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Sample records for correct cause-of-death statistics

  1. Deaths from heart failure: using coarsened exact matching to correct cause-of-death statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibuya Kenji

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incomplete information on death certificates makes recorded cause-of-death data less useful for public health monitoring and planning. Certifying physicians sometimes list only the mode of death without indicating the underlying disease or diseases that led to the death. Inconsistent cause-of-death assignment among cardiovascular causes of death is of particular concern. This can prevent valid epidemiologic comparisons across countries and over time. Methods We propose that coarsened exact matching be used to infer the underlying causes of death where only the mode of death is known. We focus on the case of heart failure in US, Mexican, and Brazilian death records. Results Redistribution algorithms derived using this method assign the largest proportion of heart failure deaths to ischemic heart disease in all three countries (53%, 26%, and 22% respectively, with larger proportions assigned to hypertensive heart disease and diabetes in Mexico and Brazil (16% and 23% vs. 7% for hypertensive heart disease, and 13% and 9% vs. 6% for diabetes. Reassigning these heart failure deaths increases the US ischemic heart disease mortality rate by 6%. Conclusions The frequency with which physicians list heart failure in the causal chain for various underlying causes of death allows for inference about how physicians use heart failure on the death certificate in different settings. This easy-to-use method has the potential to reduce bias and increase comparability in cause-of-death data, thereby improving the public health utility of death records.

  2. Systematic review of statistics on causes of deaths in hospitals: strengthening the evidence for policy-makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampatige, Rasika; Mikkelsen, Lene; Hernandez, Bernardo; Riley, Ian; Lopez, Alan D

    2014-11-01

    To systematically review the reliability of hospital data on cause of death and encourage periodic reviews of these data using a standard method. We searched Google Scholar, Pubmed and Biblioteca Virtual de la Salud for articles in English, Spanish and Portuguese that reported validation studies of data on cause of death. We analysed the results of 199 studies that had used medical record reviews to validate the cause of death reported on death certificates or by the vital registration system. The screened studies had been published between 1983 and 2013 and their results had been reported in English (n = 124), Portuguese (n = 25) or Spanish (n = 50). Only 29 of the studies met our inclusion criteria. Of these, 13 had examined cause of death patterns at the population level - with a view to correcting cause-specific mortality fractions - while the other 16 had been undertaken to identify discrepancies in the diagnosis for specific diseases before and after medical record review. Most of the selected studies reported substantial misdiagnosis of causes of death in hospitals. There was wide variation in study methodologies. Many studies did not describe the methods used in sufficient detail to be able to assess the reproducibility or comparability of their results. The assumption that causes of death are being accurately reported in hospitals is unfounded. To improve the reliability and usefulness of reported causes of death, national governments should do periodic medical record reviews to validate the quality of their hospital cause of death data, using a standard.

  3. Causes of death in Tonga: quality of certification and implications for statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Karen; Hufanga, Sione; Rao, Chalapati; Akauola, Sione; Lopez, Alan D; Rampatige, Rasika; Taylor, Richard

    2012-03-05

    Detailed cause of death data by age group and sex are critical to identify key public health issues and target interventions appropriately. In this study the quality of local routinely collected cause of death data from medical certification is reviewed, and a cause of death profile for Tonga based on amended data is presented. Medical certificates of death for all deaths in Tonga for 2001 to 2008 and medical records for all deaths in the main island Tongatapu for 2008 were sought from the national hospital. Cause of death data for 2008 were reviewed for quality through (a) a review of current tabulation procedures and (b) a medical record review. Data from each medical record were extracted and provided to an independent medical doctor to assign cause of death, with underlying cause from the medical record tabulated against underlying cause from the medical certificate. Significant associations in reporting patterns were evaluated and final cause of death for each case in 2008 was assigned based on the best quality information from the medical certificate or medical record. Cause of death data from 2001 to 2007 were revised based on findings from the evaluation of certification of the 2008 data and added to the dataset. Proportional mortality was calculated and applied to age- and sex-specific mortality for all causes from 2001 to 2008. Cause of death was tabulated by age group and sex, and age-standardized (all ages) mortality rates for each sex by cause were calculated. Reported tabulations of cause of death in Tonga are of immediate cause, with ischemic heart disease and diabetes underrepresented. In the majority of cases the reported (immediate) cause fell within the same broad category as the underlying cause of death from the medical certificate. Underlying cause of death from the medical certificate, attributed to neoplasms, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease were assigned to other underlying causes by the medical record review in 70% to 77% of deaths. Of

  4. Causes of death in Tonga: quality of certification and implications for statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Karen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed cause of death data by age group and sex are critical to identify key public health issues and target interventions appropriately. In this study the quality of local routinely collected cause of death data from medical certification is reviewed, and a cause of death profile for Tonga based on amended data is presented. Methods Medical certificates of death for all deaths in Tonga for 2001 to 2008 and medical records for all deaths in the main island Tongatapu for 2008 were sought from the national hospital. Cause of death data for 2008 were reviewed for quality through (a a review of current tabulation procedures and (b a medical record review. Data from each medical record were extracted and provided to an independent medical doctor to assign cause of death, with underlying cause from the medical record tabulated against underlying cause from the medical certificate. Significant associations in reporting patterns were evaluated and final cause of death for each case in 2008 was assigned based on the best quality information from the medical certificate or medical record. Cause of death data from 2001 to 2007 were revised based on findings from the evaluation of certification of the 2008 data and added to the dataset. Proportional mortality was calculated and applied to age- and sex-specific mortality for all causes from 2001 to 2008. Cause of death was tabulated by age group and sex, and age-standardized (all ages mortality rates for each sex by cause were calculated. Results Reported tabulations of cause of death in Tonga are of immediate cause, with ischemic heart disease and diabetes underrepresented. In the majority of cases the reported (immediate cause fell within the same broad category as the underlying cause of death from the medical certificate. Underlying cause of death from the medical certificate, attributed to neoplasms, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease were assigned to other underlying causes by

  5. A elaboração de estatísticas de mortalidade segundo causas múltiplas Mortality statistics according to multiple causes of death

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    Ruy Laurenti

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Uma das possibilidades permitidas pelo avanço tecnológico é o estudo da mortalidade por causas múltiplas em contraposição à estatística feita por uma única causa, a chamada causa básica de morte. O conhecimento das várias doenças que contribuem para uma morte permite que seja avaliada a importância das causas que normalmente não estariam privilegiadas nas estatísticas porque são doenças não caracterizadas como causa básica. Um exemplo é a mortalidade por infarto do miocárdio em pessoas com diabetes mellitus. Este último, neste caso e em outros semelhantes, poderá não ser considerado nas estatísticas, enquanto o infarto o será. Desta forma, no exemplo citado, analisando apenas a causa básica, perde-se a informação sobre a magnitude do diabetes e sua relação com as complicações que levam à morte. A idéia da elaboração de estatísticas de mortalidade segundo causas múltiplas não é nova. No entanto não é realizada de forma sistemática, ainda que vários estudos mostrem suas vantagens. Entre essas vantagens estão a possibilidade de descobrir novas associações de doenças; conhecer informações sobre a natureza das lesões em casos de morte por causas externas (acidentes e violências, entre outras. A existência de computadores e de programas específicos para a elaboração das estatísticas de mortalidade, atualmente em uso, deve permitir que essa idéia seja colocada em prática e que, a partir das estatísticas de mortalidade por causas múltiplas, possibilite melhores e mais específicas ações de saúde.The introduction of new technology has made it possible to study multiple causes of death as opposed to mortality statistics based only on the underlying cause of death. The knowledge of all diseases that contribute to one death allows the assessment of the importance of causes that frequently do not appear in mortality statistics, because of those diseases that are not characterized as the

  6. The Danish registers of causes of death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, K; Helweg-Larsen, K

    1999-01-01

    In 1875 registration of causes of death in Denmark was established by the National Board of Health, and annual statistics of death have since been published. Until 1970 the national statistics were based upon punched cards with data collected from the death certificates. Since then the register h......, and the research based upon the registers, presenting some examples of research activities....

  7. Linking mortuary data improves vital statistics on cause of death of children under five years in the Western Cape Province of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewald, Pam; Bradshaw, Debbie; Neethling, Ian; Martin, Lorna J; Dempers, Johan; Morden, Erna; Zinyakatira, Nesbert; Coetzee, David

    2016-01-01

    Reducing child mortality requires good information on its causes. Whilst South African vital registration data have improved, the quality of cause-of-death data remains inadequate. To improve this, data from death certificates were linked with information from forensic mortuaries in Western Cape Province. A local mortality surveillance system was established in 2007 by the Western Cape Health Department to improve data quality. Cause-of-death data were captured from copies of death notification forms collected at Department of Home Affairs Offices. Using unique identifiers, additional forensic mortuary data were linked with mortality surveillance system records. Causes of death were coded to the ICD-10 classification. Causes of death in children under five were compared with those from vital registration data for 2011. Cause-of-death data were markedly improved with additional data from forensic mortuaries. The proportion of ill-defined causes was halved (25-12%), and leading cause rankings changed. Lower respiratory tract infections moved above prematurity to rank first, accounting for 20.8% of deaths and peaking in infants aged 1-3 months. Only 11% of deaths from lower respiratory tract infections occurred in hospital, resulting in 86% being certified in forensic mortuaries. Road traffic deaths increased from 1.1-3.1% (27-75) and homicides from 3 to 28. The quality and usefulness of cause-of-death information for children in the WC was enhanced by linking mortuary and vital registration data. Given the death profile, interventions are required to prevent and manage LRTI, diarrhoea and injuries and to reduce neonatal deaths. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Ten Leading Causes of Death and Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug Overdose Traumatic Brain Injury Violence Prevention Ten Leading Causes of Death and Injury Recommend on Facebook ... Treated in Hospital Emergency Departments, United States – 2014 Leading Causes of Death Charts Causes of Death by ...

  9. FastStats: Leading Causes of Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Leading Causes of Death Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Number of deaths for leading causes of death Heart disease: 633,842 • Cancer: ...

  10. Potential misclassification of causes of death from COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henriette Hvide; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Lange, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about causes of death in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the validity of mortality statistics in COPD. The present authors examined causes of death using data from the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Of the 12,979 subjects with sufficient data from the baseline...... COPD, CMH and smoking were predictors of COPD as underlying cause of death, ORs 2.3 (1.5-3.7) and 2.2 (1.4-3.6), respectively. It was concluded that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is underreported on death certificates, that biases in the use of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as cause...... of death can be assessed, and that possible "over-diagnosis" of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on death certificates in subjects unlikely to have significant disease should initiate caution when using causes of mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease epidemiology....

  11. Local perceptions of causes of death in rural South Africa: a comparison of perceived and verbal autopsy causes of death

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    Laith Hussain-Alkhateeb

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding how lay people perceive the causes of mortality and their associated risk factors is important for public health. In resource-limited settings, where verbal autopsy (VA is used as the most expedient method of determining cause of death, it is important to understand how pre-existing concepts of cause of death among VA-informants may influence their VA-responses and the consequential impact on cause of death assessment. This study describes the agreement between VA-derived causes of death and informant-perceived causes and associated influential factors, which also reflects lay health literacy in this setting. Method: Using 20 years of VA data (n=11,228 from the Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS site in rural South Africa, we explored the agreement between the causes of death perceived by the VA-informants and those assigned by the automated Inter-VA tool. Kappa statistics and concordance correlation coefficients were applied to measure agreement at individual and population levels, respectively. Multivariable regression models were used to explore factors associated with recognised lay perceptions of causes of mortality. Results: Agreement between informant-perceived and VA-derived causes of death at the individual level was limited, but varied substantially by cause of death. However, agreement at the population level, comparing cause-specific mortality fractions was higher, with the notable exception of bewitchment as a cause. More recent deaths, those in adults aged 15–49 years, deaths outside the home, and those associated with external causes showed higher concordance with InterVA. Conclusion: Overall, informant perception of causes of death was limited, but depended on informant characteristics and causes of death, and to some extent involved non-biomedical constructs. Understanding discordance between perceived and recognised causes of death is important for public health planning; low

  12. Local perceptions of causes of death in rural South Africa: a comparison of perceived and verbal autopsy causes of death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain-Alkhateeb, Laith; Fottrell, Edward; Petzold, Max; Kahn, Kathleen; Byass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding how lay people perceive the causes of mortality and their associated risk factors is important for public health. In resource-limited settings, where verbal autopsy (VA) is used as the most expedient method of determining cause of death, it is important to understand how pre-existing concepts of cause of death among VA-informants may influence their VA-responses and the consequential impact on cause of death assessment. This study describes the agreement between VA-derived causes of death and informant-perceived causes and associated influential factors, which also reflects lay health literacy in this setting. Method Using 20 years of VA data (n=11,228) from the Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) site in rural South Africa, we explored the agreement between the causes of death perceived by the VA-informants and those assigned by the automated Inter-VA tool. Kappa statistics and concordance correlation coefficients were applied to measure agreement at individual and population levels, respectively. Multivariable regression models were used to explore factors associated with recognised lay perceptions of causes of mortality. Results Agreement between informant-perceived and VA-derived causes of death at the individual level was limited, but varied substantially by cause of death. However, agreement at the population level, comparing cause-specific mortality fractions was higher, with the notable exception of bewitchment as a cause. More recent deaths, those in adults aged 15–49 years, deaths outside the home, and those associated with external causes showed higher concordance with InterVA. Conclusion Overall, informant perception of causes of death was limited, but depended on informant characteristics and causes of death, and to some extent involved non-biomedical constructs. Understanding discordance between perceived and recognised causes of death is important for public health planning; low community

  13. Medical examiner and medical toxicologist agreement on cause of death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manini, Alex F.; Nelson, Lewis S.; Olsen, Dean; Vlahov, David; Hoffman, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Poisoning is a significant public health threat as the second leading cause of injury-related death in the US. Disagreements on cause of death determination may have widespread implications across several realms of public health including policy and prevention efforts, interpretation of the poisoning literature, epidemiologic data analysis, medical-legal case outcomes, and individualized autopsy interpretation. We aimed to test agreement between the cause of death determined by the medical examiner (ME) and a medical toxicologist (MT) adjudication panel (MTAP) in cases of poisoning. This retrospective 7-year study evaluated all deaths attributed to poisoning in one large urban catchment area. Cross-matched data were obtained from Department of Vital Statistics and the Poison Control Center (PCC). Out of >380,000 deaths in the catchment area over the study period, there were 7050 poisonings in the Vital Statistics database and 414 deaths reported to PCC. Cross-matching yielded 321 cases for analysis. The ME and MTAP concurred on cause of death in 66%, which was only fair agreement (κ 0.25, CI 0.14–0.38). Factors associated with the likelihood of agreement were peri-mortem fire exposures, prehospital cardiac arrest, and timing of drug toxicity (chronic versus acute). In conclusion, agreement for poisoning cause of death between specialties was much lower than expected. We recommend an improved formal process of information sharing and consultation between specialties to assure that all existing information is analyzed thoroughly to enhance cause of death certainty. PMID:20655675

  14. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Multiple Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Multiple Cause of Death data on CDC WONDER are county-level national mortality and population data spanning the years 1999-2009. Data are based on...

  15. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Multiple Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Multiple Cause of Death data on CDC WONDER are county-level national mortality and population data spanning the years 1999-2006. These data are...

  16. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC WONDER Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death online database is a county-level national mortality and population database spanning the years since 1979. Data...

  17. Cause of Death Affects Racial Classification on Death Certificates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noymer, Andrew; Penner, Andrew M.; Saperstein, Aliya

    2011-01-01

    Recent research suggests racial classification is responsive to social stereotypes, but how this affects racial classification in national vital statistics is unknown. This study examines whether cause of death influences racial classification on death certificates. We analyze the racial classifications from a nationally representative sample of death certificates and subsequent interviews with the decedents' next of kin and find notable discrepancies between the two racial classifications by cause of death. Cirrhosis decedents are more likely to be recorded as American Indian on their death certificates, and homicide victims are more likely to be recorded as Black; these results remain net of controls for followback survey racial classification, indicating that the relationship we reveal is not simply a restatement of the fact that these causes of death are more prevalent among certain groups. Our findings suggest that seemingly non-racial characteristics, such as cause of death, affect how people are racially perceived by others and thus shape U.S. official statistics. PMID:21298093

  18. Validity of underlying cause of death statistics in Hermosillo, Mexico Validez de las estadísticas de causa básica de muerte en Hermosillo, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary H Freire de Carvalho

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This paper assesses the quality of the underlying cause of death (COD statistics in Hermosillo, Mexico in a random sample of 300 in-hospital adult deaths. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A "gold standard" COD, determined by a systematic review of hospital medical charts, was compared to the COD reported by the vital registry system. RESULTS: Overall agreement between the reviewer and original COD at the ICD-10 chapter block was 69.2%, with a weighted kappa of 0.62. Agreement varied greatly by ICD-10 chapter. Mutual misclassification among common co-morbidities,such as diabetes mellitus and circulatory disease, minimized the net change in the mortality fraction assigned to each ICD-10 chapter after physician review. CONCLUSIONS: The ICD-10 chapter level underlying COD codes can be used to estimate disease burden in the population. Caution is recommended for use of vital registry statistics in Hermosillo for individual level or disease-specific analyses.OBJETIVO: Examinar la validez de la causa básica de muerte (CBM de certificados de defunción de un sistema digital de vigilancia epidemiológica en Hermosillo, México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se comparó la CBM originalmente codificada en una muestra aleatoria de 300 certificados de defunción de muertes adultas ocurridas en al año 2005, con la CBM determinada por una revisión de expedientes médicos. RESULTADOS: Se identificó una concordancia global de 69.2% entre la CBM original y la determinada por la revisión, con un coeficiente de kappa de 0.62. La concordancia varió,con errores de codificación en padecimientos como diabetes mellitus, enfermedades circulatorias y respiratorias y neoplasias. El efecto de esos errores fue compensado por una mutua asignación equivocada en el proceso de codificación de la CBM empleado por el sistema. CONCLUSIONES: Las estadísticas generadas por el sistema examinado pueden usarse con cautela para estimar la carga poblacional de mortalidad en Hermosillo

  19. Dismemberment: cause of death in the Colombian armed conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo-Méndez, Maria Dolores; Campos, Isla Yolima

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate major findings in the recovery and analysis of victims, where dismemberment is the cause of death, but also a manner of torture within the context of the armed conflict in Colombia. It is intended to provide useful analytical information and to contribute to the correct interpretation of forensic analyses in cases of dismemberment and/or in the examination of human remains within the context of the Colombian armed conflict. The importance of including dismemberment as an opinion in the forensic report by correlating the findings on the body, the grave and context of the information available, and the accounts on the facts is encouraged. Otherwise these cases will be recorded as undetermined cause of death, which does not reflect the brutality of the war.

  20. Causes of death in familial adenomatous polyposis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, T S; Juel, K; Bülow, S

    1999-01-01

    The prognosis in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) has improved over the past decades owing to a reduction in the prevalence of colorectal cancer, resulting from effective early screening. During the same period several polyposis registers have recorded an increasing number of deaths due...... to duodenal/periampullary cancer and desmoid tumours. The aim of this study was to examine the causes of death with special emphasis on duodenal/periampullary cancer....

  1. Social class and cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Robert; Torssander, Jenny

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that causes of death differ in their relationship to social class, but we lack a more comprehensive description of this variation. The present study provides a detailed and extensive list of social class differences for a large number of specific causes of death. All deaths between 1991 and 2003 in Sweden were linked with information on household social class from 1990. Relative death risks and excess mortality in groups of causes according to the European shortlist were estimated separately for men and women in eight classes using Cox Regression. A clear mortality gradient among employees was found for the majority of causes, from low-relative death risks among higher managerial and professional occupations to relatively high risks for the unskilled working class. There is considerable variation in the strength of the association, from causes such as malignant melanoma, breast cancer and transport accidents among women, where no clear class differences were found. At the other extreme, mental and behavioural disorders, endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases and diseases of the respiratory system all show steep slopes for both men and women. Circulatory diseases and cancer together account for 15-20% of excess mortality. Exceptions to the general pattern--causes of death in which higher social classes are exposed to greater death risks or in which there is no mortality gradient--are practically non-existent. There is nevertheless significant variation in the strength of the class differences in specific causes.

  2. Underlying cause of death in Danish patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Stenager, Egon

    1998-01-01

    To determine the underlying causes of death in a large population based register series of patients with multiple sclerosis.......To determine the underlying causes of death in a large population based register series of patients with multiple sclerosis....

  3. Leading Causes of Death in Males United States, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What’s this? Submit What’s this? Submit Button Leading Causes of Death in Males and Females, United ... links to current and previous listings for the leading causes of death for males and females in ...

  4. Leading Causes of Death in Females United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety and Health Issues at Work Health Equity Leading Causes of Death in Females Recommend on Facebook ... links to current and previous listings for the leading causes of death in females in the United ...

  5. Causes of death behind low life expectancy of Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Rune; Keiding, Niels; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2006-01-01

    curvature in parabola patterns for 50 causes of death. RESULTS: A total of 34 causes of death contributed to the relatively high mortality for women born 1915-45. The main contribution came from smoking-related causes of death. CONCLUSION: The results indicate a high smoking prevalence to be the main...

  6. 38 CFR 3.312 - Cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cause of death. 3.312... Cause of death. (a) General. The death of a veteran will be considered as having been due to a service... contributory cause of death. The issue involved will be determined by exercise of sound judgment,...

  7. First assumptions and overlooking competing causes of death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind; Andersen, Anh Thao Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Determining the most probable cause of death is important, and it is sometimes tempting to assume an obvious cause of death, when it readily presents itself, and stop looking for other competing causes of death. The case story presented in the article illustrates this dilemma. The first assumptio...

  8. The Interpretation of Cause of Death 53 Among Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengtsson, Magdalena

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Earlier studies on mortality in 18th and 19th century Sweden have discussed the validity of cause of death information. The fact that the Swedish clergy historically were responsible for the stipulation and reporting of causes of death has initiated a discussion on the medical competence of the clergy. Other issues concern the level of accomplishment in medical science and the effects of instructions and regulations on cause of death registration. This paper argues that cause of death analyses are quite useful for the understanding of mortality transitions if cause of death information is placed in its proper context and are combined with other kinds of mortality analyses. An awareness of 1 the conditions under which causes of death were stipulated, 2 what regulations were in effect at the particular time, and 3 the environmental and epidemiological changes provides good prerequisites for successful use of cause of death information.

  9. Mortality and Causes of Death in Patients With Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkestad, Lars; Hald, Jannie Dahl; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir;

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary connective tissue disease that causes frequent fractures. Little is known about causes of death and length of survival in OI. The objective of this work was to calculate the risk and cause of death, and the median survival time in patients with OI...

  10. Reliability of cause of death coding: an international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antini, Carmen; Rajs, Danuta; Muñoz-Quezada, María Teresa; Mondaca, Boris Andrés Lucero; Heiss, Gerardo

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluates the agreement of nosologic coding of cardiovascular causes of death between a Chilean coder and one in the United States, in a stratified random sample of death certificates of persons aged ≥ 60, issued in 2008 in the Valparaíso and Metropolitan regions, Chile. All causes of death were converted to ICD-10 codes in parallel by both coders. Concordance was analyzed with inter-coder agreement and Cohen's kappa coefficient by level of specification ICD-10 code for the underlying cause and the total causes of death coding. Inter-coder agreement was 76.4% for all causes of death and 80.6% for the underlying cause (agreement at the four-digit level), with differences by the level of specification of the ICD-10 code, by line of the death certificate, and by number of causes of death per certificate. Cohen's kappa coefficient was 0.76 (95%CI: 0.68-0.84) for the underlying cause and 0.75 (95%CI: 0.74-0.77) for the total causes of death. In conclusion, causes of death coding and inter-coder agreement for cardiovascular diseases in two regions of Chile are comparable to an external benchmark and with reports from other countries.

  11. Estimated causes of death in Thailand, 2005: implications for health policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vos Theo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost 400,000 deaths are registered each year in Thailand. Their value for public health policy and planning is greatly diminished by incomplete registration of deaths and by concerns about the quality of cause-of-death information. This arises from misclassification of specified causes of death, particularly in hospitals, as well as from extensive use of ill-defined and vague codes to attribute the underlying cause of death. Detailed investigations of a sample of deaths in and out of hospital were carried out to identify misclassification of causes and thus derive a best estimate of national mortality patterns by age, sex, and cause of death. Methods A nationally representative sample of 11,984 deaths in 2005 was selected, and verbal autopsy interviews were conducted for almost 10,000 deaths. Verbal autopsy procedures were validated against 2,558 cases for which medical record review was possible. Misclassification matrices for leading causes of death, including ill-defined causes, were developed separately for deaths inside and outside of hospitals and proportionate mortality distributions constructed. Estimates of mortality undercount were derived from "capture-recapture" methods applied to the 2005-06 Survey of Population Change. Proportionate mortality distributions were applied to this mortality "envelope" and ill-defined causes redistributed according to Global Burden of Disease methods to yield final estimates of mortality levels and patterns in 2005. Results Estimated life expectancy in Thailand in 2005 was 68.5 years for males and 75.6 years for females, two years lower than vital registration data suggest. Upon correction, stroke is the leading cause of death in Thailand (10.7%, followed by ischemic heart disease (7.8% and HIV/AIDS (7.4%. Other leading causes are road traffic accidents (males and diabetes mellitus (females. In many cases, estimated mortality is at least twice what is estimated in vital

  12. CDC WONDER: Detailed Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Detailed Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death data on CDC WONDER are county-level national mortality and population data spanning the years 1999-2009. Data are...

  13. CDC WONDER: Compressed Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC WONDER Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death online database is a county-level national mortality and population database spanning the years since 1979...

  14. Top 10 Causes of Death in the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes. Ischaemic heart disease and stroke are the world’s biggest killers, accounting for a combined 15 million ... million. HIV/AIDS is no longer among the world’s top 10 causes of death, having killed 1. ...

  15. Causes of Death Data in the Global Burden of Disease Estimates for Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Iversen, Helle K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke mortality estimates in the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study are based on routine mortality statistics and redistribution of ill-defined codes that cannot be a cause of death, the so-called 'garbage codes' (GCs). This study describes the contribution of these codes to stroke...

  16. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease : Are national registries reliable for cause of death?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, A. Carla; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Mariman, Edwin C. M.; Verheugt, Carianne L.; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Pieper, Petronella G.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Statistics on cause-specific mortality are important for prognostic research. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of the national mortality registry in research on causes of death in adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: The CONCOR registry of over

  17. Cause of death conundrum with methadone use: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letsky, Michael C; Zumwalt, Ross E; Seifert, Steven A; Benson, Blaine E

    2011-06-01

    Deaths caused by a methadone intoxication or overdose are becoming more frequent. We report a case involving a patient who had extremely high methadone blood concentrations but whose cause of death may have been unrelated to the drug. A 51-year-old woman was found deceased in bed by her daughter. At the scene were numerous bottles of methadone, with the chronic dosage of 240 mg 3 times a day. There was no history of prior suicide attempts, there were no reports of suicidal ideation having been voiced and there was no suicide note. At autopsy, there were no pills found in the stomach. Microscopic tissue examination revealed lobar pneumonia of the right lower lobe. Postmortem lung cultures grew out Streptococcus pneumoniae. Femoral blood contained methadone, 5.7 mg/L; EDDP, 2.1 mg/L; oxycodone, 0.017 mg/L; doxylamine, 0.022 mg/L; and ethanol, 13.0 mg/dL. The postmortem methadone concentration was consistent with her known dose, plausible pharmacokinetics and conditions of discovery. Various causes of death, such as a methadone-related arrhythmia from QTc prolongation or the contribution of methadone to the development of the pneumonia, cannot be ruled out and may well have caused or contributed to death, but the pneumonia was felt to be a competent cause of death. Ultimately, the most likely cause(s) of death, is a decision left to the individual medical examiner. This case is illustrative of the growing number of similar cases facing forensic pathologists. The cause of death cannot be solely based on drug concentrations and it may not be possible to come to a conclusion as to "the" cause of death and the forensic pathologist must be content with "a" cause of death.

  18. Causes of death among undocumented migrants in Sweden, 1997–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wahlberg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Undocumented migrants are one of the most vulnerable groups in Swedish society, where they generally suffer from poor health and limited health care access. Due to their irregular status, such migrants are an under-researched group and are not included in the country's Cause of Death Register (CDR. Objective: To determine the causes of death among undocumented migrants in Sweden and to ascertain whether there are patterns in causes of death that differ between residents and undocumented migrants. Design: This is a cross-sectional study of death certificates issued from 1997 to 2010 but never included in the CDR from which we established our study sample of undocumented migrants. As age adjustments could not be performed due to lack of data, comparisons between residents and undocumented migrants were made at specific age intervals, based on the study sample's mean age at death±a half standard deviation. Results: Out of 7,925 individuals surveyed, 860 were classified as likely to have been undocumented migrants. External causes (49.8% were the most frequent cause of death, followed by circulatory system diseases, and then neoplasms. Undocumented migrants had a statistically significant increased risk of dying from external causes (odds ratio [OR] 3.57, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.83–4.52 and circulatory system diseases (OR 2.20, 95% CI: 1.73–2.82 compared to residents, and a lower risk of dying from neoplasms (OR 0.07, 95% CI: 0.04–0.14. Conclusions: We believe our study is the first to determine national figures on causes of death of undocumented migrants. We found inequity in health as substantial differences in causes of death between undocumented migrants and residents were seen. Legal ambiguities regarding health care provision must be addressed if equity in health is to be achieved in a country otherwise known for its universal health coverage.

  19. Impact of a Hospital-Level Intervention to Reduce Heart Disease Overreporting on Leading Causes of Death

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Samarrai, Teeb; Madsen, Ann; Zimmerman, Regina; Maduro, Gil; Li, Wenhui; Greene, Carolyn; Begier, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The quality of cause-of-death reporting on death certificates affects the usefulness of vital statistics for public health action. Heart disease deaths are overreported in the United States. We evaluated the impact of an intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting on other leading causes of death. Methods A multicomponent intervention comprising training and communication with hospital staff was implemented during July through December 2009 at 8 New York City hospitals rep...

  20. Long-term survival and causes of death after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Davidsen, M; Thorvaldsen, P

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Danish contribution to the World Health Organization (WHO) MONICA (Monitoring Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease) Project, a register of patients with stroke was established in 1982. The purpose of the present study was to analyze long-term survival and causes of death...... after a first stroke and to compare them with those of the background population....

  1. Glucose sensor excludes hypoglycaemia as cause of death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    The cause of death can be difficult to verify post-mortem in unexpected deaths in patients with Type 1 diabetes. This report describes an unexpected death in a 44-year-old man with Type 1 diabetes treated with sensor-augmented pump therapy. Continuous glucose monitoring data proved useful...

  2. Cause of death in patients awaiting bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoff, Joshua M; Ellsmere, James; Ransom, Tom

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is associated with increased mortality. Bariatric surgery is becoming an important treatment modality for obesity, with an associated reduction in mortality. There are few data available on the incidence and cause of death in referred patients while they are waiting for bariatric surgery. We retrospectively examined all cases of death in patients who were referred for bariatric surgery assessment but who had not yet undergone bariatric surgery at a tertiary care centre in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The wait list comprised patients referred for surgery between March 2008 and May 2013. All cases of death were reviewed to determine age, sex, time of referral, time spent on the wait list, cause of death, comorbidities and body mass index (BMI). Of the 1399 patients referred, 22 (1.57%) died before receiving surgery. The mean age of these patients was 62.7 (range of 32-70) years. The average time from referral to death was 21.6 months, and the average BMI was 51.5. The most frequent cause of death was cancer, followed by cardiac and infectious causes. This study provides useful information about mortality and causes of death among patients awaiting bariatric surgery at our centre. Our results will help guide the development of a judicious system for triage in light of long wait times.

  3. Changes in the Leading Cause of Death: Recent Patterns in Heart Disease and Cancer Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Melonie; Anderson, Robert N

    2016-08-01

    Data from the National Vital Statistics System •Heart disease has consistently been the leading cause of death in the United States and remained so in 2014. •The gap between the number of heart disease and cancer deaths generally widened from 1950 through 1968, narrowed from 1968 through 2012, and then slightly widened again from 2012 through 2014. •The mortality burden of cancer has surpassed that of heart disease in several states. In 2000, there were only 2 states where cancer was the leading cause of death; in 2014, there were 22. •Heart disease remained the leading cause of death for the non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black populations in 2014. •Cancer is now the leading cause of death for the non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander and Hispanic populations. The timing of the leading-cause crossover varied by group. For the total U.S. population, heart disease has been the leading cause of death for decades, with cancer the second leading cause (1). However, the ranking of these causes has varied across demographic group and geographic unit over time. Rankings are based on the number of deaths and reflect mortality burden rather than risk of death (2). This report highlights changes in the mortality burden of heart disease and cancer and presents findings by state, race, and Hispanic origin. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  4. Impact of a hospital-level intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting on leading causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samarrai, Teeb; Madsen, Ann; Zimmerman, Regina; Maduro, Gil; Li, Wenhui; Greene, Carolyn; Begier, Elizabeth

    2013-05-16

    The quality of cause-of-death reporting on death certificates affects the usefulness of vital statistics for public health action. Heart disease deaths are overreported in the United States. We evaluated the impact of an intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting on other leading causes of death. A multicomponent intervention comprising training and communication with hospital staff was implemented during July through December 2009 at 8 New York City hospitals reporting excessive heart disease deaths. We compared crude, age-adjusted, and race/ethnicity-adjusted proportions of leading, underlying causes of death reported during death certification by intervention and nonintervention hospitals during preintervention (January-June 2009) and postintervention (January-June 2010) periods. We also examined trends in leading causes of death for 2000 through 2010. At intervention hospitals, heart disease deaths declined by 54% postintervention; other leading causes of death (ie, malignant neoplasms, influenza and pneumonia, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic lower respiratory diseases) increased by 48% to 232%. Leading causes of death at nonintervention hospitals changed by 6% or less. In the preintervention period, differences in leading causes of death between intervention and nonintervention hospitals persisted after controlling for race/ethnicity and age; in the postintervention period, age accounted for most differences observed between intervention and nonintervention hospitals. Postintervention, malignant neoplasms became the leading cause of premature death (ie, deaths among patients aged 35-74 y) at intervention hospitals. A hospital-level intervention to reduce heart disease overreporting led to substantial changes to other leading causes of death, changing the leading cause of premature death. Heart disease overreporting is likely obscuring the true levels of cause-specific mortality.

  5. [What are the causes of death of patients with tuberculosis: multiple causes of death in a cohort of cases and a research proposal of presumed causes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Marli Souza; Oliveira, Gisele Pinto de; Aguiar, Fernanda Pinheiro; Saraceni, Valéria; Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the multiple causes of death in a cohort of patients with tuberculosis (TB) and to introduce an investigation proposal death for TB from a list of presumable causes. We performed a probabilistic record linkage with the databases of the Information System for Notifiable Diseases (SINAN) 2006 and the Mortality Information System (SIM) 2006-2008. There were 825 deaths, of which 23% for death for TB, deaths due to TB with 16% and 61% without mention of TB. Two hundred and fifteen (42.7%) deaths occurred within the period of treatment, whose profile differed from the pattern of causes when TB was an associated cause, with high frequency of respiratory diseases, AIDS and ill-defined causes. We elaborated a proposal for correction of associated causes of death and an investigation proposal death for TB from a list of presumable causes. According to the proposal, 26 deaths could have modified the underlying cause. This study highlights the importance of record linkage to TB surveillance and improvement of information the SIM and SINAN.

  6. CAUSES OF DEATH IN NEWBORN INFANTS ACCORDING TO AUTOPSY FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh.- R. Walizadeh

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available Autopsy findings in 138 newborn infants which died in a university nursery during 3 years are reviewed and discussed. 80 per cent were premature and small- for- date newborns of up to 2500 g birth weight. Most of these cases showed in addition to general prematurely signs, respiratory tract diseases such as atelectasia, amniotic fluid aspiration and hyaline membrane disease. The full term infants died mostly of malformations. In post neonatal period the cause of death was almost entirely infections such as bronchopneumonia, gastroenteritis and septicemia.

  7. Long-term prognosis and causes of death after spondylodiscitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Theis; Roed, Casper; Dahl, Benny;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on long-term prognosis after spondylodiscitis are scarce. The purpose of this study was to determine long-term mortality and the causes of death after spondylodiscitis. METHODS: A nationwide, population-based cohort study using national registries of patients diagnosed with non.......62), respiratory (MRR = 1.71), gastrointestinal (MRR = 3.35), musculoskeletal (MRR = 5.39) and genitourinary diseases (MRR = 3.37), but also due to trauma, poisoning and external causes (MRR = 2.78), alcohol abuse-related diseases (MRR = 5.59) and drug abuse-related diseases (6 vs 0 deaths, MRR not calculable...

  8. Evaluating the Cause of Death in Obese Individuals: A Ten-Year Medical Autopsy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jad Saab

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity is a growing public health problem associated with increased morbidity and rate of death. Postmortem examination is imperative to determine the cause of death, to detect clinically unsuspected disease entities, and consequently to determine the actual impact of obesity on patient mortality. Methods. A total of 849 adult autopsies were retrospectively reviewed. Obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 and nonobese patients were separately studied. The primary cause of death in each group was categorized into malignancy, infection, stroke, ischemic and nonischemic heart disease, pulmonary embolism, hemorrhage, and primary nonneoplastic diseases of different organ systems. Results. Of 849 autopsies, 32.3% were obese. The leading causes of death in the obese population were malignancy (31.4%, infection (25.9%, ischemic heart disease (12.8%, and pulmonary embolism (6.2%. Obese individuals were statistically more likely to die from pulmonary embolism and liver disease and less likely to die from neurologic diseases and nonischemic heart disease. Conclusion. Autopsies on obese individuals constitute a third of all adult medical autopsies in our center. Increased death rates in the obese due to pulmonary embolism and liver disease should receive special clinical attention. Autopsy findings in the obese population should contribute to overall premortem disease detection, prevention, and management.

  9. Disability Status, Mortality, and Leading Causes of Death in the United States Community Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman-Hoffman, Valerie L.; Ault, Kimberly L.; Anderson, Wayne L.; Weiner, Joshua M.; Stevens, Alissa; Campbell, Vincent A.; Armour, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We examined the effect of functional disability on all-cause mortality and cause-specific deaths among community-dwelling US adults. Methods We used data from 142,636 adults who participated in the 1994–1995 National Health Interview Survey-Disability Supplement eligible for linkage to National Death Index records from 1994 to 2006 to estimate the effects of disability on mortality and leading causes of death. Results Adults with any disability were more likely to die than adults without disability (19.92% vs. 10.94%; hazard ratio = 1.51, 95% confidence interval, 1.45–1.57). This association was statistically significant for most causes of death and for most types of disability studied. The leading cause of death for adults with and without disability differed (heart disease and malignant neoplasms, respectively). Conclusions Our results suggest that all-cause mortality rates are higher among adults with disabilities than among adults without disabilities and that significant associations exist between several types of disability and cause-specific mortality. Interventions are needed that effectively address the poorer health status of people with disabilities and reduce the risk of death. PMID:25719432

  10. Mortality and Causes of Death in Patients With Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkestad, Lars; Hald, Jannie Dahl; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir;

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary connective tissue disease that causes frequent fractures. Little is known about causes of death and length of survival in OI. The objective of this work was to calculate the risk and cause of death, and the median survival time in patients with OI...... five to one to the OI cohort. We calculated hazard ratios for all-cause mortality and subhazard ratios for cause-specific mortality in a comparison of the OI cohort and the reference population. We also calculated all-cause mortality hazard ratios for males, females, and age groups (0 to 17.99 years......, 18.00 to 34.99 years, 35.00 to 54.99 years, 55.00 to 74.99 years, and >75 years). We identified 687 cases of OI (379 women) and included 3435 reference persons (1895 women). A total of 112 patients with OI and 257 persons in the reference population died during the observation period. The all-cause...

  11. Therapeutic milestone: stroke declines from the second to the third leading organ- and disease-specific cause of death in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towfighi, Amytis; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2010-03-01

    Stroke mortality rates declined for much of the second half of the 20th century, but recent trends and their relation to other organ- and disease-specific causes of death have not been characterized. Using the National Center for Health Statistics mortality data, leading organ- and disease-specific causes of death were assessed for the most recent 10-year period (1996 to 2005) in the United States with a specific focus on stroke deaths. Age-adjusted stroke death rates declined by 25.4%; as a result, lung cancer (which only declined by 9.2%) surpassed stroke as the second leading cause of death in 2003. Despite a 31.9% decline in age-adjusted ischemic heart disease death rates, it remains the leading cause of death. Stroke is now the fifth leading cause of death in men and the fourth leading cause of death in whites but remains the second leading cause of death in women and blacks. With stroke death rates decreasing substantially in the United States from 1996 to 2005, stroke moved from the second to the third leading organ- and disease-specific cause of death. Women and blacks may warrant attention for targeted stroke prevention and treatment because they continue to have disproportionately high stroke death rates.

  12. Algorithms for enhancing public health utility of national causes-of-death data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourmalek Farshad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coverage and quality of cause-of-death (CoD data varies across countries and time. Valid, reliable, and comparable assessments of trends in causes of death from even the best systems are limited by three problems: a changes in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD over time; b the use of tabulation lists where substantial detail on causes of death is lost; and c many deaths assigned to causes that cannot or should not be considered underlying causes of death, often called garbage codes (GCs. The Global Burden of Disease Study and the World Health Organization have developed various methods to enhance comparability of CoD data. In this study, we attempt to build on these approaches to enhance the utility of national cause-of-death data for public health analysis. Methods Based on careful consideration of 4,434 country-years of CoD data from 145 countries from 1901 to 2008, encompassing 743 million deaths in ICD versions 1 to 10 as well as country-specific cause lists, we have developed a public health-oriented cause-of-death list. These 56 causes are organized hierarchically and encompass all deaths. Each cause has been mapped from ICD-6 to ICD-10 and, where possible, they have also been mapped to the International List of Causes of Death 1-5. We developed a typology of different classes of GCs. In each ICD revision, GCs have been identified. Target causes to which these GCs should be redistributed have been identified based on certification practice and/or pathophysiology. Proportionate redistribution, statistical models, and expert algorithms have been developed to redistribute GCs to target codes for each age-sex group. Results The fraction of all deaths assigned to GCs varies tremendously across countries and revisions of the ICD. In general, across all country-years of data available, GCs have declined from more than 43% in ICD-7 to 24% in ICD-10. In some regions, such

  13. Mortality and causes of death in schizophrenic patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, P B; Juel, K

    1990-01-01

    A cohort consisting of 6178 people that were psychiatric inpatients with a clinical schizophrenia diagnosis in 1957 were followed up from 1957 through 1986, and their cause-specific mortality was determined. Mortality from cardiovascular diseases, lung diseases, gastrointestinal and urogenital...... disorders, accidents and suicide was increased, whereas mortality from cerebrovascular disorders was reduced. In the male patients cancer mortality was reduced whereas cancer mortality in the female patients was increased. Mortality from a number of causes that theoretically could be associated with side...... effects from neuroleptics was increased. Mortality from some causes of death used as a measurement of the quality of medical care was found to be slightly increased. Further studies of the quality of the medical care provided to schizophrenic patients and of the association between neuroleptic medication...

  14. Coding ill-defined and unknown cause of death is 13 times more frequent in Denmark than in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylijoki-Sørensen, Seija; Sajantila, Antti; Lalu, Kaisa; Bøggild, Henrik; Boldsen, Jesper Lier; Boel, Lene Warner Thorup

    2014-11-01

    Exact cause and manner of death determination improves legislative safety for the individual and for society and guides aspects of national public health. In the International Classification of Diseases, codes R00-R99 are used for "symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified" designated as "ill-defined" or "with unknown etiology". The World Health Organisation recommends avoiding the use of ill-defined and unknown causes of death in the death certificate as this terminology does not give any information concerning the possible conditions that led to the death. Thus, the aim of the study was, firstly, to analyse the frequencies of R00-R99-coded deaths in mortality statistics in Finland and in Denmark and, secondly, to compare these and the methods used to investigate the cause of death. To do so, we extracted a random 90% sample of the Finnish death certificates and 100% of the Danish certificates from the national mortality registries for 2000, 2005 and 2010. Subsequently, we analysed the frequencies of forensic and medical autopsies and external clinical examinations of the bodies in R00-R99-coded deaths. The use of R00-R99 codes was significantly higher in Denmark than in Finland; OR 18.6 (95% CI 15.3-22.4; pFinland, all of these deaths were investigated with a forensic autopsy. Our study suggests that if all deaths in all age groups with unclear cause of death were systematically investigated with a forensic autopsy, only 2-3/1000 deaths per year would be coded as an ill-defined and unknown cause of death in national mortality statistics. At the same time the risk to overlook unnatural deaths is decreased to a minimum. To achieve this in Denmark requires that the existing legislation on cause of death investigation would need to be changed to ensure that all deaths with unknown cause of death are investigated with a forensic autopsy.

  15. Verifying causes of death in Thailand: rationale and methods for empirical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polprasert Warangkana

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cause-specific mortality statistics by age and sex are primary evidence for epidemiological research and health policy. Annual mortality statistics from vital registration systems in Thailand are of limited utility because about 40% of deaths are registered with unknown or nonspecific causes. This paper reports the rationale, methods, and broad results from a comprehensive study to verify registered causes in Thailand. Methods A nationally representative sample of 11,984 deaths was selected using a multistage stratified cluster sampling approach, distributed across 28 districts located in nine provinces of Thailand. Registered causes were verified through medical record review for deaths in hospitals and standard verbal autopsy procedures for deaths outside hospitals, the results of which were used to measure validity and reliability of registration data. Study findings were used to develop descriptive estimates of cause-specific mortality by age and sex in Thailand. Results Causes of death were verified for a total of 9,644 deaths in the study sample, comprised of 3,316 deaths in hospitals and 6,328 deaths outside hospitals. Field studies yielded specific diagnoses in almost all deaths in the sample originally assigned an ill-defined cause of death at registration. Study findings suggest that the leading causes of death in Thailand among males are stroke (9.4%; transport accidents (8.1%; HIV/AIDS (7.9%; ischemic heart diseases (6.4%; and chronic obstructive lung diseases (5.7%. Among females, the leading causes are stroke (11.3%; diabetes (8%; ischemic heart disease (7.5%; HIV/AIDS (5.7%; and renal diseases (4%. Conclusions Empirical investigation of registered causes of death in the study sample yielded adequate information to enable estimation of cause-specific mortality patterns in Thailand. These findings will inform burden of disease estimation and economic evaluation of health policy choices in the country. The

  16. Classifying countries according to leading causes of death in the world at the beginning of the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinković Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cause mortality of a population is an important segment in the analysis of mortality, because it sums up all factors which influence death indicators on a certain territory in a direct way. At the beginning of the 21st century, the situation is not the same everywhere in the world and countries do not share a unique pattern of the causes of deaths. Infectious and parasitic diseases are still dominant in underdeveloped countries, while the leading causes of deaths in developed countries are circulatory disorders and neoplasm. Cardiovascular diseases are the cause of 29% of total mortality in the world, infectious cause 19%, tumors 13% and violent deaths about 9% (based on data from 2002. This paper gives an analysis of the spatial distribution of the leading causes of deaths using the geographic information system (Arc-View GIS, based on the ratio of total mortality and death rates of the population from a certain group of diseases. Based on data analysis, a hypothesis has been set on the significance of the regional factor in forming a picture of population mortality according to causes of death. A regional factor implies a set of physical geographical as well as general social specificities of a certain region which form a pattern of population behavior. Based on death rates, cardiovascular diseases are represented the most in the mortality rates of countries in Eastern and Southeastern Europe. Infectious diseases imperil the population in the Sub-Saharan region of Africa; tumors are most common in Europe, North America and Japan. The highest rates of violent deaths are in countries of the former Soviet Union and the Sub- Saharan zone. Classifying death rates according to leading causes of death represents a prerequisite for forming a final picture of mortality according to causes of death in the world at the beginning of the 'new century'. The method of gathering together the causes of death is possible by applying a statistical model of

  17. Trends in the leading causes of death in the United States, 1970-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemal, Ahmedin; Ward, Elizabeth; Hao, Yongping; Thun, Michael

    2005-09-14

    The decrease in overall death rates in the United States may mask changes in death rates from specific conditions. To examine temporal trends in the age-standardized death rates and in the number of deaths from the 6 leading causes of death in the United States. Analyses of vital statistics data on mortality in the United States from 1970 to 2002. The age-standardized death rate and number of deaths (coded as underlying cause) from each of the 6 leading causes of death: heart disease, stroke, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, accidents (ie, related to transportation [motor vehicle, other land vehicles, and water, air, and space] and not related to transportation [falls, fire, and accidental posioning]), and diabetes mellitus. The age-standardized death rate (per 100,000 per year) from all causes combined decreased from 1242 in 1970 to 845 in 2002. The largest percentage decreases were in death rates from stroke (63%), heart disease (52%), and accidents (41%). The largest absolute decreases in death rates were from heart disease (262 deaths per 100,000), stroke (96 deaths per 100,000), and accidents (26 deaths per 100,000).The death rate from all types of cancer combined increased between 1970 and 1990 and then decreased through 2002, yielding a net decline of 2.7%. In contrast, death rates doubled from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease over the entire time interval and increased by 45% for diabetes since 1987. Despite decreases in age-standardized death rates from 4 of the 6 leading causes of death, the absolute number of deaths from these conditions continues to increase, although these deaths occur at older ages. The absolute number of deaths and age at death continue to increase in the United States. These temporal trends have major implications for health care and health care costs in an aging population.

  18. Throw caution to the wind: is refeeding syndrome really a cause of death in acute care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, K L; Capra, S M; Palmer, M A

    2017-08-16

    Refeeding syndrome (RFS), a life-threatening medical condition, is commonly associated with acute or chronic starvation. While the prevalence of patients at risk of RFS in hospital reportedly ranges from 0 to 80%, the prevalence and types of patients who die as a result of RFS is unknown. We aimed to measure the prevalence rate and examine the case histories of patients who passed away with RFS listed as a cause of death. Patients were eligible for inclusion provided their death occurred within a Queensland hospital. Medical charts were reviewed, for medical, clinical and nutrition histories with results presented using descriptive statistics. Across 18 years (1997-2015) and ~260000 hospital deaths, five individuals (4F, 74 (37-87)yrs) were identified. No patient had a past or present diagnosis, such as anorexia nervosa, that would classify them as at high risk for RFS. RFS was not listed as the primary cause of death for any patient. No individual consumed >3400 kJ per day. Limited consensus was observed in the signs and symptoms used to diagnose RFS, although all patients experienced low levels of potassium, phosphate and/or magnesium. Eighty percent of electrolytes improved before death. RFS was a rare underlying cause of death, despite reported high prevalence rates of risk. Patient groups usually considered to be at high risk were not identified, suggesting a level of imprecision with the interpretation of criteria used to identify RFS risk. More detailed research is warranted to assist in the identification of those distinctly at risk of RFS.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 16 August 2017; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2017.124.

  19. A method for reclassifying cause of death in cases categorized as "event of undetermined intent".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Evgeny; Shkolnikov, Vladimir M; Pridemore, William Alex; Nikitina, Svetlana Yu

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for reclassifying external causes of death categorized as "event of undetermined intent" (EUIs) into non-transport accidents, suicides, or homicides. In nations like Russia and the UK the absolute number of EUIs is large, the EUI death rate is high, or EUIs comprise a non-trivial proportion of all deaths due to external causes. Overuse of this category may result in (1) substantially underestimating the mortality rate of deaths due to specific external causes and (2) threats to the validity of studies of the patterns and causes of external deaths and of evaluations of the impact of interventions meant to reduce them. We employ available characteristics about the deceased and the event to estimate the most likely cause of death using multinomial logistic regression. We use the set of known non-transport accidents, suicides, and homicides to calculate an mlogit-based linear score and an estimated classification probability (ECP). This ECP is applied to EUIs, with varying levels of minimal classification probability. We also present an optional second step that employs a population-level adjustment to reclassify deaths that remain undetermined (the proportion of which varies based on the minimal classification probability). We illustrate our method by applying it to Russia. Between 2000 and 2011, 521,000 Russian deaths (15 % percent of all deaths from external causes) were categorized as EUIs. We used data from anonymized micro-data on the ~3 million deaths from external causes. Our reclassification model used 10 decedent and event characteristics from the computerized death records. Results show that during this period about 14 % of non-transport accidents, 13 % of suicides, and 33 % of homicides were officially categorized as EUIs. Our findings also suggest that 2011 levels of non-transport accidents and suicides would have been about 24 % higher and of homicide about 82 % higher than that reported by official vital statistics data. Overuse

  20. Gastro-intestinal complications as one of causes of death in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V N Sorotskaya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess frequency of gastro-intestinal (Gl bleeding and ulcer perforation as direct cause of death in pts with rheumatic diseases. Material and methods. Statistical analysis of Tula region patient care institutions documentation was performed to assess frequency and character of severe GI complications leading to death of pts. 300 cases of death which took place during 5 years (1996-2000 in 3 rheumatologic (105 cases and 10 therapeutic (195 cases departments of Tula region patient care institutions were studied. Results. Gl bleeding and ulcer perforation were the direct causes of death in 15 pts with rheumatic diseases i.e. in 5% from the whole number of died. GI complications caused death in 4 pts with chronic rheumatic heart disease (HRHD (1,7%, in 7 (15,2%with rheumatoid arthritis -, in 2 with ankylosing spondylitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (8,0 and 22,2% respectively. Pts with systemic sclerosis did not die because of GI damage. GI changes most frequently localized in duodenum (8 pts. 4 pts had complications connected with gastric ulcer and in 2 diffuse erosive damage of Gl mucosa was the source of bleeding. Conclusion. Severe Gl complications quite often lead to death of pts with rheumatic diseases in Tula region.

  1. Leading Causes of Death in Nonmetropolitan and Metropolitan Areas- United States, 1999-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Ernest; Garcia, Macarena C; Bastian, Brigham; Rossen, Lauren M; Ingram, Deborah D; Faul, Mark; Massetti, Greta M; Thomas, Cheryll C; Hong, Yuling; Yoon, Paula W; Iademarco, Michael F

    2017-01-13

    Higher rates of death in nonmetropolitan areas (often referred to as rural areas) compared with metropolitan areas have been described but not systematically assessed. 1999-2014 DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: Mortality data for U.S. residents from the National Vital Statistics System were used to calculate age-adjusted death rates and potentially excess deaths for nonmetropolitan and metropolitan areas for the five leading causes of death. Age-adjusted death rates included all ages and were adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population by the direct method. Potentially excess deaths are defined as deaths among persons aged leading causes were higher in nonmetropolitan areas than in metropolitan areas. For example, approximately half of deaths from unintentional injury and chronic lower respiratory disease in nonmetropolitan areas were potentially excess deaths, compared with 39.2% and 30.9%, respectively, in metropolitan areas. Potentially excess deaths also differed among and within public health regions; within regions, nonmetropolitan areas tended to have higher percentages of potentially excess deaths than metropolitan areas. Compared with metropolitan areas, nonmetropolitan areas have higher age-adjusted death rates and greater percentages of potentially excess deaths from the five leading causes of death, nationally and across public health regions. Routine tracking of potentially excess deaths in nonmetropolitan areas might help public health departments identify emerging health problems, monitor known problems, and focus interventions to reduce preventable deaths in these areas.

  2. Potentially Preventable Deaths Among the Five Leading Causes of Death - United States, 2010 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Macarena C; Bastian, Brigham; Rossen, Lauren M; Anderson, Robert; Miniño, Arialdi; Yoon, Paula W; Faul, Mark; Massetti, Greta; Thomas, Cheryll C; Hong, Yuling; Iademarco, Michael F

    2016-11-18

    Death rates by specific causes vary across the 50 states and the District of Columbia.* Information on differences in rates for the leading causes of death among states might help state health officials determine prevention goals, priorities, and strategies. CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System data to provide national and state-specific estimates of potentially preventable deaths among the five leading causes of death in 2014 and compared these estimates with estimates previously published for 2010. Compared with 2010, the estimated number of potentially preventable deaths changed (supplemental material at https://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/42472); cancer deaths decreased 25% (from 84,443 to 63,209), stroke deaths decreased 11% (from 16,973 to 15,175), heart disease deaths decreased 4% (from 91,757 to 87,950), chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD) (e.g., asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema) deaths increased 1% (from 28,831 to 29,232), and deaths from unintentional injuries increased 23% (from 36,836 to 45,331). A better understanding of progress made in reducing potentially preventable deaths in the United States might inform state and regional efforts targeting the prevention of premature deaths from the five leading causes in the United States.

  3. US County-Level Trends in Mortality Rates for Major Causes of Death, 1980–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer-Lindgren, Laura; Bertozzi-Villa, Amelia; Stubbs, Rebecca W.; Morozoff, Chloe; Kutz, Michael J.; Huynh, Chantal; Barber, Ryan M.; Shackelford, Katya A.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; van Lenthe, Frank J.; Flaxman, Abraham D.; Naghavi, Mohsen; Mokdad, Ali H.; Murray, Christopher J. L.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE County-level patterns in mortality rates by cause have not been systematically described but are potentially useful for public health officials, clinicians, and researchers seeking to improve health and reduce geographic disparities. OBJECTIVES To demonstrate the use of a novel method for county-level estimation and to estimate annual mortality rates by US county for 21 mutually exclusive causes of death from 1980 through 2014. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Redistribution methods for garbage codes (implausible or insufficiently specific cause of death codes) and small area estimation methods (statistical methods for estimating rates in small subpopulations) were applied to death registration data from the National Vital Statistics System to estimate annual county-level mortality rates for 21 causes of death. These estimates were raked (scaled along multiple dimensions) to ensure consistency between causes and with existing national-level estimates. Geographic patterns in the age-standardized mortality rates in 2014 and in the change in the age-standardized mortality rates between 1980 and 2014 for the 10 highest-burden causes were determined. EXPOSURE County of residence. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cause-specific age-standardized mortality rates. RESULTS A total of 80 412 524 deaths were recorded from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2014, in the United States. Of these, 19.4 million deaths were assigned garbage codes. Mortality rates were analyzed for 3110 counties or groups of counties. Large between-county disparities were evident for every cause, with the gap in age-standardized mortality rates between counties in the 90th and 10th percentiles varying from 14.0 deaths per 100 000 population (cirrhosis and chronic liver diseases) to 147.0 deaths per 100 000 population (cardiovascular diseases). Geographic regions with elevated mortality rates differed among causes: for example, cardiovascular disease mortality tended to be highest along the

  4. Validating hierarchical verbal autopsy expert algorithms in a large data set with known causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter, Henry D; Perin, Jamie; Black, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    Physician assessment historically has been the most common method of analyzing verbal autopsy (VA) data. Recently, the World Health Organization endorsed two automated methods, Tariff 2.0 and InterVA-4, which promise greater objectivity and lower cost. A disadvantage of the Tariff method is that it requires a training data set from a prior validation study, while InterVA relies on clinically specified conditional probabilities. We undertook to validate the hierarchical expert algorithm analysis of VA data, an automated, intuitive, deterministic method that does not require a training data set. Using Population Health Metrics Research Consortium study hospital source data, we compared the primary causes of 1629 neonatal and 1456 1-59 month-old child deaths from VA expert algorithms arranged in a hierarchy to their reference standard causes. The expert algorithms were held constant, while five prior and one new "compromise" neonatal hierarchy, and three former child hierarchies were tested. For each comparison, the reference standard data were resampled 1000 times within the range of cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMF) for one of three approximated community scenarios in the 2013 WHO global causes of death, plus one random mortality cause proportions scenario. We utilized CSMF accuracy to assess overall population-level validity, and the absolute difference between VA and reference standard CSMFs to examine particular causes. Chance-corrected concordance (CCC) and Cohen's kappa were used to evaluate individual-level cause assignment. Overall CSMF accuracy for the best-performing expert algorithm hierarchy was 0.80 (range 0.57-0.96) for neonatal deaths and 0.76 (0.50-0.97) for child deaths. Performance for particular causes of death varied, with fairly flat estimated CSMF over a range of reference values for several causes. Performance at the individual diagnosis level was also less favorable than that for overall CSMF (neonatal: best CCC = 0.23, range 0

  5. Validation of verbal autopsy: determination of cause of deaths in Malaysia 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Shubash Shander; Yi Yi, Khoo; Omar, Mohd Azahadi; Anuar, Mohamad Fuad Mohamad; Jeevananthan, Chandrika; Rao, Chalapati

    2017-08-11

    Mortality statistics by age, sex and cause are the foundation of basic health data required for health status assessment, epidemiological research and formation of health policy. Close to half the deaths in Malaysia occur outside a health facility, are not attended by medical personnel, and are given a lay opinion as to the cause of death, leading to poor quality of data from vital registration. Verbal autopsy (VA) is a very useful tool in diagnosing broad causes of deaths for events that occur outside health facilities. This article reports the development of the VA methods and our principal finding from a validation study. A cross sectional study on nationally representative sample deaths that occurred in Malaysia during 2013 was used. A VA questionnaire suitable for local use was developed. Trained field interviewers visited the family members of the deceased at their homes and conducted face to face interviews with the next of kin. Completed questionnaires were reviewed by trained physicians who assigned multiple and underlying causes. Reference diagnoses for validation were obtained from review of medical records (MR) available for a sample of the overall study deaths. Corresponding MR diagnosis with matched sample of the VA diagnosis were available in 2172 cases for the validation study. Sensitivity scores were good (>75%) for transport accidents and certain cancers. Moderate sensitivity (50% - 75%) was obtained for ischaemic heart disease (64%) and cerebrovascular disease (72%). The validation sample for deaths due to major causes such as ischaemic heart disease, pneumonia, breast cancer and transport accidents show low cause-specific mortality fraction (CSMF) changes. The scores obtained for the top 10 leading site-specific cancers ranged from average to good. We can conclude that VA is suitable for implementation for deaths outside the health facilities in Malaysia. This would reduce ill-defined mortality causes in vital registration data, and yield more

  6. Evaluation of Underlying Causes of Death in Patients with Dementia to Support Targeted Advance Care Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Vorst, Irene E.; Koek, Huiberdina L.; Bots, Michiel L.; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insight in causes of death in demented patients may help physicians in end-of-life care. Objectives: To investigate underlying causes of death (UCD) in demented patients stratified by age, sex, dementia subtype [Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD)] and to compare them with

  7. Blinded and uniform cause of death verification in a lung cancer CT screening trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horeweg, N.; van Klaveren, R. J.; Groen, H. J. M.; Lammers, J. -W. J.; Weenink, C.; Nackaerts, K.; Mali, W.; Oudkerk, M.; de Koning, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Disease-specific mortality is the final outcome of a lung cancer screening trial, therefore cause of death verification is crucial. The use of death certificates for this purpose is debated because of bias, inaccurate completion and incorrect ante mortem diagnoses. A cause of death evaluation proces

  8. Causes of death in intensive care patients with a low APACHE II score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkel, A. van; Lieshout, J.v.; Hellegering, J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Pickkers, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the actual causes of death of patients with a low APACHE II score, but iatrogenic reasons may play a role. The aim of this study was to evaluate the demographics, course of disease, and causes of death in this specific group of ICU patients. Methods: For this retros

  9. Causes of deaths and influencing factors in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauchier, Laurent; Villejoubert, Olivier; Clementy, Nicolas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is associated with a higher mortality, but causes of death of atrial fibrillation patients and their specific predictors have been less well defined. We aimed to identify the causes of death among atrial fibrillation patients and secondly, clinical predictors for t...

  10. Effect of cause-of-death training on agreement between hospital discharge diagnoses and cause of death reported, inpatient hospital deaths, New York City, 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Paulina; Gambatese, Melissa; Begier, Elizabeth; Zimmerman, Regina; Soto, Antonio; Madsen, Ann

    2015-01-15

    Accurate cause-of-death reporting is required for mortality data to validly inform public health programming and evaluation. Research demonstrates overreporting of heart disease on New York City death certificates. We describe changes in reported causes of death following a New York City health department training conducted in 2009 to improve accuracy of cause-of-death reporting at 8 hospitals. The objective of our study was to assess the degree to which death certificates citing heart disease as cause of death agreed with hospital discharge data and the degree to which training improved accuracy of reporting. We analyzed 74,373 death certificates for 2008 through 2010 that were linked with hospital discharge records for New York City inpatient deaths and calculated the proportion of discordant deaths, that is, death certificates reporting an underlying cause of heart disease with no corresponding discharge record diagnosis. We also summarized top principal diagnoses among discordant reports and calculated the proportion of inpatient deaths reporting sepsis, a condition underreported in New York City, to assess whether documentation practices changed in response to clarifications made during the intervention. Citywide discordance between death certificates and discharge data decreased from 14.9% in 2008 to 9.6% in 2010 (P New York City heart disease mortality trends. Other vital records jurisdictions should employ similar interventions to improve cause-of-death reporting and use linked discharge data to monitor data quality.

