WorldWideScience

Sample records for coronal proton transport

  1. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...... proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK (a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires....

  2. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Veierskov, Bjarke

    2008-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells...... of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic...... molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...

  3. The effects of coronal holes on the propagation of solar energetic protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunches, Joseph M.; Zwickl, Ronald D.

    1999-01-01

    The accurate prediction of the start of a Solar Energetic Particle Event (SEP) is a high priority for space weather forecasters. The Space Environment Center (SEC) has recorded parameters related to SEPs since 1976, and that list includes a total of 134 events for the period 1976-1997. The onset times of individual events are variable, especially SEPs originating from the solar eastern hemisphere. An examination of the data shows the full set can be divided into two families -- those that begin at the geosynchronous satellite at a time consistent with what would be expected for activity from a given heliolongitude, and those whose onset is later than what accepted forecast techniques would predict. There are 21 'long onset' events in this historical record. Seeking to understand what factors distinguished the slow-to-arrive events, Helium I 1083.0 nm observations were examined for the presence of coronal holes at the times of the SEPs. It was found that all SEPs with long onset times had a coronal hole situated between the flare site and the footpoint of the interplanetary magnetic field line connecting to Earth ( Solar-Terrestrial Predictions-V, Hiraiso Solar-Terrestrial Research Center, Ibaraki, Japan). This coronal hole configuration is important for accurate predictions, although the hole may serve as merely a proxy for the plasma conditions that actually affect the propagation and acceleration of the protons. Since coronal holes are easily identifiable using Helium I and other wavelengths, operational forecasters can employ this technique to improve their predictions of SEPs

  4. A lower limit to the altitude of coronal particle storage regions deduced from solar proton energy spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    The spectrum of low energy protons observed at 1 AU following solar flares shows little or no evidence of energy degradation down to approximately 0.3 MeV. Such observations may be used to set a lower limit on the altitude of hypothetical coronal particle storage regions, ranging from 2 to 7 R sub s. It is pointed out that closed coronal magnetic loop structures are observed to extend to 2R sub s, so that long-term storage of low energy protons does not take place in the immediate vicinity of the sun. It is further suggested that in the few cases where the proton spectrum appears to be degraded at low energies, the energy loss may be due to adiabatic deceleration in the expanding solar wind. The alternative of continual acceleration is suggested as a plausible substitute for the particle storage hypothesis.

  5. Analysis of Proton Transport Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-05

    which can inhibit transport, may grow . The abrupt loss of transport at higher currents in the small channel suggests this possibility. Future experiments... Unicorn Park Drive Woburn, MA 01801 Attn: H. Linnerud 1 copy Lawrence Livermore Laboratory P. 0. Box 808 Livermore, CA 94550 Attn: R. J. Briggs 1 copy R

  6. Proton Transport Chains in Glucose Metabolism: Mind the Proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Roosterman

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The Embden–Meyerhof–Parnas (EMP pathway comprises eleven cytosolic enzymes interacting to metabolize glucose to lactic acid [CH3CH(OHCOOH]. Glycolysis is largely considered as the conversion of glucose to pyruvate (CH3COCOO-. We consider glycolysis to be a cellular process and as such, transporters mediating glucose uptake and lactic acid release and enable the flow of metabolites through the cell, must be considered as part of the EMP pathway. In this review, we consider the flow of metabolites to be coupled to a flow of energy that is irreversible and sufficient to form ordered structures. This latter principle is highlighted by discussing that lactate dehydrogenase (LDH complexes irreversibly reduce pyruvate/H+ to lactate [CH3CH(OHCOO-], or irreversibly catalyze the opposite reaction, oxidation of lactate to pyruvate/H+. However, both LDH complexes are considered to be driven by postulated proton transport chains. Metabolism of glucose to two lactic acids is introduced as a unidirectional, continuously flowing pathway. In an organism, cell membrane-located proton-linked monocarboxylate transporters catalyze the final step of glycolysis, the release of lactic acid. Consequently, both pyruvate and lactate are discussed as intermediate products of glycolysis and substrates of regulated crosscuts of the glycolytic flow.

  7. PREFACE: Transport phenomena in proton conducting media Transport phenomena in proton conducting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikerling, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Proton transport phenomena are of paramount importance for acid-base chemistry, energy transduction in biological organisms, corrosion processes, and energy conversion in electrochemical systems such as polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The relevance for such a plethora of materials and systems, and the ever-lasting fascination with the highly concerted nature of underlying processes drive research across disciplines in chemistry, biology, physics and chemical engineering. A proton never travels alone. Proton motion is strongly correlated with its environment, usually comprised of an electrolyte and a solid or soft host material. For the transport in nature's most benign proton solvent and shuttle, water that is, insights from ab initio simulations, matured over the last 15 years, have furnished molecular details of the structural diffusion mechanism of protons. Excess proton movement in water consists of sequences of Eigen-Zundel-Eigen transitions, triggered by hydrogen bond breaking and making in the surrounding water network. Nowadays, there is little debate about the validity of this mechanism in water, which bears a stunning resemblance to the basic mechanistic picture put forward by de Grotthuss in 1806. While strong coupling of an excess proton with degrees of freedom of solvent and host materials facilitates proton motion, this coupling also creates negative synergies. In general, proton mobility in biomaterials and electrochemical proton conducting media is highly sensitive to the abundance and structure of the proton solvent. In polymer electrolyte membranes, in which protons are bound to move in nano-sized water-channels, evaporation of water or local membrane dehydration due to electro-osmotic coupling are well-known phenomena that could dramatically diminish proton conductivity. Contributions in this special issue address various vital aspects of the concerted nature of proton motion and they elucidate important structural and dynamic effects of solvent

  8. Surface proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin films on quartz substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yuki; Kubo, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    Thin film structure and the proton transport property of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) (P-Asp100) have been investigated. An earlier study assessed partially protonated poly(aspartic acid), highly oriented thin film structure and enhancement of the internal proton transport. In this study of P-Asp100, IR p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution (P-MAIR) spectra were measured to investigate the thin film structure. The obtained thin films, with thicknesses of 120-670 nm, had no oriented structure. Relative humidity dependence of the resistance, proton conductivity, and normalized resistance were examined to ascertain the proton transport property of P-Asp100 thin films. The obtained data showed that the proton transport of P-Asp100 thin films might occur on the surface, not inside of the thin film. This phenomenon might be related with the proton transport of the biological system.

  9. Surface proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin films on quartz substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yuki, E-mail: ynagao@jaist.ac.jp; Kubo, Takahiro

    2014-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin film was investigated. • The thin film structure differed greatly from the partially protonated one. • Proton transport occurs on the surface, not inside of the thin film. • This result contributes to biological transport systems such as bacteriorhodopsin. - Abstract: Thin film structure and the proton transport property of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) (P-Asp100) have been investigated. An earlier study assessed partially protonated poly(aspartic acid), highly oriented thin film structure and enhancement of the internal proton transport. In this study of P-Asp100, IR p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution (P-MAIR) spectra were measured to investigate the thin film structure. The obtained thin films, with thicknesses of 120–670 nm, had no oriented structure. Relative humidity dependence of the resistance, proton conductivity, and normalized resistance were examined to ascertain the proton transport property of P-Asp100 thin films. The obtained data showed that the proton transport of P-Asp100 thin films might occur on the surface, not inside of the thin film. This phenomenon might be related with the proton transport of the biological system.

  10. Surface proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin films on quartz substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Yuki; Kubo, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton transport of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) thin film was investigated. • The thin film structure differed greatly from the partially protonated one. • Proton transport occurs on the surface, not inside of the thin film. • This result contributes to biological transport systems such as bacteriorhodopsin. - Abstract: Thin film structure and the proton transport property of fully protonated poly(aspartic acid) (P-Asp100) have been investigated. An earlier study assessed partially protonated poly(aspartic acid), highly oriented thin film structure and enhancement of the internal proton transport. In this study of P-Asp100, IR p-polarized multiple-angle incidence resolution (P-MAIR) spectra were measured to investigate the thin film structure. The obtained thin films, with thicknesses of 120–670 nm, had no oriented structure. Relative humidity dependence of the resistance, proton conductivity, and normalized resistance were examined to ascertain the proton transport property of P-Asp100 thin films. The obtained data showed that the proton transport of P-Asp100 thin films might occur on the surface, not inside of the thin film. This phenomenon might be related with the proton transport of the biological system

  11. Human proton/oligopeptide transporter (POT) genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botka, C. W.; Wittig, T. W.; Graul, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    The proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POT) gene family currently consists of approximately 70 cloned cDNAs derived from diverse organisms. In mammals, two genes encoding peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2 have been cloned in several species including humans, in addition to a rat...... histidine/peptide transporter (rPHT1). Because the Candida elegans genome contains five putative POT genes, we searched the available protein and nucleic acid databases for additional mammalian/human POT genes, using iterative BLAST runs and the human expressed sequence tags (EST) database. The apparent...... and introns of the likely human orthologue (termed hPHT2). Northern analyses with EST clones indicated that hPHT1 is primarily expressed in skeletal muscle and spleen, whereas hPHT2 is found in spleen, placenta, lung, leukocytes, and heart. These results suggest considerable complexity of the human POT gene...

  12. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokalp, Gokhan; Demirag, Burak; Nas, Omer Fatih; Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih; Yazici, Zeynep

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade

  13. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan, E-mail: drgokhangokalp@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Demirag, Burak, E-mail: bdemirag@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih, E-mail: fatiha@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Yazici, Zeynep, E-mail: zyazici@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected for oblique coronal images when compared with arthroscopy results (p = 0.180). Sensitivity and specificity values for ACL tear diagnosis were 37.04% and 95.65% for sagittal images; 74.07% and 91.30% for oblique coronal images. There was no significant difference between arthroscopy and oblique coronal MR images in grading AMB and PLB injuries (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade.

  14. A DATA-DRIVEN ANALYTIC MODEL FOR PROTON ACCELERATION BY LARGE-SCALE SOLAR CORONAL SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozarev, Kamen A. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (United States); Schwadron, Nathan A. [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire (United States)

    2016-11-10

    We have recently studied the development of an eruptive filament-driven, large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) in the low solar corona, using remote observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory ’s Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes. In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of the OCBF parameters regulating the efficiency of charged particle acceleration within the theoretical framework of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent front size, speed, and strength, as well as the upstream coronal magnetic field orientations with respect to the front’s surface normal direction. Here we present an analytical particle acceleration model, specifically developed to incorporate the coronal shock/compressive front properties described above, derived from remote observations. We verify the model’s performance through a grid of idealized case runs using input parameters typical for large-scale coronal shocks, and demonstrate that the results approach the expected DSA steady-state behavior. We then apply the model to the event of 2011 May 11 using the OCBF time-dependent parameters derived by Kozarev et al. We find that the compressive front likely produced energetic particles as low as 1.3 solar radii in the corona. Comparing the modeled and observed fluences near Earth, we also find that the bulk of the acceleration during this event must have occurred above 1.5 solar radii. With this study we have taken a first step in using direct observations of shocks and compressions in the innermost corona to predict the onsets and intensities of solar energetic particle events.

  15. Intense-proton-beam transport through an insulator beam guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanamori, Susumu; Kawata, Shigeo; Kikuchi, Takashi; Fujita, Akira; Chiba, Yasunobu; Hikita, Taisuke; Kato, Shigeru

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we study intense-proton-beam transport through an insulator guide. In our previous papers (Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 34 (1995) L520, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 35 (1996) L1127) we proposed a new system for intense-electron-beam transport using an insulator guide. In contrast to the electron beam, an intense-proton beam tends to generate a virtual anode, because of the large proton mass. The virtual anode formation at the initial stage is prevented by prefilled plasma in this system. During and after this, electrons are extracted from the plasma generated at the insulator surface by the proton beam space charge and expand over the transport area. The proton beam charge is effectively neutralized by the electrons. Consequently, the proton beam propagates efficiently through the insulator beam guide. The electron extraction is self-regulated by the net space charge of the proton beam. (author)

  16. Kinetics of proton transport in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornyshev, A.A.; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Spohr, E.

    2003-01-01

    for rationalizing the excess proton mobility, based on computer simulations, theory of proton transfer (PT) in condensed media, and analysis of classical proton conductivity experiments over broad temperature ranges. The mechanistic options involved are (i) classical hydrodynamic motion of the hydronium ion (H3O...... are brought into the framework of quantum mechanical PT theory in condensed media. Both the nature of the elementary act and the reaction coordinates are, however, different for the two types of PT clusters. The corresponding rate constants are calculated and compared with MD simulations. Within the framework...

  17. Gate modulation of proton transport in a nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lanju; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Qian, Shizhi

    2016-03-14

    Proton transport in confined spaces plays a crucial role in many biological processes as well as in modern technological applications, such as fuel cells. To achieve active control of proton conductance, we investigate for the first time the gate modulation of proton transport in a pH-regulated nanopore by a multi-ion model. The model takes into account surface protonation/deprotonation reactions, surface curvature, electroosmotic flow, Stern layer, and electric double layer overlap. The proposed model is validated by good agreement with the existing experimental data on nanopore conductance with and without a gate voltage. The results show that the modulation of proton transport in a nanopore depends on the concentration of the background salt and solution pH. Without background salt, the gated nanopore exhibits an interesting ambipolar conductance behavior when pH is close to the isoelectric point of the dielectric pore material, and the net ionic and proton conductance can be actively regulated with a gate voltage as low as 1 V. The higher the background salt concentration, the lower is the performance of the gate control on the proton transport.

