data in health outcomes at individual level and segregation measures at appropriate geographic levels are required to confirm these relations.

  20. Within-School Segregation in an Urban School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Dylan

    2005-01-01

    This article examines ethnic segregation, defined as segregation among racial groups as well as between native-born and immigrant students, across elementary school classrooms in New York City. Specifically, the study compares patterns in within-school segregation across ethnic groups, grades, boroughs, and years. Current levels of within-school…

  1. 41 CFR 60-1.8 - Segregated facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Segregated facilities. 60...; Compliance Reports § 60-1.8 Segregated facilities. To comply with its obligations under the Order, a contractor must ensure that facilities provided for employees are provided in such a manner that segregation...

  2. Testing sexual segregation and aggregation: old ways are best.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonenfant, Christophe; Gaillard, Jean-michel; Dray, Stéphane; Loison, Anne; Royer, Manuela; Chessel, Daniel

    2007-12-01

    The study of sexual segregation has received increasing attention over the last two decades. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the existence of sexual segregation, such as the "predation risk hypothesis," the "forage selection hypothesis," and the "activity budget hypothesis." Testing which hypothesis drives sexual segregation is hampered, however, by the lack of consensus regarding a formal measurement of sexual segregation. By using a derivation of the well-known chi-square (here called the sexual segregation and aggregation statistic [SSAS]) instead of existent segregation coefficients, we offer a reliable way to test for temporal variation in the occurrence of sexual segregation and aggregation, even in cases where a large proportion of animals are observed alone. A randomization procedure provides a test for the null hypothesis of independence of the distributions of males and females among the groups. The usefulness of SSAS in the study of sexual segregation is demonstrated with three case studies on ungulate populations belonging to species with contrasting life histories and annual grouping patterns (isard, red deer, and roe deer). The existent segregation coefficients were unreliable since, for a given value, sexual segregation could or could not occur. Similarly, the existent segregation coefficients performed badly when males and females aggregated. The new SSAS was not prone to such limitations and allowed clear conclusions regarding whether males and females segregate, aggregate, or simply mix at random applicable to all species.

  3. "E Pluribus"... Separation: Deepening Double Segregation for More Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Gary; Kucsera, John; Siegel-Hawley, Genevieve

    2012-01-01

    This report shows segregation has increased dramatically across the country for Latino students, who are attending more intensely segregated and impoverished schools than they have for generations. The segregation increases have been the most dramatic in the West. The typical Latino student in the region attends a school where less than a quarter…

  4. Induction of mitotic catastrophe by PKC inhibition in Nf1-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Shen, Ling; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Chen, Changyan

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of tumor suppressor Nf1 gene deregulate Ras-mediated signaling, which confers the predisposition for developing benign or malignant tumors. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) was shown to be in synergy with aberrant Ras for the induction of apoptosis in various types of cancer cells. However, it has not been investigated whether loss of PKC is lethal for Nf1-deficient cells. In this study, using HMG (3-hydroxy-3-methylgutaryl, a PKC inhibitor), we demonstrate that the inhibition of PKC by HMG treatment triggered a persistently mitotic arrest, resulting in the occurrence of mitotic catastrophe in Nf1-deficient ST8814 cells. However, the introduction of the Nf1 effective domain gene into ST8814 cells abolished this mitotic crisis. In addition, HMG injection significantly attenuated the growth of the xenografted ST8814 tumors. Moreover, Chk1 was phosphorylated, accompanied with the persistent increase of cyclin B1 expression in HMG-treated ST8814 cells. The knockdown of Chk1 by the siRNA prevented the Nf1-deficient cells from undergoing HMG-mediated mitotic arrest as well as mitotic catastrophe. Thus, our data suggested that the suppression of PKC activates the Chk1-mediated mitotic exit checkpoint in Nf1-deficient cells, leading to the induction of apoptosis via mitotic catastrophe. Collectively, the study indicates that targeting PKC may be a potential option for developing new strategies to treat Nf1-deficiency-related diseases.