  11. Effect of Cause-of-Death Training on Agreement Between Hospital Discharge Diagnoses and Cause of Death Reported, Inpatient Hospital Deaths, New York City, 2008–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Paulina; Gambatese, Melissa; Begier, Elizabeth; Zimmerman, Regina; Soto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Accurate cause-of-death reporting is required for mortality data to validly inform public health programming and evaluation. Research demonstrates overreporting of heart disease on New York City death certificates. We describe changes in reported causes of death following a New York City health department training conducted in 2009 to improve accuracy of cause-of-death reporting at 8 hospitals. The objective of our study was to assess the degree to which death certificates citing heart disease as cause of death agreed with hospital discharge data and the degree to which training improved accuracy of reporting. Methods We analyzed 74,373 death certificates for 2008 through 2010 that were linked with hospital discharge records for New York City inpatient deaths and calculated the proportion of discordant deaths, that is, death certificates reporting an underlying cause of heart disease with no corresponding discharge record diagnosis. We also summarized top principal diagnoses among discordant reports and calculated the proportion of inpatient deaths reporting sepsis, a condition underreported in New York City, to assess whether documentation practices changed in response to clarifications made during the intervention. Results Citywide discordance between death certificates and discharge data decreased from 14.9% in 2008 to 9.6% in 2010 (P New York City heart disease mortality trends. Other vital records jurisdictions should employ similar interventions to improve cause-of-death reporting and use linked discharge data to monitor data quality. PMID:25590598

  12. Growing burden of sepsis-related mortality in northeastern Italy: a multiple causes of death analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeli, Ugo; Piccinni, Pasquale; Schievano, Elena; Saugo, Mario; Pellizzer, Giampietro

    2016-07-13

    Few population-based data are available on mortality due to sepsis. The aim of the study was to estimate sepsis-related mortality rates and to assess the associated comorbidities. From multiple causes of death data (MCOD) of the Veneto Region (northeastern Italy), all deaths with sepsis mentioned anywhere in the death certificate were retrieved for the period 2008-2013. Among these deaths the prevalence of common chronic comorbidities was investigated, as well as the distribution of the underlying cause of death (UCOD), the single disease selected from all condition mentioned in the certificate and usually tabulated in mortality statistics. Age-standardized mortality rates were computed for sepsis selected as the UCOD, and for sepsis mentioned anywhere in the certificate. Overall 16,906 sepsis-related deaths were tracked. Sepsis was mentioned in 6.3 % of all regional deaths, increasing from 4.9 in 2008 to 7.7 % in 2013. Sepsis was the UCOD in 0.6 % of total deaths in 2008, and in 1.6 % in 2013. Age-standardized mortality rates increased by 45 % for all sepsis-related deaths, and by 140 % for sepsis as the UCOD. Sepsis was often reported in the presence of chronic comorbidities, especially neoplasms, diabetes, circulatory diseases, and dementia. Respiratory tract and intra-abdominal infections were the most frequently associated sites of infection. MCOD analyses provide an estimate of the burden of sepsis-related mortality. MCOD data suggest an increasing importance attributed to sepsis by certifying physicians, but also a real increase in mortality rates, thus confirming trends reported in some other countries by analyses of hospital discharge records.

  13. A 20-year prospective study of mortality and causes of death among hospitalized opioid addicts in Oslo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haldorsen Tor

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study mortality rate and causes of death among all hospitalized opioid addicts treated for self-poisoning or admitted for voluntary detoxification in Oslo between 1980 and 1981, and to compare their mortality to that of the general population. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted on 185 opioid addicts from all medical departments in Oslo who were treated for either self-poisoning (n = 93, 1980, voluntary detoxification (n = 75, 1980/1981 or both (n = 17. Their median age was 24 years; with a range from 16 to 41, and 53% were males. All deaths that had occurred by the end of 2000 were identified from the Central Population Register. Causes of death were obtained from Statistics Norway. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs were computed for mortality, in general, and in particular, for different causes of death. Results During a period of 20 years, 70 opioid addicts died (37.8%, with a standardized mortality ratio (SMR equal to 23.6 (95% CI, 18.7–29.9. The SMR remained high during the whole period, ranging from 32.4 in the first five-year period, to 13.4 in the last five-year period. There were no significant differences in SMR between self-poisonings and those admitted for voluntarily detoxification. The registered causes of death were accidents (11.4%, suicide (7.1%, cancer (4.3%, cardiovascular disease (2.9%, other violent deaths (2.9%, other diseases (71.4%. Among the 50 deaths classified as other diseases, the category "drug dependence" was listed in the vast majority of cases (37 deaths, 52.9% of the total. SMRs increased significantly for all causes of death, with the other diseases group having the highest SMR; 65.8 (95% CI, 49.9–86.9. The SMR was 5.4 (95% CI, 1.3–21.5 for cardiovascular diseases, and 4.3 (95% CI, 1.4–13.5 for cancer. The SMR was 13.2 (95% CI, 6.6–26.4 for accidents, 10.7 (95% CI, 4.5–25.8 for suicides, and 28.6 (95% CI, 7.1–114.4 for other violent deaths. Conclusion The risk

  14. Statistical corrections to numerical predictions. IV. [of weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemm, Jae-Kyung; Faller, Alan J.

    1986-01-01

    The National Meteorological Center Barotropic-Mesh Model has been used to test a statistical correction procedure, designated as M-II, that was developed in Schemm et al. (1981). In the present application, statistical corrections at 12 h resulted in significant reductions of the mean-square errors of both vorticity and the Laplacian of thickness. Predictions to 48 h demonstrated the feasibility of applying corrections at every 12 h in extended forecasts. In addition to these improvements, however, the statistical corrections resulted in a shift of error from smaller to larger-scale motions, improving the smallest scales dramatically but deteriorating the largest scales. This effect is shown to be a consequence of randomization of the residual errors by the regression equations and can be corrected by spatially high-pass filtering the field of corrections before they are applied.

  15. The validation of the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register and Causes of Death Register data on stroke diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Hanna; Salomaa, Veikko; Torppa, Jorma; Sivenius, Juhani; Immonen-Räihä, Pirjo; Lehtonen, Aapo

    2007-06-01

    Administrative registers, like hospital discharge registers and causes of death registers are used for the monitoring of disease incidences and in the follow-up studies. Obtaining reliable results requires that the diagnoses in these registers are correct and the coverage of the registers is high. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of the Finnish hospital discharge registers and causes of death registers stroke diagnoses against the population-based FINSTROKE register. All first stroke events from the hospital discharge registers and causes of death registers from the areas covered by the FINSTROKE register were obtained for years 1993-1998 and linked to the FINSTROKE register. The sensitivity and positive predictive values were calculated. A total of 3633 stroke events, 767 fatal and 2866 non-fatal strokes, were included in the registers. The sensitivity for all first stroke events was 85%, for fatal strokes 86% and for non-fatal strokes 85%. The positive predictive values for all first strokes was 86%, for fatal strokes 92% and for non-fatal strokes 85%. The sensitivity as well as the positive predictive values for subarachnoid haemorrhage and intracerebral haemorrhage was higher than for cerebral infarctions. There were no marked differences in the sensitivity or positive predictive values between men and women. The sensitivity and the positive predictive values of the Finnish hospital discharge registers and causes of death registers are fairly good. Finnish administrative registers can be used for the monitoring of stroke incidence, but the number of cerebral infarctions should be interpreted with caution.

  16. Causes of Death in Prader-Willi Syndrome: Prader-Willi Syndrome Association (USA) 40-Year Mortality Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G.; Manzardo, Ann M.; Heinemann, Janalee; Loker, Carolyn; Loker, James

    2016-01-01

    Background Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare complex neurodevelopmental genetic disorder that is associated with hyperphagia and morbid obesity in humans leading to a shortened life expectancy. This report summarizes the primary causes of death and evaluates mortality trends in a large cohort of individuals with PWS. Methods PWSA (USA) mortality syndrome-specific database of death reports was collected through a cursory bereavement program for PWSA(USA) families using a brief survey created in 1999. Causes of death were descriptively characterized and statistically examined using Cox Proportional Hazards. Results A total of 486 deaths were reported (263 males, 217 females, 6 unknown) between 1973 and 2015 with mean age of 29.5 ± 16 years (2mo–67yrs), 70% occurring in adulthood. Respiratory failure was the most common cause accounting for 31% of all deaths. Males were at increased risk for presumed hyperphagia-related accidents/injuries compared to females and cardiopulmonary factors. PWS maternal disomy 15 genetic subtype showed an increased risk of death from cardiopulmonary factors compared to the deletion subtype. Conclusions These findings highlight the heightened vulnerability towards obesity and hyperphagia-related mortality in PWS. Future research is needed to address critical vulnerabilities such as gender and genetic subtype in the cause of death in PWS. PMID:27854358

  17. The importance of microbiological testing for establishing cause of death in 42 forensic autopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    , microorganisms found, histological findings, antemortem information, C-reactive protein measurement and cause of death. Fiftyone different microorganisms were found distributed among 37 cases, bacteria being the most abundant. Nineteen of the cases were classified as having a microbiological related cause...... of death. C-reactive protein levels were raised in 14 cases of the 19 cases, histological findings either supported or were a decisive factor for the classification of microbiologically related cause of death in 14 cases. As a multitude of abundant microorganisms are able to cause infection under the right...

  18. Trends in the leading causes of death in Korea, 1983-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Daroh; Ha, Mina; Song, Inmyung

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to analyze trends in the 10 leading causes of death in Korea from 1983 to 2012. Death rates were derived from the Korean Statistics Information Service database and age-adjusted to the 2010 population. Joinpoint regression analysis was used to identify the points when statistically significant changes occurred in the trends. Between 1983 and 2012, the age-standardized death rate (ASR) from all causes decreased by 61.6% for men and 51.2% for women. ASRs from malignant neoplasms, diabetes mellitus, and transport accidents increased initially before decreasing. ASRs from hypertensive diseases, heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases and diseases of the liver showed favorable trends (ASR % change: -94.4%, -53.8%, -76.0%, and -78.9% for men, and -77.1%, -36.5%, -67.8%, and -79.9% for women, respectively). ASRs from pneumonia decreased until the mid-1990s and thereafter increased. ASRs from intentional self-harm increased persistently since around 1990 (ASR % change: 122.0% for men and 217.4% for women). In conclusion, death rates from all causes in Korea decreased significantly in the last three decades except in the late 1990s. Despite the great strides made in the overall mortality, temporal trends varied widely by cause. Mortality trends for malignant neoplasms, diabetes mellitus, pneumonia and intentional self-harm were unfavorable.

  19. MORTALITY AND CAUSE OF DEATH IN ABUTH, ZARIA: 1999 – 2005

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: From May 1999 to November 2005, all case folders of de- ceased patients were retrieved .... ing workshop for all the medical doctors, nurses and staff of HMI ... The framework for analysis is based on the causes of death classification.

  20. Mortality from diabetes mellitus, 2004 to 2008: A multiple-cause-of-death analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungwee; Peters, Paul A

    2014-03-01

    Using multiple-cause-of-death data, this study examines diabetes mellitus as a cause of mortality. During the 2004-to-2008 period, diabetes mellitus was listed as either the underlying cause or a contributing cause of 119,617 deaths. It was more than twice as likely to be a contributing than the underlying cause of death. When it was identified as the underlying cause of death, diabetes mellitus was rarely the only cause. The diabetes mellitus mortality rate was relatively high among males, older individuals, and people living in lower-income neighbourhoods. Provincial/Territorial differences in rates of death from diabetes mellitus were considerable. When diabetes mellitus was the underlying cause of death, cardiovascular diseases were listed as a contributing cause most often, and when diabetes mellitus was a contributing cause, cardiovascular diseases were most likely to be the underlying cause.

  1. Causes of death and associated conditions (Codac) - a utilitarian approach to the classification of perinatal deaths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Froen, J. Frederik; Pinar, Halit; Flenady, Vicki; Bahrin, Safiah; Charles, Adrian; Chauke, Lawrence; Day, Katie; Duke, Charles W.; Facchinetti, Fabio; Fretts, Ruth C.; Gardener, Glenn; Gilshenan, Kristen; Gordijn, Sanne J.; Gordon, Adrienne; Guyon, Grace; Harrison, Catherine; Koshy, Rachel; Pattinson, Robert C.; Petersson, Karin; Russell, Laurie; Saastad, Eli; Smith, Gordon C. S.; Torabi, Rozbeh

    2009-01-01

    A carefully classified dataset of perinatal mortality will retain the most significant information on the causes of death. Such information is needed for health care policy development, surveillance and international comparisons, clinical services and research. For comparability purposes, we propose

  2. Impact of haart on causes of death of persons with late-stage AIDS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sansone, Giorgio R; Dermot Frengley, J

    2000-01-01

    ...).The aim of the present study was to investigate causes of deaths in long-term care hospital patients with late-stage AIDS who expired at the Coler-Goldwater Memorial Hospital in New York City in 1995...

  3. Short- and Long-Term Cause of Death in Patients Treated With Primary PCI for STEMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Frants; Butrymovich, Vitalij; Kelbæk, Henning

    2014-01-01

    ,804 consecutive patients with STEMI (age 63 ± 13 years, 72% males) treated with primary PCI. RESULTS: Patients were followed up for a median of 4.7 years. During a total of 13,447 patient-years, 717 patients died. Main causes of death within the first 30 days were cardiogenic shock and anoxic brain injury after......BACKGROUND: Short-term mortality has been studied thoroughly in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), whereas long-term cause of death in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remains unknown. OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study...... was to describe the association between time and cause of death in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. METHODS: A centralized civil registration system, patient files, and public disease and death cause registries with an accurate record linkage were used to trace time and cause of death in 2...

  4. Secular trend of the leading causes of death in China from 2003 to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Shenzhen 518060, China. 3. ... Keywords: Causes of death; China; cancer; cardiovascular disease ..... prevalence of diabetes and obesity was the primary rea-.

  5. NCHS - Potentially Excess Deaths from the Five Leading Causes of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Potentially Excess Deaths from the Five Leading Causes of Death in Nonmetropolitan and Metropolitan Areas, United States, 2005-2015. Mortality data for U.S....

  6. The Experience of ICD Utilization on Verbal Autopsy Data to Obtain Trend of Cause of Death in Indonesian Population (1992–2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarimawar Djaja

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cause of death data is necessary for arranging health programs. The needs of these data is not fulfill yet through reporting and recording system from health facilities only,therefore national health survei should be conducted regularly. Objective: To obtain cause of death trends in the populations from VA data. Methods: Material taken from Nasional Health Survey 1992, 1995, 2001, 2007 covering 65,664 households (HH, 206,240 HH, 211,168 HH, 258,366 HH respectively, selected by stratified random sampling technique using core and module sample of Socio Economic National Survey (Susenas and taken with a Probability Proportional to Size method. Cause of death data was collected by structured questionnaire using verbal autopsy (VA technique and was classified based on ICD 9 and ICD 10. Results: The disease patterns of cause of death from 1992 to 2007 showed the non-communicable disease is increasing continuously while communicable disease (infectious, maternal and perinatal, nutritional deficiencies is decreasing; however the burden of disease is still present on both groups of diseases. Conclusions: The little bit less accurate VA data (1992–2007 collected is able to produce national statistic data of cause of death and could be used to suggest health planning program managers in Indonesia

  7. Mortality and causes of death of 344 Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Halberg, P; Ullman, S

    1998-01-01

    To determine survival, mortality and causes of death in Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), and to analyse how these parameters are influenced by demographic variables and the extent of skin involvement.......To determine survival, mortality and causes of death in Danish patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), and to analyse how these parameters are influenced by demographic variables and the extent of skin involvement....

  8. Assessment of alternatives to correct inventory difference statistical treatment deficiencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, K.R.; Johnston, J.W.; Bennett, C.A.; Brouns, R.J.; Mullen, M.F.; Roberts, F.P.

    1983-11-01

    This document presents an analysis of alternatives to correct deficiencies in the statistical treatment of inventory differences in the NRC guidance documents and licensee practice. Pacific Northwest Laboratory's objective for this study was to assess alternatives developed by the NRC and a panel of safeguards statistical experts. Criteria were developed for the evaluation and the assessment was made considering the criteria. The results of this assessment are PNL recommendations, which are intended to provide NRC decision makers with a logical and statistically sound basis for correcting the deficiencies.

  9. [Applicability of the analysis by multiple cause of death by cervical cancer: the experience in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante-Montes, Lilia Patricia; Alvarez-Solorza, Isabel; Valencia, Angel Domínguez; Hernández-Valero, María A; Tlachino, Gloria Toxqui; Huidobro, Lino González

    2011-12-01

    Objective. The study explores the applicability of the multiple-cause-of-death analysis for cervical-uterine cancer. Methods. A proportional mortality hazard design and the analysis of all causes of death due to cervical-uterine cancer from 367 death certificates of women older than 18 years of age from the State of Mexico, and 515 age and year adjusted sample of death certificates of women from the same region who died from other causes. Results. A basic multiple cause of death of 2.9 was observed in the death certificates, i.e., for every basic cause there were 2.9 multiple causes. When adjusting the multiple-causes-of-death analysis for cervical-uterine cancer by age, education, marital and insurability status, the most contributing and associated causes of death were malignant tumors from unspecified sites [OR=18.98 (2.28-157.56) and OR=14.25 (1.67-121.0)] respectively; Diabetes Mellitus as a contributing [OR=1.82 (1.02-3.27) and associated cause [OR=7.78 (1.46-41.37], and systemic arterial hypertension as an associated cause [OR=3.00 (1.40-6.47)]. Conclusions. The multiple-cause-of-death analysis is an adequate to observe the diseases that contribute condition and are associated to the cervical-uterine cancer.

  10. Adverse medical complications: an under-reported contributory cause of death in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J R; Ely, S F; Toriello, A; Hirsch, C S

    2014-04-01

    The current death certification system in the USA fails to accurately track deaths due to adverse medical events. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the under-reporting of deaths due to adverse medical events due to limitations in the current death certification/reporting system, and the benefits of using the term 'therapeutic complication' as the manner of death. Retrospective review and comparison of death certificates and vital statistical coding. The manner of death is certified as a therapeutic complication when death is caused by predictable complications of appropriate therapy, and would not have occurred but for the medical intervention. Based on medical examiner records, complications that caused or contributed to deaths over a five-year period were examined retrospectively. These fatalities were compared with deaths coded as medical and surgical complications by the New York City Bureau of Vital Statistics. The Medical Examiner's Office certified 2471 deaths as therapeutic complications and 312 deaths as accidents occurring in healthcare facilities. In contrast, the New York City Bureau of Vital Statistics reported 188 deaths due to complications of medical and surgical care. Use of the term 'therapeutic complication' as the manner of death identified nearly 14 times more deaths than were reported by the New York City Bureau of Vital Statistics. If these therapeutic complications and medical accidents were considered as a 'disease', they would rank as the 10th leading cause of death in New York City, surpassing homicides and suicides in some years. Nationwide policy shifts that use the term 'therapeutic complication' would improve the capture and reporting of these deaths, thus allowing better identification of fatal adverse medical events in order to focus on and assess preventative strategies. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mortality and cause-of-death reporting and analysis systems in seven pacific island countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Karen L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality statistics are essential for population health assessment. Despite limitations in data availability, Pacific Island Countries are considered to be in epidemiological transition, with non-communicable diseases increasingly contributing to premature adult mortality. To address rapidly changing health profiles, countries would require mortality statistics from routine death registration given their relatively small population sizes. Methods This paper uses a standard analytical framework to examine death registration systems in Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Palau, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu. Results In all countries, legislation on death registration exists but does not necessarily reflect current practices. Health departments carry the bulk of responsibility for civil registration functions. Medical cause-of-death certificates are completed for at least hospital deaths in all countries. Overall, significantly more information is available than perceived or used. Use is primarily limited by poor understanding, lack of coordination, limited analytical skills, and insufficient technical resources. Conclusion Across the region, both registration and statistics systems need strengthening to improve the availability, completeness, and quality of data. Close interaction between health staff and local communities provides a good foundation for further improvements in death reporting. System strengthening activities must include a focus on clear assignment of responsibility, provision of appropriate authority to perform assigned tasks, and fostering ownership of processes and data to ensure sustained improvements. These human elements need to be embedded in a culture of data sharing and use. Lessons from this multi-country exercise would be applicable in other regions afflicted with similar issues of availability and quality of vital statistics.

  12. Factors associated with specific causes of death amongst HIV-positive individuals in the D:A:D Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Colette; Sabin, Caroline A; Lundgren, Jens D;

    2010-01-01

    To investigate any emerging trends in causes of death amongst HIV-positive individuals in the current cART era, and to investigate the factors associated with each specific cause of death.......To investigate any emerging trends in causes of death amongst HIV-positive individuals in the current cART era, and to investigate the factors associated with each specific cause of death....

  13. Leading Causes of Death among Asian American Subgroups (2003-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Katherine G; Jose, Powell O; Kapphahn, Kristopher I; Frank, Ariel T H; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Thompson, Caroline A; Eggleston, Karen; Cullen, Mark R; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of Asian American mortality patterns has been distorted by the historical aggregation of diverse Asian subgroups on death certificates, masking important differences in the leading causes of death across subgroups. In this analysis, we aim to fill an important knowledge gap in Asian American health by reporting leading causes of mortality by disaggregated Asian American subgroups. We examined national mortality records for the six largest Asian subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) and non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) from 2003-2011, and ranked the leading causes of death. We calculated all-cause and cause-specific age-adjusted rates, temporal trends with annual percent changes, and rate ratios by race/ethnicity and sex. Rankings revealed that as an aggregated group, cancer was the leading cause of death for Asian Americans. When disaggregated, there was notable heterogeneity. Among women, cancer was the leading cause of death for every group except Asian Indians. In men, cancer was the leading cause of death among Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese men, while heart disease was the leading cause of death among Asian Indians, Filipino and Japanese men. The proportion of death due to heart disease for Asian Indian males was nearly double that of cancer (31% vs. 18%). Temporal trends showed increased mortality of cancer and diabetes in Asian Indians and Vietnamese; increased stroke mortality in Asian Indians; increased suicide mortality in Koreans; and increased mortality from Alzheimer's disease for all racial/ethnic groups from 2003-2011. All-cause rate ratios revealed that overall mortality is lower in Asian Americans compared to NHWs. Our findings show heterogeneity in the leading causes of death among Asian American subgroups. Additional research should focus on culturally competent and cost-effective approaches to prevent and treat specific diseases among these growing diverse populations.

  14. Pathology and causes of death of stranded cetaceans in the Canary Islands (1999-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbelo, Manuel; Los Monteros, Antonio Espinosa de; Herráez, Pedro; Andrada, Marisa; Sierra, Eva; Rodríguez, Francisco; Jepson, Paul D; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-03-26

    Between 1999 and 2005, 233 stranded cetaceans (comprising 19 species) were reported in the waters of the Canary Islands. Of these, 138/233 (59.2%) were subjected to a complete or partial standardized necropsy, including 4 Balaenopteridae, 9 Physeteridae, 8 Kogiidae, 27 Ziphiidae and 90 Delphinidae. Of these, 46/138 (33.3%) cetaceans were diagnosed with anthropogenic pathological categories (i.e. the cause of death was anthropogenic). These included fishing interaction (bycatch) (19 individuals), 'atypical' mass stranding events linked to naval exercises (13), ship collisions (8) and other anthropogenic-related pathology (6). 'Natural' (i.e. non-anthropogenic) causes of death accounted for another 82/138 (59.4%) cases, including infectious and non-infectious diseases (63), neonatal pathology (8), intra- and interspecific interactions (6) and mass strandings (5). The cause(s) of death could not be determined in 10/138 (7.3%) necropsied animals. The most common causes of death were ship collisions in 6/9 (66.6%) Physeteridae, 'atypical' mass stranding linked to naval exercises in 13/27 (48.1%) Ziphiidae, and 'natural' infectious and non-infectious diseases in 55/90 (61.1%) Delphinidae. Interaction with fishing activities was established as cause of death in 15/90 (16.7%) Delphinidae. These data show that a range of anthropogenic and natural single and mass mortality events occur in multiple cetacean species stranded in the Canary Islands.

  15. Certified causes of death in patients with mesothelioma in South East England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peto Julian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesothelioma is a highly fatal cancer that is caused by exposure to asbestos fibres. In many populations, the occurrence of mesothelioma is monitored with the use of mortality data from death certification. We examine certified causes of death of patients who have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, and assess the validity of death certification data as a proxy for mesothelioma incidence. Methods We extracted mesothelioma registrations in the South East of England area between 2000 and 2004 from the Thames Cancer Registry database. We retained for analysis 2200 patients who had died at the time of analysis, after having excluded seven dead cases where the causes of death were not known to the cancer registry. The 2200 deaths were classified hierarchically to identify (1 mesothelioma deaths, (2 deaths certified as lung cancer deaths or (3 deaths from unspecified cancer, and (4 deaths from other causes. Results 87% of the patients had mesothelioma mentioned on the death certificate. 6% had no mention of mesothelioma but included lung cancer as a cause of death. Another 6% had no mention of mesothelioma or lung cancer, but included an unspecified cancer as a cause of death. Lastly, 2% had other causes of death specified on the death certificate. Conclusion This analysis suggests that official mortality data may underestimate the true occurrence of mesothelioma by around 10%.

  16. Mortality and causes of death among incident cases of systemic lupus erythematosus in Finland 2000-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfving, P; Puolakka, K; Kautiainen, H; Virta, L J; Pohjolainen, T; Kaipiainen-Seppänen, O

    2014-11-01

    The objectives of the study were to investigate mortality and causes of death in patients with recent-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Finland. Data for patients with SLE for the study were collected (2000-2007) from the nationwide register on decisions of special reimbursements for drugs, maintained by the Social Insurance Institution (SII) in Finland. Data on deaths of the patients were obtained from the official death certificate statistics of Statistics Finland until the end of 2008. Of the 566 incident SLE patients, median follow-up time was 5.4 (IQR 3.3, 7.1) years, and 30 patients (23 females, seven males) died in the years 2000 through 2008. Mean age at death was 67.8 ± 17.2 years for females and 62.3 ± 15.2 years for males. The 5-year survival rates were 94.8% (95%CI 92.0-96.6%) and 88.2% (95%CI 76.5-94.3%), respectively. The age- and sex-adjusted standardized mortality ratio was 1.48 (95%CI 1.01-2.12). Primary causes of death were cardiovascular diseases, malignancy and SLE itself. In conclusion, survival of the patients with SLE was inferior to that of the general population. Cardiovascular diseases were responsible for 37% of deaths.

  17. Assessment of Medical Certificate of Cause of Death at a New Teaching Hospital in Vadodara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amul B. Patel, Hitesh Rathod, Himanshu Rana, Viren Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to find out errors in the medical certification of cause of death during July 2011 at a new teaching hospital in Vadodara. All certificates of in-hospital deaths in medical record department, from May 2010 to June 2011, were assessed for major and minor errors. Data were analyzed with SPSS 17 version software. The results revealed that out of 40 death certificates, not a single was free from any error. Major errors occurred in 23(57.5% cases with improper sequencing (55% as most frequent. Most common minor error was the absence of time interval between the onset of disease and death (92.5%. No significant association was found between major errors and factors like age, sex, ward and underlying cause of death. This study concluded that educational intervention is necessary to increase physicians' awareness regarding importance of medical certificate of cause of death and accuracy of death certificates.

  18. Malignant histiocytosis and other causes of death in Bernese mountain dogs in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L; Andreasen, S N; Andersen, S D; Kristensen, A T

    2010-02-13

    To determine the causes of death in Bernese mountain dogs, to assess the prevalence of malignant histiocytosis in the Danish Bernese mountain dog population, and to assess whether a hereditary pattern for this disease exists, 756 questionnaires were sent to members of the Danish Bernese Mountain Dog Club requesting information regarding the life span and causes of death of their dogs. A response rate of 57.7 per cent was achieved, giving information for 812 dogs, of which 290 had died. The average life span was 7.1 years. The most prevalent causes of death were neoplasia (42.1 per cent), old age (10.3 per cent), kidney disease (6.9 per cent), infection (5.9 per cent), skeletal problems (5.2 per cent), heart disease (3.8 per cent) and behavioural causes (3.5 per cent). Thirteen dogs were diagnosed with malignant histiocytosis, 11 of which were genealogically related.

  19. Clostridium difficile Infection: An Emerging Cause of Death in the Twenty-First Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullatif, Viytta N; Noymer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Enterocolitis due to Clostridium difficile is major emerging cause of death in the U.S. Between 1999 and 2012, C. diff. deaths rose by a staggering almost ten-fold amount, to 7,739 from 793. This article has three goals. First, we present a demographic description of C. diff. mortality in the U.S. since 1999. Second, we test a hypothesis that the increase in C. diff. deaths is due to population aging. We find that the emergence of this cause of death follows a proportional hazard pattern above age 40. Thus, population aging is not the only factor responsible for the increase in C. diff. deaths. This, combined with a contributory cause of death analysis, points towards health care-based strategies to combat C. diff. Third, we demonstrate a simple weighted least squares technique for estimating Gompertz models that gives parameter estimates that are closer to full maximum likelihood than conventional approaches.

  20. Defining the cause of death in hospitalised patients with acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Selby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high mortality rates that follow the onset of acute kidney injury (AKI are well recognised. However, the mode of death in patients with AKI remains relatively under-studied, particularly in general hospitalised populations who represent the majority of those affected. We sought to describe the primary cause of death in a large group of prospectively identified patients with AKI. METHODS: All patients sustaining AKI at our centre between 1(st October 2010 and 31(st October 2011 were identified by real-time, hospital-wide, electronic AKI reporting based on the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN diagnostic criteria. Using this system we are able to generate a prospective database of all AKI cases that includes demographic, outcome and hospital coding data. For those patients that died during hospital admission, cause of death was derived from the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death. RESULTS: During the study period there were 3,930 patients who sustained AKI; 62.0% had AKI stage 1, 20.6% had stage 2 and 17.4% stage 3. In-hospital mortality rate was 21.9% (859 patients. Cause of death could be identified in 93.4% of cases. There were three main disease categories accounting for three quarters of all mortality; sepsis (41.1%, cardiovascular disease (19.2% and malignancy (12.9%. The major diagnosis leading to sepsis was pneumonia, whilst cardiovascular death was largely a result of heart failure and ischaemic heart disease. AKI was the primary cause of death in only 3% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality associated with AKI remains high, although cause of death is usually concurrent illness. Specific strategies to improve outcomes may therefore need to target not just the management of AKI but also the most relevant co-existing conditions.

  1. Causes of Death in a Contemporary Cohort of Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Garcia-Vidal; Maddalena Peghin; Carlos Cervera; Carlota Gudiol; Isabel Ruiz-Camps; Asunción Moreno; Cristina Royo-Cebrecos; Eva Roselló; Jordi Puig de la Bellacasa; Josefina Ayats; Jordi Carratalà

    2015-01-01

    Information regarding the processes leading to death in patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA) is lacking. We sought to determine the causes of death in these patients, the role that IA played in the cause, and the timing of death. The factors associated with IA-related mortality are also analyzed. We conducted a multicenter study (2008-2011) of cases of proven and probable IA. The causes of death and whether mortality was judged to be IA-related or IA-unrelated were determined by consensu...

  2. Life Expectancy and Cause of Death in Popular Musicians: Is the Popular Musician Lifestyle the Road to Ruin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Dianna T; Asher, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Does a combination of lifestyle pressures and personality, as reflected in genre, lead to the early death of popular musicians? We explored overall mortality, cause of death, and changes in patterns of death over time and by music genre membership in popular musicians who died between 1950 and 2014. The death records of 13,195 popular musicians were coded for age and year of death, cause of death, gender, and music genre. Musician death statistics were compared with age-matched deaths in the US population using actuarial methods. Although the common perception is of a glamorous, free-wheeling lifestyle for this occupational group, the figures tell a very different story. Results showed that popular musicians have shortened life expectancy compared with comparable general populations. Results showed excess mortality from violent deaths (suicide, homicide, accidental death, including vehicular deaths and drug overdoses) and liver disease for each age group studied compared with population mortality patterns. These excess deaths were highest for the under-25-year age group and reduced chronologically thereafter. Overall mortality rates were twice as high compared with the population when averaged over the whole age range. Mortality impacts differed by music genre. In particular, excess suicides and liver-related disease were observed in country, metal, and rock musicians; excess homicides were observed in 6 of the 14 genres, in particular hip hop and rap musicians. For accidental death, actual deaths significantly exceeded expected deaths for country, folk, jazz, metal, pop, punk, and rock.

  3. Swedish forensic data 1992-2009 suggest hydrogen cyanide as an important cause of death in fire victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamyr, Kristin; Thelander, Gunilla; Ernstgård, Lena; Ahlner, Johan; Johanson, Gunnar

    2012-02-01

    Between 60 and 80% of all deaths related to fire are attributed to toxic fumes. Carbon monoxide (CO) is commonly thought to be the major cause. However, hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is also formed. Still, the exact contribution of HCN to fire-related fatalities is unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of HCN in relation to CO as a cause of death in fire victims. Data on carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and blood cyanide from deceased fire victims in the period 1992-2009 were collected from two Swedish nationwide forensic databases (ToxBase and RättsBase). The databases contain data on COHb and/or cyanide from 2303 fire victims, whereof 816 on both COHb and cyanide. Nonparametric statistical tests were used. Seventeen percent of the victims had lethal or life-threatening blood cyanide levels (>1 µg/g) and 32% had lethal COHb levels (>50% COHb). Over 31% had cyanide levels above 0.5 µg/g, an indication of significant HCN exposure. The percentages may be underestimates, as cyanide is quickly eliminated in blood also after death. Our results support the notion that HCN contributes more to the cause of death among fire victims than previously thought.

  4. Changes in causes of death among persons with AIDS: San Francisco, California, 1996-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Sandra K; Vu, Annie; Hsu, Ling Chin; Hessol, Nancy A

    2014-10-01

    The increased life expectancy among HIV-infected persons treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), risk behaviors, and co-morbidities associated with ART place HIV-infected persons at risk for non-HIV-related causes of death. We used the San Francisco HIV/AIDS registry to identify deaths that occurred from January 1996 through December 2011. Temporal trends in AIDS- and non-AIDS-related mortality rates, the proportion of underlying and contributory causes of death, and the ratio of observed deaths in the study population to expected number of deaths among California men aged 20-79 (standardized mortality ratio [SMR]) of underlying causes of death were examined. A total of 5338 deaths were identified. The annual AIDS-related death rate (per 100 deaths) declined from 10.8 in 1996 to 0.9 in 2011 (p<0.0001), while the annual death rate from non-AIDS-related causes declined from 2.1 in 1996 to 0.9 in 2011 (p<0.0001). The proportion of deaths due to all types of heart disease combined, all non-AIDS cancers combined, mental disorders resulting from substance abuse, drug overdose, suicide and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease increased significantly over time. The SMRs for liver diseased decreased significantly over time but remained elevated. Our data highlight the importance of age-related causes of death as well as deaths from causes that are, at least in part, preventable.

  5. The risk and causes of death in childhoodonset epilepsy: A 4-study collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Anne T.; Nickels, K.; Wirrell, E.C.; Rios, C.; Geerts, A.T.; Callenbach, P.M.; Arts, W.F.; Camfield, P.R.; Camfield, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Young people with epilepsy experience high death rates compared to the general population. Understanding the magnitude of risk and the causes of death (CoD) is essential for counseling and for potential prevention. Methods: We combined the mortality experiences of four cohort studies of

  6. Cause of Death in "John Doe & Jane Doe": A 5 year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Dasari, Harish; Singh, Amandeep

    2014-08-01

    Sometimes the opinion regarding the cause of death in "John Doe or Jane Doe" i.e. on unknown dead bodies is a test of ability of the forensic expert and on many occasions it yields little or no results. Here the identification of the body as such poses problems; rest aside the opinion regarding the cause/ manner of death. The present 5yr study was undertaken in the Department of Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, Government Medical College & Hospital, Chandigarh to find the patterns of cause of death in unknown dead bodies, as very little literature is available with regard to John Doe or Jane Doe cases as a group, in India. Unidentified bodies comprised 4 % of the total 3165 cases brought for post-mortem examination to the department. Maximum cases belonged to the age group 41 - 50 years, 30 %. Majority of the opinions regarding the cause of death were given as "no definite opinion" (31%), followed by "cranio-cerebral damage" (30 %) and coronary insufficiency/ Cardiac disease/ aortic aneurysm rupture, (8.9%). Following measures should be undertaken to increase the chances of getting these unknown bodies identified and thereby increasing the chances of arriving at a definite cause of death: drafting of additional legislation for the management of unidentified dead bodies along with streamlining of work on the part of police, use of active investigation and modern investigative techniques, fixing the accountability of the police. Internet based sites of the police like ZIPNET (Zonal Integrated Police Networking) in Northern India, should also be used.

  7. Medical causes of death in a teaching hospital in South‑Eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-25

    Apr 25, 2014 ... Other important causes of death in order of prevalence were cerebrovascular accident (10.5%) ... chronic liver disease (7.0%), septicemia (6.5%), respiratory failure ... Key words: Chronic kidney disease, infections, medical wards, mortality, Nigeria .... others were anemia's, lymphomas, and acute pulmonary.

  8. Long-term mortality and causes of death associated with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotland, N; Uhre, M L; Mejer, N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Data describing long-term mortality in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is scarce. This study investigated risk factors, causes of death and temporal trends in long-term mortality associated with SAB. METHODS: Nationwide population-based matched cohort study...

  9. The risk and causes of death in childhoodonset epilepsy: A 4-study collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Anne T.; Nickels, K.; Wirrell, E.C.; Rios, C.; Geerts, A.T.; Callenbach, P.M.; Arts, W.F.; Camfield, P.R.; Camfield, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Young people with epilepsy experience high death rates compared to the general population. Understanding the magnitude of risk and the causes of death (CoD) is essential for counseling and for potential prevention. Methods: We combined the mortality experiences of four cohort studies of n

  10. Statistical Correction for Short-term Wind Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; Tambke, J.; Heinemann, D.

    2009-04-01

    The uncertainty of wind speed forecasts from Numerical Weather Predictions (NWP) is a main source of errors in wind power forecasts. Despite increased accuracy of wind power forecasts in the last years, large wind power forecast errors still occur due to local weather and/or synoptic systems that either develop locally or that are phase-shifted relative to the forecast. The main error sources of NWP are, amongst others, inaccurate initial and/or lateral boundary conditions and inadequate representation of local forcing. Wind measurements in the WMEP program and the wind field forecasts of DWD-LM(German Weather Service - Local Model) in 2004 and from Sept. to Dec. of 2006 are used for correcting DWD-LM wind forecasts. In order to remove systematic error, phase error, or local-scale error in wind forecasts, three kinds of methods, bias correction, phase correction and Cressman technique are applied. Using bias increments changing with wind direction, the wind forecasts are modified. After bias correction, RMSE ( Root Mean Square Error ) of corrected forecasts decrease 0.1m/s to 0.4m/s. Diurnal or seasonal change of bias is also important. In addition, with optimum phase-shift vectors, the phase-shift correction is applied. It reduces the RMSE about 0.1m/s to 0.5m/s at different time steps. Moreover, statistical Cressman correction increments were obtained by Cressman technique and used to correct wind forecasts. After Cressman correction, the RMSE of wind forecasts decreases 0.1m/s to 0.2m/s. The results show that bias correction, phase correction and Cressman scheme do, to some extent, improve wind speed forecasts. That contributes to the improvement of wind power forecasts. As part of the new EU-project "SafeWind", we are continuing that study with NWP-data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and wind speed observations over Europe.

  11. Causes of death among people living with HIV/AIDS in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Luiza Lage Fazito Rezende

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The monitoring of the underlying causes of death in people living with HIV/AIDS is important so that actions to reduce morbidity and mortality can be taken. OBJECTIVE: To describe the temporal trends of underlying causes of death among people living with HIV/AIDS between 2000 and 2007 in Brazil and to identify factors associated with it. METHODS: The Mortality Information System data for deaths occurred in Brazil between 2000 and 2007 that contained reference to HIV/AIDS in any of the death certificate fields was analyzed. Temporal trends of the underlying cause of death were studied. Differences in the underlying cause of death according to gender, age, region of residence, level of education, certifying officer, race and year of death were verified. RESULTS: Between 2000 and 2007 the percentage of deaths not related to HIV/AIDS among people living with HIV/AIDS increased from 2.5% to 7.0%. People with higher level of formal education, living in the South-East region of Brazil and aged under 13 or over 60 years old were more likely to have their underlying cause of death reported as not related to HIV/AIDS. CONCLUSION: The results suggest the importance of implementing actions aimed at improving the quality of life of PLWHA, and which could include behavioral changes, such as smoking and alcoholism cessation, early screening to detect neoplasms and the monitoring of chronic conditions, such as diabetes. That is to say, the need exists to integrate the actions of HIV/AIDS programs with other public health programs.

  12. Social inequalities in causes of death amenable to health care in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Hem

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Investigate if there are educational inequalities in causes of death considered amenable to health care in Norway and compare this with non-amenable causes. Methods: The study used the concept of “amenable mortality”, which here includes 34 specific causes of death. A linked data file, with information from the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry and the Educational Registry was analyzed. The study population included the whole Norwegian population in two age groups of interest (25-49 and 50-74 years. Information on deaths was from the period 1990-2001. Education was recorded in 1990 and it was grouped in four categories as: basic, lower secondary, higher secondary and higher. In the study men and women were analysed seperately. The analysis was conducted for all amenable causes pooled with and without ischemic heart disease. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was fitted to estimate hazard rate ratios. Results: The study showed educational differences in mortality from causes of death considered amenable to health care, in both age groups and sexes. This was seen both when including and excluding ischemic heart disease. The effect sizes were comparable for amenable and non-amenable causes in both age groups and sexes. Conclusions: This study revealed systematic higher risk of death in lower educational groups in causes of death considered amenable to health care. This indicates potential weaknesses in equitable provision of health care for the Norwegian population. Additional research is needed to identify domains within the health care system of particular concern.

  13. Comparing verbal autopsy cause of death findings as determined by physician coding and probabilistic modelling: a public health analysis of 54 000 deaths in Africa and Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Byass

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coverage of civil registration and vital statistics varies globally, with most deaths in Africa and Asia remaining either unregistered or registered without cause of death. One important constraint has been a lack of fit–for–purpose tools for registering deaths and assigning causes in situations where no doctor is involved. Verbal autopsy (interviewing care–givers and witnesses to deaths and interpreting their information into causes of death is the only available solution. Automated interpretation of verbal autopsy data into cause of death information is essential for rapid, consistent and affordable processing. Methods: Verbal autopsy archives covering 54182 deaths from five African and Asian countries were sourced on the basis of their geographical, epidemiological and methodological diversity, with existing physician–coded causes of death attributed. These data were unified into the WHO 2012 verbal autopsy standard format, and processed using the InterVA–4 model. Cause–specific mortality fractions from InterVA–4 and physician codes were calculated for each of 60 WHO 2012 cause categories, by age group, sex and source. Results from the two approaches were assessed for concordance and ratios of fractions by cause category. As an alternative metric, the Wilcoxon matched–pairs signed ranks test with two one–sided tests for stochastic equivalence was used. Findings: The overall concordance correlation coefficient between InterVA–4 and physician codes was 0.83 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.91 and this increased to 0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.99 when HIV/AIDS and pulmonary TB deaths were combined into a single category. Over half (53% of the cause category ratios between InterVA–4 and physician codes by source were not significantly different from unity at the 99% level, increasing to 62% by age group. Wilcoxon tests for stochastic equivalence also demonstrated equivalence. Conclusions: These findings show strong concordance

  14. Potential Gains in Life Expectancy from Reductions in Leading Causes of Death, Los Angeles County: a Quantitative Approach to Identify Candidate Diseases for Prevention and Burden Disparities Elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Alex; Hameed, Heena; Lee, Alice W; Shih, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    Despite overall gains in life expectancy at birth among Los Angeles County residents, significant disparities persist across population subgroups. The purpose of this study was to quantify the potential sex- and race/ethnicity-specific gains in life expectancy had we been able to fully or partially eliminate the leading causes of death in Los Angeles County. Complete annual life tables for local residents were generated by applying the same method used for the National Center of Health Statistics US life tables published in 1999. Based on 2010 Los Angeles County mortality records, sex- and race/ethnicity-specific potential gains in life expectancy were calculated using scenarios of 10, 20, 50, and 100 % elimination of 12 major causes of death. Coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death, was found to be most impactful on life expectancy. Its hypothetical full elimination would result in life expectancy gains ranging from 2.2 years among white females to 3.7 years among black males. Gains from complete elimination of lung cancer and stroke ranked second, with almost an additional year of life for each gender. However, marked disparities across racial/ethnic groups were noted from the elimination of several other causes of death, such as homicide, from which the gain among black males exceeded 13 times more than their white counterparts. By differentially targeting specific causes of death in disease prevention, not only can findings of this study aid in efficiently narrowing racial/ethnic disparities, they can also provide a quantitative means to identify and rank priorities in local health policymaking.

  15. An international delphi study of the causes of death and the criteria used to assign cause of death in bovine perinatal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, J F; Sanchez-Miguel, C; Doherty, M

    2013-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to elicit opinion from two groups of veterinarians [subject matter experts and non-subject matter experts] about the causes of bovine perinatal mortality and the criteria used to assign such causes. The subject matter experts were selected on the basis of their scientific publications or experience of working in a veterinary diagnostic or research laboratory in the area of bovine perinatal mortality. The non-subject matter experts were self-selected as cattle veterinarians without particular expertise in bovine perinatology. A total of 74 veterinarians (46 subject matter experts and 28 non-subject matter experts) from 23 countries responded. The study was conducted using Delphi methodology over seven rounds. Respondents were asked to agree the causes of bovine perinatal mortality and for each cause to agree the supporting diagnostic criteria. There was a close agreement between groups on 16 causes of death apart from intra-uterine growth retardation (IUGR) and micronutrient imbalances which were accepted by fewer subject matter experts. There was inter-group consensus on the criteria to diagnose accidents, congenital defects, dystocia, hyperthermia, infections, premature placental separation, prematurity and prolonged calving. There was inter-group consensus on the criteria to diagnose anoxia, apart from gingival cyanosis; on haemorrhage, apart from haemorrhagic anaemia; on IUGR, apart from organ weights; and on iodine imbalance, apart from goitre and thyroid iodine content. The results from this study highlighted the current lack of standardization of the criteria used to define the cause of death for bovine perinatal mortality and the need for such standardization.

  16. Coding ill-defined and unknown cause of death is 13 times more frequent in Denmark than in Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ylijoki-Sørensen, Seija; Sajantila, Annti; Lalu, Kaisa;

    2014-01-01

    to the death. Thus, the aim of the study was, firstly, to analyse the frequencies of R00-R99-coded deaths in mortality statistics in Finland and in Denmark and, secondly, to compare these and the methods used to investigate the cause of death. To do so, we extracted a random 90% sample of the Finnish death...... certificates and 100% of the Danish certificates from the national mortality registries for 2000, 2005 and 2010. Subsequently, we analysed the frequencies of forensic and medical autopsies and external clinical examinations of the bodies in R00-R99-coded deaths. The use of R00-R99 codes was significantly......Exact cause and manner of death determination improves legislative safety for the individual and for society and guides aspects of national public health. In the International Classification of Diseases, codes R00-R99 are used for "symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings...

  17. Mortality by Cause of Death Among Immigrants and Natives in a South European Country: The Case of Greece, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verropoulou, Georgia; Tsimbos, Cleon

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to examine for the first time in Greece mortality by cause of death among immigrants. The analysis makes use of vital registration statistics for 2010-2012 and census data for 2011; standardised mortality ratios are estimated for four distinct groups: natives, migrants from EU-27 (excluding Greece), other Europeans (mainly Albanians) and those from all other countries (mainly Asia/Africa). All immigrants seem to experience favourable mortality from neoplasms but higher mortality from external causes in comparison to Greeks. The results regarding cardiovascular diseases are mixed. Persons originating in Asian/African regions exhibit higher mortality from infectious diseases and TB. The findings highlight the specificities of immigrant mortality which stem from pre-existing conditions in the country of origin as well as from the adverse socio-economic environment in the country of destination. As immigrants experience some excessive 'avoidable' mortality implementation of appropriate measures should be a social policy priority.

  18. Global, regional, and national age-sex specific mortality for 264 causes of death, 1980-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-16

    Monitoring levels and trends in premature mortality is crucial to understanding how societies can address prominent sources of early death. The Global Burden of Disease 2016 Study (GBD 2016) provides a comprehensive assessment of cause-specific mortality for 264 causes in 195 locations from 1980 to 2016. This assessment includes evaluation of the expected epidemiological transition with changes in development and where local patterns deviate from these trends. We estimated cause-specific deaths and years of life lost (YLLs) by age, sex, geography, and year. YLLs were calculated from the sum of each death multiplied by the standard life expectancy at each age. We used the GBD cause of death database composed of: vital registration (VR) data corrected for under-registration and garbage coding; national and subnational verbal autopsy (VA) studies corrected for garbage coding; and other sources including surveys and surveillance systems for specific causes such as maternal mortality. To facilitate assessment of quality, we reported on the fraction of deaths assigned to GBD Level 1 or Level 2 causes that cannot be underlying causes of death (major garbage codes) by location and year. Based on completeness, garbage coding, cause list detail, and time periods covered, we provided an overall data quality rating for each location with scores ranging from 0 stars (worst) to 5 stars (best). We used robust statistical methods including the Cause of Death Ensemble model (CODEm) to generate estimates for each location, year, age, and sex. We assessed observed and expected levels and trends of cause-specific deaths in relation to the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a summary indicator derived from measures of average income per capita, educational attainment, and total fertility, with locations grouped into quintiles by SDI. Relative to GBD 2015, we expanded the GBD cause hierarchy by 18 causes of death for GBD 2016. The quality of available data varied by location. Data quality

  19. Persistent and extreme outliers in causes of death by state, 1999-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscoe, Francis P

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, state-specific mortality rates that are high relative to national rates can result from legitimate reasons or from variability in coding practices. This paper identifies instances of state-specific mortality rates that were at least twice the national rate in each of three consecutive five-year periods (termed persistent outliers), along with rates that were at least five times the national rate in at least one five-year period (termed extreme outliers). The resulting set of 71 outliers, 12 of which appear on both lists, illuminates mortality variations within the country, including some that are amenable to improvement either because they represent preventable causes of death or highlight weaknesses in coding techniques. Because the approach used here is based on relative rather than absolute mortality, it is not dominated by the most common causes of death such as heart disease and cancer.

  20. Morbidity and Causes of Death in Patients with Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa Väkevä

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL, especially mycosis fungoides, can be considered as a state of longstanding low-grade systemic inflammation. Many studies have focused on secondary cancers with CTCL, but information about comorbidities is limited. A total of 144 patients with CTCL at Helsinki University Central Hospital during 2005 to 2015 were studied to determine associated comorbidities and causes of death in this cohort. Compared with an age-standardized control population, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus was increased among patients with CTCL with no link to obesity. Patients with CTCL had a lower prevalence of hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke than the control group. The 3 most common causes of death were CTCL, coronary artery disease and lung cancer. The increased risk of myocardial infarction or stroke reported previously was not detected in this patient group.

  1. Mortality and causes of death in children referred to a tertiary epilepsy center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Sabine; Uldall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with epilepsy, including children, have an increased mortality rate when compared to the general population. Only few studies on causes of mortality in childhood epilepsy exist and pediatric SUDEP rate is under continuous discussion. AIM: To describe general mortality......, incidence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), causes of death and age distribution in a pediatric epilepsy patient population. METHODS: The study retrospectively examined the mortality and causes of death in 1974 patients with childhood-onset epilepsy at a tertiary epilepsy center in Denmark...... (8 SUDEP cases per 10,000 patient years). 9 patients died in the course of neurodegenerative disease and 28 children died of various causes. Epilepsy was considered drug resistant in more than 95% of the deceased patients, 90% were diagnosed with intellectual disability. Mortality of patients...

  2. Trends in survival and cause of death in Danish patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Stenager, Egon

    2004-01-01

    The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry contains information about all Danish patients in whom multiple sclerosis has been diagnosed since 1948. The purpose of this study was to analyse trends in survival and causes of death of these patients and to compare them with those of the general population....... The study comprised all patients with onset in the period 1949-1996. All case records were validated and classified according to standardized diagnostic criteria. Data on emigration and death were obtained by record linkage to official registers. The end of follow-up was 1 January 2000 for emigration...... and death, and 1 January 1999 for cause-specific deaths. Standardized mortality ratios and excess death rates were calculated for various causes of death and periods after multiple sclerosis onset, and time trends in survival probability were analysed by Cox regression. The study comprised 9881 patients...

  3. Cause of death among Ghanaian adolescents in Accra using autopsy data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tettey Yao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited data on adolescent mortality particularly from developing countries with unreliable death registration systems. This calls for the use of other sources of data to ascertain cause of adolescent mortality. The objective of this study was to describe the causes of death among Ghanaian adolescents 10 to 19 years in Accra, Ghana utilizing data from autopsies conducted in Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH. Findings Out of the 14,034 autopsies carried out from 2001 to 2003 in KBTH, 7% were among adolescents. Of the 882 deaths among adolescents analyzed, 402 (45.6% were females. There were 365 (41.4% deaths from communicable disease, pregnancy related conditions and nutritional disorders. Non-communicable diseases accounted for 362 (41% cases and the rest were attributable to injuries and external causes of morbidity and mortality. Intestinal infectious diseases and lower respiratory tract infections were the most common communicable causes of death collectively accounting for 20.5% of total deaths. Death from blood diseases was the largest (8.5% among the non-communicable conditions followed by neoplasms (7%. Males were more susceptible to injuries than females (χ2 = 13.45, p = .000. At least five out of ten specific causes of death were as a result of infections with pneumonia and typhoid being the most common. Sickle cell disease was among the top three specific causes of death. Among the females, 27 deaths (6.7% were pregnancy related with most of them being as a result of abortion. Conclusions The autopsy data from the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital can serve as a useful source of information on adolescent mortality. Both communicable and non-communicable diseases accounted for most deaths highlighting the need for health care providers to avoid complacency in their management of adolescents presenting with these diseases.

  4. Cancer in Machado-Joseph disease patients-low frequency as a cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Gabriele Nunes; Kersting, Nathália; Gonçalves, Thomaz Abramsson; Pacheco, Daphne Louise Oliveira; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria-Luiza; Camey, Suzi Alves; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2017-04-01

    Since polyglutamine diseases have been related to a reduced risk of cancer, we aimed to study the 15 years cumulative incidence of cancer (CIC) (arm 1) and the proportion of cancer as a cause of death (arm 2) in symptomatic carriers of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3/Machado-Joseph disease (SCA3/MJD). SCA3/MJD and control individuals from our state were invited to participate. A structured interview was performed. CIC as published by the Brazilian National Institute of Cancer, was used as populational control. Causes of death were obtained from the Public Information System on Mortality. We interviewed 154 SCA3/MJD patients and 80 unrelated controls: CIC was 7/154 (4.5%) and 5/80 (6.3%), respectively. The interim analysis for futility showed that the number of individuals required to detect a significant difference between groups (1938) would be three times larger than the existing local SCA3/MJD population (625), for an absolute risk reduction of 1.8%. Then this study arm was discontinued due to lack of power. In the same period, cancer was a cause of death in 9/101 (8.9%) SCA3/MJD and in 52/202 (26.2%) controls, with an absolute reduction risk of 17.3% (OR 0.27, 95%CI 0.13 to 0.58, p = 0.01). A significant reduction of cancer as cause of death was observed in SCA3/MJD, suggesting a common effect to all polyglutamine diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Cancer as a cause of death among people with AIDS in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Edgar P.; Engels, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Background People with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), are at increased risk for cancer. Highly active antiretroviral therapy [(HAART), widely available since 1996] has resulted in dramatic declines in AIDS-related deaths. Methods We evaluated cancer as a cause of death in a U.S. registry-based cohort of 83,282 people with AIDS (1980–2006). Causes of death due to AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs) and non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs) were assessed. We evaluated mortality rates and the fraction of deaths due to cancer. Poisson regression assessed rates according to calendar year of AIDS onset. Results Overall mortality declined from 302 (1980–1989), to 140 (1990–1995), to 29 per 1,000 person-years (1996–2006). ADC mortality declined from 2.95 (1980–1989) to 0.65 per 1,000 person-years (1996–2006) (P<0.01), but the fraction of ADC-deaths increased from 1.05% to 2.47%, due to declines in other AIDS-related deaths. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma was the commonest cancer-related cause of death (36% during 1996–2006). Likewise, NADC mortality declined from 2.21 to 0.84 per 1,000 person-years (1980–1989 vs. 1996–2006, P<0.05), but the fraction of NADC-deaths increased to 3.16% during 1996–2006. Lung cancer was the most common NADC cause of death (21% of cancer-related deaths in 1996–2006). Conclusions Cancer mortality declined in the HAART era, but due to declining mortality from AIDS, cancers account for a growing fraction of deaths. Improved cancer prevention and treatment, particularly for non-Hodgkin lymphoma and lung cancer, would reduce mortality among people with AIDS. PMID:20825305

  6. The importance of microbiological testing for establishing cause of death in 42 forensic autopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, S

    2015-05-01

    Microorganisms have always been one of the great challenges of humankind, being responsible for both high morbidity and mortality throughout history. In a forensic setting microbiological information will always be difficult to interpret due to lack of antemortem information and changes in flora postmortem. With this study we aim to review the use of microbiological procedures at our forensic institute. In a retrospective study including 42 autopsies performed at our Institute, where microbiological test had been applied, analyses were made with regard to: type of microbiological tests performed, microorganisms found, histological findings, antemortem information, C-reactive protein measurement and cause of death. Fiftyone different microorganisms were found distributed among 37 cases, bacteria being the most abundant. Nineteen of the cases were classified as having a microbiological related cause of death. C-reactive protein levels were raised in 14 cases of the 19 cases, histological findings either supported or were a decisive factor for the classification of microbiologically related cause of death in 14 cases. As a multitude of abundant microorganisms are able to cause infection under the right circumstances, all findings should be compared to anamnestic antemortem information, before conclusions are drawn. A definite list of true pathogens is nearly impossible to compile.

  7. Longevity in Slovenia: Past and potential gains in life expectancy by age and causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotrič Dolinar, Aleša; Došenović Bonča, Petra; Sambt, Jože

    2017-06-01

    In Slovenia, longevity is increasing rapidly. From 1997 to 2014, life expectancy at birth increased by 7 and 5 years for men and women, respectively. This paper explores how this gain in life expectancy at birth can be attributed to reduced mortality from five major groups of causes of death by 5-year age groups. It also estimates potential future gains in life expectancy at birth. The importance of the five major causes of death was analysed by cause-elimination life tables. The total elimination of individual causes of death and a partial hypothetical adjustment of mortality to Spanish levels were analysed, along with age and cause decomposition (Pollard). During the 1997-2014 period, the increase in life expectancy at birth was due to lower mortality from circulatory diseases (ages above 60, both genders), as well as from lower mortality from neoplasms (ages above 50 years) and external causes (between 20 and 50 years) for men. However, considering the potential future gains in life expectancy at birth, by far the strongest effect can be attributed to lower mortality due to circulatory diseases for both genders. If Spanish mortality rates were reached, life expectancy at birth would increase by more than 2 years, again mainly because of lower mortality from circulatory diseases in very old ages. Life expectancy analyses can improve evidence-based decision-making and allocation of resources among different prevention programmes and measures for more effective disease management that can also reduce the economic burden of chronic diseases.

  8. Causes of death in dogs in the province of Rome (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleni, Claudia; Scholl, Francesco; Scaramozzino, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Dogs share with humans several zoonotic diseases as well as some important determinants of degenerative syndromes and tumours. For this reason, systematic surveillance on small animal disease carried out through the collection and analysis of necropsy records could be helpful to public health. To describe the causes of death in dogs from the province of Rome (Italy) submitted to the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Lazio e della Toscana for necropsy during 2003-2007, a retrospective study was conducted on diagnostic data of 870 dogs. The final diagnosis was established by anatomo-histopathological examinations and, when needed, by ancillary laboratory tests. The most common causes of death were 'infectious disease' (23%) and 'poisoning' (17%). In 5% of the cases, the cause remained undetermined. The frequency of 'poisoning' was higher (39%) in stray dogs, while 'infectious disease' was more frequent (49%) in dogs from breeding farms. Parvovirosis was the most frequent infectious disease (33%) while anticoagulants accounted for 30% of the cases involving toxicity. Death by neoplastic lesions was quite infrequent (7%). Findings from this study provide veterinarians with an overview of the causes of death in dogs and it could provide public health authorities with new data about both novel and re-emerging threats.

  9. Trends in aortic aneurysm- and dissection-related mortality in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, 1985–2009: multiple-cause-of-death analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santo Augusto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aortic aneurysm and dissection are important causes of death in older people. Ruptured aneurysms show catastrophic fatality rates reaching near 80%. Few population-based mortality studies have been published in the world and none in Brazil. The objective of the present study was to use multiple-cause-of-death methodology in the analysis of mortality trends related to aortic aneurysm and dissection in the state of Sao Paulo, between 1985 and 2009. Methods We analyzed mortality data from the Sao Paulo State Data Analysis System, selecting all death certificates on which aortic aneurysm and dissection were listed as a cause-of-death. The variables sex, age, season of the year, and underlying, associated or total mentions of causes of death were studied using standardized mortality rates, proportions and historical trends. Statistical analyses were performed by chi-square goodness-of-fit and H Kruskal-Wallis tests, and variance analysis. The joinpoint regression model was used to evaluate changes in age-standardized rates trends. A p value less than 0.05 was regarded as significant. Results Over a 25-year period, there were 42,615 deaths related to aortic aneurysm and dissection, of which 36,088 (84.7% were identified as underlying cause and 6,527 (15.3% as an associated cause-of-death. Dissection and ruptured aneurysms were considered as an underlying cause of death in 93% of the deaths. For the entire period, a significant increased trend of age-standardized death rates was observed in men and women, while certain non-significant decreases occurred from 1996/2004 until 2009. Abdominal aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections prevailed among men and aortic dissections and aortic aneurysms of unspecified site among women. In 1985 and 2009 death rates ratios of men to women were respectively 2.86 and 2.19, corresponding to a difference decrease between rates of 23.4%. For aortic dissection, ruptured and non-ruptured aneurysms, the

  10. Causes of Death and Prognostic Factors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Uehara, Hirotsugu; Berna, Marc J.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is classically characterized by the development of functional or nonfunctional hyperplasia or tumors in endocrine tissues (parathyroid, pancreas, pituitary, adrenal). Because effective treatments have been developed for the hormone excess state, which was a major cause of death in these patients in the past, coupled with the recognition that nonendocrine tumors increasingly develop late in the disease course, the natural history of the disease has changed. An understanding of the current causes of death is important to tailor treatment for these patients and to help identify prognostic factors; however, it is generally lacking. To add to our understanding, we conducted a detailed analysis of the causes of death and prognostic factors from a prospective long-term National Institutes of Health (NIH) study of 106 MEN1 patients with pancreatic endocrine tumors with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1/ZES patients) and compared our results to those from the pooled literature data of 227 patients with MEN1 with pancreatic endocrine tumors (MEN1/PET patients) reported in case reports or small series, and to 1386 patients reported in large MEN1 literature series. In the NIH series over a mean follow-up of 24.5 years, 24 (23%) patients died (14 MEN1-related and 10 non-MEN1-related deaths). Comparing the causes of death with the results from the 227 patients in the pooled literature series, we found that no patients died of acute complications due to acid hypersecretion, and 8%–14% died of other hormone excess causes, which is similar to the results in 10 large MEN1 literature series published since 1995. In the 2 series (the NIH and pooled literature series), two-thirds of patients died from an MEN1-related cause and one-third from a non-MEN1-related cause, which agrees with the mean values reported in 10 large MEN1 series in the literature, although in the literature the causes of death varied widely. In the NIH and pooled

  11. Global, regional, and national age–sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990–2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth

    2015-01-01

    disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus......BACKGROUND: Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countries......, and Russia. We improved statistical models for garbage code redistribution. We used six different modelling strategies across the 240 causes; cause of death ensemble modelling (CODEm) was the dominant strategy for causes with sufficient information. Trends for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias were...

  12. Dementia in the National Cause of Death Registry in Norway 1969-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidar Hjellvik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of dementia is expected to increase markedly during the coming decades. Epidemiological studies involving the National Cause of Death Registry (NCDR may be useful for exploring the aetiology of dementia. We therefore wanted to study developments in the reporting of dementia in the NCDR over the last four decades.Methods: We calculated the age- and gender specific proportion of deaths with dementia reported in the NCDR (dementia deaths in the period 1969-2010, and the proportion of vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease deaths in 1986-2010. Separate analyses were done for deaths occurring in nursing homes in 1996-2010. The proportion of dementia deaths where dementia was coded as underlying cause of death was also calculated.Results: The proportion of dementia deaths increased more than threefold in the period 1969-2010 among women (from 4% to 15%, and more than doubled among men (from 3% to 7%. In nursing homes the proportion increased from 17% to 26% for women and from 13% to 18% for men. The proportion of dementia deaths with Alzheimer’s disease reported in the NCDR increased from practically zero in 1986 to a maximum of 28% in 2005. The proportion of dementia deaths with dementia as underlying cause of death increased from a minimum of 6% in 1972 to a maximum of 51% in 2009.Conclusion: Although the reporting of dementia in the NCDR increased markedly from 1969 to 2010, dementia is still under-reported for old people and for deaths occurring in nursing homes when compared to prevalence estimates.

  13. Mortality and causes of death among asylum seekers in the Netherlands, 2002-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oostrum, I E A; Goosen, S; Uitenbroek, D G; Koppenaal, H; Stronks, K

    2011-04-01

    The world's growing population of asylum seekers faces different health risks from the populations of their host countries because of risk factors before and after migration. There is a current lack of insight into their health status. A unique notification system was designed to monitor mortality in Dutch asylum seeker centres (2002-2005). Standardised for age and sex, overall mortality among asylum seekers shows no difference from the Dutch population. However, it differs between subpopulations by sex, age and region of origin and by cause of death. Mortality among asylum seekers is higher than among the Dutch reference population at younger ages and lower at ages above 40. The most common causes of death among asylum seekers are cancer, cardiovascular diseases and external causes. Increased mortality was found from infectious diseases (males, standardised mortality ratio (SMR)=5.44 (95% CI 3.22 to 8.59); females, SMR=7.53 (95% CI 4.22 to 12.43)), external causes (males, SMR=1.95 (95% CI 0.52 to 2.46); females SMR=1.60 (95% CI 0.87 to 2.68)) and congenital anomalies in females (SMR 2.42; 95% CI 1.16 to 4.45). Considerable differences were found between regions of origin. Maternal mortality was increased (rate ratio 10.08; 95% CI 8.02 to 12.83) as a result of deaths among African women. Certain subgroups of asylum seekers (classified by age, sex and region of origin) are at increased risk of certain causes of death compared with the host population. Policies and services for asylum seekers should address both causes for which asylum seekers are at increased risk and causes with large absolute mortality, taking into account differences between subgroups.