  18. Proton and hydrogen transport through two-dimensional monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seel, Max; Pandey, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion of protons and hydrogen atoms in representative two-dimensional materials is investigated. Specifically, density functional calculations were performed on graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), phosphorene, silicene, and molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) monolayers to study the surface interaction and penetration barriers for protons and hydrogen atoms employing finite cluster models. The calculated barrier heights correlate approximately with the size of the opening formed by the three-fold open sites in the monolayers considered. They range from 1.56 eV (proton) and 4.61 eV (H) for graphene to 0.12 eV (proton) and 0.20 eV (H) for silicene. The results indicate that only graphene and h-BN monolayers have the potential for membranes with high selective permeability. The MoS 2 monolayer behaves differently: protons and H atoms become trapped between the outer S layers in the Mo plane in a well with a depth of 1.56 eV (proton) and 1.5 eV (H atom), possibly explaining why no proton transport was detected, suggesting MoS 2 as a hydrogen storage material instead. For graphene and h-BN, off-center proton penetration reduces the barrier to 1.38 eV for graphene and 0.11 eV for h-BN. Furthermore, Pt acting as a substrate was found to have a negligible effect on the barrier height. In defective graphene, the smallest barrier for proton diffusion (1.05 eV) is found for an oxygen-terminated defect. Therefore, it seems more likely that thermal protons can penetrate a monolayer of h-BN but not graphene and defects are necessary to facilitate the proton transport in graphene. (paper)

  19. Proton and hydrogen transport through two-dimensional monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, Max; Pandey, Ravindra

    2016-06-01

    Diffusion of protons and hydrogen atoms in representative two-dimensional materials is investigated. Specifically, density functional calculations were performed on graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), phosphorene, silicene, and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayers to study the surface interaction and penetration barriers for protons and hydrogen atoms employing finite cluster models. The calculated barrier heights correlate approximately with the size of the opening formed by the three-fold open sites in the monolayers considered. They range from 1.56 eV (proton) and 4.61 eV (H) for graphene to 0.12 eV (proton) and 0.20 eV (H) for silicene. The results indicate that only graphene and h-BN monolayers have the potential for membranes with high selective permeability. The MoS2 monolayer behaves differently: protons and H atoms become trapped between the outer S layers in the Mo plane in a well with a depth of 1.56 eV (proton) and 1.5 eV (H atom), possibly explaining why no proton transport was detected, suggesting MoS2 as a hydrogen storage material instead. For graphene and h-BN, off-center proton penetration reduces the barrier to 1.38 eV for graphene and 0.11 eV for h-BN. Furthermore, Pt acting as a substrate was found to have a negligible effect on the barrier height. In defective graphene, the smallest barrier for proton diffusion (1.05 eV) is found for an oxygen-terminated defect. Therefore, it seems more likely that thermal protons can penetrate a monolayer of h-BN but not graphene and defects are necessary to facilitate the proton transport in graphene.

  20. The Importance of Protons in Reactive Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, C. J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of pH in aqueous chemistry is evident; yet, its role in reactive transport is complex. Consider a column flow experiment through silica glass beads. Take the column to be saturated and flowing with solution of a distinct pH. An instantaneous change in the influent solution pH can yield a breakthrough curve with both a rarefaction and shock component (composite wave). This behavior is unique among aqueous ions in transport and is more complex than intuition would tell. Analysis of the hyperbolic limit of this physical system can explain these first order transport phenomenon. This analysis shows that transport behavior is heavily dependent on the shape of the adsorption isotherm. Hence it is clear that accurate surface chemistry models are important in reactive transport. The proton adsorption isotherm has nonconstant concavity due to the proton's ability to partition into hydroxide. An eigenvalue analysis shows that an inflection point in the adsorption isotherm allows the development of composite waves. We use electrostatic surface complexation models to calculate realistic proton adsorption isotherms. Surface characteristics such as specific surface area, and surface site density were determined experimentally. We validate the model by comparison against silica glass bead flow through experiments. When coupled to surface complexation models, the transport equation captures the timing and behavior of breakthrough curves markedly better than with commonly used Langmuir assumptions. Furthermore, we use the adsorption isotherm to predict, a priori, the transport behavior of protons across pH composition space. Expansion of the model to multicomponent systems shows that proton adsorption can force composite waves to develop in the breakthrough curves of ions that would not otherwise exhibit such behavior. Given the abundance of reactive surfaces in nature and the nonlinearity of chemical systems, we conclude that building a greater understanding of

  1. Proton gradients and proton-dependent transport processes in the chloroplast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricarda eHöhner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Proton gradients are fundamental to chloroplast function. Across thylakoid membranes, the light induced proton gradient is essential for ATP synthesis. As a result of proton pumping into the thylakoid lumen, an alkaline stromal pH develops, which is required for full activation of pH-dependent Calvin Benson cycle enzymes. This implies that a pH gradient between the cytosol (pH 7 and the stroma (pH 8 is established upon illumination. To maintain this pH gradient chloroplasts actively extrude protons. More than 30 years ago it was already established that these proton fluxes are electrically counterbalanced by Mg2+, K+ or Cl- fluxes, but only recently the first transport systems that regulate the pH gradient were identified. Notably several (Na+,K+/H+ antiporter systems where identified, that play a role in pH gradient regulation, ion homeostasis, osmoregulation, or coupling of secondary active transport. The established pH gradients are important to drive uptake of essential ions and solutes, but not many transporters involved have been identified to date. In this mini review we summarize the current status in the field and the open questions that need to be addressed in order to understand how pH gradients are maintained, how this is interconnected with other transport processes and what this means for chloroplast function.

  2. Giant photoeffect in proton transport through graphene membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada-Hidalgo, Marcelo; Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sheng; Kravets, Vasyl G.; Rodriguez, Francisco J.; Berdyugin, Alexey; Grigorenko, Alexander; Geim, Andre K.

    2018-04-01

    Graphene has recently been shown to be permeable to thermal protons1, the nuclei of hydrogen atoms, which sparked interest in its use as a proton-conducting membrane in relevant technologies1-4. However, the influence of light on proton permeation remains unknown. Here we report that proton transport through Pt-nanoparticle-decorated graphene can be enhanced strongly by illuminating it with visible light. Using electrical measurements and mass spectrometry, we find a photoresponsivity of ˜104 A W-1, which translates into a gain of ˜104 protons per photon with response times in the microsecond range. These characteristics are competitive with those of state-of-the-art photodetectors that are based on electron transport using silicon and novel two-dimensional materials5-7. The photo-proton effect could be important for graphene's envisaged use in fuel cells and hydrogen isotope separation. Our observations may also be of interest for other applications such as light-induced water splitting, photocatalysis and novel photodetectors.

  3. Reactive transport of aqueous protons in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    McNeece, Colin J.

    2016-10-09

    The sorption of protons determines the surface charge of natural media and is therefore a first-order control on contaminant transport. Significant effort has been extended to develop chemical models that quantify the sorption of protons at the mineral surface. To compare these models’ effect on predicted proton transport, we present analytic solutions for column experiments through silica sand. Reaction front morphology is controlled by the functional relationship between the total sorbed and total aqueous proton concentrations. An inflection point in this function near neutral pH leads to a reversal in the classic front formation mechanism under basic conditions, such that proton desorption leads to a self-sharpening front, while adsorption leads to a spreading front. A composite reaction front comprising both a spreading and self-sharpening segment can occur when the injected and initial concentrations straddle the inflection point. This behavior is unique in single component reactive transport and arises due to the auto-ionization of water rather than electrostatic interactions at the mineral surface. We derive a regime diagram illustrating conditions under which different fronts occur, highlighting areas where model predictions diverge. Chemical models are then compared and validated against a systematic set of column experiments.

  4. A numerical solution of the coupled proton-H atom transport equations for the proton aurora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, B.; Jasperse, J.R.; Grossbard, N.J.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical code has been developed to solve the coupled proton-H atom linear transport equations for the proton aurora. The transport equations have been simplified by using plane-parallel geometry and the forward-scattering approximations only. Otherwise, the equations and their numerical solutions are exact. Results are presented for the particle fluxes and the energy deposition rates, and they are compared with the previous analytical results that were obtained by using additional simplifying approximations. It is found that although the analytical solutions for the particle fluxes differ somewhat from the numerical solutions, the energy deposition rates calculated by the two methods agree to within a few percent. The accurate particle fluxes given by the numerical code are useful for accurate calculation of the characteristic quantities of the proton aurora, such as the ionization rates and the emission rates

  5. Proton transport in a membrane protein channel: two-dimensional infrared spectrum modeling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, C.; Knoester, J.; Jansen, T.L.Th.A.

    2012-01-01

    We model the two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectrum of a proton channel to investigate its applicability as a spectroscopy tool to study the proton transport process in biological systems. Proton transport processes in proton channels are involved in numerous fundamental biochemical reactions.

  6. Transport of protons and lactate in cultured human fetal retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Cour, Morten la; Ming Lui, Ge

    2000-01-01

    Electron microscopy, intracellular pH, monocarboxylate transport, pigment epithelium of eye, proton-lactate cotransport, retinal metabolism, sodium/proton exchange......Electron microscopy, intracellular pH, monocarboxylate transport, pigment epithelium of eye, proton-lactate cotransport, retinal metabolism, sodium/proton exchange...

  7. A Fano cavity test for Monte Carlo proton transport algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, Edmond; Sorriaux, Jefferson; Souris, Kevin; Vynckier, Stefaan; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the scope of reference dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to compute ionization chamber dose response accurately. Uncertainties related to the transport algorithm can be verified performing self-consistency tests, i.e., the so-called “Fano cavity test.” The Fano cavity test is based on the Fano theorem, which states that under charged particle equilibrium conditions, the charged particle fluence is independent of the mass density of the media as long as the cross-sections are uniform. Such tests have not been performed yet for MC codes simulating proton transport. The objectives of this study are to design a new Fano cavity test for proton MC and to implement the methodology in two MC codes: Geant4 and PENELOPE extended to protons (PENH). Methods: The new Fano test is designed to evaluate the accuracy of proton transport. Virtual particles with an energy ofE 0 and a mass macroscopic cross section of (Σ)/(ρ) are transported, having the ability to generate protons with kinetic energy E 0 and to be restored after each interaction, thus providing proton equilibrium. To perform the test, the authors use a simplified simulation model and rigorously demonstrate that the computed cavity dose per incident fluence must equal (ΣE 0 )/(ρ) , as expected in classic Fano tests. The implementation of the test is performed in Geant4 and PENH. The geometry used for testing is a 10 × 10 cm 2 parallel virtual field and a cavity (2 × 2 × 0.2 cm 3 size) in a water phantom with dimensions large enough to ensure proton equilibrium. Results: For conservative user-defined simulation parameters (leading to small step sizes), both Geant4 and PENH pass the Fano cavity test within 0.1%. However, differences of 0.6% and 0.7% were observed for PENH and Geant4, respectively, using larger step sizes. For PENH, the difference is attributed to the random-hinge method that introduces an artificial energy straggling if step size is not

  8. Anisotropic amplification of proton transport in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Fawaz, Mohammed; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Gautam, Manu; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2017-07-01

    Though graphene oxide (GO) membrane shuttles protons under humid conditions, it suffer severe disintegration and anhydrous conditions lead to abysmal ionic conductivity. The trade-off between mechanical integrity and ionic conductivity challenge the amplification of GO's ionic transport under anhydrous conditions. We show anisotropic amplification of GO's ionic transport with a selective amplification of in plane contribution under anhydrous conditions by doping it with a plant extract, phytic acid (PA). The hygroscopic nature of PA stabilized interlayer water molecules and peculiar geometry of sbnd OH functionalities around saturated hydrocarbon ring anisotropically enhanced ionic transport amplifying the fuel cell performance metrics.

  9. Superconductivity and fast proton transport in nanoconfined water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. H.

    2018-04-01

    A real-space molecular-orbital density-wave description of Cooper pairing in conjunction with the dynamic Jahn-Teller mechanism for high-Tc superconductivity predicts that electron-doped water confined to the nanoscale environment of a carbon nanotube or biological macromolecule should superconduct below and exhibit fast proton transport above the transition temperature, Tc ≅ 230 K (-43 °C).

  10. Sodium and Proton Effects on Inward Proton Transport through Na/K Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Travis J.; Zugarramurdi, Camila; Olivera, J. Fernando; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    The Na/K pump hydrolyzes ATP to export three intracellular Na (Nai) as it imports two extracellular K (Ko) across animal plasma membranes. Within the protein, two ion-binding sites (sites I and II) can reciprocally bind Na or K, but a third site (site III) exclusively binds Na in a voltage-dependent fashion. In the absence of Nao and Ko, the pump passively imports protons, generating an inward current (IH). To elucidate the mechanisms of IH, we used voltage-clamp techniques to investigate the [H]o, [Na]o, and voltage dependence of IH in Na/K pumps from ventricular myocytes and in ouabain-resistant pumps expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Lowering pHo revealed that Ho both activates IH (in a voltage-dependent manner) and inhibits it (in a voltage-independent manner) by binding to different sites. Nao effects depend on pHo; at pHo where no Ho inhibition is observed, Nao inhibits IH at all concentrations, but when applied at pHo that inhibits pump-mediated current, low [Na]o activates IH and high [Na]o inhibits it. Our results demonstrate that IH is a property inherent to Na/K pumps, not linked to the oocyte expression environment, explains differences in the characteristics of IH previously reported in the literature, and supports a model in which 1), protons leak through site III; 2), binding of two Na or two protons to sites I and II inhibits proton transport; and 3), pumps with mixed Na/proton occupancy of sites I and II remain permeable to protons. PMID:24940773

  11. Calcium uptake and proton transport by acidocalcisomes of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rohloff

    Full Text Available Acidocalcisomes are acidic calcium stores found in diverse organisms, being conserved from bacteria to humans. They possess an acidic matrix that contains several cations bound to phosphates, which are mainly present in the form of short and long polyphosphate chains. Their matrix is acidified through the action of proton pumps such as a vacuolar proton ATPase and a vacuolar proton pyrophosphatase. Calcium uptake occurs through a Ca(2+/H(+ countertransporting ATPase located in the membrane of the organelle. Acidocalcisomes have been identified in a variety of microorganisms, including Apicomplexan parasites such as Plasmodium and Eimeria species, and in Toxoplasma gondii. We report the purification and characterization of an acidocalcisome fraction from T. gondii tachyzoites after subcellular fractionation and further discontinuous iodixanol gradient purification. Proton and calcium transport activities in the fraction were characterized by fluorescence microscopy and spectrophotometric methods using acridine orange and arsenazo III, respectively. This work will facilitate the understanding of the function of acidocalcisomes in Apicomplexan parasites, as we can now isolate highly purified fractions that could be used for proteomic analysis to find proteins that may clarify the biogenesis of these organelles.

  12. ZGS beam transport for transverse or longitudinally polarized protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, E.; Auer, I.P.; Beretvas, A.

    1977-01-01

    A combination of dipole magnets and a superconducting solenoid is utilized to transform the spin direction of transversely polarized protons from the Argonne ZGS for use in proton-proton scattering experiments

  13. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

    2009-11-19

    It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

  14. The Large-scale Coronal Structure of the 2017 August 21 Great American Eclipse: An Assessment of Solar Surface Flux Transport Model Enabled Predictions and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Dibyendu; Bhowmik, Prantika; Yeates, Anthony R.; Panda, Suman; Tarafder, Rajashik; Dash, Soumyaranjan

    2018-01-01

    On 2017 August 21, a total solar eclipse swept across the contiguous United States, providing excellent opportunities for diagnostics of the Sun’s corona. The Sun’s coronal structure is notoriously difficult to observe except during solar eclipses; thus, theoretical models must be relied upon for inferring the underlying magnetic structure of the Sun’s outer atmosphere. These models are necessary for understanding the role of magnetic fields in the heating of the corona to a million degrees and the generation of severe space weather. Here we present a methodology for predicting the structure of the coronal field based on model forward runs of a solar surface flux transport model, whose predicted surface field is utilized to extrapolate future coronal magnetic field structures. This prescription was applied to the 2017 August 21 solar eclipse. A post-eclipse analysis shows good agreement between model simulated and observed coronal structures and their locations on the limb. We demonstrate that slow changes in the Sun’s surface magnetic field distribution driven by long-term flux emergence and its evolution governs large-scale coronal structures with a (plausibly cycle-phase dependent) dynamical memory timescale on the order of a few solar rotations, opening up the possibility for large-scale, global corona predictions at least a month in advance.

