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Sample records for coronary thrombosis

  1. Circadian Variation in Coronary Stent Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoud, Karim D.; Lennon, Ryan J.; Ting, Henry H.; Rihal, Charanjit S.; Holmes, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine the circadian, weekly, and seasonal variation of coronary stent thrombosis. Background Other adverse cardiovascular events such as acute myocardial infarction are known to have higher incidences during the early morning hours, Mondays, and winter months. Methods The

  2. Incidence and predictors of coronary stent thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Bollati, Mario; Clementi, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Stent thrombosis remains among the most feared complications of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting. However, data on its incidence and predictors are sparse and conflicting. We thus aimed to perform a collaborative systematic review on incidence and predictors of stent...

  3. Acute stent thrombosis after primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Peter; Wiberg, Sebastian; Van't Hof, Arnoud;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine clinical, procedural, and treatment factors associated with acute stent thrombosis (AST) in the EUROMAX (European Ambulance Acute Coronary Syndrome Angiography) trial. BACKGROUND: Bivalirudin started during transport for primary percutaneous coronary int...

  4. Late thrombosis of coronary bare-metal stent: Case report

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    Apostolović Svetlana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stent thrombosis remains the primary cause of death after percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI. Despite modern concepts of PCI, stent thrombosis occurs in 0.5% -2% of elective procedures and even 6% of patients with the acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Stent thrombosis most often develops within the first 48 hours after the PCI, and rarely after a week of stent implantation. Angiographically documented late (>6 months thrombosis of coronary bare-metal stent (BMS is rare, because the stent endothelialization is considered to be completed after four weeks of the intervention. Our patient is a 41 year old male and he had BMS thrombosis 345 days after the implantation, which was clinically manifested as an acute myocardial infarction in the inferoposterolateral localization. Stent Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade thrombosis occurred despite a long term dual antiplatelet therapy and control of known risk factors. Thrombolytic therapy (Streptokinase in a dose of 1 500 000 IU was not successful in reopening the occluded vessel, so the flow through the coronary artery was achieved by rescue balloon angioplasty, followed by implantation of drug eluting stent in order to prevent restenosis.

  5. Usefulness of Thrombus Aspiration for the Treatment of Coronary Stent Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoud, Karim D.; Vlaar, Pieter J.; van den Heuvel, Ad F. M.; Hillege, Hans L.; Zijlstra, Felix; de Smet, Bart J. G. L.

    2011-01-01

    Current treatment for coronary stent thrombosis (ST) often lacks satisfactory results and clinical outcome is poor. We investigated the impact of manual thrombus aspiration during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on myocardial reperfusion and clinical outcome in patients with angiographicall

  6. Very late coronary aneurysm formation with subsequent stent thrombosis secondary to drug-eluting stent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ibrahim Akin,; Stephan Kische; Tim C Rehders; Henrik Schneider; G(o)kmen R Turan; Tilo Kleinfeldt; Jasmin Ortak; Christoph A. Nienaber; Hüseyin Ince

    2011-01-01

    Drug-eluting stents have changed the practice in interventional cardiology.With the widespread use of these stents important safety concerns regarding stent thrombosis and formation of coronary artery aneurysm have been expressed.While the majority of attention was focused on stent thrombosis,the formation of coronary aneurysm was only described in anecdotal reports.We report on a patient who suffered from very late stent thrombosis in association with coronary artery aneurysm formation secondary to drug-eluting stent but not to bare-metal stent.

  7. Impact of rivaroxaban on stent thrombosis and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in acute coronary syndrome

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    Krohn-Grimberghe M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Marvin Krohn-Grimberghe, Christoph Bode, Constantin von zur MuhlenDepartment of Cardiology and Angiology I, Heart Center, University of Freiburg, GermanyAbstract: Angioplasty and stent implantation have greatly improved the outcome of patients with acute coronary syndrome. However, stents come with the risk of stent thrombosis, which is associated with a high rate of revascularization, myocardial infarction, and death. The inhibition of factor Xa due to rivaroxaban leads to an interruption of the intrinsic as well as the extrinsic coagulation pathway, which reduces thrombus formation as a potential mechanism to diminish the rate of stent thrombosis. In this review, we evaluate the role of rivaroxaban in the prevention of stent thrombosis and its general role in patients with acute coronary syndrome.Keywords: Rivaroxaban, stent thrombosis, acute coronary syndrome, secondary prevention

  8. Acute and subacute stent thrombosis after primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction : incidence, predictors and clinical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesstermans, A. A. C. M.; van Werkum, J. W.; Zwart, B.; van der Heyden, J. A.; Kelder, J. C.; Breet, N. J.; van't Hof, A. W. J.; Koolen, J. J.; Brueren, B. R. G.; Zijlstra, F.; ten Berg, J. M.; Dambrink, Jan Hendrik Everwijn

    2010-01-01

    Background: Early coronary stent thrombosis occurs most frequent after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Objectives: To identify the specific predictors of, respectively, acute and subacute stent thrombosis in patients after prim

  9. Deep Vein Thrombosis in A Post-Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Patient: Successful Conservative Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, S H; Miraj, A K; Hossain, M A; Aftabuddin, M

    2017-07-01

    Deep vein thrombosis is an alarming medical emergency. Deep vein thrombosis or deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) within a deep vein predominantly in the legs. Post-Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting deep vein thrombosis is a very rare medical condition relatively in Asian. Approximately 80% of deep vein thrombosis (DVTs) is clinically asymptomatic, 20% of those that actually demonstrate signs and symptoms can be easily confused with symptoms of other commonly presenting musculoskeletal disorders. Proper medical management can reduce patient's morbidity and further burden. A 50 years old diabetic Post-Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting gentleman had been suffering for left leg swelling, high grade fever and calf muscle pain for 5 days. He had absent Arteria Dorsalis Paedis pulse on left foot, Positive Homan sign and Wells score is 7. His left leg was hugely swelled. He had normal leg hair distribution. Duplex study of Left Leg-Deep Vein Thrombosis in left lower limb (Popliteal segment) with sign of recanalization. He is also a patient of anemia of chronic disease due to hemorrhoid. Several investigations have done to find the cause of his chronic anemia. His treatment was meticulous with complete bed rest, elevation of left lower limb, heparinization, oralrivaroxaban. He had rapid recovery following treatment. Post-Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting patient should be given post-operative enoxaparin (Low molecular weight Heparin) or Heparin for 3-5 days. Early diagnosis of the disease condition reduces morbidity. Combined treatment with Rivaroxaban and Heparin is of great clinical value and outcome in a case of Post-Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Deep Vein Thrombosis patient.

  10. Coronary aneurysm and very late stent thrombosis formation associated with sirolimus-eluting stent implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hong-zhi; ZHANG Shu-yang; ZENG Yong; SHEN Zhu-jun; FANG Quan

    2009-01-01

    @@ Since drug-eluting stents (DES) can significantly reduce the risk of instant restenosis compared with bare-metal stents, they have been widely used in interventional therapy for coronary heart disease. With bare-metal stents being rapidly replaced by DES there is a great concern about the safety of DES due to stent thrombosis.~(1,2)

  11. Multiple and Contemporary Coronary Thrombosis inspite of Low Platelet Function Response.

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    Stio, Rocco Edoardo; Calcagno, Simone; Lucisano, Luigi; Pennacchi, Mauro; Sardella, Gennaro

    2014-08-01

    We are reporting a clinical case of a 78-year-old male who had oppressive chest pain at rest, which regressed with the intake of sublingual nitrates. Coronary angiography showed a chronic total occlusion (CTO) of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery, a normal circumflex, a hypoplasic right coronary artery and a Cardiac Magnetic Resonance showing vital tissue in anterior wall. During the procedure of CTO-PCI on LAD, patient developed multiple and contemporary coronary thrombosis in spite of low platelet reactivity, which was assessed by using Multiplate. A manual thrombectomy was performed with a good final result only after drug eluting stents (DES) implantation.

  12. Spontaneous coronary thrombosis following thrombolytic therapy for acute cardiovascular accident and stroke: a case study.

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    Wallace, Eric L; Smyth, Susan S

    2012-11-01

    Cardiac complications following stroke or acute cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) are common; however, many of these complications are asymptomatic and do not cause adverse cardiac effects. Symptomatic events (such as acute myocardial infarction after CVA) rarely occur and are often the result of an underlying cardiac embolic source, such as a left ventricular thrombus. We report a case of spontaneous coronary thrombosis following thrombolytic therapy for acute CVA, and discuss the implication that an underlying systemic pro-thrombotic state may predispose individuals to thrombosis in disparate vascular beds.

  13. Predictive value of antiplatelet resistance on early stent thrombosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lei; LI Hai-yan; QIAO Rui; YU Hai-yi; ZENG Hui; GAO Wei; ZHANG Jie

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite outstanding antiplatelet properties of aspirin and clopidogrel,some patients taking these drugs continue to suffer complications.Antiplatelet resistance appears to be a new prognostic factor in acute coronary syndrome patients for clinical events associated with stent thrombosis (ST).However,there is no optimal method to identify it and assess its correlation to clinical outcomes.This study sought to evaluate the predictive value of antiplatelet resistance assessed by whole blood impedance aggregometry for the risk of early ST in patients with acute coronary syndrome who underwent coronary stenting.Methods Platelet responses to aspirin and clopidogrel in 86 patients with acute coronary syndrome were measured by whole blood impedance aggregometry.Spontaneous platelet aggregation was defined as antiplatelet resistance identified by the increased electrical impedance.The clinical endpoint was early stent thrombosis during 30-day follow-up after coronary stenting.Results The prevalence of aspirin resistance,clopidogrel resistance and dual resistance of combined clopidogrel and aspirin resistance were 19.8%,12.8% and 5.8% respectively.Diabetes,female and higher platelet counts were more frequently detected in clopidogrel-resistant and dual-resistant patients.During 30-day follow-up,the patients with clopidogrel resistance and dual resistance had higher incidence of early stent thrombosis (18.2% vs.1.3%,40.0% vs.1.2%,P <0.05).Binary Logistic Regression analysis indicated that dual resistance remained an independent predicator for early stent thrombosis (odds ratio 34.064,95% CI 1.919-604.656,P=-0.016).Conclusions Antiplatelet resistance assessed by whole blood impedance aggregometry is paralleled to clinical events,and dual antiplatelet resistance is an independent predicator for early stent thrombosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome.As a physiological assessment of platelet reactivity,whole blood impedance aggregometry is a

  14. Double coronary artery thrombosis presenting as acute extensive anterior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

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    Ching-Wei Lee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous thrombosis of more than one coronary artery is an uncommon angiographic finding in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI, and usually leads to cardiogenic shock or even sudden cardiac death. We reported a 56-year-old man presenting with persistent chest tightness and ST-segment elevation over precordial leads in electrocardiography (ECG. Emergent coronary angiogram showed total occlusion of both the proximal right coronary artery (RCA and the proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD. We performed thrombus aspiration and stenting over the LAD with thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI III flow to the distal LAD. However, diminishing collateral flow to the distal RCA complicated with complete atrioventricular block (CAVB and cardiogenic shock developed thereafter. Because distal embolization of the collateral circulation from the LAD to the distal RCA was suspected, thrombus aspiration and stenting over the proximal RCA were performed. After reperfusion of the RCA, the patient's hemodynamic status stabilized and he recovered uneventfully.

  15. The effects of oral nafazatrom (= BAY g 6575) on canine coronary artery thrombosis and myocardial ischemia.

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    Fiedler, V B

    1983-01-01

    The in-vivo effects of the new antithrombotic compound nafazatrom on experimental thrombosis of the left circumflex coronary artery, on hemodynamics and on ultimate infarct size were studied in pentobarbital-anesthetized, open-chest dogs. Coronary artery thrombosis was induced by low amperage stimulation (150 microA, DC for 6 hr) of the circumflex artery intimal lining. The effects of oral pretreatment of 1%-Tylose suspension as drug diluent and 5 mg/kg nafazatrom plus vehicle were determined. Both agents were administered twice a day before onset of current stimulation. In the drug vehicle group, coronary thrombosis caused severe hemodynamic alterations, e.g. blood pressure and left ventricular pressure decrease, as well as reduction in the LV dP/dtmax associated with increases in end-diastolic filling pressure and heart rate. Time to coronary artery occlusion was delayed by nafazatrom (5.2 +/- 1.1 vs 3.1 +/- 0.4 hr, p less than 0.05). Smaller blood pressure and LV dP/dtmax reductions and minor heart rate and filling pressure increases around the time of thrombus formation suggested cardioprotection with the drug. Smaller R wave changes and S-T segment elevation indicated minor ischemia at the time of occlusive coronary artery occlusion in nafazatrom-treated hearts (24 +/- 0.5 vs 72 +/- 7% ST segment elevation, p less than 0.01). Thrombus wet weight was 18.4 +/- 2.6 mg in the nafazatrom group, but 63.7 +/- 3.1 mg in controls (p less than 0.01). Thus, ultimate infarct size was smaller in nafazatrom-treated hearts as related to left ventricular mass (8.4 +/- 1.4 vs 32.3 +/- 3.1%, p less than 0.02) or to the occluded artery perfusion area at risk for infarction (16 +/- 3.4 vs 53 +/- 6.2%, p less than 0.05). No ex-vivo effect of nafazatrom on collagen-induced platelet aggregation was observed. These results may indicate efficacy of the drug in prevention of acute coronary artery disease as one cause of ischemic jeopardy of the myocardium and/or therapeutic value in

  16. Novel nanostructured biomaterials: implications for coronary stent thrombosis

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    Karagkiozaki V

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Varvara Karagkiozaki,1,2 Panagiotis G Karagiannidis,1 Nikolaos Kalfagiannis,1 Paraskevi Kavatzikidou,1 Panagiotis Patsalas,3 Despoina Georgiou,1 Stergios Logothetidis11Lab for Thin Films – Nanosystems and Nanometrology (LTFN, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 2AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, 3Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Epirus, GreeceBackground: Nanomedicine has the potential to revolutionize medicine and help clinicians to treat cardiovascular disease through the improvement of stents. Advanced nanomaterials and tools for monitoring cell–material interactions will aid in inhibiting stent thrombosis. Although titanium boron nitride (TiBN, titanium diboride, and carbon nanotube (CNT thin films are emerging materials in the biomaterial field, the effect of their surface properties on platelet adhesion is relatively unexplored.Objective and methods: In this study, novel nanomaterials made of amorphous carbon, CNTs, titanium diboride, and TiBN were grown by vacuum deposition techniques to assess their role as potential stent coatings. Platelet response towards the nanostructured surfaces of the samples was analyzed in line with their physicochemical properties. As the stent skeleton is formed mainly of stainless steel, this material was used as reference material. Platelet adhesion studies were carried out by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations. A cell viability study was performed to assess the cytocompatibility of all thin film groups for 24 hours with a standard immortalized cell line.Results: The nanotopographic features of material surface, stoichiometry, and wetting properties were found to be significant factors in dictating platelet behavior and cell viability. The TiBN films with higher nitrogen contents were less thrombogenic compared with the biased carbon films and control

  17. In-stent thrombosis when switching ticagrelor to clopidogrel after percutaneous coronary intervention.

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    Brice, Aaron E; Hernandez, Gabriel A; Sanchez, Mariluz; Haynick, Marshall; Mendoza, Cesar E

    2017-05-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a P2Y12 receptor blocker has been proven to reduce subsequent cardiovascular events and in-stent thrombosis in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Newer P2Y12 antagonists with faster onset and greater inhibition of platelet activity have improved cardiovascular outcomes but have created uncertainty with the appropriate dosing when switching between agents. Currently, there are no evidence-based guidelines to aid clinicians when switching between P2Y12 receptor blockers. Here we describe two patients that developed in-stent thrombosis when switching from ticagrelor to clopidogrel using a 300 mg clopidogrel loading dose. Both patients presented with ST elevation myocardial infarction and underwent stent placement but then developed in-stent thrombosis 48 hours after switching from ticagrelor to clopidogrel. These cases illustrate the severe consequences of suboptimal platelet inhibition and the need for prospective trials thoroughly powered to assess clinical outcomes in order to determine the most appropriate strategy when switching from ticagrelor to clopidogrel.

  18. Inhibition of coronary thrombosis and local inflammation by a noncarbohydrate selectin inhibitor.

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    Zoldhelyi, P; Beck, P J; Bjercke, R J; Ober, J C; Hu, X; McNatt, J M; Akhtar, S; Ahmed, M; Clubb, F J; Chen, Z Q; Dixon, R A; Yeh, E T; Willerson, J T

    2000-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that selectin inhibition with blocking antibodies or a small-molecular-weight inhibitor of L-, P-, and E-selectin, methoxybenzoylpropionic acid (MBPA), prevents thrombus formation in a canine coronary Folts' model. Cyclic flow variations (CFVs) were induced by crush injury and constriction of the left anterior descending coronary artery in dogs. Systemic infusion of antibodies to P- and L-selectin abolished CFVs, respectively, in 50% and 17% of treated dogs [P = not significant (NS)]. The combination of P- and L-selectin antibodies suppressed CFVs in 60% of treated dogs (P = NS). In contrast, systemic selectin blockade by intravenous infusion or local adventitial application of MBPA markedly reduced CFVs and, in addition, reduced myocardial myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. We conclude that inhibition of L-, P-, and E-selectin binding by a small-molecular-weight, noncarbohydrate compound markedly reduces arterial thrombosis, whereas systemic administration of antibodies to L- and P-selectin fail to reproduce this antithrombotic effect. These results underscore the role of selectins in the pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis under high shear stress and suggest that inhibition of P- and L- selectin may not suffice to prevent thrombus formation in this model. The role of E-selectin in thrombus formation in this model awaits further testing.

  19. Sirolimus-eluting stent fractures associated with aneurysm and very late stent thrombosis in the right coronary artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xuebo; Gary S.Mintz; Stéphane G.Carlier; Martin B.Leon

    2007-01-01

      Although the occurrence of coronary stent fracture is rare,recent reports showed that stent fracture after sirolimus-eluting stent(SES)implantation may be associated with neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis.We report two cases of stent fracture that occurred late after elective SES implantation into the right coronary artery(RCA)that were related to the aneurysm,restenosis,thrombosis,and vessel occlusion.……

  20. Reduction of stent thrombosis in patients with acute coronary syndromes treated with rivaroxaban in ATLAS-ACS 2 TIMI 51

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson, C.M.; Chakrabarti, A.K.; Mega, J.; Bode, C.; Bassand, J.P.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Bhatt, D.L.; Goto, S.; Cohen, M.; Mohanavelu, S.; Burton, P.; Stone, G.; Braunwald, E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine if rivaroxaban is associated with a reduction in stent thrombosis among patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in the ATLAS-ACS 2 TIMI 51 (Anti-Xa Therapy to Lower Cardiovascular Events in Addition to Standard Therapy in Subjects With Acute Co

  1. Subacute coronary stent thrombosis in a patient with angina treated with double antiplatelet drugs for six days

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Feng; YANG Xiang-jun; CHENG Xu-jie; HUI Jie; JIANG Ting-bo; CHEN Tan; LIU Zhi-hua; SONG Jian-ping; JIANG Wen-ping

    2009-01-01

    @@ Stent implantation has been a great advance in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), decreasing the frequency of acute closure and restenosis. But stent thrombosis is a severe complication of this therapy regardless of the stent type: bare-metal stent (BMS) and drug-eluting stent (DES).

  2. Percutaneous coronary intervention outcomes in a low-volume center: survival, stent thrombosis, and repeat revascularization.

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    Kenney, Kimberly M; Marzo, Mitchell C; Ondrasik, Nicholas R; Wisenbaugh, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    American College of Cardiology (ACC) guidelines state that percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) be performed at centers and by operators with high-volume (>400 yearly/center) whose historical and current risk-adjusted outcomes statistics are comparable to those reported in large registries. Tripler Army Medical Center is a low-volume treatment facility but has a geographic need and special mission requirement for providing this service. We computed 30-day incidence of stent thrombosis, need for repeat revascularization, and all-cause mortality for all PCIs performed at Tripler from January 2002 through June 2008. The New York State Registry regression model was selected among 3 risk-adjustment models that we assessed in our patients. This model was used to compute expected mortality rate based on patient risk factors. The 30-day incidence of stent thrombosis and repeat revascularization was also determined, and the long-term incidence of these events was estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method as was survival. For all 546 PCI procedures, 30-day mortality was 1.47%, the incidence of stent thrombosis 2.1%, the incidence of any repeat revascularization 5.1%, and the combined event rate 5.9%. Based on risk factors used in the New York State Registry, our expected mortality was 1.93% and not significantly different from the observed rate. Although survival at 1 and 3 years appeared comparable with benchmarks at 94.6% and 89.3%, as did repeat revascularization rates at 13.0% and 21.4%, the incidence of stent thrombosis was regarded as high whether the definition included possible cases (3.2% and 3.9%) or only those regarded as definite or probable (2.7% and 3.1%). We did not identify any remediable risk factors for stent thrombosis, nor were we able to identify significant differences by year or by operator. However, visual inspection of a plot of deciles of New York State risk of death demonstrated 2 outlier cases among the 8 who died, who could have been considered

  3. A Review of Stent Thrombosis Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention at Tripler Army Medical Center: 2002–2012

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    Fentanes, Emilio; Wisenbaugh, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Stent thrombosis is a leading cause of death after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Over the past decade, 929 PCI procedures were performed. We have found that half of the 18 deaths occurring within 30-days were related to stent thrombosis, and that of 32 patients who had definite or probable stent thrombosis at up to 26 months after PCI, more than half (17) died. To reduce the incidence of this often-fatal outcome, we need to identify and avoid repeating mistakes. Methods We reviewed records and angiograms of 12 patients with definite stent thrombosis. Results Technical factors possibly relevant to stent thrombosis: only half the patients were treated with drug-eluting rather than bare metal stents. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was used to confirm adequate deployment in only 2 cases. Only 1 stent was 10% compared to proximal or distal reference vessel diameter. An untreated edge dissection was identified in only one case. In 5 cases multiple stents were used in bifurcation stenoses including one case of culotte stenting, a well-known risk factor for stent thrombosis. Patient factors possibly relevant to stent thrombosis: Four patients were still smoking at the time of stent thrombosis. One patient had discontinued clopidogrel 10 months after receiving a bare metal stent, and had thrombosis 4 months later. Two years after receiving a drug-eluting stent, 1 patient had stent thrombosis 16 days after discontinuing clopidogrel for a prostate biopsy. In two cases of subsequent, sub-acute stent thrombosis, the stents had been deployed emergently for, respectively, STEMI in the setting of hip surgery and coronary bypass surgery for myocardial infarction associated with 3-vessel disease. Discussion To reduce the incidence of the often-fatal complication of stent thrombosis, we need to try harder to get our patients to quit smoking and to continue diligently following their compliance with clopidogrel. Patient selection is important: those with

  4. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation as a Possible Cause of Acute Coronary Stent Thrombosis: A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Syed Amer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, as a cause of acute coronary stent thrombosis, has not yet been reported to our knowledge. We report a case of 64-year-old male, who presented with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI. Coronary angiography revealed right coronary artery (RCA stenosis and a drug eluting stent was deployed. Fifteen hours following the intervention, the patient developed an inferior wall ST elevation myocardial infarction. Repeat cardiac catheterization showed an acute in-stent thrombosis. Following thrombectomy, another stent was placed. The patient noted to have an acute drop in platelet count following the second intervention. Two hours following repeat intervention, the patient again developed chest pain and EKG showed recurrent ST-segment elevations in leads II, III, and aVF. Prior to repeat cardiac catheterization, the patient became unresponsive and developed cardiogenic shock. The patient was resuscitated and intubated, and repeat catheterization showed complete stent thrombosis. Intracoronary tissue plasminogen activator (tPA was given. The platelet count further dropped. Additional studies confirmed the diagnosis of DIC. No further cardiac catheterization was done at this point. The patient then later had a cardiac arrest and unfortunately cardiopulmonary resuscitation could not revive him. Amongst the etiologies of acute stent thrombosis, DIC was deemed a possible cause.

  5. Early Stent Thrombosis and Mortality After Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dangas, George D; Schoos, Mikkel M.; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early stent thrombosis (ST) within 30 days after primary percutaneous coronary intervention in ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction is a serious event. We sought to determine the predictors of and risk of mortality after early ST according to procedural antithrombotic therapy. M...... with bivalirudin compared with heparin±GPI because of increased ST within 4 hours after primary percutaneous coronary intervention. However, the mortality attributable to early ST was significantly lower after bivalirudin than after heparin±GPI. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http...

  6. Multiple coronary thrombosis and stent implantation to the subtotally occluded right renal artery in a patient with essential thrombocytosis: a case report with review.

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    Ozben, Beste; Ekmekci, Ahmet; Bugra, Zehra; Umman, Sabahattin; Meric, Mehmet

    2006-08-01

    Essential thrombocytosis is a myeloproliferative disorder of unknown etiology manifested clinically by the overproduction of platelets in the absence of a definable cause. Platelet dysfunction in essential thrombocytosis results in both hemorrhage and thrombosis. It is one of the rare causes of ischemic cardiovascular events. Fewer than 20 cases of essential thrombocytosis with involvement of coronary arteries leading to acute coronary syndromes or myocardial infarction have been reported. We report a case of multiple coronary thrombosis involving the left anterior descending artery and circumflex artery and stent implantation to the subtotally stenotic right renal artery in a women with unstable angina pectoris, essential thrombocytosis and previous history of renal artery trombosis.

  7. Eptifibatide-induced thrombocytopenia: with thrombosis and disseminated intravascular coagulation immediately after left main coronary artery percutaneous coronary angioplasty.

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    Tempelhof, Michael W; Benzuly, Keith H; Fintel, Dan; Krichavsky, Marc Z

    2012-01-01

    Early clinical trials of eptifibatide did not show a significant association between eptifibatide and the development of thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, or disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, more recent literature has suggested a significant association between eptifibatide and the development of thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. Although the true incidence and the pathophysiology of these associations are unknown, the development of these events can be life-threatening. Herein, we describe the case of a patient who experienced acute onset of profound thrombocytopenia, developing thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. This paper adds to the few previous reports of cases that suggested an association between thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, and the administration of eptifibatide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the medical literature that associates the new onset of thrombocytopenia, thrombosis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation with the administration of eptifibatide. We also provide a subject review.

  8. Relation of body mass index to risk of stent thrombosis after percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Michelle; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar H;

    2012-01-01

    [CI] 0.86 to 0.97) for each increase in kilograms per square meter of BMI. There was no significant interaction between stent type and BMI (p = 0.48). Hazard ratios for probable stent thrombosis and possible stent thrombosis adjusted for numbers of stents at the index PCI were 1.01 (CI 0.99 to 1.......03) and 0.99 (CI 0.98 to 1.01) for each increase in kilograms per square meter of BMI, respectively. In conclusion, BMI was inversely correlated with risk of definite stent thrombosis after PCI irrespective of stent type....

  9. Coronary stent thrombosis with vorapaxar versus placebo: results from the TRA 2° P-TIMI 50 trial.

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    Bonaca, Marc P; Scirica, Benjamin M; Braunwald, Eugene; Wiviott, Stephen D; O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Murphy, Sabina A; Morrow, David A

    2014-12-09

    Vorapaxar, a novel thrombin receptor antagonist, reduces cardiovascular death and recurrent thrombotic events when added to standard antiplatelet therapy in patients with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that treatment with vorapaxar reduces the rate of coronary stent thrombosis (ST) in stable patients with a history of coronary stenting. TRA 2° P-TIMI 50 (Trial to Assess the Effects of Vorapaxar in Preventing Heart Attack and Stroke in Patients With Atherosclerosis-Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction 50) was a multinational, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vorapaxar in stable patients with prior myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease, or stroke. We evaluated the rates of definite ST as adjudicated by a central events committee using Academic Research Consortium (ARC) criteria. A total of 26,449 patients were randomized, with 14,042 (53%) having a history of a coronary stent implantation before randomization, and an additional 449 patients receiving a coronary stent during the trial (total 14,491). During follow-up (median 2.5 years), there were 152 definite ST events, with the majority (92%) occurring late or very late. Vorapaxar reduced ARC definite ST (1.1% vs. 1.4%, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.51 to 0.98; p = 0.037). The reduction was consistent, regardless of time from percutaneous coronary intervention, history of diabetes, use of drug-eluting stents, and use of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) at randomization. Vorapaxar increased GUSTO moderate/severe bleeding (HR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.26 to 1.94; p TRA 2° P-TIMI 50] [P04737]; NCT00526474). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Late and very late stent thrombosis following drug-eluting stent implantation in unprotected left main coronary artery: A multicentre registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Chieffo (Alaide); S.-J. Park (Seung-Jung); E. Meliga (Emanuele); I. Sheiban (Imad); M.S. Lee (Michael); A. Latib (Azeem); Y.-H. Kim (Young-Hak); M. Valgimigli (Marco); D. Sillano (Dario); V. Magni (Valeria); G.G. Biondi-Zoccai (Giuseppe); M. Montorfano (Matteo); F. Airoldi (Flavio); R. Rogacka (Renata); M. Carlino (Mauro); I. Michev (Iassen); M.K. Hong (Myeong); C. Moretti (Claudio); E. Bonizzoni (Erminio); G.M. Sangiorgi (Giuseppe); J. Tobis (Jonathan); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); A. Colombo (Antonio)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAims: To evaluate the occurrence of late and very late stent thrombosis (ST) following elective drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation in unprotected left main coronary artery (LMCA) stenosis in a large multicentre registry. Methods and results: All 731 consecutive patients who had siroli

  11. Incidence of definite stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis after drug-eluting stent implantation for treatment of coronary in-stent restenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Khedri; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl;

    2013-01-01

    There are limited data on the optimal management of in-stent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with bare metal stent (BMS) or drug-eluting stent (DES) implantations. We assessed the clinical presentation, the incidence, and prognosis of definite stent thrombosis...

  12. Morphodynamic interpretation of acute coronary thrombosis, with special reference to volcano-like eruption of atheromatous plaque caused by coronary artery spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C S; Penha, P D; Zak, F G; Lin, J C

    1988-06-01

    Routine autopsy studies of hearts with coronary thrombosis, collected over a period of eleven years, showed unique morphologic features of rupture of soft atheromatous plaques. These features include: (1) irregular luminar outline: angulation, invagination, upheaval, and/or wrinkles, (2) wavy outline of atheromatous cavity, (3) volcano-like rupture with seepage or gushing of semiliquid atheromatous contents into lumen, (4) cholesterol crystals arranged in rheologic vector direction, (5) rupture of deeper intimal fibrous tissue, (6) one or multiple intimal upheavals, (7) focal thickening of contracted media, (8) vestige of volcano-like eruption with organized thrombus, and (9) old thrombotic occlusion with wavy appearance of thick intimal fibrous tissue. The authors present a dynamic model of vasoconstriction or artery spasm that accounts for these features and the rupture of soft atheromatous plaques.

  13. Intra-procedural stent thrombosis: a new risk factor for adverse outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Sorin J; Cristea, Ecaterina; Kirtane, Ajay J; McEntegart, Margaret B; Xu, Ke; Mehran, Roxana; Stone, Gregg W

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the incidence, correlates, and consequences of intra-procedural stent thrombosis (IPST) in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Stent thrombosis (ST) is a rare but serious complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The Academic Research Consortium definition of ST excludes events occurring during PCI. Angiograms from the ACUITY (Acute Catheterization and Urgent Intervention Triage StrategY) and HORIZONS-AMI (Harmonizing Outcomes with RevascularIZatiON and Stents in Acute Myocardial Infarction) trials were reviewed frame-by-frame at an independent core laboratory for the occurrence of IPST. Patients with versus without IPST were compared to identify baseline characteristics associated with IPST and demonstrate the independent association between IPST and adjudicated events at 30 days and 1 year. Intra-procedural ST occurred in 47 (0.7%) of 6,591 patients. The occurrence of IPST was associated with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction presentation, high white blood cell count, treatment of thrombotic and bifurcation lesions, bivalirudin monotherapy, bail-out IIb/IIIa inhibitor use, and implantation of bare-metal (rather than drug-eluting) stents. Major adverse ischemic events were markedly higher in patients with versus without IPST, including mortality at 30 days (12.9% vs. 1.4%, p definite or probable ST also occurred significantly more often among IPST patients at 30 days (17.4% vs. 1.8%, p < 0.0001) and 1 year (19.9% vs. 2.7%, p < 0.0001). Intra-procedural ST was a significant independent predictor of 1-year mortality (hazard ratio: 3.86, 95% confidence interval: 1.66 to 9.00, p = 0.002). Intra-procedural ST is a relatively rare complication of PCI in ACS but is strongly associated with subsequent out-of-lab ST and mortality. Intra-procedural ST should be considered as a distinct category of ST and routinely reported, particularly for ACS patients. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology

  14. Simultaneous management of renal carcinoma with caval vein thrombosis and double coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Grasso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent advances in surgical and anesthesiology techniques allow simultaneous thoracic and abdominal operations to be performed for severe heart disease and benignant or malignant abdominal diseases. Case report: The simultaneous surgical management in a 75-year-old patient suffering from severe double coronary artery disease and a renal cell carcinoma with extended intravascular growth into the inferior vena cava is reported. Conclusion: The postoperative course was uneventful. Simultaneous surgery proved to be beneficial and safe, showing optimal results in our patient.

  15. Impact of inhospital stent thrombosis and cerebrovascular accidents on long-term prognosis after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Elena; Ndrepepa, Gjin; Schulz, Stefanie; Byrne, Robert; Hoppmann, Petra; Kufner, Sebastian; Ibrahim, Tareq; Tada, Tomohisa; Schunkert, Heribert; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Kastrati, Adnan

    2014-12-01

    Inhospital stent thrombosis (ST) and cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) are rare but serious adverse events after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The association of ST or CVA with long-term outcome after PCI remains poorly investigated. The study included 18,334 consecutive patients who underwent PCI. Patients were divided into 3 groups: the group with ST, the group with CVA, and the group without these events. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at 3-year follow-up. Inhospital ST or CVA occurred in 59 patients (0.32%) and in 90 patients (0. 49%), respectively. There were 2,149 deaths (11.7%) during the follow-up: 26 deaths among patients with ST, 32 deaths among patients with CVA, and 2,091 deaths among patients without ST or CVA (Kaplan-Meier estimates of 3-year mortality 45.3%, 38.0%, and 12.9%, odds ratio 6.1, 95% CI 3.6-10.2, P CVA and odds ratio 4.2 [2.7-6.6], P CVA group vs the group without ST or CVA). There was no significant difference in the 3-year mortality between CVA and ST groups (P = .29). The Cox proportional hazards model showed that ST (adjusted hazard ratio 4.97, 95% CI 2.58-9.56, P CVA (adjusted hazard ratio 2.25 [1.25-4.04], P = .006) were independently associated with the increased risk of 3-year mortality. Inhospital ST and CVA after PCI are associated with the increased risk of 3-year mortality. Both events seem to have a similar impact on long-term survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stent Thrombosis is the Primary Cause of ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction following Coronary Stent Implantation: A Five Year Follow-Up of the SORT OUT II Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, S. L.; Galloe, A. M.; Thuesen, L.;

    2014-01-01

    Background: The widespread use of coronary stents has exposed a growing population to the risk of stent thrombosis, but the importance in terms of risk of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions (STEMIs) remains unclear. Methods: We studied five years follow-up data for 2,098 all-comer patients...... treated with coronary stents in the randomized SORT OUT II trial (mean age 63.6 yrs. 74.8% men). Patients who following stent implantation were readmitted with STEMI were included and each patient was categorized ranging from definite-to ruled-out stent thrombosis according to the Academic Research...... Consortium definitions. Multivariate logistic regression was performed on selected covariates to assess odds ratios (ORs) for definite stent thrombosis. Results: 85 patients (4.1%), mean age 62.7 years, 77.1% men, were admitted with a total of 96 STEMIs, of whom 60 (62.5%) had definite stent thrombosis...

  17. Triple antithrombotic therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing coronary artery stenting: hovering among bleeding risk, thromboembolic events, and stent thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menozzi Mila

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dual antiplatelet treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel is the antithrombotic treatment recommended after an acute coronary syndrome and/or coronary artery stenting. The evidence for optimal antiplatelet therapy for patients, in whom long-term treatment oral anticoagulation is mandatory, is however scarce. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the various antithrombotic strategies adopted in this population, we reviewed the available evidence on the management of patients receiving oral anticoagulation, such as a vitamin-k-antagonists, referred for coronary artery stenting. Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent indication for oral anticoagulation. The need of starting antiplatelet therapy in this clinical scenario raises concerns about the combination to choose: triple therapy with warfarin, aspirin, and a thienopyridine being the most frequent and advised. The safety of this regimen appeared suboptimal because of an increased risk in hemorrhagic complications. On the other hand, the combination of oral anticoagulation and an antiplatelet agent is suboptimal in preventing thromboembolic events and stent thrombosis; dual antiplatelet therapy may be considered only when a high hemorrhagic risk and low thromboembolic risk are perceived. Indeed, the need for prolonged multiple-drug antithrombotic therapy increases the bleeding risks when drug eluting stents are used. Since current evidence derives mainly from small, single-center and retrospective studies, large-scale prospective multicenter studies are urgently needed.

  18. Stent thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and death after drug-eluting and bare-metal stent coronary interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Maeng, Michael; Kaltoft, Anne;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to examine outcomes subsequent to implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS). BACKGROUND: Use of DES might be associated with increased risk of stent thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI), and death. METHODS: From January 2002 ...

  19. The risk and prognostic impact of definite stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis after coronary stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thayssen, Per; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Lassen, Jens Flensted;

    2012-01-01

    of death (HR=2.71 [95% CI: 1.72-4.27]) compared to cases without stent thrombosis. In-stent restenosis had no substantial impact (HR=1.17 [95% CI: 0.79-1.75]). However, in-stent restenosis presenting as non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) was associated with a greater mortality risk...

  20. Bleeding in acute coronary syndromes and percutaneous coronary interventions: position paper by the Working Group on Thrombosis of the European Society of Cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steg, P.G.; Huber, K.; Andreotti, F.; Arnesen, H.; Atar, D.; Badimon, L.; Bassand, J.P.; Caterina, R. de; Eikelboom, J.A.; Gulba, D.; Hamon, M.; Helft, G.; Fox, K.A.; Kristensen, S.D.; Rao, S.V.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Widimsky, P.; Zeymer, U.; Collet, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Bleeding has recently emerged as an important outcome in the management of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), which is relatively frequent compared with ischaemic outcomes and has important implications in terms of prognosis, outcomes, and costs. In particular, there is evidence that patients

  1. Very late bare-metal stent thrombosis, rare but stormy!

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, Mohammed

    2011-08-01

    Recurrent in-stent thrombosis is rarely reported, with catastrophic clinical consequences of either acute coronary syndrome or death. We present a case of recurrent in-stent thrombosis with its outcome and a concise literature review.

  2. Contemporary clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of angiographically confirmed coronary stent thrombosis: results from a multicenter California registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Khung Keong; Mahmud, Ehtisham; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Bennett, William E; Shunk, Kendrick A; MacGregor, John S; Li, Zhongmin; Low, Reginald I; Rogers, Jason H

    2012-03-01

    To describe the contemporary treatment and outcomes for patients with angiographically confirmed (definite) stent thrombosis (ST). Limited data are available on contemporary treatment patterns and outcomes of patients with ST in the United States. In this multicenter California registry, consecutive cases of definite ST over 5 years were identified. Clinical characteristics, in-hospital outcomes, and long-term survival are reported. One hundred and sixty five consecutive episodes of ST were identified in 153 patients from January 2005 to February 2010. The distribution of acute (≤24 hr), subacute (24 hr to 30 days), late (30 days to 1 year), and very late (≥1 year) ST was 3.9%, 21.8%, 17.6%, and 50.3%, respectively. Only 41.2% of patients were on dual antiplatelet therapy at the time of presentation, while 22.4% of patients were on none. Of the 61.4% of patients treated with restenting, 71.1% of them received a drug-eluting stent. Procedural success was 88.1%, and in-hospital death, stroke, and CABG occurred in 5.5%, 0.6%, and 6.1% of subjects, respectively. All-cause mortality at 1 year was 14.3%. Although female gender, diabetes mellitus (DM), bifurcation disease, ejection fraction <40%, and cardiogenic shock at the time of presentation were associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality, only DM (P = 0.047) and bifurcation disease (P = 0.027) remained independent predictors of in-hospital death. In-hospital mortality from definite ST is lower than previously reported, but long-term mortality remains high. DM and bifurcation disease, but not type of percutaneous therapy, are independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Comparison of P2Y12 inhibitors for mortality and stent thrombosis in patients with acute coronary syndromes: Single center study of 10 793 consecutive 'real-world' patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, Rebecca; Yazdani, Momina; Parviz, Yasir; Hall, Ian R; Grech, Ever D; Gunn, Julian P; Storey, Robert F; Iqbal, Javaid

    2017-03-07

    Three oral platelet P2Y12 inhibitors, clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor, are available for reducing the risk of cardiovascular death and stent thrombosis in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We sought to compare the efficacy of these antiplatelet drugs in contemporary practice. Data were collected for 10 793 consecutive ACS patients undergoing coronary angiography at Sheffield, UK (2009-2015). Since prasugrel use was mostly restricted to the STEMI subgroup, clopidogrel and ticagrelor were compared for all ACS patients, and all three agents were compared in the STEMI subgroup. Differences in outcomes were evaluated at 12 months by KM curves and log-rank test after adjustment for independent risk factors. Of 10 793 patients with ACS (36% STEMI), 43% (4653) received clopidogrel, 11% (1223) prasugrel and 46% (4917) ticagrelor, with aspirin for all. In the overall group, ticagrelor was associated with lower all-cause mortality compared with clopidogrel (adjusted hazard ratio (adjHR) 0.82, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.71-0.96, p = 0.01). In the STEMI subgroup, both prasugrel and ticagrelor were associated with a lower mortality compared with clopidogrel (prasugrel vs. clopidogrel: adjHR 0.65, CI 0.48-0.89, p = 0.007; ticagrelor vs. clopidogrel: adjHR 0.70, CI 0.61-0.99, p = 0.05). Of the 7595 patients who underwent PCI, 78 (1.0%) had definite stent thrombosis by 12 months. Patients treated with ticagrelor had a lower incidence of definite stent thrombosis compared with clopidogrel (0.6% vs. 1.1%; adjHR 0.51, CI 0.29-0.89, p = 0.03). In the STEMI subgroup, there was no significant difference between the three groups (ticagrelor 1.0%, clopidogrel = 1.5%, prasugrel = 1.6%; p = 0.29). In conclusion, ticagrelor was superior to clopidogrel for reduction in both mortality and stent thrombosis in unselected invasively managed ACS patients. In STEMI patients, both ticagrelor and prasugrel were associated with lower mortality compared with clopidogrel, but

  4. Is thrombosis a contributor to heart failure pathophysiology? Possible mechanisms, therapeutic opportunities, and clinical investigation challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannad, F.; Stough, W.G.; Regnault, V.; Gheorghiade, M.; Deliargyris, E.; Gibson, C.M.; Agewall, S.; Berkowitz, S.D.; Burton, P.; Calvo, G.; Goldstein, S.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Koglin, J.; O'Connor, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Thrombotic events (coronary thrombosis, venous thromboembolism, intraventricular thrombosis, intracranial and systemic thromboembolism) occur frequently in patients with heart failure. These events may be precipitated by several mechanisms including hypercoagulability through enhancement of procoagu

  5. Discrepant ratios of arterial versus venous thrombosis in hemophilia A as compared with hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, Antonio; Bertozzi, Irene; de Marinis, Giulia Berti; Tasinato, Valentina; Sambado, Luisa

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of thrombosis in patients with congenital bleeding disorders represents an exceptional event. Hemophilia A and hemophilia B patients have been showed to present both arterial and venous thrombosis (85 cases of arterial thrombosis and 34 cases of venous thrombosis). The great majority of arterial thrombosis are myocardial infarction or other acute coronary syndromes, whereas the majority of venous thrombosis are deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolisms. However there are discrepancies in the proportion of arterial and venous thrombosis seen in hemophilia A versus hemophilia B. The ratio of arterial versus venous thrombosis in hemophilia A is 3.72 whereas that for hemophilia B is 1.12. This indicates that arterial thrombosis is more frequent in hemophilia A as compared to hemophilia B and the opposite is true for venous thrombosis. The potential significance of this discrepancy is discussed.

  6. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Demirci

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of presinusoidal portal hypertension. Portal vein thrombosis commonly occurs in patient with cirrhosis, malignancy and prothrombotic states. Patients with acute portal vein thrombosis have immediate onset. Patients with chronic portal vein thrombosis have developed portal hypertension and cavernous portal transformation. Portal vein thrombosis is diagnosed with doppler ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Therapy with low...

  7. Acute thrombosis during left main stenting using tap technique in a patient presenting with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan, Deepak, E-mail: deepaknatarajan@me.com

    2015-06-15

    This case reports the sudden development of large burden of thrombi in the left anterior descending coronary artery immediately following distal left main stenting using TAP technique in a middle aged man who presented with non ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome despite having been administered 7,500 units of unfractionated heparin and being given 325 mg of aspirin and 60 mg of prasugrel prior to the procedure. The thrombi were managed effectively by giving an intra-coronary high bolus dose of tirofiban (25 mcg/kg) without the need for catheter thrombus extraction. Tirofiban intra-venous infusion was maintained for 18 hours, and the patient was discharged in stable condition on the third day. Importantly there is no controlled study on upstream administration of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors in addition to the newer more potent anti-platelet agents in patients with unprotected distal left main disease presenting with non ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome, nor is there any data on safety and efficacy of mandatory usage of injectable anti-platelet agents at the start of a procedure in a catheterization laboratory in such a setting.

  8. Rivaroxaban in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mega, Jessica L; Braunwald, Eugene; Wiviott, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes arise from coronary atherosclerosis with superimposed thrombosis. Since factor Xa plays a central role in thrombosis, the inhibition of factor Xa with low-dose rivaroxaban might improve cardiovascular outcomes in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome....

  9. Rivaroxaban in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mega, J.L.; Braunwald, E.; Wiviott, S.D.; Bassand, J.P.; Bhatt, D.L.; Bode, C.; Burton, P.; Cohen, M.; Cook-Bruns, N.; Fox, K.A.; Goto, S.; Murphy, S.A.; Plotnikov, A.N.; Schneider, D.; Sun, X.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Gibson, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute coronary syndromes arise from coronary atherosclerosis with superimposed thrombosis. Since factor Xa plays a central role in thrombosis, the inhibition of factor Xa with low-dose rivaroxaban might improve cardiovascular outcomes in patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome. ME

  10. Comparison of the incidence of late stent thrombosis after implantation of different drug-eluting stents in the real world coronary heart disease patients: three-year follow-up results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ji-lin; LIU Hai-bo; WU Yong-jian; YUAN Jin-qing; CHEN Jue; YOU Shi-jie; DAI Jun; GAO Run-lin; GAO Li-jian; YANG Yue-jin; LI Jian-jun; QIAO Shu-bin; XU Bo; HUANG Jing-han; YAO Min; QIN Xue-wen

    2010-01-01

    Background Late stent thrombosis (LST) is still concerned by interventions cardiologists in daily clinical practice. This study aimed to compare the incidence of LST after implantation of different drug-eluting stents (DES) in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients in the real world.Methods From December 2001 to February 2009, a total of 11 875 consecutive CHD patients undergone DES implantation were enrolled in this single-center registery study. Patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, mixed DES implantation, restenosis lesions, and patients who could not take dual antiplatlet medication and those who were contraindicated for coronary interventional treatment were excluded. All patients were treated with completed dual antiplatelet medications for at least 9 months after DES deployment. The follow-up was completed by outpatient visits, letter correspondence, phone calls and coronary angiography. Definite LST was diagnosed auording to the Academic Research Consortium (ARC) definition.Results Cypher or Cypher Select stents were implanted in 4104 cases, Taxus or Taxus Liberty stents in 2271 cases and Firebird stents (Chinese rapamycin-eluting stents) in 5500 cases. One-year follow-up was completed in 9693 patients, including 3346 cases with Cypher or Cypher Select stents, 1529 cases with Taxus or Taxus Liberty stents and 4818 cases with Firebird stents. Two- and three-year follow-up results were obtained in 7133 and 4353 patients, respectively, including 2410 and 1760 cases with Cypher or Cypher Select stents, 1285 and 900 cases with Taxus or Taxus Liberty stents as well as 3438 and 1693 cases with Firebird stents. One-year follow-up results showed that the incidence of LST was 1.08% in patients with Cypher or Cypher Select stents, 1.24% in those with Taxus or Taxus Liberty stents and 0.71% in those with Firebird stents; there was no significant difference between those with Cypher or Cypher Select and Firebird stents, but there was significant

  11. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Demirci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of presinusoidal portal hypertension. Portal vein thrombosis commonly occurs in patient with cirrhosis, malignancy and prothrombotic states. Patients with acute portal vein thrombosis have immediate onset. Patients with chronic portal vein thrombosis have developed portal hypertension and cavernous portal transformation. Portal vein thrombosis is diagnosed with doppler ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Therapy with low molecular weight heparin achieves recanalization in more than half of acute cases.

  12. ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction due to arterial thrombosis in a 29-year-old woman with normal coronary arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, Eneida; Morton, Talitha; Farber, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is rare in young adults. We present a case of a 29-year-old black woman who presented with an acute onset of chest pain while sleeping. Anterior wall ST-elevation AMI was diagnosed based on clinical presentation, electrocardiographic findings, and elevated cardiac biomarkers. Coronary angiography revealed a totally occluded proximal left anterior descending artery. The obstructing lesion, thrombus, was removed. There was no evidence of atherosclerotic disease or dissection. An evaluation for a hypercoagulable state was unrevealing. Echocardiography 1 year later revealed normal left ventricular wall motion and systolic function. PMID:28127135

  13. Management of a subclavian artery thrombosis causing acute anterior wall infarction and concurrent left arm ischemia in a patient with prior coronary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgüllü, Çağdaş; Eryılmaz, Ufuk; Zencir, Cemil; Güngör, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    We report a 57-year-old patient with acute anterior wall infarction with a history of a coronary baypass graft operation in 2007. He also had concurrent left arm cyanosis and severe pain. He had received diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma one month previously and had had his first chemotherapy in the previous week with gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. After the angiography, a giant thrombus was detected in the proximal left subclavian artery, deteriorating the flows of both left internal mammarian artery (LIMA) to left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery graft, as well as the left brachial artery. The proximal subclavian artery was stented and good flow was achieved. Through the LIMA, the distal part of LAD, which was totally obstructed with probable distal thrombus embolization, was reached and a percutaneous balloon angioplasty performed. However, the no-reflow phenomenon was observed in distal LAD. A Fogarty traction of thrombus was performed successfully for the revascularization of the left arm. Approximately 30 minutes after the procedure, both angina and ST segment elevation in ECG were resolved under unfractioned heparin and nitroglycerin infusion. However, the patient died due to sepsis seven days after admission to hospital. In the literature, there are only a few previous reports on this rare clinical entity. The eitology, presentation, and the possible management strategies of this clinical entity is presented in this report.

  14. Thrombosis and the Pill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessey, M P

    1970-02-01

    The results of 3 British and 1 American investigation of the risk of thromboembolism among women using oral contraceptives are reviewed. 1 British study conducted among general practitioners found the risk of developing superficial thrombophlebitis about 3 times greater among pill users. Neither of 2 other studies, in which hospital admissions and fatalities were analyzed, found any significant link between oral contraceptives and coronary thrombosis, but both indicated a 6 to 8-fold increase in risks of venous thromboembolism and of cerebral thrombosis. The findings of the American study were similar. None of the 4 studies discovered any evidence that the thromboembolic risk is greater early in the course of medication or, that it increases with duration of use. The American study obtained some evidence that sequential preparations might be more harmful than combined ones. The British Committee on Safety of Drugs has since determined, on the basis of analysis of routinely submitted reports of suspected adverse reactions, that the thromboembolic risk is higher with pills containing 75 mcg or more of estrogen than among those containing only 50 mcg. For the woman, who for any reason finds oral contraception to be the only satisfactory method of birth control, the risks may be considered acceptable provided medical supervision is adequate. Use of the pill entails other known major hazards (jaundice, hypertension) and knowledge of the longterm effects is very incomplete. Substantial evidence suggests that the estrogenic component of combined and sequential pills is responsible for the thromboembolic risks. The greater risks of pregnancy and menstrual disturbances accompanying progestogen-only oral contraceptives may limit their advantages.

  15. Risk Factors for Thrombosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包承鑫

    2002-01-01

    @@ Thrombotic disease is a multifactorial disease, multiple interactions between genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development of the disease.This review summarized some risk factors reported for arterial thrombosis and venous thrombosis in recent few years.

  16. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein ... the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  17. Postpartum renal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubens, D; Sterns, R H; Segal, A J

    1985-01-01

    Renal vein thrombosis in adults is usually a complication of the nephrotic syndrome. Rarely, it has been reported in nonnephrotic women postpartum. The thrombosis may be a complication of the hypercoagulable state associated with both the nephrotic syndrome and pregnancy. Two postpartum patients with renal vein thrombosis and no prior history of renal disease are reported here. Neither patient had heavy proteinuria. In both cases, pyelonephritis was suspected clinically and the diagnosis of renal vein thrombosis was first suggested and confirmed by radiologic examination. Renal vein thrombosis should be considered in women presenting postpartum with flank pain.