  14. Validity of death certificates for injury-related causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, L A; Boyle, C A; Pollock, D A

    1989-11-01

    Exploration of the validity of death certificate information for classifying underlying causes of death has historically focused on "natural" or disease-related causes of death. Current interest in injury-related deaths has emphasized the need for proper certification and coding of these deaths. In this study, the authors compared agreement of the underlying cause of death as determined from death certificate information with that determined from an independent review of all relevant medical and legal documents of death by a panel of physicians. The study sample included all deaths (n = 446) occurring over an approximately 18-year follow-up period (1965-1983) in a randomly selected cohort of 18,313 US Army Veterans of the Vietnam era. Using the physician panel as the "gold standard," sensitivity and specificity were 90% or greater for broad groupings of motor vehicle crash deaths (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9), codes E810-E825), suicides (codes E950-E959), and homicides (codes E960-E969). Agreement for deaths from unintentional poisonings (codes E850-E869), mostly drug- and alcohol-related, was poor (sensitivity, 50 percent); in general, the ICD-9 drug- and alcohol-specific nomenclature is difficult to apply. The specificity and sensitivity for the individual three-digit suicide and homicide codes were all greater than 90%, and although the specificity for three-digit motor vehicle crash deaths was also above 90%, the sensitivity was lower, from 29% to 83%. Agreement on the fourth digit of ICD-9--for example, the role of the decedent in a motor vehicle crash death--was generally poor. The lack of descriptive information on death certificates to allow detailed coding was chiefly responsible for the poor agreement.

  15. Life expectancy and causes of death in Bernese mountain dogs in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfenstein, Michael; Howard, Judith; Rossetti, Menga; Geissbühler, Urs

    2016-07-25

    New regulations by the Swiss Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office provide for the monitoring of breed health by Swiss breeding clubs. In collaboration with the Swiss Bernese Mountain Dog Club, the purpose of this study was to investigate the causes of death in purebred dogs registered by the club and born in 2001 and 2002. Of a total of 1290 Bernese mountain dogs (BMDs) born in 2001 and 2002 in Switzerland, data was collected from owners and veterinarians using a questionnaire designed for this study from 389 dogs (30.2 %). By the end of the study, 381/389 dogs (97.9 %) had died. The median life expectancy of all dogs was 8.4 years (IQR, 6.9-9.7). Female dogs had a significantly longer median survival (8.8 years; IQR, 7.1-10.3) than male dogs (7.7 years; IQR, 6.6-9.3) (P < 0.00). The cause of death was unknown in 89/381 dogs (23.4 %). For the remaining dogs, the most frequent causes of death were neoplasia (222/381, 58.3 %), degenerative joint disease (16/381, 4.2 %), spinal disorders (13/381, 3.4 %), renal injury (12/381, 3.1 %), and gastric or mesenteric volvulus (7/381, 1.8 %). However, large numbers of dogs were diagnosed with neoplasia without histopathologic or cytologic confirmation. Dogs with neoplasms had a shorter median survival than dogs with other disorders. The shortest median survival (6.8 years) was found for dogs with renal injury. Findings of this study confirm a high prevalence of neoplasia and associated low life expectancy in BMDs. The results underline a need for more widespread precise diagnostics and further research on malignant tumours in this breed to improve overall breed health.

  16. An approach to adjust standardized mortality ratios for competing cause of death in cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhner, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    The calculation of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) is a standard tool for the estimation of health risks in occupational epidemiology. An increasing number of studies deal with the analysis of the mortality in employees suffering from an occupational disease like silicosis or coal-worker pneumoconiosis (CWP). Their focus lies not on the mortality risk due to the occupational disease itself, but on other diseases such as lung cancer or heart diseases. Using population-based reference rates in these studies can cause misleading results because mortality rates of the general population do not reflect the elevated mortality due to the occupational disease investigated. Hence, the purpose of the present paper is to develop an approach to adjust the risk estimates for other causes of death with respect to the effect of an occupational disease as a competing cause of death in occupational mortality cohort studies. To overcome the problems associated with SMRs, the paper makes use of proportional mortality ratios (PMR), which are a further approach for the estimation of health risks in occupational epidemiology. The cause-specific SMR can be rewritten as a product of PMR times the overall SMR. The PMR can be adjusted by ignoring the competing cause of death. Hence, an adjusted cause-specific SMR can be derived by multiplying this adjusted PMR with the overall SMR. This approach is applied to studies concerning lung cancer risk in coal miners suffering from CWP. The usual approach for calculating SMRs leads to an underestimation of the real lung cancer risk in subgroups of miners suffering from CWP. The same effect can be observed in workers exposed to respirable silica already suffering from silicosis. The presented approach results in more realistic risk estimation in mortality cohort studies of employees suffering from an occupational disease. It is easily calculable on the basis of usually published values of observed cases and the corresponding cause-specific SMR.

  17. Sex differential in life expectancy in Japan and Scotland: age and causes of death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi,Mahboob H

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of age groups and causes of death to the sex difference in life expectancy (SDLE at birth in Japan and Scotland was estimated for the period 1965-1990. The purpose was to determine the particular age groups and causes of death responsible for the opposite trend of SDLE in the two countries. SDLE has been widening and narrowing in Japan and Scotland, respectively. The availability of complete and reliable data for these two developed countries facilitated the study. A method of decomposing the total SDLE into age and cause of death components was employed. About 40-60% contribution to SDLE was observed for ages after 65 years. Marked increase in the contribution of the 75+ age group and marked decrease in the contribution of ages 45-64 for Japan and Scotland, respectively, had a major effect on the widening and narrowing of SDLE in the two countries, respectively. The contribution of diseases of the circulatory system was the maximum until 1980 in Japan (< or = 1.8 years or 33.6%; cerebrovascular disease alone < or = 23.4% and until 1990 in Scotland (< or = 3.1 years or 47.0%; ischemic heart disease alone < or = 42.0%. In Japan, the contribution of malignancy had a marked increased from 0.7 year (12.3% to 2.0 years (32.6%, particularly for the trachea, bronchus and lung, while there was only a small increase in Scotland from 1.0 year (16.6% to 1.2 years (19.8% with an increase in the negative contribution of female breast malignancy. In Japan, the contribution of diseases of the respiratory system increased considerably from 0.5 year (8.5% to 1.1 years (18.1% while it decreased in Scotland from 1.0 year (16.5% to 0.6 year (10.7%. About 60-75% of SDLE is due to the above three groups of causes of death. Malignancy and diseases of the respiratory system had a persistently increased contribution in Japan with resultant widening of SDLE by 0.9 year. Diseases of the circulatory system have always had a high contribution. On the

  18. Stillbirth and intrauterine fetal death: role of routine histopathological placental findings to determine cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, J; Hutchinson, J C; Heazell, A E; Ashworth, M; Jeffrey, I; Sebire, N J

    2016-11-01

    Placental abnormalities are a common cause of death in stillbirth, ranking second only to unexplained deaths, though there is wide variation in the proportion attributed to placental disease. In clinical practice, interpretation of the significance of placental findings is difficult, since many placental features in stillbirths overlap with those in live births. Our aim was to examine objectively classified placental findings from a series of > 1000 autopsies following intrauterine death in order to evaluate the role of placental histological examination in determining the cause of death. As part of a larger study evaluating several aspects of autopsy findings in intrauterine death, a dedicated database was used to collate antenatal and postmortem examination details for all cases examined between 2005 and 2013 at two tertiary specialist centers in London, UK. Histological findings for placentas were evaluated in relation to the final cause of death. Among 1064 intrauterine deaths, 946 (89%) cases had the placenta submitted for examination as part of the autopsy. Of these, 307 (32%) cases had the cause of death assigned to abnormalities of the placenta, cord or membranes. Around one third of stillbirths (≥ 24 weeks) had some isolated placental histological abnormality identified, many of uncertain significance, a significantly greater proportion than in cases of second-trimester intrauterine fetal demise (P weeks' gestation, with significantly more black mothers having ascending infection compared with other ethnicities (P < 0.0001). Maternal vascular malperfusion was the largest category of placental abnormalities in stillbirth, with peak prevalence in the early third trimester. There were 18 (2%) cases with specific histological abnormalities, including chronic histiocytic intervillositis and massive perivillous fibrin deposition. Placental pathologies represent the largest category of cause of intrauterine death. Placental histological examination is the

  19. Malnutrition is associated with increased mortality in older adults regardless of the cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Lisa; Rosenblad, Andreas; Thors Adolfsson, Eva; Bergkvist, Leif

    2017-02-01

    Malnutrition predicts preterm death, but whether this is valid irrespective of the cause of death is unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether malnutrition is associated with cause-specific mortality in older adults. This cohort study was conducted in Sweden and included 1767 individuals aged ≥65 years admitted to hospital in 2008-2009. On the basis of the Mini Nutritional Assessment instrument, nutritional risk was assessed as well nourished (score 24-30), at risk of malnutrition (score 17-23·5) or malnourished (score malnutrition, and 9·4 % of the participants were malnourished. During a median follow-up of 5·1 years, 839 participants (47·5 %) died. The multiple Cox regression model identified significant associations (hazard ratio (HR)) between malnutrition and risk of malnutrition, respectively, and death due to neoplasms (HR 2·43 and 1·32); mental or behavioural disorders (HR 5·73 and 5·44); diseases of the nervous (HR 4·39 and 2·08), circulatory (HR 1·95 and 1·57) or respiratory system (HR 2·19 and 1·49); and symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (HR 2·23 and 1·43). Malnutrition and risk of malnutrition are associated with increased mortality regardless of the cause of death, which emphasises the need for nutritional screening to identify older adults who may require nutritional support in order to avoid preterm death.

  20. Causes of death in patients with long outliving period injured in traffic accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micić Jelena

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available As long as a direct chain of events can be traced from the injury to the death, then the initial injury must be considered to be the basic cause of death, and this fact may have profound legal implications for both civil compensation and criminal responsibility. Some of the most difficult problems in forensic pathology concern deaths from which posttraumatic complications are disputed as being fatal causative factors. The agony and dying are irreversible dynamic patho-physiological processes. By autopsy only the morphological consequences of these processes could be noted by dissector. The dynamics of dying, direct correlation between initial injury and death, as well as appearance and development of complications provoked by trauma could be established only by clinical medical data. Therefore medical clinical data are critical for forensic pathologists and for solving the problems about the mode and manner of death in cases with long outliving period. Microscopical findings have only academic and scientific importance and are less useful in daily practice. The authors suggest that all complications of injury must be generally involved in autopsy reports, and all severe injuries should separately be registrated both in medical data and autopsy reports. The finding of cause of death must include all observed severe injuries and not only one of the most severe injuries and its complications.

  1. Survival and causes of death among released brown hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas, 1778) in Central Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiorowska, Magdalena; Wasilewski, Michał

    2012-10-01

    We describe the results of our research on population dynamics among brown hares reared in enclosures and then released into suitable natural habitat. Radio-tracking was used to follow the fate of 60 released brown hares over a 4-year period, extending between November 2005 and November 2009. The survival rate among these animals after 12 months was estimated to be 37 %, with 22 tagged individuals surviving beyond 1 year post-release. The highest (40 %) level of mortality characterised the first month after release, while a second period of enhanced mortality coincided with the breeding season (altogether accounting for a 20 % mortality rate). There was no significant relationship between body mass and mortality rate in the first month following release. A natural cause of death was predation by mammals, which accounted for some 31 % of all losses. Remaining causes were poaching (13 %), hits by vehicles (7 %) and unidentified causes (9 %). However, in at least 40 % of cases, it was not possible to determine the date when a released animal died, to say nothing of the cause of death.

  2. On the Correct Use of Statistical Tests: Reply to "Lies, damned lies and statistics (in Geology)"

    CERN Document Server

    Sornette, D

    2010-01-01

    In a recent Forum in EOS entitled "Lies, damned lies and statistics (in Geology)", Vermeesch (2009) claims that "statistical significant is not the same as geological significant", in other words, statistical tests may be misleading. In complete contradiction, we affirm that statistical tests are always informative. We trace the erroneous claim of Vermeesch (2009) to a mistake in the interpretation of the chi-square test. Furthermore, using the same catalog of 118,415 earthquakes of magnitude 4 or greater and occurring between Friday 1st January 1999 and Thursday, 1 January 2009 (USGS, http://earthquake.usgs.gov), we show that the null hypothesis that "the occurrence of earthquakes does not depend on the day of the week" cannot be rejected (p-value equal to p=0.46), when taking into account the two well-known effects of (i) catalog incompleteness and (ii) aftershock clustering. This corrects the p-value p=4.5 10^{-18} found by P. Vermeesch (2009), whose implementation of the chi-square test assumes that the 1...

  3. Changes in causes of death and mortality rates among children in Greenland from 1987 - 91 to 1992 - 99

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen-Larsen, Birger; Bjerregaard, Peter

    2003-01-01

    This study analysed the spontaneous trends in mortality among children in Greenland from 1987 - 91 to 1992 - 99 and describes the changes in the causes of death, mortality rates, and variation between regions....

  4. Short- and long-term mortality and causes of death in HIV/tuberculosis patients in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria N; Panteleev, Alexander M; Grint, Daniel;

    2014-01-01

    study. Mortality rates and causes of death were analysed by time from TB diagnosis (12 months) in 1078 consecutive HIV/TB patients. Factors associated with TB-related death were examined in multivariate Poisson regression analysis. 347 patients died during 2625 person-years of follow-up. Mortality......Mortality of HIV/tuberculosis (TB) patients in Eastern Europe is high. Little is known about their causes of death. This study aimed to assess and compare mortality rates and cause of death in HIV/TB patients across Eastern Europe and Western Europe and Argentina (WEA) in an international cohort...... in Eastern Europe was three- to ninefold higher than in WEA. TB was the main cause of death in Eastern Europe in 80%, 66% and 61% of patients who died 12 months after TB diagnosis, compared to 50%, 0% and 15% in the same time periods in WEA (p...

  5. NCHS - Age-adjusted Death Rates for the Top 10 Leading Causes of Death: United States, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Age-adjusted death rates for the top 10 leading causes of death in the United States, including mortality patterns from 1999 through 2013, and by state of residence...

  6. Final report : Albuquerque Ecological Services, interpretation of cause of death of 3 golden eagles and 1 bald eagle

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report was prepared by Environmental Contaminant Specialists on the cause of death of the 3 golden eagles and 1 bald eagle found near Folsom, New Mexico. This...

  7. Causes of death among crack cocaine users Causa mortis em usuários de crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ribeiro

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study accompanied 131 crack-cocaine users over a 5-year period, and examined mortality patterns, as well as the causes of death among them. METHOD: All patients admitted to a detoxification unit in Sao Paulo between 1992 and 1994 were interviewed during two follow-up periods: 1995-1996 and 1998-1999. RESULTS: After 5 years, 124 patients were localized (95%. By the study endpoint (1999, 23 patients (17.6% had died. Homicide was the most prevalent cause of death (n = 13. Almost one third of the deaths were due to the HIV infection, especially among those with a history of intravenous drug use. Less than 10% died from overdose. CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that the mortality risk among crack cocaine users is greater than that seen in the general population, being homicide and AIDS the most common causes of death among such individuals.OBJETIVO: O estudo acompanhou, por cinco anos, um grupo de 131 usuários de crack e observou os padrões de mortalidade, bem como as causas mortis entre esses. MÉTODO: Todos os pacientes que se internaram em um serviço de desintoxicação, localizado no município de São Paulo, entre 1992-1994 foram entrevistados em duas ocasiões: 1995-1996 e 1998-1999. RESULTADOS: Após cinco anos, 124 pacientes foram localizados (95%. Vinte e três pacientes (17,6% haviam morrido ao final do quinto ano de seguimento, sendo os homicídios a causa mortis mais prevalente (n = 13. Quase um terço dos pacientes morreu devido à infecção pelo vírus da imunodeficiência adquirida (HIV, especialmente aqueles com antecedentes pessoais de uso de drogas endovenosas. Menos de 10% dos pacientes morreu de overdose. CONCLUSÕES: O estudo sugere que os usuários de crack têm maior risco de morte do que a população geral, sendo os homicídios e a AIDS as causas mais observadas.

  8. Psychosocial therapy and causes of death after deliberate self-harm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, J; Stuart, E A; Lind, B D;

    2016-01-01

    .9%) of 5678 patients in the psychosocial therapy group had died, compared with 1736 (10.2%) of 17 034 patients in the matched comparison group. Lower odds ratios of dying by mental or behavioural disorders [0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37-0.79], alcohol-related causes (0.63, 95% CI 0.......5-448.4) for mental or behavioural disorders as a cause of death, 111.1 (95% CI 79.2-210.5) for alcohol-related causes and 96.8 (95% CI 69.1-161.8) for other diseases and medical conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that psychosocial therapy after deliberate self-harm might reduce long-term risk of death...

  9. Cause of death--so-called designed event acclimaxing timed happenings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari M

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cause-of-death as an established global medical institution faces its greatest challenge in the commonplace observation that the healthy do not necessarily survive and the diseased do not necessarily die. A logical analysis of the assumed relationships between disease and death provides some insights that allow questioning the taken-for-granted relationship between defined disease/s and the final common parameter of death. Causalism as a paradigm has taken leave of all advanced sciences. In medicine, it is lingering on for anthropocentric reasons. Natural death does not come to pass because of some (replaceable missing element, but because the evolution of the individual from womb to tomb has arrived at its final destination. To accept death as a physiologic event is to advance thanatology and to disburden medical colleges and hospitals of a lot of avoidable thinking and doing.

  10. Mortality and causes of death in autism spectrum disorders - An update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, S.E.; Hansen, H.B.; Rich, B.

    2008-01-01

    This study compared mortality among Danish citizens with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) with that of the general population. A clinical cohort of 341 Danish individuals with variants of ASD, previously followed over the period 1960-93, now on average 43 years of age, were updated with respect...... to mortality and causes of death. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for various times after diagnosis. In all, 26 persons with ASD had died, whereas the expected number of deaths was 13.5. Thus the mortality risk among those with ASD was nearly twice that of the general population. The SMR...... was particularly high in females. The excess mortality risk has remained unchanged since our first study in 1993. Eight of the 26 deaths were associated with epilepsy and four died from epilepsy. Future staff education should focus on better managing of the complex relationships between ASD and physical illness...

  11. Mortality and causes of death in autism spectrum disorders: An update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Rich, Bente

    2008-01-01

    This study compared mortality among Danish citizens with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) with that of the general population. A clinical cohort of 341 Danish individuals with variants of ASD, previously followed over the period 1960-93, now on average 43 years of age, were updated with respect...... to mortality and causes of death. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for various times after diagnosis. In all, 26 persons with ASD had died, whereas the expected number of deaths was 13.5. Thus the mortality risk among those with ASD was nearly twice that of the general population. The SMR...... was particularly high in females. The excess mortality risk has remained unchanged since our first study in 1993. Eight of the 26 deaths were associated with epilepsy and four died from epilepsy. Future staff education should focus on better managing of the complex relationships between ASD and physical illness...

  12. Survival and causes of death in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Marie Louise Mølgaard; Jensen, Annette Møller; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben;

    2016-01-01

    without vHL. vHL life expectancy was compared with the general population using a relative survival model. Results The estimated mean life expectancies for male and female patients born in 2000 were 67 and 60 years, respectively. Survival is influenced by the sex and genotype of the patient. Female......Background Historically, the survival of patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHL) has been poorer than that of the general population. We aimed to determine whether the survival of VHL mutation carriers and their risk of vHL-related death has changed over time and how it has been affected...... by sex, genotype and surveillance attendance. Methods In a retrospective cohort study, we included all known Danish vHL families with a VHL mutation. We assessed the survival and causes of death for 143 VHL mutation carriers using Cox regression models and compared vHL survival with that of 137 siblings...

  13. Cost-consequence analysis of cause of death investigation in Finland and in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ylijoki-Sørensen, Seija; Boldsen, Jesper Lier; Lalu, Kaisa;

    2014-01-01

    The 1990s 12-16% total autopsy rate in Denmark has until now declined to 4%, while in Finland, it has remained between 25 and 30%. The decision to proceed with a forensic autopsy is based on national legislation, but it can be assumed that the financing of autopsies influences the decision process...... pathologists working at the National Institute for Health and Welfare are not included in the unit cost. The unit cost for one medical autopsy is also lower in Finland than in Denmark; €700 versus €1070. In our alternative practice in Denmark, the forensic autopsy rate was increased from 2.2% to 8...... in Denmark with another cost profile. Data on cause of death investigation systems and costs were derived from Departments of Forensic Medicine, Departments of Pathology, and the National Police. Finnish and Danish autopsy rates were calculated in unnatural (accident, suicide, homicide and undetermined...

  14. A Diagnostic Supportive Sign for the Cause of Death Diagonal Ear Lobe Crease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birol Demirel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease is a major cause of natural death. The high incidence and mortality of these diseases arised a need to investigate possible risk factors beyond well known. Diagonal ear lobe crease (DEC, was the physical sign, described in 1973. We investigated the possibility of DEC as a helpful predictive sign in the postmortem examination of forensic sudden death cases. The angiographic results revealed that whenever the percentages of the stenosis in left descending coronary artery, circumflex artery and right coronary artery increased, the incidence of the DEC did so accordingly. These results were correlated with the previous studies reporting significant correlation between coronary artery disease and the DEC. Particularly, in the absence of supportive medical history and without a physical sign of trauma, the presence of DEC could well be a supportive sign for the physician to consider the coronary artery disease as a cause of death. Key words: Diagonal ear lobe crease, coronary artery disease, death investigation

  15. Determination of the underlying cause of death in three multicenter international HIV clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lifson, Alan R; Lundgren, Jens; Belloso, Waldo H;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Describe processes and challenges for an Endpoint Review Committee (ERC) in determining and adjudicating underlying causes of death in HIV clinical trials. METHOD: Three randomized HIV trials (two evaluating interleukin-2 and one treatment interruption) enrolled 11,593 persons from 36......-defining diseases, 21% non-AIDS malignancies, 9% cardiac diseases, 9% liver disease, 8% non-AIDS-defining infections, 5% suicides, 5% other traumatic events/accidents, 4% drug overdoses/acute intoxications, 11% other causes, and 18% unknown. Major reasons for unknown classification were inadequate clinical...... in HIV clinical trials. Committees should include those familiar with AIDS and non-AIDS-defining diseases and have processes for adjudicating differences of opinion. Training for local investigators and procedure manuals should emphasize obtaining maximum possible documentation and follow-up information...

  16. Causes of death in the human immunodeficiency virus population in Western Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikkiah Forbes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Monitoring the causes of death in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV in the era of expanding access to antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings has implications as more deaths are reported for reasons other than AIDS. Aims: To determine the causes of mortality in HIV-infected adults in Western Jamaica. Materials and Methods: Patients with HIV infection with a death certificate with a known cause of death between 2005 and 2010 were reviewed. Results: There were 189 patients. Co-morbidities were present in 25.3%. The mean age at death was 42.4 years. Early disease (World Health Organization [WHO] stages 1 or 2 was the presentation in 21.5% while 78.6% presented with advanced disease (WHO stages 3 or 4. The mean CD4 count at diagnosis was 95 cells/mm 3 . In patients presenting with early disease, 14.2% presented with sexually transmitted infections, 22.8% skin manifestations, and 14.2% lymphadenopathy. In patients presenting with late disease, 41.7% had Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP, 18.9% central nervous system (CNS toxoplasmosis, 11.3% HIV-associated nephropathy, and 5% cryptococcal meningitis. At death, 72.6% were in WHO class 4, and 21.2% class 3. The average CD4 count at death was 75.5 cells/mm 3 . Overall, 55.2% of the patients had received highly active antiretroviral therapy. PCP accounted for 42.9% of deaths, 27.3% had CNS opportunistic infections, HIV nephropathy 16.4%, and 4.6% had malignancies. About 52.3% of patients died within 1 year of diagnosis with HIV, while 68.3% died within 2 years. Conclusion: Patients with HIV are presenting with late disease and dying of conditions that are AIDS-related. Efforts to improve early diagnosis and treatment are urgently needed in Jamaica.

  17. Causes of death in a contemporary cohort of patients with invasive aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Garcia-Vidal

    Full Text Available Information regarding the processes leading to death in patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA is lacking. We sought to determine the causes of death in these patients, the role that IA played in the cause, and the timing of death. The factors associated with IA-related mortality are also analyzed. We conducted a multicenter study (2008-2011 of cases of proven and probable IA. The causes of death and whether mortality was judged to be IA-related or IA-unrelated were determined by consensus using a six-member review panel. A multivariate analysis was performed to determine risk factors for IA-related death. Of 152 patients with IA, 92 (60.5% died. Mortality was judged to be IA-related in 62 cases and IA-unrelated in 30. The most common cause of IA-related death was respiratory failure (50/62 patients, caused primarily by Aspergillus infection, although also by concomitant infections or severe comorbidities. Progression of underlying disease and bacteremic shock were the most frequent causes of IA-unrelated death. IA-related mortality accounted for 98% and 87% of deaths within the first 14 and 21 days, respectively. Liver disease (HR 4.54; 95% CI, 1.69-12.23 was independently associated with IA-related mortality, whereas voriconazole treatment was associated with reduced risk of death (HR 0.43; 95% CI, 0.20-0.93. In conclusion, better management of lung injury after IA diagnosis is the main challenge for physicians to improve IA outcomes. There are significant differences in causes and timing between IA-related and IA-unrelated mortality and these should be considered in future research to assess the quality of IA care.

  18. Years of life lost due to external causes of death in the lodz province, poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Pikala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of the study is the analysis of years of life lost due to external causes of death, particularly due to traffic accidents and suicides. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study material includes a database containing information gathered from 376,281 death certificates of inhabitants of the Lodz province who died between 1999 and 2010. The Lodz province is characterized by the highest mortality rates in Poland. The SEYLLp (Standard Expected Years of Life Lost per living person and the SEYLLd (per death indices were used to determine years of life lost. Joinpoint models were used to analyze time trends. RESULTS: In 2010, deaths due to external causes constituted 6.0% of the total number of deaths. The standardized death rate (SDR due to external causes was 110.0 per 100,000 males and was five times higher than for females (22.0 per 100,000 females. In 2010, the SEYLLp due to external causes was 3746 per 100,000 males and 721 per 100,000 females. Among males, suicides and traffic accidents were the most common causes of death (the values of the SEYLLp were: 1098 years and 887 years per 100,000 people, respectively. Among females, the SEYLLp values were 183 years due to traffic accidents and 143 years due to suicides (per 100,000 people. CONCLUSIONS: A decrease in the number of years of life lost due to external causes is much higher among females. The authors observe that a growing number of suicides contribute to an increase in the value of the SEYLLp index. This directly contributes to over-mortality of males due to external causes. The analysis of the years of life lost focuses on the social and economic aspects of premature mortality due to external causes.

  19. When gas analysis assists with postmortem imaging to diagnose causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; Giuliani, N; Egger, C; Rinaldi, A; Dominguez, A; Chevallier, C; Bruguier, C; Augsburger, M; Mangin, P; Grabherr, S

    2015-06-01

    Postmortem imaging consists in the non-invasive examination of bodies using medical imaging techniques. However, gas volume quantification and the interpretation of the gas collection results from cadavers remain difficult. We used whole-body postmortem multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) followed by a full autopsy or external examination to detect the gaseous volumes in bodies. Gases were sampled from cardiac cavities, and the sample compositions were analyzed by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/thermal conductivity detection (HS-GC-MS/TCD). Three categories were defined according to the presumed origin of the gas: alteration/putrefaction, high-magnitude vital gas embolism (e.g., from scuba diving accident) and gas embolism of lower magnitude (e.g., following a traumatic injury). Cadaveric alteration gas was diagnosed even if only one gas from among hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide or methane was detected. In alteration cases, the carbon dioxide/nitrogen ratio was often >0.2, except in the case of advanced alteration, when methane presence was the best indicator. In the gas embolism cases (vital or not), hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide and methane were absent. Moreover, with high-magnitude vital gas embolisms, carbon dioxide content was >20%, and the carbon dioxide/nitrogen ratio was >0.2. With gas embolisms of lower magnitude (gas presence consecutive to a traumatic injury), carbon dioxide content was gas analysis provided useful assistance to the postmortem imaging diagnosis of causes of death. Based on the quantifications of gaseous cardiac samples, reliable indicators were determined to document causes of death. MDCT examination of the body must be performed as quickly as possible, as does gas sampling, to avoid generating any artifactual alteration gases. Because of cardiac gas composition analysis, it is possible to distinguish alteration gases and gas embolisms of different magnitudes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Shaken baby syndrome: re-examination of diffuse axonal injury as cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, Manfred; Schleiss, Daniela; Pedal, Ingo; Saternus, Klaus-Steffen; Gerling, Ivana; Meissner, Christoph

    2008-09-01

    The discussion surrounding shaken baby syndrome (SBS) arose from the lack of evidence implicating diffuse axonal injury (DAI) as a cause of death. It was assumed instead that injury to the cervical cord, medulla, and nerve roots played a causal role. The present pathomorphological study examines 18 selected infants (<1-year-old) whose deaths were highly suspicious for SBS, exhibiting the classical SBS triad of acute subdural hemorrhage (SDH), retinal bleeding, and encephalopathy. Gross autopsy and microscopic findings of these infants were compared with those of 19 victims of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS; control group 1) and of 14 infants who died of disease or injuries/violence not involving the head, neck or eyes (control group 2). Symptoms of mechanical impact to the head were evident in seven of the SBS infants, but in none of the control infants. DAI was not detected in either the SBS or control cases. Localized axonal injury (AI) was regularly present in the brains of the SBS infants surviving longer than 1.5-3.0 h, but only occasionally in the craniocervical junction and within the nerve roots of the upper cervical cord; it was never present in the medulla. Epidural hemorrhage of the cervical cord was seen in four of the ten examined SBS cases, but in none of the control cases. Based on the absence of DAI in the brain and of signs of generalized cervical cord or nerve root injuries, we conclude that the cause of death in the SBS victims was a global cerebral ischemia secondary to SDH, focal vasospasm, trauma-induced transitory respiratory and/or circulatory failure.

  1. Trends of potential years of life lost due to main causes of deaths in urban and rural population in Poland, 2002–2011

    OpenAIRE

    Michalina Krzyżak; Dominik Maślach; Andrzej Szpak; Katarzyna Piotrowska; Katarzyna Florczyk; Martyna Skrodzka; Alfred Owoc; Iwona Bojar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the level and the trends of Potential Years of Life Lost due to main causes of deaths in Poland in 2002–2011, with consideration of place of residence, urban-rural. The material for the study was the number of deaths due to main causes in Poland in years 2002–2011, based on data from the Central Statistical Office. Premature mortality analysis was conducted with the use of PYLL indicator (PYLL – Potential Years of Life Lost). PYLL rate was calculated accord...

  2. Regional variations in mortality and causes of death in Israel, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Ethel-Sherry; Haklai, Ziona; Meron, Jill; Aburbeh, Miriam; Salz, Inbal Weiss; Applbaum, Yael; Goldberger, Nehama F

    2017-08-01

    Regional variations in mortality can be used to study and assess differences in disease prevalence and factors leading to disease and mortality from different causes. To enable this comparison, it is important to standardize the mortality data to adjust for the effects of regional population differences in age, nationality and country of origin. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated for the districts and sub-districts in Israel, for total mortality by gender as well as for leading causes of death and selected specific causes. Correlations were assessed between these SMRs, regional disease risk factors and socio-economic characteristics. Implications for health policy were then examined. Total mortality in the Northern District of Israel was not significantly different from the national average; but the Haifa, Tel Aviv, and Southern districts were significantly higher and the Jerusalem, Central, Judea and Samaria districts were lower. Cancer SMR was significantly lower in Jerusalem and not significantly higher in any region. Heart disease and diabetes SMRs were significantly higher in many sub-districts in the north of the country and lower in the south. SMRs for septicemia, influenza/pneumonia, and for cerebrovascular disease were higher in the south. Septicemia was also significantly higher in Tel Aviv and lower in the North, Haifa and Jerusalem districts. SMRs for accidents, particularly for motor vehicle accidents were significantly higher in the peripheral Zefat and Be'er Sheva sub-districts. The SMR, adjusted for age and ethnicity, is a good method for identifying districts that differ significantly from the national average. Some of the regional differences may be attributed to differences in the completion of death certificates. This needs to be addressed by efforts to improve reporting of causes of death, by educating physicians. The relatively low differences found after adjustment, show that factors associated with ethnicity may affect

  3. Underlying cause of death as recorded for multiple sclerosis patients: associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, R M; Valdiviezo, N L; Visscher, B R; Clark, V A; Detels, R; Fukumoto, M; Dudley, J P

    1983-01-01

    The coding of multiple sclerosis (MS) as underlying cause of death (UCD) on the death certificate provides an important epidemiologic resource for both descriptive and analytic studies. However, not all deaths among MS patients will be so coded. We investigated the effect on estimated occurrence of MS and on characteristics of MS patients when only UCD codes are used to identify cases. Of 2329 MS patients living in Los Angeles County (California) or King/Pierce Counties (Washington) in 1970, 438 had died by 1980. Only 53% of the deaths were coded to MS; 47% were attributed to other causes. Based on our comparisons, the use of only MS-coded deaths to describe decedents would: underestimate the age at MS onset; overestimate the female:male ratio; underestimate age at death; and underestimate duration of MS. Also, the percentage of MS-coded deaths decreased with lengthening duration of follow-up of these prevalent cases. The effect of using only UCD codes to report characteristics of decedents with other chronic diseases may well be similar.

  4. Accuracy of Death Certificates and Assessment of Factors for Misclassification of Underlying Cause of Death

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    Makiko Naka Mieno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cause of death (COD information taken from death certificates is often inaccurate and incomplete. However, the accuracy of Underlying CODs (UCODs recorded on death certificates has not been comprehensively described when multiple diseases are present. Methods: A total of 450 consecutive autopsies performed at a geriatric hospital in Japan between February 2000 and August 2002 were studied. We evaluated the concordance rate, sensitivity, and specificity of major UCODs (cancer, heart disease, and pneumonia reported on death certificates compared with a reference standard of pathologist assessment based on autopsy data and clinical records. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of sex, age, comorbidity, and UCODs on misclassification. Results: The concordance rate was relatively high for cancer (81% but low for heart disease (55% and pneumonia (9%. The overall concordance rate was 48%. Sex and comorbidity did not affect UCOD misclassification rates, which tended to increase with patient age, although the association with age was also not significant. The strongest factor for misclassification was UCODs (P < 0.0001. Sensitivity and specificity for cancer were very high (80% and 96%, respectively, but sensitivity for heart disease and pneumonia was 60% and 46%, respectively. Specificity for each UCOD was more than 85%. Conclusions: Researchers should be aware of the accuracy of COD data from death certificates used as research resources, especially for cases of elderly patients with pneumonia.

  5. Assessment of Traub formula and ketone bodies in cause of death investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keltanen, Terhi; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U; Partanen, Teija; Valonen, Tiina; Lindroos, Katarina

    2013-11-01

    Diabetes and alcohol abuse may cause severe metabolic disturbances that can be fatal. These may be difficult to diagnose in autopsies based solely on macroscopical and histological findings. In such cases, metabolic markers, such as postmortem glucose and ketone levels, can provide supporting information. Glucose or combined glucose and lactate, the Traub value, is often used to indicate hyperglycemia. The use of the Traub value, however, has been questioned by some, because the lactate levels are known to elevate in postmortem samples also due to other reasons than glycolysis of glucose molecules. Ketoacidosis can be detected by analyzing ketone body levels, especially beta-hydroxybutyric acid (BHB). Acetone is also elevated in severe cases of ketoacidosis. Here, we have evaluated the value of these biomarkers for postmortem determination of the metabolic disturbances. Retrospective data of 980 medico-legal autopsies performed in Finland, where glucose, lactate and ketone bodies were analyzed, was collected. Our findings show that the Traub value indicates hyperglycemia, even when glucose levels are low. For diagnosis, evaluation of complementing markers, e.g. ketone bodies and glycated hemoglobin is needed. Our results show that BHB can be used for screening and diagnosis of ketoacidosis. Acetone alone is not sufficient, since it is elevated only in the most severe cases. We also found that alcohol abuse rarely causes severe ketoacidosis. However, sporadic cases do exist where ketone body levels are extremely high. Despite this, alcoholic ketoacidosis is very rarely diagnosed as the cause of death.

  6. Survival and Cause of Death among a Cohort of Confirmed Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Cases.

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    Susan T Paulukonis

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Estimates of survival from disease onset range from 20 to 48 months and have been generated using clinical populations or death records alone.Data on a cohort of ALS cases diagnosed between 2009-2011 were collected as part of the Los Angeles and San Francisco Bay Area Metropolitan ALS Surveillance projects; death records 2009-2013 were linked to these confirmed cases to determine survival post diagnosis and factors associated with survival time.There were 618 cases identified and 283 of these died during the follow up time period. Median age at death was 64.3 years, and median survival time post-diagnosis was 2.6 years. Age at diagnosis and year of diagnosis were predictors of survival time in adjusted models; those diagnosed at age 80 or older had shorter survival than those diagnosed at age 50 or younger. Most (92% had ALS noted as a cause of death.Survival post-diagnosis may be improved compared with previous reports. Age at diagnosis continues to be the strongest predictor of prognosis; recall case reporting bias may play a role in estimates of survival time.

  7. Reducing Potentially Excess Deaths from the Five Leading Causes of Death in the Rural United States

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    Garcia, Macarena C; Faul, Mark; Massetti, Greta; Thomas, Cheryll C; Hong, Yuling; Bauer, Ursula E; Iademarco, Michael F

    2017-01-13

    In 2014, the all-cause age-adjusted death rate in the United States reached a historic low of 724.6 per 100,000 population (1). However, mortality in rural (nonmetropolitan) areas of the United States has decreased at a much slower pace, resulting in a widening gap between rural mortality rates (830.5) and urban mortality rates (704.3) (1). During 1999–2014, annual age-adjusted death rates for the five leading causes of death in the United States (heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease (CLRD), and stroke) were higher in rural areas than in urban (metropolitan) areas (Figure 1). In most public health regions (Figure 2), the proportion of deaths among persons aged leading causes that were potentially excess deaths was higher in rural areas compared with urban areas (Figure 3). Several factors probably influence the rural-urban gap in potentially excess deaths from the five leading causes, many of which are associated with sociodemographic differences between rural and urban areas. Residents of rural areas in the United States tend to be older, poorer, and sicker than their urban counterparts (3). A higher proportion of the rural U.S. population reports limited physical activity because of chronic conditions than urban populations (4). Moreover, social circumstances and behaviors have an impact on mortality and potentially contribute to approximately half of the determining causes of potentially excess deaths (5).

  8. Causes of Death in HIV Patients and the Evolution of an AIDS Hospice: 1988–2008

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    Ann Stewart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the transformation that has occurred in the care of people living with HIV/AIDS in a Toronto Hospice. Casey House opened in the pre-HAART era to care exclusively for people with HIV/AIDS, an incurable disease. At the time, all patients were admitted for palliative care and all deaths were due to AIDS-defining conditions. AIDS-defining malignancies accounted for 22 percent of deaths, mainly, Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoma. In the post-HAART era, AIDS-defining malignancies dropped dramatically and non-AIDS-defining malignancies became a significant cause of death, including liver cancer, lung cancer and gastric cancers. In the post-HAART era, people living with HIV/AIDS served at Casey House have changed considerably, with increasing numbers of patients facing homelessness and mental health issues, including substance use. Casey House offers a picture of the evolving epidemic and provides insight into changes and improvements made in the care of these patients.

  9. [Cause of death in heroin users with low blood morphine concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Andrea; Reiter, Arthur; Meissner, Christoph; Oehmichen, Manfred

    2002-01-01

    The blood morphine concentrations in cases of heroin-associated fatalities can vary considerably. Currently, a free-morphine concentration of > or = 100 ng/ml in blood is generally considered as potentially fatal. Moreover, it is a common observation that fatal cases of heroin-intoxication with blood morphine concentrations lower than 100 ng/ml occur. This poses the question of how the fatal cases with low blood morphine concentrations can be explained. In the study described here, 62 cases of morphine only intoxications were examined. The fatal cases were divided into two groups according to the free morphine concentrations measured in the blood of the heart (group I: free morphine concentration or = 100 ng/ml, n = 41 cases). The two groups were compared as to circumstances of death, as well as to autopsy findings and histopathologic alterations. Overall, infections of the respiratory tract occurred significantly more often in group I (lower morphine concentrations) than in group II. In a second step, the group I cases were analyzed individually to get detailed information on the cause of death. In 19 of the 21 cases the authors could find a plausible explanation for death in combination with low free morphine concentrations in the blood.

  10. Cancer: second cause of death among the elderly in Medellín, 2002-2006

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    Luz M. Bustamante A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe the behavior of lung, stomach, andprostate cancer mortality among the elderly in the city of Medellinfrom 2002 to 2006. Methodology: a descriptive study with asecondary information source. The study was conducted basedon the analysis of 2809 records of deaths from lung, stomach,and prostate cancer in people over 65 years. The analysis wasunivariate and bivariate. Additionally, it was accompanied bystatistical tests and had a reliability of 95 %. The average andspecific mortality rates were calculated per ten thousand elderlyindividuals. Results: the risk of dying from lung cancer was at itshighest value in 2003, with a rate of 20.27; for stomach cancer, the greatest risk was observed in 2002, with 11.88; finally, 2006was the year with the highest risk for prostate cancer, with 9.35per ten thousand inhabitants. For the three types of cancer, theaverage mortality rate over time was 37.1. Thus, cancer is thesecond leading cause of death after acute myocardial infarction.Discussion: lung, stomach, and prostate cancer pose a risk to theelderly. Moreover, the risk increases as the individuals age. Thisstudy contributes to the state of the art of the research on causesof death among the elderly.

  11. A standardized algorithm for determining the underlying cause of death in HIV infection as AIDS or non-AIDS related

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalska, Justyna D; Mocroft, Amanda; Ledergerber, Bruno;

    2011-01-01

    are a natural consequence of an increased awareness and knowledge in the field. To monitor and analyze changes in mortality over time, we have explored this issue within the EuroSIDA study and propose a standardized protocol unifying data collected and allowing for classification of all deaths as AIDS or non......-AIDS related, including events with missing cause of death. Methods: Several classifications of the underlying cause of death as AIDS or non-AIDS related within the EuroSIDA study were compared: central classification (CC-reference group) based on an externally standardised method (the CoDe procedures), local...

  12. Causes of Death among AIDS Patients after Introduction of Free Combination Antiretroviral Therapy (cART in Three Chinese Provinces, 2010-2011.

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    Liyan Wang

    Full Text Available Although AIDS-related deaths have had significant economic and social impact following an increased disease burden internationally, few studies have evaluated the cause of AIDS-related deaths among patients with AIDS on combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART in China. This study examines the causes of death among AIDS-patients in China and uses a methodology to increase data accuracy compared to the previous studies on AIDS-related mortality in China, that have taken the reported cause of death in the National HIV Registry at face-value.Death certificates/medical records were examined and a cross-sectional survey was conducted in three provinces to verify the causes of death among AIDS patients who died between January 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011. Chi-square analysis was conducted to examine the categorical variables by causes of death and by ART status. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to evaluate factors associated with AIDS-related death versus non-AIDS related death.This study used a sample of 1,109 subjects. The average age at death was 44.5 years. AIDS-related deaths were significantly higher than non-AIDS and injury-related deaths. In the sample, 41.9% (465/1109 were deceased within a year of HIV diagnosis and 52.7% (584/1109 of the deceased AIDS patients were not on cART. For AIDS-related deaths (n = 798, statistically significant factors included CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 at the time of cART initiation (AOR 1.94, 95%CI 1.24-3.05, ART naïve (AOR 1.69, 95%CI 1.09-2.61; p = 0.019 and age <39 years (AOR 2.96, 95%CI 1.77-4.96.For the AIDS patients that were deceased, only those who initiated cART while at a CD4 count ≥200 cells/mm3 were less likely to die from AIDS-related causes compared to those who didn't initiate ART at all.

  13. Cause of death and potentially avoidable deaths in Australian adults with intellectual disability using retrospective linked data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srasuebkul, Preeyaporn; Xu, Han; Howlett, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate mortality and its causes in adults over the age of 20 years with intellectual disability (ID). Design, setting and participants Retrospective population-based standardised mortality of the ID and Comparison cohorts. The ID cohort comprised 42 204 individuals who registered for disability services with ID as a primary or secondary diagnosis from 2005 to 2011 in New South Wales (NSW). The Comparison cohort was obtained from published deaths in NSW from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) from 2005 to 2011. Main outcome measures We measured and compared Age Standardised Mortality Rate (ASMR), Comparative Mortality Figure (CMF), years of productive life lost (YPLL) and proportion of deaths with potentially avoidable causes in an ID cohort with an NSW general population cohort. Results There were 19 362 adults in the ID cohort which experienced 732 (4%) deaths at a median age of 54 years. Age Standardised Mortality Rates increased with age for both cohorts. Overall comparative mortality figure was 1.3, but was substantially higher for the 20–44 (4.0) and 45–64 (2.3) age groups. YPLL was 137/1000 people in the ID cohort and 49 in the comparison cohort. Cause of death in ID cohort was dominated by respiratory, circulatory, neoplasm and nervous system. After recoding deaths previously attributed to the aetiology of the disability, 38% of deaths in the ID cohort and 17% in the comparison cohort were potentially avoidable. Conclusions Adults with ID experience premature mortality and over-representation of potentially avoidable deaths. A national system of reporting of deaths in adults with ID is required. Inclusion in health policy and services development and in health promotion programmes is urgently required to address premature deaths and health inequalities for adults with ID. PMID:28179413

  14. Drug induced mortality: a multiple cause approach on Italian causes of death Register

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    Francesco Grippo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-related mortality is a complex phenomenon that has several health, social and economic effects. In this paper trends of drug-induced mortality in Italy are analysed. Two approaches have been followed: the traditional analysis of the underlying cause of death (UC (data refers to the Istat mortality database from 1980 to 2011, and the multiple cause (MCanalysis, that is the analysis of all conditions reported on the death certificate (data for 2003-2011 period.Methods: Data presented in this paper are based on the Italian mortality register. The selection of Icd codes used for the analysis follows the definition of the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction. Using different indicators (crude and standardized rates, ratio multiple to underlying, the results obtained from the two approaches (UC and MC have been compared. Moreover, as a measure of association between drug-related causes and specific conditions on the death certificate, an estimation of the age-standardized relative risk (RR has been used.Results: In the years 2009-2011, the total number of certificates whit mention of drug use was 1,293, 60% higher than the number UC based. The groups of conditions more strongly associated with drug-related causes are the mental and behavioral disorders (especially alcohol consumption, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis and fibrosis of liver, AIDS and endocarditis.Conclusions : The analysis based on multiple cause approach shows, for the first time, a more detailed picture of the drug related death; it allows to better describe the mortality profiles and to re-evaluate  the contribution of a specific cause to death.

  15. Firearm homicide and other causes of death in delinquents: a 16-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplin, Linda A; Jakubowski, Jessica A; Abram, Karen M; Olson, Nichole D; Stokes, Marquita L; Welty, Leah J

    2014-07-01

    Delinquent youth are at risk for early violent death after release from detention. However, few studies have examined risk factors for mortality. Previous investigations studied only serious offenders (a fraction of the juvenile justice population) and provided little data on females. The Northwestern Juvenile Project is a prospective longitudinal study of health needs and outcomes of a stratified random sample of 1829 youth (657 females, 1172 males; 524 Hispanic, 1005 African American, 296 non-Hispanic white, 4 other race/ethnicity) detained between 1995 and 1998. Data on risk factors were drawn from interviews; death records were obtained up to 16 years after detention. We compared all-cause mortality rates and causes of death with those of the general population. Survival analyses were used to examine risk factors for mortality after youth leave detention. Delinquent youth have higher mortality rates than the general population to age 29 years (P < .05), irrespective of gender or race/ethnicity. Females died at nearly 5 times the general population rate (P < .05); Hispanic males and females died at 5 and 9 times the general population rates, respectively (P < .05). Compared with the general population, significantly more delinquent youth died of homicide and its subcategory, homicide by firearm (P < .05). Among delinquent youth, racial/ethnic minorities were at increased risk of homicide compared with non-Hispanic whites (P < .05). Significant risk factors for external-cause mortality and homicide included drug dealing (up to 9 years later), alcohol use disorder, and gang membership (up to a decade later). Delinquent youth are an identifiable target population to reduce disparities in early violent death. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Firearm Homicide and Other Causes of Death in Delinquents: A 16-Year Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Jessica A.; Abram, Karen M.; Olson, Nichole D.; Stokes, Marquita L.; Welty, Leah J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delinquent youth are at risk for early violent death after release from detention. However, few studies have examined risk factors for mortality. Previous investigations studied only serious offenders (a fraction of the juvenile justice population) and provided little data on females. METHODS: The Northwestern Juvenile Project is a prospective longitudinal study of health needs and outcomes of a stratified random sample of 1829 youth (657 females, 1172 males; 524 Hispanic, 1005 African American, 296 non-Hispanic white, 4 other race/ethnicity) detained between 1995 and 1998. Data on risk factors were drawn from interviews; death records were obtained up to 16 years after detention. We compared all-cause mortality rates and causes of death with those of the general population. Survival analyses were used to examine risk factors for mortality after youth leave detention. RESULTS: Delinquent youth have higher mortality rates than the general population to age 29 years (P < .05), irrespective of gender or race/ethnicity. Females died at nearly 5 times the general population rate (P < .05); Hispanic males and females died at 5 and 9 times the general population rates, respectively (P < .05). Compared with the general population, significantly more delinquent youth died of homicide and its subcategory, homicide by firearm (P < .05). Among delinquent youth, racial/ethnic minorities were at increased risk of homicide compared with non-Hispanic whites (P < .05). Significant risk factors for external-cause mortality and homicide included drug dealing (up to 9 years later), alcohol use disorder, and gang membership (up to a decade later). CONCLUSIONS: Delinquent youth are an identifiable target population to reduce disparities in early violent death. PMID:24936005

  17. Statistics of predictions with missing higher order corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Berthier, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Effective operators have been used extensively to understand small deviations from the Standard Model in the search for new physics. So far there has been no general method to fit for small parameters when higher order corrections in these parameters are present but unknown. We present a new technique that solves this problem, allowing for an exact p-value calculation under the assumption that higher order theoretical contributions can be treated as gaussian distributed random variables. The method we propose is general, and may be used in the analysis of any perturbative theoretical prediction, ie.~truncated power series. We illustrate this new method by performing a fit of the Standard Model Effective Field Theory parameters, which include eg.~anomalous gauge and four-fermion couplings.

  18. Causes of death and associated conditions (Codac – a utilitarian approach to the classification of perinatal deaths

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    Harrison Catherine

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A carefully classified dataset of perinatal mortality will retain the most significant information on the causes of death. Such information is needed for health care policy development, surveillance and international comparisons, clinical services and research. For comparability purposes, we propose a classification system that could serve all these needs, and be applicable in both developing and developed countries. It is developed to adhere to basic concepts of underlying cause in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD, although gaps in ICD prevent classification of perinatal deaths solely on existing ICD codes. We tested the Causes of Death and Associated Conditions (Codac classification for perinatal deaths in seven populations, including two developing country settings. We identified areas of potential improvements in the ability to retain existing information, ease of use and inter-rater agreement. After revisions to address these issues we propose Version II of Codac with detailed coding instructions. The ten main categories of Codac consist of three key contributors to global perinatal mortality (intrapartum events, infections and congenital anomalies, two crucial aspects of perinatal mortality (unknown causes of death and termination of pregnancy, a clear distinction of conditions relevant only to the neonatal period and the remaining conditions are arranged in the four anatomical compartments (fetal, cord, placental and maternal. For more detail there are 94 subcategories, further specified in 577 categories in the full version. Codac is designed to accommodate both the main cause of death as well as two associated conditions. We suggest reporting not only the main cause of death, but also the associated relevant conditions so that scenarios of combined conditions and events are captured. The appropriately applied Codac system promises to better manage information on causes of perinatal deaths, the conditions

  19. Discrepant comorbidity between minority and white suicides: a national multiple cause-of-death analysis

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    Stack Steven

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinician training deficits and a low and declining autopsy rate adversely impact the quality of death certificates in the United States. Self-report and records data for the general population indicate that proximate mental and physical health of minority suicides was at least as poor as that of white suicides. Methods This cross-sectional mortality study uses data from Multiple Cause-of-Death (MCOD public use files for 1999–2003 to describe and evaluate comorbidity among black, Hispanic, and white suicides. Unintentional injury decedents are the referent for multivariate analyses. Results One or more mentions of comorbid psychopathology are documented on the death certificates of 8% of white male suicides compared to 4% and 3% of black and Hispanic counterparts, respectively. Corresponding female figures are 10%, 8%, and 6%. Racial-ethnic discrepancies in the prevalence of comorbid physical disease are more attenuated. Cross-validation with National Violent Death Reporting System data reveals high relative underenumeration of comorbid depression/mood disorders and high relative overenumeration of schizophrenia on the death certificates of both minorities. In all three racial-ethnic groups, suicide is positively associated with depression/mood disorders [whites: adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 31.9, 95% CI = 29.80–34.13; blacks: AOR = 60.9, 95% CI = 42.80–86.63; Hispanics: AOR = 34.7, 95% CI = 23.36–51.62] and schizophrenia [whites: AOR = 2.4, 95% CI = 2.07–2.86; blacks: AOR = 4.2, 95% CI = 2.73–6.37; Hispanics: AOR = 4.1, 95% CI = 2.01–8.22]. Suicide is positively associated with cancer in whites [AOR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.69–1.93] and blacks [AOR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.36–2.48], but not with HIV or alcohol and other substance use disorders in any group under review. Conclusion The multivariate analyses indicate high consistency in predicting suicide-associated comorbidities across racial-ethnic groups using MCOD data

  20. Geographical patterns of proportionate mortality for the most common causes of death in Brazil

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    Sichieri Rosely

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Mortality due to chronic diseases has been increasing in all regions of Brazil with corresponding decreases in mortality from infectious diseases. The geographical variation in proportionate mortality for chronic diseases for 17 Brazilian state capitals for the year 1985 and their association with socio-economic variables and infectious disease was studied. Calculations were made of correlation coefficients of proportionate mortality for adults of 30 years or above due to ischaemic heart disease, stroke and cancer of the lung, the breast and stomach with 3 socio-economic variables, race, and mortality due to infectious disease. Linear regression analysis included as independent variables the % of illiteracy, % of whites, % of houses with piped water, mean income, age group, sex, and % of deaths caused by infectious disease. The dependent variables were the % of deaths due to each one of the chronic diseases studied by age-sex group. Chronic diseases were an important cause of death in all regions of Brazil. Ischaemic heart diseases, stroke and malignant neoplasms accounted for more than 34% of the mortality in each of the 17 capitals studied. Proportionate cause-specific mortality varied markedly among state capitals. Ranges were 6.3-19.5% for ischaemic heart diseases, 8.3-25.4% for stroke, 2.3-10.4% for infections and 12.2-21.5% for malignant neoplasm. Infectious disease mortality had the highest (p < 0.001 correlation with all the four socio-economic variables studied and ischaemic heart disease showed the second highest correlation (p < 0.05. Higher socio-economic level was related to a lower % of infectious diseases and a higher % of ischaemic heart diseases. Mortality due to breast cancer and stroke was not associated with socio-economic variables. Multivariate linear regression models explained 59% of the variance among state capitals for mortality due to ischaemic heart disease, 50% for stroke, 28% for lung cancer, 24% for breast cancer

  1. Geographical patterns of proportionate mortality for the most common causes of death in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosely Sichieri

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Mortality due to chronic diseases has been increasing in all regions of Brazil with corresponding decreases in mortality from infectious diseases. The geographical variation in proportionate mortality for chronic diseases for 17 Brazilian state capitals for the year 1985 and their association with socio-economic variables and infectious disease was studied. Calculations were made of correlation coefficients of proportionate mortality for adults of 30 years or above due to ischaemic heart disease, stroke and cancer of the lung, the breast and stomach with 3 socio-economic variables, race, and mortality due to infectious disease. Linear regression analysis included as independent variables the % of illiteracy, % of whites, % of houses with piped water, mean income, age group, sex, and % of deaths caused by infectious disease. The dependent variables were the % of deaths due to each one of the chronic diseases studied by age-sex group. Chronic diseases were an important cause of death in all regions of Brazil. Ischaemic heart diseases, stroke and malignant neoplasms accounted for more than 34% of the mortality in each of the 17 capitals studied. Proportionate cause-specific mortality varied markedly among state capitals. Ranges were 6.3-19.5% for ischaemic heart diseases, 8.3-25.4% for stroke, 2.3-10.4% for infections and 12.2-21.5% for malignant neoplasm. Infectious disease mortality had the highest (p < 0.001 correlation with all the four socio-economic variables studied and ischaemic heart disease showed the second highest correlation (p < 0.05. Higher socio-economic level was related to a lower % of infectious diseases and a higher % of ischaemic heart diseases. Mortality due to breast cancer and stroke was not associated with socio-economic variables. Multivariate linear regression models explained 59% of the variance among state capitals for mortality due to ischaemic heart disease, 50% for stroke, 28% for lung cancer, 24% for breast cancer

  2. Performance of InterVA for assigning causes of death to verbal autopsies: multisite validation study using clinical diagnostic gold standards

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    Flaxman Abraham D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background InterVA is a widely disseminated tool for cause of death attribution using information from verbal autopsies. Several studies have attempted to validate the concordance and accuracy of the tool, but the main limitation of these studies is that they compare cause of death as ascertained through hospital record review or hospital discharge diagnosis with the results of InterVA. This study provides a unique opportunity to assess the performance of InterVA compared to physician-certified verbal autopsies (PCVA and alternative automated methods for analysis. Methods Using clinical diagnostic gold standards to select 12,542 verbal autopsy cases, we assessed the performance of InterVA on both an individual and population level and compared the results to PCVA, conducting analyses separately for adults, children, and neonates. Following the recommendation of Murray et al., we randomly varied the cause composition over 500 test datasets to understand the performance of the tool in different settings. We also contrasted InterVA with an alternative Bayesian method, Simplified Symptom Pattern (SSP, to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the tool. Results Across all age groups, InterVA performs worse than PCVA, both on an individual and population level. On an individual level, InterVA achieved a chance-corrected concordance of 24.2% for adults, 24.9% for children, and 6.3% for neonates (excluding free text, considering one cause selection. On a population level, InterVA achieved a cause-specific mortality fraction accuracy of 0.546 for adults, 0.504 for children, and 0.404 for neonates. The comparison to SSP revealed four specific characteristics that lead to superior performance of SSP. Increases in chance-corrected concordance are attained by developing cause-by-cause models (2%, using all items as opposed to only the ones that mapped to InterVA items (7%, assigning probabilities to clusters of symptoms (6%, and using empirical

  3. Cause-of-death ascertainment for deaths that occur outside hospitals in Thailand: application of verbal autopsy methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattaraarchachai Junya

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ascertainment of cause for deaths that occur in the absence of medical attention is a significant problem in many countries, including Thailand, where more than 50% of such deaths are registered with ill-defined causes. Routine implementation of standardized, rigorous verbal autopsy methods is a potential solution. This paper reports findings from field research conducted to develop, test, and validate the use of verbal autopsy (VA methods in Thailand. Methods International verbal autopsy methods were first adapted to the Thai context and then implemented to ascertain causes of death for a nationally representative sample of 11,984 deaths that occurred in Thailand in 2005. Causes of death were derived from completed VA questionnaires by physicians trained in ICD-based cause-of-death certification. VA diagnoses were validated in the sample of hospital deaths for which reference diagnoses were available from medical record review. Validated study findings were used to adjust VA-based causes of death derived for deaths in the study sample that had occurred outside hospitals. Results were used to estimate cause-specific mortality patterns for deaths outside hospitals in Thailand in 2005. Results VA-based causes of death were derived for 6,328 out of 7,340 deaths in the study sample that had occurred outside hospitals, constituting the verification arm of the study. The use of VA resulted in large-scale reassignment of deaths from ill-defined categories to specific causes of death. The validation study identified that VA tends to overdiagnose important causes such as diabetes, liver cancer, and tuberculosis, while undercounting deaths from HIV/AIDS, liver diseases, genitourinary (essential renal, and digestive system disorders. Conclusions The use of standard VA methods adapted to Thailand enabled a plausible assessment of cause-specific mortality patterns and a substantial reduction of ill-defined diagnoses. Validation studies

  4. A statistical method for correcting salinity observations from autonomous profiling floats: An ARGO perspective

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Durand, F.; Reverdin, G.

    The Profiling Autonomous Lagrangian Circulation Explorer (PALACE) float is used to implement the Array for Real-Time Geostrophic Oceanography (ARGO). This study presents a statistical approach to correct salinity measurement errors of an ARGO...

  5. Evaluating tetanus neonatorum as a child survival risk in rural Egypt in the absence of reliable cause-of-death registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak, A B; Kielmann, A A; van der Most van Spijk, M; Hammamy, M T; Nagaty, A A

    1985-12-01

    The principal finding of the investigation is that neonatal tenanus is, indeed an important cause of infant death in rural Egypt even though the normal cause-of-death reporting system had not altered health authorities to the problem. The finding is based on a comparison of registration statistics with (anthropological) reconstruction of pregnancies and child survival using the case-history rather than the epidemiological method. The histories go back ten years and refer to 102 women in two villages of Egypt. An incidental finding is confirmation of the known deficiency of infant death reporting, and associated births, with the extra dividend of showing how serious this may be in the neonatal period. Another incidental finding is the identification of induced abortion as a health problem.

  6. Validity of a minimally invasive autopsy tool for cause of death determination in pediatric deaths in Mozambique: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassat, Quique; Castillo, Paola; Martínez, Miguel J; Jordao, Dercio; Lovane, Lucilia; Hurtado, Juan Carlos; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Santos Ritchie, Paula; Bandeira, Sónia; Sambo, Calvino; Chicamba, Valeria; Ismail, Mamudo R; Carrilho, Carla; Lorenzoni, Cesaltina; Fernandes, Fabiola; Cisteró, Pau; Mayor, Alfredo; Cossa, Anelsio; Mandomando, Inacio; Navarro, Mireia; Casas, Isaac; Vila, Jordi; Munguambe, Khátia; Maixenchs, Maria; Sanz, Ariadna; Quintó, Llorenç; Macete, Eusebio; Alonso, Pedro; Menéndez, Clara; Ordi, Jaume

    2017-06-01

    In recent decades, the world has witnessed unprecedented progress in child survival. However, our knowledge of what is killing nearly 6 million children annually in low- and middle-income countries remains poor, partly because of the inadequacy and reduced precision of the methods currently utilized in these settings to investigate causes of death (CoDs). The study objective was to validate the use of a minimally invasive autopsy (MIA) approach as an adequate and more acceptable substitute for the complete diagnostic autopsy (CDA) for pediatric CoD investigation in a poor setting. In this observational study, the validity of the MIA approach in determining the CoD was assessed in 54 post-neonatal pediatric deaths (age range: ≥1 mo to 15 y) in a referral hospital of Mozambique by comparing the results of the MIA with those of the CDA. Concordance in the category of disease obtained by the two methods was evaluated by the Kappa statistic, and the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the MIA diagnoses were calculated. A CoD was identified in all cases in the CDA and in 52/54 (96%) of the cases in the MIA, with infections and malignant tumors accounting for the majority of diagnoses. The MIA categorization of disease showed a substantial concordance with the CDA categorization (Kappa = 0.70, 95% CI 0.49-0.92), and sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy were high. The ICD-10 diagnoses were coincident in up to 75% (36/48) of the cases. The MIA allowed the identification of the specific pathogen deemed responsible for the death in two-thirds (21/32; 66%) of all deaths of infectious origin. Discrepancies between the MIA and the CDA in individual diagnoses could be minimized with the addition of some basic clinical information such as those ascertainable through a verbal autopsy or clinical record. The main limitation of the analysis is that both the MIA and the CDA include some degree of expert subjective interpretation. The

  7. Validity of a Minimally Invasive Autopsy for Cause of Death Determination in Adults in Mozambique: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Paola; Martínez, Miguel J; Ussene, Esperança; Jordao, Dercio; Lovane, Lucilia; Ismail, Mamudo R; Carrilho, Carla; Lorenzoni, Cesaltina; Fernandes, Fabiola; Bene, Rosa; Palhares, Antonio; Ferreira, Luiz; Lacerda, Marcus; Mandomando, Inacio; Vila, Jordi; Hurtado, Juan Carlos; Munguambe, Khátia; Maixenchs, Maria; Sanz, Ariadna; Quintó, Llorenç; Macete, Eusebio; Alonso, Pedro; Bassat, Quique; Menéndez, Clara; Ordi, Jaume

    2016-11-01

    There is an urgent need to identify tools able to provide reliable information on the cause of death in low-income regions, since current methods (verbal autopsy, clinical records, and complete autopsies) are either inaccurate, not feasible, or poorly accepted. We aimed to compare the performance of a standardized minimally invasive autopsy (MIA) approach with that of the gold standard, the complete diagnostic autopsy (CDA), in a series of adults who died at Maputo Central Hospital in Mozambique. In this observational study, coupled MIAs and CDAs were performed in 112 deceased patients. The MIA analyses were done blindly, without knowledge of the clinical data or the results of the CDA. We compared the MIA diagnosis with the CDA diagnosis of cause of death. CDA diagnoses comprised infectious diseases (80; 71.4%), malignant tumors (16; 14.3%), and other diseases, including non-infectious cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, kidney, and lung diseases (16; 14.3%). A MIA diagnosis was obtained in 100/112 (89.2%) cases. The overall concordance between the MIA diagnosis and CDA diagnosis was 75.9% (85/112). The concordance was higher for infectious diseases and malignant tumors (63/80 [78.8%] and 13/16 [81.3%], respectively) than for other diseases (9/16; 56.2%). The specific microorganisms causing death were identified in the MIA in 62/74 (83.8%) of the infectious disease deaths with a recognized cause. The main limitation of the analysis is that both the MIA and the CDA include some degree of expert subjective interpretation. A simple MIA procedure can identify the cause of death in many adult deaths in Mozambique. This tool could have a major role in improving the understanding and surveillance of causes of death in areas where infectious diseases are a common cause of mortality.