  15. Proton movement and coupling in the POT family of peptide transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Joanne L; Li, Chenghan; Brinth, Allete; Wang, Zhi; Vogeley, Lutz; Solcan, Nicolae; Ledderboge-Vucinic, Gregory; Swanson, Jessica M J; Caffrey, Martin; Voth, Gregory A; Newstead, Simon

    2017-12-12

    POT transporters represent an evolutionarily well-conserved family of proton-coupled transport systems in biology. An unusual feature of the family is their ability to couple the transport of chemically diverse ligands to an inwardly directed proton electrochemical gradient. For example, in mammals, fungi, and bacteria they are predominantly peptide transporters, whereas in plants the family has diverged to recognize nitrate, plant defense compounds, and hormones. Although recent structural and biochemical studies have identified conserved sites of proton binding, the mechanism through which transport is coupled to proton movement remains enigmatic. Here we show that different POT transporters operate through distinct proton-coupled mechanisms through changes in the extracellular gate. A high-resolution crystal structure reveals the presence of ordered water molecules within the peptide binding site. Multiscale molecular dynamics simulations confirm proton transport occurs through these waters via Grotthuss shuttling and reveal that proton binding to the extracellular side of the transporter facilitates a reorientation from an inward- to outward-facing state. Together these results demonstrate that within the POT family multiple mechanisms of proton coupling have likely evolved in conjunction with variation of the extracellular gate. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  16. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  17. Helium abundance and speed difference between helium ions and protons in the solar wind from coronal holes, active regions, and quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hui; Madjarska, M. S.; Li, Bo; Xia, LiDong; Huang, ZhengHua

    2018-05-01

    Two main models have been developed to explain the mechanisms of release, heating and acceleration of the nascent solar wind, the wave-turbulence-driven (WTD) models and reconnection-loop-opening (RLO) models, in which the plasma release processes are fundamentally different. Given that the statistical observational properties of helium ions produced in magnetically diverse solar regions could provide valuable information for the solar wind modelling, we examine the statistical properties of the helium abundance (AHe) and the speed difference between helium ions and protons (vαp) for coronal holes (CHs), active regions (ARs) and the quiet Sun (QS). We find bimodal distributions in the space of AHeand vαp/vA(where vA is the local Alfvén speed) for the solar wind as a whole. The CH wind measurements are concentrated at higher AHeand vαp/vAvalues with a smaller AHedistribution range, while the AR and QS wind is associated with lower AHeand vαp/vA, and a larger AHedistribution range. The magnetic diversity of the source regions and the physical processes related to it are possibly responsible for the different properties of AHeand vαp/vA. The statistical results suggest that the two solar wind generation mechanisms, WTD and RLO, work in parallel in all solar wind source regions. In CH regions WTD plays a major role, whereas the RLO mechanism is more important in AR and QS.

  18. IPROP simulations of the GAMBLE II proton transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The author has simulated the proton transport of the 6-kA, 1-MV GAMBLE II experiment using a modified version of the IPROP particle-in-cell code. IPROP now uses a hybrid model in which plasma electrons are divided into high-energy macro particle and thermal-fluid components. This model includes open-quotes knock-onclose quotes bound-electron collision and runaway sources for high-energy electrons. Using IPROP, the authors has calculated net currents in reasonable agreement with the experiment ranging from 5-11% of the total current in pressures from 0.25-4 torr helium. In the simulations, the pinch current sample by the 1.5-cm beam was 2-3 times larger than the net current at 4 cm radius. The attenuation of net current at larger radii was the result of a highly-conductive energetic component of plasma electrons surrounding the beam. Having benchmarked IPROP against experiment, the author has examined higher-current ion beams with respect to possible transport for inertial confinement fusion

  19. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swathirajan, S. [General Motors R& D Center, Warren, MI (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are extremely promising as future power plants in the transportation sector to achieve an increase in energy efficiency and eliminate environmental pollution due to vehicles. GM is currently involved in a multiphase program with the US Department of Energy for developing a proof-of-concept hybrid vehicle based on a PEM fuel cell power plant and a methanol fuel processor. Other participants in the program are Los Alamos National Labs, Dow Chemical Co., Ballard Power Systems and DuPont Co., In the just completed phase 1 of the program, a 10 kW PEM fuel cell power plant was built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating a methanol fuel processor with a PEM fuel cell stack. However, the fuel cell power plant must overcome stiff technical and economic challenges before it can be commercialized for light duty vehicle applications. Progress achieved in phase I on the use of monolithic catalyst reactors in the fuel processor, managing CO impurity in the fuel cell stack, low-cost electrode-membrane assembles, and on the integration of the fuel processor with a Ballard PEM fuel cell stack will be presented.

  20. Beam collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harres, K; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Nuernberg, F; Otten, A; Schuetrumpf, J; Roth, M [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Tauschwitz, A; Bagnoud, V [GSI - Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Plasmaphysik and PHELIX, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Daido, H; Tampo, M [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa-city, Kyoto, 619-0215 (Japan); Schollmeier, M, E-mail: k.harres@gsi.d [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM 87185 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    A pulsed high field solenoid was used in a laser-proton acceleration experiment to collimate and transport the proton beam that was generated at the irradiation of a flat foil by a high intensity laser pulse. 10{sup 12} particles at an energy of 2.3 MeV could be caught and transported over a distance of more than 240 mm. Strong space charge effects occur, induced by the high field of the solenoid that forces all co-moving electrons down the the solenoid's axis, building up a strong negative space charge that interacts with the proton beam. This leads to an aggregation of the proton beam around the solenoid's axis and therefore to a stronger focusing effect. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications like post-acceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  1. Beam collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harres, K; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Nuernberg, F; Otten, A; Schuetrumpf, J; Roth, M; Tauschwitz, A; Bagnoud, V; Daido, H; Tampo, M; Schollmeier, M

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed high field solenoid was used in a laser-proton acceleration experiment to collimate and transport the proton beam that was generated at the irradiation of a flat foil by a high intensity laser pulse. 10 12 particles at an energy of 2.3 MeV could be caught and transported over a distance of more than 240 mm. Strong space charge effects occur, induced by the high field of the solenoid that forces all co-moving electrons down the the solenoid's axis, building up a strong negative space charge that interacts with the proton beam. This leads to an aggregation of the proton beam around the solenoid's axis and therefore to a stronger focusing effect. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications like post-acceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  2. Kinetics of proton transport into influenza virions by the viral M2 channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Ivanovic

    Full Text Available M2 protein of influenza A viruses is a tetrameric transmembrane proton channel, which has essential functions both early and late in the virus infectious cycle. Previous studies of proton transport by M2 have been limited to measurements outside the context of the virus particle. We have developed an in vitro fluorescence-based assay to monitor internal acidification of individual virions triggered to undergo membrane fusion. We show that rimantadine, an inhibitor of M2 proton conductance, blocks the acidification-dependent dissipation of fluorescence from a pH-sensitive virus-content probe. Fusion-pore formation usually follows internal acidification but does not require it. The rate of internal virion acidification increases with external proton concentration and saturates with a pK(m of ∼4.7. The rate of proton transport through a single, fully protonated M2 channel is approximately 100 to 400 protons per second. The saturating proton-concentration dependence and the low rate of internal virion acidification derived from authentic virions support a transporter model for the mechanism of proton transfer.

  3. Reactive transport of aqueous protons in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    McNeece, Colin J.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    and total aqueous proton concentrations. An inflection point in this function near neutral pH leads to a reversal in the classic front formation mechanism under basic conditions, such that proton desorption leads to a self-sharpening front, while adsorption

  4. Probing water structure and transport in proton exchange membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, X.

    2018-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have attracted tremendous attention as alternative energy sources because of their high energy density and practically zero greenhouse gas emission - water is their only direct by-product. Critical to the function of PEMFCs is fast proton and water

  5. Electron transfer activation of a second water channel for proton transport in [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sode, Olaseni; Voth, Gregory A., E-mail: gavoth@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, James Franck Institute, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, Computation Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA and Computing, Environment and Life Sciences, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Hydrogenase enzymes are important because they can reversibly catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen. Proton transport mechanisms have been previously studied in residue pathways that lead to the active site of the enzyme via residues Cys299 and Ser319. The importance of this pathway and these residues has been previously exhibited through site-specific mutations, which were shown to interrupt the enzyme activity. It has been shown recently that a separate water channel (WC2) is coupled with electron transport to the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The water-mediated proton transport mechanisms of the enzyme in different electronic states have been studied using the multistate empirical valence bond reactive molecular dynamics method, in order to understand any role WC2 may have in facilitating the residue pathway in bringing an additional proton to the enzyme active site. In a single electronic state A{sup 2−}, a water wire was formed through which protons can be transported with a low free energy barrier. The remaining electronic states were shown, however, to be highly unfavorable to proton transport in WC2. A double amino acid substitution is predicted to obstruct proton transport in electronic state A{sup 2-} by closing a cavity that could otherwise fill with water near the proximal Fe of the active site.

  6. Electron transfer activation of a second water channel for proton transport in [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sode, Olaseni; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogenase enzymes are important because they can reversibly catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen. Proton transport mechanisms have been previously studied in residue pathways that lead to the active site of the enzyme via residues Cys299 and Ser319. The importance of this pathway and these residues has been previously exhibited through site-specific mutations, which were shown to interrupt the enzyme activity. It has been shown recently that a separate water channel (WC2) is coupled with electron transport to the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The water-mediated proton transport mechanisms of the enzyme in different electronic states have been studied using the multistate empirical valence bond reactive molecular dynamics method, in order to understand any role WC2 may have in facilitating the residue pathway in bringing an additional proton to the enzyme active site. In a single electronic state A 2− , a water wire was formed through which protons can be transported with a low free energy barrier. The remaining electronic states were shown, however, to be highly unfavorable to proton transport in WC2. A double amino acid substitution is predicted to obstruct proton transport in electronic state A 2- by closing a cavity that could otherwise fill with water near the proximal Fe of the active site

  7. Proton transport in additives to the polymer electrolyte membrane for fuel cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelle, Pia

    2011-03-21

    The enhancement of proton transport in polymer electrolyte membranes is an important issue for the development of fuel cell technology. The objective is a material providing proton transport at a temperature range of 350 K to 450 K independent from a purely water based mechanism. To enhance the PEM properties of standard polymer materials, a class of additives is studied by means of atomistic simulations consisting of functionalised mesoporous silicon dioxide particles. The functional molecules are imidazole or sulphonic acid, covalently bound to the surface via a carbon chain with a surface density of about 1.0 nm{sup -2} groups. At first, the proton transport mechanism is explored in a system of functional molecules in vacuum. The molecules are constrained by the terminal carbon groups according to the geometric arrangement in the porous silicon dioxide. The proton transport mechanism is characterised by structural properties obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations and consists of the aggregation of two or more functional groups, a barrier free proton transport between these groups followed by the separation of the groups and formation of new aggregates due to fluctuations in the hydrogen bond network and movement of the carbon chain. For the different proton conducting groups, i.e. methyl imidazole, methyl sulphonic acid and water, the barrier free proton transport and the formation of protonated bimolecular complexes were addressed by potential energy calculations of the density functional based tight binding method (DFTB). For sulphonic acid even at a temperature of 450 K, relatively stable aggregates are formed, while most imidazole groups are isolated and the hydrogen bond fluctuations are high. However, high density of groups and elevated temperatures enhance the proton transport in both systems. Besides the anchorage and the density of the groups, the influence of the chemical environment on the proton transport was studied. Therefore, the

  8. Coronal magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jie; Bastian, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of research articles on the subject of the solar corona, and particularly, coronal magnetism. The book was motivated by the Workshop on Coronal Magnetism: Connecting Models to Data and the Corona to the Earth, which was held 21 - 23 May 2012 in Boulder, Colorado, USA. This workshop was attended by approximately 60 researchers. Articles from this meeting are contained in this topical issue, but the topical issue also contains contributions from researchers not present at the workshop. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in solar physics. Originally published in Solar Physics, Vol. 288, Issue 2, 2013 and Vol. 289, Issue 8, 2014.

  9. SRNA-2K5, Proton Transport Using 3-D by Monte Carlo Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, Radovan D.

    2005-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: SRNA-2K5 performs Monte Carlo transport simulation of proton in 3D source and 3D geometry of arbitrary materials. The proton transport based on condensed history model, and on model of compound nuclei decays that creates in nonelastic nuclear interaction by proton absorption. 2 - Methods: The SRNA-2K5 package is developed for time independent simulation of proton transport by Monte Carlo techniques for numerical experiments in complex geometry, using PENGEOM from PENELOPE with different material compositions, and arbitrary spectrum of proton generated from the 3D source. This package developed for 3D proton dose distribution in proton therapy and dosimetry, and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The compound nuclei decay was simulated by our and Russian MSDM models using ICRU 49 and ICRU 63 data. If protons trajectory is divided on great number of steps, protons passage can be simulated according to Berger's Condensed Random Walk model. Conditions of angular distribution and fluctuation of energy loss determinate step length. Physical picture of these processes is described by stopping power, Moliere's angular distribution, Vavilov's distribution with Sulek's correction per all electron orbits, and Chadwick's cross sections for nonelastic nuclear interactions, obtained by his GNASH code. According to physical picture of protons passage and with probabilities of protons transition from previous to next stage, which is prepared by SRNADAT program, simulation of protons transport in all SRNA codes runs according to usual Monte Carlo scheme: (i) proton from the spectrum prepared for random choice of energy, position and space angle is emitted from the source; (ii) proton is loosing average energy on the step; (iii) on that step, proton experience a great number of collisions, and it changes direction of movement randomly chosen from angular distribution; (iv) random fluctuation is added to average energy loss; (v

  10. Thermal generation and mobility of charge carriers in collective proton transport in hydrogen-bonded chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrard, M.; Boesch, R.; Kourakis, I.