  18. Thrombosis and morphology of plaque rupture using optical coherence tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jun; CHEN Yun-dai; TIAN Feng; LIU Hong-bin; CHEN Lian; SUN Zhi-jun; REN Yi-hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombosis following plaque rupture is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome,but not all plaque ruptures lead to thrombosis.There are limited in vivo data on the relationship between the morphology of ruptured plaque and thrombosis.Methods We used optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate the morphology of plaque rupture and its relation to coronary artery thrombosis in patients with coronary heart disease.Forty-two patients with coronary artery plaque rupture detected by OCT were divided into two groups (with or without thrombus) and the morphological characteristics of ruptured plaque,including fibrous cap thickness and broken cap site,were recorded.Results The fibrous cap of ruptured plaque with thrombus was significantly thinner compared to caps without thrombus ((57.00±17.00) μm vs.(96.00±48.00) μm; P=0.0076).Conclusions Plaque rupture associated with thrombosis occurs primarily in plaque covered by a thin fibrous cap.Thick fibrous caps are associated with greater stability of ruptured plaque.

  19. The late acute thrombosis in coronary drug-eluting stent-cases pooled analysis%冠状动脉药物洗脱支架晚发支架内急性血栓形成分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王禹; 盖鲁粤; Sueselbeck T; Remppis A; 杨庭树; 陈练; 刘宏斌; 金琴花; 李丽

    2006-01-01

    目的分析近期临床应用冠脉药物洗脱支架(drug-eluting stent,DES)术后,晚发的支架内急性血栓形成病例的发生特点及可能影响因素.方法应用关键词:coronary artery、sirolimus、paclitaxil、drug-elutistent、thrombosis,anuervsm、malapposition等,应用美国国立医学图书馆的PubMed系统和德国海德堡大学的电子期刊系统对临床医学核心期刊进行系统检索.对检索出的12个病例及本中心3例冠状动脉内置入DES后晚发支架内急性血栓形成病例汇总分析.结果共有15例患者,在DES(sirolimus和paclitaxel支架)术后出现晚发的支架内急性血栓形成和(或)同时合并冠脉瘤样扩张、支架与血管壁贴合不良(malapposition).急性血栓发生时间:120~540天.9例患者在停用阿司匹林、氯吡格雷后4~15天发生;3例患者在DES置入部位出现明显冠脉瘤样扩张和(或)瘤腔内血栓形成;4例患者在DES发生急性血栓时、同时置入的6枚普通金属支架完全通畅.结论晚发的DES内急性血栓形成(≥6个月)、支架与血管壁贴合不良、明显的冠脉管壁瘤样扩张造成再次严重的心肌缺血或梗死.

  20. Lifestyle and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, Elisabeth Rebekka

    2008-01-01

    In the Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis (MEGA study), a large population-based case-control study, we investigated lifestyle factors as risk factors for venous thrombosis. Overweight, smoking and alcohol consumption were addressed and pregnancy and

  1. Evaluation of triple anti-platelet therapy by modified thrombelastography in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yi-hong; JIN Jing; XIN You-hong; LI Rong-bin; LI Hai-yan; LIN Lin; LIU Chun-xue; YANG Ting-shu; WANG Yu; GAI Lu-yue; LIU Hong-bin; CHEN Lian; WANG Hong-ye; WANG Chun-ya; XU Xiu-li

    2008-01-01

    @@ Most cases of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) involve coronary atherosclerosis and plaque rupture,as well as subsequent thrombosis. The initial thrombotic events leading to red thrombus formation are platelet adherence and aggregation.

  2. Antiphospholipid (Hughes) syndrome: beyond pregnancy morbidity and thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mialdea, Maria; Sangle, Shirish R; D'Cruz, David P

    2009-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disease characterised by recurrent arterial or venous thrombosis, pregnancy morbidity and the persistence of positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Many other clinical manifestations may occur including heart valve disease, livedo reticularis, thrombocytopenia and neurological manifestations such as migraine and seizures. We review a number of other manfestations including stenotic lesions, coronary artery disease and accelerated atherosclerosis, ...

  3. Biocompatibility of Coronary Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamarasee M. Jeewandara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the dominant cause of mortality in developed countries, with coronary artery disease (CAD a predominant contributor. The development of stents to treat CAD was a significant innovation, facilitating effective percutaneous coronary revascularization. Coronary stents have evolved from bare metal compositions, to incorporate advances in pharmacological therapy in what are now known as drug eluting stents (DES. Deployment of a stent overcomes some limitations of balloon angioplasty alone, but provides an acute stimulus for thrombus formation and promotes neointimal hyperplasia. First generation DES effectively reduced in-stent restenosis, but profoundly delay healing and are susceptible to late stent thrombosis, leading to significant clinical complications in the long term. This review characterizes the development of coronary stents, detailing the incremental improvements, which aim to attenuate the major clinical complications of thrombosis and restenosis. Despite these enhancements, coronary stents remain fundamentally incompatible with the vasculature, an issue which has largely gone unaddressed. We highlight the latest modifications and research directions that promise to more holistically design coronary implants that are truly biocompatible.

  4. [Pregnancy and coronary artery dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction during pregnancy is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality. Coronary atherosclerosis is the most common cause due to an increase in the age of the patients and the association with cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and the existence of family history of coronary disease. However, thrombosis, coronary dissection or coronary vasospasms are other causes that may justify it. We report the case of a 33 weeks pregnant first-time mother, without cardiovascular risk factors, who presented an acute coronary event in the context of atherosclerotic disease and coronary dissection after percutaneous coronary intervention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Deep vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Gargi; Roy, Subesha Basu; Haldar, Swaraj; Bhattacharya, Rabindra

    2010-12-01

    Occlusive clot formation in the veins causes venous thrombosis, the site most common in the deep veins of leg, called deep vein thrombosis. The clot can block blood flow and when it breaks off, called an embolism which in turn can damage the vital organs. Venous thrombosis occurs via three mechanisms ie, Virchow's triad. The mechanisms are decreased flow rate of blood, damage to the blood vessel wall and an increased tendency of the blood to clot. There are several factors which can increase a person's risk for deep vein thrombosis. The symptoms of deep vein thrombosis in the legs are pain, swelling and redness of the part. One variety of venous thrombosis is phlegmasia alba dolens where the leg becomes pale and cool. Investigations include Doppler ultrasound examination of the limb, D-dimer blood test, plethysmography of the legs, x-rays to show vein in the affected area (venography). Hospitalisation is necessary in some cases with some risk factors. The mainstream of treatment is with anticoagulants, mostly low molecular weight heparin for 6 months. Deep venous thrombosis is a rising problem. Early diagnosis and treatment is associated with a good prognosis.

  6. Postpartal right ventricular thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velicki, Lazar; Milosavljević, Aleksandar; Majin, Marijan; Vujin, Bojan; Kovacević, Pavle

    2008-11-01

    The discovery of an intracardial mass in patients presents a serious diagnostic dilemma. The differential diagnosis of this condition may seem abundant, but myxomas and intracardial thrombosis are the most frequent diagnoses. A connection between pregnancy and the presence of thrombosis has been documented frequently. Normal pregnancy leads to changes of the coagulative and fibrinolytic status toward a hypercoagulable condition which has its own physiological justification (the risk of blood loss decreases during labor). The case of a patient suffering from postpartal right ventricular thrombosis, which was successfully resolved by surgery as described in this contribution, demonstrates the value of a multidisciplinary approach.

  7. Pediatric transplantation: preventing thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J D

    2015-06-01

    Due to progressive advances in surgical techniques, immunosuppressive therapies, and supportive care, outcomes from both solid organ transplantation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation continue to improve. Thrombosis remains a challenging management issue in this context, with implications for both graft survival and long-term quality of life. Unfortunately, there remains a general paucity of pediatric-specific data regarding thrombosis incidence, risk stratification, and the safety or efficacy of preventative strategies with which to guide treatment algorithms. This review summarizes the available evidence and rationale underlying the spectrum of current practices aimed at preventing thrombosis in the transplant recipient, with a particular focus on risk factors, pathophysiology, and described antithrombotic regimens.

  8. CD147 in cardiovascular disease and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, Gabrielle J; Kritharides, Leonard

    2014-10-01

    Thrombotic and inflammatory pathways play a key role in coronary artery disease (CAD) development. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase (aka CD147) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that is expressed on many cell types including hematopoietic, endothelial cells, leukocytes, keratinocytes, platelets, and others. The binding partners of CD147 are numerous and diverse, and give some indication to the various roles that CD147 can play; these include homophilic interactions, integrins, cyclophilins, glycoprotein VI (GPVI), caveolin 1, and monocarboxylate transporters. Recent evidence suggests a role for CD147 in both thrombosis and inflammation, as well as involvement in CAD and cancer. In this review, we summarize the role of CD147 and its binding partners in platelets, thrombosis, and arterial disease and assess mechanistic aspects of CD147 biology.

  9. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renowden, Shelley [Frenchay Hospital, Bristol BS16 1LE (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    A comprehensive synopsis on cerebral venous thrombosis is presented. It emphasizes the various aetiologies, the wide clinical spectrum and the unpredictable outcome. Imaging techniques and pitfalls are reported and the therapeutic options are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Cancer and Thrombosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敏涓

    2011-01-01

    @@ Relationship between cancer and thromboembolic disease, the research has been going on for more than a century.Armand trousseau in 1865 first reported the formation of venous thrombosis prone patients with gastric cancer.

  11. Neonatal pulmonary artery thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangesh Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery thrombosis in neonates is a rare entity. We describe two neonates with this diagnosis; their presentation, evaluation, and management. These cases highlight the importance of this differential diagnosis when evaluating the cyanotic neonate.

  12. Cancer and Thrombosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家增

    2006-01-01

    @@ Since 1865, Aremand Trousseau first reported on the association between cancer and thrombosis. For many years, it has been recognized that venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common occurrence in patients with malignant disease. Compared to other groups of patients with VTE the cancer population is unique because the pathogenesis of thrombosis differs, the frequency of VTE is greater and the clinical management required is more complex.

  13. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Portal vein thrombosis (PVT is the blockage or narrowing of the portal vein by a thrombus. It is relatively rare and has been linked with the presence of an underlying liver disease or prothrombotic disorders. We present a case of a young male who presented with vague abdominal symptoms for approximately one week. Imaging revealed the presence of multiple nonocclusive thrombi involving the right portal vein, the splenic vein, and the left renal vein, as well as complete occlusion of the left portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein. We discuss pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of both acute and chronic thrombosis. The presence of PVT should be considered as a clue for prothrombotic disorders, liver disease, and other local and general factors that must be carefully investigated. It is hoped that this case report will help increase awareness of the complexity associated with portal vein thrombosis among the medical community.

  14. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  15. Flow disturbances in stent-related coronary evaginations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radu, Maria D; Pfenniger, Aloïs; Räber, Lorenz

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Angiographic ectasias and aneurysms in stented segments have been associated with late stent thrombosis. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT), some stented segments show coronary evaginations reminiscent of ectasias. The purpose of this study was to explore, using computational fluid...

  16. Transcatheter Aortic Heart Valve Thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Nicolaj C; Grove, Erik L; Andersen, Henning R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing focus on transcatheter heart valve (THV) thrombosis. However, there are limited data on incidence, clinical implications and predisposing factors of THV thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). OBJECTIVES: We assessed the incidence...

  17. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Samia Ben; Touati, Nahla; Baccouche, Hela; Drissi, Cyrine; Romdhane, Neila Ben; Hentati, Fayçal

    2016-01-01

    Data regarding cerebral venous thrombosis in North Africa are scarce. This study aims to identify the clinical features, risk factors, outcome, and prognosis of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tunisia. Data of 160 patients with radiologically confirmed cerebral venous thrombosis, hospitalized in Mongi Ben Hmida National Institute of Neurology (Tunis, Tunisia), were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The mean age was 37.3 years with a female predominance (83.1%). The mode of onset was subacute in most cases (56.2%). Headache was the most common symptom (71.3%), and focal neurologic symptoms were the main clinical presentation (41.8%). The most common sites of thrombosis were the superior sagittal sinus (65%) and the lateral sinus (60.6%). More than 1 sinus was involved in 114 (71.2%) patients. Parenchymal lesions observed in 85 (53.1%) patients did not correlate with cerebral venous thrombosis extent. Major risk factors were obstetric causes (pregnancy and puerperium) found in 46 (38.6% of women aged <50 years) patients, followed by anemia (28.1%) and congenital or acquired thrombophilia (16.2%). Mortality rate was of 6.6%. Good outcome at 6 months (modified Rankin Scale ≤2) was observed in 105 (87.5%)of 120 patients available for follow-up. Predictors of poor outcome were altered consciousness and elevated plasma C-reactive protein levels. Clinical and radiologic presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis in Tunisia was quite similar to other parts of the world with, however, a particularly high frequency of obstetric causes. Plasma C-reactive protein level should be considered as a prognostic factor in CVT.

  18. Arterial and Venous Thrombosis in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Blann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent ultimate cause of death is myocardial arrest. In many cases this is due to myocardial hypoxia, generally arising from failure of the coronary macro- and microcirculation to deliver enough oxygenated red cells to the cardiomyocytes. The principle reason for this is occlusive thrombosis, either by isolated circulating thrombi, or by rupture of upstream plaque. However, an additionally serious pathology causing potentially fatal stress to the heart is extra-cardiac disease, such as pulmonary hypertension. A primary cause of the latter is pulmonary embolus, considered to be a venous thromboembolism. Whilst the thrombotic scenario has for decades been the dominating paradigm in cardiovascular disease, these issues have, until recently, been infrequently considered in cancer. However, there is now a developing view that cancer is also a thrombotic disease, and notably a disease predominantly of the venous circulation, manifesting as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Indeed, for many, a venous thromboembolism is one of the first symptoms of a developing cancer. Furthermore, many of the standard chemotherapies in cancer are prothrombotic. Accordingly, thromboprophylaxis in cancer with heparins or oral anticoagulation (such as Warfarin, especially in high risk groups (such as those who are immobile and on high dose chemotherapy, may be an important therapy. The objective of this communication is to summarise current views on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of arterial and venous thrombosis in cancer.

  19. [Epidemiology and maternal thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosson, Jean-Luc

    2003-01-01

    The monthly incidence of deep vein thrombosis during pregnancy varies from 0.1 to 0.8 per 1000 pregnancies, depending on the study. These figures are undoubtedly an underestimation because they were determined from clinical events with no estimation of asymptomatic forms which, in general, increase the prevalence about 3-fold. Although the absolute figures are reliable, the consequences in terms of maternal mortality and post-phlebitis sequelae warrant the careful attention paid to this condition. Moreover, it should be recalled that the prevalence of superficial venous thrombosis is similar and may be associated with a risk of pulmonary embolism.

  20. New Anti-Thrombotic Drugs in Acute Coronary Syndromes and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. The Role of Prasugrel, Ticagrelor and Cangrelor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Constantinos Stratos; Alexandros Kouloubinis

    2012-01-01

      Platelet activation and subsequent aggregation play a dominant role in the propagation of arterial thrombosis and consequently are the key therapeutic targets in the management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS...

  1. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-05

    This podcast discusses the risk for deep vein thrombosis in long-distance travelers and ways to minimize that risk.  Created: 4/5/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/5/2012.

  2. Testosterone, thrombophilia, and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueck, Charles J; Richardson-Royer, Caitlin; Schultz, Reiker; Burger, Tim; Labitue, Fanta; Riaz, Muhammad K; Padda, Jagjit; Bowe, Dedrick; Goldenberg, Naila; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    We describe thrombosis, deep venous thrombosis (DVT) pulmonary embolism (PE; n = 9) and hip-knee osteonecrosis (n = 5) that developed after testosterone therapy (median 11 months) in 14 previously healthy patients (13 men and 1 woman; 13 Caucasian and 1 African American), with no antecedent thrombosis and previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Of the 14 patients, 3 were found to be factor V Leiden heterozygotes, 3 had high factor VIII, 3 had plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 4G4G homozygosity, 2 had high factor XI, 2 had high homocysteine, 1 had low antithrombin III, 1 had the lupus anticoagulant, 1 had high anticardiolipin antibody Immunoglobulin G, and 1 had no clotting abnormalities. In 4 men with thrombophilia, DVT-PE recurred when testosterone was continued despite therapeutic international normalized ratio on warfarin. In 60 men on testosterone, 20 (33%) had high estradiol (E2 >42.6 pg/mL). When exogenous testosterone is aromatized to E2, and E2-induced thrombophilia is superimposed on thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis, thrombosis occurs. The DVT-PE and osteonecrosis after starting testosterone are associated with previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis. Thrombophilia should be ruled out before administration of exogenous testosterone.

  3. Primary renal graft thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakir, N; Sluiter, WJ; Ploeg, RJ; van Son, WJ; Tegzess, Adam

    1996-01-01

    Background. Renal allograft thrombosis is a serious complication of kidney transplantation that ultimately leads to graft loss. Its association with acute and hyperacute rejection is well documented; however, in a large proportion of patients the precise cause remains obscure. The exact incidence an

  4. Mesenteric vein thrombosis: CT identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, A.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.; Kelvin, F.M.

    1984-07-01

    Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis was identified on computed tomographic scans in six patients. In each case, contrast-enhanced scans showed a high-density superior mesenteric vein wall surrounding a central filling defect. Four fo the six patients had isolated superior mesenteric vein thrombosis. A fifth patient had associated portal vein and splenic vein thrombosis, and the sixth patient had associated portal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis. One of the six patients had acute ischemic bowel disease. The other five patients did not have acute ischemic bowel symptoms associated with their venous occlusion. This study defines the computed tomographic appearance of mesenteric vein thrombosis.

  5. Traumatic Distal Ulnar Artery Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet A. Karaarslan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about a posttraumatic distal ulnar artery thrombosis case that has occurred after a single blunt trauma. The ulnar artery thrombosis because of chronic trauma is a frequent condition (hypothenar hammer syndrome but an ulnar artery thrombosis because of a single direct blunt trauma is rare. Our patient who has been affected by a single blunt trauma to his hand and developed ulnar artery thrombosis has been treated by resection of the thrombosed ulnar artery segment. This report shows that a single blunt trauma can cause distal ulnar artery thrombosis in the hand and it can be treated merely by thrombosed segment resection in suitable cases.

  6. Peri-operative management of antiplatelet therapy in patients with coronary artery disease: joint position paper by members of the working group on Perioperative Haemostasis of the Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis Research (GTH), the working group on Perioperative Coagulation of the Austrian Society for Anesthesiology, Resuscitation and Intensive Care (OGARI) and the Working Group Thrombosis of the European Society for Cardiology (ESC).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Chassot, P.G.; Eichinger, S.; Heymann, C. von; Hofmann, N.; Rickli, H.; Spannagl, M.; Ziegler, B.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Huber, K.

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of patients suffering from cardiovascular disease, especially coronary artery disease (CAD), are treated with aspirin and/or clopidogrel for the prevention of major adverse events. Unfortunately, there are no specific, widely accepted recommendations for the perioperative manage

  7. Simulation of the microscopic process during initiation of stent thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K W; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Coronary stenting is one of the most commonly used approaches to open coronary arteries blocked due to atherosclerosis. However, stent struts can induce stent thrombosis due to altered hemodynamics and endothelial dysfunction, and the microscopic process is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the microscale processes during the initiation of stent thrombosis. We utilized a discrete element computational model to simulate the transport, collision, adhesion, and activation of thousands of individual platelets and red blood cells in thrombus formation around struts and dysfunctional endothelium. As strut height increased, the area of endothelium activated by low shear stress increased, which increased the number of platelets in mural thrombi. These thrombi were generally outside regions of recirculation for shorter struts. For the tallest strut, wall shear stress was sufficiently low to activate the entire endothelium. With the entire endothelium activated by injury or denudation, the number of platelets in mural thrombi was largest for the shortest strut. The type of platelet activation (by high shear stress or contact with activated endothelium) did not greatly affect results. During the initiation of stent thrombosis, platelets do not necessarily enter recirculation regions or deposit on endothelium near struts, as suggested by previous computational fluid dynamics simulations. Rather, platelets are more likely to deposit on activated endothelium outside recirculation regions and deposit directly on struts. Our study elucidated the effects of different mechanical factors on the roles of platelets and endothelium in stent thrombosis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Iatrogenic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm and Secondary Ipsilateral Deep Vein Thrombosis: An Indication for Early Surgical Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Marios; Zirngibl, Hubert; Floros, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysm formation often complicates transfemoral interventional procedures. Nonsurgical treatment consists of femoral compression and thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance. We report a 74-year-old man who was diagnosed with a pseudoaneurysm, following coronary angiography. Duplex ultrasound revealed deep vein thrombosis of the ipsilateral common femoral vein. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection was unsuccessfully performed, and the patient subsequently underwent surgical exploration for repair of the pseudoaneurysm and release of the venous compression. The increased local inflammation, because of the thrombosis, added in surgical difficulties. We conclude that early surgical intervention should be considered as a primary strategy in patients with femoral pseudoaneurysms and deep vein thrombosis secondary to femoral compression.

  9. Diastolic timed Vibro-Percussion at 50 Hz delivered across a chest wall sized meat barrier enhances clot dissolution and remotely administered Streptokinase effectiveness in an in-vitro model of acute coronary thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low Frequency Vibro-Percussion (LFVP assists clearance of thrombi in catheter systems and when applied to the heart and timed to diastole is known to enhance coronary flow. However LFVP on a clotted coronary like vessel given engagement over a chest wall sized barrier (to resemble non-invasive heart attack therapy requires study. Methods One hour old clots (n=16 were dispensed within a flexible segment of Soft-Flo catheter (4 mm lumen, weighted, interfaced with Heparinized Saline (HS, secured atop a curved dampening base, and photographed. A ~4 cm meat slab was placed over the segment and randomized to receive intermittent LFVP (engaged, - disengaged at 1 second intervals, or no LFVP for 20 minutes. HS was pulsed (~120/80 mmHg, with the diastolic phase coordinated to match LFVP delivery. The segment was then re-photographed and aspirated of fluid to determine post clot weight. The trial was then repeated with 0.5 mls of Streptokinase (15,000 IU/100 microlitre delivered ~ 2 cm upstream from the clot. Results LFVP - HS only samples (vs. controls showed; a development of clot length fluid channels absent in the control group (p Conclusion Diastolic timed LFVP (50 Hz engaged across a chest wall sized barrier enhances clot disruptive effects to an underlying coronary like system.

  10. Neonatal renal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Leonardo R; Simpson, Ewurabena A; Lau, Keith K

    2011-12-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis (RVT) continues to pose significant challenges for pediatric hematologists and nephrologists. The precise mechanism for the onset and propagation of renal thrombosis within the neonatal population is unclear, but there is suggestion that acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia traits may increase the risk for renal thromboembolic disease during the newborn period. This review summarizes the most recent studies of neonatal RVT, examining its most common features, the prevalence of acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors among these patients, and evaluates their short and long term renal and thrombotic outcomes as they may relate to these risk factors. Although there is some consensus regarding the management of neonatal RVT, the most recent antithrombotic therapy guidelines for the management of childhood thrombosis do not provide a risk-based algorithm for the acute management of RVT among newborns with hereditary prothrombotic disorders. Whereas neonatal RVT is not a condition associated with a high mortality rate, it is associated with significant morbidity due to renal impairment. Recent evidence to evaluate the effects of heparin-based anticoagulation and thrombolytic therapy on the long term renal function of these patients has yielded conflicting results. Long term cohort studies and randomized trials may be helpful to clarify the impact of acute versus prolonged antithrombotic therapy for reducing the morbidity that is associated with neonatal RVT.

  11. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in elective percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Berg, Jurriën M; Plokker, HW Thijs; Verheugt, Freek WA

    2001-01-01

    Thrombosis plays a major role in acute vessel closure both after coronary balloon angioplasty and after stenting. This review will address the role of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in preventing early thrombotic complications after percutaneous coronary intervention. The focus will be on agents that are routinely available and commonly used.

  12. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in elective percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verheugt Freek WA

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thrombosis plays a major role in acute vessel closure both after coronary balloon angioplasty and after stenting. This review will address the role of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in preventing early thrombotic complications after percutaneous coronary intervention. The focus will be on agents that are routinely available and commonly used.

  13. Presentation of Neonatal Sinovenous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Signs, risk factors, comorbidities, and radiographic findings in 59 neonates presenting with sinovenous thrombosis are reported from Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.

  14. Testosterone, thrombophilia, thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Joel; Glueck, Charles J; Prince, Marloe; Riaz, Rashid; Wang, Ping

    2015-05-01

    We screened previously undiagnosed thrombophilia (V Leiden-prothrombin mutations, Factors VIII and XI, homocysteine, and antiphospholipid antibody [APL] syndrome) in 15 men and 2 women with venous thromboembolism (VTE) or osteonecrosis 7 months (median) after starting testosterone therapy (TT), gel (30-50 mg/d), intramuscular (100-400 mg/wk), or human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) (6000 IU/wk). Thrombophilia was studied in 2 healthy control groups without thrombosis (97 normal controls, 31 subjects on TT) and in a third control group (n = 22) with VTE, not on TT. Of the 17 cases, 76% had ≥1 thrombophilia vs 19% of 97 normal controls (P 150%) (24% vs 7%, P = 0.058), by high homocysteine (29% vs 5%, P = 0.007), and from both normal and TT controls for APL syndrome (18% vs 2%, P = 0.023, vs 0%, P = 0.04). Despite adequate anticoagulation with TT continued after the first deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary embolus (DVT-PE), 1 man sustained 3 DVT-PEs 5, 8, and 11 months later and a second man had 2 DVT-PEs 1 and 2 months later. Of the 10 cases with serum T measured on TT, 6 (60%) had supranormal T (>800 ng/dL) and of 9 with estradiol measured on TT, 7 (78%) had supranormal levels (>42.6 pg/mL). TT interacts with thrombophilia leading to thrombosis. TT continuation in thrombophilic men is contraindicated because of recurrent thrombi despite anticoagulation. Screening for thrombophilia before starting TT should identify subjects at high risk for VTE with an adverse the risk to benefit ratio for TT.

  15. Numerical simulations of thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar G Ramunigari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mathematical approaches for biological events have gained significant importance in development of biomedical research. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT is caused by blood clot in veins deeply rooted in the body, resulting in loss of blood, pain, and numbness of the body part associated with that vein. This situation can get complicated and can be fatal, when the blood clot travels to other parts of the body which may result in pulmonary embolism (PE. PE causes approximately 300,000 deaths annually in the United States alone. Materials and Methods: We are trying to propose a computational approach for understanding venous thrombosis using the theory of fluid mechanics. In our study, we are trying to establish a computational model that mimics the venous blood flow containing unidirectional venous valves and will be depicting the blood flow in the veins. We analyzed the flow patterns in veins, which are included with lump like substances. This lump like substances can be clots, tissue debris, collagen or even cholesterol. Our study will facilitate better understanding of the biophysical process in case of thrombosis. Results: The predicted model analyzes the consequences that occur due to the clot formations in veins. Knowledge of Navier-Stokes equations in fluid dynamics along with the computational model of a complex biological system would help in diagnosis of the problem at much faster rate of time. Valves of the deep veins are damaged as a result of DVT, with no valves to prevent deep system reflux, the hydrostatic venous pressure in the lower extremity increases dramatically. Conclusion: Our model is used to determine the effects of an interrupted blood flow as a result of thrombin formation, which might result in disturbed systemic circulation. Our results indicated a positive inverse correlation exists between clots and the flow velocity. This would support medical practitioners to recommend faster curing measures.

  16. Cerebral venous thrombosis in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, T.A.G.M.; Martin, E.; Willi, U.V. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, University Children' s Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Holzmann, D. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2001-09-01

    This was a retrospective study to determine different etiologies of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) in childhood and to correlate extent and location of thrombosis with the etiology and the age of the child as well as the final outcome. In addition, the radiologic approach is discussed. This was a retrospective analysis of 19 children with CVT. The children were examined by contrast-enhanced dynamic CT. Radiologic findings were correlated with the etiology of CVT. Cerebral venous thrombosis is not as infrequent in children as has been thought. Cerebral venous thrombosis in children can occur due to trauma (n=9), infections (n=7), or coagulation disorders (n=3). Extent and location of thrombosis, as well as complications, final outcome, and therapy, depend on the etiology. Computed tomography remains a valuable primary imaging modality in the diagnosis of CVT in the acutely injured or diseased child. (orig.)

  17. Coronary artery thrombus resulting in sudden cardiac death in an infant with Kawasaki disease and giant coronary artery aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umakumaran Ponniah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a six-month-old Hispanic male infant who had Kawasaki disease and coronary artery aneurysms on echocardiography. He died suddenly five months later in spite of aggressive medical therapy. Autopsy showed extensive coronary artery thrombosis. Giant coronary artery aneurysms need diligent follow up as they pose significant risks including risk of thrombus, myocardial infarction and sudden death.

  18. The Year in Cardiology 2013: coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbel, Raimund; Wijns, William

    2014-02-01

    The year 2013 was rich of new developments in cardiology, and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in particular. This overview article will focus on contributions in the following areas: training for PCI, appropriateness and indications; access site selection, risk scores, peri-procedural myocardial infarction; trial results and long-term follow-up; PCI for specific patient and lesion subsets, including acute coronary syndrome and ST-segment myocardial infarction; prevention of ischemic and reperfusion injury; stent thrombosis and new coronary stents and scaffolds.

  19. Epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.D. Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous thrombosis, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a common disease that frequently recurs. Recurrence can be prevented by anticoagulants, but this comes at the risk of bleeding. Therefore, assessment of the risk of recurrence is important to balance the risks and benefits of anticoagulant treatment. This review briefly outlines what is currently known about the epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis, and focuses in more detail on potential new risk factors for venous recurrence. The general implications of these findings in patient management are discussed.

  20. Who is responsible for the consequences? A case of stent thrombosis subsequent to noncompliance with post angioplasty treatment regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajwani, Salma Abdul Aziz; Allana, Saleema

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major cause of mortality internationally and in Pakistan. Angioplasty has been proven to be an effective treatment for CAD. Stent thrombosis is a known but preventable complication of angioplasty. Several factors may lead to stent thrombosis with non-compliance with the prescribed drug regimen, being one of the most important factors. We report a case of stent thrombosis after four months of angioplasty. After exploring of patient's post angioplasty routines, it was found that the patient was non-compliant with the prescribed anti- platelets and other prescribed drugs. This time the patient presented with another acute myocardial infarction, and he went through angioplasty again.

  1. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  2. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Raphael Alvis-Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  3. Vitamin K and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Geno J; Fink, James

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin K was discovered in the 1930s during cholesterol metabolism experiments in chickens. It is a fat-soluble vitamin which occurs naturally in plants as phylloquinone (vitamin K1) and is produced by gram-negative bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract as menaquinone (vitamin K2). This vitamin was found to be essential for normal functioning of hemostasis. In addition, a number of clinical conditions in which vitamin K deficiency was found to be the underlying pathophysiologic problem were discovered. These conditions include hemorrhagic disease of the newborn, obstructive jaundice, and malabsorption syndromes. The importance of this vitamin has become more apparent with the discovery of the anticoagulant warfarin which is a vitamin K antagonist. There are millions of patients on this therapy for a variety of thrombogenic conditions such as atrial fibrillation, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and prosthetic cardiac valves. The wide use of this narrow therapeutic index drug has resulted in significant risk for major bleeding. Vitamin K serves as one of the major reversing agent for patients over-anticoagulated with warfarin. In the past few years, research has focused on new areas of vitamin K metabolism, which include bone and endovascular metabolism; cell growth, regulation, migration, and proliferation; cell survival, apoptosis, phagocytosis, and adhesion. These new areas of research highlight the significance of vitamin K but raise new clinical questions for patients who must be maintained on long-term warfarin therapy.

  4. Thrombosis in nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbano, Biagio; Gigante, Antonietta; Amoroso, Antonio; Cianci, Rosario

    2013-07-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is characterized by heavy proteinuria, edema, hypoalbuminemia, and hyperlipidemia and the most frequent causes are glomerular diseases. An uncommon presentation is iatrogenic NS, an adverse effect of some drugs administration. In the clinical course of NS, a typical feature is dysregulated coagulation state, promoted by the breakdown of permselectivity barrier of the glomerular capillary wall, resulting in the leakage of high-molecular-mass proteins, at least the size of albumin. This hypercoagulable condition is supported by several factors, such as abnormalities in platelet activation and an imbalance between anticoagulation/antithrombosis and procoagulant/prothrombotic mechanisms. Thus, NS and the risk of developing thromboses are strictly related. Thrombotic events affect the venous system rather than arterial vessels with different features and frequencies. Deep venous system of the lower extremities and renal veins are the most frequent source of pulmonary embolism, the most dangerous NS complication. Prophylactic anticoagulation and thrombosis treatment are not clearly established because large randomized trials and guidelines are lacking. The management of NS and the decision of when and how to anticoagulate the patient represent a teamwork challenge for physicians.

  5. Coronary microembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyschally, Andreas; Leineweber, Kkirsten; Gres, Petra; Haude, Michael; Erbel, Raimund; Heusch, Gerd

    2006-09-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque rupture is the key event in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes and it also occurs during coronary interventions. Atherosclerotic plaque rupture does not always result in complete thrombotic occlusion of the epicardial coronary artery with subsequent impending myocardial infarction, but may in milder forms result in the embolization of atherosclerotic and thrombotic debris into the coronary microcirculation. This review summarizes the present experimental pathophysiology of coronary microembolization in animal models of acute coronary syndromes and highlights the main consequences of coronary microembolization--reduced coronary reserve, microinfarction, inflammation and oxidative modification of contractile proteins, contractile dysfunction and perfusion-contraction mismatch.Furthermore, the review presents the available clinical evidence for coronary microembolization in patients and compares the clinical observations with observations in the experimental model.

  6. Management of late/very late stent thrombosis: Utility of ıntravenous ultrasonography (IVUS) in clinical practise

    OpenAIRE

    Emre Yalçınkaya; Barış Bugan; Yalçın Gökoğlan; Erkan Yıldırım

    2013-01-01

    To the editor We read with great interest the article by Aksu et al. [1] on the management of very late bare metal stent thrombosis. They performed intracoronary thrombus aspiration and inflated balloon in-stent for restenosis. During percutaneous coronary interventions, interventionalists have often to deal with thrombus-laden lesions in coronary vessels. Plaque characteristics and distribution, severity and extent of calcification, arterial remodeling and the presence of dissection or throm...

  7. Isolated huge aneurysm of the left main coronary artery in a 22-year-old patient with type 1 neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontailler, Margaux; Vilarem, Didier; Paul, Jean-François; Deleuze, Philippe H

    2015-03-01

    A 22-year-old patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 presented with acute chest pain. A computed tomography scan and coronary angiography revealed a partially thrombosed huge aneurysm of the left main coronary artery. Despite medical treatment, the patient's angina recurred. The patient underwent a coronary bypass grafting operation and surgical exclusion of the aneurysm. Postoperative imaging disclosed good permeability of the 3 coronary artery bypass grafts and complete thrombosis of the excluded aneurysm.

  8. Familial hypercholesterolaemic downsized pig with human-like coronary atherosclerosis: a model for preclinical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thim, Troels; Hagensen, Mette; Drouet, L.

    2010-01-01

    site-specifically by inflicting coronary artery balloon injury. Both spontaneously developed and balloon accelerated coronary plaques mirrored pertinent human plaque features, including a large necrotic core covered by a thin and inflamed fibrous cap as seen in the most common type of thrombosis...

  9. Acute Simultaneous Thrombotic Occlusion of Multiple Coronary Arteries in Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahdi Daei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Simultaneous multiple coronary artery thrombosis is a rare finding in ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI, and has a high mortality rate. Case Presentation We report a case of myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock, left bundle branch block, and multiple ST segment elevation on the electrocardiogram and thrombotic occlusion of the left circumflex, optus marginal, and left anterior descending arteries on emergency coronary angiography. Thrombus aspiration was performed at left circumflex, optus marginal, and left anterior descending arteries. Conclusions In patients with STEMI, multiple coronary thrombosis is unusual and associated with high patient mortality.

  10. Hormonal contraceptives and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Berendina Hendrika (Bernardine)

    2013-01-01

    Oral contraceptive use is associated with venous thrombosis. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate genetic variation in the first-pass metabolism of contraceptives, to identify the clinical implications of hormonal contraceptive use after a

  11. Venous thrombosis : a patient's view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korlaar, Inez van

    2006-01-01

    The studies described in this thesis had two main aims: 1) To study the quality of life of patients with venous thrombosis and to examine the role of illness perceptions in explaining the quality of life of these patients. 2) To assess the psychological consequences of genetic testing for thrombop

  12. Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochelle Sweis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia analyzed the clinical and radiographic findings in 12 cases of cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST seen between 2000 and 2013, and conducted a literature search and review of the pooled data.

  13. Hormonal contraceptives and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Berendina Hendrika (Bernardine)

    2013-01-01

    Oral contraceptive use is associated with venous thrombosis. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate genetic variation in the first-pass metabolism of contraceptives, to identify the clinical implications of hormonal contraceptive use after a thromb

  14. Venous thrombosis : a patient's view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korlaar, Inez van

    2006-01-01

    The studies described in this thesis had two main aims: 1) To study the quality of life of patients with venous thrombosis and to examine the role of illness perceptions in explaining the quality of life of these patients. 2) To assess the psychological consequences of genetic testing for

  15. Thrombosis following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasum, Miro; Danolić, Damir; Orešković, Slavko; Ježek, Davor; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Pekez, Marijeta

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this review is to analyse the pathophysiology and complications of thrombosis in conjuction with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) following ovulation induction and to suggest practical guidelines usefull for the prevention and treatment. Although the incidence of thrombosis varies from 0.2% among in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles and up to 10% for severe cases of the syndrome, it represents the most dangerous complication of OHSS. Different changes in haemostatic markers have been found to create a state of hypercoagulability, but no single standard test is available to estimate the state of thrombosis. The role of markers for thrombophilia is controversial. Thromboses are mostly venous (67-75%) involving upper limbs and neck, then arterial (25-33%) which are mainly intracerebral. The predominant sites of venous thromboembolism in the upper part of the body may be explained by higher concentrations of estrogens drained through lymphatic ducts from ascites and by compression of rudimentary branchyal cysts. Once early diagnosis is established, it is crucial to use an anticoagulant treatment with heparin proceeded with thromboprophylaxis. However, identification of patients at risk and preventive measures of OHSS are the best means in reducing the risk of thrombosis after ovarian stimulation.

  16. Doping and thrombosis in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    Historically, humans have long sought to enhance their "athletic" performance to increase body weight, aggressiveness, mental concentration and physical strength, contextually reducing fatigue, pain, and improving recovery. Although regular training is the mainstay for achieving these targets, the ancillary use of ergogenic aids has become commonplace in all sports. The demarcation between ergogenic aids and doping substances or practices is continuously challenging and mostly based on perceptions regarding the corruption of the fairness of competition and the potential side effects or adverse events arising from the use of otherwise unnecessary ergogenic substances. A kaleidoscope of side effects has been associated with the use of doping agents, including behavioral, skeletal, endocrinologic, metabolic, hemodynamic, and cardiovascular imbalances. Among the various doping substances, the most striking association with thrombotic complications has been reported for androgenic anabolic steroids (i.e., cardiomyopathy, fatal and nonfatal arrhythmias, myocardial infarction [MI], intracardiac thrombosis, stroke, venous thromboembolism [VTE], limb arterial thrombosis, branch retinal vein occlusion, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis) and blood boosting (i.e., VTE and MI, especially for epoetin and analogs). The potential thrombotic complication arising from misuse of other doping agents such as the administration of cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin, cocaine, and platelet-derived preparations is instead speculative or anecdotal at best. The present article provides an overview on the epidemiological association as well as the underlying biochemical and biological mechanisms linking the practice of doping in sports with the development of thrombosis.

  17. [Edge effect and late thrombosis -- inevitable complications of vascular brachytherapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, T M; Staber, L; Kantlehner, R; Pöllinger, B; Dühmke, E; Theisen, K; Klauss, V

    2002-11-01

    Restenosis is the limiting entity after percutaneous coronary angioplasty. Vascular brachytherapy for the treatment of in-stent restenosis has been shown to reduce the repeat restenosis rate and the incidence of major adverse events in several randomized trials. Besides the beneficial effects, brachytherapy yielded some unwanted side effects. The development of new stenoses at the edges of the target lesion treated with radiation is termed edge effect. It occurs after afterloading brachytherapy as well as after implantation of radioactive stents. It is characterized by extensive intimal hyperplasia and negative remodeling. As contributing factors the axial dose fall-off, inherent to all radioactive sources, and the application of vessel wall trauma by angioplasty have been identified. The combination of both factors, by insufficient overlap of the radiation length over the injured vessel segment, has been referred to as geographic miss. It has been shown to be associated with a very high incidence of the edge effect. Avoidance of geographic miss is strongly recommended in vascular brachytherapy procedures. Late thrombosis after vascular brachytherapy is of multifactorial origin. It comprises platelet recruitment, fibrin deposition, disturbed vasomotion, non-healing dissection and stent malapposition predisposing to turbulent blood flow. The strongest predictors for late thrombosis are premature discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy and implantation of new stents during the brachytherapy procedure. With a consequent and prolonged antiplatelet therapy, the incidence of late thrombosis has been reduced to placebo levels. Edge effect and late thrombosis represent unwanted side effects of vascular brachytherapy. By means of a thorough treatment planning and prolonged antiplatelet therapy their incidences can be largely reduced. With regard to the very favorable net effect, they do not constitute relevant limitations of vascular brachytherapy.

  18. Stent Thrombosis Patients with Hyporesponsiveness to Clopidogrel, Prasugrel, and Ticagrelor: A Case Series Using Short Thromboelastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Olechowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI with stent implantation and functional hyporesponsiveness to P2Y12 inhibitors are at higher risk of ischaemic events, particularly stent thrombosis (ST. It is currently not routine practice to assess the functional response to these agents. However, concern over functional hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel has led to widespread uptake of prasugrel and ticagrelor as the default P2Y12 inhibitor after stent implantation in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Here we report, for the first time, 3 cases in which patients who have had ST exhibit hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor.

  19. Contraceptives and cerebral thrombosis: a five-year national case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Kreiner, Svend

    2002-01-01

    Oral contraceptives; Cerebral thrombosis; Thrombotic stroke; Transitory cerebral ischemic attack; Thrombosis......Oral contraceptives; Cerebral thrombosis; Thrombotic stroke; Transitory cerebral ischemic attack; Thrombosis...

  20. Deep vein thrombosis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman-Brochu, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a review of the incidence, pathophysiology, and treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in pregnancy, a rare but serious complication of pregnancy. The incidence of DVT in pregnancy varies widely, but it is a leading cause of maternal morbidity in both the United States and the United Kingdom. Risk factors during pregnancy include prolonged bed rest or immobility, pelvic or leg trauma, and obesity. Additional risk factors are preeclampsia, Cesarean section, instrument-assisted delivery, hemorrhage, multiparity, varicose veins, a previous history of a thromboembolic event, and hereditary or acquired thrombophilias such as Factor V Leiden. Heparin is the anticoagulant of choice to treat active thromboembolic disease or to administer for thromboprophylaxis, but low molecular-weight heparin is being used with increasing frequency in the pregnant woman. Perinatal nurses should be aware of the symptoms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options available to manage active thrombosis during pregnancy and in the intrapartum and postpartum periods.

  1. Hydrocephalus in cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M; van den Berg, René; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B; Stam, Jan; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure is common in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), but hydrocephalus is rarely reported in these patients. We examined the frequency, pathophysiology and associated clinical manifestations of hydrocephalus in patients with CVT admitted to our hospital between 2000 and 2010 (prospectively since July 2006). Hydrocephalus was defined as a bicaudate index larger than the 95th percentile for age, and/or a radial width of the temporal horn of ≥ 5 mm. We excluded patients in whom hydrocephalus was caused by a disease other than CVT or if it was iatrogenic. 20 out of 99 patients with CVT had hydrocephalus. 6 patients with hydrocephalus were excluded from the analysis. Patients with hydrocephalus more often had focal neurological deficits (86 vs. 49%, p = 0.02) and were more frequently comatose (43 vs. 16%, p = 0.06), as compared to patients without hydrocephalus. Deep cerebral venous thrombosis (64 vs. 9%, p hydrocephalus. Intraventricular hemorrhage was present in 1 patient with hydrocephalus, compared to none among patients without hydrocephalus (7 vs. 0%, p = 0.15). Outcome at follow-up was worse in patients with hydrocephalus (mRS 0-1, 36 vs. 68%, p = 0.02; mortality 29 vs. 9%, p = 0.07). Hydrocephalus occurs more frequently in cerebral venous thrombosis than previously believed, especially in patients with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and edema of the basal ganglia. The presence of hydrocephalus is associated with a worse clinical outcome, but a direct causal relation is unlikely. Routine shunting procedures are not advisable.

  2. Advances in nanotechnology for the management of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C

    2013-02-01

    Nanotechnology holds tremendous potential to advance the current treatment of coronary artery disease. Nanotechnology may assist medical therapies by providing a safe and efficacious delivery platform for a variety of drugs aimed at modulating lipid disorders, decreasing inflammation and angiogenesis within atherosclerotic plaques, and preventing plaque thrombosis. Nanotechnology may improve coronary stent applications by promoting endothelial recovery on a stent surface utilizing bio-mimetic nanofibrous scaffolds, and also by preventing in-stent restenosis using nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs that are decoupled from stents. Additionally, nanotechnology may enhance tissue-engineered graft materials for application in coronary artery bypass grafting by facilitating cellular infiltration and remodeling of a graft matrix.

  3. Safety and efficacy of hybrid platform design sirolimus eluting stent system in percutaneous coronary intervention in ST elevation myocardial infarction patients at 1 year after treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louie Fisher

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: In contemporary practice of percutaneous coronary intervention in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction, Genxsync stent was associated with low risks of stent thrombosis and MACE. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(10.000: 4458-4464

  4. Acute Arterial Thrombosis of the Hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannuzzi, Nicholas P; Higgins, James P

    2015-10-01

    Arterial thrombosis of the hand occurs infrequently but may result in considerable morbidity and compromise of hand function. The hand surgeon may be called upon to direct management in cases of acute arterial thrombosis of the hand and should have an understanding of the available diagnostic tools and treatment modalities. This article discusses the vascular anatomy of the hand and clinical manifestations of arterial thrombosis. Differences between isolated thrombosis and diffuse intravascular injury are detailed, and treatment options for these conditions are described. Appropriate care often requires coordination with interventional radiologists or vascular surgeons. Outcomes after treatment of arterial thrombosis of the hand are variable, and prognosis may be related to whether isolated thrombosis or diffuse intravascular injury is present.

  5. Thrombosis in pregnancy and maternal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Andra H

    2015-09-01

    Pregnancy increases the risk of thrombosis four- to five-fold. Seventy-five to eighty percent of pregnancy-related thrombotic events are venous and twenty to -twenty-five percent are arterial. The main reason for the increased risk is hypercoagulability. Women are hypercoagulable because they have evolved so that they are protected against the bleeding challenges of pregnancy, miscarriage, or childbirth. Both genetic and acquired risk factors can further increase the risk of thrombosis. The maternal consequences of thrombosis of pregnancy include permanent vascular damage, disability, and death. While the maternal outcomes of thrombosis can be modified by anticoagulation therapy, management of thrombosis during pregnancy is the subject of another paper in this issue (see paper by B. Konkle). This review will focus on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors, and maternal consequences of thrombosis in pregnancy.

  6. Thrombosis in end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casserly, Liam F; Dember, Laura M

    2003-01-01

    Although renal failure has classically been associated with a bleeding tendency, thrombotic events are common among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A variety of thrombosis-favoring hematologic alterations have been demonstrated in these patients. In addition, "nontraditional" risk factors for thrombosis, such as hyperhomocysteinemia, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and malnutrition, are present in a significant proportion of chronic dialysis patients. Hemodialysis (HD) vascular access thrombosis, ischemic heart disease, and renal allograft thrombosis are well-recognized complications in these patients. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are viewed as rare in chronic dialysis patients, but recent studies suggest that this perception should be reconsidered. Several ESRD treatment factors such as recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) administration, dialyzer bioincompatibility, and calcineurin inhibitor administration may have prothrombotic effects. In this article we review the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombosis in ESRD and evaluate the evidence that chronic renal failure or its management predisposes to thrombotic events.

  7. Activated Protein C-Resistance Determination and Vascular Access Thrombosis in Populations with High Prevalence of Factor V Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androulakis, Nikolaos E; Tzenakis, Nikolaos; Nioti, Eleni; Spatharaki, Paraskevi; Vyzoukaki, Rodanthi; Papadopoulou, Anastasia; Kokonozaki, Maria; Alexandrakis, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Factor V Leiden heterozygosity occurs in 3-8% of the general European and US populations. Activated protein C resistance (APC-R)--a non-molecular laboratory test--can efficiently demonstrate the presence of this mutation and can be performed on most coagulation analyzers. On the other hand, fistula or graft thrombosis is a common and costly complication in hemodialysis patients. Our aim was to establish the value of APC-R determination in hemodialysis patients by assessing the risk of access thrombosis in patients with increased APC-R. A total of 133 patients (81 men, mean age 64.5 ± 14.9 years and 52 women, mean age 63.6 ± 15 years) were selected. Participants were divided into 2 groups: those with access thrombosis (54 patients, 40.6%) and those with no access thrombosis (79 patients, 59.4%), and they were tested for the most common congenital or acquired thrombophilia risk factors. Overall, 12 patients (9%) had an increased APC-R and 10 of them had at least 1 episode of access thrombosis (83.3%). Univariate analysis to estimate crude odds ratio (OR) showed an OR of 8.8 (95% CI 1.8-41.8) times higher risk for access thrombosis in these patients. No significant differences were found after adjusting for age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease and malignancy. Sex was also a factor influencing thrombosis, presenting a higher OR for women (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.4). This study revealed a significant association between access thrombosis and increased APC-R in hemodialysis patients. This indicates that the determination of APC-R should be considered--especially, in populations with a high prevalence of Factor V Leiden--as proper anticoagulant therapy in these patients may reduce the risk of access thrombosis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Differential regulation of functional gene clusters in overt coronary artery disease in a transgenic atherosclerosis-hypertensive rat model.

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Victoria M. L.; Didishvili, Tamara; Lopez, Lyle V.; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human acute coronary syndrome refers to the spectrum of clinical manifestations of overt coronary artery (CAD) disease characterized by atherosclerotic plaque destabilization and resultant myocardial injury. Typically studied as distinct pathologies, emerging pathogenic paradigms implicate multiple processes beyond thrombosis and ischemic cell injury respectively, with significant pathway overlap involving inflammation, apoptosis, matrix degradation, and oxidative stress. However,...

  9. Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Venous Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cushman, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Venous thrombosis, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, occurs at an annual incidence of about 1 per 1000 adults. Rates increase sharply after around age 45 years, and are slightly higher in men than women in older age. Major risk factors for thrombosis, other than age, include exogenous factors such as surgery, hospitalization, immobility, trauma, pregnancy and the puerperium and hormone use, and endogenous factors such as cancer, obesity, and inherited and acquired disorde...

  10. 支架内血栓形成的原因及防治%Cause and prevention of stent thrombosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷利华; 黄文胜; 裴宜斌; 何小伍

    2015-01-01

    Objective Investigate the causes and prevention of stent thrombosis after percu-taneous coronary intervention ( PCI).Methods Retrospective analysis was made on the cases of stent thrombosis .Results In the last 5 years, there were 4 cases of stent thrombosis in 497 PCI ca-ses.Among them, one case of stent thrombosis happened within 30 min after PCI.After second PCI and anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy , the patient safely discharged .Conclusion Stent throm-bosis is a serious postoperative complication of PCI in patients with coronary heart disease .Considering patient ’s specific conditions , personalized treatment can prevent stent thrombosis .%目的:探讨经皮冠状动脉介入治疗(percutaneous coronary intervention ,PCI)后支架内血栓发生的原因及防治策略。方法对支架内血栓形成的病例进行回顾性分析。结果近5年497例 PCI术后4例出现支架内血栓;其中,1例PCI术后30 min即出现支架内血栓,经再次PCI和调整抗凝、抗血小板药物治疗方案,患者症状缓解,安全出院。结论支架内血栓形成是严重影响冠心病患者预后的PCI术后并发症。结合患者具体病情,选择更具个性化的治疗,可避免支架内血栓形成。

  11. Increased rate of stent thrombosis and target lesion revascularization after filter protection in primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: 15-month follow-up of the DEDICATION (Drug Elution and Distal Protection in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Anne; Kelbaek, Henning; Kløvgaard, Lene;

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of distal protection during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).......The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of distal protection during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)....

  12. PORTAL VEIN THROMBOSIS-ULTRASOUND IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trajkovska Meri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Portal venous system, apart from the main portal vein, includes its tributaries: superior and inferior mesenteric vein, as well as splenic vein, so the term portal venous thrombosis encompasses a broad spectrum of pathological conditions. Usually, one or more causative factors can be recognized, either local endothelial/ flow disturbances, or systemic inherited /acquired conditions. Portal vein thrombosis can be associated with benign or malignant disorders. Weather we are speaking about acute or chronic thrombosis, the clinical presentation is different. Acute thrombosis can be presented in a wide range, from mild abdominal discomfort to a state of intestinal ischemia and life-threatening infarction. Chronic thrombosis is usually recognized when variceal bleeding or other symptoms of portal hypertension express. Fast and accurate diagnosis sometimes is a life-saving procedure, especially in acute vascular alterations. Recently, due to the improvement of imaging procedures the number of patients with diagnosed portal vein thrombosis is increasingly growing. With a negative predictive value of 98% color Doppler ultrasound is considered as imaging modality of choice in detecting portal vein thrombosis. Based on large studies it is presumed that overall risk of getting portal vein thrombosis during lifetime is 1% in general population, but much bigger 5%-15% in cirrhotic patients. Existence of specific ultrasound criteria, if fulfilled, has ensured that diagnosis of portal vein thrombosis is fast and non-invasive. Procedure is convenient for the patient and healthcare providers, and above all, allows prompt treatment preventing further deterioration.