  8. Global and regional mortality from 235 causes of death for 20 age groups in 1990 and 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano, Rafael; Naghavi, Mohsen; Foreman, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Reliable and timely information on the leading causes of death in populations, and how these are changing, is a crucial input into health policy debates. In the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 (GBD 2010), we aimed to estimate annual deaths for the world and 21...... regions between 1980 and 2010 for 235 causes, with uncertainty intervals (UIs), separately by age and sex....

  9. Causes of death among Danish HIV patients compared with population controls in the period 1995-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helleberg, M; Kronborg, G; Larsen, carsten schade;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the mortality and causes of death in human immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) patients with the background population. METHODS: All adult HIV patients treated in Danish HIV centers from 1995 to 2008 and 14 controls for each HIV patient were included. Age-adjusted mortality rates...... (MR) and mortality rate ratios (MRR) were estimated using direct standardization and Poisson regression analyses. Up to four contributory causes of death for each person were included in analyses of cause-specific MR. RESULTS: A total of 5,137 HIV patients and 71,918 controls were followed for 37...... did not change substantially from 6.9 (95 % CI 3.8-12.5) to 5.6 (95 % CI 3.6-8.8). The MR of unnatural causes declined from 6.9 (95 % CI 3.8-12.5) to 2.7 (95 % CI 1.4-5.1). The MRR of infections declined from 46.6 (95 % CI 19.6-110.9) to 3.3 (95 % CI 1.6-6.6). The MRR of other natural causes of death...

  10. Evaluation of Impact of Major Causes of Death on Life Expectancy Changes in China, 1990-2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN-HONG WANG; LI-MING LI

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of major causes of death on changes of life expectancy in China. Methods Life expectancy was calculated by standard life table techniques using mortality data from the national censuses in 1990 and 2000 and the 1% National Population Sampling Surveys in 1995 and 2005. Mortality data about the major causes of death from VR-MOH were used as reference values to estimate their death proportions of the specific age groups by sex and regions, as well as all-cause mortality and age-specific mortality rates of major causes of death. Decomposition method was used to quantitatively evaluate the impact. Results Three key findings were identified in our study. First, China's health challenge was shifted from diseases related to living conditions to those related to behavior and lifestyle, with rural areas relatively lagged behind urban areas. Second, the impacts of cardiovascular diseases and neoplasm on the middle aged and elderly population were stressed. Third, compared to the urban population, the rural population tended to have increasing mortality of neoplasm and cardiovascular diseases, especially in adults at the age of 15-39 years. Conclusion Further efforts should be made to reduce the incidence of neoplasm and cardiovascular diseases, especially in rural areas, by promoting healthy behavior and lifestyle and providing appropriate therapies for all patients in need.

  11. Trends in mortality risk by education level and cause of death among US White women from 1986 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montez, Jennifer Karas; Zajacova, Anna

    2013-03-01

    To elucidate why the inverse association between education level and mortality risk (the gradient) has increased markedly among White women since the mid-1980s, we identified causes of death for which the gradient increased. We used data from the 1986 to 2006 National Health Interview Survey Linked Mortality File on non-Hispanic White women aged 45 to 84 years (n = 230 692). We examined trends in the gradient by cause of death across 4 time periods and 4 education levels using age-standardized death rates. During 1986 to 2002, the growing gradient for all-cause mortality reflected increasing mortality among low-educated women and declining mortality among college-educated women; during 2003 to 2006 it mainly reflected declining mortality among college-educated women. The gradient increased for heart disease, lung cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease. Lung cancer and chronic lower respiratory disease explained 47% of the overall increase. Mortality disparities among White women widened across 1986 to 2006 partially because of causes of death for which smoking is a major risk factor. A comprehensive policy framework should address the social conditions that influence smoking among disadvantaged women.

  12. Survival and Causes of Death Among People With Clinically Diagnosed Synucleinopathies With Parkinsonism: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savica, Rodolfo; Grossardt, Brandon R; Bower, James H; Ahlskog, J Eric; Boeve, Bradley F; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Rocca, Walter A; Mielke, Michelle M

    2017-07-01

    To our knowledge, a comprehensive study of the survival and causes of death of persons with synucleinopathies compared with the general population has not been conducted. Understanding the long-term outcomes of these conditions may inform patients and caregivers of the expected disease duration and may help with care planning. To compare survival rates and causes of death among patients with incident, clinically diagnosed synucleinopathies and age- and sex-matched referent participants. This population-based study used the Rochester Epidemiology Project medical records-linkage system to identify all residents in Olmsted County, Minnesota, who received a diagnostic code of parkinsonism from 1991 through 2010. A movement-disorders specialist reviewed the medical records of each individual to confirm the presence of parkinsonism and determine the type of synucleinopathy. For each confirmed patient, an age- and sex-matched Olmsted County resident without parkinsonism was also identified. We determined the age- and sex-adjusted risk of death for each type of synucleinopathy, the median time from diagnosis to death, and the causes of death. Of the 461 patients with synucleinopathies, 279 (60.5%) were men, and of the 452 referent participants, 272 (60.2%) were men. From 1991 through 2010, 461 individuals received a diagnosis of a synucleinopathy (309 [67%] of Parkinson disease, 81 [17.6%] of dementia with Lewy bodies, 55 [11.9%] of Parkinson disease dementia, and 16 [3.5%] of multiple system atrophy with parkinsonism). During follow-up, 68.6% (n = 316) of the patients with synucleinopathies and 48.7% (n = 220) of the referent participants died. Patients with any synucleinopathy died a median of 2 years earlier than referent participants. Patients with multiple system atrophy with parkinsonism (hazard ratio, 10.51; 95% CI, 2.92-37.82) had the highest risk of death compared with referent participants, followed by those with dementia with Lewy bodies (hazard ratio, 3

  13. Changes in mortality rates and causes of death in a population-based cohort of persons living with and without HIV from 1996 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyawo, Oghenowede; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado; Hull, Mark W; Nohpal, Adriana; Samji, Hasina; Sereda, Paul; Lima, Viviane D; Shoveller, Jeannie; Moore, David; Montaner, Julio S G; Hogg, Robert S

    2017-02-27

    Non-HIV/AIDS-related diseases are gaining prominence as important causes of morbidity and mortality among people living with HIV. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare changes over time in mortality rates and causes of death among a population-based cohort of persons living with and without HIV in British Columbia (BC), Canada. We analysed data from the Comparative Outcomes And Service Utilization Trends (COAST) study; a retrospective population-based study created via linkage between the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS and Population Data BC, and containing data for HIV-infected individuals and the general population of BC, respectively. Our analysis included all known HIV-infected adults (≥ 20 years) in BC and a random 10% sample of uninfected BC adults followed from 1996 to 2012. Deaths were identified through Population Data BC - which contains information on all registered deaths in BC (BC Vital Statistics Agency dataset) and classified into cause of death categories using International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 9/10 codes. Age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) and mortality rate ratios were calculated. Trend test were performed. 3401 (25%), and 47,647 (9%) individuals died during the 5,620,150 person-years of follow-up among 13,729 HIV-infected and 510,313 uninfected individuals, respectively. All-cause and cause-specific mortality rates were consistently higher among HIV-infected compared to HIV-negative individuals, except for neurological disorders. All-cause ASMR decreased from 126.75 (95% CI: 84.92-168.57) per 1000 population in 1996 to 21.29 (95% CI: 17.79-24.79) in 2011-2012 (83% decline; p people living with HIV.

  14. Causes of death in patients with Itai-itai disease suffering from severe chronic cadmium poisoning: a nested case-control analysis of a follow-up study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijo, Muneko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Suwazono, Yasushi; Nogawa, Kazuhiro; Kido, Teruhiko

    2017-07-13

    To clarify the causes of deaths among patients with Itai-itai disease and severe cadmium (Cd) poisoning. Nested case-control analysis of a population-based cohort study. Database of patients with Itai-itai disease and residents of Cd-polluted areas, maintained by the Ministry of Environment, Japan. Subjects included 142 women with Itai-itai disease, 111 women with Cd-induced renal tubular dysfunction and 253 controls matched for sex, age and occupation. All subjects participated in a health impact survey between 1979 and 1984 and were followed until 30 November 2005. Adjusted HRs with 95% CIs for cause of death in women with Itai-itai disease and screened female cases with tubular dysfunction were compared with matched pair controls, using Cox's proportional hazard model. Vital statistics data were used to determine cause of death. Direct causes of death from autopsy records were used in 29 patients who died from Cd poisoning. The most common cause of death among patients with Itai-itai disease was pneumonia, with a significantly increased adjusted HR of 4.54 (95% CI 2.65 to 7.76). Renal diseases were the most common cause of death in renal tubular dysfunction cases, with an increased HR of 12.0 (95% CI 3.92 to 36.8). The adjusted HR for renal diseases was also significantly increased in patients with Itai-itai disease (19.49 (95% CI 6.43 to 59.09)), with a greater impact on mortality of patients with Itai-itai disease than screened cases. The HR for gastrointestinal (GI) diseases was significantly increased (13.79 (95% CI 3.87 to 49.10)) in patients, especially in the first 10 years (37.1 (4.81 to 286.0)). Among patients with Itai-itai disease, pneumonia and GI diseases contributed to increased mortality risk. Renal disease is also a significant mortality risk in patients with Itai-itai disease and women with renal tubular dysfunction. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No

  15. Trends in causes of death among children under 5 in Bangladesh, 1993-2004: an exercise applying a standardized computer algorithm to assign causes of death using verbal autopsy data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Neff

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trends in the causes of child mortality serve as important global health information to guide efforts to improve child survival. With child mortality declining in Bangladesh, the distribution of causes of death also changes. The three verbal autopsy (VA studies conducted with the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys provide a unique opportunity to study these changes in child causes of death. Methods To ensure comparability of these trends, we developed a standardized algorithm to assign causes of death using symptoms collected through the VA studies. The original algorithms applied were systematically reviewed and key differences in cause categorization, hierarchy, case definition, and the amount of data collected were compared to inform the development of the standardized algorithm. Based primarily on the 2004 cause categorization and hierarchy, the standardized algorithm guarantees comparability of the trends by only including symptom data commonly available across all three studies. Results Between 1993 and 2004, pneumonia remained the leading cause of death in Bangladesh, contributing to 24% to 33% of deaths among children under 5. The proportion of neonatal mortality increased significantly from 36% (uncertainty range [UR]: 31%-41% to 56% (49%-62% during the same period. The cause-specific mortality fractions due to birth asphyxia/birth injury and prematurity/low birth weight (LBW increased steadily, with both rising from 3% (2%-5% to 13% (10%-17% and 10% (7%-15%, respectively. The cause-specific mortality rates decreased significantly due to neonatal tetanus and several postneonatal causes (tetanus: from 7 [4-11] to 2 [0.4-4] per 1,000 live births (LB; pneumonia: from 26 [20-33] to 15 [11-20] per 1,000 LB; diarrhea: from 12 [8-17] to 4 [2-7] per 1,000 LB; measles: from 5 [2-8] to 0.2 [0-0.7] per 1,000 LB; injury: from 11 [7-17] to 3 [1-5] per 1,000 LB; and malnutrition: from 9 [6-13] to 5 [2-7]. Conclusions

  16. Joint statistical correction of clutters, spokes and beam height for a radar climatology in Southern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wagner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Extensive corrections of radar data are a crucial prerequisite for radar derived climatology. This kind of climatology demands a high level of data quality. Little deviations or minor systematic underestimations or overestimations in single radar images become a major cause of error in statistical analysis. First results of radar derived climatology have emerged over the last years, as data sets of appropriate extent are becoming available. Usually, these statistics are based on time series lasting up to ten years as storage of radar data was not achieved before.

    We present a new statistical post-correction scheme, which is based on seven years of radar data of the Munich weather radar (2000–2006 that is operated by DWD (German Weather Service. The typical correction algorithms for single radar images, such as clutter corrections, are used. Then an additional statistical post-correction based on the results of a climatological analysis from radar images follows. The aim of this statistical correction is to correct systematic errors caused by clutter effects or measuring effects but to conserve small-scale natural variations in space.

    The statistical correction is based on a thorough analysis of the different causes of possible errors for the Munich weather radar. This robust analysis revealed the following basic effects: the decrease of rain rate in relation to height and distance from the radar, clutter effects such as remaining clutter, eliminated clutter or shading effects from obstacles near the radar, visible as spokes, as well as the influence of the Bright Band. The correction algorithm is correspondingly based on these results. It consists of three modules. The first one is an altitude correction, which minimizes measuring effects. The second module corrects clutter effects and the third one realizes a mean adjustment to selected rain gauges. Two different radar products are used. The statistical analysis as well as

  17. Use of the Coding Causes of Death in HIV in the classification of deaths in Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Diana Neves; Bresani-Salvi, Cristiane Campello; Batista, Joanna d'Arc Lyra; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de Barros; Melo, Heloísa Ramos Lacerda de; Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima Pessoa Militão de

    2017-01-01

    Describe the coding process of death causes for people living with HIV/AIDS, and classify deaths as related or unrelated to immunodeficiency by applying the Coding Causes of Death in HIV (CoDe) system. A cross-sectional study that codifies and classifies the causes of deaths occurring in a cohort of 2,372 people living with HIV/AIDS, monitored between 2007 and 2012, in two specialized HIV care services in Pernambuco. The causes of death already codified according to the International Classification of Diseases were recoded and classified as deaths related and unrelated to immunodeficiency by the CoDe system. We calculated the frequencies of the CoDe codes for the causes of death in each classification category. There were 315 (13%) deaths during the study period; 93 (30%) were caused by an AIDS-defining illness on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list. A total of 232 deaths (74%) were related to immunodeficiency after application of the CoDe. Infections were the most common cause, both related (76%) and unrelated (47%) to immunodeficiency, followed by malignancies (5%) in the first group and external causes (16%), malignancies (12 %) and cardiovascular diseases (11%) in the second group. Tuberculosis comprised 70% of the immunodeficiency-defining infections. Opportunistic infections and aging diseases were the most frequent causes of death, adding multiple disease burdens on health services. The CoDe system increases the probability of classifying deaths more accurately in people living with HIV/AIDS. Descrever o processo de codificação das causas de morte em pessoas vivendo com HIV/Aids, e classificar os óbitos como relacionados ou não relacionados à imunodeficiência aplicando o sistema Coding Causes of Death in HIV (CoDe). Estudo transversal, que codifica e classifica as causas dos óbitos ocorridos em uma coorte de 2.372 pessoas vivendo com HIV/Aids acompanhadas entre 2007 e 2012 em dois serviços de atendimento especializado em HIV em

  18. Long-Term Follow-Up of Individuals Undergoing Sex-Reassignment Surgery: Somatic Morbidity and Cause of Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Rikke Kildevæld; Hald, Gert Martin; Kristensen, Ellids; Giraldi, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Studies of mortality and somatic well-being after sex-reassignment surgery (SRS) of transsexual individuals are equivocal. Accordingly, the present study investigated mortality and somatic morbidity using a sample of transsexual individuals who comprised 98% (n = 104) of all surgically reassigned transsexual individuals in Denmark. Aims To investigate somatic morbidity before and after SRS and cause of death and its relation to somatic morbidity after SRS in Danish individuals who underwent SRS from 1978 through 2010. Methods Somatic morbidity and mortality in 104 sex-reassigned individuals were identified retrospectively by data from the Danish National Health Register and the Cause of Death Register. Main Outcome Measures Somatic morbidity and cause of death. Results Overall, 19.2% of the sample were registered with somatic morbidity before SRS and 23.1% after SRS (P = not significant). In total, 8.6% had somatic morbidity before and after SRS. The most common diagnostic category was cardiovascular disease, affecting 18 individuals, 9 before and 14 after SRS, and 5 of those 14 who were affected after SRS had cardiovascular disease before and after SRS. Ten individuals died after SRS at an average age of 53.5 ± 7.9 years (male to female) and 53.5 ± 7.3 years (female to male). Conclusion Of 98% of all Danish transsexuals who officially underwent SRS from 1978 through 2010, one in three had somatic morbidity and approximately 1 in 10 had died. No significant differences in somatic morbidity or mortality were found between male-to-female and female-to-male individuals. Despite the young average age at death and the relatively larger number of individuals with somatic morbidity, the present study design does not allow for determination of casual relations between, for example, specific types of hormonal or surgical treatment received and somatic morbidity and mortality. PMID:26944779

  19. Trends in Overall Mortality, and Timing and Cause of Death among Extremely Preterm Infants near the Limit of Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Sein; Ahn, So Yoon; Park, Won Soon

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the trends in mortality, as well as in the timing and cause of death, among extremely preterm infants at the limit of viability, and thus to identify the clinical factors that contribute to decreased mortality. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 382 infants born at 23–26 weeks’ gestation; 124 of the infants were born between 2001 and 2005 (period I) and 258 were born between 2006 and 2011 (period II). We stratified the infants into two subgroups–“23–24 weeks” and “25–26 weeks”–and retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics and mortality in each group, as well as the timing and cause of death. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were done to identify the clinical factors associated with mortality. Results The overall mortality rate in period II was 16.7% (43/258), which was significantly lower than that in period I (30.6%; 38/124). For overall cause of death, there were significantly fewer deaths due to sepsis (2.4% [6/258] vs. 8.1% [10/124], respectively) and air-leak syndrome (0.8% [2/258] vs. 4.8% (6/124), respectively) during period II than during period I. Among the clinical factors of time period, 1-and 5-min Apgar score, antenatal steroid identified significant by univariate analyses. 5-min Apgar score and antenatal steroid use were significantly associated with mortality in multivariate analyses. Conclusion Improved mortality rate attributable to fewer deaths due to sepsis and air leak syndrome in the infants with 23–26 weeks’ gestation was associated with higher 5-minute Apgar score and more antenatal steroid use. PMID:28114330

  20. A NEW METHOD TO CORRECT FOR FIBER COLLISIONS IN GALAXY TWO-POINT STATISTICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Hong; Zehavi, Idit [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Zheng Zheng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    In fiber-fed galaxy redshift surveys, the finite size of the fiber plugs prevents two fibers from being placed too close to one another, limiting the ability to study galaxy clustering on all scales. We present a new method for correcting such fiber collision effects in galaxy clustering statistics based on spectroscopic observations. The target galaxy sample is divided into two distinct populations according to the targeting algorithm of fiber placement, one free of fiber collisions and the other consisting of collided galaxies. The clustering statistics are a combination of the contributions from these two populations. Our method makes use of observations in tile overlap regions to measure the contributions from the collided population, and to therefore recover the full clustering statistics. The method is rooted in solid theoretical ground and is tested extensively on mock galaxy catalogs. We demonstrate that our method can well recover the projected and the full three-dimensional (3D) redshift-space two-point correlation functions (2PCFs) on scales both below and above the fiber collision scale, superior to the commonly used nearest neighbor and angular correction methods. We discuss potential systematic effects in our method. The statistical correction accuracy of our method is only limited by sample variance, which scales down with (the square root of) the volume probed. For a sample similar to the final SDSS-III BOSS galaxy sample, the statistical correction error is expected to be at the level of 1% on scales {approx}0.1-30 h {sup -1} Mpc for the 2PCFs. The systematic error only occurs on small scales, caused by imperfect correction of collision multiplets, and its magnitude is expected to be smaller than 5%. Our correction method, which can be generalized to other clustering statistics as well, enables more accurate measurements of full 3D galaxy clustering on all scales with galaxy redshift surveys.

  1. [Induction mechanism of shock: applying the etiology in judgment of the cause of death in forensic practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Noriyuki

    2004-09-01

    In the field of forensic medicine, shock has been identified as a cause of death owing to various kinds of exogenous insults. The etiology and pathogenesis of shock cannot be explained well by the usual gross appearance in medicolegal autopsies, because it is now generally established that the shock is a functional reaction of the vascular system to bodily injury, and that several organs are secondarily impaired during shock. Thus it seemed to forensic pathologists that these morphological changes in several organs after shock did not reveal any significant differences among the causes of death. We approached to the induction mechanism of shock, and we investigated what etiology induced these morphological changes after shock in order to identify shock as the cause of death. It is now generally accepted that the kidney is a target organ of shock, so we mainly investigated the cause of kidney disorder in a case of burn shock and hemorrhagic shock. 1. Consequences of bacterial translocation (BT) in the shock. The concept of BT indicates that the beginning of shock is induced by the loss of gut barrier function and consequent translocation of bacteria. In general, impaired gut barrier function can be caused either during the shock period by decreased intestinal blood flow and reduced oxygen delivery, resulting during reperfusion in a stage of increased intestinal blood flow, or at a later stage again by reduced flow. A variety of physiological stresses, such as trauma, hemorrhage, thermal injury, surgical operation, various kinds of drags and mental stress, have been shown to cause failure of the gut mucosal barrier, with translocation of bacteria/endotoxin from the gastrointestinal into the mesenteric lymph nodes, and translocation into remote organs and systemic circulation. 2. Burn shock. We designed to evaluate the BT in a burn shock rat model (following 20% full-thickness scald injury). The p38 MAPK pathway is an important stress-responsive signal molecule

  2. [Causes of death and the relation between scientific and popular knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdiguero Gil, E

    1993-01-01

    "The framework of this contribution is the nexus between scientific and popular knowledge, and their importance assessing diagnostical expressions when studying death causes in times prior to the setting of a standard for the definition of illness. By means of a particular example, the expression teething, we shall show some nuances concerning the loanwords and equivalences between popular and academic knowledge, and their deep, if sometimes hidden, influence upon the diagnostical expressions informing us about the death causes as shown in the records of life and death statistics." The geographical focus is on Spain. (SUMMARY IN ENG AND FRE) excerpt

  3. Years of Life Lost (YLL in Colombia 1998-2011: Overall and Avoidable Causes of Death Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Castillo-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Estimate the Years of Life Lost (YLL for overall and avoidable causes of death (CoD in Colombia for the period 1998-2011.From the reported deaths to the Colombian mortality database during 1998-2011, we classified deaths from avoidable causes. With the reference life table of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD 2010 study, we estimated the overall YLL and YLL due to avoidable causes. Calculations were performed with the difference between life expectancy and the age of death. Results are reported by group of cause of death, events, sex, year and department. Comparative analysis between number of deaths and YLL was carried out.A total of 83,856,080 YLL were calculated in Colombia during period 1998-2011, 75.9% of them due to avoidable CoD. The year 2000 reported the highest number of missed YLL by both overall and avoidable CoD. The departments with the highest YLL rates were Caquetá, Guaviare, Arauca, Meta, and Risaralda. In men, intentional injuries and cardiovascular and circulatory diseases had the higher losses, while in women YLL were mainly due to cardiovascular and circulatory diseases.The public health priorities should focus on preventing the loss of YLL due to premature death and differentiated interventions by sex.

  4. Analyses of cardiac blood cells and serum proteins with regard to cause of death in forensic autopsy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Li; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Li, Dong-Ri; Zhao, Dong; Yoshida, Chiemi; Chen, Jian-Hua; Komatsu, Ayumi; Azuma, Yoko; Sakoda, Shigeki; Zhu, Bao-Li; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2009-04-01

    To investigate hematological and serum protein profiles of cadaveric heart blood with regard to the cause of death, serial forensic autopsy cases (n=308, >18 years of age, within 48 h postmortem) were examined. Red blood cells (Rbc), hemoglobin (Hb), platelets (Plt), white blood cells (Wbc), total protein (TP) and albumin (Alb) were examined in bilateral cardiac blood. Blood cell counts, collected after turning the bodies at autopsy, approximated to the clinical values. Postmortem changes were not significant for these markers. In non-head blunt injury cases, Rbc counts, Hb, TP and Alb levels in bilateral cardiac blood were lower in subacute deaths (survival time, 1-12 h) than in acute deaths (survival time blood were significantly higher for non-head injury than for head injury in subacute deaths. In fire fatality cases, Plt count was markedly higher with an automated hematology analyzer than by using a blood smear test, suggesting Rbc fragmentation caused by deep burns, while increases in Wbc count and decreases in Alb levels were seen for subacute deaths. For asphyxiation, Rbc count, Hb, TP and Alb levels in bilateral cardiac blood were higher than other groups, and TP and Alb levels in the right cardiac blood were higher for hanging than for strangulation. These findings suggest that analyses of blood cells and proteins are useful for investigating the cause of death.

  5. [Bleeding to death because of hemorrhage into soft tissues as a cause of death in a beaten battered child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukić, Dragana

    2011-12-01

    Bleeding to death is one of the leading causes of death speaking about violent death in general. Bleeding to death mostly happens through hurt organs or blood vessels of thorax, abdomen and neck or because of destruction of extremities or the whole body. Bleeding to death is very often the consequence of blood pouring, rarely of simultaneous pouring and suffusing of blood, and it is extremely rarely the result of blood suffusing solely and especially due to subcutaneous, retoperitoneal and intramediastinal blood suffusing. Fatal bleeding into soft tissues solely is very rare. During a 10-year-period among 3 000 performed autopsies in the Department of Forensic Medicine in Podgorica, the presented case was the unique one. The paper presents a 5-year-old boy who was beaten to death by his mother and step-father and died because of massive bleeding into soft tissues. In order to establish a cause of death in cases of exsanguination in soft tissues, a series of postmortem diagnostic procedures should be performed, like those presented in this paper.

  6. [The cause of death of Theo van Gogh (1857-1891)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskuil, Piet H A

    2009-01-01

    In 1992 Theo van Gogh's medical files from the Willem Arntsz Huis, a psychiatric centre in Utrecht, the Netherlands, were made available. A study based on two copies of these files was published in this journal earlier. While reviewing the archives, the author noticed a third copy which included an extra (last) page that was missing in the other two copies. This page provided medical information regarding Theo van Gogh's final days. Based on this new information the present article corrects some misconceptions about his death. For example, it is commonly thought that Theo had uraemia or, like his brother Vincent the painter (1853-1890), committed suicide. This new information demonstrates that this is not the case. The extra page, dated 26 January 1891, shows that on the two days before he died Theo suffered two epileptic fits, most probably symptomatic to his dementia paralytica. After the second fit he did not regain consciousness. Heartbeat and respiration gradually weakened and he passed away on January 25th at eleven thirty P.M. Other symptoms mentioned were vomiting, fever and early signs of decubitus. The family did not give permission for a post-mortem.

  7. Correcting Students' Misconceptions about Probability in an Introductory College Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, Leonid; Prado, Lucio

    2010-01-01

    College students' misconceptions about probability are common and widespread. These misconceptions impede students' ability to make sound judgments in situations of uncertainty and master fundamental concepts of inferential statistics. In this paper the authors report the results of a study undertaken with the objective of correcting three common…

  8. Changes in main causes of death in Macao residents from 1986-2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAN Man-si; CHEN Qing; LAM Christopher Wai-kei

    2013-01-01

    Background Since Macao's return of sovereignty to China in December 1999,the life style of Macao residents has changed.The aim of this study was to investigate changes of death patterns in Macao residents from 1986 to 2006 in order to identify the trends and patterns of major public health problems,which could provide the guidance for developing public health policies.Methods A retrospective study was conducted for this investigation.Research data were collected from official websites and statistical yearbooks and classified by the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9.Results It was observed that mortality from the three major causes of (1) infectious,maternal and childhood diseases,(2) chronic non-communicable diseases,and (3) injury and poisoning were 17.7,298.2 and 26.0 per 100 000,respectively.The largest decrease in death rate over the 21-year study-period was from infectious,maternal and childhood diseases (62.5%).The highest mortality rate was ischemic heart diseases (37.0%).The largest increase in mortality rate was lung cancer (46.9%).Conclusions Mortality rate of Macao residents progressively decreased,but the constituent ratio of death from chronic non-communicable diseases was increasing.The mortality rate of lung cancer was clearly ascending,so emphasis should be put on tertiary prevention in future.

  9. InSAR Tropospheric Correction Methods: A Statistical Comparison over Different Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekaert, D. P.; Walters, R. J.; Wright, T. J.; Hooper, A. J.; Parker, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Observing small magnitude surface displacements through InSAR is highly challenging, and requires advanced correction techniques to reduce noise. In fact, one of the largest obstacles facing the InSAR community is related to tropospheric noise correction. Spatial and temporal variations in temperature, pressure, and relative humidity result in a spatially-variable InSAR tropospheric signal, which masks smaller surface displacements due to tectonic or volcanic deformation. Correction methods applied today include those relying on weather model data, GNSS and/or spectrometer data. Unfortunately, these methods are often limited by the spatial and temporal resolution of the auxiliary data. Alternatively a correction can be estimated from the high-resolution interferometric phase by assuming a linear or a power-law relationship between the phase and topography. For these methods, the challenge lies in separating deformation from tropospheric signals. We will present results of a statistical comparison of the state-of-the-art tropospheric corrections estimated from spectrometer products (MERIS and MODIS), a low and high spatial-resolution weather model (ERA-I and WRF), and both the conventional linear and power-law empirical methods. We evaluate the correction capability over Southern Mexico, Italy, and El Hierro, and investigate the impact of increasing cloud cover on the accuracy of the tropospheric delay estimation. We find that each method has its strengths and weaknesses, and suggest that further developments should aim to combine different correction methods. All the presented methods are included into our new open source software package called TRAIN - Toolbox for Reducing Atmospheric InSAR Noise (Bekaert et al., in review), which is available to the community Bekaert, D., R. Walters, T. Wright, A. Hooper, and D. Parker (in review), Statistical comparison of InSAR tropospheric correction techniques, Remote Sensing of Environment

  10. The choice of the ability estimate with asymptotically correct standardized person-fit statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sandip

    2016-05-01

    Snijders (2001, Psychometrika, 66, 331) suggested a statistical adjustment to obtain the asymptotically correct standardized versions of a specific class of person-fit statistics. His adjustment has been used to obtain the asymptotically correct standardized versions of several person-fit statistics including the lz statistic (Drasgow et al., 1985, Br. J. Math. Stat. Psychol., 38, 67), the infit and outfit statistics (e.g., Wright & Masters, 1982, Rating scale analysis, Chicago, IL: Mesa Press), and the standardized extended caution indices (Tatsuoka, 1984, Psychometrika, 49, 95). Snijders (2001), van Krimpen-Stoop and Meijer (1999, Appl. Psychol. Meas., 23, 327), Magis et al. (2012, J. Educ. Behav. Stat., 37, 57), Magis et al. (2014, J. Appl. Meas., 15, 82), and Sinharay (2015b, Psychometrika, doi:10.1007/s11336-015-9465-x, 2016b, Corrections of standardized extended caution indices, Unpublished manuscript) have used the maximum likelihood estimate, the weighted likelihood estimate, and the posterior mode of the examinee ability with the adjustment of Snijders (2001). This paper broadens the applicability of the adjustment of Snijders (2001) by showing how other ability estimates such as the expected a posteriori estimate, the biweight estimate (Mislevy & Bock, 1982, Educ. Psychol. Meas., 42, 725), and the Huber estimate (Schuster & Yuan, 2011, J. Educ. Behav. Stat., 36, 720) can be used with the adjustment. A simulation study is performed to examine the Type I error rate and power of two asymptotically correct standardized person-fit statistics with several ability estimates. A real data illustration follows.

  11. Drug suicide: a sex-equal cause of death in 16 European countries

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Varnik, Airi

    2011-01-29

    Abstract Background There is a lack of international research on suicide by drug overdose as a preventable suicide method. Sex- and age-specific rates of suicide by drug self-poisoning (ICD-10, X60-64) and the distribution of drug types used in 16 European countries were studied, and compared with other self-poisoning methods (X65-69) and intentional self-injury (X70-84). Methods Data for 2000-04\\/05 were collected from national statistical offices. Age-adjusted suicide rates, and age and sex distributions, were calculated. Results No pronounced sex differences in drug self-poisoning rates were found, either in the aggregate data (males 1.6 and females 1.5 per 100,000) or within individual countries. Among the 16 countries, the range (from some 0.3 in Portugal to 5.0 in Finland) was wide. \\'Other and unspecified drugs\\' (X64) were recorded most frequently, with a range of 0.2-1.9, and accounted for more than 70% of deaths by drug overdose in France, Luxembourg, Portugal and Spain. Psychotropic drugs (X61) ranked second. The X63 category (\\'other drugs acting on the autonomic nervous system\\') was least frequently used. Finland showed low X64 and high X61 figures, Scotland had high levels of X62 (\\'narcotics and hallucinogens, not elsewhere classified\\') for both sexes, while England exceeded other countries in category X60. Risk was highest among the middle-aged everywhere except in Switzerland, where the elderly were most at risk. Conclusions Suicide by drug overdose is preventable. Intentional self-poisoning with drugs kills as many males as females. The considerable differences in patterns of self-poisoning found in the various European countries are relevant to national efforts to improve diagnostics of suicide and appropriate specific prevention. The fact that vast majority of drug-overdose suicides came under the category X64 refers to the need of more detailed ICD coding system for overdose suicides is needed to permit better design of suicide

  12. Drug suicide: a sex-equal cause of death in 16 European countries

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    Scheerder Gert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a lack of international research on suicide by drug overdose as a preventable suicide method. Sex- and age-specific rates of suicide by drug self-poisoning (ICD-10, X60-64 and the distribution of drug types used in 16 European countries were studied, and compared with other self-poisoning methods (X65-69 and intentional self-injury (X70-84. Methods Data for 2000-04/05 were collected from national statistical offices. Age-adjusted suicide rates, and age and sex distributions, were calculated. Results No pronounced sex differences in drug self-poisoning rates were found, either in the aggregate data (males 1.6 and females 1.5 per 100,000 or within individual countries. Among the 16 countries, the range (from some 0.3 in Portugal to 5.0 in Finland was wide. 'Other and unspecified drugs' (X64 were recorded most frequently, with a range of 0.2-1.9, and accounted for more than 70% of deaths by drug overdose in France, Luxembourg, Portugal and Spain. Psychotropic drugs (X61 ranked second. The X63 category ('other drugs acting on the autonomic nervous system' was least frequently used. Finland showed low X64 and high X61 figures, Scotland had high levels of X62 ('narcotics and hallucinogens, not elsewhere classified' for both sexes, while England exceeded other countries in category X60. Risk was highest among the middle-aged everywhere except in Switzerland, where the elderly were most at risk. Conclusions Suicide by drug overdose is preventable. Intentional self-poisoning with drugs kills as many males as females. The considerable differences in patterns of self-poisoning found in the various European countries are relevant to national efforts to improve diagnostics of suicide and appropriate specific prevention. The fact that vast majority of drug-overdose suicides came under the category X64 refers to the need of more detailed ICD coding system for overdose suicides is needed to permit better design of suicide

  13. Suicides, homicides, accidents, and other external causes of death among blacks and whites in the Southern Community Cohort Study.

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    Jennifer S Sonderman

    Full Text Available Prior studies of risk factors associated with external causes of death have been limited in the number of covariates investigated and external causes examined. Herein, associations between numerous demographic, lifestyle, and health-related factors and the major causes of external mortality, such as suicide, homicide, and accident, were assessed prospectively among 73,422 black and white participants in the Southern Community Cohort Study (SCCS. Hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated in multivariate regression analyses using the Cox proportional hazards model. Men compared with women (HR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.87-2.89, current smokers (HR = 1.74; 95% CI: 1.40-2.17, and unemployed/never employed participants at the time of enrollment (HR = 1.67; 95% CI 1.38-2.02 had increased risk of dying from all external causes, with similarly elevated HRs for suicide, homicide, and accidental death among both blacks and whites. Blacks compared with whites had lower risk of accidental death (HR = 0.46; 95% CI: 0.38-0.57 and suicide (HR = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.31-0.99. Blacks and whites in the SCCS had comparable risks of homicide death (HR = 1.05; 95% CI: 0.63-1.76; however, whites in the SCCS had unusually high homicide rates compared with all whites who were resident in the 12 SCCS states, while black SCCS participants had homicide rates similar to those of all blacks residing in the SCCS states. Depression was the strongest risk factor for suicide, while being married was protective against death from homicide in both races. Being overweight/obese at enrollment was associated with reduced risks in all external causes of death, and the number of comorbid conditions was a risk factor for iatrogenic deaths. Most risk factors identified in earlier studies of external causes of death were confirmed in the SCCS cohort, in spite of the low SES of SCCS participants. Results from other epidemiologic cohorts are needed to confirm the novel findings

  14. Verbal autopsy interpretation: a comparative analysis of the InterVA model versus physician review in determining causes of death in the Nairobi DSS

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Developing countries generally lack complete vital registration systems that can produce cause of death information for health planning in their populations. As an alternative, verbal autopsy (VA) - the process of interviewing family members or caregivers on the circumstances leading to death - is often used by Demographic Surveillance Systems to generate cause of death data. Physician review (PR) is the most common method of interpreting VA, but this method is a time- and...

  15. GAMBARAN PENYEBAB KEMATIAN DI KABUPATEN GOWA PROVINSI SULAWESI SELATAN TAHUN 2011 (Description of Causes of Death in Gowa District South Sulawesi Province in 2011

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    Kristina Kristina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research of mortality was essential to provide basic information on the status of population health. Indonesia does not have a standart role for recording and reporting cause of death for every case that occurs in hospital or at home. Objective: determinan cause of death in MCCD in Gowa regency in 2011. Methods: Training and socialitation to medical doctors in every hospital how to fill the Information and Cause of Death Form ICD-10. The source information to fill MCCD was medical record and autopsi verbal questionnaire. Autopsi verbal was collected by nurse and paramedics then the doctors was resumed and cause of death code in MCCD. The analyses data was underlying causes of death based on ICD 10. Results: There are 2.813 mortality in Gowa regency in 2011 year. The place of mortality most at home (87,6% and 12,4% only in health facility. The mortality was rised by increasing of age. The most of mortality by age group is + 65 years (47,2%. The main of base on 6 groups cause of death in Gowa regency is non communicable deseases (54,1%. There are transition of epidemiology cause of death in Gowa regency from communicable disease to non communicable disease. The main casue of death is stroke (13,6%. Conclusions: Recording and reporting system on UCoD in Gowa regency is developed but not optimal, because the result was still underestimate of mortality rate. The most mortality by sex is man and by place of death is at home. The main cause of death in Gowa regency is stroke. Recommendations: need to increase non-communicable disease control programs, especially stroke to reduce deaths from stroke.

  16. Global, regional, and national age-sex specific mortality for 264 causes of death, 1980–2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard Iburg, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Background Monitoring levels and trends in premature mortality is crucial to understanding how societies can address prominent sources of early death. The Global Burden of Disease 2016 Study (GBD 2016) provides a comprehensive assessment of cause-specific mortality for 264 causes in 195 locations...... coding; and other sources including surveys and surveillance systems for specific causes such as maternal mortality. To facilitate assessment of quality, we reported on the fraction of deaths assigned to GBD Level 1 or Level 2 causes that cannot be underlying causes of death (major garbage codes...... causes was lower (a decrease of 1·59%) during the same interval. Globally, the five leading causes of total YLLs in 2016 were cardiovascular diseases; diarrhoea, lower respiratory infections, and other common infectious diseases; neoplasms; neonatal disorders; and HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. At a finer...

  17. Failure in generating hemopoietic stem cells is the primary cause of death from cytomegalovirus disease in the immunocompromised host

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutter, W.; Reddehase, M.J.; Busch, F.W.; Buehring, H.J.K.; Koszinowski, U.H.

    1988-05-01

    We have shown in a murine model system for cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in the immunocompromised host that CMV infection interferes with the earliest detectable step in hemopoiesis, the generation of the stem cell CFU-S-I, and thereby prevents the autoreconstitution of bone marrow after sublethal irradiation. The antihemopoietic effect could not be ascribed to a direct infection of stem cells. The failure in hemopoiesis was prevented by adoptive transfer of antiviral CD8+ T lymphocytes and could be overcome by syngeneic bone marrow transplantation. CD8+ T lymphocytes and bone marrow cells both mediated survival, although only CD8+ T lymphocytes were able to limit virus multiplication in host tissues. We concluded that not the cytopathic effect of virus replication in host tissues, but the failure in hemopoiesis, is the primary cause of death in murine CMV disease.

  18. Investigation of final causes of death in 5360 deceased patients within a teaching hospital in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Tolou-Ghamari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To increase quality of care for critically ill patients admitted to hospitals, understanding various causes of death could provide better quality of care. In this study, medical records of 5360 deceased patientswere reviewed with reference to the mortality reports.A total of 2019 deceased females and 3341deceased males were studied from 2011 to 2013. Neurologic disorders could be categorized as the highest cause of mortality report (25%. Pulmonary, gastrointestinal and heart diseases could be expressed as 17%, 17% and 15% of death episodes respectively. Stroke caused mortality among neurologic disorders in 35% at the minimum age of 27 and maximum age of 94 years old. To prevent worse outcome in critically ill patients admitted to hospital, quality of care related to neurological, pulmonary, heart and gastrointestinal disorders was suggested to be upgrading. To avoid financial burden to the family of deceased related to population that stayed more than a month in hospital, further study is recommended in advance.

  19. Parasitic diseases as the cause of death of prisoners of war during the Korean War (1950-1953).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Sun

    2014-06-01

    To determine the cause of death of prisoners of war during the Korean War (1950-1953), death certificates or medical records were analyzed. Out of 7,614 deaths, 5,013 (65.8%) were due to infectious diseases. Although dysentery and tuberculosis were the most common infectious diseases, parasitic diseases had caused 14 deaths: paragonimiasis in 5, malaria in 3, amoebiasis in 2, intestinal parasitosis in 2, ascariasis in 1, and schistosomiasis in 1. These results showed that paragonimiasis, malaria, and amoebiasis were the most fatal parasitic diseases during the early 1950s in the Korean Peninsula. Since schistosomiasis is not endemic to Korea, it is likely that the infected private soldier moved from China or Japan to Korea.

  20. Statistical Correction of Air Temperature Forecasts for City and Road Weather Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahura, Alexander; Petersen, Claus; Sass, Bent; Gilet, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    The method for statistical correction of air /road surface temperatures forecasts was developed based on analysis of long-term time-series of meteorological observations and forecasts (from HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model & Road Conditions Model; 3 km horizontal resolution). It has been tested for May-Aug 2012 & Oct 2012 - Mar 2013, respectively. The developed method is based mostly on forecasted meteorological parameters with a minimal inclusion of observations (covering only a pre-history period). Although the st iteration correction is based taking into account relevant temperature observations, but the further adjustment of air and road temperature forecasts is based purely on forecasted meteorological parameters. The method is model independent, e.g. it can be applied for temperature correction with other types of models having different horizontal resolutions. It is relatively fast due to application of the singular value decomposition method for matrix solution to find coefficients. Moreover, there is always a possibility for additional improvement due to extra tuning of the temperature forecasts for some locations (stations), and in particular, where for example, the MAEs are generally higher compared with others (see Gilet et al., 2014). For the city weather applications, new operationalized procedure for statistical correction of the air temperature forecasts has been elaborated and implemented for the HIRLAM-SKA model runs at 00, 06, 12, and 18 UTCs covering forecast lengths up to 48 hours. The procedure includes segments for extraction of observations and forecast data, assigning these to forecast lengths, statistical correction of temperature, one-&multi-days statistical evaluation of model performance, decision-making on using corrections by stations, interpolation, visualisation and storage/backup. Pre-operational air temperature correction runs were performed for the mainland Denmark since mid-April 2013 and shown good results. Tests also showed

  1. COPD-Related Mortality and Co-morbidities in Northeastern Italy, 2008-2012: A Multiple Causes of Death Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alessandro; Saugo, Mario; Fedeli, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of COPD mortality based only on the underlying cause of death (UCOD) derived from death certificates underestimates disease burden. We analyzed the burden of COPD, as well as the pattern of reporting COPD and its co-morbidities in death certificates, using multiple-cause of death (MCOD) records. All 220,281 death certificates of decedents aged ≥ 40 years in the Veneto region (northeastern Italy) were analyzed through 2008-2012. The UCOD was selected by the Automated Classification of Medical Entities software. COPD was defined by ICD-10 codes J40-J44 and J47 based either on the UCOD or on any mention of COPD in death certificates (MCOD). Annual age-standardized COPD death rates were computed for 40-85 year-old subjects. COPD was mentioned in 7.9% (and selected as the UCOD in 2.7%) of death certificates. In about half of these, COPD was mentioned in Part II only. After circulatory and neoplastic diseases, the most frequent chronic diseases reported in certificates with any mention of COPD were diabetes (15.2%) and dementia/Alzheimer (8.9%). Between 2008 and 2012, age-standardized death rates (/100,000/year) decreased from 39.8 to 34.0 in males and from 12.7 to 11.3 in females in the UCOD analyses. These trends were confirmed, although figures were three times greater, in the MCOD analyses. MCOD analysis should be adopted to fully evaluate the burden of COPD-related mortality. Our findings support a decreasing trend in COPD-related mortality in northeastern Italy between 2008 and 2012, in line with other recent studies in Europe and beyond.

  2. Neurocysticercosis-related mortality in Brazil, 2000-2011: Epidemiology of a neglected neurologic cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlândio; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Cavalcanti, Marta Guimarães; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an important cause of severe neurological disease mainly in low- and middle-income countries, but data on NCC mortality from endemic areas are scarce. Here we analysed the epidemiological patterns of NCC-related mortality in Brazil. We included all deaths recorded in Brazil between 2000 and 2011, in which NCC was mentioned on death certificates, either as underlying or as associated cause of death. NCC was identified in 1829/12,491,280 deaths (0.015%), 1130 (61.8%) as underlying cause, and 699 (38.2%) as associated cause. Overall age-adjusted mortality rate for the period was 0.97 deaths/1,000,000 inhabitants (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.83-1.12). The highest NCC-related mortality rates were found in males, elderly, white race/colour and residents in endemic states/regions. Age-adjusted mortality rates at national level decreased significantly over time (annual percent change [APC]: -4.7; 95% CI: -6.0 to -3.3), with a decrease in the Southeast, South and Central-West regions, and a non-significant increasing trend in the North and Northeast regions. We identified spatial and spatiotemporal high-risk mortality clusters located mainly in NCC-endemic areas. Conditions related to the nervous system were the most commonly associated causes of death when NCC was mentioned as an underlying cause, and HIV/AIDS was the main underlying cause when NCC was an associated cause. NCC is a neglected and preventable cause of severe neurologic disease and death with high public health impact in Brazil. There is a clear need to strengthen nationwide epidemiological surveillance and control for the taeniasis/cysticercosis complex.

  3. Revealing the burden of maternal mortality: a probabilistic model for determining pregnancy-related causes of death from verbal autopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desta Teklay

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substantial reductions in maternal mortality are called for in Millennium Development Goal 5 (MDG-5, thus assuming that maternal mortality is measurable. A key difficulty is attributing causes of death for the many women who die unaided in developing countries. Verbal autopsy (VA can elicit circumstances of death, but data need to be interpreted reliably and consistently to serve as global indicators. Recent developments in probabilistic modelling of VA interpretation are adapted and assessed here for the specific circumstances of pregnancy-related death. Methods A preliminary version of the InterVA-M probabilistic VA interpretation model was developed and refined with adult female VA data from several sources, and then assessed against 258 additional VA interviews from Burkina Faso. Likely causes of death produced by the model were compared with causes previously determined by local physicians. Distinction was made between free-text and closed-question data in the VA interviews, to assess the added value of free-text material on the model's output. Results Following rationalisation between the model and physician interpretations, cause-specific mortality fractions were broadly similar. Case-by-case agreement between the model and any of the reviewing physicians reached approximately 60%, rising to approximately 80% when cases with a discrepancy were reviewed by an additional physician. Cardiovascular disease and malaria showed the largest differences between the methods, and the attribution of infections related to pregnancy also varied. The model estimated 30% of deaths to be pregnancy-related, of which half were due to direct causes. Data derived from free-text made no appreciable difference. Conclusion InterVA-M represents a potentially valuable new tool for measuring maternal mortality in an efficient, consistent and standardised way. Further development, refinement and validation are planned. It could become a routine

  4. Analysis of injuries and causes of death in fatal farm-related incidents in Lower Silesia, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rorat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Workers in the agriculture sector are among the groups at the highest risk of fatal occupational injuries. The aim of study is to show the most common causes of farm-related deaths in Poland, with the circumstances, injuries sustained and mechanisms of death. Materials and methods. There were 109 (90.8% males aged 19–81 and 11 females aged 19–73. 18.3% were over 60 years of age. There were 6 children (boys aged between 2–6. A retrospective review was undertaken of 16,140 medico-legal autopsy reports by the Department of Forensic Medicine in Wroclaw between 1991–2011, which included 120 fatal farm-related incidents. The study protocol included gender, age, date and cause of death, all injuries found, circumstances and mechanism of death, place of death and blood alcohol concentration. Results. The most common (33/120; 27.5% causes of death, both in men and women, were traffic accidents, the second being hit, crushed or buried by materials and falling objects. The most common injury was multi-organ damage (27/120; 22.5%, less common were cranio-cerebral injury (17/120; 14.2% and thoracic blunt trauma (11/120; 9.2%. In multi-organ and thoracic traumas the mechanism of death was almost always exsanguinations. 85.3% of victims died at the place found. 37.2% of victims were drunk. Conclusion. In Poland, fatal injuries occurring in agriculture are mostly related to the misuse of transport and machinery. The main efforts to prevent accidents are engineering improvements, use of personal protective equipment, alcohol intake prevention and appropriate education of the workforce. Special prevention programmes should take gender and age differences into account.

  5. Static scene statistical algorithm for nonuniformity correction in focal-plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarius, Adrian M.; Seal, Michael D.

    2015-10-01

    A static scene statistical nonuniformity correction (S3NUC) method was developed based on the higher-order moments of a linear statistical model of a photodetection process. S3NUC relieves the requirement for calibrated targets or a moving scene for NUC by utilizing two data sets of different intensities but requires low scene intensity levels. The first-, second-, and third-order moments of the two data sets are used to estimate the gain and bias values for the detectors in a focal-plane array (FPA). These gain and bias values may then be used to correct the nonuniformities between detectors or to initialize other continuous calibration methods. S3NUC was successfully applied to simulated data as well as measured data at visible wavelengths.

  6. Tests for, origins of, and corrections to non-Gaussian statistics. The dipole-flip model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schile, Addison J; Thompson, Ward H

    2017-04-21

    Linear response approximations are central to our understanding and simulations of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. Despite the success of these approaches in predicting nonequilibrium dynamics, open questions remain. Laird and Thompson [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 211104 (2007)] previously formalized, in the context of solvation dynamics, the connection between the static linear-response approximation and the assumption of Gaussian statistics. The Gaussian statistics perspective is useful in understanding why linear response approximations are still accurate for perturbations much larger than thermal energies. In this paper, we use this approach to address three outstanding issues in the context of the "dipole-flip" model, which is known to exhibit nonlinear response. First, we demonstrate how non-Gaussian statistics can be predicted from purely equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (i.e., without resort to a full nonequilibrium MD as is the current practice). Second, we show that the Gaussian statistics approximation may also be used to identify the physical origins of nonlinear response residing in a small number of coordinates. Third, we explore an approach for correcting the Gaussian statistics approximation for nonlinear response effects using the same equilibrium simulation. The results are discussed in the context of several other examples of nonlinear responses throughout the literature.

  7. Causes of Death among Children Aged 5 to 14 Years Old from 2008 to 2013 in Kersa Health and Demographic Surveillance System (Kersa HDSS), Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedefo, Melkamu; Zelalem, Desalew; Eskinder, Biniyam; Assefa, Nega; Ashenafi, Wondimye; Baraki, Negga; Damena Tesfatsion, Melake; Oljira, Lemessa; Haile, Ashenafi

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of mortality among children is still very huge though its trend has started declining following the improvements in the living standard. It presents serious challenges to the well-being of children in many African countries. Today, Sub-Saharan Africa alone accounts for about 50% of global child mortality. The overall objective of this study was to determine the magnitude and distribution of causes of death among children aged 5 to 14 year olds in the population of Kersa HDSS using verbal autopsy method for the period 2008 to 2013. Kersa Health and Demographic Surveillance System(Kersa HDSS) was established in September 2007. The center consists of 10 rural and 2 urban kebeles which were selected randomly from 38 kebeles in the district. Thus this study was conducted in Kersa HDSS and data was taken from Kersa HDSS database. The study population included all children aged 5 to 14 years registered during the period of 2008 to 2013 in Kersa HDSS using age specific VA questionnaires. Data were extracted from SPSS database and analyzed using STATA. A total of 229 deaths were recorded over the period of six years with a crude death rate of 219.6 per 100,000 population of this age group over the study period. This death rate was 217.5 and 221.5 per 100,000 populations for females and males, respectively. 75% of deaths took place at home. The study identified severe malnutrition(33.9%), intestinal infectious diseases(13.8%) and acute lower respiratory infections(9.2%) to be the three most leading causes of death. In broad causes of death classification, injuries have been found to be the second most cause of death next to communicable diseases(56.3%) attributing to 13.1% of the total deaths. In specific causes of death classification severe malnutrition, intestinal infectious diseases and acute lower respiratory infections were the three leading causes of death where, in broad causes of death communicable diseases and injuries were among the leading

  8. A robust vector field correction method via a mixture statistical model of PIV signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong; Yang, Hua; Yin, Zhouping

    2016-03-01

    Outlier (spurious vector) is a common problem in practical velocity field measurement using particle image velocimetry technology (PIV), and it should be validated and replaced by a reliable value. One of the most challenging problems is to correctly label the outliers under the circumstance that measurement noise exists or the flow becomes turbulent. Moreover, the outlier's cluster occurrence makes it difficult to pick out all the outliers. Most of current methods validate and correct the outliers using local statistical models in a single pass. In this work, a vector field correction (VFC) method is proposed directly from a mixture statistical model of PIV signal. Actually, this problem is formulated as a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of a Bayesian model with hidden/latent variables, labeling the outliers in the original field. The solution of this MAP estimation, i.e., the outlier set and the restored flow field, is optimized iteratively using an expectation-maximization algorithm. We illustrated this VFC method on two kinds of synthetic velocity fields and two kinds of experimental data and demonstrated that it is robust to a very large number of outliers (even up to 60 %). Besides, the proposed VFC method has high accuracy and excellent compatibility for clustered outliers, compared with the state-of-the-art methods. Our VFC algorithm is computationally efficient, and corresponding Matlab code is provided for others to use it. In addition, our approach is general and can be seamlessly extended to three-dimensional-three-component (3D3C) PIV data.

  9. Causes of death in patients ≥75 years of age with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morici, Nuccia; Savonitto, Stefano; Murena, Ernesto; Antonicelli, Roberto; Piovaccari, Giancarlo; Tucci, Daniele; Tamburino, Corrado; Fontanelli, Alessandro; Bolognese, Leonardo; Menozzi, Mila; Cavallini, Claudio; Petronio, Anna Sonia; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Piscione, Federico; Steffenino, Giuseppe; De Servi, Stefano

    2013-07-01

    The causes of death within 1 year of hospital admission in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes are ill defined, particularly in patients aged ≥75 years. From January 2008 through May 2010, we enrolled 645 patients aged ≥75 years with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: 313 in a randomized trial comparing an early aggressive versus an initially conservative approach, and 332, excluded from the trial for specific reasons, in a parallel registry. Each death occurring during 1 year of follow-up was adjudicated by an independent committee. The mean age was 82 years in both study cohorts, and 53% were men. By the end of the follow-up period (median 369 days, interquartile range 345 to 391), 120 patients (18.6%) had died. The mortality was significantly greater in the registry (23.8% vs 13.1%, p = 0.001). The deaths were classified as cardiac in 94% of the cases during the index admission and 68% of the cases during the follow-up period. Eighty-six percent of the cardiac deaths were of ischemic origin. In a multivariate logistic regression model that included the variables present on admission in the whole study population, the ejection fraction (hazard ratio 0.95, 95% confidence interval 0.94 to 0.97; p segment elevation acute coronary syndromes, most deaths in patients aged ≥75 years have a cardiac origin, mostly owing to myocardial ischemia.

  10. Relationships of survival time, productivity and cause of death with telomere lengths of cows produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Kazuyuki; Yonai, Miharu; Kaneyama, Kanako; Ito, Satoshi; Matsuda, Hideo; Yoshioka, Hajime; Nagai, Takashi; Imai, Kei

    2011-10-01

    The reproductive ability, milk-producing capacity, survival time and relationships of these parameters with telomere length were investigated in 4 groups of cows produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Each group was produced using the same donor cells (6 Holstein (1H), 3 Holstein (2H), 4 Jersey (1J) and 5 Japanese Black (1B) cows). As controls, 47 Holstein cows produced by artificial insemination were used. The SCNT cows were artificially inseminated, and multiple deliveries were performed after successive rounds of breeding and conception. No correlation was observed between the telomere length and survival time in the SCNT cows. Causes of death of SCNT cows included accidents, accident-associated infections, inappropriate management, acute mastitis and hypocalcemia. The lifetime productivity of SCNT cows was superior to those of the controls and cell donor cows. All SCNT beef cows with a relatively light burden of lactation remained alive and showed significantly prolonged survival time compared with the cows in the SCNT dairy breeds. These results suggest that the lifetime productivity of SCNT cows was favorable, and their survival time was more strongly influenced by environmental burdens, such as pregnancy, delivery, lactation and feeding management, than by the telomere length.

  11. HIV and hepatitis C mortality in Massachusetts, 2002-2011: spatial cluster and trend analysis of HIV and HCV using multiple cause of death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Meyers

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases, while associated with a much smaller proportion of deaths than they were 50 years ago, still play a significant role in mortality across the state of Massachusetts. Most analysis of infectious disease mortality in the state only take into account the underlying cause of death, rather than contributing causes of death, which may not capture the full extent of mortality trends for infectious diseases such as HIV and the Hepatitis C virus (HCV.In this study we sought to evaluate current trends in infectious disease mortality across the state using a multiple cause of death methodology. We performed a mortality trend analysis, identified spatial clusters of disease using a 5-step geoprocessing approach and examined spatial-temporal clustering trends in infectious disease mortality in Massachusetts from 2002-2011, with a focus on HIV/AIDS and HCV.Significant clusters of high infectious disease mortality in space and time throughout the state were detected through both spatial and space time cluster analysis. The most significant clusters occurred in Springfield, Worcester, South Boston, the Merrimack Valley, and New Bedford with other smaller clusters detected across the state. Multiple cause of death mortality rates were much higher than underlying cause mortality alone, and significant disparities existed across race and age groups.We found that our multi-method analyses, which focused on contributing causes of death, were more robust than analyses that focused on underlying cause of death alone. Our results may be used to inform public health resource allocation for infectious disease prevention and treatment programs, provide novel insight into the current state of infectious disease mortality throughout the state, and benefited from approaches that may more accurately document mortality trends.

  12. Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Cromer, Deborah; Tolstrup, Martin

    2016-01-01

    [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.].......[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005000.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005740.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1005679.]....

  13. To Analyze the Old Hospitalization' s Disease and Cause of Death%老年住院患者病种和死因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾颖婕; 刘芳; 孙莉; 王峰; 冯永林; 何敏慧

    2002-01-01

    Objective To know the old people's disease and cause of death at present. MethodCollected and analyzed 329 examples of old hospitalizations' main disease, and the 251 examples of oldhospitalizations' cause of the death in our hospital during 1999 ~ 2001. Result The main disease of oldhospitalization is the Alzheimers disease, brain blood- vascular system disease and cardiorascular systemdisease; the main cause of death of old patient is respiratory system disease, cardiovascular system diseaseand brain blood-vascular system disease, most of them are lunged infection. Conclusion It is an impor-tant task to strength on the work of the medical treatment and life nursing about the old people.

  14. Insight into the Female Longevity Puzzle: Using Register Data to Analyse Mortality and Cause of Death Behaviour Across Socio-economic Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallestrup-Lamb, Malene; Rosenskjold, Carsten Paysen T.

    been driving the standstill for Danish women and within each socio-economic group we further analyse the cause of death pattern. Further, we compare the forecast performance of the Lee-Carter model with the multi-population Li and Lee model. The decline in life expectancy for Danish women is present...... for all subgroups, however with particular large decreases for the low-middle and middle affluence groups. We find that causes of deaths related to smoking partly contribute to the slowdown in female longevity. However the lack of improvements in deaths relating to ischemic heart diseases is dominant...

  15. Cause of Death in Women of Reproductive Age in Rural Nepal Obtained Through Community-Based Surveillance: Is Reducing Maternal Mortality the Right Priority for Women's Health Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakurel, Ram; Sharma, Nirmala; Paudel, Deepak; Coghill, Anna; Sinden, Laura; Bost, Liberty; Larkin, Melissa; Burrus, Carla Jean; Roy, Khrist

    2015-01-01

    We used a community surveillance system to gather information regarding pregnancy outcomes and the cause of death for women of reproductive age (WRA) in Kanchanpur, Nepal. A total of 784 mother groups participated in the collection of pregnancy outcomes and mortality data. Of the 273 deaths among WRA, the leading causes of death reported were chronic diseases (94, 34.4%) poisoning, snake bites, and suicide (grouped together; 55, 20.1%), and accidents (29, 10.6%), while maternal mortality accounted for 7%. Nevertheless, the calculated maternal mortality ratio was quite high (259.3 per 100,000 live births).

  16. ARBITRATION CORRECTNESS OF STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES ACCORDING TO PRIORITY DISTRIBUTION PRINCIPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Khavruk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An application of a priority distribution principle provides a possibility to establish rights and obligations of the parties while executing statistical quality control of products.Procedures of quality control from the side of a manufacturer and a consumer according to PDP are accompanied by certain decisions taken by the parties which in their turn are components of the arbitration characteristic. Arbitration characteristics show probability dependences of  an arbitration situation occurrence on quality indices, parameters of  control plans and decision-making rules.The paper considers cases when control procedures of  a supplier and a  consumer are correct.  The paper also shows that unified control plans and a decision-­making rules do not guarantee generally a correctness of double control procedures. The paper reveals that an intervention of standardization bodies  which is estimated by different amount of expenses depending on a choice of control plans and results is required  in order to ensure a correctness of the control procedures by the parties.

  17. Place and cause of death in centenarians: a population-based observational study in England, 2001 to 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J Evans

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Centenarians are a rapidly growing demographic group worldwide, yet their health and social care needs are seldom considered. This study aims to examine trends in place of death and associations for centenarians in England over 10 years to consider policy implications of extreme longevity.This is a population-based observational study using death registration data linked with area-level indices of multiple deprivations for people aged ≥100 years who died 2001 to 2010 in England, compared with those dying at ages 80-99. We used linear regression to examine the time trends in number of deaths and place of death, and Poisson regression to evaluate factors associated with centenarians' place of death. The cohort totalled 35,867 people with a median age at death of 101 years (range: 100-115 years. Centenarian deaths increased 56% (95% CI 53.8%-57.4% in 10 years. Most died in a care home with (26.7%, 95% CI 26.3%-27.2% or without nursing (34.5%, 95% CI 34.0%-35.0% or in hospital (27.2%, 95% CI 26.7%-27.6%. The proportion of deaths in nursing homes decreased over 10 years (-0.36% annually, 95% CI -0.63% to -0.09%, p = 0.014, while hospital deaths changed little (0.25% annually, 95% CI -0.06% to 0.57%, p = 0.09. Dying with frailty was common with "old age" stated in 75.6% of death certifications. Centenarians were more likely to die of pneumonia (e.g., 17.7% [95% CI 17.3%-18.1%] versus 6.0% [5.9%-6.0%] for those aged 80-84 years and old age/frailty (28.1% [27.6%-28.5%] versus 0.9% [0.9%-0.9%] for those aged 80-84 years and less likely to die of cancer (4.4% [4.2%-4.6%] versus 24.5% [24.6%-25.4%] for those aged 80-84 years and ischemic heart disease (8.6% [8.3%-8.9%] versus 19.0% [18.9%-19.0%] for those aged 80-84 years than were younger elderly patients. More care home beds available per 1,000 population were associated with fewer deaths in hospital (PR 0.98, 95% CI 0.98-0.99, p<0.001.Centenarians are more likely to have causes of death certified as

  18. Mortality associated with hepatitis C and hepatitis B virus infection: A nationwide study on multiple causes of death data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeli, Ugo; Grande, Enrico; Grippo, Francesco; Frova, Luisa

    2017-03-14

    To analyze mortality associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Italy. Death certificates mentioning either HBV or HCV infection were retrieved from the Italian National Cause of Death Register for the years 2011-2013. Mortality rates and proportional mortality (percentage of deaths with mention of HCV/HBV among all registered deaths) were computed by gender and age class. The geographical variability in HCV-related mortality rates was investigated by directly age-standardized rates (European standard population). Proportional mortality for HCV and HBV among subjects aged 20-59 years was assessed in the native population and in different immigrant groups. HCV infection was mentioned in 1.6% (n = 27730) and HBV infection in 0.2% (n = 3838) of all deaths among subjects aged ≥ 20 years. Mortality rates associated with HCV infection increased exponentially with age in both genders, with a male to female ratio close to unity among the elderly; a further peak was observed in the 50-54 year age group especially among male subjects. HCV-related mortality rates were higher in Southern Italy among elderly people (45/100000 in subjects aged 60-79 and 125/100000 in subjects aged ≥ 80 years), and in North-Western Italy among middle-aged subjects (9/100000 in the 40-59 year age group). Proportional mortality was higher among Italian citizens and North African immigrants for HCV, and among Sub-Saharan African and Asian immigrants for HBV. Population ageing, immigration, and new therapeutic approaches are shaping the epidemiology of virus-related chronic liver disease. In spite of limits due to the incomplete reporting and misclassification of the etiology of liver disease, mortality data represent an additional source of information for surveillance.

