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Sample records for coronary disease stroke

  1. Association of ischemic stroke to coronary artery disease using computed tomography coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Møller; Medina, Hector; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and cerebrovascular disease share similar risk factor profiles, data on whether IS can be considered a "CAD equivalent" are limited. We aimed to determine whether ischemic stroke is an independent predictor of CAD by using cardiac...... increase odds of having coronary artery plaque (odds ratio [OR] 4.9, P4 segments of plaque than 0-4 segments as compared to patients without stroke (OR 18.3, P...

  2. Alcohol intake in relation to non-fatal and fatal coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricci, Cristian; Wood, Angela; Muller, David

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between alcohol consumption (at baseline and over lifetime) and non-fatal and fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. DESIGN: Multicentre case-cohort study. SETTING: A study of cardiovascular disease (CVD) determinants within the European Prospecti...

  3. Unrealistic pessimism about risk of coronary heart disease and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asimakopoulou, Koula G.; Skinner, T. Chas; Spimpolo, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    and rated their mood about these risks using a self-report measure. Using an objective risk calculator, they were then told their actual risk of CHD and stroke and their mood was re-assessed. Results: Patients' estimates of their risk of CHD/stroke were grossly inflated. A negative relationship between...... disease risk and mood was also seen where higher risk of actual and perceived CHD/stroke was related to worse mood. A positive relationship between mood and extent of perceptual error was further observed; the more inaccurate patients' perceptions of CHD/stroke risk were, the better their mood. Mood......Objective: We examined the accuracy of type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients' risk estimates of developing coronary heart disease (CHD)/having a stroke as a consequence of diabetes and their mood about these risks. Methods: Patients reported their perceived risks of developing CHD/having a stroke...

  4. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    (Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.) The Fibrinogen Studies Collaboration.The Copenhagen City Heart Study; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...

  5. Adult height, coronary heart disease and stroke : A multi-locus Mendelian randomization meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nüesch, Eveline; Dale, Caroline; Palmer, Tom M.; White, Jon; Keating, Brendan J.; van Iperen, Erik P A; Goel, Anuj; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Asselbergs, F. W.; Verschuren, W. M.; Wijmenga, C.; Van der Schouw, Y. T.; Onland-Moret, N. C.; Lange, Leslie A.; Hovingh, G. K.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Morris, Richard W.; Whincup, Peter H.; Wannamethe, Goya S.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Ebrahim, Shah; Steel, Laura; Nair, Nikhil; Reiner, Alexander P.; Kooperberg, Charles; Wilson, James F.; Bolton, Jennifer L.; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jacqueline F.; Strachan, Mark W J; Robertson, Christine M.; Kleber, Marcus E.; Delgado, Graciela; März, Winfried; Melander, Olle; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Farrall, Martin; Watkins, Hugh; Leusink, Maarten; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.; de Groot, Mark C H; Dudbridge, Frank; Hingorani, Aroon; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Amuzu, A.; Caufield, M.; Cavadino, A.; Cooper, J.; Davies, T. L.; Day, I. N.; Drenos, F.; Engmann, J.; Finan, C.; Giambartolomei, C.; Hardy, R.; Humphries, S. E.; Hypponen, E.; Kivimaki, M.; Kuh, D.; Kumari, M.; Ong, K.; Plagnol, V.; Power, C.; Richards, M.; Shah, S.; Shah, T.; Sofat, R.; Talmud, P. J.; Wareham, N.; Warren, H.; Whittaker, J. C.; Wong, A.; Zabaneh, D.; Smith, George Davey; Wells, Jonathan C.; Leon, David A.; Holmes, Michael V.; Casas, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We investigated causal effect of completed growth, measured by adult height, on coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke and cardiovascular traits, using instrumental variable (IV) Mendelian randomization meta-analysis. Methods: We developed an allele score based on 69 single nucleotide

  6. Lipoprotein(a) concentration and the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and nonvascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collaboration, Emerging Risk Factors; Erqou, Sebhat; Kaptoge, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    were recorded, including 9336 CHD outcomes, 1903 ischemic strokes, 338 hemorrhagic strokes, 751 unclassified strokes, 1091 other vascular deaths, 8114 nonvascular deaths, and 242 deaths of unknown cause. Within-study regression analyses were adjusted for within-person variation and combined using meta.......02-1.18) for ischemic stroke, 1.01 (95% CI, 0.98-1.05) for the aggregate of nonvascular mortality, 1.00 (95% CI, 0.97-1.04) for cancer deaths, and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.95-1.06) for nonvascular deaths other than cancer. CONCLUSION: Under a wide range of circumstances, there are continuous, independent, and modest......CONTEXT: Circulating concentration of lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), a large glycoprotein attached to a low-density lipoprotein-like particle, may be associated with risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of Lp(a) concentration with risk of major vascular...

  7. Early menopause predicts future coronary heart disease and stroke: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellons, Melissa; Ouyang, Pamela; Schreiner, Pamela J; Herrington, David M; Vaidya, Dhananjay

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women. Identifying women at risk of cardiovascular disease has tremendous public health importance. Early menopause is associated with increased cardiovascular disease events in some predominantly white populations, but not consistently. Our objective was to determine if self-reported early menopause (menopause at an age menopause (either natural menopause or surgical removal of ovaries at an age menopause. In survival curves, women with early menopause had worse coronary heart disease and stroke-free survival (log rank P = 0.008 and P = 0.0158). In models adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, Multi-ethnic Study Atherosclerosis site, and traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, this risk for coronary heart disease and stroke remained (hazard ratio, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.17-3.70; and hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.11-4.32, respectively). Early menopause is positively associated with coronary heart disease and stroke in a multiethnic cohort, independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  8. Executive function, but not memory, associates with incident coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostamian, Somayeh; van Buchem, Mark A; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association of performance in cognitive domains executive function and memory with incident coronary heart disease and stroke in older participants without dementia. METHODS: We included 3,926 participants (mean age 75 years, 44% male) at risk for cardiovascular diseases...... from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER) with Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥24 points. Scores on the Stroop Color-Word Test (selective attention) and the Letter Digit Substitution Test (processing speed) were converted to Z scores and averaged into a composite...... executive function score. Likewise, scores of the Picture Learning Test (immediate and delayed memory) were transformed into a composite memory score. Associations of executive function and memory were longitudinally assessed with risk of coronary heart disease and stroke using multivariable Cox regression...

  9. PCOS, coronary heart disease, stroke and the influence of obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, P. C. M.; Dekkers, O. M.; Romijn, J. A.; Dieben, S. W. M.; Helmerhorst, F. M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at risk of arterial disease. We examined the risk of (non) fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke in patients with PCOS and ovulatory women without PCOS, and assessed whether obesity might explain a higher risk of CHD or stroke.

  10. Early Menopause Predicts Future Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellons, Melissa; Ouyang, Pamela; Schreiner, Pamela J; Herrington, David M; Vaidya, Dhananjay

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women. Identifying women at risk of cardiovascular disease has tremendous public health importance. Early menopause is associated with increased cardiovascular disease events in some predominantly white populations, but not consistently. Our objective was to determine if a self-reported early menopause (menopause at an age menopause (either natural menopause or surgical removal of ovaries at an age menopause. In survival curves, women with early menopause had worse coronary heart disease and stroke-free survival (log rank p=menopause is positively associated with coronary heart disease and stroke in a multiethnic cohort, independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. PMID:22692332

  11. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    , Economic and Social Research Council, European Union New and Emerging Risks in Occupational Safety and Health research programme, Finnish Work Environment Fund, Swedish Research Council for Working Life and Social Research, German Social Accident Insurance, Danish National Research Centre for the Working......BACKGROUND: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. METHODS: We...... identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium and open-access data archives. We used cumulative...

  12. Depressive disorder, coronary heart disease, and stroke: dose-response and reverse causation effects in the Whitehall II cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Eric J; Shipley, Martin J; Britton, Annie R; Stansfeld, Stephen A; Heuschmann, Peter U; Rudd, Anthony G; Wolfe, Charles D A; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Kivimaki, Mika

    2014-03-01

    Systematic reviews examining associations of depressive disorder with coronary heart disease and stroke produce mixed results. Failure to consider reverse causation and dose-response patterns may have caused inconsistencies in evidence. This prospective cohort study on depressive disorder, coronary heart disease, and stroke analysed reverse causation and dose-response effects using four 5-year and three 10-year observation cycles (total follow up 24 years) based on multiple repeat measures of exposure. Participants in the Whitehall II study (n = 10,036, 31,395 person-observations, age at start 44.4 years) provided up to six repeat measures of depressive symptoms via the 30-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30) and one measure via Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The cohort was followed up for major coronary events (coronary death/nonfatal myocardial infarction) and stroke (stroke death/morbidity) through the national mortality register Hospital Episode Statistics, ECG-screening, medical records, and self-report questionnaires. GHQ-30 caseness predicted stroke over 0-5 years (age-, sex- and ethnicity-adjusted HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.1-2.3) but not over 5-10 years (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.6-1.4). Using the last 5-year observation cycle, cumulative GHQ-30 caseness was associated with incident coronary heart disease in a dose-response manner (1-2 times a case: HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.7-1.7; 3-4 times: HR 2.06, 95% CI 1.2-3.7), and CES-D caseness predicted coronary heart disease (HR 1.81, 95% CI 1.1-3.1). There was evidence of a dose-response effect of depressive symptoms on risk of coronary heart disease. In contrast, prospective associations of depressive symptoms with stroke appeared to arise wholly or partly through reverse causation.

  13. PCOS, coronary heart disease, stroke and the influence of obesity: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, P. C. M.; Dekkers, O. M.; Romijn, J. A.; Dieben, S. W. M.; Helmerhorst, F. M.

    2011-01-01

    background: Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at risk of arterial disease. We examined the risk of (non)fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke in patients with PCOS and ovulatory women without PCOS, and assessed whether obesity might explain a higher risk of CHD or stroke. methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled observational studies. Four definitions of PCOS were considered: World Health Organization type II anovulation, Na...

  14. Incidence of stroke and coronary heart disease in the adult health study sample, 1958 - 78

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazunori; Shimizu, Yukiko; Sawada, Hisao; Kato, Hiroo.

    1986-04-01

    Approximately 16,000 study subjects in the Adult Health Study sample who had received examination at least once during the 20 years (1958 - 78) in Hiroshima or Nagasaki and were found to have neither stroke nor coronary heart disease (CHD) at the initial examination were studied for the incidence of stroke and CHD and the relationship of these to atomic bomb radiation exposure. Their secular trends were also studied. Findings suggestive of a relationship between stroke and radiation exposure among Hiroshima females were first discovered for the years 1969 - 73, that is, 24 - 28 years after A-bomb exposure. In general, this association is supported by the present analysis. Stroke incidence continued to decrease during the present report's period of observation. Analysis by type showed that cerebral infarction and cerebral hemorrhage both decreased, but the decrease of the latter is especially remarkable. The trend to decrease is observed in both sexes and in both cities. A relationship between CHD and radiation exposure was, as noted for stroke, first observed only in Hiroshima females for the years 1969 - 73, but from this analysis it appears that the trend began earlier and the association is getting stronger with the passage of time. Analysis by type showed myocardial infarction (MI), but not angina pectoris, to be related to radiation exposure. The incidence rate for CHD, especially for MI, was almost constant during the observation period, it being 1.2/1,000 person-years on the average. Comparing by sex, the incidence rate was constant in males. In females, the pattern varied with time. There appear to be no between-city differences in secular trends - essentially constant. (author)

  15. Coronary heart disease risk in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease: findings from the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Noncoronary forms of atherosclerosis (including transient ischemic attacks or stroke of carotid origin or >50% stenosis of the carotid artery) are associated with a 10-year vascular risk of >20% and are considered as a coronary heart disease (CHD) -risk equivalent from the standpoint of lipid...... management. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known CHD regardless of the presence of carotid atherosclerosis. We evaluated the risk of developing clinically recognized CHD in SPARCL patients....

  16. Health Gain through Screening--Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: Developing Primary Health Care Services for People with Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, M. B.; Turner, S.; Martin, D. M.; Roy, A.

    1997-01-01

    A study of 120 British adults with intellectual disability found they had higher risk factors of developing coronary heart disease and stroke than the general population. There was a greater incidence of obesity and considerably lower physical activity levels than the general population. Several also had abnormal cholesterol readings. (CR)

  17. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kivimäki, M.; Jokela, M.; Nyberg, S.T.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Fransson, E.I.; Alfredsson, L.; Bjorner, J.B.; Borritz, M.; Burr, H.; Casini, A.; Clays, E.; Bacquer, D. de; Dragano, N.; Erbel, R.; Geuskens, G.A.; Hamer, M.; Hooftman, W.E.; Houtman, I.L.; Jöckel, K.H.; Kittel, F.; Knutsson, A.; Koskenvuo, M.; Lunau, T.; Madsen, I.E.; Nielsen, M.L.; Nordin, M.; Oksanen, T.; Pejtersen, J.H.; Pentti, J.; Rugulies, R.; Salo, P.; Shipley, M.J.; Siegrist, J.; Steptoe, A.; Suominen, S.B.; Theorell, T.; Vahtera, J.; Westerholm, P.J.M.; O'Reilly, D.; Kumari, M.; Batty, G.D.; Ferrie, J.E.; Virtanen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. Methods: We identified

  18. [Major depressive disorder in relation with coronary heart disease and stroke in Chinese adults aged 30-79 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C Q; Chen, Y P; Lv, J; Guo, Y; Sherliker, P; Bian, Z; Zhou, H Y; Tan, Y L; Chen, J S; Chen, Z M; Li, L M

    2016-06-18

    To investigate the associations of major depressive disorder with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke in Chinese adults aged 30-79 years. In 2004-2008, China Kadoorie Biobank was conducted in 10 geographically defined regions (5 urban and 5 rural) of China. A total number of 512 891 participants aged 30-79 years were recruited in the baseline survey. A laptop-based electronic questionnaire was administrated face-to-face by trained health workers, collecting the general demographic and socio-economic status, dietary and other lifestyle behaviours (e.g. smoking, alcohol drinking, physical activity), medical history and family history of common chronic diseases. Major depressive episodes (MDE) in the past 12 months were assessed with the World Health Organization composite international diagnostic interview-short form (CIDI-SF). The physical measurements included the heights and weights, which were used to calculate the body mass indexes (BMI).Chi squared and t test were used to compare the differences in participants characteristics according to their major depressive disorder. Logistic models were employed to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% CI of their major depressive disorder with prevalent coronary heart disease and stroke. Among the 512 891 participants, 3 281 (0.6%) showed an MDE in the preceding 12 months, 15 472 (3.0%) reported prevalent CHD, and 8 884 (1.7%) reported prevalent stroke. Major depressive disorder was significantly associated with an increased risk of CHD and risk of stroke. Age- and gender-adjusted ORs (95% CI) were 1.80 (1.53-2.12) for CHD and 2.53 (2.09-3.05) for stroke. The associations were significant after further adjustment for potential confounders, such as other socio-demographic status, smoking, alcohol drinking, physical activity, and BMI, prevalent hypertension, diabetes as well as family history of cardiovascular diseases (OR=1.83, 95% CI=1.54-2.18 for CHD; OR=2.19, 95% CI=1.79-2.69 for stroke). Moreover, gender

  19. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke : a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Kivimaki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T.; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Fransson, Eleonor I.; Alfredsson, Lars; Bjorner, Jakob B.; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Casini, Annalisa; Clays, Els; De Bacquer, Dirk; Dragano, Nico; Erbel, Raimund; Geuskens, Goedele A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. METHODS: We identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-anal...

  20. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Kivimäki, M.; Jokela, M.; Nyberg, S.T.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Fransson, E.I.; Alfredsson, L.; Bjorner, J.B.; Borritz, M.; Burr, H.; Casini, A.; Clays, E.; Bacquer, D. de; Dragano, N.; Erbel, R.; Geuskens, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. Methods: We identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-anal...

  1. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603 838 individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Kivimäki, M.; Jokela, M.; Nyberg, S. T.; Singh-Manoux, A.; Fransson, E. I.; Alfredsson, L.; Bjorner, J. B.; Borritz, M.; Burr, H.; Casini, A.; Clays, E.; De Bacquer, D.; Dragano, N.; Erbel, R.; Geuskens, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. / Methods: We identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Met...

  2. Comparing the decline in coronary heart disease and stroke mortality in neighbouring countries with different healthcare systems.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bennett, K

    2013-06-04

    OBJECTIVE: To examine age and gender specific trends in coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke mortality in two neighbouring countries, the Republic of Ireland (ROI) and Northern Ireland (NI). DESIGN: Epidemiological study of time trends in CHD and stroke mortality. SETTING\\/PATIENTS: The populations of the ROI and NI, 1985-2010. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Directly age standardised CHD and stroke mortality rates were calculated and analysed using joinpoint regression to identify years where the slope of the linear trend changed significantly. This was performed separately for specific age groups (25-54, 55-64, 65-74 and 75-84 years) and by gender. Annual percentage change (APC) and 95% CIs are presented. RESULTS: There was a striking similarity between the two countries, with percentage change between 1985 and 1989 and between 2006 and 2010 of 67% and 69% in CHD mortality, and 64% and 62% in stroke mortality for the ROI and NI, respectively. However, joinpoint analysis identified differences in the pace of change between the two countries. There was an accelerated pace of decline (negative APC) in mortality for both CHD and stroke in both countries from the mid-1990s (APC ROI -8% (95% CI -9.5 to 6.5) and NI -6.6% (-6.9 to -6.3)), but the accelerated decrease started later for CHD mortality in the ROI. In recent years, a levelling off in CHD mortality was observed in the 25-54 year age group in NI and in stroke mortality for men and women in the ROI. CONCLUSIONS: While differences in the pace of change in mortality were observed at different time points, similar, substantial decreases in CHD and stroke mortality were achieved between 1985 and 1989 and between 2006 and 2010 in the ROI and NI despite important differences in health service structures. There is evidence of a levelling in mortality rates in some groups in recent years.

  3. PCOS, coronary heart disease, stroke and the influence of obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, P C M; Dekkers, O M; Romijn, J A; Dieben, S W M; Helmerhorst, F M

    2011-01-01

    Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at risk of arterial disease. We examined the risk of (non)fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke in patients with PCOS and ovulatory women without PCOS, and assessed whether obesity might explain a higher risk of CHD or stroke. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled observational studies. Four definitions of PCOS were considered: World Health Organization type II anovulation, National Institutes of Health criteria, Rotterdam consensus and Androgen-excess criteria. Obesity was defined as BMI > 30 kg/m(2) and/or waist circumference >88 cm. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Primary outcome was fatal/non-fatal CHD or stroke. Definitions of CHD and stroke were based on criteria used by the various authors. The effect measure was the pooled relative risk in a random effects model. Risk ratios and rate ratios were combined here. After identifying 1340 articles, 5 follow-up studies published between 2000 and 2008 were included. The studies showed heterogeneity in design, definitions and quality. In a random effects model the relative risk for CHD or stroke were 2.02 comparing women with PCOS to women without PCOS (95% confidence interval 1.47, 2.76). Pooling the two studies with risk estimates adjusted for BMI showed a relative risk of 1.55 (1.27, 1.89). This meta-analysis showed a 2-fold risk of arterial disease for patients with PCOS relative to women without PCOS. BMI adjustment did not affect this finding, suggesting the increased risk for cardiovascular events in PCOS is not completely related to a higher BMI in patients with PCOS.

  4. Impact of level and patterns of alcohol drinking on coronary heart disease and stroke burden in Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Esteban Bardach

    Full Text Available Deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD, including coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke are expected to increase in Latin America. Moderate and regular alcohol consumption confers cardiovascular protection, while binge drinking increases risk. We estimated the effects of alcohol use on the number of annual CHD and stroke deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs in Argentina.Alcohol use data were obtained from a nationally representative survey (EnPreCosp 2011, and etiological effect sizes from meta-analyses of epidemiological studies. Cause-specific mortality rates were from the vital registration system.There were 291,475 deaths in 2010 including 24,893 deaths from CHD and 15,717 from stroke. 62.7% of men and 38.7% of women reported drinking alcohol in the past year. All heavy drinkers (i.e. women who drank >20g/day and men who drank >40g/day of alcohol met the definition of binge drinking and therefore did not benefit from cardioprotective effects. Alcohol drinking prevented 1,424 CHD deaths per year but caused 935 deaths from stroke (121 ischemic and 814 hemorrhagic, leading to 448 CVD deaths prevented (58.3% in men. Alcohol use was estimated to save 85,772 DALYs from CHD, but was responsible for 52,171 lost from stroke.In Argentina, the cardioprotective effect of regular and moderate alcohol drinking is slightly larger than the harmful impact of binge drinking on CVD. However, considering global deleterious effects of alcohol in public health, policies to reduce binge drinking should be enforced, especially for young people. Studies are still needed to elucidate effects on cardiovascular health.

  5. Effects of early age at natural menopause on coronary heart disease and stroke in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lijun; Song, Lulu; Liu, Bingqing; Li, Hui; Zheng, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Lina; Yuan, Jing; Liang, Yuan; Wang, Youjie

    2017-08-15

    Menopause is identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease because of the change of estrogen. The objective of the study was to explore the associations between early age at natural menopause (menopause at an age≤45years) and the presence of CHD and stroke. The study subjects were from the first follow-up survey of the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study. A total of 16,515 postmenopausal women were included for the analysis. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between age at natural menopause (≤45, 45-52, >52years) and the presence of CHD and stroke adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle, reproductive history and metabolic factors. In the fully adjusted model, for each 1-year delay in menopausal age, the prevalence of CHD and stroke was reduced by 3% (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95-0.98) and 5% (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98), respectively. Women with early menopause (≤45years) had a higher prevalence of CHD (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.13-1.57) compared with those with menopause at ages 45-52years. Similarly, women with early menopause (≤45years) was associated with higher prevalence of stroke (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.25-2.30) compared with those with menopause at ages 45-52years. Early age at natural menopause is significantly associated with the presence of CHD and stroke among Chinese women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Chocolate Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheng; Li, Xia; Jin, Yalei; Lu, Jinping

    2017-07-02

    Although epidemiological studies have examined the role of chocolate in preventing cardiometabolic disease, the results remain inconsistent. Herein, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies to determine the association between chocolate intake and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and diabetes. A systematical search in PubMed and Embase through March 2017, together with reference scrutiny of relevant literatures, was performed to identify eligible studies. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using random effect models. Fourteen prospective studies of primary prevention with 508,705 participants were finally included, with follow-up durations ranging from 5 to 16 years. The summary RRs for the highest versus lowest chocolate consumption were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.82-0.97; n = 6) for CHD, 0.84 (95% CI: 0.78-0.90; n = 7) for stroke, and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.70-0.96; n = 5) for diabetes. Dose-response meta-analysis suggested a nonlinear association of chocolate consumption with all outcomes. For both CHD and stroke, there was little additional risk reduction when consuming chocolate ≥3 servings/week (one serving was defined as 30 g of chocolate). For diabetes, the peak protective effect of chocolate emerged at 2 servings/week (RR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.63-0.89), with no benefit observed when increasing consumption above 6 servings/week. In conclusion, chocolate intake is associated with decreased risks of CHD, stroke, and diabetes. Consuming chocolate in moderation (≤6 servings/week) may be optimal for preventing these disorders.

  7. Chocolate Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although epidemiological studies have examined the role of chocolate in preventing cardiometabolic disease, the results remain inconsistent. Herein, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies to determine the association between chocolate intake and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD, stroke, and diabetes. A systematical search in PubMed and Embase through March 2017, together with reference scrutiny of relevant literatures, was performed to identify eligible studies. Relative risks (RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were pooled using random effect models. Fourteen prospective studies of primary prevention with 508,705 participants were finally included, with follow-up durations ranging from 5 to 16 years. The summary RRs for the highest versus lowest chocolate consumption were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.82–0.97; n = 6 for CHD, 0.84 (95% CI: 0.78–0.90; n = 7 for stroke, and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.70–0.96; n = 5 for diabetes. Dose–response meta-analysis suggested a nonlinear association of chocolate consumption with all outcomes. For both CHD and stroke, there was little additional risk reduction when consuming chocolate ≥3 servings/week (one serving was defined as 30 g of chocolate. For diabetes, the peak protective effect of chocolate emerged at 2 servings/week (RR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.63–0.89, with no benefit observed when increasing consumption above 6 servings/week. In conclusion, chocolate intake is associated with decreased risks of CHD, stroke, and diabetes. Consuming chocolate in moderation (≤6 servings/week may be optimal for preventing these disorders.

  8. Chocolate Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheng; Li, Xia; Jin, Yalei; Lu, Jinping

    2017-01-01

    Although epidemiological studies have examined the role of chocolate in preventing cardiometabolic disease, the results remain inconsistent. Herein, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies to determine the association between chocolate intake and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and diabetes. A systematical search in PubMed and Embase through March 2017, together with reference scrutiny of relevant literatures, was performed to identify eligible studies. Relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using random effect models. Fourteen prospective studies of primary prevention with 508,705 participants were finally included, with follow-up durations ranging from 5 to 16 years. The summary RRs for the highest versus lowest chocolate consumption were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.82–0.97; n = 6) for CHD, 0.84 (95% CI: 0.78–0.90; n = 7) for stroke, and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.70–0.96; n = 5) for diabetes. Dose–response meta-analysis suggested a nonlinear association of chocolate consumption with all outcomes. For both CHD and stroke, there was little additional risk reduction when consuming chocolate ≥3 servings/week (one serving was defined as 30 g of chocolate). For diabetes, the peak protective effect of chocolate emerged at 2 servings/week (RR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.63–0.89), with no benefit observed when increasing consumption above 6 servings/week. In conclusion, chocolate intake is associated with decreased risks of CHD, stroke, and diabetes. Consuming chocolate in moderation (≤6 servings/week) may be optimal for preventing these disorders. PMID:28671591

  9. Long term risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke: influence of duration of follow-up over four decades of mortality surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, G David; Shipley, Martin; Smith, George Davey; Kivimaki, Mika

    2015-09-01

    While cohort studies have revealed a range of risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke, the extent to which the strength of these associations varies according to duration of follow-up in studies with extended disease surveillance is unclear. This was the aim of the present study. Initiated in 1967/70, the original Whitehall study is an on-going cohort study of 15,402 male UK government workers free of coronary heart disease when they took part in a baseline medical examination during which a range of standard risk factors was measured. In analyses in which we stratified by duration of follow-up, there was evidence of time-dependency for most risk factor-disease relationships. Thus, the associations of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and cigarette smoking with coronary heart disease and stroke diminished in strength with increasing duration of follow-up, whereas the magnitude of the body mass index-coronary heart disease relation was unchanged. For example, the age-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) for cigarette smoking (versus never smoked) in relation to coronary heart disease were: 2.49 (1.80, 3.44), 1.65 (1.34, 2.03), 1.36 (1.15, 1.61) and 1.32 (1.10, 1.58) for follow-up periods 0-10, 10-20, 20-30 and 30+ years, respectively. Despite a general diminution in the strength of effect over time, even in the fourth decade of follow-up, classic risk factors retained some predictive capacity for coronary heart disease and, to a lesser degree, stroke. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  10. Bowel Movement Frequency, Laxative Use, and Mortality From Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke Among Japanese Men and Women: The Japan Collaborative Cohort (JACC Study

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    Yasuhiko Kubota

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The associations of bowel movement frequency and laxative use with cardiovascular disease (CVD are unclear. Methods: A total of 72 014 subjects (29 668 men and 42 346 women aged 40 to 79 years, without a history of CVD or cancer, completed a lifestyle questionnaire at baseline between 1988 and 1990 that included information on bowel movement frequency (daily, every 2–3 days, or once every 4 or more days and laxative use (yes or no, and were followed-up until 2009. Results: During the subjects’ 1 165 569 person-years of follow-up, we documented 977 deaths from coronary heart disease (561 men and 416 women, 2024 from total stroke (1028 men and 996 women, 1127 from ischemic stroke (606 men and 521 women, and 828 from hemorrhagic stroke (388 men and 440 women. The prevalence of CVD risk factors, such as diabetes, stress, depression, and physical inactivity, was higher in laxative users and in those with a lower frequency of bowel movements. The multivariable HRs (95% confidence intervals [CIs] of laxative users were as follows: 1.56 (95% CI, 1.21–2.03 for coronary heart disease and 1.37 (95% CI, 1.07–1.76 for ischemic stroke in men, and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08–1.49 for total stroke, and 1.45 (95% CI, 1.17–1.79 for ischemic stroke in women. Similar results were observed even after the exclusion of deaths that occurred early in the follow-up period. A significant association between bowel movement frequency and mortality from CVD was not observed. Conclusions: Constipation could be a marker of exposure to CVD risk factors, and laxative use could be a risk factor for mortality from coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke.

  11. Trends and disparities in coronary heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases in the United States: findings of the national conference on cardiovascular disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R; Cutler, J; Desvigne-Nickens, P; Fortmann, S P; Friedman, L; Havlik, R; Hogelin, G; Marler, J; McGovern, P; Morosco, G; Mosca, L; Pearson, T; Stamler, J; Stryer, D; Thom, T

    2000-12-19

    A workshop was held September 27 through 29, 1999, to address issues relating to national trends in mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular diseases; the apparent slowing of declines in mortality from cardiovascular diseases; levels and trends in risk factors for cardiovascular diseases; disparities in cardiovascular diseases by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and geography; trends in cardiovascular disease preventive and treatment services; and strategies for efforts to reduce cardiovascular diseases overall and to reduce disparities among subpopulations. The conference concluded that coronary heart disease mortality is still declining in the United States as a whole, although perhaps at a slower rate than in the 1980s; that stroke mortality rates have declined little, if at all, since 1990; and that there are striking differences in cardiovascular death rates by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and geography. Trends in risk factors are consistent with a slowing of the decline in mortality; there has been little recent progress in risk factors such as smoking, physical inactivity, and hypertension control. There are increasing levels of obesity and type 2 diabetes, with major differences among subpopulations. There is considerable activity in population-wide prevention, primary prevention for higher risk people, and secondary prevention, but wide disparities exist among groups on the basis of socioeconomic status and geography, pointing to major gaps in efforts to use available, proven approaches to control cardiovascular diseases. Recommendations for strategies to attain the year 2010 health objectives were made.

  12. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  13. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published and unpublished data for 603,838 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Fransson, Eleonor I; Alfredsson, Lars; Bjorner, Jakob B; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Casini, Annalisa; Clays, Els; De Bacquer, Dirk; Dragano, Nico; Erbel, Raimund; Geuskens, Goedele A; Hamer, Mark; Hooftman, Wendela E; Houtman, Irene L; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kittel, France; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Lunau, Thorsten; Madsen, Ida E H; Nielsen, Martin L; Nordin, Maria; Oksanen, Tuula; Pejtersen, Jan H; Pentti, Jaana; Rugulies, Reiner; Salo, Paula; Shipley, Martin J; Siegrist, Johannes; Steptoe, Andrew; Suominen, Sakari B; Theorell, Töres; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerholm, Peter J M; Westerlund, Hugo; O'Reilly, Dermot; Kumari, Meena; Batty, G David; Ferrie, Jane E; Virtanen, Marianna

    2015-10-31

    Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. We identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium and open-access data archives. We used cumulative random-effects meta-analysis to combine effect estimates from published and unpublished data. We included 25 studies from 24 cohorts in Europe, the USA, and Australia. The meta-analysis of coronary heart disease comprised data for 603,838 men and women who were free from coronary heart disease at baseline; the meta-analysis of stroke comprised data for 528,908 men and women who were free from stroke at baseline. Follow-up for coronary heart disease was 5·1 million person-years (mean 8·5 years), in which 4768 events were recorded, and for stroke was 3·8 million person-years (mean 7·2 years), in which 1722 events were recorded. In cumulative meta-analysis adjusted for age, sex, and socioeconomic status, compared with standard hours (35-40 h per week), working long hours (≥55 h per week) was associated with an increase in risk of incident coronary heart disease (relative risk [RR] 1·13, 95% CI 1·02-1·26; p=0·02) and incident stroke (1·33, 1·11-1·61; p=0·002). The excess risk of stroke remained unchanged in analyses that addressed reverse causation, multivariable adjustments for other risk factors, and different methods of stroke ascertainment (range of RR estimates 1·30-1·42). We recorded a dose-response association for stroke, with RR estimates of 1·10 (95% CI 0·94-1·28; p=0·24) for 41-48 working hours, 1·27 (1·03-1·56; p=0·03) for 49-54 working hours, and 1·33 (1·11-1·61; p

  14. Effects of past and recent blood pressure and cholesterol level on coronary heart disease and stroke mortality, accounting for measurement error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Lanti, Mariapaola; Menotti, Alessandro; Moschandreas, Joanna; Tolonen, Hanna; Nissinen, Aulikki; Nedeljkovic, Srecko; Kafatos, Anthony; Kromhout, Daan

    2007-02-15

    The authors aimed to quantify the effects of current systolic blood pressure (SBP) and serum total cholesterol on the risk of mortality in comparison with SBP or serum cholesterol 25 years previously, taking measurement error into account. The authors reanalyzed 35-year follow-up data on mortality due to coronary heart disease and stroke among subjects aged 65 years or more from nine cohorts of the Seven Countries Study. The two-step method of Tsiatis et al. (J Am Stat Assoc 1995;90:27-37) was used to adjust for regression dilution bias, and results were compared with those obtained using more commonly applied methods of adjustment for regression dilution bias. It was found that the commonly used univariate adjustment for regression dilution bias overestimates the effects of both SBP and cholesterol compared with multivariate methods. Also, the two-step method makes better use of the information available, resulting in smaller confidence intervals. Results comparing recent and past exposure indicated that past SBP is more important than recent SBP in terms of its effect on coronary heart disease mortality, while both recent and past values seem to be important for effects of cholesterol on coronary heart disease mortality and effects of SBP on stroke mortality. Associations between serum cholesterol concentration and risk of stroke mortality are weak.

  15. The effects of pay for performance on disparities in stroke, hypertension, and coronary heart disease management: interrupted time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John Tayu; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), a major pay-for-performance programme, was introduced into United Kingdom primary care in April 2004. The impact of this programme on disparities in health care remains unclear. This study examines the following questions: has this pay for performance programme improved the quality of care for coronary heart disease, stroke and hypertension in white, black and south Asian patients? Has this programme reduced disparities in the quality of care between these ethnic groups? Did general practices with different baseline performance respond differently to this programme? Retrospective cohort study of patients registered with family practices in Wandsworth, London during 2007. Segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series was used to take into account the previous time trend. Primary outcome measures were mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Our findings suggest that the implementation of QOF resulted in significant short term improvements in blood pressure control. The magnitude of benefit varied between ethnic groups with a statistically significant short term reduction in systolic BP in white and black but not in south Asian patients with hypertension. Disparities in risk factor control were attenuated only on few measures and largely remained intact at the end of the study period. Pay for performance programmes such as the QOF in the UK should set challenging but achievable targets. Specific targets aimed at reducing ethnic disparities in health care may also be needed.

  16. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphism rs1044925 and the Risk of Coronary Artery Disease and Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Feng Wu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was performed to clarify the association between the acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs1044925 and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD and ischemic stroke (IS in the Guangxi Han population. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism was performed to determine the genotypes of the ACAT-1 SNP rs1044925 in 1730 unrelated subjects (CAD, 587; IS, 555; and healthy controls; 588. The genotypic and allelic frequencies of rs1044925 were significantly different between the CAD patients and controls (p = 0.015 and borderline different between the IS patients and controls (p = 0.05. The AC/CC genotypes and C allele were associated with a decreased risk of CAD and IS (CAD: p = 0.014 for AC/CC vs. AA, p = 0.022 for C vs. A; IS: p = 0.014 for AC/CC vs. AA; p = 0.017 for C vs. A. The AC/CC genotypes in the healthy controls, but not in CAD or IS patients, were associated with an increased serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C concentration. The present study shows that the C allele carriers of ACAT-1 rs1044925 were associated with an increased serum HDL-C level in the healthy controls and decreased risk in CAD and IS patients.

  17. Gender Differences in Risks of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Their Association with Metabolic Syndrome in China

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    Mei-Fang Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke are common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We aimed to explore the differences in the risks of CHD and stroke between Chinese women and men with T2DM and their association with metabolic syndrome (MS. This study included 1514 patients with T2DM. The Asian Guidelines of ATPIII (2005 were used for MS diagnosis, and the UKPDS risk engine was used to evaluate the 10-year CHD and stroke risks. Women had lower CHD risk (15.3% versus 26.3%, fatal CHD risk (11.8% versus 19.0%, stroke risk (8.4% versus 10.3%, and fatal stroke risk (1.4% versus 1.6% compared with men with T2DM (p<0.05–0.001. The CHD risk (28.4% versus 22.6%, p<0.001 was significantly higher in men with MS than in those without MS. The CHD (16.2% versus 11.0%, p<0.001 and stroke risks (8.9% versus 5.8%, p<0.001 were higher in women with MS than in those without MS. In conclusion, our findings indicated that Chinese women with T2DM are less susceptible to CHD and stroke than men. Further, MS increases the risk of both these events, highlighting the need for comprehensive metabolic control in T2DM.

  18. Influence of the β-fibrinogen-455G/A polymorphism on development of ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lian; Liu, Wenhui; Yan, Yan; Su, Li; Wu, Guangliang; Liang, Baoyun; Tan, Jinjing; Huang, Guihua

    2014-06-01

    Ischemic stroke (IS) and coronary heart disease (CHD) are two vascular disorders that are a common cause of death worldwide. Several studies have assessed the association of the β-fibrinogen-455G/A (FGB-455G/A) polymorphism and risk of IS and CHD, but the results are still inconsistent. Our study aimed to investigate whether the FGB-455G/A polymorphism was associated with susceptibility to IS and CHD by using meta-analysis. Relevant studies were identified from PubMed, Embase and four Chinese database up to July 2013.Data were analyzed and processed by Stata 11.2. A pooled OR with 95% CI was calculated to estimate the strength of the genetic association. Cumulative meta-analysis was performed to assess the tendency of pooled OR over time. 45 studies based on a total of 7238 cases and 7395 controls were included in our meta-analysis. The results indicated that the FGB-455G/A polymorphism is associated with the risk of IS when compared with the dominant model (OR=1.518, 95%CI=1.279-1.802 for AA+GA vs. GG). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significantly elevated risks were associated with the A allele in Asians (OR=1.700, 95%CI=1.417-2.040), but not in Caucasians (OR=0.942, 95%CI=0.813-1.091). Both the hypertension and non-hypertension subgroups reached significant results, but no significance was found when stratified according to sex or subtype of IS. Results indicate that the FGB-455G/A polymorphism is associated with CHD (OR=1.802, 95%CI=1.445-2.246). Our meta-analysis suggests that the FGB-455G/A polymorphism contributes to susceptibility to IS and CHD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Coronary artery disease, left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction are associated with stroke in patients affected by persistent non-valvular atrial fibrillation: a case-control study

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    Andrea Passantino

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Persistent non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events such as stroke, and its rate is expected to rise because of the ageing population. The absolute rate of stroke depends on age and comorbidity. Risk stratification for stroke in patients with NVAF derives from populations enrolled in randomized clinical trials. However, participants in clinical trials are often not representative of the general population. Many stroke risk stratification scores have been used, but they do not include transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE, pulsate wave Doppler (PWD and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI, simple and non-invasive diagnostic tools. The role of TTE, PWD and TDI findings has not been previously determined. Our study goal was to determine the association between TTE and PWD findings and stroke prevalence in a population of NVAF prone outpatients. Patients were divided into two groups: P for stroke prone and F for stroke free. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups concerning cardiovascular risk factors, age (p=0.2, sex (p=0.2, smoking (p=0.3, diabetes (p=0.1 and hypercholesterolemia (p=0.2; hypertension was statistically significant (p less than 0.001. There were statistically significant differences concerning coronary artery disease, previous acute myocardial infarction (AMI (p less than 0.05 and non- AMI coronaropathy (p less than 0.04, a higher rate being in the P group. Concerning echo-Doppler findings, a higher statistically significant rate of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH (p less than  0.05 and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (p less than 0.001 was found in the P group and dilated left atrium (p Sodium intake and prevalence of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and stroke in Korean adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhyung Park

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: In order to control the effect of sodium on diseases, attention must also be paid to the influence of potassium on diseases as a covariate, and it is considered that additional research should be made regarding the role of potassium in studying the impact of sodium on health in the future.

  1. Causal Associations of Adiposity and Body Fat Distribution With Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke Subtypes, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Caroline E; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Palmer, Tom M; White, Jon; Prieto-Merino, David; Zabaneh, Delilah; Engmann, Jorgen E L; Shah, Tina; Wong, Andrew; Warren, Helen R; McLachlan, Stela; Trompet, Stella; Moldovan, Max; Morris, Richard W; Sofat, Reecha; Kumari, Meena; Hyppönen, Elina; Jefferis, Barbara J; Gaunt, Tom R; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Zhou, Ang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ryan, Andy; Mutsert, Renée de; Noordam, Raymond; Caulfield, Mark J; Jukema, J Wouter; Worrall, Bradford B; Munroe, Patricia B; Menon, Usha; Power, Chris; Kuh, Diana; Lawlor, Debbie A; Humphries, Steve E; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Sattar, Naveed; Kivimaki, Mika; Price, Jacqueline F; Davey Smith, George; Dudbridge, Frank; Hingorani, Aroon D; Holmes, Michael V; Casas, Juan P

    2017-06-13

    The implications of different adiposity measures on cardiovascular disease etiology remain unclear. In this article, we quantify and contrast causal associations of central adiposity (waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index [WHRadjBMI]) and general adiposity (body mass index [BMI]) with cardiometabolic disease. Ninety-seven independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms for BMI and 49 single-nucleotide polymorphisms for WHRadjBMI were used to conduct Mendelian randomization analyses in 14 prospective studies supplemented with coronary heart disease (CHD) data from CARDIoGRAMplusC4D (Coronary Artery Disease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis [CARDIoGRAM] plus The Coronary Artery Disease [C4D] Genetics; combined total 66 842 cases), stroke from METASTROKE (12 389 ischemic stroke cases), type 2 diabetes mellitus from DIAGRAM (Diabetes Genetics Replication and Meta-analysis; 34 840 cases), and lipids from GLGC (Global Lipids Genetic Consortium; 213 500 participants) consortia. Primary outcomes were CHD, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and major stroke subtypes; secondary analyses included 18 cardiometabolic traits. Each one standard deviation (SD) higher WHRadjBMI (1 SD≈0.08 U) associated with a 48% excess risk of CHD (odds ratio [OR] for CHD, 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-1.71), similar to findings for BMI (1 SD≈4.6 kg/m 2 ; OR for CHD, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.22-1.52). Only WHRadjBMI increased risk of ischemic stroke (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.03-1.70). For type 2 diabetes mellitus, both measures had large effects: OR, 1.82 (95% CI, 1.38-2.42) and OR, 1.98 (95% CI, 1.41-2.78) per 1 SD higher WHRadjBMI and BMI, respectively. Both WHRadjBMI and BMI were associated with higher left ventricular hypertrophy, glycemic traits, interleukin 6, and circulating lipids. WHRadjBMI was also associated with higher carotid intima-media thickness (39%; 95% CI, 9%-77% per 1 SD). Both general and central adiposity have causal effects on CHD and type 2 diabetes mellitus

  2. Causal nature of neighborhood deprivation on individual risk of coronary heart disease or ischemic stroke: A prospective national Swedish co-relative control study in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Per-Ola; Ohlsson, Henrik; Sundquist, Kristina

    2018-03-01

    We studied the association between neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) or ischemic stroke in the total population and in full- and half-siblings to determine whether these associations are causal or a result from familial confounding. Data were retrieved from nationwide Swedish registers containing individual clinical data linked to neighborhood of residence. After adjustment for individual SES, the association between neighborhood SES and CHD showed no decrease with increasing genetic resemblance, particularly in women. This indicates that the association between neighborhood SES and CHD incidence is partially causal among women, which represents a novel finding. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Epidemiologic studies of coronary heart disease and stroke in Japanese men living in Japan, Hawaii, and California: mortality

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    Worth, R M; Kato, H; Rhoads, G G; Kagan, A; Syme, S L

    1974-01-01

    Stroke, coronary heart desease (CHD), and total mortality are evaluated from death certificates in enumerated cohorts of 45 to 64 year-old Japanese men in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (1965--1970), in Honolulu (1966--1970), and in the San Francisco area (1968--1972). Total mortality is highest in Japan with no consistent differences between Japanese Americans in Honolulu and San Francisco. Age-specific CHD death rates are markedly lower in all three Japanese groups than in American whites. The CHD rates are consistently and significantly lower in Japan than in American Japanese. Stroke death rates for American Japanese men appear equivalent to figures for U.S. white men of the same age, but are significantly lower than in the Japan cohort for the 60 to 64 year old group. The number of stroke deaths below that age are too few as yet for analysis. Validation of mortality ascertainment and of the accuracy of death certification has been carried out in Japan and in Hawaii. The international differences in mortality do not appear to be entirely due to certification or other methodologic artifact. (auth)

  4. Fluidity of the dietary fatty acid profile and risk of coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke: Results from the EPIC-Netherlands cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluijs, I; Praagman, J; Boer, J M A; Verschuren, W M M; van der Schouw, Y T

    2017-09-01

    The fluidity of dietary fatty acids consumed has been suggested to inversely affect coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Lipophilic index (LI) represents overall fluidity of the dietary fatty acid profile. Lipophilic load (LL) represents a combination of overall fluidity and absolute intake of dietary fatty acids. We investigated the relations of dietary LI and LL with risk of CHD and ischemic stroke (iStroke). We used data from the prospective EPIC-NL study, including 36,520 participants aged 20-70 years. LI and LL were calculated using dietary intake data estimated with a validated FFQ. Incident CHD (n = 2348) and iStroke (n = 479) cases were obtained through linkage to national registers during 15 years follow-up. LI and LL were not associated with CHD risk (HRs highest-versus-lowest-quartiles : 0.93 [95%CI: 0.83, 1.04], and 0.92 [95%CI: 0.79, 1.07], respectively), and neither with iStroke risk (HRs 1.15 (95%CI: 0.89, 1.48), and 0.98 (95%CI: 0.70, 1.38), respectively). Original fatty acid classes (SFA, MUFA and PUFA), and LI and LL stratified by these fatty acid classes, were overall not related to CHD and ischemic stroke either. In this Dutch population, neither the overall fluidity of the dietary fatty acid profile (LI), nor the combined fluidity and amount of fatty acids consumed (LL) were related to CHD or iStroke risk. Dietary LI and LL may have limited added value above original fatty acid classes and food sources in establishing the relation of fatty acid consumption with CVD. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolic mediators of the effects of body-mass index, overweight, and obesity on coronary heart disease and stroke: a pooled analysis of 97 prospective cohorts with 1·8 million participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; Ezzati, Majid; Woodward, Mark; Rimm, Eric B; Danaei, Goodarz

    2014-03-15

    Body-mass index (BMI) and diabetes have increased worldwide, whereas global average blood pressure and cholesterol have decreased or remained unchanged in the past three decades. We quantified how much of the effects of BMI on coronary heart disease and stroke are mediated through blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose, and how much is independent of these factors. We pooled data from 97 prospective cohort studies that collectively enrolled 1·8 million participants between 1948 and 2005, and that included 57,161 coronary heart disease and 31,093 stroke events. For each cohort we excluded participants who were younger than 18 years, had a BMI of lower than 20 kg/m(2), or who had a history of coronary heart disease or stroke. We estimated the hazard ratio (HR) of BMI on coronary heart disease and stroke with and without adjustment for all possible combinations of blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose. We pooled HRs with a random-effects model and calculated the attenuation of excess risk after adjustment for mediators. The HR for each 5 kg/m(2) higher BMI was 1·27 (95% CI 1·23-1·31) for coronary heart disease and 1·18 (1·14-1·22) for stroke after adjustment for confounders. Additional adjustment for the three metabolic risk factors reduced the HRs to 1·15 (1·12-1·18) for coronary heart disease and 1·04 (1·01-1·08) for stroke, suggesting that 46% (95% CI 42-50) of the excess risk of BMI for coronary heart disease and 76% (65-91) for stroke is mediated by these factors. Blood pressure was the most important mediator, accounting for 31% (28-35) of the excess risk for coronary heart disease and 65% (56-75) for stroke. The percentage excess risks mediated by these three mediators did not differ significantly between Asian and western cohorts (North America, western Europe, Australia, and New Zealand). Both overweight (BMI ≥25 to obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) were associated with a significantly increased risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

  6. Metabolic mediators of the effects of body-mass index, overweight, and obesity on coronary heart disease and stroke: a pooled analysis of 97 prospective cohorts with 1·8 million participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Body-mass index (BMI) and diabetes have increased worldwide, whereas global average blood pressure and cholesterol have decreased or remained unchanged in the past three decades. We quantified how much of the effects of BMI on coronary heart disease and stroke are mediated through blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose, and how much is independent of these factors. Methods We pooled data from 97 prospective cohort studies that collectively enrolled 1·8 million participants between 1948 and 2005, and that included 57 161 coronary heart disease and 31 093 stroke events. For each cohort we excluded participants who were younger than 18 years, had a BMI of lower than 20 kg/m2, or who had a history of coronary heart disease or stroke. We estimated the hazard ratio (HR) of BMI on coronary heart disease and stroke with and without adjustment for all possible combinations of blood pressure, cholesterol, and glucose. We pooled HRs with a random-effects model and calculated the attenuation of excess risk after adjustment for mediators. Findings The HR for each 5 kg/m2 higher BMI was 1·27 (95% CI 1·23–1·31) for coronary heart disease and 1·18 (1·14–1·22) for stroke after adjustment for confounders. Additional adjustment for the three metabolic risk factors reduced the HRs to 1·15 (1·12–1·18) for coronary heart disease and 1·04 (1·01–1·08) for stroke, suggesting that 46% (95% CI 42–50) of the excess risk of BMI for coronary heart disease and 76% (65–91) for stroke is mediated by these factors. Blood pressure was the most important mediator, accounting for 31% (28–35) of the excess risk for coronary heart disease and 65% (56–75) for stroke. The percentage excess risks mediated by these three mediators did not differ significantly between Asian and western cohorts (North America, western Europe, Australia, and New Zealand). Both overweight (BMI ≥25 to coronary heart disease and stroke, compared with normal weight (BMI ≥20

  7. Low cigarette consumption and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: meta-analysis of 141 cohort studies in 55 study reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Joan K; Boniface, Sadie; Tang, Jin-Ling; Milenković, Dušan

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective To use the relation between cigarette consumption and cardiovascular disease to quantify the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke for light smoking (one to five cigarettes/day). Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline 1946 to May 2015, with manual searches of references. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Prospective cohort studies with at least 50 events, reporting hazard ratios or relative risks (both hereafter referred to as relative risk) compared with never smokers or age specific incidence in relation to risk of coronary heart disease or stroke. Data extraction/synthesis MOOSE guidelines were followed. For each study, the relative risk was estimated for smoking one, five, or 20 cigarettes per day by using regression modelling between risk and cigarette consumption. Relative risks were adjusted for at least age and often additional confounders. The main measure was the excess relative risk for smoking one cigarette per day (RR1_per_day−1) expressed as a proportion of that for smoking 20 cigarettes per day (RR20_per_day−1), expected to be about 5% assuming a linear relation between risk and consumption (as seen with lung cancer). The relative risks for one, five, and 20 cigarettes per day were also pooled across all studies in a random effects meta-analysis. Separate analyses were done for each combination of sex and disorder. Results The meta-analysis included 55 publications containing 141 cohort studies. Among men, the pooled relative risk for coronary heart disease was 1.48 for smoking one cigarette per day and 2.04 for 20 cigarettes per day, using all studies, but 1.74 and 2.27 among studies in which the relative risk had been adjusted for multiple confounders. Among women, the pooled relative risks were 1.57 and 2.84 for one and 20 cigarettes per day (or 2.19 and 3.95 using relative risks adjusted for multiple factors). Men who smoked one cigarette per day had 46% of the excess relative risk for

  8. Genetic predisposition to coronary heart disease and stroke using an additive genetic risk score: A population-based study in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannakouris, N.; Katsoulis, M.; Dilis, V.; Parnell, L.D.; Trichopoulos, D.; Ordovas, J.M.; Trichopoulou, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which the risk for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) increases in relation to a genetic risk score (GRS) that additively integrates the influence of high-risk alleles in nine documented single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CHD, and to examine whether this GRS also predicts incident stroke. Methods Genotypes at nine CHD-relevant SNPs were determined in 494 cases of incident CHD, 320 cases of incident stroke and 1345 unaffected controls drawn from the population-based Greek component of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. An additive GRS was calculated for each study participant by adding one unit for the presence of each high-risk allele multiplied by the estimated effect size of that allele in the discovery samples. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results The GRS was significantly associated with the incidence of CHD where the odds of CHD incidence in the highest quintile of the GRS were 1.74 times higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.25–2.43, p for trend = 0.0004), compared to the lowest quintile. With respect to stroke, a weaker and non-significant positive association with GRS was apparent as the odds of stroke incidence in the highest quintile of the GRS were 1.36 times higher (95% CI = 0.90–2.06, p for trend = 0.188), compared to the lowest quintile. Conclusion A GRS relying on nine documented “CHD-specific” SNPs is significantly predictive of CHD but it was not found to be statistically significantly associated with incident stroke. PMID:22429504

  9. Metabolic mediators of the effects of body-mass index, overweight, and obesity on coronary heart disease and stroke: a pooled analysis of 97 prospective cohorts with 1.8 million participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, D.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Hollander, de E.L.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background - Body-mass index (BMI) and diabetes have increased worldwide, whereas global average blood pressure and cholesterol have decreased or remained unchanged in the past three decades. We quantified how much of the effects of BMI on coronary heart disease and stroke are mediated through blood

  10. Dietary glycemic load and glycemic index and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke in Dutch men and women: the EPIC-MORGEN study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koert N J Burger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The associations of glycemic load (GL and glycemic index (GI with the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD are not well-established, particularly in men, and may be modified by gender. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether high dietary GL and GI increase the risk of CVD in men and women. METHODS: A large prospective cohort study (EPIC-MORGEN was conducted within the general Dutch population among 8,855 men and 10,753 women, aged 21-64 years at baseline (1993-1997 and free of diabetes and CVD. Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food-frequency questionnaire and GI and GL were calculated using Foster-Powell's international table of GI. Information on morbidity and mortality was obtained through linkage with national registries. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs for incident coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke, while adjusting for age, CVD risk factors, and dietary factors. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 11.9 years, 581 CHD cases and 120 stroke cases occurred among men, and 300 CHD cases and 109 stroke cases occurred among women. In men, GL was associated with an increased CHD risk (adjusted HR per SD increase, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.02-1.35], while no significant association was found in women (1.09 [0.89-1.33]. GI was not associated with CHD risk in both genders, while it was associated with increased stroke risk in men (1.27 [1.02-1.58] but not in women (0.96 [0.75-1.22]. Similarly, total carbohydrate intake and starch intake were associated with a higher CHD risk in men (1.23 [1.04-1.46]; and 1.24 [1.07-1.45], but not in women. CONCLUSION: Among men, high GL and GI, and high carbohydrate and starch intake, were associated with increased risk of CVD.

  11. Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh

    2017-01-01

    A family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) is an important risk factor for adverse coronary events, in particular if the disease has an early onset. The risk of CAD is influenced by genetic and environmental factors with a greater genetic contribution earlier in life. Through recent years......), and to characterize and quantify subclinical atherosclerosis in their relatives. Furthermore, the aim was to explore the impact of common genetic risk variants on the age of onset, familial clustering and disease severity. In study I, 143 patients with early- onset CAD were recruited from the Western Denmark Heart...... Registry and risk factor control was evaluated. The study revealed that risk factors are common in early-onset CAD and that a large room for risk factor improvement remains. In study II, we used coronary computed tomography angiography to compare the coronary plaque burden and characteristics between 88...

  12. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevent Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and ... can’t change some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of ...

  13. Periodontal profile class is associated with prevalent diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, and systemic markers of C-reactive protein and interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, James D; Moss, Kevin L; Morelli, Thiago; Offenbacher, Steven

    2018-02-01

    This paper focuses on the Periodontal Profile Class (PPC) System that may be more informative and representative of periodontitis phenotypes than current case definitions of periodontitis. This study illustrates the unique aspects of the PPC compared with other periodontal indices for studying associations between periodontal disease and prevalent systemic conditions. We computed odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals to compare associations between periodontal disease and prevalent systemic conditions using our new PPC and two traditional indices. We used the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) to determine the fit of the model and the magnitude of the contribution attributable to periodontal disease beyond traditional risk factors. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (1996-1998) results were compared with results from the combined National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2014 datasets. In the ARIC Study, high gingival inflammation, tooth loss, severe tooth loss, and severe disease PPC components were significantly associated with diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and interleukin (IL)-6, while only severe disease was associated with stroke. Severe disease was associated with CHD using the Centers for Disease Control/American Academy of Periodontology index, and the European Periodontal index was associated with CHD and IL-6. The addition of the PPC to traditional variables associated with prevalent diabetes, stroke, CHD, and systemic measures of inflammation resulted in very strong improvement of the overall models, while the traditional indices were less likely to be associated and, if present, the associations were weaker. The PPC system provides specific insight into the individuals and periodontal characteristics of the phenotype that are associated with systemic conditions that may be useful in designing treatment interventions. © 2018 American Academy of Periodontology.