    1991-01-01

    The transport of protons in hydrogen-bonded systems is a long standing problem which has not yet obtained a satisfactorily theoretical description. Although this problem was examined first for ice, it is relevant in many systems and in particular in biology for the transport along proteins or for proton conductance across membranes, an essential process in cell life. The broad relevance makes the study of proton conduction very appealing. Since the original work of Bernal and Fowler on ice, the idea that the transport occurs through chains of hydrogen bonds has been well accepted. Such ''proton wires'' were invoked by Nagle and Morowitz for proton transport across membranes proteins and more recently across lipid bilayers. In this report, we assume the existence of such an hydrogen-bonded chain and discuss its consequences on the dynamics of the charge carriers. We show that this assumption leads naturally to the idea of soliton transport and we put a special emphasis on the role of the coupling between the protons and heavy ions motions. The model is presented. We show how the coupling affects strongly the dynamics of the charge carriers and we discuss the role it plays in the thermal generation of carriers. The work presented has been performed in 1986 and 87 with St. Pnevmatikos and N. Flyzanis and was then completed in collaboration with D. Hochstrasser and H. Buettner. Therefore the results presented in this part are not new but we think that they are appropriate in the context of this multidisciplinary workshop because they provide a rather complete example of the soliton picture for proton conduction. This paper discusses the thermal generation of the charge carriers when the coupling between the protons and heavy ions dynamics is taken into account. The results presented in this part are very recent and will deserve further analysis but they already show that the coupling can assist for the formation of the charge carriers

  11. Laser accelerated protons captured and transported by a pulse power solenoid

    OpenAIRE

    Burris-Mog, T.; Harres, K.; Zielbauer, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Roth, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Nürnberg, F.; Busold, S.; Bussmann, M.; Deppert, O.; Hoffmeister, G.; Joost, M.; Sobiella, M.; Tauschwitz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Using a pulse power solenoid, we demonstrate efficient capture of laser accelerated proton beams and the ability to control their large divergence angles and broad energy range. Simulations using measured data for the input parameters give inference into the phase-space and transport efficiencies of the captured proton beams. We conclude with results from a feasibility study of a pulse power compact achromatic gantry concept. Using a scaled target normal sheath acceleration spectrum, we prese...

  12. Srna - Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulation in combined and voxelized geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes new Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulations in complex geometrical forms and in materials of different composition. The SRNA codes were developed for three dimensional (3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry. The model of these codes is based on the theory of proton multiple scattering and a simple model of compound nucleus decay. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG and SRNA-VOX. The first code simulates proton transport in combined geometry that can be described by planes and second order surfaces. The second one uses the voxelized geometry of material zones and is specifically adopted for the application of patient computer tomography data. Transition probabilities for both codes are given by the SRNADAT program. In this paper, we will present the models and algorithms of our programs, as well as the results of the numerical experiments we have carried out applying them, along with the results of proton transport simulation obtained through the PETRA and GEANT programs. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by means of the Multi-Layer Faraday Cup and spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by our program indicate the imminent application of Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice.

  13. Laser accelerated protons captured and transported by a pulse power solenoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Burris-Mog

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Using a pulse power solenoid, we demonstrate efficient capture of laser accelerated proton beams and the ability to control their large divergence angles and broad energy range. Simulations using measured data for the input parameters give inference into the phase-space and transport efficiencies of the captured proton beams. We conclude with results from a feasibility study of a pulse power compact achromatic gantry concept. Using a scaled target normal sheath acceleration spectrum, we present simulation results of the available spectrum after transport through the gantry.

  14. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Applied for Transport Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Rokni, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of a PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) is investigated. PEMFC may be the most promising technology for fuel cell automotive systems, which is operating at quite low temperatures, (between 60 to 80℃). In this study the fuel cell motive power part of a lift truck has...... been investigated. The fuel cell stack used in this model is developed using a Ballard PEMFC [1], so that the equations used in the stack modeling are derived from the experimental data. The stack can produce 3 to 15 kilowatt electricity depending on the number of cells used in the stack. Some...

  15. Experimental results on transport and focusing of laser accelerated protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busold, Simon; Deppert, Oliver; Roth, Markus [TU Darmstadt, IKP, Schlossgartenstr. 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Schumacher, Dennis; Blazevic, Abel; Zielbauer, Bernhard; Hofmann, Ingo; Bagnoud, Vincent [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brabetz, Christian; Al-Omari, Husam [JWG Universitaet Frankfurt, IAP, Max von Laue Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Joost, Martin; Kroll, Florian; Cowan, Tom [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Collaboration: LIGHT-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Irradiation of thin foils with high-intensity laser pulses became a reliable tool during the last decade for producing high-intensity proton bunches in about a pico-second from a sub-millimeter source. However, the energy distribution is of an exponential shape with a currently achievable cut-off energy <100 MeV (TNSA mechanism) and the beam is highly divergent with an energy-dependent envelope-divergence of up to 60 deg. Thus, for most applications it is necessary to be able to capture and control these protons as well as select a specific energy. In the frame of the LIGHT collaboration, experimental studies were done at the PHELIX laser at GSI Darmstadt using a pulsed high-field solenoid and alternatively a permanent magnet quadrupole triplet in order to match the beam for injection into a RF cavity. The beam was characterized at several distances after the source and the results are compared to particle tracking simulations.

  16. Srna-Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulation in combined and voxelized geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Ilic, R D; Stankovic, S J

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes new Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulations in complex geometrical forms and in materials of different composition. The SRNA codes were developed for three dimensional (3D) dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry. The model of these codes is based on the theory of proton multiple scattering and a simple model of compound nucleus decay. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG and SRNA-VOX. The first code simulates proton transport in combined geometry that can be described by planes and second order surfaces. The second one uses the voxelized geometry of material zones and is specifically adopted for the application of patient computer tomography data. Transition probabilities for both codes are given by the SRNADAT program. In this paper, we will present the models and algorithms of our programs, as well as the results of the numerical experiments we have carried out applying them, along with the results of proton transport simulation obtaine...

  17. The prototypical proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YdgR from Escherichia coli facilitates chloramphenicol uptake into bacterial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Aduri, Nanda G; Sharma, Neha

    2018-01-01

    . However, to date no report exists on any specific transport protein that facilitates Cam uptake. The proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POT) YdgR from Escherichia coli is a prototypical member of the POT family, functioning in proton-coupled uptake of di- and tripeptides. By following bacterial...

  18. Beam collimation and transport of quasineutral laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Guenther, M.; Nuernberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schuetrumpf, J.; Roth, M.; Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Daido, H.; Tampo, M.; Schollmeier, M.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports about controlling laser-accelerated proton beams with respect to beam divergence and energy. The particles are captured by a pulsed high field solenoid with a magnetic field strength of 8.6 T directly behind a flat target foil that is irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. Proton beams with energies around 2.3 MeV and particle numbers of 10 12 could be collimated and transported over a distance of more than 300 mm. In contrast to the protons the comoving electrons are strongly deflected by the solenoid field. They propagate at a submillimeter gyroradius around the solenoid's axis which could be experimentally verified. The originated high flux electron beam produces a high space charge resulting in a stronger focusing of the proton beam than expected by tracking results. Leadoff particle-in-cell simulations show qualitatively that this effect is caused by space charge attraction due to the comoving electrons. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications such as postacceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  19. MCNPX proton transport simulations for a therapy set-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herault, J.; Iborra, N.; Chauvel, P.; Serrano, B.

    2005-01-01

    Patients with ocular melanoma have been treated since June 1991 at the medical cyclotron of the Centre Antoine Lacassagne (CAL). Positions and sizes of the ocular nozzle elements were initially defined based on experimental work, taking as a pattern functional existing facilities. Nowadays Monte Carlo (MC) calculation offers a tool to refine this geometry by adjusting size and place of beam modelling devices. Moreover, the MC tool is a useful way to calculate the dose and to evaluate the impact of secondary particles in the field of radiotherapy or radiation protection. Both LINAC and cyclotron producing X-rays, electrons, protons and neutrons are available in CAL, which suggests choosing MCNPX for its particle versatility. As a first step, the existing installation was input in MCNPX to check its aptitude to reproduce experimentally measured depth-dose profile, lateral profile. Relative comparisons of percentage depth-dose and lateral profiles, performed between measured data and simulations, show an agreement of the order of 2% in dose and 0.1 mm in range accuracy. These comparisons carried out with and without beam-modifying device, yield results compatible to the required precision in ocular melanoma treatments, as long as adequate choices are made on MCNPX input decks for physics card. (authors)

  20. Proton transport properties of poly(aspartic acid) with different average molecular weights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yuki, E-mail: ynagao@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.j [Department of Mechanical Systems and Design, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aoba Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Imai, Yuzuru [Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer (IDAC), Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Matsui, Jun [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ogawa, Tomoyuki [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aoba Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Miyashita, Tokuji [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: Seven polymers with different average molecular weights were synthesized. The proton conductivity depended on the number-average degree of polymerization. The difference of the proton conductivities was more than one order of magnitude. The number-average molecular weight contributed to the stability of the polymer. - Abstract: We synthesized seven partially protonated poly(aspartic acids)/sodium polyaspartates (P-Asp) with different average molecular weights to study their proton transport properties. The number-average degree of polymerization (DP) for each P-Asp was 30 (P-Asp30), 115 (P-Asp115), 140 (P-Asp140), 160 (P-Asp160), 185 (P-Asp185), 205 (P-Asp205), and 250 (P-Asp250). The proton conductivity depended on the number-average DP. The maximum and minimum proton conductivities under a relative humidity of 70% and 298 K were 1.7 . 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} (P-Asp140) and 4.6 . 10{sup -4} S cm{sup -1} (P-Asp250), respectively. Differential thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTA) was carried out for each P-Asp. The results were classified into two categories. One exhibited two endothermic peaks between t = (270 and 300) {sup o}C, the other exhibited only one peak. The P-Asp group with two endothermic peaks exhibited high proton conductivity. The high proton conductivity is related to the stability of the polymer. The number-average molecular weight also contributed to the stability of the polymer.

  1. Perturbation of the Electron Transport Mechanism by Proton Intercalation in Nanoporous TiO2 Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, A. F.; Zhu, K.; Erslev, P. T.; Kim, J. Y.; Neale, N. R.; Frank, A. J.

    2012-04-11

    This study addresses a long-standing controversy about the electron-transport mechanism in porous metal oxide semiconductor films that are commonly used in dye-sensitized solar cells and related systems. We investigated, by temperature-dependent time-of-flight measurements, the influence of proton intercalation on the electron-transport properties of nanoporous TiO{sub 2} films exposed to an ethanol electrolyte containing different percentages of water (0-10%). These measurements revealed that increasing the water content in the electrolyte led to increased proton intercalation into the TiO{sub 2} films, slower transport, and a dramatic change in the dependence of the thermal activation energy (E{sub a}) of the electron diffusion coefficient on the photogenerated electron density in the films. Random walk simulations based on a microscopic model incorporating exponential conduction band tail (CBT) trap states combined with a proton-induced shallow trap level with a long residence time accounted for the observed effects of proton intercalation on E{sub a}. Application of this model to the experimental results explains the conditions under which E{sub a} dependence on the photoelectron density is consistent with multiple trapping in exponential CBT states and under which it appears at variance with this model.

  2. Proton transport properties in zwitterion blends with Brønsted acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa-Fujita, Masahiro; Byrne, Nolene; Forsyth, Maria; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-16

    We describe zwitterion, 3-(1-butyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium-3-yl)propane-1-sulfonate (Bimps), mixtures with 1,1,1-trifluoro-N-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methanesulfoneamide (HN(Tf)(2)) as new proton transport electrolytes. We report proton transport mechanisms in the mixtures based on results from several methods including thermal analyses, the complex-impedance method, and the pulsed field gradient spin echo NMR (pfg-NMR) method. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of the mixtures decreased with increasing HN(Tf)(2) concentration up to 50 mol %. The Tg remained constant at -55 °C with further acid doping. The ionic conductivity of HN(Tf)(2) mixtures increased with the HN(Tf)(2) content up to 50 mol %. Beyond that ratio, the mixtures showed no increase in ionic conductivity (10(-4) S cm(-1) at room temperature). This tendency agrees well with that of Tg. However, the self-diffusion coefficients obtained from the pfg-NMR method increased with HN(Tf)(2) content even above 50 mol % for all component ions. At HN(Tf)(2) 50 mol %, the proton diffusion of HN(Tf)(2) was the fastest in the mixture. These results suggest that Bimps cannot dissociate excess HN(Tf)(2), that is, the excess HN(Tf)(2) exists as molecular HN(Tf)(2) in the mixtures. The zwitterion, Bimps, forms a 1:1 complex with HN(Tf)(2) and the proton transport property in this mixture is superior to those of other mixing ratios. Furthermore, CH(3)SO(3)H and CF(3)SO(3)H were mixed with Bimps for comparison. Both systems showed a similar tendency, which differed from that of the HN(Tf)(2) system. The Tg decreased linearly with increasing acid content for every mixing ratio, while the ionic conductivity increased linearly. Proton transport properties in zwitterion/acid mixtures were strongly affected by the acid species added.

  3. Proton transport model in the ionosphere. 2. Influence of magnetic mirroring and collisions on the angular redistribution in a proton beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Galand

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of magnetic mirroring and elastic and inelastic scattering on the angular redistribution in a proton/hydrogen beam by using a transport code in comparison with observations. H-emission Doppler profiles viewed in the magnetic zenith exhibit a red-shifted component which is indicative of upward fluxes. In order to determine the origin of this red shift, we evaluate the influence of two angular redistribution sources which are included in our proton/hydrogen transport model. Even though it generates an upward flux, the redistribution due to magnetic mirroring effect is not sufficient to explain the red shift. On the other hand, the collisional angular scattering induces a much more significant red shift in the lower atmosphere. The red shift due to collisions is produced  by <1 -keV protons and is so small as to require an instrumental bandwidth <0.2 nm. This explains the absence of measured upward proton/hydrogen fluxes in the Proton I rocket data because no useable data concerning protons <1 keV are available. At the same time, our model agrees with measured ground-based H-emission Doppler profiles and suggests that previously reported red shift observations were due mostly to instrumental bandwidth broadening of the profile. Our results suggest that Doppler profile measurements with higher spectral resolution may enable us to quantify better the angular scattering in proton aurora.Key words. Auroral ionosphere · Particle precipitation

  4. Dynamics of laser-driven proton beam focusing and transport into solid density matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F.; Wei, M.; Mariscal, D.; Chen, S.; Fuchs, J.

    2016-10-01

    Isochoric heating and local energy deposition capabilities make intense proton beams appealing for studying high energy density physics and the Fast Ignition of inertial confinement fusion. To study proton beam focusing that results in high beam density, experiments have been conducted using different target geometries irradiated by a kilojoule, 10 ps pulse of the OMEGA EP laser. The beam focus was measured by imaging beam-induced Cu K-alpha emission on a Cu foil that was positioned at a fixed distance. Compared to a free target, structured targets having shapes of wedge and cone show a brighter and narrower K-alpha radiation emission spot on a Cu foil indicating higher beam focusability. Experimentally observed images with proton radiography demonstrate the existence of transverse fields on the structures. Full-scale simulations including the contribution of a long pulse duration of the laser confirm that such fields can be caused by hot electrons moving through the structures. The simulated fields are strong enough to reflect the diverging main proton beam and pinch a transverse probe beam. Detailed simulation results including the beam focusing and transport of the focused intense proton beam in Cu foil will be presented. This work was supported by the National Laser User Facility Program through Award DE-NA0002034.