  19. The evidence of porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus induced nonsuppurative encephalitis as the cause of death in piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An acute outbreak of porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (PHEV infection in piglets, characterized with neurological symptoms, vomiting, diarrhea, and wasting, occurred in China. Coronavirus-like particles were observed in the homogenized tissue suspensions of the brain of dead piglets by electron microscopy, and a wild PHEV strain was isolated, characterized, and designated as PHEV-CC14. Histopathologic examinations of the dead piglets showed characteristics of non-suppurative encephalitis, and some neurons in the cerebral cortex were degenerated and necrotic, and neuronophagia. Similarly, mice inoculated with PHEV-CC14 were found to have central nervous system (CNS dysfunction, with symptoms of depression, arched waists, standing and vellicating front claws. Furthmore, PHEV-positive labeling of neurons in cortices of dead piglets and infected mice supported the viral infections of the nervous system. Then, the major structural genes of PHEV-CC14 were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed, and the strain shared 95%–99.2% nt identity with the other PHEV strains available in GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis clearly proved that the wild strain clustered into a subclass with a HEV-JT06 strain. These findings suggested that the virus had a strong tropism for CNS, in this way, inducing nonsuppurative encephalitis as the cause of death in piglets. Simultaneously, the predicted risk of widespread transmission showed a certain variation among the PHEV strains currently circulating around the world. Above all, the information presented in this study can not only provide good reference for the experimental diagnosis of PHEV infection for pig breeding, but also promote its new effective vaccine development.

  20. The evidence of porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus induced nonsuppurative encephalitis as the cause of death in piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yungang; Zhao, Kui; Lv, Xiaoling; Lu, Huijun; Ding, Ning; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Junchao; Shan, Changjian

    2016-01-01

    An acute outbreak of porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (PHEV) infection in piglets, characterized with neurological symptoms, vomiting, diarrhea, and wasting, occurred in China. Coronavirus-like particles were observed in the homogenized tissue suspensions of the brain of dead piglets by electron microscopy, and a wild PHEV strain was isolated, characterized, and designated as PHEV-CC14. Histopathologic examinations of the dead piglets showed characteristics of non-suppurative encephalitis, and some neurons in the cerebral cortex were degenerated and necrotic, and neuronophagia. Similarly, mice inoculated with PHEV-CC14 were found to have central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction, with symptoms of depression, arched waists, standing and vellicating front claws. Furthmore, PHEV-positive labeling of neurons in cortices of dead piglets and infected mice supported the viral infections of the nervous system. Then, the major structural genes of PHEV-CC14 were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed, and the strain shared 95%–99.2% nt identity with the other PHEV strains available in GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis clearly proved that the wild strain clustered into a subclass with a HEV-JT06 strain. These findings suggested that the virus had a strong tropism for CNS, in this way, inducing nonsuppurative encephalitis as the cause of death in piglets. Simultaneously, the predicted risk of widespread transmission showed a certain variation among the PHEV strains currently circulating around the world. Above all, the information presented in this study can not only provide good reference for the experimental diagnosis of PHEV infection for pig breeding, but also promote its new effective vaccine development. PMID:27672502

  1. Recalibration of CFS seasonal precipitation forecasts using statistical techniques for bias correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliefernicht, Jan; Laux, Patrick; Siegmund, Jonatan; Kunstmann, Harald

    2013-04-01

    The development and application of statistical techniques with a special focus on a recalibration of meteorological or hydrological forecasts to eliminate the bias between forecasts and observations has received a great deal of attention in recent years. One reason is that retrospective forecasts are nowadays available which allows for a proper training and validation of this kind of techniques. The objective of this presentation is to propose several statistical techniques with different degree of complexity and to evaluate and compare their performance for a recalibration of seasonal ensemble forecasts of monthly precipitation. The techniques selected in this study range from straightforward normal score and quantile-quantile transformation, local scaling, to more sophisticated and novel statistical techniques such as Copula-based methodology recently proposed by Laux et al. (2011). The seasonal forecasts are derived from the Climate Forecast System Version 2. This version is the current coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model of the U.S. National Centers for Environmental Prediction used to provide forecasts up to nine months. The CFS precipitation forecasts are compared to monthly precipitation observations from the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre. The statistical techniques are tested for semi-arid regions in West Africa and the Indian subcontinent focusing on large-scale river basins such as the Ganges and the Volta basin. In both regions seasonal precipitation forecasts are a crucial source of information for the prediction of hydro-meteorological extremes, in particular for droughts. The evaluation is done using retrospective CFS ensemble forecast from 1982 to 2009. The training of the statistical techniques is done in a cross-validation mode. The outcome of this investigation illustrates large systematic differences between forecasts and observations, in particular for the Volta basin in West Africa. The selection of straightforward

  2. Global, regional, and national age–sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990–2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard Iburg, Kim

    2015-01-01

    disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus...

  3. Global, regional, and national age–sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990–2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard Iburg, Kim

    2015-01-01

    disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus...

  4. 出院后精神病患者死亡资料原因分析%Mental Patients after Discharge Data Analysis of the Causes of Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪群

    2015-01-01

    目的对精神病患者出院后的死亡原因进行分析调查。方法选择我院2012年4月~2014年4月29例出院后死亡的精神病患者的临床资料进行分析,了解患者的死亡原因。结果29例患者中有13例患者死亡原因为躯体疾病,占比例的44.8%;8例患者死亡原因为药物治疗导致死亡,占比例的27.6%;7例患者死亡原因为自杀,占比例的24.2%;另1例为意外死亡,占比例的3.4%。结论身体并发症是导致患者出院后死亡的主要原因,其次为药物并发症和自杀,因此有效控制患者疾病发生、加强看护是降低患者死亡率的主要手段。%Objective Analyzes the cause of death for psychiatric patients after discharge.Methods Choose our hospital in April 2012,2014~April 29 patients who died after hospital discharge of psychiatric patients clinical data were analyzed,and understand the cause of death of patients.Results 29 cases with 13 patients were the cause of death for the body disease,accounting for 44.8%of the proportion;8 patients were the cause of death cause of death for drug treatment,accounting for 27.6% of the proportion;The cause of death as suicide,7 cases accounted for 24.2% of proportion; The other 1 case for accidental death,accounting for 3.4%of the proportion.Conclusion Body complications is a major cause of death in patients after discharge,fol owed by drug complications and suicide,ef ective control of diseases, strengthening the nursing for the patient is to reduce the mortality of patients with primary means.

  5. Who died of what in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: a cause of death analysis using InterVA-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Mossong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: For public health purposes, it is important to see whether men and women in different age groups die of the same causes in South Africa. Objective: We explored sex- and age-specific patterns of causes of deaths in a rural demographic surveillance site in northern KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa over the period 2000–2011. Design: Deaths reported through the demographic surveillance were followed up by a verbal autopsy (VA interview using a standardised questionnaire. Causes of death were assigned likelihoods using the publicly available tool InterVA-4. Cause-specific mortality fractions were determined by age and sex. Results: Over the study period, a total of 5,416 (47% and 6,081 (53% deaths were recorded in men and women, respectively. Major causes of death proportionally affecting more women than men were (all p<0.0001: human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS (20.1% vs. 13.6%, other and unspecified cardiac disease (5.9% vs. 3.2%, stroke (4.5% vs. 2.7%, reproductive neoplasms (1.7% vs. 0.4%, diabetes (2.4% vs. 1.2%, and breast neoplasms (0.4% vs. 0%. Major causes of deaths proportionally affecting more men than women were (all p<0.0001 assault (6.1% vs. 1.7%, pulmonary tuberculosis (34.5% vs. 30.2%, road traffic accidents (3.0% vs. 1.0%, intentional self-harm (1.3% vs. 0.3%, and respiratory neoplasms (2.5% vs. 1.5%. Causes of death due to communicable diseases predominated in all age groups except in older persons. Conclusions: While mortality during the 2000s was dominated by tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, we found substantial sex-specific differences both for communicable and non-communicable causes of death, some which can be explained by a differing sex-specific age structure. InterVA-4 is likely to be a valuable tool for investigating causes of death patterns in other similar Southern African settings.

  6. Verbal autopsy completion rate and factors associated with undetermined cause of death in a rural resource-poor setting of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliti Deodatus V

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Verbal autopsy (VA is a widely used tool to assign probable cause of death in areas with inadequate vital registration systems. Its uses in priority setting and health planning are well documented in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA and Asia. However, there is a lack of data related to VA processing and completion rates in assigning causes of death in a community. There is also a lack of data on factors associated with undetermined causes of death documented in SSA. There is a need for such information for understanding the gaps in VA processing and better estimating disease burden. Objective The study's intent was to determine the completion rate of VA and factors associated with assigning undetermined causes of death in rural Tanzania. Methods A database of deaths reported from the Ifakara Health and Demographic Surveillance System from 2002 to 2007 was used. Completion rates were determined at the following stages of processing: 1 death identified; 2 VA interviews conducted; 3 VA forms submitted to physicians; 4 coding and assigning of cause of death. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with deaths coded as "undetermined." Results The completion rate of VA after identification of death and the VA interview ranged from 83% in 2002 and 89% in 2007. Ninety-four percent of deaths submitted to physicians were assigned a specific cause, with 31% of the causes coded as undetermined. Neonates and child deaths that occurred outside health facilities were associated with a high rate of undetermined classification (33%, odds ratio [OR] = 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] (1.05, 1.67, p = 0.016. Respondents reporting high education levels were less likely to be associated with deaths that were classified as undetermined (24%, OR = 0.76, 95% CI (0.60, -0.96, p = 0.023. Being a child of the deceased compared to a partner (husband or wife was more likely to be associated with undetermined cause of death classification

  7. Verbal autopsy completion rate and factors associated with undetermined cause of death in a rural resource-poor setting of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanyangala, Mathew A; Urassa, Honorathy M; Rutashobya, Jensen C; Mahutanga, Chrisostom C; Lutambi, Angelina M; Maliti, Deodatus V; Masanja, Honorati M; Abdulla, Salim K; Lema, Rose N

    2011-08-05

    Verbal autopsy (VA) is a widely used tool to assign probable cause of death in areas with inadequate vital registration systems. Its uses in priority setting and health planning are well documented in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and Asia. However, there is a lack of data related to VA processing and completion rates in assigning causes of death in a community. There is also a lack of data on factors associated with undetermined causes of death documented in SSA. There is a need for such information for understanding the gaps in VA processing and better estimating disease burden. The study's intent was to determine the completion rate of VA and factors associated with assigning undetermined causes of death in rural Tanzania. A database of deaths reported from the Ifakara Health and Demographic Surveillance System from 2002 to 2007 was used. Completion rates were determined at the following stages of processing: 1) death identified; 2) VA interviews conducted; 3) VA forms submitted to physicians; 4) coding and assigning of cause of death. Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with deaths coded as "undetermined." The completion rate of VA after identification of death and the VA interview ranged from 83% in 2002 and 89% in 2007. Ninety-four percent of deaths submitted to physicians were assigned a specific cause, with 31% of the causes coded as undetermined. Neonates and child deaths that occurred outside health facilities were associated with a high rate of undetermined classification (33%, odds ratio [OR] = 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] (1.05, 1.67), p = 0.016). Respondents reporting high education levels were less likely to be associated with deaths that were classified as undetermined (24%, OR = 0.76, 95% CI (0.60, -0.96), p = 0.023). Being a child of the deceased compared to a partner (husband or wife) was more likely to be associated with undetermined cause of death classification (OR = 1.35, 95% CI (1.04, 1.75), p = 0.023). Every year

  8. Increase in non-AIDS related conditions as causes of death among HIV-infected individuals in the HAART era in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio G Pacheco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 1996, Brazil became the first developing country to provide free and universal access to HAART. Although a decrease in overall mortality has been documented, there are no published data on the impact of HAART on causes of death among HIV-infected individuals in Brazil. We assessed temporal trends of mortality due to cardiovascular diseases (CVD, diabetes mellitus (DM and other conditions generally not associated with HIV-infection among persons with and without HIV infection in Brazil between 1999 and 2004. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Odds ratios were used to compare causes of death in individuals who had HIV/AIDS listed on any field of the death certificate with those who did not. Logistic regression models were fitted with generalized estimating equations to account for spatial correlation; co-variables were added to the models to control for potential confounding. Of 5,856,056 deaths reported in Brazil between 1999 and 2004 67,249 (1.15% had HIV/AIDS listed on the death certificate and non-HIV-related conditions were listed on 16.3% in 1999, increasing to 24.1% by 2004 (p<0.001. The adjusted average yearly increases were 8% and 0.8% for CVD (p<0.001, and 12% and 2.8% for DM (p<0.001, for those who had and did not have HIV/AIDS listed on the death certificate, respectively. Similar results were found for these conditions as underlying causes of death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In Brazil between 1999 and 2004 conditions usually considered not to be related to HIV-infection appeared to become more likely causes of death over time than reported causes of death among individuals who had HIV/AIDS listed on the death certificate than in those who did not. This observation has important programmatic implications for developing countries that are scaling-up access to antiretroviral therapy.

  9. Automatic ICD-10 multi-class classification of cause of death from plaintext autopsy reports through expert-driven feature selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Ghulam; Shuib, Liyana; Raj, Ram Gopal; Rajandram, Retnagowri; Shaikh, Khairunisa; Al-Garadi, Mohammed Ali

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Widespread implementation of electronic databases has improved the accessibility of plaintext clinical information for supplementary use. Numerous machine learning techniques, such as supervised machine learning approaches or ontology-based approaches, have been employed to obtain useful information from plaintext clinical data. This study proposes an automatic multi-class classification system to predict accident-related causes of death from plaintext autopsy reports through expert-driven feature selection with supervised automatic text classification decision models. Methods Accident-related autopsy reports were obtained from one of the largest hospital in Kuala Lumpur. These reports belong to nine different accident-related causes of death. Master feature vector was prepared by extracting features from the collected autopsy reports by using unigram with lexical categorization. This master feature vector was used to detect cause of death [according to internal classification of disease version 10 (ICD-10) classification system] through five automated feature selection schemes, proposed expert-driven approach, five subset sizes of features, and five machine learning classifiers. Model performance was evaluated using precisionM, recallM, F-measureM, accuracy, and area under ROC curve. Four baselines were used to compare the results with the proposed system. Results Random forest and J48 decision models parameterized using expert-driven feature selection yielded the highest evaluation measure approaching (85% to 90%) for most metrics by using a feature subset size of 30. The proposed system also showed approximately 14% to 16% improvement in the overall accuracy compared with the existing techniques and four baselines. Conclusion The proposed system is feasible and practical to use for automatic classification of ICD-10-related cause of death from autopsy reports. The proposed system assists pathologists to accurately and rapidly determine underlying

  10. Automatic ICD-10 multi-class classification of cause of death from plaintext autopsy reports through expert-driven feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Ghulam; Shuib, Liyana; Raj, Ram Gopal; Rajandram, Retnagowri; Shaikh, Khairunisa; Al-Garadi, Mohammed Ali

    2017-01-01

    Widespread implementation of electronic databases has improved the accessibility of plaintext clinical information for supplementary use. Numerous machine learning techniques, such as supervised machine learning approaches or ontology-based approaches, have been employed to obtain useful information from plaintext clinical data. This study proposes an automatic multi-class classification system to predict accident-related causes of death from plaintext autopsy reports through expert-driven feature selection with supervised automatic text classification decision models. Accident-related autopsy reports were obtained from one of the largest hospital in Kuala Lumpur. These reports belong to nine different accident-related causes of death. Master feature vector was prepared by extracting features from the collected autopsy reports by using unigram with lexical categorization. This master feature vector was used to detect cause of death [according to internal classification of disease version 10 (ICD-10) classification system] through five automated feature selection schemes, proposed expert-driven approach, five subset sizes of features, and five machine learning classifiers. Model performance was evaluated using precisionM, recallM, F-measureM, accuracy, and area under ROC curve. Four baselines were used to compare the results with the proposed system. Random forest and J48 decision models parameterized using expert-driven feature selection yielded the highest evaluation measure approaching (85% to 90%) for most metrics by using a feature subset size of 30. The proposed system also showed approximately 14% to 16% improvement in the overall accuracy compared with the existing techniques and four baselines. The proposed system is feasible and practical to use for automatic classification of ICD-10-related cause of death from autopsy reports. The proposed system assists pathologists to accurately and rapidly determine underlying cause of death based on autopsy findings

  11. Ehrenfest-time dependence of quantum transport corrections and spectral statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltner, Daniel; Kuipers, Jack

    2010-12-01

    The Ehrenfest-time scale in quantum transport separates essentially classical propagation from wave interference and here we consider its effect on the transmission and reflection through quantum dots. In particular, we calculate the Ehrenfest-time dependence of the next-to-leading-order quantum corrections to the transmission and reflection for dc and ac transport and check that our results are consistent with current conservation relations. Looking as well at spectral statistics in closed systems, we finally demonstrate how the contributions analyzed here imply changes in the calculation, given by Brouwer [Phys. Rev. E 74, 066208 (2006)], of the next-to-leading order of the spectral form factor. Our semiclassical result coincides with the result obtained by Tian and Larkin [Phys. Rev. B 70, 035305 (2004)] by field-theoretical methods.

  12. Statistical Bias Correction scheme for climate change impact assessment at a basin scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyunt, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for understanding how the global climate may change in the future. GCM precipitation is characterized by underestimation of heavy precipitation, frequency errors by low intensity with long drizzle rain days and fail to catch the inter-seasonal change compared to the ground data. This study focus on the basin scale climate change impact study and we proposed the method for the multi model (GCMs) selection method together with the statistical bias correction method which cover the major deficiencies of GCM biases for climate change impact study at the basin level. The proposed method had been tested its applicability in the various river basin under different climate such as semiarid region in Tunisia, tropical monsoonal climate in Philippines and temperate humid region in Japan. It performed well enough for the climate change impact study in the basin scale and it can catch the point scale and basin scale climatology precipitation very well during the historical simulation. We found the GCM simulation during baiu season dissipate the baiu activity more earlier than the actual one when compared to the in-situ station data in Japan. For that case, the proposed bias correction performed in each season to reduce the bias of GCM for the impact study. The proposed bias correction method is still tested in different river basin in the world to check it applicability and now under developing as the web interface as the handy and efficient tool for the end users from the different parts of the world.

  13. Analogue Correction Method of Errors by Combining Statistical and Dynamical Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Hongli; CHOU Jifan

    2006-01-01

    Based on the atmospheric analogy principle, the inverse problem that the information of historical analogue data is utilized to estimate model errors is put forward and a method of analogue correction of errors (ACE) of model is developed in this paper. The ACE can combine effectively statistical and dynamical methods, and need not change the current numerical prediction models. The new method not only adequately utilizes dynamical achievements but also can reasonably absorb the information of a great many analogues in historical data in order to reduce model errors and improve forecast skill.Furthermore, the ACE may identify specific historical data for the solution of the inverse problem in terms of the particularity of current forecast. The qualitative analyses show that the ACE is theoretically equivalent to the principle of the previous analogue-dynamical model, but need not rebuild the complicated analogue-deviation model, so has better feasibility and operational foreground. Moreover, under the ideal situations, when numerical models or historical analogues are perfect, the forecast of the ACE would transform into the forecast of dynamical or statistical method, respectively.

  14. 重型颅脑损伤死亡原因分析%Causes of death in severe traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭红雨

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨重型颅脑损伤患者的死亡原因.方法 回顾分析本院2004年2月至2009年6月60例重型颅脑损伤患者的临床资料.结果 入院后1d内死亡15例.1~3d 18例,4~7d 22例,超过7d 5例,最短30min,最长115d.脑损伤过重致中枢性呼吸循环衰竭死亡49例,严重合并伤伴休克死亡4例,急性神经源性肺水肿死亡2例,水、电解质酸碱平衡紊乱死亡2例,严重肺部感染死亡2例,长期消耗衰竭死亡1例.结论 对于重型颅脑损伤者应积极救治,及时纠正休克,减少继发性损伤,对症支持治疗,积极防治并发症,重视营养支持,以降低重型颅脑损伤患者的死亡率.%Objective To explore patients with severe head injury the cause of death. Methods Retrospective analysis of our hospital from February 2004 to June 2009 totally 60 patients with severe traumatic brain injury clinical data. Results At admission 15 patients died within 1 day, 1 day to 3 days in 18 cases, 4 days to 7 days in 22 cases, more than 7 days in 5 cases, the shortest 30min, the longest 115 days. Brain damage caused by excessive death of central respiratory and circulatory failure, 49 patients with severe shock and death associated injuries, 4 cases of acute neurogenic pulmonary edema, 2 patients died, water, electrolyte acid - base balance disorders 2 deaths, 2 serious lung infection death cases, long- term consumption of failure, 1 died. Conclusions For severe brain injury treatment should be actively and promptly to correct shock and reduce secondary injury, symptomatic and supportive treatment, and actively prevent complications, attention to nutritional support to reduce mortality in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

  15. Causes of death and prognostic indicators of rheumatoid arthritis%类风湿关节炎患者91例死亡原因及预后因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高莉; 贾园; 刘萍; 张晓盈; 姚海红; 李春; 栗占国

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解类风湿关节炎(RA)患者主要死因构成及预后因素.方法 收集我院1990-2011年91例RA死亡患者临床及血清学资料,分析其死因构成及其与病情活动度、用药情况等的关系,采用t检验和x2检验、Mann-WhithreyU检验进行统计分析,并应用比例风险模型(Cox参数回归)探讨预后因素.结果 合并感染、心脑血管疾病和肿瘤为RA患者最主要的三大死因,分别占总死亡人数的57%、13%、12%.RA病情中高度活动者死亡比例高,占总死亡人数64%.RA死亡患者系统受累常见,其中以全身症状最常见,包括发热、乏力、体质量下降,占总死亡人数的75%,其次为肺间质纤维化、胸腔积液.多因素分析结果显示多关节外表现是RA死亡的独立危险因素,改善病情抗风湿药(DMARDs)的应用是RA的预后保护因素.结论 合并感染、心脑血管疾病和肿瘤是RA最主要死亡原因.多关节外表现是RA预后的独立危险因素.%Objective To analyze the causes of death and prognostic indicators of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).Methods A retrospective investigation was performed on 91 RA patients who were admitted into our hospital from 1990 to 2011.The clinical features and laboratory data were studied to assess the causes of death and the relationship between causes of death and disease activity and treatment.T test and x2 test were used for statistical analysis.Prognostic indicators of mortality were studied by Cox propor-tional hazards models.The prognostic indicators of RA were also analyzed.Results The three most common causes of death in patients with RA were infection (57%),cardiac-cerebral vascular diseases (13%) and cancer (12%).Severe disease activity and presence of extra-articular manifestations were more common among the patients who died.Seventy-five percent patients presented with systemic symptoms including fever,fatigue and weight loss,followed by pulmonary fibrosis (32%) and pleural

  16. Analysis of causes of death among HIV-infected patients of Kiev Regional AIDS Center during 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Stepchenkova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ukraine is a leader in Europe in the prevalence of HIV infection. There are up to 270 thousand people, who are living with HIV. Since 1987, in Ukraine, 33,149 HIV-infected people died. During the first six months of 2013, of all the dead, who were suffering from HIV and in need of antiretroviral treatment (ART at the time of death, 41% received treatment and only 5.7% received ART for more than one year. Specialists of Kiev Regional AIDS Center analyzed mortality among the patients of the centre, in order to determine the most frequent cause of death, set the group most at risk and to develop effective measures to reduce mortality among HIV-infected patients. In Kiev AIDS Center, 10,000 people are under medical observation and 4004 of them are taking ART. During 2013, 305 persons died: 217 were women and 88 were men which included 3 children under 14 years. Most of the dead – 272 (89% were aged 25–49. Among the total number of the dead, 125 people (41% were receiving ART, 53 of them (17% were receiving ART for at least one year and 39 of them (13% were receiving ART for less than one month. Hundred and fifty-eight people (52% required ART and 22 (7% did not need therapy. Hundred and ninety-two patients (63% were in four clinical stage of HIV infection. Hundred and ten of them had HIV+TB co-infection. Twenty patients died due to TB and 12 patients died due to hepatitis b virus/hepatitis c virus (HBV/HCV. Among these patients, 87 people (39% were taking ART and 136 persons (61% were in need of ART, but did not get it. Nineteen patients were diagnosed with cancer. Sixteen patients, who were co-infected HIV+TB had a CD4 cell count of more than 300. Based on this analysis, we can conclude that the main causes of high mortality among HIV-infected patients in 2013 were late diagnosis of HIV, besides a large number (52% of patients, who were in need of ART did not take it. A large number (40% among those who died were patients co-infected with HIV

  17. Distribution of cause of death in rural Bangladesh during 2003-2010: evidence from two rural areas within Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Nurul; Chowdhury, Hafizur R; Ahmed, Ali; Rahman, Mahfuzur; Streatfield, P Kim

    2014-01-01

    This study used the InterVA-4 computerised model to assign probable cause of death (CoD) to verbal autopsies (VAs) generated from two rural areas, with a difference in health service provision, within the Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance site (HDSS). This study aimed to compare CoD by gender, as well as discussing possible factors which could influence differences in the distribution of CoD between the two areas. Data for this study came from the Matlab the HDSS maintained by the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) since 1966. In late 1977, icddr,b divided HDSS and implemented a high-quality maternal, newborn and child health and family planning (MNCH-FP) services project in one half, called the icddr,b service area (SA), in addition to the usual public and private MNCH-FP services that serve the other half, called the government SA. HDSS field workers registered 12,144 deaths during 2003-2010, and trained interviewers obtained VA for 98.9% of them. The probabilistic model InterVA-4 probabilistic model (version 4.02) was used to derive probable CoD from VA symptoms. Cause-specific mortality rates and fractions were compared across gender and areas. Appropriate statistical tests were applied for significance testing. Mortality rates due to neonatal causes and communicable diseases (CDs) were lower in the icddr,b SA than in the government SA, where mortality rates due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) were lower. Cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMFs) due to CDs (23.2% versus 18.8%) and neonatal causes (7.4% versus 6%) were higher in the government SA, whereas CSMFs due to NCDs were higher (58.2% versus 50.7%) in the icddr,b SA. The rank-order of CSMFs by age group showed marked variations, the largest category being acute respiratory infection/pneumonia in infancy, injury in 1-4 and 5-14 years, neoplasms in 15-49 and 50-64 years, and stroke in 65+ years. Automated InterVA-4 coding of VA to determine probable Co

  18. Distribution of cause of death in rural Bangladesh during 2003–2010: evidence from two rural areas within Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Alam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study used the InterVA-4 computerised model to assign probable cause of death (CoD to verbal autopsies (VAs generated from two rural areas, with a difference in health service provision, within the Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance site (HDSS. This study aimed to compare CoD by gender, as well as discussing possible factors which could influence differences in the distribution of CoD between the two areas. Design: Data for this study came from the Matlab the HDSS maintained by the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b since 1966. In late 1977, icddr,b divided HDSS and implemented a high-quality maternal, newborn and child health and family planning (MNCH-FP services project in one half, called the icddr,b service area (SA, in addition to the usual public and private MNCH-FP services that serve the other half, called the government SA. HDSS field workers registered 12,144 deaths during 2003–2010, and trained interviewers obtained VA for 98.9% of them. The probabilistic model InterVA-4 probabilistic model (version 4.02 was used to derive probable CoD from VA symptoms. Cause-specific mortality rates and fractions were compared across gender and areas. Appropriate statistical tests were applied for significance testing. Results: Mortality rates due to neonatal causes and communicable diseases (CDs were lower in the icddr,b SA than in the government SA, where mortality rates due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs were lower. Cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMFs due to CDs (23.2% versus 18.8% and neonatal causes (7.4% versus 6% were higher in the government SA, whereas CSMFs due to NCDs were higher (58.2% versus 50.7% in the icddr,b SA. The rank-order of CSMFs by age group showed marked variations, the largest category being acute respiratory infection/pneumonia in infancy, injury in 1–4 and 5–14 years, neoplasms in 15–49 and 50–64 years, and stroke in 65+ years. Conclusions

  19. Distribution of cause of death in rural Bangladesh during 2003-2010: evidence from two rural areas within Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Nurul; Chowdhury, Hafizur R; Ahmed, Ali; Rahman, Mahfuzur; Streatfield, P Kim

    2014-12-01

    Objective This study used the InterVA-4 computerised model to assign probable cause of death (CoD) to verbal autopsies (VAs) generated from two rural areas, with a difference in health service provision, within the Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance site (HDSS). This study aimed to compare CoD by gender, as well as discussing possible factors which could influence differences in the distribution of CoD between the two areas. Design Data for this study came from the Matlab the HDSS maintained by the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) since 1966. In late 1977, icddr,b divided HDSS and implemented a high-quality maternal, newborn and child health and family planning (MNCH-FP) services project in one half, called the icddr,b service area (SA), in addition to the usual public and private MNCH-FP services that serve the other half, called the government SA. HDSS field workers registered 12,144 deaths during 2003-2010, and trained interviewers obtained VA for 98.9% of them. The probabilistic model InterVA-4 probabilistic model (version 4.02) was used to derive probable CoD from VA symptoms. Cause-specific mortality rates and fractions were compared across gender and areas. Appropriate statistical tests were applied for significance testing. Results Mortality rates due to neonatal causes and communicable diseases (CDs) were lower in the icddr,b SA than in the government SA, where mortality rates due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) were lower. Cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMFs) due to CDs (23.2% versus 18.8%) and neonatal causes (7.4% versus 6%) were higher in the government SA, whereas CSMFs due to NCDs were higher (58.2% versus 50.7%) in the icddr,b SA. The rank-order of CSMFs by age group showed marked variations, the largest category being acute respiratory infection/pneumonia in infancy, injury in 1-4 and 5-14 years, neoplasms in 15-49 and 50-64 years, and stroke in 65+ years. Conclusions Automated InterVA-4

  20. Distribution of cause of death in rural Bangladesh during 2003–2010: evidence from two rural areas within Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Nurul; Chowdhury, Hafizur R.; Ahmed, Ali; Rahman, Mahfuzur; Streatfield, P. Kim

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study used the InterVA-4 computerised model to assign probable cause of death (CoD) to verbal autopsies (VAs) generated from two rural areas, with a difference in health service provision, within the Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance site (HDSS). This study aimed to compare CoD by gender, as well as discussing possible factors which could influence differences in the distribution of CoD between the two areas. Design Data for this study came from the Matlab the HDSS maintained by the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) since 1966. In late 1977, icddr,b divided HDSS and implemented a high-quality maternal, newborn and child health and family planning (MNCH-FP) services project in one half, called the icddr,b service area (SA), in addition to the usual public and private MNCH-FP services that serve the other half, called the government SA. HDSS field workers registered 12,144 deaths during 2003–2010, and trained interviewers obtained VA for 98.9% of them. The probabilistic model InterVA-4 probabilistic model (version 4.02) was used to derive probable CoD from VA symptoms. Cause-specific mortality rates and fractions were compared across gender and areas. Appropriate statistical tests were applied for significance testing. Results Mortality rates due to neonatal causes and communicable diseases (CDs) were lower in the icddr,b SA than in the government SA, where mortality rates due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) were lower. Cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMFs) due to CDs (23.2% versus 18.8%) and neonatal causes (7.4% versus 6%) were higher in the government SA, whereas CSMFs due to NCDs were higher (58.2% versus 50.7%) in the icddr,b SA. The rank-order of CSMFs by age group showed marked variations, the largest category being acute respiratory infection/pneumonia in infancy, injury in 1–4 and 5–14 years, neoplasms in 15–49 and 50–64 years, and stroke in 65+ years. Conclusions Automated

  1. Study of statistically correcting model CMAQ-MOS for forecasting regional air quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jianming; HE Jinhai; YANG Yuanqin; WANG Jiahe; XU Xiangde; LIU Yu; DING Guoan; CHEN Huailiang; HU Jiangkai; ZHANG Jianchun; WU Hao; LI Weiliang

    2005-01-01

    Based on analysis of the air pollution observational data at 8 observation sites in Beijing including outer suburbs during the period from September 2004 to March 2005, this paper reveals synchronal and in-phase characteristics in the spatial and temporal variation of air pollutants on a city-proper scale at deferent sites; describes seasonal differences of the pollutant emission influence between the heating and non-heating periods, also significantly local differences of the pollutant emission influence between the urban district and outer suburbs, i.e. the spatial and temporal distribution of air pollutant is closely related with that of the pollutant emission intensity. This study shows that due to complexity of the spatial and temporal distribution of pollution emission sources, the new generation Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model developed by the EPA of USA produced forecasts, as other models did, with a systematic error of significantly lower than observations, albeit the model has better capability than previous models had in predicting the spatial distribution and variation tendency of multi-sort pollutants. The reason might be that the CMAQ adopts average amount of pollutant emission inventory, so that the model is difficult to objectively and finely describe the distribution and variation of pollution emission sources intensity on different spatial and temporal scales in the areas, in which the pollution is to be forecast. In order to correct the systematic prediction error resulting from the average pollutant emission inventory in CMAQ, this study proposes a new way of combining dynamics and statistics and establishes a statistically correcting model CMAQ-MOS for forecasts of regional air quality by utilizing the relationship of CMAQ outputs with corresponding observations, and tests the forecast capability. The investigation of experiments presents that CMAQ-MOS reduces the systematic errors of CMAQ because of the uncertainty of pollution

  2. Changes in causes of death and risk of cancer in Danish patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney didease and end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørskov, Bjarne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo Friis; Strandgaard, Svend Valdemar;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background. With the improved prognosis in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), causes of death and the risk of cancer might have changed. This was investigated in a Danish population with ADPKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) between 1 January 1993 and 31...... December 2008. Methods. Data were retrieved from three Danish national registries and a total of 823 patients were identified of which 431 had died during the study period. The 16 years were divided into two 8-year periods and the causes of death were divided into six categories: cancer, cardiovascular...... (HR) 0.65, P = 0.008] and deaths from cerebrovascular disease decreased by 69% (HR 0.31, P = 0.0003) from the first to the second time period. There were no significant changes between the time periods in death from cancer, infection, other or unknown. From the first to the second 8-year interval...

  3. Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter are both associated with increased mortality but differ with respect to the cause of death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frans; Thvilum, Marianne; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyperthyroidism has been associated with increased all-cause mortality. Whether the underlying cause of hyperthyroidism influences this association is unclear. Our objectives were to explore whether mortality risk and cause of death differ between Graves' disease (GD) and toxic nodular...... associated with increased all-cause mortality. After stratification for the cause of death, GD was associated with increased mortality due to cardiovascular diseases (HR=1.49 [CI 1.25-1.77]) and lung diseases (HR=1.91 [CI 1.37-2.65]), whereas TNG was associated with increased cancer mortality (HR=1.36 [CI 1.......06-1.75]). When analyzing mortality in GD using TNG individuals as controls, there was no significant difference in all-cause mortality between GD and TNG. However, GD was clearly associated with a higher cardiovascular mortality (HR=1.39 [CI 1.10-1.76]) compared to TNG. Conclusion: Both GD and TNG, treated...

  4. Lightweight and Statistical Techniques for Petascale Debugging: Correctness on Petascale Systems (CoPS) Preliminry Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Supinski, B R; Miller, B P; Liblit, B

    2011-09-13

    Petascale platforms with O(10{sup 5}) and O(10{sup 6}) processing cores are driving advancements in a wide range of scientific disciplines. These large systems create unprecedented application development challenges. Scalable correctness tools are critical to shorten the time-to-solution on these systems. Currently, many DOE application developers use primitive manual debugging based on printf or traditional debuggers such as TotalView or DDT. This paradigm breaks down beyond a few thousand cores, yet bugs often arise above that scale. Programmers must reproduce problems in smaller runs to analyze them with traditional tools, or else perform repeated runs at scale using only primitive techniques. Even when traditional tools run at scale, the approach wastes substantial effort and computation cycles. Continued scientific progress demands new paradigms for debugging large-scale applications. The Correctness on Petascale Systems (CoPS) project is developing a revolutionary debugging scheme that will reduce the debugging problem to a scale that human developers can comprehend. The scheme can provide precise diagnoses of the root causes of failure, including suggestions of the location and the type of errors down to the level of code regions or even a single execution point. Our fundamentally new strategy combines and expands three relatively new complementary debugging approaches. The Stack Trace Analysis Tool (STAT), a 2011 R&D 100 Award Winner, identifies behavior equivalence classes in MPI jobs and highlights behavior when elements of the class demonstrate divergent behavior, often the first indicator of an error. The Cooperative Bug Isolation (CBI) project has developed statistical techniques for isolating programming errors in widely deployed code that we will adapt to large-scale parallel applications. Finally, we are developing a new approach to parallelizing expensive correctness analyses, such as analysis of memory usage in the Memgrind tool. In the first two

  5. Joint statistical correction of clutters, spokes and beam height for a radar derived precipitation climatology in southern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wagner

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available First results of radar derived climatology have emerged over the last years, as datasets of appropriate extent are becoming available. Usually, these statistics are based on time series lasting up to ten years as continuous storage of radar data was often not achieved before. This kind of climatology demands a high level of data quality. Small deviations or minor systematic under- or overestimations in single radar images become a major cause of error in statistical analysis. Extensive corrections of radar data are a crucial prerequisite for radar derived climatology. We present a new statistical post-correction scheme based on a climatological analysis of seven years of radar data of the Munich weather radar (2000–2006 operated by DWD (German Weather Service. Original radar products are used subject only to corrections within the signal processor without any further corrections on single radar images. The aim of this statistical correction is to make up for the average systematic errors caused by clutter, propagation, or measuring effects but to conserve small-scale natural variations in space.

    The statistical correction is based on a thorough analysis of the different causes of possible errors for the Munich weather radar. This analysis revealed the following basic effects: the decrease of rain amount as a function of height and distance from the radar, clutter effects such as clutter remnants after filtering, holes by eliminated clutter or shading effects from obstacles near the radar, visible as spokes, as well as the influence of the bright band. The correction algorithm is correspondingly based on these results. It consists of three modules. The first one is an altitude correction which minimises measuring effects. The second module corrects clutter effects and disturbances and the third one realises a mean adjustment to selected rain gauges. Two different sets of radar products are used. The statistical analysis as well as

  6. Widening rural-urban disparities in all-cause mortality and mortality from major causes of death in the USA, 1969-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gopal K; Siahpush, Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    This study examined trends in rural-urban disparities in all-cause and cause-specific mortality in the USA between 1969 and 2009. A rural-urban continuum measure was linked to county-level mortality data. Age-adjusted death rates were calculated by sex, race, cause-of-death, area-poverty, and urbanization level for 13 time periods between 1969 and 2009. Cause-of-death decomposition and log-linear and Poisson regression were used to analyze rural-urban differentials. Mortality rates increased with increasing levels of rurality overall and for non-Hispanic whites, blacks, and American Indians/Alaska Natives. Despite the declining mortality trends, mortality risks for both males and females and for blacks and whites have been increasingly higher in non-metropolitan than metropolitan areas, particularly since 1990. In 2005-2009, mortality rates varied from 391.9 per 100,000 population for Asians/Pacific Islanders in rural areas to 1,063.2 for blacks in small-urban towns. Poverty gradients were steeper in rural areas, which maintained higher mortality than urban areas after adjustment for poverty level. Poor blacks in non-metropolitan areas experienced two to three times higher all-cause and premature mortality risks than affluent blacks and whites in metropolitan areas. Disparities widened over time; excess mortality from all causes combined and from several major causes of death in non-metropolitan areas was greater in 2005-2009 than in 1990-1992. Causes of death contributing most to the increasing rural-urban disparity and higher rural mortality include heart disease, unintentional injuries, COPD, lung cancer, stroke, suicide, diabetes, nephritis, pneumonia/influenza, cirrhosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Residents in metropolitan areas experienced larger mortality reductions during the past four decades than non-metropolitan residents, contributing to the widening gap.

  7. Cause of Death and Predictors of All‐Cause Mortality in Anticoagulated Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: Data From ROCKET AF

    OpenAIRE

    Pokorney, Sean D; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Stevens, Susanna R.; Patel, Manesh R.; Pieper, Karen S.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Breithardt, Günter; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Hacke, Werner; Becker, Richard C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A A

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is associated with higher mortality. Identification of causes of death and contemporary risk factors for all‐cause mortality may guide interventions. Methods and Results In the Rivaroxaban Once Daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET AF) study, patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation were randomized to rivaroxaban or dose‐adjusted warfarin. Cox prop...

  8. Cause of Death and Predictors of All‐Cause Mortality in Anticoagulated Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: Data From ROCKET AF

    OpenAIRE

    Pokorney, Sean D; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Stevens, Susanna R.; Patel, Manesh R.; Pieper, Karen S.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Breithardt, Günter; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Hacke, Werner; Becker, Richard C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation is associated with higher mortality. Identification of causes of death and contemporary risk factors for all‐cause mortality may guide interventions. Methods and Results: In the Rivaroxaban Once Daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation (ROCKET AF) study, patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation were randomized to rivaroxaban or dose‐adjusted warfarin. Cox pr...

  9. Postmortem volumetric CT data analysis of pulmonary air/gas content with regard to the cause of death for investigating terminal respiratory function in forensic autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogawa, Nozomi; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Kawamoto, Osamu; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2014-08-01

    Postmortem CT (PMCT) is useful to investigate air/gas distribution and content in body cavities and viscera. The present study investigated the procedure to estimate total lung air/gas content and aeration ratio as possible indices of terminal respiratory function, using three-dimensional (3-D) PMCT data analysis of forensic autopsy cases without putrefactive gas formation (within 3 days postmortem, n=75), and analyzed the volumetric data with regard to the cause of death. When 3-D bilateral lung images were reconstructed using an image analyzer, combined lung volume was larger in drowning (n=12) than in alcohol/sedative-hypnotic intoxication (n=8) and sudden cardiac death (SCD; n=10), and intermediate in other cases, including mechanical asphyxiation (n=12), fire fatalities due to burns (n=6) and carbon monoxide intoxication (n=7), fatal methamphetamine abuse (n=7), hyperthermia (heatstroke; n=6) and fatal hypothermia (cold exposure; n=7). Air/gas content of the lung as detected using HU interval between -2000 and -400 ('effective' lung aeration areas) and between -2000 and -191 (total lung aeration areas) as well as the ratios to total lung volume ('effective' and total lung aeration ratios, respectively) was higher in mechanical asphyxiation, drowning, fatal burns and hypothermia (cold exposure) than in SCD, and was intermediate in other cases. 'Effective' and total lung aeration ratios may be useful for comparisons between specific causes of death to discriminate between hypothermia (cold exposure) and drug intoxication, and between SCD and other causes of death, respectively. These findings provide interesting insights into potential efficacy of PMCT data analyses of lung volume and CT density as well as lung air/gas content and aeration ratio with regard to the cause of death, as possible indicators of terminal respiratory function, as part of virtual autopsy of the viscera in situ.

  10. Mortality in over 350,000 Insured Swedish Dogs from 1995–2000: II. Breed-Specific Age and Survival Patterns and Relative Risk for Causes of Death

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    Olson P

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study continues analysis from a companion paper on over 350,000 insured Swedish dogs up to 10 years of age contributing to more than one million dog-years at risk during 1995–2000. The age patterns for total and diagnostic mortality and for general causes of death (trauma, tumour, locomotor, heart and neurological are presented for numerous breeds. Survival estimates at five, eight and 10 years of age are calculated. Survival to 10 years of age was 75% or more in Labrador and golden retrievers, miniature and toy poodles and miniature dachshunds and lowest in Irish wolfhounds (91% dead by 10 years. Multivariable analysis was used to estimate the relative risk for general and more specific causes of death between breeds accounting for gender and age effects, including two-way interactions. Older females had tumour as a designated cause of death more often than males in most breeds, but not in the Bernese mountain dog. Information presented in this and the companion paper inform our understanding of the population level burden of disease, and support decision-making at the population and individual level about health promotion efforts and treatment and prognosis of disease events.

  11. Causes of death among people living with AIDS in the pre- and post-HAART Eras in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

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    Carmen-Silvia Bruniera Domingues

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We examine the trend in causes of death among people living with AIDS in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, in the periods before and after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, and we investigate potential disparities across districts of residence. METHODS: Descriptive study of three periods: pre-HAART (1991-1996; early post-HAART (1997-1999; and late post-HAART (2000-2006. The data source was the São Paulo State STD/AIDS Program and São Paulo State Data Analysis Foundation. Causes of death were classified by the ICD-9 (1991-1995 and ICD-10 (1996-2006. We estimated age-adjusted mortality rates for leading underlying causes of death and described underlying and associated causes of death according to sociodemographic characteristics and area of residence. We used Pearson's chi-square test or Fisher's exact test to compare categorical variables. Areas of residence were categorized using a socioeconomic index. To analyze trends we apply generalized linear model with Poisson regression. RESULTS: We evaluated 32,808 AIDS-related deaths. Between the pre- and late post-HAART periods, the proportion of deaths whose underlying causes were non-AIDS-related diseases increased from 0.2% to 9.6% (p<0.001: from 0.01% to 1.67% (p<0.001 for cardiovascular diseases; 0.01% to 1.62% (p<0.001 for bacterial/unspecified pneumonia; and 0.03% to 1.46% (p<0.001 for non-AIDS-defining cancers. In the late post-HAART period, the most common associated causes of death were bacterial/unspecified pneumonia (35.94%, septicemia (33.46%, cardiovascular diseases (10.11% and liver diseases (8.0%; and common underlying causes, besides AIDS disease, included non-AIDS-defining cancers in high-income areas, cardiovascular diseases in middle-income areas and assault in low-income areas. CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of HAART has shifted the mortality profile away from AIDS-related conditions, suggesting changes in the pattern of morbidity, but

  12. Comparison of mobile apps for the leading causes of death among different income zones: a review of the literature and app stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Sainz-De-Abajo, Beatriz

    2014-01-09

    The advances achieved in technology, medicine, and communications in the past decades have created an excellent scenario for the improvement and expansion of eHeath and mHealth in particular. Mobile phones, smartphones, and tablets are exceptional means for the application of mobile health, especially for those diseases and health conditions that are the deadliest worldwide. The main aim of this paper was to compare the amount of research and the number of mobile apps dedicated to the diseases and conditions that are the leading causes of death according to the World Health Organization grouped by different income regions. These diseases and conditions were ischemic heart disease; stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases; lower respiratory infections; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; diarrheal diseases; HIV/AIDS; trachea, bronchus, and lung cancers; malaria; and Alzheimer disease and other dementias. Two reviews were conducted. In the first, the systems IEEE Xplore, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, and PubMed were used to perform a literature review of applications related to the mentioned diseases. The second was developed in the currently most important mobile phone apps stores: Google play, iTunes, BlackBerry World, and Windows Phone Apps+Games. Search queries up to June 2013 located 371 papers and 557 apps related to the leading causes of death, and the following findings were obtained. Alzheimer disease and other dementias are included in the diseases with more apps, although it is not among the top 10 causes of death worldwide, whereas lower respiratory infections, the third leading cause of death, is one of the less researched and with fewer apps. Two diseases that are the first and second of low-income countries (lower respiratory infections and diarrheal diseases) have very little research and few commercial applications. HIV/AIDS, in the top 6 of low-income and middle-income zones, is one of the diseases with more research and applications, although it is

  13. Social media in public health: an analysis of national health authorities and leading causes of death in Spanish-speaking Latin American and Caribbean countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novillo-Ortiz, David; Hernández-Pérez, Tony

    2017-02-03

    Information and communications technologies, like social media, have the potential to reduce some barriers in disease prevention and control in the Americas. National health authorities can use these technologies to provide access to reliable and quality health information. A study was conducted to analyze availability of information about the leading causes of death on social media channels of national health authorities in 18 Spanish-speaking Latin American and Caribbean countries. We gathered data of national health authorities's institutional presence in social media. Exploratory-descriptive research was useful for analysis and interpretation of the data collected. An analysis was carried out for 6 months, from April 1 to September 30, 2015. Sixteen of the 18 countries studied have institutional presences on social media. National health authorities have a presence in an average of almost three platforms (2.8%). An average of 1% of the populations with Internet access across the 18 countries in this study follows national health authorities on social media (approximately, an average of 0.3% of the total population of the countries under study). On average, information on 3.2 of the 10 leading causes of death was posted on the national health authorities' Facebook pages, and information on 2.9 of the 10 leading causes of death was posted on their Twitter profiles. Additionally, regarding public health expenditures and the possibility of retrieving information on the leading causes of death, an apparent negative correlation exists in the case of Facebook, r(13) = -.54, P = .03 and a weak negative correlation in the case of Twitter, r(14) = -.26, P = .31, for the countries with presences in those networks. National health authorities can improve their role in participating in conversations on social media regarding the leading causes of death affecting their countries. Taking into account Internet accessibility levels in the countries under study

  14. Mortality in patients with HIV-1 and tuberculosis co-infection in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - associated factors and causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Escada, Rodrigo Otavio; Velasque, Luciane; Ribeiro, Sayonara Rocha; Cardoso, Sandra Wagner; Marins, Luana Monteiro Spindola; Grinsztejn, Eduarda; da Silva Lourenço, Maria Cristina; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves

    2017-05-30

    Tuberculosis is the most frequent opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death among persons living with HIV in several low and middle-income countries. Mortality rates during tuberculosis treatment and death causes among HIV-1/TB co-infected patients may differ based on the immunosuppression severity, timing of diagnosis and prompt initiation of tuberculosis and antiretroviral therapy. This was a retrospective observational study conducted in the clinical cohort of patients with HIV-1/Aids of the National Institute of Infectious Diseases Evandro Chagas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. All HIV-1 infected patients who started combination antiretroviral therapy up to 30 days before or within 180 days after the start of tuberculosis treatment from 2000 to 2010 were eligible. Causes of death were categorized according to the "Coding Causes of Death in HIV" (CoDe) protocol. The Cox model was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of selected mortality variables. A total of 310 patients were included. Sixty-four patients died during the study period. Mortality rate following tuberculosis treatment initiation was 44 per 100 person-years within the first 30 days, 28.1 per 100 person-years within 31 and 90 days, 6 per 100 person-years within 91 and 365 days and 1.6 per 100 person-years after 365 days. Death probability within one year from tuberculosis treatment initiation was approximately 13%. In the adjusted analysis the associated factors with mortality were: CD4 ≤ 50 cells/mm3 (HR: 3.10; 95% CI: 1.720 to 5.580; p = 0.00); mechanical ventilation (HR: 2.81; 95% CI: 1.170 to 6.760; p = 0.02); and disseminated tuberculosis (HR: 3.70; 95% CI: 1.290 to 10.590, p = 0.01). Invasive bacterial disease was the main immediate cause of death (46.9%). Our results evidence the high morbidity and mortality among patients co-infected with HIV-1 and tuberculosis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. During the first year following tuberculosis diagnosis, mortality was the highest

  15. Analysis on the situation and cause of death among residents in Liaocheng City in 2011%2011年聊城市居民死亡情况及死因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕾; 姜宝法; 刘永清; 郭廷敏

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the distribution characteristic of situation and cause of death among residents in Liaocheng City, and provide basis for comprehensive control. Method Conduct descriptive statistical analysis on the monitoring data in 2011 through mortality rate and constituent ratio. Results The mortality rate of Liaocheng in 2011 was 449. 52/100 000, and the top five death causes were heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, malignant neoplasm, accidental injury and respiratory disease, which accounting for 89. 87% of all the deaths. Conclusions Noninfectious chronic diseases had become the main causes of death in Liaocheng, so we should actively develop the monitoring and control of chronic diseases, and injury intervention measures.%目的 了解聊城市居民死亡情况及死因分布特点,为综合防治提供依据.方法 利用死亡率、构成比对我市201 1年死因监测资料进行描述性统计分析.结果 聊城市201 1年报告粗死亡率为449.52/10万,前5位死因分别为心脏病、脑血管病、恶性肿瘤、意外伤害和呼吸系统疾病,占全部死因构成的89.87%.结论 慢性非传染性疾病、伤害已成为聊城市居民死亡的主要原因,应积极开展慢性病的监测、防治工作和伤害干预措施.

  16. Causas mal definidas de morte e óbitos sem assistência Ill-defined causes of death and unattended deaths, Brazil, 2003

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    Augusto Hasiak Santo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Este trabalho estuda a distribuição dos óbitos por causas mal definidas no Brasil, no ano de 2003, entre as quais identifica a proporção de mortes sem assistência. MÉTODOS: Os dados provieram do Sistema de Informações Sobre Mortalidade, coordenado pelo Ministério da Saúde. As causas mal definidas de morte compreenderam as incluídas no "Capítulo XVIII - Sintomas, sinais e achados anormais de exames clínicos e de laboratório não classificados em outra parte" da Classificação Estatística Internacional de Doenças e Problemas Relacionados à Saúde, décima revisão, capítulo este no qual a categoria R98 identificava a "morte sem assistência". RESULTADOS: No Brasil, em 2003, a causa básica de 13,3% dos óbitos foi identificada como mal definida, sendo que as proporções maiores ocorreram nas Regiões Nordeste e Norte. Do total de causas mal definidas no país, 53,3% corresponderam a mortes sem assistência, proporção esta que superou 70% nos Estados do Maranhão, Piauí, Rio Grande do Norte, Pernambuco, Bahia, Paraíba e Alagoas. CONCLUSÃO: Dada a estrutura descentralizada para o levantamento dos óbitos no país, identifica-se a maior responsabilidade dos municípios e, em seguida, dos Estados para o aprimoramento da qualidade das estatísticas de mortalidade.BACKGROUND: We studied the distribution of deaths from ill-defined causes that occurred in Brazil during 2003, from which was identified the proportion of unattended deaths. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Mortality Information System, coordinated by the Ministry of Health. Causes of death included in "Chapter XVIII - Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not classified elsewhere" of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, tenth revision, were considered ill-defined, among which the category R98 identified "unattended deaths". RESULTS: In Brazil during 2003 the underlying causes of

  17. [Analysis of cause of death of workers of non-ferrous metal industry in the Far North].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talykova, L V; Artiunina, G P

    1997-01-01

    Mortality parameters among able-bodied individuals engaged into nonferrous metallurgy due to cardiovascular, respiratory diseases and malignancies several times exceed the analogous parameters among general population residing in the same climate (5.4, 4.9 and 3.6 times respectively). High mortality due to malignancies among the workers exposed to nonferrous metals does not match the data by official statistics declaring the occupational malignancies rate over 400 times lower than the mortality parameter. Such gap between actual and official statistics could result from inadequate occupational medical service for these workers.

  18. Flowing toward Correct Contributions during Group Problem Solving: A Statistical Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ming Ming

    2008-01-01

    Groups that created more correct ideas (correct contributions or CCs) might be more likely to solve a problem, and students' recent actions (micro-time context) might aid CC creation. 80 high school students worked in groups of 4 on an algebra problem. Groups with higher mathematics grades or more CCs were more likely to solve the problem. Dynamic…

  19. The burden of diabetes-related mortality in France in 2002: an analysis using both underlying and multiple causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romon, Isabelle; Jougla, Eric; Balkau, Beverley; Fagot-Campagna, Anne

    2008-01-01

    To describe the burden of diabetes-related mortality in France. Underlying and multiple causes (all causes listed) of death were extracted from the 2002 French national mortality registry. Death rates were standardized on the age structure of the European population. Diabetes was reported as the underlying cause of death in 11,177 certificates (2.1%), and as multiple causes in 29,357 certificates (5.3%), giving a ratio (multiple/underlying causes) of 2.6. When diabetes was a multiple cause, the mean age at death was 75 years in men, 81 years in women. The age-standardized mortality rates were 41.0/100,000 in men, 24.6/100,000 in women. The excess mortality observed in men (men/women ratio = 1.7) decreased with age. Geographic differences were observed: higher rates in the North-East, lower rates in the West of the country. In certificates mentioning diabetes, the most frequent cause of death was diseases of the circulatory system (76%). Coronary heart diseases, foot ulcers and renal diseases were more likely to be mentioned in certificates referring to diabetes than in those that did not. The use of multiple rather than underlying causes of death more than doubled diabetes-related mortality rates. While probably still under-estimated, the burden of diabetes-related mortality corresponds to a high proportion of the total mortality, especially in men. Geographic differences partially reflect disparities in diabetes prevalence. Causes more frequently associated with diabetes include coronary heart disease and complications related to neuropathy and nephropathy.

  20. Approximations for Estimating Change in Life Expectancy Attributable to Air Pollution in Relation to Multiple Causes of Death Using a Cause Modified Life Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieb, David M; Judek, Stan; Brand, Kevin; Burnett, Richard T; Shin, Hwashin H

    2015-08-01

    There is considerable debate as to the most appropriate metric for characterizing the mortality impacts of air pollution. Life expectancy has been advocated as an informative measure. Although the life-table calculus is relatively straightforward, it becomes increasingly cumbersome when repeated over large numbers of geographic areas and for multiple causes of death. Two simplifying assumptions were evaluated: linearity of the relation between excess rate ratio and change in life expectancy, and additivity of cause-specific life-table calculations. We employed excess rate ratios linking PM2.5 and mortality from cerebrovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ischemic heart disease, and lung cancer derived from a meta-analysis of worldwide cohort studies. As a sensitivity analysis, we employed an integrated exposure response function based on the observed risk of PM2.5 over a wide range of concentrations from ambient exposure, indoor exposure, second-hand smoke, and personal smoking. Impacts were estimated in relation to a change in PM2.5 from 19.5 μg/m(3) estimated for Toronto to an estimated natural background concentration of 1.8 μg/m(3) . Estimated changes in life expectancy varied linearly with excess rate ratios, but at higher values the relationship was more accurately represented as a nonlinear function. Changes in life expectancy attributed to specific causes of death were additive with maximum error of 10%. Results were sensitive to assumptions about the air pollution concentration below which effects on mortality were not quantified. We have demonstrated valid approximations comprising expression of change in life expectancy as a function of excess mortality and summation across multiple causes of death.

  1. Early mortality and primary causes of death in mothers of children with intellectual disability or autism spectrum disorder: a retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Fairthorne

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mothers of children with intellectual disability or autism spectrum disorder (ASD have poorer health than other mothers. Yet no research has explored whether this poorer health is reflected in mortality rates or whether certain causes of death are more likely. We aimed to calculate the hazard ratios for death and for the primary causes of death in mothers of children with intellectual disability or ASD compared to other mothers. METHODS: The study population comprised all mothers of live-born children in Western Australia from 1983-2005. We accessed state-wide databases which enabled us to link socio-demographic details, birth dates, diagnoses of intellectual disability or ASD in the children and dates and causes of death for all mothers who had died prior to 2011. Using Cox Regression with death by any cause and death by each of the three primary causes as the event of interest, we calculated hazard ratios for death for mothers of children intellectual disability or ASD compared to other mothers. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: During the study period, mothers of children with intellectual disability or ASD had more than twice the risk of death. Mothers of children with intellectual disability were 40% more likely to die of cancer; 150% more likely to die of cardiovascular disease and nearly 200% more likely to die from misadventure than other mothers. Due to small numbers, only hazard ratios for cancer were calculated for mothers of children with ASD. These mothers were about 50% more likely to die from cancer than other mothers. Possible causes and implications of our results are discussed. CONCLUSION: Similar studies, pooling data from registries elsewhere, would improve our understanding of factors increasing the mortality of mothers of children with intellectual disability or ASD. This would allow the implementation of informed services and interventions to improve these mothers' longevity.

  2. The freetext matching algorithm: a computer program to extract diagnoses and causes of death from unstructured text in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anoop D; Martinez, Carlos; Hemingway, Harry

    2012-08-07

    Electronic health records are invaluable for medical research, but much information is stored as free text rather than in a coded form. For example, in the UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD), causes of death and test results are sometimes recorded only in free text. Free text can be difficult to use for research if it requires time-consuming manual review. Our aim was to develop an automated method for extracting coded information from free text in electronic patient records. We reviewed the electronic patient records in GPRD of a random sample of 3310 patients who died in 2001, to identify the cause of death. We developed a computer program called the Freetext Matching Algorithm (FMA) to map diagnoses in text to the Read Clinical Terminology. The program uses lookup tables of synonyms and phrase patterns to identify diagnoses, dates and selected test results. We tested it on two random samples of free text from GPRD (1000 texts associated with death in 2001, and 1000 general texts from cases and controls in a coronary artery disease study), comparing the output to the U.S. National Library of Medicine's MetaMap program and the gold standard of manual review. Among 3310 patients registered in the GPRD who died in 2001, the cause of death was recorded in coded form in 38.1% of patients, and in the free text alone in 19.4%. On the 1000 texts associated with death, FMA coded 683 of the 735 positive diagnoses, with precision (positive predictive value) 98.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 97.2, 99.2) and recall (sensitivity) 92.9% (95% CI 90.8, 94.7). On the general sample, FMA detected 346 of the 447 positive diagnoses, with precision 91.5% (95% CI 88.3, 94.1) and recall 77.4% (95% CI 73.2, 81.2), which was similar to MetaMap. We have developed an algorithm to extract coded information from free text in GP records with good precision. It may facilitate research using free text in electronic patient records, particularly for extracting the cause of death.

  3. Results and observations from the reconstruction of continuous time series of mortality by cause of death: Case of West Germany, 1968-1997.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marketa Pechholdova

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Though many countries have been collecting cause-of-death information from death certificates for more than a century, these valuable data sources remain underexplored. This is certainly due in part to the frequent revisions of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD, which have caused breaks in data continuity. This paper describes the methodological background and the results of the transition between the eighth and the ninth revision of ICD for the territory of former West Germany. Using practical examples, we examine the difficulties encountered and discuss the solutions applied.

  4. STUDY THE CAUSE OF DEATH & ITS SOME FACTORS AMONG HOSPITALIZED PAEDIATRIC CASES AT A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE OF RURAL DISTRICT OF MAHARASHTRA, INDIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol R

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Reaching the MDG on reducing child mortality will require universal coverage with key effective and affordable interventions. Records of vital events like death constitute an important component of publi c health information system. In - depth analysis of death of children provides valuable information. Aim of the study wa s to describe the causes of deaths among hospitalized pediatric patient and contributing factors associated with it. METHODS AND MATERIALS : This was a r etrospective re cord based study. Total pediatric deaths were identified & segregated through admission records from medical record section under PSM department of Government Medical College , during January 2010 to December 2010. Variables lik e age , sex , birth weight and cause of death were collected from death records. WHO Child Growth Standards (z score separate for boys & girls were used for comparing weight of child at the time of admission. Data was entered , cleaned and analyzed using MS excel. RESULTS : An overall 313 (13.1% death occurred among 2380 hospitalized pediatric cases.56.4% were male child and 43.8% female child. Maximum deaths (67.8% were among early neonates. 175(60% were severely underweight a t the time of admission. Time interval between admission and death i.e. hospital stay revealed that 134 (42.8% of deaths occurred within 24 h of ad mission. 180 (77% deaths were in low birth weight (less than 2.5 kg. Infection (35% was the leading cause of death among all pediatric age groups followed by birth asphyxia (29% , prematurity (22% nutritional (4% and congenital (6%.Viral encephalitis was found to be the most common cause of death in more than 5 yrs. age group. CONCLUSION : Monitoring the mo rtality pattern among hospitalized cases is important strategy to address public health issues at community level as well as to strengthen the hospital services. Strategies like antenatal care about nutrition to avoid LBW , timely treatment of

  5. Danger: electric shock. Overhead power line masts as the cause of death of large birds; Vorsicht: Stromschlag. Strommasten als Todesursache fuer bedrohte Grossvoegel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aebischer, A.; Heynen, D.

    2007-07-01

    This short article takes a look at the masts of power lines running at 1 kV to 36 kV that pose a great danger for large birds. For white storks and owls, electric shock is the most frequent cause of death. The types of mast and the fittings which are particularly dangerous for these large birds are described. The effects noted on their population are discussed. Simple measures that can be taken to prevent theses deaths are looked at, including simple ones such the insulation of the wires near to the masts.

  6. Correction

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Tile Calorimeter modules stored at CERN. The larger modules belong to the Barrel, whereas the smaller ones are for the two Extended Barrels. (The article was about the completion of the 64 modules for one of the latter.) The photo on the first page of the Bulletin n°26/2002, from 24 July 2002, illustrating the article «The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter gets into shape» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.

  7. The statistical nature of the second order corrections to the thermal SZE

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows that the accepted expressions for the second order corrections in the parameter $z$ to the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect can be accurately reproduced by a simple convolution integral approach. This representation allows to separate the second order SZE corrections into two type of components. One associated to a single line broadening, directly related to the even derivative terms present in the distortion intensity curve, while the other is related to a frequency shift, ...