  5. Determinants of mitotic catastrophe on abrogation of the G2 DNA damage checkpoint by UCN-01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, Kin Fan; Chen, Yue; Ma, Hoi Tang; Chow, Jeremy P H; Poon, Randy Y C

    2011-05-01

    Genotoxic stress such as ionizing radiation halts entry into mitosis by activation of the G(2) DNA damage checkpoint. The CHK1 inhibitor 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01) can bypass the checkpoint and induce unscheduled mitosis in irradiated cells. Precisely, how cells behave following checkpoint abrogation remains to be defined. In this study, we tracked the fates of individual cells after checkpoint abrogation, focusing in particular on whether they undergo mitotic catastrophe. Surprisingly, while a subset of UCN-01-treated cells were immediately eliminated during the first mitosis after checkpoint abrogation, about half remained viable and progressed into G(1). Both the delay of mitotic entry and the level of mitotic catastrophe were dependent on the dose of radiation. Although the level of mitotic catastrophe was specific for different cell lines, it could be promoted by extending the mitosis. In supporting this idea, weakening of the spindle-assembly checkpoint, by either depleting MAD2 or overexpressing the MAD2-binding protein p31(comet), suppressed mitotic catastrophe. Conversely, delaying of mitotic exit by depleting either p31(comet) or CDC20 tipped the balance toward mitotic catastrophe. These results underscore the interplay between the level of DNA damage and the effectiveness of the spindle-assembly checkpoint in determining whether checkpoint-abrogated cells are eliminated during mitosis.

  6. Identification of a BET Family Bromodomain/Casein Kinase II/TAF-Containing Complex as a Regulator of Mitotic Condensin Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Soo Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Condensin is a central regulator of mitotic genome structure with mutants showing poorly condensed chromosomes and profound segregation defects. Here, we identify NCT, a complex comprising the Nrc1 BET-family tandem bromodomain protein (SPAC631.02, casein kinase II (CKII, and several TAFs, as a regulator of condensin function. We show that NCT and condensin bind similar genomic regions but only briefly colocalize during the periods of chromosome condensation and decondensation. This pattern of NCT binding at the core centromere, the region of maximal condensin enrichment, tracks the abundance of acetylated histone H4, as regulated by the Hat1-Mis16 acetyltransferase complex and recognized by the first Nrc1 bromodomain. Strikingly, mutants in NCT or Hat1-Mis16 restore the formation of segregation-competent chromosomes in cells containing defective condensin. These results are consistent with a model where NCT targets CKII to chromatin in a cell-cycle-directed manner in order to modulate the activity of condensin during chromosome condensation and decondensation.

  7. Time scale of entropic segregation of flexible polymers in confinement: Implications for chromosome segregation in filamentous bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Axel; Jun, Suckjoon

    2007-01-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the segregation of two overlapping chains in cylindrical confinement. We find that the entropic repulsion between the chains can be sufficiently strong to cause segregation on a time scale that is short compared to the one for diffusion. This result implies that entropic driving forces are sufficiently strong to cause rapid bacterial chromosome segregation.

  8. Time scale of entropic segregation of flexible polymers in confinement: Implications for chromosome segregation in filamentous bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Axel; Jun, Suckjoon

    2007-09-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the segregation of two overlapping chains in cylindrical confinement. We find that the entropic repulsion between chains can be sufficiently strong to cause segregation on a time scale that is short compared to the one for diffusion. This result implies that entropic driving forces are sufficiently strong to cause rapid bacterial chromosome segregation.

  9. From Schelling to Schools : A comparison of a model of residential segregation with a model of school segregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoica, Victor; Flache, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We address theoretically whether and under what conditions Schelling's celebrated result of 'self-organized' unintended residential segregation may also apply to school segregation. We propose here a computational model of school segregation that is aligned with a corresponding Schelling-type model

  10. Phase diagram of a Schelling segregation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvin, L.; Vannimenus, J.; Nadal, J.-P.

    2009-07-01

    The collective behavior in a variant of Schelling’s segregation model is characterized with methods borrowed from statistical physics, in a context where their relevance was not conspicuous. A measure of segregation based on cluster geometry is defined and several quantities analogous to those used to describe physical lattice models at equilibrium are introduced. This physical approach allows to distinguish quantitatively several regimes and to characterize the transitions between them, leading to the building of a phase diagram. Some of the transitions evoke empirical sudden ethnic turnovers. We also establish links with ‘spin-1’ models in physics. Our approach provides generic tools to analyze the dynamics of other socio-economic systems.