  5. Transport of laser accelerated proton beams and isochoric heating of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, M; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Harres, K; Bagnoud, V; Brown, C; Gregori, G; Clarke, R; Heathcote, R; Li, B; Daido, H; Fernandez, J; Flippo, K; Gaillard, S; Gauthier, C; Glenzer, S; Kritcher, A; Kugland, N; LePape, S; Makita, M

    2010-01-01

    The acceleration of intense proton and ion beams by ultra-intense lasers has matured to a point where applications in basic research and technology are being developed. Crucial for harvesting the unmatched beam parameters driven by the relativistic electron sheath is the precise control of the beam. We report on recent experiments using the PHELIX laser at GSI, the VULCAN laser at RAL and the TRIDENT laser at LANL to control and use laser accelerated proton beams for applications in high energy density research. We demonstrate efficient collimation of the proton beam using high field pulsed solenoid magnets, a prerequisite to capture and transport the beam for applications. Furthermore we report on two campaigns to use intense, short proton bunches to isochorically heat solid targets up to the warm dense matter state. The temporal profile of the proton beam allows for rapid heating of the target, much faster than the hydrodynamic response time thereby creating a strongly coupled plasma at solid density. The target parameters are then probed by X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) to reveal the density and temperature of the heated volume. This combination of two powerful techniques developed during the past few years allows for the generation and investigation of macroscopic samples of matter in states present in giant planets or the interior of the earth.

  6. Transport of laser accelerated proton beams and isochoric heating of matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, M; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Harres, K [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Bagnoud, V [GSI Helmholtzzentrum f. Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brown, C; Gregori, G [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Clarke, R; Heathcote, R; Li, B [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX14 OQX (United Kingdom); Daido, H [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, Kizugawa-City, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Fernandez, J; Flippo, K; Gaillard, S; Gauthier, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Glenzer, S; Kritcher, A; Kugland, N; LePape, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Makita, M, E-mail: markus.roth@physik.tu-darmstadt.d [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    The acceleration of intense proton and ion beams by ultra-intense lasers has matured to a point where applications in basic research and technology are being developed. Crucial for harvesting the unmatched beam parameters driven by the relativistic electron sheath is the precise control of the beam. We report on recent experiments using the PHELIX laser at GSI, the VULCAN laser at RAL and the TRIDENT laser at LANL to control and use laser accelerated proton beams for applications in high energy density research. We demonstrate efficient collimation of the proton beam using high field pulsed solenoid magnets, a prerequisite to capture and transport the beam for applications. Furthermore we report on two campaigns to use intense, short proton bunches to isochorically heat solid targets up to the warm dense matter state. The temporal profile of the proton beam allows for rapid heating of the target, much faster than the hydrodynamic response time thereby creating a strongly coupled plasma at solid density. The target parameters are then probed by X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) to reveal the density and temperature of the heated volume. This combination of two powerful techniques developed during the past few years allows for the generation and investigation of macroscopic samples of matter in states present in giant planets or the interior of the earth.

  7. Injector and beam transport simulation study of proton dielectric wall accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Quantang; Yuan, P.; Zhang, Z.M.; Cao, S.C; Shen, X.K.; Jing, Y.; Ma, Y.Y.; Yu, C.S.; Li, Z.P.; Liu, M.; Xiao, R.Q.; Zhao, H.W.

    2012-01-01

    A simulation study of a short-pulsed proton injector for, and beam transport in, a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) has been carried out using the particle-in-cell (PIC) code Warp. It was shown that applying “tilt pulse” voltage waveforms on three electrodes enables the production of a shorter bunch by the injector. The fields in the DWA beam tube were simulated using Computer Simulation Technology’s Microwave Studio (CST MWS) package, with various choices for the boundary conditions. For acceleration in the DWA, the beam transport was simulated with Warp, using applied fields obtained by running CST MWS. Our simulations showed that the electric field at the entrance to the DWA represents a challenging issue for the beam transport. We thus simulated a configuration with a mesh at the entrance of the DWA, intended to improve the entrance field. In these latter simulations, a proton bunch was successfully accelerated from 130 keV to about 36 MeV in a DWA with a length of 36.75 cm. As the beam bunch progresses, its transverse dimensions diminish from (roughly) 0.5×0.5 cm to 0.2×0.4 cm. The beam pulse lengthens from 1 cm to 2 cm due to lack of longitudinal compression fields. -- Highlights: ► A pulse proton injector with tilt voltages on the three electrodes was simulated. ► The fields in different part of the DWA were simulated with CST and analyzed. ► The proton beam transport in DWA was simulated with Warp successfully. ► The simulation can help for designing a real DWA.

  8. A coupled RL and transport model for mixed-field proton irradiation of Al2O3:C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler; Jain, Mayank

    2008-01-01

    effects and inelastic hadronic scattering occur in proton therapy dosimetry. To investigate these aspects in relation to our system, we have combined simulation of particle transportation with a luminescence generation code based on track structure theory. The model was found to qualitatively reproduce...... the main features in experimental data from proton irradiations. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION MODEL OF ENERGETIC PROTON TRANSPORT THROUGH SELF-GENERATED ALFVEN WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasiev, A.; Vainio, R., E-mail: alexandr.afanasiev@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-08-15

    A new Monte Carlo simulation model for the transport of energetic protons through self-generated Alfven waves is presented. The key point of the model is that, unlike the previous ones, it employs the full form (i.e., includes the dependence on the pitch-angle cosine) of the resonance condition governing the scattering of particles off Alfven waves-the process that approximates the wave-particle interactions in the framework of quasilinear theory. This allows us to model the wave-particle interactions in weak turbulence more adequately, in particular, to implement anisotropic particle scattering instead of isotropic scattering, which the previous Monte Carlo models were based on. The developed model is applied to study the transport of flare-accelerated protons in an open magnetic flux tube. Simulation results for the transport of monoenergetic protons through the spectrum of Alfven waves reveal that the anisotropic scattering leads to spatially more distributed wave growth than isotropic scattering. This result can have important implications for diffusive shock acceleration, e.g., affect the scattering mean free path of the accelerated particles in and the size of the foreshock region.

  10. Non-Linear Beam Transport System for the LENS 7 MeV Proton Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, William P; Derenchuk, Vladimir Peter; Rinckel, Thomas; Solberg, Keith

    2005-01-01

    A beam transport system has been designed to carry a high-intensity low-emittance proton beam from the exit of the RFQ-DTL acceleration system of the Indiana University Low Energy Neutron System (LENS)* to the neutron production target. The goal of the design was to provide a beam of uniform density over a 3cm by 3cm area at the target. Two octupole magnets** are employed in the beam line to provide the necessary beam phase space manipulations to achieve this goal. First order calculations were done using TRANSPORT and second order calculations have been performed using TURTLE. Second order simulations have been done using both a Gaussian beam distribution and a particle set generated by calculations of beam transport through the RFQ-DTL using PARMILA. Comparison of the design characteristics with initial measurements from the LENS commissioning process will be made.

  11. Transport calculation of medium-energy protons and neutrons by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Syuuichi; Hirayama, Hideo; Katoh, Kazuaki.

    1978-09-01

    A Monte Carlo transport code, ARIES, has been developed for protons and neutrons at medium energy (25 -- 500 MeV). Nuclear data provided by R.G. Alsmiller, Jr. were used for the calculation. To simulate the cascade development in the medium, each generation was represented by a single weighted particle and an average number of emitted particles was used as the weight. Neutron fluxes were stored by the collisions density method. The cutoff energy was set to 25 MeV. Neutrons below the cutoff were stored to be used as the source for the low energy neutron transport calculation upon the discrete ordinates method. Then transport calculations were performed for both low energy neutrons (thermal -- 25 MeV) and secondary gamma-rays. Energy spectra of emitted neutrons were calculated and compared with those of published experimental and calculated results. The agreement was good for the incident particles of energy between 100 and 500 MeV. (author)

  12. Shielding calculations in support of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) proton beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey O.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Popova, Irina

    2002-01-01

    Determining the bulk shielding requirements for accelerator environments is generally an easy task compared to analyzing the radiation transport through the complex shield configurations and penetrations typically associated with the detailed Title II design efforts of a facility. Shielding calculations for penetrations in the SNS accelerator environment are presented based on hybrid Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates particle transport methods. This methodology relies on coupling tools that map boundary surface leakage information from the Monte Carlo calculations to boundary sources for one-, two-, and three-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations. The paper will briefly introduce the coupling tools for coupling MCNPX to the one-, two-, and three-dimensional discrete ordinates codes in the DOORS code suite. The paper will briefly present typical applications of these tools in the design of complex shield configurations and penetrations in the SNS proton beam transport system

  13. Reply to the 'Comment on "Proton transport in barium stannate: classical, semi-classical and quantum regime"'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneste, Grégory; Hermet, Jessica; Dezanneau, Guilhem

    2017-08-09

    We respond to the erroneous criticisms about our modeling of proton transport in barium stannate [G. Geneste et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 19104]. In this previous work, we described, on the basis of density-functional calculations, proton transport in the classical and semi-classical regimes, and provided arguments in favor of an adiabatic picture for proton transfer at low temperature. We re-explain here our article (with more detail and precision), the content of which has been distorted in the Comment, and reiterate our arguments in this reply. We refute all criticisms. They are completely wrong in the context of our article. Even though a few of them are based on considerations probably true in some metals, they make no sense here since they do not correspond to the content of our work. It has not been understood in the Comment that two competitive configurations, associated with radically different transfer mechanisms, have been studied in our work. It has also not been understood in the Comment that the adiabatic regime described for transfer occurs in the protonic ground state, in a very-low barrier configuration with the protonic ground state energy larger than the barrier. Serious confusion has been made in the Comment with the case of H in metals like Nb or Ta, leading to the introduction of the notion of (protonic) "excited-state proton transfer", relevant for H in some metals, but (i) that does not correspond to the (ground state) adiabatic transfers here described, and (ii) that does not correspond to what is commonly described as the "adiabatic limit for proton transfer" in the scientific literature. We emphasize, accordingly, the large differences between proton transfer in the present oxide and hydrogen jumps in metals like Nb or Ta, and the similarities between proton transfer in the present oxide and in acid-base solutions. We finally describe a scenario for proton transfer in the present oxide regardless of the temperature regime.

  14. Sausage instability in a proton-beam transport through wall-confined plasma channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Tetsuo; Masugata, Katsumi; Matsui, Masao; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    1983-01-01

    An instability observed previously in a 800-keV of proton-beam transport through a wall-confined, z-discharged plasma channel (1-m long) has been identified as a sausage type from measurements made using an image converter campera. Clear evidence of the sausage instability has been obtained from the streak and framing photographs. When the instability grows with time, the wavelength tends to increase. The pinch velocity of the channel has also been measured in a parameter space, which gives reasonable agreement with the existing theory. (author)

  15. The mechanism of the tyrosine transporter TyrP supports a proton motive tyrosine decarboxylation pathway in Lactobacillus brevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolken, WAM; Lucas, PM; Lonvaud-Funel, A; Lolkema, JS; Wolken, Wout A.M.; Lucas, Patrick M.

    The tyrosine decarboxylase operon of Lactobacillus brevis IOEB9809 contains, adjacent to the tyrosine decarboxylase gene, a gene for TyrP, a putative tyrosine transporter. The two genes potentially form a proton motive tyrosine decarboxylation pathway. The putative tyrosine transporter gene of L.

  16. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, L., E-mail: neri@lns.infn.it; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Ciavola, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Torrisi, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile, Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Via Graziella, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, Lund (Sweden); Galatà, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell' università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Patti, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell' università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Gozzo, A.; Lega, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Informatica e delle Telecomunicazioni, Università degli Studi di Catania, Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  17. Calculation of channels for forming and transport of medical proton beams at the JINR phasotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'min, E.S.; Mirokhin, I.V.; Molokanov, A.G.; Obukhov, Yu.L.; Savchenko, O.V.

    1984-01-01

    Results of numerical simulation of shaping and transporting processes of therapeutic proton beams with a modified Bragg curve at the JINR phasotron are presented. The mean energy of proton beams are about 100, 130 and 200 MeV. To provide the flat-topped depth-dose distributions with a steep back slope, the method of shaping with a necessary energy spectrum from a nonmonoenergetic beam is used. It is shown by the calculations that it is possible to choose such modes of the channel operation at which clinical-physical requirements to the parameters of medical proton beams are satisfied. Extensions of flat-tops of dose peaks are 1.3 g/cm 2 , 1.7 g/cm 2 and 3.5 g/cm 2 for the 100 MeV, 130 MeV and 200 MeV beam energies, respectively. Dose rate in the peaks of modified distributions are not less than 100 rad per minute

  18. Assaying the proton transport and regulation of UCP1 using solid supported membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesneac, Iulia; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Machillot, Paul; Zoonens, Manuela; Masscheylen, Sandrine; Miroux, Bruno; Vivaudou, Michel; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva

    2012-08-01

    The uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) is a mitochondrial protein that carries protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. It has an important role in non-shivering thermogenesis, and recent evidence suggests its role in human adult metabolism. Using rapid solution exchange on solid supported membranes, we succeeded in measuring electrical currents generated by the transport activity of UCP1. The protein was purified from mouse brown adipose tissue, reconstituted in liposomes and absorbed on solid supported membranes. A fast pH jump activated the ion transport, and electrical signals could be recorded. The currents were characterized by a fast rise and a slow decay, were stable over time, inhibited by purine nucleotides and activated by fatty acids. This new assay permits direct observation of UCP1 activity in controlled cell-free conditions, and opens up new possibilities for UCP1 functional characterization and drug screening because of its robustness and its potential for automation.