  14. Television viewing time and mortality from stroke and coronary artery disease among Japanese men and women -- the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Satoyo; Iso, Hiroyasu; Wada, Yasuhiko; Tanabe, Naohito; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Kikuchi, Shogo; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    No study has examined the association between television (TV) viewing time and mortality from stroke and coronary artery disease (CAD) in Japanese. A total of 35,959 men and 49,940 women aged 40-79 years without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer were followed from 1988-1990 until 2009. During 19.2 median years of follow-up, there were 2,553 deaths from stroke, 1,206 from CAD and 5,835 from total CVD. Compared with viewing TV for TV viewing. The multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) for ≥6 h/day of TV viewing were 1.15 (95% confidence interval: 0.96-1.37) for stroke, 1.33 (1.03-1.72) for CAD and 1.19 (1.06-1.34) for total CVD. The corresponding HRs for each 1-h/day increment in TV viewing time were 1.01 (0.99-1.04), 1.04 (1.01-1.08) and 1.02 (1.01-1.04), respectively. The excess risk of mortality from CAD and total CVD was somewhat attenuated after further adjustment for potential mediators such as history of hypertension and diabetes: the multivariable HRs for ≥6 h/day of TV viewing were 1.24 (0.96-1.61) and 1.14 (1.02-1.28). The corresponding HRs for each 1-h/day increment in TV viewing time were 1.03 (1.00-1.07) and 1.01 (1.00-1.03). Prolonged TV viewing was associated with a small but significant increase in mortality from CAD and total CVD in Japanese.

  15. Childhood intelligence in relation to adult coronary heart disease and stroke risk: evidence from a Danish birth cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batty, G. David; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2005-01-01

    While recent studies have reported an inverse relation between childhood intelligence test scores and all-cause mortality in later life, the link with disease-specific outcomes has been rarely examined. Furthermore, the potential confounding effect of birthweight and childhood social circumstances.......60, 4.57; P(trend) = 0.0001). After adjustment for paternal social class and birthweight, this association was attenuated only marginally. There was little evidence of a IQ-stroke relationship. The cognitive characteristics captured by IQ testing in the present study, such as communication and problem...... solving ability, appear to be associated with risk of CHD. Health promotion specialists and clinical practitioners may wish to consider these skills in their interactions with the general public. Replication of these results using studies which hold data on intelligence and socio-economic position across...

  16. Predicting coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Fuster, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and disabling disease. Whereas risk factors are well known and constitute therapeutic targets, they are not useful for prediction of risk of future myocardial infarction, stroke, or death. Therefore, methods to identify atherosclerosis itself have bee...

  17. Long-term Reduction in Coronary Artery Disease and Stroke with 7,8 Years of Intensified, Multifactorial Intervention in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria in the Steno-2 Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oellgaard, Jens; Gæde, Peter; Rossing, Peter

    2016-01-01

    approaches. After 7.8 years the study continued as an observational follow-up with all patients offered treatment as for the original intensive-therapy group. The primary end-point of this sub-analysis of the follow-up, 21.2 years after intervention start was the relative risk reduction in CAD (defined...... as non-fatal acute myocardial infarction or cardiac revascularization) and cerebrovascular disease (defined as non-fatal ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke) and the secondary end-point was a composite of CAD, stroke and death from cardiovascular disease. Results: Hazard rates of CAD, stroke and the composite...... risk reductions in coronary and cerebral artery disease. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00320008.)...

  18. Achievement of optimal medical therapy goals for U.S. adults with coronary artery disease: results from the REGARDS Study (REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Todd M; Voeks, Jenifer H; Bittner, Vera; Brenner, David A; Cushman, Mary; Goff, David C; Glasser, Stephen; Muntner, Paul; Tabereaux, Paul B; Safford, Monika M

    2014-04-29

    In a nonclinical trial setting, we sought to determine the proportion of individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD) with optimal risk factor levels based on the COURAGE (Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive DruG Evaluation) trial. In the COURAGE trial, the addition of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to optimal medical therapy did not reduce the risk of death or myocardial infarction in stable CAD patients but resulted in more revascularization procedures. The REGARDS (REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke) study is a national prospective cohort study of 30,239 African-American and white community-dwelling individuals older than 45 years of age who enrolled in 2003 through 2007. We calculated the proportion of 3,167 participants with self-reported CAD meeting 7 risk factor goals based on the COURAGE trial: 1) aspirin use; 2) systolic blood pressure 40 mg/dl, and triglycerides exercise ≥4 days per week. The mean age of participants was 69 ± 9 years; 33% were African American and 35% were female. Overall, the median number of goals met was 4. Less than one-fourth met ≥5 of the 7 goals, and 16% met all 3 goals for aspirin, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Older age, white race, higher income, more education, and higher physical functioning were independently associated with meeting more goals. There is substantial room for improvement in risk factor reduction among U.S. individuals with CAD. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  20. Southern Dietary Pattern is Associated with Hazard of Acute Coronary Heart Disease in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikany, James M.; Safford, Monika M.; Newby, P. K.; Durant, Raegan W.; Brown, Todd M.; Judd, Suzanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of overall diet, as characterized by dietary patterns, with risk of incident acute coronary heart disease (CHD) has not been studied extensively in samples including sociodemographic and regional diversity. Methods and Results We used data from 17,418 participants in Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS), a national, population-based, longitudinal study of white and black adults aged ≥45 years, enrolled from 2003-2007. We derived dietary patterns with factor analysis, and used Cox proportional hazards regression to examine hazard of incident acute CHD events – nonfatal myocardial infarction and acute CHD death – associated with quartiles of consumption of each pattern, adjusted for various levels of covariates. Five primary dietary patterns emerged: Convenience, Plant-based, Sweets, Southern, and Alcohol and Salad. A total of 536 acute CHD events occurred over a median (IQR) 5.8 (2.1) years of follow-up. After adjustment for sociodemographics, lifestyle factors, and energy intake, highest consumers of the Southern pattern (characterized by added fats, fried food, eggs, organ and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages) experienced a 56% higher hazard of acute CHD (comparing quartile 4 to quartile 1: HR = 1.56; 95% CI: 1.17, 2.08; P for trend across quartiles = 0.003). Adding anthropometric and medical history variables to the model attenuated the association somewhat (HR = 1.37; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.85; P = 0.036). Conclusions A dietary pattern characteristic of the southern US was associated with greater hazard of CHD in this sample of white and black adults in diverse regions of the US. PMID:26260732

  1. Fibrinogen concentration and risk of ischemic stroke and acute coronary events in 5113 patients with transient ischemic attack and minor ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothwell, PM; Howard, SC; Power, DA; Gutnikov, SA; Algra, A; van Gijn, J; Clark, TG; Murphy, MFG; Warlow, CP

    2004-01-01

    Background and Purpose - Fibrinogen is an independent risk factor for coronary events in population-based studies and in patients with coronary heart disease, but there is uncertainty about prediction of stroke, particularly in secondary prevention. Methods - We studied unpublished data from 3

  2. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media for Heart.org Heart and Stroke Association Statistics Each year, the American Heart Association, in conjunction ... health and disease in the population. Heart & Stroke Statistics FAQs What is Prevalence? Prevalence is an estimate ...

  3. The effect of long working hours on 10-year risk of coronary heart disease and stroke in the Korean population: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 2007 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Wook; Hong, Yun-Chul; Min, Kyoung-Bok; Kim, Tae-Shik; Kim, Min-Seok; Kang, Mo-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the emergence of long working hours and the associated conditions such as coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke have gained attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between long working hours and the 10-year-risk of CHD and stroke, estimated by Jee's health risk-appraisal model for ischemic heart disease. We analyzed data from Koreans who randomly enrolled in Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2012 and finally included 13,799 participants. The participants were classified as per their working hours: 0-30 h/week, 31-39 h/week, 40 h/week, 41-50 h/week, 51-60 h/week, 61-70 h/week, 71-80 h/week, and >80 h/week. The risks for CHD and stroke were determined using Jee's health risk-appraisal model. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the association between working hours and 10-year risk for CHD. The 10-year risks for CHD and stroke were significantly and positively associated with working hours in both men and women. Furthermore, higher risks for CHD and stroke were associated with longer working hours in women. Long working hours are significantly associated with the risks of CHD and stroke, estimated by Jee's health risk-appraisal model. This study suggests the need for proper management of working hours to reduce CHD risk and stroke risk in the Korean population.

  4. Early results of coronary artery bypass grafting with coronary endarterectomy for severe coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toischer Karl

    2009-09-01

    failure: 3; stroke: 1; cancer: 1; unknown reasons: 3. NYHA-classification significantly improved after CABG with CE from 2.2 ± 0.9 preoperative to 1.7 ± 0.9 postoperative. CCS also changed from 2.4 ± 1.0 to 1.5 ± 0.8 Conclusion Early results of coronary endarterectomy are acceptable with respect to mortality, NYHA & CCS. This technique offers a valuable surgical option for patients with endstage coronary artery disease in whom complete revascularization otherwise can not be obtained. Careful patient selection will be necessary to assure the long-term benefit of this procedure.

  5. C-reactive protein concentration and risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and mortality: an individual participant meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Lowe, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Associations of C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration with risk of major diseases can best be assessed by long-term prospective follow-up of large numbers of people. We assessed the associations of CRP concentration with risk of vascular and non-vascular outcomes under different circumstances....

  6. Evaluating the Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Statin Use Guidelines for Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, David J; Coxson, Pamela G; Penko, Joanne; Pletcher, Mark J; Goldman, Lee; Odden, Michelle C; Kazi, Dhruv S; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2017-09-19

    Statins are effective in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guideline expands recommended statin use, but its cost-effectiveness has not been compared with other guidelines. We used the Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of the ACC/AHA guideline relative to current use, Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, and universal statin use in all men 45 to 74 years of age and women 55 to 74 years of age over a 10-year horizon from 2016 to 2025. Sensitivity analyses varied costs, risks, and benefits. Main outcomes were incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and numbers needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Each approach produces substantial benefits and net cost savings relative to the status quo. Full adherence to the Adult Treatment Panel III guideline would result in 8.8 million more statin users than the status quo, at a number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 35. The ACC/AHA guideline would potentially result in up to 12.3 million more statin users than the Adult Treatment Panel III guideline, with a marginal number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 68. Moderate-intensity statin use in all men 45 to 74 years of age and women 55 to 74 years of age would result in 28.9 million more statin users than the ACC/AHA guideline, with a marginal number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 108. In all cases, benefits would be greater in men than women. Results vary moderately with different risk thresholds for instituting statins and statin toxicity estimates but depend greatly on the disutility caused by daily medication use (pill burden). At a population level, the ACC/AHA guideline for expanded statin use for primary prevention is projected to treat more people, to save more lives, and to cost less

  7. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not as great as men's. Heredity (Including Race) Children of parents with heart disease are more likely to develop it themselves. African Americans have more severe high blood pressure than Caucasians and a higher risk of heart ...

  8. Dietary patterns derived from principal component- and k-means cluster analysis: long-term association with coronary heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, M D; Onland-Moret, N C; Boer, J M A; van der Schouw, Y T; Verschuren, W M M; May, A M; Peeters, P H M; Beulens, J W J

    2013-03-01

    Studies comparing dietary patterns derived from different a posteriori methods in view of predicting disease risk are scarce. We aimed to explore differences between dietary patterns derived from principal component- (PCA) and k-means cluster analysis (KCA) in relation to their food group composition and ability to predict CHD and stroke risk. The study was conducted in the EPIC-NL cohort that consists of 40,011 men and women. Baseline dietary intake was measured using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Food items were consolidated into 31 food groups. Occurrence of CHD and stroke was assessed through linkage with registries. After 13 years of follow-up, 1,843 CHD and 588 stroke cases were documented. Both PCA and KCA extracted a prudent pattern (high intakes of fish, high-fiber products, raw vegetables, wine) and a western pattern (high consumption of French fries, fast food, low-fiber products, other alcoholic drinks, soft drinks with sugar) with small variation between components and clusters. The prudent component was associated with a reduced risk of CHD (HR for extreme quartiles: 0.87; 95%-CI: 0.75-1.00) and stroke (0.68; 0.53-0.88). The western component was not related to any outcome. The prudent cluster was related with a lower risk of CHD (0.91; 0.82-1.00) and stroke (0.79; 0.67-0.94) compared to the western cluster. PCA and KCA found similar underlying patterns with comparable associations with CHD and stroke risk. A prudent pattern reduced the risk of CHD and stroke. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of cigarette smoking on the relationship between body mass index and coronary heart disease: a pooled analysis of 3264 stroke and 2706 CHD events in 378579 individuals in the Asia Pacific region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated levels of body mass index (BMI and smoking are well established lifestyle risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke. If these two risk factors have a synergistic relationship, rigorous lifestyle modification may contribute to greater reduction in cardiovascular burden than previously expected. Methods A pooled analysis of individual participant data from 38 cohorts, involving 378,579 participants. Hazards ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for BMI by cigarette smoking status were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models. Results During a mean follow-up of 3.8 years, 2706 CHD and 3264 strokes were recorded. There was a log-linear, positive relationship of BMI with CHD and stroke in both smokers and non-smokers with evidence of a synergistic effect of smoking on the association between BMI and CHD only: HRs (95% CIs associated with a 2 kg/m2 higher BMI were 1.13 (1.10 – 1.17 in current smokers and 1.09 (1.06 – 1.11 in non-smokers (p-value for interaction = 0.04. Conclusion Smoking amplifies the positive association between BMI and CHD but not stroke. If confirmed, these results suggest that effective strategies that target smoking cessation and weight loss are likely to have a greater impact than anticipated on reducing the burden of CHD.

  10. Animal product consumption and mortality because of all causes combined, coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cancer in Seventh-day Adventists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, D A

    1988-09-01

    This report reviews, contrasts, and illustrates previously published findings from a cohort of 27,529 California Seventh-day Adventist adults who completed questionnaires in 1960 and were followed for mortality between 1960 and 1980. Within this population, meat consumption was positively associated with mortality because of all causes of death combined (in males), coronary heart disease (in males and females), and diabetes (in males). Egg consumption was positively associated with mortality because of all causes combined (in females), coronary heart disease (in females), and cancers of the colon (in males and females combined) and ovary. Milk consumption was positively associated with only prostate cancer mortality, and cheese consumption did not have a clear relationship with any cause of death. The consumption of meat, eggs, milk, and cheese did not have negative associations with any of the causes of death investigated.

  11. Management of coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safri, Z.

    2018-03-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, therefore it’s important to early and accurate detection and appropriate management. Diagnosis of CAD include clinical examination, noninvasive techniques such as biochemical testing, a resting ECG, possibly ambulatory ECG monitoring, resting echocardiography, chest X-ray in selected patients; and catheterization. Managements of CAD patients include lifestyle modification, control of CAD risk factors, pharmacologic therapy, and patient education. Revascularization consists of percutaneous coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass grafting. Cardiac rehabilitation should be considered in all patients with CAD. This comprehensive review highlights strategies of management in patients with CAD.

  12. Comparison of Expert Adjudicated Coronary Heart Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality With the National Death Index: Results From the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olubowale, Olusola Tope; Safford, Monika M; Brown, Todd M; Durant, Raegan W; Howard, Virginia J; Gamboa, Christopher; Glasser, Stephen P; Rhodes, J David; Levitan, Emily B

    2017-05-03

    The National Death Index (NDI) is widely used to detect coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths, but its reliability has not been examined recently. We compared CHD and CVD deaths detected by NDI with expert adjudication of 4010 deaths that occurred between 2003 and 2013 among participants in the REGARDS (REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke) cohort of black and white adults in the United States. NDI derived CHD mortality had sensitivity 53.6%, specificity 90.3%, positive predictive value 54.2%, and negative predictive value 90.1%. NDI-derived CVD mortality had sensitivity 73.4%, specificity 84.5%, positive predictive value 70.6%, and negative predictive value 86.2%. Among NDI-derived CHD and CVD deaths, older age (odds ratios, 1.06 and 1.04 per 1-year increase) was associated with a higher probability of disagreement with the adjudicated cause of death, whereas among REGARDS adjudicated CHD and CVD deaths a history of CHD or CVD was associated with a lower probability of disagreement with the NDI-derived causes of death (odds ratios, 0.59 and 0.67, respectively). The modest accuracy and differential performance of NDI-derived cause of death may impact CHD and CVD mortality statistics. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  13. Homocysteine and coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Robert; Bennett, Derrick A; Parish, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) appreci......Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR...

  14. NEUROTICISM PROFILE IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Bhargava, S. C.; Sharma, S. N.; Agarwal, B. V.

    1980-01-01

    SUMMARY Thirty seven cases of coronary heart disease and 30 normal healthy controls were administered Hindi version of MHQ. The coronary heart disease patients scored significantly higher on total neuroticism, free-floating anxiety and somatic anxiety subscales of MHQ.

  15. Progress in genetics of coronary artery disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radwa Gamal

    To the Editor. Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide [1] and it is a result of coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary artery disease refers to the build-up of atherosclerotic plaque in the blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the heart. Progressive infiltration of the ...

  16. Coronary Heart Disease and Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga SAKA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease is a chronic process, of which the progression can rapidly change the functional capacity of patients. In CAD patients, the quality of life can be improved with an appropriate exercise prescription. This article explains how a safe exercise program for CAD patients can be prescribed.

  17. Achievement of Optimal Medical Therapy Goals for US Adults with Coronary Artery Disease: Results from the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Todd M.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Bittner, Vera; Brenner, David A.; Cushman, Mary; Goff, David C.; Glasser, Stephen; Muntner, Paul; Tabereaux, Paul B.; Safford, Monika M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In a non-clinical trial setting, to determine the proportion of individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD) with optimal risk factor levels based on the Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive DruG Evaluation (COURAGE) trial. Background In COURAGE, the addition of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to optimal medical therapy did not reduce the risk of death or myocardial infarction in stable CAD patients but resulted in more revascularization procedures. Methods REGARDS is a national prospective cohort study of 30,239 African American and White community-dwelling individuals aged >45 years enrolled in 2003-7. We calculated the proportion of 3,167 participants with self-reported CAD meeting 7 risk factor goals based on COURAGE: 1) aspirin use, 2) systolic blood pressure 40 mg/dL, and triglycerides goals met was 4. Less than a quarter met ≥5 of the 7 goals, and 16% met all 3 goals for aspirin, blood pressure, and LDL-C. Older age, white race, higher income, more education, and higher physical functioning were independently associated with meeting more goals. Conclusions There is substantial room for improvement in risk factor reduction among US individuals with CAD. PMID:24534599

  18. Nanomedicine in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambesh, Paurush; Campia, Umberto; Obiagwu, Chukwudi; Bansal, Rashika; Shetty, Vijay; Hollander, Gerald; Shani, Jacob

    Nanomedicine is one of the most promising therapeutic modalities researchers are working on. It involves development of drugs and devices that work at the nanoscale (10-9m). Coronary artery disease (CAD) is responsible for more than a third of all deaths in age group >35 years. With such a huge burden of mortality, CAD is one of the diseases where nanomedicine is being employed for preventive and therapeutic interventions. Nanomedicine can effectively deliver focused drug payload at sites of local plaque formation. Non-invasive strategies include thwarting angiogenesis, intra-arterial thrombosis and local inflammation. Invasive strategies following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) include anti-restenosis and healing enhancement. However, before practical application becomes widespread, many challenges need to be dealt with. These include manufacturing at the nanoscale, direct nanomaterial cellular toxicity and visualization. Copyright © 2017 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Routine Troponin Measurements Are Unnecessary to Exclude Asymptomatic Coronary Events in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farwa; Young, Jimmy; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Flemming, Kelly D; Fugate, Jennifer E

    2016-05-01

    Obtaining serum troponin levels in every patient with acute stroke is recommended in recent stroke guidelines, but there is no evidence that these contribute positively to clinical care. We sought to determine the clinical significance of measuring troponin levels in acute ischemic stroke patients. We reviewed 398 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke at a large academic institution from 2010 to 2012. Troponin levels were measured as a result of protocol in place during part of the study period. The mean age was 70 years (standard deviation ±16 years) and 197 (49.5%) were men. Chronic kidney disease was present in 78 (19.6%), coronary artery disease in 107 (26.9%), and atrial fibrillation in 107 (26.9%). Serum troponin T was measured in 246 of 398 patients (61.8%). Troponin was elevated (>.01 ng/mL) at any point in 38 of 246 patients (15.5%) and was elevated in 28 patients at all 3 measurements (11.3% of those with troponin measured). Only 4 of 246 patients (1.6%) had a significant uptrend. Two were iatrogenic in the setting of hemodynamic augmentation using vasopressors to maintain cerebral perfusion. One case was attributed to stroke and chronic kidney disease and another case to heart failure from inflammatory fibrocalcific mitral valvular heart disease. Serum troponin elevation in patients with ischemic stroke is not usually caused by clinically significant acute myocardial ischemia unless iatrogenic in the setting of vasopressor administration. Serum troponin levels should be measured judicially, based on clinical context, rather than routinely in all stroke patients. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Epidemiologic studies of coronary heart disease and stroke in Japanese men living in Japan, Hawaii, and California: demographic, physical, dietary, and biochemical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, A.; Harris, B.R.; Winkelstein, W. Jr.; Johnson, K.G.; Kato, H.; Syme, S.L.; Rhoads, G.G.; Gay, M.L.; Nichaman, M.Z.; Hamilton, H.B.; Tillotson, J.

    1973-01-01

    These summary descriptive data of ethnically similar cohorts of indigenous and migrant Japanese males have shown similarities or slight differences in characteristics wholly or largely genetically determined, such as blood groups, stature, and skeletal size. Differences have been noted in characteristics largely environmental or behavioral, such as diet and cigarette smoking habit, as well as in characteristics determined by a varying mixture of genetic and environmental influences, such as weight, blood pressure, glucose tolerance, and serum lipid and uric acid levels. Detailed analyses of the distributions of laboratory variables, of dietary data obtained by different methods, and of correlations among laboratory, dietary, physical, and demographic variables are currently in progress. Also part of the study plan are determinations of disease prevalence from evaluation of examination, laboratory, and electrocardiographic findings, of disease incidence from repeat examinations and from surveillance of hospital records, and of cause-specific mortality from hospital records, and from death certificates. In addition, at Hiroshima and Honolulu a uniform autopsy protocol is in use. All of these disease findings will be correlated with characteristics determined by questionnaire, interview, examination, and laboratory analyses in order to determine the relations between the measured variables and the occurrence of CHD and stroke. (U.S.)

  1. MRI in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkhausen, Joerg; Hunold, Peter; Waltering, Kai-Uwe

    2004-01-01

    Diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major challenge for medical imaging, because CAD is the leading cause of death in developed nations. Several non-invasive tests are used in clinical routine for the detection of CAD. However, due to limited sensitivity and specificity, the reliable diagnosis as well as the exclusion of CAD can only be established by catheter angiography. In patients with known CAD, therapeutic decisions require accurate information on myocardial function, ischemia and viability. Recently, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as a non-invasive cardiac imaging technique that provides information on cardiac morphology, cardiac function, myocardial viability, and coronary morphology. This review discusses technical aspects and the clinical impact of different MR techniques. (orig.)

  2. Percutaneous coronary intervention versus coronary-artery bypass grafting for severe coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M-C. Morice (Marie-Claude); A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter); A. Colombo (Antonio); D.R. Holmes Jr (David); M.J. Mack (Michael); E. Stahle (Elisabeth); T.E. Feldman (Ted); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); E.J. Bass (Eric); N. van Dyck (Nic); K. Leadly (Katrin); K.D. Dawkins (Keith); F.W. Mohr (Friedrich)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) involving drug-eluting stents is increasingly used to treat complex coronary artery disease, although coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) has been the treatment of choice historically. Our trial compared PCI and CABG for treating

  3. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Flu and Heart Disease & Stroke Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir People with Heart Disease* and Those Who Have Had a Stroke Are ...

  4. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  5. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes in ...

  6. Fabry disease and early stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, U

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from deficient activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. Affected males with the classic phoenotype have acroparaesthesias, hypohidrosis, and corneal opacities in childhood and develop renal failure, cardiac hypertrophy or strokes in ...

  7. Diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfisterer, M.; Gordon, D.; Battler, A.; Ashburn, W.; Froelicher, V.; Kantonsspital Basel

    1979-01-01

    In order to compare the three non-invasive exercise tests Ecg, Thallium myocardial perfusion imaging and radionuclide angiography in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, the results of these tests in a consecutive series of 30 patients and 14 controls were analyzed. In all 88 symptom-limited exercise tests a significantly higher double product (heart rate x systolic blood pressure, mm Hg/min) was reached on a treadmill test (for Ecg and Thallium scintigraphy) as compared to the supine bicycle ergometer exercise (for radionuclide angiography): 243.1 +- 61.1 vs. 215.2 +- 46.5 x 10 2 (p [de

  8. Oral Health and Coronary Artery Disease, A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Rostami

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Various risk factors have been identified for atherosclerosis. Recently, bacterial and viral organisms, which are involved in chronic inflammatory processes, have been also implicated in atherosclerosis development. Individuals with a prior history of periodontal diseases and/or tooth loss are considered to be at a higher risk for peripheral arterial disease, compared to those without periodontal diseases or tooth loss. Evidence suggests that periodontitis contributes to the overall burden of infection and inflammation and may lead to cardiovascular events and stroke in susceptible patients. In this article, we aimed to review the available data on the relationship between periodontal diseases and cardiovascular diseases, especially coronary artery disease. At least sixty papers were reviewed during 2014-15. Of these, 44 were included in our study.

  9. PLACENTAL GROWTH FACTOR AND CORONARY NEOANGIOGENESIS IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Tulikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoangiogenesis in coronary heart disease is a protective reaction aimed to improve ischemic myocardial perfusion, by increasing the number and size of arterial collaterals. Placental growth factor (PlGF is one of the key peptides regulating angiogenic processes in atherosclerosis. In particular, a number of investigators have shown that injection of recombinant PlGF into the system or regional blood flow can stimulate neoangiogenesis. On the other hand, there is evidence confirming the involvement of PlGF in the progression of atherosclerosis and in the development of acute coronary syndrome. In this connection, the problem of investigating the efficiency and safety of possible use of PlGF preparations, as well as its place in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndrome remains urgent

  10. Diagnosis and therapy of coronary artery disease: Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, P.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 18 selections. Some of the titles are: Nuclear cardiology; Diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction; Therapy of angina pectoris; Psychosocial aspects of coronary artery disease; Nonatherosclerotic coronary artery disease; and The epidemiology of coronary artery disease

  11. Coronary artery disease in patients with cerebrovascular disease: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokey, R.; Rolak, L.A.; Harati, Y.; Kutka, N.; Verani, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the cause of death in most patients who have transient ischemic attacks or stroke. Evaluation for this condition is not routinely performed in such patients, and no prospective studies have been reported. We prospectively examined 50 consecutive patients with transient ischemic attacks or mild stroke to determine the prevalence and importance of coronary artery disease. All patients were examined by a cardiologist and underwent both exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and exercise radionuclide ventriculography. Sixteen patients were suspected to have coronary artery disease on the basis of clinical evaluation. In 15 of these the was confirmed by the nuclear scans. The remaining 34 patients had no clinical evidence of heart disease, yet 14 had abnormal cardiac scans. Twenty of 22 patients with abnormal scans who underwent cardiac catheterization had significant coronary artery disease or a cardiomyopathy. The discovery of heart disease altered clinical management in 13 patients. Overall, 29 of 50 patients had significant coronary artery disease, compared with a 7% prevalence of the condition in other patients of similar age at the same institution

  12. Exercise Benefits Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Ai, Dongmei; Zhang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a group of diseases that include: no symptoms, angina, myocardial infarction, ischemia cardiomyopathy and sudden cardiac death. And it results from multiple risks factors consisting of invariable factors (e.g. age, gender, etc.) and variable factors (e.g. dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, etc.). Meanwhile, CHD could cause impact not only localized in the heart, but also on pulmonary function, whole-body skeletal muscle function, activity ability, psychological status, etc. Nowadays, CHD has been the leading cause of death in the world. However, many clinical researches showed that exercise training plays an important role in cardiac rehabilitation and can bring a lot of benefits for CHD patients.

  13. The impact of the combination of income and education on the incidence of coronary heart disease in the prospective Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Marquita W; Khodneva, Yulia; Redmond, Nicole; Durant, Raegan W; Judd, Suzanne E; Wilkinson, Larrell L; Howard, Virginia J; Safford, Monika M

    2015-12-29

    We investigated the association between income-education groups and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) in a national prospective cohort study. The REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke study recruited 30,239 black and white community-dwelling adults between 2003 and 2007 and collected participant-reported and in-home physiologic variables at baseline, with expert adjudicated CHD endpoints during follow-up. Mutually exclusive income-education groups were: low income (annual household income events through December 31, 2011 (median follow-up 6.0 years; interquartile range 4.5-7.3 years). Those with low income/low education had the highest incidence of CHD (10.1 [95% CI 8.4-12.1]/1000 person-years). After full adjustment, those with low income/low education had higher risk of incident CHD (HR 1.42 [95% CI: 1.14-1.76]) than those with high income/high education, but findings varied by age. Among those aged independent effects of income and education are less pronounced.

  14. Characteristics and risk factors of cerebrovascular accidents after percutaneous coronary interventions in patients with history of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Feng, Li-qun; Bi, Qi; Wang, Yu-ping

    2010-06-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a well-established method for managing coronary diseases. However, the increasing use of PCI has led to an increased incidence of acute cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) related to PCI. In this study, we investigated the characteristics and risk factors of CVA after PCI in patients with known stroke history. Between January 1, 2005 and March 1, 2009, 621 patients with a history of stroke underwent a total of 665 PCI procedures and were included in this retrospective study. Demographic and clinical characteristics, previous medications, procedures, neurologic deficits, location of lesion and in-hospital clinical outcomes of patients who developed a CVA after the cardiac catheterization laboratory visit and before discharge were reviewed. Acute CVA was diagnosed in 53 (8.5%) patients during the operation or the perioperative period. Seventeen patients suffered from transient ischemic attack, thirty-four patients suffered from cerebral infarction and two patients suffered from cerebral hemorrhage. The risk factors for CVA after PCI in stroke patients were: admission with an acute coronary syndrome, use of an intra-aortic balloon pump, urgent or emergency procedures, diabetes mellitus, and poor left ventricular systolic function, arterial fibrillation, previous myocardial infarction, dyslipidemia, tobacco use, and no/irregular use of anti-platelet medications. The incidence of CVA during and after PCI in patients with history of stroke is much higher than that in patients without history of stroke. Patients with atrial fibrillation, previous myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, tobacco use, and no or irregular use of anti-platelet medications were at higher risk for recurrent stroke. This study showed a strong association between acute coronary syndromes and in-hospital stroke after PCI.

  15. Radiation-induced coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsmore, L.D.; LoPonte, M.A.; Dunsmore, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes three patients who developed myocardial infarction at an untimely age, 4 to 12 years after radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease. These cases lend credence to the cause and effect relation of such therapy to coronary artery disease

  16. Coronary artery calcification in Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ino, T.; Shimazaki, S.; Akimoto, K.; Park, I.; Nishimoto, K.; Yabuta, K.; Tanaka, A.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the angiographic features of coronary lesions in Kawasaki disease with coronary artery calcification, cinefluoroscopy and cineangiography were retrospectively reviewed in 116 patients who had undergone coronary angiography between 1982 and 1989. Angiographic abnormalities of coronary arteries were demonstrated in 55 of 116 patients. In 5 (9.1%) of the 55 patients, 9 with calcification were identified by cinefluoroscopy and chest X-ray. Eight of the 9 calcified lesions showed a circular or ring-shape configuration. Coronary angiography revealed a total occlusion of the right coronary artery with collateral circulation from the distal left coronary artery in 2 patients and a severe stenosis of the right coronary artery in 2 patients, in whom anticoagulant therapy had not been continued during the follow-up periods. The remaining patient in whom anticoagulant therapy had been continued had bilateral aneurysms but no significant stenosis. These results indicate that a ring-shape calcification on chest X-ray in 2 patients with a history of Kawasaki disease may suggest an involvement by coronary artery stenosis even when anticoagulant drugs had been given. Therefore, coronary angiography should be performed to evaluate the stenotic lesions if this type of calcification is found by routine radiographic examination. (orig.)

  17. Nutrition in the prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and the management of lipoprotein disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comprised of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). CVD is caused by progressive narrowing and blockage of arteries supplying the heart, brain, and other tissues and organs. CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in our ...

  18. Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McPherson, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute importantly to the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), and in the past decade, there has been major progress in this area. The tools applied include genome-wide association studies encompassing >200,000 individuals complemented by bioinformatic approaches, including...... identified. Furthermore, a total of 202 independent signals in 109 loci have achieved a false discovery rate (qgenetic risk scores that can improve risk prediction beyond conventional risk...... have led to a broader understanding of the genetic architecture of CAD and demonstrate that it largely derives from the cumulative effect of multiple common risk alleles individually of small effect size rather than rare variants with large effects on CAD risk. Despite this success, there has been...

  19. Epidemiologic studies of coronary heart disease and stroke in Japanese men living in Japan, Hawaii, and California: prevalence of coronary and hypertensive heart disease and associated risk factors. [Coronary and hypertensive heart disease in Japanese men living in Japan, Hawaii, and California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmot, M G; Syme, S L; Kagan, A; Kato, H; Cohen, J B; Belsky, J L

    1974-01-01

    A study of coronary heart disease (CHD) among Japanese migrants compared with Japanese living in Japan provided the opportunity to study factors possibly responsible for the high rates of CHD in America as compared with Japan. Comparable methods were employed in examining 11,900 men of Japanese ancestry aged 45-69 living in Japan, Hawaii, and California. The age-adjusted prevalence rates/1000 for definite CHD as determined by electrocardiogram were: Japan 5.3, Hawaii 5.2, and California 10.8. For definite plus possible CHD the rates were 25.4, 34.7, and 44.6. The prevalence of angina pectoris and pain of possible myocardial infarction, determined by questionnaire, showed a similar gradient. Elevated serum cholesterol showed a Japan < Hawaii < California gradient, but the prevalence of hypertension in Japan was intermediate between the prevalence in Hawaii and the higher prevalence in California. The three geographical locations were compared as to prevalence of CHD at comparable levels of blood pressure and cholesterol. At each blood pressure level and at each cholesterol level, the greater prevalence of CHD in California persisted. These facts, plus the near universality of smoking in Japan, suggest that conventional risk factors only partly explain the observed gradient in CHD. (auth)

  20. Diagnosing coronary artery disease after a positive coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, L; Winther, S; Westra, J

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Perfusion scans after coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) may reduce unnecessary invasive coronary angiographies (ICAs). However, the diagnostic accuracy of perfusion scans after primary CCTA is unknown. The aim...

  1. Aneurysmal coronary artery disease: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElGuindy, Mohamed S.

    Aneurysmal coronary artery disease (ACAD) comprises both coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) and coronary artery ectasia (CAE). The reported prevalence of ACAD varies widely from 0.2 to 10%, with male predominance and a predilection for the right coronary artery (RCA). Atherosclerosis is the commonest cause of ACAD in adults, while Kawasaki disease is the commonest cause in children and adolescents, as well as in the Far East. Most patients are asymptomatic, but when symptoms do exist, they are usually related to myocardial ischemia. Coronary angiography is the mainstay of diagnosis, but follow up is best achieved using noninvasive imaging that does not involve exposure to radiation. The optimal management strategy in patients with ACAD remains controversial. Medical therapy is indicated for the vast majority of patients and includes antiplatelets and/or anticoagulants. Covered stents effectively limit further expansion of the affected coronary segments. Surgical ligation, resection, and coronary artery bypass grafting are appropriate for large lesions and for associated obstructive coronary artery disease. PMID:29564347

  2. Updates in management of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dong Heon; Chae, Shung Chull

    2005-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has been increasing during the last decade and is the one of major causes of death. The management of patients with coronary artery disease has evolved considerably. There are two main strategies in the management of CAD, complementary, not competitive, each other; the pharmacologic therapy to prevent and treat CAD and the percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to restore coronary flow. Antiplatelet drugs and cholesterol lowering drugs have central roles in pharmacotherapy. Drug eluting stent (DES) bring about revolutional changes in PCL in the management of patients with ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI), there has been a debate on the better strategy for the restoration of coronary flow. Thrombolytic therapy is widely available and easy to administer, whereas primary PCI is less available and more complex, but more complete. Recently published evidences in the pharmacologic therapy including antiplatelet and statin, and PCI including DES and reperfusion therapy in patients with ST segment elevation AMI were reviewed

  3. Updates in management of coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dong Heon; Chae, Shung Chull [Kyungpook National University Medical School, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-15

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has been increasing during the last decade and is the one of major causes of death. The management of patients with coronary artery disease has evolved considerably. There are two main strategies in the management of CAD, complementary, not competitive, each other; the pharmacologic therapy to prevent and treat CAD and the percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to restore coronary flow. Antiplatelet drugs and cholesterol lowering drugs have central roles in pharmacotherapy. Drug eluting stent (DES) bring about revolutional changes in PCL in the management of patients with ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI), there has been a debate on the better strategy for the restoration of coronary flow. Thrombolytic therapy is widely available and easy to administer, whereas primary PCI is less available and more complex, but more complete. Recently published evidences in the pharmacologic therapy including antiplatelet and statin, and PCI including DES and reperfusion therapy in patients with ST segment elevation AMI were reviewed.

  4. Myocardial perfusion studies in coronary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mut, Fernando

    1994-01-01

    For detecting in precocious form a coronary disease is necessary to apply a diagnostic techniques. The main considerations to be indicated in the present work are: physiological considerations, myocardial perfusion studies with radiotracers such as Talio 201, 99mTc, MIBI, 99mTc-Teboroxima, 99mTc-Fosfinas, instrumentation for obtain good images,proceedings protocols, studies interpretation, standards, SPECT, anomalies standards, coronary diseases

  5. Usefulness of preoperative coronary angiography and brain computed tomography in cases of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease undergoing revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Tall; Shibata, Yoshiki

    2003-01-01

    Coronary angiography and brain computed tomography were preoperatively performed to evaluate the clinical condition of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease in 101 patients (mean age, 68.4 years) with revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans. Eighty patients had hypertension, 12 had diabetes, and 26 had hyperlipidemia. Seventy-one patients (70.3%) had coronary stenosis. Significant stenoses in major coronary artery branches were confirmed in 35 patients, including 13 patients with old myocardial infarction. Coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous coronary angioplasty were performed in 2 and 7 patients with critical stenosis, respectively. Of 57 patients, who underwent brain computed tomography, abnormalities were found in 52 patients (91.2%), including cortical infarction in 9, lacunar infarction in 35, and leukoaraiosis in 27 patients. During the follow-up period 13 patients died (including 3 cases of myocardial infarction and 3 cases of stroke). Actuarial survival rate at 5 years was 80.4%. The influence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease on early and late mortality after surgical reconstruction for peripheral occlusive vascular disease is significant. Using visual diagnostic techniques, such as coronary angiography and brain computed tomography, long term survivor should be closely observed for multiple arteriosclerotic vascular diseases. (author)

  6. Usefulness of preoperative coronary angiography and brain computed tomography in cases of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease undergoing revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurada, Tall; Shibata, Yoshiki [Southern Tohoku Fukushima Hospital (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Coronary angiography and brain computed tomography were preoperatively performed to evaluate the clinical condition of coronary artery disease and cerebrovascular disease in 101 patients (mean age, 68.4 years) with revascularization for arteriosclerosis obliterans. Eighty patients had hypertension, 12 had diabetes, and 26 had hyperlipidemia. Seventy-one patients (70.3%) had coronary stenosis. Significant stenoses in major coronary artery branches were confirmed in 35 patients, including 13 patients with old myocardial infarction. Coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous coronary angioplasty were performed in 2 and 7 patients with critical stenosis, respectively. Of 57 patients, who underwent brain computed tomography, abnormalities were found in 52 patients (91.2%), including cortical infarction in 9, lacunar infarction in 35, and leukoaraiosis in 27 patients. During the follow-up period 13 patients died (including 3 cases of myocardial infarction and 3 cases of stroke). Actuarial survival rate at 5 years was 80.4%. The influence of ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease on early and late mortality after surgical reconstruction for peripheral occlusive vascular disease is significant. Using visual diagnostic techniques, such as coronary angiography and brain computed tomography, long term survivor should be closely observed for multiple arteriosclerotic vascular diseases. (author)

  7. Migraine and risk of stroke and acute coronary syndrome in two case-control studies in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Migraine has consistently been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, while the evidence for a relation with other types of stroke or coronary outcomes is limited. We examined the association between migraine and stroke and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) subtypes and the ......INTRODUCTION: Migraine has consistently been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, while the evidence for a relation with other types of stroke or coronary outcomes is limited. We examined the association between migraine and stroke and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) subtypes...... medication had increased ORs of all stroke subtypes (ischemic, hemorrhagic stroke and transient ischemic attacks). The diagnosis of migraine was also associated with both angina and myocardial infarction (ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction [STEMI], non-STEMI and unspecified) with the highest OR for angina...

  8. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Mar 16, ... be life-threatening. It’s a condition known as sleep apnea, in which the person may experience pauses ...

  9. Combined effect of educational status and cardiovascular risk factors on the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in European cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veronesi, Giovanni; Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh; Ferrario, Marco M

    2017-01-01

    Background The combined effect of social status and risk factors on the absolute risk of cardiovascular disease has been insufficiently investigated, but results provide guidance on who could benefit most through prevention. Methods We followed 77,918 cardiovascular disease-free individuals aged 35......-74 years at baseline, from 38 cohorts covering Nordic and Baltic countries, the UK and Central Europe, for a median of 12 years. Using Fine-Gray models in a competing-risks framework we estimated the effect of the interaction of education with smoking, blood pressure and body weight on the cumulative risk...... genders. Less educated men and women with a cluster of two or more risk factors had an added cardiovascular disease risk of 3.6% (+0.1%, +7.0%) and of 2.6% (-0.5%, +5.6%), respectively, compared with their more educated counterparts. Conclusions Socially disadvantaged subjects have more to gain from...

  10. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Diseases Resources Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... important step in staying healthy. If you have cardiovascular disease, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations ...

  11. Psychosocial factors in coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J. R. P., Jr.; Chaplan, R. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relationship between job satisfaction and coronary heart disease is explored for blue and white collar groups, different personalities and physiological risk factors. Differences found among administrators, engineers and scientists with regard to variables associated with heart disease are in terms of physiology, personality, reported job stress, and smoking.

  12. Smoking, Stress, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Leonard H.; Perkins, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on the interrelation between stressors and smoking, and on its potential impact on coronary heart disease risk beyond that due to stressors or to smoking alone. Reviews evidence supporting the stress-smoking interrelationship, its relevance to the risk of heart disease, and mechanisms explaining why smokers smoke more during stress and why…

  13. Epidemiological studies of coronary heart disease and stroke in Japanese men living in Japan, Hawaii, and California. Serum lipids and diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, H; Tillotson, J; Nichaman, M Z; Rhoads, G C; Hamilton, H B

    1972-01-01

    The relationship between serum lipids (cholesterol and triglycerides) and dietary intake was studied as part of a comparative study of cardiovascular diseases. Serum cholesterol (SC) showed a positive regression with intake of saturated fat, animal protein, and dietary cholesterol. The regression with saturated fat was stronger in Japan where weight and SC levels are lower than in the Americanized cohorts, and where dietary fat intake is approx.40% of those in Hawaii and California. The relation between saturated fat intake and SC was stronger in the group with lower relative body weight in both Japan and Hawaii. SC was negatively associated with complex carbohydrate intake and not associated with simple carbohydrate. Regression of nutrient variables with casual triglycerides was weak, although consistently negative with the calorie/weight index. (DLC)

  14. Determinants and Outcomes of Stroke Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention by Indication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo Kyaw; Kwok, Chun Shing; Roffe, Christine; Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Zaman, Azfar; Berry, Colin; Ludman, Peter F; de Belder, Mark A; Mamas, Mamas A

    2016-06-01

    Stroke after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a serious complication, but its determinants and outcomes after PCI in different clinical settings are poorly documented. The British Cardiovascular Intervention Society (BCIS) database was used to study 560 439 patients who underwent PCI in England and Wales between 2006 and 2013. We examined procedural-type specific determinants of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and the likelihood of subsequent 30-day mortality and in-hospital major adverse cardiovascular events (a composite of in-hospital mortality, myocardial infarction or reinfarction, and repeat revascularization). A total of 705 stroke cases were recorded (80% ischemic). Stroke after an elective PCI or PCI for acute coronary syndrome indications was associated with a higher risk of adverse outcomes compared with those without stroke; 30-day mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events outcomes in fully adjusted model were odds ratios 37.90 (21.43-67.05) and 21.05 (13.25-33.44) for elective and 5.00 (3.96-6.31) and 6.25 (5.03-7.77) for acute coronary syndrome, respectively. Comparison of odds of these outcomes between these 2 settings showed no differences; corresponding odds ratios were 1.24 (0.64-2.43) and 0.63 (0.35-1.15), respectively. Hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke complications are uncommon, but serious complications can occur after PCI and are independently associated with worse mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events outcomes in both the elective and acute coronary syndrome setting irrespective of stroke type. Our study provides a better understanding of the risk factors and prognosis of stroke after PCI by procedure type, allowing physicians to provide more informed advice around stroke risk after PCI and counsel patients and their families around outcomes if such neurological complications occur. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. [Prevention of coronary heart disease: smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, T; Meinertz, T

    2005-01-01

    Smoking is the leading preventable cause of illness and premature death in Germany, claiming over 110,000 lives a year because it directly increases the risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, emphysema and a variety of cancers. The overwhelming majority of smokers begin tobacco use before they reach adulthood. Among those young people who smoke, the average age is now 13-14. In Germany, about 39% of male and 31% of female adults (age 18-60 years) continue to smoke, despite information about the unequivocally negative health consequences of smoking. The exact mechanisms of smoking-related vascular disease are not yet known. Smoking causes acute hemodynamic alterations such as increase in heart rate, systematic and coronary vascular resistance, myocardial contractility, and myocardial oxygen demand. These short-term effects could lower the ischemic threshold in smokers with coronary artery disease and contribute to the increased risk for acute cardiovascular events. Endothelial damage is thought to be an initiating event in atherosclerosis and early studies have demonstrated that long-term smoking has direct toxic effects with structural changes of human endothelial cells. Recent research has shown the importance of the functional role of the endothelium in regulating vascular tone, platelet-endothelial interactions, leukocyte adhesion and smooth muscle cell proliferation via synthesis and release of a variety of substances such as nitric oxide. There is strong evidence that smoking leads to endothelial dysfunction mainly by increased inactivation of nitric oxide by oxygen-derived free radicals. Smoking also increases oxidative modification of LDL and is associated with lower HDL plasma levels. Smoking induces a systemic inflammatory response with increased leukocyte count and elevation of the C-reactive protein level. Importantly, the prothrombotic effects of smoking have been repeatedly demonstrated to cause alterations in platelet function, imbalance of

  16. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A. [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Servico de Neurorradiologia, Almada (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  17. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A.

    2005-01-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  18. Carbon monoxide and coronary heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidemandel, V

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the relationship between increased carboxyhemoglobin levels in the blood and coronary heart disease in smokers and city dwellers are reviewed. The evidence of myocardial infarction is significantly higher in smokers than in nonsmokers which is due, apart from nicotine which promotes coronary arteriosclerosis, to inhaled carbon monoxide which leads to increased carboxyhemoglobin levels and most likely plays a role in the risk of arteriosclerosis and the coronary heart disease. Apart from combining with hemoglobin, CO increases the circulation rate and the coronary blood flow, and reduces the coronary arteriovenous oxygen difference, which is indicative of a reduced rate of oxygen extraction by the myocardium against an increased myocardial oxygen demand. The reduction of the oxygen extraction correlates with the increased COHb level. Inhaled CO lowers the threshold of angina pectoris due to the reduced myocardial oxygen tension. Also, considerable reduction of the oxygen diffusion from the capillaries toward the mitochondria due to the combination of CO with myoglobin is observed. Chronically increased CO levels in the blood and tissues not only accelerate the development of arteriosclerosis, but also induce a process directly injurious to the myocardial metabolism. (Air Pollut. Abstr.)

  19. Coronary artery disease and symptoms of depression in a Kenyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coronary artery disease and symptoms of depression in a Kenyan population. ... death. Little is known about the co-morbidity of heart disease and depression in Africa. Objective: To describe the prevalence of depression in Black Africans with and without. Coronary Artery Disease as documented on coronary angiography ...

  20. Gender differences in the prevalence of coronary artery tortuosity and its association with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Chiha

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: There is a significant relationship between coronary artery tortuosity and gender. Women with severe tortuosity are more likely to have normal coronary arteries or less severe disease than men despite presenting with chest pain.

  1. [Coronary heart disease: epidemiologic-genetic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, F H

    1985-01-01

    Coronary heart disease and the risk factors which predispose to it aggregate in families. How much of this clustering of disease is "explained" by the familial resemblance in predisposing factors? The published reports which bear on this question fall into six distinct study designs: prospective studies, persons at high or low risk or persons with and without a positive family history as points of departure, case-control studies, studies of patients who had a coronary angiogram and studies in different ethnic groups. The findings of the 16 investigations reviewed suggest that there are as yet unidentified factors - genetic, environmental or both - which are responsible for familial clustering of coronary heart disease, apart from the three main risk factors (serum lipids, blood pressure, smoking) and diabetes. Future research must put greater emphasis on studies of families rather than individuals and on closer collaboration between epidemiologists and geneticists, in order to fill these gaps in knowledge. It is likely that the individual predisposition to coronary heart disease is due in part to genetic influences which remain to be discovered in the course of such studies. They would help in identifying susceptible person in the population with greater precision than is now possible. The "high-risk strategy" of coronary heart disease prevention will become more efficient as more specific and sensitive tests of disease prediction are developed. In the meantime, preventive programmes must be put into action on the basis of what is already known, on the level of both the high-risk and the community-wide mass strategy.

  2. Genetically Determined Height and Coronary Artery Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, Christopher P.; Hamby, Stephen E.; Saleheen, Danish; Hopewell, Jenna C.; Zeng, Lingyao; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Willenborg, Christina; Burgess, Stephen; Amouyel, Phillipe; Anand, Sonia; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Clarke, Robert J.; Collins, Rory; Dedoussis, George; Farrall, Martin; Franks, Paul W.; Groop, Leif; Hall, Alistair S.; Hamsten, Anders; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hovingh, G. Kees; Ingelsson, Erik; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; König, Inke R.; Kooner, Jaspal; Lehtimäki, Terho; März, Winifred; McPherson, Ruth; Metspalu, Andres; Nieminen, Markku S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Peters, Annette; Perola, Markus; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ripatti, Samuli; Roberts, Robert; Salomaa, Veikko; Shah, Svati H.; Schreiber, Stefan; Siegbahn, Agneta; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Veronesi, Giovani; Wareham, Nicholas; Willer, Cristen J.; Zalloua, Pierre A.; Erdmann, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The nature and underlying mechanisms of an inverse association between adult height and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) are unclear. METHODS We used a genetic approach to investigate the association between height and CAD, using 180 height-associated genetic variants. We tested

  3. Detecting asymptomatic coronary artery disease using routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ECG-monitored exercise testing has been proposed as a relatively inexpensive and effective means of screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients presenting for peripheral vascular surgery. Despite the fact that exercise thallium scintigraphy is also dependent on the patient's ability to exercise, using this ...

  4. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...

  5. Depression in Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Safaie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is one of the Common psychological disorders. From the cognitive point of view, the unhealthy attitudes increase the severity of the depression. The aim of this study was to investigate depression and unhealthy attitudes in coronary patients hospitalized at Tabriz Shahid Madani Heart Center. Methods: One hundred twenty eight hospitalized patients having myocardial Infarctions were studied regarding unhealthy attitudes, severity of depression and demographic data. Results: The study showed a significant relation between unhealthy attitudes, BDI (Beck Depression Inventory and severe depression. Moreover, a significant relation existed between gender and depression (P=0.0001. In addition, the level of education increased the intensity of unhealthy attitudes (P=0.0001. Several researches in both outside and inside Iran support the idea. Conclusion: Based on present study and more other investigations, it can be suggested to provide the necessary elements and parameters such as antidepressant medication, psychologists, complementary treatment for coping with negative mood and its unwanted consequences.

  6. Heart diseases and strokes in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the relevance of the problem associated with the diagnosis and treatment of stroke in young patients aged 15-45 years. It considers the major causes of acute cerebrovascular accidents in young people, including pregnant women. Diseases, such patent foramen ovale, mitral valve prolapse, infective endocarditis, and postpartum cardiomyopathy, are described in detail. The basic principles of the diagnosis and therapy of ischemic stroke at a young age are given. The mainstay of therapy for acute ischemic stroke is stated to include two procedures: reperfusion and neuronal protection.

  7. Coding in Stroke and Other Cerebrovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Pearce J; Jones, William

    2017-02-01

    Accurate coding is critical for clinical practice and research. Ongoing changes to diagnostic and billing codes require the clinician to stay abreast of coding updates. Payment for health care services, data sets for health services research, and reporting for medical quality improvement all require accurate administrative coding. This article provides an overview of coding principles for patients with strokes and other cerebrovascular diseases and includes an illustrative case as a review of coding principles in a patient with acute stroke.

  8. Diabetic retinopathy: A predictor of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia El Demerdash

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Diabetic retinopathy is a good predictor of coronary artery disease that exceeds the conventional risk factors. Diabetics with retinopathy would benefit from early coronary angiography and diabetic retinocoronary clinics are warranted.

  9. Dietary fiber and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Mark A; O'Reilly, Eilis; Augustsson, Katarina

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few epidemiologic studies of dietary fiber intake and risk of coronary heart disease have compared fiber types (cereal, fruit, and vegetable) or included sex-specific results. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pooled analysis of dietary fiber and its subtypes and risk...... of coronary heart disease. METHODS: We analyzed the original data from 10 prospective cohort studies from the United States and Europe to estimate the association between dietary fiber intake and the risk of coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Over 6 to 10 years of follow-up, 5249 incident total coronary cases...... associated with risk of coronary heart disease....

  10. Heart Disease and Stroke in Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-11

    This women's health podcast focuses on the impact of heart disease and stroke in women and includes steps to prevent these conditions.  Created: 5/11/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/11/2009.

  11. Association of various blood pressure variables and vascular phenotypes with coronary, stroke and renal deaths: Potential implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaoui, Brahim; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Milon, Hughes; Fauvel, Jean-Pierre; Khettab, Fouad; Mechtouff, Laura; Cassar, Emmanuel; Girerd, Nicolas; Lantelme, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular diseases has been extensively documented. However, the benefit of anti-hypertensive drugs differs according to the type of cardiovascular event. Aortic stiffness is tightly intertwined with BP and aorta cross-talk with small arteries. We endeavored to elucidate which BP component and type of vessel remodeling was predictive of the following outcomes: fatal myocardial infarction (MI), fatal stroke, renal -, coronary- or cerebrovascular-related deaths. Large vessel remodeling was estimated by an aortography-based aortic atherosclerosis score (ATS) while small vessel disease was documented by the presence of a hypertensive retinopathy. We included 1031 subjects referred for hypertension workup and assessed outcomes 30 years later. After adjustment for major risk factors, ATS and pulse pressure (PP) were predictive of coronary events while mean BP (MBP) and retinopathy were not. On the contrary, MBP was predictive of cerebrovascular and renal related deaths while ATS and PP were not. Retinopathy was only predictive of cerebrovascular related deaths. Lastly, the aortic atherosclerosis phenotype and increased PP identified patients prone to develop fatal MI whereas the retinopathy phenotype and increased MBP identified patients at higher risk of fatal stroke. These results illustrate the particular feature of the resistive coronary circulation comparatively to the brain and kidneys' low-resistance circulation. Our results advocate for a rational preventive strategy based on the identification of distinct clinical phenotypes. Accordingly, decreasing MBP levels could help preventing stroke in retinopathy phenotypes whereas targeting PP is possibly more efficient in preventing MI in atherosclerotic phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy; Maridaki Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-09-23

    Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD.

  13. Moderators of Coronary Vasomotion during Mental Stress in Coronary Artery Disease Patients: Stress Reactivity, Serum Lipoproteins, and Severity of Atherosclerosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Howell, Robert H

    1996-01-01

    Impaired coronary artery vasomotion in response to behavioral triggers such as mental stress may be an important pathophysiological process involved in acute manifestations of coronary artery disease...

  14. Comparison of Five-Year Outcome of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Triple-Vessel Coronary Artery Disease (from the Coronary Revascularization Demonstrating Outcome Study in Kyoto PCI/CABG Registry Cohort-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Hiroki; Morimoto, Takeshi; Furukawa, Yutaka; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Tazaki, Junichi; Sakata, Ryuzo; Okabayashi, Hitoshi; Hanyu, Michiya; Shimamoto, Mitsuomi; Nishiwaki, Noboru; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Kimura, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    Studies evaluating long-term (≥5 years) outcomes of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using drug-eluting stents compared with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with triple-vessel coronary artery disease (TVD) are still limited. We identified 2,978 patients with TVD (PCI: n = 1,824, CABG: n = 1,154) of 15,939 patients with first coronary revascularization enrolled in the Coronary Revascularization Demonstrating Outcome Study in Kyoto PCI/CABG Registry Cohort-2. The primary outcome measure in the present analysis was a composite of death, myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke. Median follow-up duration for the surviving patients was 1,973 days (interquartile range 1,700 to 2,244). The cumulative 5-year incidence of death/MI/stroke was significantly higher in the PCI group than in the CABG group (28.2% vs 24.0%, log-rank p = 0.006). After adjusting for confounders, the excess risk of PCI relative to CABG for death/MI/stroke remained significant (hazard ratio [HR] 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13 to 1.68, p = 0.002). The excess risks of PCI relative to CABG for all-cause death, MI, and any coronary revascularization were also significant (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.74, p = 0.006; HR 2.81, 95% CI 1.69 to 4.66, p PCI and CABG groups (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.61 to 1.26, p = 0.48). There were no interactions for the primary outcome measure between the mode of revascularization (PCI or CABG) and the subgroup factors such as age, diabetes, and Synergy Between PCI With Taxus and Cardiac Surgery score. In conclusion, CABG compared with PCI was associated with better long-term outcome in patients with TVD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Contemporary Management of Patients with Concomitant Coronary and Carotid Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poi, Mun J; Echeverria, Angela; Lin, Peter H

    2018-01-01

    The ideal management of concomitant carotid and coronary artery occlusive disease remains elusive. Although researchers have advocated the potential benefits of varying treatment strategies based on either concomitant or staged surgical treatment, there is no consensus in treatment guidelines among national or international clinical societies. Clinical studies show that coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with either staged or synchronous carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is associated with a high procedural stroke or death rate. Recent clinical studies have found carotid artery stenting (CAS) prior to CABG can lead to superior treatment outcomes in asymptomatic patients who are deemed high risk of CEA. With emerging data suggesting favorable outcome of CAS compared to CEA in patients with critical coronary artery disease, physicians must consider these diverging therapeutic options when treating patients with concurrent carotid and coronary disease. This review examines the available clinical data on therapeutic strategies in patients with concomitant carotid and coronary artery disease. A treatment paradigm for considering CAS or CEA as well as CABG and percutaneous coronary intervention is discussed.