  13. Sonographic Findings in Fetal Renal Vein Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Rebecca E; Bromley, Bryann; Benson, Carol B; Frates, Mary C

    2015-08-01

    We present the sonographic findings of fetal renal vein thrombosis in a series of 6 patients. The mean gestational age at diagnosis was 31.2 weeks. Four cases were unilateral, and 2 were bilateral. The most common findings were renal enlargement and intrarenal vascular calcifications, followed by increased renal parenchymal echogenicity. Inferior vena cava thrombosis was found in 4 patients and common iliac vein thrombosis in 2. Fetal renal vein thrombosis is an uncommon diagnosis with characteristic sonographic findings. The presence of these findings should prompt Doppler interrogation of the renal vein and inferior vena cava to confirm the diagnosis.

  14. Long-term outcome in patients treated with sirolimus-eluting stents in complex coronary artery lesions: 3-year results of the SCANDSTENT (Stenting Coronary Arteries in Non-Stress/Benestent Disease) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, H.; Klovgaard, L.; Helqvist, S.;

    2008-01-01

    data of the long-term outcome of patients with complex coronary artery lesions. METHODS: We randomly assigned 322 patients with total coronary occlusions or lesions located in bifurcations, ostial, or angulated segments of the coronary arteries to have SES or BMS implanted. RESULTS: At 3 years, major...... performed between 1 and 3 years after the index treatment (p = NS). According to revised definitions, stent thrombosis occurred in 5 patients (3.1%) in the SES group and in 7 patients (4.4%) in the BMS group (p = NS); very late stent thrombosis was observed in 4 versus 1 patient. CONCLUSIONS: A continued...

  15. Clinical trials in thrombosis: secondary prevention of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R; Doub, P H; Doub, N H

    1976-02-29

    Numerous in vivo and in vitro experiments, investigating the inhibition of platelet aggregation and the prevention of experimentally-induced thrombosis, suggest that anti-platelet drugs, such as aspirin or the combination of aspirin, and dipyridamole or sulfinpyrazone, may be effective anti-thrombotic agents in man. Since 1971, seven randomized prospective trials and two case-control studies have been referenced in the literature or are currently being conducted, which evaluate the effects of aspirin, sulfinpyrazone, or dipyridamole in combination with aspirin in the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction. A critical review of these trials indicates a range of evidence from no difference to a favorable trend that anti-platelet drugs may serve as anti-thrombotic agents in man. To date, a definitive answer concerning the therapeutic effects of these drugs in the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease is not available.

  16. Chinese herbal remedies affecting thrombosis and hemostasis: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute coronary syndrome, stroke and other ischemic events continue to be the most common causes of mortality and morbidity in the world, and their incidence is rapidly increasing in the developing nations. These cardiovascular disorders clinically manifest as acute atherothrombotic events. Application of oral antiplatelet drugs is a milestone in the therapy of cardiovascular diseases. However, the limited efficacy of these drugs in the setting of arterial thrombosis, their unfavorable side effects, cost-to-benefit issues and the drug resistance phenomenon substantiate the need for the development of new and more efficacious antithrombotic drugs. In recent years, with the progress in the study of the Chinese medicine pharmacology, many Chinese herbs and formulas, as well as active constituents have been reported to possess not only effects on platelet aggregation and activation but also beneficial roles in vascular functions. Compared with currently used antithrombotic agents, herb remedies exert antithrombotic effects in a multi-pathway and multi-target manner. This paper will cover the progress in research on the ameliorating effects of herbal remedies on thrombosis, with focusing on their protection of vascular endothelial cells and inhibition of platelet activation.

  17. Hormonal contraception, thrombosis and age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2014-01-01

    risk of venous thromboembolism as compared with nonusers, and about twice the risk as compared with users of products with norethisterone, levonorgestrel or norgestimate (low-risk products). Transdermal patches and vaginal ring belong to high-risk products. The risk of thrombotic stroke and myocardial......: First choice in women below 35 years should be a combined low-risk pill, that is, with a second-generation progestin, with the lowest compliable dose of estrogen. Young women with risk factors of thrombosis such as age above 35 years, genetic predispositions, adiposity, polycystic ovary syndrome...

  18. Meta-analysis of stent thrombosis after drug-eluting stent implantation: 4-year follow-up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nata(s)a M Mili(c); Biljana J Parapid; Miodrag (C) Ostoji(c); Milan A Nedeljkovi(c); Jelena M Marinkovi(c)

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug-eluting stents (DES) are the most common device used in percutaneous treatment of coronary artery disease. Recently, there has been an increased concern regarding their safety profile, in particular the late and very late stent thrombosis rate compared to bare metal stents (BMS). The aim of the study was to compare the reported incidence of late and very late stent thrombosis of DES and BMS in patients from published clinical studies with an extended follow-up period to four years.Methods A search strategy was developed to identify publications reporting on late or very late thrombosis of BMS and DES available through MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases. Two independent reviewers appraised eligible studies and extracted data. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated for each outcome and presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results Fourteen randomized controlled trials, which were at least single blinded, were identified. There was no difference in the incidence of late and very late stent thrombosis in patients treated with DES compared with patients treated with BMS (late OR 0.55, 95%Cl 0.23-1.31 and late/very late OR=1.08, 95%CI 0.61-1.91).Conclusions The safety profile of DES was similar to BMS in terms of stent thrombosis. We found no evidence of increased risk of late and very late thrombosis for DES.

  19. Thrombosis in ST-elevation myocardial infarction:Insights from thrombi retrieved by aspiration thrombectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Rios P Ribeiro; Eduardo Cambruzzi; Marcia Moura Schmidt; Alexandre S Quadros

    2016-01-01

    In patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, recurrent cardiovascular events still remain the main cause of morbidity and mortality, despite significant improvements in antithrombotic therapy. We sought to review data regarding coronary thrombus analysis provided by studies using manual aspiration thrombectomy(AT), andto discuss how insights from this line of investigation could further improve management of acute coronary disease. Several studies investigated the fresh specimens retrieved by AT using techniques such as traditional morphological evaluation, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, and immunohistochemistry. These approaches have provided a better understanding of the composition and dynamics of the human coronary thrombosis process, as well as its relationship with some clinical outcomes. Recent data signaling to new antithrombotic therapeutic targets are still emerging.

  20. Prevention and treatment of hemodialysis access thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Johannes Henricus Maria

    2001-01-01

    Thrombosis of the vascular access is the main problem in hemodialysis therapy for end-stage renal disease. In most cases, thrombosis is associated with the presence of one or more stenoses in the access. These stenoses are due to progressive neointimal hyperplasia. In this thesis, methods are descri

  1. Sex-specific aspects of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roach, Rachel Elizabeth Jo

    2014-01-01

    Venous thrombosis is a disease that occurs in 1-2 per 1000 people per year. At the time of their first venous thrombosis, approximately 50% of women are exposed to reproductive risk factors (oral contraception, postmenopausal hormone therapy, pregnancy and the puerperium). In this thesis, we showed

  2. Successful management of neonatal renal venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, Antonio; Galiano, Rossella; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Concolino, Daniela; Strisciuglio, Pietro

    2014-10-01

    Renal vein thrombosis is the most common vascular condition involving the newborn kidney and it can result in severe renal damage. We report a newborn with renal vein thrombosis treated with continuous infusion of unfractionated heparin who had normal total renal function after 3 years of follow up, despite reduction of the functional contribution of the affected kidney.

  3. A Patient with Recurrent Arteriovenous Graft Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allon, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) are prone to frequent thrombosis that is superimposed on underlying hemodynamically significant stenosis, most commonly at the graft-vein anastomosis. There has been great interest in detecting AVG stenosis in a timely fashion and performing preemptive angioplasty, in the belief that this will prevent AVG thrombosis. Three surveillance methods (static dialysis venous pressure, flow monitoring, and duplex ultrasound) can detect AVG stenosis. Whereas observational studies have reported that surveillance with preemptive angioplasty substantially reduces AVG thrombosis, randomized clinical trials have failed to confirm such a benefit. There is a high frequency of early AVG restenosis after angioplasty caused by aggressive neointimal hyperplasia resulting from vascular injury. Stent grafts prevent AVG restenosis better than balloon angioplasty, but they do not prevent AVG thrombosis. Several pharmacologic interventions to prevent AVG failure have been evaluated in randomized clinical trials. Anticoagulation or aspirin plus clopidogrel do not prevent AVG thrombosis, but increase hemorrhagic events. Treatment of hyperhomocysteinemia does not prevent AVG thrombosis. Dipyridamole plus aspirin modestly decreases AVG stenosis or thrombosis. Fish oil substantially decreases the frequency of AVG stenosis and thrombosis. In patients who have exhausted all options for vascular access in the upper extremities, thigh AVGs are a superior option to tunneled internal jugular vein central vein catheters (CVCs). An immediate-use AVG is a reasonable option in patients with recurrent CVC dysfunction or infection. Tunneled femoral CVCs have much worse survival than internal jugular CVCs.

  4. Cerebral Arterial Thrombosis in Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Casella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis, mainly venous, is a rare and well-recognized extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. We describe a 25-year-old Caucasian man affected by ulcerative colitis and sclerosing cholangitis with an episode of right middle cerebral arterial thrombosis resolved by intraarterial thrombolysis. We perform a brief review of the International Literature.

  5. Prevention of stent thrombosis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reejhsinghani R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Risheen Reejhsinghani, Amir S LotfiDivision of Cardiology, Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA, USAAbstract: Stent thrombosis is an uncommon but serious complication which carries with it significant mortality and morbidity. This review analyzes the entity of stent thrombosis from a historical and clinical perspective, and chronicles the evolution of this condition through the various generations of stent development, from bare metal to first-generation, second-generation, and third-generation drug-eluting stents. It also delineates the specific risk factors associated with stent thrombosis and comprehensively examines the literature related to each of these risks. Finally, it highlights the preventative strategies that can be garnered from the existing data, and concludes that a multifactorial approach is necessary to combat the occurrence of stent thrombosis, with higher risk groups, such as patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, meriting further research.Keywords: stent thrombosis, preventative strategies, post-procedural myocardial infarction

  6. Antithrombotic therapy in anticoagulated patients with atrial fibrillation presenting with acute coronary syndromes and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention/stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. Wrigley

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The management of antithrombotic therapy in atrial fibrillation patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary inter vention/stenting cannot be done according to a regimented common protocol, and stroke and bleeding risk stratification schema should be employed to individualize treatment options. A delicate balance is needed between the prevention of thromboembolism, against recurrent cardiac ischemia or stent thrombosis, and bleeding risk. New guidance from a consensus document of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, endorsed by the European Heart Rhythm Association and the European Association ofPercutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions on the management of Antithrombotic Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Presenting with Acute Coronary Syndrome and/or Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/Stenting has sought to clarify some of the major issues and problems surrounding this practice, and will allow clinicians to make much more informed decisions when faced with treating such patients.

  7. Emergency coronary artery bypass surgery after failed percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwazah, A K; Islim, I; Hanbali, B; Shama, R A; Aloul, J

    2009-12-01

    The incidence of patients subjected to emergency coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is decreasing due to improvement of PCI technique and device technology. The aim of our study is to evaluate cases subjected to emergency CABG after complicated PCI to determine incidence, indications and results of surgery and to compare them with other emergency cases which are not related to angioplasty or stenting. From April 1999 to December 2005, 1 200 patients who underwent PCI were analysed. Those patients who developed complications related to PCI and required surgical intervention were included (PCI group N.=31). These patients were compared with other emergency cases not related to PCI (non-PCI group N.=48). The selection of these patients was based on the criteria of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. The incidence of PCI complications which necessitated emergency surgical intervention was 2.6%. The main indication was due to unsatisfactory angioplasty with ongoing myocardial ischemia (68%), stent thrombosis (13%), dissection (10%) retained angioplasty wire (6.5%), and perforation (3%). The incidence of cardiogenic shock, ongoing ischemia, acute infarction Emergency coronary artery bypass grafting among patients with PCI complications and those patients not related to PCI is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Although, the percentage of mortality and morbidity was more among PCI patients the difference between both groups was not significant. Surgical backup and collaboration between cardiologist and surgeons is needed to reduce delay in management and patients transfer to obtain the best surgical outcome.

  8. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection in a Male Patient with Takayasu's Arteritis and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerede, Demet Menekşe; Yüksel, Bağdagül; Tutar, Eralp; Küçükşahin, Orhan; Uzun, Cağlar; Atasoy, Kayhan Çetin; Düzgün, Nurşen; Bengisun, Uğur

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 34-year-old male who presented to the emergency ward with fever and abdominal pain. The diagnosis of Takayasu's arteritis and also antiphospholipid syndrome was made during an imaging workup of deep-vein thrombosis. A spontaneous coronary artery dissection was revealed in coronary CT angiography requested for chest pain and dyspnea. The patient was treated medically and discharged on close followup. The concurrence of spontaneous coronary artery dissection with antiphospholipid syndrome and Takayasu's arteritis has not been reported in the previous literature. The possibility of a spontaneous coronary artery dissection should be considered in patients presenting with both diseases.

  9. Intravascular ultrasound assessed incomplete stent apposition and stent fracture in stent thrombosis after bare metal versus drug-eluting stent treatment the Nordic Intravascular Ultrasound Study (NIVUS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosonen, Petteri; Vikman, Saila; Jensen, Lisette Okkels;

    2013-01-01

    This prospective multicenter registry used intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in patients with definite stent thrombosis (ST) to compare rates of incomplete stent apposition (ISA), stent fracture and stent expansion in patients treated with drug-eluting (DES) versus bare metal (BMS) stents. ST...... is a rare, but potential life threatening event after coronary stent implantation. The etiology seems to be multifactorial....

  10. Coronary artery fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart defect - coronary artery fistula; Birth defect heart - coronary artery fistula ... A coronary artery fistula is often congenital, meaning that it is present at birth. It generally occurs when one of the coronary arteries ...

  11. Prior chronic clopidogrel therapy is associated with increased adverse events and early stent thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Elad; Fefer, Paul; Sabbag, Avi; Herscovici, Romana; Regev, Ehud; Mazin, Israel; Shlomo, Nir; Zahger, Doron; Atar, Shaul; Hammerman, Haim; Polak, Arthur; Beigel, Roy; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing use of clopidogrel, limited data exist regarding the prognostic significance of chronic clopidogrel therapy in patients sustaining acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Our aim was to determine whether patients sustaining ACS while on chronic clopidogrel therapy have a worse prognosis than clopidogrel-naïve patients. A total of 5,386 consecutive ACS patients were prospectively characterised and followed-up for 30 days. Of them, 680 (13%) were treated with clopidogrel prior to the index ACS. Major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) were defined as death, recurrent ACS, stroke and/or stent thrombosis. Compared with clopidogrel-naïve, chronic clopidogrel-treated patients were older (66 ± 12 vs 63 ± 13, respectively; pclopidogrel therapy was associated with a two-fold increase in in-hospital (1.6% vs 0.6%, respectively; p =0.006) as well as 30-day stent thrombosis (2.2% vs 1.0%, respectively; p=0.007). MACE at 30 days was also higher among chronic clopidogrel-treated compared with clopidogrel-naïve patients [12.3% vs 9.4%, respectively; pclopidogrel treatment was an independent predictor of stent thrombosis [OR=2.6 (95%CI 1.2-5.6), p=0.001]. Patients sustaining ACS while on chronic clopidogrel treatment are at higher risk for in-hospital and 30-day adverse outcomes, including stent thrombosis.

  12. Cancer associated thrombosis: risk factors and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, Sabine

    2016-04-01

    Deep vein thrombosis of the leg and pulmonary embolism are frequent diseases and cancer is one of their most important risk factors. Patients with cancer also have a higher prevalence of venous thrombosis located in other parts than in the legs and/or in unusual sites including upper extremity, splanchnic or cerebral veins. Cancer also affects the risk of arterial thrombotic events particularly in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms and in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor recipients. Several risk factors need to interact to trigger thrombosis. In addition to common risk factors such as surgery, hospitalisation, infection and genetic coagulation disorders, the thrombotic risk is also driven and modified by cancer-specific factors including type, histology, and stage of the malignancy, cancer treatment and certain biomarkers. A venous thrombotic event in a cancer patient has serious consequences as the risk of recurrent thrombosis, the risk of bleeding during anticoagulation and hospitalisation rates are all increased. Survival of cancer patients with thrombosis is worse compared to that of cancer patients without thrombosis, and thrombosis is a leading direct cause of death in cancer patients.

  13. Risk factors of thrombosis in abdominal veins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit Kumar Durra; Ashok Chacko; Biju George; Joseph Anjilivelil Joseph; Sukesh Chandran Nair; Vikram Mathews

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of inherited and acquired thrombophilic risk factors in patients with abdominal venous thrombosis and to compare the risk factor profiles between Budd-Chiari syndromes (BCS) and splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT).METHODS: In this retrospective study, 36 patients with abdominal venous thrombosis were studied.The patients were divided into Budd-Chiari group (hepatic vein, IVC thrombosis) and splanchnic venous thrombosis group (portal, splenic, superior mesenteric veins) based on the veins involved. Hereditary and acquired thrombophilic risk factors were evaluated in all patients.RESULTS: Twenty patients had SVT, 14 had BCS,and 2 had mixed venous thrombosis. Ten patients (28%) had hereditary and 10 patients (28%) acquired thrombophilic risk factors. The acquired risk factors were significantly more common in the SVT group (SVT vs BCS:45% vs 7%,x2=5.7,P=0.02) while hereditary risk factors did not show significant differences between the two groups (SVT vs BCS: 25%vs 36%, x2=0.46,P=0.7). Multiple risk factors were present in one (7%) patient with BCS and in 3 patients (15%) with SVT. No risk factors were identified in 57% of patients with BCS and in 45% of patients with SVT.CONCLUSION: Hereditary and acquired risk factors play an important role in the etiopathogenesis of abdominal venous thrombosis. Acquired risk factors are significantly more common in SVT patients while hereditary factors are similar in both groups.

  14. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. ST-elevated acute myocardial infarction happening 1 month post stent implantation: late thrombosis in-stents or new lesions?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Guang-yuan; YANG Yue-jin; XU Bo; LI Jian-jun; GAO Run-lin; QIAO Shu-bin; YUAN Jin-qing; TANG Yi-da; YOU Shi-jie; PEI Han-jun; ZHAO Zhen-yan; WANG Xi-mei; WU Yong-jian

    2009-01-01

    Background ST-elevated acute myocardial infarction (STEAMI) happening in the first month post percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is almost related to acute thrombosis or subacute thrombosis in-stents. This study aimed to investigate the possible causes of myocardial infarction one month later. Methods Patients who had a history of successful PCI, and received coronary angiography or re-PCI due to STEAMI were included in this study. The AMI-related lesions and previous angiographic findings such as the number of lesions, the degree of the stenosis, the type of stents and acute results of last PCI were recorded. If the AMI-related lesion was localized in-stents or at the edge of stents (distance apart from the edge <5 mm), it was defined to be late thrombosis; otherwise as a new-lesion induced AMI. Results One hundred and ninety-two patients aged 40-79 years were included in this study. New lesions, as the cause of STEAMI, were found in 144 patients (Group A, 75%), and late thrombosis in 48 patients (Group B, 25%). Almost all newly built thromboses were found at the sites of previous insignificant lesions (diameter stenosis <50%). There was a significant difference in the average time from previous PCI to AMI ((30.1+12.4) vs (20.3+11.9) months) between the two groups. Diabetes mellitus (DM) and drug-eluting stent (DES) utilization were associated with markedly higher morbidity of late thrombosis in adjusted Logistic regression (hazard ratio (HR) 3.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-10.9 and 5.3, 95% CI 1.1-26.5). Conclusions STEAMIs happening 1 month after PCI are more likely to develop from previous insignificant lesion rupture than from late thrombosis in-stents. Moreover, DM and DES are associated with the high incidence of latethrombosis, which may indicate that intensive antiplatelet therapy should be considered in patients with diabetes.

  16. Assessment of Venous Thrombosis in Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Steven P; Evans, Colin E; Patel, Ashish S; Modarai, Bijan; Saha, Prakash; Smith, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and common complications, including pulmonary embolism and post-thrombotic syndrome, represent a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Experimental models of venous thrombosis have provided considerable insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate thrombus formation and subsequent resolution. Here, we critically appraise the ex vivo and in vivo techniques used to assess venous thrombosis in these models. Particular attention is paid to imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, micro-computed tomography, and high-frequency ultrasound that facilitate longitudinal assessment of thrombus size and composition.

  17. Sagittal sinus thrombosis in adult minimal change nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urch, C; Pusey, C D

    1996-02-01

    Nephrotic syndrome causes a hypercoagulable state, leading to both venous and arterial thrombosis. The mechanisms are as yet unclear, but numerous alterations in coagulant and anti-coagulant factors have been reported [Llach et al. 1985, Harris and Ismail 1994]. The most common clinical features in adults are renal vein thrombosis, femoral vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, although thrombosis in numerous other arterial and venous sites has been described [Cameron 1984, Llach et al. 1985]. Intracranial thrombosis is rare, although in adult nephrotic syndrome arterial thrombosis is well recognized [Fuh et al. 1991]. We report a patient with minimal change nephrotic syndrome who developed venous sinus thrombosis detected by magnetic resonance (MR) scanning.

  18. Acute Coronary Syndromes: From The Laboratory Markers To The Coronary Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palazzuoli Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of "interesting" risk markers have been proposed as providing prognostic information in acute coronary syndromes (ACS. Elevation in plasma inflammatory and necrosis biomarkers have been related to future cardiovascular events in individuals with or without prior myocardial infarction. Recently BNP and pro-BNP are entered in clinical practice to recognize patients at major risk, providing incremental information respect to the traditional markers. Together with these laboratory indexes, a few of promising laboratory markers once easily available, could become useful in identification of patients at high risk. Several studies evaluated many markers of platelet aggregation, endothelial dysfunction and vascular thrombosis, but it is not yet clear whether each of the proposed markers may provide incremental predictive information. We describe, following the most studies reported in literature, the laboratory markers with potential clinical and prognostic power that could early help physicians in the identifi cation of patients with impaired coronary disease and more narrowed coronary arteries.

  19. Quality Control in Laboratory Hemostasis and Thrombosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周立红; 刘泽霖

    2010-01-01

    @@ Introdution Laboratory diagnosis in medical practice,the position has been established,hernostasis and thrombosis.expefimental testing is no different.Experimental test of information not only for early diagnosis and guide treatment,prognosis and estimated recurrence.

  20. A time of change at Thrombosis Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ten Cate Hugo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thrombosis and hemostasis related disease have a heavy burden in cardiovascular disease and it is important to have a journal where research into this can be accessed by all.

  1. Arterial thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, R.T

    2008-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a non-inflammatory autoimmune disease that mainly affects young women. The syndrome is characterized by recurrent thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity in association with the persistent serological presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Antiphospholipid antibodi

  2. Deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitfod, Lotte; Broholm, R; Baekgaard, N

    2013-01-01

    to the condition. Malignancy and therapeutic interventions are major risk factors for the secondary deep vein thrombosis in combination with the patient's characteristics, comorbidities and prior history of deep vein thrombosis. Complications: recurrent deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and Post......Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT) occurs either spontaneously, as a consequence of strenuous upper limb activity (also known as the Paget-Schroetter syndrome) or secondary to an underlying cause. Primary and secondary UEDVT differs in long-term sequelae and mortality. This review...... will focus on the clinical presentation, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment strategies of UEDVT. In the period from January to October 2012 an electronic literature search was performed in the PubMed/MEDLINE database, and 27 publications were included. Clinical presentation: swelling, pain and functional...

  3. Arterial thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, R.T

    2008-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a non-inflammatory autoimmune disease that mainly affects young women. The syndrome is characterized by recurrent thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity in association with the persistent serological presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Antiphospholipid

  4. Everolimus-eluting coronary stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Saez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Alejandro Saez, Raul MorenoDivision of Interventional Cardiology, University Hospital La Paz, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Bare metal stents enabled a reduction in the risk of early procedural complications and restenosis in comparison with balloon angioplasty alone, but introduced a new and device-specific iatrogenic condition, ie, in-stent restenosis due to increased neointimal hyperplasia. Sirolimus- and paclitaxel-eluting stents reduce restenosis and the need for new revascularizations in comparison with bare metal stents, although at the cost of a slight increase in the risk of late stent thrombosis and a need for prolonged dual antiplatelet therapy. Everolimus is an analog of sirolimus with an increased solubility. In this review, the currently available evidence for everolimus-eluting stents is revised, including randomized trials against bare metal stents, and head-to-head trials comparing this stent with other drug-eluting stents.Keywords: coronary stents, restenosis, everolimus, review

  5. Rare occurrence of simultaneous coronary artery perforation and intracoronary thrombus formation following angioplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Yan Bian; Liu-Fa Duan

    2013-01-01

    Both coronary artery perforation and intracoronary thrombus formation are life-threatening complications of percutaneous coronary interventions, which rarely occur simultaneously during angioplasty. We herein report a case of stent-related, left circumflex artery perforation, and subsequently acute left main artery thrombosis after the leakage was embolized with 7 microcoils. Intracoronary thromboectomy and systemic anticoagulant therapy were carefully used with good results. This case also represents some of our uncertainties regarding the best management of the patient.

  6. Tenecteplase in prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In the few reported cases of prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis, where surgical intervention was considered as high risk, fibrinolytic therapy had proved life saving. The authors present clinical, laboratory, and imaging data from such a patient, with prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis and its successful management with tenecteplase. The use of tenecteplase as a viable fibrinolytic agent for the first time was justified, due to the lack of immunogenicity concerns compared to streptokinase.

  7. Tenecteplase in prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyub Ghori, Masood; Bakir, Sherif; Ellahham, Samer; Al Nassir, Adnan; Al Zubaidi, Abdulmajeed; Augustin, Norbert; Abdelaziz, Moataz Ayman; Turrin, Nicolas Patrick; Al Mahmeed, Wael Abdulrahman

    2011-04-01

    In the few reported cases of prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis, where surgical intervention was considered as high risk, fibrinolytic therapy had proved life saving. The authors present clinical, laboratory, and imaging data from such a patient, with prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis and its successful management with tenecteplase. The use of tenecteplase as a viable fibrinolytic agent for the first time was justified, due to the lack of immunogenicity concerns compared to streptokinase.

  8. Cervical Rib causing Thrombosis of Subclavian Atery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe here an unusual case of thrombosis of left subclavian artery in a patient with cervical rib. The patient presented with features of ischaemia of left upper limb. X-ray chest revealed bilateral cervical ribs, longer on the left side. Color Doppler studies showed echogenic thrombus within the left subclavian artery. Angiography revealed complete occlusion of left subclavian artery. Embolectomy was done. She was planned for excision of rib. KEYWORDS: cervical rib, thrombosis of subclavian artery.

  9. Coronary anomaly: the single coronary artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Xu-guang; XIONG Wei-guo; LU Chun-peng; GONG Cheng-jie; SHANG Li-hua

    2010-01-01

    @@ Single coronary artery (SCA), defined as an artery that arises from the arterial trunk and nourishes the entire myocardium, is rare. We report two cases of SCA, one is the right coronary artery (RCA) originating from the middle of left descending artery (LAD), and the other is the left main coronary artery (LMCA) arising from the proximal right coronary artery.

  10. Computational simulation of platelet interactions in the initiation of stent thrombosis due to stent malapposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K W; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Coronary stenting is one of the most commonly used approaches to open coronary arteries blocked due to atherosclerosis. Stent malapposition can induce thrombosis but the microscopic process is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the platelet-level process by which different extents of stent malapposition affect the initiation of stent thrombosis. We utilized a discrete element model to computationally simulate the transport, adhesion, and activation of thousands of individual platelets and red blood cells during thrombus initiation in stented coronary arteries. Simulated arteries contained a malapposed stent with a specified gap distance (0, 10, 25, 50, or 200 μm) between the struts and endothelium. Platelet-level details of thrombus formation near the proximal-most strut were measured during the simulations. The relationship between gap distance and amount of thrombus in the artery varied depending on different conditions (e.g., amount of dysfunctional endothelium, shear-induced activation of platelets, and thrombogenicity of the strut). Without considering shear-induced platelet activation, the largest gap distance (200 μm) produced no recirculation and less thrombus than the smallest two gap distances (0 and 10 μm) that created recirculation downstream of the strut. However, with the occurrence of shear-induced platelet activation, the largest gap distance produced more thrombus than the two smallest gap distances, but less thrombus than an intermediate gap distance (25 μm). A large gap distance was not necessarily the most thrombogenic, in contrast to implications of some computational fluid dynamics studies. The severity of stent malapposition affected initial stent thrombosis differently depending on various factors related to fluid recirculation, platelet trajectories, shear stress, and endothelial condition. PMID:26790093

  11. Computational simulation of platelet interactions in the initiation of stent thrombosis due to stent malapposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-02-01

    Coronary stenting is one of the most commonly used approaches to open coronary arteries blocked due to atherosclerosis. Stent malapposition can induce thrombosis but the microscopic process is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the platelet-level process by which different extents of stent malapposition affect the initiation of stent thrombosis. We utilized a discrete element model to computationally simulate the transport, adhesion, and activation of thousands of individual platelets and red blood cells during thrombus initiation in stented coronary arteries. Simulated arteries contained a malapposed stent with a specified gap distance (0, 10, 25, 50, or 200 μm) between the struts and endothelium. Platelet-level details of thrombus formation near the proximal-most strut were measured during the simulations. The relationship between gap distance and amount of thrombus in the artery varied depending on different conditions (e.g., amount of dysfunctional endothelium, shear-induced activation of platelets, and thrombogenicity of the strut). Without considering shear-induced platelet activation, the largest gap distance (200 μm) produced no recirculation and less thrombus than the smallest two gap distances (0 and 10 μm) that created recirculation downstream of the strut. However, with the occurrence of shear-induced platelet activation, the largest gap distance produced more thrombus than the two smallest gap distances, but less thrombus than an intermediate gap distance (25 μm). A large gap distance was not necessarily the most thrombogenic, in contrast to implications of some computational fluid dynamics studies. The severity of stent malapposition affected initial stent thrombosis differently depending on various factors related to fluid recirculation, platelet trajectories, shear stress, and endothelial condition.

  12. [Safety of magnetic resonance imaging after coronary stenting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsyn, V E; Stukalova, O V; Kupriianova, O M; Ternovoĭ, S K

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is contraindicated to some patients with certain types of metallic devices and implants (e.g. cerebral surgical clips, defibrillators). There are some controversies concerning safety of MRI in patients with metallic coronary stents in cases when MRI examination is performed earlier then one month after stent implantation. Analysis of published data has shown that MRI performed with systems having field strength up to 3 Tesla does not cause migration and heating of both bare and coated stent and is not associated with increased risk of coronary artery thrombosis. MRI can be performed safely in first days after coronary stent implantation. Small local artifacts on MRI images do not influence interpretation of the data (except for cases of coronary magnetic resonance angiography).

  13. Asymptomatic giant coronary aneurysm in an adolescent with Behcet's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Behcet's is an idiopathic multi-organ syndrome, which may have onset during childhood. Vascular involvement is uncommon, with rarely reported coronary aneurysm formation. We present a case report of a teenager girl who developed recalcitrant life-threatening Behcet's vasculitis, involving both small and large venous and arterial systems including a giant coronary aneurysm. Case report De-identified data were collected retrospectively in case report format. Although our sixteen year old female with Behcet's vasculitis had resolution of many arterial aneurysms, she had persistent venous thrombosis of large vessels, as well as persistent, giant arterial aneurysms requiring intra-arterial coiling of a lumbar artery and coronary bypass grafting despite intensive immunosuppression including glucocorticoids, cyclophosphamide, infliximab, methotrexate, azathioprine and intravenous immunoglobulin. Conclusions Vascular manifestations may be seen in Behcet's syndrome, including asymptomatic coronary aneurysm, which may be refractory to immunosuppression and ultimately require surgical intervention. Increased awareness is essential for prompt diagnosis and management.

  14. [Coronary artery fistulas, a current problem: Clinical and therapeutic considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiritilli, A; Iaria, P; Viard, P; Sayah, S; Benali, T; Detienne, J-P; Martis, S; Tchatchum, F; Aouate, P

    2016-02-01

    The coronary fistula is a link between one or more of the coronary arteries and cardiac cavity or great vessel. The exact occurrence is unknown. The majority of these fistulas are congenital in origin. However, they may occasionally be detected after cardiac surgery. For a long time, fistulas are asymptomatic, especially if they are small; the frequency of the symptoms and especially the complications rise with age. The potential complications are: cardiac failure, endocarditis, endarteritis, atrial fibrillation, ventricular arrhythmias, rupture, and thrombosis. The main differential diagnosis is patent arterial duct, while other congenital arteriovenous shunts need to be excluded. Even though echocardiography Doppler can help to differentiate shunts, the coronary angiography remains the main diagnostic tool for the description of the anatomy. For a long time, the surgery was the only therapeutic means, up till now, percutaneous occlusion is the first line therapy of coronary fistulas and that the different devices can be tailored to meet different anatomic and functional characteristics.

  15. Coronary collaterals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerselman, Jeroen

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, in particular coronary artery disease, are the leading cause of death and disease in industrialized countries. Atherosclerotic changes of the arterial vessel wall constitute one of the major causes for the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Important risk factors for

  16. Coronary collaterals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerselman, Jeroen

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, in particular coronary artery disease, are the leading cause of death and disease in industrialized countries. Atherosclerotic changes of the arterial vessel wall constitute one of the major causes for the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Important risk factors for card

  17. Giant coronary artery aneurysms in a 58-year-old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Singhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available All giant Kawasaki aneurysms may not regress fully; some may eventually calcify, undergo thrombosis, and get detected in asymptomatic adults at later age. Tomisaku Kawasaki initially described this illness as mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome in childhood in 1967 and coronary arteritis was recognized later. We present a 58-year-old male, possibly one of the oldest surviving patients with giant coronary aneurysms who presented with large secundum atrial septal defect (ASD with heart failure. This indicates that the disease was perhaps prevalent outside Japan even before the first Kawasaki′s description.

  18. Fibrinolytic therapy for mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajali, Zahra; Mohammadzadeh, Shabnam; Maleki, Majid; Peighambari, Mohammad Mehdi; Sadeghpoor, Anita; Ghavidel, Alireza; Elahi, Behrad; Mirzaaghayan, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of prosthetic heart valve thrombosis using intravenous thrombolytics, although an acceptable alternative to surgery, is not complication free, and the literature has a dearth of data on the subject. This study analyzed the results of fibrinolytic treatment (FT) among a single-center group of patients with mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis. Between 2000 and 2013, 23 consecutive patients with 25 episodes of pulmonary valve thrombosis received FT. The diagnosis of mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis was established by fluoroscopy and echocardiography. Streptokinase (SK) was used in 24 cases and alteplase in 1 case. The FT was continued a second day for 14 patients (58.3%), a third day for 1 patient, and a fourth day for 1 patient. Echocardiography and fluoroscopy were performed every day until improvement of malfunction was achieved. Of the 23 patients, 19 had complete resolution of hemodynamic abnormalities after FT, 1 had partial resolution, and 2 showed no change. No patient had major complications. Five minor complications were detected, namely, fever, nausea, thrombophlebitis, epistaxi, and pain. Seven patients (30%) experienced recurrence of thrombosis, whereas four patients had surgery (biological pulmonary valve replacement) without re-thrombolytic therapy, one patient was treated with Alteplase, one patient received SK, and one patient received intense anticoagulation using heparin and warfarin. Overall, FT had a success rate of 84%. The results indicate that regardless of the time to pulmonary valve replacement and echocardiographic and fluoroscopic findings, FT was effective in most cases of mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis. The efficacy increased with second-day thrombolytic therapy. Major complications were not common after lytic therapy for mechanical pulmonary valve thrombosis.

  19. Insights into the pathophysiology of unstable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, S D; Ravn, H B; Falk, E

    1997-09-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis without thrombosis is, in general, a benign disease. However, plaque disruption, or fissuring, with superimposed thrombosis, frequently complicates the course of coronary atherosclerosis. Small ruptures often remain clinically silent, whereas more extensive plaque rupture may cause the development of unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. The risk of plaque disruption depends more on plaque type (composition) than on plaque size and stenosis severity. Major determinants of a plaque's vulnerability to rupture are: the size and consistency of the lipid-rich atheromatous core; the thickness of the fibrous cap covering the core; and ongoing inflammation and repair within the cap. Both plaque vulnerability (intrinsic disease) and rupture triggers (extrinsic forces) are important for plaque disruption. The former predisposes the plaque to rupture whereas the latter may precipitate it. The resultant thrombotic response, which is important for the clinical presentation and outcome, is portly determined by the reactivity of the circulating platelets and the balance between the fibrinolytic and coagulation systems. New ways of identification and treatment of the dangerous vulnerable plaques responsible for infarction and death, and optimization of antithrombotic treatment, are highly warranted in order to prevent and treat life-threatening coronary thrombosis.

  20. International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis core curriculum project: core competencies in clinical thrombosis and hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLintock, C; Pabinger, I; Bauer, K A; Laffan, M; Angchaisuksiri, P; Rezende, S M; Middeldorp, S; Ross, M

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The priority of ISTH was to establish a global core curriculum in thrombosis and hemostasis. International survey to determine competencies required for clinical specialists was carried out in the field. Competency framework provides a reference point for mapping and developing regional curricula. Core curriculum informs and links to a variety of ISTH educational materials. Background The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) identified the need for an international core curriculum on thrombosis and hemostasis for its society members and the larger thrombosis and hemostasis community. Aims The current research sought consensus on the core competencies required by medical doctors who are ready to practise as independent clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis with the aim of developing a core clinical curriculum for specialists in the field. Method A draft list of competencies was developed by the Working Group and formed the basis of an online survey. ISTH members and the larger thrombosis and hemostasis community were asked to rate the importance of each competency, on a Likert scale, for clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis. Results There were a total of 644 responses to the online survey with broad geographical representation. There was general agreement on what level of competency would be required for clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis at the specified level of training. Conclusions Using the survey to gain consensus on the level of competency required by clinical specialists in the field of thrombosis and hemostasis enabled the development of a core clinical curriculum that has been endorsed by the ISTH Council. The curriculum will offer a framework and international reference that will be used by the society, by national and regional organizations, and for further research. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  1. Short- and Long-term Outcomes in Patients with Connective Tissue Diseases Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Patients with CTD and CAD may have severe coronary lesions. PCI in these patients tends to result in an increased rate of stent thrombosis and TVR during long-term follow-up, which may be influenced by traditional and nontraditional risk factors.

  2. Causal effect of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 on coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Ci; Burgess, Stephen; Eicher, John D.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Huang, Jie; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Asselbergs, Folkert W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270752137; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Shin, So Youn; Ding, Jingzhong; Baumert, Jens; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Folkersen, Lasse; Smith, Nicholas L.; Williams, Scott M; Ikram, Mohammad Arfan; Kleber, Marcus E.; Becker, Diane M.; Truong, Vinh; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Tang, Weihong; Yang, Qiong; Sennblad, Bengt; Moore, Jason H; Williams, Frances M.K.; Dehghan, Abbas; Silbernagel, Günther; Schrijvers, Elisabeth M.C.; Smith, Shelly; Karakas, Mahir; Tofler, Geoffrey H.; Silveira, Angela; Navis, Gerjan J.; Lohman, Kurt; Chen, Ming Huei; Peters, Annette; Goel, Anuj; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Saleheen, Danish; Lundmark, Per; Psaty, Bruce M.; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Carter, Angela M.; Meisinger, Christa; Peden, John F.; Bis, Joshua C.; McKnight, Barbara; Öhrvik, John; Taylor, Kent D.; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Collins, Rory; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Goodall, Alison H.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Cushman, Mary; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Folsom, Aaron R.; Basu, Saonli; Matijevic, Nena; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Danesh, John; Clarke, Robert; Meigs, James B; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P; Klopp, Norman; Harris, Tamara B.; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Grant, Peter J.; Hillege, Hans L.; Watkins, Hugh; Spector, Timothy D; Becker, Lewis C; Tracy, Russell P.; März, Winfried; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Eriksson, Per; Cambien, Francois; Morange, Pierre Emmanuel; Koenig, Wolfgang; Soranzo, Nicole; van der Harst, Pim; Liu, Yongmei; Hamsten, Anders; Ehret, Georg B.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bochud, Murielle; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Albert V.; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A.; Jackson, Anne U.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H.; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N.; Fava, Cristiano; Fox, Ervin R.; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; Linda Kao, Wen Hong; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D. G.; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H.; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/26504362X; Cooper, Matthew N.; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S.P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/136603947; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter R.; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen Pei C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Grobbee, Diederick E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071889256; Arking, Dan E.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Beilby, John P.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J. Hunter; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette R.; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Hoffman Bolton, Judith A.; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M.; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif C.; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay Tee; Weder, Alan B.; Hunt, Steven C.; Sun, Yan V.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan Martin; Staessen, Jan A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Burton, Paul R.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt; Rudock, Megan E.; Heckbert, Susan R; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A.; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S.; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter M.; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J.; Yao, Jie; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Arfan Ikram, M.; Longstreth, W.T. jr.; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R.G.; Wain, Louise V.; Morken, Mario A.; Swift, Amy J.; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Rasheed, Asif; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Mani, K. Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S.; Oostra, Ben A.; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M. V.Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles N.; Bots, Michiel L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/110610032; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J.; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073449253; Casas, Juan P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Shyong Tai, E.; Cooper, Richard S.; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Morris, Richard W.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G.; Miki, Tetsuro; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan J.; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Elosua, Roberto; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P.; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J.; Johnson, Toby; van der Lugt, Aad; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Hofman, Albert; Kraja, Aldi T.; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Ziegler, Andreas; Newman, Anne B; Schillert, Arne; Oostra, Ben A.; Thorsson, Bolli; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Fox, Caroline S.; White, Charles C.; Ballantyne, Christie; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Herrington, David M.; O'Leary, Daniel H.; Siscovick, David S.; Couper, David J; Halperin, Eran; Stoegerer, Eva Maria; Ernst, Florian; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Homuth, Georg; Heiss, Gerardo; Usala, Gianluca; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Shen, Haiqing; Erich Wichmann, H.; Schmidt, Helena; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Markus, Hugh S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Lüdemann, Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Thiery, Joachim; Seissler, Jochen; Massaro, Joseph M.; Polak, Joseph F.; Cunningham, Julie; North, Kari E.; Petrovic, Katja E; Rice, Kenneth M.; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Launer, Lenore J.; de Andrade, Mariza; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sitzer, Matthias; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Province, Michael A.; Nalls, Michael A.; Franceschini, Nora; Peyser, Patricia A.; Wolf, Philip A.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wild, Philipp S; Schnabel, Renate B.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Chilukoti, Ravi Kumar; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sanna, Serena; Demissie, Serkalem; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Blankenberg, Stefan; Bevan, Steve; Elias-Smale, Suzette E.; Zeller, Tanja; Illig, Thomas; Münzel, Thomas; Howard, Timothy D.; Hoffmann, Udo; Schminke, Ulf; Nambi, Vijay; Post, Wendy S.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Li, Xia; Cheng, Yu Ching

    2017-01-01

    Background--Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) plays an essential role in the fibrinolysis system and thrombosis. Population studies have reported that blood PAI-1 levels are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is unclear whether the association

  3. Percutaneous coronary intervention following repair of type B aortic dissection: a report of 8 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanmin Jing; Xiaozeng Wang; Yaling Han; Bo Luan; Geng Wang; Xiaojiang Liu; Hongxu Jin

    2008-01-01

    Objective Patients with aortic dissection have a significant incidence of coronary artery disease.The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous coronary stent in patients who have undergone endovascular stent,and to assess the effect of anti-coagulant and anti-platelet treatment on patients' thrombosis process.Methods From January 2005 to July 2007,8 patients who had undergone endovascular stent-graft during the past 1 to 7 months for type B aortic dissection repair,underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) because of coexisting coronary artery disease.Anti-coagulant and anti-platelet treatments were administrated after PCI according to the standard protocol.Patients were followed up for a mean period of 23 months.Clinical and false lumen status data were collected during the follow-up.Results PCI were technically successful in all 8 patients and no severe complications such as death,paraplegia,renal failure occurred during hospitalization.Complete false lumen thrombosis was observed in 5 patients and incomplete false lumen thrombosis in the remained 3 patients at the end of follow up.There were no major complications such as death,dissection rupture or aneurysm development occurred during the follow-up period.Conclusion Our data implied that PCI can be safely performed in patients with type B aortic dissection who have undergone endovascular stent-graft,without interrupting the thrombosis process.

  4. Diabetes mellitus: a prothrombotic state. Implications for outcomes after coronary revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Cola

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Clarissa Cola1, Salvatore Brugaletta1, Victoria Martín Yuste1, Bieito Campos1, Dominick J Angiolillo2, Manel Sabaté11Interventional Cardiology Unit, Department of Cardiology, Sant Pau University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain; 2Interventional Cardiology Unit, Shands Jacksonville, University of Florida, Florida, USAAbstract: Coronary stent thrombosis is a serious problem in the drug-eluting stent era. Despite aggressive antiplatelet therapy during and after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, the incidence of sub-acute stent thrombosis remains approximately 0.5%–2%, which may represent a catastrophic clinical situation. Both procedural factors and discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy are normally associated with this event. We report on simultaneous stent thromboses of two drug-eluting stents implanted in two different vessels, which resulted in a life-threatening clinical condition. Possible contributing factors that led to synergistic thrombotic effects are discussed.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, platelet function, antiplatelet therapy, drug-eluting stent, stent thrombosis

  5. Portal vein thrombosis in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettino, Graziela C M; Fagundes, Eleonora D T; Roquete, Mariza L V; Ferreira, Alexandre R; Penna, Francisco J

    2006-01-01

    To review the literature on portal vein thrombosis in children and adolescents, focusing on its diagnosis, complications and treatment. The medical literature of the past 10 years was reviewed using the PubMed and MEDLINE search engines, with major focus on portal vein thrombosis and its clinical outcomes. The following keywords or expressions were used for the web search: portal vein thrombosis, extra-hepatic portal vein obstruction, prognosis, children, portal hypertension, esophagogastric varices. Additionally, we also reviewed the articles cited in the references of the initially selected papers, as well as relevant textbooks. Portal vein thrombosis is one of the most common causes of portal hypertension among children. The initial clinical manifestation is characterized either by episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding or by splenomegaly on routine clinical examination. The major complications include upper gastrointestinal bleeding, hypersplenism secondary to splenomegaly, growth retardation, and portal biliopathy. The diagnosis is made by abdominal Doppler ultrasonography. Treatment is targeted at the complications and includes primary and secondary prophylaxis against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (which results from the rupture of esophageal varices), and portosystemic shunting in selected cases. Portal vein thrombosis is one of the major triggers of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children. Bleeding episodes have a remarkable effect on the quality of life of affected patients. Thus, appropriate diagnosis and treatment are needed in order to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  6. Nonclinical aspects of venous thrombosis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struble, Evi; Harrouk, Wafa; DeFelice, Albert; Tesfamariam, Belay

    2015-09-01

    Pregnancy is a hypercoagulable state which carries an excess risk of maternal venous thrombosis. Endothelial injury, alterations in blood flow and activation of the coagulation pathway are proposed to contribute to the hypercoagulability. The risk for thrombosis may be accentuated by certain drugs and device implants that directly or indirectly affect the coagulation pathway. To help ensure that these interventions do not result in adverse maternal or fetal outcomes during pregnancy, gravid experimental animals can be exposed to such treatments at various stages of gestation and over a dosage range that would identify hazards and inform risk assessment. Circulating soluble biomarkers can also be evaluated for enhancing the assessment of any increased risk of venous thrombosis during pregnancy. In addition to traditional in vivo animal testing, efforts are under way to incorporate reliable non-animal methods in the assessment of embryofetal toxicity and thrombogenic effects. This review summarizes hemostatic balance during pregnancy in animal species, embryofetal development, biomarkers of venous thrombosis, and alterations caused by drug-induced venous thrombosis.

  7. Role of surgery in iliofemoral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, R B

    1986-05-01

    Thrombectomy has a limited but definite role in the clinical management of patients with iliofemoral venous thrombosis. It is best applied selectively to achieve specific goals in two different groups of patients at either end of the disease spectrum. In relatively active healthy young patients with phlegmasia alba dolens operated on relatively soon after thrombosis, better protection against the late postthrombotic sequelae can be achieved. Patients with malignancy, underlying coagulopathy, or those who are inactive or have a limited life expectancy due to age or concurrent disease should not be operated on for bland thrombosis. At the other extreme, when phlegmasia cerulea dolens causes painful tense swelling, increases compartmental or decreases ankle pressures, and threatens limb viability in spite of heparinization and leg elevation, thrombectomy should be performed.

  8. [Aftermaths of lesions of coronary arteries in Kawasaki disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostokova, A A; Grunina, E A; Klemenov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease, also known as cutaneous-mucous-glandular mucocutaneous glandular syndrome, is acute systemic vasculitis of small-to-medium calibre arteries, frequently involving coronary arteries, affect almost exceptionally children, with reports concerning cases of Kawasaki syndrome in 20-to-30-year-old adults being extremely rare. The most serious manifestation of Kawasaki disease is coronaritis and formation of coronary artery aneurysms. The dynamics of the formed coronary aneurysms and, consequently, the fate of patients may be different. Thrombosis of an aneurysm in the early period of the disease and stenosing of the affected coronary artery later on present possible complications of Kawasaki disease and potential causes of myocardial infection in young adults. Increased risk of coronary artery thromboses in Kawasaki disease is conditioned by a decrease in velocity of blood flow and its turbulent pattern in the aneurysms, endothelial dysfunction due to currently existing or endured coronaritis and thrombocytosis typical of this pathology. Predisposing factors of coronary artery stenosing are unfavourable haemodynamic conditions appearing at the sites of the "entry" and "exit" of the aneurysm. Described herein are two case reports of myocardial infarction, one of which being a complication of an acute case of Kawasaki disease in a 29-year-old patient, with the second one being a consequence of coronary artery stenosing in a 25-year-old patient who had endured Kawasaki disease in his childhood.

  9. Acute coronary disease Athero-Inflammation: Therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altman Raul

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antithrombotic therapy is the cornerstone of the treatment of acute coronary syndromes, but there is now evidence which indicates that by blocking inflammation, thrombosis and thus, acute coronary events, could be lowered. The concept of athero-inflammation emerges as the meeting point of different morbidities; dyslipemia, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, immunity, infection, hyperhomocyteinemia, smoking, etc. usual named as risk factors. Thus, beside specific drugs, earliest treatment, in the stage of inflammation, using anti-inflammatory drugs, should be considered since in patients with increased risk of acute coronary process are likely to have many point of origen throughout the coronary arteries. There are a body of evidences for supporting the potential of anti-inflammatory therapy to the prevention of inflammation and atherosclerosis. COX-2 inhibition may decrease endothelial inflammation reducing monocytes infiltration improving vascular cells function, plaque stability and probably resulting in a decrease of coronary atherothrombotic events. Trials including large numbers of patients in prospective double-blind randomized studies worthwhile to confirm the efficacy of NSAID, mainly, COX-2 inhibitors, together with aspirin in the prevention of coronary events in patients with acute coronary disease.

  10. [Is coronary artery disease different in women?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, François; Chopard, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the primary cause of death in women. Although acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is relatively infrequent in young women, failure to recognize ACS in this population can incur a major risk and registry data show that there is still plenty of room for improvement in this area. Women may suffer from "classical" CAD with development of atherosclerosis with a delay of about 10 years as compared to men, reflecting hormonal protection in women. Besides this classical presentation, angina in women often corresponds to impaired microcirculation, a syndrome known to associate typical angina, demonstrable myocardial ischemia, but no lesions on the coronary angiography. Finally, spasm, spontaneous dissection or coronary thrombosis through endothelial rupture are more frequent in women. The influence of risk factors on the development of CAD is comparable in both women and men. Recent registry studies show that in France, in particular, diabetes, obesity, and smoking are all risk factors that are on the rise in women. In addition, certain other risk factors are more specific to women, namely psycho-social stress. The methods to evaluate risk and detect CAD were mainly developed in male study populations, and these tools thus perform less well in female patients. In case of ACS, women benefit just as much from invasive management, but are at greater risk of iatrogenic complications, particularly with anti-thrombotic therapy or during revascularization procedures.