  19. Stoichiometric relationship between energy-dependent proton ejection and electron transport in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M D; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1976-01-01

    The number of protons ejected during electron transport per pair of electrons per energy-conserving site (the H+/site ratio) was measured in rat liver mitochondria by three different methods under conditions in which transmembrane movements of endogenous phosphate were minized or eliminated. (1) In the Ca2+ pulse method, between 3.5 and 4.0 molecules of 3-hydroxybutyrate and 1.75 to 2.0 Ca2+ ions were accumulated per 2 e- per site during Ca2+ induced electron transport in the presence of rotenone, when measured under conditions in which movements of endogenous phosphate were negligible. Since entry of 3-hydroxybutyrate requires its protonation to the free acid these data correspond to an H+/site ratio of 3.5-4.0 (2) In the oxygen pulse method addition of known amounts of oxygen to anaerobic mitochondria in the presence of substrate yielded H+/site ratios of 3.0 when phosphate transport was eliminated by addition of N-ethylmaleimide or by anaerobic washing to remove endogenous phosphate. In the absence of such measures the observed H+/site ratio was 2.0. (3) In the reductant pulse method measurement of the initial steady rates of H+ ejection and oxygen consumption by mitochondria in an aerobic medium after addition of substrate gave H+/site near 4.0 in the presence of N-ethylmaleimide; in the absence of the inhibitor the observed ratio was only 2.0. These and other experiments reported indicate that the values of 2.0 earlier obtained for the H+/site ratio by Mitchell and Moyle [Biochem J. (1967) 105, 1147-1162] and others were underestimates due to the unrecognized masking of H+ ejection by movements of endogenous phosphate. The results presented here show that the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport is at least 3.0 and may be as high as 4.0. PMID:1061146

  20. Electrochemical Approach for Analyzing Electrolyte Transport Properties and Their Effect on Protonic Ceramic Fuel Cell Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Nikolay; Lyagaeva, Julia; Vdovin, Gennady; Medvedev, Dmitry; Demin, Anatoly; Tsiakaras, Panagiotis

    2017-08-16

    The design and development of highly conductive materials with wide electrolytic domain boundaries are among the most promising means of enabling solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to demonstrate outstanding performance across low- and intermediate-temperature ranges. While reducing the thickness of the electrolyte is an extensively studied means for diminishing the total resistance of SOFCs, approaches involving an improvement in the transport behavior of the electrolyte membranes have been less-investigated. In the present work, a strategy for analyzing the electrolyte properties and their effect on SOFC output characteristics is proposed. To this purpose, a SOFC based on a recently developed BaCe 0.5 Zr 0.3 Dy 0.2 O 3-δ proton-conducting ceramic material was fabricated and tested. The basis of the strategy consists of the use of traditional SOFC testing techniques combined with the current interruption method and electromotive force measurements with a modified polarization-correction assessment. This allows one to determine simultaneously such important parameters as maximal power density; ohmic and polarization resistances; average ion transport numbers; and total, ionic, and electronic film conductivities and their activation energies. The proposed experimental procedure is expected to expand both fundamental and applied basics that could be further adopted to improve the technology of electrochemical devices based on proton-conducting electrolytes.

  1. Conductivity equations of protons transporting through 2D crystals obtained with the rate process theory and free volume concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tian; Xu, Yuanze; Hao, Ting

    2018-04-01

    The Eyring's rate process theory and free volume concept are employed to treat protons (or other particles) transporting through a 2D (two dimensional) crystal like graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. The protons are assumed to be activated first in order to participate conduction and the conduction rate is dependent on how much free volume available in the system. The obtained proton conductivity equations show that only the number of conduction protons, proton size and packing structure, and the energy barrier associated with 2D crystals are critical; the quantization conductance is unexpectedly predicted with a simple Arrhenius type temperature dependence. The predictions agree well with experimental observations and clear out many puzzles like much smaller energy barrier determined from experiments than from the density function calculations and isotope separation rate independent of the energy barrier of 2D crystals, etc. Our work may deepen our understandings on how protons transport through a membrane and has direct implications on hydrogen related technology and proton involved bioprocesses.

  2. A pH-dependent conformational ensemble mediates proton transport through the influenza A/M2 protein†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Alexei L.; Lear, James D.; Ma, Chunlong; Lamb, Robert A.; Pinto, Lawrence H.; DeGrado, William F.

    2010-01-01

    The influenza A M2 protein exhibits inwardly rectifying, pH-activated proton transport that saturates at low pH. A comparison of high-resolution structures of the transmembrane domain at high and low pH suggests that pH-dependent conformational changes may facilitate proton conduction by alternately changing the accessibility of the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the channel as a proton transits through the transmembrane domain. Here, we show that M2 functionally reconstituted in liposomes populates at least three different conformational states over a physiologically relevant pH range, with transition midpoints that are consistent with previously reported His37 pKas. We then develop and test two similar, quantitative mechanistic models of proton transport, where protonation shifts the equilibrium between structural states having different proton affinities and solvent accessibilities. The models account well for a collection of experimental data sets over a wide range of pHs and voltages and require only a small number of adjustable parameters to accurately describe the data. While the kinetic models do not require any specific conformation for the protein, they nevertheless are consistent with a large body of structural information based on high-resolution NMR and crystallographic structures, optical spectroscopy, and MD calculations. PMID:20968306

  3. Transport and energy selection of laser generated protons for postacceleration with a compact linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo; Sumini, Marco

    2013-03-01

    Laser accelerated proton beams have a considerable potential for various applications including oncological therapy. However, the most consolidated target normal sheath acceleration regime based on irradiation of solid targets provides an exponential energy spectrum with a significant divergence. The low count number at the cutoff energy seriously limits at present its possible use. One realistic scenario for the near future is offered by hybrid schemes. The use of transport lines for collimation and energy selection has been considered. We present here a scheme based on a high field pulsed solenoid and collimators which allows one to select a beam suitable for injection at 30 MeV into a compact linac in order to double its energy while preserving a significant intensity. The results are based on a fully 3D simulation starting from laser acceleration.

  4. Transport and energy selection of laser generated protons for postacceleration with a compact linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sinigardi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser accelerated proton beams have a considerable potential for various applications including oncological therapy. However, the most consolidated target normal sheath acceleration regime based on irradiation of solid targets provides an exponential energy spectrum with a significant divergence. The low count number at the cutoff energy seriously limits at present its possible use. One realistic scenario for the near future is offered by hybrid schemes. The use of transport lines for collimation and energy selection has been considered. We present here a scheme based on a high field pulsed solenoid and collimators which allows one to select a beam suitable for injection at 30 MeV into a compact linac in order to double its energy while preserving a significant intensity. The results are based on a fully 3D simulation starting from laser acceleration.

  5. Formation of coronal cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, C.H.; Suess, S.T.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Steinolfson, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical study of the formation of a coronal cavity and its relation to a quiescent prominence is presented. It is argued that the formation of a cavity is initiated by the condensation of plasma which is trapped by the coronal magnetic field in a closed streamer and which then flows down to the chromosphere along the field lines due to lack of stable magnetic support against gravity. The existence of a coronal cavity depends on the coronal magnetic field strength; with low strength, the plasma density is not high enough for condensation to occur. Furthermore, we suggest that prominence and cavity material is supplied from the chromospheric level. Whether a coronal cavity and a prominence coexist depends on the magnetic field configuration; a prominence requires stable magnetic support

  6. An integrated field-effect microdevice for monitoring membrane transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes via lateral proton diffusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Felix Schaffhauser

    Full Text Available An integrated microdevice for measuring proton-dependent membrane activity at the surface of Xenopus laevis oocytes is presented. By establishing a stable contact between the oocyte vitelline membrane and an ion-sensitive field-effect (ISFET sensor inside a microperfusion channel, changes in surface pH that are hypothesized to result from facilitated proton lateral diffusion along the membrane were detected. The solute diffusion barrier created between the sensor and the active membrane area allowed detection of surface proton concentration free from interference of solutes in bulk solution. The proposed sensor mechanism was verified by heterologously expressing membrane transport proteins and recording changes in surface pH during application of the specific substrates. Experiments conducted on two families of phosphate-sodium cotransporters (SLC20 & SLC34 demonstrated that it is possible to detect phosphate transport for both electrogenic and electroneutral isoforms and distinguish between transport of different phosphate species. Furthermore, the transport activity of the proton/amino acid cotransporter PAT1 assayed using conventional whole cell electrophysiology correlated well with changes in surface pH, confirming the ability of the system to detect activity proportional to expression level.

  7. Dynamic behavior of liquid water transport in a tapered channel of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akhtar, N.; Kerkhof, P.J.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    A numerical model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathode with a tapered channel design has been developed in order to examine the dynamic behavior of liquid water transport. Three-dimensional, transient simulations employing the level-set method (available in COMSOL 3.5a, a

  8. Several hPepT1-transported drugs are substrates of the Escherichia coli proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YdgR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Aduri, Nanda G; Iqbal, Mazhar; Rahman, Moazur; Gajhede, Michael; Hansen, Paul R; Mirza, Osman

    2017-06-01

    Proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters found in all kingdoms of life. POTs utilize the proton electrochemical gradient for the uptake of nutrient dipeptides and tripeptides. The human POT hPepT1 is known to transport a number of drugs. As part of ongoing studies on substrate specificities of POTs from Escherichia coli, our aim in this study was to investigate whether bacterial POTs could also transport these drugs. For this, we selected the common orally administered drugs sulpiride, bestatin, valacyclovir, ampicillin and oseltamivir, that are all transported by hPepT1. The transport of these drugs was evaluated using the prototypical POT YdgR from E. coli. The transport studies were pursued through combining cell-based assays with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. These investigations revealed that YdgR from E. coli is able to transport five (sulpiride, bestatin, valacyclovir, ampicillin and oseltamivir) drugs. Furthermore, cells not overexpressing YdgR were also able to transport these drugs in a POT-like manner. Orthologues of YdgR are found in several species in the gut microbiome; hence, our findings could have implications for further understanding about the interaction between gut microbes and orally administered drugs. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of hydrophobic additive on oxygen transport in catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunzhong; Li, Xiaohui; Wan, Zhaohui; Chen, Yanan; Tan, Jinting; Pan, Mu

    2018-03-01

    Oxygen transport resistance (OTR) is a critical factor influencing the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In this paper, an effective method to reduce the OTR of catalyst layers (CLs) by introducing a hydrophobic additive into traditional CLs is proposed. A low-molecular-weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is selected for its feasibility to prepare an emulsion, which is mixed with a traditional catalyst ink to successfully fabricate the CL with PTFE of 10 wt%. The PTFE film exists in the mesopores between the carbon particles. The limiting current of the hydrophobic CL was almost 4000 mA/cm2, which is 500 mA/cm2 higher than that of the traditional CL. PTFE reduces the OTR of the CL in the dry region by as much as 24 s/m compared to the traditional CL and expands the dry region from 2000 mA/cm2 in the traditional CL to 2500 mA/cm2. Furthermore, the CL with the hydrophobic agent can improve the oxygen transport in the wet region (>2000 mA/cm2) more effectively than that in the dry region. All these results indicate that the CL with the hydrophobic agent shows a superior performance in terms of optimizing water management and effectively reduces the OTR in PEMFCs.

  10. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J.D.; Izatt, R.M.; Bradshaw, J.S.; Shirts, R.B.

    1996-08-24

    The objective of this research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period. In addition, new, more convenient synthetic routes were achieved for several nitrogen-containing bicyclic and tricyclic macrocycles. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber and other membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. A study of the effect of methoxyalkyl macrocycle substituents on metal ion transport was completed. A new calorimeter was constructed which made it possible to study the thermodynamics of macrocycle-cation binding to very high temperatures. Measurements of thermodynamic data for the interaction of crown ethers with alkali and alkaline earth cations were achieved to 473 K. Molecular modeling work was begun for the first time on this project and fundamental principles were identified and developed for the establishment of working models in the future.

  11. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Doyle, J. G.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: The present study aims to provide observational evidence of whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. Methods: We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. Results: The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules that rise, rotate, and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 250 kms-1. We clearly associated the red- and blue-shifted emissions in transition region lines not only with rotating but also with rising and descending plasmas. Our main result is that these spicules although very large and dynamic, are not present in the spectral lines formed at temperatures above 300 000 K. Conclusions: In this paper we present the analysis of three Ca ii H large spicules that are composed of numerous dynamic thin spicules but appear as macrospicules in lower resolution EUV images. We found no coronal counterpart of these and smaller spicules. We believe that the identification of phenomena that have very different origins as macrospicules is due to the interpretation of the transition region emission, and especially the He ii emission, wherein both chromospheric large spicules and coronal X-ray jets are present. We suggest that the recent observation of spicules in the coronal AIA/SDO 171 Å and 211 Å channels probably comes from the existence of transition region emission there. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Quantum-mechanical analysis of amino acid residues function in the proton transport during F0F1-ATP synthase catalytic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivontsin, L. A.; Mashkovtseva, E. V.; Nartsissov, Ya R.

    2017-11-01

    Implications of quantum-mechanical approach to the description of proton transport in biological systems are a tempting subject for an overlapping of fundamental physics and biology. The model of proton transport through the integrated membrane enzyme FoF1-ATP synthase responsible for ATP synthesis was developed. The estimation of the mathematical expectation of the proton transfer time through the half-channel was performed. Observed set of proton pathways through the inlet half-channel showed the nanosecond timescale highly dependable of some amino acid residues. There were proposed two types of crucial amino acids: critically localized (His245) and being a part of energy conserving system (Asp119).

  13. MO-A-BRD-10: A Fast and Accurate GPU-Based Proton Transport Monte Carlo Simulation for Validating Proton Therapy Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Chan Tseung, H; Ma, J; Beltran, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To build a GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of proton transport with detailed modeling of elastic and non-elastic (NE) protonnucleus interactions, for use in a very fast and cost-effective proton therapy treatment plan verification system. Methods: Using the CUDA framework, we implemented kernels for the following tasks: (1) Simulation of beam spots from our possible scanning nozzle configurations, (2) Proton propagation through CT geometry, taking into account nuclear elastic and multiple scattering, as well as energy straggling, (3) Bertini-style modeling of the intranuclear cascade stage of NE interactions, and (4) Simulation of nuclear evaporation. To validate our MC, we performed: (1) Secondary particle yield calculations in NE collisions with therapeutically-relevant nuclei, (2) Pencil-beam dose calculations in homogeneous phantoms, (3) A large number of treatment plan dose recalculations, and compared with Geant4.9.6p2/TOPAS. A workflow was devised for calculating plans from a commercially available treatment planning system, with scripts for reading DICOM files and generating inputs for our MC. Results: Yields, energy and angular distributions of secondaries from NE collisions on various nuclei are in good agreement with the Geant4.9.6p2 Bertini and Binary cascade models. The 3D-gamma pass rate at 2%–2mm for 70–230 MeV pencil-beam dose distributions in water, soft tissue, bone and Ti phantoms is 100%. The pass rate at 2%–2mm for treatment plan calculations is typically above 98%. The net computational time on a NVIDIA GTX680 card, including all CPU-GPU data transfers, is around 20s for 1×10{sup 7} proton histories. Conclusion: Our GPU-based proton transport MC is the first of its kind to include a detailed nuclear model to handle NE interactions on any nucleus. Dosimetric calculations demonstrate very good agreement with Geant4.9.6p2/TOPAS. Our MC is being integrated into a framework to perform fast routine clinical QA of pencil

  14. Structure and Mechanism of Proton Transport Through the Transmembrane Tetrameric M2 Protein Bundle of the Influenza A Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Acharya; V Carnevale; G Fiorin; B Levine; A Polishchuk; V Balannick; I Samish; R Lamb; L Pinto; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The M2 proton channel from influenza A virus is an essential protein that mediates transport of protons across the viral envelope. This protein has a single transmembrane helix, which tetramerizes into the active channel. At the heart of the conduction mechanism is the exchange of protons between the His37 imidazole moieties of M2 and waters confined to the M2 bundle interior. Protons are conducted as the total charge of the four His37 side chains passes through 2{sup +} and 3{sup +} with a pK{sub a} near 6. A 1.65 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the transmembrane protein (residues 25-46), crystallized at pH 6.5, reveals a pore that is lined by alternating layers of sidechains and well-ordered water clusters, which offer a pathway for proton conduction. The His37 residues form a box-like structure, bounded on either side by water clusters with well-ordered oxygen atoms at close distance. The conformation of the protein, which is intermediate between structures previously solved at higher and lower pH, suggests a mechanism by which conformational changes might facilitate asymmetric diffusion through the channel in the presence of a proton gradient. Moreover, protons diffusing through the channel need not be localized to a single His37 imidazole, but instead may be delocalized over the entire His-box and associated water clusters. Thus, the new crystal structure provides a possible unification of the discrete site versus continuum conduction models.