  8. Time-dependent corrections to effective rate and event statistics in Michaelis-Menten kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Sinitsyn, N. A.; Nemenman, I.

    2010-01-01

    We generalize the concept of the geometric phase in stochastic kinetics to a noncyclic evolution. Its application is demonstrated on kinetics of the Michaelis-Menten reaction. It is shown that the nonperiodic geometric phase is responsible for the correction to the Michaelis-Menten law when parameters, such as a substrate concentration, are changing with time. We apply these ideas to a model of chemical reactions in a bacterial culture of a growing size, where the geometric correction qualita...

  9. Correction

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photo on the second page of the Bulletin n°48/2002, from 25 November 2002, illustrating the article «Spanish Visit to CERN» was published with a wrong caption. We would like to apologise for this mistake and so publish it again with the correct caption.   The Spanish delegation, accompanied by Spanish scientists at CERN, also visited the LHC superconducting magnet test hall (photo). From left to right: Felix Rodriguez Mateos of CERN LHC Division, Josep Piqué i Camps, Spanish Minister of Science and Technology, César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology), Juan Antonio Rubio, ETT Division Leader at CERN, Manuel Aguilar-Benitez, Spanish Delegate to Council, Manuel Delfino, IT Division Leader at CERN, and Gonzalo León, Secretary-General of Scientific Policy to the Minister.

  10. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Gorelik, G., & Shackelford, T.K. (2011. Human sexual conflict from molecules to culture. Evolutionary Psychology, 9, 564–587: The authors wish to correct an omission in citation to the existing literature. In the final paragraph on p. 570, we neglected to cite Burch and Gallup (2006 [Burch, R. L., & Gallup, G. G., Jr. (2006. The psychobiology of human semen. In S. M. Platek & T. K. Shackelford (Eds., Female infidelity and paternal uncertainty (pp. 141–172. New York: Cambridge University Press.]. Burch and Gallup (2006 reviewed the relevant literature on FSH and LH discussed in this paragraph, and should have been cited accordingly. In addition, Burch and Gallup (2006 should have been cited as the originators of the hypothesis regarding the role of FSH and LH in the semen of rapists. The authors apologize for this oversight.

  11. Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding Tagler, M. J., and Jeffers, H. M. (2013. Sex differences in attitudes toward partner infidelity. Evolutionary Psychology, 11, 821–832: The authors wish to correct values in the originally published manuscript. Specifically, incorrect 95% confidence intervals around the Cohen's d values were reported on page 826 of the manuscript where we reported the within-sex simple effects for the significant Participant Sex × Infidelity Type interaction (first paragraph, and for attitudes toward partner infidelity (second paragraph. Corrected values are presented in bold below. The authors would like to thank Dr. Bernard Beins at Ithaca College for bringing these errors to our attention. Men rated sexual infidelity significantly more distressing (M = 4.69, SD = 0.74 than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 4.32, SD = 0.92, F(1, 322 = 23.96, p < .001, d = 0.44, 95% CI [0.23, 0.65], but there was little difference between women's ratings of sexual (M = 4.80, SD = 0.48 and emotional infidelity (M = 4.76, SD = 0.57, F(1, 322 = 0.48, p = .29, d = 0.08, 95% CI [−0.10, 0.26]. As expected, men rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.44, SD = 0.70 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.66, SD = 1.37, F(1, 322 = 120.00, p < .001, d = 1.12, 95% CI [0.85, 1.39]. Although women also rated sexual infidelity (M = 1.40, SD = 0.62 more negatively than they rated emotional infidelity (M = 2.09, SD = 1.10, this difference was not as large and thus in the evolutionary theory supportive direction, F(1, 322 = 72.03, p < .001, d = 0.77, 95% CI [0.60, 0.94].

  12. Differentiating cause-of-death terminology for deaths coded as sudden infant death syndrome, accidental suffocation, and unknown cause: an investigation using US death certificates, 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Y; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Chu, Susan Y; Camperlengo, Lena T; Anderson, Robert N

    2012-03-01

    We compared written text on infant death certificates for deaths coded as sudden infant death syndrome (R95), unknown cause (R99), and accidental suffocation (W75). Using US mortality files supplemented with the death certifiers' written text for all infant deaths with International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 assigned codes R95, R99, and W75, we formed cause-of-death subcategories from common themes identified from the written text. Among all infant deaths in 2003-2004, the underlying cause of death was listed as R99 for 2128 deaths, R95 for 4408 deaths, and W75 for 931 deaths. Among the postneonatal deaths, the differences in subcategories varied between assigned ICD-10 codes: for R99-coded deaths, 45.8% were categorized as "Unknown" and 48.6% as "Pending"; for R95-coded deaths, 67.7% were categorized as "sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)"; and for W75-coded deaths, 76.4% were categorized as "Suffocation." Examination of the written text on the death certificates demonstrates variability in the assigned ICD-10 codes which could have an important effect on the estimates of SIDS cases in the United States.

  13. Causes of death due to hematological and non-hematological cancers in 57 US patients with type 1 Gaucher Disease who were never treated with enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, Neal J; Lee, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Patients with type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1) have increased risk of developing myeloma, other hematological cancers, hepatocellular carcinoma, and other solid tumors. Patient awareness of the GD1-cancer association causes anxiety and fear. Little is known about cancer as a cause of death in GD1, especially in patients never treated with GD1-specific therapies. Consequently, the effect of treatment on cancer mortality in GD1 patients is difficult to evaluate. In this review, starting with a population of 184 GD1 cases never treated, we annotate and analyze the causes of death of 57 GD1 patients who died of cancer. The proportional mortality ratio (PMR) for all malignancies in patients with GD1 is 1.57 (p = 0.0002), but it is much higher for myeloma (PMR = 9.66) and other hematological cancers, hepatocellular carcinoma, and kidney cancer (PMR = ≍4). However, deaths from colorectal and pancreatic cancers were not more frequent than expected, and deaths from lung, breast, gynecological, and prostate cancer occurred less than anticipated. Herein, we discuss whether GD1 is truly a hereditary cancer syndrome and the problem of comorbidities and cancer risk assessment, and we speculate as to whether the variability in death by cancer type might be attributable to biochemical sequelae of tumor cell and macrophage/stromal cell GBA1 mutation affecting signals for metastasis, the process most closely associated with cancer mortality.

  14. Investigating the Potential Influence of Cause of Death and Cocaine Levels on the Differential Expression of Genes Associated with Cocaine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Michael J.; Savonen, Candace L.; Hartley, Zachary J.; Johnson, Magen M.; Schmidt, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of complex brain disorders such as drug addiction is likely to be advanced by a more complete understanding of the underlying molecular pathophysiology. Although the study of postmortem human brain represents a unique resource in this regard, it can be challenging to disentangle the relative contribution of chronic pathological processes versus perimortem events to the observed changes in gene expression. To begin to unravel this issue, we analyzed by quantitative PCR the midbrain expression of numerous candidate genes previously associated with cocaine abuse. Data obtained from chronic cocaine abusers (and matched control subjects) dying of gunshot wounds were compared with a prior study of subjects with deaths directly attributable to cocaine abuse. Most of the genes studied (i.e., tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, forkhead box A2, histone variant H3 family 3B, nuclear factor kappa B inhibitor alpha, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible beta) were found to be differentially expressed in chronic cocaine abusers irrespective of immediate cause of death or perimortem levels of cocaine, suggesting that these may represent core pathophysiological changes arising with chronic drug abuse. On the other hand, chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 and jun proto-oncogene expression were unaffected in cocaine-abusing subjects dying of gunshot wounds, in contrast to the differential expression previously reported in cocaine-related fatalities. The possible influence of cause of death and other factors on the cocaine-responsiveness of these genes is discussed. PMID:25658879

  15. Statistical correction of lidar-derived digital elevation models with multispectral airborne imagery in tidal marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffington, Kevin J.; Dugger, Bruce D.; Thorne, Karen M.; Takekawa, John

    2016-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) is a valuable tool for collecting large amounts of elevation data across large areas; however, the limited ability to penetrate dense vegetation with lidar hinders its usefulness for measuring tidal marsh platforms. Methods to correct lidar elevation data are available, but a reliable method that requires limited field work and maintains spatial resolution is lacking. We present a novel method, the Lidar Elevation Adjustment with NDVI (LEAN), to correct lidar digital elevation models (DEMs) with vegetation indices from readily available multispectral airborne imagery (NAIP) and RTK-GPS surveys. Using 17 study sites along the Pacific coast of the U.S., we achieved an average root mean squared error (RMSE) of 0.072 m, with a 40–75% improvement in accuracy from the lidar bare earth DEM. Results from our method compared favorably with results from three other methods (minimum-bin gridding, mean error correction, and vegetation correction factors), and a power analysis applying our extensive RTK-GPS dataset showed that on average 118 points were necessary to calibrate a site-specific correction model for tidal marshes along the Pacific coast. By using available imagery and with minimal field surveys, we showed that lidar-derived DEMs can be adjusted for greater accuracy while maintaining high (1 m) resolution.

  16. Molecular identification of bacteria by total sequence screening: determining the cause of death in ancient human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Thèves

    Full Text Available Research of ancient pathogens in ancient human skeletons has been mainly carried out on the basis of one essential historical or archaeological observation, permitting specific pathogens to be targeted. Detection of ancient human pathogens without such evidence is more difficult, since the quantity and quality of ancient DNA, as well as the environmental bacteria potentially present in the sample, limit the analyses possible. Using human lung tissue and/or teeth samples from burials in eastern Siberia, dating from the end of 17(th to the 19(th century, we propose a methodology that includes the: 1 amplification of all 16S rDNA gene sequences present in each sample; 2 identification of all bacterial DNA sequences with a degree of identity ≥ 95%, according to quality criteria; 3 identification and confirmation of bacterial pathogens by the amplification of the rpoB gene; and 4 establishment of authenticity criteria for ancient DNA. This study demonstrates that from teeth samples originating from ancient human subjects, we can realise: 1 the correct identification of bacterial molecular sequence signatures by quality criteria; 2 the separation of environmental and pathogenic bacterial 16S rDNA sequences; 3 the distribution of bacterial species for each subject and for each burial; and 4 the characterisation of bacteria specific to the permafrost. Moreover, we identified three pathogens in different teeth samples by 16S rDNA sequence amplification: Bordetella sp., Streptococcus pneumoniae and Shigella dysenteriae. We tested for the presence of these pathogens by amplifying the rpoB gene. For the first time, we confirmed sequences from Bordetella pertussis in the lungs of an ancient male Siberian subject, whose grave dated from the end of the 17(th century to the early 18(th century.

  17. Physics-Based Correction of Inhomogeneities in Temperature Series: Model Transferability Testing and Comparison to Statistical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchmann, Renate; Brönnimann, Stefan; Croci-Maspoli, Mischa

    2016-04-01

    For the correction of inhomogeneities in sub-daily temperature series, Auchmann and Brönnimann (2012) developed a physics-based model for one specific type of break, i.e. the transition from a Wild screen to a Stevenson screen at one specific station in Basel, Switzerland. The model is based solely on physical considerations, no relationships of the covariates to the differences between the parallel measurements have been investigated. The physics-based model requires detailed information on the screen geometry, the location, and includes a variety of covariates in the model. The model is mainly based on correcting the radiation error, including a modification by ambient wind. In this study we test the application of the model to another station, Zurich, experiencing the same type of transition. Furthermore we compare the performance of the physics based correction to purely statistical correction approaches (constant correction, correcting for annual cycle using spline). In Zurich the Wild screen was replaced in 1954 by the Stevenson screen, from 1954-1960 parallel temperature measurements in both screens were taken, which will be used to assess the performance of the applied corrections. For Zurich the required model input is available (i.e. three times daily observations of wind, cloud cover, pressure and humidity measurements, local times of sunset and sunrise). However, a large number of stations do not measure these additional input data required for the model, which hampers the transferability and applicability of the model to other stations. Hence, we test possible simplifications and generalizations of the model to make it more easily applicable to stations with the same type of inhomogeneity. In a last step we test whether other types of transitions (e.g., from a Stevenson screen to an automated weather system) can be corrected using the principle of a physics-based approach.

  18. Time-dependent corrections to effective rate and event statistics in Michaelis-Menten kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsyn, N A; Nemenman, I

    2010-11-01

    The authors generalise the concept of the geometric phase in stochastic kinetics to a non-cyclic evolution. Its application is demonstrated on kinetics of the Michaelis-Menten reaction. It is shown that the non-periodic geometric phase is responsible for the correction to the Michaelis-Menten law when parameters, such as a substrate concentration, are changing with time. The authors apply these ideas to a model of chemical reactions in a bacterial culture of a growing size, where the geometric correction qualitatively changes the outcome of the reaction kinetics.

  19. The statistical nature of the second order corrections to the thermal SZE

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows that the accepted expressions for the second order corrections in the parameter $z$ to the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect can be accurately reproduced by a simple convolution integral approach. This representation allows to separate the second order SZE corrections into two type of components. One associated to a single line broadening, directly related to the even derivative terms present in the distortion intensity curve, while the other is related to a frequency shift, which is in turn related to the first derivative term.

  20. The preventable causes of death in the United States: comparative risk assessment of dietary, lifestyle, and metabolic risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodarz Danaei

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knowledge of the number of deaths caused by risk factors is needed for health policy and priority setting. Our aim was to estimate the mortality effects of the following 12 modifiable dietary, lifestyle, and metabolic risk factors in the United States (US using consistent and comparable methods: high blood glucose, low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, and blood pressure; overweight-obesity; high dietary trans fatty acids and salt; low dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids (seafood, and fruits and vegetables; physical inactivity; alcohol use; and tobacco smoking. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used data on risk factor exposures in the US population from nationally representative health surveys and disease-specific mortality statistics from the National Center for Health Statistics. We obtained the etiological effects of risk factors on disease-specific mortality, by age, from systematic reviews and meta-analyses of epidemiological studies that had adjusted (i for major potential confounders, and (ii where possible for regression dilution bias. We estimated the number of disease-specific deaths attributable to all non-optimal levels of each risk factor exposure, by age and sex. In 2005, tobacco smoking and high blood pressure were responsible for an estimated 467,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 436,000-500,000 and 395,000 (372,000-414,000 deaths, accounting for about one in five or six deaths in US adults. Overweight-obesity (216,000; 188,000-237,000 and physical inactivity (191,000; 164,000-222,000 were each responsible for nearly 1 in 10 deaths. High dietary salt (102,000; 97,000-107,000, low dietary omega-3 fatty acids (84,000; 72,000-96,000, and high dietary trans fatty acids (82,000; 63,000-97,000 were the dietary risks with the largest mortality effects. Although 26,000 (23,000-40,000 deaths from ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, and diabetes were averted by current alcohol use, they were outweighed by

  1. Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In the article by Quintavalle et al (Quintavalle C, Anselmi CV, De Micco F, Roscigno G, Visconti G, Golia B, Focaccio A, Ricciardelli B, Perna E, Papa L, Donnarumma E, Condorelli G, Briguori C. Neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin and contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2015;8:e002673. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.115.002673.), which published online September 2, 2015, and appears in the September 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed. On page 1, the institutional affiliation for Elvira Donnarumma, PhD, “SDN Foundation,” has been changed to read, “IRCCS SDN, Naples, Italy.” The institutional affiliation for Laura Papa, PhD, “Institute for Endocrinology and Experimental Oncology, National Research Council, Naples, Italy,” has been changed to read, “Institute of Genetics and Biomedical Research, Milan Unit, Milan, Italy” and “Humanitas Research Hospital, Rozzano, Italy.” The authors regret this error.

  2. Principles for Checking the Statistical Results Processing Correctness of the Cavendish Classic Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Tutubalin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In teaching mathematical statistics it is desirable that students of engineering and natural sciences could study the methods of statistical processing based on data of real experiments. Conditions for these experiments are of critical importance to justify the application of statistical methods.The article considers a classic Henry Cavendish’s experiment to determine a mean density of the Earth from this point of view. The article gives a detailed description of the experimental Cavendish’s setup, ideas, his experiments are based on, and a method to determine the values used for assessment of the mean density of the Earth. It also concretizes the equation of a pendulum model with friction on which Cavendish implicitly (and neglecting a friction relied.It is shown that the formal use of methods of mathematical statistics is not always justified. Detailed records of all experiments, published by Cavendish, enable us to study these data in terms of mathematical statistics, convince us of their statistical inhomogeneity and impossibility to construct a confidence interval to estimate accuracy.The article proposes an alternative way for processing Cavendish's data implicitly using the pendulum model equation with friction to reduce an effect of systematic errors and improve matching the Cavendish results with modern data.

  3. A combined statistical bias correction and stochastic downscaling method for precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volosciuk, Claudia; Maraun, Douglas; Vrac, Mathieu; Widmann, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Much of our knowledge about future changes in precipitation relies on global (GCMs) and/or regional climate models (RCMs) that have resolutions which are much coarser than typical spatial scales of precipitation, particularly extremes. The major problems with these projections are both climate model biases and the gap between gridbox and point scale. Wong et al. (2014) developed a model to jointly bias correct and downscale precipitation at daily scales. This approach, however, relied on pairwise correspondence between predictor and predictand for calibration, and, thus, on nudged simulations which are rarely available. Here we present an extension of this approach that separates the downscaling from the bias correction and in principle is applicable to free-running GCMs/RCMs. In a first step, we bias correct RCM-simulated precipitation against gridded observations at the same scale using a parametric quantile mapping (QMgrid) approach. In a second step, we bridge the scale gap: we predict local variance employing a regression-based model with coarse-scale precipitation as a predictor. The regression model is calibrated between gridded and point-scale (station) observations. For this concept we present one specific implementation, although the optimal model may differ for each studied location. To correct the whole distribution including extreme tails we apply a mixture distribution of a gamma distribution for the precipitation mass and a generalized Pareto distribution for the extreme tail in the first step. For the second step a vector generalized linear gamma model is employed. For evaluation we adopt the perfect predictor experimental setup of VALUE. We also compare our method to the classical QM as it is usually applied, i.e., between RCM and point scale (QMpoint). Precipitation is in most cases improved by (parts of) our method across different European climates. The method generally performs better in summer than in winter and in winter best in the

  4. Analysis of the cause of death in 31 severe organophosphorus poisoning%重症有机磷中毒31例致死原因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙陟中

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore cause of death and the lessons learned in critically ill patients with organophosphate poisoning.Methods The clinical manifestations,treatment,cause of death in 31 patients with severe organophosphate poisoning deaths were retrospectively analyzed.Results 31 deaths of patients,12 patients died of cholinergic crisis(38.70%),16 patients died of respiratory failure(51.61%),2 patients died of atropine intoxication (6.45%),1 patient died of the solution be excessive phosphorus(3.23%).6.01% incidence of intermediate syndrome,mortality was 16.94%.Conclusion Poison not completely clear,atropine and cholinesterase agents applied inappropriately,patients with mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure improper treatment,the merger is an important organ of the original basis of disease leading cause of death,accurately determine the condition is the key to reducing mortality.%目的 分析探讨重症有机磷中毒患者的致死原因及经验教训.方法 对31例重症有机磷中毒死亡病例的临床表现、治疗方法、致死原因进行回顾性分析.结果 31例死亡患者中,12例死于胆碱危象(38.70%),16例死于呼吸衰竭(51.61%),2例死于阿托品中毒(6.45%),1例死于解磷定过量(3.23%).中间综合征发生率为6.01%,病死率为16.94%.结论 毒物清除不彻底,阿托品与胆碱酯酶复能剂应用不当,对呼吸衰竭患者机械通气治疗方法不当,合并重要脏器原有基础病变是导致死亡的主要原因,准确判断病情是降低病死率的关键.

  5. A hospital-based estimate of major causes of death among under-five children from a health facility in Lagos, Southwest Nigeria: possible indicators of health inequality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afolabi Bamgboye M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Current evidence on the root-causes of deaths among children younger than 5years is critical to direct international efforts to improve child survival, focus on health promotion and achieve Millennium Development Goal 4. We report a hospital-based estimate for 2005-2007 of the major causes of death in children in this age-group in south-west Nigeria. Methods We used retrospective data from the intensive care unit of a second-tier health facility to extract the presenting complaints, clinical diagnosis, treatment courses, prognosis and outcome among children aged 6—59months. SPSS-19 was used for data analysis. Results Of the 301 children (58% males, 42% females admitted into the ICU within the period of study, 173 (26% presented with complaints related to the gastrointestinal system, 138 (21% with respiratory symptoms and 196 (29% with complaints of fever. Overall, 708 investigations were requested for among which were full blood count (215, 30% and blood slides for malaria parasite (166, 23%. Infection ranked highest (181, 31% in clinicians’ diagnosis, followed by haematological health problems (109, 19% and respiratory illnesses (101, 17%. There were negative correlations between outcome of the illness and patient’s weight (r=-0.195, p=0.001 and a strong positive correlation between prognosis and outcome of admission (r=0.196, p=0.001. Of the 59 (20% children that died, presentation of respiratory tract illnesses were significantly higher in females (75% than in males (39% (χ²=7.06; p=0.008 and diagnoses related to gastrointestinal pathology were significantly higher in males (18% than in females (0% (χ²=4.07; p=0.05. Majority of the deaths (21% occurred among children aged 1.0 to 1.9years old and among weight group of 5.1-15.0kg. Conclusion The major causes of deaths among under-five years old originate from respiratory, gastrointestinal and infectious diseases – diseases that were recognized as major causes

  6. Tendencias recientes de las principales causas de muerte en Navarra: 1995-2004 Recent trends of the main causes of death in Navarre: 1995-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Moreno-Iribas

    2006-12-01

    statistics for mortality in Navarre for the 1995-2004 period by sex, age and cause of death. Methods. The data proceeds from the statistical bulletins on death. The 1995-1999 period is compared with the 2000-2004 period, using adjusted rates to the population of Navarre for the year 2001 and the rate of potential years of life lost between 0-70 years adjusted to the European population. Results. Life expectancy at birth in the 2000-2004 period was 77.9 years in men and 85 years in women, the latter being one of the highest registered at the world level. Infant mortality fell to 3.3 per 1,000 living newborn infants. The risk of death has fallen in practically all age groups, with a notable fall in mortality of 40% in the 25-34 group at the cost of AIDS. There has been a significant increase of mortality due to lung cancer amongst women under 65 years of age (46% in the 2000-2004 period with respect to the previous five year period and a sharp fall in mortality due to breast cancer (45.4%. In both sexes there has been a continued fall of mortality due to cerebrovascular diseases, ischaemic heart diseases, cardiac failure and arteriosclerosis and of mortality due to ulcer and cirrhosis. The rates of mortality in Navarre in all the main groups of causes are lower than those of Europe, except for the rate of mortality due to external causes. Conclusions. The increase of mortality due to lung cancer and other cancers related to smoking, due to the spread of consumption in recent decades, could have a negative influence on the life expectancy of women in Navarre in coming years. The prevention of mortality due to external causes and the prevention of deaths linked to tobacco consumption are the two priorities that emerge from the data on mortality in this autonomous community.

  7. Global, regional, and national age–sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990–2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Carrie Beth

    2015-01-01

    the prominent role of reductions in age-standardised death rates for cardiovascular diseases and cancers in high-income regions, and reductions in child deaths from diarrhoea, lower respiratory infections, and neonatal causes in low-income regions. HIV/AIDS reduced life expectancy in southern sub-Saharan Africa...... disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus......BACKGROUND: Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countries...

  8. Global, regional, and national age–sex specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 240 causes of death, 1990–2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard Iburg, Kim

    2015-01-01

    the prominent role of reductions in age-standardised death rates for cardiovascular diseases and cancers in high-income regions, and reductions in child deaths from diarrhoea, lower respiratory infections, and neonatal causes in low-income regions. HIV/AIDS reduced life expectancy in southern sub-Saharan Africa...... disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus......Background Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countries...

  9. Cause of death during 2009–2012, using a probabilistic model (InterVA-4: an experience from Ballabgarh Health and Demographic Surveillance System in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay K. Rai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study aimed to estimate the age and cause-specific mortality in Ballabgarh Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS site for the years 2009 to 2012, using a probabilistic model (InterVA-4. Methods: All Deaths in Ballabgarh HDSS from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2012, were included in the study. InterVA-4 model (version 4.02 was used for assigning cause of death (COD. Data from the verbal autopsy (VA tool were extracted and processed with the InterVA-4 model. Cause-specific mortality rate (CSMR per 1,000 person-years was calculated. Results: A total of 2,459 deaths occurred in the HDSS during the year 2009 to 2012. Among them, 2,174 (88.4% valid VA interviews were conducted. Crude death rate ranged from 7.1 (2009 to 6.4 (2012 per 1,000 population. The CSMR per 1,000 person-years over the years (2009–2012 for non-communicable diseases, communicable diseases, trauma, neoplasm, and maternal and neonatal diseases were 1.78, 1.68, 0.68, 0.49, and 0.48, respectively. The most common causes of death among children, adults, and the elderly were infectious diseases, trauma, and non-communicable diseases, respectively. Conclusions: Overall, non-communicable diseases constituted the largest proportion of mortality, whereas trauma was the most common COD among adults at Ballabgarh HDSS. Policy-makers ought to focus on prevention of premature CODs, especially prevention of infectious diseases in children, and intentional self-harm and road traffic accidents in the adult population.

  10. Causes of Death and Autopsy Findings in a Large Study Cohort of Individuals with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrier, Samantha A.; Sherer, Ilana; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Clark, Dinah; Audette, Lynn; Gillis, Lynette; Kline, Antonie D.; Ernst, Linda; Loomes, Kathy; Krantz, Ian D.; Jackson, Laird G.

    2011-01-01

    To identify causes of death (COD) in propositi with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) at various ages, and to develop guidelines to improve management and avoid morbidity and mortality, we retrospectively reviewed a total of 426 propositi with confirmed clinical diagnoses of CdLS in our database who died in a 41-year period between 1966–2007. Of these, 295 had an identifiable COD reported to us. Clinical, laboratory and complete autopsy data were completed on 41, of which 38 were obtainable, an additional 19 had autopsies that only documented the COD, and 45 propositi had surgical, imaging, or terminal event clinical documentation of their COD. Proband ages ranged from fetuses (21 to 40 weeks gestation) to 61 years. A literature review was undertaken to identify all reported causes of death in CdLS individuals. In our cohort of 295 propositi with a known COD, respiratory causes including aspiration/reflux and pneumonias were the most common primary causes (31%), followed by gastrointestinal disease, including obstruction/volvulus (19%). Congenital anomalies accounted for 15% of deaths and included congenital diaphragmatic hernia and congenital heart defects. Acquired cardiac disease accounted for 3% of deaths. Neurological causes and accidents each accounted for 8%, sepsis for 4%, cancer for 2%, renal disease for 1.7%, and other causes, 9% of deaths. We also present 21 representative clinical cases for illustration. This comprehensive review has identified important etiologies contributing to the morbidity and mortality in this population that will provide for an improved understanding of clinical complications, and management for children and adults with CdLS. PMID:22069164

  11. Temporal trends in sudden infant death syndrome in Canada from 1991 to 2005: contribution of changes in cause of death assignment practices and in maternal and infant characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Nicolas L; Fell, Deshayne B; Joseph, K S; Liu, Shiliang; León, Juan Andrés; Sauve, Reg

    2012-03-01

    The rate of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) declined significantly in Canada and the US between the late 1980s and the early 2000s. In the US, this decline was shown to be due in part to a shift in diagnosis, as deaths from accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed and from other ill-defined and unspecified cause increased concurrently. This study was undertaken to determine whether there was such a shift in diagnosis from SIDS to other causes of death in Canada, and to quantify the true temporal decrease in SIDS. Cause-specific infant death rates were compared across three periods: 1991-95, 1996-2000 and 2001-05 using the Canadian linked livebirth-infant death file. The temporal decline in SIDS was estimated after adjustment for maternal and infant characteristics such as maternal age and small-for-gestational age using logistic regression. Deaths from SIDS decreased from 78.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 73.4, 83.4] per 100 000 livebirths in 1991-95, to 48.5 [95% CI 44.3, 52.7] in 1996-2000 and to 34.6 [95% CI 31.0, 38.3] in 2001-05. Mortality rates from other ill-defined and unspecified causes and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed remained stable. The temporal decline in SIDS between 1991-95 and 2001-05 did not change substantially after adjustment for maternal and infant factors. It is unlikely that the temporal decline of SIDS in Canada was due to changes in cause-of-death assignment practices or in maternal and infant characteristics.

  12. Five-year survival and causes of death in patients on home parenteral nutrition for severe chronic and benign intestinal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Francisca; Baxter, Janet; Staun, Michael; Kelly, Darlene G; Hwa, Yi Lisa; Corcos, Olivier; De Francesco, Antonella; Agostini, Federica; Klek, Stanislaw; Santarpia, Lidia; Contaldo, Franco; Jonker, Cora; Wanten, Geert; Chicharro, Luisa; Burgos, Rosa; Van Gossum, Andre; Cuerda, Cristina; Virgili, Nuria; Pironi, Loris

    2017-06-19

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is the primary treatment for chronic intestinal failure (IF). Intestinal transplantation (ITx) is indicated when there is an increased risk of death due to HPN complications or to the underlying disease. Age, pathophysiologic conditions and underlying disease are known predictors of HPN dependency and overall survival. Although the cause of death on HPN is mostly related to underlying disease in these patients, the relationship between mortality and duration of HPN use remains unclear. The purpose of the present study is to describe factors associated with survival and HPN dependency as well as causes of death in adult patients requiring HPN for chronic intestinal failure during the first 5 years of treatment with HPN. A multicenter international (European and USA) questionnaire-based retrospective follow-up of a cohort of 472 IF patients who started HPN was conducted between June and December 2000. Study endpoint was either end of 5-year follow-up, weaned-off HPN, ITx, or death on HPN. Data were analyzed for HPN dependence and overall survival using Kaplan-Meier models and log rank tests. The overall survival probability was 88%, 74% and 64% at 1, 3 and 5 years respectively. Survival was inversely related to age (p < .001) and higher in patients with Crohn's disease or chronic idiopathic pseudo-obstruction. A total of 169 (36.5%) patients were weaned-off HPN mainly (80%) within the first year and most frequently in patients with fistulae. Five of the 14 patients who underwent ITx died. By the end of the study, 104 (23%) of patients died on HPN; 65% of deaths occurred within the first 2.5 years of HPN. Younger ages at HPN initiation and underlying pathologies are significantly predictive of survival on HPN. Risk of death is greatest during the first 2 years of HPN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  13. A Statistical Bias Correction Tool for Generating Climate Change Scenarios in Indonesia based on CMIP5 Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faqih, A.

    2017-03-01

    Providing information regarding future climate scenarios is very important in climate change study. The climate scenario can be used as basic information to support adaptation and mitigation studies. In order to deliver future climate scenarios over specific region, baseline and projection data from the outputs of global climate models (GCM) is needed. However, due to its coarse resolution, the data have to be downscaled and bias corrected in order to get scenario data with better spatial resolution that match the characteristics of the observed data. Generating this downscaled data is mostly difficult for scientist who do not have specific background, experience and skill in dealing with the complex data from the GCM outputs. In this regards, it is necessary to develop a tool that can be used to simplify the downscaling processes in order to help scientist, especially in Indonesia, for generating future climate scenario data that can be used for their climate change-related studies. In this paper, we introduce a tool called as “Statistical Bias Correction for Climate Scenarios (SiBiaS)”. The tool is specially designed to facilitate the use of CMIP5 GCM data outputs and process their statistical bias corrections relative to the reference data from observations. It is prepared for supporting capacity building in climate modeling in Indonesia as part of the Indonesia 3rd National Communication (TNC) project activities.

  14. The Asian Correction Can Be Quantitatively Forecasted Using a Statistical Model of Fusion-Fission Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Boon Kin; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2016-01-01

    The Global Financial Crisis of 2007-2008 wiped out US$37 trillions across global financial markets, this value is equivalent to the combined GDPs of the United States and the European Union in 2014. The defining moment of this crisis was the failure of Lehman Brothers, which precipitated the October 2008 crash and the Asian Correction (March 2009). Had the Federal Reserve seen these crashes coming, they might have bailed out Lehman Brothers, and prevented the crashes altogether. In this paper, we show that some of these market crashes (like the Asian Correction) can be predicted, if we assume that a large number of adaptive traders employing competing trading strategies. As the number of adherents for some strategies grow, others decline in the constantly changing strategy space. When a strategy group grows into a giant component, trader actions become increasingly correlated and this is reflected in the stock price. The fragmentation of this giant component will leads to a market crash. In this paper, we also derived the mean-field market crash forecast equation based on a model of fusions and fissions in the trading strategy space. By fitting the continuous returns of 20 stocks traded in Singapore Exchange to the market crash forecast equation, we obtain crash predictions ranging from end October 2008 to mid-February 2009, with early warning four to six months prior to the crashes. PMID:27706198

  15. German cancer statistics 2004

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background For years the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) has been annually pooling and reviewing the data from the German population-based cancer registries and evaluating them together with the cause-of-death statistics provided by the statistical offices. Traditionally, the RKI periodically estimates the number of new cancer cases in Germany on the basis of the available data from the regional cancer registries in which registration is complete; this figure, in turn, forms the basis fo...

  16. Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Hayslett, H T

    1991-01-01

    Statistics covers the basic principles of Statistics. The book starts by tackling the importance and the two kinds of statistics; the presentation of sample data; the definition, illustration and explanation of several measures of location; and the measures of variation. The text then discusses elementary probability, the normal distribution and the normal approximation to the binomial. Testing of statistical hypotheses and tests of hypotheses about the theoretical proportion of successes in a binomial population and about the theoretical mean of a normal population are explained. The text the

  17. Selective Ring Oscillator PUF with Statistics Correction Technique and its Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Masaya; Asai, Toshiya; Shiozaki, Mitsuru; Fujino, Takeshi

    The physical unclonable function (PUF) is a method to derive ID information peculiar to a device by detecting random physical features that cannot be controlled during the device’s manufacture. Because information such as the ID information is difficult to replicate, PUF is used as a technique to prevent forgery. PUF has two major application fields: an authentication scheme, and protection of intellectual property of the semiconductor industry. Several circuit systems to compose PUF have been reported. This study proposes a new PUF based on ring oscillator PUF. By incorporating a mechanism to correct the oscillation frequency dispersion that results from the layout, the proposed PUF can generate ID accurately. We verified the proposed PUF’s validity by conducting experiments using an FPGA that incorporates the proposed PUF.

  18. Bayesian Statistical Inference in Ion-Channel Models with Exact Missed Event Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Michael; Calderhead, Ben; Girolami, Mark A; Sivilotti, Lucia G

    2016-07-26

    The stochastic behavior of single ion channels is most often described as an aggregated continuous-time Markov process with discrete states. For ligand-gated channels each state can represent a different conformation of the channel protein or a different number of bound ligands. Single-channel recordings show only whether the channel is open or shut: states of equal conductance are aggregated, so transitions between them have to be inferred indirectly. The requirement to filter noise from the raw signal further complicates the modeling process, as it limits the time resolution of the data. The consequence of the reduced bandwidth is that openings or shuttings that are shorter than the resolution cannot be observed; these are known as missed events. Postulated models fitted using filtered data must therefore explicitly account for missed events to avoid bias in the estimation of rate parameters and therefore assess parameter identifiability accurately. In this article, we present the first, to our knowledge, Bayesian modeling of ion-channels with exact missed events correction. Bayesian analysis represents uncertain knowledge of the true value of model parameters by considering these parameters as random variables. This allows us to gain a full appreciation of parameter identifiability and uncertainty when estimating values for model parameters. However, Bayesian inference is particularly challenging in this context as the correction for missed events increases the computational complexity of the model likelihood. Nonetheless, we successfully implemented a two-step Markov chain Monte Carlo method that we called "BICME", which performs Bayesian inference in models of realistic complexity. The method is demonstrated on synthetic and real single-channel data from muscle nicotinic acetylcholine channels. We show that parameter uncertainty can be characterized more accurately than with maximum-likelihood methods. Our code for performing inference in these ion channel

  19. Quantum-Shell Corrections to the Finite-Temperature Thomas-Fermi-Dirac Statistical Model of the Atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, A B

    2003-07-22

    Quantum-shell corrections are made directly to the finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi-Dirac statistical model of the atom by a partition of the electronic density into bound and free components. The bound component is calculated using analytic basis functions whose parameters are chosen to minimize the energy. Poisson's equation is solved for the modified density, thereby avoiding the need to solve Schroedinger's equation for a self-consistent field. The shock Hugoniot is calculated for aluminum: shell effects characteristic of quantum self-consistent field models are fully captures by the present model.

  20. Pierre Gy's sampling theory and sampling practice heterogeneity, sampling correctness, and statistical process control

    CERN Document Server

    Pitard, Francis F

    1993-01-01

    Pierre Gy's Sampling Theory and Sampling Practice, Second Edition is a concise, step-by-step guide for process variability management and methods. Updated and expanded, this new edition provides a comprehensive study of heterogeneity, covering the basic principles of sampling theory and its various applications. It presents many practical examples to allow readers to select appropriate sampling protocols and assess the validity of sampling protocols from others. The variability of dynamic process streams using variography is discussed to help bridge sampling theory with statistical process control. Many descriptions of good sampling devices, as well as descriptions of poor ones, are featured to educate readers on what to look for when purchasing sampling systems. The book uses its accessible, tutorial style to focus on professional selection and use of methods. The book will be a valuable guide for mineral processing engineers; metallurgists; geologists; miners; chemists; environmental scientists; and practit...

  1. Statistical unfolding of elementary particle spectra: Empirical Bayes estimation and bias-corrected uncertainty quantification

    CERN Document Server

    Kuusela, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    We consider the high energy physics unfolding problem where the goal is to estimate the spectrum of elementary particles given observations distorted by the limited resolution of a particle detector. This important statistical inverse problem arising in data analysis at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN consists in estimating the intensity function of an indirectly observed Poisson point process. Unfolding typically proceeds in two steps: one first produces a regularized point estimate of the unknown intensity and then uses the variability of this estimator to form frequentist confidence intervals that quantify the uncertainty of the solution. In this paper, we propose forming the point estimate using empirical Bayes estimation which enables a data-driven choice of the regularization strength through marginal maximum likelihood estimation. Observing that neither Bayesian credible intervals nor standard bootstrap confidence intervals succeed in achieving good frequentist coverage in this problem due to the inh...

  2. Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Links to sources of cancer-related statistics, including the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program, SEER-Medicare datasets, cancer survivor prevalence data, and the Cancer Trends Progress Report.

  3. Leading Causes of Death Contributing to Decrease in Life Expectancy Gap Between Black and White Populations: United States, 1999-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Kenneth D; Anderson, Robert N; Arias, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    Life expectancy at birth has increased steadily since 1900 to a record 78.8 years in 2013. But differences in life expectancy between the white and black populations still exist, despite a decrease in the life expectancy gap from 5.9 years in 1999 to 3.6 years in 2013. Differences in the change over time in the leading causes of death for the black and white populations have contributed to this decrease in the gap in life expectancy. Between 1999 and 2013, the decrease in the life expectancy gap between the black and white populations was mostly due to greater decreases in mortality from heart disease, cancer, HIV disease, unintentional injuries, and perinatal conditions among the black population. Similarly, the decrease in the gap between black and white male life expectancy was due to greater decreases in death rates for HIV disease, cancer, unintentional injuries, heart disease, and perinatal conditions in black males. For black females, greater decreases in diabetes death rates, combined with decreased rates for heart disease and HIV disease, were the major causes contributing to the decrease in the life expectancy gap with white females. The decrease in the gap in life expectancy between the white and black populations would have been larger than 3.6 years if not for increases in death rates for the black population for aortic aneurysm, Alzheimer’s disease, and maternal conditions. For black males, the causes that showed increases in death rates over white males were hypertension, aortic aneurysm, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and kidney disease, while the causes that showed increases in death rates for black females were Alzheimer’s disease, maternal conditions, and atherosclerosis. This NCHS Data Brief is the second in a series of data briefs that explore the causes of death contributing to differences in life expectancy between detailed ethnic and racial populations in the United States. The first data brief focused on the racial differences in life

  4. Differences in the causes of death of HIV-positive patients in a cohort study by data sources and coding algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, Victoria; Sobrino-Vegas, Paz; Burriel, M Carmen; Berenguer, Juan; Navarro, Gemma; Santos, Ignacio; Reparaz, Jesús; Martínez, M Angeles; Antela, Antonio; Gutiérrez, Félix; del Amo, Julia

    2012-09-10

    To compare causes of death (CoDs) from two independent sources: National Basic Death File (NBDF) and deaths reported to the Spanish HIV Research cohort [Cohort de adultos con infección por VIH de la Red de Investigación en SIDA CoRIS)] and compare the two coding algorithms: International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) and revised version of Coding Causes of Death in HIV (revised CoDe). Between 2004 and 2008, CoDs were obtained from the cohort records (free text, multiple causes) and also from NBDF (ICD-10). CoDs from CoRIS were coded according to ICD-10 and revised CoDe by a panel. Deaths were compared by 13 disease groups: HIV/AIDS, liver diseases, malignancies, infections, cardiovascular, blood disorders, pulmonary, central nervous system, drug use, external, suicide, other causes and ill defined. There were 160 deaths. Concordance for the 13 groups was observed in 111 (69%) cases for the two sources and in 115 (72%) cases for the two coding algorithms. According to revised CoDe, the commonest CoDs were HIV/AIDS (53%), non-AIDS malignancies (11%) and liver related (9%), these percentages were similar, 57, 10 and 8%, respectively, for NBDF (coded as ICD-10). When using ICD-10 to code deaths in CoRIS, wherein HIV infection was known in everyone, the proportion of non-AIDS malignancies was 13%, liver-related accounted for 3%, while HIV/AIDS reached 70% due to liver-related, infections and ill-defined causes being coded as HIV/AIDS. There is substantial variation in CoDs in HIV-infected persons according to sources and algorithms. ICD-10 in patients known to be HIV-positive overestimates HIV/AIDS-related deaths at the expense of underestimating liver-related diseases, infections and ill defined causes. CoDe seems as the best option for cohort studies.

  5. Improving pan-european hydrological simulation of extreme events through statistical bias correction of RCM-driven climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rojas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we asses the benefits of removing bias in climate forcing data used for hydrological climate change impact assessment at pan-European scale, with emphasis on floods. Climate simulations from the HIRHAM5-ECHAM5 model driven by the SRES-A1B emission scenario are corrected for bias using a histogram equalization method. As predictand for the bias correction we employ gridded interpolated observations of precipitation, average, minimum, and maximum temperature from the E-OBS data set. Bias removal transfer functions are derived for the control period 1961–1990. These are subsequently used to correct the climate simulations for the control period, and, under the assumption of a stationary error model, for the future time window 2071–2100. Validation against E-OBS climatology in the control period shows that the correction method performs successfully in removing bias in average and extreme statistics relevant for flood simulation over the majority of the European domain in all seasons. This translates into considerably improved simulations with the hydrological model of observed average and extreme river discharges at a majority of 554 validation river stations across Europe. Probabilities of extreme events derived employing extreme value techniques are also more closely reproduced. Results indicate that projections of future flood hazard in Europe based on uncorrected climate simulations, both in terms of their magnitude and recurrence interval, are likely subject to large errors. Notwithstanding the inherent limitations of the large-scale approach used herein, this study strongly advocates the removal of bias in climate simulations prior to their use in hydrological impact assessment.

  6. Improving pan-European hydrological simulation of extreme events through statistical bias correction of RCM-driven climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rojas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work we asses the benefits of removing bias in climate forcing data used for hydrological climate change impact assessment at pan-European scale, with emphasis on floods. Climate simulations from the HIRHAM5-ECHAM5 model driven by the SRES-A1B emission scenario are corrected for bias using a histogram equalization method. As target for the bias correction we employ gridded interpolated observations of precipitation, average, minimum, and maximum temperature from the E-OBS data set. Bias removal transfer functions are derived for the control period 1961–1990. These are subsequently used to correct the climate simulations for the control period, and, under the assumption of a stationary error model, for the future time window 2071–2100. Validation against E-OBS climatology in the control period shows that the correction method performs successfully in removing bias in average and extreme statistics relevant for flood simulation over the majority of the European domain in all seasons. This translates into considerably improved simulations with the hydrological model of observed average and extreme river discharges at a majority of 554 validation river stations across Europe. Probabilities of extreme events derived employing extreme value techniques are also more closely reproduced. Results indicate that projections of future flood hazard in Europe based on uncorrected climate simulations, both in terms of their magnitude and recurrence interval, are likely subject to large errors. Notwithstanding the inherent limitations of the large-scale approach used herein, this study strongly advocates the removal of bias in climate simulations prior to their use in hydrological impact assessment.

  7. Doenças cerebrovasculares como causa múltipla de morte em Salvador: magnitude e diferenças espaciais da mortalidade omitida nas estatísticas oficiais Spacial differences in the mortality by cerebrovascular disease as underlying and as associated cause of death, Salvador - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Lessa

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Através de estudo descritivo de agregado (ecológico espacial foram determinadas as desigualdades sociais da mortalidade por doenças cerebrovasculares (DCV em Salvador, quantificada a parcela da mortalidade omitida nas estatísticas oficiais e identificadas zonas prioritárias para intensificação de ações preventivas. Foram incluídos no estudo todos os óbitos de adultos, de 1988, com menção de DCV como causa básica e como causa associada de morte, distribuídas conforme procedência por 66 zonas da cidade. Com a inclusão das DCV associadas detectou-se aumento de 29,10% na mortalidade. Os coeficientes variaram entre 22,94 a 376,62/100000 adultos e a variação média do excesso de mortalidade ficou entre 16,12 e 33,72%. Das 16 zonas com mortalidade elevada e prioritárias para intensificação de intervenções preventivas, 7 foram consideradas com mortalidade excepcionalmente elevada por terem ultrapassado o coeficiente de Salvador em 1,64 vezes o seu desvio» padrão corrigido. Os autores sugerem possíveis explicações para as desigualdades espaciais da mortalidade pelas DCV.Social inequalities and the excess (% in mortality by cerebrosvascular diseases (CVD unregistered in the official death statistics were studied in Salvador, Brazil, 1988. In an ecological spacial (aggregate desing, all death mentioning CVD as basic and as associated cause of death were reviewed and distributed, according to their addresses by 66 geographical zones. The mortality nates by CVD (basie+associated ranged from 22.94 to 376.62/ 100000 adults. The mortality fraction not included in the official statistics was 29.1% for Salvador with means between 16.12 and 33.72% in the group of zones of very low to those in the high mortality levels. Seven out of 16 zones included in the 4th quantil showed exceptionally high mortality rates (above those of Salvador + 1.64 X standard deviation corrected by the zones population. The authors discuss possible

  8. Damages and causes of death in plantations with containerised seedlings of Scots pine and Norway spruce in the central of Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumburg, Jan

    2000-07-01

    In 1972, 94 forest areas were planted with containerised seedlings, 83 with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and 11 with Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.), in the central of Sweden. In the first season after planting, 99% of the Scots pine and 98% of the Norway spruce seedlings survived. Three seasons after plantation, 67% of Scots pine and 62% of Norway spruce were alive. The most common type of known damages causing mortality were mammals and insects. Vegetation was registered as the cause of mortality at some occasions in Scots pine plantations, whereas vegetation never was considered as the cause of death in Norway spruce plantations. The average size of the scarification patches were 0.25 m{sup 2} and 0.4 m{sup 2} in Scots pine and Norway spruce respectively. In Scots pine plantations there were 1600 planted seedlings ha{sup -1} and in Norway spruce there were 1550 ha{sup -1}. After the third growing season, the numbers of main crop plants, including naturally regenerated hardwood and softwood plants, were 1500 ha{sup -1} for Scots pine and 1350 ha{sup -1} for Norway spruce. The studied plantings had been approved if the recommended number of seedlings had been planted. As there always is some mortality among planted seedlings, in the present study 35-40%, this phenomenon has to be taken into consideration when dimensioning the number of seedlings which are to be planted.

  9. Excess mortality, causes of death and life expectancy in 270,770 patients with recent onset of mental disorders in Denmark, Finland and Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Nordentoft

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excess mortality among patients with severe mental disorders has not previously been investigated in detail in large complete national populations. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the excess mortality in different diagnostic categories due to suicide and other external causes of death, and due to specific causes in connection with diseases and medical conditions. METHODS: In longitudinal national psychiatric case registers from Denmark, Finland, and Sweden, a cohort of 270,770 recent-onset patients, who at least once during the period 2000 to 2006 were admitted due to a psychiatric disorder, were followed until death or the end of 2006. They were followed for 912,279 person years, and 28,088 deaths were analyzed. Life expectancy and standardized cause-specific mortality rates were estimated in each diagnostic group in all three countries. RESULTS: The life expectancy was generally approximately 15 years shorter for women and 20 years shorter for men, compared to the general population. Mortality due to diseases and medical conditions was increased two- to three-fold, while excess mortality from external causes ranged from three- to 77-fold. Mortality due to diseases and medical conditions was generally lowest in patients with affective disorders and highest in patients with substance abuse and personality disorders, while mortality due to suicide was highest in patients with affective disorders and personality disorders, and mortality due to other external causes was highest in patients with substance abuse. CONCLUSIONS: These alarming figures call for action in order to prevent the high mortality.

  10. Causes of death and the impact of histiocytic sarcoma on the life expectancy of the Dutch population of Bernese mountain dogs and Flat-coated retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erich, Suzanne A; Rutteman, Gerard R; Teske, Erik

    2013-12-01

    Bernese mountain dogs and Flat-coated retrievers are predisposed to hereditary oncological diseases. Since 1986 several authors have reported a high prevalence of tumours in both breeds, especially malignant histiocytosis/histiocytic sarcoma, which has a negative influence on life expectancy. However, many earlier reports included relatively low numbers of dogs, distributed over a small number of broad categories, often using outdated disease criteria. The aim of this study was to provide new data on causes of death, and the relative role of tumours, especially histiocytic sarcoma, collected and verified in a large number of dogs of both breeds in co-operation with dog owners and veterinarians. The study demonstrates that the death of at least 55.1% of Bernese mountain dogs and 63.8% of Flat-coated retrievers is associated with malignant tumours. In addition, it appears that over 1/7 of all Bernese mountain dogs and Flat-coated retrievers die because of histiocytic sarcoma. This emphasises the need for further research on tumours, especially histiocytic sarcoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A study on the cause of death produced by angusticeps-type toxin F7 isolated from eastern green mamba venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C Y; Lee, S Y; Chen, Y M

    1986-01-01

    The cause of death due to toxin F7, an angusticeps-type toxin, isolated from the venom of Dendroaspis angusticeps was studied in anesthetized mice. The carotid arterial blood pressure, the ECG and the respiratory movements were recorded. Within a few minutes after i.v. injection of F7 (1 mg/kg), both the rate and amplitude of the respiratory movements decreased and respiratory arrest took place within 15 min in most cases. Before respiratory arrest, marked bradycardia with various types of arrhythmia and oscillation of blood pressure were observed. Artificial ventilation could abolish these cardiovascular changes and maintain the blood pressure for a long period. Toxin F7 caused a transient and slight increase of arterial blood pressure which could be prevented by hexamethonium. Intracisternal application of F7 (1 mg/kg) caused a long-lasting hypertension and bradycardia and the respiratory arrest time was significantly longer than after i.v. injection. A large dose (50 mg/kg i.p.) of atropine, but not smaller doses (5-10 mg/kg), protected mice against respiratory failure induced by F7. In rats, the phrenic nerve discharge was prolonged during respiratory depression. Since F7 has a potent anticholinesterase activity, it is concluded that the respiratory failure induced by F7 is peripheral in origin, chiefly, if not entirely, due to its anticholinesterase activity.

  12. Implementing a generic method for bias correction in statistical models using random effects, with spatial and population dynamics examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorson, James T.; Kristensen, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Statistical models play an important role in fisheries science when reconciling ecological theory with available data for wild populations or experimental studies. Ecological models increasingly include both fixed and random effects, and are often estimated using maximum likelihood techniques...... abundance relative to the conventional plug-in estimator, and also gives essentially identical estimates to a sample-based bias-correction estimator. The epsilon-method has been implemented by us as a generic option in the open-source Template Model Builder software, and could be adapted within other....... Quantities of biological or management interest ("derived quantities") are then often calculated as nonlinear functions of fixed and random effect estimates. However, the conventional "plug-in" estimator for a derived quantity in a maximum likelihood mixed-effects model will be biased whenever the estimator...

  13. A statistical approach for site error correction in lightning location networks with DF/TOA technique and its application results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Chen, Mingli; Du, Yaping; Qiu, Zongxu

    2017-02-01

    Lightning location network (LLN) with DF/TOA (direction-finder/time-of-arrival) combined technique has been widely used in the world. However, the accuracy of the lightning data from such LLNs has still been restricted by "site error", especially for those detected only by two DF/TOA sensors. In this paper we practice a statistical approach for evaluation and correction of "site error" for DF/TOA type LLN based on its lightning data. By comparing lightning locations recorded by at least 4 sensors between DF and TOA techniques, the spatial characteristics of "site error" for each sensor in the network can be obtained. The obtained "site error" then can be used to improve the accuracy of lightning locations especially those recorded by only 2 sensors. With this approach, the "site error" patterns for 23 sensors in Yunnan LLN are obtained. The features of these site error patterns are in good consistency with those in literature. Significant differences in lightning locations before and after "site error" corrections indicate that the proposed approach works effectively.

  14. Trends in underlying causes of death in people with HIV from 1999 to 2011 (D:A:D): a multicohort collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Colette J; Ryom, Lene; Weber, Rainer; Morlat, Philippe; Pradier, Christian; Reiss, Peter; Kowalska, Justyna D; de Wit, Stephane; Law, Matthew; el Sadr, Wafaa; Kirk, Ole; Friis-Moller, Nina; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Phillips, Andrew N; Sabin, Caroline A; Lundgren, Jens D

    2014-07-19

    With the advent of effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy for people with HIV is now approaching that seen in the general population. Consequently, the relative importance of other traditionally non-AIDS-related morbidities has increased. We investigated trends over time in all-cause mortality and for specific causes of death in people with HIV from 1999 to 2011. Individuals from the Data collection on Adverse events of anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study were followed up from March, 1999, until death, loss to follow-up, or Feb 1, 2011, whichever occurred first. The D:A:D study is a collaboration of 11 cohort studies following HIV-1-positive individuals receiving care at 212 clinics in Europe, USA, and Australia. All fatal events were centrally validated at the D:A:D coordinating centre using coding causes of death in HIV (CoDe) methodology. We calculated relative rates using Poisson regression. 3909 of the 49,731 D:A:D study participants died during the 308,719 person-years of follow-up (crude incidence mortality rate, 12.7 per 1000 person-years [95% CI 12.3-13.1]). Leading underlying causes were: AIDS-related (1123 [29%] deaths), non-AIDS-defining cancers (590 [15%] deaths), liver disease (515 [13%] deaths), and cardiovascular disease (436 [11%] deaths). Rates of all-cause death per 1000 person-years decreased from 17.5 in 1999-2000 to 9.1 in 2009-11; we saw similar decreases in death rates per 1000 person-years over the same period for AIDS-related deaths (5.9 to 2.0), deaths from liver disease (2.7 to 0.9), and cardiovascular disease deaths (1.8 to 0.9). However, non-AIDS cancers increased slightly from 1.6 per 1000 person-years in 1999-2000 to 2.1 in 2009-11 (p=0.58). After adjustment for factors that changed over time, including CD4 cell count, we detected no decreases in AIDS-related death rates (relative rate for 2009-11 vs 1999-2000: 0.92 [0.70-1.22]). However, all-cause (0.72 [0.61-0.83]), liver disease (0.48 [0.32-0.74]), and cardiovascular

  15. Approach to indicators of avoidable cause of death among infants in Sichuan province%四川省婴儿可避免死亡分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋迎佳; 吴方银; 曹静; 赵梓伶; 熊庆

    2011-01-01

    [Objective]To determine avoidable death indication among infants in Sichuan province and reduce mortality of infants.[Method]Relative risk(RR) of mortality in infants between USA and Sichuan, rural and urban areas of Sichuan were measured to determine avoidable death indicators among Sichuan province.[Results]Septicemia, pneumonia, diarrhea, tetanus, neonatal scleredema, intracerebral hemorrhage, Down's syndrome, birth asphyxia, accident suffocation, drowning, accident falling were considered as avoidable death causes of Sichuan province.[Conclusion]Avoidable causes of death mortality among infants in Sichuan should be controlled by medical intervention.%[目的]明确四川省婴儿可避免死亡指标,为制定该省婴儿死亡率的卫生政策和医疗保健措施提供一定的理论依据.[方法]根据Rutstein等提出的可避免死亡指标,采用四川省与美国、本省城乡婴儿死因死亡率对比,计算相对危险度.[结果]四川省婴儿可避免死因为:败血症、肺炎、腹泻、新生儿破伤风、新生儿硬肿症、颅内出血、先天愚型、出生窒息、意外窒息、溺水和意外跌落.[结论]要降低本省婴儿死亡率,应加强可避免死因疾病的控制.

  16. Disease patterns and causes of death of hospitalized HIV-positive adults in West Africa: a multicountry survey in the antiretroviral treatment era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Lewden

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to describe the morbidity and mortality patterns in HIV-positive adults hospitalized in West Africa. Method: We conducted a six-month prospective multicentre survey within the IeDEA West Africa collaboration in six adult medical wards of teaching hospitals in Abidjan, Ouagadougou, Cotonou, Dakar and Bamako. From April to October 2010, all newly hospitalized HIV-positive patients were eligible. Baseline and follow-up information until hospital discharge was recorded using standardized forms. Diagnoses were reviewed by a local event validation committee using reference definitions. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality were studied with a logistic regression model. Results: Among 823 hospitalized HIV-positive adults (median age 40 years, 58% women, 24% discovered their HIV infection during the hospitalization, median CD4 count was 75/mm3 (IQR: 25–177 and 48% had previously received antiretroviral treatment (ART. The underlying causes of hospitalization were AIDS-defining conditions (54%, other infections (32%, other diseases (8% and non-specific illness (6%. The most frequent diseases diagnosed were: tuberculosis (29%, pneumonia (15%, malaria (10% and cerebral toxoplasmosis (10%. Overall, 315 (38% patients died during hospitalization and the underlying cause of death was AIDS (63%, non-AIDS-defining infections (26%, other diseases (7% and non-specific illness or unknown cause (4%. Among them, the most frequent fatal diseases were: tuberculosis (36%, cerebral toxoplasmosis (10%, cryptococcosis (9% and sepsis (7%. Older age, clinical WHO stage 3 and 4, low CD4 count, and AIDS-defining infectious diagnoses were associated with hospital fatality. Conclusions: AIDS-defining conditions, primarily tuberculosis, and bacterial infections were the most frequent causes of hospitalization in HIV-positive adults in West Africa and resulted in high in-hospital fatality. Sustained efforts are needed to integrate care of these

  17. Subtypes of Native American ancestry and leading causes of death: Mapuche ancestry-specific associations with gallbladder cancer risk in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo; Boekstegers, Felix; González Silos, Rosa; Marcelain, Katherine; Baez Benavides, Pablo; Barahona Ponce, Carol; Müller, Bettina; Ferreccio, Catterina; Koshiol, Jill; Fischer, Christine; Peil, Barbara; Sinsheimer, Janet; Fuentes Guajardo, Macarena; Barajas, Olga; Gonzalez-Jose, Rolando; Bedoya, Gabriel; Cátira Bortolini, Maria; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Gallo, Carla; Ruiz Linares, Andres; Rothhammer, Francisco

    2017-05-01

    Latin Americans are highly heterogeneous regarding the type of Native American ancestry. Consideration of specific associations with common diseases may lead to substantial advances in unraveling of disease etiology and disease prevention. Here we investigate possible associations between the type of Native American ancestry and leading causes of death. After an aggregate-data study based on genome-wide genotype data from 1805 admixed Chileans and 639,789 deaths, we validate an identified association with gallbladder cancer relying on individual data from 64 gallbladder cancer patients, with and without a family history, and 170 healthy controls. Native American proportions were markedly underestimated when the two main types of Native American ancestry in Chile, originated from the Mapuche and Aymara indigenous peoples, were combined together. Consideration of the type of Native American ancestry was crucial to identify disease associations. Native American ancestry showed no association with gallbladder cancer mortality (P = 0.26). By contrast, each 1% increase in the Mapuche proportion represented a 3.7% increased mortality risk by gallbladder cancer (95%CI 3.1-4.3%, P = 6×10-27). Individual-data results and extensive sensitivity analyses confirmed the association between Mapuche ancestry and gallbladder cancer. Increasing Mapuche proportions were also associated with an increased mortality due to asthma and, interestingly, with a decreased mortality by diabetes. The mortality due to skin, bladder, larynx, bronchus and lung cancers increased with increasing Aymara proportions. Described methods should be considered in future studies on human population genetics and human health. Complementary individual-based studies are needed to apportion the genetic and non-genetic components of associations identified relying on aggregate-data.

  18. HIV感染者/AIDS病人死亡原因的研究进展%Analysis of the causes of death of HIV infectors/AIDS patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯瑞芳; 刘中夫

    2013-01-01

    近年来,随着越来越多的艾滋病病毒(HIV)感染者进入艾滋病(AIDS)发病期,越来越多的感染者死于AIDS相关疾病.另外,随着抗病毒治疗的覆盖率不断扩大,HIV感染者/AIDS病人死于AIDS相关疾病的比例不断降低,而死于其他非AIDS相关疾病的比例却不断升高.文章就当前国内外对HIV感染者/AIDS病人死亡原因的有关研究进展进行综述,为医疗机构加强和提高对重点疾病的诊疗技术水平提供理论支持,也为中国AIDS死因监测的建立提供理论依据.%In recent years, an increasing number of HIV infectors died of AIDS related diseases because more and more HIV infections are progressing into AIDS stage. Furthermore, along with the expanding of antiretroviral therapy coverage, the proportion of HIV infectors/AIDS patients who died of AIDS related diseases was decreasing while the proportion of deaths of non-AIDS related diseases was rising continuously. This paper reviews domestic and oversea reports about progress in researches on the causes of death of HIV infectors/AIDS patients. Hopefully it could provide theoretical support and evidence for medical care facilities to strengthen and enhance their diagnostic and therapeutic ability and also for the establishment of AIDS related death monitoring system in China.

  19. Second Cancers and Richter’s Transformation are the Leading Causes of Death in Patients with Trisomy 12 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strati, Paolo; Abruzzo, Lynne V.; Wierda, William G.; O’Brien, Susan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Trisomy 12 (+12) is detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis in up to 20% of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Patients with +12 are known to have unique features and to carry an intermediate prognosis. In order to better define this large group, we reviewed the characteristics of 250 untreated patients with +12. When compared to 516 untreated patients negative for +12 by FISH, patients with +12 showed a higher incidence of thrombocytopenia, Richter Transformation (RT) and second malignant neoplasms (SMN), in addition to the expected increased rate of CD38 positivity and atypical immunophenotype. At a median follow-up of 51 months, 57% of patients needed first-line treatment; median time-to-first-treatment was 38 months and on multivariate analysis (MVA) it was shorter in patients with advanced Rai stage, palpable splenomegaly, and deletion 14q by conventional cytogenetic analysis. The overall response rate with first-line treatment was 94%. The median failure-free survival has not been reached, but on MVA it was shorter in patients who achieved a response other than complete remission or with FISH negativity for deletion 13q. The median overall survival for the entire group has not been reached, but on MVA it was shorter in patients with an absolute lymphocyte count >30×109/L or who developed SMN. Eighteen deaths have been observed so far, and RT and SMN were the leading causes of death (3 and 6, respectively). In conclusion, patients with +12 CLL show characteristic clinical and biological features, and may benefit from increased surveillance for second cancers. PMID:25800543

  20. Temporal Trends in Geographical Variation in Breast Cancer Mortality in China, 1973–2005: An Analysis of Nationwide Surveys on Cause of Death

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    Changfa Xia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To describe geographical variation in breast cancer mortality over time, we analysed breast cancer mortality data from three retrospective national surveys on causes of death in recent decades in China. We first calculated the age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR for each of the 31 provinces in mainland China stratified by survey period (1973–1975, 1990–1992 and 2004–2005. To test whether the geographical variation in breast cancer mortality changed over time, we then estimated the rate ratio (RR for the aggregated data for seven regions and three economic zones using generalized linear models. Finally, we examined the correlation between mortality rate and several macro-economic measures at the provincial level. We found that the overall ASMR increased from 2.98 per 100,000 in 1973–1975 to 3.08 per 100,000 in 1990–1992, and to 3.85 per 100,000 in 2004–2005. Geographical variation in breast cancer mortality also increased significantly over time at the regional level (p = 0.002 but not at the economic zone (p = 0.089 level, with RR being generally lower for Western China (Northwest and Southwest and higher in Northeast China over the three survey periods. These temporal and spatial trends in breast cancer mortality were found to be correlated with per capita gross domestic product, number of hospitals and health centres’ beds per 10,000 population and number of practicing doctors per 10,000 population, and average number of live births for women aged 15–64. It may be necessary to target public health policies in China to address the widening geographic variation in breast cancer mortality, and to take steps to ensure that the ease of access and the quality of cancer care across the country is improved for all residents.