  11. Interobserver reliability of compression ultrasound for residual thrombosis after first unprovoked deep vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M; Bornais, C; Rodger, M

    2012-09-01

    Accurate assessment of residual thrombosis is of clinical importance for diagnostic baseline imaging, and may be of value in risk stratification for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study evaluated the interobserver reliability of the measurement of residual thrombosis in patients 6 months after a first unprovoked deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the leg. All enrolled patients received two ultrasound examinations by two independent blinded ultrasound technicians 5-7 months after their first unprovoked DVT. In total, 49 patients completed the two baseline ultrasound examinations. During the examinations, the presence of residual thrombosis was evaluated. If residual thrombosis was present, a detailed description of the size and location was reported. After all ultrasound results had been collected, the interobserver agreement was calculated by use of the kappa statistics, Pearson correlation, and the Bland-Altman plot. Furthermore, the clinical implications of interobserver reliability were examined. The interobserver reliability of the assessment of whether residual thrombosis is present was very good (κ = 0.92). The interobserver reliability of the measurement of residual thrombosis was good (r2 = 0.648), with a limited number of patients being misclassified. For the assessment of the percentage of residual occlusion, the interobserver reliability was fair (r2 = 0.357). Our results suggest that the interobserver reliability for measurement of residual thrombosis is high, and that the variability introduced by interobserver reliability has minimal clinical implications. Our study is important for the use of baseline imaging for the diagnostic and prognostic management of recurrent VTE. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  12. Upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Cuc; Hunt, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis is less common than lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis. However, upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis is associated with similar adverse consequences and is becoming more common in patients with complex medical conditions requiring central venous catheters or wires. Although guidelines suggest that this disorder be managed using approaches similar to those for lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis, studies are refining the prognosis and management of upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis. Physicians should be familiar with the diagnostic and treatment considerations for this disease. This review will differentiate between primary and secondary upper-extremity deep venous thromboses; assess the risk factors and clinical sequelae associated with upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis, comparing these with lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis; and describe an approach to treatment and prevention of secondary upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis based on clinical evidence.

  13. Decompensated porto-pulmonary hypertension in a cirrhotic patient with thrombosis of portocaval shunt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of decompensated porto-pulmonary hypertension closely associated with the development of intra-portocaval shunt thrombosis. A woman with Laennec's cirrhosis was hospitalized because of severe dyspnea and edema. She underwent surgical portocaval anastomosis ten years ago. Imaging studies showed massive intra-shunt thrombosis, portal hypertension, ascites, pleuro-pericardial effusions and enlargement of right cardiac cavities. Cardiac catheterization allowed to rule out coronary and leftsided heart abnormalities and led to the diagnosis of pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension. Antithrombotic treatment with low molecular weight heparin was instituted. The management also included ACE inhibitors,spironolactone, low-salt diet and lactulose. The patient was discharged and three months later we observed the disappearance of edema, ascites and pleuropericardial effusions, a marked body weight reduction and improved dyspnea and liver function tests. A possible link between the development of intra-shunt thrombosis and clinical decompensation in our patient was hypothesized. In fact, it has been demonstrated that the increased portal pressure, caused by occlusion of portosystemic shunt, reduces renal plasma flow and increases systemic endothelin-1 concentration. In our patient the disappearance of edematous state and improved dyspnea observed after recanalization of the shunt strongly support this hypothesis.

  14. Fatal Kounis syndrome with stent thrombosis secondary to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid use: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salouage, Issam; El Aidli, Sihem; Kastalli, Sarra; Daghfous, Riadh; Lakhal, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    Anaphylactic reactions are often induced by drugs, and the most frequent ones are penicillin derivates. The concurrence of acute coronary syndrome with hypersensitivity and anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions constitutes the Kounis syndrome. We report a case of a coronary stent thrombosis with a fatal outcome complicating an anaphylactic shock induced by amoxicillin-clavulanic acid association. A 58-year-old woman with a history of triple coronary stenting was treated by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid association for pharyngitis. One hour after the first drug intake, she developed an anaphylactic shock with acute constricting chest pain. She received intravenous hydrocortisone and was transferred to emergency department. The patient received epinephrine intravenously with fluid perfusion and oxygen. Electrocardiogram showed Pardee waves in the anterior precordial leads. Cardiac enzyme levels (troponin I) were disturbed. The patient was transferred to the coronary care unit with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The coronary angiography revealed anterior interventricular stent thrombosis. The patient experienced a cardiogenic shock with an important hemodynamic repercussion, and she died few hours later despite emergency care. The responsibility of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid association was retained in the genesis of this anaphylactic shock in front of a suggestive delay, a compatible evolution and a high semiotic score. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid use may cause Kounis syndrome. The use of epinephrine is a challenging decision. We suggest that Kounis syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Sickle Cell Trait Causing Splanchnic Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Saxena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell trait is considered as a benign condition as these individuals carry only one defective gene and typically have their life span similar to the normal population without any health problems related to sickle cell. Only under extreme conditions, red cells become sickled and can cause clinical complications including hematuria and splenic infarction. Although twofold increased risk of venous thrombosis has been described in African Americans, there is no data available from Indian population. We here report a case of sickle cell trait from India whose index presentation was thrombosis of unusual vascular territory.

  16. Renal actinomycosis with concomitant renal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dong-Suk; Jang, Won Ik; Jung, Ji Yoon; Chung, Sarah; Choi, Dae Eun; Na, Ki-Ryang; Lee, Kang Wook; Shin, Yong-Tai

    2012-02-01

    Renal actinomycosis is a rare infection caused by fungi of the genus Actinomyces. A 74-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of gross hematuria with urinary symptoms and intermittent chills. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed thrombosis in the left renal vein and diffuse, heterogeneous enlargement of the left kidney. After nephrectomy, sulfur granules with chronic suppurative inflammation were seen microscopically, and the histopathological diagnosis was renal actinomycosis. Our case is the first report of renal actinomycosis with renal vein thrombosis.

  17. Portal vein thrombosis in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Köckritz, Leona; De Gottardi, Andrea; Trebicka, Jonel

    2017-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis and possible severe complications such as mesenteric ischemia are rare, but can be life-threatening. However, different aspects of clinical relevance, diagnosis and management of PVT are still areas of uncertainty and inves......Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis and possible severe complications such as mesenteric ischemia are rare, but can be life-threatening. However, different aspects of clinical relevance, diagnosis and management of PVT are still areas of uncertainty...

  18. Current perspective of venous thrombosis in the upper extremity

    OpenAIRE

    Flinterman, L.E.; Meer, van der, D; Rosendaal, F.R.; Doggen, C. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Venous thrombosis of the upper extremity is a rare disease. Therefore, not as much is known about risk factors, treatment and the risk of recurrence as for venous thrombosis of the leg. Only central venous catheters and strenuous exercise are commonly known risk factors for an upper extremity venous thrombosis. In this review an overview of the different risk factors, possible treatments and the complications for patients with a venous thrombosis of the upper extremity is given

  19. Risk factors for a first and recurrent venous thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Flinterman, Linda Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to identify new risk factors for first and recurrent venous thrombosis of both the upper and lower extremity, and assess the incidence of recurrence and mortality after a first venous thrombosis. An overview was provided of the current literature on risk factors and treatment for a first venous thrombosis of the upper extremity (chapter 2). We investigated the association between levels of coagulation factors, blood group and a first venous thrombosis of the upper e...

  20. Nutcracker Syndrome Complicated by Left Renal Vein Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faouzi Mallat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated renal vein thrombosis is a rare entity. We present a patient whose complaint of flank pain led to the diagnosis of a renal vein thrombosis. In this case, abdominal computed tomography angiography was helpful in diagnosing the nutcracker syndrome complicated by the renal vein thrombosis. Anticoagulation was started and three weeks later, CTA showed complete disappearance of the renal vein thrombosis. To treat the Nutcracker syndrome, we proposed left renal vein transposition that the patient consented to.

  1. Nutcracker syndrome complicated by left renal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallat, Faouzi; Hmida, Wissem; Jaidane, Mehdi; Mama, Nadia; Mosbah, Faouzi

    2013-01-01

    Isolated renal vein thrombosis is a rare entity. We present a patient whose complaint of flank pain led to the diagnosis of a renal vein thrombosis. In this case, abdominal computed tomography angiography was helpful in diagnosing the nutcracker syndrome complicated by the renal vein thrombosis. Anticoagulation was started and three weeks later, CTA showed complete disappearance of the renal vein thrombosis. To treat the Nutcracker syndrome, we proposed left renal vein transposition that the patient consented to.

  2. Pleural mesothelioma and venous thrombosis: the eosinophilia link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aye Win

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peripheral blood eosinophilia and vascular occlusions are rare occurrences in patients with pleural mesothelioma whereas eosinophilia may associate with thrombosis. We describe a patient with mesothelioma who developed peripheral blood eosinophilia followed by deep vein thrombosis despite being on low molecular weight heparin prophylaxis. We discuss the genesis of peripheral blood eosinophilia and thrombosis in pleural mesothelioma.

  3. Physical activity, immobilization and the risk of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stralen, Karlijn Janneke van

    2008-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis is a common disease. Already in 1856 it was suggested that immobilization could cause venous thrombosis. However, so far little research has shown whether exercise or ambulation could decrease the risk of venous thrombosis. We performed a historical review regarding the role o

  4. Coronary stenting: A matter of revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Aldo; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Liberale, Luca

    2017-03-26

    In the last few decades, the recommended treatment for coronary artery disease has been dramatically improved by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and the use of balloon catheters, bare metal stents (BMSs), and drug-eluting stents (DESs). Catheter balloons were burdened by acute vessel occlusion or target-lesion re-stenosis. BMSs greatly reduced those problems holding up the vessel structure, but showed high rates of in-stent re-stenosis, which is characterized by neo-intimal hyperplasia and vessel remodeling leading to a re-narrowing of the vessel diameter. This challenge was overtaken by first-generation DESs, which reduced re-stenosis rates to nearly 5%, but demonstrated delayed arterial healing and risk for late in-stent thrombosis, with inflammatory cells playing a pivotal role. Finally, new-generation DESs, characterized by innovations in design, metal composition, surface polymers, and anti-proliferative drugs, finally reduced the risk for stent thrombosis and greatly improved revascularization outcomes. New advances include bioresorbable stents potentially changing the future of revascularization techniques as the concept bases upon the degradation of the stent scaffold to inert particles after its function expired, thus theoretically eliminating risks linked with both stent thrombosis and re-stenosis. Talking about DESs also dictates to consider dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), which is a fundamental moment in view of the good outcome duration, but also deals with bleeding complications. The better management of patients undergoing PCI should include the use of DESs and a DAPT finely tailored in consideration of the potentially developing bleeding risk in accordance with the indications from last updated guidelines.

  5. Role of P2Y12 Receptor in Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaqi; Zhang, Si; Ding, Zhongren

    2017-01-01

    P2Y12 receptor is a 342 amino acid Gi-coupled receptor predominantly expressed on platelets. P2Y12 receptor is physiologically activated by ADP and inhibits adenyl cyclase (AC) to decrease cyclic AMP (cAMP) level, resulting in platelet aggregation. It also activates PI3 kinase (PI3K) pathway leading to fibrinogen receptor activation, and may protect platelets from apoptosis. Abnormalities of P2Y12 receptor include congenital deficiencies or high activity in diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), exposing such patients to a prothrombotic condition. A series of clinical antiplatelet drugs, such as clopidogrel and ticagrelor, are designed as indirect or direct antagonists of P2Y12 receptor to reduce incidence of thrombosis mainly for patients of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who are at high risk of thrombotic events. Studies on novel dual-/multi-target antiplatelet agents consider P2Y12 receptor as a promising part in combined targets. However, the clinical practical phenomena, such as "clopidogrel resistance" due to gene variations of cytochrome P450 or P2Y12 receptor constitutive activation, call for better antiplatelet agents. Researches also showed inverse agonist of P2Y12 receptor could play a better role over neutral antagonists. Personalized antiplatelet therapy is the most ideal destination for antiplatelet therapy in ACS patients with or without other underlying diseases like DM or CKD, however, there is still a long way to go.

  6. Acute myocardial infarction with multiple coronary thromboses in a young addict of amphetamines and benzodiazepines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Al Shehri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old man of average build and a smoker, with a background of a psychiatric disorder, was brought by his neighbor to the emergency department after an hour of severe chest pain. Upon arrival at the hospital he had cardiac arrest, was resuscitated, and moved to the catheterization laboratory with inferior, posterior, and lateral myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography showed an unusual thrombosis in multiple coronary branches. Toxicology report showed high levels of amphetamines and benzodiazepines in the patient’s original blood sample. The patient was kept under ventilation for 18 days, with difficult recovery due to severe withdrawal manifestations, ventilation acquired pneumonia, and rhabdomyolysis inducing acute renal failure. The patient regained near normal left ventricular function after baseline severe regional and global dysfunction. We postulate a relationship between the use of amphetamines, potentiated by benzodiazepines, and occurrence of acute thrombosis of multiple major coronary arteries.

  7. Platelet aggregation secondary to coronary obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S

    1976-03-01

    From many observations made at autopsy it is apparent that thrombosis in a coronary artery is usually, if not always, associated with rupture of an atheromatous plaque. The sequelae of such rupture include hemorrhage into the plaque with further narrowing of the lumen, formation of an occlusive thrombus or of a non-occlusive thrombus. A developing thrombus in an artery undergoes fragmentation with showering of the distal microcirculation by aggregates of platelets possibly with some admixture of fibrin. In many cases of sudden cardiac death associated with severe atherosclerotic stenosis of the coronary vessels, an occlusive thrombus is not found and the myocardium shows no morphological lesion or else focal patchy early damage in the subendocardial region. One possible mechanism that might explain these findings is microembolism from mural nonobstructing coronary thrombus. Such a mechanism is well established in transient ischemia of the brain and retina related to ulcerated atheroma of the internal carotid artery. Experimental observations indicate that platelet aggregates in the myocardial circulation cause arrhythmias, sudden death, vasculitis, and myocardial ischemic damage. Induction of an occlusive coronary artery thrombus is associated with development of an infarct involving the full thickness of the myocardium. A nonocclusive thrombus is associated with either no myocardial damage or focal subendocardial ischemic injury. It is possible that further aggregation of platelets may facilitate the extension of infarction subsequent to an occlusive event, although there is little evidence on this point. A number of clinical studies show increased platelet reactivity to agents causing aggregation, such as norepinephrine or collagen, in subjects experiencing thromboembolic episodes. It seems unlikely, however, that in vitro tests of platelet function can identify or predict clinical arterial thrombotic disease, although studies of platelet survival and turnover

  8. Psychological impact of thrombosis in the young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiandaca, Diletta; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Martinelli, Ida; Tantardini, Francesca; Clemente, Carmen; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2006-01-01

    Thrombosis is rare in the young, but can cause severe psychological distress that influences the quality of life and the coping capacities of these patients. This study was meant to increase the understanding of self-perception, social and family functioning and ways of coping with the disease in young patients after an episode of thrombosis. Seven questionnaires spanning social and family functioning and ways of coping with disease were completed by 50 patients self-esteem, showed higher impairment in social activities and in familial relationships, and used more frequently coping strategies. Most patients used all coping strategies, preferring the more active ones, but more patients than controls used the passive ones, particularly "avoidance" and "religiosity". A correlation was found between the frequency of use of passive or negative coping strategies and some of the psychological, social and familial dimensions that scored more negatively. Greater psychological impairment and differences in coping styles were found in women compared with men and in individuals or = 34 years. Young individuals with thrombosis develop psychological changes that influence their behaviour, quality of life and coping. This is particularly evident in women and in young patients. Physicians dealing with thrombosis should be aware of this situation and offer psychological support.

  9. Puzzles in practice: splenic vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Brittany; Marsh, Melanie; Walden, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    This report details a 58-year-old gentleman who presented to his outpatient primary care physician's clinic several times over four weeks for ongoing epigastric pain radiating into his left flank, dry heaving, and constipation. He was presumed to have gastritis at each visit and prescribed escalating doses of proton pump inhibitors. Due to the unrelenting pain, he eventually was admitted to the hospital and diagnosed with splenic vein thrombosis after computed tomography imaging of the abdomen. Our literature search revealed that pancreatic pathology is overwhelmingly the contributing factor to splenic vein thrombosis. Our patient had prominent collateral vasculature, suggesting that his splenic vein thrombosis was chronic in nature and likely the cause of his ongoing abdominal pain. Splenic vein thrombosis is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain, but one that should be included in the treating physician's differential diagnoses when abdominal pain is ongoing despite medical therapy. Although he had no evidence of initial findings on radiography, our patient was eventually diagnosed with biopsy-proven pancreatic cancer. Our case report demonstrates how patients presenting with persistent or worsening abdominal pain despite the use of proton pump inhibitors or other acid reducing agents and potential 'red flag' findings such as decreased appetite and weight loss should be worked up for other potential sources of abdominal pathology.

  10. Complement component 5 promotes lethal thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Tomohiro; Yoshioka, Kengo; Mizuno, Masashi; Shimizu, Mie; Nagano, Fumihiko; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Tsuboi, Naotake; Maruyama, Shoichi; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Imai, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular histones promote platelet aggregation and thrombosis; this is followed by induction of coagulation disorder, which results in exhaustion of coagulation factors. Complement component 5 (C5) is known to be associated with platelet aggregation and coagulation system activation. To date, the pathological mechanism underlying liver injury has remained unclear. Here, we investigated whether C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. C5-sufficient and C5-deficient mice received single tail vein injections of purified, unfractionated histones obtained from calf thymus (45–75 μg/g). Subsequently, the mice were monitored for survival for up to 72 h. Based on the survival data, the 45 μg/g dose was used for analysis of blood cell count, liver function, blood coagulation ability, and promotion of platelet aggregation and platelet/leukocyte aggregate (PLA) production by extracellular histones. C5-deficient mice were protected from lethal thrombosis and had milder thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy, and liver injury with embolism and lower PLA production than C5-sufficient mice. These results indicate that C5 is associated with coagulation disorders, PLA production, and embolism-induced liver injury. In conclusion, C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. PMID:28205538

  11. Image Diagnosis: Inferior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Avin; Garg, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    A 59-year-old man presented to the gastroenterology clinic with 2 weeks of worsening lower back pain. There was associated poor appetite, fatigue, night sweats, and chills. The patient's medical history was significant for well-controlled hypertension and sigmoid diverticulosis. The thrombosis probably resulted from inflammation in the adjacent diverticulum.

  12. Imaging in acute basilar artery thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)); Falcone, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)); Naidich, T.P. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)); Bowen, B. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)); Quencer, R.M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States))

    1994-08-01

    The aim of this study was to review the imaging features in acute (< 24 h) basilar artery thrombosis. CT and MR studies in 11 patients with clinical diagnosis of acute basilar artery thrombosis were retrospectively reviewed. MR angiography was obtained in 4 patients. Correlation with clinical symptoms was performed. Multiple cranial nerve palsies and hemiparesis were the most common clinical symptoms at presentation. CT revealed hyperdense basilar arteries (n = 7) and hypodensities in the posterior circulation territory (n = 8). In one instance, the infarction was hemorrhagic. MR imaging showed absence of flow void within the basilar in 6 patients and MRA (using both PC and TOF techniques) confirmed absence of blood flow in 4 basilar arteries. One week after presentation, 5 patients died. Autopsy was obtained in 1 case and confirmed the diagnosis of basilar artery thrombosis. Basilar artery thrombosis has fairly typical imaging features by both CT and MR. MRA may be used to confirm the diagnosis. Prompt recognition may lead to early thrombolytic treatment and may improve survival. (orig.)

  13. Ulcerative colitis flare with splenic ven thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Huseyin Sancar; Kara, Banu; Citil, Serdal

    2015-01-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have an increased risk of thromboembolic events. Here, we present a 28-year-old man with active ulcerative pancolitis presenting via splenic vein thrombosis and left renal superior infarct that was not associated with a surgical procedure.

  14. Diagnosing deep venous thrombosis in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudega, Rudolphus

    2005-01-01

    In patients suspected of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in primary care, it is a challenge to discriminate the patients with DVT from those without DVT. The risk of missing the diagnosis and the risk of unnecessary referral and treatment with a potential harmful therapy has to be balanced by the prima

  15. Gene Variants Associated With Deep Vein Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, Irene D.; Bare, Lance A.; Doggen, Carine J.M.; Arellano, Andre R.; Tong, Carmen; Rowland, Charles M.; Catanese, Joseph; Young, Bradford A.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Devlin, James J.; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2008-01-01

    Context The genetic causes of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) are not fully understood. Objective To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with DVT. Design, Setting, and Patients We used 3 case-control studies of first DVT. A total of 19 682 gene-centric SNPs were genotyped in 44

  16. Portal Vein Thrombosis in non cirrhotic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.W. Spaander (Manon)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractExtrahepatic portal vein thrombosis (EPVT) is the most common cause of portal hypertension in non- cirrhotic patients. EPVT has been defined as an obstruction of the extrahepatic portal vein with or without involvement of the intrahepatic portal veins. Although the portal vein accounts f

  17. Venous thrombosis: the history of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, P M

    2002-01-01

    Venous thrombosis is a frequent disease. It is surprising, therefore, that no case truly compatible with a diagnosis of venous thrombosis was apparently reported in the antiquity. There is no case that could be reasonably attributed to a venous thrombus in the writings of Hippocrates, Galenus, Celius Aurelianus, Ibn an-Nafiz, Avicenna and others. Venous thrombosis is not among the many diseases mentioned in the Bible. The term "leucophlegmasia", first used by Hippocrates and then by Celius Aurelianus, refers to cases of bilateral leg edema, most likely due to conditions such as heart failure, liver cirrhosis and renal insufficiency. Nothing compatible with a diagnosis of venous thrombosis can be found in pieces of art from ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, Persia and South America. While in these sources there are sometimes representations of varicose veins and ulcers, unilateral leg edema or other pictures compatible with venous thrombosis are not featured. The first well documented case of venous thrombosis is depicted in a beautifully illustrated manuscript written in the 13th century and currently preserved in Paris at the Bibliothèque Nationale (MS Fr 2829, Folio 87). The manuscript describes the case of a young man from Normandy named Raoul who at the age of twenty developed unilateral edema in the right ankle that subsequently extended up to the thigh, with no obvious symptoms in the contralateral leg. Raoul was advised to visit the tomb of Saint Louis who was buried in the church of Saint Denis, where the patient spent several days confessing his sins and praying the saint. Afterwards he chose to collect the dust accumulating below the stone that covered the tomb and to apply it on the fistulae and ulcers of his foot. The openings stopped running and were filled with flesh. He was first obliged to use crutches but subsequently he could walk with a cane, to be eventually able to dispose of all devices, even though his foot throbbed a little. Raoul was cured as

  18. Multiple Recurrent Stent Thrombosis in a Patient with Coexisting Clopidogrel Resistance and Increased Anticardiolipin Antibodies: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik H. Middlebrooks

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is a common cause of both arterial and venous thrombosis. While studies exist demonstrating the role of APS in coronary artery bypass graft failure, its role in stent thrombosis is less clearly documented. Also, a literature search of PubMed did not reveal any articles regarding the coexistence of clopidogrel resistance and APS despite increasing awareness of resistance to clopidogrel treatment. We present a case of a 59-year-old male having recurrent myocardial infarction after subacute restenosis of multiple drug-eluting stents despite anticoagulant therapy. The patient had in-stent thrombosis of seven drug-eluting stents in a course of eight days. He was subsequently found to have mild elevation of IgG anticardiolipin (aCL antibody titers and resistance to clopidogrel. Long-term anticoagulation with a combination of low-molecular-weight heparin, clopidogrel, and aspirin has been effective. While the patient's aCL titer level was not elevated above the level required by the current diagnostic criteria for APS, we believe that this patient suffers from the antiphospholipid syndrome. We will discuss some of the controversies surrounding the diagnosis of APS as well as appropriate treatment and recognition of the coexistence of APS and clopidogrel resistance in patients with stent thrombosis.

  19. Acute cytomegalovirus infection complicated by venous thrombosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parola Philippe

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CMV-induced vasculopathy and thrombosis have been reported, but they are rare conditions usually encountered in immunocompromised patients. However more and more complications of CMV infections are recognized in immunocompetent patients. Case presentation We present a case report of a previously healthy adult with cytomegalovirus infection that was complicated by tibiopopliteal deep venous thrombosis and in whom Factor V Leiden heterozygous mutation was found. Conclusion This new case report emphasizes the involvement of cytomegalovirus in induction of vascular thrombosis in patients with predisposing risk factors for thrombosis. It is necessary to screen for CMV infection in patients with spontaneous thrombosis and an history of fever.

  20. Bioprinted thrombosis-on-a-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Davoudi, Farideh; Walch, Philipp; Manbachi, Amir; Luo, Xuan; Dell'Erba, Valeria; Miri, Amir K; Albadawi, Hassan; Arneri, Andrea; Li, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xiaoying; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi

    2016-10-18

    Pathologic thrombosis kills more people than cancer and trauma combined; it is associated with significant disability and morbidity, and represents a major healthcare burden. Despite advancements in medical therapies and imaging, there is often incomplete resolution of the thrombus. The residual thrombus can undergo fibrotic changes over time through infiltration of fibroblasts from the surrounding tissues and eventually transform into a permanent clot often associated with post-thrombotic syndrome. In order to understand the importance of cellular interactions and the impact of potential therapeutics to treat thrombosis, an in vitro platform using human cells and blood components would be beneficial. Towards achieving this aim, there have been studies utilizing the capabilities of microdevices to study the hemodynamics associated with thrombosis. In this work, we further exploited the utilization of 3D bioprinting technology, for the construction of a highly biomimetic thrombosis-on-a-chip model. The model consisted of microchannels coated with a layer of confluent human endothelium embedded in a gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogel, where human whole blood was infused and induced to form thrombi. Continuous perfusion with tissue plasmin activator led to dissolution of non-fibrotic clots, revealing clinical relevance of the model. Further encapsulating fibroblasts in the GelMA matrix demonstrated the potential migration of these cells into the clot and subsequent deposition of collagen type I over time, facilitating fibrosis remodeling that resembled the in vivo scenario. Our study suggests that in vitro 3D bioprinted blood coagulation models can be used to study the pathology of fibrosis, and particularly, in thrombosis. This versatile platform may be conveniently extended to other vascularized fibrotic disease models.

  1. Hemodynamic simulations in coronary aneurysms of a patient with Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Dibyendu; Marsden, Alison; Burns, Jane

    2010-11-01

    Kawasaki Disease is the leading cause of acquired pediatric heart disease, and can cause large coronary artery aneurysms in untreated cases. A simulation case study has been performed for a 10-year-old male patient with coronary aneurysms. Specialized coronary boundary conditions along with a lumped parameter heart model mimic the interactions between the ventricles and the coronary arteries, achieving physiologic pressure and flow waveforms. Results show persistent low shear stress in the aneurismal regions, and abnormally high shear at the aneurysm neck. Correlation functions have been derived to compare wall shear stress and wall shear stress gradients with recirculation time with the idea of localizing zones of calcification and thrombosis. Results are compared with those of an artificially created normal coronary geometry for the same patient. The long-term goal of this work is to develop links between hemodynamics and thrombotic risk to assist in clinical decision-making.

  2. Thrombosis in vasculitic disorders-clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ofrat Beyar; Brenner, Benjamin; Horowitz, Netanel A

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation and coagulation are known to affect each other in many ways. Vasculitis represents a group of disorders where blood vessels (small, medium, large or variable) are infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Accumulating evidence in the literature suggests both clinical and physiological association between vasculitis and thrombosis. Vasculitis-associated thrombosis involves arteries and veins, and a tight connection has been reported between the activity of vasculitis and the appearance of thrombosis. Pathophysiology of these relations is complex and not completely understood. While thrombophilic factors are associated with vasculitis, it remains unclear whether a true association with clinical thrombosis is present. Furthermore, several factors leading to hemostasis, endothelial injury and induction of microparticles were described as possibly accounting for thrombosis. Management of thrombosis in vasculitis patients is challenging and should be further assessed in randomized controlled studies. The current review describes clinical manifestations, pathogenesis and management of thrombosis associated with different vasculitides.

  3. Repeated pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis leads to intractable gastric variceal bleeding: A case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shan-Hong; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; He, Qian-Wen; Qin, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhao; He, Xuan; Zhou, Xiao-Lei; Fan, Quan-Shui; Jiang, Ming-De

    2015-10-16

    Gastric varices (GV) are one of the most common complications for patients with portal hypertension. Currently, histoacryl injection is recommended as the initial treatment for bleeding of GV, and this injection has been confirmed to be highly effective for most patients in many studies. However, this treatment might be ineffective for some types of GV, such as splenic vein thrombosis-related localized portal hypertension (also called left-sided, sinistral, or regional portal hypertension). Herein, we report a case of repeated pancreatitis-induced complete splenic vein thrombosis that led to intractable gastric variceal bleeding, which was treated by splenectomy. We present detailed radiological and pathological data and blood rheology analysis (the splenic artery - after a short gastric vein or stomach vein - gastric coronary vein - portal vein). The pathophysiology can be explained by the abnormal direction of blood flow in this patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case for which detailed pathology and blood rheology data are available.

  4. Bioabsorbable scaffolds for the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease: the next revolution in coronary intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Niket; Banning, Adrian P

    2013-09-01

    Conventional drug eluting stents allow predictable long-term relief from coronary obstruction in most cases. However, rigid permanent metallic stents alter flow dynamics, abolish vascular reactivity, limit the potential for maximal vasodilation and promote ongoing inflammation and abnormalities of endothelial function. It is hypothesised that they may contribute to mal-apposition of stent struts, accelerated atheroma within the stented segment and perhaps very late stent thrombosis. Dramatic advances in bioabsorbable materials and technology have delivered the potential for a fully absorbable scaffold, which is able to mechanically support the coronary artery, and elute a drug, for a predetermined time period and is then fully absorbed in to the vascular wall. This could permit the 'normalisation' of vascular function, with a number of potential advantages including true normalisation of vasomotor function, restoration of physiological responses to stress/exercise and completion of the vascular response to stenting, without the long-term consequences related to inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Currently, over 16 different scaffolds are at varying stages of development. This review summarises the rationale for the development of absorbable scaffolds and the principal clinical research data.

  5. Influence of World Thrombosis Day on digital information seeking on venous thrombosis: a Google Trends study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheres, L J J; Lijfering, W M; Middeldorp, S; Cannegieter, S C

    2016-12-01

    Essentials In 2014, World Thrombosis Day (WTD) was initiated to increase global awareness of thrombosis. Google Trends can be used freely to monitor digital information seeking behavior. We used Google Trends data to assess the impact of WTD on internet searches on venous thrombosis. The WTD period was associated with more searches on thrombosis compared to control periods. Background World Thrombosis Day (WTD) was launched in 2014 and is to be held every year to increase global awareness of venous thrombosis. Measuring the impact of health awareness days is challenging; however, use of internet-based data seems promising. Methods Google Trends data were used to quantify digital searches for 'venous thrombosis' worldwide and 'trombose' in the Netherlands. The relative search volume (RSV), which is the proportion of the term of interest amongst all Google searches for a specific region and timeframe was used. Mean differences for 4 weeks surrounding WTD (period of interest) and the remaining weeks of the year (control period) were estimated with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). This was done for 2014, 2015 and 2009-2013 (control years). Results and discussion Mean differences in RSV for worldwide searches were 2.9 (95% CI, -8.2, 14.1) in 2014 and 10.5 (95% CI, 0.4, 20.5) in 2015. These figures were 15.3 (95% CI, 4.7, 25.8) and 15.9 (95% CI, 7.8, 24.1) for the Netherlands, respectively. Relatively, this corresponds to an increase in RSV of 3.9% and 13.9% for 2014 and 2015 worldwide and a 21.9% and 23.3% increase for 2014 and 2015 in the Netherlands. There was one control year with an increase in RSV in the WTD period. Conclusion In 2014 and 2015 WTD was associated with an increase in digital information seeking on venous thrombosis worldwide. This association was more pronounced in 2015 than in 2014. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  6. An autopsy case of traumatic sinus thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Y; Takeichi, S

    1996-02-01

    A 38-year-old male slipped accidentally and fell from a height of 4.6 m, and was admitted to a hospital. A radiograph indicated a linear fracture of the parietal bone across the sagittal sutura, and a computed tomography scan of the head showed severe subdural hematoma on both parietal sides, so an operation was performed to remove the hematoma. Five hours after the operation, brain death due to a cerebral herniation occurred, and he died six days later. Autopsy revealed a linear fracture of the parietal bones, which crossed obliquely the sagittal sutura. A slightly lacerated wound of the dura mater was seen on the sagittal sutura, from where the latter half of that point to the left and right transverse sinuses were occluded completely with thrombosis. The brain was markedly swollen. From these findings, the victim was considered to have died from acute cerebral swelling due to traumatic thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus.

  7. Specific treatment for cancer-associated thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffan, Mike; Westcott, Gemma

    2015-11-01

    Mike Laffan speaks to Gemma Westcott, Commissioning Editor: Michael Laffan is Professor of Haemostasis and Thrombosis in the Department of Haematology at Imperial College, London, UK, and Director of the Hammersmith Hospital Haemophilia Centre. He trained in medicine at Oxford University and hematology at the Hammersmith and Royal Free hospitals in London. His principal research interests are the structure-function relationship of von Willebrand factor, in particular the role of glycosylation, and the mechanisms and regulation of thrombin generation. He has published extensively on hemostasis and recently edited the 11th edition of Practical Haematology. He also served on NEQAS and the British Committee for Standards in Haematology Task force on Haemostasis and Thrombosis.

  8. Increased rheumatoid factor and deep venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Olesen, Christine L; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    in the general population. METHODS: We included 54628 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1981-83) and the Copenhagen General Population Study (2004-12), all with a measured concentration of IgM rheumatoid factor and without autoimmune rheumatic disease or venous thromboembolism. The main outcome...... was incident deep venous thrombosis. There were no losses to follow-up. RESULTS: During 368381 person-years, 670 individuals developed deep venous thrombosis. A rheumatoid factor concentration ≥ vs ... ratios of 9.0 (95% CI 3.1-26) for 1-year follow-up, 4.3 (2.2-8.5) for 5-year follow-up, and 3.1 (1.7-5.6) for up to 32 years of follow-up. Compared with rheumatoid factor concentrations

  9. [Calcified deep vein thrombosis in a patient with recurrent deep vein thrombosis and sarcoidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krmek, Dubravka Zupanić; Brajković, Ivana; Bekić, Dinko; Krnić, Antun; Jurković, Petar; Pavlović, Tomislav

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we present a rare case of calcified deep vein thrombosis in a 42-year-old female patient with frequent relapses of pulmonary sarcoidosis since 1995, for which she was on maintenance therapy with corticosteroids and with consequential secondary diabetes. Recent femoral vein thrombosis was diagnosed with color Doppler in 2012. At the same time, calcified occlusive thrombus in vena cava inferior from the level of renal vein to the confluence of hepatic veins was diagnosed on abdominal multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). Digital subtraction venography (DSV) revealed a well-developed collateral circulation through the paravertebral veins, azygos and hemiazygos vein. There were no risk factors for thrombosis other than sarcoidosis and diabetes. Deep vein thrombosis is rarely described with sarcoidosis, but according to literature reports, it usually appears as a recurrence and simultaneously at multiple locations. According to the current knowledge, we cannot say for sure whether it is a disease with an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis or there is a combination of multiple risk factors present simultaneously.

  10. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Aggarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Venous Thrombosis ( CVT is a multifactorial condition which is described as idiopathic in 12.5% of patients. Hyperthyroidism has been associated with CVT in many case reports, and increased levels of factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (vWF have been proposed as the possible link in this association, but only few rare case reports have described an association of hypothyroidism with CVT. We report here a case of autoimmune thyroiditis presenting with CVT.

  11. Deep Vein Thrombosis, Raynaud's Phenomenon, and Prinzmetal Angina in a Patient with Glanzmann Thrombasthenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurden, Alan; Mercié, Patrick; Zely, Pascal; Nurden, Paquita

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia fail to form large platelet thrombi due to mutations that affect the biosynthesis and/or function of the αIIbβ3 integrin. The result is a moderate to severe bleeding syndrome. We now report unusual vascular behaviour in a 55-year-old woman with classic type I disease (with no platelet αIIbβ3 expression) and a homozygous ITGA2B missense mutation (E324K) affecting the terminal β-propeller domain of αIIb. While exhibiting classic bleeding symptoms as a child, in later life this woman first developed deep vein thrombosis after a long air flight then showed vascular problems characteristic of Raynaud's phenomenon, and finally this year she presented with chest pains suggestive of coronary heart disease. Yet while coronary angiography first showed a stenosis, this was not seen on a second examination when she was diagnosed with coronary spastic angina and Prinzmetal phenomenon. It is significant that the absence of platelet aggregation with physiologic agonists had not prevented any of the above cardiovascular or vascular diseases.

  12. Deep Vein Thrombosis, Raynaud's Phenomenon, and Prinzmetal Angina in a Patient with Glanzmann Thrombasthenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Nurden

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia fail to form large platelet thrombi due to mutations that affect the biosynthesis and/or function of the αIIbβ3 integrin. The result is a moderate to severe bleeding syndrome. We now report unusual vascular behaviour in a 55-year-old woman with classic type I disease (with no platelet αIIbβ3 expression and a homozygous ITGA2B missense mutation (E324K affecting the terminal β-propeller domain of αIIb. While exhibiting classic bleeding symptoms as a child, in later life this woman first developed deep vein thrombosis after a long air flight then showed vascular problems characteristic of Raynaud’s phenomenon, and finally this year she presented with chest pains suggestive of coronary heart disease. Yet while coronary angiography first showed a stenosis, this was not seen on a second examination when she was diagnosed with coronary spastic angina and Prinzmetal phenomenon. It is significant that the absence of platelet aggregation with physiologic agonists had not prevented any of the above cardiovascular or vascular diseases.

  13. Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Jalaj; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Sarungbam, Judy; Jain, Diwakar

    2016-01-01

    St. Jude mechanical prosthesis is the most commonly used prosthetic device with least valvular complications with excellent hemodynamics. However, prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the serious complications, with rates between 0.03% and 0.13% per patient-year depending on the type of anticoagulation used and compliance to the therapy. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the initial screening tool (class I) that would provide clues for the assessment of valvular hemodynamics. Fluoroscopy is an alternate imaging modality for the assessment of mechanical leaflet motion, especially in patients when prosthetic valves are difficult to image on TTE or transesophageal echocardiography. A complete fluoroscopic evaluation of a prosthetic valve includes assessment of valvular motion and structural integrity. Opening and closing angles can be measured fluoroscopically to determine whether a specific valve is functioning properly. We discuss a case of a 91-year-old man with thrombosis of bileaflet mechanical mitral prosthesis that was demonstrated on real-time fluoroscopy (not evident on TTE). An algorithmic approach to diagnosis and management of prosthetic heart valve thrombosis is outlined.

  14. Giant arachnoid granulation mimicking dural sinus thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Ercan; Atalay, Basak; Baysal, Begumhan; Senturk, Senem; Aslan, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Arachnoid granulations (AG) are composed of dense, collagenous connective tissue that includes clusters of arachnoid cells. They tend to invaginate into the dural sinuses, through which cerebrospinal fluid enters the venous system. AG are most commonly seen at the junction between the middle and lateral thirds of the transverse sinuses near the entry sites of the superficial veins. Presently described is the case of a 21-year-old female who presented at the clinic with recurrent headaches. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a 3.5-cm lesion, which extended from confluens sinuum through the superior sagittal sinus. The lesion had created a scallop-shaped area of erosion in the neighboring occipital bone. To exclude sinus thrombosis, MR venography was performed, which displayed a maintained venous flow around the lesion. Headaches were treated symptomatically with medical therapy. Giant AG can be misdiagnosed as dural sinus thrombosis. MR imaging combined with MR venography is the most useful diagnostic tool to differentiate giant AG from dural sinus thrombosis.

  15. Immediate retransplantation for pancreas allograft thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinger, E F; Powelson, J A; Mangus, R S; Kazimi, M M; Taber, T E; Goble, M L; Fridell, J A

    2009-04-01

    Early pancreas allograft failure most commonly results from thrombosis and requires immediate allograft pancreatectomy. Optimal timing for retransplantation remains undefined. Immediate retransplantation facilitates reuse of the same anatomic site before extensive adhesions have formed. Some studies suggest that early retransplantation is associated with a higher incidence of graft loss. This study is a retrospective review of immediate pancreas retransplants performed at a single center. All cases of pancreas allograft loss within 2 weeks were examined. Of 228 pancreas transplants, 12 grafts were lost within 2 weeks of surgery. Eleven of these underwent allograft pancreatectomy for thrombosis. One suffered anoxic brain injury and was not a retransplantation candidate, one was retransplanted at 3.5 months and nine patients underwent retransplantation 1-16 days following the original transplant. Of the nine early retransplants, one pancreas was lost to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, one recipient died with function at 2.9 years and the other grafts continue to function at 76-1137 days (mean 572 days). One-year graft survival for early retransplantation was 89% compared to 91% for all pancreas transplants at our center. Immediate retransplantation following pancreatic graft thrombosis restores durable allograft function with outcomes comparable to first-time pancreas transplantation.

  16. Portal Vein Inflow From Enlarged Coronary Vein in Liver Transplantation: Surgical Approach and Technical Tips: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safwan, M; Nagai, S; Abouljoud, M S

    2016-11-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is common in patients with end-stage liver disease, with an incidence as high as 26% in liver transplant candidates. It is known to be associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality posttransplantation, and its management can be challenging. The management options range from a simple thrombendvenectomy to multivisceral transplantation in cases with diffuse portomesenteric thrombosis. We report a case of liver transplantation in which we performed a rare reconstruction of the portal vein. Briefly, the patient had diffuse portomesenteric thrombosis, calcified aneurysmosis, and a large collateral coronary vein, to which we directly anastomosed the donor portal vein in an end-to-side fashion. This report describes a unique surgical approach for similar cases of severe portal vein thrombosis in liver transplant candidates.

  17. Coronary CT angiography in coronary artery disease: Opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary CT angiography is widely recognised as a reliable imaging modality for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Coronary CT angiography not only provides excellent visualisation of anatomical changes in the coronary artery with high diagnostic value in the detection of lumen stenosis or occlusion, but also offers quantitative characterisation of coronary plaque components. Furthermore, coronary CT angiography allows myocardial perfusion imaging with diagnostic value comparable to the reference standard method. Coronary CT angiography-derived haemodynamic analysis has the potential to evaluate functional significance of coronary lesions. This review article aims to provide an overview of clinical applications of coronary CT angiography in coronary artery disease.

  18. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... slow down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...

  19. [Treatment of renal vein thrombosis associated with nephrotic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funami, M; Takaba, T; Tanaka, H; Murakami, A; Kadokura, M; Hori, G; Ishii, J

    1988-06-01

    Renal vein thrombosis is a rare entity in which true incidence is unknown. The disease occurs most frequently in patients with nephrotic syndrome, but it also can occur in the presence of other hypercoagulable state. Two cases of renal vein thrombosis with nephrotic syndrome which were treated by thrombectomy are reported here. One patient was successfully treated by renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombectomy before developing severe pulmonary embolism. The other was treated by renal vein thrombectomy by which fatal shock was able to be prevented. In those cases, immediate operation was indicated, primarily to prevent additional, possibly fatal, pulmonary embolism and also to improve perfusion of the kidney. In the hope of salvaging the kidney, thrombectomy may be the treatment of choice for acute renal vein thrombosis, complication of pulmonary embolism and inferior vena cava thrombosis, right renal vein thrombosis without collateral flow and acute renal vein thrombosis with shock.

  20. Thrombosis in the uremic milieu--emerging role of "thrombolome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashar, Moshe; Francis, Jean; Chitalia, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by retention of a number of toxins, which unleash cellular damage. CKD environment with these toxins and a host of metabolic abnormalities (collectively termed as uremic milieu) is highly thrombogenic. CKD represents a strong and independent risk factor for both spontaneous venous and arterial (postvascular injury) thrombosis. Emerging evidence points to a previously unrecognized role of some of the prothrombotic uremic toxins. Here, we provide an overview of thrombosis in CKD and an update on indolic uremic toxins, which robustly increase tissue factor, a potent procoagulant, in several vascular cell types enhancing thrombosis. This panel of uremic toxins, which we term "thrombolome" (thrombosis and metabolome), represents a novel risk factor for thrombosis and can be further explored as biomarker for postvascular interventional thrombosis in patients with CKD.

  1. Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008417 Efficacy comparison with low and high dose natroparin for patients with acute coronary syndrome underwent percutancous coronary intervention. SUN Chaoyu(孙超宇), et al. Dept Cardiol, 4th Affili Hosp, Harbin Med Univ, Harbin 150001. Chin J Cardiol 2008;36(6):493-496. Objective To evaluate the safety and optimal piror percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) natroparin dose in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

  2. [Giant coronary aneurysms in infants with Kawasaki disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Andrés, Antonio; Salvador Mercader, Inmaculada; Seller Moya, Julia; Carrasco Moreno, José Ignacio

    2017-08-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute vasculitis of unknown origin and predominant in males. The long-term effects of the disease depend on whether there are coronary lesions, particularly aneurysms. The prognosis of patients with giant aneurysms is very poor due to their natural progression to coronary thrombosis or severe obstructive lesions. A series of 8 cases is presented where the epidemiology and diagnostic methods are described. The treatment of the acute and long-term cardiovascular sequelae is also reviewed. A descriptive analysis was conducted on patients admitted to the Paediatric Cardiology Unit of La Fe University Hospital (Valencia) with KD and a coronary lesion. More than one artery was involved in all patients. Although early diagnosis was established in only two cases, none of the patients had severe impairment of ventricular function during the acute phase. Treatment included intravenous gammaglobulin and acetylsalicylic acid at anti-inflammatory doses during the acute phase. A combination of dual antiplatelet therapy and corticosteroids was given in cases of coronary thrombosis. The silent aneurysms continue to persist. KD is the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children. The delay in diagnosis is associated with a greater likelihood of coronary lesions that could increase the risk of cardiovascular events in adulthood. Thus, this subgroup requires close clinical monitoring for a better control of cardiovascular risk factors over time. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Heparin-Coated Coronary Stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Der Giessen WJ; van Beusekom HM; Larsson; Serruys

    1999-09-01

    The development of the heparin-coated (HC)-stent should be viewed against the backdrop of the early unfavorable results with noncoated stents in the pre-intravascular ultrasound and pre-ticlopidine era. Notwithstanding, results of pilot and randomized trials show a surprisingly low incidence of (sub)acute stent thrombosis under challenging circumstances, such as acute coronary syndromes. Considering the quite low incidence of early complications with noncoated second-generation stents, it may require large trials to prove the clinical efficacy of the heparin- coating against noncoated devices. However, even if the "added value" of the heparin-coating will never be clinically proven, it has helped to enhance the penetration of stent therapy in interventional cardiology. Unlike the situation in 1992, very few cardiologists will now disagree with the statement that stents contribute to the state-of-the-art treatment of patients with angina pectoris or acute myocardial infarction. A preliminary comparison of available trials also suggests that the heparin-coated Palmaz-Schatz stent (Cordis Corp., Waterloo, Belgium) is as effective as the noncoated stent plus abciximab treatment.

  4. Effects of co-existence of coronary stenosis and the extent of coronary ectasia on the TIMI frame count in patients with coronary artery ectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosar, Feridun; Acikgoz, Nusret; Sahin, Ibrahim; Topal, Ergun; Gunen, Hakan; Ermis, Necip; Cehreli, Sengul

    2005-03-01

    The measurement of the thrombosis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count is a simple method for evaluating coronary blood flow. Although it is well known that slow coronary flow is present in patients with coronary artery ectasia (CAE), the effects of coexisting stenosis and the severity of ectatic involvement on coronory flow have not been adequately studied. Thus, we examined (1) the effect of coexistence of obstructive coronary artery disease on TIMI frame count (TFC) and (2) the relation between the severity of ectatic involvement and TFC in patients with CAE. Ninety-seven study patients with CAE were examined in two steps to determine if they were appropriate in terms of the aim of this study. In the first step, ectasias were divided into three groups: an isolated CAE group, a CAE group with coexisting nonsignificant stenosis, and CAE with coexisting significant stenosis. In the second step, ectasias were subdivided into three groups: CAE with one segment, two segments, and three segments (or diffuse) involvement. The TIMI frame counts for the right coronary artery (RCA), the left circumflex coronary artery (LCx), and the left anterior descending artery (LAD) in the ectasia group were significantly higher than that of the control group (P 0.05, for all). In addition, the severity of ectasia involvement, regardless of the localization of ectatic segments and the type of the affected vessel, did not change the TFC (P > 0.05, for all). These results suggest that neither the coexisting stenosis nor the extent of involvement significantly affect TFC in patients with coronary ectasia.

  5. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Nose Complicated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Swaminath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive life threatening bacterial infection of the skin, the subcutaneous tissue, and the fascia. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the nose complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis. Few cases of septic cavernous sinus thrombosis have been reported to be caused by cellulitis of the face but necrotizing fasciitis of the nose is rare. It is very important to recognize the early signs of cavernous thrombosis. Treatment for septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is controversial but early use of empirical antibiotics is imperative.

  6. Serum Indoxyl Sulfate Associates with Postangioplasty Thrombosis of Dialysis Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Cheng; Hsieh, Mu-Yang; Hung, Szu-Chun; Kuo, Ko-Lin; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Lai, Chao-Lun; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong; Huang, Po-Hsun; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2016-04-01

    Hemodialysis vascular accesses are prone to recurrent stenosis and thrombosis after endovascular interventions.In vitro data suggest that indoxyl sulfate, a protein-bound uremic toxin, may induce vascular dysfunction and thrombosis. However, there is no clinical evidence regarding the role of indoxyl sulfate in hemodialysis vascular access. From January 2010 to June 2013, we prospectively enrolled patients undergoing angioplasty for dialysis access dysfunction. Patients were stratified into tertiles by baseline serum indoxyl sulfate levels. Study participants received clinical follow-up at 6-month intervals until June 2014. Primary end points were restenosis, thrombosis, and failure of vascular access. Median follow-up duration was 32 months. Of the 306 patients enrolled, 262 (86%) had symptomatic restenosis, 153 (50%) had access thrombosis, and 25 (8%) had access failure. In patients with graft access, free indoxyl sulfate tertiles showed a negative association with thrombosis-free patency (thrombosis-free patency rates of 54%, 38%, and 26% for low, middle, and high tertiles, respectively;P=0.001). Patients with graft thrombosis had higher free and total indoxyl sulfate levels. Using multivariate Cox regression analysis, graft thrombosis was independently predicted by absolute levels of free indoxyl sulfate (hazard ratio=1.14;P=0.01) and free indoxyl sulfate tertiles (high versus low, hazard ratio=2.41;P=0.001). Results of this study provide translational evidence that serum indoxyl sulfate is a novel risk factor for dialysis graft thrombosis after endovascular interventions.

  7. Coronary CTA assessment of coronary anomalies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pursnani, A.; Jacobs, J.E.; Saremi, F.; Levisman, J.; Makaryus, A.N.; Capunay, C.; Rogers, I.S.; Wald, C.; Azmoon, S.; Stathopoulos, I.A.; Srichai, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Coronary anomalies occur in <1% of the general population and can range from a benign incidental finding to the cause of sudden cardiac death. The coronary anomalies are classified here according to the traditional grouping into those of origin and course, intrinsic arterial anatomy, and

  8. Coronary CTA assessment of coronary anomalies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pursnani, A.; Jacobs, J.E.; Saremi, F.; Levisman, J.; Makaryus, A.N.; Capunay, C.; Rogers, I.S.; Wald, C.; Azmoon, S.; Stathopoulos, I.A.; Srichai, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Coronary anomalies occur in <1% of the general population and can range from a benign incidental finding to the cause of sudden cardiac death. The coronary anomalies are classified here according to the traditional grouping into those of origin and course, intrinsic arterial anatomy, and terminat

  9. Emergency coronary stenting with the Palmaz-Schatz stent for failed transluminal coronary angioplasty: results of a learning phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G J; van der Wieken, R; Suwarganda, J

    1993-07-01

    This study describes initial results of Palmaz-Schatz stent implantation in our department to restore and maintain vessel patency in 52 patients with obstructive dissection, defined as an intraluminal filling defect with coronary flow impairment after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). The majority of patients (62%) underwent PTCA for unstable angina (n = 28), defined as angina at rest with documented ST segment changes resistant to nitrates, or acute myocardial infarction (n = 4). In six patients (11%) the stent could not be delivered. Seven of the remaining 46 patients (15%) had coronary artery bypass surgery performed because of increased risk for subacute stent occlusion, residual thrombosis, residual obstruction near the stent, coronary artery diameter less than 3.0 mm, or multiple and overlapping stents. One patient (3%) died in hospital from intracranial bleeding. Nine patients (23%) had subacute stent occlusion, retrospectively unpredictable in four patients. Nine of 29 patients (29%) with an uncomplicated clinical course after stenting had angiographic restenosis at a mean follow-up of 6.0 +/- 1.4 months (range 12 days to 8.3 months). Two patients (7%) died 3 months after successful stenting: one patient because of stent thrombosis after stopping warfarin before an abdominal operation and one patient after acute vascular surgery for late traumatic groin bleeding. Of the 39 medically treated patients with a stent, three (8%) had major bleeding complications. It is concluded that stent implantation is feasible in most patients with obstructive dissection after PTCA. After successful stent delivery, coronary flow is temporarily restored.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. 24-hour antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with previous definite stent thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Morten; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Lisette O

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Once-daily aspirin is standard treatment, but recent studies point towards increased platelet function at the end of the dosing interval. Stent thrombosis (ST) has been linked with reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin, so we investigated if platelet inhibition by aspirin declines...... with 100 patients with stable coronary artery disease and 50 healthy volunteers. All participants were on aspirin 75 mg/day mono antiplatelet therapy. Platelet aggregation was measured 1 and 24 h after aspirin intake using platelet aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyzer). Cyclooxygenase-1 activity, platelet...... activation, immature platelets, and thrombopoietin were measured. RESULTS: Platelet aggregation increased by 109±150 (arachidonic acid) and 47±155 (collagen) aggregation units per minute from 1 to 24 h after aspirin intake (p-values

  11. Symptomatic radial artery thrombosis successfully treated with endovascular approach via femoral access route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasha, Ahmed Khurshid [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Arizona (United States); Elder, Mahir D. [Heart and Vascular Institute, Detroit, MI (United States); Division of Cardiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Malik, Umer Ejaz [Department of Internal Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Science Center at Permian Basin, TX (United States); Khalid, Abdullah Mian [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburg Medical Center, Mercy Hospital, Pittsburg, PA (United States); Noor, Zeeshan [Department of Internal Medicine, St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Movahed, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: rmova@aol.com [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Arizona (United States); Sarver Heart Center, University of Arizona (United States); CareMore HealthCare, AZ (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Radial access has been increasingly utilized for coronary intervention due to higher safety profile in comparison to femoral access site with lower bleeding rate. Radial artery occlusion is not uncommon with radial access site. This usually does not lead to any harm due to ulnar artery collaterals that are sufficient to prevent hand ischemia and is usually left alone. However, in the case of significant hand ischemia, treatment is often necessary. We are reporting an interesting case of symptomatic radial artery thrombosis leading to arm ischemia that was successfully treated percutaneously using femoral access. Using femoral access for radial artery intervention has not been reported previously. This case is followed by review of the literature.