  16. Heart disease and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  17. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Severely Calcified Unprotected Left Main Coronary Artery Disease: Initial Experience With Orbital Atherectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Shlofmitz, Evan; Kaplan, Barry; Shlofmitz, Richard

    2016-04-01

    We report the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with orbital atherectomy for severely calcified unprotected left main coronary artery (ULMCA) disease. Although surgical revascularization is the gold standard for patients with ULMCA disease, not all patients are candidates for this. PCI is increasingly used to treat complex coronary artery disease, including ULMCA disease. The presence of severely calcified lesions increases the complexity of PCI. Orbital atherectomy can be used to facilitate stent delivery and expansion in severely calcified lesions. The clinical outcomes of patients treated with orbital atherectomy for severely calcified ULMCA disease have not been reported. From May 2014 to July 2015, a total of 14 patients who underwent PCI with orbital atherectomy for ULMCA disease were retrospectively evaluated. The primary endpoint was major cardiac and cerebrovascular event (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and target-lesion revascularization) at 30 days. The mean age was 78.2 ± 5.8 years. The mean ejection fraction was 41.8 ± 19.8%. Distal bifurcation disease was present in 9 of 14 patients. Procedural success was achieved in all 14 patients. The 30-day major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular event rate was 0%. One patient had coronary dissection that was successfully treated with stenting. No patient had perforation, slow flow, or thrombosis. Orbital atherectomy in patients with severely calcified ULMCA disease is feasible, even in high-risk patients who were considered poor surgical candidates. Randomized trials are needed to determine the role of orbital atherectomy in ULMCA disease.

  18. Contemporary Management of Coronary Artery Disease and Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have emerged as a worldwide public health problem. Due to the remarkably higher incidence and prevalence of this chronic disease in Taiwan than in other countries, CKD/ESRD has contributed to a significant health burden in Taiwan. Patients with CKD/ESRD have an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to the normal population. Patients with ACS alone can present differently than patients with ACS and CKD/ESRD. Also, due to the lower prevalence of chest pain and ST-segment elevation, CKD/ESRD patients were more difficult to diagnose than other patients. Furthermore, whether advances in ACS management with medical therapy and an early invasive approach could improve patient outcomes with CKD/ESRD is not known. The use of antiplatelets such as aspirin and other antithrombotic agents might reduce the incidence of ACS or stroke in CKD patients. However, such use could also increase bleeding risk and even increase the likelihood of mortality, especially in dialysis patients. While recent clinical data suggest the potential benefit of aggressive management with coronary intervention for CAD and ACS in this category of patients, further clinical studies are still indicated for the proper medical strategy and revascularization therapy to improve the outcomes of CAD and ACS in CKD/ESRD patients, both in Taiwan and worldwide. PMID:27122697

  19. Imaging diagnosis of congenital heart disease with single coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Li Yuhua; Zhong Yumin; Sun Aimin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To report 56 cases of congenital heart disease with congenital single coronary artery and to evaluate the imaging diagnostic techniques. Methods: All 56 patients with congenital single coronary artery underwent angiocardiography. Contrast enhancement magnetic resonance angiography (CE MRA) was performed in 4 cases. 48 cases were confirmed by operation. Results: In these 56 cases, single left coronary artery was found in 44 cases and single right coronary artery was found in 12. Conclusion: Congenital heart disease with congenital single coronary artery is not rare and correct diagnosis is very important for surgery

  20. Differences Characteristics Patients Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 with and without Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nindara Citra Aquarista

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is the third highest Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs, which causes death in Indonesia.The incidence of coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus is high, 65% of people with diabetes mellitus die due to coronary heart disease and stroke. The purpose of this study is to analyze the differences in the characteristics of Diabetes mellitus type 2 in patients with and without coronary heart disease in Haji General Hospital Surabaya year 2016. This research uses observational analysis with cross sectional study design. The subject of the study is the incidence of diabetes Mellitus type 2 with and without coronary heart disease with undergoing outpatient treatment at Haji General Hospital Surabaya year 2016. The Samples were taken by fixed-disease sampling method with 42 people as the samples. The data analysis uses Chi Square test. The results show for the independent variables that have the most significant difference inHaji General Hospital Surabaya year 2016 is smoking behavior (p = 0.00; PR = 7.85; 95% CI = 2.09 to 29.50 and hypertension (p = 0,002; PR = 3.51; 95% CI = 1.42 to 8.67. In conclusion, the smoking behavior and hypertension can lead to complications of coronary heart disease for patients with type in Diabetes Mellitus type 2 in Haji General Hospital year 2016. It needs awareness to check blood pressure regularly and eliminate the smoking habit as the prevention of complications of coronary heart disease for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Keywords: diabetes mellitus type 2, coronary hearth disease.

  1. Heart Rate and Initial Presentation of Cardiovascular Diseases (Caliber)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease NOS; Unheralded Coronary Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest, Sudden Cardiac Death

  2. Psychological factors and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadži-Pešić Marina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CAD results from an interaction of different somatic, environmental and behavioral risk factors. Commonly, development of CAD is associated with arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking, sedentary life style and the like. Psychological factors in their own sake or in combination with other risk factors are also important for genesis of CAD. In this study, 170 people that were diagnosed with CAD and 170 healthy controls of corresponding sex and age were compared for anxiety, aggressiveness and Eysenck's two personality dimension. The data indicate that patients with CAD have very low level of anxiety and aggressiveness and very high level of neuroticism relative to the controls. .

  3. Stroke after coronary artery bypass grafting. Is there place for a stroke-risk stratification model?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noyez, L.; Swieten, H.A. van

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Preoperative carotid screening is common in the prevention of perioperative stroke. The authors describe our experience with selective screening of patients with a recent (<1 year) neurological event. Because many variables are related with the development of perioperative stroke we

  4. Non-obstructive coronary artery disease assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L.; Bøtker, H. E.; Sorensen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary CT angiography (CTA) detects non-obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) that may not be recognized by functional testing, but the prognostic impact is not well understood. This study aimed to compare the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and all-cause mortality...... in patients without or with non-obstructive and obstructive CAD assessed by coronary CTA. Methods: Consecutive patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) and with chest pain who underwent coronary CTA (>64-detector row) between January 2007 and December 2012 in the 10 centers participating...... in the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry were included. The endpoints were 3-year MI or all-cause mortality. The coronary CTA result was defined as normal (0% luminal stenosis), non-obstructive CAD (1%-49% luminal stenosis) or obstructive CAD (>50% luminal stenosis; 1-vessel, 2-vessel, or 3...

  5. Systematic preoperative coronary angiography and stenting improves postoperative results of carotid endarterectomy in patients with asymptomatic coronary artery disease: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, G; Ricco, J-B; Greco, C; Mangieri, E; Calio', F; Ceccanei, G; Pacilè, M A; Schiariti, M; Tanzilli, G; Barillà, F; Paravati, V; Mazzesi, G; Miraldi, F; Tritapepe, L

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of systematic coronary angiography followed, if needed, by coronary artery angioplasty (percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)) on the incidence of cardiac ischaemic events after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in patients without evidence of coronary artery disease (CAD). From January 2005 to December 2008, 426 patients, candidates for CEA, with no history of CAD and with normal cardiac ultrasound and electrocardiography (ECG), were randomised into two groups. In group A (n=216) all the patients had coronary angiography performed before CEA. In group B, all the patients had CEA without previous coronary angiography. In group A, 66 patients presenting significant coronary artery lesions at angiography received PCI before CEA. They subsequently underwent surgery under aspirin (100 mg day(-1)) and clopidogrel (75 mg day(-1)). CEA was performed within a median delay of 4 days after PCI (range: 1-8 days). Risk factors, indications for CEA and surgical techniques were comparable in both groups (p>0.05). The primary combined endpoint of the study was the incidence of postoperative myocardial ischaemic events combined with the incidence of complications of coronary angiography. Secondary endpoints were death and stroke rates after CEA and incidence of cervical haematoma. Postoperative mortality was 0% in group A and 0.9% in group B (p=0.24). One postoperative stroke (0.5%) occurred in group A, and two (0.9%) in group B (p=0.62). No postoperative myocardial event was observed in group A, whereas nine ischaemic events were observed in group B, including one fatal myocardial infarction (p=0.01). Binary logistic regression analysis demonstrated that preoperative coronary angiography was the only independent variable that predicted the occurrence of postoperative coronary ischaemia after CEA. The odds ratio for coronary angiography (group A) indicated that when holding all other variables constant, a patient having preoperative coronary angiography

  6. Coronary artery disease - strategies for primary prevention in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death among middle aged and elderly population. The increase in prevalence of coronary artery disease in Pakistan, has also involved the younger population and about 30% of the patients of coronary artery disease are below the age of 40 years. It seems that with this high prevalence of coronary artery disease, we will be entering in the new millennium with coronary artery disease as number one killer in young adults in Pakistan. This is the time, though belated, we must embark on strategies for primary prevention of this disease so that we are able to reduce the incidence of the disease and the economic burden it entails on the national exchequer. Before suggesting the strategies for the prevention of coronary artery disease in Pakistan, let us briefly review the significance of modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. Several studies have been found a significant relationship between physical inactivity and coronary artery disease. (A.B./orig.)

  7. PR interval prolongation in coronary patients or risk equivalent: excess risk of ischemic stroke and vascular pathophysiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yap-Hang; Hai, Jo Jo; Lau, Kui-Kai; Li, Sheung-Wai; Lau, Chu-Pak; Siu, Chung-Wah; Yiu, Kai-Hang; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2017-08-24

    Whether PR prolongation independently predicts new-onset ischemic events of myocardial infarction and stroke was unclear. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of PR prolongation leading to adverse cardiovascular events were poorly understood. We investigated the role of PR prolongation in pathophysiologically-related adverse cardiovascular events and underlying mechanisms. We prospectively investigated 597 high-risk cardiovascular outpatients (mean age 66 ± 11 yrs.; male 67%; coronary disease 55%, stroke 22%, diabetes 52%) for new-onset ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), congestive heart failure (CHF), and cardiovascular death. Vascular phenotype was determined by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). PR prolongation >200 ms was present in 79 patients (13%) at baseline. PR prolongation >200 ms was associated with significantly higher mean carotid IMT (1.05 ± 0.37 mm vs 0.94 ± 0.28 mm, P = 0.010). After mean study period of 63 ± 11 months, increased PR interval significantly predicted new-onset ischemic stroke (P = 0.006), CHF (P = 0.040), cardiovascular death (P 200 ms. Using multivariable Cox regression, PR prolongation >200 ms independently predicted new-onset ischemic stroke (HR 8.6, 95% CI: 1.9-37.8, P = 0.005), cardiovascular death (HR 14.1, 95% CI: 3.8-51.4, P PR interval predicts new-onset MI at the exploratory cut-off >162 ms (C-statistic 0.70, P = 0.001; HR: 8.0, 95% CI: 1.65-38.85, P = 0.010). PR prolongation strongly predicts new-onset ischemic stroke, MI, cardiovascular death, and combined cardiovascular endpoint including CHF in coronary patients or risk equivalent. Adverse vascular function may implicate an intermediate pathophysiological phenotype or mediating mechanism.

  8. HFE gene mutations in coronary atherothrombotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calado R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Although iron can catalyze the production of free radicals involved in LDL lipid peroxidation, the contribution of iron overload to atherosclerosis remains controversial. The description of two mutations in the HFE gene (Cys282Tyr and His63Asp related to hereditary hemochromatosis provides an opportunity to address the question of the association between iron overload and atherosclerosis. We investigated the prevalence of HFE mutations in 160 survivors of myocardial infarction with angiographically demonstrated severe coronary atherosclerotic disease, and in 160 age-, gender- and race-matched healthy control subjects. PCR amplification of genomic DNA followed by RsaI and BclI restriction enzyme digestion was used to determine the genotypes. The frequency of the mutant Cys282Tyr allele was identical among patients and controls (0.022; carrier frequency, 4.4%, whereas the mutant His63Asp allele had a frequency of 0.143 (carrier frequency, 27.5% in controls and of 0.134 (carrier frequency, 24.5% in patients. Compound heterozygotes were found in 2 of 160 (1.2% controls and in 1 of 160 (0.6% patients. The finding of a similar prevalence of Cys282Tyr and His63Asp mutations in the HFE gene among controls and patients with coronary atherothrombotic disease, indirectly questions the possibility of an association between hereditary hemochromatosis and atherosclerosis.

  9. Coronary heart disease mortality after irradiation for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivin, J.F.; Hutchison, G.B.

    1982-01-01

    The authors conducted a study designed to evaluate the hypothesis that irradiation to the heart in the treatment for Hodgkin's disease (HD) is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality. This report describes 957 patients diagnosed with HD in 1942-75 and analyzes follow-up findings through December 1977. Twenty-five coronary heart disease deaths have been observed, and 4258.2 person-years of experience at risk have been accrued. The relative death rate (RDR), defined as the CHD mortality for heart-irradiated subjects divided by the mortality for nonirradiated subjects, was estimated. After adjustment for the effect of interval of observation, age, stage, and class, the RDR estimate is 1.5 but does not differ significantly from unit

  10. Changing Trend in Coronary Heart Disease in Nigeria | Nwaneli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is the greatest cause of death in Western countries but reported to be rare in sub-Saharan Africa. There are suggestions that the incidence of coronary heart disease is rising in Nigeria as a result of many factors. This review looks at the burden of CHD in Nigeria and its risk ...

  11. Association of plasma protein C levels and coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several studies have shown the risk factor causes of coronary heart disease. In this study we tested the hypothesis that plasma protein C level might be used as a biomarker for coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction. The study included 60 men that were classified into 3 groups according to clinical examination; ...

  12. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublished...

  13. Left main coronary artery disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Carlos; Capodanno, Davide; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Banning, Adrian; Stone, Gregg W; Taggart, David P; Sabik, Joseph; Serruys, Patrick W

    2018-06-01

    The advent of coronary angiography in the 1960s allowed for the risk stratification of patients with stable angina. Patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease have an increased risk of death related to the large amount of myocardium supplied by this vessel. Although coronary angiography remains the preferred imaging modality for the evaluation of left main coronary artery stenosis, this technique has important limitations. Angiograms of the left main coronary artery segment can be difficult to interpret, and almost one-third of patients can be misclassified when fractional flow reserve is used as the reference. In patients with clinically significant unprotected left main coronary artery disease, surgical revascularization was shown to improve survival compared with medical therapy and has been regarded as the treatment of choice for unprotected left main coronary artery disease. Two large-scale clinical trials published in 2016 support the usefulness of catheter-based revascularization in selected patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease. In this Review, we describe the pathophysiology of unprotected left main coronary artery disease, discuss diagnostic approaches in light of new noninvasive and invasive imaging techniques, and detail risk stratification models to aid the Heart Team in the decision-making process for determining the best revascularization strategy for these patients.

  14. Imaging techniques in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, H.

    1997-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Coronary angiography makes it possible to visualize coronary artery stenosis and can be used for angioplasty and stent implantation; however, it does not allow the assessment of changes in myocardial microcirculation. The severity of an angiographically evaluated coronary stenosis does not always correspond to the extent of myocardial ischemia. Nonivasive techniques are needed to reexamine our reliance on coronary angiography and to explore the clinical value fo the physiological assessment of coronary artery stenoses. Such noninvasive techniques might become important tools in the future following an overal evaluation of coronary morphology, myocardial function and perfusion ascertained by all available methods. (orig.) [de

  15. Drug therapy or coronary angioplasty for the treatment of coronary artery disease : New insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amoroso, G; Van Boven, AJ; Crijns, HJGM

    Background In the last decade percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty has become a very popular strategy For the treatment of coronary artery disease, although its efficacy in reducing ischemic events and the subsequent need for revascularization has yet to be proved. Methods We reviewed the

  16. Subclinical Coronary Plaque Burden in Asymptomatic Relatives of Patients With Documented Premature Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh; Jensen, Jesper Møller; Bøtker, Hans Erik

    Introduction: A family history of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) is a well-known risk factor for adverse coronary events with age of onset being inversely related to the degree of heritability. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that asymptomatic first degree relatives, of patients with premature...... CAD, suffer a high burden of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Methods: First degree relatives, aged 30-65 years, of patients with a documented coronary revascularization procedure before the age of 40 years, were invited to participate in the study. Participants were matched by age, sex...... and absence of a family history, with patients referred for coronary CT angiography (CTA) because of atypical angina or non-anginal chest pain. A pooled blinded analysis was performed. The main outcome measure was the number of plaque-affected coronary segments. Results: 88 relatives and 88 symptomatic...

  17. Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease The Coronary Arterial Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloff, Joseph K

    2012-01-01

    Background: The coronary circulation in cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) includes the extramural coronary arteries, basal coronary blood flow, flow reserve, the coronary microcirculation, and coronary atherogenesis. Methods: Coronary arteriograms were analyzed in 59 adults with CCHD. Dilated extramural coronaries were examined histologically in six patients. Basal coronary blood flow was determined with N-13 positron emission tomography in 14 patients and in 10 controls. Hyperemic flow was induced by intravenous dipyridamole pharmacologic stress. Immunostaining against SM alpha-actin permitted microcirculatory morphometric analysis. Non-fasting total cholesterols were retrieved in 279 patients divided into four groups: Group A---143 cyanotic unoperated, Group B---47 rendered acyanotic by reparative surgery, Group C---41 acyanotic unoperated, Group D---48 acyanotic before and after operation. Results: Extramural coronary arteries were mildly or moderately dilated to ectatic in 49/59 angiograms. Histologic examination disclosed loss of medial smooth muscle, increased medial collagen, and duplication of internal elastic lamina. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased. Hyperemic flow was comparable to controls. Remodeling of the microcirculation was based upon coronary arteriolar length, volume and surface densities. Coronary atherosclerosis was absent in both the arteriograms and the necropsy specimens. Conclusions: Extramural coronary arteries in CCHD dilate in response to endothelial vasodilator substances supplemented by mural attenuation caused by medial abnormalities. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased, but hyperemic flow was normal. Remodeling of the microcirculation was responsible for preservation of flow reserve. The coronaries were atheroma-free because of the salutory effects of hypocholesterolemia, hypoxemia, upregulated nitric oxide, low platelet counts, and hyperbilirubinrmia. PMID:22845810

  18. Congenital heart disease with high origin of coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Li Yuhua; Zhong Yumin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To report 6 cases of congenital heart disease with high origin of coronary artery and to evaluate the imaging method for diagnosis of congenital high origin of coronary artery. Methods: Six patients with congenital high origin of coronary artery underwent angiocardiography, echocardiography, and 2 patients also underwent magnetic resonance examination. All 6 cases were confirmed by operation. Results: All 6 cases were congenital high origin of right coronary artery. Angiocardiography made correct diagnosis in all 6 cases; MRI made the correct diagnosis in 1 of the 2 cases; echocardiography made 1 correct diagnosis. Conclusion: Correct diagnosis of congenital high origin of coronary artery was very important for patients with congenital heart disease. Angiocardiography was a very reliable imaging method and MRI can play an important role in preoperative diagnosis of congenital high origin of coronary artery

  19. CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN INDIAN WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Umar Farooque

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women regardless of race or ethnicity accounting for deaths of 1 in 3 women. The aim of the study is to identify the important risk factors contributing to the coronary artery disease in Indian women. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study conducted on 120 women patients of age >40 yrs. visiting a female outpatient department of Jawahar Lal Nehru Medical College, Bhagalpur, who presented with complaints related to CAD cases diagnosed from the electrocardiogram findings, clinical features and biochemical marker as per World Health Organization guidelines. RESULTS 50-59 years age group is most effected group in study with 44.2%. Most of the women are of postmenopausal age group. The maximum number of cases was seen in upper lower socioeconomic status (37.5% followed by lower (19.2%. CAD incidence was minimum in upper class. Chest pain was the main complaint in patients, next in frequency was sweating and followed by breathlessness. The major risk factors in the study group were hypertension (74.1, diabetes (63.3, sedentary habits (49.1, stress (34.2, family history (29.2 and tobacco consumption (21.8. 25 patients had obesity and 54 peoples were overweight. In our study, 48 patients had 3 children, 19 had more than 3 children. 61.7% of the patients are with hypercholesterolaemia, which most of the patients found with 2 vessel block is most common blocks observed. CONCLUSION Despite this delay in onset, mortality from coronary heart disease is increasing more rapidly among women than men.

  20. Cardiac PET/CT for the diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geronazzo, R.J.; Romero, R.L.; Campisi, R.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is considered by de World Health Organization (WHO) to be pandemic. Eighty percent of the deaths occurs secondary to coronary artery disease, stroke and diabetes, thus they can be prevented. All of them are related to the same risk factors. Ischemic heart disease is the mayor cause of death in Argentina in the elderly population. Primary prevention strategies are essential in the health system. Hence, image complementary methods are very important to accomplish risk stratification, secondary prevention and pre-surgical evaluation. Nuclear cardiology has occupied this place through myocardial perfusion studies with radiopharmaceuticals, using SPECT (Single photon emission computed tomography) that have improved the level of sensitivity and specificity with ECG gated. Furthermore, positron emission tomography (PET) can evaluate relative myocardial perfusion, quantify absolute myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve. With its capacity to quantify rest-peak stress left ventricular systolic function we can underscore for example “balance ischemia”. By using hybrid PET/CT, also we can get information of coronary artery calcium scoring and coronary angiography. Currently, with the available softwares, we can acquire images in List mode. It means, from a single acquisition, it allows multiple image reconstructions, along with the associated electrocardiographic phase. PET/CT uses radiopharmaceuticals with short physical half life, and in conjunction with the possibility of acquiring in 3D mode, the perfusion studies can be done in a short time and offers lower radiation exposure to the patient. The new softwares for routine correction of misalignments between transmission and emission images have helped to reduce the frequency of artifacts and improve diagnostic accuracy. Hybrid PET/CT technology allows functional evaluation of myocardial perfusion combined with anatomic characterization of the epicardial coronary arteries, thereby

  1. Periodontal Disease, Regular Dental Care Use, and Incident Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Souvik; Giamberardino, Lauren D; Moss, Kevin; Morelli, Thiago; Rosamond, Wayne D; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Beck, James; Offenbacher, Steven

    2018-02-01

    Periodontal disease is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. Identification of periodontal disease as a risk factor for incident ischemic stroke raises the possibility that regular dental care utilization may reduce the stroke risk. In the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study, pattern of dental visits were classified as regular or episodic dental care users. In the ancillary dental ARIC study, selected subjects from ARIC underwent fullmouth periodontal measurements collected at 6 sites per tooth and classified into 7 periodontal profile classes (PPCs). In the ARIC study 10 362 stroke-free participants, 584 participants had incident ischemic strokes over a 15-year period. In the dental ARIC study, 6736 dentate subjects were assessed for periodontal disease status using PPC with a total of 299 incident ischemic strokes over the 15-year period. The 7 levels of PPC showed a trend toward an increased stroke risk (χ 2 trend P periodontal disease). Periodontal disease was significantly associated with cardioembolic (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-5.6) and thrombotic (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.8) stroke subtypes. Regular dental care utilization was associated with lower adjusted stroke risk (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.94). We confirm an independent association between periodontal disease and incident stroke risk, particularly cardioembolic and thrombotic stroke subtype. Further, we report that regular dental care utilization may lower this risk for stroke. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Development of Coronary Pulse Wave Velocity: New Pathophysiological Insight Into Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbaoui, Brahim; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Cividjian, Andrei; Lantelme, Pierre

    2017-02-02

    Although aortic stiffness assessed by pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a strong predictor of coronary artery disease, the significance of local coronary stiffness has never been tackled. The first objective of this study was to describe a method of measuring coronary PWV (CoPWV) invasively and to describe its determinants. The second objective was to assess both CoPWV and aortic PWV in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes or stable coronary artery disease. In 53 patients, CoPWV was measured from the delay in pressure wave and distance traveled as a pressure wire was withdrawn from the distal to the proximal coronary segment. Similarly, aortic PWV was measured invasively when the wire was pulled across the ascending aorta; carotid-femoral PWV was also measured noninvasively using the SphygmoCor system (AtCor Medical). Mean CoPWV was 10.3±6.1 m/s. Determinants of increased CoPWV were fractional flow reserve, diastolic blood pressure, and previous stent implantation in the recorded artery. CoPWV was lower in patients with acute coronary syndromes versus stable coronary artery disease (7.6±3 versus 11.5±6.4 m/s; P=0.02), and this persisted after adjustment for confounders. In contrast, aortic stiffness, assessed by aortic and carotid-femoral PWV, did not differ significantly. CoPWV seems associated with acute coronary events more closely than aortic PWV. High coronary compliance, whether per se or because it leads to a distal shift in compliance mismatch, may expose vulnerable plaques to high cyclic stretch. CoPWV is a new tool to assess local compliance at the coronary level; it paves the way for a new field of research. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. Peripheral artery disease is a coronary heart disease risk equivalent among both men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R; Kober, Lars

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) has been proposed as a 'coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent'. We aimed to examine whether PAD confers similar risk for mortality as incident myocardial infarction (MI) and whether risk differs by gender. METHODS: Using nationwide Dani...... and cardiovascular mortality vs. those with incident MI. PAD should be considered a CHD risk equivalent, warranting aggressive secondary prevention........62-1.80, respectively), and composite of death, MI, and ischaemic stroke, 95% CI HR, 1.38, 95% CI 1.36-1.42; and HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.61-1.75, respectively). The greater long-term risks of PAD were seen for both women and men. CONCLUSIONS: Both women and men with incident PAD have greater long-term risks of total...

  4. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    INFO (1980 to July 2015; articles in English and published articles only), and bibliographies. Information on aim, study design, sample size, inclusion and exclusion criteria, assessment methods of psychological risk factors, and results of crude and adjusted regression analyses were abstracted independently......OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate.......22-1.85) for prospective studies, and 2.61 (95% CI = 1.66-4.10) for case-control studies using hospital controls. Risk of recurrent events in patients with CHD was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.54-2.68). The pooled adjusted risk of chronic heart failure in healthy populations was 1.37 (95% CI = 1.21-1.56), but this was based...

  5. Coronary artery disease in Bangladesh: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K.M. Monwarul Islam

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is an increasingly important medical and public health problem, and is the leading cause of mortality in Bangladesh. Like other South Asians, Bangladeshis are unduly prone to develop CAD, which is often premature in onset, follows a rapidly progressive course and angiographically more severe. The underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. Genetic predisposition, high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and conventional risk factors play important role. Lifestyle related factors, including poor dietary habits, excess saturated and trans fat, high salt intake, and low-level physical activity may be important as well. Some novel risk factors, including hypovitaminosis D, arsenic contamination in water and food-stuff, particulate matter air pollution may play unique role. At the advent of the new millennium, we know little about our real situation. Largescale epidemiological, genetic and clinical researches are needed to explore the different aspects of CAD in Bangladesh.

  6. Explaining the Decline in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in the Czech Republic between 1985 and 2007

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruthans, J.; Cifková, R.; Lánská, V.; O'Flaherty, M.; Critchley, J.A.; Holub, J.; Janský, P.; Zvárová, Jana; Capewell, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2014), s. 829-839 ISSN 2047-4873 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : coronary heart disease * Czech MONICA and Czech post-MONICA * coronary heart disease management * coronary heart disease mortality * coronary heart disease risk factors Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Disease s incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.319, year: 2014

  7. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection presenting as an ischaemic stroke in a middle-aged man with anti-cardiolipin antibodies: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim F

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cerebrovascular disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Ischemic stroke is the most common manifestation, encompassing a wide variety of causative mechanisms. We present the case of a middle-aged male patient with spontaneous coronary artery dissection in the presence of anti-cardiolipin antibodies, leading to left ventricular thrombus and presenting with stroke. Case presentation A 56-year-old Caucasian man presented with dysarthria and right-sided weakness. There was a history of chest pain with autonomic symptoms four days earlier. Examination revealed right-sided hemiparesis. Electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm with anterior Q waves. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed large left parietal and smaller multiple cerebral infarcts. Echocardiogram showed anterior wall and apical akinesis with a large mural thrombus. Anti-cardiolipin antibodies immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M were strongly positive. Coronary angiography showed dissection of the mid left anterior descending artery with normal flow down the distal vessel. He was treated conservatively with anticoagulation and secondary prevention. He was in good health when seen in clinic four months later. Conclusion We highlight the importance of a comprehensive approach at obtaining the correct diagnosis, input of different specialities and the fact that the presence of anti-cardiolipin antibodies is associated with coronary artery dissection in a middle-aged male patient whose presentation was stroke.

  8. Drug-eluting stents vs. coronary artery bypass-grafting in coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG and percutaneous revascularisations with implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES are important treatment methods in coronary heart disease (CHD. Research questions: The evaluation addresses questions on medical efficacy, health economic parameters as well as ethic, social and legal implications in the use of DES vs. CABG in CHD patients. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in December 2006 in the most important electronic databases beginning from 2004. Register data and controlled clinical studies were included in the evaluation. Additionally, a health economic modelling was conducted. Results: Medical evaluation: The literature search yielded 2,312 hits. 14 publications about six controlled clinical studies and five publications about two registers were included into the evaluation. Register data showed low mortality (0.2% to 0.7% and low rates of myocardial infarction (0.5% to 1.4% during hospital stay. In patients with stenosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery one study showed in several analyses a significantly higher rate of reinterventions and a significantly higher rate of repeated angina pectoris for DES up to two years after the implantation (16.8% vs. 3.6% and 35% vs. 8%. In patients with left main coronary artery stenosis two studies revealed a significantly higher survival without myocardial infarction and stroke for DES up to one year (96% vs. 79% and 95% vs. 91% and two studies a significantly higher rate of revascularisations up to two years (20% vs. 4% and 25% vs. 5% after the primary intervention. In patients with multivessel disease, one study found a significantly higher mortality and myocardial infarction rate for CABG at one year (2.7% vs. 1.0% and 4.2% vs. 1.3%. The rate of revascularisations was significantly higher in two studies up to two years after DES implantation (8.5% vs. 4.2% and 14.2% vs. 5.3%. The rate at repeated angina pectoris was

  9. Association of Aortic Valve Sclerosis with Previous Coronary Artery Disease and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Carvalho Marmelo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aortic valve sclerosis (AVS is characterized by increased thickness, calcification and stiffness of the aortic leaflets without fusion of the commissures. Several studies show an association between AVS and presence of coronary artery disease. Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between presence of AVS with occurrence of previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors. Methods: The sample was composed of 2,493 individuals who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between August 2011 and December 2012. The mean age of the cohort was 67.5 ± 15.9 years, and 50.7% were female. Results: The most frequent clinical indication for Doppler echocardiography was the presence of stroke (28.8%, and the most common risk factor was hypertension (60.8%. The most prevalent pathological findings on Doppler echocardiography were mitral valve sclerosis (37.1% and AVS (36.7%. There was a statistically significant association between AVS with hypertension (p < 0.001, myocardial infarction (p = 0.007, diabetes (p = 0.006 and compromised left ventricular systolic function (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Patients with AVS have higher prevalences of hypertension, stroke, hypercholesterolemia, myocardial infarction, diabetes and compromised left ventricular systolic function when compared with patients without AVS. We conclude that there is an association between presence of AVS with previous coronary artery disease and classical risk factors.

  10. Role of coronary physiology in the contemporary management of coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruparelia, Neil; Kharbanda, Rajesh K

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains the leading cause of death worldwide with approximately 1 in 30 patients with stable CAD experiencing death or acute myocardial infarction each year. The presence and extent of resultant myocardial ischaemia has been shown to confer an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Whilst, optimal medical therapy (OMT) forms the cornerstone of the management of patients with stable CAD, a significant number of patients present with ischaemia refractory to OMT. Historically coronary angiography alone has been used to determine coronary lesion severity in both stable and acute settings. It is increasingly clear that this approach fails to accurately identify the haemodynamic significance of lesions; especially those that are visually “intermediate” in severity. Revascularisation based upon angiographic appearances alone may not reduce coronary events above OMT. Technological advances have enabled the measurement of physiological indices including the fractional flow reserve, the index of microcirculatory resistance and the coronary flow reserve. The integration of these parameters into the routine management of patients presenting to the cardiac catheterization laboratory with CAD represents a critical adjunctive tool in the optimal management of these patients by identifying patients that would most benefit from revascularisation and importantly also highlighting patients that would not gain benefit and therefore reducing the likelihood of adverse outcomes associated with coronary revascularisation. Furthermore, these techniques are applicable to a broad range of patients including those with left main stem disease, proximal coronary disease, diabetes mellitus, previous percutaneous coronary intervention and with previous coronary artery bypass grafting. This review will discuss current concepts relevant to coronary physiology assessment, its role in the management of both stable and acute patients and future applications. PMID

  11. Role of coronary physiology in the contemporary management of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruparelia, Neil; Kharbanda, Rajesh K

    2015-02-16

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains the leading cause of death worldwide with approximately 1 in 30 patients with stable CAD experiencing death or acute myocardial infarction each year. The presence and extent of resultant myocardial ischaemia has been shown to confer an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Whilst, optimal medical therapy (OMT) forms the cornerstone of the management of patients with stable CAD, a significant number of patients present with ischaemia refractory to OMT. Historically coronary angiography alone has been used to determine coronary lesion severity in both stable and acute settings. It is increasingly clear that this approach fails to accurately identify the haemodynamic significance of lesions; especially those that are visually "intermediate" in severity. Revascularisation based upon angiographic appearances alone may not reduce coronary events above OMT. Technological advances have enabled the measurement of physiological indices including the fractional flow reserve, the index of microcirculatory resistance and the coronary flow reserve. The integration of these parameters into the routine management of patients presenting to the cardiac catheterization laboratory with CAD represents a critical adjunctive tool in the optimal management of these patients by identifying patients that would most benefit from revascularisation and importantly also highlighting patients that would not gain benefit and therefore reducing the likelihood of adverse outcomes associated with coronary revascularisation. Furthermore, these techniques are applicable to a broad range of patients including those with left main stem disease, proximal coronary disease, diabetes mellitus, previous percutaneous coronary intervention and with previous coronary artery bypass grafting. This review will discuss current concepts relevant to coronary physiology assessment, its role in the management of both stable and acute patients and future applications.

  12. Is diet an essential risk factor for coronary heart disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, hypertension and diet each play a major role in the development of coronary heart attacks in most industrialized nations. In some countries where cigarette smoking and hypertension are prevalent there is a low risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Hyperlipidaemia resulting from national food habits appears to be the essential factor in the high rates of CHD in developed countries.

  13. Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease in type 2 ... Recognition of diabetic individuals at greatest risk of developing coronary artery ... CAD, Group II: 48 type 2DM patients with developed CAD, Group III: 40 age and ...

  14. Risk stratification of patients suspected of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper M; Voss, Mette; Hansen, Vibeke Bøgelund

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of five risk models (Diamond-Forrester, the updated Diamond-Forrester, Morise, Duke, and a new model designated COronary Risk SCORE (CORSCORE) in predicting significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with chest pain suggestive of stable angina pectoris....

  15. Socio-economic status, risk factors and coronary heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship of socio-economic status (SES) indicators and coronary risk factors (RFs) with coronary heart disease (CHD) prevalence was examined in 5620 subjects aged 20 ... The SES indicators had Iitlle or no independent effect on CHD prevalence in multivariate logistic analyses after, inclusion of the standard RFs.

  16. Psoriasis and ischemic coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiques-Santos, L; Soriano-Navarro, C J; Perez-Pastor, G; Tomas-Cabedo, G; Pitarch-Bort, G; Valcuende-Cavero, F

    2015-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with an increased risk of ischemic coronary artery disease (CAD) in some populations. We aimed to determine the association between these 2 diseases in our geographic area. We performed a cross-sectional study of patient records between 2005 and 2012 in the database (Abucacis, Datamart) that contains all medical case histories in the province of Castellón, Spain. Patients diagnosed with psoriasis were compared with a control group of patients diagnosed with melanocytic nevus. The prevalence of CAD and the presence or absence of the main cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed in each group. A total of 9181 patients with psoriasis and 21925 with melanocytic nevus were studied. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed that CAD was significantly associated with psoriasis, age (in years), sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and obesity (P<.05). On adjustment for age, sex, and the other cardiovascular risk factors, multivariate regression analysis established that psoriasis was independently associated with CAD (P<.029). Our findings in a large sample of patients in a Mediterranean area support the hypothesis that patients in this population have an increased risk of ischemic CAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  17. The educational gradient in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariansen, Inger; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Igland, Jannicke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Independently of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, cognitive ability may account for some of the excess risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) associated with lower education. We aimed to assess how late adolescence cognitive ability and midlife CVD risk factors are associated...... with the educational gradient in CHD in Norway. METHODS: In a cohort of 57 279 men born during 1949-1959, health survey information was linked to military conscription records of cognitive ability, to national educational data, to hospitalisation records from the Cardiovascular Disease in Norway (CVDNOR) project...... and to the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. RESULTS: Age and period adjusted HR for incident CHD events was 3.62 (95% CI 2.50 to 5.24) for basic relative to tertiary education, and was attenuated after adjustment; to 2.86 (1.87 to 4.38) for cognitive ability, to 1.90 (1.30 to 2.78) for CVD risk factors, and to 1...

  18. A Review of Coronary Artery Disease Research in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, C S; Chan, K M J

    2016-06-01

    Coronary artery disease is the major cause of mortality and morbidity in Malaysia and worldwide. This paper reviews all research and publications on coronary artery disease in Malaysia published between 2000-2015. 508 papers were identified of which 146 papers were selected and reviewed on the basis of their relevance. The epidemiology, etiology, risk factors, prevention, assessment, treatment, and outcomes of coronary artery disease in the country are reviewed and summarized. The clinical relevance of the studies done in the country are discussed along with recommendations for future research.

  19. Peripheral vascular disease in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, E. A.; Aslam, N.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) has been investigated in many different ways. It depends on the diagnostic methods used and definition of atherosclerotic manifestations in the different vascular beds. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of PVD in the lower limbs in group of patients with CAD. Design: This is a prospective observational study. Place and duration of study: The study was conducted at Combined Military Hospital/Armed Forces institute of Cardiology, Rawalpindi, over a period of one year (January 1998 to January 1999). Subjects and methods: A total number of 200 patient (171 male and 29 females) aged 55-77 years with CAD. Diagnosed by coronary angiography were included in the study. In all patients blood pressure was recorded in both arms by sphygmomanometer and ankle systolic pressure by Doppler ultrasound. Ankle branchial index was calculated. Demographic data were obtained from the patient's hospital files. Results: The prevalence of PVD was 22.5% in patients with CAD in agreement with the results of most previous investigation. There was tendency towards increasing prevalence of PVD with more advanced CAD. Thirty patients (27%) showed evidence of triple vessel disease as compared to 13 patient (18%) with double vessel and 2 patients (1%) with single vessel disease. Conclusion: A non-invasive investigation of peripheral arterial circulation should be included early in the clinical consideration of patients with chest pain or similar symptoms suggesting coronary artery disease. Ankle systolic pressure appears to be simple and cheap technique for evaluation of results. (author)

  20. Coronary CT angiography in clinical triage of patients at high risk of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kühl, J Tobias; Hove, Jens D; Kristensen, Thomas S

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test if cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) can be used in the triage of patients at high risk of coronary artery disease. DESIGN: The diagnostic value of 64-detector CCTA was evaluated in 400 patients presenting with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction using...... invasive coronary angiography (ICA) as the reference method. The relation between the severity of disease by CCTA and a combined endpoint of death, re-hospitalization due to new myocardial infarction, or symptom-driven coronary revascularization was assessed. RESULTS: CCTA detects significant (>50...... in patients with high likelihood of coronary artery disease and could, in theory, be used to triage high risk patients. As many obstacles remain, including logistical and safety issues, our study does not support the use of CCTA as an additional diagnostic test before ICA in an all-comer NSTEMI population....

  1. Coronary 64-slice CT angiography predicts outcome in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaemperli, Oliver; Valenta, Ines; Schepis, Tiziano [University Hospital Zurich NUK C 32, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Husmann, Lars; Scheffel, Hans; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich NUK C 32, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-06-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of 64-slice CT angiography (CTA) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Sixty-four-slice coronary CTA was performed in 220 patients [mean age 63 {+-} 11 years, 77 (35%) female] with known or suspected CAD. CTA images were analyzed with regard to the presence and number of coronary lesions. Patients were followed-up for the occurrence of the following clinical endpoints: death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and coronary revascularization. During a mean follow-up of 14 {+-} 4 months, 59 patients (27%) reached at least one of the predefined clinical endpoints. Patients with abnormal coronary arteries on CTA (i.e., presence of coronary plaques) had a 1st-year event rate of 34%, whereas in patients with normal coronary arteries no events occurred (event rate, 0%, p < 0.001). Similarly, obstructive lesions ({>=}50% luminal narrowing) on CTA were associated with a high first-year event rate (59%) compared to patients without stenoses (3%, p < 0.001). The presence of obstructive lesions was a significant independent predictor of an adverse cardiac outcome. Sixty-four-slice CTA predicts cardiac events in patients with known or suspected CAD. Conversely, patients with normal coronary arteries on CTA have an excellent mid-term prognosis. (orig.)

  2. C-reactive protein, inflammation and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Shrivastava

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is widely considered to be an important contributing factor of the pathophysiology of coronary heart disease (CHD, and the inflammatory cascade is particularly important in the atherosclerotic process. In consideration of the important role that inflammatory processes play in CHD, recent work has been focused on whether biomarkers of inflammation may help to improve risk stratification and identify patient groups who might benefit from particular treatment strategies. Of these biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP has emerged as one of the most important novel inflammatory markers. CRP an acute phase protein is synthesized by hepatocytes in response to proinflammatory cytokines, in particular interleukin-6. Many large-scale prospective studies demonstrate that CRP strongly and independently predicts adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and sudden cardiac death in individuals both with and without overt CHD. CRP is believed to be both a marker and a mediator of atherosclerosis and CHD. CRP plays a pivotal role in many aspects of atherogenesis including, activation of complement pathway, lipids uptake by macrophage, release of proinflammatory cytokines, induces the expression of tissue factor in monocytes, promotes the endothelial dysfunction and inhibits nitric oxide production. The commercial availability of CRP high sensitive assays has made screening for this marker simple, reliable, and reproducible and can be used as a clinical guide to diagnosis, management, and prognosis of CHD.

  3. Stress myocardial scintigraphy in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Noritake; Koumi, Shin-ichi; Yasutake, Masahiro; Imaizumi, Takahiro; Saito, Tsutomu; Kishida, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Hirokazu

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of asymptomatic ischemic heart disease, exercise electrocardiography and stress myocardial scintigraphy were performed. These were correlated with symptoms during exercise tests and histories of myocardial infarction (MI). The study subjects consisted of 70 patients with coronary artery disease, including 34 with MI, and 36 without MI but with angina pectoris. Stress tests were performed using bicycle ergometer under electrocardiographic monitoring throughout the test. Transient myocardial ischemia was confirmed by perfusion defects on thallium myocardial imaging demonstrated immediately after exercise, but not 3 hours after the stress test. Asymptomatic ST depression was observed in 18 of 34 patients with MI (53%) and in 21 of the 36 patients with angina (58%); however, transient myocardial perfusion defects were confimred in 61% of the patients with MI (11 of 18 patients), but in only 33% of those with angina (7 of 21 patients). The difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). It was suggested that there are some differences in the clinical significance of asymptomatic ST depression between the patients with MI and those without MI but with angina pectoris. (author)

  4. Prevalence of Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease in Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (48.5 %), fatty food consumption (47.5 %), obesity (38 %) and smoking (37 %), respectively. Other less ... Keywords: Risk factors, Prevalence, Coronary artery disease, Diabetes, Southern Punjab ... developing world, including Pakistan [1]. The.

  5. Changing Trend In Coronary Heart Disease In Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Buchi

    lifestyle. Conclusion: Coronary Heart disease is still relatively uncommon in ... the world where most health resources are channeled into .... cholesterol in the elderly population in Benin, Nigeria, .... Reducing risks, promoting healthy life.

  6. Hepatitis C virus infection and risk of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Torsten; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Kjaer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Several chronic infections have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, including Chlamydia pneumoniae, human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis. This review evaluates the literature on the association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the risk of coronary artery...

  7. Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gehan Hamdy

    2014-04-22

    Apr 22, 2014 ... Recognition of diabetic individuals at greatest risk of developing coronary ..... Early detection of the disease and timely interventions can reduce the morbidity ..... additional risk factor of retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Prognostic assessment of stable coronary artery disease as determined by coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüche Nielsen, Lene; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Sørensen, Henrik T.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To examine the 3.5 year prognosis of stable coronary artery disease (CAD) as assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in real-world clinical practice, overall and within subgroups of patients according to age, sex, and comorbidity. Methods and results: This cohort study......, and comorbidity. Conclusion: Coronary artery disease determined by CCTA in real-world practice predicts the 3.5 year composite risk of late revascularization, myocardial infarction, and all-cause death across different groups of age, sex, or comorbidity burden....... included 16,949 patients (median age 57 years; 57% women) with new-onset symptoms suggestive of CAD, who underwent CCTA between January 2008 and December 2012. The endpoint was a composite of late coronary revascularization procedure >90 days after CCTA, myocardial infarction, and all-cause death...

  9. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Not all patients with severe coronary artery disease can be treated satisfactorily with current recommended medications and revascularization techniques. Various vascular growth factors have the potential to induce angiogenesis in ischemic tissue. Clinical trials have only evaluated the effect...... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...

  10. Natriuretic peptides in unstable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernberg, Tomas; James, Stefan; Lindahl, Bertil; Johnston, Nina; Stridsberg, Mats; Venge, Per; Wallentin, Lars

    2004-09-01

    Patients with unstable coronary artery disease (CAD), i.e., unstable angina or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction, vary widely in clinical presentation, prognosis and response to treatment. To select appropriate therapy, early risk stratification has become increasingly important. This review focuses on the emerging role of natriuretic peptides in the early assessment of patients with unstable CAD. We conclude that levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are strongly associated to mortality and the risk of future congestive heart failure, and carry important prognostic information independent from previously known risk factors in unstable CAD. There are some data indicating that these markers can also be helpful in the selection of appropriate therapy in these patients but further studies are needed. Before a routine use of BNP or NT-proBNP in unstable CAD can be recommended, the cost-effectiveness of adding these new markers to the currently routine markers and their impact on selection of treatment needs further evaluation. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd

  11. Angiographic prevalence and pattern of coronary artery disease in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhumalai, Babu; Jayaraman, Balachander

    2014-01-01

    There are not many studies describing the prevalence and pattern of "coronary artery disease" (CAD) in women undergoing "coronary angiography" (CAG). Hence, uncertainty thrives with regard to the angiographic prevalence and pattern of CAD in women. Our objective was to study the prevalence and pattern of CAD among women undergoing CAG. Data of 500 women who underwent CAG for suspected CAD over 3 years were retrospectively analyzed. They were classified into young group (age right coronary artery. Bifurcation lesion involving distal left main coronary artery is the most prevalent pattern of LMD. There has been a change with regard to clinical presentation and onset of risk factors for CAD at young age, but the load of atherosclerotic burden and pattern of involvement of coronary arteries have not changed in women. Copyright © 2014 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Severity of coronary artery disease in obese patients undergoing coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, A.; Ali, J.; Kayani, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relationship of severity of coronary artery disease with obesity in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology - National Institute of Heart Diseases (AFIC-NIHD), 1st February 2010 to 31st August 2010 Patients and Methods: The study population included 468 patients undergoing coronary angiography. Obesity was classified according to the BMI using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) criteria as normal (BMI 21-24 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25-29 kg/m2), obesity class I (BMI 30-34 kg/m2), obesity class II (BMI 35 to 39 kg/m2 and obesity class III (BMI 40 or above kg/m2). Coronary angiography data were obtained from the Siemens Queries software system, which maintains the database including detailed angiographic findings of all patients at this institution. Significant lesions were defined as those with >70% diameter narrowing of coronary arteries (>50% for the left main coronary artery). We attempted to quantify the 'severity of CAD' by ascertaining the prevalence of High-Risk Coronary Anatomy (HRCA). Results: Insignificant difference was observed in traditional risk factors i.e. age, diabetes mellitus and smoking except hypertension and gender. Statistically significantly low prevalence of HRCA was encountered in the obese group (57.7%) as compared to normal/overweight group (75.8%) (p < 0.05). Conclusion: We conclude that obesity is associated with less severe coronary artery disease. (author)

  13. Coronary heart disease after radiotherapy for peptic ulcer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, Zhanat A.; Land, Charles E.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Weinstock, Robert W.; Stovall, Marilyn; Griem, Melvin L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease after radiotherapy (RT) for peptic ulcer disease. Methods and materials: Peptic ulcer disease patients treated with RT (n = 1859) or by other means (n = 1860) at the University of Chicago Medical Center between 1936 and 1965, were followed through 1997. The observed numbers of cause-specific deaths were compared with the expected numbers from the general population rates. During RT, 5% of the heart was in the treatment field and the remainder of the heart mostly received scattered radiation. A volume-weighted cardiac dose was computed to describe the average tissue dose to the entire organ. We used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to analyze the CHD and cerebrovascular disease risk associated with RT, adjusting for confounding factors. Results: Greater than expected CHD mortality was observed among the irradiated patients. The irradiated patients received volume-weighted cardiac doses ranging from 1.6 to 3.9 Gy and the portion of the heart directly in the field received doses of 7.6-18.4 Gy. The CHD risk increased with the cardiac dose (p trend = 0.01). The cerebrovascular disease risk was not associated with the surrogate carotid dose. Conclusion: The excess CHD risk in patients undergoing RT for peptic ulcer disease decades previously indicates the need for long-term follow-up for cardiovascular disease after chest RT

  14. Coronary artery disease confined to secondary branches of the left coronary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Klein, B.L.; Segal, B.L.; Kimbiris, D.; Bemis, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    Among 3,000 patients studied by coronary arteriography during a 4-year period, 31 patients (1%) had coronary artery disease limited to a diagonal branch of the left anterior descending (15 patients), marginal branch of the left circumflex (10 patients), or to both branches (6 patients). Ten patients had 50-69% and twenty-one had greater than or equal to 70% diameter narrowing. The suitability for grafting was noted in 20 patients as judged by the caliber and distribution of the diseased branches. Collaterals were noted in seven patients. Disease was present in 28 men and 3 women (age range 38-70 years). At least one major coronary risk factor was present in 27 patients. Angina was noted in 27 patients; prior myocardial infarction was noted in 5 patients by history and in 4 by ECG. The left ventriculogram was normal in 22 patients and showed mild segmental asynergy in 9; ejection fraction was normal in all. Exercise ECGs were positive in 12 of 25 patients; exercise 201thallium scans were positive in 13. All patients responded to medical therapy. In conclusion, among the population of patients who undergo catheterization, coronary branch disease is rare. The clinical findings are indistinguishable from patients with major coronary disease. Prognosis remains benign and patients respond to medical therapy

  15. YKL-40 a new biomarker in patients with acute coronary syndrome or stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y.Z.; Ripa, R.S.; Johansen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background. YKL-40 is involved in remodelling and angiogenesis in non-cardiac inflammatory diseases. Aim was to quantitate plasma YKL-40 in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or stable chronic coronary artery disease (CAD), and YKL-40 gene activation in human myocardium....... Methods and results. We included 73 patients: I) 20 patients with STEMI; II) 28 patients with stable CAD; III) 15 CAD patients referred for coronary by-pass surgery. YKL-40 mRNA expression was measured in myocardium subtended by stenotic or occluded arteries and areas with no apparent disease; and IV) 10...

  16. Coronary Microvascular Function and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Women With Angina Pectoris and No Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Naja Dam; Michelsen, Marie Mide; Peña, Adam

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The majority of women with angina-like chest pain have no obstructive coronary artery disease when evaluated with coronary angiography. Coronary microvascular dysfunction is a possible explanation and associated with a poor prognosis. This study evaluated the prevalence of coronary...... microvascular dysfunction and the association with symptoms, cardiovascular risk factors, psychosocial factors, and results from diagnostic stress testing. METHODS AND RESULTS: After screening 3568 women, 963 women with angina-like chest pain and a diagnostic coronary angiogram without significant coronary.......01), hypertension (P=0.02), current smoking (Ppain characteristics or results from diagnostic stress testing...

  17. Use of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography to Guide Management of Patients With Coronary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michelle C.; Hunter, Amanda; Shah, Anoop S.V.; Assi, Valentina; Lewis, Stephanie; Smith, Joel; Berry, Colin; Boon, Nicholas A.; Clark, Elizabeth; Flather, Marcus; Forbes, John; McLean, Scott; Roditi, Giles; van Beek, Edwin J.R.; Timmis, Adam D.; Newby, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, 4,146 patients were randomized to receive standard care or standard care plus coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Objectives The purpose of this study was to explore the consequences of CCTA-assisted diagnosis on invasive coronary angiography, preventive treatments, and clinical outcomes. Methods In post hoc analyses, we assessed changes in invasive coronary angiography, preventive treatments, and clinical outcomes using national electronic health records. Results Despite similar overall rates (409 vs. 401; p = 0.451), invasive angiography was less likely to demonstrate normal coronary arteries (20 vs. 56; hazard ratios [HRs]: 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.23 to 0.68]; p coronary artery disease (283 vs. 230; HR: 1.29 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.55]; p = 0.005) in those allocated to CCTA. More preventive therapies (283 vs. 74; HR: 4.03 [95% CI: 3.12 to 5.20]; p coronary heart disease, CCTA leads to more appropriate use of invasive angiography and alterations in preventive therapies that were associated with a halving of fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction. (Scottish COmputed Tomography of the HEART Trial [SCOT-HEART]; NCT01149590) PMID:27081014

  18. Detection of coronary calcium with electron beam tomography in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberl, R.; Knez, A.; Becker, A.; Becker, C.; Bruening, R.; Reiser, M.; Maass, A.; Steinbeck, G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Coronary calcium is a powerful indicator of arteriosclerosis and can be detected very precisely with electron beam tomography. The method can be applied in patients with known coronary artery disease or in asymptomatic patients at risk of arteriosclerotic disease. Results: At the University of Munich we performed an EBT scan of the heart in 1100 patients within the last year. In 567 patients coronary angiography was performed also (±3 days). Confirming previous reports in the literature, we found a correlation of the calcium score with the age and gender of the patients. Severe coronary artery disease (stenoses ≥ 75%) was associated with significantly more calcium than less severe CAD. The calcium score did not discriminate between one-, two- and three-vessel disease. The site of calcification does not correlate with the localization of stenoses. Thirty-three percent of the patients with significant coronary artery disease showed a normal age-adjusted calcium score; a total of 8.1% of patients with severe stenoses did not reveal any coronary calcification (score =0). With asymptomatic patients there are only a few studies available. Soft plaques cannot be detected with EBT, but in most patients soft plaques occur together with hard plaques. Our results show that spiral CT of the newest generation may also be used for calcium screening. There was an excellent correlation of the calcium scores of EBT and spiral CT at all levels of calcification. Discussion: Coronary calcium is a sensitive marker of coronary artery disease. In the clinical setting EBT is indicated in patients with known coronary artery disease (to evaluate prognosis), in patients who are unable to perform a stress test, and in patients with atypical chest pain. However, lack of calcification may be associated with severe stenoses in a minority of patients. The clinical value in asymptomatic patients needs to be defined: Randomized studies are necessary. We see a possible indication in

  19. Psychological Perspectives on the Development of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Karen A.

    2005-01-01

    Psychological science has new opportunities to have major input into the understanding of the development of coronary heart disease. This article provides an overview of advances in understanding the etiology of heart disease, recently applied technologies for measuring early stages of heart disease, and an accumulating base of evidence on the…

  20. Balloon angioplasty in acute and chronic coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, D.R. Jr.; Vlietstra, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty has grown exponentially since its introduction. Currently, selection criteria include single-vessel and multivessel disease, stable and unstable angina, and acute infarction. The outcome depends on specific patient and antiographic characteristics. In ideal lesions, success rates should be greater than 90%, with low morbidity and mortality. With more severe and diffuse multivessel disease, success rates are lower and complication rates are higher. In these cases, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty still offers a reasonable option, provided complete revascularization can be achieved or the angina-producing lesion dilated. Numerous issues remain unresolved, including (1) the role of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty vs coronary surgery (currently being tested), (2) restenosis, which occurs in approximately 30% of treated lesions, and (3) organizational adjustments such as training and certification to maintain high standards of care

  1. The association of opium with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Saeed; Darvish, Soodabeh; Davoodi, Gholamreza; Salarifar, Mojtaba; Mahmoodian, Mehran; Fallah, Nader; Karimi, Abbas Ali

    2007-10-01

    The effects of opium consumption on coronary artery disease are still unknown. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 2405 patients admitted to the Angiographic Ward at Tehran Heart Center from 7 May 2005 to 13 August 2005. After adjusting for conventional cardiovascular risk factors, opium consumption was a significant risk factor for coronary artery disease (P=0.01 and odds ratio=1.8). Moreover, the amount of opium consumption was associated significantly with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis, as measured by clinical vessel score (r=0.2, P=0.002). To our knowledge, this is the first time that the adverse effects of opium consumption on coronary arteries was defined.