  15. Evolution of a beam dynamics model for the transport line in a proton therapy facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoglio, V.; Adelmann, A.; Baumgarten, C.; Frey, M.; Gerbershagen, A.; Meer, D.; Schippers, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    During the conceptual design of an accelerator or beamline, first-order beam dynamics models are essential for studying beam properties. However, they can only produce approximate results. During commissioning, these approximate results are compared to measurements, which will rarely coincide if the model does not include the relevant physics. It is therefore essential that this linear model is extended to include higher-order effects. In this paper, the effects of particle-matter interaction have been included in the model of the transport lines in the proton therapy facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland. The first-order models of these beamlines provide an approximated estimation of beam size, energy loss and transmission. To improve the performance of the facility, a more precise model was required and has been developed with opal (Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library), a multiparticle open source beam dynamics code. In opal, the Monte Carlo simulations of Coulomb scattering and energy loss are performed seamless with the particle tracking. Beside the linear optics, the influence of the passive elements (e.g., degrader, collimators, scattering foils, and air gaps) on the beam emittance and energy spread can be analyzed in the new model. This allows for a significantly improved precision in the prediction of beam transmission and beam properties. The accuracy of the opal model has been confirmed by numerous measurements.

  16. Exploration of Structural Changes in Lactose Permease on Sugar Binding and Proton Transport through Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Jewel, Yead; Dutta, Prashanta

    2017-11-01

    Escherichia coli lactose permease (LacY) actively transports lactose and other galactosides across cell membranes through lactose/H+ symport process. Lactose/H+ symport is a highly complex process that involves large-scale protein conformational changes. The complete picture of lactose/H+ symport is largely unclear. In this work, we develop the force field for sugar molecules compatible with PACE, a hybrid and coarse-grained force field that couples the united-atom protein models with the coarse-grained MARTINI water/lipid. After validation, we implement the new force field to investigate the binding of a β-D-galactopyranosyl-1-thio- β-D-galactopyranoside (TDG) molecule to a wild-type LacY. Transitions from inward-facing to outward-facing conformations upon TDG binding and protonation of Glu269 have been achieved from microsecond simulations. Both the opening of the periplasmic side and closure of the cytoplasmic side of LacY are consistent with experiments. Our analysis suggest that the conformational changes of LacY are a cumulative consequence of inter-domain H-bonds breaking at the periplasmic side, inter-domain salt-bridge formation at the cytoplasmic side, as well as the TDG orientational changes during the transition. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1604211.

  17. Role of phosphate and other proton-donating anions in respiration-coupled transport of Ca2+ by mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, A L

    1974-04-01

    Measurements of extra oxygen consumption, (45)Ca(2+) uptake, and the osmotic expansion of the matrix compartment show that not all permeant anions are capable of supporting and accompanying the energy-dependent transport of Ca(2+) from the medium into the matrix in respiring rat-liver mitochondria. Phosphate, arsenate, acetate, butyrate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, lactate, and bicarbonate + CO(2) supported Ca(2+) uptake, whereas the permeant anions, nitrate, thiocyanate, chlorate, and perchlorate, did not. The active anions share a common denominator, the potential ability to donate a proton to the mitochondrial matrix; the inactive anions lack this capacity. Phosphate and the other active permeant anions move into the matrix in response to the alkaline-inside electrochemical gradient of protons generated across the mitochondrial membrane by electron transport, thus forming a negative-inside anion gradient. It is postulated that the latter gradient is the immediate "pulling" force for the influx of Ca(2+) on the electrogenic Ca(2+) carrier in respiring mitochondria under intracellular conditions. Since mitochondria in the cell are normally exposed to an excess of phosphate (and the bicarbonate-CO(2) system), particularly in state 4, inward transport of these proton-yielding anions probably precedes and is necessary for inward transport of Ca(2+) and other cations under biological conditions. These observations indicate that a negative-inside gradient of phosphate generated by electron transport is a common step and provides the immediate motive power not only for (a) the inward transport of dicarboxylates and tricarboxylates and (b) the energy-dependent exchange of external ADP(3-) for internal ATP(4-) during oxidative phosphorylation, as has already been established, but also for (c) the inward transport of Ca(2+), K(+), and other cations.

  18. Erythromycin and azithromycin transport into Haemophilus influenzae ATCC 19418 under conditions of depressed proton motive force (delta mu H)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capobianco, J.O.; Goldman, R.C. (Abbott Laboratories, IL (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The effect of collapsing the electrochemical proton gradient (delta mu H) on ({sup 3}H)erythromycin and ({sup 14}C)azithromycin transport in Haemophilus influenzae ATCC 19418 was studied. The proton gradient and membrane potential were determined from the distribution of (2-{sup 14}C)dimethadione and rubidium-86, respectively. delta mu H was reduced from 124 to 3 mV in EDTA-valinomycin-treated cells at 22{degrees}C with 150 mM KCl and 0.1 mM carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. During the collapse of delta mu H, macrolide uptake increased. Erythromycin efflux studies strongly suggested that this increase was not due to an energy-dependent efflux pump but was likely due to increased outer membrane permeability. These data indicated that macrolide entry was not a delta mu H-driven active transport process but rather a passive diffusion process.

  19. A Deterministic Electron, Photon, Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation Transport Suite for the Study of the Jovian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    A deterministic suite of radiation transport codes, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), which describe the transport of electrons, photons, protons, and heavy ions in condensed media is used to simulate exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons, protons and carbon-oxygen-sulfur (C-O-S) trapped heavy ions in the Jovian radiation environment. The particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron and photon deterministic transport algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light particle and heavy ion deterministic transport algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means for the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, proton and heavy ion radiation exposure assessments in complex space structures. In this paper, the radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Galileo Interim Radiation Electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), the 105 days at Europa mission fluence energy spectra provided by JPL is used to produce the corresponding dose-depth curve in silicon behind an aluminum shield of 100 mils ( 0.7 g/sq cm). The transport suite can also accept ray-traced thickness files from a computer-aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point. In that regard, using a low-fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe, the transport suite was verified by comparing with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for orbits JOI--J35 of the Galileo extended mission (1996-2001). For the upcoming EJSM mission with a potential launch date of 2020, the transport suite is used to compute

  20. Importance of pH Homeostasis in Metabolic Health and Diseases: Crucial Role of Membrane Proton Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Aoi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protons dissociated from organic acids in cells are partly buffered. If not, they are transported to the extracellular fluid through the plasma membrane and buffered in circulation or excreted in urine and expiration gas. Several transporters including monocarboxylate transporters and Na+/H+ exchanger play an important role in uptake and output of protons across plasma membranes in cells of metabolic tissues including skeletal muscle and the liver. They also contribute to maintenance of the physiological pH of body fluid. Therefore, impairment of these transporters causes dysfunction of cells, diseases, and a decrease in physical performance associated with abnormal pH. Additionally, it is known that fluid pH in the interstitial space of metabolic tissues is easily changed due to little pH buffering capacitance in interstitial fluids and a reduction in the interstitial fluid pH may mediate the onset of insulin resistance unlike blood containing pH buffers such as Hb (hemoglobin and albumin. In contrast, habitual exercise and dietary intervention regulate expression/activity of transporters and maintain body fluid pH, which could partly explain the positive effect of healthy lifestyle on disease prognosis.

  1. Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-05

    This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

  2. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumaker, Karen S [Professor

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  3. Water versus DNA A new deal for proton transport modeling in biological matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, C; Quinto, M A; Monti, J M; Galassi, M E; Fojón, O A; Hanssen, J; Rivarola, R D; Week, P F

    2015-01-01

    Water vapor is a common surrogate of DNA for modeling the proton-induced ionizing processes in living tissue exposed to radiations. The present study aims at scrutinizing the validity of this approximation and then revealing new insights into proton-induced energy transfers by a comparative analysis between water and realistic biological medium. In this context, self-consistent quantum mechanical modeling of the ionization and electron capture processes is reported within the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state framework for both isolated water molecules and DNA components impacted by proton beams. (paper)

  4. A deterministic electron, photon, proton and heavy ion transport suite for the study of the Jovian moon Europa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William; Nealy, John E.; Norman, Ryan B.

    2011-01-01

    A Langley research center (LaRC) developed deterministic suite of radiation transport codes describing the propagation of electron, photon, proton and heavy ion in condensed media is used to simulate the exposure from the spectral distribution of the aforementioned particles in the Jovian radiation environment. Based on the measurements by the Galileo probe (1995-2003) heavy ion counter (HIC), the choice of trapped heavy ions is limited to carbon, oxygen and sulfur (COS). The deterministic particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron photon algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light heavy ion algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means to the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, photon, proton and heavy ion exposure assessment in a complex space structure. In this paper, the reference radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron and proton spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the jet propulsion laboratory (JPL) Galileo interim radiation electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter system mission (EJSM), the JPL provided Europa mission fluence spectrum, is used to produce the corresponding depth dose curve in silicon behind a default aluminum shield of 100 mils (∼0.7 g/cm 2 ). The transport suite can also accept a geometry describing ray traced thickness file from a computer aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point within the interior of the vehicle. In that regard, using a low fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe generated by the authors, the transport suite was verified versus Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for orbits JOI-J35 of the Galileo probe

  5. Coronal mass ejections and coronal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildner, E.; Bassi, J.; Bougeret, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Research on coronal mass ejections (CMF) took a variety of forms, both observational and theoretical. On the observational side there were: case studies of individual events, in which it was attempted to provide the most complete descriptions possible, using correlative observations in diverse wavelengths; statistical studies of the properties of CMEs and their associated activity; observations which may tell us about the initiation of mass ejections; interplanetary observations of associated shocks and energetic particles; observations of CMEs traversing interplanetary space; and the beautiful synoptic charts which show to what degree mass ejections affect the background corona and how rapidly (if at all) the corona recovers its pre-disturbance form. These efforts are described in capsule form with an emphasis on presenting pictures, graphs, and tables so that the reader can form a personal appreciation of the work and its results

  6. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Compression on Water Transport in the Cathode of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional, multicomponent, two-fluid model developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS Inc.) is used to investigate the effect of porous media compression on water transport in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC model only consist of the cathode channel, gas....... Furthermore, the presence of irreducible liquid water is taken into account. In order to account for compression, porous media morphology variations are specified based on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) through-plane strain and intrusion which are stated as a function of compression. These morphology...... variations affect gas and liquid water transport, and hence liquid water distribution and the risk of blocking active sites. Hence, water transport is studied under GDL compression in order to investigate the qualitative effects. Two simulation cases are compared; one with and one without compression....

  7. Intracellular Requirements for Passive Proton Transport through the Na+,K+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Kevin S; Meyer, Dylan J; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2016-12-06

    The Na + ,K + -ATPase (NKA or Na/K pump) hydrolyzes one ATP to exchange three intracellular Na+ (Na + i ) for two extracellular K+ (K + o ) across the plasma membrane by cycling through a set of reversible transitions between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated conformations, alternately opening ion-binding sites externally (E2) or internally (E1). With subsaturating [Na + ] o and [K + ] o , the phosphorylated E2P conformation passively imports protons generating an inward current (I H ), which may be exacerbated in NKA-subunit mutations associated with human disease. To elucidate the mechanisms of I H , we studied the effects of intracellular ligands (transported ions, nucleotides, and beryllium fluoride) on I H and, for comparison, on transient currents measured at normal Na + o (Q Na ). Utilizing inside-out patches from Xenopus oocytes heterologously expressing NKA, we observed that 1) in the presence of Na + i , I H and Q Na were both activated by ATP, but not ADP; 2) the [Na + ] i dependence of I H in saturating ATP showed K 0.5,Na  = 1.8 ± 0.2 mM and the [ATP] dependence at saturating [Na + ] i yielded K 0.5,ATP  = 48 ± 11 μM (in comparison, Na + i -dependent Q Na yields K 0.5,Na  = 0.8 ± 0.2 mM and K 0.5,ATP  = 0.43 ± 0.03 μM; 3) ATP activated I H in the presence of K + i (∼15% of the I H observed in Na + i ) only when Mg 2+ i was also present; and 4) beryllium fluoride induced maximal I H  even in the absence of nucleotide. These data indicate that I H occurs when NKA is in an externally open E2P state with nucleotide bound, a conformation that can be reached through forward Na/K pump phosphorylation of E1, with Na + i and ATP, or by backward binding of K + i to E1, which drives the pump to the occluded E2(2K), where free P i (at the micromolar levels found in millimolar ATP solutions) promotes external release of occluded K + by backdoor NKA phosphorylation. Maximal I H through beryllium-fluorinated NKA indicates that this complex mimics ATP

  8. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming; Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  9. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu, E-mail: emmazhang103@gmail.com [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir [BEST Cyclotron Inc (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN–LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  10. Biological amine transport in chromaffin ghosts. Coupling to the transmembrane proton and potential gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R G; Pfister, D; Carty, S E; Scarpa, A

    1979-11-10

    The effect of the transmembrane proton gradient (delta pH) and potential gradient (delta psi) upon the rate and extent of amine accumulation was investigated in chromaffin ghosts. The chromaffin ghosts were formed by hypo-osmotic lysis of isolated bovine chromaffin granules and extensive dialysis in order to remove intragranular binding components and dissipate the endogenous electrochemical gradients. Upon ATP addition to suspensions of chromaffin ghosts, a transmembrane proton gradient alone, a transmembrane gradient alone, or both, could be established, depending upon the compositions of the media in which the ghosts were formed and resuspended. When chloride was present in the medium, addition of ATP resulted in the generation of a transmembrane proton gradient, acidic inside of 1 pH unit (measured by [14C]methylamine distribution), and no transmembrane potential (measured by [14C]-thiocyanate distribution). When ATP was added to chromaffin ghosts suspended in a medium in which chloride was substituted by isethionate, a transmembrane potential, inside positive, of 45 mV and no transmembrane proton gradient, was measured. In each medium, the addition of agents known to affect proton or potential gradients, respectively, exerted a predictable mechanism of action. Accumulation of [14C]epinephrine or [14C]5-hydroxytryptamine was over 1 order of magnitude greater in the presence of the transmembrane proton gradient or the transmembrane potential than in the absence of any gradient and, moreover, was related to the magnitude of the proton or potential gradient in a dose-dependent manner. When ghosts were added to a medium containing chloride and isethionate, both a delta pH and delta psi could be generated upon addition of ATP. In this preparation, the maximal rate of amine accumulation was observed. The results indicate that amine accumulation into chromaffin ghosts can occur in the presence of either a transmembrane proton gradient, or a transmembrane potential

  11. Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Kunow, H; Linker, J. A; Schwenn, R; Steiger, R

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that the Sun gravitationally controls the orbits of planets and minor bodies. Much less known, however, is the domain of plasma fields and charged particles in which the Sun governs a heliosphere out to a distance of about 15 billion kilometers. What forces activates the Sun to maintain this power? Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants are the troops serving the Sun during high solar activity periods. This volume offers a comprehensive and integrated overview of our present knowledge and understanding of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants, Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). It results from a series of workshops held between 2000 and 2004. An international team of about sixty experimenters involved e.g. in the SOHO, ULYSSES, VOYAGER, PIONEER, HELIOS, WIND, IMP, and ACE missions, ground observers, and theoreticians worked jointly on interpreting the observations and developing new models for CME initiations, development, and interplanetary propagation. The book provides...