  12. Fibrinolytic therapy for thrombosis in cardiac valvular prosthesis short and long term results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auristela I. O. Ramos

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the short- and long-term results of the use of streptokinase (SK for the treatment of thromboses in cardiac valvular prostheses. METHODS: Seventeen patients with cardiac prosthetic thrombosis diagnosed by clinical, echocardiographic, and radioscopic findings underwent fibrinolytic treatment with a streptokinase bolus of 250,000 U followed by 100.000 U/hour. Short- and long-term results were assessed by radioscopy and echocardiography. RESULTS: Of the 17 patients, 12 had mechanical double-disk prostheses (4 aortic, 6 mitral, 2 tricuspid, 4 had single-disk prostheses (2 aortic, 1 mitral, and 1 tricuspid, and 1 had a tricuspid bioprosthesis. The success rate was 64.8%, the partial success rate was 17.6%, and the nonsuccess rate was 17.6%. All patients with a double-disk prosthesis responded, completely or partially, to the treatment. None of the patients with a single-disk prosthesis had complete resolution of the thrombosis. The time of streptokinase infusion ranged from 6 to 80 hours (mean of 56 h. The mortality rate due to the use of streptokinase was 5.8% and was secondary to cerebral bleeding. During streptokinase infusion, 3 (17.6% embolic episodes occurred as follows: 1 cerebral, 1 peripheral, and 1 coronary. The rethrombosis index was 33% in a mean follow-up of 42 months. CONCLUSION: The use of fibrinolytic agents was effective and relatively safe in patients with primary thrombosis of a double-disk prosthesis. A fatal hemorrhagic complication occurred in 1 (5.8% patient, and embolic complications occurred in 3 (17.6% patients. In a mean 42-month follow-up, 67% of the patients were free from rethrombosis.

  13. The effectiveness of antioxidant therapy in aspirin resistance, diabetes population for prevention of thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboonabi, Anahita; Singh, Indu

    2016-10-01

    Thrombosis as the main complication of coronary heart disease (CHD) represents the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). In the course of diabetes mellitus some coagulation abnormalities occur, that may result in a thrombogenic propensity. Aspirin (ASA) as a platelet-inhibiting agent through inactivation of Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is mostly used for the prevention and treatment of atherothrombotic disorders. ASA inhibits the COX-1 enzyme and therefore blocks platelet thromboxane A2 (TXA2) synthesis. However, some of the serious vascular events in high-risk vascular patients are attributable to a failure of ASA to suppress platelet aggregation. The consumption of antioxidant or antioxidant rich foods such as vitamin C, E, and polyphenols might impart anti-thrombotic and cardiovascular protective effects via their inhibition of platelet hyper-activation or aggregation similar to the action of aspirin. This review will discuss the risk of thrombosis in diabetes, what aspirin resistance means, and the effectiveness of antioxidant therapy in the prevention and possible treatment of atherothrombotic disorders.

  14. Intracardiac Thrombosis during Adult Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Moguilevitch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracardiac thrombosis (ICT and pulmonary embolism (PE during adult liver transplantation are rare but potentially lethal complications. They are often overlooked because of significant diagnostic challenges. The combination of hemodynamic compromise and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE findings allows for correct diagnosis. A large variety of putative risk factors for ICT and PE have been suggested, but these events are considered to be multifactorial. There are different proposed treatment modalities for these devastating complications. Unfortunately, in spite of growing knowledge in this area, intraoperative and postoperative mortalities remain very high. The retrospective nature of the study of these events makes the case reports extremely valuable.

  15. Cerebral venous thrombosis: An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Dash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely varied clinical presentations, predisposing factors, imaging findings, and outcomes, and thus can be extremely challenging to diagnose. Accurate and prompt diagnosis of CVT is crucial because timely and appropriate therapy can reverse the disease process and significantly reduce the risk of acute complications and long-term squel. In this article, we have reviewed the epidemiology, causative factors, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of CVT from an Indian perspective. Over the last decade, a change in trends in the causative factors has been noted from India.

  16. Unilateral Pseudotumoral Presentation of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Halley Carvalho Pimentel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is an unusual cause of stroke. It is more common in middle-aged women and deep CVT lesions are usually bilateral. CVT can have very diverse clinical presentations and mimic other conditions. We report two women with CVT initially diagnosed as tumors (unilateral pseudotumoral presentation of CVT successfully treated with intravenous heparin. Early diagnosis was important and completely reversed the symptoms. The diagnosis of CVT should be remembered when clinical picture is compatible even if brain imaging suggests unilateral tumor.

  17. [FEATURES LIVER TRANSPLANTATION IN PORTAL VEIN THROMBOSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasov, P A

    2015-07-01

    In 2012 - 2013 years in 265 patients for liver transplantation was performed, including in 224 (84.5%)--from a living donor, in 41 (15.5%)--from the dead body. Using a Foley catheter to stop bleeding, and the imposition of vascular sutures during endovenectomy in portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and its possible damage under all conditions. In particular, PVT IV degree (Grade IV) in order to restore blood flow in the graft using the left gastric and renal vein is an alternative, if they are cryopreserved vein may be suitably used.

  18. [Acute myocardial infarction with normal coronary arteries as initial manifestation of polyarteritis nodosa. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badui, E; Rangel, A; Ramos, M A; Enciso, R; Solorio, S; Lepe, L; Miranda, J

    1997-01-01

    A thirty four-year-old-white man in good health developed an acute anterior wall myocardial infarction (AMI), Killip II with normal coronary arteries. No thrombolytic therapy was given. Selective angiography revealed multiple aneurysms in mesenteric and renal arteries. The diagnosis of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) was performed. AMI in PAN is secondary to arteritis with thrombosis, or to atherosclerosis due to steroid therapy. This case, having multiorgan vascular aneurysms involvement without previous cardiac symptomatology nor steroid therapy, presented as his first cardiac complication an AMI with normal coronary arteries probably due to selective arteritis.

  19. Cerebral venous thrombosis: treatment with local fibrinolysis plus alteplase; Trombosis venosa cerebral. Tratamiento mediante fibrinolisis local con alteplasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asis Bravo, F. de; Delgado, F.; Cano, A.; Bautista, D.

    2002-07-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare entity with widely variable clinical signs: thus, a high degree of suspicion is required for diagnosis. It affects the dural sinuses and may or may not invade cerebral veins. The diagnosis has usually been based on an angiographic study although, at the present time, new noninvasive imaging techniques, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance angiography are being employed in a growing number of cases. Treatment should involve symptomatic and etiologic therapy. Although anti coagulation would appear to be a reasonable option in these patients, it remains controversial. As in other processes such as pulmonary embolism and coronary thrombosis, the introduction of novel and increasingly safe fibrinolytic drugs, together with technical innovations in the field of interventional neuroradiology, is changing the perspectives for the management of these patients. We present the case of a 43-year-old woman with right sinus thrombosis who was treated with local thrombolysis plus alteplase (tissue plasminogen activator). The authors describe the technique employed and review the literature. (Author) 16 refs.

  20. Validation of the revised International Prognostic Score of Thrombosis for Essential Thrombocythemia (IPSET-thrombosis) in 585 Mayo Clinic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Mahnur; Gangat, Naseema; Lasho, Terra; Abou Hussein, Ahmed K; Elala, Yoseph C; Hanson, Curtis; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2016-06-01

    The primary objective of treatment in essential thrombocythemia (ET) is to prevent thromboembolic complications. In this regard, advanced age and thrombosis history have long distinguished "low" from "high" risk patients. More recently, JAK2V617F and cardiovascular (CV) risk factors were identified as additional modifiers, leading to the development of a 3-tiered International Prognostic Score of Thrombosis for ET (IPSET-thrombosis): "low," "intermediate," and "high". The international data set used to develop IPSET-thrombosis was recently re-analyzed in order to quantify the additional pro-thrombotic effect of JAK2V617F and CV risk factors in specific risk subcategories. The revised IPSET-thrombosis identified four risk categories based on three adverse variables (thrombosis history, age >60 years and JAK2V617F): very low (no adverse features), low (presence of JAK2V617F), intermediate (age >60 years) and high (presence of thrombosis history or presence of both advanced age and JAK2V617F). In this study of 585 patients with ET (median age 68 years; 61% female), we validated the revised IPSET-thrombosis by confirming significant differences in thrombosis risk between "very low" and "low" (HR 2.4, 95% CI 1.1 - 5.3) and between "intermediate" and "high" (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1 - 5.2) risk patients. Furthermore, in multivariable analysis, only JAK2V617F (HR=1.8, CI= 1.07 - 2.94) and history of thrombosis (HR=2.1, CI= 1.20 - 3.58) were independently predictive of future thrombotic events. The revised IPSET-thrombosis needs confirmation in prospective studies, especially in terms of risk-adapted therapy that includes the need for aspirin therapy in very low risk, twice-daily aspirin therapy for low risk and cytoreductive therapy for low or intermediate risk patients.

  1. The Plot Thickens: Diet Microbe Interactions May Modulate Thrombosis Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Del Campo, Ana; Romano, Kymberleigh A; Rey, Federico E; Balskus, Emily P

    2016-04-12

    Thrombosis plays an important role in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Platelet activation is an essential step in the genesis and propagation of atherothrombotic complications. In a recent publication, Zhu and colleagues report that gut microbe-derived TMAO enhances platelet responsiveness and thrombosis, providing a novel mechanistic connection between microbes and CVD (Zhu et al., 2016).

  2. Current perspective of venous thrombosis in the upper extremity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flinterman, L.E.; Meer, van der F.J.M.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Doggen, C.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Venous thrombosis of the upper extremity is a rare disease. Therefore, not as much is known about risk factors, treatment and the risk of recurrence as for venous thrombosis of the leg. Only central venous catheters and strenuous exercise are commonly known risk factors for an upper extremity venous

  3. Risk factors for a first and recurrent venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flinterman, Linda Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to identify new risk factors for first and recurrent venous thrombosis of both the upper and lower extremity, and assess the incidence of recurrence and mortality after a first venous thrombosis. An overview was provided of the current literature on risk factors and treatm

  4. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis following the Heimlich maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerdi, Juan; Gupta, Sushil K; Sampson, Lawrence N; Deshmukh, Narayan

    2002-04-01

    Complications from the Heimlich maneuver are relatively infrequent. Two fatal cases of abdominal aortic thrombosis have been reported following this technique. We report on the first patient that suffered an acute thrombosis of the abdominal aorta and survived. Prompt recognition of this complication provides the only hope of survival from this rare and catastrophic complication.

  5. Thrombin Avtivable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor in Venous and Arterial Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L.E. de Bruijne

    2011-01-01

    textabstractVenous and arterial thromboses are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Venous thrombosis is the result of pathological occlusive clot formation in the veins. It occurs mainly in the deep veins of the leg (deep vein thrombosis), from which parts of the clot frequently embolize to the

  6. [The fibrinolytic treatment with urokinase of acute arterial thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, A; Donato di Paola, M; Saccà, A; Cappello, I; D'Addato, M

    1993-01-01

    We present our experiences on 86 patients with acute arterial thrombosis of the legs, undergoing a fibrinolytic treatment with urokinase. Results from the treatment are analyzed according to: the administration way (systemic, locoregional, intrathrombotic), the level of thrombosis (upper or lower legs), the associated morbidity and mortality.

  7. Direct visualization of a significant stenosis of the right coronary artery by transthoracic echocardiography. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiseth Rune

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Non-invasive imaging of coronary arteries by transthoracic echocardiography is an emerging diagnostic tool to study the left main (LM, left descending artery (LAD, circumflex (Cx and right coronary artery (RCA. Impaired coronary circulation can be assessed by measuring coronary velocity flow reserve (CVFR by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. Coronary artery stenoses can be identified as localized colour aliasing and accelerated flow velocities. We report a case with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS of a 46-year-old man. With non-invasive imaging of coronary arteries by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE, we identified a segment of the mid right coronary artery (RCA suggestive of stenosis with localized colour aliasing and accelerated flow velocity. We found a high ratio between the stenotic peak velocity and the prestenotic peak velocity, and a pathologic coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR distal to the stenosis in the posterior interventricular descending branch (RDP. Subsequent coronary angiography demonstrated one vessel disease with a stenosis in segment 3 of RCA, which was successfully treated with percutaneos coronary intervention PCI. Two weeks following the PCI procedure he was readmitted to hospital with chest pain. A subacute stent thrombosis was questioned, and repeated echocardiography was preformed. The mid portion of RCA showed normal and laminar flow. The CVFR of RCA measured in the RDP showed normal vasodilatory response, confirming an open RCA without any flow limitation. A repeated coronary angiogram demonstrated only a mild in stent intimal hyperplasia. This case illustrates the value of transthoracic echocardiography as a tool both in the diagnosis and the follow-up of chest pain disorders and coronary flow problems. Transthoracic echocardiography allows both direct visualization of the various coronary segments and assessment of the CVFR.

  8. Appraisal of the Prognosis in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction Treated with Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晓娟; 殷惠军; 陈可冀

    2009-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction(AMI) is still the leading factor causing crippling and death in cardiovascular disease.Percutaneous coronary intervention(PCI) can significantly reduce inpatient mortality and incidence of complication.But owing to the existence of restenosis,in-stent thrombosis,etc.,recurrent post-PCI cardiovascular events and high repeatability of hospitalization,as well as its crippling rate and mortality, remain a serious threat to the society and the patients' family.Therefore,the apprais...

  9. Oral anticoagulation and antiplatelets in atrial fibrillation patients after myocardial infarction and coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberts, Morten; Gislason, Gunnar H.; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the risk of thrombosis and bleeding according to multiple antithrombotic treatment regimens in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients after myocardial infarction (MI) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background The optimal antithrombo...... after MI/PCI, OAC and clopidogrel was equal or better on both benefit and safety outcomes compared to triple therapy. (C) 2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation...

  10. Purinergic Receptors in Thrombosis and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Under various pathological conditions, including thrombosis and inflammation, extracellular nucleotide levels may increase because of both active release and passive leakage from damaged or dying cells. Once in the extracellular compartment, nucleotides interact with plasma membrane receptors belonging to the P2 purinergic family, which are expressed by virtually all circulating blood cells and in most blood vessels. In this review, we focus on the specific role of the 3 platelet P2 receptors P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2X1 in hemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Beyond platelets, these 3 receptors, along with the P2Y2, P2Y6, and P2X7 receptors, constitute the main P2 receptors mediating the proinflammatory effects of nucleotides, which play important roles in various functions of circulating blood cells and cells of the vessel wall. Each of these P2 receptor subtypes specifically contributes to chronic or acute vascular inflammation and related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, endotoxemia, and sepsis. The potential for therapeutic targeting of these P2 receptor subtypes is also discussed.

  11. Kaempferol inhibits thrombosis and platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Park, Se-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jun; Kim, Seung

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate whether kaempferol affects pro-coagulant proteinase activity, fibrin clot formation, blood clot and thrombin (or collagen/epinephrine)-stimulated platelet activation, thrombosis, and coagulation in ICR (Imprinting Control Region) mice and SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats. Kaempferol significantly inhibited the enzymatic activities of thrombin and FXa by 68 ± 1.6% and 52 ± 2.4%, respectively. Kaempferol also inhibited fibrin polymer formation in turbidity. Microscopic analysis was performed using a fluorescent conjugate. Kaempferol completely attenuated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/PKB (AKT) in thrombin-stimulated platelets and delayed aggregation time (clotting) by 34.6% in an assay of collagen/epinephrine-stimulated platelet activation. Moreover, kaempferol protected against thrombosis development in 3 animal models, including collagen/epinephrine- and thrombin-induced acute thromboembolism models and an FeCl3-induced carotid arterial thrombus model. The ex vivo anticoagulant effect of kaempferol was further confirmed in ICR mice. This study demonstrated that kaempferol may be clinically useful due to its ability to reduce or prevent thrombotic challenge.

  12. Portal vein thrombosis related to Cassia angustifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyuncu, Secgin; Cete, Yildiray; Nokay, Ali E

    2008-09-01

    Cassia angustifolia (Senna), used as a laxative, is a plant from the Fabaceae family. It includes hydroxyanthracene glycosides, also known as Senna Sennoside. These glycosides stimulate the peristalsis of the colon and alter colonic absorption and secretion resulting in fluid accumulation and expulsion. In the literature, there are reports illustrating the hepatotoxic effects of Cassia angustifolia but there is no report of portal vein thrombosis caused by Cassia Angustifolia. A 42-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with a five-day history of worsening epigastric pain, anorexia, episodic vomiting, and intermittent fever. She reported that she had boiled dried senna leaves she had bought from herbalists and drank approximately 200 mL daily for two years. Color Doppler screening found an echogen thrombus obliterating portal vein bifurcation and the right branch. The lumen was obstructed at this level and there was no blood flow through it. Treatment with thrombolytics was unsuccessful. Severe hepatotoxicity senna use is unusual. The cause of senna-related hepatotoxicity is unclear but could be explained by the exposure of the liver to unusual amounts of toxic metabolites of anthraquinone glycosides. Chronic use of Cassia angustifolia may rarely be associated with portal vein thrombosis.

  13. The aetiology of deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, P C; Agutter, P S

    2006-09-01

    Most ideas about the pathogenesis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are dominated by a 'consensus model' first articulated around 1962. This model invokes 'Virchow's triad' and attributes thrombogenesis in veins to some combination of 'hypercoagulability', 'stasis' and 'intimal injury'. This arose as a by-product of studies on the mechanisms of haemostasis and bleeding diatheses that were at best only indirectly relevant to thrombosis, and there are reasons for doubting the causal significance of 'hypercoagulability' and 'stasis' in the aetiology of DVT. Proponents of the consensus model make little reference to a substantial literature, mostly historical, that: (a) emphasizes the significance of the venous valve pockets (VVP) and blood rheology in DVT pathogenesis; and (b) describes morphological features specific to venous thrombi that a valid aetiological model must explain. This literature provides the basis for an alternative hypothesis of DVT aetiology, published some 30 years ago, which has been experimentally corroborated and is compatible with recent cell and molecular biological studies of the venous endothelium. We review this alternative hypothesis, considering its potential value for future research on DVT and embolism, and its significance for clinical practice.

  14. Patients with previous definite stent thrombosis have a larger fraction of immature platelets and a reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Morten; Grove, Erik; Wulff, Lise Nielsen

    Objectives This study sought to evaluate the platelet response to aspirin and the immature platelet fraction in patients with previous stent thrombosis (ST). Background ST is a potentially fatal complication of coronary stenting. A reduced platelet response to aspirin increases the risk of cardio......Objectives This study sought to evaluate the platelet response to aspirin and the immature platelet fraction in patients with previous stent thrombosis (ST). Background ST is a potentially fatal complication of coronary stenting. A reduced platelet response to aspirin increases the risk...... were treated with aspirin 75 mg once daily. Platelet function was assessed by multiple electrode aggregometry in citrated and hirudinized blood and by VerifyNow Aspirin Assay (Accumetrics, San Diego, California). Flow cytometric determination of the immature platelet fraction was performed to evaluate...... platelet turnover. Platelet activation was evaluated by soluble serum P-selectin. Compliance was confirmed by serum thromboxane B2. Results All patients were fully compliant, which was confirmed by suppressed levels of serum thromboxane B2. Platelet aggregation was increased in patients with previous ST...

  15. CEREBRAL VENOUS THROMBOSIS AND TURNER SYNDROME: A RARE REPORTED ASSOCIATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, A; Alpaydin, S; Bademkiran, F; Sirin, H; Celebisoy, N

    2015-01-01

    Turner Syndrome is the only known viable chromosomal monosomy, characterised by the complete or partial absence of an X chromosome. It's the most common chromosomal abnormality in females. Apart from the well known dysmorphic features of the syndrome, it has been associated with a number of vascular pathologies; mainly involving the cardiovascular, renovascular, peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular system. It seems striking that thromboembolism is not considered as a feature of the syndrome. Most of the thromboembolism cases are related to the arterial vascular system; except for some rare reported portal venous thrombosis cases, peripheral venous thrombosis cases and to the best of our knowledge a single case of cerebral venous thrombosis with Dandy Walker malformation and polymicrogyria. We herein report a cerebral venous thrombosis case with Turner Syndrome. With no other found underlying etiology, we want to highlight that Turner Syndrome, itself, may have a relationship not only with the cerebral arterial vascular system pathologies but also with the cerebral venous thrombosis.

  16. Ovarian vein thrombosis in Behçet disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Justina Wei Lynn; Howe, Hwee Siew; Chng, Hiok Hee

    2012-03-01

    We describe a 35-year-old Chinese woman with Behçet disease complicated by recurrent gastrointestinal flares. During admission for acute lower abdominal pain, a computed tomographic scan of the abdomen showed thrombosis of the left ovarian vein. She was treated with increased immunosuppressant and oral anticoagulant. Although she was not compliant to oral anticoagulant with her international normalized ratio frequently subtherapeutic, her symptoms abated and the thrombosis resolved. There has been only 1 reported case of a patient with Behçet disease presenting with postpartum ovarian vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism and no reported case of Behçet disease with ovarian vein thrombosis occurring outside pregnancy and the puerperium. Ovarian vein thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain that should be considered in patients with Behçet disease.

  17. Acute scrotal pain: an uncommon manifestation of renal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Yeong-Chin; Jong, Ing-Chin; Hsieh, Ying-Chen; Kang, Chun-Hsiung

    2014-03-01

    The clinical manifestation of renal vein thrombosis varies with the speed and degree of venous occlusion. Such patients may be asymptomatic, have minor nonspecific symptoms such as nausea or weakness, or have more specific symptoms such as upper abdominal pain, flank pain, or hematuria. Acute scrotal pain is a very uncommon clinical expression of renal vein thrombosis. Here, we report a case of membranous glomerulonephritis-induced renal vein thrombosis presented with the symptom of acute scrotal pain caused by thrombosis-induced varicocele. This case report suggests that renal vein thrombosis should be considered in the diagnosis of acute scrotal pain; it also emphasizes that an investigation of retroperitoneum should be performed for adult patients with the sudden onset of varicocele.

  18. Thrombosis warning in children suffering from Henoch-Schonlein Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luan Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Henoch-Schonlein Purpura (HSP is one of the most common types of vasculitis in children. The characteristic clinical manifestations include non-thrombocytopenic purpura, arthritis or arthralgia, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal hemorrhage and renal abnormalities. Thrombosis has been reported as, a rare complication of HSP. We present the case of a 14-year-old boy who was diagnosed with HSP and suspected superior mesenteric vein thrombosis. We reviewed the relevant literature and found eight similar reported cases. HSP is associated with thrombosis and HSP itself and some risk factors may result in thrombosis. We suggest that physicians should monitor patients with HSP who are at a higher risk of developing thrombosis more closely.

  19. Gut Microbial Metabolite TMAO Enhances Platelet Hyperreactivity and Thrombosis Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weifei; Gregory, Jill C; Org, Elin; Buffa, Jennifer A; Gupta, Nilaksh; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Lin; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Mehrabian, Margarete; Sartor, R Balfour; McIntyre, Thomas M; Silverstein, Roy L; Tang, W H Wilson; DiDonato, Joseph A; Brown, J Mark; Lusis, Aldons J; Hazen, Stanley L

    2016-03-24

    Normal platelet function is critical to blood hemostasis and maintenance of a closed circulatory system. Heightened platelet reactivity, however, is associated with cardiometabolic diseases and enhanced potential for thrombotic events. We now show gut microbes, through generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), directly contribute to platelet hyperreactivity and enhanced thrombosis potential. Plasma TMAO levels in subjects (n > 4,000) independently predicted incident (3 years) thrombosis (heart attack, stroke) risk. Direct exposure of platelets to TMAO enhanced sub-maximal stimulus-dependent platelet activation from multiple agonists through augmented Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. Animal model studies employing dietary choline or TMAO, germ-free mice, and microbial transplantation collectively confirm a role for gut microbiota and TMAO in modulating platelet hyperresponsiveness and thrombosis potential and identify microbial taxa associated with plasma TMAO and thrombosis potential. Collectively, the present results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanistic link between specific dietary nutrients, gut microbes, platelet function, and thrombosis risk.

  20. The coronary heart team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Bobby; Puskas, John D; Bhatt, Deepak L; Verma, Subodh

    2017-09-01

    The concept of a Coronary Heart Team has generated increased interest, including support from major practice guidelines. Here, we review the rationale and the published experience of Coronary Heart Teams. A Coronary Heart Team should be led by both cardiology and cardiac surgery with a shared decision-making approach. The team should incorporate data from anatomic and clinical risk prediction models to offer individualized care. Most teams focus on management of complex patients and those with indications for both coronary artery bypass graft and percutaneous coronary intervention. The potential benefits of a Coronary Heart Team include balanced decision-making, greater adherence to evidence-based practice guidelines, as well as promoting greater collegiality and exchange of knowledge between specialties. Single-center series have demonstrated consistency in decision-making by Coronary Heart Teams but prospective data demonstrating improved patient outcomes and/or cost effectiveness are necessary. The concept of a Coronary Heart Team is gaining traction for patients with complex coronary artery disease. There is a growing literature in support of Coronary Heart Teams but comparative and prospective data demonstrating improved patient outcomes are needed.

  1. The risk of venous thrombosis in individuals with a history of superficial vein thrombosis and acquired venous thrombotic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Rachel E J; Lijfering, Willem M; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; Helmerhorst, Frans M; Rosendaal, Frits R; Cannegieter, Suzanne C

    2013-12-19

    Superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) increases the risk of venous thrombosis fourfold to sixfold. As most individuals with SVT do not develop venous thrombosis, additional risk factors may explain the risk of developing a venous thrombosis. In the Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis study, we assessed the risk of venous thrombosis in individuals with previous SVT and a mild thrombotic risk factor (smoking or overweight/obesity), a strong risk factor (surgery, hospitalization, plaster cast immobilization, or malignancy), or a reproductive factor in women (oral contraception, postmenopausal hormone therapy, or pregnancy/puerperium). Individuals with previous SVT alone had a 5.5-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.4-6.8) increased risk of venous thrombosis. This was 9.3 (95% CI, 7.2-12.1) combined with a mild thrombotic risk factor, 31.4 (95% CI, 14.6-67.5) with a strong risk factor, and 34.9 (95% CI, 19.1-63.8) in women with a reproductive risk factor. The highest separate risk estimates were found for SVT with surgery (42.5; 95% CI, 10.2-177.6), hospitalization (49.8; 95% CI, 11.9-209.2), or oral contraception (43.0; 95% CI, 15.5-119.3 in women). In conclusion, the risk of venous thrombosis is markedly increased in individuals with previous SVT who have an acquired thrombotic risk factor.

  2. Risk factors for cerebral venous thrombosis and deep venous thrombosis in patients aged between 15 and 50 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Karen; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Vroomen, Patrick C A J; van der Meer, Jannes; De Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) and deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism (DVT/PE) are associated with many risk factors. It is unclear why CVT occurs less often than DVT/PE. Age dependent risk factors may play a role. The aim of our study was to compare risk factors in a uniform age group of

  3. Association of varicosities and concomitant deep venous thrombosis in patients with superficial venous thrombosis, a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baggen, Vivan J M; Chung, Kaman; Koole, Koos; Sarneel, Michelle H J; Rutten, Frans H; Hajer, Gideon R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with superficial venous thrombosis (SVT) co-existence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be present. Varicosities are considered as a risk factor for both SVT and DVT separately. However, current evidence is contradictory whether varicosities are associated with an increased

  4. Assessment of the safety and performance of the STENTYS self-expanding coronary stent in acute myocardial infarction: Results from the APPOSITION I study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Amoroso (Giovanni); R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); C.M. Spaulding (Christian); S. Manzo-Silberman (Stephane); K. Hauptmann (Karl); R. Spaargaren (René); H.M. Garcia-Garcia (Hector); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); S. Verheye (Stefan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAims: In the setting of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), epicardial vasoconstriction and throm- bus load may lead to stent undersizing and malapposition after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), which can both be responsible for stent thrombosis or restenosis.

  5. Efficacy and safety of zotarolimus-eluting and sirolimus-eluting coronary stents in routine clinical care (SORT OUT III): a randomised controlled superiority trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Klaus; Maeng, Michael; Kaltoft, Anne

    2010-01-01

    In low-risk patients, the zotarolimus-eluting stent has been shown to reduce rates of restenosis without increasing the risk of stent thrombosis. We compared the efficacy and safety of the zotarolimus-eluting stent versus the sirolimus-eluting stent in patients with coronary artery disease who we...

  6. Assessment of the safety and performance of the STENTYS self-expanding coronary stent in acute myocardial infarction: Results from the APPOSITION I study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Amoroso (Giovanni); R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); C.M. Spaulding (Christian); S. Manzo-Silberman (Stephane); K. Hauptmann (Karl); R. Spaargaren (René); H.M. Garcia-Garcia (Hector); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); S. Verheye (Stefan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAims: In the setting of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), epicardial vasoconstriction and throm- bus load may lead to stent undersizing and malapposition after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), which can both be responsible for stent thrombosis or restenosis. A

  7. Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh

    2017-01-01

    A family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) is an important risk factor for adverse coronary events, in particular if the disease has an early onset. The risk of CAD is influenced by genetic and environmental factors with a greater genetic contribution earlier in life. Through recent years...... Registry and risk factor control was evaluated. The study revealed that risk factors are common in early-onset CAD and that a large room for risk factor improvement remains. In study II, we used coronary computed tomography angiography to compare the coronary plaque burden and characteristics between 88...... first-degree relatives of patients with early-onset CAD and 88 controls with no familial predisposition. Relatives had a significantly increased coronary plaque burden, which displayed characteristics associated with myocardial ischemia and adverse coronary events. In study III, 134 patients with early...

  8. Living with Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Coronary Heart Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) can cause serious complications. However, if you ... changes and medicines, go to "How Is Coronary Heart Disease Treated?" Work closely with your doctor to control ...

  9. Outpatient coronary angioplasty: feasible and safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagboom, Ton; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Laarman, Gert Jan; van der Wieken, Ron

    2005-04-01

    This study tested the safety and feasibility of coronary angioplasty on an outpatient basis. The purpose of this approach includes cost-effectiveness and patient comfort. Six hundred forty-four patients were randomized to either transradial or transfemoral PTCA using 6 Fr equipment. Patients were triaged to outpatient management based on a predefined set of predictors of an adverse outcome in the first 24 hr after initially successful coronary angioplasty. Three hundred seventy-five patients (58%) were discharged 4-6 hr after PTCA; 42% stayed in hospital overnight. In the outpatient group, one adverse event occurred (subacute stent thrombosis 7 hr postdischarge, nonfatal myocardial infarction). There were no major vascular complications. In the hospital group, 19 patients (7%) sustained an adverse cardiac even in the first 24 hr; 1 patient died. Patients treated via the femoral route had more (minor) bleeding complications (19 patients; 6%); in 17 of these, this was the sole reason that discharge was delayed. PTCA on an outpatient basis, performed via the radial or the femoral artery with low-profile equipment, is safe and feasible in a considerable part of a routine PTCA population. A larger proportion of transradial patients can be discharged due to a reduction in (minor) bleeding complications.

  10. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T B; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Banner, Jytte

    2000-01-01

    in the child. This prompted us to investigate these genetic markers of thromboembolic disease in 121 cases of sudden infant death syndrome and in relevant controls, in the expectation of a more frequent occurrence of these markers if thrombosis is an etiological factor in sudden infant death syndrome......Sudden infant death syndrome or "cot death" has until the late eighties been a significant cause of death in children between the ages of 1 month and 1 year. Approximately two per 1000 children born alive dies of sudden infant death syndrome each year in Western Europe, North America, and Australia....... The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life, affecting vital...

  11. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, TB; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Lundemose, JB

    2000-01-01

    . The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life, affecting vital......Sudden infant death syndrome or "cot death" has until the late eighties been a significant cause of death in children between the ages of 1 month and 1 year. Approximately two per 1000 children born alive dies of sudden infant death syndrome each year in Western Europe, North America, and Australia...... in the child. This prompted us to investigate these genetic markers of thromboembolic disease in 121 cases of sudden infant death syndrome and in relevant controls, in the expectation of a more frequent occurrence of these markers if thrombosis is an etiological factor in sudden infant death syndrome...

  12. Coronary artery aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koischwitz, D.; Harder, T.; Schuppan, U.; Thurn, P.

    1982-04-01

    Seven saccular coronary artery aneurysms have been demonstrated in the course of 1452 selective coronary artery angiograms. In six patients they were arterio-sclerotic; in one patient the aneurysm must have been congenital or of mycotic-embolic origin. The differential diagnosis between true aneurysms and other causes of vascular dilatation is discussed. Coronary artery aneurysms have a poor prognosis because of the possibility of rupture with resultant cardiac tamponade, or the development of thrombo-embolic myocardial infarction. These aneurysms can only be diagnosed by means of coronary angiography and require appropriate treatment.

  13. Selective Coronary Arteriography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, John O.; Challis, Thomas W.; West, Roxroy O.

    1966-01-01

    The technique of selective coronary arteriography, as described originally by Sones, was employed in 255 patients. Successful catheterization of both coronary arteries was carried out in 88% of these patients, and in the last 100 examinations both coronary arteries were entered in 95 patients. Selective coronary arteriography is a useful diagnostic tool but is a potentially hazardous form of examination as we encountered four episodes of ventricular fibrillation in the present series. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Figs. 3A-DFig. 3EFig. 3FFig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:5902704

  14. IVUS-Guided Implantation of Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffolds for Very Late Paclitaxel Stent Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhe-Zhong; Chang, Wei-Ting; Chiang, Chun-Yen; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Ku, Po-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) implantation has been shown to be safe in patients with stable coronary disease, and effective against the thrombotic lesion and the in-stent restenosis (ISR) of the drug-eluting stent (DES). BVSs have the advantages of a snow racket concept, positive vessel remodeling, and better conformability compared with DES in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We report on a young patient with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who presented to our emergency department arising from very late stent thrombosis (VLST) of a 2.5 × 28 mm paclitaxel-eluting stent (Coroflex® Please) three years after its implantation. After the patient was treated with balloon dilation, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) revealed a short segment of a guide wire outside the DES mesh. Two BVSs were implanted to prevent a DES recoil. Post-scaffold-implantation IVUS showed adequately expanded strut of BVSs. Six months later, optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed that some segments of the scaffold had been absorbed and that there was no in-scaffold restenosis. The patient had not complained about angina during the out-patient clinic follow-up. This is the first report of successful BVS implantation for a STEMI patient attributable to DES VLST. PMID:28115812

  15. COCAiNE-RELATED ILIAC ARTERY THROMBOSiS: CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ekin ilkeli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, all over the world, illegal substance abuse is an important social problem. The health consequences that have been created by this problem, are complex and highly lethal. Cardiovascular pathologies that are caused by cocaine create a broad clinical forms, from amputation to sudden death. In this article, we presented an Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive case with iliac artery thrombosis due to cocaine addiction, [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(4.000: 245-248

  16. Unsuspected lower extremity deep venous thrombosis simulating musculoskeletal pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parellada, Antoni J.; Reiter, Sean B.; Glickman, Peter L.; Kloss, Linda A. [Frankford Hospitals, DII - Diagnostic Imaging, Inc., Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Carrino, John A. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Patel, Pinecca [Frankford Hospitals, Jefferson Health System, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to highlight the critical role that MRI may play in diagnosing unsuspected lower extremity deep venous thrombosis and to stress the importance of scrutinizing MRI studies of the lower extremity showing apparently non-specific muscle edema for any evidence of intramuscular venous thrombosis. The imaging studies of four patients in whom deep venous thrombosis was unsuspected on clinical grounds, and first diagnosed on the basis of MRI findings, were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. In all four patients the initial clinical suspicion was within the scope of musculoskeletal injuries (gastrocnemius strain, n=3; ruptured Baker cyst, n=1), explaining the choice of MRI over ultrasound as the first diagnostic modality. All patients showed marked reactive edema in the surrounding soft tissues or muscles. Three patients showed MR evidence of branching rim-enhancing structures within intramuscular plexuses characteristic of venous thrombosis (gastrocnemius, n=1; sural, n=2); one patient showed a distended popliteal vein. Ultrasound was able to duplicate the MRI findings in three patients: one patient showed above-the-knee extension on ultrasound; neither of the two patients with intramuscular thrombosis demonstrated on ultrasound showed extension to the deep venous trunks. Intramuscular venous thrombosis can present as marked edema-like muscle changes on MRI, simulating primary musculoskeletal conditions. In the absence of clinical suspicion for deep venous thrombosis, only the identification of rim-enhancing branching intramuscular tubular structures will allow the correct diagnosis to be made. (orig.)

  17. Thrombosis associated with a large leiomyomatous uterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Meira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Female patient, 47 years old, with pain, edema and functional impotence of her left lower limb in the past 3 days. Recent history of menorrhagia and anaemia, requiring blood transfusion. Abdominal examination revealed a large, hard and painless mass in the hypogastrium. She was diagnosed with venous thrombosis of the left common and superficial femoral veins and thromboembolism of the right branch of the pulmonary artery. Abdominal-pelvic Computed Tomography Scan (Figure 1 showed a large heterogeneous uterine mass with central areas of necrosis. Pelvic magnetic resonance (Figure 2 demonstrated a uterine lesion with features of aggressiveness, which may correspond to sarcoma. She underwent subtotal hysterectomy and bilateral adnexectomy. However, histopathological study didn´t confirmed the presence of leiomyosarcoma, but instead a uterine leiomyoma. It is a benign tumor with an incidence of malignant degeneration less than 1.0% and whose surgical treatment is definitive.

  18. LATERAL SINUS THROMBOSIS IN OTOLOGY: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Visavanatha

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Lateral sinus thrombosis (LST is usually occurs as a complication of middle ear infection .The involvement of lateral sinus during the course of ear infection was a well known complication in preantibiotic days .The decrease in the incidence of LST is due to the introduction of broad-spectrum antibiotics, early diagnosis and surgical treatment. Now, it is a rare complication of otitis media and poses a serious threat that warrants immediate medical and surgical treatment. The classical clinical picture is often changed by previous antibiotic therapy. An awareness of this rare potentially devastating condition and its varied presentations is necessary for early diagnosis and treatment. LST can also occur after head injury.

  19. Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis following Oropharyngeal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Bostanci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal jugular vein thrombosis (IJVT is a rare condition which may lead to life-threatening complications such as sepsis and pulmonary embolism. Prolonged central venous catheterization, intravenous (IV drug use, trauma, and radiotherapy are the most frequent causes of the IJVT. IJVT that develops after the oropharyngeal infection is a quite rare situation today. In this paper, a 37-year-old woman was presented; swelling occurred on her neck after acute tonsillitis and she was diagnosed with IJVT through Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging and managed without complications. Early diagnosis and conservative treatment with broad-spectrum IV antibiotics and anticoagulant agents have a critical importance for the prevention of fatal complications.

  20. Ovarian vein thrombosis in a polytrauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, Emma; Beaven, Alastair; Balogun, Moji; Porter, Keith

    2015-12-18

    A young mother presented to a major trauma centre following a road traffic collision. Her admission CT traumagram demonstrated liver and renal lacerations, spinal and pelvic fractures with no abnormalities of the ovarian veins. Her inpatient course was uncomplicated other than a sustained, isolated raised C reactive protein. CT of the abdomen 1 week after injury demonstrated stable solid organ injuries and the additional, unexpected finding of a right ovarian vein thrombosis (OVT). A pragmatic approach was taken towards the management of the OVT given the haemorrhagic risk from her traumatic injuries. A multidisciplinary, consultant-led plan was made to slowly increase enoxaparin to a therapeutic dose under close surveillance and to then switch to warfarin following an outpatient consultation with a consultant haematologist. A MR venogram was performed after 3 months of anticoagulation, and this demonstrated complete resolution of the OVT and normal appearances of the ovary.

  1. Neuropeptide Y signal peptide Pro7 substitution protects against coronary artery atherosclerosis: the Helsinki Sudden Death Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilveskoski, Erkki; Viiri, Leena E; Mikkelsson, Jussi; Pörsti, Ilkka; Lehtimäki, Terho; Karhunen, Pekka J

    2008-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has a single nucleotide polymorphism at T1128C, leading to change of Leucine7 to Proline7. The Leu7Pro substitution has been linked to cardiovascular disease, but it is unknown whether the Pro7 allele is associated with increased or decreased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of the Leu7Pro polymorphism with coronary atherosclerosis and its consequences. We studied two autopsy series comprising 700 unselected middle-aged Caucasian men (Helsinki Sudden Death Study) who had died suddenly out of hospital. Areas of coronary artery atherosclerosis, narrowings of coronary arteries, and presence of myocardial infarction and/or coronary thrombosis were analyzed. All information including CHD risk factor data was obtained from 410 men. NPY genotype distribution was Leu7/Leu7=89.8%, Leu7/Pro7=10.0% and Pro7/Pro7=0.2%). Although the Pro7 allele was associated with reported hypertension (p=0.03), the men carrying Pro7 allele had lower area of fatty streaks (p=0.04), fibrotic lesions (p=0.07) and complicated lesions (p=0.004) in the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery and also less severe LAD narrowings (p=0.04) than men with the Leu7/Leu7 genotype. Supporting a protective role for the Pro7 allele against atherosclerosis, only 1 out of 46 men (2%) with coronary thrombosis carried the Pro7 allele (p=0.08 compared to men dying of other causes). This association weakened (OR 0.18 for Pro7 versus Leu7/Leu7, p=0.16) when adjusted for all available CHD risk factors. NPY Pro7 substitution protects middle-aged men from coronary artery atherosclerosis and might decrease the risk of acute coronary events.

  2. Postpartum ovarian vein thrombosis after cesarean delivery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Royo Pedro

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Postpartum ovarian vein thrombosis is an uncommon complication; incidence varies between 0.002% and 0.05%. It most often occurs during the 2–15 days following delivery. Case presentation A 22-year-old pregnant woman at term presented to hospital with uterine contractions, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. After delivery an ovarian vein thrombosis was diagnosed. Conclusion Low-molecular weight heparin with broad-spectrum antibiotics are the accepted therapy in non-complicated cases of postpartum ovarian vein thrombosis.

  3. Postpartum ovarian vein thrombosis after cesarean delivery: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo, Pedro; Alonso-Burgos, Alberto; García-Manero, Manuel; Lecumberri, Ramón; Alcázar, Juan Luis

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Postpartum ovarian vein thrombosis is an uncommon complication; incidence varies between 0.002% and 0.05%. It most often occurs during the 2–15 days following delivery. Case presentation A 22-year-old pregnant woman at term presented to hospital with uterine contractions, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. After delivery an ovarian vein thrombosis was diagnosed. Conclusion Low-molecular weight heparin with broad-spectrum antibiotics are the accepted therapy in non-complicated cases of postpartum ovarian vein thrombosis. PMID:18400095

  4. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Sassi, Samia; Mizouni, Habiba; Nabli, Fatma; Kallel, Lamia; Kefi, Mounir; Hentati, Fayçal

    2010-01-01

    Venous infarction in the cerebellum has been reported only rarely, probably because of the abundant venous collateral drainage in this region. Bilateral occipital infarction is a rare cause of visual loss in cerebral venous thrombosis. We describe a 50-year-old woman with a history of ulcerative colitis who developed acute cerebellar ataxia and cortical blindness. She had bilateral cerebellar and occipital lesions related to sigmoid venous thrombosis and achieved complete recovery with anticoagulation therapy. Cerebral venous thrombosis should be considered in cases of simultaneous cerebellar and occipital vascular lesions.

  5. Thrombosis modeling in intracranial aneurysms: a lattice Boltzmann numerical algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouared, R.; Chopard, B.; Stahl, B.; Rüfenacht, D. A.; Yilmaz, H.; Courbebaisse, G.

    2008-07-01

    The lattice Boltzmann numerical method is applied to model blood flow (plasma and platelets) and clotting in intracranial aneurysms at a mesoscopic level. The dynamics of blood clotting (thrombosis) is governed by mechanical variations of shear stress near wall that influence platelets-wall interactions. Thrombosis starts and grows below a shear rate threshold, and stops above it. Within this assumption, it is possible to account qualitatively well for partial, full or no occlusion of the aneurysm, and to explain why spontaneous thrombosis is more likely to occur in giant aneurysms than in small or medium sized aneurysms.

  6. Unusual Presentation of Renal Vein Thrombosis in a Preterm Infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chang-Yo; Fu, Ren-Huei; Lien, Reyin; Yang, Peng-Hong

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal renal vein thrombosis is the most common vascular condition in the newborn kidney, which could lead to serious complication in infants undergoing intensive care. In this study, we report the case of a preterm infant with left renal vein and inferior vena cava thrombosis, presented with gross hematuria, thrombocytopenia, transient hypertension, and adrenal hemorrhage. Supportive care was offered instead of heparin therapy or thrombolytic agents. In conclusion, our case teaches that, despite the lack of a clinically obvious shock event, renal vein thrombosis should be considered in a macrohematuric newborn without renal failure.

  7. Ovarian Vein Thrombosis as a Complication of Laparoscopic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anu; Gupta, Natasha; Blankstein, Josef; Trester, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian vein thrombosis (OVT) is an extremely rare but life-threatening complication of the postpartum period. It has never been reported as a complication of laparoscopic surgery. We report a case of right ovarian vein thrombosis that occurred in the postoperative period after patient underwent laparoscopic salpingectomy for a right side ectopic pregnancy. She presented with 1-week history of abdominal pain and fever. A complete workup for fever was performed and was found negative. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right ovarian vein thrombosis. The patient was treated with anticoagulant therapy and responded well.

  8. Ovarian Vein Thrombosis as a Complication of Laparoscopic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian vein thrombosis (OVT is an extremely rare but life-threatening complication of the postpartum period. It has never been reported as a complication of laparoscopic surgery. We report a case of right ovarian vein thrombosis that occurred in the postoperative period after patient underwent laparoscopic salpingectomy for a right side ectopic pregnancy. She presented with 1-week history of abdominal pain and fever. A complete workup for fever was performed and was found negative. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right ovarian vein thrombosis. The patient was treated with anticoagulant therapy and responded well.

  9. Incidence and diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis associated with pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, A

    1983-01-01

    The incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), diagnosed by ascending phlebography, has been calculated retrospectively in a group of 14 869 obstetrical patients. The incidence was calculated to 0.13 per thousand antepartum and 0.61 per thousand postpartum. The study revealed that clinical signs and symptoms of thrombosis are very unreliable in pregnant women but more reliable in puerperal women. It is concluded that objective diagnosis of thrombosis is important in pregnant women, and ascending phlebography is a rewarding objective method to use in pregnant women.

  10. Acute Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis with a Vaginal Contraceptive Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Eilbert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain, which if left untreated may result in bowel infarction, peritonitis and death. The majority of patients with this illness have a recognizable, predisposing prothrombotic condition. Oral contraceptives have been identified as a predisposing factor for mesenteric venous thrombosis in reproductive-aged women. In the last fifteen years new methods of hormonal birth control have been introduced, including a transdermal patch and an intravaginal ring. In this report, we describe a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis in a young woman caused by a vaginal contraceptive ring. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(4:395-397.

  11. Primary leiomyosarcoma of saphenous vein presenting as deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremed, Daniel I; Faries, Peter L; Schanzer, Harry R; Marin, Michael L; Ting, Windsor

    2014-12-01

    Only a small number of venous leiomyosarcomas have been previously reported. Of these tumors, those of saphenous origin comprise a minority of cases. A 59-year-old man presented with symptoms of deep vein thrombosis and was eventually diagnosed with primary leiomyosarcoma of great saphenous vein origin. The tumor was treated with primary resection and femoral vein reconstruction with autologous patch. Although extremely rare, saphenous leiomyosarcoma can present as deep vein thrombosis. Vascular tumors should be included in the differential diagnosis of atypical extremity swelling refractory to conventional deep vein thrombosis management.

  12. Simultaneous occlusion of left anterior descending and left circumflex arteries by very late stent thrombosis: vascular response to drug-eluting stents assessed by intravascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamawaki, Masahiro; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Nakano, Masatsugu; Muramatsu, Takashi; Nakatani, Shimpei; Ishibashi, Yuki; Ishimori, Hiroshi; Hirano, Keisuke; Ito, Yoshiaki; Tsukahara, Reiko; Muramatsu, Toshiya

    2015-11-01

    Very late stent thrombosis (VLST) is a catastrophic complication after implantation of a drug-eluting stent (DES). It has been reported that VLST is associated with pathological changes, which often include late acquired incomplete stent apposition (LAISA) with thrombus formation. In addition, the vascular response to the stent (evaginations, neointimal growth, and thrombosis) and the incidence of LAISA are reported to vary among the different types of DES. We experienced a patient with cardiogenic shock induced by simultaneous VLST of both the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and the left circumflex artery (LCX) at 3 years after implantation of two sirolimus-eluting stents. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) showed LAISA of both arteries. A paclitaxel-eluting stent, which had been implanted in the right coronary artery 3 years earlier, did not show such a finding. IVUS revealed "different vascular reactions" to "different types of DES" in this patient.

  13. Effects of sirolimus-eluting stent on calcified coronary lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-jun; WU Yong-jian; YUAN Jin-qing; CHEN Jue; YOU Shi-jie; DAI Jun; XIA Ran; GAO Run-lin; XU Bo; YANG Yue-jin; CHEN Ji-lin; QIAO Shu-bing; MA Wei-hua; QIN Xue-wen; YAO Min; LIU Hai-bo

    2008-01-01

    Background Calcified coronary lesions carry the risk of suboptimal stent expansion, subsequently leading to restenosis. The effectiveness of sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) for the treatment of calcified lesion has not been fully investigated. In the present study, therefore, we evaluated the effectiveness of SES Implantation for the treatment of calcified coronary lesions.Mothods A total of 333 consecutive patients with 453 lesions were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups according to whether the lesion treated with SES was calcified or not; no calcification group (n=264) and calcification group (n=189). Lesions treated with SES were subjected to quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) immediately and 8 months following stenting.Results Baseline clinical, demographic or angiographic characteristics were well balanced in both groups. Angiographic follow-up at 8 months, the in-stent restenosis and in-segment restenosis rates were not significantly different between the two groups; in-stent restenosis: 3.8% vs 4.2%; P=0.081; in-segment restenosis: 8.7% vs 10.6%, P=0.503. The target lesion revascularization (TLR) was also not significantly different between the two groups; 4.9% vs 6.9%, P=0.378. In addition, the in-stent late loss was similar in both groups; (0.16±0.40) mm vs (0.17±0.33) mm, P>0.05. Meantime, overall thrombosis rates were also similar in both groups; 1.6% vs 1.6%, P>0.05.Conclusion Although calcified coronary lesion was hard to stent, successful percutaneous coronary intervention with SES stenting for calcified lesions was conferred by the similar favorable results that were seen when comparing non-calcified and calcified coronary lesions.

  14. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    In coronary artery disease (CAD), the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to your heart muscle grow hardened and narrowed. You may try ... these treatments don't help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new ...

  15. MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION TYPE 4TH: FEATURES OF THE COURSE, PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS AFTER PERCUTANEOUS CORONARY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Pravdyuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, cardiovascular diseases occupy the first place in the structure of total morbidity and mortality in many countries. In 2013 in the Russian Federation from cardiovascular disease died 1 million 799 thousand people, from the bottom 529.8 thousand from coronary heart disease, the primary role belongs to myocardial infarction and its complications. Currently, the "gold standard" for the diagnosis of coronary heart disease, including myocardial infarction, remains coronary angiography; the main objectives of coronary angiography are to assess the features of the coronary anatomy, determination of the possibility of endovascular treatment of myocardial infarction and revascularization by stent implantation. Despite the constant improvement of technology and the progress made in relation to pharmacological support, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI is an invasive manipulation, which is associated with a certain risk. Diagnostic criteria for myocardial infarction 4a type include increasing the level of troponin above 5 rules of 99th the upper threshold reference values within 48 hours after the PCI procedure, in patients with normal troponin increased (≤ 99th the upper threshold reference values, or a level of troponin 20 % or more in patients with initial high level troponin combined with evidence of prolonged myocardial ischemia. Stent when performing percutaneous coronary interventions, accompanied by the activation of thrombogenic reactions, can lead to thrombosis and development 4b type. To the diagnostic signs of the myocardial infarction 4b type are the stent thrombosis, angiographic proven and/or at autopsy, in combination with increased troponin level at least one greater than the 99th the upper threshold reference values. Stent when performing PCI, accompanied by the activation of thrombogenic reactions, can lead to thrombosis and development myocardial infarction 4b type. The diagnostic signs myocardial infarction 4b type are

  16. Exercised-Induced Coronary Spasm in Near Normal Coronary Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Franzen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to effort-induced symptoms in obstructive coronary disease, spasm in normal coronary arteries is characterized by angina at rest. We describe a 44-year-old patient with minor coronary plaques and pure exercised-induced coronary spasm. The case questions the differential pathogenic considerations of variant of the variant as opposed to Prinzmetal's variant angina.