  2. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  3. Relation of coronary vasoreactivity and coronary calcification in asymptomatic subjects with a family history of premature coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirich, Christian; Leber, Alexander; Knez, Andreas; Bengel, Frank M.; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus; Haberl, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) allows non-invasive imaging of coronary calcification and has been promoted as a screening tool for coronary artery disease (CAD) in asymptomatic high-risk subjects. This study assessed the relation of coronary calcifications to alterations in coronary vascular reactivity by means of positron emission tomography (PET) in asymptomatic subjects with a familial history of premature CAD. Twenty-one subjects (mean age 51±10 years) underwent EBCT imaging for coronary calcifications expressed as the coronary calcium score (CCS according to Agatston) and rest/adenosine-stress nitrogen-13 ammonia PET with quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). The mean CCS was 237±256 (median 146, range 0-915). The CCS was 100 units in 13. As defined by age-related thresholds, 15 subjects had an increased CCS (>75th percentile). Overall mean resting and stress MBF and CFR were 71±16 ml 100 g -1 min -1 , 218±54 ml 100 g -1 min -1 and 3.20±0.77, respectively. Three subjects with CCS ranging from 114 to 451 units had an abnormal CFR (<2.5). There was no relation between CCS and resting or stress MBF or CFR (r=0.17, 0.18 and 0.10, respectively). In asymptomatic subjects a pathological CCS was five times more prevalent than an abnormal CFR. The absence of any close relationship between CCS and CFR reflects the fact that quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging with PET characterises the dynamic process of vascular reactivity while EBCT is a measure of more stable calcified lesions in the arterial wall whose presence is closely related to age. (orig.)

  4. Correlation between obstructive coronary artery disease and electron beam tomography coronary artery calcium scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Hong, Yong Kook; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Hyang Mee; Choe, Kyu Ok

    1998-01-01

    To determine the correlation between obstructive coronary artery disease and electron beam tomography coronary artery calcium(EBT CAC) scan and to measure the difference in calcium score according to symptoms. Materials and Methods : Fifty-six patients underwent EBT CAC scanning and either coronary angiography or stress thallium 201 scanning or the treadmill test. When the results were positive, coronary artery obstructive disease(CAOD) was assumed to be present. The patients were divided into three groups : symptomatic CAOD,asymptomatic CAOD, and asymptomatic non- CAOD; those with a previous history of myocardial ischemia or who showed positive results in any of the three tests relating to typical symptoms of angina were assigned to the symptomatic group. Results : The number of cases assigned to group to group 1,2 and 3 was 19, 16 and 21, respectively; total CAC scores were 571 ± 751, 600 ± 726 293± 401, respectively. The difference in CAC score between asymptomatic CAOD and asymptomatic non- CAOD was not statistically significant(p=0.079) but in asymptomatic CAOD, the score tended to be higher. The CAC score was not different between symptomatic and asymptomatic CAOD(p>0.1). When the CAC threshold was 1, sensitivity was 89% and specificity was 14%;when the threshold was 200, sensitivity was 60% and specificity was 67%. Conclusion : When the EBT CAC score is high, further evaluation provides early evidence of coronary artery obstructive disease

  5. The value of coronary artery calcium score assessed by dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography for predicting presence and severity of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almasi, Alireza; Pouraliakbar, Hamidreza; Sedghian, Ahmad; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Firouzi, Ata; Tehrai, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Measuring coronary artery calcium score (CACS) using a dual-source CT scanner is recognized as a major indicator for assessing coronary artery disease. The present study aimed to validate the clinical significance of CACS in predicting coronary artery stenosis and its severity. This prospective study was conducted on 202 consecutive patients who underwent both conventional coronary angiography and dual-source (256-slice) computed tomography coronary angiography (CTA) for any reason in our cardiac imaging center from March to September 2013. CACS was measured by Agatston algorithm on non-enhanced CT. The severity of coronary artery disease was assessed by Gensini score on conventional angiography. There was a significant relationship between the number of diseased coronary vessels and mean calcium score, i.e. the mean calcium score was 202.25±450.06 in normal coronary status, 427.50±607.24 in single-vessel disease, 590.03±511.34 in two-vessel disease, and 953.35±1023.45 in three-vessel disease (p<0.001). There was a positive association between calcium score and Gensini score (r=0.636, p<0.001). In a linear regression model, calcium score was a strong determinant of the severity of coronary artery disease. Calcium scoring had an acceptable value for discriminating coronary disease from normal condition with optimal cutoff point of 350, yielding a sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 70%, respectively. Our study confirmed the strong relationship between the coronary artery calcium score and the presence and severity of stenosis in coronary arteries assessed by both the number of diseased coronary vessels and also by the Gnesini score

  6. Clinical perspective of coronary computed tomographic angiography in diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Chung, Namsik

    2011-01-01

    Since a 4-detector row coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) was launched in 1998, CCTA has experienced rapid improvement of imaging qualities with the ongoing evolution of computed tomography (CT) technology. The diagnostic accuracy of CCTA to detect coronary artery stenosis is well established, whereas improvements are still needed to reduce the overestimation of coronary artery disease (CAD) and assess plaque composition. CCTA has been used to evaluate CAD in various clinical settings. For example, CCTA could be an efficient initial triage tool at emergency departments for patients with acute chest pain with low-to-intermediate risk because of its high negative predictive value. In patients with suspected CAD, CCTA could be a cost-effective alternative to myocardial perfusion imaging and exercise electrocardiogram for the initial coronary evaluation of patients with intermediate pre-test likelihood suspected CAD. However, in asymptomatic populations, there is a lack of studies that show an improved prognostic power of CCTA over other modalities. Therefore, the clinical use of CCTA to detect CAD for purposes of risk stratification in asymptomatic individuals should be discouraged. As CT technology evolves, CCTA will provide better quality coronary imaging and non-coronary information with lower radiation exposure. Future studies should cover these ongoing technical improvements and evaluate the prognostic power of CCTA in various clinical settings of CAD in large, well-designed, randomized trials. (author)

  7. Prognosis of non-significant coronary atherosclerotic disease detected by coronary artery tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Marcio Vinicius Lins; Siqueira, Bruna Pinto; Guimaraes, Carolina Camargos Braichi; Cruz, David Filipe Silva; Guimaraes, Leiziane Assuncao Alves; Lima, Maicom Marcio Perigolo, E-mail: marciovlbarros@gmail.com [Faculdade de Saude e Ecologia Humana, Vespasiano, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira [Universidade de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Siqueira, Maria Helena Albernaz [Hospital Materdei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-15

    Introduction: Although studies have shown high diagnostic accuracy of coronary tomography (CT) in detecting coronary artery disease (CAD), data on the prognostic value of this method in patients with no significant coronary obstruction are limited. Objective: To evaluate the value of CT in predicting adverse events in patients with suspected CAD and no significant coronary obstruction. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 440 patients between January 2008 and July 2013 by MDCT, diagnosed with no significant obstruction or no atherosclerotic coronary obstruction with an average follow-up of 33 months. The outcomes evaluated were: cardiac death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina associated with hospitalization or coronary artery bypass grafting. Results: Of the 440 patients studied, 295 (67%) were men with mean age 55.9 ± 12.0 years. Non-significant obstruction was found in 152 (35%) of the patients and there were 49 (11%) outcomes. In the multivariate analysis using the Cox regression model, the predictors of clinical outcomes were non-significant obstruction on CT (hazard ratio 3.51; 95% CI 1.73 - 7.8; p <0.01), age and hypertension. Non-significant obstruction on CT was associated with adverse clinical outcomes and survival analysis showed a significant difference (log-rank 24.6; p <0.01) in predicting these outcomes. Conclusion: The detection of non-significant atherosclerotic obstruction by CT was associated with the presence of adverse events in patients with suspected CAD, which may prove useful in the risk stratification of these patients. (author)

  8. The Role of Alcohol Consumption in the Aetiology of Different Cardiovascular Disease Phenotypes: a CALIBER Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    Chronic Stable Angina; Unstable Angina; Coronary Heart Disease Not Otherwise Specified; Acute Myocardial Infarction; Heart Failure; Ventricular Arrhythmias; Cardiac Arrest; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Ischaemic Stroke; Subarachnoid Haemorrhagic Stroke; Intracerebral Haemorrhagic Stroke; Stroke Not Otherwise Specified; Sudden Cardiac Death; Unheralded Coronary Death; Mortality; Coronary Heart Disease (CHD); Cardiovascular Disease (CVD); Fatal Cardiovascular Disease (Fatal CVD); ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI); Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (nSTEMI); Myocardial Infarction Not Otherwise Specified (MI NOS)

  9. Hydroxychloroquine, a promising choice for coronary artery disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lizhe; Liu, Mengping; Li, Ruifeng; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Junhui; Yang, Yanjie; Zhang, Lisha; Bai, Xiaofang; Wei, Yuanyuan; Ma, Qiangqiang; Zhou, Juan; Yuan, Zuyi; Wu, Yue

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is a common disease that seriously threaten the health of more than 150 million people per year. Atherosclerosis is considered to be the main cause of coronary artery disease which begins with damage or injury to the inner layer of a coronary artery, sometimes as early as childhood. The damage may be caused by various factors, including: smoking, high blood pressure, hypercholesterolemia, sedentary lifestyle, diabetes and insulin resistance. Once a coronary artery disease has developed, all patients need to be treated with long term standard treatment, including heart-healthy lifestyle changes, medicines, and medical procedures or surgery. Hydroxychloroquine, an original antimalarial drug, prevents inflammation caused by lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. It is relatively safe and well-tolerated during the treatment. Since atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis have resemble mechanism and increasing clinical researches confirm that hydroxychloroquine has an important role in both anti-rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular protection (such as anti-platelet, anti-thrombotic, lipid-regulating, anti-hypertension, hypoglycemia, and so on), we hypothesize that hydroxychloroquine might be a promising choice to coronary artery disease patients for its multiple benefits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sedentary lifestyle and state variation in coronary heart disease mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, K K; Anda, R F; Macera, C A; Donehoo, R S; Eaker, E D

    1995-01-01

    Using linear regression, the authors demonstrated a strong association between State-specific coronary heart disease mortality rates and State prevalence of sedentary lifestyle (r2 = 0.34; P = 0.0002) that remained significant after controlling for the prevalence of diagnosed hypertension, smoking, and overweight among the State's population. This ecologic analysis suggests that sedentary lifestyle may explain State variation in coronary heart disease mortality and reinforces the need to include physical activity promotion as a part of programs in the States to prevent heart disease. PMID:7838933

  11. A Left Atrial Myxoma Case with a History of Stroke on whom a Coronary Bypass Surgery was Performed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Kaymaz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac myxomas are the most frequently encountered benign cardiac tumors in adult groups. Patients with myxoma may suffer from variety of clinical features. A patient who had suffered from stroke a yearago came to our hospital with a chest pain complaint. In the echocardiography of the patient suffering from acute coronary syndrome, left ventricular disfunction and left atrial mass was determined. In the coronary angiography, LAD and Cx critical stenosis, and an abnormal feeding artery which roots from Cxperformed was observed. LIMA-AD, Ao-RCA bypass and mass exision withleft atriotomy was made. Cardiac tumor embolism which makes up a rare cause of cerebral embolies should be considered especiallyin patients with sinus rhythm. In the coronary angiography the feeding artery of the myxoma was shown. A patient who has underwent coronary bypass operation and left atrial myxoma exision has beenpresented as a case.

  12. Functional Information in Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Klaus F; Sørgaard, Mathias H; Linde, Jesper J

    2017-01-01

    as an add-on to standard coronary CT angiography (CCTA), to identify regions of myocardial hypoperfusion, at rest and during adenosine stress. The principle of measurement is well-validated in animal experimental models, and CT myocardial perfusion imaging has a high degree of concordance with already...

  13. Attentional bias and anxiety in individuals with coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginting, H.; Näring, G.W.B.; Becker, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether in an emotional Stroop task, individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) would show greater attention towards the threatening words related to their disease than healthy persons, and if such an attentional bias is associated with anxiety. An emotional Stroop task with

  14. Spirituality and negative emotions in individuals with coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginting, H.; Näring, G.W.B.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Becker, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Many individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) experience disease-related anxiety, depressive symptoms, and anger. Spirituality may be helpful to cope with these negative emotions. Research findings on the role of spirituality in dealing with negative emotions are inconsistent. In this study, we

  15. Interleukin-6 receptor pathways in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, Nadeem; Butterworth, Adam S; Freitag, Daniel F

    2012-01-01

    Persistent inflammation has been proposed to contribute to various stages in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) signalling propagates downstream inflammation cascades. To assess whether this pathway is causally relevant to coronary heart disease, we studied ...

  16. An assessment of the physical fitness and coronary heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health and fitness clubs play an important role in addressing the causes of hypokinetic diseases and coronary heart disease (CHD). In order to be well prepared, service providers should be aware of the health and fitness profiles of their clients when they join their clubs. In the current study 243 white female subjects ...

  17. Fibrates for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deren; Liu, Bian; Tao, Wendan; Hao, Zilong; Liu, Ming

    2015-10-25

    Fibrates are a class of drugs characterised by mainly lowering high triglyceride, raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and lowering the small dense fraction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Their efficacy for secondary prevention of serious vascular events is unclear, and to date no systematic review focusing on secondary prevention has been undertaken. To assess the efficacy and safety of fibrates for the prevention of serious vascular events in people with previous cardiovascular disease (CVD), including coronary heart disease and stroke. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 9, 2014) on the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (OVID, 1946 to October week 1 2014), EMBASE (OVID, 1980 to 2014 week 41), the China Biological Medicine Database (CBM) (1978 to 2014), the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1979 to 2014), Chinese Science and Technique Journals Database (VIP) (1989 to 2014). We also searched other resources, such as ongoing trials registers and databases of conference abstracts, to identify further published, unpublished, and ongoing studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which a fibrate (for example gemfibrozil, fenofibrate) was compared with placebo or no treatment. We excluded RCTs with only laboratory outcomes. We also excluded trials comparing two different fibrates without a placebo or no-treatment control. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed risk of bias, and extracted the data. We contacted authors of trials for missing data. We included 13 trials involving a total of 16,112 participants. Eleven trials recruited participants with history of coronary heart disease, two trials recruited participants with history of stroke, and one trial recruited participants with a mix of people with CVD. We judged overall risk of bias to be moderate. The meta-analysis (including all fibrate trials) showed evidence for a protective

  18. Prevalence of asymptomatic coronary disease in fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassagnes, Lucie; Gaillard, Vianney; Monge, Emmanuel; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Delhaye, Cédric; Molinari, Francesco; Petyt, Grégory; Hossein-Foucher, Claude; Wallaert, Benoit; Duhamel, Alain; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Because of growing body of interest on the association between fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (f-IIP) and ischaemic heart disease, we initiated this prospective study to evaluate the prevalence of asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with f-IIP. Methods: Forty-two patients with f-IIP underwent noninvasive screening for CAD that included (a) a chest CT examination enabling calculation of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, then depiction of coronary artery stenosis; and (b) stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). Patients with significant coronary abnormalities, defined by a CAC score >400 or coronary artery stenosis >50% at CT and/or perfusion defect >5% at MPS, were referred to the cardiologist. Coronary angiography was indicated in presence of a perfusion defect >10% at MPS or significant left main or proximal left anterior descending stenosis whatever MPS findings. Results: Combining CT and MPS, significant abnormalities were detected in 32/42 patients (76%). The cardiologist: (a) did not consider further investigation in 21 patients (CT abnormalities but no ischaemia at MPS: 12/21; false-positive findings at MPS: 3/21; poor respiratory condition: 6/21); (b) proceeded to coronary angiography in 11 patients which confirmed significant stenoses in 5 patients (5/42; 12%). In the worst-case-scenario (i.e., inclusion of 6 patients with significant coronary artery abnormalities who were not investigated due to poor respiratory condition), the prevalence of CAD reached 26% (11/42). Conclusion: In the studied population of patients with f-IIP, asymptomatic CAD ranged between 12% and 26%

  19. Prevalence of asymptomatic coronary disease in fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassagnes, Lucie; Gaillard, Vianney [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Monge, Emmanuel [Department of Pulmonology, Center of Competence for Rare Pulmonary Diseases, Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Faivre, Jean-Baptiste [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Delhaye, Cédric [Department of Cardiology, Cardiology Hospital, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Molinari, Francesco [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Petyt, Grégory; Hossein-Foucher, Claude [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Salengro, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Wallaert, Benoit [Department of Pulmonology, Center of Competence for Rare Pulmonary Diseases, Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [Department of Medical Statistics (EA 2694), Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Remy, Jacques [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Remy-Jardin, Martine, E-mail: martine.remy@chru-lille.fr [Department of Thoracic Imaging (EA 2694), Hospital Calmette, CHRU and Univ Lille 2 Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France)

    2015-01-15

    Background: Because of growing body of interest on the association between fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (f-IIP) and ischaemic heart disease, we initiated this prospective study to evaluate the prevalence of asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with f-IIP. Methods: Forty-two patients with f-IIP underwent noninvasive screening for CAD that included (a) a chest CT examination enabling calculation of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, then depiction of coronary artery stenosis; and (b) stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). Patients with significant coronary abnormalities, defined by a CAC score >400 or coronary artery stenosis >50% at CT and/or perfusion defect >5% at MPS, were referred to the cardiologist. Coronary angiography was indicated in presence of a perfusion defect >10% at MPS or significant left main or proximal left anterior descending stenosis whatever MPS findings. Results: Combining CT and MPS, significant abnormalities were detected in 32/42 patients (76%). The cardiologist: (a) did not consider further investigation in 21 patients (CT abnormalities but no ischaemia at MPS: 12/21; false-positive findings at MPS: 3/21; poor respiratory condition: 6/21); (b) proceeded to coronary angiography in 11 patients which confirmed significant stenoses in 5 patients (5/42; 12%). In the worst-case-scenario (i.e., inclusion of 6 patients with significant coronary artery abnormalities who were not investigated due to poor respiratory condition), the prevalence of CAD reached 26% (11/42). Conclusion: In the studied population of patients with f-IIP, asymptomatic CAD ranged between 12% and 26%.

  20. Diagnosing Coronary Heart Disease using Ensemble Machine Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen H. Miao; Julia H. Miao; George J. Miao

    2016-01-01

    Globally, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. One in every four people is afflicted with and dies of heart disease. Early and accurate diagnoses of heart disease thus are crucial in improving the chances of long-term survival for patients and saving millions of lives. In this research, an advanced ensemble machine learning technology, utilizing an adaptive Boosting algorithm, is developed for accurate coronary heart disease diagnosis and outcome predictions. Th...

  1. Sudden cardiac death and coronary disease in the young

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariasardóttir, Sára; Risgaard, Bjarke; Ågesen, Frederik Nybye

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sudden cardiac death caused by coronary artery disease (CAD-SCD) is the most frequent cause of SCD in persons ..., CAD-SCD victims aged 36-49years had more severe atherosclerosis in all coronary arteries, more multi-vessel disease (29% vs. 15%, p=0.049) and less commonly (38% vs. 54%, p=0.039) acute coronary occlusion than victims ... to death. CONCLUSION: This nationwide study found several differences in the pathologic lesions of the heart in victims aged 18-35 and 36-49years, which might be associated with different disease progression leading to death in these age groups. We also report a high frequency of cardiac symptoms prior...

  2. Symptomatic coronary artery disease after mantle irradiation for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Vernon; Constine, Louis S.; Clark, Douglas; Schwartz, Ronald G.; Muhs, Ann G.; Henzler, Margaret; Hutson, Alan; Rubin, Philip

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: a) To assess the age-related incidence of morbid cardiac events including cardiac death (CD), nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), and angina pectoris (AP) in all patients treated for Hodgkin's disease at a single institution; b) to examine the prevalence of cardiac risk factors and presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in affected patients. Methods and materials: 475 patients were treated for Hodgkin's disease in our institution between 1954 and 1989. The status of 97% of the cohort was established either by patient visit and examination in 1992-1993, personal telephone contact, or documentation of death. The 326 of these patients who had mantle irradiation (RT) and survived 3 years formed the study population. Patients who experienced AP, MI, or CD secondary to CAD were assessed for the presence of specific cardiac risk factors. Cardiac catheterization and necropsy data were reviewed to determine the presence and degree of coronary artery stenosis. Results: Eighteen of 326 patients (5.5%) have had a morbid cardiac event directly related to CAD. Seven patients had CD. Seven patients experienced nonfatal MI, and four patients had AP. The mean interval from RT to morbid cardiac event was 13.1 years (range: 4.4-27.0), and the mean age at the time of the event was 39.4 years (range: 24-65). Four of these patients had morbid cardiac events between ages 24-29 years. Based on US statistics of CD secondary to MI, the relative risk of CD for the treated group was 2.8 (3.1 for males and 1.8 for females). Remarkably, no difference was found in the risk of experiencing a morbid cardiac endpoint in patients stratified by either decile of age at which RT was given, or by duration of follow-up. Only one patient experiencing an event (AP) had received an anthracycline. The mean RT dose to the central cardiac volume for the affected patients was 44.3 Gy (range: 35-60.4). Autopsy or catheterization data were available on 15 patients and revealed 90-100% stenosis of at

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of premature coronary artery disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography in Kurdistan, Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ameen Mosa; Jehangeer, Hekmat Izzat; Shaikhow, Sabri Khalif

    2015-11-18

    Premature coronary artery disease (PCAD) seems to increase, particularly in developing countries. Given the lack of such studies in the country, this study examines the prevalence, associated cardiovascular risk factors, and coronary angiographic profile of the disease in Iraq. Data was collected from a total of 445 adult patients undergoing coronary angiography at Duhok Heart Center, Kurdistan in a period between March and September 2014. Patients were divided into PCAD (male 70 % compared to lesser obstruction. Premature coronary artery disease is alarming  in the country. Cardiovascular risk factors are clustered among them. But the angiographic profile and therapeutic options of PCAD are close to those reported from previous studies.

  4. Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.

  5. Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention: Data Trends & Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention's Data Trends & Maps online tool allows searching for and view of health indicators related to Heart...

  6. Coronary artery anomalies and clinically important anatomy in patients with congenital heart disease: multislice CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Seo, Dong-Man; Yun, Tae-Jin; Park, Jeong-Jun; Park, In-Sook; Ko, Jae Kon; Kim, Young Hwee

    2009-01-01

    In patients with congenital heart disease, coronary artery anomalies are common and have different clinical importance from individuals with structurally normal hearts. Visibility of the coronary arteries by CT has markedly improved due to high temporal resolution and ECG-synchronized data acquisition. In this article we describe current multislice CT techniques for coronary artery imaging and illustrate coronary artery anomalies and clinically important coronary artery anatomy from the point of view of congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  7. Coronary artery anomalies and clinically important anatomy in patients with congenital heart disease: multislice CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Seo, Dong-Man; Yun, Tae-Jin; Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Park, In-Sook; Ko, Jae Kon; Kim, Young Hwee [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-03-15

    In patients with congenital heart disease, coronary artery anomalies are common and have different clinical importance from individuals with structurally normal hearts. Visibility of the coronary arteries by CT has markedly improved due to high temporal resolution and ECG-synchronized data acquisition. In this article we describe current multislice CT techniques for coronary artery imaging and illustrate coronary artery anomalies and clinically important coronary artery anatomy from the point of view of congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  8. Modern antiplatelet agents in coronary artery disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Rachel F

    2012-10-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy is well recognized in the prevention of thrombotic complications of acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary interventions. Despite clinical benefits of aspirin and clopidogrel therapy, a number of limitations curtail their efficacy: slow onset of action, variability in platelet inhibitory response and potential drug-drug interactions. Furthermore, the single platelet-activation pathway targeted by these agents allows continued platelet activation via other pathways, ensuring incomplete protection against ischemic events, thus, underscoring the need for alternate antiplatelet treatment strategies. A number of novel antiplatelet agents are currently in advance development and many have established superior effects on platelet inhibition, clinical outcomes and safety profile than clopidogrel in high-risk patients. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current status of P2Y12 receptor inhibition and PAR-1 antagonists in determining a future strategy for individualized antiplatelet therapy.

  9. IS LIPOPROTEIN (A A PREDICTOR OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE SEVERITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyebeh Miandoabi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract    INTRODUCTION: Studies on the association between the plasma concentration of lipoprotein (a and coronary heart disease (CHD have reported conflicting findings.    METHOD AND MATERIALS: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the association between serum levels of lipoprotein (a and ischemic heart disease as well as other cardiovascular risk factors in a population-based study. Lipoprotein (a serum was measured in 142 patients with chronic stable angina undergoing clinically indicated coronary angiography. Lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, anthropometric and clinical parameters were analyzed.    RESULTS: Lipoprotein (a levels were significantly associated with coronary artery stenosis in men, but not in women. Also, an direct association between mean levels of lipoprotein (a and coronary artery stenosis in men younger than 55 years old and an inverse association in men older than 55 years old were observed.     CONCLUSION: Multivariate analysis revealed that lipoprotein (a was considered an independent predictor for severity of CAD in men, especially in younger ages.      Keywords: Lipoprotein (a, cardiovascular risk factors, Ischemic heart disease, coronary angiography.

  10. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions.......Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  11. Evaluation of left ventricular myocardial function in patients with coronary artery disease and myocardial dysfunction before and after coronary artery bypass grafting by cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juergens, K.U.; Renger, B.; Reimer, P.; Tombach, B.; Heindel, W.; Wichter, T.; Bruns, H.J.; Vahlhaus, C.; Janssen, F.W.; Breithardt, G.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate left ventricular (LV) myocardial function in ten patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) preoperatively and 6 months after coronary bypass grafting (CABG) by cardiac MRI. Material and methods: Ten patients (mean 65.2±5.9 years) with angiographically proven CAD and an indication for elective CABG underwent prospective evaluation of global LV function and regional wall motion by Cine-MRI at rest using a multiphase FLASH-2D sequence following regions of interest (ROI)-defined diagnostics of regional myocardial wall motion by means of levocardiography. Within the ROIs a total of 613 LV myocardial segments were analyzed preceding and following surgical revascularization. Results were compared with the data of 10 healthy volunteers. Results: Preoperatively, patients showed reduced stroke volume and ejection fraction compared with volunteers (p [de

  12. Radial artery spasm occurred in transradial coronary intervention for coronary heart disease: its occurrence and predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Jiming; Li Lang; Lu Yongguang; Zeng Shuyi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the incidence and clinical predictors of radial artery spasm occurred in performing transradial coronary intervention for coronary heart disease. Methods: A total of 1020 patients, who underwent transradial coronary procedures for coronary heart disease during the period of May 2007 Jan 2010 in authors' hospital, were enrolled in this study. All clinical information and medication were recorded in detail. Arteriography via radial artery was performed in all patients. The diameter of the radial artery as well as the arterial anatomy, including arterial variations, were determined and observed, which was follow by coronary angiography or percutaneous coronary intervention. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis was adopted to evaluate the variables, such as clinical parameters, angiographic characteristics of the radial artery and procedure-related factors, in predicting the occurrence of radial artery spasm. Results: Radial artery spasm occurred in 209 (20.5%) patients. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that the following eight factors were independently associated with the occurrence of radial artery spasm. These factors were as follows: female gender (OR=2.8, 95% CI 2.5-5.8; P=0.001), age (OR=0.68, 95% CI 0.60-0.92; P=0.003), smoking (OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.8-4.1; P=0.026), moderate-to-severe pain of forearm during radial artery cannulation (OR=3.0, 95% CI 2.3-4.8; P=0.006), radial artery anatomical abnormalities (OR=4.7, 95% CI 3.6-7.2; P=0.002), the ratio of radial artery diameter to patient's height (RAH) (OR=5.2, 95% CI 3.7-8.1; P=0.012), the ratio of radial artery diameter to outer diameter of the sheath (RAOD) (OR=5.8, 95% CI 4.2-6.9; P=0.006) and the number of catheter exchange (OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.4-4.3; P=0.038). Conclusion: Radial artery spasm occurred in performing transradial coronary intervention for coronary heart disease is frequently seen in clinical practice. Female gender, younger age, smoking, forearm pain during

  13. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David

    2013-01-01

    To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease.......To determine the association between self reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease....

  14. Evaluation of coronary artery disease by helical CT using retrospective ECG-gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawawa, Yoko

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of helical CT using retrospective ECG-gating for visualization of the coronary artery and detection of coronary artery disease. We performed a coronary artery phantom study and established this new application, with 1-mm collimation, 1-mm table increment, and 0.1-mm reconstruction (0.8 sec/rotation). Helical CT of 31 patients with 39 coronary artery diseases (34 coronary artery stenoses, 1 vasospastic angina, 1 coronary artery dissection, 1 coronary artery ectasia and 2 coronary artery aneurysms) was performed in a single breath hold and ECG-gating without and with intravenous injection of nonionic iodine contrast material. We selected the images which were not affected by cardiac motion from the reconstruction images, in order to visualize the coronary artery for detection of coronary artery disease. The coronary artery was well visualized in 32 out of 39 vessels (82%). A good visualization of the coronary artery was correlated with the heart rate. Further, in this well visualized group, coronary artery diseases were detected in 24 out of 31 cases (77%). One case of vasospastic angina was not included. It was difficult to detect coronary artery disease in cases of heavily calcified vessels or in the left circumflex artery. Helical CT using this retrospective ECG-gating is a useful noninvasive examination for evaluation of coronary artery disease. (author)

  15. Correlation between serum Hcy content and coronary atherosclerosis severity in patients with H-type hypertension and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Mei Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the correlation between serum Hcy content and coronary atherosclerosis severity in patients with H-type hypertension and coronary heart disease. Methods: 48 patients with H-type hypertension and coronary heart disease were selected as observation group, and 57 patients with normal hypertension and coronary heart disease were selected as control group. Echocardiography was used to determine coronary lesion parameters, enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to determine serum levels of homocysteine (Hcy and coronary heart disease-related indexes, and the correlation between Hcy levels and coronary heart disease was further analyzed. Results: Serum Hcy level of observation group was higher than that of control group (P<0.05, absolute GLPSS value and E/A value under echocardiography were less than those of control group while E-DT and E/e value were higher than those of control group (P<0.05; serum adiponectin (APN level was lower than that of control group while P-selectin, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, oxidized high-density lipoprotein (OX-HDL, MMP-2, MMP-9, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2 and Resistin levels were higher than those of control group (P<0.05; Hcy was negatively correlated with absolute GLPSS value, E/A value and APN level, and was positively correlated with E-DT value, E/e value as well as P-selectin, ADMA, OX-HDL, MMP-2, MMP-9, Lp- PLA2 and Resistin levels (P<0.05. Conclusions: There is direct correlation between serum Hcy levels and the severity of coronary heart disease in patients with H-type hypertension and coronary heart disease, it can be a reliable way to early screen for coronary heart disease and evaluate the illness, and it is also a new target of coronary heart disease intervention.

  16. Management standards for stable coronary artery disease in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep Mishra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is one of the important causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality globally, giving rise to more than 7 million deaths annually. An increasing burden of CAD in India is a major cause of concern with angina being the leading manifestation. Stable coronary artery disease (SCAD is characterised by episodes of transient central chest pain (angina pectoris, often triggered by exercise, emotion or other forms of stress, generally triggered by a reversible mismatch between myocardial oxygen demand and supply resulting in myocardial ischemia or hypoxia. A stabilised, frequently asymptomatic phase following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS is also classified as SCAD. This definition of SCAD also encompasses vasospastic and microvascular angina under the common umbrella.

  17. Asymptomatic coronary artery disease in Type-2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.S.F.; Othman, S.; Meo, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To select a subgroup of type-2 diabetics with two additional pre specified risk factors to see that whether there is any benefit of screening such patients. Methodology: Five hundred twenty six patients were sent for treadmill stress test or thallium scan. Those who had abnormal results were advised coronary angiography. The angiographically proven CAD was correlated with various risk factors to find the relationship between the disease and variables. Results: Two hundred thirty five (48%) patients had abnormal results and among them 158 (67%)underwent coronary angiography. Among these 21% had evidence of CAD. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) was performed in 35(33%) patients, catheter based intervention (PCI) in 44(40%) patients and 30(27%) patients were not suitable for intervention. Duration of diabetes, smoking, diabetic retinopathy, albuminuria, and peripheral vascular disease were significant predictor of asymptomatic CAD. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated strong relationship between risk factors and asymptomatic CAD in type 2 diabetics. (author)

  18. Serum protein profiles predict coronary artery disease in symptomatic patients referred for coronary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaFramboise William A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than a million diagnostic cardiac catheterizations are performed annually in the US for evaluation of coronary artery anatomy and the presence of atherosclerosis. Nearly half of these patients have no significant coronary lesions or do not require mechanical or surgical revascularization. Consequently, the ability to rule out clinically significant coronary artery disease (CAD using low cost, low risk tests of serum biomarkers in even a small percentage of patients with normal coronary arteries could be highly beneficial. Methods Serum from 359 symptomatic subjects referred for catheterization was interrogated for proteins involved in atherogenesis, atherosclerosis, and plaque vulnerability. Coronary angiography classified 150 patients without flow-limiting CAD who did not require percutaneous intervention (PCI while 209 required coronary revascularization (stents, angioplasty, or coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Continuous variables were compared across the two patient groups for each analyte including calculation of false discovery rate (FDR ≤ 1% and Q value (P value for statistical significance adjusted to ≤ 0.01. Results Significant differences were detected in circulating proteins from patients requiring revascularization including increased apolipoprotein B100 (APO-B100, C-reactive protein (CRP, fibrinogen, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1, myeloperoxidase (MPO, resistin, osteopontin, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and N-terminal fragment protein precursor brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pBNP and decreased apolipoprotein A1 (APO-A1. Biomarker classification signatures comprising up to 5 analytes were identified using a tunable scoring function trained against 239 samples and validated with 120 additional samples. A total of 14 overlapping signatures classified patients without significant coronary disease (38% to 59% specificity while maintaining 95% sensitivity for patients requiring

  19. 77 FR 9842 - Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... (formerly 2006P-0316)] Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease AGENCY: Food and Drug... concerning the use of the health claim for phytosterols and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), in a manner... risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) for phytosterol-containing conventional food and dietary...

  20. Coronary heart disease risk assessment and characterization of coronary artery disease using coronary CT angiography: comparison of asymptomatic and symptomatic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.; Kim, Y.; Chung, I.-M.; Ryu, J.; Park, H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in relation to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and assess plaque characteristics from coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Materials and methods: Three hundred and ninety consecutive patients [asymptomatic group, n = 138; symptomatic group (atypical or non-anginal chest pain), n = 252] were retrospectively enrolled. They were subsequently classified into three CHD risk categories, based on the National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines, and 10 year risks of coronary events were calculated using Framingham risk score. CT was evaluated for stenosis, plaque composition, and coronary calcium scores. Results: CAD was observed in 42% of the asymptomatic group and 62% of the symptomatic group. In the former, the prevalence of CAD in low-, moderate- and high-risk subgroups was 21.4, 47.4 and 65%, respectively, and was 33.3, 74.4, and 72.4% in the symptomatic group. Framingham 10-year risks of coronary events were significantly higher in patients with CAD than in normal participants, and receiver operating characteristics curves showed that discriminatory power was poor in the asymptomatic group and symptomatic men, and good in symptomatic women. Of the participants in the asymptomatic group, 12% exhibited only non-calcified plaques and of the symptomatic group, 7% exhibited only non-calcified plaques. The coronary calcium score was significantly higher for significant stenosis than for non-significant stenosis in both groups. Conclusions: The prevalence of CAD was not negligible even in subgroups with low-to-moderate CHD risk. Additionally, the Framingham risk score was effective for predicting CAD only in symptomatic women. Coronary calcium scores correlated with significant stenosis; however, a sizeable percentage of both groups had only non-calcified plaques.

  1. Efficacy of Patient Selection for Diagnostic Coronary Angiography in Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Flávio Costa Filho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground:Guidelines recommend that in suspected stable coronary artery disease (CAD, a clinical (non-invasive evaluation should be performed before coronary angiography.Objective:We assessed the efficacy of patient selection for coronary angiography in suspected stable CAD.Methods:We prospectively selected consecutive patients without known CAD, referred to a high-volume tertiary center. Demographic characteristics, risk factors, symptoms and non-invasive test results were correlated to the presence of obstructive CAD. We estimated the CAD probability based on available clinical data and the incremental diagnostic value of previous non-invasive tests.Results:A total of 830 patients were included; median age was 61 years, 49.3% were males, 81% had hypertension and 35.5% were diabetics. Non-invasive tests were performed in 64.8% of the patients. At coronary angiography, 23.8% of the patients had obstructive CAD. The independent predictors for obstructive CAD were: male gender (odds ratio [OR], 3.95; confidence interval [CI] 95%, 2.70 - 5.77, age (OR for 5 years increment, 1.15; CI 95%, 1.06 - 1.26, diabetes (OR, 2.01; CI 95%, 1.40 - 2.90, dyslipidemia (OR, 2.02; CI 95%, 1.32 - 3.07, typical angina (OR, 2.92; CI 95%, 1.77 - 4.83 and previous non-invasive test (OR 1.54; CI 95% 1.05 - 2.27.Conclusions:In this study, less than a quarter of the patients referred for coronary angiography with suspected CAD had the diagnosis confirmed. A better clinical and non-invasive assessment is necessary, to improve the efficacy of patient selection for coronary angiography.

  2. Assessment of coronary artery disease and calcified coronary plaque burden by computed tomography in patients with and without diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffei, Erica; Seitun, Sara [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Parma (Italy); Nieman, Koen; Weustink, Annick C.; Mollet, Nico R. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Martini, Chiara [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Parma (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Guaricci, Andrea Igoren [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Foggia, Department of Cardiology, Foggia (Italy); Tedeschi, Carlo [Ospedale San Gennaro, Department of Cardiology, Naples (Italy); Berti, Elena; Grilli, Roberto [Regione Emilia-Romagna, Healthcare and Social Agency, Bologna (Italy); Messalli, Giancarlo [SDN Foundation, IRCCS, Naples (Italy); Cademartiri, Filippo [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Parma (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria - Parma, Department of Radiology, Parma (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    To compare the coronary atherosclerotic burden in patients with and without type-2 diabetes using CT Coronary Angiography (CTCA). 147 diabetic (mean age: 65 {+-} 10 years; male: 89) and 979 nondiabetic patients (mean age: 61 {+-} 13 years; male: 567) without a history of coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent CTCA. The per-patient number of diseased coronary segments was determined and each diseased segment was classified as showing obstructive lesion (luminal narrowing >50%) or not. Coronary calcium scoring (CCS) was assessed too. Diabetics showed a higher number of diseased segments (4.1 {+-} 4.2 vs. 2.1 {+-} 3.0; p < 0.0001); a higher rate of CCS > 400 (p < 0.001), obstructive CAD (37% vs. 18% of patients; p < 0.0001), and fewer normal coronary arteries (20% vs. 42%; p < 0.0001), as compared to nondiabetics. The percentage of patients with obstructive CAD paralleled increasing CCS in both groups. Diabetics with CCS {<=} 10 had a higher prevalence of coronary plaque (39.6% vs. 24.5%, p = 0.003) and obstructive CAD (12.5% vs. 3.8%, p = 0.01). Among patients with CCS {<=} 10 all diabetics with obstructive CAD had a zero CCS and one patient was asymptomatic. Diabetes was associated with higher coronary plaque burden. The present study demonstrates that the absence of coronary calcification does not exclude obstructive CAD especially in diabetics. (orig.)

  3. Stroke in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes: Incidence and Outcomes in the Platelet Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in Unstable Angina: Receptor Suppression Using Integrilin Therapy (PURSUIT) Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.W. Mahaffey (Kenneth); C.M. MacAulay; R.A. Harrington (Robert Alex); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); C.B. Granger (Christopher); R.M. Califf (Robert); C. Graffagnino (Carmen); M.J. Alberts; D.T. Laskowitz; E.J. Topol (Eric); J.M. Miller; M.A. Sloan (Michael); L.G. Berdan (Lisa); A.M. Lincoff (Michael); J.W. Deckers (Jaap)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The incidence of stroke in patients with acute coronary syndromes has not been clearly defined because few trials in this patient population have been large enough to provide stable estimates of stroke rates. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied the 10 948

  4. Quality of medical management in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shammeri, Owayed; Stafford, Randall S; Alzenaidi, Ahlam; Al-Hutaly, Bushra; Abdulmonem, Alaa

    2014-01-01

    Patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) are at high risk of recurrent adverse cardiac events. Such risk can be diminished through a guideline-recommend optimal medical therapy (OMT), defined as adherence to appropriate antiplatelet therapy, lipid-lowering agents, beta-blockers and angio.tensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, blood pressure investment in strategies to achieve OMT in these high-risk patients.

  5. Health actions and disease patterns related to coronary heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The health-related behaviour of the Cape Peninsula coloured population, which has been shown to have an adverse coronary heart disease (CHO) risk factor profile, is reported. Private medical services were used most often by participants: 54,1% and 51,6% of males and females respectively had made use of these ...

  6. Genetic epidemiology of coronary artery disease: an Asian Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent findings on the role of genetic factors in the aetiopathology of CAD have implicated novel genes and variants in addition to those involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. However, our present knowledge is ...

  7. Effectiveness of Interventions to Reduce Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of coronary heart disease risk reduction interventions. Methods: The effects of lipid lowering interventions as well as dietary and lifestyle modifications on some risk factors of CHD were studied retrospectively in 47 males and 53 female patients [aged 33 to 61 years; mean age 47.20 ...

  8. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins.

  9. Tea and coronary heart disease : protection through estrogenlike activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleijnse, J.M.; Witteman, J.C.; Launer, L.J.; Lamberts, S.J.; Pols, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Tea drinking appears to be protective against coronary heart disease in a number of epidemiologic studies. It has been suggested that tea flavonols with antioxidative activity, including quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin,1 could account for the favorable effect on cardiovascular health. In the

  10. GST polymorphisms and early-onset coronary artery disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dysfunctional detoxification enzymes are responsible for prolonged exposure to reactive molecules and can contribute to endothelial damage, an underlying factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). Objectives. We aimed to assess 2 common polymorphic variant isoforms in GSTM1 and GSTP1 of GST in young CAD patients ...

  11. Childhood Antecedents to Adult Coronary Artery Diseases. Special Reference Briefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winick, Myron

    This reference brief deals with the childhood antecedents to atherosclerosis and hypertension. While diet is related to the development of coronary artery diseases, there is some disagreement about what dietary changes are necessary or desirable in children to prevent their development, and at what age such changes should be made. Fifty-five…

  12. Association between height and coronary heart disease mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Skytthe, Axel

    2006-01-01

    An inverse association between height and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) is well demonstrated, but it is not known whether this association is because of genetic factors, socioeconomic background, or other environmental factors. Four population-based twin cohorts with register-based follow...

  13. Environmental Stress and Biobehavioral Antecedents of Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of research on the biobehavioral antecedents of coronary heart disease, including stressful occupational settings characterized by high demands and little control over the job, and the Type A pattern, particularly hostility and mode of anger expression (anger-in). Discusses research on physiologic responsiveness (reactivity)…

  14. Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Kryss; Higgins, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Ten sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics considered predictors of difficulty with smoking cessation in patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. The compounding effects of nicotine addiction are discussed. Consideration of these factors may result in individualized programs for smoking cessation. A brief overview…

  15. Learning Style Preferences of Elderly Coronary Artery Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, Saundra L.; Merritt, Sharon L.

    1992-01-01

    The Patient Learning Styles Questionnaire derived from Canfield and administered to 134 elderly coronary artery disease patients revealed the following order of learning preferences: structure, iconics, listening, direct experience, reading, achievement, affiliation, and eminence. Level of education significantly influenced preferred learning…

  16. What is killing? People's knowledge about coronary heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From which nearly 80% can be because of modifiable risks. In Egypt, there is a lack of studies on the knowledge of people about coronary heart diseases and its modifiable risks. So, this research reported here we designed to measure the dimensions of peoples knowledge about CHD and their attitude towards prevention, ...

  17. Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through global profiling, network analysis and independent validation of key candidate genes. Prathima ... Table 2. Differentially expressed genes in CAD compared to age and gender matched controls. .... Regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain containing 1A.

  18. Antibiotics for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sethi, Naqash J.; Safi, Sanam; Korang, Steven Kwasi

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of antibiotics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. As a secondary objective, we plan to assess the effects of individual types of antibiotics...

  19. Inflammatory cytokines and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Gao, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Because low-grade inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), and pro-inflammatory cytokines govern inflammatory cascades, this study aimed to assess the associations of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and CHD risk in a new prospective study, including meta...

  20. Resistance training and predicted risk of coronary heart disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of resistance training, designed to prevent the development of coronary heart disease (CHD) based on the Framingham Risk Assessment (FRA) score. Twenty-five healthy sedentary men with low CHD risk were assigned to participate in a 16-week (three days per week) ...

  1. CoViCAD : comprehensive visualization of coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temeer, M.; Olivan Bescos, J.; Breeuwer, M.; Vilanova, A.; Gerritsen, F.A.; Gröller, E.

    2007-01-01

    We present novel, comprehensive visualization techniques for the diagnosis of patients with Coronary Artery Disease using segmented cardiac MRI data. We extent an accepted medical visualization technique called the bull’s eye plot by removing discontinuities, preserving the volumetric nature of the

  2. Screening for anxiety disorders in patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunevicius, A.; Staniute, M.; Brozaitiene, J.; Pop, V.J.M.; Neverauskas, J.; Bunevicius, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are prevalent and associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, studies examining screening of anxiety disorders in CAD patients are lacking. In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients with

  3. High density lipoproteins, dyslipidemia, and coronary heart disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2010-01-01

    ... with premature coronary heart disease (CHD). These familial disorders include lipoprotein(a) excess, dyslipidemia (high triglycerides and low HDL), combined hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol and high triglycerides often with low HDL), hypoalphalipoproteinemia (low HDL), and hypercholesterolemia. We discuss the management of these disorders. W...

  4. Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through global profiling, network analysis ... A_33_P3249595 B-cell CLL/lymphoma 11A (zinc finger protein). BCL11A. 2.29 ..... It acts as a cytoplasmic sensor for viral infection and ...

  5. Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in Czech Men, 1980-2004

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reissigová, Jindra; Tomečková, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2008), s. 12-16 ISSN 1801-5603 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : coronary heart disease * cardiovascular * mortality * 1980-2004 Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/articles/200812/33/1.html

  6. C-reactive protein level in coronary artery disease and its correlation with serum d-dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, C.; Marwat, Z.I.; Israr, M.; Hanif, R.; Arshad, M.

    2017-01-01

    C-reactive protein concentration has continuous associations with risk of coronary artery disease, ischemic stroke and death from several cancers. In addition, several studies have shown that CRP could be used to predict first ever myocardial infarction and stroke in healthy subjects, as well as outcome in acute setting. High levels of another biomarker, D-dimer, have been found to be independently associated with occurrence of coronary events. Methods: This correlational study was carried out at the Department of Cardiology, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad, in collaboration with the department of Biochemistry Postgraduate Medical Institute Lahore from 15th July 2013 to 15th May 2014. Patients aged 30 years or more of either gender having coronary artery disease was included in the study. Their serum D-dimer levels and C-reactive protein levels were measured for correlation with coronary artery disease. Results: A total of 50 patients of CAD were included in this study. Out of these 30 (60 percent) were males and 20 (40 percent) were females. Elevated CRP levels and D-dimer levels were noted in all of these patients. Pearson correlation coefficient test was performed on both CRP and D-dimer levels. Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to be r= -0.1522 and when a p value was calculated, it was found to be 0.292 which implied that the results were not significant. Conclusion: This study showed that there is no correlation between CRP levels and D-dimer levels in patients with Coronary Artery Disease. (author)

  7. Accurate Prediction of Coronary Artery Disease Using Bioinformatics Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Shafiee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Cardiovascular disease is one of the main causes of death in developed and Third World countries. According to the statement of the World Health Organization, it is predicted that death due to heart disease will rise to 23 million by 2030. According to the latest statistics reported by Iran’s Minister of health, 3.39% of all deaths are attributed to cardiovascular diseases and 19.5% are related to myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to predict coronary artery disease using data mining algorithms. Methods: In this study, various bioinformatics algorithms, such as decision trees, neural networks, support vector machines, clustering, etc., were used to predict coronary heart disease. The data used in this study was taken from several valid databases (including 14 data. Results: In this research, data mining techniques can be effectively used to diagnose different diseases, including coronary artery disease. Also, for the first time, a prediction system based on support vector machine with the best possible accuracy was introduced. Conclusion: The results showed that among the features, thallium scan variable is the most important feature in the diagnosis of heart disease. Designation of machine prediction models, such as support vector machine learning algorithm can differentiate between sick and healthy individuals with 100% accuracy.

  8. Endothelial dysfunction, vascular disease and stroke: the ARTICO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquer, J; Segura, T; Serena, J; Castillo, J

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a fundamental step in the atherosclerotic disease process. Its presence is a risk factor for the development of clinical events, and may represent a marker of atherothrombotic burden. Also, endothelial dysfunction contributes to enhanced plaque vulnerability, may trigger plaque rupture, and favors thrombus formation. The assessment of endothelial vasomotion is a useful marker of atherosclerotic vascular disease. There are different methods to assess endothelial function: endothelium-dependent vasodilatation brachial flow-mediated dilation, cerebrovascular reactivity to L-arginine, and the determination of some biomarkers such as microalbuminuria, platelet function, and C-reactive protein. Endothelial dysfunction has been observed in stroke patients and has been related to stroke physiopathology, stroke subtypes, clinical severity and outcome. Resting ankle-brachial index (ABI) is also considered an indicator of generalized atherosclerosis, and a low ABI is associated with an increase in stroke incidence in the elderly. Despite all these data, there are no studies analyzing the predictive value of ABI for new cardiovascular events in patients after suffering an acute ischemic stroke. ARTICO is an ongoing prospective, observational, multicenter study being performed in 50 Spanish hospitals. The aim of the ARTICO study is to evaluate the prognostic value of a pathological ABI (ARTICO study will increase the knowledge of patient outcome after ischemic stroke and may help to improve our ability to detect patients at high risk of stroke recurrence or major cardiovascular events. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Myocardial scintigraphy with 201thallium for the diagnosis of coronary heart disease and heart muscle disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, E.

    1986-01-01

    This work gives an overview of the presently used methods of diagnostic and therapy of coronary heart disease. With the use of 105 patients the viability of scintigraphical and radiological studies were compared to each other. The thallium scintigraphy thereby achieves excellent results with a sensitivity of 95% of coronary heart disease (with a pre-determined exclusion of myocardial diseases). In three cases small vessel disease was detected which could not be detected by a coronary angiogram. The correct localization of coronary stenosis with thallium scintigraphy was attained in the area of LAD at 77% and in the avea of RCA at 74% fairly reliable, whereas the determination of circumflex artery (sensitivity 29%) was rather poor. Also, the excact determination of the extent of coronary sclerosis shows that with multiple vessel diseases the sensitivity clearly decreases (1-vessel 78%, 2-vessel 38%, 3-vessel 13%), whereby the various coronary stenoses probably appear differently in scintigraphs. A better study method for the exact determination of the extent of myocardial ischemia is offered by the single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) with the use of a rotating gamma camera. In view of the differential diagnostic for coronary diseases myocardial scintigraphy still plays a major role in myocardial diseases. In my own research pathological storage patterns could be shown in 14 such cases. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Behavioral interventions for coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orth-Gomér Kristina

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There is a strong clinical need to provide effective stress reduction programs for patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Such programs for men have been implemented and their cardiovascular health benefit documented. For women such programs are scarce. In this report, The feasibility of a cognitive method that was recently demonstrated to prolong lives of women is tested. A setting with gender segregated groups was applied. Method The principles of a behavioural health educational program originally designed to attenuate the stress of patients with coronary prone behaviours were used as a basis for the intervention method. For the groups of female patients this method was tailored according to female stressors and for the groups of men according to male stressors. The same core stress reduction program was used for women and men, but the contents of discussions and responses to the pre planned program varied. These were continuously monitored throughout the fifteen sessions. Implementation group: Thirty consecutive patients, eleven women and nineteen men, hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome were included in this intervention. All expressed their need to learn how to cope with stress in daily life and were highly motivated. Five groups, three groups of men and two groups of women were formed. Psychological assessments were made immediately before and after completion of the program. Results No gender differences in the pre planned programs were found, but discussion styles varied between the women and men, Women were more open and more personal. Family issues were more frequent than job issues, although all women were employed outside their homes. Men talked about concrete and practical things, mostly about their jobs, and not directly about their feelings. Daily stresses of life decreased significantly for both men and women, but more so for women. Depressive thoughts were low at baseline, and there was no

  11. Behavioral interventions for coronary heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth-Gomér, Kristina

    2012-02-02

    There is a strong clinical need to provide effective stress reduction programs for patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Such programs for men have been implemented and their cardiovascular health benefit documented. For women such programs are scarce.In this report, The feasibility of a cognitive method that was recently demonstrated to prolong lives of women is tested. A setting with gender segregated groups was applied. The principles of a behavioural health educational program originally designed to attenuate the stress of patients with coronary prone behaviours were used as a basis for the intervention method. For the groups of female patients this method was tailored according to female stressors and for the groups of men according to male stressors. The same core stress reduction program was used for women and men, but the contents of discussions and responses to the pre planned program varied. These were continuously monitored throughout the fifteen sessions. Implementation group: Thirty consecutive patients, eleven women and nineteen men, hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome were included in this intervention. All expressed their need to learn how to cope with stress in daily life and were highly motivated. Five groups, three groups of men and two groups of women were formed. Psychological assessments were made immediately before and after completion of the program. No gender differences in the pre planned programs were found, but discussion styles varied between the women and men, Women were more open and more personal. Family issues were more frequent than job issues, although all women were employed outside their homes. Men talked about concrete and practical things, mostly about their jobs, and not directly about their feelings. Daily stresses of life decreased significantly for both men and women, but more so for women. Depressive thoughts were low at baseline, and there was no change over time. In contrast, anxiety scores were high at

  12. Coronary Artery Calcium Distribution and Interscan Measurement Variability in End-Stage Renal and Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafin, Z.; Laskowska, K.; Marzec, M.; Lasek, W. (Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz (Poland)); Sinjab, T.A.; Wlodarczyk, Z. (Dept. of Transplantology, Nicolaus Copernicus Univ., Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz (Poland))

    2009-04-15

    Background: Coronary heart disease patients and end-stage renal disease patients have been documented to have an increased amount of coronary artery calcifications (CAC). Purpose: To evaluate the distribution of CAC and its influence on interscan variability of measurement in end-stage renal disease and coronary heart disease patients, proven to have calcifications. Material and Methods: 69 patients having CAC, including 34 with coronary heart disease and 35 with end-stage renal disease, were scanned twice with multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Amount of CAC was determined as the number of calcified lesions (CN), total calcium score (CS), calcium volume (CV), and calcium mass (CM). Distribution of CAC was evaluated on a per-patient basis as the median CS and CM of a single lesion. Density of the calcifications was calculated as the patient's CM divided by CV. Results: The overall median CS was 457.2, and the median CM was 75.6 mg. There were no significant differences in the number of calcified lesions, CS, or CM between the two groups. Both CS and CM of a single lesion, as well as the mean calcium density were lower in renal disease patients (P<0.05) than in coronary heart disease subjects. The relative interscan variability of coronary calcium measurement was higher in the renal disease group (P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between the calcium concentration and the relative interscan variability. Conclusion: The results indicate that the coronary calcium distribution influences the measurement interscan reproducibility, and the distribution may differ between end-stage renal disease patients and coronary heart disease patients, reflecting the dissimilar nature of coronary calcifications in those groups.

