WorldWideScience

Sample records for coronary heart disease

  1. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... slow down or stop. A risk factor for heart disease is something that increases your chance of getting ...

  2. Living with Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Coronary Heart Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) can cause serious complications. However, if you ... changes and medicines, go to "How Is Coronary Heart Disease Treated?" Work closely with your doctor to control ...

  3. Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008277 Relationship between pulse wave velocity and the NYHA classification of coronary insufficiency.SUN Weiping(孙卫平),et al.Dept Cardiol,Tongji Hosp Tongji Univ,Shanghai 200065.Chin J Intern Med 2008;47(5):382-384.Objective To investigate the relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity(baPWV)and different stage of cardiac dysfunction.Methods 253 consecutive patients with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease

  4. What Is Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Coronary Heart Disease? Español Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a disease in which a waxy ... medical procedures can help prevent or treat coronary heart disease. These treatments may reduce the risk of related ...

  5. Chelation for Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... V W X Y Z Chelation for Coronary Heart Disease Share: © AHA Coronary heart disease is a leading cause of death among both ... health approach . The use of disodium EDTA for heart disease has not been approved by the U.S. Food ...

  6. Depression and Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    There are exciting findings in the field of depression and coronary heart disease. Whether diagnosed or simply self-reported, depression continues to mark very high risk for a recurrent acute coronary syndrome or for death in patients with coronary heart disease. Many intriguing mechanisms have been posited to be implicated in the association between depression and heart disease, and randomized controlled trials of depression treatment are beginning to delineate the types of depression manage...

  7. Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950286 Percutaneous transluminal coronary angio-plasty for unstable angina.LIU Meilin(刘梅林),et.al.1st Teach Hosp,Beijing Med Univ,Beijing,100034.Chin J Intern Med 1995;34(3):169-172.Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty(PTCA) was performed in 190 patients with 250 dis-eased vessels and 278 lesions from Dec.1987 to Feb.1994.All the patients had unstable angina (UA).There were 52(18.7%) type A lesions,175(62.9%)type B lesions and 51(18.3%) type C lesions.Of the

  8. Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008417 Efficacy comparison with low and high dose natroparin for patients with acute coronary syndrome underwent percutancous coronary intervention. SUN Chaoyu(孙超宇), et al. Dept Cardiol, 4th Affili Hosp, Harbin Med Univ, Harbin 150001. Chin J Cardiol 2008;36(6):493-496. Objective To evaluate the safety and optimal piror percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) natroparin dose in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

  9. Homocysteine and coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Robert; Bennett, Derrick A; Parish, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR...

  10. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result of coronary artery disease, or CAD, said Edward A. Fisher, M.D., Ph.D., M.P. ... Problems and Disease • High Blood Pressure (HBP) • Metabolic Syndrome • Pericarditis • Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) • Stroke • Vascular Health • ...

  11. Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008042 Analysis of coronary artery lesion characteristics and its clinical implications in patients with acute non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. BAI Taizhu(柏太柱), et al. Cardiovasc Dept, Hengyang Centr Hosp & Hengyang Cardiovasc Intervention Center, Hengyang 421001. Chin J Arterioscler 2007;15(10):780-782. Objective To investigate the coronary artery lesion characteristics and its clinical implications in patients with acute non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI).

  12. Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920658 Assessment of plasma catechola-mine and β-endorphin contents in patientswith silent myocardial ischemia and anginapectoris. WU Lin(吴林), et al. 1st Hosp, BeijingMed Univ, Beijing, 100034. Cbin J Cardiol1992; 20(2): 90-91. Thirteen Patients with totally silent myocar-dial ischemia(group 1)and 15 patients with ef-fort angina(group 2)were studied. The coronary

  13. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease? A common symptom of coronary heart disease (CHD) ... and Symptoms of Heart Problems Related to Coronary Heart Disease Some people who have CHD have no signs ...

  14. Predicting coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Fuster, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and disabling disease. Whereas risk factors are well known and constitute therapeutic targets, they are not useful for prediction of risk of future myocardial infarction, stroke, or death. Therefore, methods to identify atherosclerosis itself have been...

  15. How Is Coronary Heart Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... healthy lifestyle changes if you have coronary heart disease. Heart-healthy lifestyle changes include: Heart-healthy eating Maintaining a healthy ... CAD risk factors and prevent or delay the disease. Lifestyle changes include ... following a healthy eating plan, maintaining a healthy weight, and being ...

  16. Reducing cholesterol to prevent coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew J. Sorrentino

    2005-01-01

    @@ Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains the number one killer of men and women in the United States of America despite major advances in interventional technologies for the treatment of coronary artery disease. CHD is rapidly becoming a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing nations as well and is now recognized as the leading cause of death worldwide.

  17. Smoking, Stress, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Leonard H.; Perkins, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on the interrelation between stressors and smoking, and on its potential impact on coronary heart disease risk beyond that due to stressors or to smoking alone. Reviews evidence supporting the stress-smoking interrelationship, its relevance to the risk of heart disease, and mechanisms explaining why smokers smoke more during stress and why…

  18. Genetic research in coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, A G

    1984-01-01

    Coronary heart disease research along genetic lines is difficult. Studies in molecular genetics of apolipoprotein and receptor variability appear most promising in the near future. However, unexpected discoveries and methodology may turn up that may completely change the field. Exclusive concentration on lipid research therefore should be avoided. It is likely that most advances will come from carefully designed studies that ask specific questions. Such research design is appropriate not only for laboratory studies but also for clinical and epidemiological investigations. The collaboration of clinicians, biochemists, geneticists, epidemiologists, and statisticians is likely to lead to better understanding of coronary heart disease.

  19. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...

  20. PLACENTAL GROWTH FACTOR AND CORONARY NEOANGIOGENESIS IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Tulikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoangiogenesis in coronary heart disease is a protective reaction aimed to improve ischemic myocardial perfusion, by increasing the number and size of arterial collaterals. Placental growth factor (PlGF is one of the key peptides regulating angiogenic processes in atherosclerosis. In particular, a number of investigators have shown that injection of recombinant PlGF into the system or regional blood flow can stimulate neoangiogenesis. On the other hand, there is evidence confirming the involvement of PlGF in the progression of atherosclerosis and in the development of acute coronary syndrome. In this connection, the problem of investigating the efficiency and safety of possible use of PlGF preparations, as well as its place in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome remains urgent

  1. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy; Maridaki Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-09-23

    Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD.

  2. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate.......22-1.85) for prospective studies, and 2.61 (95% CI = 1.66-4.10) for case-control studies using hospital controls. Risk of recurrent events in patients with CHD was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.54-2.68). The pooled adjusted risk of chronic heart failure in healthy populations was 1.37 (95% CI = 1.21-1.56), but this was based...

  3. Dietary fiber and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Mark A; O'Reilly, Eilis; Augustsson, Katarina

    2004-01-01

    of coronary heart disease. METHODS: We analyzed the original data from 10 prospective cohort studies from the United States and Europe to estimate the association between dietary fiber intake and the risk of coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Over 6 to 10 years of follow-up, 5249 incident total coronary cases......BACKGROUND: Few epidemiologic studies of dietary fiber intake and risk of coronary heart disease have compared fiber types (cereal, fruit, and vegetable) or included sex-specific results. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pooled analysis of dietary fiber and its subtypes and risk...... associated with risk of coronary heart disease....

  4. The educational gradient in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariansen, Inger; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Igland, Jannicke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Independently of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, cognitive ability may account for some of the excess risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) associated with lower education. We aimed to assess how late adolescence cognitive ability and midlife CVD risk factors are associated...... with the educational gradient in CHD in Norway. METHODS: In a cohort of 57 279 men born during 1949-1959, health survey information was linked to military conscription records of cognitive ability, to national educational data, to hospitalisation records from the Cardiovascular Disease in Norway (CVDNOR) project...

  5. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease.

  6. How Can Coronary Heart Disease Be Prevented or Delayed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Coronary Heart Disease Be Prevented or Delayed? You can prevent ... the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Celebrating American Heart Month: NIH Advancing Heart Research 02/07/2014 ...

  7. Study the relationship between adiponectin and coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Hui Yang; Li-Xin Zhao; Yan-Hong Lu; Xiao-Jun Li; Jun Shi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study whether adiponectin in serum of patients with coronary heart disease is reduced, and compare with the test results in total cholesterol (TC), Triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), blood glucose (GLU), C-reactive protein (CRP). Method: We selected 80 cases of coronary heart disease patients as the experimental group, 50 healthy subjects as control group. The coronary heart disease group compared with the control group, we know the changes of adiponectin in coronary heart disease group and compared coronary heart disease group with control group in test results of blood lipid, blood glucose, C-reactive protein. Results: Adiponectin in coronary heart disease group was (0.47±0.09) mg/L, which decreased significantly comparing to control group’s level (t=-18.4, P<0.001), HDL-C in coronary heart disease group was (1.24±0.04) mmol/L, which decreased significantly comparing to control group’s level (t=-27.67, P<0.001). The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: The level’s adiponectin in patients of coronary heart disease dropped, which lead to hypoadiponectinemia, Hypoadiponectinemia may be one of the risk factors of coronary heart disease.

  8. [Stress, mental disorders and coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederbogen, F; Ströhle, A

    2012-11-01

    There are numerous associations between stress, mental disorders and coronary heart disease (CHD). Exposure to an acute stressor leads to activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal and sympathoadrenal systems and chronic stressors are associated with sustained functional changes of these systems. Experiencing acute and chronic stress is paralleled by an increased incidence of mental disorders with the most consistent evidence on the triggering of major depressive episodes. Various mental disorders, including depression, anxiety and schizophrenia, are associated with an increased risk of CHD. Furthermore, acute and chronic stressors have been identified as risk factors or triggers of acute coronary syndromes. Thus therapeutic strategies aim at reducing subjective stress experience, therapy of mental disorders and treatment of cardiac risk factors known to be more prevalent in increased stress states and mental disorders.

  9. Psychological factors and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadži-Pešić Marina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CAD results from an interaction of different somatic, environmental and behavioral risk factors. Commonly, development of CAD is associated with arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking, sedentary life style and the like. Psychological factors in their own sake or in combination with other risk factors are also important for genesis of CAD. In this study, 170 people that were diagnosed with CAD and 170 healthy controls of corresponding sex and age were compared for anxiety, aggressiveness and Eysenck's two personality dimension. The data indicate that patients with CAD have very low level of anxiety and aggressiveness and very high level of neuroticism relative to the controls. .

  10. Fruits, vegetables and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchet, Luc; Amouyel, Philippe; Dallongeville, Jean

    2009-09-01

    Diet plays an important part in the maintenance of optimal cardiovascular health. This Review summarizes the evidence for a relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and the occurrence of coronary heart disease. This evidence is based on observational cohort studies, nutrition prevention trials with fruit and vegetables, and investigations of the effects of fruit and vegetables on cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the evidence supporting a cardioprotective effect comes from observational epidemiological studies; these studies have reported either weak or nonsignificant associations. Controlled nutritional prevention trials are scarce and the existing data do not show any clear protective effects of fruit and vegetables on coronary heart disease. Under rigorously controlled experimental conditions, fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with a decrease in blood pressure, which is an important cardiovascular risk factor. However, the effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on plasma lipid levels, diabetes, and body weight have not yet been thoroughly explored. Finally, the hypothesis that nutrients in fruit and vegetables have a protective role in reducing the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and preventing complications of atherosclerosis has not been tested in prevention trials. Evidence that fruit and vegetable consumption reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease remains scarce thus far.

  11. 10.9.Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930272 Clinical relevant factors of the my-ocardial ischemic threshold.LU Duan (鲁端),et al.1st Affil Hosp,Zhejiang Med Univ,Hangzhou,310003.Chin J cardiol 1992;20(6):357—358.The myocardial ischemic threshold (heart rateat the onset of ischemia) was assessed in 92 pa-tients with coronary heart disease.The highestmyocardial ischemic threshold (HMIT) rangedfrom 83 to 163 (122±18) beats/min usuallyhappened during activities at the daytime.Thelowest myocardial ischemic threshold (LMIT)ranged from 45 to 115 (82±17) beats/min usu-ally happened when awaken in early morning orasleep at night.The differences were statistical-

  12. [Passive smoking and the risk of coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 10 years it has become clear that passive smoking is correlated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. The relative risk of 25-30% is comparable to that of lung cancer due to passive smoking. Since coronary heart disease is the most common cause of death, it is likely that p

  13. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublished...

  14. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  15. Education and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Helene; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

    2013-01-01

    Educational-related gradients in coronary heart disease (CHD) and mediation by behavioral risk factors are plausible given previous research; however this has not been comprehensively addressed in absolute measures. Questionnaire data on health behavior of 69,513 participants, 52 % women, from...... seven Danish cohort studies were linked to registry data on education and incidence of CHD. Mediation by smoking, low physical activity, and body mass index (BMI) on the association between education and CHD were estimated by applying newly proposed methods for mediation based on the additive hazards...... model, and compared with results from the Cox proportional hazards model. Short (vs. long) education was associated with 277 (95 % CI: 219, 336) additional cases of CHD per 100,000 person-years at risk among women, and 461 (95 % CI: 368, 555) additional cases among men. Of these additional cases 17 (95...

  16. An Update on Gender Disparities in Coronary Heart Disease Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Tina; Palaskas, Nicolas; Ahmed, Ameera

    2016-05-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), traditionally considered a male disease, causes far more deaths in women than cancer. The prevalence of CHD is lower in women at any age, but with advancing age, this differential decreases. The clinical outcomes including myocardial infarction mortality, all-cause mortality, and reinfarction rates are also worse in women with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) than in men. Yet, women appear to be underdiagnosed and undertreated for coronary heart disease. There is still a gap in the knowledge, understanding, and general awareness of CHD in women. This review provides updates in gender disparities in the management of risk factors, treatments, and outcomes of coronary heart disease.

  17. Pathogenetic relationship between coronary heart disease and osteopenic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Mykhailovskaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the comorbidity problem of coronary heart disease and osteoporosis is caused by the rising prevalence, lack of early detection, prevention, severe complications and significant impact on the quality of life of the patients. Aim. In order to compile and submit a current point of view on the pathogenetic relationship between the coronary heart disease and the osteopenic syndrome we reviewed specialized literature. Conclusion. We established that coronary heart disease and osteoporosis have common mechanisms of progression involving a cascade of proinflammatory cytokines, osteoprotegerin, endothelial dysfunction, estrogen, calcium deficiency, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous system.

  18. A genetic future for coronary heart disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Kate; Martin, Paul

    2008-04-01

    This paper is concerned with changing conceptions of genetic disease. It is based on an analysis of biomedical literature and focuses on the treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD) in four published commentary papers. The aim of this analysis is to explore the ways in which CHD is constructed as genetic and the place of genetic discourses in the wider set of ideas that circulate about the disease. This analysis is then used to consider some of the claims of the geneticisation thesis (Lippman 1991, 1992). The analysis suggests that a genetic vision for understanding and managing CHD has emerged, which has many of the hallmarks of the geneticisation imagined by Lippman. However, a number of alternative and competing models of CHD are also supported within the biomedical discourse. These are related to the different disciplines with a stake in the field of CHD, and their struggles for authority. In conclusion, it is suggested that the geneticisation thesis, as a universal claim, is at odds with the diffuse and distributed nature of biomedical knowledge and practice. Rather than analysing geneticisation in a literal way, it may be more fruitful to see the thesis, itself, as a form of boundary work (Gieryn 1983).

  19. The epidemic of the 20(th) century: coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalen, James E; Alpert, Joseph S; Goldberg, Robert J; Weinstein, Ronald S

    2014-09-01

    Heart disease was an uncommon cause of death in the US at the beginning of the 20th century. By mid-century it had become the commonest cause. After peaking in the mid-1960s, the number of heart disease deaths began a marked decline that has persisted to the present. The increase in heart disease deaths from the early 20th century until the 1960s was due to an increase in the prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis with resultant coronary heart disease, as documented by autopsy studies. This increase was associated with an increase in smoking and dietary changes leading to an increase in serum cholesterol levels. In addition, the ability to diagnose acute myocardial infarction with the aid of the electrocardiogram increased the recognition of coronary heart disease before death. The substantial decrease in coronary heart disease deaths after the mid-1960s is best explained by the decreased incidence, and case fatality rate, of acute myocardial infarction and a decrease in out-of-hospital sudden coronary heart disease deaths. These decreases are very likely explained by a decrease in coronary atherosclerosis due to primary prevention, and a decrease in the progression of nonobstructive coronary atherosclerosis to obstructive coronary heart disease due to efforts of primary and secondary prevention. In addition, more effective treatment of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction has led to a substantial decrease in deaths due to acute myocardial infarction. It is very likely that the 20th century was the only century in which heart disease was the most common cause of death in America.

  20. Coronary collaterals improve prognosis in patients with ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Regieli; J.W. Jukema; H.M. Nathoe; A.H. Zwinderman; S. ng; D.E. Grobbee; Y. van der Graaf; P.A. Doevendans

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recruitment of coronary collateral vessels results from an endogenous adaptation to ischemic heart disease (IHD). Presence of collaterals may exert protection at the time of acute or chronic obstructive coronary disease. The protective role of collaterals in patients with extensive c

  1. Manifestation of severe coronary heart disease after anabolic drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewis, C; Spyridopoulos, I; Kühlkamp, V; Seipel, L

    1996-02-01

    Anabolic steroids are frequently abused, thus increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease, despite the known unfavorable influence on lipid profiles. We report on a young bodybuilder who presented with ventricular tachycardia as the first manifestation of severe underlying coronary heart disease. Coronary angiogram revealed severe stenotic lesions in the right coronary artery and the left descending coronary artery, and hypokinetic regions corresponded to posterolateral and anterior myocardial infarctions. This young patient had a history without any coronary risk factors, but with a 2-year abuse of the anabolic steroid stanazolol. No report published so far has shown possible atherogenic consequences of long-term abuse of stanazolol.

  2. Effectiveness of Interventions to Reduce Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness of Interventions to Reduce Coronary Heart Disease Risk. ... modifications on some risk factors of CHD were studied retrospectively in 47 males and ... within a short period of time in all patients, irrespective of their initial risk status.

  3. Smoking status, sports participation and mortality from coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, H; Iso, H; Toyoshima, H; Date, C; Yamamoto, A; Kikuchi, S; Koizumi, A; Kondo, T; Watanabe, Y; Wada, Y; Inaba, Y; Tamakoshi, A

    2008-04-01

    Since smoking and exercise have opposite effects on coronary risk factors, the hypothesis was proposed that smoking might weaken the protective effect of exercise on prevention of coronary heart disease. To determine the effect of smoking on the relationship between sports participation and mortality from coronary heart disease. Population-based prospective cohort study in Japan. A total of 76 832 Japanese men and women, aged 40-79 years with no history of stroke, coronary heart disease, or cancer, completed a self-administered questionnaire between 1988 and 1990. Systematic mortality surveillance was carried out through 2003, and 638 deaths from coronary heart disease (496 myocardial infarction) were identified. People who reported the longest time in sports participation (>or=5 hours/week) had an approximately 50-80% lower age-adjusted risk of mortality from coronary heart disease compared with those in the second lowest category (1-2 hours/week) among never and ex-smokers, but no association was found among current smokers. Adjustment for known risk factors and exclusion of subjects who died within 2 years of the baseline inquiry did not substantially alter these associations. The multivariable hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of coronary heart disease for the >or=5 hours/week versus 1-2 hours/week of sports participation were 0.44 (0.23 to 0.86) among never smokers, 0.18 (0.05 to 0.60) among ex-smokers, and 0.82 (0.47 to 1.40) among current smokers. Similar associations were found for men and women. Smoking may reduce the beneficial effect of sports participation for reduction of fatal coronary heart disease.

  4. Sedentary lifestyle and state variation in coronary heart disease mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, K K; Anda, R F; Macera, C A; Donehoo, R S; Eaker, E D

    1995-01-01

    Using linear regression, the authors demonstrated a strong association between State-specific coronary heart disease mortality rates and State prevalence of sedentary lifestyle (r2 = 0.34; P = 0.0002) that remained significant after controlling for the prevalence of diagnosed hypertension, smoking, and overweight among the State's population. This ecologic analysis suggests that sedentary lifestyle may explain State variation in coronary heart disease mortality and reinforces the need to include physical activity promotion as a part of programs in the States to prevent heart disease. PMID:7838933

  5. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  6. Diagnosing Coronary Heart Disease using Ensemble Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen H. Miao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Globally, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. One in every four people is afflicted with and dies of heart disease. Early and accurate diagnoses of heart disease thus are crucial in improving the chances of long-term survival for patients and saving millions of lives. In this research, an advanced ensemble machine learning technology, utilizing an adaptive Boosting algorithm, is developed for accurate coronary heart disease diagnosis and outcome predictions. The developed ensemble learning classification and prediction models were applied to 4 different data sets for coronary heart disease diagnosis, including patients diagnosed with heart disease from Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF, Hungarian Institute of Cardiology (HIC, Long Beach Medical Center (LBMC, and Switzerland University Hospital (SUH. The testing results showed that the developed ensemble learning classification and prediction models achieved model accuracies of 80.14% for CCF, 89.12% for HIC, 77.78% for LBMC, and 96.72% for SUH, exceeding the accuracies of previously published research. Therefore, coronary heart disease diagnoses derived from the developed ensemble learning classification and prediction models are reliable and clinically useful, and can aid patients globally, especially those from developing countries and areas where there are few heart disease diagnostic specialists.

  7. The Counselor and Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottens, Allen J.

    1977-01-01

    It is clear that steps can be taken for heart disease prevention and that counselors must give thought to adapting existing ideas and techniques and to developing and experimenting with new and innovative preventive tactics. Of utmost importance is the belief that behavioral intervention is both warranted and worthwhile. (Author)

  8. Interleukin-6 receptor pathways in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, Nadeem; Butterworth, Adam S; Freitag, Daniel F

    2012-01-01

    Persistent inflammation has been proposed to contribute to various stages in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) signalling propagates downstream inflammation cascades. To assess whether this pathway is causally relevant to coronary heart disease, we studied...

  9. The role of coronary artery disease in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Anuradha; Desai, Akshay S

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced survival following acute myocardial infarction and the declining prevalence of hypertension and valvular heart disease as contributors to incident heart failure (HF) have fueled the emergence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as the primary risk factor for HF development. Despite the acknowledged role of CAD in the development of HF, the role of coronary revascularization in reducing HF-associated morbidity and mortality remains controversial. The authors review key features of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CAD in patients with HF as well as the emerging data from recent clinical trials that inform the modern approach to management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated heart rate is an established marker of cardiovascular risk. Previous analyses have suggested that ivabradine, a heart-rate-reducing agent, may improve outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heart rate of 70 beats per...... minute or more. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ivabradine, added to standard background therapy, in 19,102 patients who had both stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure and a heart rate of 70 beats per minute or more (including 12......,049 patients with activity-limiting angina [class ≥II on the Canadian Cardiovascular Society scale, which ranges from I to IV, with higher classes indicating greater limitations on physical activity owing to angina]). We randomly assigned patients to placebo or ivabradine, at a dose of up to 10 mg twice daily...

  11. Echocardiographic evaluation of coronary arteries in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Grace; Miller, Michelle S

    2015-12-01

    Among populations of patients with the congenital heart disease, there is considerable diversity in the anatomy of the coronary arteries. Understanding these anatomical differences is vitally important in directing interventions and surgical repair. In this report, the authors describe the echocardiographic evaluation of the variants of coronary artery anatomy in the following lesions: transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, double-inlet left ventricle, common arterial trunk, tetralogy of Fallot, and double-outlet right ventricle.

  12. Clinical Significance of Serum Bilirubin Detection of Patient with Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Li; LUO Rui; ZHUANG Diankui

    2004-01-01

    Objective To explore the relation between serum bilirubin and coronary heart disease.Methods Compare the level of serum bilirubin among patients with coronary heart disease, patients with other disease and normal persons. Results The level of serum bilirubin of patients with coronary heart disease is higher than that of normal persons. Conclusion The reduction of density of serum bilirubin is one of the independent risk factors of coronary heart disease.

  13. Preventing clinically evident coronary heart disease in the postmenopausal woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Francine K

    2004-01-01

    This review summarizes data on the prevalent coronary heart disease risk factors of postmenopausal women and the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies available for preventing or treating them. Medline searches from 1966 on were used to identify manuscripts for coronary heart disease risk factor information, lipid levels as predictors of cardiovascular disease in women, non-pharmacologic therapies, side effects of statins, and lipid-lowering trials that included women and had myocardial infarction or coronary heart disease death as endpoints. Dyslipidemias that occur with menopause are particularly atherogenic and tend to cluster with other metabolic and nonmetabolic risk factors. Estrogen therapy, with or without progestogen, can no longer be recommended for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women. Statins have been effective in reducing cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality and should be first-line therapy for lipid-lowering. A considerable number of women look to obstetricians-gynecologists for primary care. For postmenopausal women especially, primary care must include management of risk factors for coronary heart disease. Estrogen or estrogen plus progestin should be used only for symptomatic hot flashes and at the lowest dose possible. Statins should be first-line therapy in preventive strategies for lipid-lowering.

  14. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David;

    2013-01-01

    To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease.......To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease....

  15. Coronary angiographic findings in patients with glucometabolic abnormality and coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勇

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of coronary angiographic(CAG) findings in patients with glucometabolic abnormality and coronary heart disease (CAD).Methods A total of 130 patients with CAD confirmed by CAG were included in this study. The blood pressure, blood glucose

  16. Mendelian randomization of blood lipids for coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmes, Michael V.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Palmer, Tom M.; Drenos, Fotios; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Dale, Caroline E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Finan, Chris; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Tragante, Vinicius; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Shah, Sonia; Elbers, Clara C.; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Zabaneh, Delilah; Sofat, Reecha; McLachlan, Stela; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Hall, Alistair S.; North, Kari E.; Almoguera, Berta; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Cushman, Mary; Fornage, Myriam; Patel, Sanjay R.; Redline, Susan; Siscovick, David S.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Hofker, Marten H.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Bots, Michiel L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Melander, Olle; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Richard; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Price, Jackie; Kumari, Meena; Baumert, Jens; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Humphries, Steve E.; Clarke, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Lange, Leslie A.; Smith, George Davey; Reiner, Alex P.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimaeki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Dudbridge, Frank; Samani, Nilesh J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the causal role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides in coronary heart disease (CHD) using multiple instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization. Methods and results We developed weighted allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (S

  17. Tea and coronary heart disease : protection through estrogenlike activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleijnse, J.M.; Witteman, J.C.; Launer, L.J.; Lamberts, S.J.; Pols, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Tea drinking appears to be protective against coronary heart disease in a number of epidemiologic studies. It has been suggested that tea flavonols with antioxidative activity, including quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin,1 could account for the favorable effect on cardiovascular health. In the ol

  18. Inflammatory cytokines and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Gao, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Because low-grade inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), and pro-inflammatory cytokines govern inflammatory cascades, this study aimed to assess the associations of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and CHD risk in a new prospective study, including meta...

  19. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins.

  20. Association between height and coronary heart disease mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Skytthe, Axel

    2006-01-01

    An inverse association between height and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) is well demonstrated, but it is not known whether this association is because of genetic factors, socioeconomic background, or other environmental factors. Four population-based twin cohorts with register-based follow...

  1. Prospective studies on diet and coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of prospective studies on fatty acids, B-vitamins and arginine and the occurrence of coronary heart disease have been described. The results presented are mainly based on the Zutphen Elderly Study. In this study of 939 men aged 64-84 years, detailed information was availa

  2. Parity, breastfeeding and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Sanne Ae; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Wood, Angela M;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is uncertainty about the direction and magnitude of the associations between parity, breastfeeding and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined the separate and combined associations of parity and breastfeeding practices with the incidence of CHD later in life among...

  3. Environmental Stress and Biobehavioral Antecedents of Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of research on the biobehavioral antecedents of coronary heart disease, including stressful occupational settings characterized by high demands and little control over the job, and the Type A pattern, particularly hostility and mode of anger expression (anger-in). Discusses research on physiologic responsiveness (reactivity)…

  4. Genetic and metabolomic approaches for coronary heart disease risk prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaarhorst, Anika Antoinette Maria

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk is currently based on traditional risk factors (TRFs) like age, sex, lipid levels, blood pressure. Here we investigated, using the CAREMA cohort, whether this prediction can potentially be improved by applying a metabolomics approach and by includi

  5. Darapladib for preventing ischemic events in stable coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harvey D; Held, Claes; Stewart, Ralph; Tarka, Elizabeth; Brown, Rebekkah; Davies, Richard Y; Budaj, Andrzej; Harrington, Robert A; Steg, P Gabriel; Ardissino, Diego; Armstrong, Paul W; Avezum, Alvaro; Aylward, Philip E; Bryce, Alfonso; Chen, Hong; Chen, Ming-Fong; Corbalan, Ramon; Dalby, Anthony J; Danchin, Nicolas; De Winter, Robbert J; Denchev, Stefan; Diaz, Rafael; Elisaf, Moses; Flather, Marcus D; Goudev, Assen R; Granger, Christopher B; Grinfeld, Liliana; Hochman, Judith S; Husted, Steen; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Koenig, Wolfgang; Linhart, Ales; Lonn, Eva; López-Sendón, José; Manolis, Athanasios J; Mohler, Emile R; Nicolau, José C; Pais, Prem; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Pedersen, Terje R; Pella, Daniel; Ramos-Corrales, Marco A; Ruda, Mikhail; Sereg, Mátyás; Siddique, Saulat; Sinnaeve, Peter; Smith, Peter; Sritara, Piyamitr; Swart, Henk P; Sy, Rody G; Teramoto, Tamio; Tse, Hung-Fat; Watson, David; Weaver, W Douglas; Weiss, Robert; Viigimaa, Margus; Vinereanu, Dragos; Zhu, Junren; Cannon, Christopher P; Wallentin, Lars

    2014-05-01

    Elevated lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity promotes the development of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, and elevated plasma levels of this enzyme are associated with an increased risk of coronary events. Darapladib is a selective oral inhibitor of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. In a double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 15,828 patients with stable coronary heart disease to receive either once-daily darapladib (at a dose of 160 mg) or placebo. The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. Secondary end points included the components of the primary end point as well as major coronary events (death from coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, or urgent coronary revascularization for myocardial ischemia) and total coronary events (death from coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, or any coronary revascularization). During a median follow-up period of 3.7 years, the primary end point occurred in 769 of 7924 patients (9.7%) in the darapladib group and 819 of 7904 patients (10.4%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the darapladib group, 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 1.03; P=0.20). There were also no significant between-group differences in the rates of the individual components of the primary end point or in all-cause mortality. Darapladib, as compared with placebo, reduced the rate of major coronary events (9.3% vs. 10.3%; hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82 to 1.00; P=0.045) and total coronary events (14.6% vs. 16.1%; hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.84 to 0.98; P=0.02). In patients with stable coronary heart disease, darapladib did not significantly reduce the risk of the primary composite end point of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. (Funded by GlaxoSmithKline; STABILITY ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00799903.).

  6. 77 FR 9842 - Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ...; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification... phytosterols and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), in a manner that is consistent with FDA's February 14... use of a health claim regarding reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) for phytosterol...

  7. Managing the lipid profile of coronary heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakopoulou, Maria; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Stathogiannis, Konstantinos; Synetos, Andreas; Trantalis, George; Tousoulis, Dimitrios

    2016-11-01

    Lipid profile management is even more critical in patients treated for secondary prevention, since patients with established coronary heart disease are at higher risk of developing events. Current guidelines encourage lifestyle modification and patient engagement in disease prevention. However, the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines seem to differ considerably from their predecessors, having an impact on clinical practice of lipid management. Area covered: This review article discusses and provides a summary of the current recommendations for lipid profile management in patients with coronary heart disease, with a view to present lifestyle modification and novel treatment strategies, and to indicate areas of dispute among recent guidelines. Expert commentary: Existing controversies between current guidelines concerning treatment goals and therapeutic decisions may have potential implications on the clinical management of patients. In the meantime, we eagerly wait for the results of randomized controlled trials evaluating promising, potent, safe and prolonged drugs that are in progress.

  8. Coffee consumption and the incidence of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCroix, A Z; Mead, L A; Liang, K Y; Thomas, C B; Pearson, T A

    1986-10-16

    We conducted a prospective investigation of the effect of coffee consumption on coronary heart disease in 1130 male medical students who were followed for 19 to 35 years. Changes in coffee consumption and cigarette smoking during follow-up were examined in relation to the incidence of clinically evident coronary disease in comparisons of three measures of coffee intake--base-line intake, average intake, and most recent intake reported before the manifestation of coronary disease. Clinical evidence of coronary disease included myocardial infarction, angina, and sudden cardiac death. In separate analyses for each measure of coffee intake, the relative risks for men drinking five or more cups of coffee per day, as compared with nondrinkers, were approximately 2.80 for all three measures in the univariate analyses (maximum width of 95 percent confidence intervals, 1.27 to 6.51). After adjustment for age, current smoking, hypertension status, and base-line level of serum cholesterol, the estimated relative risk for men drinking five or more cups of coffee per day (using the most recent coffee intake measure), as compared with those drinking none, was 2.49 (maximum width of 95 percent confidence interval, 1.08 to 5.77). The association between coffee and coronary disease was strongest when the time between the reports of coffee intake and the coronary event was shortest. These findings support an independent, dose-responsive association of coffee consumption with clinically evident coronary heart disease, which is consistent with a twofold to threefold elevation in risk among heavy coffee drinkers.

  9. Prospective study of alcohol drinking patterns and coronary heart disease in women and men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne; Jensen, Majken K; Tjønneland, Anne

    2006-01-01

    at entry to the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of coronary heart disease occurring during a median follow-up period of 5.7 years. RESULTS: 749 and 1283 coronary heart disease events occurred among women and men. Women who drank alcohol on at least one day a week had a lower risk of coronary heart...

  10. [The Roman coronary heart disease prevention program. Final results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The Rome Project of Coronary Heart Disease Prevention (PPCC) is a primary prevention trial of coronary heart disease; it represents the Italian section of the WHO European Multifactor Preventive Trial of CHD. The study has been carried out in 4 working groups of male subjects aged 40-59 years at entry, two groups (a total of 3,131 men) being assigned to treatment and the other two (a total of 2,896 men) to control, with a 6-year follow-up. The preventive intervention aimed at reducing or modifying: mean levels of serum cholesterol (generally through dietary prescriptions and, in a smaller number of subjects, with drug treatment), smoking habits (subjects were advised to reduce or stop smoking); overweight (by means of diet); sedentary life-style (with increased physical activity). The intervention program has also involved other factors such as high levels of serum triglycerides, blood glucose and serum uric acid. The treatment was carried out through individual sessions on about one third of subjects belonging to the upper part of an estimated coronary risk score, while mass education was administered to the remaining two thirds. No intervention at all was offered to the control groups. Changes in the levels of risk factors were measured through periodical examinations of the whole population enrolled in the trial. Monitoring of both fatal and non fatal morbid events provided data on mortality and incidence trends. Over the 6 years of follow-up, the mean reduction in the mean levels of the main coronary risk factors in treated groups, as compared to controls, was as follows: serum cholesterol: 4.8%; systolic blood pressure: 4.6%; number of cigarettes per day: 8.7%; body weight: 2.4%; estimated coronary risk: 38.9%. At the end of the 6 years of observation, mortality for all causes was lower by 6.0% to 10.7% in treated groups than in controls; mortality for coronary heart disease was also lower (by 26.8% to 30.2%), as well as the incidence of fatal plus non

  11. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t even on Jennifer's radar. And when this television news reporter suffered a heart attack at age ... part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Sleep Apnea Research: The HeartBeat Study 06/07/2012 ...

  12. How Is Coronary Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... signs of a previous or current heart attack . Stress Testing During stress testing , you exercise to make ... 2009, this project provided six awards at five academic institutions to identify genetic connections to heart, lung, ...

  13. Serum calcium levels are not associated with coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Y

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Yuelong Jin,* Lianping He,* Quanhai Wang, Yan Chen, Xiaohua Ren, Hui Tang, Xiuli Song, Lingling Ding, Qin Qi, Zhiwei Huang, Jiegen Yu, Yingshui Yao Department of Preventive Medicine, Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Numerous studies have reported that low calcium intake is related to a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease. However, the relationship between serum calcium and coronary heart disease is unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare serum calcium levels in patients with coronary heart disease and those in healthy individuals. Methods: This retrospective, case-control study conducted in the People's Republic of China comprised 380 cases and 379 controls. Serum calcium levels, blood lipids, and anthropometric measurements were measured in both groups. The Student's unpaired t-test or Chi-square test was used to compare differences between cases and controls. Pearson's partial correlation coefficient was used to determine the association between serum calcium, blood lipids, and blood pressure in both groups. Results: Our results indicate that the average level of serum calcium in cases was higher than in controls. Serum calcium levels showed no correlation with any parameter except for triglycerides in either group. Conclusion: Overall, these data suggest that serum calcium has no influence on coronary heart disease or triglyceride levels in the general population. Keywords: serum calcium, hypertension, blood lipids

  14. 10.9.Coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920084 Clinical and radiological analysesof 100 cases of selective coronary angiogra-phy.ZENG Xingde (曾行德),et al.Dept Radiol,Nanfang Hosp,1st Milit Med Coll.Chin Cir J 1991;6 (5): 399-401.Clinical and radiological analyses of 100 cases(89 males and 11 females),with age ranged 29-72yrs (mean 53.3 yrs.),of selective coronaryangiography were presented.Among the 100

  15. Diet and coronary heart disease. The National Heart Foundation of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrapnel, W S; Calvert, G D; Nestel, P J; Truswell, A S

    1992-05-04

    Over the last four decades there has been extensive research into the links between diet and coronary heart disease. The most recent literature is reviewed in this position statement. The clinical and public health aspects of the National Heart Foundation's nutrition policy are based on this review. The key points are as follows: 1. Saturated fatty acids A high intake of saturated fatty acids is strongly associated with elevated serum cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels and increased risk of coronary heart disease. 2. The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (principally linoleic acid) lower serum cholesterol levels when substituted for saturated fats and probably have an independent cholesterol-lowering effect. 3. The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (fish oils) The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reduce serum triglyceride levels, decrease the tendency to thrombosis and may further reduce coronary risk through other mechanisms. 4. Monounsaturated fatty acids Monounsaturated fatty acids reduce serum cholesterol levels when substituted for saturated fatty acids. It is not clear whether this is an independent effect or simply the result of displacement of saturates. 5. Trans fatty acids Trans fatty acids may increase serum cholesterol levels and can be reckoned to be equivalent to saturated fatty acids. 6. Total fat Total fat intake, independent of fatty acid type, is not strongly associated with coronary heart disease but may contribute to obesity. Associations between total fat intake and coronary heart disease are primarily mediated through the saturated fatty acid component. 7. Dietary cholesterol Dietary cholesterol increases serum cholesterol levels in some people and may increase risk of coronary heart disease. 8. Alcohol A high intake of alcohol increases blood pressure and serum triglyceride levels and increases mortality from cardiovascular disease. Light alcohol consumption reduces the risk of coronary heart disease. 9

  16. The independent relationship between triglycerides and coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Morrison, John E Hokanson

    2008-01-01

    Alan Morrison1, John E Hokanson21SCRIBCO, Blue Bell, PA, USA; 2Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado at Denver Denver, CO, USAAims: The aim was to review epidemiologic studies to reassess whether serum levels of triglycerides should be considered independently of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) as a predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD).Methods and results: We systematically reviewed population-based cohort studies in which basel...

  17. The independent relationship between triglycerides and coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Morrison, John E Hokanson

    2008-01-01

    Alan Morrison1, John E Hokanson21SCRIBCO, Blue Bell, PA, USA; 2Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado at Denver Denver, CO, USAAims: The aim was to review epidemiologic studies to reassess whether serum levels of triglycerides should be considered independently of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) as a predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD).Methods and results: We systematically reviewed population-based cohort studies in which basel...

  18. PREVALENCE OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH VALVULAR HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranya Kumar Saharia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Heart disease is a growing problem, particularly in developing countries. India has quoted to have 12.2% and 12% prevalence of coronary artery disease and rheumatic valvular heart disease respectively. Some older reports suggest that rheumatic fever, in addition to producing specific injuries to small coronary arterial branches may accelerate the development of coronary atherosclerosis. AIM To assess the prevalence of Coronary Artery disease in patients with Valvular Heart disease in some selected hospitals of Guwahati, Assam. SETTING AND DESIGN It was conducted in Gauhati Medical College and Hospital and Hayat Hospital, Guwahati. Explorative approach, survey design was selected for the study. MATERIALS AND METHODS Purposive sampling technique was used to select 126 patients who were diagnosed with valvular heart disease. Data was collected through a self-structured interview scheduled on prevalence of coronary artery disease. RESULTS Of the total 126 patients of valvular heart disease, 108 (85.71% cases were rheumatic valvular heart disease and 18 (14.29% were non-rheumatic valvular heart disease. Majority (56.34% of cases with CAD and RHD were in the range of 45 to 54 years. The prevalence of typical angina was significantly high among men (41.18%. Most of the rheumatic patients (72.22% did not complain about angina. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidaemia are significantly high among non-rheumatic group and Coronary artery disease group. In our study, the overall prevalence of significant coronary artery disease in patients with valvular heart disease was 14.28%. CONCLUSION Coronary artery disease prevalence is very high in this part of the country. Health professionals should actively participate in health promotion activities, apply the findings of the study to identify high risk individuals and prevent the occurrence of coronary artery disease.

  19. Transplant coronary heart disease: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jentzer JC

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jacob C Jentzer,1 Gavin W Hickey,1 Sameer J Khandhar2,3 1Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Heart and Vascular Institute, Penn-Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV remains one of the leading causes of death and graft failure after heart transplantation. A variety of causes, including donor heart characteristics, recipient risk factors, and immune-mediated influences, are associated with developing CAV. In this review, we will focus on the pathophysiology of developing CAV and various methods to screen for this condition. The pathogenesis of CAV likely involves repeated injuries to the endothelium from a variety of factors such as cellular-mediated rejection, and alloimmune factors, including antibody-mediated injury, ischemia-reperfusion injury at time of transplant, cytomegalovirus infections, immunosuppression medications, systemic inflammation, and traditional atherosclerosis risk factors. Patients with significant CAV are often asymptomatic, and therefore early detection by routine screening prior to graft dysfunction is crucial. There are a variety of invasive, noninvasive, and blood tests that have been studied as screening methods, and we will discuss the role of each of these in this review article. Although some treatment regimens have been established for CAV, this is an area where further studies and research are necessary.Keywords: cardiac allograft vasculopathy, orthotopic heart transplantation, intra-vascular imaging

  20. 76 FR 9525 - Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... Coronary Heart Disease AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Extension of enforcement... of coronary heart disease (CHD), in a manner that is consistent with FDA's February 14, 2003, letter... supplement products with claims regarding free phytosterols and heart disease that were marketed prior to...

  1. Ivabradine, coronary artery disease, and heart failure: beyond rhythm control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Scicchitano,1 Francesca Cortese,1 Gabriella Ricci,1 Santa Carbonara,1 Michele Moncelli,1 Massimo Iacoviello,1 Annagrazia Cecere,1 Michele Gesualdo,1 Annapaola Zito,1 Pasquale Caldarola,2 Domenico Scrutinio,3 Rocco Lagioia,3 Graziano Riccioni,4 Marco Matteo Ciccone1 1Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari, School of Medicine, Policlinico, Bari, Italy; 2Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Policlinic, San Paolo Hospital, Bari, Italy; 3Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Fondazione Maugeri, Cassano Murge, Italy; 4Intensive Cardiology Care Unit, San Camillo de Lellis Hospital, Manfredonia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Elevated heart rate could negatively influence cardiovascular risk in the general population. It can induce and promote the atherosclerotic process by means of several mechanisms involving endothelial shear stress and biochemical activities. Furthermore, elevated heart rate can directly increase heart ischemic conditions because of its skill in unbalancing demand/supply of oxygen and decreasing the diastolic period. Thus, many pharmacological treatments have been proposed in order to reduce heart rate and ameliorate the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals, especially those suffering from coronary artery diseases (CAD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Ivabradine is the first pure heart rate reductive drug approved and currently used in humans, created in order to selectively reduce sinus node function and to overcome the many side effects of similar pharmacological tools (ie, β-blockers or calcium channel antagonists. The aim of our review is to evaluate the role and the safety of this molecule on CAD and CHF therapeutic strategies. Keywords: chronic heart failure, heart rate reduction, cardiac ischemic disease, heart-rate lowering drugs, funny current

  2. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.83 Section 101.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION.... (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease... lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk of developing coronary heart disease...

  3. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory...

  4. Clinical Significance of Serum Bilirubin Detection of Patient with Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAOLi; LUORui; ZHUANGDiankui

    2004-01-01

    To explore the relation between serum bilinabin and eoronary heart disease Methods Compare the level of serum bilinabin among patients with eoronary heart disease, patients with other disease and normal persons. Results The level of serum bilinabin of patients with coronary heart disease is higher than that of normal persons. Conclusion The reduction of density of serum bihrubin is one of the independent risk factors of coronary heart disease.

  5. Effects of Psychoeducation on Mental Health in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bashiri, Zahra; Aghajani, Mohammad; Masoudi Alavi, Negin

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with coronary heart disease are at high risk for mental health disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Psychoeducation is a well-known intervention for psychiatric patients, but its use has been limited in other health conditions, such as coronary heart disease. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psychoeducation on mental health in coronary heart disease patients. Patients and Methods This randomized clinical trial included 70 patients with c...

  6. 21 CFR 101.81 - Health claims: Soluble fiber from certain foods and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.81 Section 101.81 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a) Relationship between diets that are low in saturated fat and... means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is one of the most...

  7. [Adipokines: adiponectin, leptin, resistin and coronary heart disease risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopff, Barbara; Jegier, Anna

    2005-01-01

    lesions. Correlation between resistin concentration and the extent of atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary vessels has also been found. The disturbances in secretion, function and balance of adiponectin, leptin and resistin are to be considered not only a link between visceral adiposity and cardiovascular risk but also independent risk factor of coronary heart disease.

  8. Associaton between plasma osteopontin levels and severity of coronary heart disease in non-diabetic subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏芹

    2014-01-01

    Objective To seek the association between plasma osteopontin(OPN)levels and severity of coronary heart disease in non-diabetic subjects.Methods A total of 166stable angina patients free of diabetes were enrolled in the study.Clinical characteristic of patients was recorded.Plasma OPN levels were measured by an enzymelinked immunosorbent assay method.Coronary heart disease was determined by coronary artery angiography.The extent of coronary artery stenosis was represented as the

  9. The independent relationship between triglycerides and coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Alan; Hokanson, John E

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to review epidemiologic studies to reassess whether serum levels of triglycerides should be considered independently of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) as a predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods and results: We systematically reviewed population-based cohort studies in which baseline serum levels of triglycerides and HDL-C were included as explanatory variables in multivariate analyses with the development of CHD (coronary events or coronary death) as dependent variable. A total of 32 unique reports describing 38 cohorts were included. The independent association between elevated triglycerides and risk of CHD was statistically significant in 16 of 30 populations without pre-existing CHD. Among populations with diabetes mellitus or pre-existing CHD, or the elderly, triglycerides were not significantly independently associated with CHD in any of 8 cohorts. Triglycerides and HDL-C were mutually exclusive predictors of coronary events in 12 of 20 analyses of patients without pre-existing CHD. Conclusions: Epidemiologic studies provide evidence of an association between triglycerides and the development of primary CHD independently of HDL-C. Evidence of an inverse relationship between triglycerides and HDL-C suggests that both should be considered in CHD risk estimation and as targets for intervention. PMID:19436658

  10. Education and coronary heart disease: mendelian randomisation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Taavi; Vaucher, Julien; Okbay, Aysu; Pikhart, Hynek; Peasey, Anne; Kubinova, Ruzena; Pajak, Andrzej; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Malyutina, Sofia; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Fischer, Krista; Veronesi, Giovanni; Palmer, Tom; Bowden, Jack; Davey Smith, George; Bobak, Martin; Holmes, Michael V

    2017-08-30

    Objective To determine whether educational attainment is a causal risk factor in the development of coronary heart disease.Design Mendelian randomisation study, using genetic data as proxies for education to minimise confounding.Setting The main analysis used genetic data from two large consortia (CARDIoGRAMplusC4D and SSGAC), comprising 112 studies from predominantly high income countries. Findings from mendelian randomisation analyses were then compared against results from traditional observational studies (164 170 participants). Finally, genetic data from six additional consortia were analysed to investigate whether longer education can causally alter the common cardiovascular risk factors.Participants The main analysis was of 543 733 men and women (from CARDIoGRAMplusC4D and SSGAC), predominantly of European origin.Exposure A one standard deviation increase in the genetic predisposition towards higher education (3.6 years of additional schooling), measured by 162 genetic variants that have been previously associated with education.Main outcome measure Combined fatal and non-fatal coronary heart disease (63 746 events in CARDIoGRAMplusC4D).Results Genetic predisposition towards 3.6 years of additional education was associated with a one third lower risk of coronary heart disease (odds ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.77; P=3×10(-8)). This was comparable to findings from traditional observational studies (prevalence odds ratio 0.73, 0.68 to 0.78; incidence odds ratio 0.80, 0.76 to 0.83). Sensitivity analyses were consistent with a causal interpretation in which major bias from genetic pleiotropy was unlikely, although this remains an untestable possibility. Genetic predisposition towards longer education was additionally associated with less smoking, lower body mass index, and a favourable blood lipid profile.Conclusions This mendelian randomisation study found support for the hypothesis that low education is a causal risk factor in the

  11. The Myers-Briggs type indicator and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, B M; Fyfe, J H; Carskadon, T G

    1987-01-01

    Researchers have for many years attempted to establish a relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and personality type. In our study, 103 subjects completed Form G of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Comparisons were made between 93 CHD patients and an age-appropriate control group (Group C) on each of the four MBTI dimensions: Extraversion-Introversion, Sensing-Intuition, Thinking-Feeling, and Judging-Perceiving. The comparison between CHD patients and Group C showed that CHD patients were significantly more likely to prefer sensing and feeling.