  17. Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis Complicating Typhoid Fever in a Teenager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Okunola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus (sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare life-threatening disorder in childhood that is often misdiagnosed. CSVT encompasses cavernous sinus thrombosis, lateral sinus thrombosis, and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST. We present an adolescent girl who was well until two weeks earlier when she had a throbbing frontal headache and fever with chills; she later had dyspnoea, jaundice, melena stool, multiple seizures, nuchal rigidity, and monoparesis of the right lower limb a day before admission. Urine test for Salmonella typhi Vi antigen was positive, and Widal reaction was significant. Serial cranial computerized tomography scans revealed an expanding hypodense lesion in the parafalcine region consistent with SSST or a parasagittal abscess. Inadvertent left parietal limited craniectomy confirmed SSST. She recovered completely with subsequent conservative management. Beyond neuropsychiatric complications of Typhoid fever, CSVT should be highly considered when focal neurologic deficits are present.

  18. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-02-05

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully.

  19. Is there a tendency for thrombosis in gestational diabetes mellitus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suheyla Gorar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our findings indicate tendency to develop thrombosis in GDM similar to diabetes mellitus; but more comprehensive studies with larger sample size are needed to determine the relationship between GDM and hemostasis.

  20. Imaging characteristics of two patients with isolated cortical venous thrombosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shunchang Han; Hui Zhang; Guoguang Fan; Baohai Sun

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Over the past twenty years, improvements in neuroimaging have greatly improved the ability to diagnose cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, as well as isolated cortical venous thrombosis. Neuroimaging allows for variations to be detected in the cortical vein and venous sinus. Diagnosis of thromboses in the venous system should not depend entirely on angiography of undeveloped veins or venous sinus. Currently, the combination of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography is the gold standard for diagnosing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, rather than digital subtraction angiography. This article summarizes clinical manifestations, results from computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in two cases of isolated cortical venous thrombosis, analyzed relevant literature, and discussed the clinical and imaging characteristics of isolated cortical venous thromboses.

  1. Plantar vein thrombosis: a rare cause of plantar foot pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, Daniel S.; Wu, Jim S.; Brennan, Darren D.; Hochman, Mary G. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Challies, Tracy [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Plantar vein thrombosis is a rare condition, with only a handful of cases reported in the literature. The cause is unknown; however, the disease has been attributed to prior surgery, trauma, and paraneoplastic conditions. We present a case of a 32-year-old female runner with plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed on contrast-enhanced MRI and confirmed on ultrasound. The symptoms resolved with conservative treatment and evaluation revealed the presence of a prothrombin gene mutation and use of oral contraceptive pills. To our knowledge, this is the first case of plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed initially by MRI. Moreover, this case suggests that plantar vein thrombosis should be considered in patients with hypercoagulable states and plantar foot pain. (orig.)

  2. Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis associated with isopropanol ingestion in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Michelle E; Golomb, Meredith R

    2009-03-01

    This report describes a 5-week-old female infant who presented with accidental ingestion of rubbing alcohol (which contains about 70% isopropanol), and was subsequently diagnosed with cerebral sinovenous thrombosis. Isopropanol is a clear, volatile 3-carbon alcohol found in varying concentrations in many solvents. Mislabeled rubbing alcohol was mixed with this patient's formula. After ingesting it, she presented with a 1-day history of uncontrolled fussiness and an episode of deviation of the eyes to the right for 30 minutes, followed by rhythmic movements of the arms and legs for 20 minutes. Cerebral imaging demonstrated sinovenous thrombosis. To our knowledge, there have been no reports describing cerebral sinovenous thrombosis as a complication of isopropanol ingestion. The possible association of isopropanol ingestion and sinovenous thrombosis is discussed.

  3. New insights into the mechanisms of venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackman, Nigel

    2012-07-01

    Venous thrombosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries, especially in the elderly. Many risk factors have been identified for venous thrombosis that alter blood flow, activate the endothelium, and increase blood coagulation. However, the precise mechanisms that trigger clotting in large veins have not been fully elucidated. The most common site for initiation of the thrombus appears to be the valve pocket sinus, due to its tendency to become hypoxic. Activation of endothelial cells by hypoxia or possibly inflammatory stimuli would lead to surface expression of adhesion receptors that facilitate the binding of circulating leukocytes and microvesicles. Subsequent activation of the leukocytes induces expression of the potent procoagulant protein tissue factor that triggers thrombosis. Understanding the mechanisms of venous thrombosis may lead to the development of new treatments.

  4. Inflammation, thrombosis and atherosclerosis: results of the Glostrup study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maat, M de; Bladbjerg, E-M; Drivsholm, T;

    2003-01-01

    Inflammation and thrombosis are important mechanisms in cardiovascular disease, as illustrated by the consistent association between inflammatory and hemostatic variables and the risk of cardiovascular events in epidemiological studies. However, the relationship between plasma concentrations of i...

  5. Anti-GBM disease and renal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Phillippa; Sarfraz, Farook; Ravanan, Rommel

    2011-11-15

    A 23-year-old female who presented with advanced renal failure was subsequently diagnosed with renal vein thrombosis and antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease. A previous case of renal vein thrombosis has been reported in association with anti-GBM disease, but to our knowledge, this is the first reported case in which the presentation of anti-GBM disease and renal vein thrombosis was concurrent. Further study is essential to understand if the association of anti-GBM disease and renal vein thrombosis as seen in our case was pure coincidence or is in fact occurs more frequently. It may be that the dual diagnosis is not made as establishing one sufficient diagnosis for renal failure may halt further investigations for additional diagnoses.

  6. Placental fetal vascular thrombosis lesions and maternal thrombophilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeksma, F. A.; Erwich, J. J. H. M.; Khong, T. Y.

    Aims: Following intrauterine fetal death (IUFD), the placental fetal vessels undergo regressive changes. These changes are virtually indistinguishable from lesions that are the result of fetal vascular thrombosis (FVT). This study investigated the relation between these lesions and maternal

  7. Chylous ascites caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Dong Eun; Chae, Kwon Mook

    2011-01-01

    Chylous ascites is defined as the accumulation of chyle in the peritoneum due to obstruction or rupture of the peritoneal or retroperitoneal lymphatic glands. Chylous ascites that arises from acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis is very rare. We report here on a case of chylous ascite that was caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis, in which the patient showed an impressive response to conservative therapy with total parenteral nutrition and octerotide. We also rev...

  8. Acute celiac trunk thrombosis revealed by biliary peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerraya, H; Sbaï, A; Khalfallah, M; Dziri, C

    2015-11-01

    Acute thrombosis of the celiac trunk is a very uncommon condition, which is a life-threatening emergency. The clinical presentation is highly variable depending on the extent of the ischemic territory. We report a case of biliary peritonitis related to an acute thrombosis of the celiac trunk. This case highlights the role of abdominal computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute upper abdominal pain.

  9. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis due to renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Haghighatkhah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC had a tendency to extend into the renal vein and inferior vena cava, while extension into the gonadal vein has been rarely reported. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis appears as an enhancing filling defect within the dilated gonadal vein anterior to the psoas muscle and shows an enhancement pattern identical to that of the original tumor. The possibility of gonadal vein thrombosis should be kept in mind when looking at an imaging study of patients with RCC

  10. Plantar Vein Thrombosis: An Unusual Cause of Plantar Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Vansevenant, Milan; Vanhoenacker, Filip M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of an 80-year-old man with progressive pain for 5 days at the medial and plantar aspect of the left heel. Wearing shoes aggravated the pain. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed thrombosis of the medial plantar veins. Plantar vein thrombosis is a rare condition. The clinical symptoms are non-specific and can be confused with plantar fasciitis. It has been associated with hypercoagulable conditions, foot trauma and recent surgery. The imaging modality of c...

  11. Upper extremity thrombosis in Behçet’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Küçük

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Behçet’s disease (BD is a systemic disease characterizedby oral aphthosis, genital ulcers, ocular lesions andalso gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, neurological andvessel involvements may develop. Venous manifestationsare more common than arterial involvement. Venousinvolvement often occurs in the veins of lower extremity.Upper extremity venous involvement is rare. In this paperwe report a case of BH presenting with upper extremitysuperficial vein thrombosis.Key words: Behçet’s disease, upper extremity, superficialvein thrombosis

  12. Abdominal aortic thrombosis in a patient with nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M; Ohnishi, T; Okamoto, S; Yamakado, T; Isaka, N; Nakano, T

    1998-01-01

    We report a patient who presented with severe nephrotic syndrome complicated with infrarenal aortic and right renal arterial thrombosis. The nephrotic syndrome frequently causes thromboembolic complications in veins, but arterial thrombosis is relatively rare, especially in the aorta. Various predisposing factors leading to thromboembolic complications are discussed. In this case, the thromboembolic complication may have some clinical association with the hypercoagulable state in nephrotic syndrome.

  13. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis due to renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighatkhah, Hamidreza; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Taheri, Morteza Sanei

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) had a tendency to extend into the renal vein and inferior vena cava, while extension into the gonadal vein has been rarely reported. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis appears as an enhancing filling defect within the dilated gonadal vein anterior to the psoas muscle and shows an enhancement pattern identical to that of the original tumor. The possibility of gonadal vein thrombosis should be kept in mind when looking at an imaging study of patients with RCC.

  14. Vena porta thrombosis in patient with inherited factor VII deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klovaite, Jolanta; Friis-Hansen, Lennart Jan; Larsen, Fin S;

    2010-01-01

    with inherited FVII deficiency and chronic vena porta thrombosis. She presented at 32 weeks of gestation with spontaneously increased international normalized ratio, severe thrombocytopenia and very few unspecific symptoms. The extensive examination of the patient revealed cavernous transformation of the portal...... vein with well expressed portosystemic collaterals, heterozygosity for three common polymorphisms in FVII gene, associated with reduction in plasma FVII levels, and no other factors predisposing to thrombosis....

  15. Ovarian Vein Thrombosis as a Complication of Laparoscopic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Anu Gupta; Natasha Gupta; Josef Blankstein; Richard Trester

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian vein thrombosis (OVT) is an extremely rare but life-threatening complication of the postpartum period. It has never been reported as a complication of laparoscopic surgery. We report a case of right ovarian vein thrombosis that occurred in the postoperative period after patient underwent laparoscopic salpingectomy for a right side ectopic pregnancy. She presented with 1-week history of abdominal pain and fever. A complete workup for fever was performed and was found negative. Computed...

  16. A Rare Complication of Acute Appendicitis: Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Koncoro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric vein (SMV thrombosis caused by acute appendicitis is quite rare nowadays. These conditions occurs secondary to infection in the region drained by the portal venous system. In this case, we report a successfully treated case of SMV thrombosis and liver abscess associated with appendicitis with antibiotics and anticoagulant.Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are basic to a favorable clinical course.

  17. Myocardial FFR (Fractional Flow Reserve in patients with angiographically intermediate coronary artery stenosis - an initial institutional experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish H. Ramaiah

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical significance of coronary artery stenosis of intermediate severity can be difficult to determine. The management of intermediate coronary lesions, defined by a diameter stenosis of ¡I40% to ¡U70%, continues to be a therapeutic dilemma for cardiologists. The 2-dimensional representation of the arterial lesion provided by angiography is limited in distinguishing intermediate lesions that require stenting from those that simply need appropriate medical therapy. In the era of drug-eluting stents, some might propose that stenting all intermediate coronary lesions is an appropriate solution. However, the possibility of procedural complications such as coronary dissection, no reflow phenomenon, in-stent restenosis, and stent thrombosis requires accurate stratification of patients with intermediate coronary lesions to appropriate therapy. Myocardial fractional flow reserve (FFR is an index of the functional severity of coronary stenosis that is calculated from pressure measurements made during coronary angiography. The objective of the study is to evaluate the usefulness of FFR in patients with angiographically intermediate coronary artery stenosis. Methods: 20 patients with intermediate coronary stenosis and chest pain of uncertain origin. The Exercise Electrocardiography (TMT, Myocardial Perfusion Imaging study (MPI, Quantitative Coronary Angiography (QCA were compared with the results of FFR measurements. Results: 20 patients were undergone FFR measurement during the study period. With the mean age of 57.25¡À11.2 and male patients were 16 (80%, female patients 4 (20%, in all 13 patients with an FFR of 0.75 tested negative for reversible myocardial ischemia on TMT and MPI study. No revascularization procedures were performed in 7 (35% patients, and no adverse cardiovascular events were noted in all these patients during 6 months of follow-up. Conclusions: In patients with coronary stenosis of intermediate severity, FFR

  18. Stent Thrombosis in Drug-Eluting or Bare-Metal Stents in Patients Receiving Dual Antiplatelet Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereiakes, Dean J; Yeh, Robert W; Massaro, Joseph M; Driscoll-Shempp, Priscilla; Cutlip, Donald E; Steg, P Gabriel; Gershlick, Anthony H; Darius, Harald; Meredith, Ian T; Ormiston, John; Tanguay, Jean-François; Windecker, Stephan; Garratt, Kirk N; Kandzari, David E; Lee, David P; Simon, Daniel I; Iancu, Adrian Corneliu; Trebacz, Jaroslaw; Mauri, Laura

    2015-10-01

    This study sought to compare rates of stent thrombosis and major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) (composite of death, myocardial infarction, or stroke) after coronary stenting with drug-eluting stents (DES) versus bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients who participated in the DAPT (Dual Antiplatelet Therapy) study, an international multicenter randomized trial comparing 30 versus 12 months of dual antiplatelet therapy in subjects undergoing coronary stenting with either DES or BMS. Despite antirestenotic efficacy of coronary DES compared with BMS, the relative risk of stent thrombosis and adverse cardiovascular events is unclear. Many clinicians perceive BMS to be associated with fewer adverse ischemic events and to require shorter-duration dual antiplatelet therapy than DES. Prospective propensity-matched analysis of subjects enrolled into a randomized trial of dual antiplatelet therapy duration was performed. DES- and BMS-treated subjects were propensity-score matched in a many-to-one fashion. The study design was observational for all subjects 0 to 12 months following stenting. A subset of eligible subjects without major ischemic or bleeding events were randomized at 12 months to continued thienopyridine versus placebo; all subjects were followed through 33 months. Among 10,026 propensity-matched subjects, DES-treated subjects (n = 8,308) had a lower rate of stent thrombosis through 33 months compared with BMS-treated subjects (n = 1,718, 1.7% vs. 2.6%; weighted risk difference -1.1%, p = 0.01) and a noninferior rate of MACCE (11.4% vs. 13.2%, respectively, weighted risk difference -1.8%, p = 0.053, noninferiority p Antiplatelet Therapy Study [DAPT study]; NCT00977938). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Deep vein thrombosis: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesieme EB

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Emeka Kesieme1, Chinenye Kesieme2, Nze Jebbin3, Eshiobo Irekpita1, Andrew Dongo11Department of Surgery, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, Nigeria; 2Department of Paediatrics, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua, Nigeria; 3Department of Surgery, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port-Harcourt, NigeriaBackground: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT is the formation of blood clots (thrombi in the deep veins. It commonly affects the deep leg veins (such as the calf veins, femoral vein, or popliteal vein or the deep veins of the pelvis. It is a potentially dangerous condition that can lead to preventable morbidity and mortality.Aim: To present an update on the causes and management of DVT.Methods: A review of publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google.Results: DVT affects 0.1% of persons per year. It is predominantly a disease of the elderly and has a slight male preponderance. The approach to making a diagnosis currently involves an algorithm combining pretest probability, D-dimer testing, and compression ultrasonography. This will guide further investigations if necessary. Prophylaxis is both mechanical and pharmacological. The goals of treatment are to prevent extension of thrombi, pulmonary embolism, recurrence of thrombi, and the development of complications such as pulmonary hypertension and post-thrombotic syndrome.Conclusion: DVT is a potentially dangerous condition with a myriad of risk factors. Prophylaxis is very important and can be mechanical and pharmacological. The mainstay of treatment is anticoagulant therapy. Low-molecular-weight heparin, unfractionated heparin, and vitamin K antagonists have been the treatment of choice. Currently anticoagulants specifically targeting components of the common pathway have been recommended for prophylaxis. These include fondaparinux, a selective indirect factor Xa inhibitor and the new oral selective direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran and selective

  20. [Pain in venous thrombosis of the leg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, J P

    1992-01-01

    According to D. Reinharez, pain and edema are the commonest presenting symptoms in phlebology. Pain is one of the most classical symptoms of an ordinary deep venous thrombosis, a valuable feature when present, in the form of deep tension, heaviness, swelling and a feeling of dead weight. It is often absent or slight. It may consist merely of a dull cramp, or of an "undefinable" (C. Bourde) odd, heavy leg. It generally affects the calf but may involve the sole of the foot, the heel, the thigh, the groin or even the true pelvis. This feeling, although "imprecise and variable" (P. Wallois, P. Griton) is highly suggestive. It increases on standing and walking in the form of unilateral uncomfortable tension, heaviness or painful swelling, which maybe a source of worry or even anxiety to the patient. Tenderness on palpation of venous tracts and their stretching is more suggestive. In the opinion of M. Duruble, Neuhof's sign (feeling of tender fullness of the calf) is more reliable than Homans' sign (pain in the calf caused by passive dorsiflexion of the foot, with the lower limb in extension) which essentially stretches only the posterior tibial venous system. The value of Sigg's sign (pain in the popliteal fossa on passive extension of the knee) is controversial. Far more rare is phlegmasia coerulea dolens or Grégoire's blue leg, complicating phlegmasia alba dolens or of sudden onset, with initial very severe or even "intolerable" pain (J.J. Pinot) in Scarpa's triangle, rapidly spreading to the limb. In varicose phlebitis (M. Perrin) or superficial thrombophlebitis or varico-phlebitis (A.A. Ramelet) or superficial venitis (J.P. Henriet), pain most often consists of moderate burning tension overlying the thrombosed vein(s), increased by palpation and mobilisation. Sometimes severe initially, it is exacerbated by the slightest touch. In total, pain, regardless of its characteristics, its site and/or its severity, is one of the most constant clinical features of venous

  1. [Portal vein thrombosis in patients with thrombophilia--own observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatkowska-Stodulska, Renata; Kazimierska, Ewa; Weyer-Hepka, Jolanta; Dworakowska, Dorota; Lubińska, Monika; Gnacińska, Maria; Bakowska, Alicja; Czestochowska, Eugenia

    2005-04-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is one of the main prehepatic causes of portal hypertension. The most frequent causes of thrombosis in this localization, apart from hepatic cirrhosis, are the following: acute inflammatory diseases and abdominal cancers, traumas, proliferative diseases of the hematopoietic system. In recent years attention was given to disorders in hemostasis, such as thrombophilia, in the course of which thrombosis development is particularly common. The authors present 10 patients after an incident of portal vein thrombosis, in which primary hepatic pathology was excluded and tests directed at thrombophilia were performed. In seven patients abnormalities in the examined parameters were found, and what is more, in two cases they had a complex character and involved more than one parameter. In five patients hyperhomocysteinemia was found. Among them, in two patients there was also a decreased protein S activity and in one of them there was also APC-resistance. In the next two patients there were abnormalities in one of the examined parameters - APC-resistance. Hyperhomocysteinemia was found in all patients with idiopathic thrombosis, and in one of them there were concurrent changes in protein S activity and APC-resistance. In patients with the history of portal vein thrombosis diagnostics of thrombophilia should be performed.

  2. Upper extremity venous thrombosis. Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmers, D W; Thorpe, P E; Knibbe, M A; Beard, D W

    1990-02-01

    Upper extremity venous thrombosis is a clinical entity with numerous etiologic factors. Only 2% of all cases of deep venous thrombosis involve the upper extremity, and the incidence of pulmonary embolism related to thrombosis in this location is approximately 12%. Primary or "effort" thrombosis of the upper limb is related to the inherent anatomical structure of the thoracic outlet and axillary region. Secondary thrombosis may have such diverse origins as trauma, infection, congestive heart failure, central venous catheters, neoplasms, septic phlebitis, intravenous drug use, and hypercoagulable states. Patients present with peripheral edema and prominent superficial veins, and neurologic symptoms (pain and paresthesias) are usually present as well. Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by venography or sonography. Treatment regimens include conservative measures, thrombolysis with fibrinolytic agents, and surgical correction of indicated thoracic outlet and axillary structures. We present an unusual case in which upper extremity venous thrombosis in a young healthy female athlete was associated with the presence of cervical ribs. The patient was successfully treated with focal thrombolysis and surgical resection of her ipsilateral cervical rib.

  3. Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis in Isolated Tuberculous Cervical Lymphadenopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Khaladkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a common infectious disease with a high prevalence in developing countries and presents a major public health issue. Internal jugular vein (IJV thrombosis is a rare complication in tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy. We report a case of 26-year male patient with a history of low-grade evening rise in fever, dry cough, loss of appetite, and loss of weight with swelling in lower neck on right side. Ultrasonography (USG neck showed well-defined hypoechoic lymph nodes posterior to right IJV and common carotid artery in the lower neck at level IV and in the right supraclavicular region showing central necrotic areas with adjoining IJV thrombosis. The association between tuberculosis and deep vein thrombosis is rare. Awareness of IJV thrombosis in isolated cervical lymphadenopathy needs high diagnostic suspicion and prompt treatment to avoid fatal complication. Our case is rare as there was isolated tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy with adjoining IJV thrombosis. Both USG and computed tomography (CT are accurate and reliable radiological investigations for detecting IJV thrombosis along with cervical lymph nodes. They are useful in assessing surrounding soft tissue and fat planes and knowing the size and extent of cervical lymphadenopathy. USG is inexpensive and readily available for monitoring response to treatment.

  4. Ectopic Origin of Coronary Arteries Diagnozed by Coronary Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Gorani, Daut; Sejdiu, Basri; Citaku, Hajdin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Anomalous origin of coronary arteries from opposite sinus of Valsalva is rare finding. The incidence of anomalous origination of the left coronary artery from right sinus is 0.15% and the right coronary artery from the left sinus is 0.92%. The ectopic origin of left coronary artery or right coronary artery from opposite sinus depending on pathways and considering atherosclerotic changes are manifested with different clinical significance. Case report: We report two cases, the first case the coronary angiography showed the left coronary artery arising from the right coronary sinus, presenting with proximally and distally stenosed left anterior descending artery (LAD), associated with medial and distal stenosed right coronary artery (RCA). The second case the coronary angiography revealed the right coronary artery arising from the left coronary sinus, associated with tortuous medial and distal segments of left anterior descending artery (LAD), without atherosclerotic changes. The first case successfully underwent treatment procedures based on guidelines for revascularization. Conclusion: The coronary angiography of patients with coronary ischemia determines atherosclerotic disease with possibility of the presence of coronary artery anomalies that in cases with ectopic origin from opposite sinus continues to exist as a challenge during treatment in interventional cardiology. PMID:27482140

  5. Acute myocardial infarction in chronic Chagas' cardiomyopathy: report of two cases with no obstructive coronary artery lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia G. Lage

    1986-04-01

    Full Text Available This report describes two patients with chronic Chagas' Heart Disease who developed clinical and laboratorial signs of myocardial infarction. Both patients presented sudden oppressive chest pain, without precipitating factor. In the first case, the highest MB-CK value was 65 IU, 22 hours after the beginning of the pain. On the second case, it was 77 IU at 18 hours after the beginning of the pain. In both cases ECG changes suggesting non-transmural infarction were present. The 99mTc PYP myocardial scintigram of the first case was positive. Coronary angiograms performed on the 18th and 9th day, respectively, after the acute infarction did not display obstructive lesions. Possible mechanisms causing myocardial infarction with normal coronary arteries in Chagas' Disease may include: embolic event's, particularly when there is associated congestive heart failure; coronary thrombosis and coronary spasms.

  6. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection in a Male Patient with Takayasu’s Arteritis and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Menekşe Gerede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 34-year-old male who presented to the emergency ward with fever and abdominal pain. The diagnosis of Takayasu’s arteritis and also antiphospholipid syndrome was made during an imaging workup of deep-vein thrombosis. A spontaneous coronary artery dissection was revealed in coronary CT angiography requested for chest pain and dyspnea. The patient was treated medically and discharged on close followup. The concurrence of spontaneous coronary artery dissection with antiphospholipid syndrome and Takayasu’s arteritis has not been reported in the previous literature. The possibility of a spontaneous coronary artery dissection should be considered in patients presenting with both diseases.

  7. Integrated laboratory coagulation tests in hypercoagulation diagnosis and thrombosis risk assessment. Part I. The pathophysiology of thrombosis and hypercoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Lipets

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis is a fatal hemostatic disorders occurring in various conditions ranging from pregnancy and surgery to cancer, sepsis and heart attack. Despite the availability of different anticoagulants and accumulated clinical experience, proving their effectiveness, thrombosis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. This is largely due to the fact that conventional laboratory coagulation tests are not sufficiently sensitive to the hypercoagulable state, and they are difficult to use for assessing the risk of thrombosis. Specific molecular markers (D-dimers, fibrinopeptide, thrombin-antithrombin complex are more effective, but also have a large number of disadvantages. A possible solution is the use of integrated test, which simulate in vitro the majority of the physiological coagulation processes. In the first part of this paper the biochemical processes that cause the risk of thrombosis were discussed.

  8. The concentration of platelet microparticles is increased in old patients with essential hypertension complicating with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Xin-li; CAO Jian

    2012-01-01

    To the Editor:Hypertension and coronary heart disease are commonly seen in the elderly population.The pathophysiology of their development is closely related to the mechanism of hemostasis and thrombosis,where the involvement of platelets is pivotal.Platelet microparticle (PMP) is an ultra-microvesicle released in the process of platelet activation,and holds important function in hemostasis and thrombosis.1 We measured concentration of PMP in peripheral blood among patients with elderly essential hypertension (EH) complicating with coronary heart disease (n=22,ages range from 68 to 84 years),and elderly healthy volunteers (n=20,ages range from 63 to 82 years).The results showed that PMP in patients with EH complicating with CAD was greater that that in healthy volunteers (Table 1).

  9. Correlation Between C677T and A1298C Mutations on the MTHFR Gene With Plasma Homocysteine Levels and Venous Thrombosis in Pregnant Women at Risk of Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kazem Ghaffari; Ali Ghasemi; Abbas Ghotaslou; Mohsen Mohammadi; Zeynal Salmanpour

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common disease with a high morbidity, mortality and increase in miscarriages. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assessment the correlation between C677T and A1298C mutations on the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with total plasma homocysteine levels and deep venous thrombosis in pregnant women at risk of thrombosis. Pati...

  10. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result of coronary artery disease, or CAD, said Edward A. Fisher, M.D., Ph.D., M.P. ... Problems and Disease • High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Metabolic Syndrome • Pericarditis • Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) • Stroke • Vascular Health • ...

  11. Imaging Diagnosis of Splanchnic Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT is a broad term that includes Budd-Chiari syndrome and occlusion of veins that constitute the portal venous system. Due to the common risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of these clinically distinct disorders, concurrent involvement of two different regions is quite common. In acute and subacute SVT, the symptoms may overlap with a variety of other abdominal emergencies while in chronic SVT, the extent of portal hypertension and its attendant complications determine the clinical course. As a result, clinical diagnosis is often difficult and is frequently reliant on imaging. Tremendous improvements in vascular imaging in recent years have ensured that this once rare entity is being increasingly detected. Treatment of acute SVT requires immediate anticoagulation. Transcatheter thrombolysis or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is used in the event of clinical deterioration. In cases with peritonitis, immediate laparotomy and bowel resection may be required for irreversible bowel ischemia. In chronic SVT, the underlying cause should be identified and treated. The imaging manifestations of the clinical syndromes resulting from SVT are comprehensively discussed here along with a brief review of the relevant clinical features and therapeutic approach.

  12. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Risk Factors for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvis, Suzanne M; Middeldorp, Saskia; Zuurbier, Susanna M; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare thrombotic disorder involving the cerebral veins and dural sinuses. In contrast to more common sites of venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as the legs and lungs, CVT mainly affects young adults and children, and women are affected three times more often than men. Although presenting symptoms are variable, headache is usually the first symptom, often in combination with focal neurologic deficits and epileptic seizures. The primary therapy for CVT consists of heparin followed by oral anticoagulation for at least 3 to 6 months. The mortality in the acute phase is 5 to 10% and a substantial proportion of survivors suffer from long-term disabilities. A large number of risk factors have been linked to CVT, although the scientific evidence for an association varies considerably between risk factors. Some risk factors, such as hereditary thrombophilia, correspond with risk factors for more common sites of VTE, whereas others, such as head trauma, are specific to CVT. In most patients, at least one risk factor can be identified. In this review, we provide an overview of the risk factors for CVT.

  14. Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Toker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE are known collectively as venous thromboembolism (VTE. Venous thromboembolic events are common and potentially life-threatening complications following trauma with an incidence of\t5 to 63%. DVT prophylaxis is essential in the management of trauma patients. Currently, the optimal VTE prophylaxis strategy for trauma patients is unknown. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been considered risk factors for VTE; however it is unclear which combination of risk factors defines a high-risk group. Modalities available for trauma patient thromboprophylaxis are classified into pharmacologic anticoagulation, mechanical prophylaxis, and inferior vena cava (IVC filters. The available pharmacologic agents include low-dose heparin (LDH, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH, and factor Xa inhibitors. Mechanical prophylaxis methods include graduated compression stockings (GCSs, pneumatic compression devices (PCDs, and A-V foot pumps. IVCs are traditionally used in high risk patients in whom pharmacological prophylaxis is contraindicated. Both EAST and ACCP guidelines recommend primary use of LMWHs in trauma patients; however there are still controversies regarding the definitive VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. Large randomized prospective clinical studies would be required to provide level I evidence to define the optimal VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients.

  15. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Causing Celiac Artery Trunk Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Challand

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Vascular complications of pancreatitis are more common in alcoholrather than gallstone-induced pancreatitis. Such complications are an important cause of mortality and morbidity, although peripancreatic vessel obstruction is a rare consequence. Patients with peripancreatic arterial obstruction can present with sudden and unexplained clinical deterioration requiring prompt diagnosis and intervention. Case report A 42-year-old woman with a proven pancreatic pseudocyst presented with acute abdominal pain. Initial investigations were non-diagnostic. A gastroscopy revealed patchy necrosis of the proximal stomach. Following sudden clinical deterioration, a contrast-enhanced CT scan was performed. The CT scan demonstrated a thickened gastric wall with intramural gas. The decision was taken to proceed to laparotomy, which revealed both gastric and splenic infarction. A total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction and splenectomy was performed. She made a successful recovery. Conclusion Arterial thrombosis should be considered in any patient with chronic pancreatitis who presents with an acute clinical deterioration. Successful outcomes can be achieved with prompt diagnosis using contrast-enhanced CT scanning and early surgical intervention.

  16. [Association between venous thrombosis and dyslipidemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Raso, Aránzazu; Ene, Gabriela; Miranda, Carolina; Vidal, Rosa; Mata, Raquel; Llamas Sillero, M Pilar

    2014-07-07

    Venous and arterial thrombosis, despite being historically considered as distinct conditions, share certain risk factors. Dyslipidemia is a clinical condition with a relatively high prevalence in the population and has been associated with an increased thrombotic risk. Lipids and lipoproteins modulate the expression and/or function of thrombotic, fibrinolytic and rheological factors. We have developed a descriptive, retrospective, comparative, cross-sectional study including a group of 313 patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). We collected basic demographic data, cardiovascular risk factors and thrombotic complications. All patients were subjected to a lipid profile study with determination of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (cHDL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (cLDL) and triglycerides. The multivariable analysis showed that dyslipidemia was a risk factor for VTE (odds ratio [OR] 3.87, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.72-5.56; Pcomplications, recurrence and post-thrombotic syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Trousseau's syndrome: cancer-associated thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikushima, Soichiro; Ono, Ryu; Fukuda, Kensuke; Sakayori, Masashi; Awano, Nobuyasu; Kondo, Keisuke

    2016-03-01

    Trousseau's syndrome (cancer-associated thrombosis) is the second leading cause of death in cancer patients, after death from cancer itself. The risk of a venous thromboembolism is 4- to 7-fold higher in patients with cancer than in those without cancer. The causes of this impaired coagulation are associated with general patient-related risk factors, and other factors that are specific to the particular cancer or treatment. It is important to assess the risk of thrombotic events in cancer patients and administer effective prophylaxis and treatment. Effective prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism reduces morbidity and mortality, and improves patients' quality of life. Low molecular weight heparin is the first-line treatment for venous thromboembolism, as an effective and safe means for prophylaxis and treatment, according to guidelines released by international scientific societies. Oral anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is preferable to no therapy. However, warfarin has low efficacy and is associated with high rates of recurrence. If low molecular weight heparin is unavailable, some guidelines recommend the use of vitamin K antagonists that have a target international normalized ratio in the range of 2-3, as acceptable alternatives. Novel oral anticoagulants that directly inhibit factor Xa or thrombin are promising for the prophylaxis of high-risk cancer patients and in the long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, to date, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of these new anticoagulants.

  18. Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, Serdar; Hak, David J; Morgan, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are known collectively as venous thromboembolism (VTE). Venous thromboembolic events are common and potentially life-threatening complications following trauma with an incidence of 5 to 63%. DVT prophylaxis is essential in the management of trauma patients. Currently, the optimal VTE prophylaxis strategy for trauma patients is unknown. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been considered risk factors for VTE; however it is unclear which combination of risk factors defines a high-risk group. Modalities available for trauma patient thromboprophylaxis are classified into pharmacologic anticoagulation, mechanical prophylaxis, and inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. The available pharmacologic agents include low-dose heparin (LDH), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), and factor Xa inhibitors. Mechanical prophylaxis methods include graduated compression stockings (GCSs), pneumatic compression devices (PCDs), and A-V foot pumps. IVCs are traditionally used in high risk patients in whom pharmacological prophylaxis is contraindicated. Both EAST and ACCP guidelines recommend primary use of LMWHs in trauma patients; however there are still controversies regarding the definitive VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. Large randomized prospective clinical studies would be required to provide level I evidence to define the optimal VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients.

  19. Cerebral Vein Thrombosis Misdiagnosed and Mismanaged

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Sasidharan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all unexplained CNS disorders of sudden onset. Etiological factors are often subclinical forms of several common thrombophilic states occurring together, rather than the typical inherited and rare causes. Diagnosis is missed because of the heterogeneity in clinical presentation and etiological factors. In several patients with the so called idiopathic CVT nutritional deficiencies and lifestyle issues are more important factors in pathogenesis, rather than single rarer causes. High index of suspicion is the key to diagnosis. Clinical skill has to be fine tuned to diagnose the problem and to identify all the etiological factors. Radiology is essential for diagnosis but relying on radiology alone will lead to missing several cases and even erroneous diagnosis. It is inappropriate to proceed prematurely to laboratory investigations, forgetting proper clinical evaluation by studying diet, lifestyle, and environment of the patients. Success in managing lies in identifying all the contributory causes and correcting all of them giving excellent outcome almost always. Clinical observations based on case series and sharing of such information alone are the means to arrive at a consensus in diagnosis and management.

  20. Coronary Artery Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadri Ceberut

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ancient schwannoma is a rare variant of neural tumors though rarely seen in the thorax. The combination with coronary artery diseases is also rare. Here we describe a 66 year-old male who had undergone one-stage combined surgery for thoracic ancient schwannomas removal and coronary artery disease. The masses were, respectively, 13 cm in the middle mediastinum and 5 cm in diameter originating from the intercostal nerve. The tumors were successfully removed using sternotomy, and then a coronary artery bypass grafting was performed. Here we discuss this rare tumor in relation to the relevant literature.

  1. Long-term clinical effects of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with coronary artery stent implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Mehmet Gungor; Okyay, Kaan; Yazici, Huseyin; Sen, Nihat; Tavil, Yusuf; Turkoglu, Sedat; Timurkaynak, Timur; Ozdemir, Murat; Cemri, Mustafa; Yalcin, Ridvan; Cengel, Atiye

    2009-03-01

    We sought to investigate the early and late effects of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on stent thrombosis and major adverse coronary events after coronary artery stent (CAS) implantation at a long-term follow-up period. Forty-three patients (28 men, mean age 63+/-10 years) who underwent CAS implantation before MRI examination were included. MRI was performed on a 1.5-T MR-system with a phased array multicoil. An average of 1.3 stents per patient were implanted (1-4 stents). More than one MRI was performed for two patients. Patients who underwent MRI within 8 weeks after the procedure were included in the early-term group (17 patients), and those who underwent MRI after 8 weeks were included in the late-term group (26 patients). Mean follow-up period was 36+/-15 months. There was no acute or subacute stent thrombosis. Late stent thrombosis that resulted in acute myocardial infarction was observed in a patient from the early group after an operation for prostate hyperplasia 5 months after MRI, and the patient underwent percutaneous coronary artery angioplasty. De-nova lesion was observed in four patients in the early group and two patients in the late group (P=0.14). In-stent restenosis was recorded in two patients in the early group and three patients in the late group (P=0.98). Composite major adverse cardiac events (acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, death, and cerebrovascular event) were observed in seven of the early-group patients (41%), and in six of the late-group patients (23%) (P=0.20). MRI can be safely performed in patients with CAS implantation both in the early and late course, and is not associated with an increased risk of major adverse clinical cardiac events at long-term follow-up.

  2. Pre-existing coronary stenoses in patients with first myocardial infarction are not necessarily severe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, D; Davies, G; Maseri, A

    1988-12-01

    The sudden, often unheralded, onset of symptoms in acute myocardial infarction suggests that pre-existing coronary stenoses susceptible to acute thrombosis in the infarct-related artery may not necessarily have been severe. We investigated the severity of residual coronary stenoses after successful thrombolytic recanalization and the relationship to previous symptoms, collateral vessels and the extent of coronary artery disease in 60 consecutive patients at the time of presentation of their first acute myocardial infarction by performing quantitative coronary arteriography before, during and after intracoronary thrombolytic therapy. Recanalization was achieved in 48 (80%) patients with a residual stenosis of 58.1 +/- 10.8% (mean +/- ISD; range 33-82%) obstruction diameter and a minimum lumen calibre of 1.10 +/- 0.3 mm (range 0.39-1.95 mm). A residual stenosis of less than 60% obstruction diameter was present in 28 (47%) patients. When residual stenoses were mild, no acute collateral filling of the occluded artery was observed. After thrombolysis, residual infarct-related coronary stenoses in patients with their first acute myocardial infarction are not necessarily severely obstructive. This raises the problem of identifying which non-obstructive coronary stenoses are likely to occlude suddenly and why they do so.

  3. Epidemiology of venous thrombosis in children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Dana; Attard, Chantal; Monagle, Paul; Ignjatovic, Vera

    2014-06-01

    There has been an extensive body of research focusing on the epidemiology of thrombosis in adult cancer populations; however, there is significantly less knowledge about thrombosis in paediatric cancer populations. Thrombosis is diagnosed with increasing frequency in children being treated for cancer, and there is an urgent need to increase our understanding of the epidemiology of thrombosis in this population. Currently, there are no guidelines for identification of high-risk groups, prophylaxis or management of thrombotic complications in paediatric cancer patients. We reviewed the available literature regarding the epidemiology, mechanisms, risk factors, prophylaxis and outcomes of thrombosis in children with cancer and identified areas that require further research. The reported incidence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) in children with cancer ranges between 2.1% and 16%, while the incidence of asymptomatic events is approximately 40%. Approximately 30% of VTE in this population is associated with central venous lines (CVL). The most common location of VTE is upper and lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (43 to 50% of events, respectively), while 50% of events in ALL patients occur in the central nervous system. Key characteristics that increase the risk of thrombosis include the type of cancer, age of the patient, the presence of a CVL, presence of pulmonary/intra thoracic disease, as well as the type of chemotherapy. Outcomes for paediatric cancer patients with VTE include post-thrombotic syndrome, pulmonary embolism, recurrent thromboembolism, destruction of upper venous system and death. Prospective studies aimed at enabling risk stratification of patients are required to facilitate development of paediatric specific recommendations related to thromboprophylaxis in this population.

  4. Coronary artery spasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2016:chap 71. Giugliano RP, Cannon CP, Braunwald E. Non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of ...

  5. Auxetic coronary stent endoprosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Faisal; Ali, Murtaza Najabat; Ansari, Umar;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular heart disease is one of the leading health issues in the present era and requires considerable health care resources to prevent it. The present study was focused on the development of a new coronary stent based on novel auxetic geometry which enables the stent to exhibit...... a negative Poisson's ratio. Commercially available coronary stents have isotropic properties, whereas the vascular system of the body shows anisotropic characteristics. This results in a mismatch between anisotropic-isotropic properties of the stent and arterial wall, and this in turn is not favorable...... for mechanical adhesion of the commercially available coronary stents with the arterial wall. It is believed that an auxetic coronary stent with inherent anisotropic mechanical properties and negative Poisson's ratio will have good mechanical adhesion with the arterial wall. METHODS: The auxetic design...

  6. Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened and narrowed. This is due ...

  7. Percutaneous coronary interventions and antiplatelet therapy in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summaria, Francesco; Giannico, Maria Benedetta; Talarico, Giovanni Paolo; Patrizi, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity following renal transplantation (RT), accounting for 40-50% of all deaths. After renal transplantation, an adverse cardiovascular event occurs in nearly 40% of patients; given the dialysis vintage and the average wait time, the likelihood of receiving coronary revascularization is very high. There is a significant gap in the literature in terms of the outcomes of prophylactic coronary revascularization in renal transplantation candidates. Current guidelines on myocardial revascularization stipulate that renal transplant patients with significant coronary artery disease (CAD) should not be excluded from the potential benefit of revascularization. Compared with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), however, coronary artery bypass grafting is associated with higher early and 30-day mortality. About one-third of renal transplant patients with CAD have to be treated invasively and so PCI is currently the most popular mode of revascularization in these fragile and compromised patients. A newer generation drug-eluting stent (DES) should be preferred over a bare metal stent (BMS) because of its lower risk of restenosis and improved safety concerns (stent thrombosis) compared with first generation DES and BMS. Among DES, despite no significant differences being reported in terms of efficacy, the newer everolimus and zotarolimus eluting stents should be preferred given the possibility of discontinuing, if necessary, dual antiplatelet therapy before 12 months. Since there is a lack of randomized controlled trials, the current guidelines are inadequate to provide a specifically tailored antiplatelet therapeutic approach for renal transplant patients. At present, clopidogrel is the most used agent, confirming its central role in the therapeutic management of renal transplant patients undergoing PCI. While progress in malignancy-related mortality seems a more distant target, a slow but steady reduction in

  8. Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008042 Analysis of coronary artery lesion characteristics and its clinical implications in patients with acute non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. BAI Taizhu(柏太柱), et al. Cardiovasc Dept, Hengyang Centr Hosp & Hengyang Cardiovasc Intervention Center, Hengyang 421001. Chin J Arterioscler 2007;15(10):780-782. Objective To investigate the coronary artery lesion characteristics and its clinical implications in patients with acute non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI).

  9. Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008277 Relationship between pulse wave velocity and the NYHA classification of coronary insufficiency.SUN Weiping(孙卫平),et al.Dept Cardiol,Tongji Hosp Tongji Univ,Shanghai 200065.Chin J Intern Med 2008;47(5):382-384.Objective To investigate the relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity(baPWV)and different stage of cardiac dysfunction.Methods 253 consecutive patients with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease

  10. Large coronary intramural hematomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Lisbeth; Thayssen, Per; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2015-01-01

    coronary vessel wall pathology, with poorly understood underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Affected individuals may present with a broad spectrum of symptoms ranging from acute coronary syndromes (ACS) to cardiogenic shock or even sudden cardiac death. The disease entity causes challenges in terms of both......, no randomized, controlled trials exist to guide treatment, and no consensus regarding management is available. Currently, treatment strategies are based on a case-by-case clinical assessment, and experiences described in previous, limited retrospective studies and case reports....

  11. Coronary Fistulas: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Fennich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery fistula is an uncommon finding during angiographic exams. We report a case series of five patients with congenital coronary fistulas. The first patient was 56 years old and had a coronary fistula associated with a partial atrio ventricular defect, the second patient was 54 years old and had two fistulas originating from the right coronary artery with a severe atherosclerotic coronary disease, the third patient was 57 years old with a fistula originating from the circumflex artery associated with a rheumatic mitral stenosis, the fourth patient was 50 years old and had a fistulous communication between the right coronary artery and the right bronchial artery, and the last patient was 12 years old who had bilateral coronary fistulas draining into the right ventricle with an aneurismal dilatation of the coronary arteries. Angiographic aspects of coronary fistulas are various; management is controversial and depends on the presence of symptoms.

  12. Contribution of recurrent venous thrombosis and inherited thrombophilia to the pathogenesis of postthrombotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreidy, Raghid

    2015-01-01

    Postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) is a common complication of deep vein thrombosis. This study aims to assess the role of recurrent venous thrombosis and inherited thrombophilia in the pathogenesis of PTS. A series of 206 patients diagnosed with lower extremity venous thrombosis were retrospectively reviewed. The PTS was observed in 30.58% of the patients. Recurrent venous thrombosis was identified in 3.4% of the patients without PTS and in 33.3% of patients with PTS (P thrombophilia alone or in association with recurrent venous thrombosis was more commonly detected when PTS was moderate to severe (P = .04 and thrombophilia is present either alone or in association with recurrent venous thrombosis.

  13. Computer-assisted venous thrombosis volume quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, John; Dhibi, Mounir; Bressollette, Luc; Guias, Bruno; Solaiman, Basel

    2009-03-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) volume assessment, by verifying its risk of progression when anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapies are prescribed, is often necessary to screen life-threatening complications. Commonly, VT volume estimation is done by manual delineation of few contours in the ultrasound (US) image sequence, assuming that the VT has a regular shape and constant radius, thus producing significant errors. This paper presents and evaluates a comprehensive functional approach based on the combination of robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contours to calculate VT volume in a more accurate manner when applied to freehand 2-D US image sequences. Robust anisotropic filtering reduces image speckle noise without generating incoherent edge discontinuities. Prior knowledge of the VT shape allows initializing the deformable contour, which is then guided by the noise-filtering outcome. Segmented contours are subsequently used to calculate VT volume. The proposed approach is integrated into a system prototype compatible with existing clinical US machines that additionally tracks the acquired images 3-D position and provides a dense Delaunay triangulation required for volume calculation. A predefined robust anisotropic diffusion and deformable contour parameter set enhances the system usability. Experimental results pertinence is assessed by comparison with manual and tetrahedron-based volume computations, using images acquired by two medical experts of eight plastic phantoms and eight in vitro VTs, whose independently measured volume is the reference ground truth. Results show a mean difference between 16 and 35 mm(3) for volumes that vary from 655 to 2826 mm(3). Two in vivo VT volumes are also calculated to illustrate how this approach could be applied in clinical conditions when the real value is unknown. Comparative results for the two experts differ from 1.2% to 10.08% of the smallest estimated value when the image acquisition cadences are similar.

  14. Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis following cranial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Dmitriy; Uohara, Michael Y; Ichord, Rebecca; Ali, Zarina; Jastrzab, Laura; Lang, Shih-Shan; Billinghurst, Lori

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) is an important, though less common subtype of pediatric stroke. It has been linked to several risk factors, including cranial procedures, with few studies highlighting this relationship. The aim of this study was to characterize the diagnosis and treatment of CSVT after cranial surgery. An institutional pediatric stroke research database was used to identify all CSVT cases diagnosed within 30 days of cranial surgery from November 2004 to December 2014. Thirteen subjects were retrospectively analyzed for clinical presentation, surgical details, radiographic characteristics, laboratory study results, treatment, and outcome. Diagnostic testing and treatment adhered to a consensus-based institutional stroke protocol. Cranial vault reconstruction, subdural empyema evacuation, and tumor resection were each observed in three subjects. Eleven (85%) subjects had sinus exposure during surgery, and eight (73%) developed thrombus in a sinus within or adjacent to the operative field. Two (15%) had documented iatrogenic sinus injury. On post-operative testing, ten (77%) subjects had prothrombotic abnormalities. Seven (54%) were treated with anti-coagulation therapy (ACT) starting on a median of post-operative day (POD) 3 (IQR 1-3) for a median of 2.9 months (IQR 2.4-5.4). Median time to imaging evidence of partial or complete recanalization was 2.4 months (IQR 0.7-5.1). No symptomatic hemorrhagic complications were encountered. Pediatric CSVT may be encountered after cranial surgery, and decisions related to anti-coagulation are challenging. The risk of CSVT should be considered in pre-surgical planning and post-operative evaluation of cases with known risk factors. In our study, judicious use of ACT was safe in the post-operative period.

  15. Coronary Artery Anomalies in Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Scansen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery anomalies represent a disease spectrum from incidental to life-threatening. Anomalies of coronary artery origin and course are well-recognized in human medicine, but have received limited attention in veterinary medicine. Coronary artery anomalies are best described in the dog, hamster, and cow though reports also exist in the horse and pig. The most well-known anomaly in veterinary medicine is anomalous coronary artery origin with a prepulmonary course in dogs, which limits treatment of pulmonary valve stenosis. A categorization scheme for coronary artery anomalies in animals is suggested, dividing these anomalies into those of major or minor clinical significance. A review of coronary artery development, anatomy, and reported anomalies in domesticated species is provided and four novel canine examples of anomalous coronary artery origin are described: an English bulldog with single left coronary ostium and a retroaortic right coronary artery; an English bulldog with single right coronary ostium and transseptal left coronary artery; an English bulldog with single right coronary ostium and absent left coronary artery with a prepulmonary paraconal interventricular branch and an interarterial circumflex branch; and a mixed-breed dog with tetralogy of Fallot and anomalous origin of all coronary branches from the brachiocephalic trunk. Coronary arterial fistulae are also described including a coronary cameral fistula in a llama cria and an English bulldog with coronary artery aneurysm and anomalous shunting vessels from the right coronary artery to the pulmonary trunk. These examples are provided with the intent to raise awareness and improve understanding of such defects.

  16. Traveller's thrombosis: airlines still not giving passengers the WRIGHT advice!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurr, J R H; Ahmad, N; Thavarajan, D; Fisher, R K

    2010-10-01

    This study has examined the impact of the World Health Organization's Research into Global Hazards of Travel (WRIGHT) Project's phase 1 report on the information given by airlines to their passengers regarding traveller's thrombosis. Official websites of all airlines flying from Heathrow (UK) and John F Kennedy (USA) were located through links on the websites of these two busy international airports. In June 2007, each site was scrutinized by three independent researchers to identify if traveller's thrombosis and its risk factors were discussed and what methods of prevention were advised. This exercise was repeated a year after the publication of the WRIGHT report. One hundred and nineteen international airlines were listed in 2007 (12 were excluded from analysis). A quarter (27/107) of airlines warned of the risk of traveller's thrombosis. A year later, five airlines were no longer operational and there had been no increase in the discussion of traveller's thrombosis (23/102). Additional risk factors discussed in June 2007 versus September 2008: previous venous thromboembolism (16%, 15%); thrombophilia (14%, 15%); family history (11%, 9%); malignancy (12%, 14%); recent surgery (19%, 16%); pregnancy (17%, 16%) and obesity (11%, 12%). Prophylaxis advice given in June 2007 versus September 2008: in-flight exercise (34%, 42%); Hydration (30%, 34%); medical consultation prior to flying (20%, 18%); graduated compression stockings (13%, 12%); aspirin (airlines continue to fail to warn of the risk of traveller's thrombosis or offer appropriate advice. Alerting passengers at risk gives them an opportunity to seek medical advice before flying.

  17. Homocystinuria: A Rare Disorder Presenting as Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein ESLAMIYEH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Eslamiyeh H, Ashrafzadeh F, Akhondian J, Beiraghi Toosi M. Homocystinuria: A Rare Disorder Presenting as Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis. Iran J Child Neurol. Spring 2015;9(2:53-57.AbstractObjectiveHomocystinuria is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism caused by cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency that affects methionine metabolism. The clinical features are heterogeneous ranging from mental retardation, ectopia lentis, and osteoporosis to vascular events such as deep vein thrombosis,   sagital sinus thrombosis, and myocardial infarction. Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CVST is an unusual disorder in children and requires prompt and accurate management. Some causal factors for thedevelopment of CVST differ between children and adults. The majority of cases with CSVT are found to have an underlying cause for thrombosis like dehydration, infections, prothrombotic and hematologic disorders, malignancy and trauma.Although homocystinuria is usually associated with ischemic strokes, CVST as initial clinical presentation of homocystinuria is rare in children.In this article, we presented a 10-year old boy with seizure, hemiparesis, and ataxia due to CSVT caused by homocystinuria.