  13. Coronary Artery Calcium Distribution and Interscan Measurement Variability in End-Stage Renal and Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serafin, Z.; Laskowska, K.; Marzec, M.; Lasek, W.; Sinjab, T.A.; Wlodarczyk, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Coronary heart disease patients and end-stage renal disease patients have been documented to have an increased amount of coronary artery calcifications (CAC). Purpose: To evaluate the distribution of CAC and its influence on interscan variability of measurement in end-stage renal disease and coronary heart disease patients, proven to have calcifications. Material and Methods: 69 patients having CAC, including 34 with coronary heart disease and 35 with end-stage renal disease, were scanned twice with multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Amount of CAC was determined as the number of calcified lesions (CN), total calcium score (CS), calcium volume (CV), and calcium mass (CM). Distribution of CAC was evaluated on a per-patient basis as the median CS and CM of a single lesion. Density of the calcifications was calculated as the patient's CM divided by CV. Results: The overall median CS was 457.2, and the median CM was 75.6 mg. There were no significant differences in the number of calcified lesions, CS, or CM between the two groups. Both CS and CM of a single lesion, as well as the mean calcium density were lower in renal disease patients (P<0.05) than in coronary heart disease subjects. The relative interscan variability of coronary calcium measurement was higher in the renal disease group (P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between the calcium concentration and the relative interscan variability. Conclusion: The results indicate that the coronary calcium distribution influences the measurement interscan reproducibility, and the distribution may differ between end-stage renal disease patients and coronary heart disease patients, reflecting the dissimilar nature of coronary calcifications in those groups

  14. Carotid disease in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Abid, A.R.; Dar, M.A.; Noeman, A.; Amin, S.; Azhar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the severity of carotid artery disease in diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: From January to June 2008, 379 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery were preoperatively evaluated for the presence of carotid stenoses by duplex scanning. Patients were divided into two groups, Group I, 156 (41.2%) diabetic patients and Group II, 223 (58.8%) non-diabetic patients. Results: There were 314 (82.8%) males and 65 (17.2%) females with a mean age of 57.2+-9.1 years. In diabetic group there were 125 (80.1%) males and 31 (19.9%) females with a mean age of 56.3+-8.9 years. Left main stem stenosis was present in 59 (37.8%) diabetics and 45 (20.2%) non-diabetics (p 70% stenosis was present in 20 (5.3%) with 13 (8.3%) diabetics and 7 (3.1%) non-diabetics (p<0.025). Stenosis of 50-70% was observed in 30 (7.9%) of which 17 (10.9%) were diabetics and 13 (5.8%) were non-diabetics. Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus is associated with diffuse coronary artery disease and significant carotid artery disease in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. (author)

  15. Cardiogenic shock due to coronary artery disease associated with interrupted aortic arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Alberto Oliveira Dallan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary edema is a serious event. Its occurrence in association with interrupted aortic arch and coronary heart disease is rare. Recently, an old patient developed cardiogenic shock and acute pulmonary edema due to acute coronary insufficiency, associated with interrupted aortic arch. The coronary angiography revealed occlusion of the right coronary artery and 95% obstruction in the left main coronary artery, associated with interruption of the descending aorta. Coronary artery bypass graft was performed, without extracorporeal circulation, to the anterior descending coronary artery. We discuss the initial management, given the seriousness of the case.

  16. Coexistent coronary artery disease or myocardial bridging in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hwan; Chun, Eun Ju; Kim, Yeo Koon; Yoo, Jin Young; Choi, Sang Il; Choi, Dong Ju [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the prevalence of coexistent coronary artery disease (CAD) or myocardial bridging (MB) in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) using coronary CT angiography (CCTA) and assess the role of CCTA. The prevalence of obstructive CAD (> 50% luminal reduction) and MB (partial and full encasement) were assessed in 150 patients with HCM diagnosed by clinical findings, electrocardiography, and echocardiography of 19588 consecutive patients who underwent CCTA for suspected CAD. The overall feasibility of coronary artery visualization was 98.9% with CCTA. In patients with HCM, the prevalence of obstructive CAD and MB (14.7% partial and 28.0% full encasement) were 23.3% and 42.7%, respectively. Age, hypertension, family history of premature CAD, Framingham risk score and severe chest pain were associated with CAD, whereas male gender and septal type were associated with MB (all p < 0.05). In comparison to invasive coronary angiography (n = 37), the diagnostic accuracy of CCTA for the detection of CAD and full encasement MB was 89.2% and 86.5%, respectively. One-quarter of patients with HCM had coexistent obstructive CAD or full encasement MB. CCTA can be a feasible and accurate noninvasive imaging modality for the detection of CAD and MB in patients with HCM.

  17. Treatment strategies in the left main coronary artery disease associated with acute coronary syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Karabulut

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Significant left main coronary artery (LMCA stenosis is not rare and reported 3 to 10% of patients undergoing coronary angiography. Unprotected LMCA intervention is a still clinical challenge and surgery is still going to be a traditional management method in many cardiac centers. With a presentation of drug eluting stent (DES, extensive use of IVUS and skilled operators, number of such interventions increased rapidly which lead to change in recommendation in the guidelines regarding LMCA procedures in the stable angina (Class 2a recommendation for ostial and shaft lesion and class 2b recommendation for distal bifurcation lesion. However, there was not clear consensus about the management of unprotected LMCA lesion associated with acute myocardial infarction (MI with a LMCA culprit lesion itself or distinct culprit lesion of other major coronary arteries. Surgery could be preferred as an obligatory management strategy even in the high risk patients. With this review, we aimed to demonstrate treatment strategies of LMCA disease associated with acute coronary syndrome, particularly acute myocardial infarction (MI. In addition, we presented a short case series with LMCA lesion and ST elevated acute MI in which culprit lesion placed either in the left anterior descending artery or circumflex artery. We reviewed the current medical literature and propose simple algorithm for management.

  18. Association of Endodontic Lesions with Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Liljestrand, J. M.; Mäntylä, P.; Paju, S.; Buhlin, K.; Kopra, K. A. E.; Persson, G. R.; Hernandez, M.; Nieminen, M. S.; Sinisalo, J.; Tjäderhane, L.; Pussinen, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    An endodontic lesion (EL) is a common manifestation of endodontic infection where Porphyromonas endodontalis is frequently encountered. EL may associate with increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) via similar pathways as marginal periodontitis. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to delineate the associations between EL and CAD. Subgingival P. endodontalis, its immune response, and serum lipopolysaccharide were examined as potential mediators between these 2 diseases. The Finn...

  19. Benefits of smoking cessation for coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Hidayat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD incidence increases with age and is frequently higher in the elderly.(1 Therefore prevention of CVD in the elderly through management of risk factors is important in order to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD. There are several risk factors of CVD that can be modified, such as smoking, physical activity, and unhealthy diet. Cessation of smoking is the most potent measure to prevent thousands of CVD events and death

  20. Discharge Disposition After Stroke in Patients With Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Neal S; Merkler, Alexander E; Schneider, Yecheskel; Navi, Babak B; Kamel, Hooman

    2017-02-01

    Liver disease is associated with both hemorrhagic and thrombotic processes, including an elevated risk of intracranial hemorrhage. We sought to assess the relationship between liver disease and outcomes after stroke, as measured by discharge disposition. Using administrative claims data, we identified a cohort of patients hospitalized with stroke in California, Florida, and New York from 2005 to 2013. The predictor variable was liver disease. All diagnoses were defined using validated diagnosis codes. Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyze the association between liver disease and worsening discharge disposition: home, nursing/rehabilitation facility, or death. Secondarily, multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the association between liver disease and in-hospital mortality. Models were adjusted for demographics, vascular risk factors, and comorbidities. We identified 121 428 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and 703 918 with ischemic stroke. Liver disease was documented in 13 584 patients (1.7%). Liver disease was associated with worse discharge disposition after both intracerebral hemorrhage (global odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.38) and ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.29). Similarly, liver disease was associated with in-hospital death after both intracerebral hemorrhage (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-1.44) and ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.51-1.71). Liver disease was associated with worse hospital discharge disposition and in-hospital mortality after stroke, suggesting worse functional outcomes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. The association of atopy with incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk

    2015-01-01

    analyzed by Cox regression analyses with age as underlying time axis and adjusted for study cohort, gender, education, body mass index, alcohol intake, smoking habits, physical activity during leisure time, serum lipids, and blood pressure. The prevalence of atopy was 26.9 % (n = 3,994). There were 1......Allergy is a systemic inflammatory disease that could theoretically affect the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes through inflammatory pathways or mast cell-induced coronary spasm. Whether allergy is associated with an increased risk of CVD and diabetes is largely unknown. We......-specific IgE positivity to inhalant allergens. The Danish National Diabetes Register enabled identification of incident diabetes. Likewise, the Danish Registry of Causes of Death and the Danish National Patient Register provided information on fatal and non-fatal ischemic heart disease and stroke. Data were...

  2. Asymptomatic acute ischemic stroke after primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute coronary syndrome might be caused mainly by manipulating catheters or devices in the ascending aorta, regardless of the approach to the coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, Motonobu; Hazui, Hiroshi; Sugie, Akira

    2007-01-01

    Asymptomatic acute ischemic stroke (aAIS) following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (p-PCI) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has not been studied in detail. Of 75 patients who underwent p-PCI, 26 (34.7%) developed aAIS as determined by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Including the approach to the coronary artery (via lower limb or right upper limb), 23 factors were compared between patients with (n=26) and without (n=49) aAIS. Age, hypertension, smoking, plasma glucose levels, Killip grade, right coronary artery (RCA) as culprit vessel, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) time, and the frequency of device insertion into the coronary artery differed in a statistically significant manner. However, multivariate analysis showed that the RCA (odds ratio 3.477) and the frequency of device insertion (1.375) were independent factors linked to the incidence of aAIS. Moreover, anterior or posterior location and left or right cerebral circulation of aAIS were equivalent in both approaches. Cranial MRI images following emergency PCI revealed that 34.7% of the patients with ACS had aAIS that might be caused by manipulating the catheter or devices in the ascending aorta, micro-air bubble embolism during injection, or micro-thrombus embolism derived from the ACS lesions during the PCI procedure. (author)

  3. Classification of stroke disease using convolutional neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbun, J. T.; Seniman; Andayani, U.

    2018-03-01

    Stroke is a condition that occurs when the blood supply stop flowing to the brain because of a blockage or a broken blood vessel. A symptoms that happen when experiencing stroke, some of them is a dropped consciousness, disrupted vision and paralyzed body. The general examination is being done to get a picture of the brain part that have stroke using Computerized Tomography (CT) Scan. The image produced from CT will be manually checked and need a proper lighting by doctor to get a type of stroke. That is why it needs a method to classify stroke from CT image automatically. A method proposed in this research is Convolutional Neural Network. CT image of the brain is used as the input for image processing. The stage before classification are image processing (Grayscaling, Scaling, Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization, then the image being classified with Convolutional Neural Network. The result then showed that the method significantly conducted was able to be used as a tool to classify stroke disease in order to distinguish the type of stroke from CT image.

  4. The prognostic value of coronary endothelial and microvascular dysfunction in subjects with normal or non-obstructive coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brainin, Philip; Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Coronary vascular dysfunction is linked with poor cardiovascular prognosis in patients without obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) but a critical appraisal of the literature is lacking. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to quantify...

  5. Coronary artery disease in patients undergoing cardiac surgery for non-coronary lesions in a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cholenahally Nanjappa Manjunath

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The overall prevalence of CAD among patients undergoing non-coronary cardiac surgery is 8.7%. Coronary artery disease is relatively uncommon in patients with rheumatic VHD (4.9%, while its prevalence is highest in DAVD (23.4%.

  6. Coronary Flow Reserve Predicts Cardiopulmonary Fitness in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Independently of Systolic and Diastolic Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoer, Martin; Olsen, Rasmus Huan; Monk-Hansen, Tea

    2014-01-01

    Aims Despite revascularization and optimal medical treatment, patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) have reduced exercise capacity. In the absence of coronary artery stenosis, coronary flow reserve (CFR) is a measure of coronary microvascular function, and a marker of future poor outcome...... in CAD patients. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship among CFR, systolic and diastolic function, peripheral vascular function, and cardiopulmonary fitness in CAD patients. Methods and Results Forty patients with median left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 49 (interquartile 46....... Conclusions Coronary flow reserve measured noninvasively predicts cardiopulmonary fitness independently of resting systolic and diastolic function in CAD patients, indicating that cardiac output during maximal exercise is dependent on the ability of the coronary circulation to adapt to the higher metabolic...

  7. Prognostic value of atherosclerotic burden and coronary vascular function in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assante, Roberta; Zampella, Emilia; Nappi, Carmela; Mainolfi, Ciro Gabriele; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Acampa, Wanda [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Arumugam, Parthiban; Tonge, Christine M. [Central Manchester University Teaching Hospitals, Nuclear Medicine Center, Manchester (United Kingdom); Gaudieri, Valeria; Panico, Mariarosaria; Magliulo, Mario [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Petretta, Mario [University Federico II, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of coronary atherosclerotic burden, assessed by coronary artery calcium (CAC) score, and coronary vascular function, assessed by coronary flow reserve (CFR) in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). We studied 436 patients undergoing hybrid {sup 82}Rb positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging. CAC score was measured according to the Agatston method, and patients were categorized into three groups (0, <400, and ≥400). CFR was calculated as the ratio of hyperemic to baseline myocardial blood flow, and it was considered reduced when <2. Follow-up was 94% complete during a mean period of 47±15 months. During follow-up, 17 events occurred (4% cumulative event rate). Event-free survival decreased with worsening of CAC score category (p < 0.001) and in patients with reduced CFR (p < 0.005). At multivariable analysis, CAC score ≥400 (p < 0.01) and CFR (p < 0.005) were independent predictors of events. Including CFR in the prognostic model, continuous net reclassification improvement was 0.51 (0.14 in patients with events and 0.37 in those without). At classification and regression tree analysis, the initial split was on CAC score. For patients with a CAC score < 400, no further split was performed, while patients with a CAC score ≥400 were further stratified by CFR values. Decision curve analyses indicate that the model including CFR resulted in a higher net benefit across a wide range of decision threshold probabilities. In patients with suspected CAD, CFR provides significant incremental risk stratification over established cardiac risk factors and CAC score for prediction of adverse cardiac events. (orig.)

  8. Elevated oxidative stress among coronary artery disease patients on statin therapy: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabitha Palazhy

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: Though coronary artery disease subjects had healthy lipid profile, oxidative stress, a recognized risk factor for coronary events, was still elevated among this patient group. Novel risk factors were not found to be major predictors for coronary artery disease among the study subjects.

  9. Serum adiponectin levels in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayyaz, I.; Shah, S.I.; Ghani, M.

    2009-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocytokine secreted from white adipose tissue. Serum level of adiponectin has been shown to be reduced in several disease states like obesity and diabetes. Hypoadiponectinemia has also been included in the list of newer risk factors for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). In this analytical cross-sectional study serum adiponectin level was measured by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA) in 60 cases of coronary artery disease (CAD) (both sexes, aged 40-60 yrs) and 60 healthy controls. Low levels of adiponectin were seen in CAD patients as well as controls. These levels were lower as compared to western standards. Our study conforms to the previous observation of lower serum adiponectin levels in South Asians compared to the western standards. Serum adiponectin level should be considered in the laboratory work-up of CAD patients. (author)

  10. Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  11. Comparison of efficacy and safety of atorvastatin (80 mg) to simvastatin (20 to 40 mg) in patients aged <65 versus >or=65 years with coronary heart disease (from the Incremental DEcrease through Aggressive Lipid Lowering [IDEAL] study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tikkanen, Matti J; Holme, Ingar; Cater, Nilo B

    2009-01-01

    -label study. Several cardiovascular end points were evaluated, including the occurrence of a first major coronary event (MCE; nonfatal myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, or resuscitated cardiac arrest), the primary end point of the trial, and occurrence of any cardiovascular event (MCE......, stroke, revascularization, unstable angina, congestive heart failure, and peripheral artery disease). Although there were no significant interactions between age and treatment, the magnitude of effect in favor of atorvastatin was higher in younger versus older patients (occurrence of first MCE, hazard...... in primary and secondary end points were observed only in patients 65 years with stable coronary disease....

  12. Preoperative Hematocrit Concentration and the Risk of Stroke in Patients Undergoing Isolated Coronary-Artery Bypass Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled M. Musallam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Identification and management of risk factors for stroke following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG could potentially lower the risk of such serious morbidity. Methods. We retrieved data for 30-day stroke incidence and perioperative variables for patients undergoing isolated CABG and used multivariate logistic regression to assess the adjusted effect of preoperative hematocrit concentration on stroke incidence. Results. In 2,313 patients (mean age 65.9 years, 73.6% men, 43 (1.9%, 95% CI: 1.4–2.5 developed stroke within 30 days following CABG (74.4% within 6 days. After adjustment for a priori defined potential confounders, each 1% drop in preoperative hematocrit concentration was associated with 1.07 (95% CI: 1.01–1.13 increased odds for stroke (men, OR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01–1.16; women, OR: 1.02, 95% CI: 0.91–1.16. The predicted probability of stroke for descending preoperative hematocrit concentration exceeded 2% for values <37% (<37% for men (adjusted OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.08–5.26 and <38% for women (adjusted OR: 2.52, 95% CI: 0.53–11.98, with a steeper probability increase noted in men. The association between lower preoperative hematocrit concentration and stroke was evident irrespective of intraoperative transfusion use. Conclusion. Screening and management of patients with low preoperative hematocrit concentration may alter postoperative stroke risk in patients undergoing isolated CABG.

  13. Should the patient with coronary artery disease use sildenafil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheitlin, Melvin D

    2003-01-01

    Since the etiology of erectile dysfunction is frequently related to endothelial dysfunction, a problem in common with much vascular disease, erectile dysfunction disproportionately affects patients with cardiovascular disease. With the development of phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, the first of which was sildenafil (Viagra), an effective oral medication became available. The question of safety of these drugs, especially in patients with latent or overt coronary artery disease, is of concern. Sildenafil relaxes smooth muscle and therefore lowers systolic and diastolic blood pressure slightly. With organic nitrates, the drop in blood pressure is potentiated, at times dangerously, thereby making it contraindicated to take nitrates within 24 hours of using sildenafil. In double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, there was no difference between sildenafil subjects and control patients in the incidence of myocardial infarction, cardiovascular, and total deaths. Coronary disease patients with stable angina, controlled on medications, were included in the trials. Therefore, sildenafil, as a drug, is safe in such patients. With a patient with coronary artery disease suddenly engaging in the physical exercise associated with sexual intercourse, there is the danger of increased risk of precipitating myocardial infarction or death. The cardiovascular metabolic cost of sexual activity is reviewed and appears to be approximately at the level of 3-5 metabolic equivalents of exercise. Sexual activity occurs within 2 hours of the onset of an acute myocardial infarction in life will be markedly improved by their ability to engage in sexual activity.

  14. [Giant coronary aneurysms in infants with Kawasaki disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Andrés, Antonio; Salvador Mercader, Inmaculada; Seller Moya, Julia; Carrasco Moreno, José Ignacio

    2017-08-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute vasculitis of unknown origin and predominant in males. The long-term effects of the disease depend on whether there are coronary lesions, particularly aneurysms. The prognosis of patients with giant aneurysms is very poor due to their natural progression to coronary thrombosis or severe obstructive lesions. A series of 8 cases is presented where the epidemiology and diagnostic methods are described. The treatment of the acute and long-term cardiovascular sequelae is also reviewed. A descriptive analysis was conducted on patients admitted to the Paediatric Cardiology Unit of La Fe University Hospital (Valencia) with KD and a coronary lesion. More than one artery was involved in all patients. Although early diagnosis was established in only two cases, none of the patients had severe impairment of ventricular function during the acute phase. Treatment included intravenous gammaglobulin and acetylsalicylic acid at anti-inflammatory doses during the acute phase. A combination of dual antiplatelet therapy and corticosteroids was given in cases of coronary thrombosis. The silent aneurysms continue to persist. KD is the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children. The delay in diagnosis is associated with a greater likelihood of coronary lesions that could increase the risk of cardiovascular events in adulthood. Thus, this subgroup requires close clinical monitoring for a better control of cardiovascular risk factors over time. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Refractory angina pectoris in end-stage coronary artery disease : Evolving therapeutic concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoebel, FC; Frazier, OH; Jessurun, GAJ; DeJongste, MJL; Kadipasaoglu, KA; Jax, TW; Heintzen, MP; Cooley, DA; Strauer, BE; Leschke, M

    1997-01-01

    Refractory angina pectoris in coronary artery disease is defined as the persistence of severe anginal symptoms despite maximal conventional antianginal combination therapy. Further, the option to use an invasive revascularization procedure such as percutaneous coronary balloon angioplasty or

  16. Unipolar Depression and the Progression of Coronary Artery Disease : Toward an Integrative Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, Johan; de Jonge, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite extensive research on the relationship between depression and coronary artery disease (CAD) after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), causal interpretations are still difficult. This uncertainty has led to much confusion regarding screening and treatment for depression in CAD

  17. Epidemiologic studies of coronary heart disease and stroke in Japanese men living in Japan, Hawaii, and California: blood pressure distributions. [Blood pressure in Japanese men living in Japan, Hawaii, and California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelstein, W Jr; Kagan, A; Kato, H; Sacks, S T

    1974-01-01

    Blood pressure values were compared in men of Japanese ancestry resident in Japan, Hawaii, and California as a part of a large-scale comparative study of cardiovascular diseases. The median of systolic and diastolic blood pressure values failed to show a difference between men in Japan and Hawaii, but the median for those in San Francisco tended to be higher than the other two groups. However, blood pressure levels generally increase with weight. Therefore, when correction is made for the weight difference among the three groups, the foregoing difference in medians between the San Francisco and the other two groups is decreased, and with the exception of one or two age categories, the difference is not statistically significant. (auth)

  18. Percutaneous coronary intervention and the management of acute coronary syndromes in patients with von Willebrand disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Sulaiman; Deleon, Dexter; Akram, Hafsa; Sane, David; Ball, Timothy

    2013-04-01

    Von Willebrand disease (vWD) results from quantitative or qualitative deficiency of von Willebrand factor (vWF). The occurrence of myocardial infarction is very rare in patients with vWD. A few case reports of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in vWD patients are present in the literature, but no definite management recommendations are available for such patients. We report a case of successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with bare-metal stent (BMS) implantation in a 46-year-old woman with type 1 vWD and history of coronary artery disease (CAD). She received periprocedural dual-antiplatelet therapy for 2 weeks and then continued aspirin without any bleeding complications. The optimal management of patients with vWD and ACS is complex and presents a therapeutic challenge. We propose that dual-antiplatelet therapy can be used safely in most vWD patients presenting with ACS as most of them are type 1 vWD. PCI with BMS can be done safely. Long-term management of these patients requires a systemic approach including hematological consultation, ascertaining vWF levels, as well as patient education and close outpatient follow-up.

  19. Unprotected Left Main Coronary Artery Disease: Management in the Post NOBLE and EXCEL Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nyal; Kapadia, Samir R; Ellis, Stephen G

    2017-09-01

    The optimal management of unprotected left main coronary artery (ULMCA) disease is currently a debated topic. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has seen an increased adoption for the management of ULMCA disease after numerous small-scale randomised trials and cohort studies showed equipoise with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for low complexity lesions. The recently published NOBLE and EXCEL trials are two of the largest international randomised clinical trials comparing PCI and CABG in patients with ULMCA disease. In lieu of all the available evidence, PCI appears to be equivalent to CABG in regard to mortality in patients with ULMCA disease. In non-diabetic patients with low complexity coronary disease (SYNTAX score ≤32), PCI appears to be a reasonable alternative to CABG, especially for ostial and midshaft left main coronary lesions. CABG is preferable in the presence of diabetes, multivessel coronary disease in addition to ULMCA or complex coronary lesions (SYNTAX score >33) including distal left main lesions.

  20. Factors associated with coronary artery disease progression assessed by serial coronary computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, Gabriel Cordeiro; Gottlieb, Ilan; Rothstein, Tamara; Derenne, Maria Eduarda; Sabioni, Leticia; Lima, Ronaldo de Souza Leão; Lima, João A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) allows for noninvasive coronary artery disease (CAD) phenotyping. Factors related to CAD progression are epidemiologically valuable. Objective: To identify factors associated with CAD progression in patients undergoing sequential CCTA testing. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 384 consecutive patients who had at least two CCTA studies between December 2005 and March 2013. Due to limitations in the quantification of CAD progression, we excluded patients who had undergone surgical revascularization previously or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) between studies. CAD progression was defined as any increase in the adapted segment stenosis score (calculated using the number of diseased segments and stenosis severity) in all coronary segments without stent (in-stent restenosis was excluded from the analysis). Stepwise logistic regression was used to assess variables associated with CAD progression. Results: From a final population of 234 patients, a total of 117 (50%) had CAD progression. In a model accounting for major CAD risk factors and other baseline characteristics, only age (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.01–1.07), interstudy interval (OR 1.03, 95%CI 1.01–1.04), and past PCI (OR 3.66, 95%CI 1.77–7.55) showed an independent relationship with CAD progression. Conclusions: A history of PCI with stent placement was independently associated with a 3.7-fold increase in the odds of CAD progression, excluding in-stent restenosis. Age and interstudy interval were also independent predictors of progression. (author)

  1. Factors associated with coronary artery disease progression assessed by serial coronary computed tomography angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Gabriel Cordeiro; Gottlieb, Ilan, E-mail: ilangottlieb@gmail.com [Casa de Saúde São José, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rothstein, Tamara; Derenne, Maria Eduarda; Sabioni, Leticia; Lima, Ronaldo de Souza Leão [Centro de Diagnóstico por Imagem CDPI, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lima, João A. C. [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Background: Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) allows for noninvasive coronary artery disease (CAD) phenotyping. Factors related to CAD progression are epidemiologically valuable. Objective: To identify factors associated with CAD progression in patients undergoing sequential CCTA testing. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 384 consecutive patients who had at least two CCTA studies between December 2005 and March 2013. Due to limitations in the quantification of CAD progression, we excluded patients who had undergone surgical revascularization previously or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) between studies. CAD progression was defined as any increase in the adapted segment stenosis score (calculated using the number of diseased segments and stenosis severity) in all coronary segments without stent (in-stent restenosis was excluded from the analysis). Stepwise logistic regression was used to assess variables associated with CAD progression. Results: From a final population of 234 patients, a total of 117 (50%) had CAD progression. In a model accounting for major CAD risk factors and other baseline characteristics, only age (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 1.01–1.07), interstudy interval (OR 1.03, 95%CI 1.01–1.04), and past PCI (OR 3.66, 95%CI 1.77–7.55) showed an independent relationship with CAD progression. Conclusions: A history of PCI with stent placement was independently associated with a 3.7-fold increase in the odds of CAD progression, excluding in-stent restenosis. Age and interstudy interval were also independent predictors of progression. (author)

  2. Coronary artery disease in Brazil: contemporary management and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanczyk, C A; Ribeiro, J P

    2009-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are responsible for 32% of total mortality in Brazil, mostly due to cerebrovascular and coronary artery disease. Epidemiological and socio-economical factors play a pivotal role on the distribution, severity and management of coronary artery disease, and the burden is greater in the southeast and south regions of the country, with a higher mortality in low-income populations. The Brazilian healthcare structure is divided into two complementary systems-public and private-but 75% of the population is covered exclusively by the public system. Some Brazilian institutions offer state-of-the-art care to patients with acute and chronic coronary artery disease, but regional inequalities in medical care are still significant. National policies will have to be implemented to fight risk factors, to ensure primary prevention strategies, including assistance on drugs with known protective effects, areas to be tackled by both the private and the public health sectors. Finally, large investments will have to be made to improve tertiary care, to reorganise systems of care for acute patients and mainly to ensure prompt access and continuity of cardiac care and secondary prevention strategies for the whole population.

  3. Ethnicity and Onset of Cardiovascular Disease: A CALIBER Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-07

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Coronary Heart Disease; Sudden Cardiac Death; Intracerebral Haemorrhage; Heart Failure; Ischemic Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Stroke; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Stable Angina Pectoris; Subarachnoid Haemorrhage; Transient Ischemic Attack; Unstable Angina; Cardiac Arrest

  4. Periodontal disease, tooth loss and coronary heart disease assessed by coronary angiography: a cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, S M; Pereira, S S; Barbisan, J N; Vieira, L; Saba-Chujfi, E; Haas, A N; Rösing, C K

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the association between periodontal disease, tooth loss and coronary heart disease (CHD). There is still controversy about the relationship between periodontal disease and tooth loss with vessel obstruction assessed using coronary angiography. This cross-sectional study included 195 patients that underwent coronary angiography and presented with at least six teeth. Patients were classified into three categories of coronary obstruction severity: absence; one or more vessels with ≤ 50% obstruction; and one or more vessels with ≥ 50% obstruction. The extent of coronary obstruction was dichotomized into 0 and ≥ 1 affected vessels. A periodontist blinded to patient CHD status conducted a full mouth examination to determine mean clinical attachment loss, mean periodontal probing depth and tooth loss. Multiple logistic regression models were applied adjusting for age, gender, hypertension, smoking, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein. Most patients were males (62.1%) older than 60 years (50.8%), and 61% of them had CHD. Mean periodontal probing depth, clinical attachment loss and tooth loss were 2.64 ± 0.72 mm, 4.40 ± 1.31 mm and 12.50 ± 6.98 teeth respectively. In the multivariable models, tooth loss was significantly associated with a higher chance of having at least one obstructed vessel (odds ratio = 1.04; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.09) and with vessel obstruction ≥ 50% (odds ratio = 1.06; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.11). No significant associations were found between periodontal variables and vessel obstruction. Tooth loss was found to be a risk indicator for CHD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Association of changes in health-related quality of life in coronary heart disease with coronary procedures and sociodemographic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rollag Arnfinn

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have focused on the association between the sociodemographic characteristics of a patient with the change in health-related quality of life (HRQOL following invasive coronary procedures, and the results remain inconclusive. The objective of the present study was to measure the temporal changes in HRQOL of patients with coronary heart disease, and assess how these changes are associated with invasive coronary procedures and sociodemographic characteristics. Methods This was a prospective study of 254 patients with angina pectoris and 90 patients with acute coronary syndrome. HRQOL was assessed with the multi-item scales and summary components of the SF-36, both 6 weeks and 2 years after baseline hospitalization in 1998. Paired t-tests and multiple regression analyses were used to assess temporal changes in HRQOL and to identify the associated factors. Results Physical components of HRQOL had improved most during the 2 years following invasive coronary procedures. Our findings indicated that patients with angina pectoris who were younger, male, and more educated were most likely to increase their HRQOL following invasive coronary procedures. When adjusting for baseline HRQOL scores, invasive coronary procedures and sociodemographic characteristics did not explain temporal changes in patients with acute coronary syndrome, possibly due to higher comorbidity. Conclusion Sociodemographic characteristics should be taken into account when comparing and interpreting changes in HRQOL scores in patients with and without invasive coronary procedures.

  6. Left ventricular diastolic function in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, P.T.

    1986-01-01

    In 302 patients with confirmed coronary disease we determined the left ventricular diastolic function with the Nuclear Stethoscope by the aid of the Peak Filling Rate (PFR) and the Time to Peak Filling Rate (TPFR). Moreover we investigated the ejection fraction (EF). 201 patients had already suffered a myocardial infarction, of these 99 an anterior wall and 102 an inferior wall infarction. The remaining 101 patients had a CAD without a history of myocardial infarction. The PFR was 2.19 ± 0.65 EDV/sec in the 99 patients after anterior wall infarction and 2.62 ± 0.85 EDV/sec in the 102 patients after inferior wall infarction and 2.79 ± 0.85 EDV/sec in 101 patients with coronary artery disease without a history of myocardial infarction. For the PFR there could be found a statistically significant difference between normal patients and patients after anterior wall infarction (p [de

  7. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    -blind placebo-controlled trials could not confirm the initial high efficacy of either the growth factor protein or the gene therapy approaches observed in earlier small trials. The clinical studies so far have all been without any gene-related serious adverse events. Future trials will focus on whether...... an improvement in clinical results can be obtained with a cocktail of growth factors or by a combination of gene and stem cell therapy in patients with severe coronary artery disease, which cannot be treated effectively with current treatment strategies....... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...

  8. Myocardial flow reserve is influenced by both coronary artery stenosis severity and coronary risk factors in patients with suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Naya, Masanao; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Morita, Koichi; Katoh, Chietsugu; Inubushi, Masayuki; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara

    2006-01-01

    Myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurement has an important role in assessing the functional severity of coronary artery stenosis. However, a discrepancy between the anatomical severity of coronary artery stenosis and MFR is often observed. Such a discrepancy may be explained by coronary risk factors. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of coronary artery stenosis severity and risk factors on MFR. Seventy-four patients suspected to have coronary artery disease and seven age-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) and MFR were measured using 15 O-labelled water PET. Regional MFR was calculated in regions with significant coronary artery stenosis (stenotic regions) and in regions without significant stenosis (remote regions). The contributions of coronary artery stenosis severity and coronary risk factors were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. In stenotic regions, MFR correlated inversely with coronary artery stenosis severity (r=-0.50, p<0.01). Univariate analysis did not show any significant difference in MFR between the patients with and the patients without each risk factor. In remote regions, however, MFR was significantly decreased in the diabetes and smoking groups (each p<0.05). By multivariate analysis, diabetes and smoking were independent predictors of MFR (each p<0.05). In the group with more than one risk factor, MFR was significantly lower (2.78±0.79) than in the other group (3.40±1.22, p<0.05). MFR is influenced not only by coronary stenosis severity but also by coronary risk factors. In particular, the influence of risk factors should be considered in regions without severe coronary stenosis. (orig.)

  9. Intensive lifestyle changes for reversal of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornish, D; Scherwitz, L W; Billings, J H; Brown, S E; Gould, K L; Merritt, T A; Sparler, S; Armstrong, W T; Ports, T A; Kirkeeide, R L; Hogeboom, C; Brand, R J

    1998-12-16

    The Lifestyle Heart Trial demonstrated that intensive lifestyle changes may lead to regression of coronary atherosclerosis after 1 year. To determine the feasibility of patients to sustain intensive lifestyle changes for a total of 5 years and the effects of these lifestyle changes (without lipid-lowering drugs) on coronary heart disease. Randomized controlled trial conducted from 1986 to 1992 using a randomized invitational design. Forty-eight patients with moderate to severe coronary heart disease were randomized to an intensive lifestyle change group or to a usual-care control group, and 35 completed the 5-year follow-up quantitative coronary arteriography. Two tertiary care university medical centers. Intensive lifestyle changes (10% fat whole foods vegetarian diet, aerobic exercise, stress management training, smoking cessation, group psychosocial support) for 5 years. Adherence to intensive lifestyle changes, changes in coronary artery percent diameter stenosis, and cardiac events. Experimental group patients (20 [71%] of 28 patients completed 5-year follow-up) made and maintained comprehensive lifestyle changes for 5 years, whereas control group patients (15 [75%] of 20 patients completed 5-year follow-up) made more moderate changes. In the experimental group, the average percent diameter stenosis at baseline decreased 1.75 absolute percentage points after 1 year (a 4.5% relative improvement) and by 3.1 absolute percentage points after 5 years (a 7.9% relative improvement). In contrast, the average percent diameter stenosis in the control group increased by 2.3 percentage points after 1 year (a 5.4% relative worsening) and by 11.8 percentage points after 5 years (a 27.7% relative worsening) (P=.001 between groups. Twenty-five cardiac events occurred in 28 experimental group patients vs 45 events in 20 control group patients during the 5-year follow-up (risk ratio for any event for the control group, 2.47 [95% confidence interval, 1.48-4.20]). More regression

  10. Specific perfusion pattern in stress 201Tl myocardial scintigraphy of left main coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasugi, Shigetoshi; Shibata, Nobuhiko; Kobayashi, Tohru; Fudemoto, Yoshiyuki; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa; Nakano, Shunichi

    1986-01-01

    The usefulness of stress 201 Tl myocardial scintigraphy for identifying left main coronary artery disease was evaluated with data from 23 patients with 50% or more narrowing of the left main coronary artery and 56 patients with 75% or more narrowing of the major coronary arteries but without left main coronary artery involvement (no left main coronary artery disease). Quantitative evaluation of stress perfusion scintigrams in all five patients with narrowing of the left main coronary artery of 90% or more showed a characteristic perfusion pattern (left main pattern) of extensive homogeneous defect over the whole anterolateral segment and simultaneous defects in all radii of the high anteroseptal and high posterolateral segments. On the other hand, such a perfusion pattern was noted in only 1 of 18 patients with less than 90% stenosis of the left main coronary artery and in only 1 of 56 patients with no left coronary artery disease. (orig.)

  11. The independent relationship between triglycerides and coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Alan; Hokanson, John E

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to review epidemiologic studies to reassess whether serum levels of triglycerides should be considered independently of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) as a predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods and results: We systematically reviewed population-based cohort studies in which baseline serum levels of triglycerides and HDL-C were included as explanatory variables in multivariate analyses with the development of CHD (coronary events or coronary death) as dependent variable. A total of 32 unique reports describing 38 cohorts were included. The independent association between elevated triglycerides and risk of CHD was statistically significant in 16 of 30 populations without pre-existing CHD. Among populations with diabetes mellitus or pre-existing CHD, or the elderly, triglycerides were not significantly independently associated with CHD in any of 8 cohorts. Triglycerides and HDL-C were mutually exclusive predictors of coronary events in 12 of 20 analyses of patients without pre-existing CHD. Conclusions: Epidemiologic studies provide evidence of an association between triglycerides and the development of primary CHD independently of HDL-C. Evidence of an inverse relationship between triglycerides and HDL-C suggests that both should be considered in CHD risk estimation and as targets for intervention. PMID:19436658

  12. The independent relationship between triglycerides and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Alan; Hokanson, John E

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to review epidemiologic studies to reassess whether serum levels of triglycerides should be considered independently of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) as a predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD). We systematically reviewed population-based cohort studies in which baseline serum levels of triglycerides and HDL-C were included as explanatory variables in multivariate analyses with the development of CHD (coronary events or coronary death) as dependent variable. A total of 32 unique reports describing 38 cohorts were included. The independent association between elevated triglycerides and risk of CHD was statistically significant in 16 of 30 populations without pre-existing CHD. Among populations with diabetes mellitus or pre-existing CHD, or the elderly, triglycerides were not significantly independently associated with CHD in any of 8 cohorts. Triglycerides and HDL-C were mutually exclusive predictors of coronary events in 12 of 20 analyses of patients without pre-existing CHD. Epidemiologic studies provide evidence of an association between triglycerides and the development of primary CHD independently of HDL-C. Evidence of an inverse relationship between triglycerides and HDL-C suggests that both should be considered in CHD risk estimation and as targets for intervention.

  13. Reduced Antiplatelet Effect of Aspirin Does Not Predict Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Neergaard-Petersen, Søs; Würtz, Morten; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2017-08-05

    Increased platelet aggregation during antiplatelet therapy may predict cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease. The majority of these patients receive aspirin monotherapy. We aimed to investigate whether high platelet-aggregation levels predict cardiovascular events in stable coronary artery disease patients treated with aspirin. We included 900 stable coronary artery disease patients with either previous myocardial infarction, type 2 diabetes mellitus, or both. All patients received single antithrombotic therapy with 75 mg aspirin daily. Platelet aggregation was evaluated 1 hour after aspirin intake using the VerifyNow Aspirin Assay (Accriva Diagnostics) and Multiplate Analyzer (Roche; agonists: arachidonic acid and collagen). Adherence to aspirin was confirmed by serum thromboxane B 2 . The primary end point was the composite of nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and cardiovascular death. At 3-year follow-up, 78 primary end points were registered. The primary end point did not occur more frequently in patients with high platelet-aggregation levels (first versus fourth quartile) assessed by VerifyNow (hazard ratio: 0.5 [95% CI, 0.3-1.1], P =0.08) or Multiplate using arachidonic acid (hazard ratio: 1.0 [95% CI, 0.5-2.1], P =0.92) or collagen (hazard ratio: 1.4 [95% CI, 0.7-2.8], P =0.38). Similar results were found for the composite secondary end point (nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, stent thrombosis, and all-cause death) and the single end points. Thromboxane B 2 levels did not predict any end points. Renal insufficiency was the only clinical risk factor predicting the primary and secondary end points. This study is the largest to investigate platelet aggregation in stable coronary artery disease patients receiving aspirin as single antithrombotic therapy. We found that high platelet-aggregation levels did not predict cardiovascular events. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart

  14. [Risk management of coronary artery disease--pharmacological therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    Treatment of coronary artery disease primarily aims at reducing the severity and frequency of cardiac symptoms and improving prognosis. Both goals can be achieved by the administration of beta-receptor blockers, which are now used as first-line therapy in these patients. Calcium channel blockers or nitrates should be given in the event of contraindications or severe intolerance to beta-receptor blocking therapy. Only long-acting calcium channel blockers should be used in this setting. Another indication for additional treatment with calcium channel blockers and nitrates is given when the efficacy of beta-blocker therapy is not sufficient to relieve symptoms. Nitroglycerin and nitrates are the drugs of choice for the treatment of the acute angina pectoris attack. Calcium channel blockers are used as first-line treatment in patients with vasospastic angina. In patients with syndrome X, nitrates as well as calcium channel blockers or beta-receptor blockers can be administered. In the absence of contraindications, every patient with coronary artery disease should be given aspirin. A daily dosage of 75 to 150 mg is sufficient to reduce the rate of future cardiac events. Clopidogrel should be given in every patient with intolerance or contraindications for aspirin. Increased plasma homocystein levels seem to be a risk factor for coronary artery disease. Homocystein levels can be reduced by dietary means as well as supplementation of folic acid or vitamin B complex. There is no evidence from controlled randomised studies that a decrease of homocystein is beneficial for the prognosis of patients with coronary artery disease.

  15. The independent relationship between triglycerides and coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Morrison, John E Hokanson

    2008-01-01

    Alan Morrison1, John E Hokanson21SCRIBCO, Blue Bell, PA, USA; 2Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado at Denver Denver, CO, USAAims: The aim was to review epidemiologic studies to reassess whether serum levels of triglycerides should be considered independently of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) as a predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD).Methods and results: We systematically reviewed population-based cohort studies in which basel...

  16. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Lindsey; Thompson, David R; Oldridge, Neil; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rees, Karen; Martin, Nicole; Taylor, Rod S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single most common cause of death globally. However, with falling CHD mortality rates, an increasing number of people live with CHD and may need support to manage their symptoms and prognosis. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) aims to improve the health and outcomes of people with CHD. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of exercise...

  17. Radiation for not-so-benign coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massullo, Vincent

    1996-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of malignant disease has long been accepted. More limited application of radiation in the treatment of benign conditions has been proven but generally not pursued. On the centennial anniversary of radiation therapy, a promising, but as yet unproved, application of radiation for treatment of benign vascular disease has become an exciting field of research, speculation, and controversy. This panel presentation will discuss the rationales and dilemmas of applying radiation in the prevention of arterial restenosis after therapeutic intervention. Coronary artery bypass grafting and more recently coronary angioplasty have become accepted, effective therapies to reverse significant coronary stenosis, and thereby benefit the majority of patients with coronary artery disease. However, a large proportion of patients will suffer restenosis in spite of optimal conventional therapy. The search for a means to prevent such restenosis has been partially successful by therapies, and even engineering intravascular devices. In spite of these efforts, a significant number of patients will fail today's conventional therapy and suffer arterial restenosis. Fibroblast myointimal proliferation is felt to be a major element in this restenosis process. Clinical experience shows that radiation inhibits other similar benign fibroblast proliferative processes such as keloid scar formation and heterotopic ossification. Radiation is now being considered as a means to inhibit myointimal fibroblast proliferation and hopefully prevent attendant arterial restenosis as well. This has catalyzed various animal model investigations that have shown significant arteries. Promising results in the animal model and in very early human institutional trials. These trials are designed to determine if radiation is truly effective and can be safely delivered to prevent restenosis in diseased human arteries. This panel discussion will provide a firm basic science and

  18. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  19. Cost effectiveness of coronary angiography and calcium scoring using CT and stress MRI for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc; Hamm, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    We compared the cost effectiveness of recent approaches [coronary angiography and calcium scoring using computed tomography (CT) and stress magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] to the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) with those of the traditional diagnostic modalities [conventional angiography (CATH), exercise ECG, and stress echocardiography] using a decision tree model. For patients with a 10% to 50% pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease, non-invasive coronary angiography using CT was the most cost effective approach, with costs per correctly identified CAD patient of EUR4,435 (10% likelihood) to EUR1,469 (50% likelihood). Only for a pretest likelihood of 30% to 40% was calcium scoring using CT more cost effective than any of the traditional diagnostic modalities, while MRI was not cost effective for any pretest likelihood. At a pretest likelihood of 60%, CT coronary angiography and CATH were equally effective, while CATH was most cost effective for a pretest likelihood of at least 70%. In conclusion, up to a pretest likelihood for coronary artery disease of 50%, CT coronary angiography is the most cost-effective procedure, being superior to the other new modalities and the most commonly used traditional diagnostic modalities. With a very high likelihood for disease (above 60%), CATH is the most effective procedure from the perspective of society. (orig.)

  20. Correlation study on waist circumference-triglyceride (WT) index and coronary artery scores in patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R-F; Liu, X-Y; Lin, Z; Zhang, G

    2015-01-01

    Coronary disease is analyzed through common lipid profiles, but these analyses fail to account for residual risk due to abdominal weight and elevated TG levels. We aimed to investigate the relationship between the waist circumference × triglyceride index (WT index) and the Coronary Artery Score (CAS) in patients with coronary heart disease. 346 patients in our Cardiology Department were recruited from September 2007 to August 2011 and divided into two groups according to whether the patients presented with metabolic syndrome. We performed coronary angiography using the standard Judkins method. The severity of coronary artery stenosis and the CAS were calculated and analyzed with a computerized quantitative analysis system. The signs index, which includes the body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-hip-ratio, and waist-height-ratio, the blood glucose and blood lipid index of all the patients were collected and used to calculate the WT index (waist circumference x triglyceride index. We performed a correlative analysis with age, gender, body mass index, blood glucose and blood lipid, blood pressure and other risk indicators of all patients as the dependent variables and the CAS as the independent variable. We show that the CAS is positively correlated to the WT index. Several lipid profiles and waist circumference were significantly associated with the CAS. The WT index is correlated to the CAS and is a good predictor for the development of coronary artery disease; it can be applied in the clinic for early intervention in populations at risk for coronary heart disease.

  1. Bioresorbable scaffolds in the treatment of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Yaojun Zhang,1,2 Christos V Bourantas,1 Vasim Farooq,1 Takashi Muramatsu,1 Roberto Diletti,1 Yoshinobu Onuma,1 Hector M Garcia-Garcia,1 Patrick W Serruys11Thoraxcenter, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 2Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Drug-eluting stents have reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis and have broadened the application in percutaneous coronary intervention in coronary artery disease. However, the concept of using a permanent metallic endovascular device to restore the patency of a stenotic artery has inherited pitfalls, namely the presence of a foreign body within the artery causing vascular inflammation, late complications such as restenosis and stent thrombosis, and impeding the restoration of the physiologic function of the stented segment. Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS were introduced to potentially overcome these limitations, as they provide temporary scaffolding and then disappear, liberating the treated vessel from its cage. Currently, several BRSs are available, undergoing evaluation either in clinical trials or in preclinical settings. The aim of this review is to present the new developments in BRS technology, describe the mechanisms involved in the resorption process, and discuss the potential future prospects of this innovative therapy.Keywords: bioresorbable scaffold, drug-eluting stent, biodegradable, design, mechanism, coronary artery disease

  2. European Consensus on Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, G

    1988-07-01

    The European Consensus on Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease has recommended that providing care for individuals at particular risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) requires case finding through medical examinations in primary care, hospital and employment health examination settings. Decisions concerning management of elevated lipid levels should be based on overall cardiovascular risk. The goal of reducing cholesterol levels through risk reduction can ultimately be accomplished only with the implementation of health education efforts directed toward all age groups and actions by government and supranational agencies, including adequate food labelling to identify fat content, selective taxation to encourage healthful habits and wider availability of exercise facilities. Only measures directed at the overall population can eventually reach the large proportion of individuals at mildly to moderately increased risk for CAD. The European Policy Statement on the Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease recognizes that the question of lipid elevation as a risk factor for CAD involves assessment, not only of cholesterol level alone, but also of triglycerides and the HDL cholesterol lipid fraction. Five specific categories of dyslipidemia have been identified, with individualized screening and treatment strategies advised for each. It is the consensus of the study group panel members that these procedures are both practical and feasible. They begin the necessary long term process to reduce the unacceptably high levels of morbidity and mortality due to CAD throughout the European community.

  3. Genetic determinants and stroke in children with sickle cell disease,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela O.W. Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To verify genetic determinants associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease (SCD. Methods: Prospective cohort with 110 children submitted to neonatal screening by the Neonatal Screening Program, between 1998 and 2007, with SCD diagnosis, followed at a regional reference public service for hemoglobinopathies. The analyzed variables were type of hemoglobinopathy, gender, coexistence with alpha thalassemia (α-thal, haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster, and stroke. The final analysis was conducted with 66 children with sickle cell anemia (SCA, using the chi-squared test in the program SPSS® version 14.0. Results: Among children with SCD, 60% had SCA. The prevalence of coexistence with α-thal was 30.3% and the Bantu haplotype (CAR was identified in 89.2%. The incidence of stroke was significantly higher in those with SCA (27.3% vs. 2.3%; p = 0.001 and males (24.1% vs. 9.6%; p = 0.044. The presence of α-thal (p = 0.196, the CAR haplotype (p = 0.543, and socioeconomic factors were not statistically significant in association with the occurrence of stroke. Conclusion: There is a high incidence of stroke in male children and in children with SCA. Coexistence with α-thal and haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster did not show any significant association with stroke. The heterogeneity between previously evaluated populations, the non-reproducibility between studies, and the need to identify factors associated with stroke in patients with SCA indicate the necessity of conducting further research to demonstrate the relevance of genetic factors in stroke related to SCD.

  4. Genetic determinants and stroke in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniela O W; Ribeiro, Luiz C; Sudário, Lysla C; Teixeira, Maria T B; Martins, Marina L; Pittella, Anuska M O L; Junior, Irtis de O Fernandes

    To verify genetic determinants associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Prospective cohort with 110 children submitted to neonatal screening by the Neonatal Screening Program, between 1998 and 2007, with SCD diagnosis, followed at a regional reference public service for hemoglobinopathies. The analyzed variables were type of hemoglobinopathy, gender, coexistence with alpha thalassemia (α-thal), haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster, and stroke. The final analysis was conducted with 66 children with sickle cell anemia (SCA), using the chi-squared test in the program SPSS ® version 14.0. Among children with SCD, 60% had SCA. The prevalence of coexistence with α-thal was 30.3% and the Bantu haplotype (CAR) was identified in 89.2%. The incidence of stroke was significantly higher in those with SCA (27.3% vs. 2.3%; p=0.001) and males (24.1% vs. 9.6%; p=0.044). The presence of α-thal (p=0.196), the CAR haplotype (p=0.543), and socioeconomic factors were not statistically significant in association with the occurrence of stroke. There is a high incidence of stroke in male children and in children with SCA. Coexistence with α-thal and haplotypes of the beta globin chain cluster did not show any significant association with stroke. The heterogeneity between previously evaluated populations, the non-reproducibility between studies, and the need to identify factors associated with stroke in patients with SCA indicate the necessity of conducting further research to demonstrate the relevance of genetic factors in stroke related to SCD. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Reconsidering the Gatekeeper Paradigm for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Stable Coronary Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman-Marcus, Joshua; Weintraub, William S; Boden, William E

    2017-10-15

    Major randomized clinical trials over the last decade support the role of optimal medical therapy for the initial management approach for patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD), whereas percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) ought to be reserved for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Likewise, several studies have continued to demonstrate the superiority of coronary artery bypass grafting surgery over PCI in many patients with extensive multivessel CAD, especially those with diabetes. Nevertheless, the decision-making paradigm for patients with stable CAD often continues to propagate the upfront use of "ad hoc PCI" and disadvantages alternative therapeutic approaches. In our editorial, we discuss how multiple systemic and interpersonal factors continue to favor early revascularization with PCI in stable patients. We discuss whether the interventional cardiologist can be an unbiased "gatekeeper" for the use of PCI or whether other physicians should also be involved with the patient in decision-making. Finally, we offer suggestions that can redefine the gatekeeper role to facilitate an evidence-based approach that embraces shared decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Incremental value of the CT coronary calcium score for the prediction of coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genders, Tessa S.S. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology, P.O. Box 2040, CA, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, CA, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pugliese, Francesca; Mollet, Nico R.; Meijboom, W. Bob; Weustink, Annick C.; Mieghem, Carlos A.G. van; Feyter, Pim J. de [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, CA, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, P.O. Box 2040, CA, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hunink, M.G.M. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology, P.O. Box 2040, CA, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, CA, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Harvard University, Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston (United States)

    2010-10-15

    To validate published prediction models for the presence of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with new onset stable typical or atypical angina pectoris and to assess the incremental value of the CT coronary calcium score (CTCS). We searched the literature for clinical prediction rules for the diagnosis of obstructive CAD, defined as {>=}50% stenosis in at least one vessel on conventional coronary angiography. Significant variables were re-analysed in our dataset of 254 patients with logistic regression. CTCS was subsequently included in the models. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to assess diagnostic performance. Re-analysing the variables used by Diamond and Forrester yielded an AUC of 0.798, which increased to 0.890 by adding CTCS. For Pryor, Morise 1994, Morise 1997 and Shaw the AUC increased from 0.838 to 0.901, 0.831 to 0.899, 0.840 to 0.898 and 0.833 to 0.899. CTCS significantly improved model performance in each model. Validation demonstrated good diagnostic performance across all models. CTCS improves the prediction of the presence of obstructive CAD, independent of clinical predictors, and should be considered in its diagnostic work-up. (orig.)

  7. Incremental value of the CT coronary calcium score for the prediction of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genders, Tessa S.S.; Pugliese, Francesca; Mollet, Nico R.; Meijboom, W. Bob; Weustink, Annick C.; Mieghem, Carlos A.G. van; Feyter, Pim J. de; Hunink, M.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    To validate published prediction models for the presence of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with new onset stable typical or atypical angina pectoris and to assess the incremental value of the CT coronary calcium score (CTCS). We searched the literature for clinical prediction rules for the diagnosis of obstructive CAD, defined as ≥50% stenosis in at least one vessel on conventional coronary angiography. Significant variables were re-analysed in our dataset of 254 patients with logistic regression. CTCS was subsequently included in the models. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to assess diagnostic performance. Re-analysing the variables used by Diamond and Forrester yielded an AUC of 0.798, which increased to 0.890 by adding CTCS. For Pryor, Morise 1994, Morise 1997 and Shaw the AUC increased from 0.838 to 0.901, 0.831 to 0.899, 0.840 to 0.898 and 0.833 to 0.899. CTCS significantly improved model performance in each model. Validation demonstrated good diagnostic performance across all models. CTCS improves the prediction of the presence of obstructive CAD, independent of clinical predictors, and should be considered in its diagnostic work-up. (orig.)

  8. Etiologies of coronary artery disease in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopelson, G.; Herwig, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    The growing number of patient reports of angina and myocardial infarction during cancer management prompted this review of coronary artery disease (CAD) in cancer patients. There is no definite evidence that cancer per se nor any particular tumor type predisposes to coronary atherosclerosis. Cardiac metastases can cause CAD via tumor emboli, extrinsic compression, or ostial obstruction; in these patients the diagnosis of CAD as a result of cardiac metastases often is not made until death. The course of these patients usually is fulminant. Tumor-associated coagulation disorders and non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis can cause coronary thromboemboli; treatment should be initiated early as these patients often are not in a terminal state when such CAD develops. Post-radiation CAD seen in experimental animals (via fibrosis and/or accelerated atherogenesis) can be extrapolated to the clinical situation. This is best evidenced by 10 young patients, with minimal coronary risk factors in most, who developed angina and/or myocardial infarction 2 to 100 months after chest radiotherapy; approximate mediastinal doses ranged from 1440 Roentgen to 5075 rad. In 5 patients there was no significant atherosclerosis beyond the radiation portals; 2 had successful saphenous vein bypass grafts. Lipid-lowering therapy may prevent post-radiotherapy atherogenesis in high risk individuals. Chemotherapy (acting directly or synergistically with radiotherapy) has caused angina and myocardial infarction within hours to days after the infusion of agents both classically cardiotoxic as well as others, although the exact mechanism(s) for coronary artery damage as a result of chemotherapy presently is unknown

  9. Value of multiple risk factors in predicting coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhengbin; Zhang Ruiyan; Zhang Qi; Yang Zhenkun; Hu Jian; Zhang Jiansheng; Shen Weifeng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to assess the relationship between correlative comprehension risk factors and coronary arterial disease and to build up a simple mathematical model to evaluate the extension of coronary artery lesion in patients with stable angina. Methods: A total of 1024 patients with chest pain who underwent coronary angiography were divided into CAD group(n=625)and control group(n=399) based on at least one significant coronary artery narrowing more than 50% in diameter. Independent risk factors for CAD were evaluated and multivariate logistic regression model and receiver-operating characteristic(ROC) curves were used to estimate the independent influence factor for CAD and built up a simple formula for clinical use. Results: Multivariate regression analysis revealed that UACR > 7.25 μg/mg(OR=3.6; 95% CI 2.6-4.9; P 20 mmol/L(OR=3.2; 95% CI 2.3-4.4; P 2 (OR=2.3; 95% CI 1.4-3.8; P 2.6 mmol/L (OR 2.141; 95% CI 1.586-2.890; P 7.25 μg/mg + 1.158 x hsCRP > 20 mmol/L + 0.891 GFR 2 + 0.831 x LVEF 2.6 mmol/L + 0.676 x smoking history + 0.594 x male + 0.459 x diabetes + 0.425 x hypertension). Area under the curve was 0.811 (P < 0.01), and the optimal probability value for predicting severe stage of CAD was 0.977 (sensitivity 49.0%, specificity 92.7% ). Conclusions: Risk factors including renal insufficiency were the main predictors for CAD. The logistic regression model is the non-invasive method of choice for predicting the extension of coronary artery lesion in patients with stable agiana. (authors)

  10. [THE INFLUENCE OF MONO- AND MULTIVASCULAR LESIONS OF CORONARY ARTERIES ON THE COURSE OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypalo, A; Kravchun, P; Kadykova, O

    2017-03-01

    The article assesses the influence of mono- and multivascular lesions of coronary arteries on the course of coronary heart disease at patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. For this purpose, a comprehensive survey of 75 patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 was arranged. Depending on the number of vascular lesions of the coronary arteries, according to the data of coronary arteries computer tomography, all patients were divided into two subgroups. The first subgroup included 27 patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with monovascular lesions of coronary arteries. To the second subgroup were included 48 patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries. During the analysis of carbohydrate metabolism in cases of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 the HOMA index increase by 25.40% and insulin level increase by 17.05% were revealed at patients with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries in comparison with patients with monovascular lesions of coronary arteries, respectively. The combination of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries was associated with an increase of sortilin level (233,47±47,85 ng/l). A significant increase in triglycerides, lipoprotein cholesterol of very low density influences greatly on the progression of coronary atherosclerosis with lesions of greater number of coronary arteries at patients surveyed. At patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries the left ventricle myocardial re-modeling occurred through the increase of left ventricle's size and cavity.