  12. The coronary heart team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Bobby; Puskas, John D; Bhatt, Deepak L; Verma, Subodh

    2017-09-01

    The concept of a Coronary Heart Team has generated increased interest, including support from major practice guidelines. Here, we review the rationale and the published experience of Coronary Heart Teams. A Coronary Heart Team should be led by both cardiology and cardiac surgery with a shared decision-making approach. The team should incorporate data from anatomic and clinical risk prediction models to offer individualized care. Most teams focus on management of complex patients and those with indications for both coronary artery bypass graft and percutaneous coronary intervention. The potential benefits of a Coronary Heart Team include balanced decision-making, greater adherence to evidence-based practice guidelines, as well as promoting greater collegiality and exchange of knowledge between specialties. Single-center series have demonstrated consistency in decision-making by Coronary Heart Teams but prospective data demonstrating improved patient outcomes and/or cost effectiveness are necessary. The concept of a Coronary Heart Team is gaining traction for patients with complex coronary artery disease. There is a growing literature in support of Coronary Heart Teams but comparative and prospective data demonstrating improved patient outcomes are needed.

  13. Predictive Value of Auricular Diagnosis on Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorna Kwai-Ping Suen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ear has a reflexive property; therefore, various physical attributes may appear on the auricle when disorders of the internal organs or other parts of the body exist. Auricular diagnostics is an objective, painless, and noninvasive method that provides rapid access to information. Thus, the association between auricular signals and coronary heart disease (CHD should be further investigated. A case control study was conducted to determine the predictive value of auricular signals on 100 cases of CHD (CHD+ve = 50; CHD−ve = 50 via visual inspection, electrical skin resistance measurement, and tenderness testing. The results showed that the presence of an ear lobe crease (ELC was significantly associated with coronary heart disease. The “heart” zone of the CHD+ve group significantly exhibited higher conductivity on both ears than that of the controls. The CHD+ve group experienced significant tenderness in the “heart” region compared with those in the CHD−ve group in both acute and chronic conditions. Further studies that take into consideration the impact of age, race, and earlobe shape on ELC prevalence in a larger sample should be done.

  14. Pulpal inflammation and incidence of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshipura, Kaumudi J; Pitiphat, Waranuch; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Willett, Walter C; Colditz, Graham A; Douglass, Chester W

    2006-02-01

    Pulpal inflammation is primarily caused by coronal caries, and leads to root canal therapy (RCT). Chronic inflammation has been associated with various cardiovascular diseases. This study evaluates the association between pulpal inflammation (using RCT as a surrogate) and incident coronary heart disease (CHD). We report results among males from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS), excluding participants with prior cardiovascular disease or diabetes. We obtained RCT data from the HPFS cohort (n = 34,683). Compared to men without RCT, those with >/=1 RCT had a multivariate RR of 1.21 (95% CI 1.05-1.40) for CHD. The association was limited to dentists (RR = 1.38; 95% CI 1.14-1.67). There was no association among nondentists (RR = 1.03). Dental caries was not associated with CHD. The results suggest a possible modest association between pulpal inflammation and CHD.

  15. Ultrasound screening of multifocal atherosclerosis: markers for coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lachezar Grozdinski; Mario Stankev; Alexander Doganov

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective The frequency of multifocal atherosclerosis (MFA) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) has not been thoroughly studied. The purpose of our study was to perform ultrasound screening for MFA in patients with coronary atherosclerosis and make evaluation of the sensitivity and significance of different atherosclerosis markers. Methods Using Color Dupplex Ultrasound (CDU), we studied 32 clinically healthy persons and 87 patients of the city of B with clinical data for CHD where we also performed coronarography. Results In patients with coronary atherosclerosis we found high frequency of carotid atherosclerosis (93%) and peripheral artery disease (PAD) (81%). We established verifiable thickening of the intima-media (IMT) of the common carotid artery (CCA) and common femoral artery (CFA) in patients with CHD. There is a correlation between the frequency of carotid and femoral stenoses and CHD proven by coronarography. Patients with CHD had a high relative risk to develop carotid (RR = 5) and peripheral atherosclerosis (RR=3.5) and high frequency of asymptomatic stenoses and thromboses of the internal carotid artery (86.9%) and femoral artery (78.3%), as well as aneurisms of the abdominal aorta (8.1%). Markers for CAD with high sensitivity were the atherosclerotic plaques of ICA (0.93) and CFA (0.81) as well as IMT of the CFA (0.84). Conclusions MFA are common among patients with CHD. Ultrasound diagnosis is the method of choice for simultaneous non-invasive screening of carotid, peripheral and MFA and provides sensitive markers for coronary atherosclerosis. The most sensitive and specific markers for CHD are the combination of the IMT and atherosclerotic plaques of CCA, ICA and CFA (100% sensitivity and 0.92 specificity).

  16. Common clinical practice versus new PRIM score in predicting coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schnohr, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    To compare the new Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) Score and common clinical practice with the Framingham Point Score for classification of individuals with respect to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk.......To compare the new Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) Score and common clinical practice with the Framingham Point Score for classification of individuals with respect to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk....

  17. Smoking and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Younger, Middle-Aged, and Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne S; Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht;

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated associations of smoking and coronary heart disease (CHD) by age. Methods. Data came from the Pooling Project on Diet and Coronary Heart Disease (8 prospective studies, 1974-1996; n = 192 067 women and 74 720 men, aged 40-89 years). Results. During follow-up, 4326 cases...

  18. 21 CFR 101.82 - Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... heart disease (CHD). 101.82 Section 101.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Health Claims § 101.82 Health claims: Soy protein and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). (a... risk of CHD. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. CHD is one...

  19. Hostility, Type A Personality and Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Heidari Pahlavian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In modern medicine, researches in behavioural sciences have described link between psychosocial characteristic, specific personality traits, and development of coronary artery disease. The aim of present study was to investigate the relationship between " hostility" and "type A" personality with acute myocardial infarction. Materials & Methods: In this case-control study 102 patients suffering from acute myocardial infarction and 162 no patents individuals after matching by age, gender, education level, marital status and occupation were studied and compared with regard psychological conditions by type A Najarian questionnaire and SCL – 90 – R. Results: Our study found evidence in support of the hypothesis that hostility may predict heart disease more than type A personality.Conclusion: Our study has some practical meaning for prediction and prevention of CHD. This finding suggests that mental health providers should continue to look at the effectiveness of providing psychological intervention for those individuals with high hostility levels.

  20. Reductionism and holism in coronary heart disease and cardiac nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chummun, Harry

    Reductionism and holism are two contrasting philosophies which provide scientific knowledge of disease processes, health dynamics and care interventions. While reductionism focuses on specific and perhaps narrow concepts, it enhances our in-depth knowledge of key health issues. Holism focuses on understanding how all the significant factors affecting the particular health issue are involved, so a more informed decision can be made about health intervention. This article explores the contribution each makes to our understanding of coronary heart disease (CHD) and to the preparation of nurses working in cardiac nursing. It proposes that pre- and post-registration nursing curricula reflect both reductionist and holistic approaches and therefore cardiac nurses are suitably trained to manage reductionist as well as holistic care for clients with CHD.

  1. Cardiovascular metabolic syndrome: mediators involved in the pathophysiology from obesity to coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Cornelis J; Quax, Paul H A; Jukema, J Wouter

    2012-02-01

    Patients with obesity and diabetes mellitus are at increased risk for cardiovascular events and have a higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This worse prognosis is partly explained by the late recognition of coronary heart disease in these patients, due to the absence of symptoms. Early identification of coronary heart disease is vital, to initiate preventive medical therapy and improve prognosis. At present, with the use of cardiovascular risk models, the identification of coronary heart disease in these patients remains inadequate. To this end, biomarkers should improve the early identification of patients at increased cardiovascular risk. The first part of this review describes the pathophysiologic pathway from obesity to coronary heart disease. The second part evaluates several mediators from this pathophysiologic pathway for their applicability as biomarkers for the identification of coronary heart disease.

  2. Coronary heart disease risk factors in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Jennifer; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Lofgren, Ingrid E

    2014-03-01

    More than one-half of young adults aged 18-24 y have at least 1 coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factor and nearly one-quarter have advanced atherosclerotic lesions. The extent of atherosclerosis is directly correlated with the number of risk factors. Unhealthy dietary choices made by this age group contribute to weight gain and dyslipidemia. Risk factor profiles in young adulthood strongly predict long-term CHD risk. Early detection is critical to identify individuals at risk and to promote lifestyle changes before disease progression occurs. Despite the presence of risk factors and pathological changes, risk assessment and disease prevention efforts are lacking in this age group. Most young adults are not screened and are unaware of their risk. This review provides pathological evidence along with current risk factor prevalence data to demonstrate the need for early detection. Eighty percent of heart disease is preventable through diet and lifestyle, and young adults are ideal targets for prevention efforts because they are in the process of establishing lifestyle habits, which track forward into adulthood. This review aims to establish the need for increased screening, risk assessment, education, and management in young adults. These essential screening efforts should include the assessment of all CHD risk factors and lifestyle habits (diet, exercise, and smoking), blood pressure, glucose, and body mass index in addition to the traditional lipid panel for effective long-term risk reduction.

  3. Correlation between mimecan expression and coronary artery stenosis in patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Youdong; Liu, Junying; Zhao, Qingna; Xu, Peijing; Chen, Ying; Zhou, Hualan; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation between coronary artery stenosis and Mimecan expression in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Seventy eight patients with CHD and 80 controls without vascular lesions were recruited into present study. CHD patients were divided into one-vessel CHD subgroup, 2-vessel CHD subgroup and multivessel CHD subgroup. ELISA was performed to detect the expressions of serum Mimecan and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB). When compared with control group, the expressions of serum mimecan gene and NF-κB significantly increased in CHD groups (P coronary lesions (rmimecan=0.79, rNF-κB=0.83, P < 0.05). Increased expressions of serum mimecan and NF-κB in CHD patients are related to cardiac insufficiency, which may be ascribed to the binding of NF-κB to mimecan gene.

  4. Clinical Significance of Heart Chronotropic Incompetence in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingjun Feng; Handong Yang; Xinwen Min; Xin Chen; Dongfeng Li; Hao Xu

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the relationship between the chronotropic incompetence and angiographic severity of coro-nary artery disease, and the clinical value of inappropriate chronotropic responses in exercise. Methods Coronary an-giography was performed in 130 patients suspected or diagnosed as coronary heart disease (CHD), and angiographic se-verity of coronary artery disease was quantitated by Duke score and Gensini score. The patients were divided into 4groups: non-CHD group (39 cases), CHD group with only one coronary artery involved (CHD1, 30 cases), CHD group with two coronary arteries involved (CHD2, 31 cases) and CHD group with three coronary arteries involved (CHD3 group, 30 cases). A month before coronary angiography, symptom-limited bicycle ergometor exercise had been accomplished, the chronotropic response had been measured and expressed as ratio of heart rate reserve (HRR)and the maximal age-predicted heart rate achieved (rHR). Results Analysis of variance showed that rHR and HRR were much significantly lower (all P 0.05)and between CHD2 group and CHD3 group(P>0.05). HRR has no difference between CHD2 group and CHD3 group (P >0.05), but was significandy different between non-CHD group and CHD1 group (P <0. 05). There was a significantly negative correlation between rHR, HRR and Duke score(r = -0. 554, -0. 578, respectively, all P <0. 01), Gensini score (r = -0. 453, -0. 467 ,respectively, all P <0. 01). CHD propor-tion reached 75% in patients who had positive rHR (or HRR) and non-ST depression. Diagnostic value [sensitivity 0. 868 (P < 0. 01), 0. 846 (P < 0. 01), specificity 0. 462, 0. 462, accuracy 0. 746 (P < 0. 05), 0. 731, positive predic-tive value 0. 790, 0. 786, negative predictive value 0. 600, 0. 563, respectively] ofrHR <85% or HRR <72% which were used as annexed positive. Standard in the patients without ST depression in symptom-limited exercise treadmill tests was a little higher than that of traditional ST standard (sensitivity 0. 637

  5. Elevated serum secretory type Ⅱ phospholipase A2 in patients with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于路

    2006-01-01

    Objective To measure the serum level of secretory type H phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) in patients with coronary heart disease and investigate the possible relationship with IL-8 and LPA. Methods A total of 110 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) , 63 patients with stable coronary heart disease (SCHD) group and 89 non-CHD control patients were studied. Serum levels of sPLA2, IL-8, LPA and hs-CRP were measured and the

  6. Coronary Heart Disease: Pandemic in a True Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are caused because of abnormalities in the heart and blood vessels. Recent trends reveal that the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD has gradually decreased in many developed countries, but the situation remains quite challenging in developing nations that account for more than 60% of the global burden. Multiple socio-demographic, personal, physician related and healthcare delivery system related factors have been identified which act in variable combinations to either influence the incidence of CHD or affect the short/long-term outcome of the disease. Of all CHD cases who succumb within 28 days of onset of symptoms, almost 67% fail to reach even a hospital. This clearly signifies the importance of primary prevention and early recognition of the warning signs in averting cause-specific mortality. The main priority is to develop cost-effective equitable health care innovations in CHD prevention and to monitor the trend of CHD so that evidence-based interventions can be formulated. To conclude, inculcating health-promoting behaviors in school children and the general population by means of community-based health screening and education interventions could avert many more deaths attributed to CHDs.

  7. Potential benefits of cell therapy in coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Mancini, Francesco Paolo; Casamassimi, Amelia; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Zullo, Alberto; Infante, Teresa; Napoli, Claudio

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest both in basic and clinical research regarding the field of cell therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD). Several preclinical models of CHD have suggested that regenerative properties of stem and progenitor cells might help restoring myocardial functions in the event of cardiac diseases. Here, we summarize different types of stem/progenitor cells that have been tested in experimental and clinical settings of cardiac regeneration, from embryonic stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. Then, we provide a comprehensive description of the most common cell delivery strategies with their major pros and cons and underline the potential of tissue engineering and injectable matrices to address the crucial issue of restoring the three-dimensional structure of the injured myocardial region. Due to the encouraging results from preclinical models, the number of clinical trials with cell therapy is continuously increasing and includes patients with CHD and congestive heart failure. Most of the already published trials have demonstrated safety and feasibility of cell therapies in these clinical conditions. Several studies have also suggested that cell therapy results in improved clinical outcomes. Numerous ongoing clinical trials utilizing this therapy for CHD will address fundamental issues concerning cell source and population utilized, as well as the use of imaging techniques to assess cell homing and survival, all factors that affect the efficacy of different cell therapy strategies.

  8. The rarity of coronary heart disease in South African blacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seftel, H C

    1978-07-15

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains an uncommon disorder in the South African Black population. It has been suggested that herein lies an enigma, since it is believed that these people are considerably exposed to the conventional risk factors for CHD. To test this belief I have assessed the exposure of Black people, in time and degree, to the following CHD risk factors: affluence, age, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, dietary excess, smoking, physical inactivity, diabetes, obesity, hyperuricaemia and hyperinsulinism. Among males only hypertension, and among females only hypertension and obesity, emerged as prominent factors. However, neither of these is significantly atherogenic in the social, nutritional and metabolic milieu in which Blacks generally live, and obesity is a doubtful atherogenic factor, even in westernized populations. It is therefore concluded that the rarity of CHD in Blacks is not enigmatic, but is appropriate to their environmental circumstances.

  9. Saturated and trans fatty acids and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodside, Jayne V; McKinley, Michelle C; Young, Ian S

    2008-12-01

    Dietary intake of both saturated and trans fatty acids has been associated with an increase in the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Evidence comes mainly from controlled dietary experiments with intermediate end points, such as blood lipoproteins, and from observational studies. A few small, randomized controlled trials with clinical end points have been carried out in which saturated fat was replaced with polyunsaturated fat, leading to a reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a reduction in CHD risk. However, no such studies exist for trans fatty acids. More high-quality, randomized controlled trials on fatty acids and CHD are required, but public health recommendations to reduce intake of both saturated and trans fatty acids are appropriate based on the current evidence.

  10. 64-multyslice computed tomography: detection of coronary artery disease in patients with ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Nikonenko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available At present time, the death rate from cardiovascular disease occupies leading position in the structure of total mortality worldwide. The opportunity to conduct non-invasive studies of the coronary arteries has appeared through the development and implementation of multislice computed tomography (MSCT into medical practice, which carry 64 or more sections. Aim. The purpose of this research is the identification of diagnostic capabilities of 64-slice MSCT in the verification of the severity of coronary artery lesions in patients with proven coronary artery disease. Methods and results. The study has been conducted on a 64-slice CT scanner Optima 660 (GE, USA. The degree of stenosis and calcification of the coronary arteries and also central hemodynamics have been studied. The analysis of survey results of 65 patients with coronary heart disease (30.8% of patients had a history of myocardial infarction has been carried out. The average age of patients in observation group was 60.2 ± 10.56 years. Male patients were dominated (75.4%. According to the 64-slice MSCT it has been found that coronary artery stenosis occurs ≥ 50% in 90.0% of patients with myocardial infarction, and in 32.5% of patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease. Conclusion. Therefore, MSCT has sufficient specificity in the diagnosis of occlusive and stenotic lesions of the coronary arteries, and can be used for screening patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

  11. Abdominal fat and risk of coronary heart disease in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Beate G.; Visseren, Frank L. J.; Stolk, Ronald P.; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We investigated whether the presence of concomitant coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be explained by intra-abdominal fat accumulation and compared different measures of adiposity as predictors of CHD in patients with PAD. Research Methods

  12. Effort-Reward Imbalance at Work and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragano, Nico; Siegrist, Johannes; Nyberg, Solja T

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic evidence for work stress as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is mostly based on a single measure of stressful work known as job strain, a combination of high demands and low job control. We examined whether a complementary stress measure that assesses an imbalance...... between efforts spent at work and rewards received predicted coronary heart disease. METHODS: This multicohort study (the "IPD-Work" consortium) was based on harmonized individual-level data from 11 European prospective cohort studies. Stressful work in 90,164 men and women without coronary heart disease...... at baseline was assessed by validated effort-reward imbalance and job strain questionnaires. We defined incident coronary heart disease as the first nonfatal myocardial infarction or coronary death. Study-specific estimates were pooled by random effects meta-analysis. RESULTS: At baseline, 31.7% of study...

  13. Coronary Artery Calcium Distribution and Interscan Measurement Variability in End-Stage Renal and Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafin, Z.; Laskowska, K.; Marzec, M.; Lasek, W. (Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz (Poland)); Sinjab, T.A.; Wlodarczyk, Z. (Dept. of Transplantology, Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz (Poland))

    2009-04-15

    Background: Coronary heart disease patients and end-stage renal disease patients have been documented to have an increased amount of coronary artery calcifications (CAC). Purpose: To evaluate the distribution of CAC and its influence on interscan variability of measurement in end-stage renal disease and coronary heart disease patients, proven to have calcifications. Material and Methods: 69 patients having CAC, including 34 with coronary heart disease and 35 with end-stage renal disease, were scanned twice with multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Amount of CAC was determined as the number of calcified lesions (CN), total calcium score (CS), calcium volume (CV), and calcium mass (CM). Distribution of CAC was evaluated on a per-patient basis as the median CS and CM of a single lesion. Density of the calcifications was calculated as the patient's CM divided by CV. Results: The overall median CS was 457.2, and the median CM was 75.6 mg. There were no significant differences in the number of calcified lesions, CS, or CM between the two groups. Both CS and CM of a single lesion, as well as the mean calcium density were lower in renal disease patients (P<0.05) than in coronary heart disease subjects. The relative interscan variability of coronary calcium measurement was higher in the renal disease group (P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between the calcium concentration and the relative interscan variability. Conclusion: The results indicate that the coronary calcium distribution influences the measurement interscan reproducibility, and the distribution may differ between end-stage renal disease patients and coronary heart disease patients, reflecting the dissimilar nature of coronary calcifications in those groups.

  14. Association between Six Minute Walk Test and All-Cause Mortality, Coronary Heart Disease-Specific Mortality, and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanyar, Ali; Aziz, Michael M; Enright, Paul L; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Boudreau, Robert; Sutton-Tyrell, Kim; Kuller, Lewis; Newman, Anne B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between six-minute walk test (6 MWT) performance and all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease mortality, and incident coronary heart disease in older adults. Methods We conducted a time-to-event analysis of 1,665 Cardiovascular Health Study participants with a 6 MWT and without prevalent cardiovascular disease. Results During a mean follow-up of 8 years, there were 305 incident coronary heart disease events, 504 deaths of which 100 were coronary heart disease-related deaths. The 6 MWT performance in the shortest two distance quintiles was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality (290-338 meters: HR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.5; <290 meters: HR 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.0). The adjusted risk of coronary heart disease mortality incident events among those with a 6 MWT <290 meters was not significant. Discussion Performance on the 6 MWT is independently associated with all-cause mortality and is of prognostic utility in community-dwelling older adults. PMID:24695552

  15. 76 FR 49707 - Food Labeling; Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease; Reopening of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease; Reopening of the Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug... reconsider its proposed amendments to the phytosterols and risk of coronary heart disease health ] claim. The... December 8, 2010, proposing to amend regulations on plant sterol/ stanol esters and risk of coronary heart...

  16. Asymptotic dental score and prevalent coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janket, Sok-Ja; Qvarnström, Markku; Meurman, Jukka H; Baird, Alison E; Nuutinen, Pekka; Jones, Judith A

    2004-03-09

    Oral infections have been postulated to produce cytokines that may contribute to the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD). We hypothesized that by estimating the combined production of inflammatory mediators attributable to several oral pathologies, we might be able to explain CHD with better precision. A total of 256 consecutive Finnish cardiac patients from Kuopio University Hospital with angiographically confirmed CHD and 250 age-, gender-, and residence-matched noncardiac patients (controls) were recruited. All dental factors expected to generate inflammatory mediators, including pericoronitis, dental caries, dentate status, root remnants, and gingivitis, were examined, and an asymptotic dental score (ADS) was developed by logistic regression analyses with an appropriate weighting scheme according to the likelihood ratio. We validated the explanatory ability of ADS by comparing it to that of the Total Dental Index and examining whether the ADS was associated with known predictors of CHD. A model that included ADS, C-reactive protein, HDL, and fibrinogen offered an explanatory ability that equaled or exceeded that of the Framingham heart score (C statistic=0.82 versus 0.80). When ADS was removed from this model, the C-statistic decreased to 0.77, which indicates that the ADS was a significant contributor to the explanatory ability of a logistic model. ADS may be useful as a prescreening tool to promote proactive cardiac evaluation among individuals without overt symptoms of CHD. However, additional prospective study is needed to validate the use of an oral health score as a predictor of incident CHD.

  17. Efficacy analysis of ezetimibe on lipid management in elderly patients with coronary heart disease after coronary intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段明勤

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the clinical efficacy of ezetimibe combined with atorvastatin calcium on hyperlipidemia,and to evaluate the role of ezetimibe on lipid management in elderly patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) after coronary intervention.Methods A total of 150 elderly CHD patients with hyperlipidemia

  18. An Update on the Utility of Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring for Coronary Heart Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianoush, Sina; Al Rifai, Mahmoud; Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Umapathi, Priya; Graham, Garth; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Estimating cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is necessary for determining the potential net benefit of primary prevention pharmacotherapy. Risk estimation relying exclusively on traditional CVD risk factors may misclassify risk, resulting in both undertreatment and overtreatment. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring personalizes risk prediction through direct visualization of calcified coronary atherosclerotic plaques and provides improved accuracy for coronary heart disease (CHD) or CVD risk estimation. In this review, we discuss the most recent studies on CAC, which unlike historical studies, focus sharply on clinical application. We describe the MESA CHD risk calculator, a recently developed CAC-based 10-year CHD risk estimator, which can help guide preventive therapy allocation by better identifying both high- and low-risk individuals. In closing, we discuss calcium density, regional distribution of CAC, and extra-coronary calcification, which represent the future of CAC and CVD risk assessment research and may lead to further improvements in risk prediction.

  19. THE EFFECT OF WAIST CIRCUMFERENCES MORE THAN NORMAL ON THE INCIDENT OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pria Wahyu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coronary heart disease is known as the most common disease that causes mortality in the world, one of the examination to identify the risks of coronary heart disease is measuring waist circumference. The purpose of this study was to identify correlation between large waist circumferences and the incident of coroner heart disease. Method: Design used in this study was analytic observational (retrospective with cross sectional approach. There were 63 respondents which sampling by simple random sampling. The independent variable was waist circumferences and the dependent variable was coronary heart disease. Data were collected by direct observation then analyzed by spearman correlation statistic test with significance level α≤0.05. Result: The result showed that waist circumferences more than normal had significant correlation with the incident of coronary heart disease (p=0.02. Analysis: It can be concluded that there was correlation between waist circumferences more than normal and the incident of coronary heart disease to the clients with coroner cardiac disease. Discussion: Earlier screening and detection is needed to prevent coronary heart disease.

  20. [Heart rhythm disturbances in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in aggregate with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoĭkhet, Ia N; Klester, E B; Golovin, V A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study kinds, frequencies and features of heart rhythm disturbances (HRD) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) subject to degree of severity, including presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). 1189 of patients with registered HRD were examined. 315 of them had COPD (group 1), 531--combination of COPD and CHD (group 2), 343 were CHD patients (group 3). The extent of examinations included electrocardiogram (ECG), Halter monitoring (HM), bicycle ergometry (BEM), external respiration function estimation. Supraventricular HRD were registered statistically more frequently in group 1: according to ECG data in rest - in 37.2% patients, by BEM results--in 18.8%, by HM--in 50%. Combined (supraventricular and ventricular) HRD were registered most frequently in group 2: 41.2 24.4, and 45.5% respectively. Ventricular HRD dominated in group 3: 47.6, 29.3 and 48.6% respectively. The results of the study indicate that supraventricular HRDprevaile in patients with COPD, combined HRD - in patients with COPD and CHD. Ventricular HRD, which most informatively reflect changes in intracardiac geometry and left ventricle hemodynamics, dominate in CHD patients. The optimization of therapy correction consists in early diagnostics of HRD subject to features of cardiorespiratory system functional state.

  1. [Childhood body mass index and the risk of coronary heart disease in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer Lyn; Olsen, L.W.; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.

    2008-01-01

    The severity of the long term consequences of the current childhood obesity epidemic on coronary heart disease is unknown. Therefore we investigated the association between body mass index (BMI) at ages 7-13 years and heart disease in adulthood among 276,835 Danish schoolchildren. We found...... that higher BMI during this period of childhood is associated with an increased risk of any, non-fatal and fatal heart disease in adulthood. Worldwide, as children are becoming heavier, our findings suggest that greater numbers of children are at risk of having coronary heart disease in adulthood...

  2. Spirituality and Negative Emotions in Individuals With Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginting, Henndy; Näring, Gérard; Kwakkenbos, Linda; Becker, Eni S

    2015-01-01

    Many individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) experience disease-related anxiety, depressive symptoms, and anger. Spirituality may be helpful to cope with these negative emotions. Research findings on the role of spirituality in dealing with negative emotions are inconsistent. In this study, we examined the associations between 7 dimensions of spirituality (ie, meaningfulness, trust, acceptance, caring for others, connectedness with nature, transcendent experiences, and spiritual activities) and negative emotions among individuals with CHD in Indonesia, controlling for perceived social support as well as demographic and clinical characteristics. In total, 293 individuals with CHD were recruited from the 3 largest hospitals in Bandung, Indonesia. They completed the Spiritual Attitude and Involvement List, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Trait Anxiety Scale of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Multidimensional Anger Inventory, and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Hierarchical linear regression analyses indicated that a higher overall level of spirituality was associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms, less anxiety, and less anger. Specifically, a higher level of trust was significantly associated with both less depressive symptoms and less anxiety. Higher levels of caring for others and spiritual activities were associated with less anxiety, and a higher level of connectedness with nature was associated with less anger. These findings underscore the importance of specific dimensions of spirituality as a potentially independent buffer against negative emotions in individuals with CHD.

  3. Effects of whole grains on coronary heart disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kristina A; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2010-11-01

    Characterizing which types of carbohydrates, including whole grains, reduce the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) is challenging. Whole grains are characterized as being high in resistant carbohydrates as compared with refined grains, meaning they typically are high in fiber, nutrients, and bound antioxidants. Whole grain intake consistently has been associated with improved cardiovascular disease outcomes, but also with healthy lifestyles, in large observational studies. Intervention studies that assess the effects of whole grains on biomarkers for CHD have mixed results. Due to the varying nutrient compositions of different whole grains, each could potentially affect CHD risk via different mechanisms. Whole grains high in viscous fiber (oats, barley) decrease serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure and improve glucose and insulin responses. Grains high in insoluble fiber (wheat) moderately lower glucose and blood pressure but also have a prebiotic effect. Obesity is inversely related to whole grain intake, but intervention studies with whole grains have not produced weight loss. Visceral fat, however, may be affected favorably. Grain processing improves palatability and can have varying effects on nutrition (e.g., the process of milling and grinding flour increases glucose availability and decreases phytochemical content whereas thermal processing increases available antioxidants). Understanding how individual grains, in both natural and processed states, affect CHD risk can inform nutrition recommendations and policies and ultimately benefit public health.

  4. Perceived social support following percutaneous coronary intervention is a crucial factor in patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähkönen, Outi; Kankkunen, Päivi; Miettinen, Heikki; Lamidi, Marja-Leena; Saaranen, Terhi

    2017-05-01

    To describe perceived social support among patients with coronary heart disease following percutaneous coronary intervention. A low level of social support is considered a risk factor for coronary heart disease in healthy individuals and reduces the likelihood that people diagnosed with coronary heart disease will have a good prognosis. A descriptive cross-sectional study. A survey of 416 patients was conducted in 2013. A self-report instrument, Social Support of People with Coronary Heart Disease, was used. The instrument comprises three dimensions of social support: informational, emotional, functional supports and 16 background variables. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, factor analysis, mean sum variables and multivariate logistic regression. Perceived informational support was primarily high, but respondents' risk factors were not at the target level. The weakest items of informational support were advice on physical activity, continuum of care and rehabilitation. Regarding the items of emotional support, support from other cardiac patients was the weakest. The weakest item of functional support was respondents' sense of the healthcare professionals' care of patients coping with their disease. Background variables associated with perceived social support were gender, marital status, level of formal education, profession, physical activity, duration of coronary heart disease and previous myocardial infarction. Healthcare professionals should pay extra attention to women, single patients, physically inactive patients, those demonstrating a lower level of education, those with a longer duration of CHD, and respondents without previous acute myocardial infarction. Continuum of care and counselling are important to ensure especially among them. This study provides evidence that healthcare professionals should be more aware of the individual needs for social support among patients with coronary heart disease after percutaneous coronary intervention

  5. Nutrition in the prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and the management of lipoprotein disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comprised of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). CVD is caused by progressive narrowing and blockage of arteries supplying the heart, brain, and other tissues and organs. CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in our ...

  6. Serum inflammatory cytokine and adhesion molecule content in patients with coronary heart disease and their value for disease severity diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hu; Li-juan Fu; Jiang-Qiao Hu; Peng Liang; Lin Pi; Gui-Hua Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To detect inflammatory cytokine and adhesion molecule content in patients with coronary heart disease and analyze their value for disease severity diagnosis.Methods:A total of 113 patients with coronary heart disease and 107 healthy subjects were included in the study and further divided into mild group (n=40), moderate group (n=52) and severe group (n=21) according to the severity of coronary heart disease. Serum inflammatory cytokine and adhesion molecule content of all subjects were detected, and the value of inflammatory cytokine and adhesion molecule content for judging the severity of coronary heart disease was further analyzed.Results:Serum CRP, TNF-α and YKL-40 levels of coronary heart disease group were higher than those of healthy control group while IL-35 level was lower than that of healthy control group (P<0.05); serum E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and sICAM-1 levels of coronary heart disease group were higher than those of healthy control group (P<0.05); serum CRP, TNF-α, YKL-40, E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and sICAM-1 levels of mild group were lower than those of moderate group and severe group, IL-35 level was higher than those of moderate group and severe group (P<0.05), and with the aggravation of coronary heart disease, CRP, TNF-α, YKL-40, E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and sICAM-1 levels increased while IL-35 level decreased (P<0.05).Conclusions: Serum inflammatory cytokine and adhesion molecule content change significantly in patients with coronary heart disease, are directly correlated with the severity of coronary heart disease and can be used as the reliable means to assess the condition and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease.

  7. Depressive Symptoms, Health Behaviors, and Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whooley, Mary A.; de Jonge, Peter; Vittinghoff, Eric; Otte, Christian; Moos, Rudolf; Carney, Robert M.; Ali, Sadia; Dowray, Sunaina; Na, Beeya; Feldman, Mitchell D.; Schiller, Nelson B.; Browner, Warren S.

    2008-01-01

    Context Depressive symptoms predict adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease, but the mechanisms responsible for this association are unknown. Objective To determine why depressive symptoms are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Design and Part

  8. Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation for Coronary Heart Disease: Cochrane Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Lindsey; Oldridge, Neil; Thompson, David R; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rees, Karen; Martin, Nicole; Taylor, Rod S

    2016-01-01

    Although recommended in guidelines for the management of coronary heart disease (CHD), concerns have been raised about the applicability of evidence from existing meta-analyses of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation...

  9. Dr. Li Chuanjie's Experience in the Acupuncture and Herbal Treatment for Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Having been engaged in TCM clinical practice, teaching, and scientific research for 55 years, Dr. Li Chuanjie has obtained rich experience in treating coronary heart disease with acupuncture and herbs and got remarkable therapeutic effects.

  10. Ruling out coronary heart disease in primary care patients with chest pain: a clinical prediction score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnand Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chest pain raises concern for the possibility of coronary heart disease. Scoring methods have been developed to identify coronary heart disease in emergency settings, but not in primary care. Methods Data were collected from a multicenter Swiss clinical cohort study including 672 consecutive patients with chest pain, who had visited one of 59 family practitioners' offices. Using delayed diagnosis we derived a prediction rule to rule out coronary heart disease by means of a logistic regression model. Known cardiovascular risk factors, pain characteristics, and physical signs associated with coronary heart disease were explored to develop a clinical score. Patients diagnosed with angina or acute myocardial infarction within the year following their initial visit comprised the coronary heart disease group. Results The coronary heart disease score was derived from eight variables: age, gender, duration of chest pain from 1 to 60 minutes, substernal chest pain location, pain increasing with exertion, absence of tenderness point at palpation, cardiovascular risks factors, and personal history of cardiovascular disease. Area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was of 0.95 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.92; 0.97. From this score, 413 patients were considered as low risk for values of percentile 5 of the coronary heart disease patients. Internal validity was confirmed by bootstrapping. External validation using data from a German cohort (Marburg, n = 774 revealed a receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.72; 0.81 with a sensitivity of 85.6% and a specificity of 47.2%. Conclusions This score, based only on history and physical examination, is a complementary tool for ruling out coronary heart disease in primary care patients complaining of chest pain.

  11. Dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: possible effect modification by gender and age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Overvad, Kim; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    In a 16-year follow-up study (ending in 1998) of 3,686 Danish men and women aged 30–71 years at recruitment, the association between energy intake from dietary fat and the risk of coronary heart disease was evaluated while assessing the possible modifying role of gender and age. In the models used...... not significantly. In conclusion, the present study suggests that coronary heart disease risk relates to both the quantity and the quality of dietary fats....

  12. C-reactive protein, inflammation and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Shrivastava

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is widely considered to be an important contributing factor of the pathophysiology of coronary heart disease (CHD, and the inflammatory cascade is particularly important in the atherosclerotic process. In consideration of the important role that inflammatory processes play in CHD, recent work has been focused on whether biomarkers of inflammation may help to improve risk stratification and identify patient groups who might benefit from particular treatment strategies. Of these biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP has emerged as one of the most important novel inflammatory markers. CRP an acute phase protein is synthesized by hepatocytes in response to proinflammatory cytokines, in particular interleukin-6. Many large-scale prospective studies demonstrate that CRP strongly and independently predicts adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and sudden cardiac death in individuals both with and without overt CHD. CRP is believed to be both a marker and a mediator of atherosclerosis and CHD. CRP plays a pivotal role in many aspects of atherogenesis including, activation of complement pathway, lipids uptake by macrophage, release of proinflammatory cytokines, induces the expression of tissue factor in monocytes, promotes the endothelial dysfunction and inhibits nitric oxide production. The commercial availability of CRP high sensitive assays has made screening for this marker simple, reliable, and reproducible and can be used as a clinical guide to diagnosis, management, and prognosis of CHD.

  13. Helicobacter pylori vs coronary heart disease- searching for connections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdalena; Chmiela; Adrian; Gajewski; Karolina; Rudnicka

    2015-01-01

    In this review,we discussed the findings and concepts underlying the potential role of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) infections in the initiation,development or persistence of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease(CHD).This Gram-negative bacterium was described by Marshall and Warren in 1984.The majority of infected subjects carries and transmits H.pylori with no symptoms; however,in some individuals these bacteria may cause peptic ulcers,and even gastric cancers.The widespread prevalence of H.pylori infections and the fact that frequently they remain asymptomatic may suggest that,similarly to intestinal microflora,H.pylori may deliver antigens that stimulate not only local,but also systemic inflammatory response.Recently,possible association between H.pylori infection and extragastric disorders has been suggested.Knowledge on the etiology of atherosclerosis together with current findings in the area of H.pylori infections constitute the background for the newly proposed hypothesis that those two processes may be related.Many research studies confirm the indirect association between the prevalence of H.pylori and the occurrence of CHD.According to majority of findings the involvement of H.pylori in this process is based on the chronic inflammation which might facilitate the CHDrelated pathologies.It needs to be elucidated,if the infection initiates or just accelerates the formation of atheromatous plaque.

  14. Coronary heart disease in women: why the disproportionate risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colhoun, Helen

    2006-02-01

    Women with diabetes experience much greater relative risks of coronary heart disease (CHD) compared with the nondiabetic population than do men with diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, much of the greater elevation in risk in women is explained by a more adverse pattern of known CHD risk factors. In type 1 diabetes the picture is less clear, but current evidence suggests that a cardioprotective lipid profile is found in type 1 diabetic men, thus reducing the effect of diabetes on CHD, but that in women this is not the case. Also, in type 1 diabetic women there is some evidence of altered body fat distribution and a greater elevation in blood pressure. Whether these reflect a greater degree of insulin resistance in type 1 women, and what the origin of this might be, remains controversial. The practical consequence is that clinicians need to be aware that the usual cardioprotective effect of sex does not apply in diabetic women and that risk factor intervention is needed at an early age.

  15. [Trans-fatty acids--effects on coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowska, Joanna; Kochan, Zdzisław

    2011-07-01

    Trans-fatty acids (TFA) are formed during the industrial process of hydrogenation of vegetable oils. The consumption of hydrogenated fats has increased significantly over the last few decades. In Poland, the average daily intake of TFA for adults was estimated to be 2.8 to 6.9 g; which greatly exceeds the recommended daily maximum of 2 g/day (less than 1% of total energy intake). Increasing trans-fatty acid intake has detrimental effects on the lipid profile: TFA raise total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, and decrease HDL-cholesterol levels. Moreover, dietary trans-fatty acids may increase plasma levels of lipoprotein (a) and biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Several studies have demonstrated that a high intake of TFA is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. In addition, TFA consumption has been implicated as an independent risk factor for sudden cardiac arrest. It is therefore necessary to reduce the intake of hydrogenated fats rich in trans-fatty acids in order to minimize the adverse effects of TFA on health.

  16. Coronary heart disease multiple risk factor reduction. Providers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosal, Milagros C; Ockene, Judith K; Luckmann, Roger; Zapka, Jane; Goins, Karin Valentine; Saperia, Gordon; Mason, Theresa; Donnelly, Gary

    2004-08-01

    Although primary care physicians understand the importance of preventive services for patients with multiple risk factors (MRF) for coronary heart disease, physician intervention is limited. This study investigated (1) physicians' views of challenges faced in managing patients with MRF; (2) the counseling and management methods they utilize; and (3) possible strategies to enhance MRF intervention in the primary care setting. Two focus groups were conducted with primary care physicians from varying settings to gain insight into these issues noted above. Each group was co-facilitated by a physician and a behavioral scientist using a previously developed semistructured interview guide. The group discussions were tape recorded and subsequently transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative method for analysis. Physicians are challenged by knowledge limitations (contribution of individual risk factors to overall risk); limited support (guidelines, materials, and staff); and logistic difficulties (organizational issues, time limitations). Their approach to MRF management tends to be highly individualized with an initial preference for lifestyle change interventions rather than prescription of medications with some qualifying circumstances. Physicians favored a serial rather than a parallel approach to MRF intervention, starting with behaviors that the patient perceives as a priority. Proposed solutions to current challenges emphasize physician education and the development of innovative approaches that include physician assistance and a team approach. Physicians are aware of and sensitive to the complexity of MRF management for their patients and themselves. However, future MRF interventions will require nonphysician staff involvement and increased systems support.

  17. Fatigue in the presence of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Ann L; Devon, Holli A; Piano, Mariann R; Ryan, Catherine J; Zerwic, Julie J

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is a prevalent and disabling symptom associated with many acute and chronic conditions, including acute myocardial infarction and chronic heart failure. Fatigue has not been explored in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). The purpose of this partially mixed sequential dominant status study was to (a) describe fatigue in patients with stable CHD; (b) determine if specific demographic (gender, age, education, income), physiological (hypertension, hyperlipidemia), or psychological (depressive symptoms) variables were correlated with fatigue; and (c) determine if fatigue was associated with health-related quality of life. The theory of unpleasant symptoms was used as a conceptual framework. Patients (N = 102) attending two cardiology clinics completed the Fatigue Symptom Inventory, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 to measure fatigue, depressive symptoms, and health-related quality of life. Thirteen patients whose interference from fatigue was low, moderate, or high participated in qualitative interviews. Forty percent of the sample reported fatigue more than 3 days of the week lasting more than one half of the day. Lower interference from fatigue was reported on standardized measures compared with qualitative interviews. Compared with men, women reported a higher fatigue intensity (p = .003) and more interference from fatigue (p = .007). In regression analyses, depressive symptoms were the sole predictor of fatigue intensity and interference. Patients with stable CHD reported clinically relevant levels of fatigue. Patients with stable CHD may discount fatigue as they adapt to their symptoms. Relying solely on standardized measures may provide an incomplete picture of fatigue burden in patients with stable CHD.

  18. Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Program on Heart Rate Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Mahdavi Anari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been suggested that the autonomic system function and the metabolic syndrome can significantly affect patients' survival. The aim of the current study was to investigate the impact of the cardiac rehabilitation program on the autonomic system balance in patients with coronary artery disease.Methods: Patients with a previous diagnosis of coronary artery disease who were referred to the Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Center of Afshar Hospital (Yazd, Iran between March and November 2011 were enrolled. All the patients participated in rehabilitation sessions 3 times a week for 12 weeks. Heart rate recovery (HRR was measured as an indicator of the autonomic system balance. In order to calculate HRR, the maximum heart rate during the exercise test was recorded. At the end of the exercise test, the patients were asked to sit down without having a cooldown period and their heart rate was recorded again after 1 minute. The difference between these 2 measurements was considered as HRR.Results: A total of 108 patients, including 86 (79.6% men and 22 (20.4% women, completed the rehabilitation course. The mean age of the study participants was 58.25 ± 9.83 years. A statistically significant improvement was observed in HRR (p value = 0.040. Significant declines were also observed in the patients' waist circumference (p value < 0.001 and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (p value = 0.018 and 0.003, respectively. A decreasing trend was observed in the patients' body mass index, but it failed to reach statistical significance (p value = 0.063. No statistically meaningful changes were noted in fasting blood glucose (p value = 0.171, high-density lipoprotein (p value = 0.070, or triglyceride concentrations (p value = 0.149. Conclusion: The cardiac rehabilitation program may help to improve HRR and several components of the metabolic syndrome in patients with coronary heart disease.

  19. Coronary Arteries in Childhood Heart Disease: Implications for Management of Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraona, Fernando; Valente, Anne Marie; Porayette, Prashob; Pluchinotta, Francesca Romana; Sanders, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    Survival of patients with congenital heart defects has improved dramatically. Many will undergo interventional catheter or surgical procedures later in life. Others will develop atherosclerotic or post-surgical coronary heart disease. The coronary artery anatomy in patients with congenital heart disease differs substantially from that seen in the structurally normal heart. This has implications for diagnostic procedures as well as interventions. The unique epicardial course seen in some defects could impair interpretation of coronary angiograms. Interventional procedures, especially at the base of the heart, risk injuring unusually placed coronary arteries so that coronary artery anatomy must be delineated thoroughly prior to the procedure. In this review, we will describe the variants of coronary artery anatomy and their implications for interventional and surgical treatment and for sudden death during late follow-up in several types of congenital heart defects including: tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, transposition of the great arteries, double outlet right ventricle, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries and defects with functionally one ventricle. We will also discuss the coronary abnormalities seen in Kawasaki disease. PMID:24294539

  20. Effects of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention on Serum Angiopoietin-2 in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Yu Zeng; Chun Gui; Lang Li; Xiao-Min Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background:Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) plays a crucial role in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis and is expressed only in sites of vascular remodeling.Ang-2 expression can be regulated by hypoxia inducible factors and other regulators with exposure to hypoxia.The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on serum Ang-2 concentrations,and analyze the correlation between serum Ang-2 and the severity of coronary artery stenosis in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD).Methods:Sixty-four patients with CHD were selected as the study group,each undergone PCI.Thirty-two healthy subjects were selected as the control group.Pre-PCI and post-PCI serum Ang-2 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.The severity of coronary artery stenosis was evaluated using angiographic Gensini scores,and the coronary collateral vessels were scored according to Rentrop's classification.Results:Concentrations of pre-PCI serum Ang-2 in the study group were significantly higher than those in the control group (4625.06 ± 1838.06 vs.1945.74 ± 1588.17 pg/ml,P < 0.01);however,concentrations of post-PCI serum Ang-2 were significantly lower than those of pre-PCI (3042.63 ± 1845.33 pg/ml vs.4625.06 ± 1838.06 pg/ml,P < 0.01).Concentrations of pre-PCI serum Ang-2 were significantly correlated with Gensini scores (r =0.488,P < 0.01);however,the decrease in serum Ang-2 after PCI was not correlated with Gensini scores,coronary collateral vessel grading,or left ventricular ejection fraction.Conclusions:Serum Ang-2 concentrations significantly increased in patients with CHD,and PCI treatment significantly decreased these concentrations.Serum Ang-2 concentrations,but not the decrease in serum Ang-2 concentrations,were significantly correlated with the severity of coronary artery stenosis.These results suggested that Ang-2 may be a biomarker of myocardial ischemia and vessel remodeling.

  1. Current Role of Ivabradine in Stable Coronary Artery Disease Without Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Muñoz, Oscar C; Abbas, Aamer

    2016-02-01

    Increase in heart rate represents a significant contribution in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and heart failure, by promoting atherosclerotic process and endothelial dysfunction. Thus, it negatively influences cardiovascular risk in the general population. The aim of this review is to analyze the current, controversial, and future role of ivabradine as an anti-anginal agent in the setting of coronary artery disease without heart failure. Ivabradine represents a selective heart rate-lowering agent that increased diastolic perfusion time and improving energetics in the ischemic myocardium.

  2. Coronary risk stratification of patients undergoing surgery for valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Rasmus Bo; Engstrøm, Thomas; Pries-Heje, Mia

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) is a non-invasive, less expensive, low-radiation alternative to coronary angiography (CAG) prior to valvular heart surgery. MSCT has a high negative predictive value for coronary artery disease (CAD) but previous studies of patients with valvular ...

  3. Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Diseases Using Gene Expression Profiling; Stable Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiac Ischemia with and without Myocardial Necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmi, Nabila; Gaunt, Tom R

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction) is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. With the recent advances in genomic tools and technologies there is potential to predict and diagnose heart disease using molecular data from analysis of blood cells. We analyzed gene expression data from blood samples taken from normal people (n = 21), non-significant coronary artery disease (n = 93), patients with unstable angina (n = 16), stable coronary artery disease (n = 14) and myocardial infarction (MI; n = 207). We used a feature selection approach to identify a set of gene expression variables which successfully differentiate different cardiovascular diseases. The initial features were discovered by fitting a linear model for each probe set across all arrays of normal individuals and patients with myocardial infarction. Three different feature optimisation algorithms were devised which identified two discriminating sets of genes, one using MI and normal controls (total genes = 6) and another one using MI and unstable angina patients (total genes = 7). In all our classification approaches we used a non-parametric k-nearest neighbour (KNN) classification method (k = 3). The results proved the diagnostic robustness of the final feature sets in discriminating patients with myocardial infarction from healthy controls. Interestingly it also showed efficacy in discriminating myocardial infarction patients from patients with clinical symptoms of cardiac ischemia but no myocardial necrosis or stable coronary artery disease, despite the influence of batch effects and different microarray gene chips and platforms.

  4. Radiologic evaluation of coronary artery disease in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, David M; Ordovas, Karen G

    2016-01-01

    Improved surgical and medical therapy have prolonged survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) such that general medical conditions like coronary artery disease (CAD) are now the main determinants of mortality. A summary of the association of CAD with CHD, as well as a discussion of the radiologic evaluation of the coronary arteries in adults with CHD is described herein. Cross sectional imaging to evaluate CAD in adults with CHD should follow the same appropriateness criteria as gender and aged matched patients without CHD. Coronary CT imaging may be particularly valuable in evaluating the coronary arteries in this patient population as invasive coronary angiography may prove challenging secondary to complicated or unconventional anatomy of the coronary arteries. Further, typical methods for evaluating CAD such as stress or echocardiography may be impractical in adults with CHD. Finally, delineating the anatomic relationship of the coronary arteries and their relationship with the sternum, chest wall, conduits, grafts, and valves is highly recommended in patients with CHD prior to reintervention to avoid iatrogenic complications.