  11. Sister chromatid segregation in meiosis II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassmann, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic divisions (meiosis I and II) are specialized cell divisions to generate haploid gametes. The first meiotic division with the separation of chromosomes is named reductional division. The second division, which takes place immediately after meiosis I without intervening S-phase, is equational, with the separation of sister chromatids, similar to mitosis. This meiotic segregation pattern requires the two-step removal of the cohesin complex holding sister chromatids together: cohesin is removed from chromosome arms that have been subjected to homologous recombination in meiosis I and from the centromere region in meiosis II. Cohesin in the centromere region is protected from removal in meiosis I, but this protection has to be removed—deprotected”—for sister chromatid segregation in meiosis II. Whereas the mechanisms of cohesin protection are quite well understood, the mechanisms of deprotection have been largely unknown until recently. In this review I summarize our current knowledge on cohesin deprotection. PMID:23574717

  12. Organization and segregation of bacterial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xindan; Montero Llopis, Paula; Rudner, David Z

    2013-03-01

    The bacterial chromosome must be compacted more than 1,000-fold to fit into the compartment in which it resides. How it is condensed, organized and ultimately segregated has been a puzzle for over half a century. Recent advances in live-cell imaging and genome-scale analyses have led to new insights into these problems. We argue that the key feature of compaction is the orderly folding of DNA along adjacent segments and that this organization provides easy and efficient access for protein-DNA transactions and has a central role in driving segregation. Similar principles and common proteins are used in eukaryotes to condense and to resolve sister chromatids at metaphase.

  13. Socio-Spatial Segregations in Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat SEIFY

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In conjunction with developments in communication technologies, life spaces of people also change and develop. What constitutes the most important building block of these new life spaces are digital communication resources. Digital communication resources form new spaces in social media by manipulating identities and cultures. These new spaces create socio-spatial segregations, whether consciously or unconsciously. Especially in recent years, grouping is observed intensely in social media and from time to time these groups play an important role in mass actions. In this study, closed and secret groups formed in social media were examined, with qualitative and quantitative research methods. Within this context, through in-depth interviews with group admins and survey study with group members, socio-spatial segregation in social media and grouping processes in social media were examined.

  14. Phase Segregation in Polystyrene?Polylactide Blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Bonnie; Hitchcock, Adam; Brash, John; Scholl, Andreas; Doran, Andrew

    2010-06-09

    Spun-cast films of polystyrene (PS) blended with polylactide (PLA) were visualized and characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and synchrotron-based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM). The composition of the two polymers in these systems was determined by quantitative chemical analysis of near-edge X-ray absorption signals recorded with X-PEEM. The surface morphology depends on the ratio of the two components, the total polymer concentration, and the temperature of vacuum annealing. For most of the blends examined, PS is the continuous phase with PLA existing in discrete domains or segregated to the air?polymer interface. Phase segregation was improved with further annealing. A phase inversion occurred when films of a 40:60 PS:PLA blend (0.7 wt percent loading) were annealed above the glass transition temperature (Tg) of PLA.

  15. Granular segregation driven by particle interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, C; Zuriguel, I; Garcimartín, A; Mullin, T

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of particle-particle interactions in a horizontally shaken granular layer that undergoes a second order phase transition from a binary gas to a segregation liquid as the packing fraction C is increased. By focusing on the behavior of individual particles, the effect of C is studied on (1) the process of cluster formation, (2) cluster dynamics, and (3) cluster destruction. The outcomes indicate that the segregation is driven by two mechanisms: attraction between particles with the same properties and random motion with a characteristic length that is inversely proportional to C. All clusters investigated are found to be transient and the probability distribution functions of the separation times display a power law tail, indicating that the splitting probability decreases with time.

  16. Analysis of T-DNA integration and generative segregation in transgenic winter triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hensel Goetz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the genetic transformation of the major cereal crops has become relatively routine, to date only a few reports were published on transgenic triticale, and robust data on T-DNA integration and segregation have not been available in this species. Results Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of stable transgenic winter triticale cv. Bogo carrying the selectable marker gene HYGROMYCIN PHOSPHOTRANSFERASE (HPT and a synthetic green fluorescent protein gene (gfp. Progeny of four independent transgenic plants were comprehensively investigated with regard to the number of integrated T-DNA copies, the number of plant genomic integration loci, the integrity and functionality of individual T-DNA copies, as well as the segregation of transgenes in T1 and T2 generations, which also enabled us to identify homozygous transgenic lines. The truncation of some integrated T-DNAs at their left end along with the occurrence of independent segregation of multiple T-DNAs unintendedly resulted in a single-copy segregant that is selectable marker-free and homozygous for the gfp gene. The heritable expression of gfp driven by the maize UBI-1 promoter was demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Conclusions The used transformation method is a valuable tool for the genetic engineering of triticale. Here we show that comprehensive molecular analyses are required for the correct interpretation of phenotypic data collected from the transgenic plants.