  11. Left ventricular diastolic function in patients with coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, P.T.

    1986-08-01

    In 302 patients with confirmed coronary disease we determined the left ventricular diastolic function with the Nuclear Stethoscope by the aid of the Peak Filling Rate (PFR) and the Time to Peak Filling Rate (TPFR). Moreover we investigated the ejection fraction (EF). 201 patients had already suffered a myocardial infarction, of these 99 an anterior wall and 102 an inferior wall infarction. The remaining 101 patients had a CAD without a history of myocardial infarction. The PFR was 2.19 +- 0.65 EDV/sec in the 99 patients after anterior wall infarction and 2.62 +- 0.85 EDV/sec in the 102 patients after inferior wall infarction and 2.79 +- 0.85 EDV/sec in 101 patients with coronary artery disease without a history of myocardial infarction. For the PFR there could be found a statistically significant difference between normal patients and patients after anterior wall infarction (p < 0.0001), normal patients and patients after inferior wall infarction (p < 0.0001) and normal patients and patients with coronary artery disease (p < 0.0001). The TPFR was 180 +- 37.5 msec after anterior - and 158 +- 50.7 msec after inferior wall infarction and 156 +- 45.2 msec in the patients with CAD without previous infarction. The left ventricular diastolic function (PFR and/or TPFR) was abnormal in 88% after anterior- and in 82% after inferior wall infarction and in 69% in coronary patients without previous myocardial infarction. In comparison with this the ejection fraction was reduced in 66% in anterior- and in 61% inferior wall infarction at rest. These results indicate that the diastolic function at rest appears to be more informative for evaluation of a left ventricular dysfunction than the systolic function at rest.

  12. Concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors and clopidogrel in patients with coronary, cerebrovascular, or peripheral artery disease in the factores de Riesgo y ENfermedad Arterial (FRENA) registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Torrero, Juan Francisco Sánchez; Escudero, Domingo; Suárez, Carmen; Sanclemente, Carmen; Pascual, Ma Teresa; Zamorano, José; Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Monreal, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Among patients receiving clopidogrel for coronary artery disease, concomitant therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been associated with an increased risk for recurrent coronary events. Factores de Riesgo y ENfermedad Arterial (FRENA) is an ongoing, multicenter, observational registry of consecutive outpatients with coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, or peripheral artery disease. We retrospectively examined the influence of concomitant use of PPIs on outcome in patients receiving clopidogrel. As of March 2009, 1222 patients were using clopidogrel: 595 had coronary artery disease, 329 cerebrovascular disease, and 298 had peripheral artery disease. Of these, 519 (42%) were concomitantly using PPIs. Over a mean follow-up of 15 months, 131 patients (11%) had 139 subsequent ischemic events: myocardial infarction 44, ischemic stroke 40, and critical limb ischemia 55. Seventeen of them (13%) died within 15 days of the subsequent event. PPI users had a higher incidence of myocardial infarction (rate ratio, 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-4.8), ischemic stroke (rate ratio, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.03-3.7), and a nonsignificantly higher rate of critical limb ischemia (rate ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.95-2.8) than nonusers. On multivariate analysis, concomitant use of clopidogrel and PPIs was independently associated with an increased risk for subsequent ischemic events both in the whole series of patients (hazard ratio, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.7) and in those with cerebrovascular disease or peripheral artery disease (hazard ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.01-2.4). In patients with established arterial disease, concomitant use of PPIs and clopidogrel was associated with a nearly doubling of the incidence of subsequent myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke. This higher incidence persisted after multivariate adjustment.

  13. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000759.htm Understanding cardiovascular disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... lead to heart attack or stroke. Types of Cardiovascular Disease Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common ...

  14. cholesterol, coronary heart disease and oestrogens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-04-03

    Apr 3, 1971 ... atheromatosis and coronalY heart disease in the human female are reviewed. Aspects ... For example, Barr' recorded mean levels of 197 in normal women aged 18 ..... Epstein, F. H. (1965): J. Chron. Dis.. 18. 735. 26. Kanne!

  15. Perceived social support following percutaneous coronary intervention is a crucial factor in patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähkönen, Outi; Kankkunen, Päivi; Miettinen, Heikki; Lamidi, Marja-Leena; Saaranen, Terhi

    2017-05-01

    To describe perceived social support among patients with coronary heart disease following percutaneous coronary intervention. A low level of social support is considered a risk factor for coronary heart disease in healthy individuals and reduces the likelihood that people diagnosed with coronary heart disease will have a good prognosis. A descriptive cross-sectional study. A survey of 416 patients was conducted in 2013. A self-report instrument, Social Support of People with Coronary Heart Disease, was used. The instrument comprises three dimensions of social support: informational, emotional, functional supports and 16 background variables. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, factor analysis, mean sum variables and multivariate logistic regression. Perceived informational support was primarily high, but respondents' risk factors were not at the target level. The weakest items of informational support were advice on physical activity, continuum of care and rehabilitation. Regarding the items of emotional support, support from other cardiac patients was the weakest. The weakest item of functional support was respondents' sense of the healthcare professionals' care of patients coping with their disease. Background variables associated with perceived social support were gender, marital status, level of formal education, profession, physical activity, duration of coronary heart disease and previous myocardial infarction. Healthcare professionals should pay extra attention to women, single patients, physically inactive patients, those demonstrating a lower level of education, those with a longer duration of CHD, and respondents without previous acute myocardial infarction. Continuum of care and counselling are important to ensure especially among them. This study provides evidence that healthcare professionals should be more aware of the individual needs for social support among patients with coronary heart disease after percutaneous coronary intervention

  16. Coronary artery disease in Africa and the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurdi MI

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Wael Almahmeed1, Mohamad Samir Arnaout2, Rafik Chettaoui3, Mohsen Ibrahim4, Mohamed Ibrahim Kurdi5, Mohamed Awad Taher6, Giuseppe Mancia71Heart and Vascular Institute, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 2American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon; 3General and Cardiovascular Clinic of Tunis, Tunisia; 4Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; 5King Khalid University Hospital and The Kingdom Hospital, Saudi Arabia; 6Ain Shams University School of Medicine, Cairo, Egypt; 7University of Milan, Bicocca, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Countries in Africa and the Middle East bear a heavy burden from cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of coronary heart disease is promoted in turn by a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, particularly smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and sedentary lifestyles. Patients in Africa and the Middle East present with myocardial infarction at a younger age, on average, compared with patients elsewhere. The projected future burden of mortality from coronary heart disease in Africa and the Middle East is set to outstrip that observed in other geographical regions. Recent detailed nationally representative epidemiological data are lacking for many countries, and high proportions of transient expatriate workers in countries such as Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates complicate the construction of such datasets. However, the development of national registries in some countries is beginning to reveal the nature of coronary heart disease. Improving lifestyles (reducing calorie intake and increasing physical activity in patients in the region will be essential, although cultural and environmental barriers will render this difficult. Appropriate prescribing of pharmacologic treatments is essential in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease. In particular, recent controversies relating to the therapeutic profile of beta-blockers may have reduced their use. The

  17. Impact of chronic kidney disease on long-term ischemic and bleeding outcomes in medically managed patients with acute coronary syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melloni, Chiara; Cornel, Jan H; Hafley, Gail

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: We aimed to study the relationship of chronic kidney disease stages with long-term ischemic and bleeding outcomes in medically managed acute coronary syndrome patients and the influence of more potent antiplatelet therapies on platelet reactivity by chronic kidney disease stage. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: We estimated creatinine clearance for 8953 medically managed acute coronary syndrome patients enrolled in the Targeted Platelet Inhibition to Clarify the Optimal Strategy to Medically Manage Acute Coronary Syndromes trial. Patients were classified by chronic kidney disease stage: normal renal...... function/mild (creatinine clearance >60 mL/min); moderate (creatinine clearance 30-60 mL/min); severe (creatinine clearance event rates through 30 months were evaluated for ischemic (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke; primary end point) and bleeding (Global Use...

  18. Fractional flow reserve derived from coronary CT angiography in stable coronary disease: a new standard in non-invasive testing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noergaard, B.L.; Jensen, J.M.; Leipsic, J.

    2015-01-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) measured during invasive coronary angiography is the gold standard for lesion-specific decisions on coronary revascularization in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Current guidelines recommend non-invasive functional or anatomic testing as a gatekeeper to the catheterization laboratory. However, the ''holy grail'' in non-invasive testing of CAD is to establish a single test that quantifies both coronary lesion severity and the associated ischemia. Most evidence to date of such a test is based on the addition of computational analysis of FFR to the anatomic information obtained from standard-acquired coronary CTA data sets at rest (FFR CT ). This review summarizes the clinical evidence for the use of FFR CT in stable CAD in context to the diagnostic performance of other non-invasive testing modalities. (orig.)

  19. Interventional cardiology and diabetes mellitus: age of effective coronary heart disease treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Yur'evich Kalashnikov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction into clinical practice of coronary angioplasty has provided new possibilities for treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD in patientswith diabetes mellitus. The indications for endovascular interventions and principles of coronary stenting in such patients are described in this article.

  20. Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention or Bypass Surgery in Patients With Unprotected Left Main Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalcante, Rafael; Sotomi, Yohei; Lee, Cheol W.; Ahn, Jung-Min; Farooq, Vasim; Tateishi, Hiroki; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Zeng, Yaping; Suwannasom, Pannipa; Collet, Carlos; Albuquerque, Felipe N.; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Park, Seung-Jung; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2016-01-01

    Currently available randomized data on the comparison between percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) for the treatment of unprotected left main coronary disease (LMD) lacks statistical power due to low numbers of patients enrolled. This study assessed

  1. Risk indicators in coronary cardiac disease and occlusive disease of the peripheral arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, H.

    1982-01-01

    In 160 patients with clinically confirmed coronary heart diseases, angiograms of the coronary vessels, the left ventricle, the abdominal aorta, the pelvic and femoral arteries and the supra-aortic vessels were taken. At the same time the incidence of the risk indicators overweight, hypercholesterinaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, hyperuricaemia, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cigarette smoking was established and compared with the angiograms. Hypercholesterinaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, diabetes mellitus and hypertension are found to be in a clearly positive correlation with the frequency and severity of coronary and peripheral vascular diseases. For hyperuricaemia and overweight a relation to the frequency and severity of peripheral but not coronary vascular stenoses is outlined. Cigarette smoking, again, proves to be a clear risk indicator. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Depressive symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Maria Mendonça da Cunha

    Full Text Available Objective.To assess the presence of depressive symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease in the preoperative period for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG in Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. Methods. A cross-sectional study with 63 hospitalized patients prior to CABG. Two instruments were used for data collection; one for the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, and the other to evaluate the presence of depressive symptoms, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results. The mean age was 58 years; most were male (60.3%; with a partner (81% low educational level (71.4% attended school through elementary school. Among the patients, 36.5% were classified with dysphoria, and 25.4% had some degree of depression (6.3% mild, 17.5% moderate, and 1.6% severe. The group of patients with lower educational level presented higher depressive symptoms. Conclusion. Six of every ten patients with coronary artery disease showed dysphoria or some degree of depression. The results of this study can support the planning of nursing care for patients before and after CABG, as well as the development of public health policies to ensure complete, quality care for these patients, understanding depression as a variable that can interfere with recovery after cardiac surgery.

  3. Coronary artery disease and its association with Vitamin D deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Aggarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD has become the latest scourge of humankind and referred to in this article as CAD, is the end result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of coronary arteries that supply the myocardium, a process also known as atherosclerosis and manifests mostly in the form of chronic stable angina or acute coronary syndrome. Vitamin D has attracted considerable interest recently due to its role in a number of extraskeletal disease processes including multiple sclerosis, malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and CAD. It is also known as sunshine vitamin due to its production in the body following exposure to ultraviolet rays, and it is a unique vitamin as it acts like a hormone with its receptor present in a wide range of tissues including endothelium, which is the important mediator of atherosclerosis and subsequent CAD. A large number of studies conducted in the past have provided the basic scientific framework and this article attempts to explore the role of Vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of CAD and stresses the need for further research to fill up gap in our knowledge.

  4. Matrix metalloproteinase gene polymorphisms in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L.N. Dalepiane

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the pathology underlying the majority of coronary artery disease (CAD. In this study we tested the hypothesis that polymorphic variation in the MMP genes influences the risk of developing atherosclerosis. We analyzed functional polymorphisms in the promoter of the MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9 and MMP-12 genes in 183 Brazilian Caucasian individuals submitted to coronary angiography, of which 67 (37% had normal coronary arteries (control group and 116 (63% had CAD (CAD patient group. The -1607 1G/2G MMP-1, -1171 5A/6A MMP-3, -1562 C/T MMP-9, -82 A/G MMP-12 polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR followed by restriction digestion. No significant differences were observed in allele frequencies between the CAD patients and controls. Haplotype analysis showed no differences between the CAD patients and controls. There was a significant difference in the severity of CAD, as assessed by the number of diseased vessels, in MMP-1 1G/1G homozygous individuals and in those homozygous for the 6A allele of the MMP-3 polymorphism. However, multivariate analysis showed that diabetes mellitus was the only variable independently associated with CAD severity. Our findings indicated that MMP polymorphisms have no significant impact on the risk and severity of CAD.

  5. OBESITY, LEPTIN, AND CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Hergenf, Gülay

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an important health problem both in developed and developing countries. Obesity is an abnormal increase in body weight due to fat deposition. The real cause of obesity is unknown but genetic, environmental factors and family eating habits, hormonal, and psychological factors have roles. Regardless of the origin of the disease, obesity develops when caloric intake exceeds the caloric needs of the individual. Adipose tissue is not merely a fat store, it is metabolically active and al...

  6. Risk of Nonfatal Stroke in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Retrospective Comparison Between Disease Management Programs and Standard Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiefarn, Stefan; Heumann, Christian; Rettelbach, Anja; Kostev, Karel

    2017-07-01

    The present retrospective study examines the influence of disease management programs on nonfatal stroke in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Germany. The evaluation is based on retrospective patient data from the Disease Analyzer (IMS Health). The analysis included 169 414 T2DM patients aged 40 years and older with an initial prescription of antihyperglycemic therapy between January 2004 and December 2014. A total of 86 713 patients participated in a disease management program (DMP) for T2DM and 82 701 patients received standard care. The main outcome measure of this study was nonfatal stroke. Kaplan-Meier curves of DMP and SC patients were compared using log rank test. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to provide an adjusted estimate of the DMP effect. It is apparent from the baseline characteristics that the general health of patients receiving standard care was poorer than that of patients participating in a DMP. The baseline HbA1c value was 7.6% in the DMP group and 7.8% in the SC group. Furthermore, the SC group had a higher proportion of preexisting conditions, such as coronary heart disease (CHD), peripheral arterial occlusive disease (pAOD), and renal insufficiency. The proportion of patients who received insulin in first year therapy was higher in the SC group. Time to event analysis showed that DMP was associated with a delayed occurrence of stroke, because stroke occurred an average of 350 days later in DMP patients than in patients receiving SC (DMP: 1.216 days, RV: 866 days). The Cox model with covariable adjustment confirmed the significant association of DMPs with nonfatal stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (HR 0.71; 95% CI: 0.69-0.74). The present study indicates that DMPs are positively associated with stroke. The possible reasons for this must be verified in further studies.

  7. Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults with Moyamoya Disease: Prognostic Factors for Stroke Recurrence and Functional Outcome after Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng; Deng, Xiaofeng; Gao, Faliang; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Shuo; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Rong; Zhao, Jizong

    2017-07-01

    Stroke in young adults is uncommon and rarely described. Moyamoya disease is one of the leading causes of stroke in young adults. We aimed to study the prognostic factors for stroke recurrences and functional outcomes in young stroke patients with moyamoya disease after revascularization. We reviewed 696 consecutive patients with moyamoya disease admitted to our hospital from 2009-2015 and identified patients aged 18-45 years with first-ever stroke. Follow-up was conducted via face-to-face or structured telephone interviews. Outcome measures were recurrent stroke events and unfavorable functional outcomes (modified Rankin Scale >2). We included 121 young patients with moyamoya disease suffering from stroke (initial presentation age, 35.4 ± 7.5 years). All patients underwent revascularization after the acute phase of initial stroke events as the secondary prevention for recurrences. During follow-up (median, 40 months), 9 patients (7.4%) experienced recurrent strokes and 8 of them (6.6%) suffered unfavorable functional outcomes. In the multivariate analysis, diabetes was an independent predictor for stroke recurrences (hazard ratio 6.76; 95% confidence interval 1.30-35.11; P = 0.02) and was significantly associated with unfavorable functional outcomes (odds ratio 7.87; 95% confidence interval 1.42-38.74; P = 0.01). We identified diabetes as an independent risk factor for recurrent strokes and unfavorable functional outcomes after revascularization in young stroke patients with moyamoya disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Malignant Multivessel Coronary Spasm Complicated by Myocardial Infarction, Transient Complete Heart Block, Ventricular Fibrillation, Cardiogenic Shock and Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viji S. Thomson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multivessel coronary spasm resulting to cardiogenic shock and malignant ventricular arrhythmias though rare has been reported in the literature. The disease seems to be more prevalent in Asians. There have been isolated reports of coronary spasm in patients with reactive airway disease. We report the first case of spontaneous multivessel spasm in a male patient with bronchial asthma of Arab ethnicity resulting in acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock, recurrent ventricular arrhythmias, and transient complete heart block. Literature review of similar cases suggests a strong association with bronchial asthma and a more malignant course in patients with reactive airway disease. The role of intracoronary nitroglycerin in proving the diagnosis even in patients in shock on maximal inotropic supports and intra-aortic balloon pump is highlighted and the importance of considering multivessel coronary spasm as a cause for acute coronary syndrome even in patients with conventional risk factors for atherosclerotic coronary artery disease is reinforced in the discussion of this case.

  9. Informed Decision Making for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Stable Coronary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, Michael B; Sivalingam, Senthil K; Kleppel, Reva; Schweiger, Marc; Hu, Bo; Sepucha, Karen R

    2015-07-01

    Patients with stable coronary disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are frequently misinformed about the benefits of PCI. Little is known about the quality of decision making before angiography and possible PCI. To assess the quality of informed decision making and its association with patient decisions. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of recorded conversations between August 1, 2008, and August 31, 2012, among adults with known or suspected stable coronary disease at outpatient cardiology practices. Presence of 7 elements of informed decision making and the decision to undergo angiography and possible PCI. Of 59 conversations conducted by 23 cardiologists, 2 (3%) included all 7 elements of informed decision making; 8 (14%) met a more limited definition of procedure, alternatives, and risks. Specific elements significantly associated with not choosing angiography and possible PCI included discussion of uncertainty (odds ratio [OR], 20.5; 95% CI, 2.3-204.9), patient's role (OR, 5.3; 95% CI, 1.3-21.3), exploration of alternatives (OR, 9.5; 95% CI, 2.5-36.5), and exploration of patient preference (OR, 4.8; 95% CI, 1.2-19.4). Neither the presence of angina nor severity of symptoms was associated with choosing angiography and possible PCI. In a multivariable analysis using the total number of elements as a predictor, better informed patients were less likely to choose angiography and possible PCI (OR per additional element, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.4-7.1; P = .005). In conversations between cardiologists and patients with stable angina, informed decision making is often incomplete. More complete discussions are associated with patients choosing not to undergo angiography and possible PCI.

  10. [Population surveillance of coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Romdhane, Habiba; Bougatef, Souha; Skhiri, Hajer; Gharbi, Donia; Haouala, Habib; Achour, Noureddine

    2005-05-01

    A cross-sectional population survey was carried out in the Ariana region in 2000-01. The aim of this study is to report the prevalence of CHD as indicated by ECG Minnesota coding. A randomly selected sample included 1837 adults 40-70 years. Data on socio-economic status, demographic, medical history, health behaviour, clinical and biological investigations were recorded. Risk factors (hypertension, dyslipedemia, obesity, diabetes) are defined according to WHO criterias. Standard supine 12 lead ECGs were recorded. All ECGs are red and classified according to the Minnesota codes criteria on CHD probable, CHD possible and on Major abnormalities and minor abnormalities. CHD prevalence was higher on women. Major abnormalities are more common on women (20.6% vs 13%), while minor abnormalities prevalence was higher on men (15.5% vs 7.5%) (p<0.0001). The prevalence increased with age in both genders. This study tested how feasible is the population approach on CVDs surveillance. It highlighted the burden of cardiovascular diseases and support that women are at risk as men are. The value of ECG findings must be integrated in the cardiovascular diseases surveillance to identify high risk population.

  11. Myocardial blood flow in patients with coronary disease while in active employment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, P.; Heeger, H.; Aldor, E.; Hanuschkrankenhaus, Vienna

    1975-01-01

    In the course of coronary angiographies the blood flow of the right and the left coronary artery was determined by the 133 Xe lavage method in 89 patients with coronary heart disease. There was a statistically significant difference between the flow values of the LCA and RCA, while there was none between the blood flow values of blue- and white-collar workers suffering from coronary artery disease. Also a significantly better blood circulation of the right as well as of the left coronary artery was found in female employees in comparison to male employees. (orig.) [de

  12. Peripheral Endothelial Function and Coronary Flow Velocity Reserve Are Not Associated in Women with Angina and No Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flintholm Raft, Kristoffer; Frestad, Daria; Michelsen, Marie Mide

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated whether impaired flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and plasma biomarkers reflecting endothelial dysfunction are associated with coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) in women with angina and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS: Patients (n = 194) were rand...

  13. Apolipoprotein E genotypes associated with Alzheimer disease and concomitant stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekih-Mrissa, Najiba; Klai, Sarra; Mrad, Meriem; Mansour, Malek; Zaouali, Jamel; Gritli, Nasreddine; Mrissa, Ridha

    2014-04-01

    The ɛ4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene is a well-characterized genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD). The association between stroke and a higher risk for AD has also been reported. Our study sought to determine the relationship between the APOE gene and AD and the comorbid risk of stroke. The subjects of this study consisted of 48 patients with AD and 48 members of a control group. All subjects were genotyped for APOE. The results clearly show a significant increased risk of AD in carriers of the APOE ε3/ε4 genotype (P = .003, odds ratio [OR] = 4.1) or ε4 allele (P = .001, OR = 4.2). The risk for stroke in AD patients was also increased for carriers of the APOE ε3/ε4 genotype (P = .02, OR = 9.0) and for carriers of the APOE ε4 allele (P = .004, OR = 5.5). The present study is the first to establish a relationship between APOE ε4 and concomitant AD and stroke in the Tunisian population. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Linkages between oral commensal bacteria and atherosclerotic plaques in coronary artery disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chhibber-Goel, Jyoti; Singhal, Varsha; Bhowmik, Debaleena; Vivek, Rahul; Parakh, Neeraj; Bhargava, Balram; Sharma, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is an inflammatory disorder characterized by narrowing of coronary arteries due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. To date, the accumulated epidemiological evidence supports an association between oral bacterial diseases and coronary artery disease, but has failed to prove a causal link between the two. Due to the recent surge in microbial identification and analyses techniques, a number of bacteria have been independently found in atherosclerotic plaque samples from...

  15. Regadenoson in the detection of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Buhr

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Christiane Buhr1, Mario Gössl2, Raimund Erbel1, Holger Eggebrecht11Department of Cardiology, West-German Heart Center Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 2Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USAAbstract: Myocardial perfusion studies use either physical exercise or pharmacologic vasodilator stress to induce maximum myocardial hyperemia. Adenosine and dipyridamole are the most commonly used agents to induce coronary arterial vasodilation for myocardial perfusion imaging. Both cause frequent undesirable side-effects. Because of its ultrashort half-life, adenosine must be administered by constant intravenous infusion during the examination. A key feature of an ideal A2A agonist for myocardial perfusion imaging studies would be an optimal level and duration of hyperemic response. Drugs with a longer half-time and more selective A2A adenosine receptor agonism, such as regadenoson, should theoretically result in a similar degree of coronary vasodilation with fewer or less severe side-effects than non-selective, ultrashort-lasting adenosine receptor stimulation. The available preclinical and clinical data suggest that regadenoson is a highly subtype-selective, potent, low-affinity A2A adenosine receptor agonist that holds promise for future use as a coronary vasodilator in myocardial perfusion imaging studies. Infusion of regadenoson achieves maximum coronary hyperemia that is equivalent to adenosine. After a single bolus infusion over 10 s, hyperemia is maintained significantly longer (approximately 2–5 min than with adenosine, which should facilitate radionuclide distribution for myocardial perfusion imaging studies. In comparison with the clinically competitive A2A adenosine receptor agonist binodenoson, regadenoson has a several-fold shorter duration of action, although the magnitude of hyperemic response is comparable between the two. The more rapid termination of action of regadenoson

  16. Hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease in the survivors of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, S Lucy; Silversides, Candice K

    2013-07-01

    Obesity, hypertension, and coronary artery disease are prevalent in the general population and well recognized as contributors to cardiac morbidity and mortality. With surgical and medical advances, there is a growing and aging population with congenital heart disease who are also at risk of developing these comorbidities. In addition, some congenital cardiac lesions predispose patients to conditions such as hypertension or coronary artery disease. The effect of these comorbidities on the structurally abnormal heart is not well understood, but might be very important, especially in those with residual abnormalities. Thus, in addition to surveillance for and treatment of late complications it is important for the congenital cardiologist to consider and aggressively manage acquired comorbidities. In this review we explore the prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease, discuss congenital lesions that predispose to these conditions and review management strategies for this unique population. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of a postdischarge coronary artery disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housholder-Hughes, Susan D; Ranella, Michael J; Dele-Michael, Abiola; Bumpus, Sherry; Krishnan, Sangeetha M; Rubenfire, Melvyn

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a demonstration project to assess the value of a nurse practitioner (NP) based coronary artery disease management (CAD-DM) program for patients with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients were recruited to attend three 1-h monthly visits. The intervention included assessment of clinical symptoms and guideline-based treatments; education regarding CAD/ACS; review of nutrition, exercise, and appropriate referrals; and recognition of significant symptoms and emergency response. Two hundred thirteen (84.5%) completed the program. Physician approval for patient participation was 99%. Average age was 63 ± 11 years, 70% were male, and 89% white. At baseline, 61% (n = 133) had one or more cardiopulmonary symptoms, which declined to 30% at 12 weeks, p < .001. Sixty-nine percent attended cardiac rehabilitation or an exercise consult. Compared to the initial assessment, an additional 20% were at low-density lipoprotein cholesterol < 70 mg/dL (p = .04), an additional 35% met exercise goals (p < .0001), and there was an improvement in the mental (baseline 49.7 vs. 12 weeks 53, p = .0015) and physical components (44 vs. 48, p = .002) of the SF-12 health survey. This NP-based CAD-DM program was well received and participants demonstrated improvement in physical and mental health, and increased compliance with recommended lifestyle changes. © 2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  18. Diagnosis of coronary artery disease in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuocolo, A.; Esposito, S.; Acampora, C.; Squame, C.

    1988-01-01

    Exercise radionuclide ventriculography (ERV) is considered a superior non-invasive screening test for coronary artery disease (CAD). ERV showed, however, a low specificity in hypertensive patients (H). The diagnostic accuracy of EAR and thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy (M) was evaluated in 23 patients (H) with chest pain and positive ECG-strees test. All patients underwent ERV and M, randomly, in different days. Finally, they all underwent coronary angiography: CAD was diagnosed in case of luminal narrowing ≥ 70% in 1 major coronary artery at least. Eleven patients had severe CAD. ERV was considered positive for CAD in presence of ex-induced abnormality of wall motion and/or in case of ex-induced ejection fraction increase ≤ 5% respect to the basal values. M was considered positive for CAD when perfusion defects were observed in early images only. ERV showed low diagnostic accuracy. On the contrary M had both sensibility and specificity, and a high positive and negative predictive value in the diagnosis of CAD. M is thus suggested as the non-invasive methodology of choice in hypertensive patients with suspected CAD

  19. General Anesthesia in the Surgical Treatment of Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Karpun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the problem of anesthetic maintenance during surgical correction of coronary blood flow. The basis for this is the results of the investigations conducted at the V. A. Negovsky Research Institute of General Reanimatology, the objective of which was to improve the results of surgical treatment in patients with different forms of coronary heart disease (CHD, by optimizing the anesthetic maintenance of open heart surgery. Clinical and special examinations were made in 367 patients who had undergone surgical treatment (aortocoronary bypass surgery; formation of a mammary coronary anastomosis; resection and plastic repair of left ventricular aneurysms; thrombectomy from the heart chambers for CHD and its complications. The main methodological approach to this study is to personalize intensive therapy and general anesthesia, which are relied on both evidence-based medicine and an individual pathophysiological approach. The paper details how to choose the basic mode of general anesthesia depending on the form of CHD and myocardial contractile function. Furthermore, the authors propose methods for optimizing the perioperative period: postoperative analgesia; correction of the aggregate state of blood; operative hemodilution; prevention and correction of critically reduced blood oxygen capacity 

  20. Exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging in left main coronary artery disease: sensitive but not specific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, T.; Griffith, L.S.; Achuff, S.C.; Bailey, I.K.; Bulkley, B.H.; Burow, R.; Pitt, B.; Becker, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of thallium-201 scintigraphy for identifying left main coronary artery disease, the results of scintigraphy at rest and during exercise were compared in 24 patients with 50 percent or greater narrowing of the left main coronary artery and 80 patients with 50 percent or greater narrowing of one or more of the major coronary arteries but without left main coronary involvement. By segmental analysis of the scintigrams, perfusion defects were assigned to the left anterior descending, left circumflex or right coronary artery, singly or in combination, and the pattern of simultaneous left anterior descending and circumflex arterial defects was used to identify left main coronary artery disease. Of the 24 patients with left main coronary artery disease, 22 (92 percent) had abnormal exercise scintigrams. Despite this high sensitivity, the pattern of perfusion defects was not specific; the ''left main pattern'' was found in 3 patients (13 percent) with left main coronary artery disease but also in 3 (33 percent) of 9 patients with combined left anterior descending and left circumflex arterial disease, 4 (19 percent) of 21 patients with three vessel disease and 3 (6 percent) of 50 patients with one or two vessel disease but excluding the group with left anterior descending plus left circumflex arterial disease. The pattern of perfusion defects in the patients with left main coronary artery disease was determined by the location and severity of narrowings in the coronary arteries downstream from the left main arterial lesion. Concomitant lesions in other arteries were found in all patients with left main coronary disease (one vessel in 1 patient, two vessels in 7 patients and three vessels in 16). For this reason, it is unlikely that even with improvements in radiopharmaceutical agents and imaging techniques, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy will be sufficiently specific for definitive identification of left main coronary artery disease

  1. Circulating tocopherols and risk of coronary artery disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangxiao; Li, Ying; Chen, Xin; Sun, Hao; Hou, Xiaowen; Shi, Jingpu

    2016-05-01

    Circulating level of tocopherols was supposed to be associated with risk of coronary artery disease. However, the results from previous studies remain controversial. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis based on observational studies to evaluate the association between circulating tocopherols and coronary artery disease risk for the first time. Meta-analysis. PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched to retrieve articles published during January 1995 and May 2015. Articles were included if they provided sufficient information to calculate the weighted mean difference and its corresponding 95% confidence interval. Circulating level of total tocopherols was significantly lower in coronary artery disease patients than that in controls (weighted mean difference -4.33 μmol/l, 95% confidence interval -6.74 to -1.91, P tocopherol alone was not significantly associated with coronary artery disease risk. Results from subgroup analyses showed that a lower level of circulating total tocopherols was merely associated with higher coronary artery disease risk in studies with higher sex ratio in cases (tocopherols was associated with early onset coronary artery disease rather than late onset coronary artery disease (tocopherols when the studies were stratified by matching status and assay methods. Our findings suggest that a deficiency in circulating total tocopherols might be associated with higher coronary artery disease risk. Whereas circulating α-tocopherol alone could not protect us from developing coronary artery disease. Further prospective studies were warranted to confirm our findings. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  2. Imaging and intervention for coronary artery disease following irradiation of malignant thymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatimi, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    Thymomas are rare malignant epithelial growths, constituting 20% of mediastinal tumours. Resection followed by irradiation may be employed in all thymomas except for stage 1 thymomas. Mediastinal irradiation is associated with coronary artery disease. The mean duration of presentation of post-irradiation coronary artery disease is 16 years (range 3-29 years). In our patient coronary artery disease was found only a year post irradiation. A 55 year old male who presented with complaints of dyspnoea, retrosternal chest pain and heaviness since one year underwent resection for malignant thymoma followed by radiotherapy. He presented with coronary artery disease a year after undergoing mediastinal irradiation. On follow-up, patient was treated successfully by coronary artery bypass graft. This case is an unusual occurrence and suggests that mediastinal irradiation may result in significant coronary artery disease as early as within one year. (author)

  3. Coronary arterial Disease associated with arteriosclerosis in lower extremity: Angiographic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, Seon Kyu; Han, Joon Koo; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Jae Seung; Han, Man Chung

    1993-01-01

    We performed both peripheral and coronary angiographies in 52 patients with an arteriosclerosis in lower extremities. The severity of arteriosclerotic narrowing of the coronary and peripheral arteries were compared on angiographies. An angiographic vascular score(AVS, 0-5) reflecting the number and the degree of stenosis in 12 lower extremity arteries and three major coronary arteries was assigned to each angiogram and the sun of scores in the lower extremity arteries was compared with the incidence of significant coronary artery disease (more than grade 3) and coronary score. Relation of incidence and severity of vascular stenosis and risk factors (diabetes metallitus, hypertension, smoking, and hypercholesterolemia) was also analyzed. Thirty-four of 52 patients (65%) had an angiographically significant coronary artery disease. Thirteen of these 34 patients (38%) had no clinical symptom and sign of the ischemic heart disease. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence and severity of coronary artery disease between high (more than 30) and low AVS group in lower extremity (p>0.14). All patients had at least one risk factor and 49 of 52 patients (94%) had multiple risk factors. Coronary angiography was normal in there patients with only one risk factors, and angiographically significant coronary artery disease existed in nine of 16 cases (56.3%) with two risk factors. 13 of 17 case (76.5%) with three risk factors, and 12 of 16 cases (75.0%) with all four risk factors. There were no significant correlations between individual risk factors and incidence, severity of arteriosclerosis in coronary and lower extremity arteries. In conclusion, angiographic evaluation of the coronary artery disease in patients with lower extremity arteriosclerosis is necessary because of the high chance of coronary artery disease and difficulty in the prediction of coronary artery disease with a severity of the peripheral arteriosclerosis, presence of various risk

  4. Effect of Heart Rate and Coronary Calcification on the Diagnostic Accuracy of the Dual-Source CT Coronary Angiography in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Lingdong; Cui, Lianqun; Cheng, Yuntao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Tang, Yuansheng; Wang, Yong; Xu, Fayun

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of a dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography, with a particular focus on the effect of heart rate and calcifications. One hundred and nine patients with suspected coronary disease were divided into 2 groups according to a mean heart rate ( 400). Next, the effect of heart rate and calcification on the accuracy of coronary artery stenosis detection was analyzed by using an invasive coronary angiography as a reference standard. Coronary segments of less than 1.5 mm in diameter in an American Heart Association (AHA) 15-segment model were independently assessed. The mean heart rate during the scan was 71.8 bpm, whereas the mean Agatston score was 226.5. Of the 1,588 segments examined, 1,533 (97%) were assessable. A total of 17 patients had calcium scores above 400 Agatston U, whereas 50 had heart rates ≥ 70 bpm. Overall the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) for significant stenoses were: 95%, 91%, 65%, and 99% (by segment), respectively and 97%, 90%, 81%, and 91% (by artery), respectively (n = 475). Heart rate showed no significant impact on lesion detection; however, vessel calcification did show a significant impact on accuracy of assessment for coronary segments. The specificity, PPV and accuracy were 96%, 80%, and 96% (by segment), respectively for an Agatston score less than 100% and 99%, 96% and 98% (by artery). For an Agatston score of greater to or equal to 400 the specificity, PPV and accuracy were reduced to 79%, 55%, and 83% (by segment), respectively and to 79%, 69%, and 85% (by artery), respectively. The DSCT provides a high rate of accuracy for the detection of significant coronary artery disease, even in patients with high heart rates and evidence of coronary calcification. However, patients with severe coronary calcification (> 400 U) remain a challenge to diagnose

  5. Regulation of Coronary Blood Flow in Health and Ischemic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Dirk J.; Koller, Akos; Merkus, Daphne; Canty, John M.

    2018-01-01

    The major factors determining myocardial perfusion and oxygen delivery have been elucidated over the past several decades, and this knowledge has been incorporated into the management of patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). The basic understanding of the fluid mechanical behavior of coronary stenoses has also been translated to the cardiac catheterization laboratory where measurements of coronary pressure distal to a stenosis and coronary flow are routinely obtained. However, the role of perturbations in coronary microvascular structure and function, due to myocardial hypertrophy or coronary microvascular dysfunction, in IHD is becoming increasingly recognized. Future studies should therefore be aimed at further improving our understanding of the integrated coronary microvascular mechanisms that control coronary blood flow, and of the underlying causes and mechanisms of coronary microvascular dysfunction. This knowledge will be essential to further improve the treatment of patients with IHD. PMID:25475073

  6. Isoproterenol stress thallium scintigraphy for detecting coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shigeyuki; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Masuoka, Takeshi; Iida, Kaname; Sugishita, Yasuro; Ito, Iwao; Takeda, Tohru; Toyama, Hinako; Akisada, Masayoshi

    1989-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the diagnostic value of isoproterenol (ISP) thallium scintigraphy. The findings were compared with those of ISP-ECG and exercise thallium scintigraphy. The study population consisted of 24 patients who had a history of chest pain without previous myocardial infarction. ISP was given at increasing doses of 0.02, 0.04, 0.08 μg/mg/min at 3-minutes intervals, and was terminated for any of the following reasons: angina, significant arrhythmia, significant ST segment depression, or target heart rate. Thallium scintigrams were obtained immediately after terminating ISP infusion, and after a 3-hour delay, redistribution scans were obtained. Scintigrams were considered positive when a reversible defect was present. After stress tests, coronary angiography was performed. According to the presence or absence of significant coronary artery stenosis, the patients were divided into coronary artery disease (CAD) group (n=12) and so-called normal coronary (NC) group (n=12). Among 12 patients in the CAD group, ISP induced anginal pain in six (50%), and ISP-ECT and ISP thallium scintigraphy were positive in 10 (83%) and in 11 (92%), compared with four(33%), four(33%) and two (17%) in the NC group. These data indicate that ISP-ECG had a sensitivity of 83%, a specificity of 67%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 75%; and the corresponding figures for ISP thallium scintigraphy were 92%, 83%, and 88%. Among nine patients who underwent both ISP thallium scintgraphy and exercise thallium scintigraphy, all patients, except for one false negative case on ISP thallium scintigraphy, were correctly diagnosed. No serious complications occurred in association with the ISP infusion test. ISP thallium scintigraphy was considered to be a safe, sensitive, and specific method for diagnosing CAD when exercise tests were intolerable. (N.K.)

  7. Shared genetic contribution to ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib‐Samii, Poneh; Harold, Denise; Dichgans, Martin; Williams, Julie; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Markus, Hugh S.; Fornage, Myriam; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sharma, Pankaj; Bis, Joshua C; Psaty, Bruce M; Seshadri, Sudha; Nalls, Mike A; Devan, William J; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Malik, Rainer; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J; Ikram, M Arfan; Clarke, Robert; Rosand, Jonathan; Meschia, James F; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M; Levi, Christopher; Bevan, Steve; Kilarski, Laura L; Walters, Matthew; Thijs, Vincent; Slowik, Agnieszka; Lindgren, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I W; Lambert, Jean‐Charles; Ibrahim‐Verbaas, Carla A; Harold, Denise; Naj, Adam C; Sims, Rebecca; Bellenguez, Céline; Jun, Gyungah; DeStefano, Anita L; Bis, Joshua C; Beecham, Gary W; Grenier‐Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton‐Wells, Tricia A; Jones, Nicola; Smith, Albert V; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao‐Feng; Gerrish, Amy; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie‐Thçrèse; Choi, Seung‐Hoan; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Ramirez, Alfredo; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L; De Jager, Philip L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Morón, Francisco J; Rubinsztein, David C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M; Fiçvet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger‐Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B; Green, Robert; Myers, Amanda J; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; St George‐Hyslop, Peter; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petroula; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez‐Garcia, Florentino; Fox, Nick C; Hardy, John; Deniz Naranjo, Maria Candida; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Matthews, Fiona; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Del Zompo, Maria; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Bullido, Maria; Panza, Francesco; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Gilbert, John R; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton‐Nelson, Kara L; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J; Faber, Kelley M; Jonsson, Palmi V; Combarros, Onofre; O'Donovan, Michael C; Cantwell, Laura B; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Bennett, David A; Harris, Tamara B; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F A G; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M; Kukull, Walter A; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F; Nalls, Michael A; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Kauwe, John S K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Wang, Li‐San; Dartigues, Jean‐François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L; Holmans, Peter A; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak‐Vance, Margaret A; Launer, Lenore J; Farrer, Lindsay A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Moskvina, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increasing evidence suggests epidemiological and pathological links between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and ischemic stroke (IS). We investigated the evidence that shared genetic factors underpin the two diseases. Methods Using genome‐wide association study (GWAS) data from METASTROKE + (15,916 IS cases and 68,826 controls) and the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP; 17,008 AD cases and 37,154 controls), we evaluated known associations with AD and IS. On the subset of data for which we could obtain compatible genotype‐level data (4,610 IS cases, 1,281 AD cases, and 14,320 controls), we estimated the genome‐wide genetic correlation (rG) between AD and IS, and the three subtypes (cardioembolic, small vessel, and large vessel), using genome‐wide single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. We then performed a meta‐analysis and pathway analysis in the combined AD and small vessel stroke data sets to identify the SNPs and molecular pathways through which disease risk may be conferred. Results We found evidence of a shared genetic contribution between AD and small vessel stroke (rG [standard error] = 0.37 [0.17]; p = 0.011). Conversely, there was no evidence to support shared genetic factors in AD and IS overall or with the other stroke subtypes. Of the known GWAS associations with IS or AD, none reached significance for association with the other trait (or stroke subtypes). A meta‐analysis of AD IGAP and METASTROKE + small vessel stroke GWAS data highlighted a region (ATP5H/KCTD2/ICT1) associated with both diseases (p = 1.8 × 10−8). A pathway analysis identified four associated pathways involving cholesterol transport and immune response. Interpretation Our findings indicate shared genetic susceptibility to AD and small vessel stroke and highlight potential causal pathways and loci. Ann Neurol 2016;79:739–747 PMID:26913989

  8. Abdominal fat and risk of coronary heart disease in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Beate G.; Visseren, Frank L. J.; Stolk, Ronald P.; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    Objective: We investigated whether the presence of concomitant coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be explained by intra-abdominal fat accumulation and compared different measures of adiposity as predictors of CHD in patients with PAD. Research Methods

  9. Causes of Death Data in the Global Burden of Disease Estimates for Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Iversen, Helle K

    2015-01-01

    on the International Classification of Diseases and the pathology behind each code by checking multiple causes of death and literature review. RESULTS: Unspecified stroke and primary and secondary hypertension are leading contributing 'GCs' to stroke mortality estimates for hemorrhagic stroke (HS) and ischemic stroke...... (IS). There were marked differences in the fraction of death assigned to IS and HS for unspecified stroke and hypertension between GBD regions and between age groups. CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of stroke fatalities are derived from the redistribution of 'unspecified stroke' and 'hypertension...

  10. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness is Associated with Longer Culprit Lesion and Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Hang; Ng, Wai-Yee; Hau, William; Ho, Hee-Hwa; Tai, Bee-Choo; Chan, Mark Y.; Richards, A. Mark; Tan, Huay-Cheem

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: We assessed whether excessive daytime sleepiness was associated with coronary plaque phenotype and subsequent adverse cardiovascular events. Methods: Prospective cohort study. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) examination of the culprit coronary stenosis was performed. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) questionnaire was administered, and the patients were divided into 2 groups—(1) sleepier and (2) less sleepy—based on the ESS score. Adverse cardiovascular outcomes were defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, stroke, unplanned revascularization, or heart failure admission. Results: One hundred seventeen patients undergoing urgent or non-urgent coronary angiography were recruited. Compared with the less sleepy group (ESS ≤ 10, n = 87), the sleepier group (ESS > 10, n = 30) had higher serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density-lipoprotein cholesterols (p 10 was associated with longer culprit lesions and future adverse cardiovascular events. Citation: Lee CH; Ng WY; Hau W; Ho HH; Tai BC; Chan MY; Richards AM; Tan HC. Excessive daytime sleepiness is associated with longer culprit lesion and adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(12):1267-1272. PMID:24340288

  11. Primary prevention in patients with a strong family history of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lora A

    2003-01-01

    The interplay of genetic and environmental factors places first-degree relatives of individuals with premature coronary heart disease at greater risk of developing the disease than the general population. Disease processes, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose and insulin metabolism, and lifestyle habits, such as eating and exercise patterns, as well as socioeconomic status aggregate in families with coronary heart disease. The degree of risk associated with a family history varies with the degree of relationship and the age at onset of disease. All individuals with a family history of premature heart disease should have a thorough coronary risk assessment performed, which can be initiated in an office visit. Absolute risk for coronary heart disease determination will predict the intensity of preventive interventions. This article reviews the components of risk determination and primary prevention in individuals with a strong family history of coronary heart disease.

  12. The Statins in Prevention of Coronary Heart Diseases in Type 2 Diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bećir Heljić

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine whether the administration of statins to type 2 diabetics without pre-existing CHD reduced the incidence of CHD and their effects on cholesterol and CRP levels. All the participants were carefully interviewed, clinically examined, and laboratory tested to exclude conditions likely to provoke an inflammatory response that was an exclusion criterion. Exclusion criteria: Serious heart, liver or kidney problems, history of renal transplant, recent history of drug or alcohol abuse, HbA1c>10%, blood pressure >140/90mmHg, BMI >35 kg/m2, triglycerides >3,0mmol/dm3. 95 obese diabetics (mean age 60,9 years and BMI=31,59 kg/m2, diabetes duration more than 10 years without pre-existing CHD, were included in the analysis and were randomized to simvastatin (25 female and 20 male used 40 mg simvastatin daily or placebo (30 female and 20 male group. After six months, simvastatin significantly lowered CRP levels by 19%, (p<0,01, cholesterol levels by 18%, TG levels by 8%, LDL levels by 20% and VLDL levels by 17%, whereas there was no change with placebo. After one year the difference sustained between groups. Coronary events were rarely in the simvastatin group (6,6% than in the placebo group (14%. Coronary revascularizations were 4 in the placebo group and 1 in the simvastatin group. Rate of stroke was more often in the placebo group (18% than in the simvastatin group (8,8%. So, reduction of acute CHD events is for 7,4% in the simvastatin group. Positive correlation was between CRP and CVD (r=0,29. Statin therapy reduced the risk of coronary hearth disease in diabetics without CHD.

  13. Education and coronary heart disease: mendelian randomisation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Taavi; Vaucher, Julien; Okbay, Aysu; Pikhart, Hynek; Peasey, Anne; Kubinova, Ruzena; Pajak, Andrzej; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Malyutina, Sofia; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Fischer, Krista; Veronesi, Giovanni; Palmer, Tom; Bowden, Jack; Davey Smith, George; Bobak, Martin; Holmes, Michael V

    2017-08-30

    Objective  To determine whether educational attainment is a causal risk factor in the development of coronary heart disease. Design  Mendelian randomisation study, using genetic data as proxies for education to minimise confounding. Setting  The main analysis used genetic data from two large consortia (CARDIoGRAMplusC4D and SSGAC), comprising 112 studies from predominantly high income countries. Findings from mendelian randomisation analyses were then compared against results from traditional observational studies (164 170 participants). Finally, genetic data from six additional consortia were analysed to investigate whether longer education can causally alter the common cardiovascular risk factors. Participants  The main analysis was of 543 733 men and women (from CARDIoGRAMplusC4D and SSGAC), predominantly of European origin. Exposure  A one standard deviation increase in the genetic predisposition towards higher education (3.6 years of additional schooling), measured by 162 genetic variants that have been previously associated with education. Main outcome measure  Combined fatal and non-fatal coronary heart disease (63 746 events in CARDIoGRAMplusC4D). Results  Genetic predisposition towards 3.6 years of additional education was associated with a one third lower risk of coronary heart disease (odds ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.77; P=3×10 -8 ). This was comparable to findings from traditional observational studies (prevalence odds ratio 0.73, 0.68 to 0.78; incidence odds ratio 0.80, 0.76 to 0.83). Sensitivity analyses were consistent with a causal interpretation in which major bias from genetic pleiotropy was unlikely, although this remains an untestable possibility. Genetic predisposition towards longer education was additionally associated with less smoking, lower body mass index, and a favourable blood lipid profile. Conclusions  This mendelian randomisation study found support for the hypothesis that low education is a causal risk

  14. A comparative study of 99Tcm-MIBI exercise myocardial perfusion imaging and the coronary arteriography in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiaohong; Yan Aiping; Li Yuren; Hou Zhenwen; Jiang Ningyi; Lu Xianping

    2003-01-01

    Objective: A comparative evaluation of 99 Tc m -MIBI exercise myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and coronary arteriography (CAG) in diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Methods: MPI and CAG were performed on 92 patients with clinical equivocal diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The results were comparatively studied. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of MPI were 83.9% and 69.1%. Both modalities matched in 78.3% cases. Conclusion: MPI offers useful information for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. And patients with a normal MPI don't need a further coronary angiography

  15. Chylomicrons metabolism in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandizzi, Laura Ines Ventura

    2002-01-01

    Chylomicrons are the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins that carry dietary lipids absorbed in the intestine. In the bloodstream , chylomicron triglycerides are broken-down by lipoprotein lipase using apoliprotein (apo) CII as co factor. Fatty acids and glycerol resulting from the enzymatic action are absorbed and stored in the body tissues mainly adipose and muscle for subsequent utilizations energy source. The resulting triglycerides depleted remnants are taken-up by liver receptor such as the LDL receptor using mainly apo E as ligand. For methodological reasons, chylomicron metabolism has been unfrequently studied in subjects despite its pathophysiological importance, and this metabolism was not evaluated in the great clinical trials that established the link between atherosclerosis and lipids. In studies using oral fat load tests, it has been shown that in patients with coronary artery disease there is a trend to accumulation of post-prandial triglycerides, vitamin A or apo B-48 , suggesting that in those patients chylomicrons and their remnants are slowly removed from the circulation. A triglyceride-rich emulsion marked radioisotopic which mimics chylomicron metabolism when injected into the bloodstream has been described that can offer a more straight forward approach to evaluate chylomicrons. In coronary artery disease patients both lipolysis and remnant removal from the plasma of the chylomicron-like emulsions were found slowed-down compared with control subjects without the disease. The introduction of more practical techniques to assess chylomicron metabolism may be new mechanisms underlying atherogenesis. (author)

  16. Role of depression in secondary prevention of Chinese coronary heart disease patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Feng

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD patients who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI have higher rates of depression than the general population. However, few researchers have assessed the impact of depression on the secondary prevention of CHD in China.The main purpose of this investigation was to explore the relationship between depression and secondary prevention of CHD in Chinese patients after PCI.This descriptive, cross-sectional one-site study recruited both elective and emergency PCI patients one year after discharge. Data from 1934 patients were collected in the clinic using questionnaires and medical history records between August 2013 and September 2015. Depression was evaluated by the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Secondary prevention of CHD was compared between depression and non-depression groups.We found that depression affected secondary prevention of CHD in the following aspects: lipid levels, blood glucose levels, smoking status, physical activity, BMI, and rates of medication use.Depressive patients with CHD are at increased risk of not achieving the lifestyle and risk factor control goals recommended in the 2006 AHA guidelines. Screening should focus on patients after PCI because treating depression can improve outcomes by improving secondary prevention of CHD.

  17. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor Preventing falls Stroke - discharge Swallowing problems Images Brain Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the left artery Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery Stroke Brainstem function Cerebellum - function Circle of Willis Left cerebral hemisphere - ...

  18. Frequency and clinical predictors of coronary artery disease in chronic renal failure renal transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque Seixas, Emerson; Carmello, Beatriz Leone; Kojima, Christiane Akemi; Contti, Mariana Moraes; Modeli de Andrade, Luiz Gustavo; Maiello, José Roberto; Almeida, Fernando Antonio; Martin, Luis Cuadrado

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality in chronic renal failure patients before and after renal transplantation. Among them, coronary disease presents a particular risk; however, risk predictors have been used to diagnose coronary heart disease. This study evaluated the frequency and importance of clinical predictors of coronary artery disease in chronic renal failure patients undergoing dialysis who were renal transplant candidates, and assessed a previously developed scoring system. Coronary angiographies conducted between March 2008 and April 2013 from 99 candidates for renal transplantation from two transplant centers in São Paulo state were analyzed for associations between significant coronary artery diseases (≥70% stenosis in one or more epicardial coronary arteries or ≥50% in the left main coronary artery) and clinical parameters. Univariate logistic regression analysis identified diabetes, angina, and/or previous infarction, clinical peripheral arterial disease and dyslipidemia as predictors of coronary artery disease. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified only diabetes and angina and/or previous infarction as independent predictors. The results corroborate previous studies demonstrating the importance of these factors when selecting patients for coronary angiography in clinical pretransplant evaluation.

  19. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendryx, Michael; Zullig, Keith J

    2009-11-01

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N=235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR=1.22, 95% CI=1.14-1.30), angina or CHD (OR=1.29, 95% CI=1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR=1.19, 95% CI=1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  20. Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Community Medicine

    2009-11-15

    This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

  1. Outcomes of coronary artery bypass grafting versus percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents for patients with multivessel coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, Aamir; Steinberg, Daniel H; Buch, Ashesh N; Corso, Paul J; Boyce, Steven W; Pinto Slottow, Tina L; Roy, Probal K; Hill, Peter; Okabe, Teruo; Torguson, Rebecca; Smith, Kimberly A; Xue, Zhenyi; Gevorkian, Natalie; Suddath, William O; Kent, Kenneth M; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2007-09-11

    Advances in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents have dramatically improved results of these procedures. The optimal treatment for patients with multivessel coronary artery disease is uncertain given the lack of prospective, randomized data reflecting current practice. This study represents a "real-world" evaluation of current technology in the treatment of multivessel coronary artery disease. A total of 1680 patients undergoing revascularization for multivessel coronary artery disease were identified. Of these, 1080 patients were treated for 2-vessel disease (196 CABG and 884 PCI) and 600 for 3-vessel disease (505 CABG and 95 PCI). One-year mortality, cerebrovascular events, Q-wave myocardial infarction, target vessel failure, and composite major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events were compared between the CABG and PCI cohorts. Outcomes were adjusted for baseline covariates and reported as hazard ratios. The unadjusted major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular event rate was reduced with CABG for patients with 2-vessel disease (9.7% CABG versus 21.2% PCI; P<0.001) and 3-vessel disease (10.8% CABG versus 28.4% PCI; P<0.001). Adjusted outcomes showed increased major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular event with PCI for patients with 2-vessel (hazard ratio 2.29; 95% CI 1.39 to 3.76; P=0.01) and 3-vessel disease (hazard ratio 2.90; 95% CI 1.76 to 4.78; P<0.001). Adjusted outcomes for the nondiabetic subpopulation demonstrated equivalent major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular event with PCI for 2-vessel (hazard ratio 1.77; 95% CI 0.96 to 3.25; P=0.07) and 3-vessel disease (hazard ratio 1.70; 95% CI 0.77 to 3.61; P=0.19). Compared with PCI with drug-eluting stents, CABG resulted in improved major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular event in patients with 2- and 3-vessel coronary artery disease, primarily in those with underlying diabetes

  2. Relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and subclinical coronary artery disease in long-term smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas; Køber, Lars; Pedersen, Jesper Holst

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular conditions are reported to be the most frequent cause of death in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unsettled whether severity of COPD per se is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) independent of traditional cardiovascular risk...... factors. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the presence and severity of COPD and the amount of coronary artery calcium deposit, an indicator of CAD and cardiac risk, in a large population of current and former long-term smokers....

  3. A review of methods for assessment of coronary microvascular disease in both clinical and experimental settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries, A.R.; Habazettl, H.; Ambrosio, G.

    2008-01-01

    -will certainly result in more rational diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for patients with ischaemic heart disease. Specifically targeted research based on improved assessment modalities is needed to improve the diagnosis of CMD and to translate current molecular, cellular, and physiological knowledge......Obstructive disease of the large coronary arteries is the prominent cause for angina pectoris. However, angina may also occur in the absence of significant coronary atherosclerosis or coronary artery spasm, especially in women. Myocardial ischaemia in these patients is often associated...