  5. CT coronary angiography in patients with suspected angina due to coronary heart disease (SCOT-HEART): an open-label, parallel-group, multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-13

    The benefit of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients presenting with stable chest pain has not been systematically studied. We aimed to assess the effect of CTCA on the diagnosis, management, and outcome of patients referred to the cardiology clinic with suspected angina due to coronary heart disease. In this prospective open-label, parallel-group, multicentre trial, we recruited patients aged 18-75 years referred for the assessment of suspected angina due to coronary heart disease from 12 cardiology chest pain clinics across Scotland. We randomly assigned (1:1) participants to standard care plus CTCA or standard care alone. Randomisation was done with a web-based service to ensure allocation concealment. The primary endpoint was certainty of the diagnosis of angina secondary to coronary heart disease at 6 weeks. All analyses were intention to treat, and patients were analysed in the group they were allocated to, irrespective of compliance with scanning. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01149590. Between Nov 18, 2010, and Sept 24, 2014, we randomly assigned 4146 (42%) of 9849 patients who had been referred for assessment of suspected angina due to coronary heart disease. 47% of participants had a baseline clinic diagnosis of coronary heart disease and 36% had angina due to coronary heart disease. At 6 weeks, CTCA reclassified the diagnosis of coronary heart disease in 558 (27%) patients and the diagnosis of angina due to coronary heart disease in 481 (23%) patients (standard care 22 [1%] and 23 [1%]; pcoronary heart disease increased (1·09, 1·02-1·17; p=0·0172), the certainty increased (1·79, 1·62-1·96; pcoronary heart disease. This changed planned investigations (15% vs 1%; pcoronary heart disease, CTCA clarifies the diagnosis, enables targeting of interventions, and might reduce the future risk of myocardial infarction. The Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates funded the trial

  6. Coronary anatomy in children with bicuspid aortic valves and associated congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenraadt, Wilke M C; Bartelings, Margot M; Bökenkamp, Regina; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; DeRuiter, Marco C; Schalij, Martin J; Jongbloed, Monique Rm

    2017-07-27

    In patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), coronary anatomy is variable. High take-off coronary arteries have been described, but data are scarce, especially when associated with complex congenital heart disease (CHD). The purpose of this study was to describe coronary patterns in these patients. In 84 postmortem heart specimens with BAV and associated CHD, position and height of the coronary ostia were studied and related to BAV morphology. High take-off right (RCA) and left coronary arteries (LCA) were observed in 23% and 37% of hearts, respectively, most frequently in hearts with hypoplastic left ventricle (HLV) and outflow tract anomalies. In HLV, high take-off was observed in 18/40 (45%) more frequently of LCA (n=14) than RCA (n=6). In hearts with aortic hypoplasia, 8/13 (62%) had high take-off LCA and 6/13 (46%) high take-off RCA. High take-off was seen 19 times in 22 specimens with perimembranous ventricular septal defect (RCA 8, LCA 11). High take-off was associated with type 1A BAV (raphe between right and left coronary leaflets), more outspoken for the RCA. Separate ostia of left anterior descending coronary artery and left circumflex coronary artery were seen in four hearts (5%), not related to specific BAV morphology. High take-off coronary arteries, especially the LCA, occur more frequently in BAV with associated CHD than reported in normal hearts and isolated BAV. Outflow tract defects and HLV are associated with type 1A BAV and high take-off coronary arteries. Although it is unclear whether these findings in infants with detrimental outcome can be related to surviving adults, clinical awareness of variations in coronary anatomy is warranted. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Roma coronary heart disease patients have more medical risk factors and greater severity of coronary heart disease than non-Roma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sudzinova, A.; Nagyova, I.; Studencan, M.; Rosenberger, J.; Skodova, Z.; Vargova, H.; Middel, B.; Reijneveld, S. A.; van Dijk, J. P.

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity world-wide. Evidence on ethnic differences between the Roma and non-Roma regarding medical risk factors is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess differences in medical risk factors and the severity of CHD in Roma

  8. Roma coronary heart disease patients have more medical risk factors and greater severity of coronary heart disease than non-Roma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sudzinova, A.; Nagyova, I.; Studencan, M.; Rosenberger, J.; Skodova, Z.; Vargova, H.; Middel, B.; Reijneveld, S. A.; van Dijk, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity world-wide. Evidence on ethnic differences between the Roma and non-Roma regarding medical risk factors is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess differences in medical risk factors and the severity of CHD in Roma

  9. Population assessment of future trajectories in coronary heart disease mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Björk Thorolfsdottir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coronary heart disease (CHD mortality rates have been decreasing in Iceland since the 1980s, largely reflecting improvements in cardiovascular risk factors. The purpose of this study was to predict future CHD mortality in Iceland based on potential risk factor trends. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The previously validated IMPACT model was used to predict changes in CHD mortality between 2010 and 2040 among the projected population of Iceland aged 25-74. Calculations were based on combining: i data on population numbers and projections (Statistics Iceland, ii population risk factor levels and projections (Refine Reykjavik study, and iii effectiveness of specific risk factor reductions (published meta-analyses. Projections for three contrasting scenarios were compared: (1 If the historical risk factor trends of past 30 years were to continue, the declining death rates of past decades would level off, reflecting population ageing. (2 If recent trends in risk factors (past 5 years continue, this would result in a death rate increasing from 49 to 70 per 100,000. This would reflect a recent plateau in previously falling cholesterol levels and recent rapid increases in obesity and diabetes prevalence. 3 Assuming that in 2040 the entire population enjoys optimal risk factor levels observed in low risk cohorts, this would prevent almost all premature CHD deaths before 2040. CONCLUSIONS: The potential increase in CHD deaths with recent trends in risk factor levels is alarming both for Iceland and probably for comparable Western populations. However, our results show considerable room for reducing CHD mortality. Achieving the best case scenario could eradicate premature CHD deaths by 2040. Public health policy interventions based on these predictions may provide a cost effective means of reducing CHD mortality in the future.

  10. World scientific collaboration in coronary heart disease research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qi; Shao, Hongfang; He, Peifeng; Duan, Zhiguang

    2013-08-10

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) will continue to exert a heavy burden for countries all over the world. Scientific collaboration has become the only choice for progress in biomedicine. Unfortunately, there is a scarcity of scientific publications about scientific collaboration in CHD research. This study examines collaboration behaviors across multiple collaboration types in the CHD research. 294,756 records about CHD were retrieved from Web of Science. Methods such as co-authorship, social network analysis, connected component, cliques, and betweenness centrality were used in this study. Collaborations have increased at the author, institution and country/region levels in CHD research over the past three decades. 3000 most collaborative authors, 572 most collaborative institutions and 52 countries/regions are extracted from their corresponding collaboration network. 766 cliques are found in the most collaborative authors. 308 cliques are found in the most collaborative institutions. Western countries/regions represent the core of the world's collaboration. The United States ranks first in terms of number of multi-national publications, while Hungary leads in the ranking measured by their proportion of collaborative output. The rate of economic development in the countries/regions also affects the multi-national collaboration behavior. Collaborations among countries/regions need to be encouraged in the CHD research. The visualization of overlapping cliques in the most collaborative authors and institutions are considered "skeleton" of the collaboration network. Eastern countries/regions should strengthen cooperation with western countries/regions in the CHD research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [THE INFLUENCE OF MONO- AND MULTIVASCULAR LESIONS OF CORONARY ARTERIES ON THE COURSE OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypalo, A; Kravchun, P; Kadykova, O

    2017-03-01

    The article assesses the influence of mono- and multivascular lesions of coronary arteries on the course of coronary heart disease at patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. For this purpose, a comprehensive survey of 75 patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 was arranged. Depending on the number of vascular lesions of the coronary arteries, according to the data of coronary arteries computer tomography, all patients were divided into two subgroups. The first subgroup included 27 patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with monovascular lesions of coronary arteries. To the second subgroup were included 48 patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries. During the analysis of carbohydrate metabolism in cases of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 the HOMA index increase by 25.40% and insulin level increase by 17.05% were revealed at patients with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries in comparison with patients with monovascular lesions of coronary arteries, respectively. The combination of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries was associated with an increase of sortilin level (233,47±47,85 ng/l). A significant increase in triglycerides, lipoprotein cholesterol of very low density influences greatly on the progression of coronary atherosclerosis with lesions of greater number of coronary arteries at patients surveyed. At patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries the left ventricle myocardial re-modeling occurred through the increase of left ventricle's size and cavity.

  12. Correlation study on waist circumference-triglyceride (WT) index and coronary artery scores in patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R-F; Liu, X-Y; Lin, Z; Zhang, G

    2015-01-01

    Coronary disease is analyzed through common lipid profiles, but these analyses fail to account for residual risk due to abdominal weight and elevated TG levels. We aimed to investigate the relationship between the waist circumference × triglyceride index (WT index) and the Coronary Artery Score (CAS) in patients with coronary heart disease. 346 patients in our Cardiology Department were recruited from September 2007 to August 2011 and divided into two groups according to whether the patients presented with metabolic syndrome. We performed coronary angiography using the standard Judkins method. The severity of coronary artery stenosis and the CAS were calculated and analyzed with a computerized quantitative analysis system. The signs index, which includes the body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-hip-ratio, and waist-height-ratio, the blood glucose and blood lipid index of all the patients were collected and used to calculate the WT index (waist circumference x triglyceride index. We performed a correlative analysis with age, gender, body mass index, blood glucose and blood lipid, blood pressure and other risk indicators of all patients as the dependent variables and the CAS as the independent variable. We show that the CAS is positively correlated to the WT index. Several lipid profiles and waist circumference were significantly associated with the CAS. The WT index is correlated to the CAS and is a good predictor for the development of coronary artery disease; it can be applied in the clinic for early intervention in populations at risk for coronary heart disease.

  13. Coexpression Analysis Reveals Key Gene Modules and Pathway of Human Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu; Ke, Zun-Ping; Peng, Yi-Gen; Cai, Ping-Tai

    2017-08-31

    Coronary heart disease is a kind of disease which causes great injury to people world-widely. Although gene expression analyses had been performed previously, to our best knowledge, systemic co-expression analysis for this disease is still lacking to date. Microarray data of coronary heart disease was downloaded from NCBI with the accession number of GSE20681. Co-expression modules were constructed by WGCNA. Besides, the connectivity degree of eigengenes was analyzed. Furthermore, GO and KEGG enrichment analysis was performed on these eigengenes in these constructed modules. A total of 11 co-expression modules were constructed by the 3,000 up-regulated genes from the 99 samples with coronary heart disease. The average number of genes in these modules was 270. The interaction analysis indicated the relative independence of gene expression in these modules. The functional enrichment analysis showed that there was a significant difference in the enriched terms and degree among these 11 modules. The results showed that module 9 and module 10 played critical roles in the occurrence of coronary disease. Pathways of hsa00190(Oxidative phosphorylation)and (hsa01130: Biosynthesis of antibiotics) were thought to be closely related to the occurrence and development of coronary heart disease. Our result demonstrated that module 9 and module 10 were the most critical modules in the occurrence of coronary heart disease. Pathways as hsa00190(Oxidative phosphorylation) and (hsa01130: Biosynthesis of antibiotics) had the potential to serve as the prognostic and predictive marker of coronary heart disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Coronary heart disease mortality among young adults in Scotland in relation to social inequalities:time trend study

    OpenAIRE

    O'Flaherty, Martin; Bishop, Jennifer; Redpath, Adam; McLaughlin, Terry; Murphy, David; Chalmers, James; Capewell, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine recent trends and social inequalities in age specific coronary heart disease mortality.Design Time trend analysis using joinpoint regression.Setting Scotland, 1986-2006.Participants Men and women aged 35 years and over.Main outcome measures Age adjusted and age, sex, and deprivation specific coronary heart disease mortality.Results Persistent sixfold social differentials in coronary heart disease mortality were seen between the most deprived and the most affluent groups a...

  15. What Causes Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Disease? Research suggests that coronary heart disease (CHD) begins with damage to the lining and ... causing coronary microvascular disease (MVD). Coronary MVD is heart disease that affects the heart's tiny arteries. The cause ...

  16. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Community Medicine

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  17. Dietary magnesium intake and coronary heart disease risk: A study from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Stevanović

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To assess the relationship between dietary magnesium intakeand the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD. Methods A conducted case-control study included 290 randomly selected cases (mean age 59.98 +/- 10.03 years with first event of an acute coronary syndrome and 290 selected controls paired by sex, age and region (mean age 59.43 +/- 10.10 years admitted to the same hospitals without any suspicion of coronary disease. A diet was assessed by an interviewer-administered semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire, and magnesium intake was derived from the nutrient database. Results Subjects with coronary heart disease had significantly lower intake of foods containing high levels of magnesium like whole grain (p<0.0001, legumes (p<0.05 and nuts (p<0.05. Lower dietary magnesium intake was found to be positively associated with risk of coronary heart disease (0.027. Conclusion Our findings suggest that dietary intake of magnesium was associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease among Serbian population.

  18. Influence of drug treatment on glucocorticoid receptor levels in patients with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Hong; GUO Wei-zao; YAN Zhi-hong; LI Di; LU Cui-lian

    2010-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoid signaling exerts major roles in inflammation, metabolism and depression, which are three crucial factors accompanying or underlying coronary heart disease. Although accumulating evidence indicates the influence of glucocorticoids on the pathology and treatment of coronary heart disease, there is still a dearth of pharmaceutical mechanisms for this relationship. This study aimed to investigate the influence of drug treatment on glucocorticoid receptor levels in coronary heart disease.Methods Eighty hospitalized patients (average age (59.0 7.5) years, 46 male and 34 female) with coronary heart disease were categorized into four groups with 20 members in each according to one of the four drugs they were treated with. The four drugs were: nitrated derivative isosorbide dinitrate, the beta-adrenergic receptor blocker metoprolol, the calcium antagonist nifedipine, and the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor lovastatin. Glucocorticoid receptor protein levels of peripheral blood lymphocytes were tested using immunoblotting analysis before and after one month of treatment. Results Immunoblotting analysis showed increased glucocorticoid receptor levels after treatment with metoprolol and nifedipine. There were no statistically significant changes of glucocorticoid receptor levels after treatment with isosorbide dinitrate or lovastatin, although there were trends of up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptor expression after both treatments.Conclusions Both the beta-blocker and the calcium blocker can increase glucocorticoid receptor levels after chronic administration. This effect suggests a mechanism for their anti-inflammatory and other therapeutic roles for coronary heart disease and comorbid disorders.

  19. Triglycerides and coronary heart disease: have recent insights yielded conclusive answers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Nadeem; Sattar, Naveed

    2009-08-01

    Despite over 50 years of research, the relevance of triglycerides to coronary heart disease risk remains uncertain. Contrary to prevailing views, recent studies demonstrate that the long-term within-individual variability of triglyceride measurements is similar to that of other lipid fractions. Several prospective studies have reported on associations of circulating triglyceride levels with coronary heart disease risk, but it remains unclear whether observed associations are dependent on levels of conventional risk factors (especially other lipids) or are importantly modified under different circumstances (especially by fasting status). Ongoing large-scale studies should help clarify such outstanding uncertainties and assess whether measurement of triglyceride levels can better identify individuals at increased risk of coronary heart disease than measurement of conventional risk factors alone. Available interventions that lower levels of triglycerides are unable to judge causality as such interventions typically influence levels of several lipid fractions. Study of genetic variants that regulate triglyceride levels may provide an alternative approach to assess causality. Although recent studies have progressed our understanding of triglycerides and coronary heart disease, several outstanding uncertainties remain unresolved. Ongoing studies should help clarify these, including whether measurement of triglyceride levels can help improve coronary heart disease risk assessment, and study of genetic variants may help better understand any causal role.

  20. Efficacy of trimetazidine combining with metoprolol on plasma BNP in coronary heart disease patients with heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Li; You-Mei Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of combined application of trimetazidine and metoprolol on plasma BNP in coronary heart disease patients with heart failure and the clinical efficacy. Methods:A total of 140 cases of coronary heart disease patients with heart failure treated in Cardiology Department of our hospital from May 2012 to January 2015 were selected and divided into study group and control group by random number table method. The control group received digitalis, diuretics, ACEI (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor) and other conventional drugs for treatment, the study group received combined use of trimetazidine and metoprolol on the basis of routine treatment of the control group, and treatment duration was 12 weeks. Then plasma BNP, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, left ventricular end diastolic diameter (LVEDD), left ventricular end systolic end (LVESD) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of two groups before and after treatment were statistically analyzed, and the overall effect was evaluated.Results:Before treatment, there were no significant differences in plasma BNP, blood pressure, heart rate, LVEDD, LVESD and LVEF between the two groups; after treatment, plasma BNP, blood pressure, heart rate, LVEDD and LVESD of both groups decreased and LVEF increased, but the changes in study group were better than those in control group.Conclusion:Trimetazidine combined with metoprolol has better application effect in plasma BNP decrease and heart function improvement in coronary heart disease patients with heart failure.

  1. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk factors. ...

  2. Mendelian randomization of blood lipids for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael V; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Palmer, Tom M; Drenos, Fotios; Lanktree, Matthew B; Nelson, Christopher P; Dale, Caroline E; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Finan, Chris; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Tragante, Vinicius; van Iperen, Erik P A; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Shah, Sonia; Elbers, Clara C; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Zabaneh, Delilah; Sofat, Reecha; McLachlan, Stela; Doevendans, Pieter A; Balmforth, Anthony J; Hall, Alistair S; North, Kari E; Almoguera, Berta; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Cushman, Mary; Fornage, Myriam; Patel, Sanjay R; Redline, Susan; Siscovick, David S; Tsai, Michael Y; Karczewski, Konrad J; Hofker, Marten H; Verschuren, W Monique; Bots, Michiel L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Melander, Olle; Dominiczak, Anna F; Morris, Richard; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Price, Jackie; Kumari, Meena; Baumert, Jens; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R; Humphries, Steve E; Clarke, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Wilson, James G; Rich, Stephen S; de Bakker, Paul I W; Lange, Leslie A; Davey Smith, George; Reiner, Alex P; Talmud, Philippa J; Kivimäki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A; Dudbridge, Frank; Samani, Nilesh J; Keating, Brendan J; Hingorani, Aroon D; Casas, Juan P

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the causal role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides in coronary heart disease (CHD) using multiple instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization. We developed weighted allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with established associations with HDL-C, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). For each trait, we constructed two scores. The first was unrestricted, including all independent SNPs associated with the lipid trait identified from a prior meta-analysis (threshold P Mendelian randomization meta-analyses were conducted in 17 studies including 62,199 participants and 12,099 CHD events. Both the unrestricted and restricted allele scores for LDL-C (42 and 19 SNPs, respectively) associated with CHD. For HDL-C, the unrestricted allele score (48 SNPs) was associated with CHD (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.70), per 1 mmol/L higher HDL-C, but neither the restricted allele score (19 SNPs; OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.42, 1.98) nor the unrestricted HDL-C allele score adjusted for triglycerides, LDL-C, or statin use (OR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.44, 1.46) showed a robust association. For triglycerides, the unrestricted allele score (67 SNPs) and the restricted allele score (27 SNPs) were both associated with CHD (OR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.24, 2.11 and 1.61; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.59, respectively) per 1-log unit increment. However, the unrestricted triglyceride score adjusted for HDL-C, LDL-C, and statin use gave an OR for CHD of 1.01 (95% CI: 0.59, 1.75). The genetic findings support a causal effect of triglycerides on CHD risk, but a causal role for HDL-C, though possible, remains less certain. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  3. Mendelian randomization of blood lipids for coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael V.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Palmer, Tom M.; Drenos, Fotios; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Dale, Caroline E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Finan, Chris; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Tragante, Vinicius; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Shah, Sonia; Elbers, Clara C.; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Zabaneh, Delilah; Sofat, Reecha; McLachlan, Stela; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Hall, Alistair S.; North, Kari E.; Almoguera, Berta; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Cushman, Mary; Fornage, Myriam; Patel, Sanjay R.; Redline, Susan; Siscovick, David S.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Hofker, Marten H.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Bots, Michiel L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Melander, Olle; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Richard; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Price, Jackie; Kumari, Meena; Baumert, Jens; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Koenig, Wolfgang; Gaunt, Tom R.; Humphries, Steve E.; Clarke, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Wilson, James G.; Rich, Stephen S.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Lange, Leslie A.; Davey Smith, George; Reiner, Alex P.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimäki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Dudbridge, Frank; Samani, Nilesh J.; Keating, Brendan J.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the causal role of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides in coronary heart disease (CHD) using multiple instrumental variables for Mendelian randomization. Methods and results We developed weighted allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with established associations with HDL-C, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). For each trait, we constructed two scores. The first was unrestricted, including all independent SNPs associated with the lipid trait identified from a prior meta-analysis (threshold P < 2 × 10−6); and the second a restricted score, filtered to remove any SNPs also associated with either of the other two lipid traits at P ≤ 0.01. Mendelian randomization meta-analyses were conducted in 17 studies including 62,199 participants and 12,099 CHD events. Both the unrestricted and restricted allele scores for LDL-C (42 and 19 SNPs, respectively) associated with CHD. For HDL-C, the unrestricted allele score (48 SNPs) was associated with CHD (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.70), per 1 mmol/L higher HDL-C, but neither the restricted allele score (19 SNPs; OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.42, 1.98) nor the unrestricted HDL-C allele score adjusted for triglycerides, LDL-C, or statin use (OR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.44, 1.46) showed a robust association. For triglycerides, the unrestricted allele score (67 SNPs) and the restricted allele score (27 SNPs) were both associated with CHD (OR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.24, 2.11 and 1.61; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.59, respectively) per 1-log unit increment. However, the unrestricted triglyceride score adjusted for HDL-C, LDL-C, and statin use gave an OR for CHD of 1.01 (95% CI: 0.59, 1.75). Conclusion The genetic findings support a causal effect of triglycerides on CHD risk, but a causal role for HDL-C, though possible, remains less certain. PMID:24474739

  4. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. METHODS: We......·02-1·26; p=0·02) and incident stroke (1·33, 1·11-1·61; p=0·002). The excess risk of stroke remained unchanged in analyses that addressed reverse causation, multivariable adjustments for other risk factors, and different methods of stroke ascertainment (range of RR estimates 1·30-1·42). We recorded a dose...... long hours have a higher risk of stroke than those working standard hours; the association with coronary heart disease is weaker. These findings suggest that more attention should be paid to the management of vascular risk factors in individuals who work long hours. FUNDING: Medical Research Council...

  5. Depressive Symptoms, Health Behaviors, and Subsequent Inflammation in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease : Prospective Findings From the Heart and Soul Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duivis, Hester E.; de Jonge, Peter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Na, Bee Ya; Cohen, Beth E.; Whooley, Mary A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Depression has been associated with inflammation in patients with coronary heart disease. However, it is uncertain whether depressive symptoms lead to inflammation or vice versa. Method: The authors evaluated 667 outpatients with established coronary heart disease from the Heart and Soul

  6. Study on ultrasound evaluation of carotid atherosclerosis and its predicting value for coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Hui Jian; Li-Fen Xu; Tie-Jun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the ultrasound features of carotid atherosclerosis and its predicting value for coronary heart disease.Methods: A total of 55 cases of patients with coronary heart disease were selected as coronary heart disease group, 55 cases of healthy subjects were selected as control group, carotid artery ultrasound was used to detect intima-media thickness and judge the degree of coronary artery lesion, and plasma was collected to detect blood lipid metabolism indicators (FFA, LDL-C and HDL-C) and inflammation indicators (CCL21, CCR7, sCD40L, MFG-E8 and IL-10). Results:Carotid artery IMT of CHD group was significantly higher than that of control group, and the more the number of coronary artery lesions, the higher the IMT; plasma FFA, LDL-C, CCL21, CCR7 and sCD40L content of CHD group were higher than those of control group, and HDL-C, MFG-E8 and IL-10 content as well as HDL-C/LDL-C ratio were lower than those of control group; blood lipid metabolism indicators and inflammation indicators of coronary heart disease patients with different IMT were different, and the thicker the IMT, the higher the plasma FFA, LDL-C, CCL21, CCR7 and sCD40L content, the lower the HDL-C, MFG-E8 and IL-10 content as well as HDL-C/LDL-C ratio. Conclusion:Carotid artery IMT of patients with coronary heart disease significantly thickens and can assess the number of coronary artery lesions, blood lipid metabolism and degree of inflammation.

  7. Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened and narrowed. This is due ...

  8. Association of changes in health-related quality of life in coronary heart disease with coronary procedures and sociodemographic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rollag Arnfinn

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have focused on the association between the sociodemographic characteristics of a patient with the change in health-related quality of life (HRQOL following invasive coronary procedures, and the results remain inconclusive. The objective of the present study was to measure the temporal changes in HRQOL of patients with coronary heart disease, and assess how these changes are associated with invasive coronary procedures and sociodemographic characteristics. Methods This was a prospective study of 254 patients with angina pectoris and 90 patients with acute coronary syndrome. HRQOL was assessed with the multi-item scales and summary components of the SF-36, both 6 weeks and 2 years after baseline hospitalization in 1998. Paired t-tests and multiple regression analyses were used to assess temporal changes in HRQOL and to identify the associated factors. Results Physical components of HRQOL had improved most during the 2 years following invasive coronary procedures. Our findings indicated that patients with angina pectoris who were younger, male, and more educated were most likely to increase their HRQOL following invasive coronary procedures. When adjusting for baseline HRQOL scores, invasive coronary procedures and sociodemographic characteristics did not explain temporal changes in patients with acute coronary syndrome, possibly due to higher comorbidity. Conclusion Sociodemographic characteristics should be taken into account when comparing and interpreting changes in HRQOL scores in patients with and without invasive coronary procedures.

  9. Biomarkers in Cardiology - Part 2: In Coronary Heart Disease, Valve Disease and Special Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality and morbidity in Brazil. Their primary and secondary preventions are a priority for the health system and require multiple approaches for increased effectiveness. Biomarkers are tools used to identify with greater accuracy high-risk individuals, establish a faster diagnosis, guide treatment, and determine prognosis. This review aims to highlight the importance of biomarkers in clinical cardiology practice and raise relevant points regarding their application and perspectives for the next few years. This document was divided into two parts. This second part addresses the application of biomarkers in coronary heart disease, valvular diseases, cardio-oncology, pulmonary embolism, and cardiorenal syndrome.

  10. Risk of Coronary Heart Disease among HIV-Infected Patients: A Multicenter Study in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra C. Fuchs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease has emerged as a crescent problem among HIV-infected population. This study aimed to determine the 10-year risk of coronary heart disease using the Framingham risk score among HIV-infected patients from three regions of Brazil. This is a pooled analysis of three cohort studies, which enrolled 3,829 individuals, 59% were men, 66% had white skin color, and mean age 39.0 ± 9.9 years. Comparisons among regions showed that there were marked differences in demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and HIV-related characteristics. Prevalence of Framingham score ≥10 was 4.5% in the Southern, 4.2% in the Midwest, and 3.9% in the Northeast of Brazil. The Framingham score ≥10 was similar between regions for males, patients aged ≥60 years, with obesity, central obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Women were three times more likely to have coronary heart disease in 10 years than men. Hypertension and diabetes increased more than four times the risk of coronary heart disease, followed by central obesity, obesity, and prehypertension. The use of antiretroviral agents and time since HIV diagnosis were not risk factors for coronary artery disease in 10 years. In conclusion, hypertension and diabetes are the strongest independent predictors of 10-year risk of coronary heart disease among HIV-infected population.

  11. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  12. Ischemic heart disease induces upregulation of endothelin receptor mRNA in human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackenfors, Angelica; Emilson, Malin; Ingemansson, Richard;

    2004-01-01

    and controls using real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR). In addition, the suitability of organ culture as a model mimicking endothelin receptor changes in cardiovascular disease was evaluated by in vitro pharmacology and real-time PCR. Endothelin ETA and ETB receptor mRNA levels were......Endothelin has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. The aims were to quantify endothelin type A (ETA) and type B (ETB) receptor mRNA levels in human coronary arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure...

  13. Periodontal disease, tooth loss and coronary heart disease assessed by coronary angiography: a cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, S M; Pereira, S S; Barbisan, J N; Vieira, L; Saba-Chujfi, E; Haas, A N; Rösing, C K

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the association between periodontal disease, tooth loss and coronary heart disease (CHD). There is still controversy about the relationship between periodontal disease and tooth loss with vessel obstruction assessed using coronary angiography. This cross-sectional study included 195 patients that underwent coronary angiography and presented with at least six teeth. Patients were classified into three categories of coronary obstruction severity: absence; one or more vessels with ≤ 50% obstruction; and one or more vessels with ≥ 50% obstruction. The extent of coronary obstruction was dichotomized into 0 and ≥ 1 affected vessels. A periodontist blinded to patient CHD status conducted a full mouth examination to determine mean clinical attachment loss, mean periodontal probing depth and tooth loss. Multiple logistic regression models were applied adjusting for age, gender, hypertension, smoking, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein. Most patients were males (62.1%) older than 60 years (50.8%), and 61% of them had CHD. Mean periodontal probing depth, clinical attachment loss and tooth loss were 2.64 ± 0.72 mm, 4.40 ± 1.31 mm and 12.50 ± 6.98 teeth respectively. In the multivariable models, tooth loss was significantly associated with a higher chance of having at least one obstructed vessel (odds ratio = 1.04; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.09) and with vessel obstruction ≥ 50% (odds ratio = 1.06; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.11). No significant associations were found between periodontal variables and vessel obstruction. Tooth loss was found to be a risk indicator for CHD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Advance in diagnosis and treatment of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease with traditional Chinese medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Rong; Wang, Jiel; Liu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    To discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, therapies and prescriptions of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease. According to the advance in modern diagnosis and treatment, the authors believed that psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease is closely related with mental stresses, like anxiety, depression and insomnia. It is mostly caused by emotional injury and expressed in heart, liver, spleen and kidney. The pathogenesis is heart-liver hyperactivity, yin deficiency in heart and kidney, and insufficiency in heart and spleen. The full recognition of etiology and pathogenesis of psycho-cardiological abnormality of patients with coronary heart disease and the combined treatment of disease and syndromes are of great significance to reduce mental stress and other risk factors, prevent and treat coronary heart disease and improve prognosis.

  15. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, A.S.; Richter, G.M.; Groessner-Schreiber, B.; Noack, D.; Nothnagel, M.; El Mokhtari, N.E.; Loos, B.G.; Jepsen, S.; Schreiber, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a

  16. Involvement of interleukin-1 genotypes in the association of coronary heart disease with periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geismar, Karen; Enevold, Christian; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies demonstrated an association between periodontitis (PE) and coronary heart disease (CHD). The coexistence of the two disease entities could be dependent on mutual risk factors, and polymorphism of the interleukin (IL)-1 gene cluster associated with the severity of PE might also...

  17. Metabolic syndrome and mortality in stable coronary heart disease: relation to gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Charlotte; Køber, Lars; Faber, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome (MS) is associated with subsequent development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the general population. The impact of MS on mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease is less well defined, and the association of prognosis to gender...

  18. Novel Risk Factors for Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Coronary Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Dehghan (Abbas)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDespite the huge advances made in the understanding of type II diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD), these diseases still constitute a major health problem. Since the 1950s, epidemiologists focused on chronic disorders, including type II diabetes and CHD. Major aims of their researc

  19. Identification of a shared genetic susceptibility locus for coronary heart disease and periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, A.S.; Richter, G.M.; Groessner-Schreiber, B.; Noack, D.; Nothnagel, M.; El Mokhtari, N.E.; Loos, B.G.; Jepsen, S.; Schreiber, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies indicate a mutual epidemiological relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and periodontitis. Both diseases are associated with similar risk factors and are characterized by a chronic inflammatory process. In a candidate-gene association study, we identify an association of a

  20. Lysophospholipids in coronary artery and chronic ischemic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Heron, Paula M.; Morris, Andrew J.; Smyth, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The bioactive lysophospholipids, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine 1 phosphate (S1P) have potent effects on blood and vascular cells. This review focuses their potential contributions to the development of atherosclerosis, acute complications, such as acute myocardial infarction, and chronic ischemic cardiac damage. Recent findings Exciting recent developments have provided insight into the molecular underpinnings of LPA and S1P receptor signaling. New lines of evidence suggest roles for these pathways in the development of atherosclerosis. In experimental animal models, the production, signaling and metabolism of LPA may be influenced by environmental factors in the diet that synergize to promote the progression of atherosclerotic vascular disease. This is supported by observations of human polymorphisms in the lysophospholipid metabolizing enzyme, PPAP2B, that are associated with risk of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. S1P signaling protects from myocardial damage that follows acute and chronic ischemia both by direct effects on cardiomyocytes and through stem cell recruitment to ischemic tissue. Summary This review will suggest novel strategies to prevent the complications of coronary artery disease by targeting LPA production and signaling. Additionally, ways in which S1P signaling pathways may be harnessed to attenuate ischemia-induced cardiac dysfunction will be explored. PMID:26270808

  1. Factors predictive of stress, organizational effectiveness, and coronary heart disease potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, W H

    1985-07-01

    Research to predict stress, organizational effectiveness, and potential for developing coronary heart disease (CHD) is presented based on two samples (n = 357 and n = 225). Results indicate that perceived stress is predicted by a combination of individual and job related characteristics. The data suggest that stress, in turn, affects individual and organizational health and effectiveness, by causing increases in cold/flu episodes, somatic symptoms, while decreasing job satisfaction. In addition, stress has an indirect effect on job performance and absenteeism. Models for predicting the ratio of total serum cholesterol divided by HDL cholesterol as an indicator of coronary heart disease potential are provided and a CHD screening model is proposed.

  2. Coronary artery problems and disease in adults with congenital heart disease: how to evaluate, how to prevent, how to treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, S; Stuart, A G

    2014-10-01

    There are a wide variety of coronary artery anomalies and disease in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). In fact, the increasing burden of acquired coronary artery disease (CAD) has to be considered in addition to congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries, isolated or associated to other congenital diseases. This is largely a consequence of the increasing number of patients reaching older age. Due to complex underlying cardiac anatomy, previous surgery and comorbidities, treatment can be challenging. Individualized and multidisciplinary management involving congenital heart cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, coronary interventionists and imaging specialists is essential. This review gives an overview of coronary artery involvement in adults with CHD, summarizes the current literature and focuses on prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The potential role of cardiovascular risk factors for CAD is also discussed.

  3. Ranking of psychosocial and traditional risk factors by importance for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnohr, Peter; Marott, Jacob L; Kristensen, Tage S.

    2015-01-01

    .001] and systolic blood pressure (≥160 mmHg or blood pressure medication vs. high vs. low; HR 2.07; 95% CI, 1......-statistics and net reclassification improvement. During the follow-up, 1731 non-fatal and fatal coronary events were registered. In men, the highest ranking risk factors for coronary heart disease were vital exhaustion [high vs. low; hazard ratio (HR) 2.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.70-3.26; P ...AIMS: To rank psychosocial and traditional risk factors by importance for coronary heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective cardiovascular population study randomly selected in 1976. The third examination was carried out from 1991 to 1994, and 8882 men...

  4. Coronary heart disease prevention: nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhupathiraju, Shilpa N; Tucker, Katherine L

    2011-08-17

    Diet is a key modifiable risk factor in the prevention and risk reduction of coronary heart disease (CHD). Results from the Seven Countries Study in the early 1970s spurred an interest in the role of single nutrients such as total fat in CHD risk. With accumulating evidence, we have moved away from a focus on total fat to the importance of considering the quality of fat. Recent meta-analyses of intervention studies confirm the beneficial effects of replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids on CHD risk. Scientific evidence for a detrimental role of trans fat intake from industrial sources on CHD risk has led to important policy changes including listing trans fatty acid content on the "Nutrition Facts" panel and banning the use of trans fatty acids in food service establishments in some cities. The effects of such policy changes on changes in CHD incidence are yet to be evaluated. There has been a surging interest in the protective effects of vitamin D in primary prevention. Yet, its associations with secondary events have been mixed and intervention studies are needed to clarify its role in CHD prevention. Epidemiological and clinical trial evidence surrounding the benefit of B vitamins and antioxidants such as carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C, have been contradictory. While pharmacological supplementation of these vitamins in populations with existing CHD has been ineffective and, in some cases, even detrimental, data repeatedly show that consumption of a healthy dietary pattern has considerable cardioprotective effects for primary prevention. Results from these studies and the general ineffectiveness of nutrient-based interventions have shifted interest to the role of foods in CHD risk reduction. The strongest and most consistent protective associations are seen with fruit and vegetables, fish, and whole grains. Epidemiological and clinical trial data also show risk reduction with moderate alcohol consumption. In the past decade, there has

  5. Coated stents to prevent restenosis in coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In-stent-restenosis (ISR is considered to be an essential limiting factor of stenting in coronary heart disease (CHD. The development of coated stents has raised expectations on substantial lowering restenosis after stenting with decreasing the rate of restenosis and a reduction in the rate of clinical events. Objectives: The present analysis addresses the questions on medical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the use of various coated stent types in CHD. Methods: The literature was searched in December 2004 in the most relevant medical and economic databases. The medical evaluation was conducted on the basis of published RCT. The data from the studies regarding various angiographic, sonographic and clinical endpoints were checked for methodical quality and summarised in meta-analyses. Within the scope of economic evaluation the primary studies were analysed and modelling was performed, applying clinical effect estimates from the meta-analyses of the medical evaluation and current estimates of German costs. Results: Medical evaluation: Ten different stenttypes were used in the included 26 RCT. The results for heparin, silicon-carbide, carbon and PTFE coated stenttypes could not reveal any significant differences between the medical effectiveness of coated and uncoated stents. The application of sirolimus, paclitaxel, everolimus and 7-hexanoyltaxol eluting stents showed a significant lower restenosis at 6-9 months with decrease in the rate of restenosis for polymer-based sirolimus, paclitaxel and 7-hexanoyltaxol eluting stents. In contrast, the use of gold-coated and actinomycin-D eluting stents was associated with a significantly higher restenosis. The polymer-based sirolimus and paclitaxel eluting stents also showed a significant and considerable reduction in the rate of repeated percutaneous revascularisations at 6-12 months (3.5% vs. 19.7%; p<0.0001, RR=0.19 [95%CI: 0.11; 0.33] and 3.5% vs. 12.2%; p<0.0001, RR=0.30 [95%CI: 0

  6. Patient education in the management of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James Pr; Clark, Alexander M; Dalal, Hayes; Welch, Karen; Taylor, Rod S

    2011-12-07

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a complex multifaceted intervention consisting of three core modalities: education, exercise training and psychological support. Whilst exercise and psychological interventions for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) have been the subject of Cochrane systematic reviews, the specific impact of the educational component of CR has not previously been investigated. 1. Assess effects of patient education on mortality, morbidity, health-related quality of life (HRQofL) and healthcare costs in patients with CHD.2. Explore study level predictors of the effects of patient education (e.g. individual versus group intervention, timing with respect to index cardiac event). The following databases were searched: The Cochrane Library, (CENTRAL, CDSR, DARE, HTA, NHSEED), MEDLINE (OVID), EMBASE (OVID), PsycINFO (EBSCOhost) and CINAHL (EBSCOhost). Previous systematic reviews and reference lists of included studies were also searched. No language restrictions were applied. 1. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) where the primary interventional intent was education.2. Studies with a minimum of six-months follow-up and published in 1990 or later.3. Adults with diagnosis of CHD. Two review authors selected studies and extracted data. Attempts were made to contact all study authors to obtain relevant information not available in the published manuscript. For dichotomous variables, risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived for each outcome. For continuous variables, mean differences and 95% CI were calculated for each outcome. Thirteen RCTs involving 68,556 subjects with CHD and follow-up from six to 60 months were found. Overall, methodological quality of included studies was moderate to good. Educational 'dose' ranged from a total of two clinic visits to a four-week residential stay with 11 months of follow-up sessions. Control groups typically received usual medical care. There was no strong evidence of an effect of education on

  7. Effect of the smoking cessation services in the out-patient department for patients with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵菁

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects and clinical prognosis of out-patient department-based smoking cessation services for coronary heart disease(CHD)patients.Methods A total of 140 smoking patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease in our cardiovascular department were randomly divided into the intensive

  8. Association between C reactive protein and coronary heart disease: mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wensley, Frances; Gao, Pei; Burgess, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease.......To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease....

  9. A Health Education Program for Parents and Children Who Exhibit High Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Joyce W.; And Others

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of joint parent-child education to change the behaviors known to be associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Earlier studies have shown that parents who are at increased risk of coronary heart disease can be identified by studying certain factors in the children. Utilizing a combined risk…

  10. Sex difference in the effect of the fasting serum glucose level on the risk of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Song Vogue; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Nam, Chung Mo; Suh, Il

    2017-09-04

    Diabetic women have a greater relative risk of coronary heart disease than diabetic men. However, the sex difference in the effect of fasting serum glucose levels below the diabetic range on the risk of coronary heart disease is unclear. We investigated whether the association between nondiabetic blood glucose levels and the incident risk of coronary heart disease is different between men and women. The fasting serum glucose levels and other cardiovascular risk factors at baseline were measured in 159,702 subjects (100,144 men and 59,558 women). Primary outcomes were hospital admission and death due to coronary heart disease during the 11-year follow-up. The risk for coronary heart disease in women significantly increased with impaired fasting glucose levels (≥110mg/dL) compared to normal glucose levels (coronary heart disease in men was significantly increased at a diabetic glucose range (≥126mg/dL). Women had a higher hazard ratio of coronary heart disease associated with the fasting serum glucose level than men (p for interaction with sex=0.021). The stronger effect of the fasting serum glucose levels on the risk of coronary heart disease in women than in men was significant from a prediabetic range (≥110mg/dL). Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Explore Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet effecting on treatment outcome of coronary heart disease based on propensity score].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Xie, Yan-ming; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet is a Chinese patent medicine for treating chest pain caused by blood stasis. It is widely used in clinical prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease. In order to understand the treatment effect of Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet in patients with coronary heart disease, we extracted electronic medical record data from 18 large hospitals nationwide. We matched the coronary artery disease patients with or without Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet treatment on gender, age, condition at admission and whether combined with cardiac insufficiency on a one to one ratio. After matching, both groups, patients using Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet (group A) and patients not using Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet (group B), ended up with 1,122 people. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment, the endpoint of effective group was defined as "cure" and "better" while the endpoint of invalid group was defined as "invalid" and "death". Chi-square test showed a statistical significant difference (P coronary heart disease, with a higher efficiency in Xueshuan Xinmaining group. Classic logistic regression analysis showed no statistical significant difference between the two groups on treatment outcome efficiency. Generalized boosted models (GBM) and propensity score (PS) weighted Logistic regression were then applied to balance 45 variables between the two groups. The results showed a regression coefficient greater than 0 and a statistical significant difference (P coronary heart disease patients using Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet had a higher efficiency in clinical efficiency than the patients not using Xueshuan Xinmaining tablet. Since this study did not certainly eliminate all the possible confounders and patients from the hospitals included in this study were not yet well represent the overall situation of the source population, the study conclusion only provided drug use reference for clinical doctors for coronary heart disease. Large randomized controlled

  12. Drug-eluting stents vs. coronary artery bypass-grafting in coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG and percutaneous revascularisations with implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES are important treatment methods in coronary heart disease (CHD. Research questions: The evaluation addresses questions on medical efficacy, health economic parameters as well as ethic, social and legal implications in the use of DES vs. CABG in CHD patients. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in December 2006 in the most important electronic databases beginning from 2004. Register data and controlled clinical studies were included in the evaluation. Additionally, a health economic modelling was conducted. Results: Medical evaluation: The literature search yielded 2,312 hits. 14 publications about six controlled clinical studies and five publications about two registers were included into the evaluation. Register data showed low mortality (0.2% to 0.7% and low rates of myocardial infarction (0.5% to 1.4% during hospital stay. In patients with stenosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery one study showed in several analyses a significantly higher rate of reinterventions and a significantly higher rate of repeated angina pectoris for DES up to two years after the implantation (16.8% vs. 3.6% and 35% vs. 8%. In patients with left main coronary artery stenosis two studies revealed a significantly higher survival without myocardial infarction and stroke for DES up to one year (96% vs. 79% and 95% vs. 91% and two studies a significantly higher rate of revascularisations up to two years (20% vs. 4% and 25% vs. 5% after the primary intervention. In patients with multivessel disease, one study found a significantly higher mortality and myocardial infarction rate for CABG at one year (2.7% vs. 1.0% and 4.2% vs. 1.3%. The rate of revascularisations was significantly higher in two studies up to two years after DES implantation (8.5% vs. 4.2% and 14.2% vs. 5.3%. The rate at repeated angina pectoris was

  13. Hormone replacement therapy and risk for coronary heart disease. Data from the CORA-study--a case-control study on women with incident coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, Eberhard; Zyriax, Birgit-Christiane; Eidenmüller, Britta; Boeing, Heiner

    2007-07-20

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been suggested to prevent cardiovascular disease, while some intervention studies have shed doubt on this concept. Thus, uncertainty remains whether current HRT use is beneficial as to cardiovascular disease or may even be harmful. This research investigates the association of hormone replacement therapy, risk factors and lifestyle characteristics with the manifestation of coronary heart disease in current HRT users versus never users. The coronary risk factors for atherosclerosis in women study (CORA-study) provide clinical and biochemical parameters and data on lifestyle in 200 consecutive pre- and postmenopausal women with incident coronary heart disease compared to 255 age-matched population-based controls, of which 87.9% were postmenopausal. Significantly more controls than cases used currently HRT for a median of 9.5 years (32.9% versus 20.2%), while 50.0% of cases and 42.5% of controls had never used HRT (pCORA-study are not compatible with an adverse impact of hormone replacement therapy on cardiovascular disease, rather support the notion of beneficial effects of HRT on weight, central adiposity, insulin sensitivity and blood pressure. Yet, the data do not support the presumption of a general healthy user effect in women on HRT either. Rather, in some women adverse lifestyle habits, especially intense smoking, appear to counteract possible beneficial effects of HRT.

  14. Coronary heart disease risk assessment and characterization of coronary artery disease using coronary CT angiography: comparison of asymptomatic and symptomatic groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Y. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y., E-mail: yookkim@ewha.ac.k [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, I.-M. [Division of Cardiology in Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, J.; Park, H. [Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in relation to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and assess plaque characteristics from coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Materials and methods: Three hundred and ninety consecutive patients [asymptomatic group, n = 138; symptomatic group (atypical or non-anginal chest pain), n = 252] were retrospectively enrolled. They were subsequently classified into three CHD risk categories, based on the National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines, and 10 year risks of coronary events were calculated using Framingham risk score. CT was evaluated for stenosis, plaque composition, and coronary calcium scores. Results: CAD was observed in 42% of the asymptomatic group and 62% of the symptomatic group. In the former, the prevalence of CAD in low-, moderate- and high-risk subgroups was 21.4, 47.4 and 65%, respectively, and was 33.3, 74.4, and 72.4% in the symptomatic group. Framingham 10-year risks of coronary events were significantly higher in patients with CAD than in normal participants, and receiver operating characteristics curves showed that discriminatory power was poor in the asymptomatic group and symptomatic men, and good in symptomatic women. Of the participants in the asymptomatic group, 12% exhibited only non-calcified plaques and of the symptomatic group, 7% exhibited only non-calcified plaques. The coronary calcium score was significantly higher for significant stenosis than for non-significant stenosis in both groups. Conclusions: The prevalence of CAD was not negligible even in subgroups with low-to-moderate CHD risk. Additionally, the Framingham risk score was effective for predicting CAD only in symptomatic women. Coronary calcium scores correlated with significant stenosis; however, a sizeable percentage of both groups had only non-calcified plaques.

  15. Serum uric acid as prognostic marker of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnima, Samudrala; El-Aal, Bahiga Galal Abd

    A substantial body of epidemiological and experimental evidence suggests the significance of serum uric acid as an important and independent risk factor of cardio vascular and renal diseases especially in patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension. Hyperuricemia is a risk factor of coronary heart disease. Several studies showed positive association between hyperuricemia and CHD risk factors. To analyze the serum uric acid levels in patients with diabetes and hypertension, which helps in understanding its role as prognostic marker of coronary heart disease. The study was conducted in population of Wadi-Al Dawasir (K.S.A.) aged 20-80 years through random sampling from October 2012 to June 2013. It included 250 samples and the cases were categorized into diabetic and hypertensive. In the cases, purely hypertensive were 52, diabetic were 57 and mixed group included both diabetic and hypertensive patients 65. Fasting blood was collected to analyze lipid profile which included (total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein) and serum uric acid in association with age and heredity was also studied. Patient demographics were recorded. The study revealed significant association of serum uric acid (pcoronary heart disease. When compared to controls (non-diabetic pcoronary heart disease. With progressing age the association of lipid profile and serum uric acid reported (pcoronary heart disease, justifies the objective of research in taking preventive measures to combat the deleterious effect of coronary heart disease. Prevention and early detection of elevated uric acid in both hypertensive and diabetic patients could serve as effective investigative tool in reducing coronary heart disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [DIAGNOSIS OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE CAUSED BY TORTUOSITY OF CORONARY ARTERIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, E O; Lazoryshynets, V V; Beshliaga, V M; Grusha, M M

    2015-01-01

    This article is devoted to the problems of diagnostics of coronary artery tortuosity phenomenon. Given the lack of literature about the role of phenomenon tortuosity of coronary arteries in the genesis of ischemic myocardial damage, the purpose of study was to determine the clinical relevance as well as necessity for prevention and treatment of this vascular anomaly. Therefore were analyzed medical history, laboratory and clinical database as well as data functional studies of the heart and cardiovascular system in 1404 patients which were divided into four groups on the results of coronary angiography. The results of the study indicate tortuosity of coronary arteries may be independent and additional burdening factor in the development of ischemic heart disease.

  17. Ethnic Minorities and Coronary Heart Disease: an Update and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J Adam; Alvarez, Manrique; Rodriguez, Carlos J

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA. Overall, heart disease accounts for about 1 in 4 deaths with coronary heart disease (CHD) being responsible for over 370,000 deaths per year. It has frequently and repeatedly been shown that some minority groups in the USA have higher rates of traditional CHD risk factors, different rates of treatment with revascularization procedures, and excess morbidity and mortality from CHD when compared to the non-Hispanic white population. Numerous investigations have been made into the causes of these disparities. This review aims to highlight the recent literature which examines CHD in ethnic minorities and future directions in research and care.

  18. Evaluation of proinflammatory cytokines and brain natriuretic peptide in patients with rheumatic heart diseases and coronary heart disease complicated by chronic heart insufficiency

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Objective. To study proinflammatory cytokines and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with rheumatic heart diseases (RHD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) complicated by chronic heart insufficiency (CHI). Material and methods. 54 pts with CHI (among them 16 with RHD and 38 with CHD with signs of CHI ofll-IV functional class according to NYHA that correspond to 11A-III stage according to N.D. Strazesko-V.H. \\frsilenko classification) and 30 healthy persons of control group were examine...

  19. A focus on the prognosis and management of ischemic heart disease in patients without evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalone, Giancarla; Niccoli, Giampaolo

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease without evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease is a common phenotype comprising different coronary syndromes with either stable or unstable clinical presentation. In this context, the clinical outcome and management appear extremely variable, due to different etiologies. Of note, coronary microvascular dysfunction is the pathogenetic mechanism linking different clinical scenarios in most of the cases. Hence, in this article, we aim to provide a systematic approach of reviewing the prognosis and management of angina or myocardial infarction without evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Moreover, we will propose a new scheme of classification by distinguishing between angina with normal coronary artery and myocardial infarction with normal coronary artery in order to facilitate clinicians to perform a proper management workflow.