  17. Evaluation of the Heat, Entropy, and Rotational Changes Produced by Gravitational Segregation during Core Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne M. Hofmeister; Robert E. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Core formation by gravitational segregation allegedly released sufficient interior heat to melt the Earth. Analysis of the energetics, which compare gravitational potential energy (Ug) of a fictitious, homogeneous reference state to Earth’s current layered configuration, needs updating to correct errors and omissions, and to accommodate recent findings: (1) An erroneous positive sign was used for Ug while maintaining the reference value of 0 at infinity, which results in an incorrect sign for ΔUg, which is crucial in determining whether a process is endothermic or exothermic. (2) The value of Ug for Earth’s initial state is uncertain. (3) Recent meteorite evidence indicates that core formation began before the Earth was full-sized, which severely limitsDUg. (4) Inhomogeneous accretion additionally reducedDUg. (5) The potentially large effect of differential rotation between the core and the mantle was not accounted for. (6) Entropy changes associated with creating order were neglected. Accordingly, we revise values of Ug, evaluate uncertainties, and show thatDUg was converted substantially to configurational energy (TDS). These considerations limit the large sources of primordial heat to impacts and radioactivity. Although these processes may play a role in core formation, their energies are independent of gravitational segregation, which produces order and rotational energy, not internal heat. Instead, gravitational segregation promotes planetary cooling mainly because it segregates lithophilic radioactive elements upward, increasing surface heat flux while shortening the distance over which radiogenic heat diffuses outwards.

  18. Meiotic and Mitotic Cell Cycle Mutants Involved in Gametophyte Development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjing Liu; Li-Jia Qu

    2008-01-01

    The alternation between diploid and haploid generations is fundamentalin the life cycles of both animals and plants.The meiotic cell cycle is common to both animals and plants gamete formation, but in animals the products of meiosis are gametes,whereas for most plants,subsequent mitotic cell cycles are needed for their formation. Clarifying the regulatory mechanisms of mitotic cell cycle progression during gametophyte development will help understanding of sexual reproduction in plants.Many mutants defective in gametophyte development and,in particular,many meiotic and mitotic cell cycle mutants in Arabidopsis male and female gametophyte development were identified through both forward and reverse genetics approaches.

  19. Chromosomal organization and segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vallet-Gely

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed.

  20. Segregation effects in DEEP2 galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, R. S.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Lopes, P. A. A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate segregation phenomena in galaxy groups in the range of 0.2 low(z ≤ 0.6) and high (z > 0.6) redshift groups. Assuming that the color index (U - B)0 can be used as a proxy for the galaxy type, we found that the fraction of blue (star-forming) objects is higher in the high-z sample, with blue objects being dominant at MB > -19.5 for both samples, and red objects being dominant at MB low-z sample. Also, the radial variation of the red fraction indicates that there are more red objects with R low-z sample than in the high-z sample. Our analysis indicates statistical evidence of kinematic segregation, at the 99% c.l., for the low-z sample: redder and brighter galaxies present lower velocity dispersions than bluer and fainter ones. We also find a weaker evidence for spatial segregation between red and blue objects, at the 70% c.l. The analysis of the high-z sample reveals a different result: red and blue galaxies have velocity dispersion distributions not statistically distinct, although redder objects are more concentrated than the bluer ones at the 95% c.l. From the comparison of blue/red and bright/faint fractions, and considering the approximate lookback timescale between the two samples (˜3 Gyr), our results are consistent with a scenario where bright red galaxies had time to reach energy equipartition, while faint blue/red galaxies in the outskirts infall to the inner parts of the groups, thus reducing spatial segregation from z ˜ 0.8 to z ˜ 0.4.