  4. Is pseudoexfoliation syndrome associated with coronary artery disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiroglu, Mehmet Yunus; Coskun, Erol; Karapinar, Hekim; Capkın, Musa; Kaya, Zekeriya; Kaya, Hasan; Akcakoyun, Mustafa; Kargin, Ramazan; Simsek, Zeki; Acar, Göksel; Aung, Soe Moe; Pala, Selcuk; Özdemir, Burak; Esen, Ali Metin; Kırma, Cevat

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PEX) is recognised by chronic deposition of abnormal pseudoexfoliation material on anterior segment structures of the eye, especially the anterior lens capsule. In recent years, several studies have shown the presence of vascular, cardiac and other organ pseudoexfoliative material in patients with ocular pseudoexfoliation. Aims: The purpose of this study is to determine whether an association exists between ocular pseudoexfoliation and coronary artery disease, aortic aneurysms and peripheric vascular disease. Patients and Methods: 490 patients who underwent coronary angiography (CAG) at Kosuyolu Cardiovascula Research and Training Hospital were included in the study. Patients were evaluated for conventional risk factors such as age, sex, family history, hypertension, diabetes, dislipidemia and smoking. Detailed eye examinations including evaluation of lens were done in all patients. The presence of PEX material in the anterior segment was best appreciated by slit lamp after pupillary dilation. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of PEX, and compared for the presence of CAD and other risk factors. Results: CAD was present in 387 patients. 103 patients had normal coronary angiography. 20 (5.2 %) of CAD patients and 4 (3.9%) of normal CAG patients were found to have PEX (p>0.05). There was no significant relationship between CAD and the presence of PEX (p>0.05). When patients were grouped according to the presence of PEX, only age was significantly different between the two groups (r: 0.25, p<0.001). Conclusion: There is no significant relationship between the presence of PEX and CAD. Further studies in larger scales with elderly population may be more valuable. PMID:22558552

  5. Percutaneous coronary intervention with ABSORB biodegradable vascular scaffold in patients with left anterior descending artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    К. М. Ваккосов

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The article evaluates 30-day results of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI with ABSORB biodegradable vascular scaffold (BVS implanted in the case of stenosis of the left anterior descending (LAD coronary artery in patients with stable angina.Methods. 64 patients with significant (≥ 70% LAD disease were included in the study. At 30 days, scaffold thrombosis and major adverse cardiovascular events (all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, target vessel revascularization were evaluated. The indicator of successful percutaneous coronary intervention (residual stenosis ≤20% in the presence of counterpulsation corresponding to TIMI 3rd Grade and in the absence of significant in-patient clinical complications and successful intervention assessed by clinical criteria (successful percutaneous coronary intervention alongside with a decrease in objective and subjective symptoms of myocardial ischemia, or their complete disappearance were also analyzed. Results. Mean age of patients was 61.6±8.5 years, with males accounting for 64%; 33% had earlier MI, 14% – diabetes mellitus. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 61.3±6.8%. Left anterior descending artery disease was presented in 89% of patients with SYNTAX Score 6.6±2.2. Mean number of implanted stents was 1.2±0.4, with mean length of the stented segment equal to18.7±1.8 mm and mean diameter 3.2±0.3 mm. At 30-day follow-up, the success of intervention assessed by clinical criteria amounted to 96.9% (n=62; that of myocardial infarction 3.1% (n=2; stent thrombosis 1.56% (n=1; repeated revascularization 1.56% (n=1; major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE 3.1%.Conclusion. The implantation of everolimus-eluting BVS for LAD stenosis demonstrates satisfactory results at 30-day follow-up.Received 16 January 2017. Accepted 21 March 2017.Financing: The study did not have sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  6. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery Versus Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation for Left Main or Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease A Meta-Analysis of Individual Patient Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Cheol Whan; Ahn, Jung-Min; Cavalcante, Rafael; Sotomi, Yohei; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Suwannasom, Pannipa; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Park, Duk-Woo; Kang, Soo-Jin; Lee, Seung-Whan; Kim, Young-Hak; Park, Seong-Wook; Serruys, Patrick W.; Park, Seung-Jung

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The authors undertook a patient-level meta-analysis to compare long-term outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) versus percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents (DES) in 3,280 patients with left main or multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD).

  7. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup

    2017-01-01

    disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented...... is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited....

  8. Scintigraphic anatomy of coronary artery disease in digital thallium-201 myocardial images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wainwright, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and eight patients with single and multiple vessel coronary artery disease confirmed by arteriography were evaluated by exercise thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) myocardial scintigraphy to determine the scintigraphic appearances of specific coronary stenoses. In general proximal stenoses caused more widespread, but not necessarily more severe, myocardial tracer deficit, than distal stenoses. In particular, proximal dominant right coronary artery disease was specifically associated with extensive inferior wall tracer deficit in the anterior scintigram, whereas proximal left circumflex disease caused similar tracer depletion best visualised in the left lateral scintigram. A triad of uptake defects was caused by left anterior descending coronary artery disease; one of these defects called 'diagonal window tracer deficit' was the most useful scintigraphic sign distinguishing proximal from distal disease in the left anterior descending coronary artery. Certain scintigraphic patterns of 201 Tl myocardial accumulation appear invaluable in the noninvasive localisation of stenoses within specific coronary arteries and thus may be useful in predicting life-threatening coronary artery disease which should be confirmed by definitive coronary arteriography. The digital 201 Tl myocardial scintigram also provides an independent functional guide to the interpretation of coronary arteriograms and may be helpful in the planning of aortocoronary bypass graft surgery. (author)

  9. Coronary arterial disease after electroconvulsive therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Pimentel Rodrigues

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Unipolar depression (UPD is a leading cause of global burden of diseases, particularly among the elderly, whose treatment may be challenging. In such cases, ECT is often recommended due to its safety and efficacy. This report presents a case of a 67-year-old male inpatient that developed a rare cardiac complication during ECT. Methods Clinical case report with patient’s consent and bibliographic review. Results A 67-year-old male inpatient with recurrent severe psychotic depression was hospitalized and ECT was indicated after failure of the pharmacological treatment. A comprehensive clinical pre-evaluation revealed only nonspecific ST-segment changes in electrocardiogram. During the 7th ECT session, it was observed transitory ST-segment depression followed by a discrete increase of plasma troponin I. Severe tri-vessel coronary artery stenosis was found and a percutaneous coronary angioplasty was performed, with satisfactory psychiatric and cardiac outcomes. Conclusions Unipolar depression (UPD and cardiovascular disease are often coexistent conditions, especially among the elderly. In the current case, myocardial ischemia was detected lately during ECT therapy and its treatment allowed the UPD treatment to be completed adequately.

  10. Myocardial images in nonacute coronary and noncoronary heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poe, N.D.; Eber, L.M.; Norman, A.S.; Selin, C.E.; Terao, E.N.

    1977-01-01

    To determine the variables that might affect interpretability of myocardial perfusion images in patients with acute myocardial infarctions, images obtained following intravenous administration of potassium-43 or cesium-129 were evaluated in 68 patients with nonacute coronary or noncoronary heart diseases, who were undergoing cardiac catheterization. Severe coronary arterial disease usually produces no distinctive perfusion defects in the resting state. Remote infarcts likewise tend to remain undetectable unless accompanied by wall-motion disturbances that can be detected by ventriculography. Left ventricular hypertrophy or cardiac dilatation can produce perfusion patterns indistinguishable from the ischemic defects of infarction. Right ventricular hypertrophy can cause image alterations that mimic infarcts in the left ventricle. In patients with acute myocardial infarction, sequential imaging studies with perfusion indicators should be of value in determining the effects of various therapeutic maneuvers on regional myocardial perfusion, but variations caused by conditions other than acute vascular occlusion limit the usefulness of perfusion imaging for diagnosing acute infarction. In suspected acute infarction, perfusion imaging will be used most effectively in conjunction with other imaging or nonimaging procedures that show the presence of damaged or necrotic myocardium. The information derived from this study should be generally applicable to the interpretation of imaging results obtained with the newer indicators of myocardial perfusion now in use or under development

  11. Lack of MEF2A mutations in coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Li; Kavaslar, Nihan; Ustaszewska, Anna; Doelle, Heather; Schackwitz, Wendy; Hebert, Sybil; Cohen, Jonathan; McPherson, Ruth; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2004-12-01

    Mutations in MEF2A have been implicated in an autosomal dominant form of coronary artery disease (adCAD1). In this study we sought to determine whether severe mutations in MEF2A might also explain sporadic cases of coronary artery disease (CAD). To do this, we resequenced the coding sequence and splice sites of MEF2A in {approx}300 patients with premature CAD and failed to find causative mutations in the CAD cohort. However, we did identify the 21 base pair (bp) MEF2A coding sequence deletion originally implicated in adCAD1 in one of 300 elderly control subjects without CAD. Further screening of an additional {approx}1,500 non-CAD patients revealed two more subjects with the MEF2A 21 bp deletion. Genotyping of 19 family members of the three probands with the 21 bp deletion in MEF2A revealed that the mutation did not co-segregate with early CAD. These studies demonstrate that MEF2A mutations are not a common cause of CAD and cast serious doubt on the role of the MEF2A 21 bp deletion in adCAD1.

  12. Long working hours may increase risk of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mo-Yeol; Cho, Soo-Hun; Yoo, Min-Sang; Kim, Taeshik; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the association between long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) estimated by Framingham risk score (FRS) in Korean adults. This study evaluated adult participants in Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV (2007-2009). After inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, the final sample size for this study model was 8,350. Subjects were asked about working hours and health status. Participants also completed physical examinations and biochemical measurement necessary for estimation of FRS. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to investigate the association between working hours and 10-year risk for CHD estimated by FRS. Compared to those who work 31-40 hr, significantly higher 10-year risk was estimated among subjects working longer hours. As working hours increased, odds ratio (OR) for upper 10 percent of estimated 10-year risk for CHD was increased up to 1.94. Long working hours are significantly related to risk of coronary heart disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Association of plasma phytosterol concentrations with incident coronary heart disease Data from the CORA study, a case-control study of coronary artery disease in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windler, Eberhard; Zyriax, Birgit-Christiane; Kuipers, Folkert; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner

    Aims: Phytosterols have been proposed to be atherogenic. This research investigates whether plasma concentrations of phytosterols correlate with the manifestation of coronary heart disease. Methods and results: The CORA study compares clinical, biochemical, and lifestyle factors in consecutive pre-

  14. Computerized analysis of coronary artery disease: Performance evaluation of segmentation and tracking of coronary arteries in CT angiograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Chuan, E-mail: chuan@umich.edu; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Kuriakose, Jean; Agarwal, Prachi; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Patel, Smita; Wei, Jun [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The authors are developing a computer-aided detection system to assist radiologists in analysis of coronary artery disease in coronary CT angiograms (cCTA). This study evaluated the accuracy of the authors’ coronary artery segmentation and tracking method which are the essential steps to define the search space for the detection of atherosclerotic plaques. Methods: The heart region in cCTA is segmented and the vascular structures are enhanced using the authors’ multiscale coronary artery response (MSCAR) method that performed 3D multiscale filtering and analysis of the eigenvalues of Hessian matrices. Starting from seed points at the origins of the left and right coronary arteries, a 3D rolling balloon region growing (RBG) method that adapts to the local vessel size segmented and tracked each of the coronary arteries and identifies the branches along the tracked vessels. The branches are queued and subsequently tracked until the queue is exhausted. With Institutional Review Board approval, 62 cCTA were collected retrospectively from the authors’ patient files. Three experienced cardiothoracic radiologists manually tracked and marked center points of the coronary arteries as reference standard following the 17-segment model that includes clinically significant coronary arteries. Two radiologists visually examined the computer-segmented vessels and marked the mistakenly tracked veins and noisy structures as false positives (FPs). For the 62 cases, the radiologists marked a total of 10191 center points on 865 visible coronary artery segments. Results: The computer-segmented vessels overlapped with 83.6% (8520/10191) of the center points. Relative to the 865 radiologist-marked segments, the sensitivity reached 91.9% (795/865) if a true positive is defined as a computer-segmented vessel that overlapped with at least 10% of the reference center points marked on the segment. When the overlap threshold is increased to 50% and 100%, the sensitivities were 86

  15. Localization of coronary artery disease with exercise electrocardiography: correlation with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, R.F.; Freedman, B.; Bailey, I.K.; Uren, R.F.; Kelly, D.T.

    1981-01-01

    In 61 patients with single vessel coronary artery disease (70 percent or greater obstruction of luminal diameter in only one vessel) and no previous myocardial infarction, the sites of ischemic changes on 12 lead exercise electrocardiography and on thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning were related to the obstructed coronary artery. The site of exercise-induced S-T segment depression did not identify which coronary artery was obstructed. In the 37 patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease S-T depression was most often seen in the inferior leads and leads V4 to V6, and in the 18 patients with right coronary artery disease and in the 6 patients with left circumflex artery disease S-T depression was most often seen in leads V5 and V6. Although S-T segment elevation was uncommon in most leads, it occurred in lead V1 or a VL, or both, in 51 percent of the patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease. A reversible anterior defect on exercise thallium scanning correlated with left anterior descending coronary artery disease (probability [p] less than 0.0001) and a reversible inferior thallium defect correlated with right coronary or left circumflex artery disease (p less than 0.0001). In patients with single vessel disease, the site of S-T segment depression does not identify the obstructed coronary artery; S-T segment elevation in lead V1 or aVL, or both, identifies left anterior descending coronary artery disease; and the site of reversible perfusion defect on thallium scanning identifies the site of myocardial ischemia and the obstructed coronary artery

  16. Profile of coronary heart disease risk factors in first-year university ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is substantial evidence that coronary heart disease risk factors are present in people of all ages. The extent to which the problem exists in university students in South Africa has not been confirmed in the literature and needs further investigation. The aim of the study was to profile the coronary heart disease risk factors ...

  17. Triglyceride-mediated pathways and coronary disease: collaborative analysis of 101 studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, Nadeem; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Ricketts, Sally L

    2010-01-01

    Whether triglyceride-mediated pathways are causally relevant to coronary heart disease is uncertain. We studied a genetic variant that regulates triglyceride concentration to help judge likelihood of causality.......Whether triglyceride-mediated pathways are causally relevant to coronary heart disease is uncertain. We studied a genetic variant that regulates triglyceride concentration to help judge likelihood of causality....

  18. The association between uric acid levels and different clinical manifestations of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Trine R; Gerke, Oke; Diederichsen, Axel C P

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Uric acid (UA) has been associated with the presence and severity of coronary artery disease. To further assess the role of UA role in coronary artery disease, we investigated UA levels in both healthy asymptomatic middle-aged individuals and in different subgroups of hospitalized patients...

  19. Cardiac symptoms before sudden cardiac death caused by coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Reza; Risgaard, Bjarke; Holst, Anders G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this nationwide case-control study was to identify and characterise symptoms before sudden death of young persons who had died due to coronary artery disease (CAD).......The aim of this nationwide case-control study was to identify and characterise symptoms before sudden death of young persons who had died due to coronary artery disease (CAD)....

  20. 76 FR 9525 - Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... coronary heart disease (CHD), in a manner that is consistent with FDA's February 14, 2003, letter of.... FDA-2000-P-0102, FDA-2000-P-0133, and FDA-2006-P-0033] Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Extension of enforcement discretion...

  1. Marital Discord and Coronary Artery Disease: A Comparison of Behaviorally Defined Discrete Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy W.; Uchino, Bert N.; Berg, Cynthia A.; Florsheim, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Marital difficulties can confer risk of coronary heart disease, as in a study of outwardly healthy couples (T. W. Smith et al., 2011) where behavioral ratings of low affiliation and high control during marital disagreements were associated with asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD). However, taxometric studies suggest that marital…

  2. Control of drug treatment of chronic coronary artery disease: possibilities of a regional registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachkova S.A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the results of the Register of hypertension, coronary artery disease, chronic heart failure (Register of AH, CAD, HF in the Ivanovo region in 2015. The frequency of prescribing of the main groups of drugs in patients with coronary artery disease was estimated.

  3. Angiographic characteristics of premature coronary artery disease in pakistan population; a prospective cross-sectional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, B.; Rahman, H.U.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the angiographic characteristics of premature coronary artery disease in our population. Methodology: From April 2014 to March 2015, coronary angiograms of 102 patients less than 40 years of age with a definitive diagnosis of ischemic heart disease were studied. Traditional risk factors of atherosclerosis were documented. Mode of presentation and symptoms were recorded along with angiographic findings of coronary artery disease severity, degree of coronary involvement, culprit vessel, lesion morphology, coronary dominance, coronary ectasia and left ventricular systolic function. Results: Mean age was 36.4 ± 4.1 years and 91% were male. Overall, left ventricular systolic function were fairly preserved (82%). 52% patients had single vessel CAD, 25% had double vessel while 19% had triple vessel coronary artery disease. Four patients had no luminal stenosis on coronary angiogram. LAD was the culprit vessel in 58.8%, RCA in 24.5% and left circumflex artery in 16.7% cases. More than 82% culprit lesions were severe or critical. 58% lesions were morphologically complex B2/C type while only 42% lesions were type A/B1. Coronary ectasia was seen in nearly 25% cases and all had ACS presentation. Right dominance was more common than left (57.8% vs 37.3%) while only 4.9% cases had dual posterior septal supply. Conclusion: Premature CAD in our population is acutely symptomatic, severe, complex (B2/C), single vessel disease. (author)

  4. The relationship between fractional flow reserve, platelet reactivity and platelet leukocyte complexes in stable coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sels, J.W.E.M.; Rutten, B.; Holten, van T.C.; Hillaert, M.A.K.; Waltenberger, J.; Pijls, N.H.J.; Pasterkamp, G.; Groot, de P.G.; Roest, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The presence of stenoses that significantly impair blood flow and cause myocardial ischemia negatively affects prognosis of patients with stable coronary artery disease. Altered platelet reactivity has been associated with impaired prognosis of stable coronary artery disease. Platelets

  5. Results of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial by stroke subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Benavente, Oscar; Goldstein, Larry B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The SPARCL trial showed that atorvastatin 80 mg/d reduces the risk of stroke and other cardiovascular events in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). We tested the hypothesis that the benefit of treatment varies according to index event stroke...... subtype. METHODS: Subjects with stroke or TIA without known coronary heart disease were randomized to atorvastatin 80 mg/d or placebo. The SPARCL primary end point was fatal or nonfatal stroke. Secondary end points included major cardiovascular events (MCVE; stroke plus major coronary events). Cox...... regression models testing for an interaction with treatment assignment were used to explore potential differences in efficacy based on stroke subtype. RESULTS: For subjects randomized to atorvastatin versus placebo, a primary end point occurred in 13.1% versus 18.6% of those classified as having large vessel...

  6. Frequency of significant three vessel coronary artery disease and left main stem disease in acute coronary syndrome patients having high LDL cholesterol level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeb, S.; Achakzai, A.S.; Zeb, J.; Zeb, R.; Adil, M.; Jan, H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To calculate the frequency of significant three-vessel coronary artery and left main stem disease in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome having high LDL cholesterol level. Methodology: This observational study was performed in Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, Pakistan from June 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. All consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography admitted with acute coronary syndrome within past 30 days and having LDL cholesterol more than 130mg/dl were included in the study. Demographic data was noted. The data was analyzed by using software SPSS version 16. Results: A total number of 206 patients were included in the study. Mean age was 51.25+-8.4 years. Of them, 139(67.5%) were male and 67(32.5%) female. Hypertension was found in 87(42.2%) patients, diabetes was found in 71(34.5%) patients, 56(27.2%) were smokers, family history of CAD was present in 39(18.9%) patients. The incidence of significant three vessel coronary artery disease was 52(25.2%) and left main stem disease were present in 15(7.2%). Out of 67(32.4%) with severe triple vessel and Left main stem disease, males were 51(76.1%) and females were 16(23.9%). Patients with significant three vessel and left main stem disease were more frequently males and younger. Conclusion: Patients having acute coronary syndrome with High LDL levels are more frequently have significant three vessel and Left main stem disease.

  7. Coronary heart disease is not significantly linked to acute kidney injury identified using Acute Kidney Injury Group criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayan, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Patients with unstable angina or myocardial infarction are at risk of acute kidney injury, which may be aggravated by the iodine-containing contrast agent used during coronary angiography; however, the relationship between these two conditions remains unclear. The current study investigated the relationship between acute kidney injury and coronary heart disease prior to coronary angiography. All patients were evaluated after undergoing coronary angiography in the cardiac catheterization laboratory of the Vinzentius Hospital in Landau, Germany, in 2011. The study group included patients with both acute coronary heart disease and acute kidney injury (as defined according to the classification of the Acute Kidney Injury Group); the control group included patients without acute coronary heart disease. Serum creatinine profiles were evaluated in all patients, as were a variety of demographic and health characteristics. Of the 303 patients examined, 201 (66.34%) had coronary artery disease. Of these, 38 (18.91%) also had both acute kidney injury and acute coronary heart disease prior to and after coronary angiography, and of which in turn 34 (16.91%) had both acute kidney injury and acute coronary heart disease only prior to the coronary angiography. However, the occurrence of acute kidney injury was not significantly related to the presence of coronary heart disease (P = 0.95, Chi-square test). The results of this study indicate that acute kidney injury is not linked to acute coronary heart disease. However, physicians should be aware that many coronary heart patients may develop kidney injury while hospitalized for angiography.

  8. The association of ABO blood groups with extent of coronary atherosclerosis in Croatian patients suffering from chronic coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabuva, Svjetlana; Carević, Vedran; Radić, Mislav; Fabijanić, Damir

    2013-01-01

    The aim of study was to: 1) examine the relationship between ABO blood groups and extent of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with chronic coronary artery disease (CAD), 2) compare ABO blood groups distribution in CAD patients and general population, 3) examine possible differences in traditional risk factors frequency in CAD patients with different ABO blood groups. In the 646 chronic CAD patients (72.4% males) coronary angiograms were scored by quantitative assessment using multiple angiographic scoring system, Traditional risk factors were self reported or measured by standard methods. ABO blood distribution of patients was compared with group of 651 healthy blood donors (74.6% males). Among all ABO blood group patients there was no significant difference between the extent of coronary atherosclerosis with regard to all the three scoring systems: number of affected coronary arteries (P = 0.857), Gensini score (P = 0.818), and number of segments narrowed > 50% (P = 0.781). There was no significant difference in ABO blood group distribution between CAD patients and healthy blood donors. Among CAD patients, men with blood group AB were significantly younger than their pairs with non-AB blood groups (P = 0.008). Among CAD patients with AB blood group, males groups (P = 0.003). No association between ABO blood groups and the extent of coronary atherosclerosis in Croatian CAD patients is observed. Observation that AB blood group might possibly identify Croatian males at risk to develop the premature CAD has to be tested in larger cohort of patients.

  9. Cardiovascular metabolic syndrome: mediators involved in the pathophysiology from obesity to coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Cornelis J; Quax, Paul H A; Jukema, J Wouter

    2012-02-01

    Patients with obesity and diabetes mellitus are at increased risk for cardiovascular events and have a higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This worse prognosis is partly explained by the late recognition of coronary heart disease in these patients, due to the absence of symptoms. Early identification of coronary heart disease is vital, to initiate preventive medical therapy and improve prognosis. At present, with the use of cardiovascular risk models, the identification of coronary heart disease in these patients remains inadequate. To this end, biomarkers should improve the early identification of patients at increased cardiovascular risk. The first part of this review describes the pathophysiologic pathway from obesity to coronary heart disease. The second part evaluates several mediators from this pathophysiologic pathway for their applicability as biomarkers for the identification of coronary heart disease.

  10. Prospective Coronary Heart Disease Screening in Asymptomatic Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients Using Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Results and Risk Factor Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girinsky, Theodore, E-mail: girinsky.theodore@orange.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); M’Kacher, Radhia [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Oncology, Institut de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et Moleculaire/Direction des Sciences Vivantes/Commissariat Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France); Lessard, Nathalie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Koscielny, Serge [Biostatistics and Epidemiology Unit, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Elfassy, Eric; Raoux, François [Department of Radiology, Marie Lannelongue, Chatenay-Malabry (France); Carde, Patrice [Department of Hematology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Santos, Marcos Dos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Margainaud, Jean-Pierre [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Sabatier, Laure [Laboratory of Radiobiology and Oncology, Institut de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et Moleculaire/Direction des Sciences Vivantes/Commissariat Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France); Ghalibafian, Mithra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Paul, Jean-François [Department of Radiology, Marie Lannelongue, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the coronary artery status using coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma treated with combined modalities and mediastinal irradiation. Methods and Materials: All consecutive asymptomatic patients with Hodgkin lymphoma entered the study during follow-up, from August 2007 to May 2012. Coronary CT angiography was performed, and risk factors were recorded along with leukocyte telomere length (LTL) measurements. Results: One hundred seventy-nine patients entered the 5-year study. The median follow-up was 11.6 years (range, 2.1-40.2 years), and the median interval between treatment and the CCTA was 9.5 years (range, 0.5-40 years). Coronary artery abnormalities were demonstrated in 46 patients (26%). Coronary CT angiography abnormalities were detected in nearly 15% of the patients within the first 5 years after treatment. A significant increase (34%) occurred 10 years after treatment (P=.05). Stenoses were mostly nonostial. Severe stenoses were observed in 12 (6.7%) of the patients, entailing surgery with either angioplasty with stent placement or bypass grafting in 10 of them (5.5%). A multivariate analysis demonstrated that age at treatment, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia, as well as radiation dose to the coronary artery origins, were prognostic factors. In the group of patients with LTL measurements, hypertension and LTL were the only independent risk factors. Conclusions: The findings suggest that CCTA can identify asymptomatic individuals at risk of acute coronary artery disease who might require either preventive or curative measures. Conventional risk factors and the radiation dose to coronary artery origins were independent prognostic factors. The prognostic value of LTL needs further investigation.

  11. Thallium 201 Exercise Scintigraphy for Detection of Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease After Transmural Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadpour, Hedayatolah; Siegel, Michael E.; Colletti, Patrick; Haywood, L. Julian

    1984-01-01

    Fifty patients with prior transmural myocardial infarction were studied with cardiac catheterization, coronary angiography, and thallium 201 exercise perfusion scintigraphy. Obstructive coronary disease involved two or three vessels in 37 patients. The sensitivity of a positive electrocardiographic test during exercise for detecting multivessel coronary disease was only 40 percent (15/37), and the sensitivity of a reversible defect on 201Tl perfusion scintigraphy was 48 percent (18/37). The combination of exercise testing and 201Tl scintigraphy detected multivessel coronary disease in 75 percent (28/37) (P < .05). New perfusion defects occurred in 61 percent (13/21) of patients with inferior myocardial infarction and multivessel coronary disease whereas it occurred in only 35 percent (5/14) of patients with prior anterior infarction and multivessel coronary disease (P < .05). 201Tl exercise perfusion scintigraphy appears to be more sensitive for detecting significant multivessel coronary disease in the presence of previous inferior infarction compared with previous anterior infarction. Combined graded exercise testing and 201Tl perfusion scintigraphy can reliably detect the presence of significant multivessel coronary disease after transmural myocardial infarction. ImagesFigure 3 PMID:6512876

  12. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery Versus Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation for Left Main or Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease: A Meta-Analysis of Individual Patient Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheol Whan; Ahn, Jung-Min; Cavalcante, Rafael; Sotomi, Yohei; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Suwannasom, Pannipa; Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Park, Duk-Woo; Kang, Soo-Jin; Lee, Seung-Whan; Kim, Young-Hak; Park, Seong-Wook; Serruys, Patrick W; Park, Seung-Jung

    2016-12-26

    The authors undertook a patient-level meta-analysis to compare long-term outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) versus percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents (DES) in 3,280 patients with left main or multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative efficacy and safety of CABG versus PCI with DES for left main or multivessel CAD remain controversial. Data were pooled from the BEST (Randomized Comparison of Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery and Everolimus Eluting Stent Implantation in the Treatment of Patients With Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease), PRECOMBAT (Premier of Randomized Comparison of Bypass Surgery vs. Angioplasty Using Sirolimus-Eluting Stent in Patients With Left Main Coronary Artery Disease), and SYNTAX (Synergy Between PCI With Taxus and Cardiac Surgery) trials. The primary outcome was a composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The median follow-up was 60 months, and follow-up was completed for 96.2% of patients. The rate of primary outcome was significantly lower with CABG than with PCI (13.0% vs. 16.0%; hazard ratio [HR]: 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.69 to 1.00; p = 0.046). The difference was mainly driven by reduction in myocardial infarction (HR: 0.46; 95% CI: 0.33 to 0.64; p patients with multivessel CAD (p = 0.001), but no between-group difference in those with left main CAD (p = 0.427). The rates for all-cause death and stroke were similar between the 2 groups. By contrast, the need for repeat revascularization was significantly lower in the CABG group compared with the PCI group. CABG, as compared with PCI with DES, reduced long-term rates of the composite of all-cause death, myocardial infarction, or stroke in patients with left main or multivessel CAD. The advantage of CABG over PCI with DES was particularly pronounced in those with multivessel CAD. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Quantitative thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography during maximal pharmacologic coronary vasodilation with adenosine for assessing coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, S.; Mahmarian, J.J.; Boyce, T.M.; Verani, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The diagnostic value of maximal pharmacologic coronary vasodilation with intravenously administered adenosine in conjunction with thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for detection of coronary artery disease was investigated in 101 consecutive patients who had concomitant coronary arteriography. Tomographic images were assessed visually and from computer-quantified polar maps of the thallium-201 distribution. Significant coronary artery disease, defined as greater than 50% luminal diameter stenosis, was present in 70 patients. The sensitivity for detecting patients with coronary artery disease using quantitative analysis was 87% in the total group, 82% in patients without myocardial infarction and 96% in those with prior myocardial infarction; the specificity was 90%. The sensitivity for diagnosing coronary artery disease in patients without infarction with single-, double-and triple-vessel disease was 76%, 86% and 90%, respectively. All individual stenoses were identified in 68% of patients with double-vessel disease and in 65% of those with triple-vessel disease. The extent of the perfusion defects, as quantified by polar maps, was directly related to the extent of coronary artery disease. In conclusion, quantitative thallium-201 SPECT during adenosine infusion has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing the presence of coronary artery disease, localizing the anatomic site of coronary stenosis and identifying the majority of affected vascular regions in patients with multivessel involvement

  14. Cardiological-interventional therapy of coronary artery disease today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynen, K.; Henssge, R.

    1999-01-01

    The current importance of the interventional therapy of coronary artery disease may be deduced from the exponential increase in procedures performed in Germany in the last decade - at least 125,840 in 1996. Today, by improved catheter and balloon materials as well as by growing experience of the cardiologists, even complex lesions may be treated. Limitations of balloon angioplasty include acute vessel closure and restenosis - newer angioplasty devices like directional or rotational atherectomy or excimer-laser angioplasty did not overcome these limitations; only by coronary stenting, acute vessel closure could be managed and the likelihood of restenosis - at least in particular groups of patients - could be reduced. For a few years, intracoronary brachytherapy of the segments dilated with beta- or gamma-emitters has been seeking to reduce restenosis rate; the department of cardiology of the Dresden Cardiovascular Institute is participating in such a multicentre study using the beta-emitter 188 renium. Further main topics of our department represent primary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction and invasive diagnostic or interventional procedures by the transradial approach. (orig.)

  15. Diagnosis and prognosis of elderly patients with coronary artery disease. Assessment with dipyridamole thallium imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Fumiyasu; Takata, Jun; Seo, Hiromi; Chikamori, Taishiro; Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Yabe, Toshikazu; Doi, Yoshinori

    1995-01-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic value of dipyridamole perfusion scintigraphy was assessed in 147 patients with coronary artery disease aged 65 years and older. All patients underwent coronary angiography. Dipyridamole perfusion scintigraphy was performed safely in all patients. Multiple regression analysis showed that fixed defect and reversible defect were powerful detectors of coronary lesions, all patients with fixed disease and 94% of patients with only reversible defects had significant coronary lesion. Diffuse slow washout and ST depression were statistically significant for detection multivessel coronary lesions in patients with fixed disease, the sensitivity and specificity of diffuse slow washout and/or ST depression for detecting multivessel coronary lesions were 85% and 74%, respectively. Cox survival analysis identified diffuse slow washout as the best predictor of future cardiac events among the scintigraphic variables. Univariate analysis showed the best predictors were age (≥70), diffuse slow washout, and severe coronary lesions. Multivariate analysis showed diffuse slow washout and severe coronary lesions were the best predictors. Dividing the patients by age (≥70) showed that age and diffuse slow washout were good predictors. Scintigraphic and angiographic parameters found diffuse slow washout was the only good predictor. Dipyridamole perfusion scintigraphy is useful for the noninvasive detection of significant coronary artery disease in the elderly, and for predicting future cardiac events with similar predictability to angiographic findings. (S.Y.)

  16. The clinical role of thallium-201 scintigraphy in the management and prognosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammage, M.D.; Murray, D.P.; Rafiqi, E.; Murray, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    To determine the clinical impact of thallium-201 scintigraphy in coronary artery disease, the indications, diagnostic yield and contribution to patient management were reviewed retrospectively in 103 patients referred for routine investigations. Exercise and redistribution image data were collected in multiple projections and interpreted by visual and semi-quantitative means. A segmental image defect was accepted as indicating the presence of coronary artery disease. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed as a diagnostic procedure in 71 patients (69%) who had equivocal evidence of coronary artery disease. In 57 (80%) of these patients, thallium-201 scintigraphy was normal and 53 (75%) were spared diagnostic coronary arteriography. Despite normal thallium-201 scintigrams, arteriography was performed in 4 patients with persisting symptoms and demonstrated normal vessels in 2 patients and single vessel disease in 2 patients. Conversely, arteriography was normal in 2 of 14 patients (14%) with unequivocal image defects. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed as a functional complement to coronary arteriography in 32 patients, influencing the decision for coronary surgery in 10, for angioplasty in 4 and against surgery in 2. Myocardial ischaemia was confirmed in 8 and refuted in 8 patients with questionable arteriographic coronary disease. Positive management decisions were taken as a result of thallium-201 scintigraphy in 80 of these 103 patients (78%). These data confirm the vital role of thallium-201 scintigraphy in the evaluation and management of patients with suspected and proven coronary artery disease. (orig.)

  17. The value and limitation thallium scintigraphy in the detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Rehman, A.; Amin, W.; Khan, Z.A.; Ahmed, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    In this study we randomly selected 45 patients whose coronary angiograms were abnormal i.e. showing triple, double and single vessel disease out of a pool of 80 patients who had undergone stress thallium imaging and coronary angiography during the one year. Majority of these patients were males, their ages ranged between 34-54 years. Resting ECG's were normal in 25 patients, 15 patients had suffered inferior myocardial infraction and 5 had sustained anterior myocardial infraction in the past. Coronary angiography revealed triple vessel disease in 20 patients, double vessel disease in 15, and single vessel coronary artery disease in 10. We analysed their coronary angiograms and compared them with the scintigraphic finding. It is concluded that although thallium scanning has high sensitivity for detection of coronary artery disease in general, it has only moderate sensitivity for detection of stenosis in individual coronary arteries. In this study thallium scan identified 75% of RCA lesions, 66% of LAD lesions and 38% of circumflex lesions. The sensitivity is much higher in single vessel coronary artery disease. (author)

  18. Influence of coronary artery disease prevalence on predictive values of coronary CT angiography: a meta-regression analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlattmann, Peter [University Hospital of Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Documentation, Jena (Germany); Schuetz, Georg M. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Charite, Medical School, Department of Radiology, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, Marc [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Charite, Medical School, Department of Radiology, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Charite, Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    To evaluate the impact of coronary artery disease (CAD) prevalence on the predictive values of coronary CT angiography. We performed a meta-regression based on a generalised linear mixed model using the binomial distribution and a logit link to analyse the influence of the prevalence of CAD in published studies on the per-patient negative and positive predictive values of CT in comparison to conventional coronary angiography as the reference standard. A prevalence range in which the negative predictive value was higher than 90%, while at the same time the positive predictive value was higher than 70% was considered appropriate. The summary negative and positive predictive values of coronary CT angiography were 93.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 92.8-94.5%) and 87.5% (95% CI, 86.5-88.5%), respectively. With 95% confidence, negative and positive predictive values higher than 90% and 70% were available with CT for a CAD prevalence of 18-63%. CT systems with >16 detector rows met these requirements for the positive (P < 0.01) and negative (P < 0.05) predictive values in a significantly broader range than systems with {<=}16 detector rows. It is reasonable to perform coronary CT angiography as a rule-out test in patients with a low-to-intermediate likelihood of disease. (orig.)

  19. Influence of coronary artery disease prevalence on predictive values of coronary CT angiography: a meta-regression analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlattmann, Peter; Schuetz, Georg M.; Dewey, Marc

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of coronary artery disease (CAD) prevalence on the predictive values of coronary CT angiography. We performed a meta-regression based on a generalised linear mixed model using the binomial distribution and a logit link to analyse the influence of the prevalence of CAD in published studies on the per-patient negative and positive predictive values of CT in comparison to conventional coronary angiography as the reference standard. A prevalence range in which the negative predictive value was higher than 90%, while at the same time the positive predictive value was higher than 70% was considered appropriate. The summary negative and positive predictive values of coronary CT angiography were 93.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 92.8-94.5%) and 87.5% (95% CI, 86.5-88.5%), respectively. With 95% confidence, negative and positive predictive values higher than 90% and 70% were available with CT for a CAD prevalence of 18-63%. CT systems with >16 detector rows met these requirements for the positive (P < 0.01) and negative (P < 0.05) predictive values in a significantly broader range than systems with ≤16 detector rows. It is reasonable to perform coronary CT angiography as a rule-out test in patients with a low-to-intermediate likelihood of disease. (orig.)

  20. Noninvasive FFR derived from coronary CT angiography in the management of coronary artery disease: technology and clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakanishi R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rine Nakanishi, Mathew J Budoff Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA Abstract: After a decade of clinical use of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA to evaluate the anatomic severity of coronary artery disease, new methods of deriving functional information from CCTA have been developed. These methods utilize the anatomic information provided by CCTA in conjunction with computational fluid dynamics to calculate fractional flow reserve (FFR values from CCTA image data sets. Computed tomography-derived FFR (CT-FFR enables the identification of lesion-specific drop noninvasively. A three-dimensional CT-FFR modeling technique, which provides FFR values throughout the coronary tree (HeartFlow FFRCT analysis, has been validated against measured FFR and is now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for clinical use. This technique requires off-site supercomputer analysis. More recently, a one-dimensional computational analysis technique (Siemens cFFR, which can be performed on on-site workstations, has been developed and is currently under investigation. This article reviews CT-FFR technology and clinical evidence for its use in stable patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Keywords: fractional flow reserve, coronary computed tomographic angiography, FFRCT, cFFR

  1. Evaluation of Cognitive Schemas Based on the Presence of Anxiety Disorder among Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huri ASLAN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The relationship between psychological factors and cardiac diseases has been concerned for a long but our knowledge about the cognitive profiles which could be important etiological factor in cardiac disease and comorbid psychiatric disorders is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare the cognitive profiles of coronary artery disease patients with or without comorbid anxiety disorder. Method: A total of 35 coronary artery disease patients with anxiety disorder and 20 coronary artery disease patients without comorbid anxiety disorders were enrolled into the study. Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Young Schema Questionnaire-Short Form 3 were applied to each participant. Results: Disconnection, rejection, impaired autonomy self-manifestation, extreme vigilance, unrelenting standards, other-directedness, and impaired limits schema domain scores were significantly higher in coronary artery disease patients with anxiety disorder comorbidity compared to coronary artery disease patients without anxiety disorder. Conclusion: Our study has revealed significant differences in cognitive profiles of coronary artery disease patients with comorbidity of anxiety disorders. These findings show the importance of cognitive profiles which were observed in coronary artery disease patients with anxiety disorders. Schema-focused approach might be useful in the treatment of such patients. Further studies with schema-focused therapy approaches are needed to illustrate the issue.

  2. Missing left main ostio-proximal coronary artery disease during angiography using tiger catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Majumder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary angiography by right radial artery route using Optitorque Tiger catheter is on the rise given the low rate of local complications and feasibility to perform it as a day-care procedure. We report here a case of coronary angiography performed using Optitorque Tiger catheter (5-French which resulted in a diagnostic error, missing the ostio-proximal left main coronary artery disease which was later detected using EBU 3.5 guide catheter (7-French while performing angioplasty.

  3. The influence of contrast media on kidney function in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Simon Bertram; Harutyunyan, Marina; Mygind, Naja Dam

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the incidence of contrast media-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) referred for elective coronary intervention following hydration routines. The reversibility of CIN was followed in a 6 month-period. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total...... coronary interventions. Kidney function and the amount of contrast media used was not a predictor of CIN development. The induced CIN was not completely normalized in a 6-month follow-up period....

  4. Importance of adequate exercise in the detection of coronary heart disease by radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.H.; Lo, K.; Pitt, B.

    1980-01-01

    Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculograms were obtained on 77 symptomatic patients without prior documented coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary artery disease was present by angiograms in 48. Radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) was abnormal in 41 patients (overall sensitivity 85%). In 29 patients with normal coronary arteries, RNV was normal in 24 (specificity 83%). To determine if the exercise level affects sensitivity, the studies were graded for adequacy of exercise. It was considered adequate if patients developed (a) chest pain, or (b) ST segment depression of at least 1 mm, or (c) if they achieved a pressure rate product greater than 250. Among the 48 patients with coronary artery disease, 35 achieved adequate exercise. Thirty-three had an abnormal RNV (sensitivity 94%). In 13 patients who failed to achieve adequate exercise, RNV was abnormal in eight (sensitivity of only 62%). Some patients with coronary artery disease may have a normal ventricular response at inadequate levels of stress

  5. Myocardial scintigraphy using a fatty acid analogue detects coronary artery disease in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Masato; Hashimoto, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Toyofumi; Okino, Koji; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Fujita, Hiroshi; Inoue Tsunehiko Nishimura, Naoto; Ono, Toshihiko

    2004-08-01

    Coronary artery disease contributes significantly to mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using an iodinated fatty acid analogue, iodine-123-methyl iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (123I-BMIPP), can assess fatty acid metabolism in the myocardium. We investigated the ability of 123I-BMIPP SPECT to detect coronary artery disease in hemodialysis patients compared with 201thallium chloride (201Tl) SPECT. We prospectively studied 130 ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis for a mean of 88.6 months (male/female, 77/53; mean age, 63.8 years). Dual SPECT using 123I-BMIPP and 201Tl was performed, followed by coronary angiography. SPECT findings were graded in 17 segments on a five-point scale (0, normal uptake; 4, none) and assessed as a summed score. By coronary angiography, 71.5% of patients (93/130) had significant coronary stenosis (> or =75%), and five patients showed coronary spasm without coronary stenosis. When a BMIPP summed score of 6 or more was defined as abnormal, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for detecting coronary artery disease by BMIPP SPECT were 98.0%, 65.6%, and 90.0%, respectively; in contrast, these parameters for detecting coronary artery disease by Tl SPECT were 84.7%, 46.9%, and 75.0%, respectively, when a Tl summed score of 1 or more was defined as abnormal. In receiver operating characteristic analysis, the area under the curve was 0.895 in BMIPP and 0.727 in Tl SPECT, respectively. Resting BMIPP SPECT is superior to Tl SPECT for detecting coronary lesions, and provides safe screening for coronary artery disease among maintenance hemodialysis patients.

  6. Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation for Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Oldridge, Neil; Thompson, David R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although recommended in guidelines for the management of coronary heart disease (CHD), concerns have been raised about the applicability of evidence from existing meta-analyses of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study is to update the Cochrane...... systematic review and meta-analysis of exercise-based CR for CHD. METHODS: The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Science Citation Index Expanded were searched to July 2014. Retrieved papers, systematic reviews, and trial registries were hand-searched. We included...... randomized controlled trials with at least 6 months of follow-up, comparing CR to no-exercise controls following myocardial infarction or revascularization, or with a diagnosis of angina pectoris or CHD defined by angiography. Two authors screened titles for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk...

  7. First Nations people's challenge in managing coronary artery disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kathryn M; Sanguins, Julianne; McGregor, Lisa; LeBlanc, Pamela

    2007-10-01

    First Nations peoples bring a particular history and cultural perspective to healing and well-being that significantly influences their health behaviors. The authors used grounded theory methods to describe and explain how ethnocultural affiliation and gender influence the process that 22 First Nations people underwent when making lifestyle changes related to their coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The transcribed interviews revealed a core variable, meeting the challenge. Meeting the challenge of CAD risk management was influenced by intrapersonal, interpersonal (relationships with others), extrapersonal (i.e., the community and government), sociodemographic, and gendered factors. Salient elements for the participants included their beliefs about origins of illness, the role of family, challenges to accessing information, financial and resource management, and the gendered element of body image. Health care providers need to understand the historical, social, and culturally embedded factors that influence First Nations people's appraisal of their CAD.

  8. Coronary heart disease index based on longitudinal electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    A coronary heart disease index was developed from longitudinal ECG (LCG) tracings to serve as a cardiac health measure in studies of working and, essentially, asymptomatic populations, such as pilots and executives. For a given subject, the index consisted of a composite score based on the presence of LCG aberrations and weighted values previously assigned to them. The index was validated by correlating it with the known presence or absence of CHD as determined by a complete physical examination, including treadmill, resting ECG, and risk factor information. The validating sample consisted of 111 subjects drawn by a stratified-random procedure from 5000 available case histories. The CHD index was found to be significantly more valid as a sole indicator of CHD than the LCG without the use of the index. The index consistently produced higher validity coefficients in identifying CHD than did treadmill testing, resting ECG, or risk factor analysis.

  9. Psychosocial antecedents of hostility in persons with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofhauser, Cynthia D

    2003-09-01

    Although it is known that hostility precedes coronary heart disease (CHD), little is known about factors that influence the development and progression of hostile characteristics. The relations among hostility, self-esteem, self-concept, and psychosocial residual were conceptualized within the modeling and role-modeling theoretical framework and examined in a sample of 85 persons with CHD. There were significant associations between all variables. Regression analyses revealed that self-esteem, mistrust residual, isolation residual, and self-concept contributed significantly, accounting for 31% of the variation in hostility scores. These findings provide support for the belief that the development of hostility in persons with CHD is related to beliefs and attitudes about the self and others. Persons with self-esteem need deficits, and a subsequent build up of negative psychosocial residual, have poor self-concepts. This poor self-concept is hostile in nature and reflects a mistrust of others and a deep sense of isolation.

  10. A comparison of directional atherectomy with coronary angioplasty in patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Topol (Eric); F. Leya; C.A. Pinkerton; P.L. Whitlow (Patrick); B. Hofling; C.A. Simonton; R.R. Masden; P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M.B. Leon (Martin); D.O. Williams (David); S.B. King 3rd (Spencer); B. Daniel; D.B. Mark (Daniel); J.M. Isner; D.R. Holmes Jr (David); S.G. Ellis (Stephen); K.L. Lee (Kerry); G.P. Keeler; L.G. Berdan (Lisa); T. Hinohara; R.M. Califf (Robert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. Directional coronary atherectomy is a new technique of coronary revascularization by which atherosclerotic plaque is excised and retrieved from target lesions. With respect to the rate of restenosis and clinical outcomes, it is not known how this procedure compares with

  11. Woven Coronary Artery Disease Successfully Managed with Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A New Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup Alsancak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Woven coronary artery is relatively rare and can be complicated in both acute and chronic phases. A few case reports have been published until now. Herein we report a case with right woven coronary artery managed with drug-eluted stent implantation without complication.

  12. Relationship between Renal Artery Stenosis and Severity of Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Coronary Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirfarhang Zandparsa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present investigation was to explore probable association of renal artery stenosis (RAS with coronary artery disease (CAD and the prevalence of renal artery stenosis (RAS in patients with CAD. Patients and methods: This study comprised 165 consecutive patients with CAD, including 52.7% males and 47.2% females with respective mean ages of 60.3 ±8.9 and 59.5±10.1. The patients underwent simultaneous coronary and renal angiographies, and the lumen reduction of 50% or more was considered as significant stenosis. Indeed, stenosis of more than 70% of the arterial lumen was regarded as severe. Results: According to our findings, the prevalence of renal artery stenosis in our hypertensive and normotensive patients were 46.2% and 19.5% respectively (p=0.002. Renal artery angiography revealed that 64 (38.8% of the patients had simultaneous renal artery stenosis. RAS is more common in females than males (p=0.031. Multivariate analysis revealed that among all examined factors, hypertension and serum creatinine were associated with RAS. There was no correlations found between gensini score and RAS (p=0.63. Conclusion: We found a relatively high prevalence of RAS including 46.2% in hypertensive and 19.5% in normotensive patients in our patients with CAD.

  13. Exercise, stress or what. The non-invasive detection of latent coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltart, J.; Robinson, P.S.

    1978-01-01

    This communication discusses the methods of detecting latent coronary artery disease in an entirely asymptomatic individual with no previous symptoms or signs suggestive of coronary artery disease. Isotope techniques are being increasingly employed in the detection and assessment of coronary artery disease in that they may enable the confirmation of the presence of ischaemia, the extent and location of the underlying coronary artery disease and the effect of ischaemia on overall and regional left ventricular function. Three groups of techniques are commonly employed: 1. assessment of myocardial perfusion; 2. labelling of acute myocardial infarction; 3. overall and regional left ventricular function studies. Isotopes of potassium were initially studied, and, despite technical problems with imaging, 43 K has proved a useful agent in that over a range of coronary flow rates from normal to severely reduced flow, myocardial uptake parallels myocardial blood flow. Myocardial perfusion imaging should enhance the sensitivity and specificity of exercise testing in the symptomatic population and should also be helpful in the asymptomatic population although data on such populations are as yet extremely limited. Acute infarct labelling has little relevance to the very early detection of coronary artery disease. Assessment of overall and regional left ventricular function using gated blood pool scanning at rest and possibly also during exercise has potentially very wide applications in ischaemic heart disease and in combination with myocardial perfusion scanning in the assessment of symptomatic ischaemic heart disease and the detection of ischaemia and coronary artery disease in the asymptomatic population. (Auth.)

  14. Association of Endodontic Lesions with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljestrand, J M; Mäntylä, P; Paju, S; Buhlin, K; Kopra, K A E; Persson, G R; Hernandez, M; Nieminen, M S; Sinisalo, J; Tjäderhane, L; Pussinen, P J

    2016-11-01

    An endodontic lesion (EL) is a common manifestation of endodontic infection where Porphyromonas endodontalis is frequently encountered. EL may associate with increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) via similar pathways as marginal periodontitis. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to delineate the associations between EL and CAD. Subgingival P. endodontalis, its immune response, and serum lipopolysaccharide were examined as potential mediators between these 2 diseases. The Finnish Parogene study consists of 508 patients (mean age, 62 y) who underwent coronary angiography and extensive clinical and radiographic oral examination. The cardiovascular outcomes included no significant CAD ( n = 123), stable CAD ( n = 184), and acute coronary syndrome (ACS; n = 169). EL was determined from a panoramic tomography. We combined data of widened periapical spaces (WPSs) and apical rarefactions to a score of EL: 1, no EL ( n = 210); 2, ≥1 WPS per 1 apical rarefaction ( n = 222); 3, ≥2 apical rarefactions ( n = 76). Subgingival P. endodontalis was defined by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization analysis, and corresponding serum antibodies were determined by ELISA. In our population, 50.4% had WPSs, and 22.8% apical rarefactions. A total of 51.2% of all teeth with apical rarefactions had received endodontic procedures. Subgingival P. endodontalis levels and serum immunoglobulin G were associated with a higher EL score. In the multiadjusted model (age, sex, smoking, diabetes, body mass index, alveolar bone loss, and number of teeth), having WPSs associated with stable CAD (odds ratio [OR] = 1.94, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.13 to 3.32, P = 0.016) and highest EL score were associated with ACS (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.09 to 5.54, P = 0.030). This association was especially notable in subjects with untreated teeth with apical rarefactions ( n = 59, OR = 2.72, 95% CI = 1.16 to 6.40, P = 0.022). Our findings support the hypothesis that ELs are independently

  15. Segmental quantitative analysis of digital thallium-201 myocardial scintigrams in diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wainwright, R.J.; Maisey, M.N.; Sowton, E.

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and forty-nine patients with suspected ischaemic heart disease were evaluated by exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy ( 201 Tl SMS), single lead exercise electrocardiography, and coronary arteriography. Myocardial distribution of tracer was assessed semi-quantitatively from digital 201 Tl scintigrams and compared with tracer distribution in subjects with normal hearts. Fifty-two of 54 (96%) patients with normal coronary arteries had normal myocardial scintigrams whereas three patients had a positive ischaemic exercise electrocardiogram and were scan normal. Conversely, 36 of 95 (38%) patients with coronary artery disease had a positive ischaemic electrocardiogram compared with 94 of 95 (99%) patients who had a positive myocardial scintigram. Disease was predicted correctly in 76 out of 80 (95%) of left anterior descending coronary stenoses, in 48 out of 64 (75%) of right coronary artery stenoses, and in 55 out of 64 (85%) of left circumflex coronary artery stenoses, despite the presence of infarcted myocardium in other territories. 201 Tl SMS with segmental quantitative analysis is a highly sensitive and specific technique in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and may be a useful screening procedure to select patients for further investigation, particularly those with evidence of life-threatening severe left coronary artery disease. (author)

  16. Gene expression patterns in peripheral blood correlate with the extent of coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R Sinnaeve

    Full Text Available Systemic and local inflammation plays a prominent role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, but the relationship of whole blood gene expression changes with coronary disease remains unclear. We have investigated whether gene expression patterns in peripheral blood correlate with the severity of coronary disease and whether these patterns correlate with the extent of atherosclerosis in the vascular wall. Patients were selected according to their coronary artery disease index (CADi, a validated angiographical measure of the extent of coronary atherosclerosis that correlates with outcome. RNA was extracted from blood of 120 patients with at least a stenosis greater than 50% (CADi > or = 23 and from 121 controls without evidence of coronary stenosis (CADi = 0. 160 individual genes were found to correlate with CADi (rho > 0.2, P<0.003. Prominent differential expression was observed especially in genes involved in cell growth, apoptosis and inflammation. Using these 160 genes, a partial least squares multivariate regression model resulted in a highly predictive model (r(2 = 0.776, P<0.0001. The expression pattern of these 160 genes in aortic tissue also predicted the severity of atherosclerosis in human aortas, showing that peripheral blood gene expression associated with coronary atherosclerosis mirrors gene expression changes in atherosclerotic arteries. In conclusion, the simultaneous expression pattern of 160 genes in whole blood correlates with the severity of coronary artery disease and mirrors expression changes in the atherosclerotic vascular wall.

  17. Percutaneous coronary angioplasty versus coronary artery bypass grafting in treatment of unprotected left main stenosis (NOBLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäkikallio, Timo; Holm, Niels R; Lindsay, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Background Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is the standard treatment for revascularisation in patients with left main coronary artery disease, but use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for this indication is increasing. We aimed to compare PCI and CABG for treatment of left main...... coronary artery disease. Methods In this prospective, randomised, open-label, non-inferiority trial, patients with left main coronary artery disease were enrolled in 36 centres in northern Europe and randomised 1: 1 to treatment with PCI or CABG. Eligible patients had stable angina pectoris, unstable......, and 5% versus 2% (2 . 25, 0 . 93-5 . 48, p= 0 . 073) for stroke. Interpretation The findings of this study suggest that CABG might be better than PCI for treatment of left main stem coronary artery disease....

  18. Frequency of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, R.; Ghaffar, T.; Khan, I.; Muhammad, R.; Salman, S.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive airway disease (COPD) is considered as risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) along with other risk factors. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Pulmonology and Cardiology wards/OPD's of Khyber Teaching Hospital Peshawar. Patients more than 35 years of age, diagnosed with CAD of either gender were included. Patients already diagnosed with COPD, recent myocardial infarction (within 7 days), left ventricular impairment, pneumothorax, bronchiectasis, comatose patient, asthmatic and those with chest trauma were excluded. All the patients underwent spirometry examination before and after administration of salbutamol (5 mg for 5 minutes) via nebulizer. FEV1/FVC less than 70% confirmed the presence of COPD. Results: Out of 151 patients, 57 (37.7%) were found to have COPD. Among them, 39 (68.42%) were male and 18 (31.57%) were female. Among male patients with COPD, 82.05% (n=32) were smokers and 17.94% (n=7) were nonsmokers while in females with COPD no one was smoker. Conclusion: COPD is an under-diagnosed progressive disease in patients with high risk patients with coronary artery disease. (author)

  19. Ischemia and No Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease (INOCA): Developing Evidence-based Therapies and Research Agenda for the Next Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, C. Noel Bairey; Pepine, Carl J.; Walsh, Mary Norine; Fleg, Jerome L.