  20. Depression and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease : Data From The Heart and Soul Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, Petra W.; de Jonge, Peter; Na, Bee Ya; Farzaneh-Far, Ramin; Epel, Elissa; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Whooley, Mary A.

    Objective: Shortened telomere length has been associated with mortality in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and is considered as an emerging marker of biologic age. Whether depression is associated with telomere length or trajectory has not been evaluated in patients with CHD. Methods: In

  1. Positive Affect and Survival in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease : Findings From the Heart and Soul Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, Petra W.; Denollet, Johan; de Jonge, Peter; Whooley, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Positive affect can improve survival, but the mechanisms responsible for this association are unknown. We sought to evaluate the association between positive affect and mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease and to determine biological and behavioral factors that might e

  2. Depression and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease : Data From The Heart and Soul Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, Petra W.; de Jonge, Peter; Na, Bee Ya; Farzaneh-Far, Ramin; Epel, Elissa; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Whooley, Mary A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Shortened telomere length has been associated with mortality in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and is considered as an emerging marker of biologic age. Whether depression is associated with telomere length or trajectory has not been evaluated in patients with CHD. Methods: In

  3. Hypercholesterolaemia and risk of coronary heart disease in the elderly: impact of age: the Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Allan; Jensen, Jan Skov; Scharling, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population and interventional studies have shown that high plasma-cholesterol is a risk factor of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, in most of the studies elderly people were excluded. AIM: This paper assesses whether the effect of total plasma-cholesterol on the risk of incident...

  4. A Fuzzy Optimization Technique for the Prediction of Coronary Heart Disease Using Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persi Pamela. I

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Data mining along with soft computing techniques helps to unravel hidden relationships and diagnose diseases efficiently even with uncertainties and inaccuracies. Coronary Heart Disease (CHD is akiller disease leading to heart attack and sudden deaths. Since the diagnosis involves vague symptoms and tedious procedures, diagnosis is usually time-consuming and false diagnosis may occur. A fuzzy system is one of the soft computing methodologies is proposed in this paper along with a data mining technique for efficient diagnosis of coronary heart disease. Though the database has 76 attributes, only 14 attributes are found to be efficient for CHD diagnosis as per all the published experiments and doctors’ opinion. So only the essential attributes are taken from the heart disease database. From these attributes crisp rules are obtained by employing CART decision tree algorithm, which are then applied to the fuzzy system. A Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO technique is applied for the optimization of the fuzzy membership functions where the parameters of the membership functions are altered to new positions. The result interpreted from the fuzzy system predicts the prevalence of coronary heart disease and also the system’s accuracy was found to be good.

  5. The relationship of H-type hypertension and renal insufficiency in coronary heart disease patients with chronic heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑卫峰

    2014-01-01

    Objective To discuss the relationship between Htype hypertension and renal insufficiency in patients with coronary atherosclerotic heart disease(CHD)and chronic heart failure(CHF).Methods 100 CHD patients with both hypertension and CHF were chosen in our hospital from January 2011 to July 2013.Left ventricular ejection fraction(LVEF)was measured with echocardiography and estimated glomerular filtration rate(e GFR)was calculated with the simplified modification of diet in renal

  6. Illness perceptions in coronary heart disease: sociodemographic, illness-related, and psychosocial correlates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalto, A.M.; Heijmans, M.; Weinman, J.; Aro, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined illness perceptions (IP) and their correlates in coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: The sample of the questionnaire study (n=3130 at baseline and n=2745 at 1-year follow-up, aged 45-74 years) was drawn from the drug reimbursement register, which covers persons

  7. Association of coronary heart disease with age-adjusted aortocoronary calcification in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J M; Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Jensen, H K

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Existing algorithms of risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) do not pertain to patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), whose arteries have been exposed to hypercholesterolaemia since birth. We studied a cohort of FH patients to compare four diagnostic models of CHD: traditio...

  8. Clinical Observation in 40 Cases of Postmenopausal Coronary Heart Disease Treated with Yanghuo Sanzi Tang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张培钦; 邱仁斌; 沈瑞子; 梁劲荃

    2003-01-01

    @@ Modern researches have shown that the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) among the women before menopause is only 30% of that in men.However, the incidence and mortality of CHD among the women after menopause jumps by 400% over those before menopause, higher than that in men1.

  9. Validating the Type D personality construct in Chinese patients with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Doris S F; Thompson, David R; Yu, Cheuk Man

    2010-01-01

    Type D personality predicts poor prognosis in coronary heart disease (CHD) but little is known about Type D in non-Western cultures. We examined the (a) validity of the Type D construct and its assessment with the DS14 scale in the Chinese culture, (b) prevalence of Type D, and (c) gender vs. Type...

  10. Anxiety and Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease : A Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, Annelieke M.; Martens, Elisabeth J.; de Jonge, Peter; Denollet, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the association between anxiety and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Background Less research has focused on the association of anxiety with incident CHD in contrast to other negative emotions, such as depression. Methods A meta-analysis of ref

  11. Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Men With Poor Emotional Control : A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potijk, Marieke R.; Janszky, Imre; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Falkstedt, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many psychosocial factors have been associated with coronary heart disease (CHD), including hostility, anger, and depression. We tested the hypothesis that these factors may have their basis in emotion regulation abilities. Our aim was to determine whether poor emotional control predicted

  12. Multivariate Meta-Analysis of Preference-Based Quality of Life Values in Coronary Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevanovic, Jelena; Pechlivanoglou, Petros; Kampinga, Marthe A.; Krabbe, Paul F. M.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are numerous health-related quality of life (HRQol) measurements used in coronary heart disease (CHD) in the literature. However, only values assessed with preference-based instruments can be directly applied in a cost-utility analysis (CUA). Objective To summarize and synthesize in

  13. Explaining the decline in coronary heart disease mortality in the Netherlands between 1997 and 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Carla; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Van Dis, Ineke; Verschuren, W. M Monique; Engelfriet, Peter; Heintjes, Edith M.; Blokstra, Anneke; Deeg, Dorly J H; Visser, Marjolein; Bots, Michiel L.; O'Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We set out to determine what proportion of the mortality decline from 1997 to 2007 in coronary heart disease (CHD) in the Netherlands could be attributed to advances in medical treatment and to improvements in population-wide cardiovascular risk factors. Methods: We used the IMPACT-SEC

  14. Functional characterisation of polymorphisms in candidate genes for coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    van't Hooft, Ferdinand M.

    1999-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a multifactorial disorder. Several important risk factors, in particular cigarette smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration and hyperglycaemia, have been defined. It appears that most risk factors are influenced by genetic components, suggesting that genetic variants in candidate genes play an important role in the development of CHD. In view of the importance of transcripti...

  15. Coronary Heart Disease Knowledge and Risk Factors among Tri-Ethnic College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutoubi, Samer; Huffman, Fatma G.; Ciccazzo, Michele W.; Himburg, Susan P.; Johnson, Paulette

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and Europe. This study identified and compared nutritional knowledge associated with CHD risk factors among tri-ethnic college students. Design: A quantitative, cross-sectional, observational study using questionnaires. Setting: University laboratory.…

  16. Sociodemographic differences in myocardial infarction risk perceptions among people with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalto, Anna-Mari; Weinman, John; French, David P

    2007-01-01

    This study examines sociodemographic differences in myocardial infarction (MI) risk perceptions among people with coronary heart disease (CHD) (N = 3130). Two variables for comparative risk perceptions were computed: (1) own risk compared to that of an average person; and (2) own risk compared...

  17. Dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: possible effect modification by gender and age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Overvad, Kim; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    In a 16-year follow-up study (ending in 1998) of 3,686 Danish men and women aged 30–71 years at recruitment, the association between energy intake from dietary fat and the risk of coronary heart disease was evaluated while assessing the possible modifying role of gender and age. In the models used...

  18. Elders' Knowledge about Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease, Their Perceived Risk, and Adopted Preventive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khayyal, Hatem; El Geneidy, Moshera; El Shazly, Somaya Abdel Moneim

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the most frequent single cause of death among persons over 65 years of age and it seems to continue to be a significant threat to the health and wellbeing of the elderly population all over the world, yet the condition is largely preventable. The aims of this study to assess and determine the relations among elder's…

  19. Intake of ruminant trans fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Overvad, Kim; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have shown a positive association between trans fatty acids (TFA) intake and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), primarily accounted for by industrially produced TFA. Some of these studies indicate an inverse association between ruminant TFA (R-TFA) intake and CHD implying...

  20. Childhood body-mass index and the risk of coronary heart disease in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer Lyn; Olsen, Lina Wøhlk; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The worldwide epidemic of childhood obesity is progressing at an alarming rate. Risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) are already identifiable in overweight children. The severity of the long-term effects of excess childhood weight on CHD, however, remains unknown. METHODS: We...

  1. Education and Coronary Heart Disease Risk: Potential Mechanisms Such as Literacy, Perceived Constraints, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Howe, Chanelle J.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Rudd, Rima E.; Martin, Laurie T.; Nandi, Arijit; Wilhelm, Aude; Buka, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Education is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; however the mechanisms are poorly understood. The study objectives were to evaluate the extent to which rarely measured factors (literacy, time preference, sense of control) and more commonly measured factors (income, depressive symptomatology, body mass index) in…

  2. Short and long-term labour market consequences of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Sørensen, Jan; Davidsen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyse to what extent individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) leave the labour market earlier than individuals without CHD and to discuss the implications for rehabilitation. DATA AND METHODS: Individuals with CHD were identified from the Danish...

  3. Saturated Fat Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nettleton, Joyce A.; Brouwer, Ingeborg A.; Geleijnse, Marianne; Hornstra, G.

    2017-01-01

    At a workshop to update the science linking saturated fatty acid (SAFA) consumption with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke, invited participants presented data on the consumption and bioavailability of SAFA and their functions in the body and food technology.

  4. Clinical course of isolated stable angina due to coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poole-Wilson, Philip A.; Voko, Zoltan; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; de Brouwer, Sophie; Dunselman, Peter H. J. M.; Lubsen, Jacobus

    2007-01-01

    Aims To describe the clinical course of patients with stable angina due to coronary heart disease without a history of cardiovascular (CV) events or revascutarization (isolated angina). Methods and results Of 7665 patients in a trial comparing long-acting nifedipine with placebo, 2170 (28%) had isol

  5. Shifts in the age distribution and from acute to chronic coronary heart disease hospitalizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Carla; Bots, Michiel L.; Van Dis, Ineke; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    Background Shifts in the burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) from an acute to chronic illness have important public health consequences. Objective To assess age-sex-specific time trends in rates and characteristics of acute and chronic forms of CHD hospital admissions in the Netherlands. Methods

  6. Adult height, coronary heart disease and stroke : a multi-locus Mendelian randomization meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nüesch, Eveline; Dale, Caroline; Palmer, Tom M; White, Jon; Keating, Brendan J; van Iperen, Erik Pa; Goel, Anuj; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Verschuren, W M; Wijmenga, C; Van der Schouw, Y T; Onland-Moret, N C; Lange, Leslie A; Hovingh, G K; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Morris, Richard W; Whincup, Peter H; Wannamethe, Goya S; Gaunt, Tom R; Ebrahim, Shah; Steel, Laura; Nair, Nikhil; Reiner, Alexander P; Kooperberg, Charles; Wilson, James F; Bolton, Jennifer L; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jacqueline F; Strachan, Mark Wj; Robertson, Christine M; Kleber, Marcus E; Delgado, Graciela; März, Winfried; Melander, Olle; Dominiczak, Anna F; Farrall, Martin; Watkins, Hugh; Leusink, Maarten; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H; de Groot, Mark Ch; Dudbridge, Frank; Hingorani, Aroon; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Lawlor, Debbie A; Amuzu, A; Caufield, M; Cavadino, A; Cooper, J; Davies, T L; Drenos, F; Engmann, J; Finan, C; Giambartolomei, C; Hardy, R; Humphries, S E; Hypponen, E; Kivimaki, M; Kuh, D; Kumari, M; Ong, K; Plagnol, V; Power, C; Richards, M; Shah, S; Shah, T; Sofat, R; Talmud, P J; Wareham, N; Warren, H; Whittaker, J C; Wong, A; Zabaneh, D; Davey Smith, George; Wells, Jonathan C; Leon, David A; Holmes, Michael V; Casas, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated causal effect of completed growth, measured by adult height, on coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke and cardiovascular traits, using instrumental variable (IV) Mendelian randomization meta-analysis. METHODS: We developed an allele score based on 69 single nucleotide poly

  7. Parity, breastfeeding and risk of coronary heart disease : A pan-European case-cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Sanne A E; Van Der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Wood, Angela M.; Sweeting, Michael J.; Moons, Karel G M; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Arriola, Larraitz; Benetou, Vassiliki; Boeing, Heiner; Bonnet, Fabrice; Butt, Salma T.; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Drake, Isabel; Gavrila, Diana; Key, Timothy J.; Klinaki, Eleni; Krogh, Vittorio; Kühn, Tilman; Lassale, Camille; Masala, Giovanna; Matullo, Giuseppe; Merritt, Melissa; Molina-Portillo, Elena; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi; Nøst, Therese H.; Olsen, Anja; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Overvad, Kim; Panico, Salvatore; Redondo, M. Luisa; Tjønneland, Anne; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Tumino, Rosario; Turzanski-Fortner, Renée; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Wennberg, Patrik; Winkvist, Anna; Thompson, Simon G.; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Riboli, Elio; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Danesh, John; Butterworth, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is uncertainty about the direction and magnitude of the associations between parity, breastfeeding and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined the separate and combined associations of parity and breastfeeding practices with the incidence of CHD later in life among

  8. Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in Young People of Differing Socio-Economic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Non-Eleri; Cooper, Stephen-Mark; Williams, Simon P.; Baker, Julien S.; Davies, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in young people of differing socio-economic status (SES). A cohort of 100 boys and 108 girls, aged 12.9, SD 0.3 years drawn of differing SES were assessed for CHD risk factors. Measurements included indices of obesity, blood pressure, aerobic fitness, diet, blood…

  9. Dairy products and the risk of stroke and coronary heart disease: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praagman, J.; Franco, O.H.; Ikram, M.A.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Engberink, M.F.; Rooij, van F.J.A.; Hofman, A.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined whether consumption of total dairy and dairy subgroups was related to incident stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD) in a general older Dutch population. Methods The study involved 4,235 participants of the Rotterdam Study aged 55 and over who were free of cardiovascular

  10. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C l...

  11. Education and Coronary Heart Disease Risk: Potential Mechanisms Such as Literacy, Perceived Constraints, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Howe, Chanelle J.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D.; Rudd, Rima E.; Martin, Laurie T.; Nandi, Arijit; Wilhelm, Aude; Buka, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Education is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk; however the mechanisms are poorly understood. The study objectives were to evaluate the extent to which rarely measured factors (literacy, time preference, sense of control) and more commonly measured factors (income, depressive symptomatology, body mass index) in…

  12. Association of paraoxonase polymorphisms and serum homocysteine thiolactone complex with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦勤

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between paraoxonase (PON) polymorphisms and serum homocysteine thiolactone (HTL) and coronary heart diseases. Method In this prospective study, serum complex of HTL levels using ELISA, and the level of serum Hcy using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) , de-

  13. Coronary heart disease risk : family history and gene-environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.

    1999-01-01

    The first part of this thesis describes research into lifestyle, genetic, and biological factors that may underlie the increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) in individuals with a family history of this disorder. The second part of this thesis describes whether levels of plasma lipids and l

  14. Acute and long-term cardiovascular effects of coffee: implications for coronary heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Smits, P.

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the question as to whether coffee intake increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) remains controversial. In the current paper, we discuss the acute and long-term cardiovascular effects of coffee, and its major constituents, which could underlie such an

  15. Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Men With Poor Emotional Control : A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potijk, Marieke R.; Janszky, Imre; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Falkstedt, Daniel

    Objective Many psychosocial factors have been associated with coronary heart disease (CHD), including hostility, anger, and depression. We tested the hypothesis that these factors may have their basis in emotion regulation abilities. Our aim was to determine whether poor emotional control predicted

  16. Regular physical activity in old age. Effect on coronary heart disease risk factors and well- being.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuit, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    Background. Regular physical activity is considered an important aspect of a healthy lifestyle. It may improve fitness, physical competence and may lower the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, until now, data on the effects of regular exercise on CHD risk factors in elde

  17. Anxiety and sense of coherence in Roma and non-Roma coronary heart disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silarova, Barbora; Nagyova, Iveta; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Morbidity and mortality among Roma due to coronary heart disease (CHD) is high, but evidence on potential psychosocial pathways is lacking. This study aimed to assess the differences in the severity of anxiety symptoms and in the sense of coherence (SOC) between Roma and non-Roma CHD

  18. Contribution of the risk factor concept to patient care in coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.

    1983-01-01

    This article deals with the question of whether or not the risk factor concept, a principal aspect of preventive cardiology, has contributed to patient care in coronary heart disease. The risk factors considered are plasma cholesterol, high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes and marked obesity. With

  19. Meta-analysis of quality of life in coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevanovic, J.; Pechlivanoglou, P.; Kampinga, M.; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A large number of quality of life (QoL) values for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) are available in the literature. From the abundance of QoL values in CHD, only preference-based values can be directly applied in cost-utility analysis (CUA). In this study we performed a multiv

  20. Depression as a non-causal variable risk marker in coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Anna; Zuidersma, Marij; de Jonge, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background: After decades of investigations, explanations for the prospective association between depression and coronary heart disease (CHD) are still incomplete. Discussion: Depression is often suggested to be causally related to CHD. Based on the available literature, we would rather argue that

  1. Causal effect of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 on coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Ci; Burgess, Stephen; Eicher, John D.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Huang, Jie; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Asselbergs, Folkert W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270752137; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Shin, So Youn; Ding, Jingzhong; Baumert, Jens; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Folkersen, Lasse; Smith, Nicholas L.; Williams, Scott M; Ikram, Mohammad Arfan; Kleber, Marcus E.; Becker, Diane M.; Truong, Vinh; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Tang, Weihong; Yang, Qiong; Sennblad, Bengt; Moore, Jason H; Williams, Frances M.K.; Dehghan, Abbas; Silbernagel, Günther; Schrijvers, Elisabeth M.C.; Smith, Shelly; Karakas, Mahir; Tofler, Geoffrey H.; Silveira, Angela; Navis, Gerjan J.; Lohman, Kurt; Chen, Ming Huei; Peters, Annette; Goel, Anuj; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Saleheen, Danish; Lundmark, Per; Psaty, Bruce M.; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Carter, Angela M.; Meisinger, Christa; Peden, John F.; Bis, Joshua C.; McKnight, Barbara; Öhrvik, John; Taylor, Kent D.; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Collins, Rory; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Goodall, Alison H.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Cushman, Mary; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Folsom, Aaron R.; Basu, Saonli; Matijevic, Nena; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Danesh, John; Clarke, Robert; Meigs, James B; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P; Klopp, Norman; Harris, Tamara B.; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Grant, Peter J.; Hillege, Hans L.; Watkins, Hugh; Spector, Timothy D; Becker, Lewis C; Tracy, Russell P.; März, Winfried; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Eriksson, Per; Cambien, Francois; Morange, Pierre Emmanuel; Koenig, Wolfgang; Soranzo, Nicole; van der Harst, Pim; Liu, Yongmei; Hamsten, Anders; Ehret, Georg B.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bochud, Murielle; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Albert V.; Tobin, Martin D; Verwoert, Germaine C; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A.; Jackson, Anne U.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H.; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N.; Fava, Cristiano; Fox, Ervin R.; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; Linda Kao, Wen Hong; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D. G.; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H.; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/26504362X; Cooper, Matthew N.; Platou, Carl G P; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S.P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/136603947; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter R.; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen Pei C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Grobbee, Diederick E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071889256; Arking, Dan E.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Beilby, John P.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W; Li, Yali; Young, J. Hunter; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette R.; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Hoffman Bolton, Judith A.; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M.; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif C.; Voight, Benjamin F; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay Tee; Weder, Alan B.; Hunt, Steven C.; Sun, Yan V.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Scott, Laura J; Stringham, Heather M.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan Martin; Staessen, Jan A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Burton, Paul R.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt; Rudock, Megan E.; Heckbert, Susan R; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A.; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S.; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter M.; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J.; Yao, Jie; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Arfan Ikram, M.; Longstreth, W.T. jr.; Mosley, Thomas H; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R.G.; Wain, Louise V.; Morken, Mario A.; Swift, Amy J.; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Rasheed, Asif; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Mani, K. Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S.; Oostra, Ben A.; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würtz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee Hee; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M. V.Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Charchar, Fadi J; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles N.; Bots, Michiel L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/110610032; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J.; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073449253; Casas, Juan P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Shyong Tai, E.; Cooper, Richard S.; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Morris, Richard W.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G.; Miki, Tetsuro; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan J.; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Elosua, Roberto; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P.; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Elliott, Paul; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J.; Johnson, Toby; van der Lugt, Aad; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Hofman, Albert; Kraja, Aldi T.; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Ziegler, Andreas; Newman, Anne B; Schillert, Arne; Oostra, Ben A.; Thorsson, Bolli; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Fox, Caroline S.; White, Charles C.; Ballantyne, Christie; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Herrington, David M.; O'Leary, Daniel H.; Siscovick, David S.; Couper, David J; Halperin, Eran; Stoegerer, Eva Maria; Ernst, Florian; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Homuth, Georg; Heiss, Gerardo; Usala, Gianluca; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Shen, Haiqing; Erich Wichmann, H.; Schmidt, Helena; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Markus, Hugh S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Lüdemann, Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Thiery, Joachim; Seissler, Jochen; Massaro, Joseph M.; Polak, Joseph F.; Cunningham, Julie; North, Kari E.; Petrovic, Katja E; Rice, Kenneth M.; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Launer, Lenore J.; de Andrade, Mariza; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sitzer, Matthias; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Province, Michael A.; Nalls, Michael A.; Franceschini, Nora; Peyser, Patricia A.; Wolf, Philip A.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wild, Philipp S; Schnabel, Renate B.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Chilukoti, Ravi Kumar; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sanna, Serena; Demissie, Serkalem; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Blankenberg, Stefan; Bevan, Steve; Elias-Smale, Suzette E.; Zeller, Tanja; Illig, Thomas; Münzel, Thomas; Howard, Timothy D.; Hoffmann, Udo; Schminke, Ulf; Nambi, Vijay; Post, Wendy S.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Li, Xia; Cheng, Yu Ching

    2017-01-01

    Background--Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) plays an essential role in the fibrinolysis system and thrombosis. Population studies have reported that blood PAI-1 levels are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is unclear whether the association

  2. Intake of ruminant trans fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease - An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne U.; Bysted, Anette; Andersen, Niels Lyhne;

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a strong direct (positive) association between the intake of trans fatty acids (TRA) and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), primarily accounted for by industrially produced TFA (IP-TFA). However, comparisons, between ruminant TEA (R-TFA) and IP-TFA and risk...

  3. Omega-3 fatty acids and coronary heart disease. The final verdict?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review: The fish fatty acids eicosapentenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexenoic acid (DHA) may be protective against fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) and sudden cardiac death. This review summarizes the recent findings of prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trials. Recent fi

  4. Managing antithrombotic therapy in patients with both atrial fibrillation and coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, P.L.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) and coronary heart disease (CHD) commonly occur together. Previous consensus guidelines were published before the wide availability of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and newer P2Y12 antiplatelet agents. We examine recent evidence to guide management in 3 categori

  5. Overweight Status, Obesity, and Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, C. Michael; Robinson, Laura M.; Davidson, Philip W.; Haveman, Meindert; Janicki, Matthew P.; Albertini, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Research indicates that adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have high rates of overweight status/obesity (OSO). OSO is associated with several important risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). This study focused on assessing whether such risk factors are being identified in adults with ID who are receiving their healthcare in…

  6. Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease Among Inpatients Who Have Mild Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriman, S.; Haw, C.; Kirk, J.; Stubbs, J.

    2005-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. The aim of this study was to screen inpatients with mild or borderline intellectual disability, many of whom also have mental illness, for risk factors for CHD. Participants were interviewed, measured and had blood samples taken. Of the 53 participants, 20 (37.7%)…

  7. The Effect of a Physiological Evaluation Program on Coronary Heart Disease Risk Scores for Sedentary Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenberg, Mel; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to compare the coronary heart disease (CHD) probability estimates of a group of sedentary males involved in an exercise stress test program from 1968 through 1974 with those of a comparison group of sedentary males not involved in the program. The program was designed to evaluate cardiopulmonary function and improve…

  8. Growth in height in childhood and risk of coronary heart disease in adult men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Baker, Jennifer L; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2012-01-01

    Adult height is inversely associated with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but it is still unknown which phase of the human growth period is critical for the formation of this association. We investigated the association between growth in height from 7 to 13 years of age and the risk...

  9. Cognition and Incident Coronary Heart Disease in Late Midlife: The Whitehall II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Manoux, Archana; Sabia, Severine; Kivimaki, Mika; Shipley, Martin J.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Marmot, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cognitive function in midlife predicts incident coronary heart disease (CHD), followed up over 6 years. Data on 5292 (28% women, mean age 55) individuals free from CHD at baseline were drawn from the British Whitehall II study. We used Cox regression to model the association between cognition…

  10. Hospitalization Cost Offset of a Hostility Intervention for Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Karina W.; Gidron, Yori; Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Trudeau, Kimberlee J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors evaluated hospitalization cost offset of hostility management group therapy for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) from a previously published randomized controlled trial (Y. Gidron, K. Davidson, & I. Bata, 1999). Twenty-six male patients with myocardial infarction or unstable angina were randomized to either 2 months of…

  11. Adiponectin: an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease in men in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our aim was to determine whether plasma adiponectin levels were an independent predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma adiponectin levels were measured in 3,188 male and female participants from cycle 6 of the Framingham Offspring Study (mean age: 57 years in both men and women; BMI:...

  12. Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in Young People of Differing Socio-Economic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Non-Eleri; Cooper, Stephen-Mark; Williams, Simon P.; Baker, Julien S.; Davies, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in young people of differing socio-economic status (SES). A cohort of 100 boys and 108 girls, aged 12.9, SD 0.3 years drawn of differing SES were assessed for CHD risk factors. Measurements included indices of obesity, blood pressure, aerobic fitness, diet, blood…

  13. Longitudinal association between lifestyle and coronary heart disease risk factors among individuals with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S.; Post, M. W.; Snoek, G. J.; Schuitemaker, M.; van der Woude, L. H.

    Objective: To investigate: (1) the course of coronary heart disease risk factors (lipid profiles and body mass index (BMI)) in the first five years after discharge from inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation and (2) the association between lifestyle (physical activity, self-care related

  14. Illness perceptions in coronary heart disease: sociodemographic, illness-related, and psychosocial correlates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalto, A.M.; Heijmans, M.; Weinman, J.; Aro, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined illness perceptions (IP) and their correlates in coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: The sample of the questionnaire study (n=3130 at baseline and n=2745 at 1-year follow-up, aged 45-74 years) was drawn from the drug reimbursement register, which covers persons wit

  15. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    (Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.) The Fibrinogen Studies Collaboration.The Copenhagen City Heart Study; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular ...

  16. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid biomarkers and coronary heart disease: Pooling project of 19 cohort studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) remains controversial. Most prior longitudinal studies evaluated self-reported consumption rather than biomarkers. This study sought to evaluate biomarkers of seafood-derived eicosapentaenoic acid ...

  17. Effect of caffeine on the risk of coronary heart disease- A re-evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, J O; Akinyinka, A O; Odewole, G A; Okwusidi, J I

    2007-03-01

    The effect of caffeine intake on the risk of coronary heart disease was studied. Twenty-one rats used were randomly divided into three experimental groups, the first group served as the control while the second and third groups were administered caffeine orally at doses of 10mg/kg body weight and 20mg/kg body weight respectively for fourteen days. Caffeine, at 10mg/kg body weight, significantly increased (P<0.05) serum LDL- cholesterol concentration and coronary heart disease risk ratio while it significantly reduced (P<0.05) serum triacylglycerol concentration when compared with controls. At 20mg/kg body weight, caffeine significantly increased (P<0.05) coronary heart disease risk ratio while it significantly reduced (P<0.05) serum HDL-cholesterol concentration and serum triacylgycerol concentration when compared with controls. No dose response effect was observed possibly suggestive of a threshold effect. These results suggest that caffeine predisposes consumers of caffeine containing beverages to coronary heart disease.

  18. Addressing Health Inequities: Coronary Heart Disease Training within Learning Disabilities Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Deirdre; Sharp, John

    2014-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are at increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Research suggests this may be due to inequalities in health status and inequities in the way health services respond to need. Little is known about the most effective way to improve health outcomes for people with learning disabilities. A previously developed…

  19. Cognition and Incident Coronary Heart Disease in Late Midlife: The Whitehall II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Manoux, Archana; Sabia, Severine; Kivimaki, Mika; Shipley, Martin J.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Marmot, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cognitive function in midlife predicts incident coronary heart disease (CHD), followed up over 6 years. Data on 5292 (28% women, mean age 55) individuals free from CHD at baseline were drawn from the British Whitehall II study. We used Cox regression to model the association between cognition…

  20. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collaboration, Emerging Risk Factors; Erqou, Sebhat; Kaptoge, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...

  1. Acute and long-term cardiovascular effects of coffee: implications for coronary heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Smits, P.

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the question as to whether coffee intake increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) remains controversial. In the current paper, we discuss the acute and long-term cardiovascular effects of coffee, and its major constituents, which could underlie such an associat

  2. Addressing Health Inequities: Coronary Heart Disease Training within Learning Disabilities Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Deirdre; Sharp, John

    2014-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are at increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Research suggests this may be due to inequalities in health status and inequities in the way health services respond to need. Little is known about the most effective way to improve health outcomes for people with learning disabilities. A previously developed…

  3. Evaluation of the quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease: using two measuring assessment tools. ... Subscription or Fee Access ... 34% had felt full of life “all the time” while 10% “none of the time”. ... an additional tool for the assessment of the impact of specific clinical decisions on the health status of patients.

  4. Dietary fatty acids and risk factors for coronary heart disease: controlled studies in healthy volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zock, P.L.

    1995-01-01

    High levels of LDL cholesterol, blood pressure and Lp(a), and low levels of HDL cholesterol increase the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). This thesis describes the effects of dietary fatty acids on these risk factors. In each of three trials we fed diets with tailored fatty acid composition to

  5. Multivariate Meta-Analysis of Preference-Based Quality of Life Values in Coronary Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevanović, Jelena; Pechlivanoglou, Petros; Kampinga, Marthe A; Krabbe, Paul F M; Postma, Maarten J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are numerous health-related quality of life (HRQol) measurements used in coronary heart disease (CHD) in the literature. However, only values assessed with preference-based instruments can be directly applied in a cost-utility analysis (CUA). OBJECTIVE: To summarize and synthesize

  6. Multivariate meta-analysis of preference-based quality of life values in coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevanović, Jelena; Pechlivanoglou, Petros; Kampinga, Marthe A.; Krabbe, Paul F. M.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are numerous health-related quality of life (HRQol) measurements used in coronary heart disease (CHD) in the literature. However, only values assessed with preferencebased instruments can be directly applied in a cost-utility analysis (CUA). Objective: To summarize and synthesize i

  7. Socioeconomic Status and the Course of Quality of Life in Older Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbareschi, Giorgio; Sanderman, Robbert; Kempen, Gertrudis I. J. M.; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research suggests that socioeconomic status (SES) might be related to the course of quality of life (QoL) in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. The authors sought to determine whether there are differences in the course of QoL before and after the incidence of CHD among older persons of

  8. Longitudinal association between lifestyle and coronary heart disease risk factors among individuals with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S.; Post, M. W.; Snoek, G. J.; Schuitemaker, M.; van der Woude, L. H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate: (1) the course of coronary heart disease risk factors (lipid profiles and body mass index (BMI)) in the first five years after discharge from inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation and (2) the association between lifestyle (physical activity, self-care related t

  9. Exploring causal associations between alcohol and coronary heart disease risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawlor, Debbie A; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benn, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    AimsTo explore the causal effect of long-term alcohol consumption on coronary heart disease risk factors.Methods and resultsWe used variants in ADH1B and ADH1C genes as instrumental variables (IV) to estimate the causal effect of long-term alcohol consumption on body mass index (BMI), blood...

  10. Longitudinal association between lifestyle and coronary heart disease risk factors among individuals with spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S.; Post, M. W.; Snoek, G. J.; Schuitemaker, M.; van der Woude, L. H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate: (1) the course of coronary heart disease risk factors (lipid profiles and body mass index (BMI)) in the first five years after discharge from inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation and (2) the association between lifestyle (physical activity, self-care related t

  11. Prolonged ischemic heart disease and coronary artery bypass - relation to contractile reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Klaus F; Bangsgaard, Regitze; Carstensen, Steen;

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A major effect of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with ischemic heart disease and impaired left ventricular (LV) contractile function is believed to be an improvement in LV function due to recovery of dysfunctional, but viable myocardium. However, recent studies have...

  12. Genetic APOC3 mutation, serum triglyceride concentrations, and coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent decades have witnessed an increased awareness of the importance of lowering triglyceride concentrations in conjunction with lowering LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) to achieve optimal reduction of the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Historically, LDL-C was the only target of pharmacologic ther...

  13. Small dense low density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary heart disease: results from the Framingham Offspring Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    We sought to establish reference values for a new direct assay for small dense LDL cholesterol (sdLDL-C) and to measure sdLDL-C concentrations in patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD) vs controls. Direct LDL-C and sdLDL-C were measured in samples from 3188 male and female participan...

  14. [Combined surgical treatment for coronary heart disease as well as heart valve diseases and carotid artery stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichart, B; Kemkes, B M; Klinner, W; Kreuzer, E; Becker, H M; Harrington, O B; Crosby, V G; Wolf, R Y

    1979-04-26

    This is an account on combined procedures in 124 patients suffering from arteriosclerotic vessel disease. In order to judge the proceedings and the results the patients were divided up into two groups. in 15 patients (group I) a carotid endarterectomy combined with an aorto-coronary bypass operation was performed; once a subclavian artery stenosis was resected at the same time. One patient of that group died after 31 days (7%). In group II 108 heart valve operations were performed together with a coronary artery revascularisation. Early and late mortality divided up as follows: aortic stenosis 6/44 (14%) respectively 2/44 (5%); aortic insufficiency 1/14 (7%) resp. 0; combined aortic disease 1/8 )13%) resp. 0; mitral stenosis 1/11 (9%) resp. 0; mitral insufficiency 6/26 (23%) resp. 2/26 (8%); combined mitral valve disease 1/2 (50%) resp. 0; three times both valves (aorta, mitral) were replaced without mortality. In our opinion combined procedures, resection of supraaortic artery stenosis respectively cardiac valve operations and aorto-coronary bypass are indicated especially since the functional long-term results are excellent. Though one should consider the high operative risk in patients with mitral insufficiency and combined mitral valve disease.

  15. Long term gluten consumption in adults without celiac disease and risk of coronary heart disease: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Benjamin; Cao, Yin; Zong, Geng; Hu, Frank B; Green, Peter H R; Neugut, Alfred I; Rimm, Eric B; Sampson, Laura; Dougherty, Lauren W; Giovannucci, Edward; Willett, Walter C; Sun, Qi; Chan, Andrew T

    2017-05-02

    Objective To examine the association of long term intake of gluten with the development of incident coronary heart disease.Design Prospective cohort study.Setting and participants 64 714 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 45 303 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study without a history of coronary heart disease who completed a 131 item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire in 1986 that was updated every four years through 2010.Exposure Consumption of gluten, estimated from food frequency questionnaires.Main outcome measure Development of coronary heart disease (fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction).Results During 26 years of follow-up encompassing 2 273 931 person years, 2431 women and 4098 men developed coronary heart disease. Compared with participants in the lowest fifth of gluten intake, who had a coronary heart disease incidence rate of 352 per 100 000 person years, those in the highest fifth had a rate of 277 events per 100 000 person years, leading to an unadjusted rate difference of 75 (95% confidence interval 51 to 98) fewer cases of coronary heart disease per 100 000 person years. After adjustment for known risk factors, participants in the highest fifth of estimated gluten intake had a multivariable hazard ratio for coronary heart disease of 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.88 to 1.02; P for trend=0.29). After additional adjustment for intake of whole grains (leaving the remaining variance of gluten corresponding to refined grains), the multivariate hazard ratio was 1.00 (0.92 to 1.09; P for trend=0.77). In contrast, after additional adjustment for intake of refined grains (leaving the variance of gluten intake correlating with whole grain intake), estimated gluten consumption was associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (multivariate hazard ratio 0.85, 0.77 to 0.93; P for trend=0.002).Conclusion Long term dietary intake of gluten was not associated with risk of coronary heart disease. However, the

  16. An apparent case of undiagnosed donor Kawasaki disease manifesting as coronary artery aneurysm in a pediatric heart transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland-Little, Joshua; Aiyagari, Ranjit; Gajarski, Robert J; Schumacher, Kurt R

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of coronary ectasia and LAD coronary artery aneurysm with angiographic characteristics of Kawasaki disease in a three-yr-old girl two-yr status post-orthotopic heart transplant. Coronary anomalies were noted during initial screening coronary angiography two yr after transplant. Subsequent review of the donor echocardiogram revealed that the LMCA had been mildly dilated prior to transplant. In the absence of any symptoms consistent with Kawasaki disease in the transplant recipient, this appears to be a case of Kawasaki disease in the organ donor manifesting with coronary anomalies in the transplant recipient. The patient has done well clinically, and repeat coronary angiography has revealed partial regression of coronary anomalies. Given multiple reports in the literature of persistent abnormalities of coronary artery morphology and function after Kawasaki disease, close monitoring is warranted, with consideration of potential coronary protective medical therapies. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Cardiac rehabilitation programs improve metabolic parameters in patients with the metabolic syndrome and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Ignacio P; Zapata, Maria A; Cervantes, Carlos E; Jarabo, Rosario M; Grande, Cristina; Plaza, Rose; Garcia, Sara; Rodriguez, Miriam L; Crespo, Silvia; Perea, Jesús

    2010-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effectiveness of a cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training program on metabolic parameters and coronary risk factors in patients with the metabolic syndrome and coronary heart disease. The study involved 642 patients with coronary heart disease. Of them, 171 (26.7%) fulfilled criteria for the metabolic syndrome. Clinical data, laboratory tests, and exercise testing were performed before and after the program, which lasted 2 to 3 months. Except for waist circumference, there were no significant differences between groups; blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose improvements during the follow-up were higher in patients with the metabolic syndrome (all Pmetabolic syndrome, functional capacity increased by 26.45% ( Pmetabolic equivalents, with a slight increase of 1.25% ( P=not significant) in the double product. Patients with the metabolic syndrome who took part in this secondary prevention program reported improvements in cardiovascular risk profile and functional capacity.

  18. Association of plasma phytosterol concentrations with incident coronary heart disease Data from the CORA study, a case-control study of coronary artery disease in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, Eberhard; Zyriax, Birgit-Christiane; Kuipers, Folkert; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner

    2009-03-01

    Phytosterols have been proposed to be atherogenic. This research investigates whether plasma concentrations of phytosterols correlate with the manifestation of coronary heart disease. The CORA study compares clinical, biochemical, and lifestyle factors in consecutive pre- and postmenopausal women with incident coronary heart disease to those in age-matched population-based controls. Controls (n=231) had significantly higher plasma concentrations of the major phytosterol species than cases (n=186) (4.649mg/l vs. 4.092mg/l; p<0.001). Cases had a higher dietary intake of phytosterols, but the ratio of lathosterol over sitosterol did not significantly differ. Phytosterols correlated with cholesterol concentrations of LDL and HDL, the phytosterol-carrying lipoproteins. The age-adjusted odds ratio for the association of total phytosterols and risk of coronary heart disease was 0.69 per 5mg/dl (95% CI 0.46-0.99). After adjustment for LDL- and HDL-cholesterol the odds ratio approached 1 (0.89; 95% CI 0.61-1.30), which was reached after additional adjustment for major risk factors, particularly those reflecting the metabolic syndrome (1.05; 95% CI 0.64-1.97). Healthy controls had higher unadjusted concentrations of plasma phytosterols, but the adjusted odds ratio for coronary heart disease did not point to an impact of plasma phytosterols on coronary heart disease.

  19. Correlation among obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, coronary atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Gan; XU Zhuo-wen; ZHANG Yu-lin; YANG Zhi-jian; ZHANG Xi-long; YIN Kai-sheng

    2007-01-01

    @@ Epidemiologic investigations have shown that the morbidity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) among adults is 2%-4%, among the population aged 30 years and over is 4.63%, and among patients with hypertension or coronary atherosclerostic disease (CAD) is as high as 30%-50%.

  20. Benefits of Heart Rate Slowing With Ivabradine in Patients With Systolic Heart Failure and Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Jeffrey S; Deedwania, Prakash C; Kim, Jae B; Böhm, Michael

    2016-12-15

    Heart rate (HR) is a risk factor in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HF) that, when reduced, provides outcome benefits. It is also a target for angina pectoris prevention and a risk marker in chronic coronary artery disease without HF. HR can be reduced by drugs; however, among those used clinically, only ivabradine reduces HR directly in the sinoatrial nodal cells without other known effects on the cardiovascular system. This review provides current information regarding the safety and efficacy of HR reduction with ivabradine in clinical studies involving >36,000 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease and >6,500 patients with systolic HF. The largest trials, Morbidity-Mortality Evaluation of the If Inhibitor Ivabradine in Patients With Coronary Disease and Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Study Assessing the Morbidity-Mortality Benefits of the If Inhibitor Ivabradine in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease, showed no effect on outcomes. The Systolic Heart Failure Treatment With the If Inhibitor Ivabradine Trial, a randomized controlled trial in >6,500 patients with HF, revealed marked and significant HR-mediated reduction in cardiovascular mortality or HF hospitalizations while improving quality of life and left ventricular mechanical function after treatment with ivabradine. The adverse effects of ivabradine predominantly included bradycardia and atrial fibrillation (both uncommon) and ocular flashing scotomata (phosphenes) but otherwise were similar to placebo. In conclusion, ivabradine improves outcomes in patients with systolic HF; rates of overall adverse events are similar to placebo.

  1. How do patients at risk portray candidates for coronary heart disease? A qualitative interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, J.C.; Malterud, K.; Fugelli, P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore how patients at risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) portray candidates for CHD. DESIGN: Qualitative interview study. SETTING: Norway. SUBJECTS: A total of 20 men and 20 women diagnosed with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) recruited through a lipid clinic. MAIN...... the coronary candidate as someone who was different from themselves. Among those who mentioned gender, all presented the candidate as a man. Some women said that they had to reconcile themselves to being at risk of CHD, since they at first had conceived CHD as a man's disease. While some participants...

  2. Chocolate Consumption is Inversely Associated with Prevalent Coronary Heart Disease: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoussé, Luc; Hopkins, Paul N.; North, Kari E.; Pankow, James S.; Arnett, Donna K.; Ellison, R. Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Epidemiologic studies have suggested beneficial effects of flavonoids on cardiovascular disease. Cocoa and particularly dark chocolate are rich in flavonoids and recent studies have demonstrated blood pressure lowering effects of dark chocolate. However, limited data are available on the association of chocolate consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We sought to examine the association between chocolate consumption and prevalent CHD. Methods We studied in a cross-sectional design 4,970 participants aged 25 to 93 years who participated in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Family Heart Study. Chocolate intake was assessed through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. We used generalized estimating equations to estimate adjusted odds ratios. Results Compared to subjects who did not report any chocolate intake, odds ratios (95% CI) for CHD were 1.01 (0.76-1.37), 0.74 (0.56-0.98), and 0.43 (0.28-0.67) for subjects consuming 1-3 times/month, 1-4 times/week, and 5+ times/week, respectively (p for trend chocolate candy intake, linolenic acid intake, smoking, alcohol intake, exercise, and fruit and vegetables. Consumption of non-chocolate candy was associated with a 49% higher prevalence of CHD comparing 5+/week vs. 0/week [OR=1.49 (0.96-2.32)]. Conclusions These data suggest that consumption of chocolate is inversely related with prevalent CHD in a general population. PMID:20858571

  3. Chocolate consumption is inversely associated with prevalent coronary heart disease: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoussé, Luc; Hopkins, Paul N; North, Kari E; Pankow, James S; Arnett, Donna K; Ellison, R Curtis

    2011-04-01

    Epidemiologic studies have suggested beneficial effects of flavonoids on cardiovascular disease. Cocoa and particularly dark chocolate are rich in flavonoids and recent studies have demonstrated blood pressure lowering effects of dark chocolate. However, limited data are available on the association of chocolate consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We sought to examine the association between chocolate consumption and prevalent CHD. We studied in a cross-sectional design 4970 participants aged 25-93 years who participated in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Family Heart Study. Chocolate intake was assessed through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. We used generalized estimating equations to estimate adjusted odds ratios. Compared to subjects who did not report any chocolate intake, odds ratios (95% CI) for CHD were 1.01 (0.76-1.37), 0.74 (0.56-0.98), and 0.43 (0.28-0.67) for subjects consuming 1-3 times/month, 1-4 times/week, and 5+ times/week, respectively (p for trend chocolate candy intake, linolenic acid intake, smoking, alcohol intake, exercise, and fruit and vegetables. Consumption of non-chocolate candy was associated with a 49% higher prevalence of CHD comparing 5+/week vs. 0/week [OR = 1.49 (0.96-2.32)]. These data suggest that consumption of chocolate is inversely related with prevalent CHD in a general United States population. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Patient education in the management of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Brown, James Pr; Clark, Alexander M; Dalal, Hasnain; Rossau, Henriette K; Bridges, Charlene; Taylor, Rod S

    2017-06-28

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single most common cause of death globally. However, with falling CHD mortality rates, an increasing number of people live with CHD and may need support to manage their symptoms and improve prognosis. Cardiac rehabilitation is a complex multifaceted intervention which aims to improve the health outcomes of people with CHD. Cardiac rehabilitation consists of three core modalities: education, exercise training and psychological support. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011, which aims to investigate the specific impact of the educational component of cardiac rehabilitation. 1. To assess the effects of patient education delivered as part of cardiac rehabilitation, compared with usual care on mortality, morbidity, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and healthcare costs in patients with CHD.2. To explore the potential study level predictors of the effects of patient education in patients with CHD (e.g. individual versus group intervention, timing with respect to index cardiac event). We updated searches from the previous Cochrane review, by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library, Issue 6, 2016), MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid) and CINAHL (EBSCO) in June 2016. Three trials registries, previous systematic reviews and reference lists of included studies were also searched. No language restrictions were applied. 1. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) where the primary interventional intent was education delivered as part of cardiac rehabilitation.2. Studies with a minimum of six-months follow-up and published in 1990 or later.3. Adults with a diagnosis of CHD. Two review authors independently screened all identified references for inclusion based on the above inclusion criteria. One author extracted study characteristics from the included trials and assessed their risk of bias; a second review author checked data. Two independent

  5. Early menopause predicts future coronary heart disease and stroke: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellons, Melissa; Ouyang, Pamela; Schreiner, Pamela J; Herrington, David M; Vaidya, Dhananjay

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women. Identifying women at risk of cardiovascular disease has tremendous public health importance. Early menopause is associated with increased cardiovascular disease events in some predominantly white populations, but not consistently. Our objective was to determine if self-reported early menopause (menopause at an age menopause (either natural menopause or surgical removal of ovaries at an age menopause. In survival curves, women with early menopause had worse coronary heart disease and stroke-free survival (log rank P = 0.008 and P = 0.0158). In models adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, Multi-ethnic Study Atherosclerosis site, and traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, this risk for coronary heart disease and stroke remained (hazard ratio, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.17-3.70; and hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.11-4.32, respectively). Early menopause is positively associated with coronary heart disease and stroke in a multiethnic cohort, independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  6. Age-Related Differences of Risk Profile and Angiographic Findings in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abu Siddique

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary heart disease (CHD is a major health problem which imposes a significant burden on health caresystems because of high morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To compare the risk factors profile for coronary heartdisease in young and old subjects. Methods: Total 100 patients (50 subjects less than 40 years of age and 50 subjectsmore than 40 years of age with acute coronary syndrome or stable angina who were undergoing coronary angiogram inthe Department of Cardiology, University Cardiac Center, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Dhaka, fromJuly 2006 to June 2008 were evaluated for the presence coronary artery disease risk factors e.g. hypertension, dyslipidemiaand smoking. Results: The mean age of the study population in younger group was (33.0 ± 6.4 years and in older group(52.0±8.6. The male to female ratio in both groups was 4:1. Smokers were more in younger group (70.0% vs. 46.0% (p =0.032. Hypertension was less in the younger group (38.0% vs. 58.0% (p = 0.045. Presence of diabetes was higher in theolder age group (34.0% vs. 4.0% (p = 0.001. Higher incidence of family history of coronary heart disease was in theyounger age group. The total cholesterol was higher in older group (182.9 ± 33.1 vs. (171.1 ± 24.8 mg/dl (p = 0.047. 68%of patients of older group and 38% of younger group had stenosis in left anterior descending artery (p = 0.003. Theinvolvement of left circumflex and right coronary artery in older age group were higher (56% and 66% respectively thanthose in younger group (36% and 40% respectively (p = 0.045 and p = 0.009. Conclusion: Ischemic heart disease inyounger adults < 40 years had different risk profile characteristics than older patients.Key words: Coronary heart disease; acute coronary syndrome; stable angina; risk factors.DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v3i1.5508BSMMU J 2010; 3(1: 13-17

  7. Coronary heart disease incidence in sleep disordered breathing: the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hla, Khin Mae; Young, Terry; Hagen, Erika W; Stein, James H; Finn, Laurel A; Nieto, F Javier; Peppard, Paul E

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the association of objectively measured sleep disordered breathing (SDB) with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) or heart failure (HF) in a nonclinical population. Longitudinal analysis of a community-dwelling cohort followed up to 24 y. Sleep laboratory at the Clinical Research Unit of the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics. There were 1,131 adults who completed one or more overnight polysomnography studies, were free of CHD or HF at baseline, were not treated by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and followed over 24 y. None. In-laboratory overnight polysomnography was used to assess SDB, defined by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) using apnea and hypopnea events per hour of sleep. Incident CHD or HF was defined by new reports of myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization procedures, congestive heart failure, and cardiovascular deaths. We used baseline AHI as the predictor variable in survival analysis models predicting CHD or HF incidence adjusted for traditional confounders. The incidence of CHD or HF was 10.9/1,000 person-years. The mean time to event was 11.2 ± 5.8 y. After adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and smoking, estimated hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of incident CHD or HF were 1.5 (0.9-2.6) for AHI > 0-5, 1.9 (1.05-3.5) for AHI 5 ≤ 15, 1.8 (0.85-4.0) for AHI 15 ≤ 30, and 2.6 (1.1-6.1) for AHI > 30 compared to AHI = 0 (P trend = 0.02). Participants with untreated severe sleep disordered breathing (AHI > 30) were 2.6 times more likely to have an incident coronary heart disease or heart failure compared to those without sleep disordered breathing. Our findings support the postulated adverse effects of sleep disordered breathing on coronary heart disease and heart failure. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. Alkaline phosphatase levels in patients with coronary heart disease saliva and its relation with periodontal status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunita, Dina Suci; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Tadjoedin, Fatimah M.; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a disease that causes narrowing of the coronary arteries. Currently, there is a hypothesis regarding periodontal infection that increases risk for heart disease. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as a marker of inflammation will increase in atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. The objective of this research is analyzing the relationship between the levels of alkaline phosphatase in saliva with periodontal status in patients with CHD and non CHD. Here, saliva of 104 subjects were taken, each 1 ml, and levels of Alkaline Phosphatase was analyzed using Abbott ci4100 architect. We found that no significant difference of Alkaline Phosphatase levels in saliva between CHD patients and non CHD. Therefore, it can be concluded that Alkaline Phosphatase levels in patients with CHD saliva was higher than non CHD and no association between ALP levels with periodontal status.