  18. Uncontrolled seizures resulting from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicating neurobrucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Faraji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of stroke caused by thrombosis in venous sinuses of the brain. In this study, we reported on a patient with venous sinus thrombosis and brucellosis who presented with uncontrolled seizure despite being treated with anti-epileptic drugs at high doses. The case was a 33-year-old woman with a history of controlled complex partial seizure who presented with headache, asthenia, and uncontrolled seizure for one month. She was febrile and a brain CT scan indicated hemorrhagic focus in the left posterior parietal and the temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography also proved venous sinus thrombosis in the left transverse sinus. Besides [In addition], a laboratory assessment confirmed brucellosis. Following the treatment with anti-coagulant, anti-brucellosis, and anti-epileptic agents, the patient was discharged in good condition with medical orders. Clinical suspicion and accurate evaluation of a patient′s history is the most important clue in diagnosis and treatment of brucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, especially in uncontrolled seizure in patients who had previously been under control.

  19. Air pollution and venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang; Wang, Qing-Yun; Cheng, Zhi-Peng; Hu, Bei; Liu, Jing-Di; Hu, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. However, the effect of air pollution on venous thrombotic disorders is uncertain. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the association between air pollution and venous thrombosis. PubMed, Embase, EBM Reviews, Healthstar, Global Health, Nursing Database, and Web of Science were searched for citations on air pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particulate matters) and venous thrombosis. Using a random-effects model, overall risk estimates were derived for each increment of 10 μg/m3 of pollutant concentration. Of the 485 in-depth reviewed studies, 8 citations, involving approximately 700,000 events, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All the main air pollutants analyzed were not associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis (OR = 1.005, 95% CI = 0.998-1.012 for PM2.5; OR = 0.995, 95% CI = 0.984-1.007 for PM10; OR = 1.006, 95% CI = 0.994-1.019 for NO2). Based on exposure period and thrombosis location, additional subgroup analyses provided results comparable with those of the overall analyses. There was no evidence of publication bias. Therefore, this meta analysis does not suggest the possible role of air pollution as risk factor for venous thrombosis in general population.

  20. [Cerebral venous thrombosis in minimal change nephrotic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, M; Kuroda, M; Koni, I

    1999-06-01

    A 46-year old man presented with an eight-day history of edema and was found to be nephrotic, with a plasma albumin level of 1.1 g/dl and urine protein excretion of 13.3 g/24 hrs. The level of plasma creatinine was normal at 1.0 mg/dl. A finding of renal biopsy was consistent with minimal change glomerulopathy. On the 6th hospital day, he suddenly developed a severe headache and was noted to have bilateral papilledema. Lumbar puncture revealed an opening pressure of 250 mm of water. Magnetic resonance venography showed an irregular flow in the superior sagittal sinus and right transverse sinus, a finding consistent with thrombus. The diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis was made, and the patient was given both Warfarin 2 mg/day and prednisolone 60 mg/day. A complete recovery from nephrotic syndrome was achieved within eight weeks. Nephrotic syndrome causes a hypercoagulable state, leading to both venous and arterial thrombosis. The most common clinical features are renal vein thrombosis, femoral vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism, however, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is rare in patients with nephrotic syndrome. It is important to be aware of this complication, since prompt treatment with anticoagulation and control of nephrotic syndrome can lead to a successful outcome.

  1. [Treatment of nontumoral portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañares, Rafael; Catalina, María-Vega

    2014-07-01

    Portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis is a relatively common complication associated with the presence of an accompanying prothrombotic phenotype of advanced cirrhosis. The consequences of portal vein thrombosis are relevant because it can be associated with impaired hepatic function, might contraindicate hepatic transplantation and could increase morbidity in the surgical procedure. There is controversy concerning the most effective treatment of portal vein thrombosis, which is based on information that is seldom robust and whose primary objective is to achieve a return to vessel patency. Various studies have suggested that starting anticoagulation therapy early is associated with portal vein repatency more frequently than without treatment and has a low rate of complications. There are no proven data on the type of anticoagulant (low-molecular-weight heparins or dicoumarin agents) and the treatment duration. The implementation of TIPS is technically feasible in thrombosis without cavernous transformation and is associated with portal vein recanalization in a significant proportion of cases. Thrombolytic therapy does not appear to present an adequate balance between efficacy and safety; its use is therefore not supported for this indication. The proper definition of treatment for portal vein thrombosis requires properly designed studies to delimit the efficacy and safety of the various alternatives.

  2. Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    Allograft thrombosis is a devastating early complication of renal transplantation that ultimately leads to allograft loss. We report here on our experience of nine cases of immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis at a single centre between January 1990 and June 2009. The mean age was 42.9 years at time of transplant. For seven patients, the allograft thrombosis was their first kidney transplant and seven of the nine cases had a deceased donor transplant. The initial transplants functioned for a mean of 1.67 days and the patients received a second allograft at a mean of 3.1 days after graft failure. All of the re-transplants worked immediately. Four allografts failed after a mean of 52.5 months (2-155 months). Two of these died with a functioning allograft, one failed owing to chronic allograft nephropathy and one owing to persistent acute cellular rejection. The remaining five patients still have a functioning allograft after a mean of 101.8 months (7-187 months). One year allograft and patient survival after re-transplantation were 87.5% and 100% respectively (after 5 years, both were 57%). Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis can be a success. It may be considered in selected cases after allograft thrombosis.

  3. SPLANCHNIC VEIN THROMBOSIS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN AREA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa El-Karaksy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal venous thrombosis may present as splanchnic venous thrombosis (SVT (occlusion of portal, splenic, superior or inferior mesenteric veins or Budd- Chiari Syndrome (BCS (thrombosis of inferior vena cava and/or hepatic veins. The aim of this review is to report the scanty data available for splanchnic vein thrombosis in the South Mediterranean area. In one Egyptian study, the possible circumstantial risk factors for portal vein thrombosis were found in 30% of cases:  19% neonatal sepsis, 8.7% umbilical catheterization, 6% severe gastroenteritis and dehydration. Another Egyptian study concluded that hereditary thrombophilia was common in children with PVT (62.5%, the commonest being factor V Leiden mutation (FVL (30%. Concurrence of more than one hereditary thrombophilia was not uncommon (12.5%. The first international publication on hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD in Egypt was in 1965 in children who rapidly develop abdominal distention with ascites and hepatomegaly. This disease was more frequent in malnourished children coming from rural areas; infusions given at home may contain noxious substances that were hepatotoxic and Infections might play a role. VOD of childhood is rarely seen nowadays. Data from South Mediterranean area are deficient and this may be attributable to reporting in local medical journals that are difficult to access. Medical societies concerned with this topic could help distribute this information.

  4. Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Paul J

    2011-08-01

    Allograft thrombosis is a devastating early complication of renal transplantation that ultimately leads to allograft loss. We report here on our experience of nine cases of immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis at a single centre between January 1990 and June 2009. The mean age was 42.9 years at time of transplant. For seven patients, the allograft thrombosis was their first kidney transplant and seven of the nine cases had a deceased donor transplant. The initial transplants functioned for a mean of 1.67 days and the patients received a second allograft at a mean of 3.1 days after graft failure. All of the re-transplants worked immediately. Four allografts failed after a mean of 52.5 months (2-155 months). Two of these died with a functioning allograft, one failed owing to chronic allograft nephropathy and one owing to persistent acute cellular rejection. The remaining five patients still have a functioning allograft after a mean of 101.8 months (7-187 months). One year allograft and patient survival after re-transplantation were 87.5% and 100% respectively (after 5 years, both were 57%). Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis can be a success. It may be considered in selected cases after allograft thrombosis.

  5. Coronary Artery Imaging in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery problems in children usually have a significant impact on both short-term and long-term outcomes. Early and accurate diagnosis, therefore, is crucial but technically challenging due to the small size of the coronary artery, high heart rates, and limited cooperation of children. Coronary artery visibility on CT and MRI in children is considerably improved with recent technical advancements. Consequently, CT and MRI are increasingly used for evaluating various congenital and acquired coronary artery abnormalities in children, such as coronary artery anomalies, aberrant coronary artery anatomy specific to congenital heart disease, Kawasaki disease, Williams syndrome, and cardiac allograft vasculopathy. PMID:25741188

  6. Bioresorbable scaffolds in the treatment of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Yaojun Zhang,1,2 Christos V Bourantas,1 Vasim Farooq,1 Takashi Muramatsu,1 Roberto Diletti,1 Yoshinobu Onuma,1 Hector M Garcia-Garcia,1 Patrick W Serruys11Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 2Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Drug-eluting stents have reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis and have broadened the application in percutaneous coronary intervention in coronary artery disease. However, the concept of using a permanent metallic endovascular device to restore the patency of a stenotic artery has inherited pitfalls, namely the presence of a foreign body within the artery causing vascular inflammation, late complications such as restenosis and stent thrombosis, and impeding the restoration of the physiologic function of the stented segment. Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS were introduced to potentially overcome these limitations, as they provide temporary scaffolding and then disappear, liberating the treated vessel from its cage. Currently, several BRSs are available, undergoing evaluation either in clinical trials or in preclinical settings. The aim of this review is to present the new developments in BRS technology, describe the mechanisms involved in the resorption process, and discuss the potential future prospects of this innovative therapy.Keywords: bioresorbable scaffold, drug-eluting stent, biodegradable, design, mechanism, coronary artery disease

  7. Stent malapposition, as a potential mechanism of very late stent thrombosis after bare-metal stent implantation: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuma, Takumi, E-mail: higuma@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp; Abe, Naoki; Hanada, Kenji; Yokoyama, Hiroaki; Tomita, Hirofumi; Okumura, Ken

    2014-04-15

    A 90-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. He had a history of post-infarction angina pectoris 79 months ago and had a bare-metal stent (BMS) implanted in the proximal left anterior descending artery at our hospital. Emergent coronary angiography demonstrated thrombotic occlusion in the previously stented segment. After catheter thrombectomy, antegrade flow was restored, but 90% stenosis with haziness persisted in the proximal and distal portions of the previously stented segment. Intravascular ultrasound imaging showed interstrut cavities or stent malapposition at the proximal and distal sites of stented segment. In close proximity to the sites, residual thrombi were also observed. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated neither lipid-laden neointimal tissue nor rupture but clearly demonstrated residual thrombus adjacent to the malapposed region in addition to the stent malapposition. PCI with balloon was successfully performed and stent apposition was confirmed by OCT. Stent malapposition is an unusual mechanism of very late stent thrombosis after BMS implantation. OCT can clearly reveal the etiology of stent thrombosis.

  8. Distal coronary hemoperfusion during percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deMuinck, ED; denHeijer, P; vanDijk, RB; Crijns, HJGM; Hillige, HL; Lie, KI

    1996-01-01

    Distal coronary hemoperfusion during percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)-with an autoperfusion balloon or active system-facilitates prolonged balloon inflation. Prolonged inflations may tack up intimal dissections and improve the primary angioplasty result in complex lesions. Addit

  9. Monocyte to HDL Cholesterol Ratio Predicts Coronary Artery Disease Severity and Future Major Cardiovascular Adverse Events in Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Mehmet Serkan; Ozcan Cetin, Elif Hande; Kalender, Erol; Aydin, Selahattin; Topaloglu, Serkan; Kisacik, Halil Lutfi; Temizhan, Ahmet

    2016-11-01

    We aimed to investigate the usefulness of monocyte to HDL cholesterol ratio (MHR) in predicting coronary artery disease severity and future major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). 2661 patient with ACS were enrolled and followed up during median 31.6 months. MHR were significantly positively correlated with neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (r=0.438), CRP (r=0.394), Gensini (r=0.407), and SYNTAX score (r=0.333). During in-hospital and long-term follow-up, MACE, stent thrombosis, non-fatal MI, and mortality occurred more frequently in the third tertile group. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed the higher occurrence of MACE in the third tertile group compared with other tertiles. Adjusting for other factors, a MHR value in the third tertile group was determined as an independent predictor of in-hospital and long-term MACE. MHR as a novel inflammation-based marker seemed to be an independent predictor of severity of coronary artery disease and future cardiovascular events in patients with ACS. MHR may utilise the identification of patients who are at higher risk for MACE and individualisation of targeted therapy. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Portal hypertension due to portal venous thrombosis: Etiology, clinical outcomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ozgur Harmanci; Yusuf Bayraktar

    2007-01-01

    The thrombophilia in adult life has major implications in the hepatic vessels. The resulting portal vein thrombosis has various outcomes and complications. Esophageal varices, portal gastropathy, ascites, severe hypersplenism and liver failure needing liver transplantation are known well. The newly formed collateral venous circulation showing itself as pseudocholangicarcinoma sign and its possible clinical reflection as cholestasis are also known from a long time. The management strategies for these complications of portal vein thrombosis are not different from their counterpart which is cirrhotic portal hypertension, but the prognosis is unquestionably better in former cases. In this review we present and discuss the portal vein thrombosis, etiology and the resulting clinical pictures. There are controversial issues in nomenclature,management (including anticoagulation problems), follow up strategies and liver transplantation. In the light of the current knowledge, we discuss some controversial issues in literature and present our experience and our proposals about this group of patients.

  11. A case of neonatal arterial thrombosis mimicking interrupted aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsu, Hazım Alper; Varan, Birgül; Oktay, Ayla; Özkan, Murat

    2015-06-01

    Neonatal arterial thrombosis is a very rare entity with clinical findings resembling coarctation of aorta or interrupted aortic arch. A two day-old male newborn was admitted to a different hospital with difficulty in sucking and sleepiness. On echocardiographic examination, a diagnosis of interrupted aortic arch was made and he was treated with prostoglandin E2. When the patient presented to our center, physical examination revealed that his feet were bilaterally cold. The pulses were not palpable and there were ecchymotic regions in the lower extremities. Echocardiography ruled out interrupted aortic arch. Computerized tomographic angiography revealed a large thrombosis and total occlusion of the abdominal aorta. Since there was no response to treatment with tissue plasminogen activator, we performed thrombectomy. Homozygous Factor V Leiden and Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations were found in this patient. Neonatal aortic thrombosis which is observed very rarely and fatal should be considered in the differential diagnosis of coarctation of aorta and interrupted aortic arch.

  12. HIV associated deep vein thrombosis: Case reports from Jos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C A Daniyam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis (DVT has been reported to be 2-10 times commoner in HIV infected patients than in the general population. We report two cases of extensive unilateral deep vein thrombosis involving the lower limb in HIV infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Doppler ultrasound in the two patients revealed evidence of venous thrombosis from the femoral vein down to the posterior tibial veins. None of the patients had a history of acquired risk factors for DVT. Both patients responded well to anti-coagulants. A high index of suspicion may therefore be required to make the diagnosis and institute adequate management for this condition which has potentially life threatening consequences.

  13. MR imaging of dural sinus thrombosis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Si Kyung; Han, Chun Hwan; Lee, Moon Ok; Park, Kyung Joo; Lee, Joo Hyuk [Kang Nam General HosPital, Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-01-15

    We present a case of angiographically confirmed transverse and sigmoid sinus thrombosis, image with MR, in a 20 year old male with a history of otitis media and maxillary sinusitis. T1-weighted image demonstrated an iso signal intensity mass with tubular-shaped low signal intensity in right transverse and sigmoid sinus. The thrombus had high signal intensity on T2-weighted image. The signal intensity of the thrombus on Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted image was unusually high similar to that of transverse sinus. Although dural sinus thrombosis has a non-specific MR signal intensity, findings of MRI in this case may serve as an aid in future evaluation of venous thrombosis.

  14. Uterine myomatosis and portal vein thrombosis: a rare association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elamurugan Sujindra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Uterine leiomyomas are the most common pelvic tumors in women and occur in 20 and ndash;30% of women over 30 years of age. Many complications are seen with fibroid. We report a rare case of a large uterine leiomyoma associated with portal vein thrombosis. 50-year patient presented lower abdomen swelling associated with pain and breathlessness, diagnosed as multiple fibroids. She had massive splenomegaly. Abdomen Doppler revealed splenomegaly with thrombosis of portal, splenic and superior mesenteric vein. Total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was done. Iron deficiency anaemia with thrombocytosis caused by fibroid was the identified cause for portal vein thrombosis. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(9.000: 3265-3267

  15. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in a military patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Charlotte; Johnston, A McD

    2016-08-01

    We describe the case of a 23-year-old serviceman on overseas deployment who presented with a painful, swollen arm. Investigations showed an upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) of the right arm with an associated asymptomatic pulmonary embolism, which was treated with warfarin anticoagulation. Further investigation identified positional obstruction at the thoracic outlet, and the patient was diagnosed with Paget-Schroetter syndrome. He underwent elective resection of the first rib, and has now returned to normal duties. After review of the literature on UEDVT, it is suggested that in this military patient, the occurrence of an anatomical variant put him at risk of upper limb venous thrombosis, which was probably potentiated by the occupational factor of carrying a rifle. The external compression of the subclavian vein from the rifle butt and hypertrophied muscles, in addition to the anatomical variation, caused repetitive microtrauma of the vessel intima, which precipitated venous thrombosis.

  16. Acute aortic thrombosis following incorrect application of the Heimlich maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Lloyd; Forbes, Thomas L; Harris, Kenneth A

    2002-01-01

    The Heimlich maneuver has been widely accepted as a safe and effective method of relieving life-threatening foreign-body upper airway obstruction. When applied incorrectly, however, it may result in direct trauma to the intraabdominal viscera. Only two cases of major aortic complications have been reported. Both have involved thrombosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. We report two further instances of aortic thrombotic complications due to the incorrect application of the Heimlich maneuver. The first case resulted in thrombosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In the second case the abdominal thrusts caused dislodgement of thrombus from an atherosclerotic nonaneurysmal aorta, which resulted in thromboembolic occlusion of both lower extremities. In both cases, as with the two previously reported instances, massive reperfusion injury resulted, which eventually proved fatal. When applied incorrectly, the Heimlich maneuver may result in direct trauma to the abdominalaorta and is an unusual cause of acute aortic thrombosis.

  17. Portal vein thrombosis with renal cell carcinoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, Carolina; Cerruto, Maria Angela; Molinari, Alberto; Piovesan, Raffaella; Cavicchioli, Francesca; Minja, Anila; Novella, Giovanni; Artibani, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis refers to an obstruction of blood flow in the portal vein; this rare disease can be both local and systemic. Local risk factors, accounting for about 70% of cases, can be abdominal cancers, inflammatory of infective diseases, surgical procedures or cirrhosis. A 62-year-old man, affected by hypertension and taking acetylsalicylic acid after a myocardial infarction in 1994, developed deep venous thrombosis on the right leg. Six months later the patient was admitted to the emergency unit due to abdominal pain. A CT scan revealed the presence of a complete splanchnic vein thrombosis and a primary tumor on the right kidney. The patient was treated with total parenteral nutrition and intravenous solution of heparin sodium first and then, because of occurrence of allergy, fondaparinux, with improvement of the abdominal pain. Subsequently he underwent right radical nephrectomy.

  18. Infrahepatic inferior vena cava agenesis with bilateral renal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeik, Nedaa; Wickstrom, Kelly K; Schumacher, Clark W; Sullivan, Timothy M

    2013-10-01

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are rare and are estimated to be present in 0.07-8.7% of the general population. IVC agenesis (IVCA) is found in approximately 5% of cases of unprovoked lower extremity deep vein thrombosis in patients Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is an extremely rare and unusual presentation of IVCA. We report a unique case of a 23-year-old previously healthy man presenting with infrahepatic IVCA-induced bilateral RVT with azygos and hemiazygos continuation. To our knowledge, this is the third reported case in the literature of IVCA-induced RVT and the first to affect the bilateral renal veins in the absence of any other thrombogenic risk factors or any lower extremity venous complications. We also present a literature review of IVCA-induced vein thrombosis and highlight the lack of literature to manage this condition.

  19. Neonatal haemostasis and the management of neonatal thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Two detailed reviews of the management of neonatal thrombosis were published in 2012; one was an up-dated version of guidance first issued in 2004 and the other was a comprehensive review. Both of these publications gave very similar advice regarding the practical aspects of the indications, dosage and management of antithrombotic therapy. The authors stated that the evidence supporting most of their recommendations for anti-thrombotic therapy in neonates remained weak and so the therapy for a neonate with a thrombosis has to be based on an individualized assessment of estimated risk versus potential benefit. The aim of this present review is to give the treating physician an outline of the unique physiology of neonatal coagulation and how this affects the monitoring, dosing and even the choice of therapeutic strategy for the management of thrombosis in the neonate.

  20. Eosinophilia and thrombosis in parasitic diseases: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Paul R J; Aloj, Giuseppina; Gentile, Fabrizio

    2011-02-01

    It is known that peripheral blood eosinophilia (PBE) is a normal hematopoietic response to several parasitic diseases, but it is less known that PBE promotes a hypercoagulable state that may favor thrombosis. Scope of this article is to explore which parasitic infestations are most likely to be complicated by thrombosis and to highlight the pathogenetic contribution of PBE to vascular occlusions in this setting. A review of the world literature revealed 18 cases in which PBE was associated with vascular occlusion though no specific surveys were dedicated to this topic. The eosinophil exerts its thrombogenic potential by inhibition of the natural anticoagulant pathways and release of tissue factor with enhanced coagulation activation leading to vascular occlusion. It is hoped that this review contributes to the awareness of the link between PBE and thrombosis in parasitic disorders to foster research in this area.

  1. Deep venous thrombosis and postthrombotic syndrome: invasive management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerota, A J

    2015-03-01

    Invasive management of postthrombotic syndrome encompasses the two ends of the deep vein thrombosis spectrum, patients with acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis and those with chronic postthrombotic iliofemoral venous obstruction. Of all patients with acute deep vein thrombosis, those with involvement of the iliofemoral segments have the most severe chronic postthrombotic morbidity. Catheter-based techniques now permit percutaneous treatment to eliminate thrombus, restore patency, potentially maintain valvular function, and improve quality of life. Randomized trial data support an initial treatment strategy of thrombus removal. Failure to eliminate acute thrombus from the iliofemoral system leads to chronic postthrombotic obstruction of venous outflow. Debilitating chronic postthrombotic symptoms of the long-standing obstruction of venous outflow can be reduced by restoring unobstructed venous drainage from the profunda femoris vein to the vena cava.

  2. ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Resulting from Stent Thrombosis in Contemporary Real-World Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanei, Yumiko; Nallu, Kishore; Makker, Parth; Behuria, Supreeti; Fox, John

    2017-03-01

    Stent thrombosis (ST) is a rare but devastating complication after percutaneous coronary intervention. Newer generation drug-eluting stents (DES) and newer antiplatelet therapies have been shown to decrease the incidence of ST, but we continue to observe ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) due to ST in contemporary practice. A retrospective analysis of 527 patients who presented with STEMI was performed; 57 patients (11%) with angiographically confirmed ST were compared with the patients with STEMI due to de novo lesion. The type of previous stent, the timing of ST, and the use of antiplatelet therapy were reviewed in patients with ST. Patients with ST had higher prevalence of comorbid conditions, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease, and had lower left ventricular ejection fraction (37 ± 5 vs. 44 ± 16%, p = 0.0011). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality (2 vs. 4%, p = 0.7082). ST was seen most commonly as "very late" (56%), and with previous second-generation DES (40%). Eighty-two percent of patients among early ST, compared with 22% of patients with very late ST were on dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). In 12% of patients, ST happened after DAPT was stopped by physician for procedures. ST is seen in a variety of clinical settings with the most common presentation being very late ST and in second-generation DES, which most likely represent the growing population with previous second-generation stents.

  3. Coronary vasospastic crisis leading to cardiogenic shock and recurrent ventricular fibrillation in a patient with long-standing asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacoy, Gulten; Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Balcioğlu, Serhat; Tanindi, Asli; Ozdemir, Murat; Cemri, Mustafa; Cengel, Atiye

    2008-12-01

    Acute myocardial infarction in patients with normal coronary arteries is a therapeutic dilemma. Coronary artery vasospasm and thrombosis are the most commonly encountered clinic problems and appear in localized coronary segments. The incidence of cardiovascular disease is increased in asthmatic patients. ß(2)-Adrenergic agonists use is associated with increased cardiovascular events. Although myocardial ischemia during asthma has been described in literature, acute myocardial infarction and ventricular fibrillation with normal coronary arteries in patients with asthma bronchiale is a rare entity. Our patient with long-standing asthma bronchiale presented with cardiogenic shock whose coronary angiography revealed multivessel disease and undergone primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Due to ongoing chest pain and hemodynamic instability; an early bypass surgery was planned. A control angiogram was performed before surgery. After intracoronary nitrate administration all narrowings in coronary vasculature disappeared. Symptom relief and clinical improvement was achieved with nitrate and calcium channel blockers later. After 2 months she was readmitted with cardiac arrest due to recurrent ventricular fibrillation and intracardiac defibrillator implantation was performed.

  4. Dual anterior descending coronary artery associated with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqueira Luciane da L. V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The patient is a male with risk factors for coronary artery disease, who was referred for cardiac catheterization after acute myocardial infarction in the inferior wall. The patient underwent transluminal coronary angioplasty in the right coronary artery with successful stent implantation.

  5. Distal coronary hemoperfusion during percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muinck, Ebo Derk de

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis several aspects of passive and active coronary perfusion during coronary angioplasty are investigated. The autoperfusion balloon catheters that were evaluated are the Stack® and the RX-60® catheters (Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, inc., Santa Clara, California, U.S.A). The coronary

  6. Distal coronary hemoperfusion during percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muinck, Ebo Derk de

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis several aspects of passive and active coronary perfusion during coronary angioplasty are investigated. The autoperfusion balloon catheters that were evaluated are the Stack® and the RX-60® catheters (Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, inc., Santa Clara, California, U.S.A). The coronary

  7. Deep Vein Thrombosis as Initial Manifestation of Whipple Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Souza de Miranda Henriques

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wipple disease (WD is a rare chronic disease caused by the bacillus Tropheryma whipplei. Constitutive, rheumatologic, gastrointestinal, cardiac, cerebral, lymphatic, cutaneous, and ophthalmological signs are possible systemic symptoms. However, thrombotic manifestations are rarely described as “stroke-like syndrome” or arterial thrombosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations and pathological examination. Laboratory findings may include anemia, leukocytosis, and thrombocytosis. Objective: We report a case of venous thrombosis as initial manifestation of WD. Case Report: We describe the case of a 53-year-old male with iliofemoral vein thrombosis followed by intermittent diarrhea, loss of appetite, abdominal distension, and bloating. A mild malnutrition state with a weight loss of 13 kg, pallor (+/4 +, presence of lower-limb edema (+/4 +, and hypertympanic distended abdomen occurred. Laboratory tests on admission revealed anemia, positive inflammatory activity tests, and normal coagulation. Endoscopic examination showed villous edema with white dotted infiltrates in the second duodenal portion and intestinal lymphangiectasia in the terminal ileum. Pathological examination revealed numerous macrophages with positive periodic acid-Schiff inclusions. Venous Doppler ultrasound showed extensive deep thrombosis on the left lower limb and recanalization of the femoral vein in the right lower limb. The patient was treated with ceftriaxone and enoxaparin sodium, which led to an improvement of gastrointestinal and thrombosis symptoms. Comments: Hypercoagulability, endothelial damage, vasculitis, and blood stasis are present in T. whipplei infection, which are associated with the activation of inflammatory mechanisms as well as procoagulant and thromboembolic events. WD should be part of the differential diagnosis of diseases that cause venous thrombosis of unknown origin.

  8. A history of late and very late stent thrombosis is not associated with increased activation of the contact system, a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brügger-Andersen Trygve

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathophysiological pathways resulting in Late Stent Thrombosis (LST remain uncertain. Findings from animal studies indicate a role of the intrinsic coagulation pathway in arterial thrombus formation, while clinical studies support an association with ischemic cardiovascular disease. It is currently unknown whether differences in the state of the contact system might contribute to the risk of LST or Very Late Stent Thrombosis (VLST. We assessed the relation between levels of several components involved in the contact system and a history of LST and VLST, termed (VLST in a cohort of 20 patients as compared to a matched control group treated with PCI. Methods and Results Activated factor XII (FXIIa, FXII zymogen (FXII, FXIIa-C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inhibitor, Kallikrein-C1-inhibitor, FXIa-C1-inhibitor and FXIa-α1-antitrypsin (AT-inhibitor complexes were measured by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assy (ELISA methodology. Cases and controls showed similar distributions in sex, age, baseline medications and stent type. Patients with a history of (VLST had a significantly greater stent burden and a higher number of previous myocardial infarctions than the control patients. There were no significant between-group differences in the plasma levels of the components of the contact system. Conclusion In a cohort of patients with a history of (VLST, we did not observe differences in the activation state of the intrinsic coagulation system as compared to patients with a history of percutaneous coronary intervention without stent thrombosis.

  9. Increased venous thrombosis incidence in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anette Tarp; Kesmodel, U S; Juul, S

    2014-01-01

    by in vitro fertilization (n = 18 787) were included. Venous thrombosis incidence rates in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization were compared with venous thrombosis incidence rates in reference pregnancies, by calculating incidence rate ratios. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE In total, 48 cases were...... FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS Expenses for the acquirement of data were covered by a grant from The Secretary of Doctors further education, Central Denmark Region. None of the authors have any competing interests to declare. TRIAL REGISTRATIONS NUMBER Not applicable....

  10. Chylous ascites caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Eun; Chae, Kwon Mook

    2011-12-01

    Chylous ascites is defined as the accumulation of chyle in the peritoneum due to obstruction or rupture of the peritoneal or retroperitoneal lymphatic glands. Chylous ascites that arises from acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis is very rare. We report here on a case of chylous ascite that was caused by acute pancreatitis with portal vein thrombosis, in which the patient showed an impressive response to conservative therapy with total parenteral nutrition and octerotide. We also review the relevant literature about chylous ascites with particular reference to the management of this rare disease.

  11. Sagittal vein thrombosis caused by central vein catheter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis, including thrombosis of cerebral veins and major dural sinuses, is an uncommon disorder in the general population. However, it has a higher frequency among patients younger than 40 years of age, patients with thrombophilia, pregnant patients or those receiving hormonal contraceptive therapy or has foreign body such as catheter in their veins or arterial system. In this case report, we described clinical and radiological findings in a patient with protein C-S deficiency and malposition of central vein catheter.

  12. Thrombosis of orbital varices; Trombosis de varices orbitarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschi Oyhenart, J.; Tenyi, A.; Boschi Pau, J. [Hospital Italiano, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2002-07-01

    Orbital varices are venous malformations produced by an abnormal dilatation of one or more orbital veins, probably associated with congenital weakness of the vascular wall. They are rare lesions, usually occurring in young patients, that produce intermittent proptosis related to the increase in the systemic venous pressure. The presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis is associated with rapid development of proptosis, pain and decreased ocular motility. We report the cases of two adult patients with orbital varices complicated by thrombosis in whom the diagnosis was based on computed tomography. The ultrasound and magnetic resonance findings are also discussed. (Author) 16 refs.

  13. [Cerebral venous thrombosis imagiologic features in a pregnant woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria Madalena; Rios, Ana Cristina; Fragata, Isabel; Baptista, José Tiago; Manaças, Rui; Reis, João

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a relatively rare but serious condition potentially reversible upon accurate diagnosis and adequate therapy. The peri-partum state and pregnancy are predisposing factors and TVC accounts for about 6% of maternal deaths. Its clinical symptoms depend on the the thrombus site and extension, and also on the existing collateral vessels network. We present the case of a 33 year-old woman, 13 weeks pregnant, that complained of headaches and whose cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed a subtotal oclusión of the superior sagittal sinus. We discuss the imaging features of dural venous thrombosis in the acute phase.

  14. A rare cause of cerebral venous thrombosis: cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senadim, Songul; Alpaydin Baslo, Sezin; Tekin Güveli, Betül; Dedei Daryan, Metin; Kantaroglu, Elif; Ozturk, Oya; Atakli, Dilek

    2016-07-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis (CM) is a serious central nervous system infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, seen mostly in immunocompromised hosts and less in immunocompetent patients. The vast majority of cryptococcosis cases are seen as human immunodeficiency virus infections with advanced immunosuppression. Meningitis and meningoencephalitis are the most common clinical manifestations. Nevertheless, immunocompetent patients with CM are rarely reported. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare complication of CM. Here, we report an immunocompetent patient with CM from a non-endemic area, who presented with an acute onset and atypical symptoms associated with cerebral venous thrombosis.

  15. MANAGEMENT OF DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS AT PAEDIATRIC POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina-Costina LUCA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis (DVT was considered a rare condition in the pediatric population, more recent data show a significant increase in incidence. DVT occurs due to an imbalance of hemeostasis. There are incriminated multiple risk factors, of which the most common is the central venous catheter. Imaging evaluation plays a crucial role in early diagnosis of the disease. Anticoagulant therapy is the first line of treatment, adapted existing protocols for adults. This article addresses the assessment and treatment of pediatric patients with deep vein thrombosis.

  16. Intracranial venous sinus thrombosis complicating AIDS-associated nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsari, Khosrow; Frank, Jeffrey; Vaksman, Yulia; Nguyen, Thanhan V

    2003-03-01

    An alert and oriented 27-year-old African American woman with AIDS presented with a 10-day history of fever, cough productive of yellow sputum, nausea, and vomiting and a 1-day history of excruciating headache and photophobia. Her condition rapidly deteriorated into a coma with decorticate and then decerebrate posture, and she died 3 weeks later. There was evidence of extensive intracranial venous sinus thrombosis (ICVST), renal vein thrombosis (RVT), and multiple cerebral hemorrhagic infarcts due to a hypercoagulable state complicating AIDS-associated nephrotic syndrome. This is the first reported case of fatal ICVST and RVT with extensive cerebral hemorrhagic infarcts complicating nephrotic syndrome in a patient with AIDS.

  17. Combined arteriovenous thrombolytic infusion for refractory renal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heafner, Thomas A; Scott, Daniel; Watson, J Devin; Propper, Brandon; Johnson, Chatt; Arthurs, Zachary M

    2014-08-01

    Acute renal vein thrombosis can rapidly lead to significant impairment and eventual loss of renal function. Classically presenting with flank pain, hematuria, and laboratory markers consistent with acute kidney injury, therapeutic anticoagulation is the mainstay of treatment. However, endovascular surgery offers a safe and effective alternative for renal salvage in the setting of acute renal vein thrombosis. Described is the use of combined arteriovenous thrombolytic infusion for refractory renal vein thromboses to quickly and effectively decrease clot burden in the micro- and macrovenous circulations while limiting systemic exposure.

  18. Acute scrotum in a neonate caused by renal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, C; Müller-Hansen, I; Flechsig, H; Poets, C F

    2011-03-01

    The authors report on a rare case of neonatal scrotal oedema occurring concurrently with pain upon palpation of the spermatic cord on the first day of life. An ultrasound examination showed poor perfusion of the left testicle and a thrombosis of the left renal vein; intraoperative exploration indicated necrosis of the left testicle without signs of torsion. Gorged vessels with paravasal bleeding were found in the spermatic cord. The authors hypothesise that necrosis of the testicle may result from haemorrhagic infarction caused by renal venous thrombosis. Acute scrotal discolouration with pain upon palpation in neonates is usually attributed to testicular torsion. The authors report a case where these symptoms had a different cause.

  19. Traumatic dural venous sinus thrombosis: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dural venous sinus thrombosis is a benign disease, representing about 1% of cerebral vascular events. In some cases the development of the disease increased intracranial pressure or symptomatic epilepsy. The development towards a dural venous sinus thrombosis is rare, but is a condition to be considered before the development of ischemic vascular events and a history of recent head trauma. Intracranial hematomas or skull fractures can lead to the establishment of obstructive pathology of the dural venous sinuses. The knowledge of this entity is necessary for the critical care staff and neurosurgery staff.

  20. CFD-based Thrombotic Risk Assessment in Kawasaki Disease Patients with Coronary Artery Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Dibyendu; Kung, Ethan; Kahn, Andrew; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Coronary aneurysms occur in 25% of untreated Kawasaki Disease (KD) patients and put patients at increased risk for myocardial infarction and sudden death. Clinical guidelines recommend using aneurysm diameter >8 mm as the arbitrary criterion for treating with anti-coagulation therapy. This study uses patient-specific modeling to non-invasively determine hemodynamic parameters and quantify thrombotic risk. Anatomic models were constructed from CT angiographic image data from 5 KD aneurysm patients and one normal control. CFD simulations were performed to obtain hemodynamic data including WSS and particle residence times (PRT). Thrombosis was clinically observed in 4/9 aneurysmal coronaries. Thrombosed vessels required twice as many cardiac cycles (mean 8.2 vs. 4.2) for particles to exit, and had lower mean WSS (1.3 compared to 2.8 dynes/cm2) compared to vessels with non-thrombosed aneurysms of similar max diameter. 1 KD patient in the cohort with acute thrombosis had diameter < 8 mm. Regions of low WSS and high PRT predicted by simulations correlated with regions of subsequent thrombus formation. Thrombotic risk stratification for KD aneurysms may be improved by incorporating both hemodynamic and geometric quantities. Current clinical guidelines to assess patient risk based only on aneurysm diameter may be misleading. Further prospective study is warranted to evaluate the utility of patient-specific modeling in risk stratifying KD patients with coronary aneurysms. NIH R21.

  1. Shortened activated partial thromboplastin time, a hemostatic marker for hypercoagulable state during acute coronary event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Moufak, Shaimaa K; Yusof, Zurkurnai; Mohamad, Mohd Sapawi; Kamarul, I M

    2010-06-01

    Various factors may contribute to a hypercoagulable state and acute vascular thrombosis. A prospective study was conducted involving 165 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients from the Cardiology Unit, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among factor VIII (FVIII), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and activated protein C resistance (APC-R) state among CHD patients and to look for potential clinical applications from these laboratory findings. There were 110 cases diagnosed as acute coronary syndrome (ACS), whereas another 55 were stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) patients. PT, APTT, FVIII, and APC-R assays were performed on all subjects. There was a significant difference between the FVIII level and the APTT results (P value < 0.0001). A negative relationship was found between the FVIII level and the APTT from linear regression analysis (R(2) = 10%, P value < 0.0001). For each 1% increase in the FVIII level, the APTT was reduced by 0.013 s (95% confidence interval (CI) between -0.019 and -0.007). Interestingly, none of the SCAD patients had abnormally short APTT. Approximately 68.4% of cases with a positive APC-R assay were found to have a high FVIII level. In conclusion, the APTT test is a potential hemostatic marker for hypercoagulable state including in arterial thrombosis.

  2. Patient with Recent Coronary Artery Stent Requiring Major Non Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Kiran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesiologists are increasingly confronted with patients who had a recent coronary artery stent implanta-tion and are on dual anti-platelet medication. Non cardiac surgery and most invasive procedures increase the risk of stent thrombosis especially when procedure is performed early after stent implantation. Anaesthesiologist faces the dilemma of stopping the antiplatelet therapy before surgery to avoid bleeding versus perioperative stent thrombosis. Individualized approach should be adopted with following precautions. i In a surgical patient with a history of percu-taneous coronary intervention (PCI and coronary stent, determine the date of the procedure, the kind of the stent inserted and the possibility of complications during the procedure. ii Consider all patents with a recent stent implan-tation (e.g. less than three months for bare metal stents and less than one year for brachytherapy or drug eluting stents as high risk and consult an interventional cardiologist. iii Any decision to postpone surgery, continue, modify or discontinue antiplatelet regimes must involve the cardiologist, anaesthesiologist, surgeon, haematologist and the intensivist to balance the risk and benefit of each decision.

  3. Current Indications for Coronary Arteriography

    OpenAIRE

    Dodek, Arthur

    1981-01-01

    Coronary arteriography is not necessary in all patients with angina pectoris. Angiography is indicated to define coronary anatomy in patients who have persistent angina despite full medication. It is also indicated in patients with a markedly positive stress test, unstable angina pectoris, positive stress test following myocardial infarction, variants of angina, ventricular aneurysm complications, and in the young coronary patient. Coronary arteriography may clarify the diagnosis in patients ...

  4. External iliac vein thrombosis in an athletic cyclist with a history of external iliac artery endofibrosis and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kelly M; Skeik, Nedaa; Shepherd, Roger F; Wennberg, Paul W

    2011-11-01

    External iliac artery endofibrosis describes an intimal subendothelial fibrosis leading to wall thickening and stenosis that has been described in high-performance athletes. There are anatomical, mechanical, and probably metabolic factors that may contribute to this pathology. Ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement with exercise testing, duplex ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiogram, and ultimately arteriography help to make the diagnosis. Management can be conservative, but most cases require surgical intervention. External iliac vein stenosis and thrombosis in cyclists has rarely been described in the literature. We report a case of extensive left lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT) including the external iliac vein diagnosed in a 57-year-old athletic cyclist with a history of external iliac artery thrombosis.

  5. What Is Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Coronary Heart Disease? Español Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a disease in which a waxy ... medical procedures can help prevent or treat coronary heart disease. These treatments may reduce the risk of related ...

  6. Nuclear cardiology and coronary surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckardt, R.; Andersen, L.I.; Hesse, B.

    2008-01-01

    Rising age, repeated percutaneous coronary revascularizations, and co-morbidity such as overweight, diabetes, and hypertension, characterize a change over the last 20-30 years in coronary patients referred to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). This patient group represents a great part of to...

  7. The effect of flight-related behaviour on the risk of venous thrombosis after air travel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreijer, Anja J.M.; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria; Rosendaal, Frits R.

    2009-01-01

    In a case–control study including 11 033 participants (The Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis study) on risk factors of venous thrombosis, we studied the effect of flight-related behaviour on the risk of venous thrombosis after air travel. Patients

  8. The Incidence of Peripheral Catheter-Related Thrombosis in Surgical Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Leung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters are well established risk factors for upper limb deep vein thrombosis. There is limited literature on the thrombosis rates in patients with peripheral catheters. A prospective observational study was conducted to determine the incidence of peripheral catheter-related thrombosis in surgical patients. Methods. Patients deemed high risk for venous thrombosis with a peripheral catheter were considered eligible for the study. An ultrasound was performed on enrolment into the study and at discharge from hospital. Participants were reviewed twice a day for clinical features of upper limb deep vein thrombosis during their admission and followed up at 30 days. Results. 54 patients were included in the study. The incidence of deep vein thrombosis and superficial venous thrombosis was 1.8% and 9.2%, respectively. All cases of venous thrombosis were asymptomatic. Risk factor analysis was limited by the low incidence of thrombosis. Conclusion. This study revealed a low incidence of deep vein thrombosis in surgical patients with peripheral catheters (1.8%. The study was underpowered; therefore the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis is unable to be established. Future studies with larger sample sizes are required to determine the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis.

  9. Air travel and venous thrombosis : results of the WRIGHT study : Part I: Epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Saskia

    2009-01-01

    In venous thrombosis, a blood clot develops in a vein, usually a deep vein of the leg, causing obstruction of the blood flow. Venous thrombosis is a multicausal disease, in which genes and environment interact. One of the environmental factors that increases the risk of venous thrombosis is long dis

  10. Are pulmonary embolism and deep-vein thrombosis always one disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langevelde, Kirsten van

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is traditionally, since autopsy studies by Virchow in the mid 1800s, thought to originate from embolization of a deep-vein thrombosis, resulting in two clinical manifestations of one disease: venous thrombosis. The incidence of deep-vein thrombosis in the population is twice as hi

  11. Chemico-physical characterisation and in vivo biocompatibility assessment of DLC-coated coronary stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, Micaela; Stolojan, Vlad; Virga, Alessandro; Rovere, Massimo; Cabiale, Karine; Galloni, Marco R; Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of stent thrombosis occurs in the acute and sub-acute phases and is more common in patients with acute coronary syndromes, due to the thrombotic milieu where stent struts are positioned. Stent thrombosis is likely due to incomplete tissue coverage of metallic stents as the contact between metallic stents and blood elements may lead to platelet adhesion and trigger vessel thrombosis. If a stent is covered after 7 days, the risk that it will be found uncovered at later stages is very low (<1%). In this article, we demonstrate that diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings, deposited by physical vapour deposition, promote rapid endothelisation of coronary stent devices, with very low platelets activation, reducing thrombotic clots. We relate these behaviours to the surface and bulk material properties of the DLC films, subjected to a comprehensive chemico-physical characterisation using several techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy, Raman and dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). In vivo studies, conducted on 24 pigs, have shown complete endothelisation after 7 days, with no fibrin mesh and with only rare monocytes scattered on the endothelial layer while 30 and 180 days tests have shown reduced inflammatory activation and a complete stabilisation of the vessel healing, with a minimal neointimal proliferation. The integral and permanent DLC film coating improves haemo- and bio-compatibility and leads to an excellent early vessel healing of the stent whilst the extremely thin strut thickness reduces the amount of late neointima and consequently the risk of late restenosis. These data should translate into a reduced acute and sub-acute stent thrombosis.

  12. Towards Personalized Medicine Based on Platelet Function Testing for Stent Thrombosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea Cornelia Godschalk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stent thrombosis (ST is a severe and feared complication of coronary stenting. Patients who have suffered from ST are usually treated according to the “one-size-fits-all” dosing regimen of aspirin and clopidogrel. Many ST patients show high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR despite this antiplatelet therapy (APT. It has been shown that HPR is a risk factor for major adverse cardiac events. Therefore, ST patients with HPR are at a high risk for recurrent atherothrombotic events. New insights into the variable response to clopidogrel and the advent of stronger P2Y12 inhibitors prasugrel and ticagrelor have changed the attention from a fixed APT treatment strategy towards “personalized APT strategies.” Strategies can be based on platelet function testing, which gives insight into the overall response of a patient to APT. At our outpatient ST clinic, we practice personalized APT based on platelet function testing to guide the cardiologist to a presumed optimal antiplatelet treatment of ST patients. Beside results of platelet function testing, comedication, clinical characteristics, and genetics have to be considered to decide on personalized APT. Ongoing studies have yet to reveal the optimal personalized APT strategy for cardiologists to prevent their patients from atherothrombotic and bleeding events.

  13. Circulatory support devices: fundamental aspects and clinical management of bleeding and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susen, S; Rauch, A; Van Belle, E; Vincentelli, A; Lenting, P J

    2015-10-01

    Circulatory support devices are increasingly being used to overcome cardiac or respiratory failure. Long-term devices are used either as a 'bridge to transplant' to support patients who are unable to wait any longer for a heart transplant, or, more recently, as 'destination therapy' for older patients suffering from end-stage heart failure and who have contraindications to heart transplantation. Short-term support devices for high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, or as a 'bridge for decision' for patients suffering from refractory cardiogenic shock, have also been developed. The clinical benefit of such assist devices has been demonstrated in several important studies, but, unfortunately, thrombotic and bleeding complications are two major clinical issues in patients requiring these devices. Overcoming these issues is of major importance to allow the safe and broad use of these devices, and to consider them as true alternatives to heart transplantation. The present review focuses on thrombotic and bleeding complications, and describes how the risk of thrombosis and bleeding may vary according to the clinical indication, but also according to the type of device. We describe the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of these complications, provide some guidance for choosing the most appropriate anticoagulation regimen to prevent their occurrence for each type of device and indication, and provide some recommendations for the management of patients when the complication occurs.

  14. [Bilateral renal vein thrombosis and acute renal failure due to inferior vena cava filter thrombosis. Report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Jorge; Díaz, Rienzi

    2014-11-01

    Bilateral renal vein thrombosis is an unusual etiology of acute renal failure and usually is associated with nephrotic syndrome. We report a 77-year-old man, consulting in the emergency room for anuria that appeared 24 hours after a syncope. The patient was carrier of an inferior vena cava filter prophylactically installed 17 months earlier and was not receiving anticoagulation. Serum creatinine on admission was 5.45 mg/dl and blood urea nitrogen was 54 mg/dl. Computed tomography and Doppler ultrasonography showed an extensive thrombosis of inferior vena cava and both renal veins. Heparin therapy was started with a rapid recovery of renal function and diuresis.

  15. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF GLYCOPROTEIN IIB/IIIA BLOCKER MONOFRAM IN CORONARY STENTING IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Makhiyanova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available  Aim. To study of efficacy and safety of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa blocker monafram in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI patients, underwent coronary stenting. Material and methods. 220 STEMI patients were included in the trial; they were split into two groups. 109 patients of the first group were underwent coronary stenting with i/v monafram therapy. Coronary stenting without monafram therapy was performed in 111 patients of the second group. Bare metal stents were used in all patients. Deaths, stent thrombosis, individual intolerance, allergic reactions, bleeding were registered during hospitalization. Results. There were 3 (2.75% cases of stent thrombosis in monafram group and 4 (3.6% ones - in the control group. Good tolerance of monafram was observed in all patients. There were no allergic reactions, major and minor bleedings. Reinfarction rate was similar in both groups during 30 days observational period. Conclusions. Monafram therapy is effective and safe in acute STEMI patients underwent coronary stenting.  

  16. Case Report: Coronary arterial spasm in single right coronary artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    En-zhi JIA; Qi-jun SHAN; Zhi-jian YANG; Tie-bing ZHU; Lian-sheng WANG; Ke-jiang CAO; Wen-zhu MA

    2009-01-01

    We presented a case of anomalous single-coronary artery detected incidentally during routine coronary angiography. A 32-year-old male Chinese patient presented with recurrent pre-syncope and six episodes of syncope. Coronary angiography and coronary-computed tomography (CT)-angiography performed by a dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) revealed that the patient had a single large right coronary artery. A moderately large branch originated from the proximal part of the single right coronary artery and extended to the left, passing the anterior to the pulmonary artery, and divided into the anterior descending artery branch and circumflex branch at the base of the left auricular appendage. The episodes of the syncope were suspected to be caused by coronary arterial spasm, so this patient was on a regimen of 30 mg of diltiazem every 6 h and had no recurrence of syncope during follow-up.

  17. Anomalous origin of right coronary artery from left coronary sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeh, Gadah; Crespo, Alex; Estarán, Rafael; Rodríguez, Miguel A; Voces, Roberto; Aramendi, José I

    2008-08-01

    Anomalous aortic origin of the coronary arteries is uncommon but clinically significant. Manifestations vary from asymptomatic patients to those who present with angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, heart failure, syncope, arrhythmias, and sudden death. We describe 4 patients, aged 34 to 59 years, who were diagnosed with right coronary artery arising from the left sinus of Valsalva, confirmed by coronary angiography, which was surgically repaired. Three patients presented dyspnea and angina, and one with acute myocardial infarction. At operation, the right coronary artery was dissected at the take-off from the intramural course, and reimplanted into the right sinus of Valsalva. There was no mortality. One patient had associated coronary artery disease that required stent placement postoperatively. This reimplantation technique provides a good physiological and anatomical repair, eliminates a slit-like ostium, avoids compression of the coronary artery between the aorta and the pulmonary artery, and gives superior results to coronary artery bypass grafting or the unroofing technique.

  18. Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950286 Percutaneous transluminal coronary angio-plasty for unstable angina.LIU Meilin(刘梅林),et.al.1st Teach Hosp,Beijing Med Univ,Beijing,100034.Chin J Intern Med 1995;34(3):169-172.Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty(PTCA) was performed in 190 patients with 250 dis-eased vessels and 278 lesions from Dec.1987 to Feb.1994.All the patients had unstable angina (UA).There were 52(18.7%) type A lesions,175(62.9%)type B lesions and 51(18.3%) type C lesions.Of the

  19. Development and characterization of a coronary polylactic acid stent prototype generated by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flege, Christian; Vogt, Felix; Höges, Simon; Jauer, Lucas; Borinski, Mauricio; Schulte, Vera A; Hoffmann, Rainer; Poprawe, Reinhart; Meiners, Wilhelm; Jobmann, Monika; Wissenbach, Konrad; Blindt, Rüdiger

    2013-01-01

    In-stent restenosis is still an important issue and stent thrombosis is an unresolved risk after coronary intervention. Biodegradable stents would provide initial scaffolding of the stenosed segment and disappear subsequently. The additive manufacturing technology Selective Laser Melting (SLM) enables rapid, parallel, and raw material saving generation of complex 3- dimensional structures with extensive geometric freedom and is currently in use in orthopedic or dental applications. Here, SLM process parameters were adapted for poly-L-lactid acid (PLLA) and PLLA-co-poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) powders to generate degradable coronary stent prototypes. Biocompatibility of both polymers was evidenced by assessment of cell morphology and of metabolic and adhesive activity at direct and indirect contact with human coronary artery smooth muscle cells, umbilical vein endothelial cells, and endothelial progenitor cells. γ-sterilization was demonstrated to guarantee safety of SLM-processed parts. From PLLA and PCL, stent prototypes were successfully generated and post-processing by spray- and dip-coating proved to thoroughly smoothen stent surfaces. In conclusion, for the first time, biodegradable polymers and the SLM technique were combined for the manufacturing of customized biodegradable coronary artery stent prototypes. SLM is advocated for the development of biodegradable coronary PLLA and PCL stents, potentially optimized for future bifurcation applications.

  20. [Coronary thrombolysis in acute myocardial infarction. Initial experience with an intravenous thrombolytic agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Ríos, M A; Cárdenas, M; Gil, M; Iturbe, I; Alarcón, A; Soní, J

    1984-01-01

    Thirteen patients with less than 5 hours of the onset of symptoms of acute myocardial infarction underwent selective coronary angiography. Ten of them had angiographic signs of coronary thrombosis. In these ten patients 15 mgs of an acylated streptokinase-plasminogen complex (BRL 26921 Beecham Farmaceuticals) were administered intravenously. Total angiographic recanalization was observed in 7 patients. The coronary arteries involved were the left anterior descending in 4 cases and the right coronary artery in 3. In 8 out of the 10 patients significant diminution of injury pattern in EKG was registered, however in all of them the necrosis pattern supervened. Prolongation of the thrombin and thromboplastin times, as well as an important fibrinogen disminution were documented in all instances. There were not complications related to the administration of the drug. An increase of muscle enzimes was documented in all cases. The follow-up was uneventfull with excellent results in all the patients. This study proves that with IV trombolitic therapy coronary recanalization can be achieved in the mayority of the patients; however there is no question that myocardial infarction finally ocurred. We speculate about the possibility of avoiding infarction by the administration of the drug within the first hour after the onset of the symptoms.