    2017-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Disease in Women Committee of the American College of Cardiology, in conjunction with interested parties (from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology), convened a working group to develop a consensus on the syndrome of myocardial ischemia with no obstructive coronary arteries (INOCA). In general, these patients have elevated risk for a cardiovascular event (including acute coronary syndrome, heart failure hospitalization, stroke, and repeated cardiovascular procedures) vs reference subjects, and appear to be at higher risk for development of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). A subgroup of these patients also has coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) and evidence of inflammation. This document provides a summary of findings and recommendations toward the development of an integrated approach for identifying and managing patients with INOCA, and outlining knowledge gaps in the area. Working group members critically reviewed available literature and current practices for risk assessment and state-of-the-science techniques in multiple areas, with a focus on next steps needed to develop evidence-based therapies. This report presents highlights of this working group review and a summary of suggested research directions to advance this field in the next decade. PMID:28289007

  20. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heran, Balraj S; Chen, Jenny MH; Ebrahim, Shah; Moxham, Tiffany; Oldridge, Neil; Rees, Karen; Thompson, David R; Taylor, Rod S

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) worldwide is one of great concern to patients and healthcare agencies alike. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation aims to restore patients with heart disease to health. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (exercise training alone or in combination with psychosocial or educational interventions) on mortality, morbidity and health-related quality of life of patients with CHD. Search methods RCTs have been identified by searching CENTRAL, HTA, and DARE (using The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2009), as well as MEDLINE (1950 to December 2009), EMBASE (1980 to December 2009), CINAHL (1982 to December 2009), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to December 2009). Selection criteria Men and women of all ages who have had myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), or who have angina pectoris or coronary artery disease defined by angiography. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected and data extracted independently by two reviewers. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Main results This systematic review has allowed analysis of 47 studies randomising 10,794 patients to exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation or usual care. In medium to longer term (i.e. 12 or more months follow-up) exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduced overall and cardiovascular mortality [RR 0.87 (95% CI 0.75, 0.99) and 0.74 (95% CI 0.63, 0.87), respectively], and hospital admissions [RR 0.69 (95% CI 0.51, 0.93)] in the shorter term (< 12 months follow-up) with no evidence of heterogeneity of effect across trials. Cardiac rehabilitation did not reduce the risk of total MI, CABG or PTCA. Given both the heterogeneity in outcome measures and methods of reporting findings, a meta-analysis was not undertaken for health-related quality of life. In seven out of 10 trials reporting health

  1. Recent trends in coronary heart disease epidemiology in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajeev

    2008-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is epidemic in India and one of the major causes of disease-burden and deaths. Mortality data from the Registrar General of India shows that cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of death in India now. Studies to determine the precise causes of death in urban Chennai and rural areas of Andhra Pradesh have revealed that cardiovascular diseases cause about 40% of the deaths in urban areas and 30% in rural areas. Analysis of cross-sectional CHD epidemiological studies performed over the past 50 years reveals that this condition is increasing in both urban and rural areas. The adult prevalence has increased in urban areas from about 2% in 1960 to 6.5% in 1970, 7.0% in 1980, 9.7% in 1990 and 10.5% in 2000; while in rural areas, it increased from 2% in 1970, to 2.5% in 1980, 4% in 1990, and 4.5% in 2000. In terms of absolute numbers this translates into 30 million CHD patients in the country. The disease occurs at a much younger age in Indians as compared to those in North America and Western Europe. Rural-urban differences reveal that risk factors like obesity, truncal obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol and diabetes are more in urban areas. Case-control studies also confirm the importance of these risk factors. The INTERHEART-South Asia study identified that eight established coronary risk factors--abnormal lipids, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, abdominal obesity, psychosocial factors, low fruit and vegetable consumption, and lack of physical activity--accounted for 89% of the cases of acute myocardial infarction in Indians. There is epidemiological evidence that all these risk factors are increasing. Over the past fifty years prevalence of obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes have increased significantly in urban (R2 0.45-0.74) and slowly in rural areas (R2 0.19-0.29). There is an urgent need for development and implementation of suitable primordial, primary, and secondary prevention

  2. Comparative assessment of the diets of healthy individuals, subjects with preclinical coronary heart disease and patients with severe heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronov, D.M.; Eganyan, R.A.; Kovaleva, O.F.; Zhidko, N.I.; Danielov, G.Eh.; Rozhnov, A.V.; Shcherbakova, I.A.

    1991-01-01

    92 males aged 26 to 55 (28 healthy individuals, 45 persons with preclinical coronary heart disease and 19 patients with functional class 1-2 coronary heart disease) were examined to study the peculiarities and dietary patterns of persons with a high physical working capacity and having no typical clinical signs of the disease. All persons were subjected to a complex examination which included questionnarire, myocardial scintigraphy with 201 Tl at a maximum physical loading, echocardiography, coronaroangiography. Certain dietary peculiarities are established in persons with preclinical coronary heart disease

  3. Predictive role of stress echocardiography before carotid endarterectomy in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyfos, George; Tsioufis, Constantinos; Theodorou, Dimitris; Katsaragakis, Stilianos; Zografos, Georgios; Filis, Konstantinos

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to examine the predictive value of preoperative stress echocardiography regarding early myocardial ischemia and late cardiac events after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Patients with coronary artery disease undergoing CEA were prospectively included in this study. All patients (n = 162) were classified into low, medium, and high cardiac risk group, according to preoperative stress echocardiography. Classification was based on the criteria of the American Society of Echocardiography. For all patients, cTnI was measured before surgery and on postoperative days 1, 3, and 7. Postoperative cTnI values ranging from 0.05 to 0.5 ng/mL were classified as myocardial ischemia; values >0.5 ng/mL were classified as myocardial infarction. Cardiac damage was defined as either myocardial ischemia or infarction. No deaths, strokes, or symptomatic coronary events were observed during the early postoperative period. There were 112 low cardiac risk patients, 42 medium-risk patients, and 8 high-risk patients, according to stress echocardiography findings. Overall, there were 22 patients (14%) that increased their cTnI values postoperatively (12 of low cardiac risk and 10 of medium cardiac risk), and all of them were asymptomatic. None of the high-risk patients showed any troponin increase. Late cardiac events were associated with cTnI increase, although no high-risk patients showed any late event. Preoperative stress echocardiography does not seem to independently recognize patients in high risk for asymptomatic cardiac damage after CEA. Postoperative troponin elevation seems to be more predictive for late adverse cardiac events than preoperative stress echocardiography. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Corneal arcus: an indicator of severe coronary artery disease in a young adult man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucu, Murat; Davutoglu, Vedat

    2009-01-01

    A 32-year-old man was transferred to our emergency service with the diagnosis of sudden cardiopulmonary arrest. During eye examination, a typical corneal arcus was observed. The patient underwent the primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Coronary angiography showed a total occlusion of proximal left anterior descending artery. Primary coronary balloon angioplasty was successfully performed. Independently of total cholesterol, serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and smoking, corneal arcus has been suggested as a predictor of coronary heart disease among hyperlipidemic men. Physical examination can yield valuable diagnostic clues in a patient suspected of ischaemic heart disease. In summary, the appearance of corneal arcus in young adult men might be an indicator of severe coronary artery disease and should be screened by means of physical examination especially in the setting of cardiopulmonary arrest (Fig. 1, Ref. 4).

  5. Coronary microvascular function, insulin sensitivity and body composition in predicting exercise capacity in overweight patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürs, Anders; Pedersen, Lene Rørholm; Olsen, Rasmus Huan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a negative impact on exercise capacity. The aim of this study was to determine how coronary microvascular function, glucose metabolism and body composition contribute to exercise capacity in overweight patients with CAD and without diabetes. METHODS...... by a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Body composition was determined by whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan and magnetic resonance imaging. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) assessed by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography was used as a measure of microvascular function. RESULTS: Median BMI was 31.3 and 72...... metabolism and body composition. CFR, EDV and LVEF remained independent predictors of VO2peak in multivariable regression analysis. CONCLUSION: The study established CFR, EDV and LVEF as independent predictors of VO2peak in overweight CAD patients with no or only mild functional symptoms and a LVEF > 35...

  6. Coronary risk stratification of patients undergoing surgery for valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Rasmus Bo; Engstrøm, Thomas; Pries-Heje, Mia

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) is a non-invasive, less expensive, low-radiation alternative to coronary angiography (CAG) prior to valvular heart surgery. MSCT has a high negative predictive value for coronary artery disease (CAD) but previous studies of patients with valvular ...

  7. The ethnicity-specific association of biomarkers with the angiographic severity of coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsberts, C M; Bank, I E M; Seneviratna, A; den Ruijter, H M; Asselbergs, F W; Agostoni, P; Remijn, J A; Pasterkamp, G; Kiat, H C; Roest, M; Richards, A M; Chan, M Y; de Kleijn, D P V; Hoefer, I E

    BACKGROUND: Risk factor burden and clinical characteristics of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) differ among ethnic groups. We related biomarkers to CAD severity in Caucasians, Chinese, Indians and Malays. METHODS: In the Dutch-Singaporean UNICORN coronary angiography cohort (n = 2033) we

  8. Assessment of waist/hip ratio and its relationship with coronary heart disease in community hospital of district swat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, R.; Ahmad, A.; Jan, S.; Rehman, I.U.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between central obesity (Abdominal adiposity), measured by Waist/Hip ratio and the development of Coronary Heart Disease in adult population of district Swat. The study comprised of 100 subjects, 34 Control, 33 Hypertensive subjects and 33 subjects with Coronary Heart Disease. Weight, Height, Waist/Hip ratio and Blood Pressure of subjects with Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) were compared with Hypertensive subjects and Control subjects. Patients with Coronary Heart Disease had higher Waist/Hip ratio and Blood Pressure than Hypertensive subjects, which in turn had higher values than control subjects. Waist/hip ratio is the dominant risk factor predicting Coronary Heart Disease. (author)

  9. Epidemiology and prevention of coronary heart disease in families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, M

    2000-04-01

    Although family histories are used primarily to aid in diagnosis and risk assessment, their value is enhanced when the family is considered as a unit for research and disease prevention. The value of a family history of coronary heart disease (CHD) is increased when the age, sex, number of relatives, and age at onset of disease are incorporated in a quantitative family risk score. Medical and lifestyle risk factors that aggregate in families include dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, hyperfibrinogenemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking habits, eating patterns, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and socioeconomic status. Advances in detecting and understanding interactions between genetic susceptibility and modifiable risk factors should lead to improvements in prevention and treatment. However, working with families can be difficult. In the United States, families are usually small, are often widely dispersed, and may not be intact. Family histories may be unknown, affected relatives may be dead, and secular trends mask similarities among generations. Many exposures occur outside the home, and families change over time. Ethical, legal, and social issues arise when dealing with families. Nevertheless, opportunities are missed when research, clinical practice, and prevention focus on individual patients. Greater emphasis on families is needed to reduce the burden of CHD.

  10. Evaluation of ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocco, T.P.; Dilsizian, V.; Fischman, A.J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    The recent expansion of interventional cardiovascular technologies has stimulated a concomitant expansion of noninvasive cardiac studies, both to assist in diagnosis and to evaluate treatment outcomes. Radionuclide ventricular function studies provide a reliable, reproducible means to quantify global left ventricular systolic performance, a critical determinant of prognosis in patients with cardiovascular disease. In addition, the ability to evaluate regional left ventricular wall motion and to assess ventricular performance during exercise have secured a fundamental role for such studies in the screening and treatment of patients with coronary artery disease. Radionuclide techniques have been extended to the evaluation of left ventricular relaxation/filling events, left ventricular systolic/diastolic function in the ambulatory setting, and with appropriate technical modifications, to the assessment of right ventricular performance at rest and with exercise. As a complement to radionuclide perfusion studies, cardiac blood-pool imaging allows for thorough noninvasive description of cardiac physiology and function in both normal subjects and in patients with a broad range of cardiovascular diseases. 122 references

  11. Coronary Heart Disease: Pandemic in a True Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are caused because of abnormalities in the heart and blood vessels. Recent trends reveal that the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD has gradually decreased in many developed countries, but the situation remains quite challenging in developing nations that account for more than 60% of the global burden. Multiple socio-demographic, personal, physician related and healthcare delivery system related factors have been identified which act in variable combinations to either influence the incidence of CHD or affect the short/long-term outcome of the disease. Of all CHD cases who succumb within 28 days of onset of symptoms, almost 67% fail to reach even a hospital. This clearly signifies the importance of primary prevention and early recognition of the warning signs in averting cause-specific mortality. The main priority is to develop cost-effective equitable health care innovations in CHD prevention and to monitor the trend of CHD so that evidence-based interventions can be formulated. To conclude, inculcating health-promoting behaviors in school children and the general population by means of community-based health screening and education interventions could avert many more deaths attributed to CHDs.

  12. Coronary heart disease: pandemic in a true sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambiharilal Shrivastava, Saurabh; Saurabh Shrivastava, Prateek; Ramasamy, Jegadeesh

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are caused because of abnormalities in the heart and blood vessels. Recent trends reveal that the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) has gradually decreased in many developed countries, but the situation remains quite challenging in developing nations that account for more than 60% of the global burden. Multiple socio-demographic, personal, physician related and healthcare delivery system related factors have been identified which act in variable combinations to either influence the incidence of CHD or affect the short/long-term outcome of the disease. Of all CHD cases who succumb within 28 days of onset of symptoms, almost 67% fail to reach even a hospital. This clearly signifies the importance of primary prevention and early recognition of the warning signs in averting cause-specific mortality. The main priority is to develop cost-effective equitable health care innovations in CHD prevention and to monitor the trend of CHD so that evidence-based interventions can be formulated. To conclude, inculcating health-promoting behaviors in school children and the general population by means of community-based health screening and education interventions could avert many more deaths attributed to CHDs.

  13. Life Style Interventions in the Prevention of Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar Dwivedi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lifestyle diseases particularly coronary artery disease (CAD has been noted to be the most important   cause of the morbidity and mortality all over the world.  India is currently passing through this epidemic so much  so that it would be taking a heavy toll of Indian youth and economy to the tune of some 1.6 trillion $ during 2015-2030 . The main causative factors for CAD identified as coronary risk factors are: smoking / tobacco, physical inactivity, faulty diet, hypertension, diabetes, high level of cholesterol and stress. As most of these risk factors are lifestyle related attempt to modify them by appropriate interventions form the cornerstone of prevention of CAD epidemic.  Studies done by Dean Ornish and several others prompted us to plan an interventional case control study in 640 patients of established CAD. These cases were given power point presentation regarding healthy lifestyle on one to one basis and followed up at three and six months. Primary outcomes variable were change in smoking /tobacco habits, physical activity, obesity, dietary habits, control of hypertension, diabetes and lipid profile.  At the end of intervention it was possible to bring down the tobacco consumption, improve physical activity, better control of hypertension ( p< 0.03 , reduction in obesity ( p= 0. 0005 and raising HDL cholesterol ( p 0.05 significantly in test group.  Taking cue from above study a five step innovative strategy was developed for effective implementation of healthy life style in coronary patients attending Cardiac Clinic at HAH Centenary Hospital, Jamia Hamdard. This strategy  included sensitizing patients to  locally developed visuals , posters and pamphlets at  registration desk , concurrent counseling by attending doctor  at the end of clinical examination ,  and showing patients  and their  family the features of atherosclerosis during  carotid  ultrasound assessment . These points were again reinforced at follow up

  14. Trends in Coronary Revascularization and Ischemic Heart Disease?Related Mortality in Israel

    OpenAIRE

    Blumenfeld, Orit; Na'amnih, Wasef; Shapira?Daniels, Ayelet; Lotan, Chaim; Shohat, Tamy; Shapira, Oz M.

    2017-01-01

    Background We investigated national trends in volume and outcomes of percutaneous coronary angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and ischemic heart disease?related mortality in Israel. Methods and Results Using International Classification of Diseases 9th and 10th revision codes, we linked 5 Israeli national databases, including the Israel Center for Disease Control National PCI and CABG Registries, the Ministry of Health Hospitalization Report, the Center of Bureau of St...

  15. The progress of research on myocardial perfusion imaging in diabetic coronary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Qian; Li Juan

    2007-01-01

    The morbidity of diabetes mellitus is gradually increasing. It's most important complication is cardiovascular disease. The coronary disease is the main cause of death in patients with diabetes mellitus. The stress myocardial perfusion imaging help diagnose diabetic coronary disease and prognosis judgement and risk assessment. So it can improve the living standard of patients with diabetes mellitus, and decrease the mortality of diabetes mellitus. (authors)

  16. Determinan Penyakit Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woro Riyadina

    2013-02-01

    . Data analysis was performed by multiple logistic regression test. This study revealed that stroke disease was found in 49 people (2.6%. The main determinant of stroke included hypertension (OR = 4.20; 95% CI = 2.20 – 8.03, coronary heart disease (OR = 2.74; 95% CI = 1.51 – 4.99, diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.89; 95% CI = 1.47 – 5.64, and low economic status (OR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.03 – 3.33. Prevention of stroke should be done by increasing education (campaign through the control of major risk factors of hypertension and prevention of other degenerative diseases are coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus.

  17. Prevention and management of stroke in sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kilinç

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sickle Cell Disease(SCD is one of the most common hemoglobinopathies in the world which causes stroke. The management of stroke depends on the manifestations and the age of the patient. Especially in childhood, anatomic and physiological abnormalities of CNS may be a predisposing factors. Stroke mostly affects the distal segments of the Internal Carotid Artery, but also middle and anterior segments of the cerebral arteries are involved. The most important predisposing factors are the arterial malformations, stenosis and obstructions in cranial arteries, generally involving Internal Carotid Artery, frequently Proximal Middle Cerebral or Anterior Cerebral Arteries. After infarcts at brain vessels, most frequent clinical findings are hemiparesis or hemiplegia, impaired speech, focal seizures, gait disturbances. Risk factors for predisposing stroke are prior transient ischemia, baseline Hb decrease, acute chest sydrome within previous two weeks, systolic blood pressure rises, leucocyte increases. The patient with silent stroke or transient ischemic attacks may be asymptomatic or without neurological symptoms. Neuroimaging abnormalities may be seen without significant clinical findings in children with SCD. We talk about silent stroke if there are neuroradiological abnormalities without clinical findings. Children with silent strokes are more prone to new strokes. If there is a significant stroke a ischemic stroke often present with focal neurological signs and symptoms. If patient is asymptomatic or have suspected stroke, first step may be performance of Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCD. Children with time-averaged mean velocity (TAMV, measured in Middle Carotid Artery or in distal internal carotid Artery abnormally elevated, defined as TAMV≥200cm/sec, have sixfold increase for stroke than those with normal TAMV≤170cm/sec. For these patients under the risk of stroke, chronic blood transfusion is recommended for prevention of primary

  18. Changes in some coronary disease risk factors under influence of treatment with Swieradow radon waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczeklik, E; Halawa, B; Kwiatkowski, J

    1977-01-01

    In 66 patients subbivided into group of patients with coronary disease and group of control subjects the effect of radioactive waterbath and climatotherapy in Swieradow upon coronary disease risk factors was studied. The following risk factors were taken into account: cholesterol level, triglicerides, LDL, uric acid, the serum glucose level, arterial tension and weight. The results obtained indicate that the therapy with radon waters of Swieradow complexed with climatotherapy decreases the content of some coronary disease risk factors. The decrease of the urin acid in the serum, the lowering of arterial tension and decrease of body weight was noted. The lipid level in the serum did not change under effect of radioactive waters.

  19. Diagnostic advantages of the association of electrocardiograms and thallium 201 exercise scintigraphy in detecting coronary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubau, J.F.; Chaitman, B.R.; Dupras, G.; Waters, D.D.; Bourassa, M.G.

    1979-01-01

    Thallium 201 exercise scintigraphy combined with 14-lead exercise electrocardiography detects coronary artery disease in 95-96 percent of the patients, whether men or women. When both tests were positive, 93 percent of the men and 100 percent of the women had coronary artery disease. In women, thallium 201 seems to do better than 14-lead exercise electrocardiogram, detecting the presence of coronary artery disease in 72 percent and its absence in 83 percent of the cases. In approximately 50 percent of the cases, the results of thallium 201 and multiple-lead exercise testing were discordant; in these cases, an accurate clinical history is helpful. (author) [fr

  20. C-reactive protein, dietary n-3 fatty acids, and the extent of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Skou, Helle Aarup; Hansen, Vibeke Ellegaard

    2001-01-01

    The acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) has emerged as an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Experimental and clinical studies provide evidence of anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) derived from fish. We have studied the effect of marin.......003). The inverse correlation between CRP and DHA may reflect an anti-inflammatory effect of DHA in patients with stable coronary artery disease and suggest a novel mechanism by which fish consumption may decrease the risk of coronary artery disease. (C) 2001 by Excerpta Medica, Inc....

  1. Divorce and Severity of Coronary Artery Disease: A Multicenter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Daoulah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between marital status and coronary artery disease (CAD is supported by numerous epidemiological studies. While divorce may have an adverse effect on cardiac outcomes, the relationship between divorce and severe CAD is unclear. We conducted a multicenter, observational study of consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography during the period between April 1, 2013, and March 30, 2014. Of 1,068 patients, 124 (12% were divorced. Divorce was more frequent among women (27% compared to men (6%. Most divorced patients had been divorced only once (49%, but a subset had been divorced 2 (38% or ≥3 (12% times. After adjusting for baseline differences, there was no significant association between divorce and severe CAD in men. In women, there was a significant adjusted association between divorce and severe MVD (OR 2.31 [1.16, 4.59] or LMD (OR 5.91 [2.19, 15.99]. The modification of the association between divorce and severe CAD by gender was statistically significant for severe LMD (Pinteraction 0.0008 and marginally significant for CAD (Pinteraction 0.05. Among women, there was a significant adjusted association between number of divorces and severe CAD (OR 2.4 [95% CI 1.2, 4.5], MVD (OR 2.0 [95% CI 1.4, 3.0], and LMD (OR 3.4 [95% CI 1.9, 5.9]. In conclusion, divorce, particularly multiple divorces, is associated with severe CAD, MVD, and LMD in women but not in men.

  2. Ischemic stroke related to intracranial branch atheromatous disease and comparison with large and small artery diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, May Wai-Mei; Mak, Windsor; Cheung, Raymond Tak-Fai; Ho, Shu-Leong

    2011-04-15

    The mechanism of ischemic stroke in intracranial branch atheromatous disease (BAD) is different from large artery atherothrombotic disease (LAD) or lacunar infarction (LACI). The concept of BAD is underused in clinical practice and research. Patients admitted over 24-months with ischemic stroke caused by atherosclerotic disease were reviewed retrospectively and classified according to radiological±clinical criteria into LAD, BAD and LACI. The BAD cases were further divided into 5 BAD syndromes. Clinical characteristics, vascular risk factors, results of vascular workup and outcome among these subgroups were compared. 123 cases of LAD (17% of all stroke patients or 33% of all studied patients), 147 BAD (20% or 40%) and 102 LACI (14% or 27%) presented during the study period. Compared to LAD, BAD patients had milder neurological deficits, were less often diabetic and carotid stenosis was less common, while stenosis of the intracranial arteries was more frequent in BAD as compared with LACI patients. Outcome in BAD patients was intermediate between LAD and LACI. Comparisons among the BAD syndromes indicated they were homogenous conditions. BAD is the most prevalent ischemic stroke subtype in our cohort. The homogeneity among the BAD syndromes suggests they might represent a distinctive stroke entity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Limitations of regional myocardial thallium clearance for identification of disease in individual coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, L.C.; Rogers, W.J. Jr.; Links, J.M.; Corn, C.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to critically evaluate the usefulness of postexercise regional myocardial thallium-201 clearance for identifying disease in individual coronary arteries. Exercise and redistribution planar imaging studies were performed in 114 subjects, including 19 normal volunteers and 95 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization (70 with and 25 without greater than or equal to 50% narrowing in one or more coronary arteries). Thallium clearance was measured from predefined myocardial regions corresponding to the left anterior descending, left circumflex and right coronary arteries and was expressed as the percent decrease in activity at 4 h, assuming monoexponential clearance. In regions perfused by a normal or insignificantly diseased coronary artery, mean 4 h clearance was 58.9 +/- 9.4% for normal volunteers, 43.1 +/- 15.5% for catheterized patients without coronary artery disease and 36.3 +/- 24.9% for catheterized patients with coronary artery disease (p less than 0.001 patients with coronary artery disease versus normal volunteers). Clearance from normal regions was significantly associated with two measures of exercise performance: percent of predicted maximal heart rate achieved (r = 0.49) and exercise duration (r = 0.35). In regions perfused by a stenotic coronary artery, mean clearance was lower (31.1 +/- 19.8%) but was not significantly different from that in normal regions in the same patients. Clearance from diseased regions was also associated with maximal exercise heart rate (r = 0.28) and exercise duration (r = 0.41), but not with percent coronary artery stenosis (r = 0.02). After taking exercise performance into account, the number of diseased vessels or the presence or absence of disease in a given vessel had little influence on regional thallium clearance

  4. 76 FR 49707 - Food Labeling; Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease; Reopening of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... Risk of Coronary Heart Disease; Reopening of the Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... reconsider its proposed amendments to the phytosterols and risk of coronary heart disease health [[Page 49708... December 8, 2010, proposing to amend regulations on plant sterol/ stanol esters and risk of coronary heart...

  5. General Stroke Management In Stroke Unit: Guidelines Of Turkish Society Of Cerebrovascular Diseases – 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akif Topçuoğlu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this section, in the light of evidence-based data concerning essentiality that the stoke patients should be treated in A stroke unit and related centers, a brief and current information about general stroke treatment of patients with stroke during acute phase will be offered.

  6. Non-invasive detection of coronary endothelial response to sequential handgrip exercise in coronary artery disease patients and healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison G Hays

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Our objective is to test the hypothesis that coronary endothelial function (CorEndoFx does not change with repeated isometric handgrip (IHG stress in CAD patients or healthy subjects. BACKGROUND: Coronary responses to endothelial-dependent stressors are important measures of vascular risk that can change in response to environmental stimuli or pharmacologic interventions. The evaluation of the effect of an acute intervention on endothelial response is only valid if the measurement does not change significantly in the short term under normal conditions. Using 3.0 Tesla (T MRI, we non-invasively compared two coronary artery endothelial function measurements separated by a ten minute interval in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. METHODS: Twenty healthy adult subjects and 12 CAD patients were studied on a commercial 3.0 T whole-body MR imaging system. Coronary cross-sectional area (CSA, peak diastolic coronary flow velocity (PDFV and blood-flow were quantified before and during continuous IHG stress, an endothelial-dependent stressor. The IHG exercise with imaging was repeated after a 10 minute recovery period. RESULTS: In healthy adults, coronary artery CSA changes and blood-flow increases did not differ between the first and second stresses (mean % change ±SEM, first vs. second stress CSA: 14.8%±3.3% vs. 17.8%±3.6%, p = 0.24; PDFV: 27.5%±4.9% vs. 24.2%±4.5%, p = 0.54; blood-flow: 44.3%±8.3 vs. 44.8%±8.1, p = 0.84. The coronary vasoreactive responses in the CAD patients also did not differ between the first and second stresses (mean % change ±SEM, first stress vs. second stress: CSA: -6.4%±2.0% vs. -5.0%±2.4%, p = 0.22; PDFV: -4.0%±4.6% vs. -4.2%±5.3%, p = 0.83; blood-flow: -9.7%±5.1% vs. -8.7%±6.3%, p = 0.38. CONCLUSION: MRI measures of CorEndoFx are unchanged during repeated isometric handgrip exercise tests in CAD patients and healthy adults. These findings

  7. THE EFFECT OF WAIST CIRCUMFERENCES MORE THAN NORMAL ON THE INCIDENT OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pria Wahyu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coronary heart disease is known as the most common disease that causes mortality in the world, one of the examination to identify the risks of coronary heart disease is measuring waist circumference. The purpose of this study was to identify correlation between large waist circumferences and the incident of coroner heart disease. Method: Design used in this study was analytic observational (retrospective with cross sectional approach. There were 63 respondents which sampling by simple random sampling. The independent variable was waist circumferences and the dependent variable was coronary heart disease. Data were collected by direct observation then analyzed by spearman correlation statistic test with significance level α≤0.05. Result: The result showed that waist circumferences more than normal had significant correlation with the incident of coronary heart disease (p=0.02. Analysis: It can be concluded that there was correlation between waist circumferences more than normal and the incident of coronary heart disease to the clients with coroner cardiac disease. Discussion: Earlier screening and detection is needed to prevent coronary heart disease.

  8. Causes of Death Data in the Global Burden of Disease Estimates for Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Iversen, Helle K; Mensah, George A; Feigin, Valery L; Sposato, Luciano A; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Stroke mortality estimates in the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study are based on routine mortality statistics and redistribution of ill-defined codes that cannot be a cause of death, the so-called 'garbage codes' (GCs). This study describes the contribution of these codes to stroke mortality estimates. All available mortality data were compiled and non-specific cause codes were redistributed based on literature review and statistical methods. Ill-defined codes were redistributed to their specific cause of disease by age, sex, country and year. The reassignment was done based on the International Classification of Diseases and the pathology behind each code by checking multiple causes of death and literature review. Unspecified stroke and primary and secondary hypertension are leading contributing 'GCs' to stroke mortality estimates for hemorrhagic stroke (HS) and ischemic stroke (IS). There were marked differences in the fraction of death assigned to IS and HS for unspecified stroke and hypertension between GBD regions and between age groups. A large proportion of stroke fatalities are derived from the redistribution of 'unspecified stroke' and 'hypertension' with marked regional differences. Future advancements in stroke certification, data collections and statistical analyses may improve the estimation of the global stroke burden. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Alcohol Intake and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Younger, Middle-Aged, and Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla A; Tolstrup, Janne S; Jakobsen, Marianne U

    2010-01-01

    prospective studies from North America and Europe including 192 067 women and 74 919 men free of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancers at baseline, average daily alcohol intake was assessed at baseline with a food frequency or diet history questionnaire. An inverse association between alcohol......BACKGROUND: -Light to moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. This protective effect of alcohol, however, may be confined to middle-aged or older individuals. Coronary heart disease incidence is low in men ... of age; for this reason, study cohorts rarely have the power to investigate the effects of alcohol on coronary heart disease risk in younger adults. This study examined whether the beneficial effect of alcohol on coronary heart disease depends on age. Methods and Results-In this pooled analysis of 8...

  10. ACE INHIBITION ATTENUATES SYMPATHETIC CORONARY VASOCONSTRICTION IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY-ARTERY DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PERONDI, R; SAINO, A; TIO, RA; POMIDOSSI, G; GREGORINI, L; ALESSIO, P; MORGANTI, A; ZANCHETTI, A; MANCIA, G

    Background. In humans, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition attenuates the vasoconstriction induced by sympathetic stimulation in a number of peripheral districts. Whether this is also the case in the coronary circulation is unknown, however. Methods and Results. In nine normotensive

  11. Repeat interventions as a long-term treatment strategy in the management of progressive coronary artery disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.G. Lehmann (Kenneth); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); A.C.P. Maas (Arthur); R.T. van Domburg (Ron)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractObjectives. This study investigates whether repeat coronary interventions, applied over an extended time period, can successfully curtail the progression of ischemic symptoms and angiographic lumen narrowing. Background. Coronary artery disease is a chronic and generally progressive

  12. Fractional flow reserve versus angiography for guiding percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease: 2-year follow-up of the FAME (Fractional Flow Reserve Versus Angiography for Multivessel Evaluation) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pijls, Nico H J; Fearon, William F; Tonino, Pim A L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the 2-year outcome of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) guided by fractional flow reserve (FFR) in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD).......The purpose of this study was to investigate the 2-year outcome of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) guided by fractional flow reserve (FFR) in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD)....

  13. Social Integration and Reduced Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women: The Role of Lifestyle Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shun-Chiao; Glymour, Maria; Cornelis, Marilyn; Walter, Stefan; Rimm, Eric B; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2017-06-09

    Higher social integration is associated with lower cardiovascular mortality; however, whether it is associated with incident coronary heart disease (CHD), especially in women, and whether associations differ by case fatality are unclear. This study sought to examine the associations between social integration and risk of incident CHD in a large female prospective cohort. Seventy-six thousand three hundred and sixty-two women in the Nurses' Health Study, free of CHD and stroke at baseline (1992), were followed until 2014. Social integration was assessed by a simplified Berkman-Syme Social Network Index every 4 years. End points included nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD. Two thousand three hundred and seventy-two incident CHD events occurred throughout follow-up. Adjusting for demographic, health/medical risk factors, and depressive symptoms, being socially integrated was significantly associated with lower CHD risk, particularly fatal CHD. The most socially integrated women had a hazard ratio of 0.55 (95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.73) of developing fatal CHD compared with those least socially integrated ( P for trend social integration and nonfatal myocardial infarction risk were largely explained by health-promoting behaviors, particularly through differences in cigarette smoking; however, the association with fatal CHD risk remained after accounting for these behaviors and, thus, may involve more direct biological mechanisms. Social integration is inversely associated with CHD incidence in women, but is largely explained by lifestyle/behavioral pathways. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. The relationship of plasma decoy receptor 3 and coronary collateral circulation in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Youyou; Song, Dandan; Liu, Lulu; Meng, Xiuping; Qi, Chao; Wang, Junnan

    2017-11-15

    Previously, decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) was found to be a potential angiogenetic factor, while the relationship of DcR3 with coronary collateral circulation formation has not been investigated. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether plasma decoy receptor 3 levels was associated with CCC formation and evaluate its predictive power for CCC status in patients with coronary artery disease. Among patients who underwent coronary angiography with coronary artery disease and had a stenosis of ≥90% were included in our study. Collateral degree was graded according to Rentrope Cohen classification. Patients with grade 2 or 3 collateral degree were enrolled in good CCC group and patients with grade 0 or 1 collateral degree were enrolled in poor CCC group. Plasma DcR3 level was significantly higher in good CCC group (328.00±230.82 vs 194.84±130.63ng/l, p<0.01) and positively correlated with Rentrope grade (p<0.01). In addition, plasma DcR3 was also positively correlated with VEGF-A. Both ROC (receiver operating characteristic curve) and multinomial logistical regression analysis showed that plasma DcR3 displayed potent predictive power for CCC status. Higher plasma DcR3 level was related to better CCC formation and displayed potent predictive power for CCC status. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Noninvasive imaging in the assessment and prevention of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llerena Rojas, Luis Roberto; Peix Gonzalez, Amalia; Valiente Mustelier, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear cardiology can all help prevent coronary heart disease. Echocardiography can identify asymptomatic individuals who are at risk of coronary disease and who should receive aggressive preventative therapy by providing data on the carotid intima-media thickness, arterial stiffness and flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery. The calcium score is an independent predictor of cardiac events that influences clinical risk scores such as the Framingham risk score. By using multidetector computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging for coronary angiography, it is possible to visualize both the lumen and vessel walls of coronary arteries and to discriminate between calcified and noncalcified atherosclerotic plaque before invasive coronary angiography is performed. With nuclear cardiology, the functional effects of atherosclerotic lesions can be evaluated by assessing perfusion and ventricular function simultaneously

  16. Association of Aortic Calcification on Plain Chest Radiography with Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeong Han; Chang, Jeong Ho [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Daegu Catholic University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Sam [Dept. of Radiologic Tecnology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    This study was conducted to determine an association between aortic calcification viewed on plain chest radiography and obstructive coronary artery disease. Retrospective review of all chest radiography obtained from consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography. Chest PA images were reviewed by technical radiologist and radiologist. Considering the presence of aortic arch calcification, images were compared with the results of coronary angiography. In addition, the size of aortic arch calcification were divided into two groups - the smaller and the larger than 10 mm. Among the total 846 patients, the number of the patients with obstructive coronary artery disease is total 417 (88.3%) in males and 312 (83.4%) in females. Considering the presence of aortic arch calcification, the positive predictive value of relation between aortic arch calcification and obstructive coronary artery disease was 91.4% and the relative risk of the group with aortic arch calcification to the opposite group was 1.10. According to the size of aortic arch calcification and obstructive coronary artery disease, the positive predictive value was 91.9% and the relative risk between two groups was 1.04. This study shows that aortic calcification was closely associated with obstructive coronary artery disease. If the aortic calcification is notified on plain chest radiography, we strongly recommend to consult with doctor.

  17. Stress scintigraphy using single-photon emission computed tomography in the evaluation of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, R.; Kambara, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Tamaki, S.; Kadota, K.; Kawai, C.; Tamaki, N.; Torizuka, K.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with angina pectoris, 24 with postmyocardial infarction angina and 7 with normal coronary arteries were examined by exercise thallium-201 emission computed tomography (SPECT) and planar scintigraphy. Exercise SPECT was compared with the reperfusion imaging obtained approximately 2 to 3 hours after exercise. The sensitivity and specificity of demonstrating involved coronary arteries by identifying the locations of myocardial perfusion defects were 96 and 87% for right coronary artery, 88 and 89% for left anterior descending artery (LAD) and 78 and 100% for left circumflex artery (LC). These figures are higher than those for planar scintigraphy (85 and 87% for right coronary artery, 73 and 89% for LAD and 39 and 100% for LC arteries). In patients with 3-vessel disease, sensitivity of SPECT (100, 88 and 75% for right coronary artery, LAD and LC, respectively) was higher than planar imaging (88, 63 and 31%, respectively), with a significant difference for LC (p less than 0.05). In 1, 2 and 0-vessel disease the sensitivity and specificity of the 2 techniques were comparable. Multivessel disease was more easily identified as multiple coronary involvement than planar imaging with a significant difference in 3-vessel disease (p less than 0.05). In conclusion, stress SPECT provides useful information for the identification of LC lesions in coronary heart disease, including 3-vessel involvement

  18. Coronary artery disease in patients undergoing valve replacement at a tertiary care cardiac centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, A.H.; Hanif, B.; Hasan, K.; Hashmani, S.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing valve surgery at a tertiary care cardiac centre. The medical records of 144 consecutive patients who underwent mitral, aortic or dual (mitral and aortic) valve replacement surgery at the Tabba Heart Institute between January 2006 to December 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent coronary angiogram. Significant coronary artery disease (CAD) is defined as coronary stenosis of > 50%. There were 74 (51.4%) males and 70 (48.6%) females in the study. The mean age was 51.64 +- 11 years. Of all, 73 (50.7%) underwent mitral valve replacement, 47 (32.6%) had aortic and 24 (16.7%) had dual valve replacement. Out of 144 patients, 99 (68.8%) had 50% stenosis. In patients who had undergone mitral valve replacement (MVR), significant coronary disease was found in 32.9%, whereas in patients who had undergone aortic valve replacement (AVR) and dual valve replacement (DVR) the prevalence of coronary disease was 31.9% and 25% respectively. Our results suggest that the overall prevalence of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing valve surgery in our population is comparable with prevalence reported in international data. (author)

  19. Myocardial performance and perfusion during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease caused by Kawasaki disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paridon, S.M.; Ross, R.D.; Kuhns, L.R.; Pinsky, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    For a study of the natural history of coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease and their effect on myocardial blood flow reserve with exercise, five such patients underwent exercise testing on a bicycle. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation, and electrocardiograms were monitored continuously. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed for all patients. One patient stopped exercise before exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve but had no evidence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities. Four patients terminated exercise because of exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve; one had normal cardiovascular reserve and thallium scintiscans, but the remaining patients had diminished cardiovascular reserve. Thallium scintigrams showed myocardial ischemia in two and infarction in one. No patient had exercise-induced electrocardiographic changes. These results indicate that patients with residual coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease frequently have reduced cardiovascular reserve during exercise. The addition of thallium scintigraphy and metabolic measurements to exercise testing improved the detection of exercise-induced abnormalities of myocardial perfusion

  20. Serum leptin levels in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, S.; Ahmed, Z.; Fayyaz, I.; Mehmood, S.; Chani, M.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of morbidity, mortality and disability worldwide. Leptin, a 16kDa product of ob gene, is an endocrine hormone produced by white adipose tissue. It is primarily involved in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Hyperleptinemia is one of the novel risk factors contributing in many ways to CVD. Objective: The objective of the study was to find the level of leptin in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and compare it with healthy people in our population. Methods: Our study was an analytical and cross-sectional study. Our study included 60 patients with a history of CAD and 60 healthy controls (aged 40-60 years, both sexes). Leptin levels were measured by ELISA. Results: Mean serum leptin level in patients was 11.48+-11.25 g/ml, while control group had a mean leptin level of 8.22+-8.01 g/ml (p=0.071). Conclusion: Leptin levels were higher in patients but the difference was non-significant. More studies are needed with larger sample size in our population. (author)

  1. Inherited dyslipidaemic disorders contributing to coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaullah, S.; Ahmed, Z.; Rehman, J.

    2008-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)] is an established independent risk factor for premature myocardial infarction (MI)/coronary artery disease (CAD). The study was conducted to determine the value of Lp (a) in prediction of CAD or MI in the offspring at risk. A total of 160 subjects were investigated. Serum Lp (a) was measured by ELISA, serum total cholesterol, triglycerides (TG) and HDL-Cholesterol by enzymatic colorimetric methods using standard kits. Differences in levels of total Lp (a) and cholesterol were observed between patients and controls. Both Lp (a) (16.23+-1.95 mg/dL) and cholesterol (175.00+-7.60 mg/dL) of group A (patients) were higher than the corresponding controls. However an opposite trend in results was noted for serum HDL-Cholesterol in patients vs. controls.: Persons found to have elevated levels of Lp (a) should focus on controlling the known modifiable risk factor for heart disease, especially smoking, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, hypertension and sedentary life style. (author)

  2. Nanotechnology in diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mahdi; Zare, Hossein; Bakhshian Nik, Amirala; Yazdani, Narges; Hamrang, Mohammad; Mohamed, Elmira; Sahandi Zangabad, Parham; Moosavi Basri, Seyed Masoud; Bakhtiari, Leila; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology could provide a new complementary approach to treat coronary artery disease (CAD) which is now one of the biggest killers in the Western world. The course of events, which leads to atherosclerosis and CAD, involves many biological factors and cellular disease processes which may be mitigated by therapeutic methods enhanced by nanotechnology. Nanoparticles can provide a variety of delivery systems for cargoes such as drugs and genes that can address many problems within the arteries. In order to improve the performance of current stents, nanotechnology provides different nanomaterial coatings, in addition to controlled-release nanocarriers, to prevent in-stent restenosis. Nanotechnology can increase the efficiency of drugs, improve local and systematic delivery to atherosclerotic plaques and reduce the inflammatory or angiogenic response after intravascular intervention. Nanocarriers have potential for delivery of imaging and diagnostic agents to precisely targeted destinations. This review paper will cover the current applications and future outlook of nanotechnology, as well as the main diagnostic methods, in the treatment of CAD.

  3. Depression and coronary artery disease -real heart attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, S.; Ahmed, B.

    2001-01-01

    Both depression and ischaemic heart disease are said to become the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries during the next two decades. The relationship between these two disorders has long been speculated but only recently addressed scientifically. A Medline search was conducted to obtain the articles that address the association between depressive disorders and coronary artery disease (CAD). Most studies following large cohorts over a period ranging from 4.5 to 27 years have shown that depression is associated with a significantly high risk of developing CAD. These studies also show that patients who have depression following myocardial infarction hat poorer prognosis on major cardiac end points like reoccurrence of myocardial infarction and death as compared to the non-depressed group. The psychosocial variables associated with depression like social isolation, acute and chronic stressful life events are also associated with increased risk of developing CAD. The mechanisms underlying this association between depression and CAD are unknown at present. The effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in reducing this increased risks have been demonstrated while the trials assessing the efficacy and safety of anti depressed drugs are underway. The implications of these finding are discussed in the context of developing countries. (author)

  4. Atrioventricular depolarization differences identify coronary artery anomalies in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Daniel; Sharma, Nandita; Jone, Pei-Ni

    2017-03-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the leading cause of acquired heart disease in children. Signal average electrocardiogram changes in patients during the acute phase of KD with coronary artery anomalies (CAA) include depolarization changes. We set out to determine if 12-lead-derived atrioventricular depolarization differences can identify CAA in patients with KD. A blinded, retrospective case-control study of patients with KD was performed. Deep Q waves, corrected QT-intervals (QTc), spatial QRS-T angles, T-wave vector magnitudes (RMS-T), and a novel parameter for assessment of atrioventricular depolarization difference (the spatial PR angle) and a two dimensional PR angle were assessed. Comparisons between groups were performed to test for significant differences. One hundred one patients with KD were evaluated, with 68 having CAA (67.3%, mean age 3.6 ± 3.0 years, 82.6% male), and 32 without CAA (31.7%, mean age 2.7 ± 3.2 years, 70.4% male). The spatial PR angle significantly discriminated KD patients with CAA from those without, 59.7° ± 31.1° versus 41.6° ± 11.5° (p differences, measured by the spatial or two dimensional PR angle differentiate KD patients with CAA versus those without. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Overview of Coronary Heart Disease Risk Initiatives in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ankur; Bhatt, Deepak L; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Suri, Kunal; Mishra, Sundeep; Iqbal, Romaina; Virani, Salim S

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is now the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Industrialization and economic growth have led to an unprecedented increment in the burden of CVD and their risk factors in less industrialized regions of the world. While there are abundant data on CVD and their risk factors from longitudinal cohort studies done in the West, good-quality data from South Asia are lacking. Several multi-institutional, observational, prospective registries, and epidemiologic cohorts in South Asia have been established to systematically evaluate the burden of CVD and their risk factors. The PINNACLE (Practice Innovation and Clinical Excellence) India Quality Improvement Program (PIQIP), the Kerala Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), and Trivandrum Heart Failure registries have focused on secondary prevention of CVD and performance measurement in both outpatient and inpatient settings, respectively. The Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology (PURE), Centre for Cardiometabolic Risk Reduction in South Asia (CARRS), and other epidemiologic and genetic studies have focused on primary prevention of CVD and evaluated variables such as environment, smoking, physical activity, health systems, food and nutrition policy, dietary consumption patterns, socioeconomic factors, and healthy neighborhoods. The international cardiovascular community has been responsive to a burgeoning cardiovascular disease burden in South Asia. Several collaborations have formed between the West (North America in particular) and South Asia to catalyze evidence-based and data-driven changes in the federal health policy in this part of the world to promote cardiovascular health and mitigate cardiovascular risk.

  6. Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Carabello, Blaise; Mehta, Satish; Schlegel, Todd; Pellis, Neal; Ott, Mark; Pierson, Duane

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies on normal human lymphocytes have shown a five-fold increase (p less than 0.001) in angiogenic inducers such as Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in physiologically stressful environments such as modeled microgravity, a space analog. This suggests de-regulation of cardiovascular signalling pathways indicated by upregulation of PIGf. In the current study, we measured PIGf in the plasma of 33 patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) to investigate whether such disease is associated with increased levels of PIGf. A control consisting of 31 sex matched apparently healthy subjects was also included in the study. We observed that the levels of PIGf in CAD patients were significantly increased compared to those in healthy control subjects (p less than 0.001) and usually increased beyond the clinical threshold level (greater than 27ng/L). The mechanisms leading to up-regulation of angiogenic factors and the adaptation of organisms to stressful environments such as isolation, high altitude, hypoxia, ischemia, microgravity, increased radiation, etc are presently unknown and require further investigation in spaceflight and these other physiologically stressed environments.

  7. Milk and other dietary influences on coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    While dietary links to ischemic heart disease (IHD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality have been studied for many years, the correlation has not clearly been resolved, especially for older populations. In this paper, a multi-country statistical approach involving 32 countries is used to find dietary links to IHD and CHD for various age groups aged 35+. For IHD, milk carbohydrates were found to have the highest statistical association for males aged 35+ and females aged 65+, while for females aged 35-64, sugar was found to have the highest association. In the case of CHD, non-fat milk was found to have the highest association for males aged 45+ and females aged 75+, while for females 65-74, milk carbohydrates and sugar had the highest associations, and for females aged 45-64, sugar had the highest association. A number of mechanisms have been proposed in the literature that might explain the milk carbohydrate or non-fat milk association. One of the most prominent theories is that animal proteins contribute to homocysteine (Hcy) production; however, milk more than meat lacks adequate B vitamins to convert Hcy to useful products. Lactose and calcium in conjunction with Hcy from consumption of non-fat milk may also contribute to calcification of the arteries.

  8. Selective estrogen receptor modulators and risk for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, A; Hermenegildo, C; Oviedo, P; Tarín, J J

    2007-04-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in women in most countries. Atherosclerosis is the main biological process determining CHD. Clinical data support the notion that CHD is sensitive to estrogens, but debate exists concerning the effects of the hormone on atherosclerosis and its complications. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are compounds capable of binding the estrogen receptor to induce a functional profile distinct from estrogens. The possibility that SERMs may shift the estrogenic balance on cardiovascular risk towards a more beneficial profile has generated interest in recent years. There is considerable information on the effects of SERMs on distinct areas that are crucial in atherogenesis. The complexity derived from the diversity of variables affecting their mechanism of action plus the differences between compounds make it difficult to delineate one uniform trend for SERMs. The present picture, nonetheless, is one where SERMs seem less powerful than estrogens in atherosclerosis protection, but more gentle with advanced forms of the disease. The recent publication of the Raloxifene Use for The Heart (RUTH) study has confirmed a neutral effect for raloxifene. Prothrombotic states may favor occlusive thrombi at sites occupied by atheromatous plaques. Platelet activation has received attention as an important determinant of arterial thrombogenesis. Although still sparse, available evidence globally suggests neutral or beneficial effects for SERMs.

  9. Prognostic Value of Coronary Computed Tomography Imaging in Patients at High Risk Without Symptoms of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedic, Admir; Ten Kate, Gert-Jan R; Roos, Cornelis J; Neefjes, Lisan A; de Graaf, Michiel A; Spronk, Angela; Delgado, Victoria; van Lennep, Jeanine E Roeters; Moelker, Adriaan; Ouhlous, Mohamed; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Boersma, Eric; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Nieman, Koen; Bax, Jeroen J; de Feijter, Pim J

    2016-03-01

    At present, traditional risk factors are used to guide cardiovascular management of asymptomatic subjects. Intensified surveillance may be warranted in those identified as high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study aims to determine the prognostic value of coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography (CCTA) next to the coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in patients at high CVD risk without symptoms suspect for coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 665 patients at high risk (mean age 56 ± 9 years, 417 men), having at least one important CVD risk factor (diabetes mellitus, familial hypercholesterolemia, peripheral artery disease, or severe hypertension) or a calculated European systematic coronary risk evaluation of >10% were included from outpatient clinics at 2 academic centers. Follow-up was performed for the occurrence of adverse events including all-cause mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or coronary revascularization. During a median follow-up of 3.0 (interquartile range 1.3 to 4.1) years, adverse events occurred in 40 subjects (6.0%). By multivariate analysis, adjusted for age, gender, and CACS, obstructive CAD on CCTA (≥50% luminal stenosis) was a significant predictor of adverse events (hazard ratio 5.9 [CI 1.3 to 26.1]). Addition of CCTA to age, gender, plus CACS, increased the C statistic from 0.81 to 0.84 and resulted in a total net reclassification index of 0.19 (p value and risk reclassification benefit beyond CACS in patients without CAD symptoms but with high risk of developing CVD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. PHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENT, LIFESTYLE MODIFICATION AND AWARENESS IN CORONARY ARTERY AND CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Gharipour

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD and cerebrovascular diseases (CeVD are a large and growing problem in low- and middle-income populations. Secondary prevention, which can reduce the risk of recurrent CVD includes changes in lifestyle, pharmacological interventions and revascularization procedures. The aim of the first phase of this project was to perform situation analysis and identify gaps in secondary prevention of major cardiovascular diseases. This study estimated the physicians' awareness and the patients' knowledge and behavior towards CVD and CeVD complications. It also assessed the efficacy of methods for decreasing recurrent events. methods: A sample of consecutive patients was selected from the outpatient units of the health care facilities selected for the study. Stratified random sampling of primary and secondary private and public health care facilities in cities and villages was performed to select 449 eligible cases. A total of 257 men and 192 women were selected. The inclusion criteria were as follows: Age above 21 years, established diagnosis of CVD and/or CeVD defined as any of the following alone or in combination with others: previous myocardial infarction, stable/unstable angina, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG, stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA, and/or carotid arterectomy. The patients were included if their first event had occurred more than a month, but no earlier than three years before the study. results: The prevalence of high systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 40.1% and 26.9% respectively in MI patients, and 70.1% and 51.2% respectively in CeVD patients. In most of the patients, fasting blood sugar and total cholesterol were within the normal range. Among MI patients, 93.9%, 68.5% and 48.2% were already taking aspirin, beta-blockers and statins, respectively. Among CeVD patients, 79.9%, 61.1% and 23.2% were taking aspirin, beta

  11. Coronary vascular age: An alternate means for predicting stress-induced myocardial ischemia in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Carmela; Gaudieri, Valeria; Acampa, Wanda; Arumugam, Parthiban; Assante, Roberta; Zampella, Emilia; Mannarino, Teresa; Mainolfi, Ciro Gabriele; Imbriaco, Massimo; Petretta, Mario; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2018-01-22

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) can be used to estimate vascular age in adults, providing a convenient transformation of CAC from Agatston units into a year's scale. We investigated the role of coronary vascular age in predicting stress-induced myocardial ischemia in subjects with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 717 subjects referred to CAC scoring and 82 Rb PET/CT stress-rest myocardial perfusion imaging for suspected CAD were studied. CAC score was measured according to the Agatston method and coronary vascular age by equating estimated CAD risk for chronological age and CAC using the formula 39.1 + 7.25 × ln(CAC + 1). Stress-induced ischemia was present in 105 (15%) patients. Mean chronological age, CAC score, and coronary vascular age were higher (all P age was added to clinical variables. Including vascular age in the model, the global Chi square further increased from 68.77 to 106.38 (P age to clinical data, continuous net reclassification improvement (cNRI) was 0.57, while adding vascular age to clinical data and chronological age cNRI was 0.62. At decision curve analysis, the model including vascular age was associated with the highest net benefit compared to the model including only clinical data, to the model including chronological age and clinical data, and to a strategy considering that all patients had ischemia. The model including vascular age also showed the largest reduction in false-positive rate without missing any ischemic patients. In subjects with suspected CAD, coronary vascular age is strongly associated with stress-induced ischemia. The communication of a given vascular age would have a superior emotive impact improving observance of therapies and healthier lifestyles.

  12. f antihypertensive of coronary heart disease Hypertension in a rural

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... a high body mass index, a high uric acid level, a high prevalence of coronary ... Little information exists on the prevalence of hypertension in white South ... selective ,B-blockers have adverse effects on lipid metabolism. Research ..... importance of attention to other coronary risk factors before and during ...

  13. Long-term survival and causes of death in patients with ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome without obstructive coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Hedvig Bille; Pedersen, Frants; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Aims: We aimed to study survival and causes of death in patients with ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (STE-ACS) with and without obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and results: We included 4793 consecutive patients with STE-ACS triaged for acute coronary angiography at a larg...... than patients with obstructive CAD. Causes of death were less often cardiovascular. This suggests that STE-ACS patients without obstructive CAD warrant medical attention and close follow-up.......Aims: We aimed to study survival and causes of death in patients with ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (STE-ACS) with and without obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and results: We included 4793 consecutive patients with STE-ACS triaged for acute coronary angiography at a large...

  14. Prevalence of Fabry disease in young patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuc, Véronique; Moore, David F; Gioia, Laura C; Saposnik, Gustavo; Selchen, Daniel; Lanthier, Sylvain

    2013-11-01

    A German study diagnosed 4% of young cryptogenic ischemic stroke patients with Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A (α-GAL-A) gene resulting in an accumulation of glycosphingolipids. A lower prevalence was found in other geographic regions. To determine the prevalence of Fabry disease in a Canadian population of young cryptogenic ischemic stroke patients. Patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke at age 16-55 were retrospectively identified in our institutional stroke database and underwent a focused clinical evaluation. We sequenced the α-GAL-A gene and measured the levels of blood globotriaosylsphingosine in subjects with mutations of undetermined pathogenicity. Fabry disease was diagnosed in patients with pathogenic mutations or increased levels of blood globotriaosylsphingosine. Ninety-three of 100 study subjects had normal α-GAL-A gene polymorphisms. Seven had mutations of undetermined pathogenicity, including one with increased globotriaosylsphingosine (prevalence, 1%; 95% confidence interval, ischemic stroke presentation as the first clinical manifestation of Fabry disease. Both Fabry patients experienced recurrent ischemic stroke. Fabry disease accounts for a small proportion of young Canadians with cryptogenic ischemic stroke. Identification of Fabry biomarkers remains a research priority to delineate stroke patients disserving routine screening. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Urinary proteomic diagnosis of coronary artery disease: identification and clinical validation in 623 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delles, Christian; Schiffer, Eric; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin

    2010-01-01

    We studied the urinary proteome in a total of 623 individuals with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) in order to characterize multiple biomarkers that enable prediction of the presence of CAD....

  16. Significance of roentgenologic and nuclear medicine methods in diagnosis and operative indications of coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, R [Bonn Univ. (F.R. Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Winkler, C [Bonn Univ. (F.R. Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Nuklearmedizin; Schaede, A [Bonn Univ. (F.R. Germany). Medizinische Klinik

    1976-03-01

    Significance and technique of roentgenologic and nuclear medicine methods for evaluation of coronary artery disease and myocardial perfusion are presented. Some routinely used methods in nuclear medicine are briefly discussed concerning the evaluation of left ventricular function.

  17. Revascularisation versus medical treatment in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windecker, Stephan; Stortecky, Stefan; Stefanini, Giulio G

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether revascularisation improves prognosis compared with medical treatment among patients with stable coronary artery disease. DESIGN: Bayesian network meta-analyses to combine direct within trial comparisons between treatments with indirect evidence from other trials ...

  18. Effort-Reward Imbalance at Work and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragano, Nico; Siegrist, Johannes; Nyberg, Solja T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic evidence for work stress as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is mostly based on a single measure of stressful work known as job strain, a combination of high demands and low job control. We examined whether a complementary stress measure that assesses an imbalance...... between efforts spent at work and rewards received predicted coronary heart disease. Methods: This multicohort study (the “IPD-Work” consortium) was based on harmonized individual-level data from 11 European prospective cohort studies. Stressful work in 90,164 men and women without coronary heart disease...... have an increased risk of coronary heart disease, and this appears to be independent of job strain experienced. These findings support expanding focus beyond just job strain in future research on work stress....

  19. 78. Environmental air pollution: A new emerging factor for coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Meo

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Environmental pollution exert detrimental effects on the heart. The researchers and physicians must consider the environmental pollution as an emerging factor in the development of coronary artery disease.

  20. Betel nut usage is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Bawany, Faizan Imran; Ahmed, Muhammad Umer; Hussain, Mehwish; Khan, Asadullah; Lashari, Muhammad Nawaz

    2013-12-27

    The objective of our study was to assess betel nut usage as one of the major risk factors associated with coronary artery disease. This case control study consisted of 300 controls and 300 cases. A structured questionnaire was administered to the participants to assess consumption of betel nut and confounding variables. A respondent was considered a regular consumer of betel nut if he/she consumed one or more pieces of betel nut every day for a period of greater than 6 months. About 8 in 10 betel nut chewers developed coronary artery disease. After adjusting for diabetes and hypertension, the odds ratio analysis depicted 7.72 times greater likelihood for coronary artery disease in patients who chewed betel nut for more than 10 years. Our study concludes that betel nut chewing is a significant risk factor leading to the development of coronary artery disease.