  9. Illness perception and adherence to healthy behaviour in Jordanian coronary heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh, Sultan M; Almalik, Mona Ma

    2016-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease are strongly recommended to adopt healthier behaviours and adhere to prescribed medication. Previous research on patients with a wide range of health conditions has explored the role of patients' illness perceptions in explaining coping and health outcomes. However, among coronary heart disease patients, this has not been well examined. The purpose of this study was to explore coronary heart disease patients' illness perception beliefs and investigate whether these beliefs could predict adherence to healthy behaviours. A multi-centre cross-sectional study was conducted at four tertiary hospitals in Jordan. A convenience sample of 254 patients (73% response rate), who visited the cardiac clinic for routine review, participated in the study. Participants completed a self-reported questionnaire, which included the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, the Godin Leisure Time Activity questionnaire and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Patients reported high levels of disease understanding (coherence) and they were convinced that they were able to control their condition by themselves and/or with appropriate treatment. Male patients perceived lower consequences (padherence was predicted by both a strong perception in personal control (β 2.66, 95% confidence interval 1.28-4.04), timeline (β -1.85, 95% confidence interval 0. 8-2.88) and illness coherence (β 2.12, 95% confidence interval 0.35-3.90). Medication adherence was predicted by perception of personal control and treatment control. Adherence to a low-fat diet regimen was predicted by perception of illness coherence only (odds ratio 12, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.33). Finally, the majority of patients thought that the cause of their heart problem was related to coronary heart disease risk factors such as obesity and high-fat meals. Patients' illness beliefs are candidates for a psycho-educational intervention that should be targeted at improved disease

  10. [ANALYSIS OF ARACHIDONIC ACID RELATIVE CONTENT CHANGES IN ERYTHROCYTES AND PLATELETS PHOSPHOLIPIDS MEMBRANES FEATURES IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION PATIENTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizogub, V G; Zavalska, T V; Merkulova, I O; Bryuzgina, T S

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes and platelets phospholipid membranes fatty acid spectrum was detected in coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation patients and in patients with coronary heart disease without atrial fibrillation. 87 patients were investigated. Significant decrease in the arachidonic acid relative content in coronary heart disease patients compared with healthy individuals was related. As well as a significant decrease in the arachidonic acid relative content in coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation patients compared with coronary heart disease patients without atrial fibrillation was related too. These dates may indicate that decreasing relative content arachidonic acid can be possible pathogenetic link in the development of arrhythmias.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of a disease management programme for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease and heart failure in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D A; Paul, S; Stone, M A; Juarez-Garcia, A; Squire, I; Khunti, K

    2008-12-01

    To determine if a disease management programme for patients with coronary heart disease and heart failure represents an efficient use of health services resources. We carried out an economic evaluation alongside a cluster randomised control trial of 1163 patients with coronary heart disease and chronic heart failure in 20 primary care practices in the United Kingdom. Practices were randomised to either a control group, where patients received standard general practice care, or an intervention group where patients had access to a specialist nurse-led disease management programme. We estimated costs in both groups for coronary heart disease-related resource use. The main outcome measure used in the economic evaluation was quality adjusted life years (QALY) measured using the EuroQol. The disease management programme was associated with an increase in the QALY measured of 0.03 per year and an increase in the total NHS costs of 425 pounds (540 euros), of this only 83 pounds was directly associated with the provision of the nurse clinics. The clinics generated additional QALY at an incremental cost of 13 pounds 158 per QALY compared to the control group. The use of a nurse-led disease management programme is associated with increased costs in other coronary heart disease-related services as well as for the costs of the clinics. They are also associated with improvements in health. Even in the short term these disease management programmes may represent a cost-effective service, as additional QALY are generated at an acceptable extra cost.

  12. Deciphering the genetic and modular connections between coronary heart disease, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yingying; Zhang, Xiaoxu; Yu, Yanan; Li, Bing; Wang, Pengqian; Li, Haixia; Zhao, Yijun; Shen, Chunti; Wang, Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and pulmonary heart disease (PHD) are circulatory system diseases that may simultaneously emerge in a patient and they are often treated together in clinical practice. However, the molecular mechanisms connecting these three diseases remain unclear. In order to determine the multidimensional characteristic correlations between these three diseases based on genomic networks to aid in medical decision-making, genes from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database were obtained, and applied network construction and modularized analysis were conducted. Functional enrichment analysis was conducted to explore the associations between overlapping genes, modules and pathways. A total of 29 overlapping genes and 3 common modules were identifed for the 3 diseases. Glycosphingolipid biosynthesis and the arachidonic acid metabolism are common pathways, and the biosynthetic process is suggested to be the major function involved in the three diseases. The current study reported, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, the role of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis in IPAH and PHD. The present study provided an improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying CHD, IPAH and PHD. The overlapping genes, modules and pathways suggest novel areas for further research, and drug targets. The observations of the current study additionally suggest that drug indications can be broadened because of the presence of common targets.

  13. Components of the complete blood count as risk predictors for coronary heart disease: in-depth review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjid, Mohammad; Fatemi, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, and several inflammatory biomarkers, such as C-reactive protein, have been used to predict the risk of coronary heart disease. High white blood cell count is a strong and independent predictor of coronary risk in patients of both sexes, with and without coronary heart disease. A high number of white blood cells and their subtypes (for example, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, and eosinophils) are associated with the presence of coronary heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, and stroke. The coronary heart disease risk ratios associated with a high white blood cell count are comparable to those of other inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein. In addition, other components of the complete blood count, such as hematocrit and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, also are associated with coronary heart disease, and the combination of the complete blood count with the white blood cell count can improve our ability to predict coronary heart disease risk. These tests are inexpensive, widely available, and easy to order and interpret. They merit further research.

  14. Depression in primary care patients with coronary heart disease: baseline findings from the UPBEAT UK study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Walters

    Full Text Available An association between depression and coronary heart disease is now accepted but there has been little primary care research on this topic. The UPBEAT-UK studies are centred on a cohort of primary patients with coronary heart disease assessed every six months for up to four years. The aim of this research was to determine the prevalence and associations of depression in this cohort at baseline.Participants with coronary heart disease were recruited from general practice registers and assessed for cardiac symptoms, depression, quality of life and social problems.803 people participated. 42% had a documented history of myocardial infarction, 54% a diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease or angina. 44% still experienced chest pain. 7% had an ICD-10 defined depressive disorder. Factors independently associated with this diagnosis were problems living alone (OR 5.49, 95% CI 2.11-13.30, problems carrying out usual activities (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.93-7.14, experiencing chest pain (OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.58-6.76, other pains or discomfort (OR 3.39, 95% CI 1.42-8.10, younger age (OR 0.95 per year 95% CI 0.92-0.98.Problems living alone, chest pain and disability are important predictors of depression in this population.

  15. THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON INFLAMMATORY MARKERS.THE RISK OF NEW CORONARY EVENT IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorka Savic

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and several markers of inflammation have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Physical activity may lower the risk of coronary heart disease(CHD by mitigating inflammation. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise training on systemic inflammatory response in patients with stabile coronary artery disease participating in a cardiovascular rehabilitation exercise program. Male (n=29 and female (n=23 patients with stable coronary heart disease were recruited for this study. All patients were divided into two groups: group with regular aerobic physical training during cardiovascular rehabilitation program phase II along 3 weeks in rehabilitation center and 3 weeks after that in home of patients and sedentary lifestyle group. There were no significant differences in gender distribution among analyzed groups. Student’s t test showed no significant difference in mean age, waist circumference (OS and waist/hip ratio (WHR. Degree of obesity was measured by BMI, and there was a significant improvement in BMI in patients who underwent the six-week physical training compared to control group (p<0.05.Physical training during 6 weeks did not show any effects on leukocyte count and ICAM-1 levels compared to control group. The exercise training induced reduction in plasma CRP levels by 23.72%, p<0.001, and reduction in plasma VCAM-1 levels by Moderate aerobic exercise training resulted in a significant reduction of inflammatory state by decreasing CRP and VCAM-1 levels without significant body mass and visceral obesity reduction. The obtained results indicate that regular physical activity is clinically attractive in primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart diseases.

  16. CYP11B2 gene polymorphism among coronary heart disease patients and blood donors in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normaznah, Y; Azizah, M R; Kuak, S H; Rosli, M A

    2015-04-01

    Various previous studies have reported the implication of CYP11B2 gene polymorphism in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. In particular, the -344T/C polymorphism, which is located at a putative binding site for the steroidogenic transcription factor (SF-1) has been associated with essential hypertension, left ventricular dilation and coronary heart disease. In the present study, we aim to determine the allele and genotype frequencies of the CYP11B2 gene in patients with clinical manifestation of coronary heart disease and confirmed by angiography and blood donors and to calculate the association of the gene polymorphism with CHD. A total of 79 DNA from patients with coronary heart disease admitted to the National Heart Institute and 84 healthy blood donors have been genotyped using polymerase chain reaction technique followed by restriction enzyme digestion (RFLP). Results of the study demonstrated that out of 79 for the patients, 40 were homozygous T, 10 were homozygous C and 29 were heterozygous TC. The frequencies of genotype TT, CC and TC for patients were 0.5, 0.13 and 0.36 respectively. The frequencies of allele T and C in patients were 0.68 and 0.31 respectively. While for the blood donors, 40 subjects were of homozygous T, 7 were homozygous C and 37 were heterozygous TC. The genotype frequencies for the TT, CC and TC were 0.47, 0.08 and 0.44 respectively. The frequency of the allele T was 0.69 and allele C was 0.3. Chi-Square analysis showed that there was no significant difference in the genotype and C allele frequencies between the CHD patients and the blood donors. Our study suggests that there is lack of association between -344T/C polymorphism of CYP11B2 gene and coronary heart disease.

  17. Reconsidering the back door approach by targeting the coronary sinus in ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maria, Giovanni Luigi; Kassimis, George; Raina, Tushar; Banning, Adrian P

    2016-08-15

    Coronary sinus interventions (CSI) are a class of invasive techniques (surgical and percutaneous) originally proposed in the first half of the 20th century, aiming to treat ischaemic heart disease by acting on the venous coronary system. Three main classes of CSI have been proposed and tested: (1) retroperfusion technique, (2) retroinfusion technique and (3) coronary sinus occlusion techniques. They all share the principle that a controlled increased pressure within the coronary sinus may promote a retrograde perfusion of the ischaemic myocardium with consequent cardioprotection. Development of arterial treatments including coronary aortic bypass grafting and then percutaneous coronary intervention deflected interest from interventions on the coronary venous system. However, CSI may still have a possible niche role today in specific and selected clinical contexts in which existing therapies are insufficient. In this review paper, we aim to revise the rationale for CSI, describing the details and the evidence collected so far about these techniques and to provide insights about the main clinical scenarios in which these strategies may find a contemporary application in combination or as an alternative to existing approaches.

  18. Modifiable Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors in the Population Aged 20-49 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Valladares Mas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: evidence provided by the Framingham Heart Study established the critical role of risk factors in the development of coronary heart disease. Over half a century later, current detection and control are still inadequate. Objective: to identify modifiable risk factors of coronary heart disease in individuals aged 20 to 49 years. Methods: a descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 276 individuals from the doctor’s office No. 1 of the Fabio di Celmo Community Teaching Polyclinic in Cienfuegos. Patients were examined in the clinic visit and/or whole family visit. The studied variables included age, sex, skin color, risk factors (excess weight/obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and psychosocial factors, which were obtained from the medical interview, physical examination, laboratory tests (total cholesterol and triglycerides and review of individual medical records and family history. Results: risk factors most frequently identified were excess weight/obesity (42.4 %, physical inactivity (34.4 % and smoking (20.3 %. Presence of these risk factors increased with age, showing differences in the distribution by sex and was associated with psychosocial factors. Their coexistence and progress with age was significant. Conclusion: prevalence of modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease in a young population was high, with frequent association, predominating factors related to unhealthy lifestyles.

  19. Relationship between coronary artery calcification and osteopenic syndrome in men with coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Raskina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the relationship between coronary artery calcification (CAC and osteopenic syndrome in men with coronary heart disease (CHD.Subjects and methods. A total of 102 men aged 51 to 75 years (mean age 61 (55; 65 years with verified CHD were examined. Bone mineral density (BMD and its T-score of LI–IV and femoral neck were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. According to the T-score, the men were divided into 3 groups: 1 33 (32.4% patients with osteoporosis (OP (T-score <-2.5; 2 48 (47.0% patients with osteopenia (OSP (T-score -1 to -2.5 and 3 21 (20.6% examinees with normal BMD (NBMD (T-score ≥-1. In all the patients, CAC was quantified by multislice spiral computed tomography. The investigators calculated CA calcium scores by the Agatston method and rated the extent of calcification: none (0, minimal (1–10, mild (11–100, moderate (101–400, or severe (>400.Results and discussion. Severe CAC was detected in 57.8% of the men; moderate CAC was in 25.5%; mild CAC was in 6.9; minimal CAC was in 2.0%; and none CAC was in 7.8%. In the OP group, the majority (69.7% of the patients had severe CAC; 15.1% had moderate CAC, 6.1% had mild CAC; 3.0% had minimal CAC; CAC was undetected in 6.1% of cases. In the OSP group, there was severe CAC in 60.4%, moderate CAC in 33.3%, mild CAC in 4.2%, and minimal CAC in 2.1%. The patients without CAC were absent in this group. In the NBMD group, 33.3% of the examinees were recorded to have severe CAC; 23.8% had moderate CAC; 14.3% had mild CAC; CAC was undetected in 28.6%. Minimal CAC was also undetected in the patients of this group. There was a preponderance of patients with severe CAC in all the groups of those identified by the T-score. The extent of CAC was significantly lower in the NBMD group than in the OSP group (p<0.05. CAC was significantly more frequently absent in the NBMD group than in the low BMD group (p<0.05. There was an inverse correlation between

  20. Comparison of conventional risk factors, clinical and angiographic profile between younger and older coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajanan D. Khadkikar

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Young patients with Coronary heart disease had different risk profile and less extensive coronary artery disease as compared to older counterparts. Emphasis should be given on diagnosis and management of major modifiable risk factors. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(2.000: 567-570

  1. status, risk factors disease Socio-economic and coronary heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... UK, males in social classes 1 and 2 had higher CHD death rates than those of ... smoking appear to be more prevalent in lower SES groups,Z-S,8-l1 whereas the ... survey of the Coronary Risk Factor Study (CORIS), which.

  2. Effects of N-3 Fatty Acids on the Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of n-3 fatty acids on the coronary heart disease patients. Methods From September 2007 to March 2008, 60 patients with coronary heart disease were randomly assigned to n-3 fatty acids group (group N) and control group (group C). Both groups received standard coronary artery disease secondary prevention treatment and group N also received eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) 1.8 g plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) 1.2 g per day for 12 weeks. Plasma triacylglycerols, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and blood pressure were measured before and after the study. Results Plasma triacylglycerols, blood pressure and LDL-C level were lower in group N after n-3 fatty acids treatment while no change was found in group C ( P< 0. 05). HDL-C level slightly increased and total cholesterol level slightly decreased after n-3 fatty acids but both change were not significant ( P > 0. 05 ). Conclusions N-3 fatty acids have beneficial effects on the coronary artery disease patients.

  3. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  4. [Risk factor management of coronary heart disease : what is evidence-based?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzer, E B; Schuler, G C

    2014-06-01

    In patients with coronary heart disease the further course of the disease can be substantially influenced by means of a targeted treatment of risk factors. A reduction of hospital referrals, an improvement in quality of life and an extension in life expectation by secondary prophylactic measures have been well documented. In addition to an optimized medicinal therapy, an often drastic change in lifestyle with a focus on a consistent abstinence from nicotine, a healthy diet and regular physical exercise is necessary. Data from healthcare research show that these targets are only insufficiently achieved. The implementation of current guidelines should therefore be rigorously applied. There is a need for research particularly with respect to the prognostic significance of beta blocker therapy for patients with stable coronary heart disease and preserved left ventricular function, the prognostic significance of targeted weight loss for overweight or obese coronary heart disease patients, the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in the various patient groups and their implementation into routine care. Research is also necessary with respect to optimization of structured rehabilitation programs and improvement in patient compliance.

  5. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. METHODS: We......-response association for stroke, with RR estimates of 1·10 (95% CI 0·94-1·28; p=0·24) for 41-48 working hours, 1·27 (1·03-1·56; p=0·03) for 49-54 working hours, and 1·33 (1·11-1·61; p=0·002) for 55 working hours or more per week compared with standard working hours (ptrendwork...... long hours have a higher risk of stroke than those working standard hours; the association with coronary heart disease is weaker. These findings suggest that more attention should be paid to the management of vascular risk factors in individuals who work long hours. FUNDING: Medical Research Council...

  6. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease. DESIGN: A meta-analysis combining individual level data from a collaborative consortium and published studies identified by a systematic review. DATA SOURCES: We obtained individual...... level data from 13 cohort studies participating in the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations Consortium. Four published prospective cohort studies were identified by searches of Medline (to August 2012) and Embase databases (to October 2012), supplemented by manual searches....... REVIEW METHODS: Prospective cohort studies that reported risk estimates for clinically verified incident coronary heart disease by the level of self reported job insecurity. Two independent reviewers extracted published data. Summary estimates of association were obtained using random effects models...

  7. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease. DESIGN: A meta-analysis combining individual level data from a collaborative consortium and published studies identified by a systematic review. DATA SOURCES: We obtained individual...... level data from 13 cohort studies participating in the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations Consortium. Four published prospective cohort studies were identified by searches of Medline (to August 2012) and Embase databases (to October 2012), supplemented by manual searches....... REVIEW METHODS: Prospective cohort studies that reported risk estimates for clinically verified incident coronary heart disease by the level of self reported job insecurity. Two independent reviewers extracted published data. Summary estimates of association were obtained using random effects models...

  8. Generalized anxiety disorder prevalence and comorbidity with depression in coronary heart disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J; Cosh, Suzanne M

    2013-12-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder prevalence and comorbidity with depression in coronary heart disease patients remain unquantified. Systematic searching of Medline, Embase, SCOPUS and PsycINFO databases revealed 1025 unique citations. Aggregate generalized anxiety disorder prevalence (12 studies, N = 3485) was 10.94 per cent (95% confidence interval: 7.8-13.99) and 13.52 per cent (95% confidence interval: 8.39-18.66) employing Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria (random effects). Lifetime generalized anxiety disorder prevalence was 25.80 per cent (95% confidence interval: 20.84-30.77). In seven studies, modest correlation was evident between generalized anxiety disorder and depression, Fisher's Z = .30 (95% confidence interval: .19-.42), suggesting that each psychiatric disorder is best conceptualized as contributing unique variance to coronary heart disease prognosis.

  9. The role of Homocysteine as a predictor for coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schramm, Susanne

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: There is an ongoing debate on the role of the cytotoxic aminoacid homocysteine as a causal risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease. Results from multiple case control-studies demonstrate, that there is a strong association between high plasma levels of homoysteine and prevalent coronary heart disease, independent of other classic risk factors. Furthermore, results from interventional studies point out that elevated plasma levels of homocysteine may effectively be lowered by the intake of folic acid and B vitamins. In order to use this information for the construction of a new preventive strategy against coronary heart disease, more information is needed: first, whether homocysteine actually is a causal risk factor with relevant predictive properties and, second, whether by lowering elevated homocysteine plasma concentrations cardiac morbidity can be reduced. Currently in Germany the determination of homocysteine plasma levels is reimbursed for by statutory health insurance in patients with manifest coronary heart disease and in patients at high risk for coronary heart disease but not for screening purposes in asymptomatic low risk populations.Against this background the following assessment sets out to answer four questions: 1. Is an elevated homocysteine plasma concentration a strong, consistent and independent (of other classic risk factors predictor for coronary heart disease? 2. Does a therapeutic lowering of elevated homoysteine plasma levels reduce the risk of developing coronary events? 3. What is the cost-effectiveness relationship of homocysteine testing for preventive purposes? 4. Are there morally, socially or legally relevant aspects that should be considered when implementing a preventive strategy as outlined above? Methods: In order to answer the first question, a systematic overview of prospective studies and metaanalyses of prospective studies is undertaken. Studies are included that

  10. The Effects of Acupuncture in Treatment of Coronary Heart Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟竞壁

    2004-01-01

    A clinical study on acupuncture at point Neiguan (PC 6) was conducted on the basis of successful treatment of patients with angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarct. The effective rate (91.3%) was found to be far superior to isosorbide dinitrate and nifedipine (P<0.01). The experimental studies in animal models demonstrated that electro-acupuncture could decrease the elevated ST segments in ECGs and reduce the infarct areas induced by coronary ligation.

  11. Genetics and genomics of cholesterol and polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in relation to coronary heart disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu Yingchang (Kevin), Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among adults worldwide. Deregulated lipid metabolism (dyslipidemia) that manifests as hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) chol

  12. PPARG, AGTR1, CXCL16 and LGALS2 polymorphisms are correlated with the risk for coronary heart disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tian, Jianwei; Hu, Shunying; Wang, Feng; Yang, Xuedong; Li, Yuqian; Huang, Congchun

    2015-01-01

    Our study was designed to explore the interaction between genes of PPARG, AGTR1, CXCL16 and LGALS2 and further investigate the association between genes polymorphisms and coronary heart disease (CHD...

  13. Randomised placebo controlled multicentre trial to assess short term clarithromycin for patients with stable coronary heart disease: CLARICOR trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Christian M; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Damgaard, Morten

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if the macrolide clarithromycin affects mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in patients with stable coronary heart disease. DESIGN: Centrally randomised multicentre trial. All parties at all stages were blinded. Analyses were by intention to treat. SETTING: Five Copenha...

  14. Genetics and genomics of cholesterol and polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in relation to coronary heart disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu Yingchang (Kevin), Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among adults worldwide. Deregulated lipid metabolism (dyslipidemia) that manifests as hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density-lipoprotein (HDL)

  15. Amaranth oil application for coronary heart disease and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pogojeva Ala V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the Nation's leading killer for both men and women among all racial and ethnic groups. Development and progression of CVD is linked to the presence of risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. It is known that cholesterol is an indicator of increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Low-density cholesterol (LDL above 130 mg/dl high-density cholesterol (HDL cholesterol below 35 mg/dl and total blood cholesterol above 200 mg/dl are indicators of problematic cholesterol. Proper ranges of cholesterol are important in the prevention of CVD. It has been suggested that a reduction in the consumption of saturated and an increase in unsaturated fatty acids is beneficial and prevents CVD. Amaranth grain contains tocotrienols and squalene compounds, which are known to affect cholesterol biosynthesis. The cholesterol precursors squalene, lanosterol and other methyl sterols, reflect cholesterol synthesis 123, whereas plant sterols and cholestanol, a metabolite of cholesterol, reflect the efficiency of cholesterol absorption in normal and hyperlipidemic populations 456. Qureshi with co-authors 7 showed that feeding of chickens with amaranth oil decreases blood cholesterol levels, which are supported by the work of others 8. Previously, we have shown that Amaranth oil modulates the cell membrane fluidity 9 and stabilized membranes that could be one reason as to why it is beneficial to those who consume it. It is known that in hypertension, the cell membrane is defective and hence, the movement of the Na and K ions across the cell membranes could defective that could contribute to the development of increase in blood pressure. Based on these properties of amaranth oil we hypothesize that it could be of significant benefit for patients with CVD.

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Case Control Study To Assess Association Between Periodontal Infection And Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Mohitey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of adult mortality and morbidity throughout the world. Well known risk factors independently or combined are involved in both atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. Recent data have shown that viral and bacterial infections may also contribute to acute thromboembolic events; hence a case control study was carried out. Aims and Objective: To investigate the possible association between periodontal health and coronary artery disease, in patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI and Coronary Heart Disease (CHD. Material and Methods: 150 patients, 75 with AMI and 75 with CHD were included in the study. Data on hypertension, diabetes, smoking status and alcohol consumption were recorded. AMI patients were clinically examined 3-4 days after admission to the coronary care unit. Clinical examination of CHD patients was carried out during the hospital stay. All teeth excluding third molars were studied and clinical data were recorded regarding Plaque Index, Simplified Oral Hygiene Index, Gingival Index, Gingival Bleeding Index, Probing Depth and Clinical Attachment Loss. Results: Percentage of sites exhibiting bleeding on probing and the number of sites with more probing depth were significantly higher among AMI patients than those with CHD (P=0.05 and p=0.001 respectively.There was abundant plaque and debris around all tooth surfaces in AMI patients (p=0.001. Conclusion: Overall result of this case control study showed an association between periodontitis and acute myocardial infarction.

  17. Dietary Glycemic Index, Dietary Glycemic Load, Blood Lipids, and Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To examine the associations of dietary glycemic index (GI) and dietary glycemic load (GL) with blood lipid concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD) in nondiabetic participants in the Health Worker Cohort Study (HWCS). Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional analysis was performed, using data from adults who participated in the HWCS baseline assessment. We collected information on participants' socio-demographic conditions, dietary patterns and physical activity via self-adm...

  18. Stress resilience and physical fitness in adolescence and risk of coronary heart disease in middle age

    OpenAIRE

    Bergh, Cecilia; Udumyan, Ruzan; Fall, Katja; Almroth, Henrik; Montgomery, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective Psychosocial stress is a suggested risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). The relationship of stress resilience in adolescence with subsequent CHD risk is underinvestigated, so our objective was to assess this and investigate the possible mediating role of physical fitness. Methods In this register-based study, 237 980 men born between 1952 and 1956 were followed from 1987 to 2010 using information from Swedish registers. Stress resilience was measured at a compulsory military consc...

  19. Individuals at Risk of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD), its Prevention and Management by an Indigenous Compound

    OpenAIRE

    Dubey, G.P.; Agrawal, Aruna; S. P. Dixit; Pathak, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of rist factors have been suspected for causing the coronary heart disease. 406 cases of both sex groups with age range of 35 to 55 years were selected from three distinct localities of varanasi city. Individuals who reported single or more risk factors of CHD were isolated from the population of the particular areas. After a detailed preliminary screening of the subjects various physical, physiological, psychological and biochemical measurements were carried out. Other basis of ini...

  20. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and long-term mortality in stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Charlotte; Grønning, Bjørn; Køber, Lars;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The level of the inactive N-terminal fragment of pro-brain (B-type) natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a strong predictor of mortality among patients with acute coronary syndromes and may be a strong prognostic marker in patients with chronic coronary heart disease as well. We assessed...... the relationship between N-terminal pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP) levels and long-term mortality from all causes in a large cohort of patients with stable coronary heart disease. METHODS: NT-pro-BNP was measured in baseline serum samples from 1034 patients referred for angiography because of symptoms or signs of coronary...... of myocardial infarction, angina, hypertension, diabetes, or chronic heart failure; creatinine clearance rate; body-mass index; smoking status; plasma lipid levels; LVEF; and the presence or absence of clinically significant coronary artery disease on angiography. CONCLUSIONS: NT-pro-BNP is a marker of long...

  1. Need to combine individual strategies with population-level strategies in the prevention of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Johan Lerbech; Jørgensen, Torben; Borglykke, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine the relation between the distribution of risk, the distribution of coronary heart disease (CHD) events and the proportion who develop CHD according to risk.......The aim of this paper was to examine the relation between the distribution of risk, the distribution of coronary heart disease (CHD) events and the proportion who develop CHD according to risk....

  2. Quantitative Determination of Fibrinogen of Patients with Coronary Heart Diseases through Piezoelectric Agglutination Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fibrinogen can transform fibrin through an agglutination reaction, finally forming fibrin polymer with grid structure. The density and viscosity of the reaction system changes drastically during the course of agglutination. In this research, we apply an independently-developed piezoelectric agglutination sensor to detect the fibrinogen agglutination reaction in patients with coronary heart diseases. The terminal judgment method of determining plasma agglutination reaction through piezoelectric agglutination sensor was established. In addition, the standard curve between plasma agglutination time and fibrinogen concentration was established to determinate fibrinogen content quantitatively. The results indicate the close correlation between the STAGO paramagnetic particle method and the method of piezoelectric agglutination sensor for the detection of Fibrinogen. The correlation coefficient was 0.91 (γ = 0.91. The determination can be completed within 10 minutes. The fibrinogen concentration in the coronary heart disease group was significantly higher than that of the healthy control group (P < 0.05. The results reveal that high fibrinogen concentration is closely correlated to the incurrence, development and prognosis of coronary heart diseases. Compared with other traditional methods, the method of piezoelectric agglutination sensor has some merits such as operation convenience, small size, low cost, quick detecting, good precision and the common reacting agents with paramagnetic particle method.

  3. Historical overview of n-3 fatty acids and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Alexander

    2008-06-01

    The first evidence that fish oil fatty acids might have a beneficial effect on coronary heart disease came from the discovery that Greenland Eskimos, who have a diet high in n-3 fatty acids, have a lower mortality from coronary heart disease than do Danes and Americans. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential in our diets and can be classified in 2 groups: n-6 fatty acids found in plant seeds and n-3 fatty acids found in marine vertebrates. Further evidence of n-3 benefits to human health include a 1989 study demonstrating a 29% reduction in fatal cardiac arrhythmias among subjects with a recent myocardial infarction who had been advised to consume fish oil. The GISSI-Prevenzione Trial found a significant reduction in relative reduction of death, cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and stroke in subjects consuming n-3 fatty acids. In a recent study, subjects with implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) at high risk for fatal ventricular arrhythmias were randomly assigned to four 1-g capsules of either an ethyl ester concentrate of n-3 fatty acids or olive oil daily for 12 mo. Subjects receiving n-3 who thus had significantly higher levels of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in their red blood cell membranes showed a longer time to first ICD events and had a significantly lower relative risk of having an ICD event or probable event (P = 0.033). These studies demonstrate that fish oil fatty acids have beneficial effects on coronary heart disease.

  4. Quantitative determination of fibrinogen of patients with coronary heart diseases through piezoelectric agglutination sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qinghai; Hua, Xing; Fu, Weiling; Liu, Dongbo; Chen, Ming; Cai, Guoru

    2010-01-01

    Fibrinogen can transform fibrin through an agglutination reaction, finally forming fibrin polymer with grid structure. The density and viscosity of the reaction system changes drastically during the course of agglutination. In this research, we apply an independently-developed piezoelectric agglutination sensor to detect the fibrinogen agglutination reaction in patients with coronary heart diseases. The terminal judgment method of determining plasma agglutination reaction through piezoelectric agglutination sensor was established. In addition, the standard curve between plasma agglutination time and fibrinogen concentration was established to determinate fibrinogen content quantitatively. The results indicate the close correlation between the STAGO paramagnetic particle method and the method of piezoelectric agglutination sensor for the detection of Fibrinogen. The correlation coefficient was 0.91 (γ = 0.91). The determination can be completed within 10 minutes. The fibrinogen concentration in the coronary heart disease group was significantly higher than that of the healthy control group (P high fibrinogen concentration is closely correlated to the incurrence, development and prognosis of coronary heart diseases. Compared with other traditional methods, the method of piezoelectric agglutination sensor has some merits such as operation convenience, small size, low cost, quick detecting, good precision and the common reacting agents with paramagnetic particle method.

  5. Increased risks of coronary heart disease and stroke among spousal caregivers of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianguang; Zöller, Bengt; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan

    2012-04-10

    Spousal caregivers of cancer patients suffer psychological and physical burdens that may affect their risk of subsequently developing coronary heart disease and stroke. Cancer patients were identified in the Swedish Cancer Registry, and information on their spouses was retrieved from the Swedish Multi-Generation Register. Follow-up of caregivers was performed from the date of the first diagnosis of cancer in their spouses through 2008. Standardized incidence ratios were calculated for spousal caregivers of cancer patients compared with those without an affected spouse. After the cancer diagnosis in wives, the risks of coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke in husbands were 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.16), 1.24 (95% CI, 1.21-1.27), and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.18-1.32), respectively. The corresponding risks in wives with an affected husband were 1.13 (95% CI, 1.10-1.16), 1.29 (95% CI, 1.26-1.32), and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.19-1.34). The increases were consistent over time and were more pronounced if the spouse was affected by a cancer with a high mortality rate, such as pancreatic and lung cancers. Spousal caregivers of cancer patients have increased risks of coronary heart disease and stroke that persist over time. Clinical attention should be paid to spousal caregivers, especially those caring for cancer patients with high mortality rates.

  6. Clinical evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging in coronary heart disease: The CE-MARC study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sculpher Mark

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several investigations are currently available to establish the diagnosis of coronary heart disease (CHD. Of these, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR offers the greatest information from a single test, allowing the assessment of myocardial function, perfusion, viability and coronary artery anatomy. However, data from large scale studies that prospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of multi-parametric CMR for the detection of CHD in unselected populations are lacking, and there are few data on the performance of CMR compared with current diagnostic tests, its prognostic value and cost-effectiveness. Methods/design This is a prospective diagnostic accuracy cohort study of 750 patients referred to a cardiologist with suspected CHD. Exercise tolerance testing (ETT will be preformed if patients are physically able. Recruited patients will then undergo CMR and single photon emission tomography (SPECT followed in all patients by invasive X-ray coronary angiography. The order of the CMR and SPECT tests will be randomised. The CMR study will comprise rest and adenosine stress perfusion, cine imaging, late gadolinium enhancement and whole-heart MR coronary angiography. SPECT will use a gated stress/rest protocol. The primary objective of the study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of CMR in detecting significant coronary stenosis, as defined by X-ray coronary angiography. Secondary objectives include an assessment of the prognostic value of CMR imaging, a comparison of its diagnostic accuracy against SPECT and ETT, and an assessment of cost-effectiveness. Discussion The CE-MARC study is a prospective, diagnostic accuracy cohort study of 750 patients assessing the performance of a multi-parametric CMR study in detecting CHD using invasive X-ray coronary angiography as the reference standard and comparing it with ETT and SPECT. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN77246133

  7. Beta-blocker therapy and cardiac events among patients with newly diagnosed coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Shilane, David; Go, Alan S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of beta-blockers for preventing cardiac events has been questioned for patients who have coronary heart disease (CHD) without a prior myocardial infarction (MI). OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the association of beta-blockers with outcomes among...... patients with new-onset CHD. METHODS: We studied consecutive patients discharged after the first CHD event (acute coronary syndrome or coronary revascularization) between 2000 and 2008 in an integrated healthcare delivery system who did not use beta-blockers in the year before entry. We used time......-varying Cox regression models to determine the hazard ratio (HR) associated with beta-blocker treatment and used treatment-by-covariate interaction tests (pint) to determine whether the association differed for patients with or without a recent MI. RESULTS: A total of 26,793 patients were included, 19...

  8. Brief report: Coronary Heart Disease: an Unknown Association to Pathological Gambling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice eGermain

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathological gamblers, because of their high level of stress, depression and alcohol or nicotine consumption may be overexposed to coronary heart disease (CHD. To test this association, we assessed pathological gambling (DSM-IV-TR criteria and SOGS scale among 73 patients hospitalized in cardiology for CHD and 61 in-patients from the same department hospitalized for a non coronary disorder. We found six cases of PG (8.2% and one case of problem gambling in the CHD group versus no case in the non-coronary group (p=0.01. Pathological gambling was not associated to a higher level of alcohol or nicotine consumption neither to a higher level of sensation-seeking.

  9. Exploration of Syndrome Differentiation Patterns in Coronary Heart Disease Patients during Peri-Operative Stage of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To explore the patterns of Syndrome Differentiation (SD) of coronary heart disease (CHD) patients in peri-operative stage of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Methods: One week after operation, thirty-seven CHD patients, who received CABG of internal mammary artery or great saphena vein under conventional general anesthesia with low or middle temperature extracorporeal circulation were differentiated as various syndromes, with the pre- or post-operational EKG, color Doppler echocardiography were done during and after operation. The hemodynamic parameters were monitored. Results: In the CHD patients, 64.9% were differentiated as Qi-Yin deficiency, 67.6% were complicated with phlegm syndrome and 62.2% with blood stasis, suggesting that Qi-deficiency, phlegm and stasis are the basic pathogenetic factors in patients with CABG. Moreover, the peri-operative syndrome was correlated with the condition of coronary artery lesion, heart and lung functions before operation, and the extracorporeal circulation time during the operation. Conclusion: TCM SD conducting in peri-operative stage might be useful in exploring the patterns of syndrome alteration which provided a basis for preventing peri-operative complications and elevating success rate of operation.

  10. The changes of serum BDNF, blood lipid and PCI in the elderly patients with coronary heart disease complicated with diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Xia He; Jing-Jing Yang; Mei-Jin Yuan; Xiao-Juan Ding

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To compare the clinic from coronary heart disease complicated with diabetes mellitus patients serum BDNF changes, blood tests and PCI, for the clinical treatment of coronary heart disease in patients with diabetes mellitus provide certain reference and ideas.Methods: In outpatient of our hospital of elderly patients with coronary heart disease in patients with diabetes mellitus complicated with 126 cases into coronary heart disease combined with diabetes mellitus group, CHD patients admitted in the same period of 125 cases into coronary heart disease group and healthy subjects during the same period in 120 cases into the healthy control group, 61 males, 59 females, aged 58 to 79 years old, mean age (64.36± 2.20) to exclude coronary heart disease, diabetes and liver and other diseases. All patients according to Gensini integration system and coronary artery vascular image segmentation evaluation criteria for each of the degree of vascular stenosis were evaluated. Total cholesterol (TC), glycerin three fat (TG), low density protein (LDL-C), high density protein (HDL-C), apolipoprotein A1 (APOA-1) and apolipoprotein B (APOB) and other indicators were detected. The number of stents, mean diameter and length of stent in patients with coronary heart disease combined with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease group were compared. Results: Coronary heart disease with diabetes mellitus group Gensini score and serum BDNF concentrations were higher in CHD group and control group, CHD group Gensini score and serum BDNF concentrations were significantly higher than the control group, the differences were statistically significant; coronary heart disease and coronary heart disease group and blood fat group in TC, TG, LDL-C, diabetes, APO-B levels were significantly higher than that of control group HDL-C and APOA-1 were significantly lower than control group, coronary heart disease and diabetes group in TC, TG, LDL-C, blood lipid and APO-B level were

  11. Importance of personality traits and psychosocial factors for the development of coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Dragana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Numerous studies have provided clear and convincing evidence that psychosocial factors contribute to the pathogenesis and expression of coronary heart disease (CHD. These factors have been related to the following psychosocial domains: personality factors and character traits, depression, anxiety, social isolation and chronic life stress. The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of personality traits and psychosocial risk factors for the development of coronary heart disease. Methods. The investigation was conducted as observational cross-sectional (case-control study. Based on medical records all subjects were divided into two groups: the group of patients with CHD (61 participants, and the control group of 41 healthy participants. All participants fulfilled the Eysenck Inventory Questionnaire, Paykel stress scale and Bortner scale of A-B self-estimation. Results. The participants with CHD were shown to have lower education than healthy participants, but were comparable by gender, age and place of residence. According to the Bortner scale, most participants with CHD expressed type A personality, whereas most healthy participants expressed types B and AB. The patients with CHD achieved higher scores on the Paykel stress scale of life events, and they had the higher level of neurotic and psychotic tendencies, as well as the lower level of extroversion compared to the healthy participants. Multivariate logistic regression model identified chronic stress (odds ratio 1.018; 95% confidence interval 1.007−1.028 as an important predictor for the occurrence of coronary heart disease, when adjusted for age, gender, nourishment and blood pressure. On the other side, the lower risk for the occurrence of CHD was observed among the participants who had the higher level of extroversion (odds ratio 0.859; 95% confidence interval 0.636−0.902. Conclusion. Chronic stress and introversion can be considered important risk factors for

  12. Men's and Women's Health Beliefs Differentially Predict Coronary Heart Disease Incidence in a Population-Based Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korin, Maya Rom; Chaplin, William F.; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Butler, Mark J.; Ojie, Mary-Jane; Davidson, Karina W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender differences in the association between beliefs in heart disease preventability and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in a population-based sample. Methods: A total of 2,688 Noninstitutionalized Nova Scotians without prior CHD enrolled in the Nova Scotia Health Study (NSHS95) and were followed for 10…

  13. Hypothyroidism in coronary heart disease and its relation to selected risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Mayer Jr

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Otto Mayer Jr1, Jaroslav Šimon1, Jan Filipovský1, Markéta Plášková2, Richard Pikner11Center of Preventive Cardiology, 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Charles University, Medical Faculty, Plze , Czech Republic; 2Department of Preventive Cardiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech RepublicIntroduction: Hypothyroidism (HT has been found a predictor of cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to ascertain the prevalence of HT in patients with manifest coronary heart disease (CHD, and to establish its association with conventional risk factors.Methods: 410 patients, 6–24 months after hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome, and/or revascularization, were included into the cross-sectional study.Results: The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction was found in males and females as follows: overt HT, ie, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH > 3.65 mIU/L and free thyroxine (fT4 < 9 pmol/L and/or L-thyroxine substitution, in 2.6% and 8.4%, respectively; subclinical HT (TSH >3.65, fT4 9–23 and no substitution in 4.3% and 15.0%, respectively. Higher prevalence of HT was found in females with hypercholesterolemia, and in males and females with concomitant positive thyroid peroxydase antibodies. Hypothyroid subjects had higher total homocysteine in both genders and von Willebrand factor in males only. Hypothyroid females had higher total  and LDL cholesterol, and were more often treated for diabetes.Conclusions: HT was found highly prevalent in patient with clinical coronary heart disease, mainly in females, and was associated with several cardiovascular risk factors.Keywords: hypothyroidism, coronary heart disease, cholesterol, homocysteine, diabetes

  14. Diabetes, Glycemic Control, and New-Onset Heart Failure in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease Data from the Heart and Soul Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Melle, Joost P.; Bot, Marisica; De Jonge, Peter; De Boer, Rudolf A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Whooley, Mary A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE- Diabetes is a predictor of both coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. It is unknown to what extent the association between diabetes and heart failure is influenced by other risk factors for heart failure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- We evaluated the association of diabetes and

  15. Diabetes, glycemic control, and new-onset heart failure in patients with stable coronary artery disease : data from the heart and soul study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Melle, J.P.; Bot, M.; de Jonge, P.; de Boer, R.A.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Whooley, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes is a predictor of both coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. It is unknown to what extent the association between diabetes and heart failure is influenced by other risk factors for heart failure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We evaluated the association of diabetes and A

  16. Diabetes, glycemic control, and new-onset heart failure in patients with stable coronary artery disease : data from the heart and soul study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Melle, J.P.; Bot, M.; de Jonge, P.; de Boer, R.A.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Whooley, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes is a predictor of both coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. It is unknown to what extent the association between diabetes and heart failure is influenced by other risk factors for heart failure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We evaluated the association of diabetes and

  17. Psychophysical rehabilitation aspects of patient with coronary heart disease and Angina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ali Khaleel.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It is analyzed scientific and methodological literature, considered the views of scientists on the link of stress and cardiovascular diseases. It is determined causes of stress, with recommendations for combating stress and its prevention. A program of rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease after hospital discharge is shown. The experiment involved 88 patients of coronary heart disease and angina, II and III functional class at the age of 40-65 years. Participants were divided into two groups the main and control. The control group performed a program of physical rehabilitation, including breathing and physical exercises, in the program we have added to the main group autogenic exercises. At the end the experiment revealed that the health indicators of main group better than the control group in 23%.

  18. Association between dietary fiber intake and risk of coronary heart disease: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yihua; Qian, Yufeng; Pan, Yiwen; Li, Peiwei; Yang, Jun; Ye, Xianhua; Xu, Geng

    2015-08-01

    The association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and dietary fiber intake is not consistent, especially for the subtypes of dietary fiber. The aim of our study was to conduct a meta-analysis of existing cohort published studies assessing the association between dietary fiber intake and risk of CHD, and quantitatively estimating their dose-response relationships. We searched PubMed and EMBASE before May 2013. Random-effect model was used to calculate the pool relative risk (RRs) for the incidence and mortality of CHD. Dose-response, subgroup analyses based on fiber subtypes, heterogeneity and publication bias were also carried out. Eighteen studies involving 672,408 individuals were finally included in the present study. The pooled-adjusted RRs of coronary heart disease for the highest versus lowest category of fiber intake were 0.93 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.91-0.96, P fiber subtypes (cereal, fruit, and vegetable fiber), indicated that RRs were 0.92 (95% CI, 0.85-0.99, P = 0.032), 0.92 (95% CI, 0.86-0.98, P = 0.01), 0.95 (95% CI, 0.89-1.01, P = 0.098) respectively for all coronary event and 0.81 (95% CI, 0.72-0.92, P = 0.001), 0.68 (95% CI, 0.43-1.07, P = 0.094), 0.91 (95% CI, 0.74-1.12, P = 0.383) for mortality. In addition, a significant dose-response relationship was observed between fiber intake and the incidence and mortality of CHD (P dietary fiber is inversely associated with risk of coronary heart disease, especially for fiber from cereals and fruits. Besides, soluble and insoluble fibers have the similar effect. A significant dose-response relationship is also observed between fiber intake and CHD risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  19. Early Menopause Predicts Future Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellons, Melissa; Ouyang, Pamela; Schreiner, Pamela J; Herrington, David M; Vaidya, Dhananjay

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women. Identifying women at risk of cardiovascular disease has tremendous public health importance. Early menopause is associated with increased cardiovascular disease events in some predominantly white populations, but not consistently. Our objective was to determine if a self-reported early menopause (menopause at an age menopause (either natural menopause or surgical removal of ovaries at an age menopause. In survival curves, women with early menopause had worse coronary heart disease and stroke-free survival (log rank p=menopause is positively associated with coronary heart disease and stroke in a multiethnic cohort, independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:22692332

  20. [Takayasu arteritis associated with heart valve diseases (pulmonary and aortic) and arteritis (coronary and renal)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Abundis, A; Fraga, A; Badui, E; Guijosa, N; Navarro, J

    1992-01-01

    The most severe arteritis due to Takayasu's disease are those related to renal and coronary arteries. The first one because it produces severe arterial hypertension and the second one because it puts the patient in high risk of suffering either myocardial ischemia or infarction. These situations worsen when this entity is associated to valvular heart lesions. The authors present the clinical cases of two female patients with Takayasu's disease. One of them in acute phase of the illness, where coronary arteritis, mild coarctation of the aorta, right pulmonary artery stenosis, and pulmonary valve stenosis were present. The second patient was seen during the remission phase of the disease with obstruction of the left subclavicular artery, renal arteritis, severe arterial hypertension and aortic valve insufficiency. The authors discuss the prognosis of patients with Takayasu's disease associated to valvular heart disease and its role in the etiology of pulmonary valvular stenosis. Finally, the authors point out the importance of recognizing the active and non active phases of the Takayasu's disease in relation of the adequate stage for surgical treatment of the lesions caused by this disease.

  1. Intelligence System for Diagnosis Level of Coronary Heart Disease with K-Star Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnanto, Hari; Herianto, Herianto

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, and it is important to diagnose the level of the disease. Intelligence systems for diagnosis proved can be used to support diagnosis of the disease. Unfortunately, most of the data available between the level/type of coronary heart disease is unbalanced. As a result system performance is low. Methods This paper proposes an intelligence systems for the diagnosis of the level of coronary heart disease taking into account the problem of data imbalance. The first stage of this research was preprocessing, which included resampled non-stratified random sampling (R), the synthetic minority over-sampling technique (SMOTE), clean data out of range attribute (COR), and remove duplicate (RD). The second step was the sharing of data for training and testing using a k-fold cross-validation model and training multiclass classification by the K-star algorithm. The third step was performance evaluation. The proposed system was evaluated using the performance parameters of sensitivity, specificity, positive prediction value (PPV), negative prediction value (NPV), area under the curve (AUC) and F-measure. Results The results showed that the proposed system provides an average performance with sensitivity of 80.1%, specificity of 95%, PPV of 80.1%, NPV of 95%, AUC of 87.5%, and F-measure of 80.1%. Performance of the system without consideration of data imbalance provide showed sensitivity of 53.1%, specificity of 88,3%, PPV of 53.1%, NPV of 88.3%, AUC of 70.7%, and F-measure of 53.1%. Conclusions Based on these results it can be concluded that the proposed system is able to deliver good performance in the category of classification. PMID:26893948

  2. Mother's body size and placental size predict coronary heart disease in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Johan G.; Kajantie, Eero; Thornburg, Kent L.; Osmond, Clive; Barker, David J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Aims People whose birthweights were towards the lower end of the normal range are at increased risk of coronary heart disease. This is attributed to foetal programming through malnutrition, but the cause of the malnutrition is unknown. Methods and results We studied 6975 men born in Helsinki during 1934–44. Their size at birth was recorded. Babies who later developed coronary heart disease tended to have a low ponderal index (birthweight/length3). Three different placental phenotypes predicted the disease. In primiparous mothers who were short, having below median height, the hazard ratio for the disease was 1.14 (95% confidence interval 1.08–1.21, P< 0.0001) for each centimetre increase in the difference between the length and breadth of the placental surface. In tall mothers whose body mass index was above the median, the hazard ratio was 1.25 (1.10–1.42, P= 0.0007) per 40 cm2 decrease in the surface area. In tall mothers whose body mass index was below the median, the hazard ratio was 1.07 (1.02–1.13, P= 0.01) per 1% increase in the placental weight/birthweight ratio. Conclusions Three different combinations of maternal and placental size predicted coronary heart disease. The mother's body size determines the availability of nutrients and is linked to the development and function of the placenta, reflected in its shape and size. We speculate that variations in three processes of normal placental development lead to foetal malnutrition. The processes are (i) implantation and spiral artery invasion, (ii) growth of the chorionic surface, and (iii) compensatory expansion of the chorionic surface. PMID:21632601

  3. Peripheral artery disease is a coronary heart disease risk equivalent among both men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R; Kober, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) has been proposed as a 'coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent'. We aimed to examine whether PAD confers similar risk for mortality as incident myocardial infarction (MI) and whether risk differs by gender. METHODS: Using nationwide Danish...... the other groups. During follow up (median 1051 d, IQR 384-1938), we found that MI-alone patients had greater risk of adverse outcomes in the acute setting (first 90 d); however, the PAD-only and PAD + MI groups had higher long-term mortality at 7 years than those with MI alone (47.8 and 60.4 vs. 36.......62-1.80, respectively), and composite of death, MI, and ischaemic stroke, 95% CI HR, 1.38, 95% CI 1.36-1.42; and HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.61-1.75, respectively). The greater long-term risks of PAD were seen for both women and men. CONCLUSIONS: Both women and men with incident PAD have greater long-term risks of total...