  1. Temporal Trends in Geographical Variation in Breast Cancer Mortality in China, 1973–2005: An Analysis of Nationwide Surveys on Cause of Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Changfa; Kahn, Clare; Wang, Jinfeng; Liao, Yilan; Chen, Wanqing; Yu, Xue Qin

    2016-01-01

    To describe geographical variation in breast cancer mortality over time, we analysed breast cancer mortality data from three retrospective national surveys on causes of death in recent decades in China. We first calculated the age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) for each of the 31 provinces in mainland China stratified by survey period (1973–1975, 1990–1992 and 2004–2005). To test whether the geographical variation in breast cancer mortality changed over time, we then estimated the rate ratio (RR) for the aggregated data for seven regions and three economic zones using generalized linear models. Finally, we examined the correlation between mortality rate and several macro-economic measures at the provincial level. We found that the overall ASMR increased from 2.98 per 100,000 in 1973–1975 to 3.08 per 100,000 in 1990–1992, and to 3.85 per 100,000 in 2004–2005. Geographical variation in breast cancer mortality also increased significantly over time at the regional level (p = 0.002) but not at the economic zone (p = 0.089) level, with RR being generally lower for Western China (Northwest and Southwest) and higher in Northeast China over the three survey periods. These temporal and spatial trends in breast cancer mortality were found to be correlated with per capita gross domestic product, number of hospitals and health centres’ beds per 10,000 population and number of practicing doctors per 10,000 population, and average number of live births for women aged 15–64. It may be necessary to target public health policies in China to address the widening geographic variation in breast cancer mortality, and to take steps to ensure that the ease of access and the quality of cancer care across the country is improved for all residents. PMID:27690073

  2. [Infant mortality by cause of death in the Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area, 1976-1986: association with socioeconomic, climatic and air pollution variables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchiade, M P; Beltrao, K I

    1992-01-01

    The Metropolitan Region of Rio de Janeiro (RMR) consists of the capital (the city of Rio de Janeiro) and 13 surrounding cities. The city of Rio de Janeiro itself was divided into 24 rather heterogeneous administrative regions (RAS) based on the income level of their inhabitants, the supply of public services such as water and sewerage, and population density or air pollution. Three different socioeconomic covariables were selected in three residential zones (ZONA) or subareas: the central rich nucleus, the intermediary zone of transition, and the distant periphery. As dependent variables the specific rate of infant, neonatal, or postneonatal mortality were considered for causes. The RMRJ Civil Register mortality data were utilized. A factor of correction was estimated according to the technique of Brass using the fertility rate and the rate of delivery for specific 5-year age groups of mothers. A multivariate analysis, the adjusted generalized linear model (MLG), was used for studying associations between socioeconomic, climatic, and air pollution variables and the levels of mortality. The MLG was formulated by means of the statistical package, GLIM or Generalized Linear Interactive Modelling. Analysis of infant mortality trends during 1976-1986 for the large subareas of RMRJ and the outlying region showed that the peak months of total neonatal and perinatal mortality were March and February, while the lowest months were November and October. May and June represented maximum rates of postneonatal mortality for pneumonia, diarrhea, other respiratory infections, malnutrition, and other diseases. MLG indicated that there was a statistically significant association between the annual mortality rate for selected causes and socioeconomic indicators (INS, FS and Zona); the rates of mortality also varied depending on time (ANO and ANOQ); and the mortality rates also appeared to be associated with the variations of the log of average pollution (LPM).

  3. Voxel-based morphometry and automated lobar volumetry: the trade-off between spatial scale and statistical correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voormolen, Eduard H J; Wei, Corie; Chow, Eva W C; Bassett, Anne S; Mikulis, David J; Crawley, Adrian P

    2010-01-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and automated lobar region of interest (ROI) volumetry are comprehensive and fast methods to detect differences in overall brain anatomy on magnetic resonance images. However, VBM and automated lobar ROI volumetry have detected dissimilar gray matter differences within identical image sets in our own experience and in previous reports. To gain more insight into how diverging results arise and to attempt to establish whether one method is superior to the other, we investigated how differences in spatial scale and in the need to statistically correct for multiple spatial comparisons influence the relative sensitivity of either technique to group differences in gray matter volumes. We assessed the performance of both techniques on a small dataset containing simulated gray matter deficits and additionally on a dataset of 22q11-deletion syndrome patients with schizophrenia (22q11DS-SZ) vs. matched controls. VBM was more sensitive to simulated focal deficits compared to automated ROI volumetry, and could detect global cortical deficits equally well. Moreover, theoretical calculations of VBM and ROI detection sensitivities to focal deficits showed that at increasing ROI size, ROI volumetry suffers more from loss in sensitivity than VBM. Furthermore, VBM and automated ROI found corresponding GM deficits in 22q11DS-SZ patients, except in the parietal lobe. Here, automated lobar ROI volumetry found a significant deficit only after a smaller sub-region of interest was employed. Thus, sensitivity to focal differences is impaired relatively more by averaging over larger volumes in automated ROI methods than by the correction for multiple comparisons in VBM. These findings indicate that VBM is to be preferred over automated lobar-scale ROI volumetry for assessing gray matter volume differences between groups.

  4. Causes of death in two rural demographic surveillance sites in Bangladesh, 2004–2010: automated coding of verbal autopsies using InterVA-4

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    Nurul Alam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Population-based information on causes of death (CoD by age, sex, and area is critical for countries with limited resources to identify and address key public health issues. This study analysed the demographic surveillance and verbal autopsy (VA data to estimate age- and sex-specific mortality rates and cause-specific mortality fractions in two well-defined rural populations within the demographic surveillance system in Abhoynagar and Mirsarai subdistricts, located in different climatic zones. Design: During 2004–2010, the sample demographic surveillance system registered 1,384 deaths in Abhoynagar and 1,847 deaths in Mirsarai. Trained interviewers interviewed the main caretaker of the deceased with standard VA questionnaires to record signs and symptoms of diseases or conditions that led to death and health care experiences before death. The computer-automated InterVA-4 method was used to analyse VAs to determine probable CoD. Results: Age- and sex-specific death rates revealed a higher neonatal mortality rate in Abhoynagar than Mirsarai, and death rates and sex ratios of male to female death rates were higher in the ages after infancy. Communicable diseases (CDs accounted for 16.7% of all deaths in Abhoynagar and 21.2% in Mirsarai – the difference was due mostly to more deaths from acute respiratory infections, pneumonia, and tuberculosis in Mirsarai. Non-communicable diseases (NCDs accounted for 56.2 and 55.3% of deaths in each subdistrict, respectively, with leading causes being stroke (16.5–19.3%, neoplasms (13.2% each, cardiac diseases (8.9–11.6%, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (5.1–6.3%, diseases of the digestive system (3.1–4.1%, and diabetes (2.8–3.5%, together accounting for 49.2–51.2% points of the NCD deaths in the two subdistricts. Injury and other external causes accounted for another 7.5–7.7% deaths, with self-harm being higher among females in Abhoynagar. Conclusions: The computer

  5. Patterns of survival and causes of death following a diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Björkholm, Magnus; Andersson, Therese M-L; Eloranta, Sandra; Dickman, Paul W; Goldin, Lynn R; Blimark, Cecilie; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Wahlin, Anders; Turesson, Ingemar; Landgren, Ola

    2009-12-01

    There are limited data on survival patterns among patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. We compared the survival of 4,259 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, collected from hematology outpatient units in Sweden, with the survival of the general population by computing relative survival ratios. We also compared causes of death in these patients with those in 16,151 matched controls. One-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year relative survival ratios were 0.98 (95% CI 0.97-0.99), 0.93 (0.91-0.95), 0.82 (0.79-0.84), and 0.70 (0.64-0.76), respectively. Younger age at diagnosis of the gammopathy was associated with a significantly lower excess mortality compared to that in older patients (pundetermined significance had an increased risk of dying from multiple myeloma (hazards ratio (HR)=553; 95% CI 77-3946), Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (HR=infinity), other lymphoproliferative malignancies (6.5; 2.8-15.1), other hematologic malignancies (22.9; 8.9-58.7), amyloidosis (HR=infinity), bacterial infections (3.4; 1.7-6.7), ischemic heart disease (1.3; 1.1-1.4), other heart disorders (1.5; 1.2-1.8), other hematologic conditions (6.9; 2.7-18), liver (2.1; 1.1-4.2), and renal diseases (3.2; 2.0-4.9). Our finding of decreased life expectancy in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which was most pronounced in the elderly and explained by both malignant transformation and non-malignant causes, is of importance in the understanding and clinical management of this disease. The underlying mechanisms may be causally related to the gammopathy, but may also be explained by underlying disease that led to the detection of the hematologic disease. Our results are of importance since they give a true estimation of survival in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance diagnosed in clinical practice.

  6. Confiabilidade da informação sobre mortalidade por violência em Belo Horizonte, MG Reliability of cause of death due to violence from information systems in Belo Horizonte, Southern Brazil

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    Sonia Gesteira e Matos

    2007-02-01

    Medicine Institute database; and to assess the impact of adding information of non-specified injuries and undetermined death events subsequently obtained from Forensic Medicine Institute in the mortality statistics due to violence. METHODS: A random sample of 411 death certificates due to violence was obtained in Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil, between 1998 and 2000. Based on data from death certificates and Forensic Medicine Institute database, causes of death were coded and the agreement between this information and that from Mortality Information System was assessed. Also, in all certificates including "non-specified injury" and "undetermined death events," the impact of adding information from Forensic Medicine Institute was assessed in the classification of cause of death. RESULTS: Coding agreement was significant (Kappa=0.782; 95% CI: 0.744; 0.819 and of the underlying cause was moderate to significant (Kappa=0.602; 95% CI: 0.563; 0.641. There were 12.9% and 5.7% misclassification of suicides and murders, respectively, for those causes classified as "non-specified injury" and "undetermined death events," which were overall reduced to 47.3% and 59.8% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for further improving the process of underlying cause coding and selection. Also medical examiners need to provide more complete death certificates and medical and police information provided with bodies for Forensic Medicine Institute autopsy should be more complete, especially in those cases of road traffic injuries and falls.

  7. 对光绪帝死因研究的回顾与反思%On the Cause of Death of Emperor Guangxu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏全有

    2011-01-01

    光绪帝死因问题是学界百年公案,2008年科技检测证明光绪帝系砒霜中毒死亡。科技手段的介入推动了史学研究的进步,并得到广泛认同。随着学界认识的趋同,其研究重点迅速由“是否被害”转而为“凶手是谁”。而数十年来借助文献档案研究的主流观点是光绪帝死于疾病,这与科技检测之间形成鲜明的对立。尽管学界也有文章利用文献档案等历史文字资料进行研究得出光绪死于谋杀的结论,只是这一结论未能占据主流,难以被广泛认同。文献档案资料的最大不足在于内涵的多歧性,这就要求史学工作者要付出更多的艰辛,去伪存真。文献档案与科技手段相结合昭示着史学的光明未来,史学研究方法多样化是未来史学的必由之赂。%The cause of death of Emperor Guangxu(1875--1908) is a hundred-year case. In 2008, the test Findings showed that Emperor Guangxu died of arsenic poisoning. The involvement of Science and technology promote the progress of historical studies, and it is widely recognized. With the convergence of academic knowledge, the fbcus of research shifts quickly from "whether he is the victim" to "Who is the murderer." The past decade research through literature has come to the shared view that Emperor Guangxu died of disease, which forms a striking contrast with the test findings t~rough technology. Though some scholars put forward the similar sentiments, yet theirs are not testified and then accepted widely. The biggest deficiency in the literature archives is that there exist multiple interpretations of the same literature, which requires historians make more efforts to work hard, eliminating the false and retaining tbe trae. Therefore, the combination of documents and archives with technology means means a brighter future for history study, which means that the melhod for historical study should be diverse.

  8. Advance Report of Final Mortality Statistics, 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthly Vital Statistics Report, 1987

    1987-01-01

    This document presents mortality statistics for 1985 for the entire United States. Data analysis and discussion of these factors is included: death and death rates; death rates by age, sex, and race; expectation of life at birth and at specified ages; causes of death; infant mortality; and maternal mortality. Highlights reported include: (1) the…

  9. Use of verbal autopsy in a national health information system: Effects of the investigation of ill-defined causes of death on proportional mortality due to injury in small municipalities in Brazil

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    Souza Maria de Fátima M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mortality Information System (MIS in Brazil records mortality data in hospitals and civil registries with the responsibility of compiling underlying cause of death. Despite continuous improvements in the MIS, some areas still maintain a high proportion of deaths assigned to ill-defined causes. Deaths coded to this category have most likely been considered as miscoded deaths from communicable and noncommunicable diseases. However, some local studies have provided evidence of underreporting of injury in Brazil. The aim of this study was to investigate ill-defined causes of death using the verbal autopsy (VA method to estimate injury-specific mortality fraction in small municipalities in northeastern Minas Gerais, Brazil. Methods A sample size of reported death certificates with ill-defined conditions in a random sample of 10 municipalities was obtained, and then trained interviewers questioned family members using a standardized VA questionnaire to elicit information on symptoms experienced by the deceased before death. All attempts were made to collect existing information about the disease or death using health facilities records. Probable causes of death were assigned by a physician after review of the completed questionnaires following rules of the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10. Results Of 202 eligible ill-defined deaths, 151 were investigated using the VA methodology, and 12.6% had injury as the underlying cause of death. The proportional mortality fraction from injury among all causes of death increases from 4.4% to 8.2% after investigation. Different specific injury category causes were observed between recorded injury causes and those detected by VA. Drowning was the top specific injury cause detected after investigation. Conclusions This study provides evidence that the use of VA in the investigation of registered ill-defined conditions in an existing MIS can furnish

  10. 北京市1965-1974年居民死因分析%Analysis on causes of death of residents in Beijing, 1965-1974

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦再华; 谢学勤; 刘菲; 王苹; 王晶; 高燕琳; 苏健婷; 杜婧; 刘庆萍

    2016-01-01

    目的 填补1965-1974年北京市居民死亡资料的历史空白,为其他地区死亡数据的补充提供参考.方法 通过专家咨询了解北京市居民死亡资料保存情况,采用分层抽样方法采集北京市城区该期间死亡居民户个案信息.应用死亡率、死亡构成、死因顺位等指标进行描述性分析.结果 收集1965-1974年北京市城区10个派出所保存的死亡居民户个案信息11 668条.该时期北京市城区居民前十位死亡原因依次为心脏病、肿瘤、脑血管病、意外伤害、呼吸系统疾病、消化系统疾病、传染病和寄生虫病、神经系统疾病、泌尿生殖系统疾病、内分泌、营养代谢类疾病,占全死因的84.19%.意外伤害占总死亡的13.22%,高于1964年与1975年水平,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),自杀占全部意外伤害死亡的54.47%,位居意外伤害死亡的首位.男性前三位死因分别为意外伤害、肿瘤和心脏病,女性为心脏病、肿瘤和脑血管病.结论 1965-1974年北京市城区居民死亡的主要疾病从传染病向慢性非传染性疾病过渡.受历史原因影响,意外伤害成为该时期影响人群健康的主要原因之一.%Objective To fill up the absence of data on causes of death of urban residents in Beijing during 1965-1974 and provide evidence for the similar study in other areas.Methods All possible sources for death data during 1965-1974 were identified through expert consultations and record search.Stratified sampling was conducted to collect the death data of urban residents during this period in Beijing.The mortality rate,death cause constituent and rank of death causes were used in this descriptive analysis.Results A total of 11 668 records of deaths from 1965 to 1974 were collected from 10 local police stations in urban area of Beijing.The top 10 death causes in the urban residents were heart disease,tumor,cerebrovascular disease,accidental injury,respiratory system disease

  11. Statistical methods to correct for verification bias in diagnostic studies are inadequate when there are few false negatives: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers Andrew J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A common feature of diagnostic research is that results for a diagnostic gold standard are available primarily for patients who are positive for the test under investigation. Data from such studies are subject to what has been termed "verification bias". We evaluated statistical methods for verification bias correction when there are few false negatives. Methods A simulation study was conducted of a screening study subject to verification bias. We compared estimates of the area-under-the-curve (AUC corrected for verification bias varying both the rate and mechanism of verification. Results In a single simulated data set, varying false negatives from 0 to 4 led to verification bias corrected AUCs ranging from 0.550 to 0.852. Excess variation associated with low numbers of false negatives was confirmed in simulation studies and by analyses of published studies that incorporated verification bias correction. The 2.5th – 97.5th centile range constituted as much as 60% of the possible range of AUCs for some simulations. Conclusion Screening programs are designed such that there are few false negatives. Standard statistical methods for verification bias correction are inadequate in this circumstance.

  12. 四肢战创伤院内死亡原因及危险因素的logistic回归分析%The causes of death and risk factors in pafients of war wound and trauma of extremities by logistic regression model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程昌志; 赵东海; 李全岳; 曲海燕; 陈伯成; 林舟丹

    2008-01-01

    .05).Conclusion Acute renal failure(ARF) was the main cause of death of patients of war wound and trauma of extremities.Its should be helpful for minimize the mortality of patients of war wound and trauma to manage the shock in time and have a correct choice of amputation promptly.

  13. Statistical bias correction method applied on CMIP5 datasets over the Indian region during the summer monsoon season for climate change applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, V.

    2016-11-01

    This study makes use of temperature and precipitation from CMIP5 climate model output for climate change application studies over the Indian region during the summer monsoon season (JJAS). Bias correction of temperature and precipitation from CMIP5 GCM simulation results with respect to observation is discussed in detail. The non-linear statistical bias correction is a suitable bias correction method for climate change data because it is simple and does not add up artificial uncertainties to the impact assessment of climate change scenarios for climate change application studies (agricultural production changes) in the future. The simple statistical bias correction uses observational constraints on the GCM baseline, and the projected results are scaled with respect to the changing magnitude in future scenarios, varying from one model to the other. Two types of bias correction techniques are shown here: (1) a simple bias correction using a percentile-based quantile-mapping algorithm and (2) a simple but improved bias correction method, a cumulative distribution function (CDF; Weibull distribution function)-based quantile-mapping algorithm. This study shows that the percentile-based quantile mapping method gives results similar to the CDF (Weibull)-based quantile mapping method, and both the methods are comparable. The bias correction is applied on temperature and precipitation variables for present climate and future projected data to make use of it in a simple statistical model to understand the future changes in crop production over the Indian region during the summer monsoon season. In total, 12 CMIP5 models are used for Historical (1901-2005), RCP4.5 (2005-2100), and RCP8.5 (2005-2100) scenarios. The climate index from each CMIP5 model and the observed agricultural yield index over the Indian region are used in a regression model to project the changes in the agricultural yield over India from RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios. The results revealed a better

  14. 5 year radar-based rainfall statistics: disturbances analysis and development of a post-correction scheme for the German radar composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wagner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A radar-based rainfall statistic demands high quality data that provide realistic precipitation amounts in space and time. Instead of correcting single radar images, we developed a post-correction scheme for long-term composite radar data that corrects corrupted areas, but preserves the original precipitation patterns. The post-correction scheme is based on a 5 year statistical analysis of radar composite data and its constituents. The accumulation of radar images reveals artificial effects that are not visible in the individual radar images. Some of them are already inherent to single radar data such as the effect of increasing beam height, beam blockage or clutter remnants. More artificial effects are introduced in the process of compositing such as sharp gradients at the boundaries of overlapping areas due to different beam heights and resolution. The cause of these disturbances, their behaviour with respect to reflectivity level, season or altitude is analysed based on time-series of two radar products: the single radar reflectivity product PX for each of the 16 radar systems of the German Meteorological Service (DWD for the time span 2000 to 2006 and the radar composite product RX of DWD from 2005 through to 2009. These statistics result in additional quality information on radar data that is not available elsewhere. The resulting robust characteristics of disturbances, e.g. the dependency of the frequencies of occurrence of radar reflectivities on beam height, are then used as a basis for the post-correction algorithm. The scheme comprises corrections for shading effects and speckles, such as clutter remnants or overfiltering, as well as for systematic differences in frequencies of occurrence of radar reflectivities between the near and the far ranges of individual radar sites. An adjustment to rain gauges is also included. Applying this correction, the Root-Mean-Square-Error for the comparison of radar derived annual rain amounts with

  15. The Application of Simulation-Assisted Learning Statistics (SALS) for Correcting Misconceptions and Improving Understanding of Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.-C.; Lin, Y.-C.; Kinshuk

    2010-01-01

    Simulation-based computer assisted learning (CAL) is recommended to help students understand important statistical concepts, although the current systems are still far from ideal. Simulation-Assisted Learning Statistics (SALS) is a simulation-based CAL that is developed with a learning model that is based on cognitive conflict theory to correct…

  16. Confiabilidade e validade das Declarações de Óbito por câncer de boca no Município de Teresina, Piauí, Brasil, no período de 2004 e 2005 Reliability and validity of death certificates specifying oral cancer as cause of death in Teresina, Piauí State, Brazil, 2004-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Tolstenko Nogueira

    2009-02-01

    mortality statistics were valid and reliable. One limitation to this study was the possible underreporting of cases with oral cancer as the underlying cause of death, given that such data are not included in the mortality information system in Teresina.

  17. Comorbidities, mortality and causes of death among patients with tuberculosis in Denmark 1998–2010: a nationwide, register-based case–control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløe, Andreas; Hilberg, Ole; Wejse, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of comorbidities, age and clinical presentation of TB on mortality among Danish patients with TB. Methods: Danish patients with an ICD-10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision) diagnosis of TB in 1998–2010...

  18. Statistical methods to correct for verification bias in diagnostic studies are inadequate when there are few false negatives: a simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Vickers Andrew J; Cronin Angel M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background A common feature of diagnostic research is that results for a diagnostic gold standard are available primarily for patients who are positive for the test under investigation. Data from such studies are subject to what has been termed "verification bias". We evaluated statistical methods for verification bias correction when there are few false negatives. Methods A simulation study was conducted of a screening study subject to verification bias. We compared estimates of the...

  19. Location specific forecasting of maximum and minimum temperatures over India by using the statistical bias corrected output of global forecasting system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V R Durai; Rashmi Bhardwaj

    2014-07-01

    The output from Global Forecasting System (GFS) T574L64 operational at India Meteorological Department (IMD), New Delhi is used for obtaining location specific quantitative forecast of maximum and minimum temperatures over India in the medium range time scale. In this study, a statistical bias correction algorithm has been introduced to reduce the systematic bias in the 24–120 hour GFS model location specific forecast of maximum and minimum temperatures for 98 selected synoptic stations, representing different geographical regions of India. The statistical bias correction algorithm used for minimizing the bias of the next forecast is Decaying Weighted Mean (DWM), as it is suitable for small samples. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the skill of Direct Model Output (DMO) and Bias Corrected (BC) GFS for location specific forecast of maximum and minimum temperatures over India. The performance skill of 24–120 hour DMO and BC forecast of GFS model is evaluated for all the 98 synoptic stations during summer (May–August 2012) and winter (November 2012–February 2013) seasons using different statistical evaluation skill measures. The magnitude of Mean Absolute Error (MAE) and Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) for BC GFS forecast is lower than DMO during both summer and winter seasons. The BC GFS forecasts have higher skill score as compared to GFS DMO over most of the stations in all day-1 to day-5 forecasts during both summer and winter seasons. It is concluded from the study that the skill of GFS statistical BC forecast improves over the GFS DMO remarkably and hence can be used as an operational weather forecasting system for location specific forecast over India.

  20. A new statistical time-dependent model of earthquake occurrence: failure processes driven by a self-correcting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondi, Renata; Varini, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    The long-term recurrence of strong earthquakes is often modelled by the stationary Poisson process for the sake of simplicity, although renewal and self-correcting point processes (with non-decreasing hazard functions) are more appropriate. Short-term models mainly fit earthquake clusters due to the tendency of an earthquake to trigger other earthquakes; in this case, self-exciting point processes with non-increasing hazard are especially suitable. In order to provide a unified framework for analyzing earthquake catalogs, Schoenberg and Bolt proposed the SELC (Short-term Exciting Long-term Correcting) model (BSSA, 2000) and Varini employed a state-space model for estimating the different phases of a seismic cycle (PhD Thesis, 2005). Both attempts are combinations of long- and short-term models, but results are not completely satisfactory, due to the different scales at which these models appear to operate. In this study, we split a seismic sequence in two groups: the leader events, whose magnitude exceeds a threshold magnitude, and the remaining ones considered as subordinate events. The leader events are assumed to follow a well-known self-correcting point process named stress release model (Vere-Jones, J. Phys. Earth, 1978; Bebbington & Harte, GJI, 2003, Varini & Rotondi, Env. Ecol. Stat., 2015). In the interval between two subsequent leader events, subordinate events are expected to cluster at the beginning (aftershocks) and at the end (foreshocks) of that interval; hence, they are modeled by a failure processes that allows bathtub-shaped hazard function. In particular, we have examined the generalized Weibull distributions, a large family that contains distributions with different bathtub-shaped hazard as well as the standard Weibull distribution (Lai, Springer, 2014). The model is fitted to a dataset of Italian historical earthquakes and the results of Bayesian inference are shown.

  1. 下肢动脉硬化闭塞症患者围手术期死亡原因分析%An analysis of the causes of death for patients of peripheral arterial disease during the perioperative period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳奎; 陈剑秋; 高洁; 吴义生; 李学东; 张韬; 沈晨阳; 张小明

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨下肢动脉硬化闭塞症围手术期死亡原因及影响因素,降低其围手术期死亡率.方法 回顾性分析2005年7月至2010年7月15例下肢动脉硬化闭塞症围手术期死亡的临床资料.结果 本组15例围手术期死亡患者中,术前死亡9例,包括多器官功能衰竭5例、心功能衰竭2例、心源性猝死和呼吸衰竭各1例;术后死亡6例,包括急性肾功能衰竭2例、心功能衰竭2例、脑梗死和失血性休克各1例.与心脏、肾脏及肺脏相关的死亡分别是10例、6例、2例;直接死于心功能衰竭、心源性猝死、肾功能衰竭、呼吸衰竭、脑梗死和失血性休克分别是4例、1例、2例、1例、1例、1例.多器官功能衰竭、心功能衰竭、急性肾功能衰竭是围手术期死亡的主要原因,共占73.33%(11/15).围手术期总病死率是3.11% (15/483),手术死亡率是1.47%( 6/407).结论 死亡原因与影响因素、器官功能密切相关,有效干预影响因素,加强围手术期器官功能的监测与治疗,有利于降低围手术期死亡率.%Objective To investigate the causes of death and the influencing factors in patients with peripheral arterial disease(PAD) during the perioperative period and reduce the perioperative mortality.Methods A retrospective analysis of the causes of death was performed for PAD during the perioperative period in our hospital from July 2005 to July 2010. Results Nine patients died preoperatively.The causes of death were multible organ failure in 5,heart failure in 2,sudden cardiac death in 1,and respiratory failure in 1.Six patients died postoperatively.The causes of death were acute renal failure in 2,heart failure in 2,cerebral infarction in 1,and hemorrhagic shock in 1.The causes of death which were related to heart,kidney and lung were in 10,6 and 2,respectively.The causes of death which were directly due to heart failure,sudden cardiac death,renal failure,respiratory failure,cerebral infarction and

  2. Optimized statistical parametric mapping for partial-volume-corrected amyloid positron emission tomography in patients with Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jungsu S.; Kim, Jae Seung; Chae, Sun Young; Oh, Minyoung; Oh, Seung Jun; Cha, Seung Nam; Chang, Ho-Jong; Lee, Chong Sik; Lee, Jae Hong

    2017-03-01

    We present an optimized voxelwise statistical parametric mapping (SPM) of partial-volume (PV)-corrected positron emission tomography (PET) of 11C Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB), incorporating the anatomical precision of magnetic resonance image (MRI) and amyloid β (A β) burden-specificity of PiB PET. First, we applied region-based partial-volume correction (PVC), termed the geometric transfer matrix (GTM) method, to PiB PET, creating MRI-based lobar parcels filled with mean PiB uptakes. Then, we conducted a voxelwise PVC by multiplying the original PET by the ratio of a GTM-based PV-corrected PET to a 6-mm-smoothed PV-corrected PET. Finally, we conducted spatial normalizations of the PV-corrected PETs onto the study-specific template. As such, we increased the accuracy of the SPM normalization and the tissue specificity of SPM results. Moreover, lobar smoothing (instead of whole-brain smoothing) was applied to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in the image without degrading the tissue specificity. Thereby, we could optimize a voxelwise group comparison between subjects with high and normal A β burdens (from 10 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 30 patients with Lewy body dementia, and 9 normal controls). Our SPM framework outperformed than the conventional one in terms of the accuracy of the spatial normalization (85% of maximum likelihood tissue classification volume) and the tissue specificity (larger gray matter, and smaller cerebrospinal fluid volume fraction from the SPM results). Our SPM framework optimized the SPM of a PV-corrected A β PET in terms of anatomical precision, normalization accuracy, and tissue specificity, resulting in better detection and localization of A β burdens in patients with Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia.

  3. Statistical Hauser-Feshbach theory with width fluctuation correction including direct reaction channels for neutron induced reaction at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Kawano, T; Hilaire, S

    2016-01-01

    A model to calculate particle-induced reaction cross sections with statistical Hauser-Feshbach theory including direct reactions is given. The energy average of scattering matrix from the coupled-channels optical model is diagonalized by the transformation proposed by Engelbrecht and Weidenm\\"{u}ller. The ensemble average of $S$-matrix elements in the diagonalized channel space is approximated by a model of Moldauer [Phys.Rev.C {\\bf 12}, 744 (1975)] using newly parametrized channel degree-of-freedom $\

  4. Gendered differences in AIDS and AIDS-related cause of death among youth with secondary education in South Africa, 2009–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole De Wet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS is higher among females than males in Sub-Saharan Africa. Education is associated with better health outcomes. For this and other reasons, African countries have made a concerted effort to increase youth education rates. However, in South Africa males have lower secondary education rates than females, yet females have a higher prevalence of HIV/AIDS. This study examines if a gender disparity exists in AIDS mortality rates among youth with secondary education in South Africa. Methods: This study uses descriptive statistics and life table techniques. A sample of 4386 deaths of youth with secondary education is used. Of this total sample, 987 deaths were among males and 340 were among females with secondary education. Results: This study shows that AIDS mortality is higher among females than males in South Africa. Males and females with secondary education have lower AIDS mortality than all males and females in the population, yet the rates are higher for females. Using cause-deleted life tables, the probability of youth dying from HIV/AIDS practically disappears for both males and females. Odds ratio calculations show that secondary education does not have a protective effect from AIDS mortality among male and female youth. Conclusion: Given the gendered difference in AIDS mortality among youth with secondary education, efforts to increase secondary education among males and further research into other factors exacerbating AIDS mortality among females with secondary education is needed in the country.

  5. Gendered differences in AIDS and AIDS-related cause of death among youth with secondary education in South Africa, 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wet, Nicole

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is higher among females than males in Sub-Saharan Africa. Education is associated with better health outcomes. For this and other reasons, African countries have made a concerted effort to increase youth education rates. However, in South Africa males have lower secondary education rates than females, yet females have a higher prevalence of HIV/AIDS. This study examines if a gender disparity exists in AIDS mortality rates among youth with secondary education in South Africa. This study uses descriptive statistics and life table techniques. A sample of 4386 deaths of youth with secondary education is used. Of this total sample, 987 deaths were among males and 340 were among females with secondary education. This study shows that AIDS mortality is higher among females than males in South Africa. Males and females with secondary education have lower AIDS mortality than all males and females in the population, yet the rates are higher for females. Using cause-deleted life tables, the probability of youth dying from HIV/AIDS practically disappears for both males and females. Odds ratio calculations show that secondary education does not have a protective effect from AIDS mortality among male and female youth. Given the gendered difference in AIDS mortality among youth with secondary education, efforts to increase secondary education among males and further research into other factors exacerbating AIDS mortality among females with secondary education is needed in the country.

  6. Best (but oft-forgotten) practices: the multiple problems of multiplicity-whether and how to correct for many statistical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streiner, David L

    2015-10-01

    Testing many null hypotheses in a single study results in an increased probability of detecting a significant finding just by chance (the problem of multiplicity). Debates have raged over many years with regard to whether to correct for multiplicity and, if so, how it should be done. This article first discusses how multiple tests lead to an inflation of the α level, then explores the following different contexts in which multiplicity arises: testing for baseline differences in various types of studies, having >1 outcome variable, conducting statistical tests that produce >1 P value, taking multiple "peeks" at the data, and unplanned, post hoc analyses (i.e., "data dredging," "fishing expeditions," or "P-hacking"). It then discusses some of the methods that have been proposed for correcting for multiplicity, including single-step procedures (e.g., Bonferroni); multistep procedures, such as those of Holm, Hochberg, and Šidák; false discovery rate control; and resampling approaches. Note that these various approaches describe different aspects and are not necessarily mutually exclusive. For example, resampling methods could be used to control the false discovery rate or the family-wise error rate (as defined later in this article). However, the use of one of these approaches presupposes that we should correct for multiplicity, which is not universally accepted, and the article presents the arguments for and against such "correction." The final section brings together these threads and presents suggestions with regard to when it makes sense to apply the corrections and how to do so.

  7. The causes of death of emergency patients in Xi'an Children's Hospital from 2009 to 2010%2009至2010年西安市儿童医院急诊患儿死亡原因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文俊; 常文毅; 周南

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解近2年西安市儿童医院急诊患者死亡疾病谱变化和直接死亡原因.方法 对2009年至2010年我院收治的130例急诊死亡病例进行回顾性分析.结果 2009年主要死亡疾病依次为:肺炎,先天性心脏病,窒息,新生儿肺出血,颅内出血;2010年主要死亡疾病依次为:肺炎,窒息,病毒性脑炎,先天性心脏病,新生儿肺出血,两年死亡疾病谱发生了明显变化.91例患儿找到直接死亡原因,依次为:呼吸衰竭25例(27.5%),心力衰竭17例(18.7%),休克17例(18.7%),窒息16例(17.5),脑疝16例(17.5%).结论 要降低急诊患儿的病死率,必须加强婴幼儿卫生保健,积极治疗肺部感染和全身感染,积极抗休克治疗,控制心力衰竭,以及预防误吸.%Objective To analyze the change of disease spectrum and the direct cause of death in Xi'an Children's Hospital emergency patients in the past 2 years.Methods The cases of death in 130 emergency cases from 2009 to 2010 were retrospectively analyzed.Results The main causes of death in 2009 were pneumonia,congenital heart disease,asphyxia,neonatal pulmonary hemorrhage and intracranial hemorrhage.Meanwhile,The main cause of death in 2010 were pneumonia,asphyxia,viral encephalitis,congenital heart disease and neonatal pulmonary hemorrhage,which significantly changed compared with 2009.Major direct causes of death were found:respiratory failure in 25 cases (27.5%),heart failure in 17 patients ( 18.7% ),shock in 17patients ( 18.7% ),asphyxia in 16 cases ( 17.5% ),and hernia in 16 cases ( 17.5% ),Conclusion In order to reduce the mortality rate of emergency patients,we should strengthen health care,actively manage pulmonary infection,systemic infection,and shock,control heart failure,and prevent aspiration.

  8. Achados de necropsia relacionados com a morte de 335 eqüinos: 1968-2007 Necropsy findings related to the cause of death in 335 horses: 1968-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Pierezan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Os protocolos de necropsia de 335 eqüinos necropsiados no LPV-UFSM entre 1968-2007 foram revisados com o objetivo de determinar os achados de necropsia relacionados com a causa da morte ou razão de eutanásia. A distribuição desses achados de acordo com os sistemas afetados foi a seguinte: digestivo (79/335 [23,6%], músculo-esquelético (47/335 ([14,0%], nervoso (37/335 [11,0%], respiratório (35/335 [10,4%], tegumentar (31/335 [9,3%], hematopoético (24/335 [7,2%], cardiovascular (13/335 [3,9%], reprodutor (12/335 [3,5%], urinário (7/335 [2,1%] e endócrino (3/335 [0,9%]. Não foi possível determinar a causa da morte em 47 (14,0% eqüinos necropsiados. As principais afecções do sistema digestivo foram as alterações na posição dos intestinos (17/79 [21,5%], seguidas pelas obstruções e impactações (14/79 [17,7%]. As torções foram as principais alterações da posição dos intestinos (14/17 [82,4%]. Dentre as torções, as mais prevalentes foram as localizadas no intestino delgado (7/14 [50%]. A maioria dos eqüinos que morreram em razão de fratura óssea tinham idades entre 1-5 anos. As duas doenças mais freqüentemente diagnosticadas no sistema nervoso foram leucoencefalomalacia e tripanossomíase. Depressão respiratória causada por anestesia foi a principal causa de morte relacionada com o sistema respiratório. A anemia infecciosa eqüina foi a doença infecciosa mais diagnosticada e a principal razão para eutanásia observada neste estudo.The necropsy reports of 335 horses necropsied at the LPV-UFSM between 1968-2007 were reviewed in order to determine the necropsy findings related with cause of death or reason for euthanasia. The distribution of these findings by organ system were as follows: digestive (79/335 [23.6%], striated muscle and skeleton (47/335 [14.0%], nervous (37/335 [11.0%], respiratory (35/335 [10.4%], integument (31/335 [9.3%], hematopoietic (24/335 [7.2%], cardiovascular (13/335 [3.9%], reproductive

  9. 水中尸体肺组织硅藻检验与死因分析%Diatom Test in Lung Tissue of Corpses in Water and Causes of Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李棨; 马开军; 张晓东; 余永安; 徐尚贵; 赵海; 陈新; 闫建军

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨肺组织中硅藻对于判断水中尸体死亡原因的应用价值.方法 收集水中尸体407例,对死亡原因、案件性质、组织器官中硅藻检验结果进行分析.取45只兔按照生前、死后入水及不同季节入水等随机分为9组,应用硝酸消化法处理检材,检测肺组织中硅藻含量.结果 407例水中尸体,硅藻检验阳性372例,其中意外死亡和自杀351例,他杀21例;硅藻检验阴性35例,其中多数为他杀后抛尸入水,部分为特殊环境中溺死.动物实验证实生前溺水兔肺组织中均检出大量与水样中相同种类硅藻,且春、秋季溺水后肺组织中检出的硅藻数量高于夏、冬季.结论 肺组织硅藻检验结果可作为判断水中尸体死亡原因的辅助依据,且与死亡方式存在一定的关联性,具体死亡方式需结合尸体检验结果、现场、案情等进行综合判断.%Objective To explore potential application of diatom test of lung tissue in investigation of cause of death in victim found in the water. Methods Four hundred and seven cases were collected and analyzed for cause of death and the nature of case. Diatom test was performed in tissues and the amount was quantified. Forty-five rabbits died in the water (antemortem, postmortem and different seasons drowning) were randomly divided into 9 groups and the diatom content in lung tissue were tested with the method of nitric acid. Results In 407 drowning cases, 372 cases showed a positive result of diatom test. In positive cases, the amount of accidents or suicide were 35 and homicide were 21. Thirty-five cases showed negative result of diatom test and majority were homicide in which bodies were thrown into the water after killing. Some drowning cases were in special circumstances. Animal experiments confirmed that a large amount of diatoms in lung tissue were detected in drowning victim and showed the same type in water. The amount of diatom in lung tissue was usually lower in

  10. After accounting for competing causes of death and more advanced stage, do Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with cancer still have worse survival? A population-based cohort study in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervonen, Hanna E; Walton, Richard; You, Hui; Baker, Deborah; Roder, David; Currow, David; Aranda, Sanchia

    2017-06-02

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia have been found to have poorer cancer survival than non-Aboriginal people. However, use of conventional relative survival analyses is limited due to a lack of life tables. This cohort study examined whether poorer survival persist after accounting for competing risks of death from other causes and disparities in cancer stage at diagnosis, for all cancers collectively and by cancer site. People diagnosed in 2000-2008 were extracted from the population-based New South Wales Cancer Registry. Aboriginal status was multiply imputed for people with missing information (12.9%). Logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 'advanced stage' at diagnosis (separately for distant and distant/regional stage). Survival was examined using competing risk regression to compute subhazard ratios (SHRs) with 95%CIs. Of the 301,356 cases, 2517 (0.84%) identified as Aboriginal (0.94% after imputation). After adjusting for age, sex, year of diagnosis, socio-economic status, remoteness, and cancer site Aboriginal peoples were more likely to be diagnosed with distant (OR 1.30, 95%CI 1.17-1.44) or distant/regional stage (OR 1.29, 95%CI 1.18-1.40) for all cancers collectively. This applied to cancers of the female breast, uterus, prostate, kidney, others (those not included in other categories) and cervix (when analyses were restricted to cases with known stages/known Aboriginal status). Aboriginal peoples had a higher hazard of death than non-Aboriginal people after accounting for competing risks from other causes of death, socio-demographic factors, stage and cancer site (SHR 1.40, 95%CI 1.31-1.50 for all cancers collectively). Consistent results applied to colorectal, lung, breast, prostate and other cancers. Aboriginal peoples with cancer have an elevated hazard of cancer death compared with non-Aboriginal people, after accounting for more advanced stage and competing

  11. A cor da morte: causas de óbito segundo características de raça no Estado de São Paulo, 1999 a 2001 The color of death: causes of death according to race in the State of Sao Paulo, 1999 to 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Eduardo Batista

    2004-10-01

    represent vulnerability to sickness, this study attempts to verify whether race or ethnic origin have an effect on mortality patterns. METHODS: The Sao Paulo State death register was examined from 1999 to 2001 in a contingence table of causes according to the 10th ICD and race or skin-color categories (White, Black, Mulatto and others. Chi-square test was used to check the association between skin-color and cause of death; residual analysis was used to elicit statistically significant excessive occurrences when each category of cause of death and skin color was combined; and correspondence analysis was used to examine overall relations among all categories considered. RESULTS: A total of 647,321 valid death registers were analyzed, among which 77.7% were of Whites, 5.4% of Blacks, 14.3% of Mulattoes and 2.6% of others. A significant association between skin color or race and cause of death was found. It may be observed that, although Blacks and Mulattoes present a similar death profile, on the contrary of Whites and others, which could be aggregated into a single category, the former appear in distinct positions on the multidimensional map presented. Except for mal defined causes, which characterize only the deaths of Blacks, the other causes of death within this group are common to both Blacks and Mulattoes, varying however, in intensity and as to the order in which they appear death. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis of mortality according to race or color revealed that death has a color. There is a White death, which has, among its causes, sicknesses, which, although variable, are nothing more than sicknesses. There's a Black death, which is not caused by sicknesses but by external causes, complications in labor and delivery, mental disorders and ill- defined causes.

  12. Desnutrição como causa básica ou associada de morte: análise da qualidade de informação em mulheres em idade fértil Malnutrition as an underlying or associated cause of death: analysis of the quality of information on women of reproductive age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Dias Porto Chiavegatto Filho

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available As estatísticas de mortalidade são baseadas, rotineiramente, apenas na causa básica de morte. A introdução de uma análise por causas múltiplas pode trazer ganhos importantes ao estudo da presença de algumas doenças que não costumam ser mencionadas como "causa básica" na declaração de óbito, como é o caso da desnutrição. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a presença de desnutrição no momento da morte, em mulheres em idade fértil, e a sua associação com outras doenças, bem como analisar a qualidade do preenchimento das declarações de óbito. A população alvo foi composta pelos óbitos femininos de 10 a 49 anos, ocorridos no primeiro semestre de 2002, de residentes nas capitais de Estados do Brasil e no Distrito Federal. Utilizou-se a metodologia RAMOS (Reproductive Age Mortality Survey que permitiu a elaboração de uma nova declaração de óbito (DO-N e a comparação desta com a original, isto é, antes da investigação (DO-O. Do total de 7.332 casos analisados, originalmente havia 12 casos que apresentaram desnutrição como causa básica e 136, como causa associada. Após a pesquisa, nas DO-N, foram 9 e 179 casos, respectivamente. Nas DO-O, nos casos de associação com desnutrição, as causas básicas mais mencionadas foram aids (20,3% e neoplasia maligna dos órgãos digestivos (13,5%. Nas DO-N, foram aids (30,3% e tuberculose (11,2%. O presente trabalho apontou para a importância da presença de algumas causas básicas (como a aids e a tuberculose na mortalidade de mulheres em idade fértil, tendo como causa associada a desnutrição.Mortality statistics are frequently based only on the underlying causes of death. The use of multiple causes of death may considerably improve the study of the presence of some diseases that are not usually mentioned as underlying causes of death, such as malnutrition. The objective of this study was to study the presence of malnutrition upon death in women at reproductive age

  13. Analysis of the Causes of Death in Patients with Maintenance Hemodialysis in 25 Cases%25例维持性血液透析患者死亡原因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏敏

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨维持性血液透析患者的死亡原因。方法回顾性分析25例慢性肾功能衰竭患者维持性血液透析患者死亡的所有存在原因。结果在总结原因分析基础上的血液透析管理能提高血液透析患者的生存质量。结论分析原因,进行预见性干预可以有效地为维持性血液透析患者赢得生命时间提供帮助。%Objective To investigate the causes of death inmaintenance hemodialysis patients. Methods A retrospective analysis of 25 cases of death in patients with chronic renal failure Hemodialysis al reasons. Results Tosummarize the causes on the basis of hemodialysismanagement can improve the quality of life of patients with hemodialysis. Conclusion Cause analysis, predictiveintervention can be ef ective for maintenance hemodialysis patients to help win the life time.

  14. Diabetes como causa básica ou associada de morte no Estado de São Paulo, Brazil, 1992 Diabetes as underlying or associated cause of death in the State of S. Paulo, 1992

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    Laercio J. Franco

    1998-06-01

    bito, salientando a importância das doenças cardiovasculares.INTRODUCTION: Analysis of mortality data are usually performed with reference to the underlying cause of death. The importance of diabetes as a cause of death is always underestimated, because diabetics generally die from chronic complications of the disease, these being considered as the underlying cause of the death. To attenuate this problem, mortality data should be analized on the basis of all the causes listed on the death certificate. Frequency of references to diabetes on death certificates and the principal associated causes were evaluated as a contribution to the solution of this problem. METHODOLOGY: Specific death rates and proportional mortality by diabetes, as underlying or associated cause, were calculated on the basis of information derived from death certificates by the ACME program (Automated Classification of Medical Entities, for the State of S. Paulo, in 1992. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Of a total of 202,141 deaths, diabetes was mentioned in 13,786 (6.8% and as being the underlying cause in 5,305(2.6%. The proportion was higher for women than men (10.1 vs. 4.6% as mentioned, and 6.1 vs 2.9% as underlying cause. Among deaths with a mention of diabetes on the certificate, the main underlying causes were: diabetes (38.5%, cardiovascular (37.2% and respiratory (8.5% diseases, and neoplasias (4.8%. When diabetes was the underlying cause, the main associated causes were: cardiovascular (42.2%, respiratory (10.7% and genitourinary (10.1% diseases. When diabetes was an associated cause, the main underlying causes were: cardiovascular (60.5% and respiratory (13.8% diseases, and neoplasias (7.9%. In spite of the limitation of the data from death certificates, it is possible to observe the importance of diabetes as cause of death, reflecting its magnitude as a health problem. Also, the analysis by multiple causes of deaths gives an idea of the morbidity profile associated with diabetes at the time of death

  15. [Reliability of cancer as the underlying cause of death according to the Mortality Information System and Population-Based Cancer Registry in Goiânia, Goiás State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Patricia Pereira Vasconcelos de; Silva, Gulnar Azevedo e; Curado, Maria Paula; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Moura, Lenildo de

    2014-02-01

    This study assessed the reliability of cancer as the underlying cause of death using probabilistic linkage between the Mortality Information System and Population-Based Cancer Registry (PBCR) in Goiânia, Goiás State, Brazil, from 2000 to 2005. RecLink III was used for probabilistic linkage, and reliability was assessed by Cohen's kappa and prevalence-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK). In the probabilistic linkage, 2,874 individuals were identified for the reliability analysis. Cohen's kappa ranged from 0.336 to 0.846 and PABAK from 0.810 to 0.990 for 14 neoplasm groups defined in the study. For reliability of the 35 leading cancers, 12(34.3%) presented kappa values under 0.600 and PABAK over 0.981. Among the neoplasms common to both sexes, crude agreement ranged from 0.672 to 0.790 and adjusted agreement from 0.894 to 0.961. Sixty-seven percent of cases classified by the Mortality Information System as "cancer of ill-defined sites" were reclassified according to the PBCR. This study was useful for the classification of cancer mortality estimates in areas covered by the PBCR.

  16. Confiabilidade e validade das declarações de óbito por câncer de boca no Município do Rio de Janeiro Reliability and accuracy of oral cancer as the reported underlying cause of death in the Municipality of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane Christine de Sousa Queiroz

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available As estatísticas de mortalidade constituem uma fonte bastante utilizada em estudos epidemiológicos de neoplasias. Com o objetivo de avaliar a confiabilidade e a validade da causa básica de morte "câncer de boca", no Município do Rio de Janeiro, selecionou-se no banco de dados da Secretaria Municipal de Saúde, todas as declarações de óbito (DOs com essa causa básica, no ano de 1999. As DOs foram submetidas à nova codificação da causa básica, por técnico independente, e construiu-se formulário padronizado para coleta de dados clínicos e laboratoriais para a confirmação do diagnóstico nos prontuários médicos de cada caso. Foi considerado como padrão-ouro o diagnóstico de câncer de boca formulado com base no exame histopatológico e/ou história clínica. Observou-se concordância simples de 95,1% e coeficiente kappa de 0,93. O valor preditivo positivo correspondeu a 86,5%. Conclui-se que as estatísticas de mortalidade por neoplasia de boca no Município do Rio de Janeiro são confiáveis e que é boa a validade desta causa básica, possivelmente, por se tratar de sítio de fácil acesso para a inspeção direta e com maior facilidade de confirmação clínica.Mortality statistics are frequently employed in cancer epidemiology studies. The aim of this research was to evaluate the reliability and validity of oral cavity cancer as the underlying cause of death reported on death certificates in the Municipality of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. All death certificates since 1999 reporting this underlying cause of death were selected from the Municipal Mortality Information System. The death certificates were re-coded by an independent technician, and a standardized questionnaire was designed to collect clinical and laboratory data for diagnostic confirmation from patient records. Histopathological results and/or clinical history were considered as the gold standard to establish the diagnosis of cancer of the mouth. Reliability analysis

  17. Avaliação da qualidade das córneas doadoras em relação à idade do doador e causa do óbito Evaluation of the quality of donor corneas in relation to the age of donor and cause of death

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    Gleisson Rezende Pantaleão

    2009-10-01

    's folds, stromal opacity, corneal scarring, endothelial density and guttata. RESULTS: The mean donor age was 42.74 years (sd=17.77 years. Among the causes of death, trauma was the most common with 46.18%, followed by cardiovascular causes with 41.86%. In relation to the cornea, 57.11% were classified as "good", followed by 20.73% as "regular", 16.87% as "very good" and 5.28% as "bad". With the application of statistical tests based on ordinal regression model, trauma deaths corneas tend to be better, as well as those of younger patients. CONCLUSIONS: Statistically, the corneas from younger donors tend to have better graduations in the assessment, as well as the corneas from donors dead by trauma that tend to have better quality when compared to corneas from donors dead by cardiovascular and other systemic diseases.

  18. Shocking Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Dave

    2009-01-01

    On a Friday night in 2000, high school football player Josh Miller collapsed as he ran off the field. Several minutes later, the 15-year-old was dead from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). This is not an uncommon scenario in school athletics. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), SCA is the leading cause of death in young athletes and…

  19. Shocking Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Dave

    2009-01-01

    On a Friday night in 2000, high school football player Josh Miller collapsed as he ran off the field. Several minutes later, the 15-year-old was dead from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). This is not an uncommon scenario in school athletics. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), SCA is the leading cause of death in young athletes and…

  20. Comparabilidad entre la novena y la décima revisión de la Clasificación Internacional de Enfermedades aplicada a la codificación de la causa de muerte en España Comparability between the ninth and tenth revisions of the International Classification of Diseases applied to coding causes of death in Spain

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    M. Ruiz

    2002-12-01

    cuantificar el cambio en las grandes causas de muerte en España.Objective: To analyze comparability between the ninth and tenth revisions of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD applied to coding causes of death in Spain. Methods: According to the ninth and tenth revisions of the ICD, 80,084 statistical bulletins of mortality registered in 1999 were assigned the Basic Cause of Death. The statistical bulletins corresponded to the Autonomous Communities of Andalusia, Cantabria, Murcia, Navarre and the Basque Country, and the city of Barcelona. The underlying causes of death were classified into 17 groups. Simple correspondence, the Kappa index and the comparability ratio for major causes were calculated. Results: A total of 3.6% of deaths changed group due to an increase (36.4% in infectious and parasitic diseases, mainly because of the inclusion of AIDS, and a corresponding decrease due to the exclusion of endocrine, nutritional and metabolic disorders. Furthermore, myelodysplastic syndrome was moved to the category of neoplasm. The group including nervous system diseases, eye and related diseases, and ear and mastoid apophysis diseases increased (14.7% at the expense of mental and behavior disorders, due to the inclusion of senile and presenile organic psychosis. Poorly-defined entities increased (14.1% due to the inclusion of cardiac arrest and its synonyms, together with heart failure, to the detriment of diseases of the vascular system. Diseases of the respiratory system increased (4.8% due to the inclusion of respiratory failure, previously considered as a poorly defined cause. The correspondence for all causes was 96.4% and kappa's index was 94.9%. Conclusions: The introduction of ICD-10 affects the comparability of statistical series of mortality according to cause. The results of this study allow us to identify the main modifications and to quantify the changes in the major causes of mortality in Spain.

  1. A new molecular approach to help conclude drowning as a cause of death: simultaneous detection of eight bacterioplankton species using real-time PCR assays with TaqMan probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Taketo; Kakizaki, Eiji; Kozawa, Shuji; Nishida, Sho; Imamura, Nahoko; Yukawa, Nobuhiro

    2012-10-10

    We developed a novel tool for concluding drowning as a cause of death. We designed nine primer pairs to detect representative freshwater or marine bacterioplankton (aquatic bacteria) and then used real-time PCR with TaqMan probes to rapidly and specifically detect them. We previously cultured the genus Aeromonas, which is a representative freshwater bacterial species, in blood samples from 94% of victims who drowned in freshwater and the genera Vibrio and/or Photobacterium that are representative marine bacteria in 88% of victims who drowned in seawater. Based on these results, we simultaneously detected eight species of bacterioplankton (Aeromonas hydrophila, A. salmonicida; Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi, V. parahaemolyticus; Photobacterium damselae, P. leiognathi, P. phosphoreum) using three sets of triplex real-time PCR assays and TaqMan probes labelled with fluorophores (FAM, NED, Cy5). We assayed 266 specimens (109 blood, 157 tissues) from 43 victims, including 32 who had drowned in rivers, ditches, wells, sea or around estuaries. All lung samples of these 32 victims were TaqMan PCR-positive including the lung periphery into which water does not readily enter postmortem. On the other hand, findings in blood and/or closed organs (kidney or liver) were PCR-positive in 84% of the drowned victims (except for those who drowned in baths) although the conventional test detected diatoms in closed organs in only 44% of the victims. Thus, the results of the PCR assay reinforced those of diatom tests when only a few diatoms were detectable in organs due to the low density of diatoms in the water where they were found. Multiplex TaqMan PCR assays for bacterioplankton were rapid, less laborious and high-throughput as well as sensitive and specific. Therefore, these assays would be useful for routine forensic screening tests to estimate the amount and type of aspirated water.

  2. 41例结核性脑膜炎死亡原因分析及护理对策%The analysis of the cause of death and nursing strategy in forty-one patients with tuberculosis meningitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石琳; 陈绮美; 刘玉英

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨重症结核性脑膜炎患者的护理方法。方法回顾分析41例结核性脑膜炎患者的死亡原因和护理经过。结果41例患者死于脑疝20例(48.78%),感染14例(34.15%),上消化道出血6例(14.63%),心跳骤停1例(2.44%)。结论积极做好基础、饮食、心理和用药护理,消除脑疝的诱发因素、有效地控制颅内压、预防医院感染及消化道大出血可以降低结核性脑膜炎的死亡率。%Objective To investigate the nursing strategy in patients with severe tuberculosis meningitis. Methods Retrospective analysis of the cause of death and nursing procedure in forty-one patients with tuberculosis meningitis. Results In forty-one patients, twenty cases died of cerebral hernia (48.78%), fourteen cases of infection (34.15%), six cases of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (14.63%), one case of cardiac arrest (2.44%). Conclusion Prompt the foundation, diet, psychological and medication nursing, eliminate the predisposing factors of cerebral hernia, control the intracranial pressure, prevent the hospital infection and gastrointestinal hemorrhage, which can reduce the mortality of tuberculosis meningitis.

  3. Causes of death in 1 162 elderly patients admitted to our hospital%我院1162例老年男性住院患者死亡原因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙般若; 成晓玲; 李春霖; 田慧

    2014-01-01

    目的:研究1996-2011年于我院老年病房住院的老年男性患者死亡原因构成特点。方法以1162例年龄≥65岁长期定居北京并于我院老年病房住院死亡的男性患者为研究对象,通过查阅死亡记录确定死亡原因。结果15年间于我院老年病房死亡的老年男性患者共1162例,平均死亡年龄(83.3±6.5)岁。死因构成前4位依次为恶性肿瘤、心血管疾病、呼吸系统疾病和脑血管病,分别占总死因的41.7%、20.7%、20.4%和6.4%。肺癌、缺血性心脏病、脑梗死及肺炎分别是恶性肿瘤、心血管疾病、脑血管病及呼吸系统疾病死亡的首要原因。与<80岁年龄组相比,≥80岁年龄组恶性肿瘤所致死亡比例减少,呼吸系统疾病、消化系统疾病所致死亡比例增加(P<0.01);心、脑血管疾病死亡在两年龄组比例相当(P>0.05);近15年来呼吸系统疾病所致死亡比例增加(P<0.01);心血管疾病死亡有下降趋势,但差异无统计学意义;恶性肿瘤和脑血管疾病所致死亡比例变化不大。结论恶性肿瘤、心脑血管疾病和呼吸系统疾病是老年男性主要死亡原因。随年龄增长,恶性肿瘤死亡比例降低,呼吸系统疾病死亡比例升高。近年来,呼吸系统疾病所致死亡有上升趋势。%Objective To study the causes of death in elderly patients admitted to our hospital from 1996 to 2011. Methods A total of 1 162 elderly patients with their age≥65 years were included in this study. The causes of their death were summarized by reviewing their medical records. Results The average death age of the 1 162 elderly patients was 83.3±6.5 years. The top 4 causes of death were malignant tumors, cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases and cerebrovascular diseases, which accounted for 41.7%, 20.7%, 20.4% and 6.4%, respectively. Lung cancer, ischemic heart disease, pneumonia and cerebral infarction were the leading causes of malignant

  4. Under-5-mortality rate and causes of death in China, 2000 to 2010%中国2000-2010年5岁以下儿童死亡率和死亡原因分析

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    冯江; 袁秀琴; 朱军; 李小洪; 缪蕾; 何春花; 王艳萍

    2012-01-01

    目的 评估2000-2010年中国5岁以下儿童死亡率(U5MR)及主要死因别死亡率的变化,评价实现《中国儿童发展纲要(2001-2010年)》(纲要)目标的进展.方法 采用全国5岁以下儿童死亡监测网收集的2000-2010年以人群为基础的监测资料,计算不同地区的婴儿死亡率(IMR)、U5MR及其主要死因别死亡率.结果 2010年全国IMR和U5MR较2000年分别下降59.3%和58.7%,城市IMR和U5MR分别下降50.8%和47.1%,农村IMR和U5MR分别下降56.5%和56.0%.与2000年相比,2010年全国5岁以下儿童主要疾病的死因别死亡率均有下降,但城乡下降程度不同.位于前五位的死因是早产或低出生体重、肺炎、出生窒息、先天性心脏病和意外窒息,城乡儿童主要疾病顺位不完全相同.2010年农村IMR和U5MR均是城市的2.8倍,中、西部地区的IMR分别是东部的1.5倍和2.3倍,U5MR分别是东部的1.5倍和2.2倍.结论 2000-2010年全国IMR、U5MR及主要死因别死亡率有明显下降趋势,且实现了纲要中提出的目标,但缩小地区和人群差异是今后促进儿童健康面临的重大挑战.%Objective To assess the changes and the leading cause of deaths for children under 5 years old,in China,during 2000-2010,with the aim of evaluation on the progress in achieving the relative goal set by "National Program of Action for Child Development in China (2001-2010)",and understanding the related challenges.Methods Data used in this study were collected from the population-based National Maternal and Child' s Health Surveillance Network of China.Infant Mortality Rate (IMR),Under-5-mortality rate (U5MR) and the leading cause of deaths for under-5 children were analyzed.Results Nationwide IMR and U5MR in 2010 dropped by 59.3%and 58.7% respectively,compared to that in 2000.Decreases by 50.8% and 47.1% in IMR and U5MR were observed in urban areas,and 56.5% and 56.0% in rural areas during this period.Compared with data from 2000

  5. 慈溪市2004至2013年儿童青少年死因分析和减寿评估%Analysis and evaluation on the causes of deaths and PYLL among adolescents in Cixi City from 2004 to 2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗央努; 罗丹; 马小丽; 马旭

    2015-01-01

    目的了解慈溪市2004至2013年5~19岁儿童青少年死亡情况,为制定防治对策和有效干预措施提供依据。方法用死亡率、死因构成、潜在减寿年数(PYLL)、潜在减寿率(PYLL‰)、标化减寿年数(SPYLL)、标化减寿率(SPYLL‰)等健康测量指标对慈溪市10年间的死亡报表进行分析。结果慈溪市儿童青少年死亡率为25.56/10万,标化死亡率为25.26/10万,男性死亡率(33.20/10万)高于女性(17.91/10万)(χ2=38.90,P<0.05),损伤中毒(13.77/10万)和肿瘤(5.78/10万)是危害儿童青少年的最主要的死因,占全死因死亡的76.46%。儿童青少年全死因的PYLL为24624人年,SPYLL为37417.02人年,PYLL‰是2.59‰,SPYLL‰为3.91‰。结论损伤和中毒、肿瘤已经成为慈溪市儿童青少年健康的重要威胁,政府相关部门应采取有力措施促进儿童青少年身心健康。%Objective To understand the causes of death in children and adolescents at 5-19 years of age from 2004 to 2013 in Cixi City. Method According to data of diseases surveillance in Cixi City during the 10 years, the health indexes of mortality, potential years of life lost (PYLL), potential years of life lost rate (PYLL‰), standardized potential years of life lost (SPYLL), standardized potential years of life lost rate (SPYLL‰) were applied to analyze the causes of death and evaluate the burdens of mortality. Result The total mortality of the children and adolescents was 25.56/105, and standardized mortality was 25.26/105. Boys had higher mortality (33.20/105) than girls (17.91/105), and there was statistical significance in the prevalence between male and female. Death of injury&poisoning (13.77/105) and tumors (5.78/105) respectively ranked at the first two leading causes, accounting for 76.46%of total deaths. PYLL was 24 624 years, standardized PYLL was 37 417.02 years, and the rate of PYLL was 2.59‰. Conclusion Injury

  6. Analysis on the cause of death in People's Hospital of Chongqing Ba'nan from 2010 to 2011%重庆市巴南区人民医院2010-2011年居民死因监测分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗鑫; 肖路; 刘姝华; 刘利君

    2013-01-01

    目的 摸清我院死亡患者死因构成及变化,掌握死亡报告中存在的问题,促进监测及防控工作更加科学、规范.方法 回归性分析2010-2011 年死亡报告的资料,并通过自查门诊日志和住院病历统计并比较迟报率、漏报率及编码错误率等.利用Excel 2003、SPSS17.0 软件汇总及分析数据,不同层次间的比较经统计学检验.结果 2010-2011 年全院共报告死亡病例648 例.死亡报告居前三位的死因分别是恶性肿瘤、心脏病、损伤与中毒,构成比分别为25.15%、25.00%、17.28%.死亡报告漏报率、迟报率分别为2.78%、1.23%,未发现有编码错误的死亡病例.结论 各年龄组的死因构成不同,但是慢性非传染性疾病已经成为危害居民健康的主要疾病,应加强干预预防;另外通过各项制度的建立和完善、医务人员报告意识的增强,死亡报告质量可以得到提升.%Objective To study the structure and change of the cause of patients' death in our hospital, and to grasp the problems existing in the death report, so as to promote the monitoring and prevention work more scientific and standardized. Methods The death reports in 2010-2011 were analyzed retrospectively. The rate of delayed report, rate of missing report, and rate of coding error were collected and compared by self-examining outpatient service log and hospitalization medical records. Excel 2003 and SPSS 17.0 were used for processing data, and the different levels were compared by statistical method. Result Six hundred and forty-eight death cases were reported in 2010-2011. Malignant tumor, heart disease, injury and poisoning were major cause of death, accounting for 25.15%, 25.00% and 17.28%, respectively. The rate of delayed report and rate of missing report were 2.78%, 1.23%, respectively, with no coding error. Conclusion Patients of different age group have varied constitution in the cause of death. We should strengthen the prevention and intervention

  7. Willingness to Know the Cause of Death and Hypothetical Acceptability of the Minimally Invasive Autopsy in Six Diverse African and Asian Settings: A Mixed Methods Socio-Behavioural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maixenchs, Maria; Anselmo, Rui; Zielinski-Gutiérrez, Emily; Odhiambo, Frank O.; Akello, Clarah; Zaidi, S. Shujaat H.; Soofi, Sajid Bashir; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Diarra, Kounandji; Djitèye, Mahamane; Dembélé, Roukiatou; Sow, Samba; Minsoko, Pamela Cathérine Angoissa; Agnandji, Selidji Todagbe; Ismail, Mamudo R.; Carrilho, Carla; Ordi, Jaume; Menéndez, Clara; Bassat, Quique

    2016-01-01

    Background The minimally invasive autopsy (MIA) is being investigated as an alternative to complete diagnostic autopsies for cause of death (CoD) investigation. Before potential implementation of the MIA in settings where post-mortem procedures are unusual, a thorough assessment of its feasibility and acceptability is essential. Methods and Findings We conducted a socio-behavioural study at the community level to understand local attitudes and perceptions related to death and the hypothetical feasibility and acceptability of conducting MIAs in six distinct settings in Gabon, Kenya, Mali, Mozambique, and Pakistan. A total of 504 interviews (135 key informants, 175 health providers [including formal health professionals and traditional or informal health providers], and 194 relatives of deceased people) were conducted. The constructs “willingness to know the CoD” and “hypothetical acceptability of MIAs” were quantified and analysed using the framework analysis approach to compare the occurrence of themes related to acceptability across participants. Overall, 75% (379/504) of the participants would be willing to know the CoD of a relative. The overall hypothetical acceptability of MIA on a relative was 73% (366/504). The idea of the MIA was acceptable because of its perceived simplicity and rapidity and particularly for not “mutilating” the body. Further, MIAs were believed to help prevent infectious diseases, address hereditary diseases, clarify the CoD, and avoid witchcraft accusations and conflicts within families. The main concerns regarding the procedure included the potential breach of confidentiality on the CoD, the misperception of organ removal, and the incompatibility with some religious beliefs. Formal health professionals were concerned about possible contradictions between the MIA findings and the clinical pre-mortem diagnoses. Acceptability of the MIA was equally high among Christian and Islamic communities. However, in the two predominantly

  8. Anticitrullinated protein antibodies and rheumatoid factor are associated with increased mortality but with different causes of death in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a longitudinal study in three European cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajeganova, S; Humphreys, J H; Verheul, M K; van Steenbergen, H W; van Nies, J A B; Hafström, I; Svensson, B; Huizinga, T W J; Trouw, L A; Verstappen, S M M; van der Helm-van Mil, A H M

    2016-11-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related autoantibodies have an increased mortality rate. Different autoantibodies are frequently co-occurring and it is unclear which autoantibodies associate with increased mortality. In addition, association with different causes of death is thus far unexplored. Both questions were addressed in three early RA populations. 2331 patients with early RA included in Better Anti-Rheumatic Farmaco-Therapy cohort (BARFOT) (n=805), Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR) (n=678) and Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic cohort (EAC) (n=848) were studied. The presence of anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA), rheumatoid factor (RF) and anticarbamylated protein (anti-CarP) antibodies was studied in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality, obtained from national death registers. Cox proportional hazards regression models (adjusted for age, sex, smoking and inclusion year) were constructed per cohort; data were combined in inverse-weighted meta-analyses. During 26 300 person-years of observation, 29% of BARFOT patients, 30% of NOAR and 18% of EAC patients died, corresponding to mortality rates of 24.9, 21.0 and 20.8 per 1000 person-years. The HR for all-cause mortality (95% CI) was 1.48 (1.22 to 1.79) for ACPA, 1.47 (1.22 to 1.78) for RF and 1.33 (1.11 to 1.60) for anti-CarP. When including all three antibodies in one model, RF was associated with all-cause mortality independent of other autoantibodies, HR 1.30 (1.04 to 1.63). When subsequently stratifying for death cause, ACPA positivity associated with increased cardiovascular death, HR 1.52 (1.04 to 2.21), and RF with increased neoplasm-related death, HR 1.64 (1.02 to 2.62), and respiratory disease-related death, HR 1.71 (1.01 to 2.88). The presence of RF in patients with RA associates with an increased overall mortality rate. Cause-specific mortality rates differed between autoantibodies: ACPA associates with increased cardiovascular death and RF with death related to neoplasm

  9. Traumatismo abdominal como causa de muerte en el maltrato infantil: descripción de un caso Abdominal traumatism as cause of death in child abuse: report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Miró

    2009-04-01

    was a case of violent death caused, in medico-legal aetiology, by homicide. The immediate cause of death was an intra-abdominal haemorrhage and its fundamental cause was multiple abdominal traumas through compression. The situation described fully matches that found in the bibliography reviewed concerning abdominal wounds caused by child abuse.