  1. Percutaneous coronary intervention versus coronary-artery bypass grafting for severe coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M-C. Morice (Marie-Claude); A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter); A. Colombo (Antonio); D.R. Holmes Jr (David); M.J. Mack (Michael); E. Stahle (Elisabeth); T.E. Feldman (Ted); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); E.J. Bass (Eric); N. van Dyck (Nic); K. Leadly (Katrin); K.D. Dawkins (Keith); F.W. Mohr (Friedrich)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) involving drug-eluting stents is increasingly used to treat complex coronary artery disease, although coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) has been the treatment of choice historically. Our trial compared PCI and CABG for treating pat

  2. Anti-annexin II antibody is associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity in antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus with thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Wen; Zheng, Hui; Chen, Xiao-Wei; Shen, Yan; Yang, Cheng-De

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of antibody against annexin II (A2) in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It also explored the role of this antibody in thrombosis. Purified recombinant A2 was used in ELISA to measure the levels of IgG anti-A2 antibody in 101 APS patients, 41 SLE patients with thrombosis, 124 SLE patients without thrombosis, and 120 healthy controls. The positive rates of IgG anti-A2 antibody in APS patients and SLE patients with thrombosis were 21.8 and 26.8%, respectively. Both values are significantly higher than that in SLE patients without thrombosis (6.5%). IgG anti-A2 antibody is associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity (P pregnancy morbidity, suggesting that anti-A2 antibody may be helpful in identifying potential APS cases.

  3. Idiopathic extensive spontaneous venous thrombosis (a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathare A

    1989-04-01

    Full Text Available Two patients with extensive spontaneous venous thrombosis are reported. Both had documented evidence of polyserositis, transient abnormalities of liver function tests along with normal coagulograms. Although one patient had a short, self-limiting illness, the other required treatment with coumarin derivatives. The relevant literature is discussed.

  4. Use of tenecteplase in recurrent prosthetic valve thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariram, Vuppaladadhiam; Sharma, Nuthi Prashanthi

    2013-11-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) is a serious complication of mechanical prosthetic heart valves, the available treatment options for which are either thrombolytic therapy or surgery. In patients who have already received streptokinase to treat a previous episode of PVT, the therapeutic options are limited. Herein, the case is reported of an elderly female patient with a second episode of PVT treated successfully with tenecteplase.

  5. Basilar artery thrombosis in the setting of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Amin F; Nickell, Larry T; Heithaus, R Evans; Shamim, Sadat A; Opatowsky, Michael J; Layton, Kennith F

    2014-07-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis, recurrent first-trimester pregnancy loss, and multiple additional clinical manifestations. We describe a man with severe atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis and superimposed in situ thrombus who was found to have antiphospholipid syndrome.

  6. Etiology and consequences of thrombosis in abdominal vessels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yusuf Bayraktar; Ozgur Harmanci

    2006-01-01

    The thrombophilia which can be either congenital or acquired in adult life has major implications in the abdominal vessels. The resulting portal vein thrombosis,Budd-Chiari syndrome and mesenteric vein thrombosis have a variety of consequences ranging from acute abdomen to chronic hepatomegaly and even totally asymptomatic patient in whom the only finding is pancytope nia. The complications like esophageal varices, portal gastropathy, ascites, severe hypersplenism, liver failure requiring liver transplantation are well known. Interesting features of collateral venous circulation showing itself as pseudocholangiocarcinoma sign and its possible clinical reflection as cholestasis are also known from a long time. The management strategies for these complications of intraabdominal vessel thrombosis are not different from their counterpart which is cirrhotic portal hypertension, but the prognosis is unquestionably better in former cases. In this review we presented and discussed the abdominal venous thrombosis, etiology and the resulting clinical pictures. There are controversial issues both in nomenclature, and management including anticoagulation problems and follow up strategies. In light of the current knowledge, we discussed some controversial issues in literature and presented our experience and our proposals about this group of patients.

  7. Thrombosis: Novel nanomedical concepts of diagnosis and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iwona; Cicha

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular thrombosis, a critical pathophysiological feature of many cardiovascular disorders, leads to the formation of life-threatening obstructive blood clots within the vessels. Rapid recanalization of occluded vessels is essential for the patients’ outcome, but the currently available systemic fibrinolytic therapy is associated with low efficacy and tremendous side effects. Additionally, many patients are ineligible for systemic thrombolytic therapy, either due to delayed admission to the hospital after symptom onset, or because of recent surgery, or bleeding. In order to improve the treatment efficacy and to limit the risk of hemorrhagic complications, both precise imaging of the affected vascular regions, and the localized application of fibrinolytic agents, are required. Recent years have brought about considerable advances in nanomedical approaches to thrombosis. Although these thrombustargeting imaging agents and nanotherapies are not yet implemented in humans, substantial amount of successful in vivo applications have been reported, including animal models of stroke, acute arterial thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. It is evident that the future progress in diagnosis and treatment of thrombosis will be closely bound with the development of novel nanotechnology-based strategies. This Editorial focuses on the recently reported approaches, which hold a great promise for personalized, disease-targeted treatment and reduced side effects in the patients suffering from this life-threatening condition.

  8. Evaluation of clinical model for deep vein thrombosis: a cheap ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of clinical model for deep vein thrombosis: a cheap alternative for ... Results: Twelve (57.1% of the 21 patients evaluated had a high pretest clinical ... There was a 100% correlation between the high-risk categories and the ...

  9. Possible Subclinical Leaflet Thrombosis in Bioprosthetic Aortic Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkar, Raj R; Fontana, Gregory; Jilaihawi, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A finding of reduced aortic-valve leaflet motion was noted on computed tomography (CT) in a patient who had a stroke after transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) during an ongoing clinical trial. This finding raised a concern about possible subclinical leaflet thrombosis and pr...

  10. Basilar artery thrombosis in the setting of antiphospholipid syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Saad, Amin F.; Nickell, Larry T.; Heithaus, R. Evans; Shamim, Sadat A.; Opatowsky, Michael J.; Layton, Kennith F.

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis, recurrent first-trimester pregnancy loss, and multiple additional clinical manifestations. We describe a man with severe atherosclerotic basilar artery stenosis and superimposed in situ thrombus who was found to have antiphospholipid syndrome.

  11. Sagittal venous sinus thrombosis after cesarean section: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Keypour

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is uncommon after cesarean section. Although it can be a leading cause of maternal mortality. CVT may occur during pregnancy because of hypercoagulable states such as preeclampsia, thrombophilias, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and sepsis.Case presentation: A 31 years old woman G2 Ab1 at 37 weeks gestational age with  premature rupture of membrane underwent cesarean section because breech presentation and preeclampsia. Spinal anesthesia was done for emergent cesarean section. On the second day after cesarean section, she developed headache, vomiting, focal neurologic deficits, paresthesia, blurred vision. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed thrombosis in anterior half of superior sagittal sinus. Treatment consisted of anticoagulation.  Conclusion: Thrombophilias, pregnancy-related hypertension and cesarean section are the predisposing factors for thromboembolism. Unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparin (LMWs are effective drugs for thromboprophylaxis. It is vital to prevent venous thrombosis to reduce mortality during both intrapartum and postpartum periods. Consideration of cerebral venous thrombosis in similar cases is recommended.

  12. Venous Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis is There a link

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU MIN-JUAN; LiU Ze-lin

    2008-01-01

    @@ Venous thrombosis and arterial thrombotic disorders have long been viewed as separate pathophysiological entities, partly as a result of the obvious anatomical differences, as well as their distinct clinical presentations. Recently, the potential association between venous thromboembolism(VTE) and atherosclerosis was described for the first time in 2003. Subsequently, numerous investigations have addressed the topic.

  13. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following physical restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, S B; Jensen, T N; Bolwig, T

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We describe a case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) following the use of physical restraint in a patient with a diagnosis of acute delusional psychotic disorder. METHOD: A new case report of DVT and PE associated with prolonged physical restraint is presented...

  14. Do we have to anticoagulated patients with cerebral venous thrombosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Hargroves, D

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare form of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although anticoagulation is recommended for the initial and long term treatment with regards to thrombotic risks for patients with CVT, the role of anticogalution has not been fully elucidated. The aim...... and the outcome of a second event as good as that of the first one irrespective of underlying risk factors....

  15. [Thrombosis of the ending internal carotid artery complicating giant aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truffert, A; Jouvenot, M; Coulaud, X; Dandelot, J B

    1993-01-01

    A 30-year old man suddenly developed left hemiplegia. CT scan and cerebral angiography showed complete thrombosis of a right internal carotid giant aneurysm. Anterograde propagation of the thrombus in the parent artery led to ipsilateral hemispheric infarction, an exceptional presenting symptom of such vascular malformation. The diagnostic and etiopathogenic aspects are briefly discussed.

  16. Prospective screening for deep vein thrombosis in high risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, R W

    1977-08-01

    In 257 patients undergoing total hip replacement, gastric bypass for morbid obesity, major abdominal surgery, and major leg amputation, Doppler ultrasonic screening revealed only five instances of deep vein thrombosis. The present study suggests that Doppler screening of high risk patients is a useful alternative to routine anticoagulant prophylaxis of venous thromboembolic disease.

  17. [Cortical venous thrombosis after a diagnostic lumbar puncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeilschifter, W; Neumann-Haefelin, T; Hattingen, E; Singer, O C

    2009-10-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old female patient who underwent a lumbar puncture in the context of an extended diagnostic work-up after a transient ischemic attack. A few days later the patient who suffered from severe post-lumbar puncture headache, developed a lobar hemorrhage due to a cortical venous thrombosis requiring decompression surgery.

  18. Deep vein thrombosis in primary care : possible malignancy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudega, Ruud; Moons, Karel G. M.; Nieuwenhuis, H. Karel; van Nierop, Fred L.; Hoes, Arno W.

    2006-01-01

    Background The increased prevalence of unrecognised malignancy in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has been well established in secondary care settings. However, data from primary care settings, needed to tailor the diagnostic workup, are lacking. Aim To quantify the prevalence of unrecognis

  19. Thrombosis of the great cerebral vein in a hemodialysis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratkovic, Marina; Basic-Jukic, Nikolina; Gledovic, Branka; Radunovic, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare condition with various clinical presentations which may delay diagnosis. It is frequently associated with severe consequences. We present the first documented case of thrombosis of the great cerebral vein in a hemodialysis patient. A 29-year-old female patient with end-stage renal disease of unknown etiology was admitted to a hospital with altered consciousness and nausea. Severe headache in the right parietal area had started 2 days before. On examination, she was in the poor overall condition, dysartric, with a severe nystagmus. Urgent brain multislice computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed thrombosis of the great cerebral vein with hypodense zones in hypothalamus, thalamus and basal ganglia. She was treated with heparin bolus of 25000 IU with a favorable outcome. Detailed examination demonstrated increased lupus anticoagulant (LA) 1 and LA2 and increased LA1/LA2. Control magnetic resonance imaging performed 1 year later revealed multiple vascular lesions within the brain. Acetylsalicylate was introduced in therapy. Thrombosis of the cerebral veins should be suspected in patients with end-stage renal disease, altered neurological status and signs of increased intracranial pressure.

  20. Detection of occult cancer in patients with idiopathic venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Marianne Ingerslev; Knudsen, Søren Tang; Andersen, Birthe Søgaard;

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic venous thrombosis (VTE) is frequently associated with underlying malignancy. Thus, it is tempting to search for underlying cancer in these patients. However, extensive screening is cost-intensive and no survival benefit has been demonstrated. Based on a review of the literature, we...

  1. [Blood groups as a risk factor in venous thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Cañete, C M; Alvarez Dieguez, R; González Sánchez M de la, C; Díaz Hernández, C; Sánchez Montiel, M E

    1993-01-01

    We report 173 patients with venous thrombosis (or post-thrombotic syndrome) demonstrated by phlebography. We show up the importance of blood groups as risk factor, being very significant the A group. Female sex is associated with a high incidence of this pathology. A frequent location is the left lower limb.

  2. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in psychiatric settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els G. Van Neste

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are serious, possibly life-threatening events which are often ignored in psychiatric settings. This article investigates which psychiatric patients are at increased risk of developing a venous thromboembolism. To our knowledge we are the first to perform a literature review of clinical studies relating venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism to psychotropic drugs and mental disorders. Methods: A Medline search for English studies using the appropriate search terms was performed. In addition, cross references of the relevant articles` literature references were considered. We withheld 12 observational studies, 29 case-reports and one review-article. Results: We found evidence that low potency antipsychotic drugs like chlorpromazine and thioridazine, and clozapine for treatment of resistant schizophrenia have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. There is no evidence that antidepressants, benzodiazepines or mood stabilizers have a similar effect. Also psychiatric conditions like physical restraint, catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome are related to a higher incidence of deep venous thrombosis. Conclusions: Limitations of the studies and hypotheses about underlying biological mechanisms are reviewed. The rationale for prophylactic measures is discussed and recommendations to prevent deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are given.

  3. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Komoly, S;

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulan...

  4. Detection of occult cancer in patients with idiopathic venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Marianne Ingerslev; Knudsen, Søren Tang; Andersen, Birthe Søgaard

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic venous thrombosis (VTE) is frequently associated with underlying malignancy. Thus, it is tempting to search for underlying cancer in these patients. However, extensive screening is cost-intensive and no survival benefit has been demonstrated. Based on a review of the literature, we rec...

  5. Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis Due to Dual Antiplatelet Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köklü, Erkan, E-mail: drerkankoklu@gmail.com; Arslan, Şakir; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Clinic of Cardiology (Turkey); Koç, Pınar [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Clinic of Radiology (Turkey)

    2015-08-15

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is a revascularization modality that is an alternative to carotid endarterectomy. The efficacy of CAS in primary and secondary prevention from ischemic stroke has been demonstrated in various trials. Acute thrombosis of CAS is a rare complication that can lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. We discuss a case of acute CAS thrombosis in a patient who had previously undergone successful CAS. CAS was performed in a 73-year-old man who had had dysarthria lasting 2 weeks with 95 % stenosis in his left internal carotid artery. An acute cerebrovascular event resulting in right-sided hemiplegia developed 24 h after the procedure. Computed tomographic carotid angiography revealed complete occlusion of the stent with thrombus. The cause of stent thrombosis was thought to be antiaggregant resistance to both acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. The most important cause of acute CAS thrombosis is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. Evaluating patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may preclude this complication.

  6. The diagnosis of left ventricular assist device thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerds, H. Z. R.; Brugemann, J.; Rienstra, M.; Erasmus, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical course of a patient with a left ventricular assist device is described. A total of 6 weeks after device insertion, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level increased to 2801 U/l despite adding low-molecular-weight heparin to acenocoumarol and aspirin. Pump thrombosis was suspected but unco

  7. The benefits of drug-eluting stents in the treatment of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiramijyan S

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarkis Kiramijyan,1 Ming W Liu2 1Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA; 2Heart and Vascular Care Center, White Memorial Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: The advent of coronary stents has been a landmark development in the treatment of coronary artery disease with percutaneous coronary intervention. Initial percutaneous treatment using balloon angioplasty alone had limited clinical efficacy due to immediate vascular elastic recoil and dissection, in addition to late negative vascular remodeling and neointimal hyperplasia. With the introduction of coronary stents, initially bare-metal stents (BMS, the problems of dissection and negative remodeling due to injury in addition to vascular elastic recoil were eliminated; however, neointimal hyperplasia remained an ongoing obstacle in the long-term efficacy of stents. Neointimal hyperplasia resulted in in-stent restenosis in 20%–30% of cases after intervention with BMS, which led to high rates of target lesion revascularization. Subsequently, drug-eluting stents (DES were introduced, which had the added advantage of releasing an anti-proliferative drug from the stent to reduce the neointimal proliferation, thus resulting in the reduction of the rates of in-stent restenosis. Although the first-generation DES had significantly improved outcomes over its predecessor, the BMS, several challenges including stent thrombosis and delayed endothelialization of the stent remained. The second-generation DES have been significantly improved over their first-generation predecessors in regard to efficacy and safety, ie, improved long-term outcomes and significant reductions in stent thrombosis. The duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after DES has also been studied extensively in multiple large trials. A newer generation of stents, including those with bioresorbable polymers, polymer-free, and fully bioresorbable scaffolds is still in the early

  8. Prevalence of hereditary factors predisposing to thrombosis in 260 patients diagnosed as thrombosis and investigated at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos de Campos Guerra

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of genetic polymorphism incoagulation factors in thromboembolic disease in patients withclinical suspicion of thrombosis. Methods: A retrospective casecollection was performed searching all patients with clinicalsuspicion of thrombosis who were submitted to coagulation factoranalysis at the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein from November2003 to April 2004. We included 260 patients, 118 male and 142female, mean age of 46 years. Prothrombin mutation and Leiden Vfactor were evaluated with multiplex PCR. Protein C, S and lupusanticoagulant were studied in coagulation assays. AntithrombinIII was studied by chromogenic assay. Anticardiolipin was evaluatedthrough an immunoenzymatic method and homocysteine by animmunometric method. Results: Factor V Leiden was found in 22cases (8.3 %, one homozygote and 21 heterozygotes. Prothrombinmutation was found in 18 cases (6.8%, one homozygote and 17heterozygotes. Forty cases with genetic alteration showed 34 caseswith thrombosis (85%, 29 venous thrombosis and 4 arterialthrombosis. One hundred and seven patients were tested foranticardiolipin antibodies: 21 were anticardiolipin antibody positives(19.6%, and 15 of them had IgG antibodies, 3 IgM and 3 IgA. Sixteenof the 21 patients had thrombosis, 11 venous thrombosis and 5arterial thrombosis. Lupus anticoagulant was found in two patients,both with thrombosis. There was only one case ofhyperhomocystinemia, with thrombosis. Protein C, protein S andantithrombin III deficiencies were found in 63 cases (12%. Out of31 cases with thrombosis (49,2 %, 26 cases had venous thrombosisand 5 had arterial thrombosis. Conclusion: Thromboembolicdisease is clearly associated with genetic factors but there isconsensus its cause is multifactorial. Genetic alterations, however,should be studied when there is clinical evidence of thrombosis,at least in young patients.

  9. Correlation Between C677T and A1298C Mutations on the MTHFR Gene With Plasma Homocysteine Levels and Venous Thrombosis in Pregnant Women at Risk of Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Ghasemi; Kazem Ghaffari; Abbas Ghotaslou; Mohsen Mohammadi; Zeynal Salmanpour

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common disease with a high morbidity, mortality and increase in miscarriages. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assessment the correlation between C677T and A1298C mutations on the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with total plasma homocysteine levels and deep venous thrombosis in pregnant women at risk of thrombosis. Patients and Methods: In this case-control study, 120 pregnant women with risk of DVT and 100 preg...

  10. Noncardiac surgery and bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Andrew C Y; Armstrong, Guy; Zeng, Irene; Webster, Mark W I

    2009-06-01

    The decision on whether to implant a drug-eluting or bare-metal stent during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) depends in part on the perceived likelihood of the patient developing late stent thrombosis. Noncardiac surgery and bleeding are associated with discontinuation of dual antiplatelet therapy and with increased stent thrombosis. We assessed the incidence of and predictors for subsequent noncardiac surgery and bleeding episodes in patients who had undergone PCI. Hospital discharge coding data were used to identify all adult patients undergoing public hospital PCI in New Zealand from 1996 to 2001. Hospital admissions during the ensuing 5 years were analyzed for noncardiac surgery and bleeding episodes. Eleven thousand one hundred fifty-one patients (age, 62+/-11 years; 30% women) underwent PCI, mainly for an acute coronary syndrome (73%). During the 5-year follow-up, 26% of the population underwent at least 1 noncardiac surgical procedure (23% orthopedic, 20% abdominal, 12% urologic, 10% vascular, 35% others) and 8.6% had at least 1 bleeding episode either requiring or occurring during hospitalization. Of those, half were gastrointestinal, and one quarter of bleeding events required blood transfusion. The main clinical predictors of noncardiac surgery were advanced age, previous noncardiac surgery, osteoarthritis, and peripheral vascular disease. A previous bleeding admission and age were the strongest predictors of subsequent bleeding. Noncardiac surgery is required frequently after PCI, whereas bleeding is less common. Before implanting a drug-eluting or bare-metal stent, individual patient risk stratification by the interventional cardiologist should include assessment of whether there is an increased likelihood of needing noncardiac surgery or developing bleeding.

  11. Coronary artery anatomy and variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malago, Roberto; Pezzato, Andrea; Barbiani, Camilla; Alfonsi, Ugolino; Nicoli, Lisa; Caliari, Giuliana; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto [Policlinico G.B. Rossi, University of Verona, Department of Radiology, Verona (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    Variants and congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries are usually asymptomatic, but may present with severe chest pain or cardiac arrest. The introduction of multidetector CT coronary angiography (MDCT-CA) allows the detection of significant coronary artery stenosis. Improved performance with isotropic spatial resolution and higher temporal resolution provides a valid alternative to conventional coronary angiography (CCA) in many patients. MDCT-CA is now considered the ideal tool for three-dimensional visualization of the complex and tortuous anatomy of the coronary arteries. With multiplanar and volume-rendered reconstructions, MDCT-CA may even outperform CCA in determining the relative position of vessels, thus providing a better view of the coronary vascular anatomy. The purpose of this review is to describe the normal anatomy of the coronary arteries and their main variants based on MDCT-CA with appropriate reconstructions. (orig.)

  12. Multiple abdominal veins thrombosis secondary to protein s deficiency - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodali, Venkata Umakant; Borra, Seshulakshmi; Mandarapu, Surendra Babu; Sanda, Mallikarjuna Rao; Bolla, Srinivasa Rao

    2014-06-01

    Abdominal venous thrombosis may present either as Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) caused by hepatic vein or proximal inferior vena cava (IVC) obstruction or as an extra hepatic portal obstruction (EHPVO) caused by Portal vein thrombosis or mesenteric vein thrombosis, but a mixed involvement is uncommon. Multiple abdominal venous obstructions presenting with thrombosis of hepatic vein, IVC, portal vein and renal vein are very rarely seen . We are reporting a rare case with thrombosis of IVC, hepatic vein, portal vein and renal vein, with protein S and protein C deficiencies, which was managed by giving anticoagulant therapy.

  13. Etiology and portal vein thrombosis in Budd-Chiari syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oguz Uskudar; Meral Akdogan; Nurgul Sasmaz; Sevinc Yilmaz; Muharrem Tola; Burhan Sahin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To research the etiology, portal vein thrombosis and other features of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS)patients prospectively.METHODS: A total of 75 patients (40 female, 35 male) who were diagnosed between January 2002 and July 2004 as having BCS were studied prospectively.Findings from on physical examination, ultrasonography,duplex ultrasonography and venography were analyzed.Hemogram and blood chemistry were studied at the time of diagnosis and on each hospital visit. Bone marrow examination and immune phenotyping were performed by a hematologist when necessary. Protein C, S, antithrombin Ⅲ, activated protein C resistance,and anticardiolipin antibodies, antinuclear antibodies,and anti ds-DNA were studied twice. The presence of ascite, esophageal varices, and portal thrombosis were evaluated at admission and on every visit.RESULTS: At least one etiological factor was determined in 54 (72%) of the patients. The etiology could not be defined in 21 (28%) patients. One etiological factor was found in 39, 2 factors in 14 and 3 factors in 1 patient.The most common cause was the web (16%), the second was Hydatid disease (11%), the third was Behcet's disease (9%). Portal vein thrombosis was present in 11 patients and at least one etiology was identified in 9 of them (82%).CONCLUSION: Behcet's disease and hydatid disease are more prominent etiological factors in Turkey than in other countries. Patients with web have an excellent response to treatment without signs of portal vein thrombosis while patients having thrombofilic factors more than one are prone to develop portal vein thrombosis with worse clinical outcome.

  14. Cerebral Venous-Sinus Thrombosis: A Case Series Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Ashjazadeh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral venous-sinus thrombosis is an uncommon form but important cause of stroke, especially in young-aged women. Methods: We performed a retrospective descriptive-analytical study in which 124 patients with cerebral venous-sinus thrombosis, who referred to Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from January 2000 to March 2008, were included, and their demographic, etiologic, radiological and prognostic characteristics were evaluated. Results: The patients' mean age was 34.01±10.25. Eighty seven (70.16% were women and 37 (29.83% were men. The most frequent clinical manifestations were headache, papilledema and seizures. Fifty seven (65.51% women took oral contraceptive pills. Twenty of 57 women (35.08% took the pill longer than one month to be able to fast in Ramadan or perform the Hajj ceremonies. In the mean time they developed cerebral venous-sinus thrombosis. Superior sagital sinus, with or without lateral sinuses, was the most involved area (70.96%. High mortality and morbidity rates (14.51% and 35.48%, respectively were found in patients. Poor prognostic factors at the time of admission were stupor and coma (P=0.001 and evidence of hemorrhage in primary CT scan (P=0.005. Conclusion: Taking oral contraceptive pills was a main factor associated with cerebral venous-sinus thrombosis. Clinical manifestations, prognostic factors, common involved sinuses and image findings of this study were similar to those of other studies. Health care policy makers should design a plan to warn susceptible women of the risk of cerebral venous-sinus thrombosis, and to educate them the ways to prevent it

  15. Microfluidic Thrombosis under Multiple Shear Rates and Antiplatelet Therapy Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, David N.; Forest, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    The mainstay of treatment for thrombosis, the formation of occlusive platelet aggregates that often lead to heart attack and stroke, is antiplatelet therapy. Antiplatelet therapy dosing and resistance are poorly understood, leading to potential incorrect and ineffective dosing. Shear rate is also suspected to play a major role in thrombosis, but instrumentation to measure its influence has been limited by flow conditions, agonist use, and non-systematic and/or non-quantitative studies. In this work we measured occlusion times and thrombus detachment for a range of initial shear rates (500, 1500, 4000, and 10000 s−1) and therapy concentrations (0–2.4 µM for eptifibatide, 0–2 mM for acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA), 3.5–40 Units/L for heparin) using a microfluidic device. We also measured complete blood counts (CBC) and platelet activity using whole blood impedance aggregometry. Effects of shear rate and dose were analyzed using general linear models, logistic regressions, and Cox proportional hazards models. Shear rates have significant effects on thrombosis/dose-response curves for all tested therapies. ASA has little effect on high shear occlusion times, even at very high doses (up to 20 times the recommended dose). Under ASA therapy, thrombi formed at high shear rates were 4 times more prone to detachment compared to those formed under control conditions. Eptifibatide reduced occlusion when controlling for shear rate and its efficacy increased with dose concentration. In contrast, the hazard of occlusion from ASA was several orders of magnitude higher than that of eptifibatide. Our results show similar dose efficacy to our low shear measurements using whole blood aggregometry. This quantitative and statistically validated study of the effects of a wide range of shear rate and antiplatelet therapy doses on occlusive thrombosis contributes to more accurate understanding of thrombosis and to models for optimizing patient treatment. PMID:24404131

  16. Microfluidic thrombosis under multiple shear rates and antiplatelet therapy doses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Li

    Full Text Available The mainstay of treatment for thrombosis, the formation of occlusive platelet aggregates that often lead to heart attack and stroke, is antiplatelet therapy. Antiplatelet therapy dosing and resistance are poorly understood, leading to potential incorrect and ineffective dosing. Shear rate is also suspected to play a major role in thrombosis, but instrumentation to measure its influence has been limited by flow conditions, agonist use, and non-systematic and/or non-quantitative studies. In this work we measured occlusion times and thrombus detachment for a range of initial shear rates (500, 1500, 4000, and 10000 s(-1 and therapy concentrations (0-2.4 µM for eptifibatide, 0-2 mM for acetyl-salicylic acid (ASA, 3.5-40 Units/L for heparin using a microfluidic device. We also measured complete blood counts (CBC and platelet activity using whole blood impedance aggregometry. Effects of shear rate and dose were analyzed using general linear models, logistic regressions, and Cox proportional hazards models. Shear rates have significant effects on thrombosis/dose-response curves for all tested therapies. ASA has little effect on high shear occlusion times, even at very high doses (up to 20 times the recommended dose. Under ASA therapy, thrombi formed at high shear rates were 4 times more prone to detachment compared to those formed under control conditions. Eptifibatide reduced occlusion when controlling for shear rate and its efficacy increased with dose concentration. In contrast, the hazard of occlusion from ASA was several orders of magnitude higher than that of eptifibatide. Our results show similar dose efficacy to our low shear measurements using whole blood aggregometry. This quantitative and statistically validated study of the effects of a wide range of shear rate and antiplatelet therapy doses on occlusive thrombosis contributes to more accurate understanding of thrombosis and to models for optimizing patient treatment.

  17. Nanoparticle-induced platelet aggregation and vascular thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radomski, Anna; Jurasz, Paul; Alonso-Escolano, David; Drews, Magdalena; Morandi, Maria; Malinski, Tadeusz; Radomski, Marek W

    2005-11-01

    Ever increasing use of engineered carbon nanoparticles in nanopharmacology for selective imaging, sensor or drug delivery systems has increased the potential for blood platelet-nanoparticle interactions. We studied the effects of engineered and combustion-derived carbon nanoparticles on human platelet aggregation in vitro and rat vascular thrombosis in vivo. Multiplewall (MWNT), singlewall (SWNT) nanotubes, C60 fullerenes (C60CS) and mixed carbon nanoparticles (MCN) (0.2-300 microg ml(-1)) were investigated. Nanoparticles were compared with standard urban particulate matter (SRM1648, average size 1.4 microm). Platelet function was studied using lumi aggregometry, phase-contrast, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry, zymography and pharmacological inhibitors of platelet aggregation. Vascular thrombosis was induced by ferric chloride and the rate of thrombosis was measured, in the presence of carbon particles, with an ultrasonic flow probe. Carbon particles, except C60CS, stimulated platelet aggregation (MCN>or=SWNT>MWNT>SRM1648) and accelerated the rate of vascular thrombosis in rat carotid arteries with a similar rank order of efficacy. All particles resulted in upregulation of GPIIb/IIIa in platelets. In contrast, particles differentially affected the release of platelet granules, as well as the activity of thromboxane-, ADP, matrix metalloproteinase- and protein kinase C-dependent pathways of aggregation. Furthermore, particle-induced aggregation was inhibited by prostacyclin and S-nitroso-glutathione, but not by aspirin. Thus, some carbon nanoparticles and microparticles have the ability to activate platelets and enhance vascular thrombosis. These observations are of importance for the pharmacological use of carbon nanoparticles and pathology of urban particulate matter.

  18. Challenges in the treatment of patients with essential thrombocythemia and acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doesch, Christina; Krämer, Björn; Geisler, Tobias; May, Andreas E; Kroeber, Stefan-Martin; Kandolf, Reinhard; Gawaz, Meinrad

    2008-04-01

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET) is an acquired clonal hematological stem-cell disorder that is characterized by a persistent increase in platelet count over 600,000/microl and elevated megakaryocyte levels in the bone marrow. Patients with ET are on the one hand at risk of thrombosis and on the other hand of hemorrhagic events especially in patients with very high platelet accounts. We report two illustrative cases with ET and acute coronary syndrome from our recent clinical experience illustrating the challenges in the antithrombotic treatment of these patients.

  19. Left ventricular thrombus formation after repair of anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Lindsay R; Koenig, Peter R; Russell, Hyde M; Patel, Angira

    2014-04-01

    Although thrombus formation following myocardial infarction in adults is well known, intracardiac thrombosis in children is uncommon. We report the case of a large left ventricular thrombus in an infant with ischemic cardiomyopathy secondary to anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery. Given its mobility and protrusion across the aortic valve, the patient underwent urgent thrombus removal through a transaortic approach. There were no embolic or neurologic complications. This case highlights that thrombectomy may be performed safely and successfully in critically ill pediatric patients.

  20. Left Ventricular Thrombus Formation After Repair of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery From the Pulmonary Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freud, Lindsay R.; Koenig, Peter R.; Russell, Hyde M.; Patel, Angira

    2014-01-01

    Although thrombus formation following myocardial infarction in adults is well known, intracardiac thrombosis in children is uncommon. We report the case of a large left ventricular thrombus in an infant with ischemic cardiomyopathy secondary to anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery. Given its mobility and protrusion across the aortic valve, the patient underwent urgent thrombus removal through a transaortic approach. There were no embolic or neurologic complications. This case highlights that thrombectomy may be performed safely and successfully in critically ill pediatric patients. PMID:24668990

  1. Does the quantitative assessment of coronary artery dimensions predict the physiologic significance of a coronary stenosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Zijlstra (Felix); J.C.W. van Ommeren (Jan-Kees); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractTo study the relationship between the quantitatively assessed coronary artery dimensions and the regional coronary flow reserve as measured by digital subtraction cineangiography, we investigated 17 coronary arteries with a single discrete proximal stenosis and 12 normal coronary

  2. Transradial artery coronary angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G J; de Melker, E

    1995-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and safety of percutaneous coronary balloon angioplasty (PTCA) with miniaturized PTCA equipment via the radial artery. Coronary angioplasty (PTCA) via the femoral or brachial arteries may be associated with rare vascular complications such as bleeding and damage to the artery and adjacent structures. It was postulated that PTCA via the radial artery with miniaturized angioplasty equipment is feasible and that no major puncture site-related complications occur because hemostasis is obtained easily and because no major structures are near the radial artery. With double blood supply to the hand, radial artery occlusion is well tolerated. In 100 patients with collateral blood supply to the right hand, PTCA was attempted with 6F guiding catheters and rapid-exchange balloon catheters for exertional angina (87 patients) or nonexertional angina (13 patients). Angioplasty was attempted in 122 lesions (type A n = 67 [55%], Type B n = 37 [30%], and type C n = 18 [15%]). Pre- and post-PTCA computerized quantitative coronary analysis was performed. Radial artery function and structure were assessed clinically and with Doppler and two-dimensional ultrasound on the day of discharge. Coronary catheterization via the radial artery was successful in 94 patients (94%). The 6 remaining patients had successful PTCA via the femoral artery (n = 5) or the brachial artery (n = 1). Procedural success (120 of 122 lesions) was achieved in 92 patients (98%) via the radial artery and in 98 patients of the total study population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. [Acute coronary syndrome -- 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Dávid; Merkely, Béla

    2012-12-23

    The acute coronary syndrome is the most severe form of coronary artery disease. It is an immediate threat of life and the mortality rate can be high without proper therapy and patient management. Based on the first ECG, two different forms can be distinguished: acute coronary syndrome with and without ST elevation. Besides adequate medication, management of these patients is an essential part of treatment. In case of ST elevation, coronarography and percutaneous coronary intervention is needed in general, within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms. When ST elevation is not detected on the ECG, individual ischemic risk factors and predictable mortality of the patient may define the necessity and the date of the invasive examination. The Hungarian hemodynamic laboratory network covers almost the whole country and, therefore, practically each patient may receive a state-of-the-art therapy. Although indicators of cardiovascular diseases are still prominent, the mortality rate of myocardial Infarction is decreasing in Hungary due to the well-organized invasive care.

  4. [Acute coronary syndrome suspicion in patient with left coronary artery arising from right coronary sinus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Adam; Górny, Jerzy; Rzeszowski, Bartłomiej; Witkowska, Ewa; Wasilewski, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of 73 year-old patient who underwent coronary angiography due to suspicion of acute coronary syndrome without persistent ST segment elevation. The angiographic result showed no lesions that could cause recurrent chest pain,but it also revealed a seldom coronary artery abnormality - left coronary artery arising from right coronary sinus. Performed computed tomography of the chest confirmed the result of the coronarography. But apart from that it found the signs of neoplastic disease which was probably responsible for clinical presentation.

  5. Residual vein thrombosis and D-dimer for optimizing duration of anticoagulation in idiopathic deep vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malato, Alessandra; Saccullo, Giorgia; Iorio, Alfonso; Ageno, Walter; Siragusa, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Long-term anticoagulant treatment is highly effective in preventing recurrent Venous Thrombo-Embolism (VTE) in patients with idiopathic Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) of the lower limbs, though associated with an increased risk for major bleeding that may offset the benefits of anticoagulation. Accordingly to recent guidelines, patients with idiopathic DVT should be treated for at least 3 months and then should be evaluated for the risk-benefit ratio of long-term therapy. However, such 'time for decision' is often unclear and the optimal duration of VKA remains debatable. In recent studies, markers for the assessment of the individual risk for recurrent thrombosis have been proposed, which can be of help to establish the optimal duration of VKA treatment; among them, the D-dimer (D-d) assay and the Residual Vein Thrombosis (RVT) assessment by Compression Ultra-Sonography (CUS) were shown to be the most suitable. Studies' results showed that negative results of these parameters after 3 to 6 months of therapy, identify a group of patients at low-risk for recurrent thrombosis in whom VKA treatment can be withheld. In the present review we will discuss advantages and potential limits of using these individual markers for the management of patients with a first episode of DVT of the lower limbs.

  6. Impact of coronary tortuosity on coronary pressure: numerical simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coronary tortuosity (CT is a common coronary angiographic finding. Whether CT leads to an apparent reduction in coronary pressure distal to the tortuous segment of the coronary artery is still unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of CT on coronary pressure distribution by numerical simulation. METHODS: 21 idealized models were created to investigate the influence of coronary tortuosity angle (CTA and coronary tortuosity number (CTN on coronary pressure distribution. A 2D incompressible Newtonian flow was assumed and the computational simulation was performed using finite volume method. CTA of 30°, 60°, 90°, 120° and CTN of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 were discussed under both steady and pulsatile conditions, and the changes of outlet pressure and inlet velocity during the cardiac cycle were considered. RESULTS: Coronary pressure distribution was affected both by CTA and CTN. We found that the pressure drop between the start and the end of the CT segment decreased with CTA, and the length of the CT segment also declined with CTA. An increase in CTN resulted in an increase in the pressure drop. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to no-CT, CT can results in more decrease of coronary blood pressure in dependence on the severity of tortuosity and severe CT may cause myocardial ischemia.

  7. Relationship between venous and arterial thrombosis: a review of the literature from a causal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijfering, Willem M; Flinterman, Linda E; Vandenbroucke, Jan P; Rosendaal, Frits R; Cannegieter, Suzanne C

    2011-11-01

    Venous thrombosis and arterial thrombosis are traditionally regarded as two different diseases with respect to pathophysiology, epidemiology, and treatment strategies. Research findings of the past few years suggest that this categorical distinction may be too strict. However, whether the described relationship between venous and arterial thrombosis is real or a result of other factors such as confounding, chance, or bias is still unclear. In this review, we discuss the current literature while using causal diagrams to better understand possible causal relations between cardiovascular risk factors, atherosclerosis, arterial thrombosis, and venous thrombosis. Furthermore, we propose study designs to investigate the causal link between venous and arterial thrombosis. In addition, we comment on the effect of statin use on the occurrence of both arterial and venous thrombosis. The possible clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. CT coronary angiography vs. invasive coronary angiography in CHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Hagen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Various diagnostic tests including conventional invasive coronary angiography and non-invasive computed tomography (CT coronary angiography are used in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease (CHD. Research questions: The present report aims to evaluate the clinical efficacy, diagnostic accuracy, prognostic value cost-effectiveness as well as the ethical, social and legal implications of CT coronary angiography versus invasive coronary angiography in the diagnosis of CHD. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in electronic data bases (MEDLINE, EMBASE etc. in October 2010 and was completed with a manual search. The literature search was restricted to articles published from 2006 in German or English. Two independent reviewers were involved in the selection of the relevant publications. The medical evaluation was based on systematic reviews of diagnostic studies with invasive coronary angiography as the reference standard and on diagnostic studies with intracoronary pressure measurement as the reference standard. Study results were combined in a meta-analysis with 95 % confidence intervals (CI. Additionally, data on radiation doses from current non-systematic reviews were taken into account. A health economic evaluation was performed by modelling from the social perspective with clinical assumptions derived from the meta-analysis and economic assumptions derived from contemporary German sources. Data on special indications (bypass or in-stent-restenosis were not included in the evaluation. Only data obtained using CT scanners with at least 64 slices were considered. Results: No studies were found regarding the clinical efficacy or prognostic value of CT coronary angiography versus conventional invasive coronary angiography in the diagnosis of CHD. Overall, 15 systematic reviews with data from 44 diagnostic studies using invasive coronary angiography as the reference standard (identification of obstructive

  9. Preventive Effect of Aspirin Eugenol Ester on Thrombosis in κ-Carrageenan-Induced Rat Tail Thrombosis Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ma

    Full Text Available Based on the prodrug principle, aspirin eugenol ester (AEE was synthesized, which can reduce the side effects of aspirin and eugenol. As a good candidate for new antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory medicine, it is essential to evaluate its preventive effect on thrombosis. Preventive effect of AEE was investigated in κ-carrageenan-induced rat tail thrombosis model. AEE suspension liquids were prepared in 0.5% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na. AEE was administrated at the dosage of 18, 36 and 72 mg/kg. Aspirin (20 mg/kg, eugenol (18 mg/kg and 0.5% CMC-Na (30 mg/kg were used as control drug. In order to compare the effects between AEE and its precursor, integration of aspirin and eugenol group (molar ratio 1:1 was also designed in the experiment. After drugs were administrated intragastrically for seven days, each rat was injected intraperitoneally with 20 mg/kg BW κ-carrageen dissolved in physiological saline to induce thrombosis. The length of tail-thrombosis was measured at 24 and 48 hours. The blank group just was given physiological saline for seven days without κ-carrageenan administrated. The results indicated that AEE significantly not only reduced the average length of thrombus, PT values and FIB concentration, but also reduced the red blood cell (RBC, hemoglobin (HGB, hematocrit (HCT and platelet (PLT. The effects of AEE on platelet aggregation and anticoagulant in vitro showed that AEE could inhibit adenosine diphosphate (ADP-induced platelet aggregation as dose-dependence but no notable effect on blood clotting. From these results, it was concluded that AEE possessed positive effect on thrombosis prevention in vivo through the reduction of FIB, PLT, inhibition of platelet aggregation and the change of TT and PT values.

  10. Preventive Effect of Aspirin Eugenol Ester on Thrombosis in κ-Carrageenan-Induced Rat Tail Thrombosis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Liu, Xi-Wang; Yang, Ya-Jun; Li, Jian-Yong; Mohamed, Isam; Liu, Guang-Rong; Zhang, Ji-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Based on the prodrug principle, aspirin eugenol ester (AEE) was synthesized, which can reduce the side effects of aspirin and eugenol. As a good candidate for new antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory medicine, it is essential to evaluate its preventive effect on thrombosis. Preventive effect of AEE was investigated in κ-carrageenan-induced rat tail thrombosis model. AEE suspension liquids were prepared in 0.5% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na). AEE was administrated at the dosage of 18, 36 and 72 mg/kg. Aspirin (20 mg/kg), eugenol (18 mg/kg) and 0.5% CMC-Na (30 mg/kg) were used as control drug. In order to compare the effects between AEE and its precursor, integration of aspirin and eugenol group (molar ratio 1:1) was also designed in the experiment. After drugs were administrated intragastrically for seven days, each rat was injected intraperitoneally with 20 mg/kg BW κ-carrageen dissolved in physiological saline to induce thrombosis. The length of tail-thrombosis was measured at 24 and 48 hours. The blank group just was given physiological saline for seven days without κ-carrageenan administrated. The results indicated that AEE significantly not only reduced the average length of thrombus, PT values and FIB concentration, but also reduced the red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (HGB), hematocrit (HCT) and platelet (PLT). The effects of AEE on platelet aggregation and anticoagulant in vitro showed that AEE could inhibit adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation as dose-dependence but no notable effect on blood clotting. From these results, it was concluded that AEE possessed positive effect on thrombosis prevention in vivo through the reduction of FIB, PLT, inhibition of platelet aggregation and the change of TT and PT values.

  11. Angiography and coronary function, a clinical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoel, Martin Gerrit

    2013-01-01

    Coronary angiography has the potential to determine coronary function in addition to merely showing coronary anatomy. In this thesis, we describe several facets of angiographic evaluation of coronary flow velocity and function. Measurement of the length of the coronary vessels by means of a guide

  12. Evaluating the Risk–Benefit Profile of the Direct-Acting P2Y12 Inhibitor Ticagrelor in Acute Coronary Syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Steen

    2011-01-01

    from any cause and stent thrombosis reductions achieved nominal statistical significance. Ticagrelor showed benefit over clopidogrel in almost all patient subgroups, including patients who had previously received clopidogrel, patients with both planned invasive or noninvasive treatment, patients...... with ST-segment elevation MI (STEMI) referred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention, patients with non-STEMI, and patients who underwent bypass surgery. Hence, the PLATO population reflected specifically those patients who would ordinarily receive thienopyridine-based antiplatelet therapy...

  13. Postural abnormality as a risk marker for leg deep venous thrombosis in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushi Yamane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary thromboembolism is a common cause of death in patients with autopsy-confirmed Parkinsonism. This study investigated the incidence of leg deep vein thrombosis in Parkinson's disease and relationships between deep vein thrombosis and clinical/laboratory findings, including postural abnormalities as assessed by photographic measurements. METHODS: This cross-sectional study assessed the presence of deep vein thrombosis using bilateral leg Doppler ultrasonography in 114 asymptomatic outpatients with Parkinson's disease. RESULTS: Deep vein thrombosis was detected in 23 patients (20% with Parkinson's disease. Deep vein thrombosis was located in the distal portion in 18 patients and in the proximal portion in 5 patients. No significant differences in age, sex, body mass index, disease duration, Hoehn-Yahr stage, anti-Parkinson's drugs, or daily levodopa-equivalent dose were seen between deep vein thrombosis-positive and -negative groups. Univariate analysis for developing deep vein thrombosis in patients with Parkinson's disease identified the following markers: long-term wheelchair use, bent knee, bent spine, and D-dimer elevation. Bending angles were significantly greater in the deep vein thrombosis-positive group at the knee and spine than in the deep vein thrombosis-negative group. Half of Parkinson's disease patients with camptocormia had deep vein thrombosis. Among diabetes mellitus cases, long-term wheelchair use, bent knee over 15°, camptocormia, D-dimer elevation, the more risk markers were associated with a higher incidence of DVT. The presence of risk markers contributed to the development of deep vein thrombosis. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, a bent knee posture was strongly associated with an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis. CONCLUSION: Presence of leg deep vein thrombosis correlated with postural abnormalities in Parkinson's disease. We recommend non-invasive ultrasonographic screening for leg

  14. Bioresorbable drug-eluting magnesium-alloy scaffold for treatment of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Carlos M; Muramatsu, Takashi; Iqbal, Javaid; Zhang, Ya-Jun; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Haude, Michael; Lemos, Pedro A; Warnack, Boris; Serruys, Patrick W

    2013-12-16

    The introduction of metallic drug-eluting stents has reduced the risk of restenosis and widened the indications of percutaneous coronary intervention in treatment of coronary artery disease. However, this medical device can induce hypersensitive reaction that interferes with the endothelialization and healing process resulting in late persistent or acquired malapposition of the permanent metallic implant. Delayed endotheliaization and malapposition may lead to late and very late stent thrombosis. Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) have been introduced to potentially overcome these limitations, as they provide temporary scaffolding and then disappear, liberating the treated vessel from its cage. Magnesium is an essential mineral needed for a variety of physiological functions in the human body and its bioresorbable alloy has the strength-to-weight ratio comparable with that of strong aluminum alloys and alloy steels. The aim of this review is to present the new developments in Magnesium BRS technology, to describe its clinical application and to discuss the future prospects of this innovative therapy.

  15. Factor IXa as a target for pharmacologic inhibition in acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roser-Jones, Christopher; Chan, Mark; Howard, Emily L; Becker, Kristian C D; Rusconi, Christopher P; Becker, Richard C

    2011-08-01

    Anticoagulant therapy, combined with platelet-directed inhibitors, represents a standard-of-care in the management of patients with acute coronary syndrome, particularly those who require percutaneous coronary interventions. While a vast clinical experience, coupled with large clinical trials have collectively provided guidance, an optimal anticoagulant drug and applied strategy, defined as one that reduces thrombotic and hemorrhagic events consistently, with minimal off-target effects and active control of systemic anticoagulation according to patient and clinical-setting specific need, remains at large. An advancing knowledge of coagulation, hemostasis, and thrombosis suggests that factor IXa, a protease that governs thrombin generation in common thrombotic disorders may represent a prime target for pharmacologic inhibition.

  16. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweet, Marysia S; Gulati, Rajiv; Hayes, Sharonne N

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an important etiology of nonatherosclerotic acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Innovations in the catheterization laboratory including optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound have enhanced the ability to visualize intimal disruption and intramural hematoma associated with SCAD. Formerly considered "rare," these technological advances and heightened awareness suggest that SCAD is more prevalent than prior estimates. SCAD is associated with female sex, young age, extreme emotional stress, or extreme exertion, pregnancy, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The clinical characteristics and management strategies of SCAD patients are different than for atherosclerotic heart disease and deserve specific consideration. This review will highlight recent discoveries about SCAD as well as describe current efforts to elucidate remaining gaps in knowledge.

  17. Recent advances on thrombosis and haemostasis in Asian Pacific region: report of the Fourth Asian Pacific Congress on Thrombosis and Haemostasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhao-yue

    2006-01-01

    @@ The Fourth Asian Pacific Congress on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (APCTH) was held from September 21 to 23, 2006 in Suzhou, China and organized by the Asian Pacific Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis and the Chinese Society of Haematology with professor RUAN Chang-geng as the chairperson.

  18. Common genetic risk factors for venous thrombosis in the Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang; Wang, Hua-Fang; Lu, Xuan; Jian, Xiao-Rong; Jin, Bi; Zheng, Hong; Li, Yi-Qing; Wang, Qing-Yun; Wu, Tang-Chun; Guo, Huan; Liu, Hui; Guo, Tao; Yu, Jian-Ming; Yang, Rui; Yang, Yan; Hu, Yu

    2013-02-07

    Venous thrombosis is a major medical disorder caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Little is known about the genetic background of venous thrombosis in the Chinese population. A total of 1,304 individuals diagnosed with a first venous thrombosis and 1,334 age- and sex-matched healthy participants were enrolled in this study. Resequencing of THBD (encoding thrombomodulin) in 60 individuals with venous thrombosis and 60 controls and a functional assay showed that a common variant, c.-151G>T (rs16984852), in the 5' UTR significantly reduced the gene expression and could cause a predisposition to venous thrombosis. Therefore, this variant was genotyped in a case-control study, and results indicated that heterozygotes had a 2.80-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.88-4.29) increased risk of venous thrombosis. The THBD c.-151G>T variant was further investigated in a family analysis involving 176 first-degree relatives from 38 index families. First-degree relatives with this variant had a 3.42-fold increased risk of venous thrombosis, and their probability of remaining thrombosis-free was significantly lower than that of relatives without the variant. In addition, five rare mutations that might be deleterious were also identified in thrombophilic individuals by sequencing. This study is the largest genetic investigation of venous thrombosis in the Chinese population. Further study on genetics of thrombosis should focus on resequencing of THBD and other hemostasis genes in different populations.

  19. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis in senile male patients: New risk factors and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Fu, Zhi-Qing; Zhu, Ping; Li, Shi-Jun

    2015-06-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC)-related venous thrombosis is a common but serious clinical complication, thus prevention and treatment on this problem should be extensively investigated. In this research, we aimed to investigate the incidence rate of CVC-related venous thrombosis in senile patients and give a further discussion on the related risk factors and predictors. A total of 324 hospitalized senile male patients subjected to CVC were selected. Retrospective investigation and analysis were conducted on age, underlying diseases, clinical medications, catheterization position and side, catheter retention time, and incidence of CVC-related venous thrombosis complications. Basic laboratory test results during catheterization and thrombogenesis were also collected and analyzed. Among the 324 patients, 20 cases (6.17%) of CVC-related venous thrombosis were diagnoseds. The incidence rate of CVC-related venous thrombosis in subclavian vein catheterization was significantly lower than that in femoral vein catheterization (Pvenous thrombosis history (Prisk factors or predictors of CVC-related venous thrombosis in senile male patients. Subclavian vein catheterization was the most appropriate choice among senile patients to decrease the incidence of CVC-related venous thrombosis. Previous venous thrombosis history, high lactate dehydrogenase level, low HDL level, and low albumin level were important risk factors in predicting CVC-related venous thrombosis.

  20. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis in a Child with Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ghedira Besbes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotic syndrome (NS is a renal disorder characterized by heavy proteinuria, hypoalbuninemia, edema and hypercholesterolemia. Nephrotic syndrome in children is known to be associated with an hypercoagulable state and thromboembolic complications. However cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT is very rare. Here we report a seven-year-old child with steroid-dependent idopathic nephrotic syndrome resulting from a minimal change disease, developed multiple cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, presenting with headache, left sixth nerve palsy, and papilledema. The diagnosis of CSVT was established by cranial computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance angiography. He gradually recovered after anticoagulant therapy. CSVT is very rare in nephrotic children. The diagnosis of CSVT should be considered in any patient with nephrotic syndrome who develops neurologic symptoms. This report highlights the importance of suspecting and recognizing this potentially life threatening complication and initiating early treatment.