  4. Correlation between the coping behavior and types of attitude to the disease in patients with coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Zubareva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article represents the results of research of correlation between the coping behavior and types of attitude to the disease taking into account the emotional, behavioral and cognitive components in male patients with different types of acute coronary heart disease (acute myocardial infarction and unstable stenocardia. Recommendations for the elaborating of psychocorrectional program were given according to the analysis of the obtained data.

  5. Adult-Onset Asthma to Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthma has been associated with atherosclerotic disease in several studies with some evidence that this association may be limited to women. However, most previous studies have failed to account for the heterogeneity of asthma subtypes. We previously reported increased carotid intima medial thickne...

  6. High-density lipoprotein particles, coronary heart disease, and niacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    In clinical trials, the use of statins in patients with high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) has resulted in a 25% to 40% decrease in major clinical events. However, despite a marked reduction (up to 60%) in LDL-C, approximately 50% (or more) of patients continue to have CVD events. This high ...

  7. Requirements of a coronary heart disease risk factor intervention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... coloured population of the Cape Peninsula to be at high risk of developing CHD. Only 5,4% of men ... promotion of health and prevention of disease. Guidelines for ... among the unskilled coloured labour force. This could be.

  8. Spanish flu and early 20th-century expansion of a coronary heart disease-prone subpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azambuja, Maria Inês Reinert

    2004-01-01

    According to Stephen Jay Gould, "we have a strong preference for seeing trends as entities moving somewhere." However, trends may instead be the product of relative expansions and contractions of different subpopulations constituting the system. Variation in attributes of coronary heart disease cases during the decline in coronary heart disease mortality suggests a change in the primary source-subpopulation of cases over time. It is proposed that an early 20th-century expansion of a coronary heart disease-prone subpopulation, characterized by high serum-cholesterol phenotype and high case-fatality--which contributed to most of the coronary heart disease cases and deaths during the 1960s--may have been a late result of the 1918 influenza pandemic. The same unusual immune response to infection that in 1918 killed preferentially men, whites, and those born from 1880 to 1900 (20-40 years old) may have "primed" survivors of those birth cohorts to late coronary heart disease mortality. Ecologic evidence in favor of a birth cohort and geographic association between both epidemics is presented. Cross-reactive auto-immune response upon reinfection could explain the excess coronary heart disease deaths reported during influenza epidemics from the late 1920s onward. Mimicry between the viral hemagglutinin and the apolipoprotein B or the low-density lipoprotein receptor could be the link between infection and hypercholesterolemia. The extinction of those birth cohorts would result in a relative increase in cases coming from a 2nd subpopulation, which was characterized by insulin resistance and chronic expression of low-grade inflammation markers and was comparatively less vulnerable to die acutely from coronary heart disease.

  9. Dynamics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Dynamics of glucose concentration in human organism is an important diagnostic characteristic for it's parameters correlate significantly with the severity of metabolic, vessel and perfusion disorders. 36 patients with stable angina pectoris of II and III functional classes were involved in this study. All of them were men in age range of 45-59 years old. 7 patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (aged from 49 to 59 years old) form the group of compare. Control group (n = 5) was of practically healthy men in comparable age. To all patients intravenous glucose solution (40%) in standard loading dose was injected. Capillary and vein blood samples were withdrawn before, and 5, 60, 120, 180 and 240 minutes after glucose load. At these time points blood pressure and glucose concentration were measured. In prepared blood smears shape, deformability and sizes of erythrocytes, quantity and degree of shear stress resistant erythrocyte aggregates were studied. Received data were approximated by polynomial of high degree to receive concentration function of studied parameters, which first derivative elucidate velocity characteristics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease and practically healthy persons. Received data show principle differences in dynamics of morphofunctional erythrocyte properties during intravenous glucose injection in patients with coronary heart disease as a possible mechanism of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  10. Going High with Heart Disease: The Effect of High Altitude Exposure in Older Individuals and Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Benjamin D

    2015-06-01

    Levine, Benjamin D. Going high with heart disease: The effect of high altitude exposure in older individuals and patients with coronary artery disease. High Alt Med Biol 16:89-96, 2015.--Ischemic heart disease is the largest cause of death in older men and women in the western world (Lozano et al., 2012 ; Roth et al., 2015). Atherosclerosis progresses with age, and thus age is the dominant risk factor for coronary heart disease in any algorithm used to assess risk for cardiovascular events. Subclinical atherosclerosis also increases with age, providing the substrate for precipitation of acute coronary syndromes. Thus the risk of high altitude exposure in older individuals is linked closely with both subclinical and manifest coronary heart disease (CHD). There are several considerations associated with taking patients with CHD to high altitude: a) The reduced oxygen availability may cause or exacerbate symptoms; b) The hypoxia and other associated environmental conditions (exercise, dehydration, change in diet, thermal stress, emotional stress from personal danger or conflict) may precipitate acute coronary events; c) If an event occurs and the patient is far from advanced medical care, then the outcome of an acute coronary event may be poor; and d) Sudden death may occur. Physicians caring for older patients who want to sojourn to high altitude should keep in mind the following four key points: 1). Altitude may exacerbate ischemic heart disease because of both reduced O2 delivery and paradoxical vasoconstriction; 2). Adverse events, including acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death, are most common in older unfit men, within the first few days of altitude exposure; 3). Ensuring optimal fitness, allowing for sufficient acclimatization (at least 5 days), and optimizing medical therapy (especially statins and aspirin) are prudent recommendations that may reduce the risk of adverse events; 4). A graded exercise test at sea level is probably sufficient for

  11. Epidemiology of typical coronay heart disease versus heart disease of uncertain etiology (atypical) fatalities and their relationships with classic coronary risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menotti, A.; Puddu, P.E.; Lanti, M.; Kromhout, D.; Tolonen, H.; Parapid, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The relationships were explored of some cardiovascular risk factors to typical (TYP) and atypical (ATYP) fatal coronary events (CHD). Material and methods: Thirteen cohorts of 40-59 year-old men of the Seven Countries Study were followed-up for 40 years (N = 9704 heart disease free subje

  12. Structural Model of psychological risk and protective factors affecting on quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease: A psychocardiology model

    OpenAIRE

    Zohreh Khayyam Nekouei; Alireza Yousefy; Hamid Taher Neshat Doost; Gholamreza Manshaee; Masoumeh Sadeghei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Conducted researches show that psychological factors may have a very important role in the etiology, continuity and consequences of coronary heart diseases. This study has drawn the psychological risk and protective factors and their effects in patients with coronary heart diseases (CHD) in a structural model. It aims to determine the structural relations between psychological risk and protective factors with quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease. Materials and M...

  13. The polypill: the solution for prevention of coronary heart disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendarto Natadidjaja

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In Western countries, cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death and it is expected that it will continue to be so in the near future.(1 If the resulting physical impairment and psychosocial disturbances are also taken into account, clearly this is a serious problem from the viewpoint of productivity, quality of life, as well as community health level. Therefore the institution of preventive measures is an important issue. Unfortunately, however, currently preventive measures that are effective, safe, and at the same time practical and economical, are almost nonexistent.

  14. The Study of Chlamydia Pneumoniae DNA in the Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell of Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Tao; Xu Xiang Guang; Zhang Guo Liang; Fang Weihua

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To detection of chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn) DNA in the circulating mononuclear cell fractions of coronary heart disease and to investigate the association between infection with chlamydia pneumoniae and coronary heart disease (CHD) and prospectively whether blood -based nested polymerase chain reaction ( nPCR ) is useful in identifying Cpn infection. Methods The peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) Cpn DNA was examined using nPCR technique and confirmed by electrophoresis in 150 patients with CHD. Select 55 patients with clinical suspected CHD but angiography result are normal as control group (CG). Then we conducted a prospective , randomized, double - blind, placebo -controlled study of 6 months of azithromycin and placebo treatment in CHD group. Patients with Cpn DNA positive were then randomized to receive azithromycin or placebo. After treatment blood sample were collected for repeated measurement . Results Chlamydia pneumoniae DNA was detected in 49(32.7% ) of 150persons with CHD and in 1 ( 1.8% ) of 55 persons with control group,odds ratio 26.2, 95% confidence interva13.52 - 194.98. The positivity rates of nPCR in CHD groups were higher than those in control group. 16 cases (29. 1% ) in latent coronary heart diseases(LCHD) group , 19 cases (39.6%) in unstable angina(UAP) group ,and 14 cases (29.9%) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI)group were Cpn positive by nPCR. There were no significant difference among in AMIUAP and LCHD group. There were significiant difference in Cpn DNA negative rates after the azithromycin and the placebo treatment. Conclusions Chlamydia pneumoniae is present in PBMC of a significant proportion of persons with CHD. The potential role of chlamydia pneumoniae in coronary atherosclerosis may therefore be more related to acceleration of disease or systemic effects by persistent infection than to sudden initiation of progressive coronary artery disease by acute infection. The detection of Cpn DNA in PBMC with nPCR may be

  15. [Using the Tabu-search-algorithm-based Bayesian network to analyze the risk factors of coronary heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Z; Zhang, X L; Rao, H X; Wang, H F; Wang, X; Qiu, L X

    2016-06-01

    Under the available data gathered from a coronary study questionnaires with 10 792 cases, this article constructs a Bayesian network model based on the tabu search algorithm and calculates the conditional probability of each node, using the Maximum-likelihood. Pros and cons of the Bayesian network model are evaluated to compare against the logistic regression model in the analysis of coronary factors. Applicability of this network model in clinical study is also investigated. Results show that Bayesian network model can reveal the complex correlations among influencing factors on the coronary and the relationship with coronary heart diseases. Bayesian network model seems promising and more practical than the logistic regression model in analyzing the influencing factors of coronary heart disease.

  16. [Competitive sports and leisure-time physical activity in patients with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrinazzi, Claudio; Durin, Ornella; Inama, Giuseppe

    2012-10-01

    During recent years, the central role of exercise in the prevention of cardiovascular disease has gradually been demonstrated, and in 2003 the consensus document of the Council on Clinical Cardiology and Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism on the role of physical exercise in the prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease defined sedentary lifestyle as a modifiable independent cardiovascular risk factor, responsible for 12% of total mortality in the United States and for a 1.9-fold increase in the risk of ischemic heart disease. The reduction in cardiovascular mortality and cardiac ischemic events in subjects who perform regular physical activity is mainly due to the action that exercise plays on the control of cardiovascular risk factors. In particular, physical training has proved capable of improving lipid profile, reducing blood pressure and body weight, and improving glycemic control in diabetic subjects. In patients with coronary artery disease, combined exercise training, including both aerobic activities and strength training, is currently recommended. However, physical training in patients suffering from ischemic heart disease should be carefully prescribed, in order to maximize the positive effects and minimize the risks. It is also important that physical training programs are conducted in suitable facilities, with appropriately trained staff and with technical equipment suitable to deal with any emergency situations.

  17. Depressed heart rate variability is associated with events in patients with stable coronary artery disease and preserved left ventricular function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boven, AJ; Jukema, JW; Haaksma, J; Zwinderman, AH; Crijns, HJGM; Lie, KI

    1998-01-01

    Background Little is known about the value of heart rate variability in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease with a preserved left ventricular function. We hypothesized that in these patients heart rate variability might be a helpful adjunct to conventional parameters to predict clinica

  18. Novel insights into the complexity of ischaemic heart disease derived from combined coronary pressure and flow velocity measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Hoef, T.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis concerns the complexity of ischaemic heart disease, and the crucial role of the coronary microcirculation in its diagnosis and prognosis. After five decades of a stenosis-centered approach towards both its diagnosis and treatment, it is increasingly acknowledged that ischaemic heart

  19. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    the health and outcomes of people with CHD. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of exercise-based CR (exercise training alone or in combination with psychosocial or educational interventions) compared...... artery disease. We included RCTs that reported at least one of the following outcomes: mortality, MI, revascularisations, hospitalisations, health-related quality of life (HRQL), or costs. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened all identified references for inclusion...... based on the above inclusion and exclusion criteria. One author extracted data from the included trials and assessed their risk of bias; a second review author checked data. We stratified meta-analysis by the duration of follow up of trials, i.e. short-term: 6 to 12 months, medium-term: 13 to 36 months...

  20. Ivabradine Prevents Heart Rate Acceleration in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Coronary Heart Disease after Salbutamol Inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta C. Hoppe

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated sinus rhythm is an important side effect of inhaled salbutamol which is especially harmful in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and coronary heart disease (CHD. Cross-over, randomized, open label study design. 20 patients (18 males and two females with COPD stage II–IV and comorbide CHD NYHA class I–III were included. Spirometry with 400 mg salbutamol inhalation was performed at two consecutive days of the study. Patients in group I were prescribed 5 mg ivabradine per os 3 h before salbutamol inhalation solely on the first day of the study and patients of group II received 5 mg ivabradine only on the second day of the study. Salbutamol caused a significant increase of HR by 5.5 bpm (95% CI 0.8; 10.2, p < 0.03. After ivabradine ingestion salbutamol did not change HR significantly by −2.4 bpm (−7.0; 2.3, p = 0.33. The attenuation of HR elevation by ivabradine was significant, p < 0.01. Salbutamol alone increased FEV1 by 6.0% (2.7; 9.3, p < 0.01. This effect was not impaired by ivabradine (FEV1 increase by 7.7% (2.8; 12.6, p < 0.01 versus baseline, p = 0.5 versus no ivabradine. Ivabradine 5 mg per os prevents heart rate acceleration after inhalation of 400 mg salbutamol. Ivabradine has no impact on lung function in patients with moderate-to-very-severe COPD and CHD comorbidity.

  1. Association between resting heart rate and coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Wang, Weijing; Li, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resting heart rate is linked to risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess these associations in general populations and in populations of patients with hypertension or diabetes mellitus. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase and MEDLINE from inception to Mar. 5, 2016. We used a random-effects model to combine study-specific relative risks (RRs). We used restricted cubic splines to assess the dose–response relation. Results: We included 45 nonrandomized prospective cohort studies in the meta-analysis. The multivariable adjusted RR with an increment of 10 beats/min in resting heart rate was 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09–1.14) for coronary artery disease, 1.05 (95% CI 1.01–1.08) for stroke, 1.12 (95% CI 1.02–1.24) for sudden death, 1.16 (95% CI 1.12–1.21) for noncardiovascular diseases, 1.09 (95% CI 1.06–1.12) for all types of cancer and 1.25 (95% CI 1.17–1.34) for noncardiovascular diseases excluding cancer. All of these relations were linear. In an analysis by category of resting heart rate ( 80 beats/min), the RRs were 0.99 (95% CI 0.93–1.04), 1.08 (95% CI 1.01–1.16) and 1.30 (95% CI 1.19–1.43), respectively, for coronary artery disease; 1.08 (95% CI 0.98–1.19), 1.11 (95% CI 0.98–1.25) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.93–1.25), respectively, for stroke; and 1.17 (95% CI 0.94–1.46), 1.31 (95% CI 1.12–1.54) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.39–1.77), respectively, for noncardiovascular diseases. After excluding studies involving patients with hypertension or diabetes, we obtained similar results for coronary artery disease, stroke and noncardiovascular diseases, but found no association with sudden death. Interpretation: Resting heart rate was an independent predictor of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases over all of the studies combined. When the analysis included only studies concerning general populations, resting

  2. Effect of coronary heart disease combined with hyperhomocysteinemia on carotid plaque features and stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Ling Ning; Gang Tian

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of coronary heart disease combined with hyperhomocysteinemia on carotid plaque features and stroke.Methods:A total of 110 patients with coronary heart disease treated from May 2011 to May 2012 were selected for study, and according to the levels of plasma homocysteine (Hcy), they were divided into high Hcy groups (plasma Hcy ≥10 μmol/L) and normal Hcy group (plasma Hcy <10 μmol/L). Carotid ultrasonography was conducted and the plaque features were assessed, plasma levels of plaque stability-related molecules, lipid metabolism indexes and inflammatory mediators of two groups were detected, and the incidence of stroke were followed up for 3 years.Results: The number of instable carotid plaques of high Hcy group was more than that of normal Hcy group, and carotid intima-media thickness was higher than that of normal Hcy group; plasma TG, TC, LDL-C, PAPP-A, OPN, PTX3, ANGPTL4, MMP7, MMP9, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and MCP-1 levels of high Hcy group were significantly higher than those of normal Hcy group, HDL-C, IL-10, IL-13, TGFβ and IL-4 levels were significantly lower than those of normal Hcy group, and plasma ApoA and ApoB levels were not statistically different from those of normal Hcy group; 3 years of follow-up showed that the incidence of stroke of high Hcy group on the 1st year, 2nd year and 3rd year were higher than those of normal Hcy group.Conclusions:Carotid plaque instability increases, and the risk of long-term stroke is higher in coronary heart disease patients with hyperhomocysteinemia.

  3. [The lipoproteic state in patients with coronary heart disease (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, M; Carzaniga, G; Garimoldi, M; Sala, R; Castelfranco, M; Libretti, A

    1981-01-01

    The lipoproteic state of 28 patients with coronary heart disease (CDH) and 44 normal subjects (total N. 72) has been analyzed. In normal subjects the results showed an increase of triglyceride (TG), VLDL with age. For subjects between 20 and 40 years of age, higher values of HDL and lower RF were observed in women than in men. In CHD patients, between 40 and 60 years, higher values of total cholesterol (TC) were observed in women than in men (p less than 0,05). The comparison between male CHD patients and normal male subjects indicated a reduction of HDL and an increase of the risk factor (RF) (p less than 0,05) in coronary patients. However, the female patients showed lower levels of HDL in combination with higher values of TC, LDL, RF, and TG when compared with the control group.

  4. [Methods of the multivariate statistical analysis of so-called polyetiological diseases using the example of coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshits, A M

    1979-01-01

    General characteristics of the multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) is given. Methodical premises and criteria for the selection of an adequate MSA method applicable to pathoanatomic investigations of the epidemiology of multicausal diseases are presented. The experience of using MSA with computors and standard computing programs in studies of coronary arteries aterosclerosis on the materials of 2060 autopsies is described. The combined use of 4 MSA methods: sequential, correlational, regressional, and discriminant permitted to quantitate the contribution of each of the 8 examined risk factors in the development of aterosclerosis. The most important factors were found to be the age, arterial hypertension, and heredity. Occupational hypodynamia and increased fatness were more important in men, whereas diabetes melitus--in women. The registration of this combination of risk factors by MSA methods provides for more reliable prognosis of the likelihood of coronary heart disease with a fatal outcome than prognosis of the degree of coronary aterosclerosis.

  5. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY OF THE STATINS IN PREVENTING AND TREATING OF THE CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shalaev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to stabilize and reverse the atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries due to therapy with atorvastatin and rosuvastatin was demonstrated in recent studies. The advantage of aggressive lipid-lowering therapy compared with standard therapy is proven in patients with both stable and acute forms of ischemic heart disease (IHD. Pleiotropic effects, in particular, effect on endothelial function, ability to reduce the blood level of C-reactive protein are important in the statins mode of action. Risk reduction of cardiovascular complications and slow down of atherosclerosis progression in patients with IHD was significantly associated with decrease in levels of both atherogenic lipids and C-reactive protein.

  6. Consumption of industrial and ruminant trans fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendsen, Nathalie Tommerup; Christensen, R.; Bartels, Else Marie

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to summarize the evidence from observational studies assessing the association between intake of trans fatty acids (TFA) and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), with a specific emphasis on distinguishing between TFA of industrial...... and ruminant origin. By searching five bibliographic databases, analyses from six published and two unpublished prospective cohort studies, assessing the association of intake of TFA with fatal and/or non-fatal CHD, were identified. Four and three studies reported separate associations for intake of ruminant...

  7. Executive function, but not memory, associates with incident coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostamian, Somayeh; van Buchem, Mark A; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2015-01-01

    from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) with Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥24 points. Scores on the Stroop Color-Word Test (selective attention) and the Letter Digit Substitution Test (processing speed) were converted to Z scores and averaged into a composite...... executive function score. Likewise, scores of the Picture Learning Test (immediate and delayed memory) were transformed into a composite memory score. Associations of executive function and memory were longitudinally assessed with risk of coronary heart disease and stroke using multivariable Cox regression...

  8. Analysis of physical fitness and coronary heart disease risk of Dallas area police officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, M L; Gettman, L R; Meyer, B U

    1978-06-01

    Two hundred thirteen male police officers between 21 and 52 years of age volunteered to participate in a physical evaluation and conditioning program. Information concerning the physical fitness status and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) of police officers were shown. Younger police officers (less than 30 years of age) were average in physical fitness levels and CHD risk compared to the population of the same age. Middle-aged police officers were shown to be lower in physical fitness levels and higher in CHD risk compared to their cohorts. The results from this investigation support the need for physical fitness and preventive medicine programs for police officers.

  9. Effectiveness of the Anger Management Group Therapy on Sleep Quality and Anger among the Patients with Coronary Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Radman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Coronary heart disease is one of the main causes of mortality that has a strong relationship with psychological problems specially anger. In addition, the quality of sleep is poor among the patients with coronary heart disease. Therefore, the aim of current study is to investigate the effectiveness of the anger management group therapy on sleep quality and anger among the patients with coronary heart diseases.Materials and Methods: This research was a quasi-experimental study with pre and post-tests. The 30 male patients with coronary heart diseases were selected with a convenience sampling method from Emam Jafare Sadegh’s Hospital in Aligodarz in 2014-2015. The participants were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. Anger management group therapy was conducted with the participation of experimental group during eight sessions (90 minutes per week. The research instruments were the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, and the State-Trait Anger Expression lnventory-2 (STAXI-2. Statistical analysis was conducted by using the analysis of variance.Results: The results indicated that there is a significant difference between means of sleep quality (P=0.001 and anger (P=0.001 by eliminating the effectiveness of pretest (P < 0.01.Conclusion: The Study showed that anger management group therapy with decreasing the level of anger and improving the sleep quality should be considered as a psychological intervention in patients with coronary heart disease.

  10. Coronary Heart Disease Preoperative Gesture Interactive Diagnostic System Based on Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yi-Bo; Chen, Yi-Min; Gao, Ming-Ke; Liu, Quan; Jiang, Si-Yu; Lu, Jia-Hui; Huang, Chen; Li, Ze-Yu; Zhang, Dian-Hua

    2017-08-01

    Coronary heart disease preoperative diagnosis plays an important role in the treatment of vascular interventional surgery. Actually, most doctors are used to diagnosing the position of the vascular stenosis and then empirically estimating vascular stenosis by selective coronary angiography images instead of using mouse, keyboard and computer during preoperative diagnosis. The invasive diagnostic modality is short of intuitive and natural interaction and the results are not accurate enough. Aiming at above problems, the coronary heart disease preoperative gesture interactive diagnostic system based on Augmented Reality is proposed. The system uses Leap Motion Controller to capture hand gesture video sequences and extract the features which that are the position and orientation vector of the gesture motion trajectory and the change of the hand shape. The training planet is determined by K-means algorithm and then the effect of gesture training is improved by multi-features and multi-observation sequences for gesture training. The reusability of gesture is improved by establishing the state transition model. The algorithm efficiency is improved by gesture prejudgment which is used by threshold discriminating before recognition. The integrity of the trajectory is preserved and the gesture motion space is extended by employing space rotation transformation of gesture manipulation plane. Ultimately, the gesture recognition based on SRT-HMM is realized. The diagnosis and measurement of the vascular stenosis are intuitively and naturally realized by operating and measuring the coronary artery model with augmented reality and gesture interaction techniques. All of the gesture recognition experiments show the distinguish ability and generalization ability of the algorithm and gesture interaction experiments prove the availability and reliability of the system.

  11. Premature Coronary Heart Disease and Traditional Risk Factors-Can We Do Better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Sadeghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditional cardiovascular risk factors are strong predictors of an increased likelihood for premature CHD. Considering the benefits of risk factors᾿ management, it is imperative to find and treat them before looking for more unknown and weak risk factors. Objectives: Limited information is available about the demographic and historical characteristics of the patients with premature Coronary Heart Disease (CHD in IR Iran. The main objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of the traditional risk factors in these patients. Also, the researchers hypothesized that there are insufficient risk assessment and preventive intervention methods for the asymptomatic adult population. Methods: This study was conducted on 125 patients with premature CHD (age<50 years who were admitted in two academic hospitals with acute coronary syndromes. The patients were accepted since they had a definite CHD on the basis of acute myocardial infarction (elevated cardiac enzymes or documented CAD in coronary angiography. Results: The mean age of the study population was 42.50±5.65 (26 to 49 years. Among the patients,92 (73.6% were male, 113 (90.4% were married, 58 (46.4% were smokers,19 (15.2% were opium users, 97 (77.6% had dyslipidemia, 44 (35.2% had hypertension, and 33 (26.4% had diabetes mellitus. In addition, family history was presented in 54 patients (43.2%. Conclusions: Premature Coronary Heart Disease is a public health problem. However, there is lack of effective and intensive treatments of well-defined traditional risk factors and prevention methods for the majority of the patients experiencing premature CHD. In sum, there is still plenty of room for improvement of risk management in IR Iran.

  12. Dietary manipulation and social isolation alter disease progression in a murine model of coronary heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Nakagawa-Toyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice with a deficiency in the HDL receptor SR-BI and low expression of a modified apolipoprotein E gene (SR-BI KO/ApoeR61(h/h called 'HypoE' when fed an atherogenic, 'Paigen' diet develop occlusive, atherosclerotic coronary arterial disease (CHD, myocardial infarctions (MI, and heart dysfunction and die prematurely (50% mortality ~40 days after initiation of this diet. Because few murine models share with HypoE mice these cardinal, human-like, features of CHD, HypoE mice represent a novel, small animal, diet-inducible and genetically tractable model for CHD. To better describe the properties of this model, we have explored the effects of varying the composition and timing of administration of atherogenic diets, as well as social isolation vs. group housing, on these animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HypoE mice were maintained on a standard lab chow diet (control until two months of age. Subsequently they received one of three atherogenic diets (Paigen, Paigen without cholate, Western or control diet for varying times and were housed in groups or singly, and we determined the plasma cholesterol levels, extent of cardiomegaly and/or survival. The rate of disease progression could be reduced by lowering the severity of the atherogenic diet and accelerated by social isolation. Disease could be induced by Paigen diets either containing or free of cholate. We also established conditions under which CHD could be initiated by an atherogenic diet and then subsequently, by replacing this diet with standard lab chow, hypercholesterolemia could be reduced and progression to early death prevented. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HypoE mice provide a powerful, surgery-free, diet-'titratable' small animal model that can be used to study the onset of recovery from occlusive, atherosclerotic CHD and heart failure due to MI. HypoE mice can be used for the analysis of the effects of environment (diet, social isolation on a variety of features of

  13. Independent associations of fasting insulin, glucose, and glycated haemoglobin with stroke and coronary heart disease in older women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie A Lawlor

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that variations in fasting glucose and insulin amongst those without frank type 2 diabetes mellitus are important determinants of cardiovascular disease. However, the relative importance of variations in fasting insulin, glucose, and glycated haemoglobin as risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women without diabetes is unclear. Our aim was to determine the independent associations of fasting insulin, glucose, and glycated haemoglobin with coronary heart disease and stroke in older women. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We undertook a prospective cohort study of 3,246 British women aged 60-79 y, all of whom were free of baseline coronary heart disease, stroke, and diabetes, and all of whom had fasting glucose levels below 7 mmol/l. Fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment for insulin sensitivity (HOMA-S were linearly associated with a combined outcome of coronary heart disease or stroke (n = 219 events, but there was no association of fasting glucose or glycated haemoglobin with these outcomes. Results were similar for coronary heart disease and stroke as separate outcomes. The age, life-course socioeconomic position, smoking, and physical activity adjusted hazard ratio for a combined outcome of incident coronary heart disease or stroke per one standard deviation of fasting insulin was 1.14 (95% CI 1.02-1.33. Additional adjustment for other components of metabolic syndrome, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting glucose, and glycated haemoglobin had little effect on this result. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that in women in the 60-79 y age range, insulin resistance, rather than insulin secretion or chronic hyperglycaemia, is a more important risk factor for coronary heart disease and stroke. Below currently used thresholds of fasting glucose for defining diabetes, neither fasting glucose nor glycated haemoglobin are associated with cardiovascular disease.

  14. Coronary heart disease: incidence, risk factors and interventions in Jiaozhou of Shandong province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Hua; Li Dan; Chu Xianming; An Yi; Song Tongxun; Feng Huixin; Lin Peilin

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of heart disease and cause of heart attacks.This study investigated the epidemiological characteristics of CHD and its risk factors in Jiaozhou,Shandong province,to ultimately find a way of reducing the prevalence of cardiovascular disease,and to provide a theoretical basis for establishing a cardiovascular disease management path under the regional medical collaborative mechanism.Methods A questionnaire survey was performed including 1 952 people aged 35 years or older who were questioned by means of stratified,cluster,proportional sampling to investigate the prevalence of CHD and its risk factors.The data were inputted into SPSS11.0 statistical software for processing and analysis.We advised the local medical institutions to establish health files for the residents with CHD and risk factors.They were followed up regularly.Their risk factors and life-style were monitored,and advice was given as to proper medications.Green channels were established,and the patients were transmitted in a timely manner to superior hospitals for better treatment if the necessary treatments were not available in the local hospitals.The control of risk factors was observed after the follow-up for half a year.Results In Jiaozhou,the rates of coronary artery disease,hypertension,diabetes,hyperlipidemia and overweight were 8.15%,28.54%,11.43%,35.46%,and 18.70% respectively.The rates of hypertension,diabetes,hyperlipidemia and overweight were higher than the data published in "The report of Chinese cardiovascular disease 2012"; which are 24%,9.7%,18.6%,and 9.7%,respectively.The control of risk factors improved significantly after the guidance of the residents lifestyle and medication for six months.Conclusions The high prevalence of coronary artery disease in Jiaozhou is closely related to age,gender,diet structure,family history of cardiovascular disease

  15. Perceptions of coronary heart disease: the development and psychometric testing of a measurement scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C W

    2014-01-01

    Individuals' perceptions of coronary heart disease (CHD) have implications for the ways in which they respond to the disease, process risks, make decisions, and take action to reduce CHD risks. This study aimed to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of the perceptions of coronary heart disease scale (PCS) among a Hong Kong Chinese population. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a convenient sample (n = 232) of participants recruited from a variety of catchments including public domains, a cardiac unit, and a cardiac rehabilitation and prevention center. Exploratory factor analysis identified a nine-item, two-factor model that accounted for 52.5% of the total explained variance. The two factors were the perceived risk (five items) and perceived seriousness (four items) of CHD. The PCS demonstrated good content validity; acceptable total, and subscale internal consistency (.73, .61 - .81); and significant contrast-group differences with higher levels of CHD perceptions among males (p = .002), younger participants (p psychometric properties as a short measurement scale, which supports its use in future research. Future validation of this scale is warranted.

  16. Radiologically revealed spine osteoporosis in male with hypertension and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P A Chizhov

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiologically revealed spine osteoporosis in male with hypertension and coronary heart disease Objective. To study prevalence and intensity of spine osteoporosis (OP in men suffering from hypertension (H and coronary heart disease (CHD. Material and methods. 101 men with H and CHD aged 50 to 78 years (mean age 60,6±0,85 years and 37 men of control group without cardiovascular diseases aged 50-66 years (mean age 58,6±0,74 years were examined. Clinical examination, radiological, radiomorphometric spine examination and echocardioscopy were performed. Results. OP was revealed in 34,65% of main group pts what is 3,2 times more frequent than in control group (10,8%, p<0,05. OP intensity in men with H and CHD was significantly higher than in healthy people. Vfertebral fractures were revealed in 12,87+3,3% of main group pts and only in 2,7±2,7% in control group (p<0,05. OP development dependence from cardiac history duration and cardiac pathology severity was demonstrated. Conclusion. The results of the study show significantly higher prevalence of spine OP among men suffering from H and CHD. Long history and severity of cardiovascular pathology clinical signs promote OP frequency and severity increase.

  17. Improving awareness, knowledge and heart-related lifestyle of coronary heart disease among working population through a mHealth programme: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenru; Zhang, Hui; Lopez, Violeta; Wu, Vivien Xi; Poo, Danny Chiang Choon; Kowitlawakul, Yanika

    2015-09-01

    To develop a mHealth programme, entitled 'Care4Heart' for the working population in Singapore and thereafter examine its feasibility and effectiveness in increasing the awareness and knowledge of coronary heart disease and improving their heart-related lifestyle. Teaching and encouraging the working population to adopt a healthier lifestyle could result in preventing and/or decreasing the incidence of coronary heart disease among this population. The use of mobile application (app) is the next logical wave of healthcare support tools to prevent and manage chronic diseases like coronary heart disease. A quasi-experimental longitudinal study design. The study will be conducted in a tertiary university in Singapore. A non-probability, quota sampling of 200 participants will be recruited including 100 academic and research staff, 50 administrative staff and 50 support staff and business owners. Once consent is obtained, the newly developed mobile app will be installed onto the participants' smartphones and a well-trained research assistant will brief the participant on the use of the app. The main outcomes will be measured using the survey questionnaires: Awareness of coronary heart disease, Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire-2, Behavioural Risk Factor Surveillance System and Perceived Stress Scale. Data will be collected at baseline and at the 4th week and 6th month thereafter. If this project is successful, Care4Heart - a mHealth and novel prevention educational programme for the working population in Singapore - can be used to promote knowledge and positive heart-related lifestyle changes to prevent coronary heart disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Ischemic heart disease down-regulates angiotensin type 1 receptor mRNA in human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackenfors, Angelica; Emilson, Malin; Ingemansson, Richard;

    2004-01-01

    Angiotensin II is important in the development of cardiovascular disease. In the present study, angiotensin II receptor mRNA levels were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) in human coronary arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease and controls. Furthermore......, the suitability of artery culture for studying angiotensin receptor changes was evaluated by in vitro pharmacology and real-time PCR. The angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor mRNA levels were down-regulated in human coronary arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease as compared to controls (P

  19. Identification of metabolic biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetic coronary heart diseases based on metabolomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetic coronary heart disease (T2DM-CHD) is a kind of serious and complex disease. Great attention has been paid to exploring its mechanism; however, the detailed understanding of T2DM-CHD is still limited. Plasma samples from 15 healthy controls, 13 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, 15 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and 28 T2DM-CHD patients were analyzed in this research. The potential biomarkers of CHD and T2DM were detected and screened out by 1H NMR-based plasma me...

  20. Risk factors for coronary heart disease and actual diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović-Perišić Nataša

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Recent studies indicate that the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM type 2 is increasing in the world. Chronic hyperglycemia in DM is associated with a long term damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs, especially retina, kidney, nerves and, in addition, with an increased risk of cardiovasclar disease. For a long time the illness has been unknown. Early diagnosis of diabetes could suspend the development of diabetic complications. The aim of the study was to establish risk for the development of coronary disease in the patients evaluated by the use of new diagnostic criteria for DM. Methods. The study included 930 participants without diagnosis of DM, hypertension, dyslipidemia, nor coronary heart disease two years before the study. The patients went through measuring of fasting plasma glycemia, erythrocytes, hematocrit, cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. In the group with hyperglycemia the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test was performed. We analyzed ECG and made blood pressure monitoring, and also measured body mass, height, waist and hip circumference. We analyzed life style, especially smoking, and exercise and family history. Results. Diabetes prevalence was 2.68%, and prevalences of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and DM were 12.15%. Average age of males and females was 38 and 45 years, respectively. In the healthy population there was higher frequency of smokers (55% vs 42%, but in the population with hyperglycemia there were more obesity (23% vs 10.5%, hypertension (39% vs 9%, hypercholesterolemia (76% vs 44.1%, lower HDL-C (52.2% vs 25.7%. Cummulative risk factor in healthy subjects, and those with hyperglycemia were 5.6% and 14%, respectively. Conclusion. Subjects with hyperglicemia without diagnosis of DM have higher risk factors for coronary heart disease.

  1. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Heart diseases that affect women more than men include Coronary ...

  2. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kivimäki, M.; Jokela, M.; Nyberg, S.T.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Fransson, E.I.; Alfredsson, L.; Bjorner, J.B.; Borritz, M.; Burr, H.; Casini, A.; Clays, E.; Bacquer, D. de; Dragano, N.; Erbel, R.; Geuskens, G.A.; Hamer, M.; Hooftman, W.E.; Houtman, I.L.; Jöckel, K.H.; Kittel, F.; Knutsson, A.; Koskenvuo, M.; Lunau, T.; Madsen, I.E.; Nielsen, M.L.; Nordin, M.; Oksanen, T.; Pejtersen, J.H.; Pentti, J.; Rugulies, R.; Salo, P.; Shipley, M.J.; Siegrist, J.; Steptoe, A.; Suominen, S.B.; Theorell, T.; Vahtera, J.; Westerholm, P.J.M.; O'Reilly, D.; Kumari, M.; Batty, G.D.; Ferrie, J.E.; Virtanen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. Methods: We identified

  3. Effect of Shengmai Injection on Vascular Endothelial and Heart Functions in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease Complicated with Diabetes Mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ya-chen; LU Bao-jing; ZHAO Mei-hua; RONG Ye-zhi; CHEN Rui-ming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of Shengrnai injection (生脉注射液, SMI) on vascular endothelial and heart functions in coronary heart disease patients complicated with diabetes mellitus (CHD-DM). Methods: One hundred and twenty patients with CHD-DM, their diagnosis confirmed by coronary arteriography, were equally randomized into a control group treated with conventional treatment and a treated group treated with conventional treatment plus SMI. The changes in blood levels of nitric oxide (NO), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ ), as well as endothelium-dependent vascular dilating function and heart function in the patients were observed before treatment and after the 3-week treatment. Results: After being treated with SMI for 3 weeks, in the treated group, blood level of NO was raised significantly from 69.8 ± 33.1 μ mol/L to 120.1 ± 50.8 μ mol/L, and ET-1 was lowered from 70.1 ± 32.1 ng/L to 46.2±21.3 ng/L, respectively (P<0.01); that of Ang Ⅱ was lowered from 81.3 ± 24.3 ng/L to 50.2 ± 27.3 ng/L (P<0.01); brachial arterial post-congestion blood flow increasing rate was raised from 389.4 ± 26.3% to 459.3 ± 27.8% (P<0.01); and the improvement in heart function as seen through the ejection fraction (EF) was increased from 44 ± 5% to 68 ± 6% (P<0.01), all the changes being more significant than those in the control group (all P<0.01). Conclusion: SMI can improve not only the endothelial function in CHD-DM patients, but also heart contraction significantly.

  4. Behavioral, emotional and neurobiological determinants of coronary heart disease risk in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarino, Viola; Bremner, J Douglas

    2017-03-01

    Women have more of the stress-related behavioral profile that has been linked to cardiovascular disease than men. For example, women double the rates of stress-related mental disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than men, and have higher rates of exposure to adversity early in life. This profile may increase women's long-term risk of cardiometabolic conditions linked to stress, especially coronary heart disease (CHD). In addition to having a higher prevalence of psychosocial stressors, women may be more vulnerable to the adverse effects of these stressors on CHD, perhaps through altered neurobiological physiology. Emerging data suggest that young women are disproportionally susceptible to the adverse effects of stress on the risk of cardiovascular disease, both in terms of initiating the disease as well as worsening the prognosis in women who have already exhibited symptoms of the disease. Women's potential vulnerability to psychosocial stress could also help explain their higher propensity toward abnormal coronary vasomotion and microvascular disease compared with men.

  5. Coronary heart disease incidence in women by waist circumference within categories of body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canoy, Dexter; Cairns, Benjamin J; Balkwill, Angela; Wright, F Lucy; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian; Beral, Valerie

    2013-10-01

    High body mass index (BMI) and large waist circumference are separately associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) risk but these measures are highly correlated. Their separate associations with incident CHD, cross-classifying one variable by the other, are less investigated in large-scale studies. We examined these associations in a large UK cohort (the Million Women Study), which is a prospective population-based study. We followed 496,225 women (mean age 60 years) with both waist circumference and BMI measurements who had no vascular disease or cancer. Adjusted relative risk and 20-year cumulative CHD incidence (first coronary hospitalization or death) from age 55 to 74 years were calculated using Cox regression. Plasma apolipoproteins were assayed in 6295 randomly selected participants. There were 10,998 incident coronary events after mean follow up of 5.1 years. Within each BMI category (waist circumference; within each waist circumference category (waist circumference waist circumference ≥80 cm, with 1 in 8 (95% confidence interval 1 in 7 to 9) women developing CHD over the same period. Similar associations for apolipoprotein B to A1 ratio across adiposity categories were observed, particularly in non-obese women. Our conclusions were that both waist circumference and BMI are independently associated with incident CHD.

  6. [Efficacy of an intensive prevention programme of coronary heart disease: 5 year follow-up outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Miguel A; Subirana, Isaac; Ramos, Rafael; Franzi, Alicia; Vila, Joan; Marrugat, Jaume

    2008-04-19

    Most evidence on the efficacy of intensive preventive programs of secondary prevention of coronary diseases comes from Anglo-Saxon countries and effectiveness remains controversial. We have scarce information about the efficacy of these types of programs in Spain. In the present analysis we show the results of the ICAR (Intervención en la Comunidad de Alto Riesgo coronario) study, aimed to analyze the efficacy of an intensive preventive program primary care based in reducing the cardiovascular recurrences and mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. We designed a randomized clinical trial, multicenter and community based, which included 23 health care areas in Catalonia, Spain. We followed for 5 years 2 cohorts of patients with coronary heart disease, aged 30-80 years. The intervention group was quarterly examined by their general practitioner, who adjusted treatments to control their cardiovascular risk factors thoroughly and reinforced life style behaviours. In order to do that, patient's weight and blood pressure were determined in each visit and laboratory test carried out twice a year. Patients in the control group received the usual care. In order to analyze the effect of the intervention cardiovascular recurrences and mortality were registered. We included 983 patients. Mean (standard deviation) age was 64 (10) and 74.5% were men. During the follow-up 235 patients suffered some non-fatal cardiovascular recurrence (109 vs 126 in the control and intervention group, respectively; p = 0.84), and 45 died from cardiovascular recurrences (23 vs 22, respectively; p = 0.57). Adjusted hazard ratio of cardiovascular event and total mortality, for the intervention group were 1.01 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-1.39), and 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 0.54-1.56), respectively. The implementation of an intensive secondary prevention program based on periodical reminds to patients with stable coronary heart disease to attend their general practitioners did not

  7. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease and anemia in patients with coronary artery disease with normal serum creatinine undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions: relation to New York Heart Association class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyszko, Jolanta; Bachorzewska-Gajewska, Hanna; Malyszko, Jacek; Levin-Iaina, Nomy; Iaina, Adrian; Dobrzycki, Slawomir

    2010-08-01

    Kidney disease and cardiovascular disease seem to be lethally synergistic and both are approaching the epidemic level. A reduced glomerular filtration rate is associated with increased mortality risk in patients with heart failure. Many patients with congestive heart failure are anemic. Anemia is very often associated with chronic kidney disease. To assess--in relation to New York Heart Association class--the prevalence of anemia and chronic kidney disease in patients with normal serum creatinine in a cohort of 526 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. GFR was estimated using the simplified MDRD formula, the Cockcroft-Gault formula, the Jeliffe and the novel CKD-EPI formula. According to the WHO definition the prevalence of anemia in our study was 21%. We observed a progressive decline in GFR and hemoglobin concentration together with a rise in NYHA class. Significant correlations were observed between eGFR and systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, age, NYHA class, complications of PCI, including bleeding, and major adverse cardiac events. The prevalence of anemia and chronic kidney disease is high in patients undergoing PCI despite normal serum creatinine, particularly in higher NYHA class. Lower eGFR and hemoglobin are associated with more complications, including bleeding after PCI and higher prevalence of major adverse cardiac events. In patients with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, GFR should be estimated since renal dysfunction and subsequent anemia are important risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  8. Cigarette smoking inhibits the anti-platelet activity of aspirin in patients with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-ju; ZHANG Hong-yin; MIAO Cheng-long; TANG Ri-bo; DU Xin; SHI Ji-hui; MA Chang-sheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective Tobacco smoking results in increased platelet aggregability, which suggests that low-dose aspirin used in common clinical practice may not effectively inhibit platelet activity in smokers with coronary heart disease (CHD). This review was performed to assess the effect of aspirin on platelet aggregation in patients with CHD.Data sources We performed an electronic literature search of MEDLINE (starting from the beginning to March 15, 2009)using the term "smoking" or "tobacco" paired with the following: "platelet", "aspirin" or "coronary heart disease".Study selection We looked for review articles regarding the effect of tobacco smoking on platelet activity and on the anti-platelet efficacy of aspirin in healthy people and patients with CHD. The search was limited in "core clinical journal".In total, 1321 relevant articles were retrieved, and 36 articles were ultimately cited.Results Tobacco smoking results in increased platelet aggregability, which can be inhibited by low-dose aspirin in the healthy population. However, in patients with CHD, the increased platelet aggregability can not be effectively inhibited by the same low-dose of aspirin. A recent study indicated that clopidogrel or an increased dose of aspirin can effectively inhibit the increased platelet aggregability induced by tobacco smoking in patients with CHD.Conclusions It is important for patients with CHD to quit smoking. For the current smoker, it may be necessary to take larger doses of aspirin than normal or take an adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitor along with aspirin to effectively inhibit the increased platelet activity.

  9. Educational class inequalities in the incidence of coronary heart disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veronesi, Giovanni; Ferrario, Marco M.; Kuulasmaa, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the burden of social inequalities in coronary heart disease (CHD) and to identify their major determinants in 15 European populations. Methods: The MORGAM (MOnica Risk, Genetics, Archiving and Monograph) study comprised 49 cohorts of middle-aged European adults free of CHD ....... Conclusions: Social inequalities in CHD are still widespread in Europe. Since the major determinants of inequalities followed geographical and gender-specific patterns, European-level interventions should be tailored across different European regions....... compared with the most educated, respectively. These figures corresponded to 48% and 71% of the average event rates in each gender group. Inequalities in CHD mortality were mainly driven by incidence in the Nordic countries, Scotland and Lithuania, and by 28-day case-fatality in the remaining central......Objective: To estimate the burden of social inequalities in coronary heart disease (CHD) and to identify their major determinants in 15 European populations. Methods: The MORGAM (MOnica Risk, Genetics, Archiving and Monograph) study comprised 49 cohorts of middle-aged European adults free of CHD...

  10. Image Quality of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography with 320-Row Area Detector Computed Tomography in Children with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Akihiro; Sato, Shuhei; Kanie, Yuichiro; Tanaka, Takashi; Inai, Ryota; Akagi, Noriaki; Morimitsu, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess factors affecting image quality of 320-row computed tomography angiography (CTA) of coronary arteries in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). We retrospectively reviewed 28 children up to 3 years of age with CHD who underwent prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-gated 320-row CTA with iterative reconstruction. We assessed image quality of proximal coronary artery segments using a five-point scale. Age, body weight, average heart rate, and heart rate variability were recorded and compared between two groups: patients with good diagnostic image quality in all four coronary artery segments and patients with at least one coronary artery segment with nondiagnostic image quality. Altogether, 96 of 112 segments (85.7 %) had diagnostic-quality images. Patients with nondiagnostic segments were significantly younger (10.0 ± 11.6 months) and had lower body weight (5.9 ± 2.9 kg) (each p heart rate and heart rate variability between the two imaging groups were not significant. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for predicting patients with nondiagnostic image quality revealed an optimal body weight cutoff of ≤5.6 kg and an optimal age cutoff of ≤12.5 months. Prospective ECG-gated 320-row CTA with iterative reconstruction provided feasible image quality of coronary arteries in children with CHD. Younger age and lower body weight were factors that led to poorer image quality of coronary arteries.

  11. Effect of Cytochrome P450 2C19 681G>A Polymorphism on Premature Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-hai Chi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19 681G>A polymorphisms and the age of development of coronary heart disease. Additionally, the study might find some biological indicators at the gene level that could help to predict and evaluate the risk of coronary heart disease in time. Methods: This study included 352 individuals with coronary heart disease. Polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP was used to identify CYP2C19 681G>A. The objects were divided into wild type (GG or homozygous CYP2C19*1 wild-type and mutant type (GA/AA or the mutant CYP2C19*2 allele on the basis of genotype. The association between CYP2C19 gene polymorphism and the age of onset of coronary heart disease was assessed by multivariate linear regression analysis. Results: There was a significant association in the age of onset between the two groups (t=3.398, P=0.001, which was 58.51+12.72 years in the wild type and 53.95+11.63 years in the mutant group. The frequency of CYP2C19 681A (CYP2C19*2 allele was 3.32, 0.268, 0.227 in different age groups, which was significantly different (χ2=10.745, P=0.005 in different groups, as well as in the genotype. The result, assessed by multiple linear regression, showed that genotype, smoking, obesity, and hyperlipidemia affect the age of onset of coronary heart disease (β was -0.167, 0.156, 0.155, and 0.112, PA gene polymorphism may be one of the risk factors in susceptibility to early onset of coronary heart disease, but not an independent factor because other factors may play a synergistic role.