  10. Aplicabilidad del análisis por causa múltiple de muerte para el cáncer cervicouterino: la experiencia en México Applicability of the analysis by multiple cause of death by cervical cancer: the experience in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Patricia Bustamante-Montes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objecto. Explora-se a aplicabilidad da análise por causa múltipla de morte para o estudo do cancro cervicouterino. Métodos. Desenho de mortalidade proporcional para analisar todas as causas consignadas na totalidade dos certificados de morte por cancro cervicouterino de mulheres maiores de 18 anos do Estado de México (367, e 515 certificados de mulheres falecida por outras causas. Resultados. Encontrou-se uma razão de causa básica/múltipla de 2.9 nos certificados de morte, isto é pela cada causa básica encontraram-se 2.9 As mulheres falecidas por cancro cervicouterino morrem cinco anos dantes que as que morrem por outras causas (pObjective. The study explores the applicability of the multiple-cause-of-death analysis for cervical-uterine cancer. Methods. A proportional mortality hazard design and the analysis of all causes of death due to cervical-uterine cancer from 367 death certificates of women older than 18 years of age from the State of Mexico, and 515 age and year adjusted sample of death certificates of women from the same region who died from other causes. Results. A basic multiple cause of death of 2.9 was observed in the death certificates, i.e., for every basic cause there were 2.9 multiple causes. When adjusting the multiple-causes-of-death analysis for cervical-uterine cancer by age, education, marital and insurability status, the most contributing and associated causes of death were malignant tumors from unspecified sites [OR=18.98 (2.28-157.56 and OR=14.25 (1.67-121.0] respectively; Diabetes Mellitus as a contributing [OR=1.82 (1.02-3.27 and associated cause [OR=7.78 (1.46-41.37], and systemic arterial hypertension as an associated cause [OR=3.00 (1.40-6.47]. Conclusions. The multiple-cause-of-death analysis is an adequate to observe the diseases that contribute condition and are associated to the cervical-uterine cancer.

  11. Óbitos neonatais precoces: análise de causas múltiplas de morte pelo método Grade of Membership Early neonatal mortality: an analysis of multiple causes of death by the Grade of Membership method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane de Freitas Drumond

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudo de base populacional para determinar perfis de óbitos neonatais precoces ocorridos em Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil, de 2000 a 2003. A defini��ão dos perfis de causas amplia possibilidade de análise sob enfoque de evitabilidade, justificada pela persistência de altas taxas de mortalidade neonatal precoce. Três perfis foram gerados, a partir do enfoque de causas múltiplas, sob a perspectiva dos conjuntos nebulosos ("fuzzy sets", utilizando-se técnica Grade of Membership. Relacionaram-se esses perfis ao peso de nascimento e a natureza jurídica do hospital de ocorrência do óbito. Nos hospitais da rede privada ocorreram "óbitos dificilmente preveníveis, com menção de malformação congênita" (perfil 2. Aos hospitais do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS associaram-se dois perfis distintos. Nos hospitais contratados/conveniados ocorreram os "óbitos passíveis de prevenção" (perfil 1 e na rede própria os "óbitos de prematuros" (perfil 3. A tipologia observada aponta para necessidade de adoção de políticas diferenciadas na rede SUS: prioritariamente, na rede contratada/conveniada, ações voltadas para credenciamento e avaliação da qualidade da assistência; e, em toda rede, adoção rotineira de protocolos assistenciais e medidas profiláticas, redutores da morbimortalidade neonatal.This population-based study aimed to determine the profile of early neonatal deaths in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2000 to 2003. Profiles were analyzed from the perspective of avoidability, justified by persistently high early neonatal mortality rates in the city. Three profiles were generated for multiple causes of death from the perspective of fuzzy sets, using the Grade of Membership method. Birth weight and the hospital's corporate status were also related to the three profiles. Private hospitals were characterized by so-called "difficult-to-prevent deaths, with mention of congenital malformations" (profile 2. The

  12. Correcting a statistical artifact in the estimation of the Hubble; constant based on Type Ia Supernovae results in a change in estimate; of 1.2%

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, JH; Holst, KK; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2010-01-01

    The Hubble constant enters big bang cosmology by quantifying the expansion rate of the universe. Existing statistical methods used to estimate Hubble’s constant only partially take into account random measurement errors. As a consequence, estimates of Hubble’s constant are statistically...

  13. Quantifying the effect of corrective surgery for trigonocephaly: A non-invasive, non-ionizing method using three-dimensional handheld scanning and statistical shape modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Florez, N. (Naiara); Göktekin, Ö.K. (Özge K.); Bruse, J.L. (Jan L.); Borghi, A. (Alessandro); F. Angullia (Freida); Knoops, P.G.M. (Paul G.M.); Tenhagen, M. (Maik); O'Hara, J.L. (Justine L.); M.J. Koudstaal (Maarten); Schievano, S. (Silvia); Jeelani, N.U.O. (N.U. Owase); James, G. (Greg); D.J. Dunaway (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTrigonocephaly in patients with metopic synostosis is corrected by fronto-orbital remodelling (FOR). The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess aesthetic outcomes of FOR by capturing 3D forehead scans of metopic patients pre- and post-operatively and comparing them with controls.

  14. Generation of future potential scenarios in an Alpine Catchment by applying bias-correction techniques, delta-change approaches and stochastic Weather Generators at different spatial scale. Analysis of their influence on basic and drought statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collados-Lara, Antonio-Juan; Pulido-Velazquez, David; Pardo-Iguzquiza, Eulogio

    2017-04-01

    Assessing impacts of potential future climate change scenarios in precipitation and temperature is essential to design adaptive strategies in water resources systems. The objective of this work is to analyze the possibilities of different statistical downscaling methods to generate future potential scenarios in an Alpine Catchment from historical data and the available climate models simulations performed in the frame of the CORDEX EU project. The initial information employed to define these downscaling approaches are the historical climatic data (taken from the Spain02 project for the period 1971-2000 with a spatial resolution of 12.5 Km) and the future series provided by climatic models in the horizon period 2071-2100 . We have used information coming from nine climate model simulations (obtained from five different Regional climate models (RCM) nested to four different Global Climate Models (GCM)) from the European CORDEX project. In our application we have focused on the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 8.5 emissions scenario, which is the most unfavorable scenario considered in the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). For each RCM we have generated future climate series for the period 2071-2100 by applying two different approaches, bias correction and delta change, and five different transformation techniques (first moment correction, first and second moment correction, regression functions, quantile mapping using distribution derived transformation and quantile mapping using empirical quantiles) for both of them. Ensembles of the obtained series were proposed to obtain more representative potential future climate scenarios to be employed to study potential impacts. In this work we propose a non-equifeaseble combination of the future series giving more weight to those coming from models (delta change approaches) or combination of models and techniques that provides better approximation to the basic

  15. The Effect of the Probability of Correct Response on the Variability of Measures of Differential Item Functioning. Program Statistics Research Technical Report No. 94-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Rebecca

    The Mantel Haenszel (MH; 1959) approach of Holland and Thayer (1988) is a well-established method for assessing differential item functioning (DIF). The formula for the variance of the MH DIF statistic is based on work by Phillips and Holland (1987) and Robins, Breslow, and Greenland (1986). Recent simulation studies showed that the MH variances…

  16. Medicine, meteorology and vital statistics: the influence of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh upon Scottish civil registration, c. 1840-1855.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A

    2007-06-01

    The Scottish Registration Act of 1854 introduced compulsory civil registration of births, deaths and marriages under the GROS. The Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh had long campaigned for such legislation, but was dissatisfied with certain sections of the Act. The College possessed strong views on how causes of death ought to be recorded, on the need for a medical Superintendent of Statistics to tabulate and analyse the causes of death for the GROS, on whether or not doctors should be fined for failing to provide certificates of cause of death, and on the importance of including meteorological data in the GROS's reports. Its Fellows accordingly strove to have the new registration measures tailored to their specifications. Drawing upon the College minutes, the GROS archives, and other contemporary sources, this article explains how the College succeeded in influencing some, but not all of these aspects of vital registration in Scotland.

  17. Statistical signal processing for gamma spectrometry: application for a pileup correction method; Traitement statistique du signal spectrometrique: etude du desempilement de spectre en energie pour la spectrometrie gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigano, T

    2005-12-15

    The main objective of gamma spectrometry is to characterize the radioactive elements of an unknown source by studying the energy of the emitted photons. When a photon interacts with a detector, its energy is converted into an electrical pulse. The histogram obtained by collecting the energies can be used to identify radioactive elements and measure their activity. However, at high counting rates, perturbations which are due to the stochastic aspect of the temporal signal can cripple the identification of the radioactive elements. More specifically, since the detector has a finite resolution, close arrival times of photons which can be modeled as an homogeneous Poisson process cause pile-ups of individual pulses. This phenomenon distorts energy spectra by introducing multiple fake spikes and prolonging artificially the Compton continuum, which can mask spikes of low intensity. The objective of this thesis is to correct the distortion caused by the pile-up phenomenon in the energy spectra. Since the shape of photonic pulses depends on many physical parameters, we consider this problem in a nonparametric framework. By introducing an adapted model based on two marked point processes, we establish a nonlinear relation between the probability measure associated to the observations and the probability density function we wish to estimate. This relation is derived both for continuous and for discrete time signals, and therefore can be used on a large set of detectors and from an analog or digital point of view. It also provides a framework to this problem, which can be considered as a problem of nonlinear density deconvolution and nonparametric density estimation from indirect measurements. Using these considerations, we propose an estimator obtained by direct inversion. We show that this estimator is consistent and almost achieves the usual rate of convergence obtained in classical nonparametric density estimation in the L{sup 2} sense. We have applied our method to a set

  18. Statistical tools applied in the characterisation and evaluation of a thermo-hygrometric corrective action carried out at the Noheda archaeological site (Noheda, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Miguel Ángel; Merello, Paloma; Navajas, Ángel Fernández; García-Diego, Fernando-Juan

    2014-01-17

    The Noheda archaeological site is unique and exceptional for its size, and the quality and conservation condition of the Roman mosaic pavement covering its urban pars. In 2008 a tent was installed as protection from rain and sun. Being of interest to characterise the microclimate of the remains, six probes with relative humidity and temperature sensors were installed in 2013 for this purpose. Microclimate monitoring allowed us to check relative humidity differences resulting from the groundwater level, as well as inner sensors reaching maximum temperatures higher than the outdoors ones as a consequence of the non-ventilated tent covering the archaeological site. Microclimatic conditions in the archaeological site were deemed detrimental for the conservation of the mosaics. Thus, in summer 2013, expanded clay and geotextile were installed over the mosaics as a corrective action. The outcomes of this study have proven the effectiveness of this solution to control temperature and relative humidity, helping to configure a more stable microclimate suitable for preservation of the mosaic.

  19. Statistical Tools Applied in the Characterisation and Evaluation of a Thermo-Hygrometric Corrective Action Carried out at the Noheda Archaeological Site (Noheda, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Valero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Noheda archaeological site is unique and exceptional for its size, and the quality and conservation condition of the Roman mosaic pavement covering its urban pars. In 2008 a tent was installed as protection from rain and sun. Being of interest to characterise the microclimate of the remains, six probes with relative humidity and temperature sensors were installed in 2013 for this purpose. Microclimate monitoring allowed us to check relative humidity differences resulting from the groundwater level, as well as inner sensors reaching maximum temperatures higher than the outdoors ones as a consequence of the non-ventilated tent covering the archaeological site. Microclimatic conditions in the archaeological site were deemed detrimental for the conservation of the mosaics. Thus, in summer 2013, expanded clay and geotextile were installed over the mosaics as a corrective action. The outcomes of this study have proven the effectiveness of this solution to control temperature and relative humidity, helping to configure a more stable microclimate suitable for preservation of the mosaic.

  20. Statistical Tools Applied in the Characterisation and Evaluation of a Thermo-Hygrometric Corrective Action Carried out at the Noheda Archaeological Site (Noheda, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Miguel Ángel; Merello, Paloma; Navajas, Ángel Fernández; García-Diego, Fernando-Juan

    2014-01-01

    The Noheda archaeological site is unique and exceptional for its size, and the quality and conservation condition of the Roman mosaic pavement covering its urban pars. In 2008 a tent was installed as protection from rain and sun. Being of interest to characterise the microclimate of the remains, six probes with relative humidity and temperature sensors were installed in 2013 for this purpose. Microclimate monitoring allowed us to check relative humidity differences resulting from the groundwater level, as well as inner sensors reaching maximum temperatures higher than the outdoors ones as a consequence of the non-ventilated tent covering the archaeological site. Microclimatic conditions in the archaeological site were deemed detrimental for the conservation of the mosaics. Thus, in summer 2013, expanded clay and geotextile were installed over the mosaics as a corrective action. The outcomes of this study have proven the effectiveness of this solution to control temperature and relative humidity, helping to configure a more stable microclimate suitable for preservation of the mosaic. PMID:24445414

  1. Analysis of causes of death and YPLL on residents in the industrial pollution area in Chongqing from 1991 to 1998%重庆工业污染区1991~1998年居民死因及潜在减寿年数分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘达伟; 唐晓君; 苗菁

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the causes of death in residents living in the area of industrial pollution in Chongqing. Methods Mortality rate, sequence of causes of death, years of potential life lost (YPLL) and the valued years of potential life lost (VYPLL) were used to analyze causes of death in 1991-1998. Community not polluted by industry was chosen to serve as control. Results The annual average mortality rate of the residents was 7.34‰ (standard mortality rate 4.61‰). The sequence of major causes of death was shown as below: malignant tumors (mortality rate 198.07/105, standard mortality rate 126.35/105), cerebrovascular diseases (mortality rate 159.13/105, standard mortality rate 92.66/105), respiratory system diseases (mortality rate 107.33/105, standard mortality rate 84.85/105), cardiac diseases (mortality rate 95.36/105, standard mortality rate 59.37/105) and accidental deaths (mortality rate 47.08/105, standard mortality rate 43.28/105). Among malignant tumors, lung cancer took the lead with a mortality rate of 65.49/105(standard mortality rate 45.27/105). In both sequences of standard rates of YPLL and VYPLL for major causes of deaths, accidental death was always took the first place. Conclusion In order to reduce mortality rate of the residents in the area, it is necessary to strengthen the administration of natural and social environment of the area.%目的 分析20世纪90年代重庆市工业污染区居民主要死因。方法 应用死亡率、死因顺位、潜在减寿年数(YPLL)及潜在价值减寿年数(VYPLL)等指标分析该区1991~1998年死因资料。对照组为该市非工业污染文化社区。结果 该区年平均粗死亡率为7.34‰(标化死亡率4.61‰)。主要死因顺位为:恶性肿瘤、脑血管病、呼吸系病、心脏病和意外死亡。恶性肿瘤死亡率为198.07/10万(标化死亡率126.35/10万),其中肺癌居第一位,死亡率为65.49/10万(标化死亡率45.27/10万)。主要

  2. Analysis of the Causes of Death among Children under 5 Years Old in Xiaogan City from 2007 to 2011%孝感市2007-2011年5岁以下儿童死亡原因调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付汉东; 陆敏; 夏耀宗; 郑淑萍

    2013-01-01

    目的 调查孝感市2007-2011年5岁以下儿童死亡的原因.方法 对2007-2011年孝感市7个县(市)区发生的1 369例5 岁以下儿童死亡原因进行调查分析.结果 2007-2011年孝感市5岁以下儿童死亡1 369例,死亡率为6.37‰(1 369/214 857),不同年份死亡率年均递减率为0.53‰.男性儿童死亡率为5.46‰(716/131 063),女性儿童为7.79‰(653/83 794),差异有统计学意义(χ2=465.35,P<0.01).1 369例死亡儿童年龄≤7 d者679例(占49.60%),8~28 d者121例(占8.84%),29~364 d者273例(占19.94%),1~4岁者296例(占21.62%),差异有统计学意义(χ2=647.38,P<0.01).城市儿童死亡率为5.14‰(542/105 427),农村为7.56‰(827/109 430),差异有统计学意义(χ2=527.15,P<0.01).城市儿童患病死亡469例(占86.53%),意外死亡(包括溺水、意外窒息、交通意外等)73例(占13.47%);农村患病死亡633例(占76.54%),意外死亡194例(占23.46%);差异有统计学意义(χ2=20.38,P<0.01).城市儿童主要患病死亡原因构成前3位是:早产儿和低体质量儿、新生儿窒息、先天性心脏病;农村儿童主要患病死亡原因构成前3位是:新生儿窒息、早产儿和低体质量儿、肺炎.结论 孝感市近5年5岁以下儿童死亡有所减少,其死亡原因主要为早产儿和低体质量儿、新生儿窒息.应加强孕产妇围产期的管理,强化儿童保健系统管理,加强产科质量管理,提高儿童疾病诊治水平、加强儿童意外伤害的防范,增强社会医疗保障能力和儿童救助能力,从根本上降低 5 岁以下儿童死亡.%Objective To analyze the causes of death among children under 5 years old in Xiaogan city from 2007 to 2011. Methods The death causes of 1 369 children under five years old in seven counties of Xiaogan city from 2007 to 201 1 were investigated. Results 1 369 children under five years old died from 2007 to 2011 with a mortality rate of 6. 37‰ ( 1 369/ 214 857 ), and the annual declining rate of these

  3. Autopsy-proven causes of death in lungs of patients immunocompromised by secondary interstitial pneumonia Causas de óbito por pneumonia intersticial secundária em autópsias pulmonares de pacientes imunocomprometidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Antonio Terrabuio Junior

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To present the more frequent associations found in autopsies of immunocompromised patients who developed secondary interstitial pneumonia as well as the risk of death (odds ratio in having specific secondary interstitial pneumonia according to the cause of immunocompromise. METHOD: From January 1994 to March 2004, 17,000 autopsies were performed at Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University Medical School. After examining the pathology report review, we selected 558 of these autopsies (3.28% from patients aged 15 years or more with primary underlying diseases who developed radiologically diffuse infiltrates of the lung during their hospital course and died after secondary interstitial pneumonia (bronchopneumonia, lobar pneumonia, interstitial pneumonia, diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary recurrence of underlying disease, drug-induced lung disease, cardiogenic pulmonary edema, or pulmonary embolism. Histology slides were reviewed by experienced pathologists to confirm or not the presence of secondary interstitial pneumonia. Statistical analysis included the Fisher exact test to verify any association between histopathology and the cause of immunocompromise; a logistic regression was used to predict the risk of death for specific histological findings for each of the independent variables in the model. RESULTS: Secondary interstitial pneumonia was histologically represented by diffuse interstitial pneumonitis ranging from mild nonspecific findings (n = 213 to a pattern of diffuse alveolar damage (n = 273. The principal causes of immunocompromise in patients with diffuse alveolar damage were sepsis (136 cases, neoplasia (113 cases, diabetes mellitus (37 cases, and transplantation (48 cases. A high risk of death by pulmonary edema was found for patients with carcinoma of colon. Similarly, in patients with lung cancer or cachexia, A high risk of death by bronchopneumonia (OR = 3.6; OR = 2.6, respectively was found. Pulmonary

  4. Static Scene Statistical Non-Uniformity Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    data set in (a) and the nonuniform set in (b). There are some visible signs of the original source image, or ghosting , that is affecting the accuracy...different ratios of ∆̄KK̄ and thus different degrees of 31 precision over the image. The changing precision manifests itself as the ghosting seen in Figure...nonuniform data set. While there is some residual checkerboard pattern in these images, it should be noted that the amount of error is very small. To

  5. Drowning as a Cause of Death in Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishmael, Holly A.; Begleiter, Michael L.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2002-01-01

    This study reports on a 9-year-old boy previously diagnosed with Angelman syndrome who died unexpectedly by drowning in a shallow backyard wading pool. The case illustrates the fascination with water by individuals with Angelman syndrome and highlights that this fascination may lead to death. The need for supervision is stressed. (Contains 5…

  6. Mortality and causes of death in first admitted schizophrenic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, P B; Juel, K

    1993-01-01

    of 9156 first admitted schizophrenic patients. Suicide accounted for 50% of deaths in men and 35% of deaths in women. Suicide risk was particularly increased during the first year of follow-up. Death from natural causes, with the exception of cancer and cerebrovascular diseases, was increased. Suicide...... risk during the first year of follow-up increased by 56%, with a 50% reduction on psychiatric in-patient facilities. The study confirms that mortality in schizophrenia is still markedly elevated, and the finding of an increasing suicide risk may be an indicator of some adverse effects...

  7. Gastrointestinal diseases of Napoleon in Saint Helena: causes of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Costanzo, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    The fact that Napoleon Ist died from gastric cancer seems to be well established. Arguments for the hypothesis of chronic arsenic poisoning have recently been developed in the literature. This study, focused on the gastrointestinal diseases of Napoleon in Saint Helena, is based on a confrontation between the clinical semiological anamnesis and the anatomical data in the autopsy report by F. Antommarchi. Napoleon presented several gastrointestinal diseases: gall-bladder lithiasis complicated with angiocholitis, chronic colitis and certainly a gastric cancer. Death was consecutive to perforation of the gastric lesion leading to haemorrhagic vomitis and multiorgan failure. The description of the gastric lesions during autopsy is consistent with the diagnosis of cancer. The course of the clinical events is closely correlated with the anatomic lesions. There is strong evidence that Napoleon died from an acute complication of his gastric disease.

  8. Causes of death of patients with laryngeal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferlito, A.; Haigentz M, J.r.; Bradley, P.J.; Suarez, C.; Strojan, P.; Wolf, G.T.; Olsen, K.D.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Mondin, V.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Boedeker, C.C.; Hamoir, M.; Hartl, D.M.; Hunt, J.L.; Devaney, K.O.; Thompson, L.D.; Rinaldo, A.; Takes, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite remarkable advances in the care of patients with laryngeal cancer over the past several decades, including a growing awareness of therapeutic complications and attention to quality of life, little is known about the causes of mortality in this population. In addition to the laryngeal

  9. Survival and cause of death after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, H; Jørgensen, Torben; Davidsen, M;

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Danish WHO MONICA study, a register of patients with myocardial infarction was established in 1982, covering 11 municipalities in the western part of Copenhagen County, Denmark. During the period 1982-91, all cases of myocardial infarction among citizens aged 25-74 years were...... registered and validated according to the criteria set up for the WHO MONICA project. Short-term (28 days) and long-term (up to 15 years) survival in three periods were compared. The rate of mortality after a non-fatal myocardial infarction was compared with that of the general population, and causes...

  10. diseases and causes of death among the popes 1. introduction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    present as is to be expected in an older population group, and acute terminal febrile illnesses ... disease, gallstones, cancer, dysentery, the plague, lung infection, gangrene of a leg, ..... Information on the patients' medical histories is limited.

  11. Mortalidade feminina em idade reprodutiva no Estado de São Paulo, Brasil, 1991-1995: causas básicas de óbito e mortalidade materna Female mortality in reproductive age in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, 1991-1995: underlying causes of death and maternal mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagib Haddad

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a mortalidade materna no período reprodutivo (15 a 49 anos no Estado de São Paulo, de 1991 a 1995, segundo grupos etários e causas básicas de óbito. MÉTODOS: Foi fornecida pela Fundação Seade a listagem dos óbitos, com as causas básicas codificadas pela Classificação Internacional de Doenças, 9ª Revisão, utilizando-se o programa "Automated Classification of Medical Entities", as estimativas da população feminina segundo grupos etários e os números de nascidos vivos. Foram calculados coeficientes específicos por 100.000 mulheres, mortalidade materna por 100.000 nascidos vivos e percentagens de óbitos por subgrupos. Foram calculadas medianas dos coeficientes do quinquênio, para comparação das principais causas agrupadas nos capítulos. RESULTADOS: De 1991 a 1995 houve aumento da mortalidade por deficiência da imunidade celular a partir de 25 anos, parecendo traduzir um paralelismo com a curva ascendente da epidemia de AIDS em mulheres. Lesões e envenenamentos predominam nas mais jovens, porém a partir de 35 anos as doenças do aparelho circulatório e neoplasmas passaram a ser preponderantes. Doenças infecciosas e parasitárias ocupam a sétima ou oitava posição, em todas as idades. Acidentes e homicídios e suicídios foram elevados. A mortalidade materna variou de 43,7 a 49,6 por 100.000 nascidos vivos. CONCLUSÕES: Houve grande exposição das mulheres em idade fértil a fatores associados a causas externas, doenças crônicas e AIDS. A maioria das causas apontadas de mortalidade materna podem ser prevenidas e, portanto, revelam insuficiência de assistência pré-natal adequada e extensiva, bem como deficiências no atendimento ao parto e puerpério.OBJECTIVE: To describe female mortality in the reproductive age (15 to 49 years old in the State of S. Paulo, Brazil, from 1991 to 1995, according to the age and underlying causes of death. METHODS: Underlying causes of death, according to the

  12. 单中心九年冠状动脉介入治疗围术期患者死亡原因的探讨%Causes of death in coronary artery disease patients undergoing PCI during perioperative period in a single center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王可; 李文文; 郭志福; 游晓华; 黄新苗; 马丽萍; 赵仙先; 郑兴; 秦永文

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the causes of death in patients with coronary artery disease(CAD) undergoing PCI during perioperative period. Methods A total of 5225 CAD patients who underwent PCI during perioperative period from January 2002 to December 2010 in our hospital were included in this study. Their clinical data,features of CAD,time and causes of death during perioperative period were recorded. Results Fifty-four CAD patients died during perioperative period with a death rate of 1.03%. Of the 1337 emergency patients who underwent PCI,39 died with a death rate of 2. 92%. Of the 3888 patients who underwent PCI on a selective day, 15 died with a death rate of 0. 39%. Of the 54 patients who died during perioperative period,19 died on day 1 after PCI with a death rate of 35. 2%, 18 died of cardiogenic shock with a death rate of 33. 3%, 9 died of thrombosis in stents with a death rate of 16. 7% , and 7 died of severe left heart failure with a death rate of 12. 9%. Conclusion The death rate of patients undergoing PCI during perioperative period is low. Death usually occurs in elderly CAD patients with multiple coronary artery branch lesions,especially in emergency department. The common causes of death are cardiogenic shock,thrombosis in stents,and severe left heart failure.%目的 探讨PCI围术期患者死亡的原因.方法 选择2002年1月~2010年1 2月行PCI患者5225例,记录围术期死亡患者的基线临床资料、冠状动脉病变特点、死亡时间及死亡原因.结果 围术期患者共死亡54例,病死率1.03%,54例死亡患者中,单支病变13例,双支病变11例,3支病变30例;19例(35.2%)死于术后第1天、20例(37.0%)死于术后2~8 d;有18例(33.3%)死于心源性休克、9例(16.7%)死于支架内血栓形成、7例(12.9%)死于严重左心衰竭.结论 PCI围术期死亡发生率低,且多发生在急诊PCI、老年、多支病变患者.引起死亡原因多为心源性休克、支架内血栓形成、严重左心衰竭等.

  13. Causas de óbito em pacientes com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida, necropsiados na Fundação de Medicina Tropical do Amazonas Causes of death among patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome autopsied at the Tropical Medicine Foundation of Amazonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Leopoldina Santos de Souza

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar em 129 pacientes com AIDS, necropsiados na Fundação de Medicina Tropical do Amazonas de 1996 a 2003, as causas do óbito, observando o grau de concordância entre os diagnósticos necroscópicos com os diagnósticos clínicos. A doença mais freqüente que causou o óbito foi tuberculose 28%, seguida de pneumonia bacteriana 17%, histoplasmose 13%, toxoplasmose 10%, pneumocistose 8%, criptococose 5%, sepse bacteriana 4% e 15% outras causas. A concordância entre o diagnóstico clínico antemortem e a necropsia foi de 51,9%. O principal órgão acometido foi o pulmão 82,2%. O tempo de sobrevivência após o diagnóstico laboratorial até o óbito variou entre um mês e 120 meses. A média de sobrevivência foi 15 dias e 56% morreram menos de um mês após o diagnóstico, 15 pacientes morreram na mesma data do diagnóstico. Esses resultados demonstram a importância da necropsia na causa mortis em pacientes com AIDS.The aim of this study was to investigate the causes of death among 129 AIDS patients that were autopsied at the Tropical Medicine Foundation of Amazonas between 1996 and 2003. The degree of concordance between the autopsy diagnoses and the clinical diagnoses was observed. The disease that most frequently caused death was tuberculosis (28%, followed by bacterial pneumonia (17%, histoplasmosis (13%, toxoplasmosis (10%, pneumocystosis (8%, cryptococcosis (5%, bacterial sepsis (4% and other causes (15%. The concordance between the clinical diagnosis before death and the autopsy was 51.9%. The main organ involved was the lungs (82.2%. The length of survival from the time of the laboratory diagnosis to death ranged from one month to 120 months. The mean length of survival was 15 days and 56% died less than one month after the diagnosis, while 15 patients died on the same day that they were diagnosed. These results show the importance of autopsies in elucidating the causes of death among AIDS patients.

  14. Diferenciais geográficos, socioeconômicos e demográficos da qualidade da informação da causa básica de morte dos idosos no Brasil Geographic, demographic, and socioeconomic differences in quality of data on cause of death in Brazilian elders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Kanso

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Identificaram-se diferenciais geográficos e socioeconômicos do padrão de qualidade da informação sobre a causa básica de morte dos idosos no Brasil. Utilizaram-se três indicadores de qualidade: proporção de causas mal definidas; proporção de causas inespecíficas; e a combinação de ambas. Analisaram-se as principais causas mal definidas e inespecíficas e a associação destes indicadores com características individuais constantes na Declaração de Óbito (DO e contextuais dos municípios. A proporção de causas inespecíficas é maior do que a de mal definidas e ambas aumentam com a idade. Escolaridade, cor/raça, porte do município e PIB per capita mostraram-se associados com a qualidade da informação, mas de forma mais intensa com as causas mal definidas do que com as inespecíficas. Ter recebido assistência médica diminui a chance de o óbito do idoso ser registrado como causas mal definidas e aumenta a de inespecíficas. Programas voltados para a melhoria da qualidade da informação da DO devem focar não apenas as causas de morte mal definidas entre os idosos, mas também as inespecíficas.This study identifies geographic, demographic, and socioeconomic differences in the quality of data on underlying causes of death in the Brazilian elderly population. We used three quality indicators: the proportion of ill-defined causes, the proportion of unspecified causes, and the two proportions combined. We analyzed the main ill-defined and unspecified causes and the association between these indicators and individual characteristics on death certificates (DC and characteristics of the municipalities. Unspecified causes exceed ill-defined causes, and both increase with age. Schooling, race, size of municipality, and per capita GDP were associated with quality of data (especially with ill-defined as compared to unspecified causes. Having received medical care decreased the odds of cause of death being recorded as ill-defined and

  15. Injury Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Certification Import Safety International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & Decisions Research & Statistics Research & Statistics Technical Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury ...

  16. Cosmic Statistics of Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Szapudi, I.; Colombi, S.; Bernardeau, F.

    1999-01-01

    The errors on statistics measured in finite galaxy catalogs are exhaustively investigated. The theory of errors on factorial moments by Szapudi & Colombi (1996) is applied to cumulants via a series expansion method. All results are subsequently extended to the weakly non-linear regime. Together with previous investigations this yields an analytic theory of the errors for moments and connected moments of counts in cells from highly nonlinear to weakly nonlinear scales. The final analytic formu...

  17. Correction of GPS Surveying Data Based on Adaptive Current Statistical Model%基于自适应“当前”统计模型GPS测量数据的修正

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄杰; 林怡青; 彭关春

    2013-01-01

    For correcting outliers emerging in GPS measurement data of real-riving speed,an improved current statistical model is proposed.The model adjusts maneuvering frequency twice according to innovation vectors,and the method makes more suitable to track fast maneuverable target and improve,tracking precision.By comparing the data measured by GPS on a real-road conditions using the model with the data from a CAN bus of the vehicle,it is found that the model can effectively improve the measurement results and obtain more reliable data.%针对GPS测量实际道路车速中存在的突变野值问题,提出改进的自适应“当前”统计模型.该模型在“当前”统计模型基础之上,根据新息向量实时对机动频率做两次调整.两次调整算法使得模型更加适应于跟踪快速机动目标,提高跟踪精度.最后将模型应用于处理GPS测量的实际道路行驶车速,同时与通过CAN总线采集的车速传感器信号进行对比.实验结果表明该方法能够改善测量结果,使修正后的数据更加切合实际.

  18. Statistical Correction for Dynamical Prediction of 500 hPa Height Field in Mid-high Latitudes%中高纬度地区500 hPa高度场动力预测统计订正

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭桂容; 段浩; 任宏利

    2012-01-01

    from that of the prediction year. In this way, the analogue method is employed to correct the model prediction on OSR basis, namely, OSR-based analogue method. The results suggest that the prediction ability of the mode accounting for less variance may be higher than the mode with more variance, such as the 2nd and 3rd EOF modes have low skill but with large variance contribution to total variance of the model field. OSR fails in advancing the model prediction. The DAP method based on OSR (DAP-OSR) shows a possibility of improving the prediction techniques with ACC increasing 0. 1 by correcting the bad modes of model while OSR fails. Correcting the dynamic prediction by combing the advantages of the numerical models and statistic methods, the nonlinear analogue method based on linear OSR shows a possibility of improving the prediction techniques by correcting the EOF modes, which are predicted by the numerical modes with very low skills. However, since the numerical model has a poor capability in representing the 2nd and 3rd EOF modes of the observation which account for large percent of total variance, and the forecast ability can not be improved effectively because the model prediction information is not enough or incorrect. Therefore, it is necessary to make further analysis on the samples of the modes, predicted with low skill by the numerical model, and the corresponding external forcing. The external forcing might be more effective to improve the correction for such modes with low skill.

  19. Statistical discrete geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ariwahjoedi, Seramika; Kosasih, Jusak Sali; Rovelli, Carlo; Zen, Freddy Permana

    2016-01-01

    Following our earlier work, we construct statistical discrete geometry by applying statistical mechanics to discrete (Regge) gravity. We propose a coarse-graining method for discrete geometry under the assumptions of atomism and background independence. To maintain these assumptions, restrictions are given to the theory by introducing cut-offs, both in ultraviolet and infrared regime. Having a well-defined statistical picture of discrete Regge geometry, we take the infinite degrees of freedom (large n) limit. We argue that the correct limit consistent with the restrictions and the background independence concept is not the continuum limit of statistical mechanics, but the thermodynamical limit.

  20. Principles of statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Bulmer, M G

    1979-01-01

    There are many textbooks which describe current methods of statistical analysis, while neglecting related theory. There are equally many advanced textbooks which delve into the far reaches of statistical theory, while bypassing practical applications. But between these two approaches is an unfilled gap, in which theory and practice merge at an intermediate level. Professor M. G. Bulmer's Principles of Statistics, originally published in 1965, was created to fill that need. The new, corrected Dover edition of Principles of Statistics makes this invaluable mid-level text available once again fo

  1. Descrição das lesões microscópicas das pregas vestibulares de adultos autopsiados e sua relação com as causas de óbito e doença de base Description of microscopic lesions of vestibular folds of autopsied adults and their relationship with cause of death and underlying disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata C. Rossi

    2005-04-01

    penetração de agentes infecciosos.The increase in invasive methods currently applied to diagnosis airway upper tract infection leads to a possible increase in vestibular folds (VF lesions. Besides, VF importance in the prevention of the organism against infection pathogens had been stressed and few studies had addressed the microscopic lesions of the VF in autopsied patients because there is no routine VF examination in the postmortem exam. AIM: The aim of this study is morphological microscopic analyses of the VF from autopsied patients and its correlation with basic disease and cause of death. STUDY DESIGN: transversal cohort. MATERIAL AND METHOD: We studied 82 larynges collected during the autopsy exam and performed the Hematoxylin -eosin method for morphological analyses. RESULTS: From the 82 vestibular folds analyzed we observe that 42 (51% showed an inflammatory reaction. In fifteen (18.3% vestibular folds we found lymphoid follicular hyperplasia, in eleven (13.4% diffuse inflammatory infiltrate and in sixteen (19.5% acute inflammatory reactions. Circulatory diseases were the most frequently underlying diseases found, 31 (37.8% and from these 20 (67.8% presented associated vestibular folds inflammatory reaction. The infection diseases were the most frequently cause of death among the patients with inflammatory reaction of the VF. CONCLUSION: Besides the anatomic function, VF seem to have a immunological function preventing lower airway infections. Our study demonstrated inflammatory PV reactions in patients with infections diseases as cause of death; this finding could be a consequence of the sepses that leads the patient to death or a different way used by the organism to prevent infection.

  2. Causas de morte e razões para eutanásia de cães da Mesorregião do Centro Ocidental Rio-Grandense (1965-2004 Causes of death and reasons for euthanasia in dogs from the midland region of the Midwest of Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil (1965-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Fighera

    2008-04-01

    parasitárias, principalmente parvovirose, cinomose e verminose intestinal. Em adultos, as causas de morte mais importantes foram cinomose, neoplasmas e trauma. Em idosos, neoplasmas e doenças degenerativas foram responsáveis por aproximadamente a metade das mortes.The main objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of diseases culminating with death or motivating euthanasia of dogs from the midland region of the Midwest of Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The necropsy files of the Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária (LPV of the Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM were accessed and necropsy protocols of dogs necropsied between January 1965 and December 2004 were reviewed. During this period 4,844 reports of canine necropsies were filed at the LPV-UFSM. The case distribution in relation to the disease categories diagnosed was as follows: infectious and parasitic diseases (1,693 [35.0%]; neoplasms (378 [7.8%]; disorders caused by physical agents (369 [7.6%]; degenerative diseases (342 [7.1%]; poisonings and toxinfections (112 [2.3%]; euthanasia due to convenience (101 [2.1%]; metabolic and endocrinological diseases (97 [2.0%]; iatrogenic disorders (83 [1.7%]; developmental disorders (25 [0.5%]; immune mediate diseases (10 [0.2%]; and nutritional disorders (6 [0.1%]. Other disorders, including multifactorial or idiopathic diseases contributed 80 (1.6% cases. In 1,548 (32.0% out of the 4,844 cases it was not possible to establish either cause of death or reason for euthanasia. Infectious and parasitic diseases (mainly canine distemper, parvoviral enteritis and intestinal parasitism, neoplasia (mainly mammary neoplasms and lymphoma, disorders caused by physical agents (mainly accidents caused by automotive vehicles and degenerative diseases (mainly chronic renal failure, cirrhosis, and congestive heart failure were the main disease categories causing death or motivating euthanasia in dogs of this midland region. However, when cases were evaluated in

  3. Algebraic Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Norén, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Algebraic statistics brings together ideas from algebraic geometry, commutative algebra, and combinatorics to address problems in statistics and its applications. Computer algebra provides powerful tools for the study of algorithms and software. However, these tools are rarely prepared to address statistical challenges and therefore new algebraic results need often be developed. This way of interplay between algebra and statistics fertilizes both disciplines. Algebraic statistics is a relativ...

  4. Practical business statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Siegel, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Practical Business Statistics, Sixth Edition, is a conceptual, realistic, and matter-of-fact approach to managerial statistics that carefully maintains-but does not overemphasize-mathematical correctness. The book offers a deep understanding of how to learn from data and how to deal with uncertainty while promoting the use of practical computer applications. This teaches present and future managers how to use and understand statistics without an overdose of technical detail, enabling them to better understand the concepts at hand and to interpret results. The text uses excellent examples with

  5. Bayesian statistics

    OpenAIRE

    新家, 健精

    2013-01-01

    © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Article Outline: Glossary Definition of the Subject and Introduction The Bayesian Statistical Paradigm Three Examples Comparison with the Frequentist Statistical Paradigm Future Directions Bibliography

  6. 2003-2012年北京市5岁以下儿童死亡率和死亡原因分析%Analysis of mortality rate and causes of death among children under 5 years old in Beijing from 2003 to 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫淑娟; 朱雪娜

    2014-01-01

    性心脏病、肺炎和意外窒息(死亡率分别为59.96/10万,52.57/10万,41.89/10万,24.64/10万和15.61/10万).结论 2003-2012年,北京市城区、近郊区和远郊区县新生儿、婴儿、5岁以下儿童死亡率及先天性心脏病死亡率均有明显的下降趋势,远郊区县5岁以下儿童前8位死因中有6个呈下降趋势,以溺水死亡率下降尤为明显.%Objective To understand the age-specific and cause-specific mortality rate among children under 5 years old in Beijing from 2003 to 2012.Methods Death surveillance data of children under the age of 5 were obtained from Beijing children mortality surveillance network from 2003 to 2012.Neonatal mortality rate (NMR),infant mortality rate (IMR),under 5-year old children mortality rate (U5MR) and the leading cause of death for under 5-year old children in urban,suburbs,and outer suburbs in Beijing were analyzed.Results The NMR,IMR and U5 MR in Beijing were 2.08 (253/121 747),3.11 (379/121 747) and 3.57 (435/121 747) per 1000 live births in 2012,respectively,which declined 54.88%,50.24% and 54.75% compared with the level in 2003 respectively.The children mortality rates showed a decreasing trend in urban,suburb,and outer suburbs during 2003 and 2012 (NMR was decreased from 0.53%,0.42%,and 0.48% in 2003 to 0.20%,0.19%,and 0.23% in 2012 ; IMR was decreased from0.73%,0.58%,and 0.63% in 2003 to 0.30%,0.29%,and 0.35% in 2012; U5MR was decreased from 0.90%,0.72%,and 0.82% to 0.33%,0.34%,and 0.39% in 2012,P <0.01).There was a steady decline in the U5MR due to congenital heart disease,birth asphyxia,premature birth or low birth weight and traffic accident in Beijing from 2003 to 2012.The mortality rate of congenital heart disease declined from 140.63 to 41.89 per 100 000 live births,birth asphyxia declined from 109.38 to 59.96 per 100 000 live births,premature birth or low birth weight declined from 85.94 to 52.57 per 100 000 live births,traffic accident declined from 26.04 to 6

  7. Análise da fidedignidade da declaração da causa básica de morte por câncer em Salvador, Brasil Analysis of the declaration of the basic cause of death by cancer in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Schnitman

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi determinada a precisão das informações contidas nas estatísticas de mortalidade por câncer, comparando-se a causa básica de morte da declaração de óbito (DO com dados de laudo de anatomia patológica e de diagnóstico hospitalar de uma amostra de 966 declarações de óbito do total de mortes registradas na cidade de Salvador, no ano de 1983. Os laudos de anatomia patológica e dados de prontuários médicos hospitalares confirmam as informações das 485 declarações de óbito que se referiam aos neoplasmas selecionados,em apenas 65% das vezes. Além de observarmos este baixo percentual de confirmados para os neoplasmas selecionados, encontramos 35 declarações de óbito de indivíduos que tiveram câncer, com comprovação histológica, numa amostra aleatória de 481 declarações de óbito que se referiam a outras causas de morte. Projetando esses achados para as 10.098 mortes restantes teríamos aproximadamente 700 declarações de óbito cuja causa básica deveria ser câncer e não a registrada na declaração de óbito.The accuracy of the cancer mortality figures was determined by comparing the underlying causes of death as coded on death certificates with pathology reports and hospital diagnoses of a sample of 966 deaths of the total deaths occurring in Salvador during 1983. The death certificates were found to be accurate in 65% of 485 cancer deaths studied. Thirty-five histologically confirmed cancer deaths were found in a random sample of 481 deaths from other causes (460 stating other causes and 21 stating cancer sites that were not under study. This means that, approximately 700 more cancer deaths may be hidden among the remaining 10,098 death certificates.

  8. Mathematical statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Pestman, Wiebe R

    2009-01-01

    This textbook provides a broad and solid introduction to mathematical statistics, including the classical subjects hypothesis testing, normal regression analysis, and normal analysis of variance. In addition, non-parametric statistics and vectorial statistics are considered, as well as applications of stochastic analysis in modern statistics, e.g., Kolmogorov-Smirnov testing, smoothing techniques, robustness and density estimation. For students with some elementary mathematical background. With many exercises. Prerequisites from measure theory and linear algebra are presented.

  9. Harmonic statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-05-01

    The exponential, the normal, and the Poisson statistical laws are of major importance due to their universality. Harmonic statistics are as universal as the three aforementioned laws, but yet they fall short in their 'public relations' for the following reason: the full scope of harmonic statistics cannot be described in terms of a statistical law. In this paper we describe harmonic statistics, in their full scope, via an object termed harmonic Poisson process: a Poisson process, over the positive half-line, with a harmonic intensity. The paper reviews the harmonic Poisson process, investigates its properties, and presents the connections of this object to an assortment of topics: uniform statistics, scale invariance, random multiplicative perturbations, Pareto and inverse-Pareto statistics, exponential growth and exponential decay, power-law renormalization, convergence and domains of attraction, the Langevin equation, diffusions, Benford's law, and 1/f noise.

  10. Recuperação das principais causas de morte do Nordeste do Brasil: impacto na expectativa de vida Recuperación de las principales causas de muerte del Noreste de Brasil: impacto en la expectativa de vida Recovery of the main causes of death in the Northeast of Brazil: impact on life expectancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neir Antunes Paes

    2010-04-01

    redistribución de las causas de muerte mal definidas, según el sexo. Se construyeron tablas de vida de múltiple disminución para los principales grupos de causas de muerte, cuyos impactos de las disminuciones fueron evaluados por la esperanza de vida. RESULTADOS: La eliminación total de los principales grupos de causas en la mortalidad general proporcionó para hombres y mujeres, respectivamente, las siguientes ganancias en la esperanza de vida del Noroeste: enfermedades infecciosas y parasitarias (1,0 y 0,5 años, neoplasmas malignos (1,4 y 1,5 años, enfermedades del aparato circulatorio (4,0 y 4,0 años, enfermedades del aparato respiratorio (1,1 y 0,8 años y causas externas (2,9 y 0,3 años. CONCLUSIONES: Los niveles de las coberturas de los óbitos fueron aceptables, así como las redistribuciones de las causas mal definidas para los estados. Considerando que las estadísticas vitales del Noreste son poco utilizadas, debido a los argumentos de que su calidad limita la producción de indicadores confiables de la mortalidad, su recuperación de forma directa posibilita resultados consistentes.OBJECTIVE: To estimate the impact on life expectancy after elimination of the main groups of causes of death in the Brazilian Northeast in 2000. METHODS: Data on deaths recorded for the states of Northeastern Brazil in 2000 were extracted from the Mortality Information System. The coverage of death records of children under ten years of age was assessed using indirect procedures. Ledermann's method was used to reclassify the ill-defined death causes, according to sex. Multiple-decrement life tables were constructed for the main groups of causes of death, whose decrement impacts were assessed through life expectancy. RESULTS: The total elimination of the main groups of causes in the general mortality resulted in the following gains on the life expectancy of the Northeast for men and women, respectively: infectious and parasitic diseases (1.0 and 0.5 years, malignant neoplasms (1

  11. Celiac disease in Brazilian patients: associations, complications and causes of death. Forty years of clinical experience Doença celíaca em pacientes brasileiros: associações, complicações e causas de morte. Quarenta anos de experiência clínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorete Maria da Silva Kotze

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Celiac disease is a multisystem auto-immune disorder and may start at any age in genetically predisposed individuals. OBJECTIVE: To identify associations, complications, and cause of death in Brazilian patients. METHODS: One hundred and fifty-seven patients were studied: 23 adolescents and 134 adults, 79.6% females, 20.4% males, 75.8% at the time of diagnosis and 24.2% on a gluten-free diet, follow-up between 1 and 40 years. The diagnosis of celiac disease was based on histologic findings and the presence of serologic auto-antibodies markers for celiac disease. Specific tests were done according to clinical suspicion of associations. Bone mineral density was determined by dual energy x-rays in 53 patients upon diagnosis. The data regarding associations, complications, and causes of death were obtained by interviews and from the patient's charts. RESULTS: Associations: atopy (22.3%, depression (17.2%, thyroid disorder (15.9%, dermatitis herpetiformis (11.5%, diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2 (4.5% and tumors (4.5%. COMPLICATIONS: Anemia and osteopenia/osteoporosis in all groups; increased number of spontaneous abortion. Four patients (4.5% died (one from lymphoma, one with diabetes type 1, one from acute meningitis and one due to suicide. Conclusions - This experience is similar to those described in the world literature. Celiac disease presents the same characteristics independently of the geographic region. We recommend periodic evaluations, from childhood, independent of the duration of the diet. The key is to establish an interval between evaluations.CONTEXTO: A doença celíaca é uma enfermidade multissistêmica e autoimune que pode se manifestar em qualquer idade, em indivíduos geneticamente predispostos. OBJETIVO: Identificação das associações, complicações e causas de morte em pacientes brasileiros após longo período de acompanhamento. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados retrospectivamente 157 pacientes, 23 adolescentes e 134

  12. [Updated medical death documents: Medical Death Certificate and the Birth Statistics Bulletin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirera, Lluís; Segura, Andreu

    2010-08-01

    Public health physicians have constantly urged that the Medical Death Certificate (CMD in Spain) and the notification of perinatal deaths be adapted to WHO standards. The new CMD came into effect in January 2009, whilst significant changes were made to the Birth Statistics Bulletin (BEP acronym in Spanish) in 2007. In this article the certifying doctor is informed on their novel and key aspects. The health significance of this medico-legal act is emphasised. At the same time associated issues are mentioned that still need to be resolved in Spain. The CMD unifies the medical certificate and the death statistics bulletin on one form and complies with WHO recommendations. It asks whether the death has been the result of an already registered traffic or work accident, and if an autopsy (clinical) has been performed. For place of death, it means the place where the cadaver has been recognised and the death certified. The approximate time of the causes of death must also be indicated. The BEP registers the births and deaths in labour. It includes the education level and occupation levels of the mother and father, and still has the number of weeks gestation and the birth weight in grams. Notification of legal deaths and perinatal deaths still need to be improved; the confidential transfer of causes of death to doctors and researchers; and death statistics according to cause with less delay between the events and their availability and publication.

  13. Data and Statistics: Women and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Women and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Atlas of Heart Disease Facts on Women and Heart Disease Heart disease is the leading cause of death ...

  14. Statistical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sadovskii, Michael V

    2012-01-01

    This volume provides a compact presentation of modern statistical physics at an advanced level. Beginning with questions on the foundations of statistical mechanics all important aspects of statistical physics are included, such as applications to ideal gases, the theory of quantum liquids and superconductivity and the modern theory of critical phenomena. Beyond that attention is given to new approaches, such as quantum field theory methods and non-equilibrium problems.

  15. Statistical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Szulc, Stefan

    1965-01-01

    Statistical Methods provides a discussion of the principles of the organization and technique of research, with emphasis on its application to the problems in social statistics. This book discusses branch statistics, which aims to develop practical ways of collecting and processing numerical data and to adapt general statistical methods to the objectives in a given field.Organized into five parts encompassing 22 chapters, this book begins with an overview of how to organize the collection of such information on individual units, primarily as accomplished by government agencies. This text then

  16. Statistical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Joseph W

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses statistical methods that are useful for treating problems in modern optics, and the application of these methods to solving a variety of such problems This book covers a variety of statistical problems in optics, including both theory and applications.  The text covers the necessary background in statistics, statistical properties of light waves of various types, the theory of partial coherence and its applications, imaging with partially coherent light, atmospheric degradations of images, and noise limitations in the detection of light. New topics have been introduced i

  17. Histoplasmosis Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Histoplasmosis Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir How common is histoplasmosis? In the United States, an estimated 60% to ...

  18. Statistical distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Catherine; Hastings, Nicholas; Peacock, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    A new edition of the trusted guide on commonly used statistical distributions Fully updated to reflect the latest developments on the topic, Statistical Distributions, Fourth Edition continues to serve as an authoritative guide on the application of statistical methods to research across various disciplines. The book provides a concise presentation of popular statistical distributions along with the necessary knowledge for their successful use in data modeling and analysis. Following a basic introduction, forty popular distributions are outlined in individual chapters that are complete with re

  19. Harmonic statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliazar, Iddo, E-mail: eliazar@post.tau.ac.il

    2017-05-15

    The exponential, the normal, and the Poisson statistical laws are of major importance due to their universality. Harmonic statistics are as universal as the three aforementioned laws, but yet they fall short in their ‘public relations’ for the following reason: the full scope of harmonic statistics cannot be described in terms of a statistical law. In this paper we describe harmonic statistics, in their full scope, via an object termed harmonic Poisson process: a Poisson process, over the positive half-line, with a harmonic intensity. The paper reviews the harmonic Poisson process, investigates its properties, and presents the connections of this object to an assortment of topics: uniform statistics, scale invariance, random multiplicative perturbations, Pareto and inverse-Pareto statistics, exponential growth and exponential decay, power-law renormalization, convergence and domains of attraction, the Langevin equation, diffusions, Benford’s law, and 1/f noise. - Highlights: • Harmonic statistics are described and reviewed in detail. • Connections to various statistical laws are established. • Connections to perturbation, renormalization and dynamics are established.

  20. A Study on Detecting Diatom 18S rRNA Genes to Identify Cause of Death by Drowning on Rabbits%硅藻18S rRNA鉴别实验家兔水中尸体死因的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周玉倩

    2015-01-01

    .ConclusionThe detection rate of the 18S rRNA gene with PCR-based method developed by this study was higher than the traditional method of diatom with strong acid digestion method in drowning victims. Both of the sensitivity and specificity of this method were superior to traditional methods, and it can be used as a potentialy useful tool to identify cause of death by drowning.

  1. Scan Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Glaz, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Suitable for graduate students and researchers in applied probability and statistics, as well as for scientists in biology, computer science, pharmaceutical science and medicine, this title brings together a collection of chapters illustrating the depth and diversity of theory, methods and applications in the area of scan statistics.

  2. Statistical Diversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petocz, Peter; Sowey, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors focus on hypothesis testing--that peculiarly statistical way of deciding things. Statistical methods for testing hypotheses were developed in the 1920s and 1930s by some of the most famous statisticians, in particular Ronald Fisher, Jerzy Neyman and Egon Pearson, who laid the foundations of almost all modern methods of…

  3. Practical Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyons, L

    2016-01-01

    Accelerators and detectors are expensive, both in terms of money and human effort. It is thus important to invest effort in performing a good statistical anal- ysis of the data, in order to extract the best information from it. This series of five lectures deals with practical aspects of statistical issues that arise in typical High Energy Physics analyses.

  4. Introductory statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sheldon M

    2005-01-01

    In this revised text, master expositor Sheldon Ross has produced a unique work in introductory statistics. The text's main merits are the clarity of presentation, contemporary examples and applications from diverse areas, and an explanation of intuition and ideas behind the statistical methods. To quote from the preface, ""It is only when a student develops a feel or intuition for statistics that she or he is really on the path toward making sense of data."" Ross achieves this goal through a coherent mix of mathematical analysis, intuitive discussions and examples.* Ross's clear writin

  5. Introductory statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sheldon M

    2010-01-01

    In this 3rd edition revised text, master expositor Sheldon Ross has produced a unique work in introductory statistics. The text's main merits are the clarity of presentation, contemporary examples and applications from diverse areas, and an explanation of intuition and ideas behind the statistical methods. Concepts are motivated, illustrated and explained in a way that attempts to increase one's intuition. To quote from the preface, ""It is only when a student develops a feel or intuition for statistics that she or he is really on the path toward making sense of data."" Ross achieves this

  6. Statistics Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Foy, Millennia; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Fiedler, James

    2014-01-01

    Do you have elevated p-values? Is the data analysis process getting you down? Do you experience anxiety when you need to respond to criticism of statistical methods in your manuscript? You may be suffering from Insufficient Statistical Support Syndrome (ISSS). For symptomatic relief of ISSS, come for a free consultation with JSC biostatisticians at our help desk during the poster sessions at the HRP Investigators Workshop. Get answers to common questions about sample size, missing data, multiple testing, when to trust the results of your analyses and more. Side effects may include sudden loss of statistics anxiety, improved interpretation of your data, and increased confidence in your results.

  7. Statistical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wannier, Gregory H

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, the field of statistical physics was traditionally taught as three separate subjects: thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and kinetic theory. This text, a forerunner in its field and now a classic, was the first to recognize the outdated reasons for their separation and to combine the essentials of the three subjects into one unified presentation of thermal physics. It has been widely adopted in graduate and advanced undergraduate courses, and is recommended throughout the field as an indispensable aid to the independent study and research of statistical physics.Designed for

  8. Semiconductor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Blakemore, J S

    1962-01-01

    Semiconductor Statistics presents statistics aimed at complementing existing books on the relationships between carrier densities and transport effects. The book is divided into two parts. Part I provides introductory material on the electron theory of solids, and then discusses carrier statistics for semiconductors in thermal equilibrium. Of course a solid cannot be in true thermodynamic equilibrium if any electrical current is passed; but when currents are reasonably small the distribution function is but little perturbed, and the carrier distribution for such a """"quasi-equilibrium"""" co

  9. Cardiovascular mortality: quality diagnostics analysis and causal statistics of lethal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikulina N.N.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The high cardiovascular mortality (CVM proves the necessity of verification analysis of cardiovascular death causes. The research goal is to determine the quality, facilities and peculiarities of cardiovascular diseases (CVD of postmortem diagnostics and statistical recording as a cause of death. 1972 successive cases of CVM in Voronezh, Ryazan and Khanty-Mansiysk have been analyzed. The majority of deaths caused by CVD were classified as fatalities occurring outside hospital and in the absence of medical care (88.0%. Incidence of cardiovascular deaths was confirmed by autopsy in 28.3% cases. With increasing age, the incidence of detecting CVD as a cause of death increased, while the frequency of referral to autopsy consistently decreased. Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD forms comprising 48.3% of all CVM were confirmed by autopsy results only in 29.5% of cases. Acute IHD forms (including myocardial infarction accounted for only 11.6% of CVM; however this diagnosis was based on autopsy results in 72.4% of cases. The high death rate outside hospital and in the absence of medical care with the rare referral to autopsy, especially for elderly having chronic CVD, does not provide reliable statistical information on CVM

  10. SEER Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute works to provide information on cancer statistics in an effort to reduce the burden of cancer among the U.S. population.

  11. Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  12. CMS Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Center for Strategic Planning produces an annual CMS Statistics reference booklet that provides a quick reference for summary information about health...

  13. Reversible Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tryggestad, Kjell

    2004-01-01

    The study aims is to describe how the inclusion and exclusion of materials and calculative devices construct the boundaries and distinctions between statistical facts and artifacts in economics. My methodological approach is inspired by John Graunt's (1667) Political arithmetic and more recent work...... within constructivism and the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). The result of this approach is here termed reversible statistics, reconstructing the findings of a statistical study within economics in three different ways. It is argued that all three accounts are quite normal, albeit...... in different ways. The presence and absence of diverse materials, both natural and political, is what distinguishes them from each other. Arguments are presented for a more symmetric relation between the scientific statistical text and the reader. I will argue that a more symmetric relation can be achieved...

  14. Image Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Laura Jean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-08

    In large datasets, it is time consuming or even impossible to pick out interesting images. Our proposed solution is to find statistics to quantify the information in each image and use those to identify and pick out images of interest.

  15. Accident Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Accident statistics available on the Coast Guard’s website by state, year, and one variable to obtain tables and/or graphs. Data from reports has been loaded for...

  16. Multiparametric statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Serdobolskii, Vadim Ivanovich

    2007-01-01

    This monograph presents mathematical theory of statistical models described by the essentially large number of unknown parameters, comparable with sample size but can also be much larger. In this meaning, the proposed theory can be called "essentially multiparametric". It is developed on the basis of the Kolmogorov asymptotic approach in which sample size increases along with the number of unknown parameters.This theory opens a way for solution of central problems of multivariate statistics, which up until now have not been solved. Traditional statistical methods based on the idea of an infinite sampling often break down in the solution of real problems, and, dependent on data, can be inefficient, unstable and even not applicable. In this situation, practical statisticians are forced to use various heuristic methods in the hope the will find a satisfactory solution.Mathematical theory developed in this book presents a regular technique for implementing new, more efficient versions of statistical procedures. ...

  17. Geographical patterns of proportionate mortality for the most common causes of death in Brazil Variações geográficas no padrão de mortalidade proporcional por doenças crônico-degenerativas no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosely Sichieri

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Mortality due to chronic diseases has been increasing in all regions of Brazil with corresponding decreases in mortality from infectious diseases. The geographical variation in proportionate mortality for chronic diseases for 17 Brazilian state capitals for the year 1985 and their association with socio-economic variables and infectious disease was studied. Calculations were made of correlation coefficients of proportionate mortality for adults of 30 years or above due to ischaemic heart disease, stroke and cancer of the lung, the breast and stomach with 3 socio-economic variables, race, and mortality due to infectious disease. Linear regression analysis included as independent variables the % of illiteracy, % of whites, % of houses with piped water, mean income, age group, sex, and % of deaths caused by infectious disease. The dependent variables were the % of deaths due to each one of the chronic diseases studied by age-sex group. Chronic diseases were an important cause of death in all regions of Brazil. Ischaemic heart diseases, stroke and malignant neoplasms accounted for more than 34% of the mortality in each of the 17 capitals studied. Proportionate cause-specific mortality varied markedly among state capitals. Ranges were 6.3-19.5% for ischaemic heart diseases, 8.3-25.4% for stroke, 2.3-10.4% for infections and 12.2-21.5% for malignant neoplasm. Infectious disease mortality had the highest (p Em razão de a mortalidade por doenças crônico -degenerativas estar aumentando no Brasil, com correspondente redução das doenças infecciosas, foi realizado estudo comparativo entre 17 capitais brasileiras em relação à mortalidade proporcional para as principais causas de morte em 1985. Foram calculados coeficientes de correlação entre a mortalidade proporcional decorrente de doença isquêmica do coração, doença cerebrovascular, câncer de pulmão, mama e estômago e 3 variáveis socioeconômicas, raça e a mortalidade proporcional por

  18. Statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jana, Madhusudan

    2015-01-01

    Statistical mechanics is self sufficient, written in a lucid manner, keeping in mi