  12. Stroke Is Predicted by Low Visuospatial in Relation to Other Intellectual Abilities and Coronary Heart Disease by Low General Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajantie, Eero; Räikkönen, Katri; Henriksson, Markus; Leskinen, Jukka T.; Forsén, Tom; Heinonen, Kati; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Osmond, Clive; Barker, David J. P.; Eriksson, Johan G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Low intellectual ability is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Most studies have used a general intelligence score. We studied whether three different subscores of intellectual ability predict these disorders. Methods We studied 2,786 men, born between 1934 and 1944 in Helsinki, Finland, who as conscripts at age 20 underwent an intellectual ability test comprising verbal, visuospatial (analogous to Raven's progressive matrices) and arithmetic reasoning subtests. We ascertained the later occurrence of coronary heart disease and stroke from validated national hospital discharge and death registers. Results 281 men (10.1%) had experienced a coronary heart disease event and 131 (4.7%) a stroke event. Coronary heart disease was predicted by low scores in all subtests, hazard ratios for each standard deviation (SD) lower score ranging from 1.21 to 1.30 (confidence intervals 1.08 to 1.46). Stroke was predicted by a low visuospatial reasoning score, the corresponding hazard ratio being 1.23 (95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.46), adjusted for year and age at testing. Adjusted in addition for the two other scores, the hazard ratio was 1.40 (1.10 to 1.79). This hazard ratio was little affected by adjustment for socioeconomic status in childhood and adult life, whereas the same adjustments attenuated the associations between intellectual ability and coronary heart disease. The associations with stroke were also unchanged when adjusted for systolic blood pressure at 20 years and reimbursement for adult antihypertensive medication. Conclusions Stroke is predicted by low visuospatial reasoning scores in relation to scores in the two other subtests. This association may be mediated by common underlying causes such as impaired brain development, rather than by mechanisms associated with risk factors shared by stroke and coronary heart disease, such as socio-economic status, hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:23144789

  13. Stroke is predicted by low visuospatial in relation to other intellectual abilities and coronary heart disease by low general intelligence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero Kajantie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low intellectual ability is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease and stroke. Most studies have used a general intelligence score. We studied whether three different subscores of intellectual ability predict these disorders. METHODS: We studied 2,786 men, born between 1934 and 1944 in Helsinki, Finland, who as conscripts at age 20 underwent an intellectual ability test comprising verbal, visuospatial (analogous to Raven's progressive matrices and arithmetic reasoning subtests. We ascertained the later occurrence of coronary heart disease and stroke from validated national hospital discharge and death registers. RESULTS: 281 men (10.1% had experienced a coronary heart disease event and 131 (4.7% a stroke event. Coronary heart disease was predicted by low scores in all subtests, hazard ratios for each standard deviation (SD lower score ranging from 1.21 to 1.30 (confidence intervals 1.08 to 1.46. Stroke was predicted by a low visuospatial reasoning score, the corresponding hazard ratio being 1.23 (95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.46, adjusted for year and age at testing. Adjusted in addition for the two other scores, the hazard ratio was 1.40 (1.10 to 1.79. This hazard ratio was little affected by adjustment for socioeconomic status in childhood and adult life, whereas the same adjustments attenuated the associations between intellectual ability and coronary heart disease. The associations with stroke were also unchanged when adjusted for systolic blood pressure at 20 years and reimbursement for adult antihypertensive medication. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke is predicted by low visuospatial reasoning scores in relation to scores in the two other subtests. This association may be mediated by common underlying causes such as impaired brain development, rather than by mechanisms associated with risk factors shared by stroke and coronary heart disease, such as socio-economic status, hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  14. Genetics of coronary heart disease with reference to ApoAICⅡI-AIV gene region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suraksha; Agrawal; Sarabjit; Mastana

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are affected by multiple factors like genetic as well as environmental hence they reveal factorial nature. The evidences that genetic factors are susceptible for developing cardiovascular diseases come from twin studies and familial aggregation. Different ethnic populations reveal differences in the prevalence coronary artery disease(CAD) pointing towards the genetic susceptibility. With progression in molecular techniques different developments have been made to comprehend the disease physiology. Molecular markers have also assisted to recognize genes that may provide evidences to evaluate the role of genetic factors in causation of susceptibility towards CAD. Numerous studies suggest the contribution of specific "candidate genes", which correlate with various roles/pathways that are involved in the coronary heart disease. Different studies have revealed that there are large numbers of genes which are involved towards the predisposition of CAD. However, these reports are not consistent. One of the reasons could be weak contribution of genetic susceptibility of these genes. Genome wide associations show different chromosomal locations which dock, earlier unknown, genes which may attribute to CAD. In the present review different ApoAI-CⅡI-AIV gene clusters have been discussed.

  15. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic heart disease (DHD) increases the likelihood of earlier and more ... also tend to have less success from certain heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and ...

  16. Coronary heart disease risk factors in a rural and urban Orange Free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dietary habits, risk factor prevalence, morbidity and mortality ... measure of regional fat distribution and as an independent. IHO risk factor.9 ... An overview ofthe coronary heart ..... cholesterol levels are due mainly to a diet high in saturated fat ...

  17. PCOS, coronary heart disease, stroke and the influence of obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.C.M. de Groot; O.M. Dekkers; J.A. Romijn; S.W.M. Dieben; F.M. Helmerhorst

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at risk of arterial disease. We examined the risk of (non) fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke in patients with PCOS and ovulatory women without PCOS, and assessed whether obesity might explain a higher risk of CHD or stroke. ME

  18. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease ... can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias) A ...

  19. Impact of persistence and non-persistence in leisure time physical activity on coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality: The Copenhagen City Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnohr, Peter; O'Keefe, James H; Lange, Peter; Jensen, Gorm Boje; Marott, Jacob Louis

    2017-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of persistence and non-persistence in leisure time physical activity on coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality. Methods and results In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we prospectively followed 12,314 healthy subjects for 33 years of maximum follow-up with at least two repeated measures of physical activity. The association between persistence and non-persistence in leisure time physical activity, coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality were assessed by multivariable Cox regression analyses. Coronary heart disease mortality for persistent physical activity in leisure compared to persistent sedentary activity were: light hazard ratio (HR) 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63-0.92, moderate HR 0.52; 95% CI 0.41-0.67, and high physical activity HR 0.51; 95% CI, 0.30-0.88. The differences in longevity were 2.8 years for light, 4.5 years for moderate and 5.5 years for high physical activity. A substantial increase in physical activity was associated with lower coronary heart disease mortality (HR 0.75; 95% CI 0.52-1.08) corresponding to 2.4 years longer life, whereas a substantial decrease in physical activity was associated with higher coronary heart disease mortality (HR 1.61; 95% CI 1.11-2.33) corresponding to 4.2 years shorter life than the unchanged group. A similar pattern was observed for all-cause mortality. Conclusion We found inverse dose-response relationships between persistent leisure time physical activity and both coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality. A substantial increase in physical activity was associated with a significant gain in longevity, whereas a decrease in physical activity was associated with even greater loss of longevity.

  20. The rationale for heart team decision-making for patients with stable, complex coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Head (Stuart); S. Kaul (Sanjay); M. Mack (Michael); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); D.P. Taggart (David); D.R. Holmes (David); M.B. Leon (Martin); J. Marco (Jean); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractStable complex coronary artery disease can be treated with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or medical therapy. Multidisciplinary decision-making has gained more emphasis over the recent years to select the most optimal treatment strategy

  1. How Does Heart Disease Affect Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Does Heart Disease Affect Women? Español In the United States, 1 ... about coronary MVD and broken heart syndrome. Coronary Heart Disease CHD is a disease in which plaque (plak) ...

  2. Correlation between calcium and phosphate levels to calculus accumulation on coronary heart disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahaya, Cindy; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) or Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is a disease that happened because of blood flow being blocked by atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a process of hardening of the arteries which characterized by thickening and loss of elasticity of the intimal layer of vascular wall, by lipid deposit. Periodontitis is a chronic multifactorial inflammatory disease caused by microorganism and characterized by progressive destruction of the tooth supporting apparatus leading to tooth loss. Many studies use saliva as a valuable source for clinically information, as an asset for early diagnosis, prognostic and reviewer for pascatherapy status. Dental calculus had happened as a consequence of saliva supersaturation by calcium and phosphate. Salivary flow rate and its composition influence the formation of calculus. Increasing salivary calcium levels is characteristic of periodontitis patients. An important hipotesis in Cardiology is chronic infections contribute in atherosclerosis. Objective: To analyse the correlation between calcium and phosphate levels in saliva to calculus accumulation on CHD patients. Result: Correlation analysis between salivary calcium levels with calculus accumulation in patients with CHD and non-CHD showed no significant p value, p=0.59 and p=0.518. Correlation analysis between salivary phosphate levels and calculus accumulation showed no significant p value, p=0.836 for CHD patients and p=0.484 for non-CHD patients. Conclusion: There are no correlation between calcium levels and phosphate levels with calculus accumulation in CHD patients. Further research need to be done.

  3. Cell-cell interaction in blood flow in patients with coronary heart disease (in vitro study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions are one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. We have chosen the method of reconstruction of pulsative blood flow in vitro in the experimental set. Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Studied flow was of constant volumetric blood flow velocity (1 ml/h). Diameter of tube in use was comparable with coronary arteries diameter. Glucose solution and unfractured heparin were used as the nonspecial irritants of studied flow. Erythrocytes space structure in flow differs in all groups of patients in our study (men with stable angina pectoris (SAP), myocardial infarction (MI) and practically healthy men (PHM). Intensity of erythrocytes aggregate formation was maximal in patients with SAP, but time of their "construction/deconstruction" at glucose injection was minimal. Phenomena of primary clotting formation in patients with SAP of high function class was reconstructed under experimental conditions. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with SAP, MI and PHP but modulated the cell profile in the flow. Received data correspond with results of animal model studies and noninvasive blood flow studies in human. Results of our study reveal differences in blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease and PHP under irritating conditions as the possible framework of metabolic model of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  4. A CORRELATION STUDY BETWEEN CONVENTIONAL LIPID PARAMETERS AND HS - CRP IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangaswamy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coronary heart disease (CHD is the most common form of heart disease. Changes in lifestyle, decreased physical activity, dietary modifications etc., in indian population is considered to be the major risk factor. By 2020 it is estimated that it will be th e major cause of death in the world. High sensitivity CRP (hs - CRP test measures very small amounts of CRP in the blood and is helpful even in healthy individuals to assess their potential risk for heart ailments. The hs - CRP levels are directly proportiona l to extent source of CHD which indicates that the hs - CRP has positive correlation with the disease burden. Hence the present study was undertaken. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was done by taking two groups controls and cases between the ages 25 - 60 year s. Fasting blood samples were collected and analysed for estimation of triglycerides, cholesterol, LDL - cholesterol, HDL - cholesterol and hs - crp levels. RESULT: Serum levels of cholesterol, TG, LDL - C, and hs - CRP (p - value 0.0001 were significantly increased and HDL - C (p - value 0.0002 was significantly decreased in cases as compared to healthy controls. CONCLUSION: It is seen that hs - CRP level is significantly elevated in cases (MI patients than the normal controls. So the present study shows a significant a nd positive correlation with conventional lipid profile parameters.

  5. Ultrasound assessment of mitral annular displacement in patients with coronary heart disease and its correlation with left heart function and serum indexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing-Yan Lai

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the ultrasound assessment of mitral annular displacement in patients with coronary heart disease and its correlation with left heart function and serum indexes. Methods:A total of 89 patients with coronary heart disease were divided into angina pectoris group 42 cases and myocardial infarction group 47 cases according to the illness, and 58 cases of healthy subjects were included in control group. Values of mitral annular displacement (MAD) parameters, left heart function indexes and serum illness-related indexes of three groups were detected, and the correlation between values of MAD parameters and values of cardiac function indexes and serum illness-related indexes were further analyzed.Results:MAD parameters TMAD1, TMAD2 and TMADmid values, heart function LVEF values and serum CysC level of myocardial infarction group and angina pectoris group were lower than those of control group, and cardiac function LVEDD, LVESD and A/E values as well as serum H-FABP, ICTP, Hcy and vWF levels were higher than those of control group (P<0.05); MAD parameters TMAD1, TMAD2 and TMADmid values of patients with coronary heart disease were negatively correlated with LVEDD, LVESD and A/E values as well as H-FABP, ICTP, Hcy and vWF levels, and were positively correlated with LVEF value and CysC level (P<0.05). Conclusions:Ultrasound assessment of mitral annular displacement in patients with coronary heart disease can early diagnose coronary heart disease and judge the disease severity, and it plays a positive role in optimizing disease prognosis.

  6. Roma coronary heart disease patients have more medical risk factors and greater severity of coronary heart disease than non-Roma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudzinova, A; Nagyova, I; Studencan, M; Rosenberger, J; Skodova, Z; Vargova, H; Middel, B; Reijneveld, S A; van Dijk, J P

    2013-06-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity world-wide. Evidence on ethnic differences between the Roma and non-Roma regarding medical risk factors is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess differences in medical risk factors and the severity of CHD in Roma compared with non-Roma CHD patients, adjusted for gender, age and education. Six hundred seventy four patients were included in this cross-sectional study (132 Roma, 542 non-Roma). Data on medical risk factors, symptoms, medication and severity of CHD were obtained from medical records. After matching Roma and non-Roma according to education, linear and logistic regression analyses with adjustments for gender and age were used. Compared with non-Roma, Roma patients had significantly more risk factors and more severe types of CHD. They were treated less frequently with statins and beta-blockers, were more frequently left on pharmacotherapy and surgically revascularised. These differences remained after controlling for education, gender and age. Roma CHD patients have a worse risk profile at entry of care and seem to be undertreated compared with non-Roma CHD patients.

  7. Prognosis by C-reactive protein and matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels in stable coronary heart disease during 15 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, N; Kragelund, C; Steffensen, R;

    2012-01-01

    associate with prognosis in patients with stable coronary heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: We measured baseline plasma CRP and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in 1090 patients with stable coronary heart disease and as the primary composite endpoint detected incident unstable angina, myocardial infarction...

  8. Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack Updated:Oct 4, ... cannot reach the heart muscle. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an uncommon occurrence, but because it ...

  9. [Stress echocardiography: a sensitive method in diagnosis of coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertes, H; Erbel, R; Nixdorff, U; Mohr-Kahaly, S; Wölfinger, D; Meyer, J

    1991-10-01

    Prevalence of coronary artery disease requires sensitive diagnostic methods for screening and follow-up. The sensitivity of stress-ECG is low, 201-thallium scintigraphy is more sensitive but has the disadvantages of radiation and costs. Improved echocardiographic resolution with better identification of endocardial border as well as digital imaging technique have increased the interest in stress echocardiography as a diagnostic tool in coronary artery disease since a decade ago the clinical usefulness of stress echocardiography has been demonstrated. For stress echocardiography a semisupine bicycle position for continuous recording of echocardiographic images from the apical position in the two-chamber- and RAO-view was developed. Echocardiographic images were digitized with a frame rate of 30/s and stored on optical discs with a storage capacity of 1 Gbyte. Rest and exercise images were analysed simultaneously for newly-occurring wall motion abnormalities or deterioration of already present hypokinesia or extension of existing wall motion abnormalities. Segmental wall motion was scored according to the scheme in Figure 2. In addition end-diastolic, end-systolic volume, and ejection fraction were calculated. In a patient population of 150, 30 female and 120 male, age 56.6 +/- 8.3 years, we could confirm the results reported by other working groups and demonstrate a high sensitivity in the diagnosis of single vessel disease. Our technique with the patient cycling in semi-supine position allows continuous echocardiographic registration during exercise and offers adequate image quality. The mean workload at peak stress was 127 +/- 30 watts, the maximal heart rate 137 +/- 18 bpm. Digital cine-loop imaging allowed evaluation of the examinations in about 90% of the cases. The sensitivity in the whole study group was 87%, the specificity 80%. Under full antianginal medication, 43% of the patients developed angina pectoris during exercise and 58% had a positive stress

  10. ROLE OF GLYCAEMIA LEVEL IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF INTERSTITIAL COLLAGEN IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Rudenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A role of blood glucose levels in the development of interstitial collagen has been studied in 84 patients (53 women and 31 men, average age 60 ± 2.4 years with coronary heart disease (CHD. All patients were divided into twocomparable groups: a study group including patients with coronary heart disease andtype 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and a control group consisting of patients with coronary heart disease without DM. All patients received standard medical therapy as recommended by the European Society of Cardiology. The level of blood glucose in both groups was assessed by the standard technique, a degree of interstitial collagen volume fraction (ICVF was measured using the formula of J. Shirani et al. The data were processed by parametric and nonparametric statistical methods. It has been proved that hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes contributes to the development of ICVF, the degree of which increases with the rise of blood glucose level. A high level ofICVF in patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes type 2 can be a predictor of myocardial dyssynchrony development and heart failure progression, therefore, a close monitoring and timely correction of changes of blood glucose levelsare recommended to prevent the complication development. ICVF evaluation should become a routine diagnostic method in all patients with type 2 diabetes.

  11. Clinical feasibility and safety of a novel miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory in diagnosis and treatment for coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Ming; Han Yaling; Wang Geng; Yao Tianming; Sun Jingyang; Li Fei; Xu Kai

    2014-01-01

    Background The lack of medical facilities causes delayed diagnosis and treatment of coronary heart disease in remote mountainous area and/or at disaster site.The miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory was developed to be an intervention platform for coronary heart disease diagnosis and treatment by our team.Pre-clinical research indicated that the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory performed well in the rescue of critical cardiovascular diseases,even ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical safety and timeliness of the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory for emergent coronary interventional diagnosis and treatment.Methods X-ray radiation safety and disinfection efficacy in the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory were tested during working status.Coronary angiography and/or percutaneous coronary intervention were performed in remote mountainous areas on patients who were first diagnosed as having coronary heart disease by senior interventional cardiologists.The percutaneous coronary intervention procedures and results from patients in the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory were compared with patients who were treated in the hospital catheter lab.Results The X-ray radiation dosages in the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory were 39.55 μGy/s,247.4 μGy/h,90.3 μGy/h and 39.4 μGy/h which were corresponded to 0 m,1 m,2 m and 3 m away from the tube central of the medium C-arm.And the radiation dosages used in the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory were less than the corresponding positions in the hospital catheter lab.The numbers of bacteria colonies in the miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory in different environments range from (60±8) cfu/m3 to (120±10) cfu/m3 and met the demands of percutaneous coronary intervention.A total of 17 patients who received angiography in the miniature mobile

  12. Apparent protective effect of high density lipoprotein against coronary heart disease in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李健斋; 陈曼丽; 王抒; 董军; 曾平; 侯鲁维

    2004-01-01

    Background This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and coronary heart disease (CHD)death and to explore the protective effect of HDL against CHD in the elderly Chinese.Methods Started from 1986, 1211 retirees (92% males) were enrolled consecutively and studied prospectively. The average starting age was 70 ±9 years, and that at the end of the study was 80 ±9years. During the follow-up study, all the participants received yearly physical examination and blood chemistry survey from 1986 -2000. The average duration of the follow up study was 11.2 years. The end point of this study was either attacks of AMI or death due to CHD and other causes. CHD risk factors were screened by logistic regression analysis. According to their HDL-C levels, cases were divided into Iow (<1.03 mmol/L), medium (or normal, 1.03 - 1.56 mmol/L) and high(>1.56mmol/L) level groups, the differences in incidence of AMI and CHD death in each group were analyzed.Results The cumulative attacks of acute coronary syndrome (mostly AMI) were 214 cases,including 89 cases of coronary death and 308 death caused by other diseases during the follow up study. AMI occurrence and CHD death in normal HDL-C group were lower than those in the low HDLC group by 40% and 53%; and those in the high HDL-C group were lower than in the normal group by 56% and 50%, respectively. Statistical analysis on normal lipid cases (411 cases, total cholesterol<5. 17mmol/L, triglyceride<1.69 mmol/L) revealed that the cases at low HDL-C level had similar rates of AMI events and CHD mortality as those of the entire group (including hyperlipidemia);however, AMI attacks and CHD deaths decreased significantly at the normal and high HDL-C levels.The results demonstrated that the protective effect of HDL against coronary artery disease is more prominent in people with low lipid level.Conclusion Low HDL is an important

  13. C-Reactive Protein and Coronary Heart Disease: All Said—Is Not It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Strang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP and coronary heart disease (CHD have been the subject of intensive investigations over the last decades. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between moderately elevated CRP levels and incident CHD whereas genetic studies have shown that polymorphisms associated with elevated CRP levels do not increase the risk of ischemic vascular disease, suggesting that CRP might be a bystander rather than a causal factor in the progress of atherosclerosis. Beside all those epidemiological and genetic studies, the experimental investigations also try to reveal the role of CRP in the progress of atherosclerosis. This review will highlight the complex results of genomic, epidemiological, and experimental studies on CRP and will show why further studies investigating the relationship between CRP and atherosclerosis might be needed.

  14. Childhood intelligence in relation to adult coronary heart disease and stroke risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batty, G David; Mortensen, Erik L; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie

    2005-01-01

    is unknown. We investigated the relation of childhood intelligence with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke risk in a cohort of 6910 men born in 1953 in the Copenhagen area of Denmark. Events were ascertained from 1978 to 2000 using a cause-of-death register and hospital discharge records. There were 150...... CHD (19 fatal; 131 non-fatal) and 93 stroke (4 fatal; 89 non-fatal) events during follow-up into mid-life. Childhood intelligence was inversely related to CHD with the highest rate apparent in adults with low childhood test scores (HR(lowest vs. highest quartile), 2.70; 95% confidence interval: 1......While recent studies have reported an inverse relation between childhood intelligence test scores and all-cause mortality in later life, the link with disease-specific outcomes has been rarely examined. Furthermore, the potential confounding effect of birthweight and childhood social circumstances...

  15. Growing Epidemic of Coronary Heart Disease in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaziano, Thomas A.; Bitton, Asaf; Anand, Shuchi; Abrahams-Gessel, Shafika; Murphy, Adrianna

    2010-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single largest cause of death in the developed countries and is one of the leading causes of disease burden in developing countries. In 2001, there were 7.3 million deaths due to CHD worldwide. Three-fourths of global deaths due to CHD occurred in the low and middle-income countries. The rapid rise in CHD burden in most of the low and middle and income countries is due to socio-economic changes, increase in life span and acquisition of lifestyle related risk factors. The CHD death rate, however, varies dramatically across the developing countries. The varying incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates reflect the different levels of risk factors, other competing causes of death, availability of resources to combat CVD, and the stage of epidemiologic transition that each country or region finds itself. The economic burden of CHD is equally large but solutions exist to manage this growing burden. PMID:20109979

  16. Diagnostic Utility of ANG in Coronary Heart Disease Complicating Chronic Heart Failure: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG has been shown to be elevated in several cardiovascular diseases. To detect its levels and diagnostic capacity in coronary heart disease (CHD patients complicating chronic heart failure (CHF, we performed this cross-sectional study and enrolled 616 CHD patients and 53 healthy controls. According to complicating CHF or not, the patients were divided into CHF group (n=203 and CHD disease controls (n=413, in which the CHF group was subdivided as heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF group or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF group on the basis of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, or as different NYHA class group. Their plasma ANG levels were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Plasma ANG was 342.8 (IQR [273.9,432.9], 304.5 (IQR [254.0,370.5], and 279.7 (IQR [214.4,344.0] ng/mL in the CHF group, CHD disease controls, and healthy controls, respectively, significantly higher in the CHF group compared with the others. Furthermore, among CHF group, ANG is dramatically higher in the HFrEF patients compared with the HFpEF patients. As for the diagnostic capacity of ANG, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.71 (95% CI 0.63–0.78. We concluded that plasma ANG is elevated in CHD complicating CHF patients and may be a moderate discriminator of CHF from CHD or the healthy.

  17. Diagnostic Utility of ANG in Coronary Heart Disease Complicating Chronic Heart Failure: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yang, Xue; Yu, Ying; Zhao, Ji; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Rui; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenin (ANG) has been shown to be elevated in several cardiovascular diseases. To detect its levels and diagnostic capacity in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients complicating chronic heart failure (CHF), we performed this cross-sectional study and enrolled 616 CHD patients and 53 healthy controls. According to complicating CHF or not, the patients were divided into CHF group (n = 203) and CHD disease controls (n = 413), in which the CHF group was subdivided as heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) group or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) group on the basis of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), or as different NYHA class group. Their plasma ANG levels were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Plasma ANG was 342.8 (IQR [273.9,432.9]), 304.5 (IQR [254.0,370.5]), and 279.7 (IQR [214.4,344.0]) ng/mL in the CHF group, CHD disease controls, and healthy controls, respectively, significantly higher in the CHF group compared with the others. Furthermore, among CHF group, ANG is dramatically higher in the HFrEF patients compared with the HFpEF patients. As for the diagnostic capacity of ANG, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.71 (95% CI 0.63–0.78). We concluded that plasma ANG is elevated in CHD complicating CHF patients and may be a moderate discriminator of CHF from CHD or the healthy. PMID:27872509

  18. Correlation of ascending aorta elasticity and the severity of coronary artery stenosis in hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease assessed by M-mode and tissue Doppler echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qixiu; Liu, Houlin

    2015-03-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between ascending aorta elasticity and the severity of coronary artery stenosis in essential hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) using M-mode and tissue Doppler echocardiography. A total of 184 hypertensive patients with CHD were enrolled. Patients were divided into three groups based on the severity of coronary stenosis measured by coronary arteriography (CAG): slight stenosis (group 1), moderate stenosis (group 2) and serious stenosis (group 3). M-mode and tissue Doppler echocardiography were performed, and elasticity indexes of ascending aorta including stiffness index, distensibility index, and S wave speed of anterior wall were calculated and correlated with the severity of coronary stenosis. Ascending aorta stiffness index was increased, whereas distensibility index and S wave speed of anterior wall were decreased in moderate and severe stenosis groups compared with slight stenosis group (P coronary artery, and there was a significant correlation between aortic elasticity and severity of coronary artery by Pearson correlation analysis (P coronary stenosis. Elasticity indexes of ascending aorta can serve as predictors for coronary arterial lesion in hypertensive patients.

  19. Analysis of risk factors of coronary heart disease%冠心病的危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付丽莉; 刘芳; 韩晓燕; 李敦彤

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析探究冠心病的危险因素。方法随机选取2011年2月至2013年2月来我院救治的冠心病患者34例,根据临床特征及冠状动脉造影检查,分析冠心病患者的危险因素。结果被选取的34例患者中13例体重指数严重超标,17例有严重吸烟史,9例合并高血压,6例合并糖尿病。结论超重及肥胖是冠心病的主要潜在危险因素,高血压是冠心病的独立因素,冠心病的危险性与血糖水平相关。了解冠心病和动脉粥样硬化危险因素,对于进行危险因素的干预治疗,尤其是进行有效的血脂异常的防治具有非常重要的意义。%Objective to analyze the risk factors of coronary heart disease. Methods 34 patients with coronary heart disease admitted in our hospital were randomly selected from february 2011 to february 2013. according to the clinical characteristics and coronary angiography in patients with coronary heart disease, risk factors were analyzed. Results of 34 cases selected, 13 patients performed with body mass index severely exceeding the standard, 17 cases with serious smoking history, 9 cases with hypertension, 6 patients with diabetes mellitus. Conclusion overweight and obesity are the main potential risk factors for coronary heart disease and hypertension is an independent factor for coronary heart disease, and coronary heart disease risk is associated with blood glucose levels. Understanding the risk factors for coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis and given therapeutic intervention for risk factors, especially has very important signiifcance for effective prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia.

  20. Social class differences in coronary heart disease in middle-aged British men: implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emberson, Jonathan R; Whincup, Peter H; Morris, Richard W; Walker, Mary

    2004-04-01

    Though social class differences in coronary heart disease (CHD) are well recognized, few studies have assessed the effect of imprecision in social class assessment on the relationship or the overall contribution of social class to attributable CHD risk. Prospective observational study of the relationship between occupational social class (assessed at baseline and after 20 years), major CHD (coronary death and non-fatal myocardial infarction) and all-cause mortality rates over 20 years among 5628 middle-aged British men with no previous evidence of CHD. The age-adjusted hazard of major CHD for manual men relative to non-manual men was 1.41 (95% CI: 1.21, 1.64) before correction and 1.50 (95% CI: 1.25, 1.79) after correction for imprecision of social class measurement. The imprecision-corrected estimate was attenuated to 1.28 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.54) after adjustment for the adult coronary risk factors (blood cholesterol, blood pressure, body mass index, cigarette smoking, alcohol, physical activity, and lung function) and to 1.20 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.45) following further adjustment for height. The population attributable risk fraction of major CHD for social class (manual versus non-manual) was 22% after correction for imprecision in social class, which was reduced to 14% after adjustment for the adult coronary risk factors, and 10% after further adjustment for height. Similar results were obtained for all-cause mortality. Even taking account of measurement imprecision, the contribution of social class to overall CHD risk is modest. Population-wide strategies to reduce major CHD risk factors are likely to have greater potential benefits for CHD prevention than strategies designed specifically to reduce social inequalities in CHD.

  1. Serum total bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease--Causal association or epiphenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunutsor, Setor K

    2015-12-01

    Observational epidemiological evidence supports a linear inverse and independent association between serum total bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but whether this association is causal remains to be ascertained. A Mendelian randomization approach was employed to test whether serum total bilirubin is causally linked to CHD. The genetic variant rs6742078--well known to specifically modify levels of serum total bilirubin and accounting for up to 20% of the variance in circulating serum total bilirubin levels--was used as an instrumental variable. In pooled analysis of estimates reported from published genome-wide association studies, every copy of the T allele of rs6742078 was associated with 0.42 standard deviation (SD) higher levels of serum total bilirubin (95% confidence interval, 0.40 to 0.43). Based on combined data from the Coronary Artery Disease Genome wide Replication and Meta-analyses and the Coronary Artery Disease (C4D) Genetics Consortium involving a total of 36,763 CHD cases and 76,997 controls, the odds ratio for CHD per copy of the T allele was 1.01 (95% confidence interval, 0.99 to 1.04). The odds ratio of CHD for a 1 SD genetically elevated serum total bilirubin level was 1.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.98 to 1.09). The current findings casts doubt on a strong causal association of serum total bilirubin levels with CHD. The inverse associations demonstrated in observational studies may be driven by biases such as unmeasured confounding and/or reverse causation. However, further research in large-scale consortia is needed.

  2. Up-Beat UK: A programme of research into the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression in primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pariante Carmine M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary heart disease and depression are both common health problems and by 2020 will be the two leading causes of disability worldwide. Depression has been found to be more common in patients with coronary heart disease but the nature of this relationship is uncertain. In the United Kingdom general practitioners are now being remunerated for case-finding for depression in patients with coronary heart disease, however it is unclear how general practitioners should manage these patients. We aim to explore the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression in a primary care population and to develop an intervention for patients with coronary heart disease and depression. Methods/design This programme of research will consist of 4 inter-related studies. A 4 year prospective cohort study of primary care patients with coronary heart disease will be conducted to explore the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression. Within this, a nested case-control biological study will investigate genetic and blood-biomarkers as predictors of depression in this sample. Two qualitative studies, one of patients' perspectives of treatments for coronary heart disease and co-morbid depression and one of primary care professionals' views on the management of patients with coronary heart disease and depression will inform the development of an intervention for this patient group. A feasibility study for a randomised controlled trial will then be conducted. Discussion This study will provide information on the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression that will allow health services to determine the efficiency of case-finding for depression in this patient group. The results of the cohort study will also provide information on risk factors for depression. The study will provide evidence on the efficacy and feasibility of a joint patient and professional led intervention and data necessary to plan a

  3. Up-beat UK: a programme of research into the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression in primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylee, André; Ashworth, Mark; Barley, Elizabeth; Brown, June; Chambers, John; Farmer, Anne; Fortune, Zoe; Haddad, Mark; Lawton, Rebecca; Mann, Anthony; Mehay, Anita; McCrone, Paul; Murray, Joanna; Leese, Morven; Pariante, Carmine M; Rose, Diana; Rowlands, Gill; Smith, Alison; Walters, Paul

    2011-05-23

    Coronary heart disease and depression are both common health problems and by 2020 will be the two leading causes of disability worldwide. Depression has been found to be more common in patients with coronary heart disease but the nature of this relationship is uncertain. In the United Kingdom general practitioners are now being remunerated for case-finding for depression in patients with coronary heart disease, however it is unclear how general practitioners should manage these patients. We aim to explore the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression in a primary care population and to develop an intervention for patients with coronary heart disease and depression. This programme of research will consist of 4 inter-related studies. A 4 year prospective cohort study of primary care patients with coronary heart disease will be conducted to explore the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression. Within this, a nested case-control biological study will investigate genetic and blood-biomarkers as predictors of depression in this sample. Two qualitative studies, one of patients' perspectives of treatments for coronary heart disease and co-morbid depression and one of primary care professionals' views on the management of patients with coronary heart disease and depression will inform the development of an intervention for this patient group. A feasibility study for a randomised controlled trial will then be conducted. This study will provide information on the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression that will allow health services to determine the efficiency of case-finding for depression in this patient group. The results of the cohort study will also provide information on risk factors for depression. The study will provide evidence on the efficacy and feasibility of a joint patient and professional led intervention and data necessary to plan a definitive randomised controlled trial of the intervention.

  4. Exercise cardiac power and the risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular mortality in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurl, Sudhir; Mäkikallio, Timo; Jae, Sae Young; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Laukkanen, Jari A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of exercise cardiac power (ECP), defined as a ratio of directly measured maximal oxygen uptake with peak systolic blood pressure during exercise, with the risk of mortality from coronary heart diseases (CHD) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Population-based cohort study with an average follow-up of 25 years from eastern Finland. About 2358 men at baseline participated in exercise stress test and 182 CHD and 302 CVD deaths occurred. Men with low ECP (risk of CHD mortality as compared with men with high ECP (>16.4 mL/mmHg, highest quartile) after adjusting for age and examination year. Low ECP was associated with a 2.8-fold risk of CHD and 2.4-fold for CVD mortality after additional adjustment for conventional risk factors. After further adjustment for leisure time physical activity, the results hardly changed (HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.71-3.67, p risk of CHD and CVD mortality is an elevated afterload and peripheral resistance indicated by hypertension. Key messages Index of exercise cardiac power defined as the ratio of directly measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) with peak systolic blood pressure gives prognostic information in coronary heart disease (CHD) and CVD mortality risk stratification. ECP provides non-invasive and easily available measure for the prediction of CHD and CVD mortality. One of the most potential explanation for the association between ECP and the risk of CHD and CVD mortality is an elevated afterload and peripheral resistance indicated by hypertension.

  5. Living with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Disease If you have coronary heart disease (CHD), you can take steps to control its ... the section of this article titled "How Is Heart Disease Treated?" You also can visit the Health Topics ...

  6. the Multitargets Pharmacological Mechanism of Qishenkeli Acting on the Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a case study of Qishenkeli (QSKL to research TCM’s underlying molecular mechanism, based on drug target prediction and analyses of TCM chemical components and following experimental validation. First, after determining the compositive compounds of QSKL, we use drugCIPHER-CS to predict their potential drug targets. These potential targets are significantly enriched with known cardiovascular disease-related drug targets. Then we find these potential drug targets are significantly enriched in the biological processes of neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, calcium signaling pathway, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, and renin-angiotensin system (RAAS, and so on. Then, animal model of coronary heart disease (CHD induced by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation is applied to validate predicted pathway. RAAS pathway is selected as an example, and the results show that QSKL has effect on both rennin and angiotensin II receptor (AT1R, which eventually down regulates the angiotensin II (AngII. Bioinformatics combing with experiment verification can provide a credible and objective method to understand the complicated multitargets mechanism for Chinese herbal formula.

  7. Dietary fiber intake in relation to coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality over 40 y: the Zutphen Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streppel, M.T.; Ocke, M.C.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Kok, F.J.; Kromhout, D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the effects of dietary fiber intake on long-term mortality. Objective: We aimed to study recent and long-term dietary fiber intake in relation to coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality. Design: The effects of recent and long-term dietary fiber intakes on mor

  8. Gendered Uncertainty and Variation in Physicians' Decisions for Coronary Heart Disease: The Double-Edged Sword of "Atypical Symptoms"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Lisa C.; Lutfey, Karen E.; Gerstenberger, Eric; Grace, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Nonmedical factors and diagnostic certainty contribute to variation in clinical decision making, but the process by which this occurs remains unclear. We examine how physicians' interpretations of patient sex-gender affect diagnostic certainty and, in turn, decision making for coronary heart disease. Data are from a factorial experiment of 256…

  9. Lipid profiles reflecting high and low risk for coronary heart disease : Contribution of apolipoprotein E polymorphism and lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.M.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Havekes, L.M.; Seidell, J.C.; Kromhout, D.

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate the role of modifiable factors and the apolipoprotein E polymorphism in explaining lipid profiles reflecting low, average and high risk for coronary heart disease, we selected subjects from a large population-based study. Subjects with low total cholesterol (TC) (< 15th percentile) and

  10. The interleukin-6 receptor as a target for prevention of coronary heart disease : a mendelian randomisation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Holmes, Michael V.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Engmann, Jorgen E. L.; Shah, Tina; Sofat, Reecha; Guo, Yiran; Chung, Christina; Peasey, Anne; Ster, Roman Pfi; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Ireland, Helen A.; Leusink, Maarten; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, KaWah; Palmen, Jutta; Howard, Philip; Cooper, Jackie A.; Drenos, Fotios; Hardy, John; Nalls, Michael A.; Li, Yun Rose; Lowe, Gordon; Stewart, Marlene; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Peto, Julian; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gallacher, John; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Tomlinson, Ian; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Luan, Jian'an; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Kubinova, Ruzena; Baceviciene, Migle; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pajak, Andrzej; Topor-Madry, Roman; Malyutina, Sofi A.; Baldassarre, Damiano; Sennblad, Bengt; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandenelli, Stefania; Tanaka, Toshiko; Meschia, James F.; Singleton, Andrew; Navis, Gerjan; Mateo Leach, Irene; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Ford, Ian; Epstein, Stephen E.; Burnett, Mary Susan; Devaney, Joe M.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; de Borst, Gert Jan; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Jong, Pim A.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Klungel, Olaf H.; de Boer, Anthonius; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Eaton, Charles B.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Fowkes, F. Gerry R.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Price, Jackie F.; Whincup, Peter H.; Morris, Richard W.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Smith, George Davey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Redline, Susan; Lange, Leslie A.; Kumari, Meena; Wareham, Nick J.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Whittaker, John C.; Hamsten, Anders; Dudbridge, Frank; Delaney, J. A. Chris; Wong, Andrew; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Connolly, John J.; van der Harst, Pim; Brunner, Eric J.; Marmot, Michael G.; Wassel, Christina L.; Humphries, Steve E.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimaki, Mika; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Voevoda, Mikhail; Bobak, Martin; Pikhart, Hynek; Wilson, James G.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Reiner, Alex P.; Keating, Brendan J.; Sattar, Naveed; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Background A high circulating concentration of interleukin 6 is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Blockade of the interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) with a monoclonal antibody (tocilizumab) licensed for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis reduces systemic and articular inflammation.

  11. Association of Rare Loss-Of-Function Alleles in HAL, Serum Histidine: Levels and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Yu (Bing); A.H. Li (Alexander H.); D. Muzny (Donna); N. Veeraraghavan (Narayanan); P.S. de Vries (Paul); J.C. Bis (Joshua); S. Musani (Solomon); D. Alexander (Danny); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A.G. Uitterlinden (Andre G.); A. Hofman (Albert); A. Dehghan (Abbas); J.G. Wilson (James); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); R. Gibbs (Richard); P. Wei (Peng); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground-Histidine is a semiessential amino acid with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Few data are available on the associations between genetic variants, histidine levels, and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) in a population-based sample. Methods and Results-By cond

  12. Lipid profiles reflecting high and low risk for coronary heart disease: contribution of apolipoprotein E polymorphism and lifestyle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.M.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Havekes, L.M.; Seidell, J.C.; Kromhout, D.

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate the role of modifiable factors and the apolipoprotein E polymorphism in explaining lipid profiles reflecting low, average and high risk for coronary heart disease, we selected subjects from a large population-based study. Subjects with low total cholesterol (TC) (<15th percentile)

  13. Lipid profiles reflecting high and low risk for coronary heart disease : Contribution of apolipoprotein E polymorphism and lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J.M.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Havekes, L.M.; Seidell, J.C.; Kromhout, D.

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate the role of modifiable factors and the apolipoprotein E polymorphism in explaining lipid profiles reflecting low, average and high risk for coronary heart disease, we selected subjects from a large population-based study. Subjects with low total cholesterol (TC) (< 15th percentile) and

  14. Using Nontraditional Risk Factors in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Assessment : US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Harris, Russell; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Marion, Lucy N.; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Siu, Albert L.; Teutsch, Steven M.; Yawn, Barbara P.

    2009-01-01

    Description: New recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) on the use of nontraditional, or novel, risk factors in assessing the coronary heart disease (CHD) risk of asymptomatic persons. Methods: Systematic reviews were conducted of literature since 1996 on 9 proposed non

  15. Association between C reactive protein and coronary heart disease : mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensley, Frances; Gao, Pei; Burgess, Stephen; Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Shah, Tina; Engert, James C.; Clarke, Robert; Davey-Smith, George; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sandhu, Manjinder; Anand, Sonia; Pepys, Mark B.; Smeeth, Liam; Whittaker, John; Casas, Juan Pablo; Thompson, Simon G.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Danesh, John; Eiriksdottir, G.; Harris, T. B.; Launer, L. J.; Gudnason, V.; Folsom, A. R.; Andrews, G.; Ballantyne, C. M.; Samani, N. J.; Hall, A. S.; Braund, P. S.; Balmforth, A. J.; Whincup, P. H.; Morris, R.; Lawlor, D. A.; Lowe, G. D. O.; Timpson, N.; Ebrahim, S.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Davey-Smith, G.; Timpson, N.; Nordestgaard, B. G.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Zacho, J.; Brown, M.; Sandhu, M.; Ricketts, S. L.; Ashford, S.; Lange, L.; Reiner, A.; Cushman, M.; Tracy, R.; Wu, C.; Ge, J.; Zou, Y.; Sun, A.; Hung, J.; McQuillan, B.; Thompson, P.; Beilby, J.; Warrington, N.; Palmer, L. J.; Wanner, C.; Drechsler, C.; Hoffmann, M. M.; Fowkes, F. G. R.; Lowe, G. D. O.; Tzoulaki, I.; Kumari, M.; Miller, M.; Marmot, M.; Onland-Moret, C.; van der Schouw, Y. T.; Boer, J. M.; Wijmenga, C.; Ricketts, S. L.; Ashford, S.; Sandhu, M.; Khaw, K-T; Vasan, R. S.; Schnabel, R. B.; Yamamoto, J. F.; Benjamin, E. J.; Schunkert, H.; Erdmann, J.; Koenig, I. R.; Hengstenberg, C.; Chiodini, B.; Franzosi, M. G.; Pietri, S.; Gori, F.; Rudock, M.; Liu, Y.; Lohman, K.; Harris, T. B.; Humphries, S. E.; Hamsten, A.; Norman, P. E.; Hankey, G. J.; Jamrozik, K.; Palmer, L. J.; Rimm, E. B.; Pai, J. K.; Psaty, B. M.; Heckbert, S. R.; Bis, J. C.; Yusuf, S.; Anand, S.; Engert, J. C.; Xie, C.; Collins, R.; Clarke, R.; Bennett, D.; Kooner, J.; Chambers, J.; Elliott, P.; Maerz, W.; Kleber, M. E.; Boehm, B. O.; Winkelmann, B. R.; Melander, O.; Berglund, G.; Koenig, W.; Thorand, B.; Baumert, J.; Peters, A.; Rimm, E. B.; Manson, J.; Pai, J. K.; Humphries, S. E.; Cooper, J. A.; Talmud, P. J.; Ladenvall, P.; Johansson, L.; Jansson, J-H; Hallmans, G.; Reilly, M. P.; Qu, L.; Li, M.; Rader, D. J.; Watkins, H.; Clarke, R.; Hopewell, J.; Saleheen, D.; Danesh, J.; Frossard, P.; Sattar, N.; Robertson, M.; Shepherd, J.; Schaefer, E.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J. C. M.; Kardys, I.; Dehghan, A.; de Faire, U.; Bennet, A.; Gigante, B.; Leander, K.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Davey-Smith, G.; Timpson, N.; Peters, B.; Maitland-van der Zee, A. H.; de Boer, A.; Klungel, O.; Reiner, A.; Manson, J.; Greenland, P.; Dai, J.; Liu, S.; Brunner, E.; Kivimaki, M.; Marmot, M.; Sattar, N.; O'Reilly, D.; Ford, I.; Packard, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease. Design Mendelian randomisation meta-analysis of individual participant data from 47 epidemiological studies in 15 countries. Participants 194 418

  16. Effect of anxiety and depression on endothelial function and inflammation degree of coronary heart disease patients with angina pectoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Ni; Xiang-Yang Xia; Ka Han; Yong-Xin Wu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of anxiety and depression on endothelial function and inflammation degree of coronary heart disease patients with angina pectoris.Methods: 80 cases of patients diagnosed with angina pectoris of coronary heart disease in our hospital from May 2012 to August 2014 were enrolled for study; anxiety and depression were judged by anxiety subscale (HADS-a) and depression subscale (HADS-d). Endothelial progenitor cell and endothelial microparticle contents in peripheral blood as well as serum ET-1, CGRP, IL-6, IL-6R, IL-18, ADAMTS-1 and NO contents were detected.Results:EPC, NO and CGRP contents of angina pectoris patients with anxiety were lower than those of angina pectoris patients without anxiety, and EMP, ET-1, IL-6, IL-6R, IL-18 and ADAMTS-1 contents were higher than those of angina pectoris patients without anxiety; EPC, NO and CGRP contents of angina pectoris patients with depression were lower than those of angina pectoris patients without depression, and EMP, ET-1, IL-6, IL-6R, IL-18 and ADAMTS-1 contents were higher than those of angina pectoris patients without depression.Conclusions:Angina pectoris of coronary heart disease patients complicated with anxiety and depression have endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory reaction activation; endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory reaction activation are possible pathways that anxiety and depression cause the progression of coronary heart disease.

  17. [Real-world study in analysis of effects on concomitant medications with parenterally administered shenmai for coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun-Jie; Tang, Hao; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yang, Hu; Zhuang, Yan

    2013-09-01

    In order to understand the treatment of coronary heart disease with parenterally administered Shenmai and the efficacy of combination therapies, the study selected 18 hospitals for analysis. Data from each hospital's hospital injection system (HIS) was collected. Data of in-patients receiving parenterally administered Shenmai for a diagnosis of coronary heart disease was analyzed using; the Apriori algorithm to model use, Clementine 12.0 linkage analysis to find correlations between various drugs, and chi-square test for commonly used combination therapies to ascertain the cure rate. In 5 583 patients with coronary heart disease, it was found that Shenmai was commonly used with isosorbide mononitrate, aspirin, clopidogrel hydrogen and common combinations of combination therapy, and that the cure rate was better in these combinations than for other treatment regimes. When Shenmai is used with combination therapies for coronary heart disease, treatment guidelines should be complied with. In clinical application, the types of concomitant medications and their interactions, should be observed so as to prevent of adverse reactions.

  18. Sense of coherence as an independent predictor of health-related quality of life among coronary heart disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silarova, Barbora; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Studencan, Martin; Ondusova, Daniela; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine whether sense of coherence (SOC) at baseline predicts health-related quality of life (HRQoL) at 12-28-month follow-up among patients with coronary heart disease when controlled for sociodemographic and medical variables. Methods A total of 179

  19. Sense of coherence as a mediator between hostility and health-related quality of life among coronary heart disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silarova, Barbora; Nagyova, Iveta; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the association between hostility and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, and whether these associations are mediated by sense of coherence (SOC). Background: Intervention research has shown that a decrease in levels of hostility

  20. Changes in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Profile of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities following a Physical Activity Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is one of the modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). With an increasing age profile and similar patterns of morbidity to the general population, persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their caregivers would benefit from data that indicate CHD risk factors. Knowledge of the CHD risk…

  1. Red blood cell membrane concentration of cis-palmitoleic and cis-vaccenic acids and risk of coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although previous studies have suggested associations between plasma palmitoleic acid and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, including blood pressure, inflammation, and insulin resistance, little is known about the relation of palmitoleic acid and CHD. This ancillary study of the Physicians'...

  2. Dietary Patterns Predict Subsequent Coronary Heart Disease Risk In Postmenopausal Women : The Women’s Health Initiative Observational Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Evidence suggests that dietary patterns predispose to the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). The relationship between dietary patterns and CHD risk was assessed in postmenopausal women participating in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS). Methods: Case-co...

  3. What components of chronic care organisation relate to better primary care for coronary heart disease patients? An observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, J. van; Frigola Capell, E.; Ludt, S.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cardiovascular risk management (CVRM) received by patients shows large variation across countries. In this study we explored the aspects of primary care organisation associated with key components of CVRM in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: 273

  4. Gene-load score of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is associated with coronary heart disease in familial hypercholesterolaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B. van der Net (Jeroen); J. van Etten (Jeroen); M. Yazdanpanah (Mojgan); G.M. Dallinga-Thie (Geesje); J.J.P. Kastelein (John); J.C. Defesche (Joep); R.P. Koopmans (Richard); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAims: Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is characterized by premature coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the incidence of CHD varies considerably among FH patients. Genetic variation in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and the adrenalin/noradrenalin system may be of

  5. Dairy Intake and Coronary Heart Disease or Stroke – a population-based cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalmeijer, G.W.; Struijk, E.A.; Schouw, van der Y.T.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between total dairy intake and dairy subtypes (high-fat dairy, low-fat dairy, milk and milk products, cheese and fermented dairy) with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. METHODS: EPIC-NL is a prospective cohort study among 33,625

  6. Use of fluorquinolones is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, JA; Klungel, OH; Herings, RMC; Stolk, RP; Spoelstra, JA; Grobbee, DE; Leufkens, HGM

    2002-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to investigate whether use of specific antibiotic drugs decreases the risk of coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus type 2 patients. Methods and Results Data were obtained from the PHARMO Record Linkage System comprising pharmacy records and

  7. Changes in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Profile of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities following a Physical Activity Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is one of the modifiable risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). With an increasing age profile and similar patterns of morbidity to the general population, persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) and their caregivers would benefit from data that indicate CHD risk factors. Knowledge of the CHD risk…

  8. Regular physical activity in old age : effect on coronary heart disease risk factors and well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuit, A.J.

    1997-01-01


    Background. Regular physical activity is considered an important aspect of a healthy lifestyle. It may improve fitness, physical competence and may lower the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, until now, data on the

  9. Human plasma complement C3 is independently associated with coronary heart disease, but only in heavy smokers (the CODAM study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greevenbroek, van M.M.J.; Jacobs, M.; Kallen, van der C.J.H.; Blaak, E.E.; Jansen, E.H.J.M.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background - Complement C3 is an emerging risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) and is particularly increased in the metabolic syndrome. A direct effect of smoking on structure and function of complement C3 has been suggested. Hypothesis - Smoking behavior may affect the cardiovascular risk t

  10. Co-occurrence of metabolic factors and the risk of coronary heart disease: A prospective cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merry, A.H.; Erkens, P.M.G.; Boer, J.M.A.; Schouten, L.J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Gorgels, A.P.; Brandt, van den P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background -Prevalence of metabolic factors such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, HDL and total cholesterol that are associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) is increasing worldwide. However, less is known about combinations of these factors that are associated with the h

  11. Fatty acids in the de novo lipogenesis pathway and risk of coronary heart disease: the Cardiovascular Health Study123

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jason HY; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Imamura, Fumiaki; King, Irena B.; Song, Xiaoling; Spiegelman, Donna; Siscovick, David S.; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2011-01-01

    Background: De novo lipogenesis (DNL) is an endogenous pathway whereby carbohydrates and proteins are converted to fatty acids. DNL could affect coronary heart disease (CHD) or sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) via generation of specific fatty acids. Whether these fatty acids are prospectively associated with SCA or other CHD events is unknown.

  12. Regular Exercise and Plasma Lipid Levels Associated with the Risk of Coronary Heart Disease: A 20-Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Masaru; Golding, Lawrence A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of regular exercise on the plasma lipid levels that contribute to coronary heart disease (CHD), of 20 sedentary men who participated in an exercise program over 20 consecutive years. The men, whose initial ages ranged from 30-51 years, participated in the University of Nevada-based exercise program for an average of 45…

  13. Health Gain through Screening--Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: Developing Primary Health Care Services for People with Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, M. B.; Turner, S.; Martin, D. M.; Roy, A.

    1997-01-01

    A study of 120 British adults with intellectual disability found they had higher risk factors of developing coronary heart disease and stroke than the general population. There was a greater incidence of obesity and considerably lower physical activity levels than the general population. Several also had abnormal cholesterol readings. (CR)

  14. Lipoprotein(a) levels, apo(a) isoform size, and coronary heart disease risk in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to assess the independent contributions of plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], Lp(a) cholesterol, and of apo(a) isoform size to prospective coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Plasma Lp(a) and Lp(a) cholesterol levels, and apo(a) isoform size were measured at examinati...

  15. Evidence of the Role of Physical Activity and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in the Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Arthur S.; Norstrom, Jane

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents epidemiologic evidence on the contributions of physical inactivity and reduced cardiorespiratory fitness to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The types and dose of physical activity to reduce risk of CHD and plausible biologic mechanisms for the partial protective effect are reviewed. (Author/SM)

  16. Dietary fiber intake in relation to coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality over 40 y: the Zutphen Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streppel, M.T.; Ocke, M.C.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Kok, F.J.; Kromhout, D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the effects of dietary fiber intake on long-term mortality. Objective: We aimed to study recent and long-term dietary fiber intake in relation to coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality. Design: The effects of recent and long-term dietary fiber intakes on

  17. Birth weight, childhood body mass index and risk of coronary heart disease in adults: combined historical cohort studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lise Geisler; Ängquist, Lars Henrik; Eriksson, Johan G

    2010-01-01

    Low birth weight and high childhood body mass index (BMI) is each associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in adult life. We studied individual and combined associations of birth weight and childhood BMI with the risk of CHD in adulthood....

  18. Lifestyle modification programmes for patients with coronary heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, V.; Gucht, V. de; Dusseldorp, E.; Maes, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Lifestyle modification programmes for coronary heart disease patients have been shown to effectively improve risk factors and related health behaviours, quality of life, reincidence, and mortality. However, improvements in routine cardiac care over the recent years may offset the increme

  19. Literature-based genetic risk scores for coronary heart disease : the Cardiovascular Registry Maastricht (CAREMA) Prospective Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaathorst, A.A.; Lu Yingchang (Kevin), Y.; Heijmans, B.T.; Dolle, M.E.; Bohringer, S.; Putter, de H.; Imholz, S.; Merry, A.H.; Greevenbroek, M.M.; Jukema, J.W.; Gorgels, A.P.; Brandt, van den P.A.; Muller, M.R.; Schouten, L.J.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Boer, J.M.A.; Slagboom, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background-Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) or CHD risk factors (RF). Using a case-cohort study within the prospective Cardiovascular Registry Maastricht (CAREMA) cohort, we tested if genet

  20. Genetic variation in CYP2J2 and risk of coronary heart disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    CYP2J2 metabolizes arachidonic acid to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) which regulate endothelial function and serve as a reserve system to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3). We sought to determine if genetic variation in CYP2J2 was associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events...

  1. A coronary heart disease risk model for predicting the effect of potent antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Margaret; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Shipley, Martin;

    2007-01-01

    Many HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) experience metabolic complications including dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, which may increase their coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. We developed a prognostic model for CHD tailored to the changes in risk factors...

  2. Prospective associations of coronary heart disease loci in African Americans using the MetaboChip : The PAGE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Franceschini (Nora); Hu, Y. (Yijuan); A. Reiner (Alexander); S. Buyske (Steven); M.A. Nalls (Michael); L.R. Yanek (Lisa); Y. Li (Yun); L.A. Hindorff (Lucia A); Cole, S.A. (Shelley A.); Howard, B.V. (Barbara V.); J.M. Stafford (Jeanette M.); C. Carty (Cara); P. Sethupathy (Praveen); Martin, L.W. (Lisa W.); D.Y. Lin (Dan); Johnson, K.C. (Karen C.); L.C. Becker (Lewis); K.E. North (Kari); A. Dehghan (Abbas); J.C. Bis (Joshua); Y. Liu (Yongmei); P. Greenland (Philip); J.E. Manson (Joann); Maeda, N. (Nobuyo); M.E. Garcia (M.); T.B. Harris (Tamara); D.M. Becker (Diane); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); G. Heiss (Gerardo); C. Kooperberg (Charles); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in African Americans. However, there is a paucity of studies assessing genetic determinants of CHD in African Americans. We examined the association of published variants in CHD loci with incident CHD,

  3. Twenty-Year Predictors of Peripheral Arterial Disease Compared With Coronary Heart Disease in the Scottish Heart Health Extended Cohort (SHHEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh; Peters, Sanne A E; Woodward, Mark; Struthers, Allan D; Belch, Jill J F

    2017-09-18

    Coronary heart disease and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affect different vascular territories. Supplementing baseline findings with assays from stored serum, we compared their 20-year predictors. We randomly recruited 15 737 disease-free men and women aged 30 to 75 years across Scotland between 1984 and 1995 and followed them through 2009 for death and hospital diagnoses. Of these, 3098 developed coronary heart disease (19.7%), and 499 PAD (3.2%). Hazard ratios for 45 variables in the Cox model were adjusted for age and sex and for factors in the 2007 ASSIGN cardiovascular risk score. Forty-four of them were entered into parsimonious predictive models, tested by c-statistics and net reclassification improvements. Many hazard ratios diminished with adjustment and parsimonious modeling, leaving significant survivors. The hazard ratios were mostly higher in PAD. New parsimonious models increased the c-statistic and net reclassification improvements over ASSIGN variables alone but varied in their components and ranking. Coronary heart disease and PAD shared 7 of the 9 factors from ASSIGN: age, sex, family history, socioeconomic status, diabetes mellitus, tobacco smoking, and systolic blood pressure (but neither total nor high-density lipoprotein cholesterol); plus 4 new ones: NT-pro-BNP, cotinine, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and cystatin-C. The highest ranked hazard ratios for continuous factors in coronary heart disease were those for age, total cholesterol, high-sensitivity troponin, NT-pro-BNP, cotinine, apolipoprotein A, and waist circumference (plus 10 more); in PAD they were age, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, systolic blood pressure, expired carbon monoxide, cotinine, socioeconomic status, and lipoprotein (a) (plus 5 more). The mixture of shared with disparate determinants for arterial disease in the heart and the legs implies nonidentical pathogenesis: cholesterol dominant in the former, and inflammation (high-sensitivity C

  4. 44岁女性风湿性心脏病伴发冠心病1例%Rheumatic heart disease and coronary heart disease in a 44-vears old female case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文广; 任琳; 杨红梅; 张晶; 张双月; 刘晓媛; 王庆胜

    2013-01-01

    The female patient of 44-years old suffered from rheumatic heart disease for 22 years, and had valve replacementbefore one year. She was on admission for chest pain, with cTnT 1 236 pg/ml. Coronary angiog-raphy showed 95% of stenosis in the left main artery. She was diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. With the improvement of living standards, coronary heart disease was in younger trend. So we recommended that conventional coronary angiography was performed for women over 35-year before valve replacement in rheumatic heart disease.

  5. Low density lipoprotein levels linkage with the periodontal status patients of coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nafisah Ibrahim; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Studies found an association between periodontitis and coronary heart disease (CHD), but relationship between periodontal status CHD patients with LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein) levels, as risk factors for atherosclerosis, has not been studied. Objective: To analyze relationship between LDL and periodontal status CHD. Methods: Periodontal status of 60 CHD, 40 controls were examined (PBI, PPD, CAL) and their blood was taken to assess levels of LDL. Result: Found significant differences LDL (p=0.005), correlation between LDL with PPD (p=0.003) and CAL CHD (p=0.013), and PPD (p=0.001), CAL (p=0.008) non-CHD, but no significant correlation between LDL with PBI CAD (p=0.689) and PBI non-CHD (p=0.320). Conclusion: There is a correlation between the LDL levels with periodontal status.

  6. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Larach, Daniel B;

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL......-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss......-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from...

  7. Primordial prevention of coronary heart disease in India: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K S

    1999-12-01

    Demographic shifts, lifestyle changes, and adverse effects of childhood nutrition portend an epidemic of coronary heart disease in the Indian subcontinent, which is currently experiencing health transition. Indian susceptibility includes atherogenic blood lipid levels and a metabolic complex of central obesity, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia due to insulin resistance. These characteristics are demonstrated dramatically in urban Indians and in Indian migrants to the west. Prime targets for effective strategies of primordial prevention include children and families in lower socio-economic classes now in transition. There is the greatest urgency in India for medical, political, and social action to prevent high risk in the first place, combating the tobacco trade, enlisting food and agriculture agencies, and promoting physical activity in the population. An empowered community with an enlightened policy can prevent the threatened epidemic.

  8. Role of cis-Monounsaturated Fatty Acids in the Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joris, Peter J; Mensink, Ronald P

    2016-07-01

    The effects of cis-monounsaturated fatty acids (cis-MUFAs) on the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and on CHD mortality are not clear. Also, dietary recommendations for cis-MUFA as derived by various organizations are not in agreement. Earlier studies have mainly focused on the effects of cis-MUFA on serum lipids and lipoproteins. More recent studies, however, have also addressed effects of cis-MUFA on other non-traditional CHD risk markers such as vascular function markers, postprandial vascular function, and energy intake and metabolism. Although well-designed randomized controlled trials with CHD events as endpoints are missing, several large prospective cohort studies have recently been published on the relationship between cis-MUFA and CHD risk. The aim of this paper is to review these new studies that have been published in the last 3 years on the effects of cis-MUFA on cardiovascular risk markers and CHD.

  9. A study of cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and triene/tetraene ratio in coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanksale K

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical assessment of coronary heart diseases (CHD is done by studying serum lipids. This is usually done to under-stand the pathogenesis o f atherosclerosis which is the cause o f CHD. Indoor patients suffering from CHD were studied for their serum cholesterol, phospholipids, total fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA. Cholesterol/phospholipid and triene/tetraene ratios were calculated. It was observed that there was no significant difference in any of the parameters studied on the basis of dietary habit or body size. It was further observed on the basis of triene/tetraene ratio that the patients were ingesting adequate amounts of linoleate, there were high levels of cholesterol, phospholipids and c/p ratio in all the groups. This paradox may be due to disturbed PUFA metabolism and particularly of linoleate so that there is no influence o f linoleate on cholesterol and phospholipid synthesis.

  10. Coronary heart disease and associated risk factors in Qazvin: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhrzadeh, H; Bandarian, F; Adibi, H; Samavat, T; Malekafzali, H; Hodjatzadeh, E; Larijani, B

    2008-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study in Qazvin, Islamic Republic of Iran, 846 residents (425 men and 421 women) aged > or = 25 years were assessed for coronary heart disease and its associated risk factors comparing ischaemic and non-ischaemic groups. The age-adjusted prevalence of possible myocardial infarction, ischaemic ECG changes and angina pectoris were 4.2%, 36.8% and 2.2% respectively. There was no difference in the mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure and body mass index between ischaemic and non-ischaemic groups. There was a significant association between possible myocardial infarction and hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and smoking in women. There was also a significant association between ischaemic ECG changes and waist-hip ratio in women and between ischaemic ECG changes and hypertension in men.

  11. [Effects of mexidol on the antioxidative status of patients suffering from coronary heart disease with dislipidemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaia, O L; Baĭder, L M; Kuropteva, Z V; Fomina, I G

    2005-01-01

    The subjects of the study were 36 patients suffering from coronary heart disease with exertional angina and postinfarction cardiosclerosis with dislipidemia. The patients were administered mexidol (2-ethyl-6-methyl-3-oxipyridin succinate), a domestically produced antioxidative agent, for 1 month in a dose of 325 mg/day together with conventional cardial therapy. The result was good and included clinical improvements and improvements in biochemical serum parameters: cholesterol level decreased by 10%, the level of low density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased by 25%, high density cholesterol level elevated by 15%. The intensity of lipid peroxidation lowered, which was manifested by decrease of the level of diene conjugates and TBA-reactive products by 27% and 42%, respectively. The patients' antioxidative status increased.

  12. The effects of exercise capacity and sedentary lifestyle on haemostasis among middle-aged women with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Edit; Janszky, Imre; Eriksson-Berg, Margita; Al-Khalili, Faris; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies have established a link/relationship between haemostatic factors and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. In addition, physical conditioning is associated with lower coronary heart disease risk. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between physical exercise and haemostatic factors among middle-aged women surviving an acute coronary event. The Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Study included 292 women aged < 65 years, resident in the greater Stockholm area, who were hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome. Extensive clinical screening including exercise testing, and blood tests were performed 3-6 months after the coronary event. Self-reported physical activity was assessed by a WHO questionnaire. Patients on warfarin treatment were excluded from our analyses. Haemostatic factors were generally higher among physically inactive patients when compared to physically active women in our univariate models. Exercise capacity had a statistically significant relationship with factor VII antigen (p = 0.039) and vWFag (p = 0.038) even in our multiadjusted analyses. Physical inactivity and poor physical fitness are associated with a potentially prothrombotic blood profile in middle aged women with coronary heart disease.

  13. Usefulness of Beta blockade in contemporary management of patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, David E; Pepine, Carl J

    2014-11-15

    Considerable progress has been made over the last few decades in the management of clinically stable coronary heart disease (SCHD), including improvements in interventions (e.g., percutaneous revascularization), pharmacological management, and risk factor control (e.g., smoking, diet, activity level, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension). Although β blockers have long been used for the treatment of SCHD, their efficacy was established in the era before widespread use of reperfusion interventions, modern medical therapy (e.g., angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers), or preventive treatments (e.g., aspirin, statins). On the basis of these older data, β blockers are assumed beneficial, and their use has been extrapolated beyond patients with heart failure and previous myocardial infarction, which provided the best evidence for efficacy. However, there are no randomized clinical trials demonstrating that β blockers decrease clinical events in patients with SCHD in the modern era. Furthermore, these agents are associated with weight gain, problems with glycemic control, fatigue, and bronchospasm, underscoring the fact that their use is not without risk. In conclusion, data are currently lacking to support the widespread use of β blockers for all SCHD patients, but contemporary data suggest that they be reserved for a well-defined high-risk group of patients with evidence of ongoing ischemia, left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, and perhaps some arrhythmias.

  14. Parity, coronary heart disease and mortality in the old order Amish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elajami, Tarec K; Giuseffi, Jennifer; Avila, Maria D; Hovnanians, Ninel; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Parikh, Nisha; Welty, Francine K

    2016-11-01

    Prior data on the association between parity and mortality are limited by the presence of sociodemographic confounders including cultural norms of parity. Our objective was to determine the association between parity and mortality in the Amish, a socioeconomically homogenous group with large numbers of children per family. We conducted a population-based cohort study among 518 Old Order Amish women enrolled in a cardiovascular awareness program. The mean length of follow-up for mortality was 13.52 years. We determined the adjusted associations between parity and obesity, prevalent coronary heart disease and mortality. The mean number of total births per woman was 6.7 ± 3.6 with a mode of 8. No significant association was observed between parity and all-cause mortality when adjusted for age (HR 1.00 per additional birth; 95% CI 0.96-1.05; p = 0.85) or in multivariate analysis (HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.95-1.05; p = 0.95). There was also no association of parity in age- or multivariable adjusted models with prevalent diabetes, hypertension or coronary heart disease. Despite the lack of effect of parity on mortality, a significant association of ten or more births was observed with higher body mass index (BMI) compared to the referent group of 8-9 total births. In a highly homogeneous population with high rates of parity, no association between overall mortality and parity was observed. Ten or more births were significantly associated with a higher BMI but not with overall mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, PHeart Association, Inc.

  16. Analyzing recent coronary heart disease mortality trends in Tunisia between 1997 and 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Saidi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Tunisia, Cardiovascular Diseases are the leading causes of death (30%, 70% of those are coronary heart disease (CHD deaths and population studies have demonstrated that major risk factor levels are increasing. OBJECTIVE: To explain recent CHD trends in Tunisia between 1997 and 2009. METHODS: DATA SOURCES: Published and unpublished data were identified by extensive searches, complemented with specifically designed surveys. ANALYSIS: Data were integrated and analyzed using the previously validated IMPACT CHD policy model. Data items included: (inumber of CHD patients in specific groups (including acute coronary syndromes, congestive heart failure and chronic angina(ii uptake of specific medical and surgical treatments, and(iii population trends in major cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure (SBP, body mass index (BMI, diabetes and physical inactivity. RESULTS: CHD mortality rates increased by 11.8% for men and 23.8% for women, resulting in 680 additional CHD deaths in 2009 compared with the 1997 baseline, after adjusting for population change. Almost all (98% of this rise was explained by risk factor increases, though men and women differed. A large rise in total cholesterol level in men (0.73 mmol/L generated 440 additional deaths. In women, a fall (-0.43 mmol/L, apparently avoided about 95 deaths. For SBP a rise in men (4 mmHg generated 270 additional deaths. In women, a 2 mmHg fall avoided 65 deaths. BMI and diabetes increased substantially resulting respectively in 105 and 75 additional deaths. Increased treatment uptake prevented about 450 deaths in 2009. The most important contributions came from secondary prevention following Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI (95 fewer deaths, initial AMI treatments (90, antihypertensive medications (80 and unstable angina (75. CONCLUSIONS: Recent trends in CHD mortality mainly reflected increases in major modifiable risk factors, notably SBP and

  17. Optimal Cutoff Points of Anthropometric Parameters to Identify High Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Korean Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Choi, Hyunrim; Won, Chang Won; Kim, Byung-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Several published studies have reported the need to change the cutoff points of anthropometric indices for obesity. We therefore conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate anthropometric cutoff points predicting high coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in Korean adults. We analyzed the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 2007 to 2010. A total of 21,399 subjects aged 20 to 79 yr were included in this study (9,204 men and 12,195 women). We calculated the 10-yr Framingham coronary heart disease risk score for all individuals. We then estimated receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio to predict a 10-yr CHD risk of 20% or more. For sensitivity analysis, we conducted the same analysis for a 10-yr CHD risk of 10% or more. For a CHD risk of 20% or more, the area under the curve of waist-to-height ratio was the highest, followed by waist circumference and BMI. The optimal cutoff points in men and women were 22.7 kg/m(2) and 23.3 kg/m(2) for BMI, 83.2 cm and 79.7 cm for waist circumference, and 0.50 and 0.52 for waist-to-height ratio, respectively. In sensitivity analysis, the results were the same as those reported above except for BMI in women. Our results support the re-classification of anthropometric indices and suggest the clinical use of waist-to-height ratio as a marker for obesity in Korean adults.

  18. [Cardiovascular diseases in the focus of health economics. The example of drug-eluting vascular stents in coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, T; Müller-Riemenschneider, F; McBride, D; Brüggenjürgen, B; Willich, S N

    2012-05-01

    Coronary heart disease is an important disorder in Western industrialized societies, with regard to both the epidemiologic and economic burden of illness. A modern therapeutic strategy consists of coronary interventions and the implantation of drug-eluting vascular stents. The cost-effectiveness of such drug-eluting stents has been an important subject of health-economic evaluation research in recent years. This article presents two examples of such studies and deals with the question whether existing study projects are able to provide sufficient evidence for allocation decisions in health care. On this basis we discuss important challenges for future health economic analysis. A key conclusion is the need for long-term and cross-sectoral evaluation strategies that could be based on routinely collected health care data. Supplemented by health economic results from clinical trials, the use of such data would lead to a broader data basis for allocation decisions in health care.

  19. Association of Polymorphisms in Angiotensin-converting Enzyme and Type 1 Angiotensin Ⅱ Receptor Genes with Coronary Heart Disease and the Severity of Coronary Artery Stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Chunguang; HAN Zhanying; LU Wenjie; ZHANG Cuntai

    2007-01-01

    To explore the relation of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene polymorphism with coronary heart disease (CHD) and the severity of coronary artery stenosis, 130 CHD patients who underwent coronary angiography were examined for the number of affected coronary vessels (≥75% stenosis) and coronary Jeopardy score. The inser- tion/deletion of ACE gone polymorphism and ATIR gene polymorphism (an A→C transversion at nucleotide position 1166) were detected by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in CHD patients and 90 healthy serving as controls. The re- sults showed that DD genotype and of ACE were more frequent in CHD patients than that in control group (38.5% vs 14.4%, P<0.001). The frequency of the AT1R A/C genotypes did not differ between the patients and the controls (10% vs 13.1%, P0.05). The relative risk associated with the ACE-DD was increased by ATIR-AC genotype. Neither the number of affected coronary vessels nor the coro-nary score differed among the ACE I/D genotypes (P0.05). But the number of affected coronary vessels and the coronary score were significantly greater in the patients with the AT1R-AC genotype than in those with the AA genotype (P<0.05). In conclusion, DD genotype may he risk factor for CHD and MI in Chinese people, and is not responsible for the development of the coronary artery stenosis. The AT1R-C allele may increase the relative risk associated with the ACE-DD genotype, and may be involved in the development of the stenosis of coronary artery.

  20. Anxiety and sense of coherence in Roma and non-Roma coronary heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silarova, Barbora; Nagyova, Iveta; Van Dijk, Jitse P; Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2014-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality among Roma due to coronary heart disease (CHD) is high, but evidence on potential psychosocial pathways is lacking. This study aimed to assess the differences in the severity of anxiety symptoms and in the sense of coherence (SOC) between Roma and non-Roma CHD patients, crude and adjusted for age, sex, functional status and socio-economic status (SES). We examined 607 CHD patients (mean age 58.0 ± 7.4, 28.7% female) scheduled for coronary angiography, 98 (16.1%) of whom were Roma. Anxiety symptoms were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and SOC using the 13-item Orientation to Life Questionnaire. Data were analysed using hierarchical regression. Roma ethnicity was associated with more severe anxiety (B = 1.89; [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.79; 2.98]) adjusted for age, sex, functional status and SES. Roma ethnicity was also associated with lower SOC (B = -4.77; [95% CI = -7.85; -1.68]) adjusted for age, sex and functional status. The latter association lost statistical significance after adjustment for SES. Roma ethnicity is associated with more anxiety symptoms and lower SOC among CHD patients. Our findings indicate that Roma CHD patients have a worse position regarding psychosocial factors that increase mortality and thus require additional attention.

  1. Long-term, regular remote ischemic preconditioning improves endothelial function in patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y; Li, Y P; He, F; Liu, X Q; Zhang, J Y

    2015-06-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPre) can prevent myocardial injury. The purpose of this study was to assess the beneficial effects of long-term regular RIPre on human arteries. Forty patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were assigned randomly to a RIPre group (n=20) or coronary heart disease (CHD) group (n=20). Twenty patients scheduled for mastectomy were enrolled as a control group. RIPre was achieved by occluding arterial blood flow 5 min with a mercury sphygmomanometer followed by a 5-min reperfusion period, and this was repeated 4 times. The RIPre procedure was repeated 3 times a day for 20 days. In all patients, arterial fragments discarded during surgery were collected to evaluate endothelial function by flow-mediated dilation (FMD), CD34(+) monocyte count, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression). Phosphorylation levels of STAT-3 and Akt were also assayed to explore the underlying mechanisms. Compared with the CHD group, long-term regular RIPre significantly improved FMD after 20 days (8.5±2.4 vs 4.9±4.2%, Parteries. Long-term, regular RIPre improved endothelial function in patients with CHD, possibly due to STAT-3 activation, and this may have led to an increase in endothelial progenitor cells.

  2. Catechol-O-methyltransferase promoter hypomethylation is associated with the risk of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jinyan; Chen, Xiaoying; Wu, Nan; Shen, Caijie; Cui, Hanbin; Du, Weiping; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Feng, Mingjun; Liu, Junsong; Lin, Shaoyi; Zhang, Lulu; Wang, Jian; Chen, Xiaomin; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-11-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene variation is known to be associated with the risk of acute coronary events. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of COMT promoter methylation towards the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). COMT methylation was evaluated in 48 CHD cases and 48 well-matched non-CHD controls using bisulfite pyrosequencing technology. The results demonstrated that CHD cases had a significantly lower level of methylation at COMT CpG3 sites compared with the controls (33.77±5.71 vs. 36.42±5.00%; P=0.018). Further analysis, according to gender, showed that CpG3 methylation was associated with CHD in males (P=0.038) but not in females (P=0.253), suggesting that there is a gender disparity in the association between COMT methylation and CHD. In conclusion, it was determined that COMT CpG3 hypomethylation is associated with an increased risk of CHD in males.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of treatments reducing coronary heart disease mortality in Ireland, 2000 to 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bennett, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is associated with a large burden of disease in Ireland and is responsible for more than 6000 deaths annually. This study examined the cost-effectiveness of specific CHD treatments in Ireland. METHODS: Irish epidemiological data on patient numbers and median survival in specific groups, plus the uptake, effectiveness, and costs of specific interventions, all stratified by age and sex, were incorporated into a previously validated CHD mortality model, the IMPACT model. This model calculates the number of life-years gained (LYGs) by specific cardiology interventions to generate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) per LYG for each intervention. RESULTS: In 2000, medical and surgical treatments together prevented or postponed approximately 1885 CHD deaths in patients aged 25 to 84 years, and thus generated approximately 14,505 extra life-years (minimum 7270, maximum 22,475). In general, all the cardiac interventions investigated were highly cost-effective in the Irish setting. Aspirin, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, spironolactone, and warfarin for specific conditions were the most cost-effective interventions (< euro 3000\\/LYG), followed by the statins for secondary prevention (< euro 6500\\/LYG). Revascularization for chronic angina and primary angioplasty for myocardial infarction, although still cost-effective, had the highest ICER (between euro 12,000 and euro 20,000\\/LYG). CONCLUSIONS: Using a comprehensive standardized methodology, cost-effectiveness ratios in this study clearly favored simple medical treatments for myocardial infarction, secondary prevention, angina, and heart failure.

  4. Association between blood cholesterol level with periodontal status of coronary heart disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valensia, Rosy; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is an abnormal narrowing of heart arteries associated with local accumulation of lipids, in the form of cholesterol and triglycerides. Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory that suggests link to the development of CHD. In periodontitis have been reported changes in lipid profile, include increased of cholesterol levels of blood. Objective: to analyse correlation between blood cholesterol level with periodontal status of CHD and non CHD subjects. Methods: Periodontal status and blood cholesterol level of 60 CHD and 40 non CHD subjects was measured. Result: Blood cholesterol level in CHD subjects differs from non CHD subjects (p=0.032). Blood cholesterol level correlates with pocket depth (p=0.003) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) (p=0.000) in CHD subjects. Blood cholesterol level correlates with pocket depth (p=0.010) in non CHD subjects. There is no significant correlation between blood cholesterol level and bleeding on probing (BOP) in CHD subjects. There is no significant correlation between blood cholesterol level with BOP and CAL in non CHD subjects. Conclusion: Blood cholesterol level in control group is higher than CHD patients. Blood cholesterol level positively associated with pocket depth (r=0.375) and CAL (r=0.450) in CHD patients. Blood cholesterol level is positively associated with pocket depth (r=0.404) in control group.

  5. Analysis of heart rate variability in patients with coronary heart disease%冠心病患者心率变异性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩健; 杨靖宇; 高志刚

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究冠心病患者心率变异(HRV)的变化规律及临床意义.方法 选择50例无心律失常冠心病患者(冠心病组)、30例伴心律失常冠心病患者(心率失常组)与52例正常成人自愿者(正常组)进行24 h动态心电图HRV指标比较研究.结果 与正常组比较,冠心病患者SDNN、SDANN、RMSSD、PNN50和HF指标均降低,LF指标升高,具有显著差异.伴心律失常与无心律失常冠心病患者比较,HRV指标异常变化趋于恶化.结论 冠心病患者心脏自主神经调节功能受到损害,迷走神经活性减弱,交感神经活动占优势.%Objective To study the variation and clinical significance of heart rate variability ( HRV ) in patients with coronary heart disease. Methods Totally 50 coronary heart disease patients without arrhythmia( coronary heart disease group ), 30 coronary heart disease patients with arrhythmia ( arrhythmia group ) and 52 normal persons ( control group ) were enrolled. The 24-hours dynamic electrocardiograph HRV indicator comparison was made between the three groups. Results The indicators of HRV time domain analysis were: SDNN, SDANN, RMSSD, PNN50, HF and LF. The indicators of SDNN, SDANN, RMSSD, PNN50 and HF were lower and the indicator of HF was higher in coronary heart disease group and arrhythmia group compared with those in control group, with significant differences. The abnormal changes of HRV indicators were worsen in arrhythmia group compared with those in coronary heart disease group. Conclusion In patients with coronary heart disease, the regulatory function of the cardiac autonomic nerve is damaged, the activity of the vagus nerve is decreased and the sympathetic nerve activity is dominant.

  6. Genotype frequency of gelatinase B C-1562 T polymorphism in coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong JIANG; Dieter Niederacher; Ming DU; Roger Marx; Thomas Scheffold; Rolf Michael Klein

    2004-01-01

    Background One of the characteristics of atherosclerosis is a change in the content of extracellular matrix in the arterial wall. Gelatinase B, a member of the family of matrix metalloproteinase, can regulate extracellular matrix metabolismand play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease (CHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Gelatinase B is polymorphic due to a C to T change at the position -1562 bp in the promoter region.Its relationship with gene product concentration in serum and its role in mediating the risk of CHD and MI in Germans is still unknown. Methods We enrolled 102 controls and 322 patients with angiographically documented CHD,including a sub-group of 173 patients with acute or chronic MI and 80 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS).All patients and controls were Germans and genotyped by polymerase chain reaction and digestion with SphI. Results We found that several classical risk factors for CHD and MI, including hypercholesterolemia and cigarette smoking,were significantly increased in CHD and MI patients compared with controls. Serum levels of gelatinase B and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 were increased in the peripheral blood of patients with acute coronary syndrome. No significant differences in genotype or allelic frequencies between CHD, MI and control subjects of either men or women were found. Our search for a possible association of the polymorphisms with CHD and MI by logistic regression analysis was also negative. The serum concentrations of gelatinase B showed no differences between genotypes. Conclusions Our data showed that gelatinase B might provide an index of plaque activity in ACS, but gelatinase B protein was not affected by genotypes. Also, the T variant of gelatinase B was not associated with CHD or MI in Germans. (J Geriatr Cardiol 2004;1(2):114-118.)

  7. [Coronary heart disease in Mexico and the clinical epidemiological and preventive relevance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez Domínguez, Rafael; Ramírez Hernández, Jorge A; Casanova Garcés, José Miguel

    2003-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is dominant among heart diseases in the population, a problem to control. Heart diseases have been first place in the general mortality for the last 20 years. The trend show an annual increase without control. Atherosclerosis is responsible for at least for one fourth of all deaths in the country. The combined data of mortality and morbidity, from hospital discharges or the whole country, disclose that one out of three die of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). While only 8% of all deaths registered were admitted to a hospital. Most, 92% were never admitted to any hospital for some reason. The estimated annual incidence of AMI cases is 140,000, on the basis of 3 cases surviving for each case death, accounted by the Death Certification System, which rounds 35,000. Standardized mortality rates of AMI in Mexico are greater than in USA o Canada creating a more concerned worry. The most probable explanation to that situation is lack of preventive care, which should also include the acute care and before reaching the hospital facilities. Running the same chances are hypertension crisis and strokes and diabetic complications. The appropriate care for critical situations might reduce significantly the cardiovascular mortality in the country, in a short and middle term. Prevention is not only for chronic conditions but for acute and critical situations. The programs of preventive care should also include cultural promotion and community awareness. The timely care is life and myocardium saving. The reinforcement of prior to hospital care reduces the delay for AMI adequate intervention. These activities agree quite well with the ongoing programs of CPR, organizing the surviving chain and the training programs for paramedical emergency technicians.

  8. Associations of coeliac disease with coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, K; Koskinen, O A; Agarwal, A; Tikkinen, K A O; Mäki, M; Kaukinen, K

    2015-09-01

    Clinical experience suggests that atherosclerotic disease is common in individuals with coeliac disease, but epidemiological studies have had contradicting findings. To summarise the currently available evidence, we systematically reviewed and analysed observational studies of the association of coeliac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis with coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke. We searched for studies comparing CHD or stroke outcomes with individuals with and without coeliac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis. Three investigators independently searched electronic databases, identified relevant studies and extracted data. Study-specific results were combined in random-effects meta-analyses, and heterogeneity was quantified using the I(2) statistic and meta-regression. Twenty-one studies were included in our systematic review and 18 in the meta-analyses. For CHD, the pooled hazard ratio for incident disease was 1.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 1.19) and the overall standardised mortality ratio was 1.21 (0.99, 1.49). For stroke and brain haemorrhage, the corresponding estimates were 1.10 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.21) and 1.43 (0.97, 2.10), respectively. There was moderate to considerable heterogeneity among the study-specific estimates. In addition, many estimates were based on small numbers of outcomes and they had limitations in terms of adjustment for potential confounders. Our meta-analyses lend some support to an association between coeliac disease and CHD or cerebrovascular disease, but the evidence base was heterogeneous and had limitations. Our systematic review highlighted a need in this area for adequately powered prospective studies with appropriate adjustment for potentially confounding factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence and correlates of coronary heart disease: first population-based study in Lebanon

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    Zeidan RK

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rouba Karen Zeidan,1 Rita Farah,2 Mirna N Chahine,3 Roland Asmar,3 Hassan Hosseini,4,5 Pascale Salameh,6,7 Atul Pathak8 1Doctoral School of Biology Health and Biotechnologies, Toulouse III University, Toulouse, 2Doctoral School of Life and Health Sciences, Paris-Est University, Creteil, France; 3Foundation-Medical Research Institutes, F-MRI®, Beirut, Lebanon; 4Department of Neurology, Henri Mondor Hospital AP-HP, 5EA 4391, Nerve Excitability and Therapeutics, Université Paris-Est, Creteil, France; 6School of Pharmacy, Lebanese American University, Byblos, 7Laboratory of Clinical and Epidemiology Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lebanese University, Hadath, Lebanon; 8Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Hypertension, Risk Factors and Heart Failure Unit, Clinique Pasteur, Toulouse, France Background: Lebanon is experiencing a growing epidemic of coronary heart diseases (CHDs, as most low- and middle-income countries currently are. However, this growth can be attenuated if effective preventive strategies are adopted. Purpose: To provide the first national population-based prevalence of CHD and to describe the profile of Lebanese adults with prevalent CHD. Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional study using a multistage cluster sample across Lebanon. We interviewed residents aged 40 years and older using a questionnaire that captured the presence of CHDs and their risk factors (RFs. Results: Our study showed that 13.4% of the Lebanese population aged ≥40 years suffer from a prevalent CHD. CHD seemed to appear more prematurely than in developed countries, and males seemed to be more subject to CHD than females until a certain age. CHD was associated with older age, male sex, a lower economic situation, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, having a family history of premature cardiovascular diseases, and suffering from diabetes. However, smoking and waist circumference did not seem to have an independent effect on CHD, but rather an effect

  10. Food Choices and Coronary Heart Disease: A Population Based Cohort Study of Rural Swedish Men with 12 Years of Follow-up

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    Sara Holmberg

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease is associated with diet. Nutritional recommendations are frequently provided, but few long term studies on the effect of food choices on heart disease are available. We followed coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality in a cohort of rural men (N = 1,752 participating in a prospective observational study. Dietary choices were assessed at baseline with a 15-item food questionnaire. 138 men were hospitalized or deceased owing to coronary heart disease during the 12 year follow-up. Daily intake of fruit and vegetables was associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease when combined with a high dairy fat consumption (odds ratio 0.39, 95% CI 0.21-0.73, but not when combined with a low dairy fat consumption (odds ratio 1.70, 95% CI 0.97-2.98. Choosing wholemeal bread or eating fish at least twice a week showed no association with the outcome.

  11. [Correlation between resting heart rate and blood glucose level in elderly patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dong-Liang; Li, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Lin; Xu, Hao; Tuo, Xi-Ping; Jian, Zai-Jin; Wang, Xiao-Na; Yun, Ji-Li; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Si-Yue

    2016-05-01

    To explore the correlation between resting heart rate (RHR) and blood glucose level in elderly patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) complicated by diabetes mellitus. Between April and July, 2011, a total of 1336 outpatients over 60 years of age recruited from 165 hospitals were asked to complete a questionnaire and received blood glucose and RHR examination. According to baseline RHR, the patients were divided into 3 groups with HRH blood glucose control rate. HbA1c levels in the total, male and female patients differed significantly among the 3 groups (F=15.436, 15.436, and 24.270, respectively, PBlood glucose control rate in the total, male and female patients also differed significantly among the 3 groups (χ(2)=13.471, 6.752, and 6.522, respectively, Pblood glucose control failure of 1.99 (95% CI: 1.23-2.37, Pblood glucose level, and an increased RHR is associated with an increased risk of poor blood glucose control. Rigorous RHR control in such high-risk patients may prove beneficial for both blood glucose control and secondary prevention of CHD.

  12. Association of total cholesterol and HDL-C levels and outcome in coronary heart disease patients with heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qin; Li, Jianfei; Yang, Jin; Li, Rongshan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate associations of total cholesterol (TC) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels with prognosis in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients with heart failure (HF). Patients who were angiographical-diagnosis of CHD and echocardiographical-diagnosis of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) Hs-CRP) was observed. TC was positively correlated with BMI and albumin, and HDL-C was inversely correlated with Hs-CRP. The associations of TC level and rehospitalization for HF and all-cause mortality were attenuated but consistently significant through model 1 to 4, with odds ratio (OR) of 0.97 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92–0.99). Associations of HDL-C level and rehospitalization for HF and all-cause mortality were also consistently significant through model 1 to 4, with OR of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.90–0.98). Strength of association was attenuated prominently in model 3 after adjusted for Hs-CRP, and no change was observed after further adjusted for BMI and albumin. Higher baseline TC and HDL-C levels are associated with better outcome in CHD patients with HF. PMID:28248864

  13. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Heart Disease? Some people who have diabetic heart disease (DHD) ... when it's given right after symptoms occur. Coronary Heart Disease A common symptom of coronary heart disease (CHD) ...

  14. Coronary heart disease in women with coronary heart disease risk factors of heart failure%冠心病危险因子在女性冠心病心力衰竭中的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟文军

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of risk factors for coronary heart disease on the occurrence of heart failure in women with coronary heart disease. Methods Three hundred and twenty-eight cases with coronary heart disease including 196 male patients (male group) and 132 female patients(female group) were selected. The risk factors of coronary heart disease including age, high blood pressure,diabetes, blood fat, plasma fibrinogen and blood uric acid were compared, all the patients were followed up for 1-3 years, the occurrence of heart failure was observed between the two groups, the level of blood uric acid was compared between patients with or without heart failure in female group. Results The level of triacylglycerol, plasma fibrinogen and blood uric acid in female group was higher than that in male group (P < 0.05 ). Followed up for 1-3 years, the occurrence of heart failure in female group was higher than that in male group[27.27% (36/132) vs. 16.84% (33/196)]. The level of blood uric acid in female group with or without heart failure was (368.85 ± 78.60) μ mol/L and (336.63 + 69.65 )μ mol/L, there was significant difference between the both (P < 0.05 ). Conclusions The risk factors for coronary heart disease are the important dement in female coronary heart disease with heart failure, and blood uric acid is the alone risk factor. Through early monitoring the blood uric acid etc and intervention, the progress of the disease will slow.%目的 探讨冠心病危险因子在女性冠心病患者发生心力衰竭中的影响。方法 选取328例冠心病患者,其中男196例(男性冠心病组),女132例(女性冠心病组),对两组患者各种冠心病危险因子包括年龄、高血压、糖尿病、血脂、血浆纤维蛋白原及血尿酸水平等进行比较;对所有患者随访1~3年,观察两组患者心力衰竭发生率,并对女性冠心病组发生心力衰竭者与未发生心力衰竭者的血尿

  15. Occurrence of symptoms and depressive mood among working-aged coronary heart disease patients

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    Sillanmäki Lauri H

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The typical symptoms of coronary heart disease (CHD, chest pain and breathlessness, are well-known. They are considered quite dramatic, and can thus be fairly reliably mapped by a survey. However, people might have other clearly unpleasant symptoms impairing quality of life. The aim of this study is to evaluate the appearance of these complaints of working-aged people with self-reported CHD. Methods The study consists of a postal questionnaire of randomly selected Finns in age groups 30–34, 40–44 and 50–54, a response rate of 39% (N = 15,477. The subjects were asked whether or not a doctor had told them that they had angina pectoris or had had myocardial infarction. Four randomly selected age and sex matched controls were chosen for every patient. The occurrence of self-reported dyspnoea, chest pain during anger or other kind of emotion, palpitation and perspiration without physical exercise, irregular heartbeats, flushing, trembling of hands and voice, jerking of muscles, depression and day-time sleepiness were examined. Odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI, between occurrence of symptoms and CHD with and without heart infarction, were computed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results The sample eventually comprised 319 CHD patients. Dyspnoea, chest pain during anger or other kind of emotion, palpitation, perspiration without physical exercise, irregular heartbeats daily or almost daily, trembling of hands and voice, and jerking of muscles occurred statistically significantly more frequently among CHD patients than among controls. The CHD patients also reported more depressive mood according to Beck's inventory scores and poorer sleep and more frequent day-time sleepiness than controls. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis chest pain during anger or other kind of emotion (ORs 4.12 and 3.61 and dyspnoea (ORs 2.33 and 3.81 were the symptoms most associated with CHD. Conclusions

  16. Functional Status, Anxiety, Cardiac Self-Efficacy, and Health Beliefs of Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

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    Hamid Allahverdipour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Beliefs and emotions could effect on functional status, quality of life, and mortality amongst patients who are suffering coronary heart disease (CHD. Current study examined the role of anxiety: trait/ state, self-efficacy, health beliefs, and functional status among patient with history of CHD. Method: In this correlational study, 105 hospitalized and outpatients patients suffering CHD in Tehran Heart Center Hospital participated by using convenience sampling method in 2012. Cardiac self-efficacy, Seattle Angina, and research- designed health beliefs questionnaires were used to gather data. Results: The functional status in CHD patients showed significant relationships with gender, job, and type of medical insurance of the participants (All ps<0.05. In addition , perceived vulnerability to face again cardiac attack in the future, perceived severity of next cardiac attack, anxiety, state anxiety and trait anxiety (All ps<0.05 had significant and negative relationships with functional status. Conversely, the cardiac self-efficacy had a positive and significant relationship (P<0.001 with functional status. Conclusion: Psychological factors have important role in functional status and quality of life of patients who suffering CHD. Therefore, it is necessary to emphasize on supportive and complementary programs to promote Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs.

  17. Social Integration and Reduced Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women: The Role of Lifestyle Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shun-Chiao; Glymour, Maria; Cornelis, Marilyn; Walter, Stefan; Rimm, Eric B; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2017-06-09

    Higher social integration is associated with lower cardiovascular mortality; however, whether it is associated with incident coronary heart disease (CHD), especially in women, and whether associations differ by case fatality are unclear. This study sought to examine the associations between social integration and risk of incident CHD in a large female prospective cohort. Seventy-six thousand three hundred and sixty-two women in the Nurses' Health Study, free of CHD and stroke at baseline (1992), were followed until 2014. Social integration was assessed by a simplified Berkman-Syme Social Network Index every 4 years. End points included nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD. Two thousand three hundred and seventy-two incident CHD events occurred throughout follow-up. Adjusting for demographic, health/medical risk factors, and depressive symptoms, being socially integrated was significantly associated with lower CHD risk, particularly fatal CHD. The most socially integrated women had a hazard ratio of 0.55 (95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.73) of developing fatal CHD compared with those least socially integrated (P for trend social integration and nonfatal myocardial infarction risk were largely explained by health-promoting behaviors, particularly through differences in cigarette smoking; however, the association with fatal CHD risk remained after accounting for these behaviors and, thus, may involve more direct biological mechanisms. Social integration is inversely associated with CHD incidence in women, but is largely explained by lifestyle/behavioral pathways. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Firebird stent for the treatment of patients with coronary heart disease: short-term clinical outcome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Ying Wang; Jin-Bo Wang; Feng Liang; Da-Yi Hu; Ming-Ying Wu; Tian-Chang Li; Chu-Zhong Tang; Ji-Yun Wang; Chang-Lin Lu

    2009-01-01

    Objective The sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) has dramatically reduced the rate ofrestenosis in comparison to that with the bare-metal stent (BMS).This study aimed to evaluate the short-term efficacy and safety of Firebird stent implantation for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods From Apri12006 through July 2007, 155 patients (mean age 58.93~10.27 years) with CHD were implanted with Firebird stent or Cypher select stent at Daxing Hospital. Patients were followed up for one year. All-cause mortality, major adverse cardiac events (MACE, including cardiac death, myocardial infarction, recurrence of angina pectoris, heart failure, revascularization, and adverse arrhythmia) and stent thrombosis were compared between the 2 groups. Results Of the 155 consecutive patients, 147 patients were revascularized completely. Of these patients, 48 (with 59 lesions) were treated with Firebird stent, 59 patients (with 75 lesions) with Cypher select stent. The demographic characteristics were similar in the 2 groups. All the angiographic and procedural results were not significantly different between the 2 groups. All-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, recurrence of angina pectoris, MACE and stent thrombosis were almost identical between the 2 groups before discharge, at 6 months and at one year .Conclusion The short-term efficacy and safety of Firebird stent are similar to that of the cypher select stent for the treatment of patients with CHD.

  19. [The importance of resting ECG in diagnosis of coronary heart disease exacerbation and in heart rate disregulations in patients under home palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzek, Jarosław; Gasior, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    There are large numbers of people suffering from simultaneous coronary heart disease and ischaemic heart disease who remain under home palliative care. When concentrating on oencological palliative treatment, there exists sometimes a tendency to forget about the possibility of deterioration in the general condition of a patient with cardio-vascular system dysfunctions. Deterioration in the patient's condition and persistent somatic complaints are frequently interpreted as progress in neoplastic disease or side effects of the employed therapy. It frequently leads to unnecessary discontinuation of palliative oencological treatment. Severe general condition of most patients limits the possibility of ischaemic heart disease diagnosis. It is also impossible to perform stress tests. Resting ECG is a simple and relatively inexpensive diagnostic method, possible to be performed at home by the patient's bed. Basing on a medical survey and an analysis of ECG record, diagnosis of deterioration in CHNS is very successful. The management of a patient with advanced neoplastic disease coexistent with ischaemic heart disease demands careful oencological and cardiologic treatment. ECG examinations carried in the patient's bed constitutes a crucial element of diagnostics in deteriorating coronary heart disease and in heart rate disregulations in patients under home palliative care.

  20. Low-dose copper infusion into the coronary circulation induces acute heart failure in diabetic rats: New mechanism of heart disease.

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    Cheung, Carlos Chun Ho; Soon, Choong Yee; Chuang, Chia-Lin; Phillips, Anthony R J; Zhang, Shaoping; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes impairs copper (Cu) regulation, causing elevated serum Cu and urinary Cu excretion in patients with established cardiovascular disease; it also causes cardiomyopathy and chronic cardiac impairment linked to defective Cu homeostasis in rats. However, the mechanisms that link impaired Cu regulation to cardiac dysfunction in diabetes are incompletely understood. Chronic treatment with triethylenetetramine (TETA), a Cu²⁺-selective chelator, improves cardiac function in diabetic patients, and in rats with heart disease; the latter displayed ∼3-fold elevations in free Cu²⁺ in the coronary effluent when TETA was infused into their coronary arteries. To further study the nature of defective cardiac Cu regulation in diabetes, we employed an isolated-perfused, working-heart model in which we infused micromolar doses of Cu²⁺ into the coronary arteries and measured acute effects on cardiac function in diabetic and non-diabetic-control rats. Infusion of CuCl₂ solutions caused acute dose-dependent cardiac dysfunction in normal hearts. Several measures of baseline cardiac function were impaired in diabetic hearts, and these defects were exacerbated by low-micromolar Cu²⁺ infusion. The response to infused Cu²⁺ was augmented in diabetic hearts, which became defective at lower infusion levels and underwent complete pump failure (cardiac output = 0 ml/min) more often (P hearts. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the acute effects on cardiac function of pathophysiological elevations in coronary Cu²⁺. The effects of Cu²⁺ infusion occur within minutes in both control and diabetic hearts, which suggests that they are not due to remodelling. Heightened sensitivity to the acute effects of small elevations in Cu²⁺ could contribute substantively to impaired cardiac function in patients with diabetes and is thus identified as a new mechanism of heart disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.