  12. Proton Flares in Solar Activity Complexes: Possible Origins and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaeva, E. S.; Tomozov, V. M.; Yazev, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    Solar flares observed during the 24th solar-activity cycle and accompanied by fluxes of particles detected at the Earth's orbit with intensities exceeding 10 particles cm-2 s-1 and energies of more than 10 MeV per particle mainly occurred in activity complexes (82% of cases), with 80% of these occurring no more than 20 heliographic degrees from the nearest coronal holes. The correlation between the X-ray classes of flares and the proton fluxes detected at the Earth's orbit is weak. The work presented here supports the hypothesis that the leakage of particles into the heliosphere is due to the existence of long-lived magnetic channels, which facilitate the transport of flare-accelerated particles into the boundary regions of open magnetic structures of coronal holes. The possible contribution of exchange reconnection in the formation of such channels and the role of exchange reconnection in the generation of flares are discussed.

  13. Transport of amino acids and GABA analogues via the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter, hPAT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mie; Larsen, Birger Brodin; Frølund, Bente

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate transepithelial amino acid transport as a function of Caco-2 cell culture time. Furthermore, the objective was to investigate apical uptake characteristics of hPAT1-mediated transport under various experimental conditions. Apical amino acid uptake......, which has been shown to function as a carboxylic acid bioisostere for substrates of the GABA receptor and transport systems....

  14. Path Integral Treatment of Proton Transport Processes in BaZrO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qianfan; Wahnstrom, Goran; Björketun, Mårten

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear quantum effects on proton transfer and reorientation in BaZrO3 is investigated theoretically using the ab initio path-integral molecular-dynamics simulation technique. The result demonstrates that adding quantum fluctuations has a large effect on, in particular, the transfer barrier...

  15. Cyclic voltammetry modeling of proton transport effects on redox charge storage in conductive materials: application to a TiO2 mesoporous film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y S; Balland, V; Limoges, B; Costentin, C

    2017-07-21

    Cyclic voltammetry is a particularly useful tool for characterizing charge accumulation in conductive materials. A simple model is presented to evaluate proton transport effects on charge storage in conductive materials associated with a redox process coupled with proton insertion in the bulk material from an aqueous buffered solution, a situation frequently encountered in metal oxide materials. The interplay between proton transport inside and outside the materials is described using a formulation of the problem through introduction of dimensionless variables that allows defining the minimum number of parameters governing the cyclic voltammetry response with consideration of a simple description of the system geometry. This approach is illustrated by analysis of proton insertion in a mesoporous TiO 2 film.

  16. Analysis of coupled proton and water transport in a PEM fuel cell using the binary friction membrane model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnes, B.; Djilali, N.

    2006-01-01

    Transport of liquid water within a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is critical to the operation of a PEM fuel cell, due to the strong dependence of the membrane transport coefficients on water content. In addition, enhanced predictive abilities are particularly significant in the context of passive air breathing fuel cell designs where lower water contents will prevail in the membrane. We investigate and analyze the numerical predictions of a recently proposed rational model for transport of protons and water in a PEM, when compared to a widely used empirical model. While the performance is similar for a saturated membrane, for PEMs with low water content, the difference in computed current density and membrane water crossover can be substantial. The effects of coupling partially saturated gas diffusion electrodes (GDLs) with the membrane are studied in both a 1D and 2D context. In addition, a simplified 1D analytical membrane water transport model is validated against the complete 1D model predictions. Our numerical results predict a higher current density and more uniform membrane hydration using a dry cathode instead of a dry anode, and illustrate that the strongest 2D effects are for water vapor transport

  17. Peptide Selectivity of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Transporter from Neisseria meningitidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Neha; Aduri, Nanda G; Iqbal, Anna

    2016-01-01

    POT). It has been shown that the gene encoding this transporter is upregulated during infection. NmPOT conformed to the typical chain length preference as observed in prototypical transporters of this family. In contrast to prototypical transporters, it was unable to accommodate a positively charged peptide...

  18. Computational Laboratory Astrophysics to Enable Transport Modeling of Protons and Hydrogen in Stellar Winds, the ISM, and other Astrophysical Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, David

    As recognized prominently by the APRA program, interpretation of NASA astrophysical mission observations requires significant products of laboratory astrophysics, for example, spectral lines and transition probabilities, electron-, proton-, or heavy-particle collision data. Availability of these data underpin robust and validated models of astrophysical emissions and absorptions, energy, momentum, and particle transport, dynamics, and reactions. Therefore, measured or computationally derived, analyzed, and readily available laboratory astrophysics data significantly enhances the scientific return on NASA missions such as HST, Spitzer, and JWST. In the present work a comprehensive set of data will be developed for the ubiquitous proton-hydrogen and hydrogen-hydrogen collisions in astrophysical environments including ISM shocks, supernova remnants and bubbles, HI clouds, young stellar objects, and winds within stellar spheres, covering the necessary wide range of energy- and charge-changing channels, collision energies, and most relevant scattering parameters. In addition, building on preliminary work, a transport and reaction simulation will be developed incorporating the elastic and inelastic collision data collected and produced. The work will build upon significant previous efforts of the principal investigators and collaborators, will result in a comprehensive data set required for modeling these environments and interpreting NASA astrophysical mission observations, and will benefit from feedback from collaborators who are active users of the work proposed.

  19. Coupling of remote alternating-access transport mechanisms for protons and substrates in the multidrug efflux pump AcrB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Thomas; Seeger, Markus A; Anselmi, Claudio; Zhou, Wenchang; Brandstätter, Lorenz; Verrey, François; Diederichs, Kay; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Pos, Klaas M

    2014-09-19

    Membrane transporters of the RND superfamily confer multidrug resistance to pathogenic bacteria, and are essential for cholesterol metabolism and embryonic development in humans. We use high-resolution X-ray crystallography and computational methods to delineate the mechanism of the homotrimeric RND-type proton/drug antiporter AcrB, the active component of the major efflux system AcrAB-TolC in Escherichia coli, and one most complex and intriguing membrane transporters known to date. Analysis of wildtype AcrB and four functionally-inactive variants reveals an unprecedented mechanism that involves two remote alternating-access conformational cycles within each protomer, namely one for protons in the transmembrane region and another for drugs in the periplasmic domain, 50 Å apart. Each of these cycles entails two distinct types of collective motions of two structural repeats, coupled by flanking α-helices that project from the membrane. Moreover, we rationalize how the cross-talk among protomers across the trimerization interface might lead to a more kinetically efficient efflux system.

  20. Proton beam transport experiments with pulsed high-field magnets at the Dresden laser acceleration source Draco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroll, Florian; Schramm, Ulrich [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Kraft, Stephan; Metzkes, Josefine; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Zeil, Karl [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Compact laser-driven ion accelerators are a potential alternative to large and expensive conventional accelerators. High-power short-pulse lasers, impinging on e.g. thin metal foils, enable multi-MeV ion acceleration on μm length and fs to ps time scale. The generated ion bunches (typically protons) show unique beam properties, like ultra-high pulse dose. Nevertheless, laser accelerators still require substantial development in reliable beam generation and transport. Recently developed pulsed magnets meet the demands of laser acceleration and open up new research opportunities: We present a pulsed solenoid for effective collection and focusing of laser-accelerated protons that acts as link between fundamental research and application. The solenoid is powered by a capacitor-based pulse generator and can reach a maximum magnetic field of 20 T. It was installed in the target chamber of the Draco laser at HZDR. The transported beam was detected by means of radiochromic film, scintillator and Thomson parabola spectrometer. We present the characterization of the solenoid with regard to future application in radiobiological irradiation studies. Furthermore, a detailed comparison to previous experiments with a similar magnet at the PHELIX laser at GSI, Darmstadt is provided.

  1. High field superconducting beam transport in a BNL primary proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allinger, J.; Brown, H.N.; Carroll, A.S.; Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Glenn, J.W.; Jackson, J.; Keith, W.; Lowenstein, D.; Prodell, A.G.

    1979-01-01

    Construction of a slow external beam switchyard at the BNL AGS requires a rapid 20.4 0 bend in the upstream end of the beam line. Two curved superconducting window dipole magnets, operating at 6.0 T and about 80% of short sample magnetic field, will be utilized with two small superconducting sextupoles to provide the necessary deflection for a 28.5 GeV/c primary proton beam. Because the magnets will operate in a primary proton beam environment, they are designed to absorb large amounts of radiation heating from the beam without quenching. The field quality of the superconducting magnets is extremely good. Computer field calculations indicate a field error, ΔB/B 0 , equivalent to approx. = 1 x 10 -4 up to 75% of the 8.26 cm full aperture diameter in the magnet

  2. Proton transport facilitating water-oxidation: the role of second sphere ligands surrounding the catalytic metal cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Han; Dilbeck, Preston L; Burnap, Robert L

    2013-10-01

    The ability of PSII to extract electrons from water, with molecular oxygen as a by-product, is a remarkable biochemical and evolutionary innovation. From an evolutionary perspective, the invention of PSII approximately 2.7 Ga led to the accelerated accumulation of biomass in the biosphere and the accumulation of oxygen in the atmosphere, a combination that allowed for the evolution of a much more complex and extensive biosphere than would otherwise have been possible. From the biochemical and enzymatic perspective, PSII is remarkable because of the thermodynamic and kinetic obstacles that needed to have been overcome to oxidize water as the ultimate photosynthetic electron donor. This article focuses on how proton release is an integral part of how these kinetic and thermodynamic obstacles have been overcome: the sequential removal of protons from the active site of H2O-oxidation facilitates the multistep oxidation of the substrate water at the Mn4CaOx, the catalytic heart of the H2O-oxidation reaction. As noted previously, the facilitated deprotonation of the Mn4CaOx cluster exerts a redox-leveling function preventing the accumulation of excess positive charge on the cluster, which might otherwise hinder the already energetically difficult oxidation of water. Using recent results, including the characteristics of site-directed mutants, the role of the second sphere of amino acid ligands and the associated network of water molecules surrounding the Mn4CaOx is discussed in relation to proton transport in other systems. In addition to the redox-leveling function, a trapping function is assigned to the proton release step occurring immediately prior to the dioxygen chemistry. This trapping appears to involve a yet-to-be clarified gating mechanism that facilitates to coordinated release of a proton from the neighborhood of the active site thereby insuring that the backward charge-recombination reaction does not out-compete the forward reaction of dioxygen chemistry

  3. [Effect of high magnesium ion concentration on the electron transport rate and proton exchange in thylakoid membranes in higher plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat'ev, A R; Khorobrykh, S A; Ivanov, B N

    2001-01-01

    The effects of magnesium ion concentration on the rate of electron transport in isolated pea thylakoids were investigated in the pH range from 4.0 up to 8.0. In the absence of magnesium ions in the medium and in the presence of 5 mM MgCl2 in the experiments not only without added artificial acceptors but also with ferricyanide or methylviologen as an acceptor, this rate had a well-expressed maximum at pH 5.0. It was shown that, after depression to minimal values at pH 5.5-6.5, it gradually rose with increasing pH. An increase in magnesium ion concentration up to 20 mM essentially affected the electron transfer rate: it decreased somewhat at pH 4.0-5.0 but increased at higher pH values. At this magnesium ion concentration, the maximum rate was at pH 6.0-6.5 and the minimum, at pH 7.0. Subsequent rise upon increasing pH to 8.0 was expressed more sharply. The influence of high magnesium ion concentration on the rate of electron transport was not observed in the presence of gramicidin D. It was found that without uncoupler, the changes in the electron transfer rate under the influence of magnesium ions correlated to the changes in the first-order rate constant of the proton efflux from thylakoids. It is supposed that the change in the ability of thylakoids to keep protons by the action of magnesium ions is the result of electrostatic interactions of these ions with the charges on the external surface of membranes. A possible role of regulation of the electron transport rate by magnesium ions in vivo is discussed.

  4. A comparative study of the proton transport properties of metal (IV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    study the transport properties of these materials.5,6 The mechanism of diffusion and ionic transport in crystalline ... Cu-Kα radiation with a nickel filter. Chemical ... All the tungstates were hard and white except TiW which is yellow. The chemical.

  5. Salt-bridge Swapping in the EXXERFXYY Motif of Proton Coupled Oligopeptide Transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aduri, Nanda G; Prabhala, Bala K; Ernst, Heidi A

    2015-01-01

    to as E1XXE2R), located on Helix I, in interactions with the proton. In this study we investigated the intracellular substrate accumulation by motif variants with all possible combinations of glutamate residues changed to glutamine and arginine changed to a tyrosine; the latter being a natural variant......-motif salt bridge, i.e. R-E2 to R-E1, which is consistent with previous structural studies. Molecular dynamics simulations of the motif variants E1XXE2R and E1XXQ2R support this mechanism. The simulations showed that upon changing conformation, arginine pushes Helix V, through interactions with the highly...

  6. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    prominences, have a significantly higher rate of occurrence in the vicinity of coronal .... coronal holes due to the birth of new holes or the growth of existing holes. .... Statistics of newly formed coronal hole areas (NFOCHA) associated with ...

  7. Evaluating the ONEBFP transport code for possible use in the proton radiography program. Final report, Task 47

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marr, D.R.; Prael, R.E.; Adams, K.J.

    1996-10-01

    This is notification of the completion of Task 47 and a summary of the fulfillment of the requirements thereof. Deliverables for Task 47 include the data test files and a final report. The test files have been delivered to the customer and the attached paper satisfies the requirements for a final report. Detail on the completion of each of the subtasks described in the Statement of Work follow. The author repeats the complete list of subtasks for Task 47: (1) The software engineer will modify the ONEBFP code to generate a logarithmic distribution of discrete angles and an associated set of quadrature weights; (2) The software engineer will work with Group XTM personnel to obtain the required cross-section data for protons/nuclear cascade particles; and (3) The software engineer will perform 5 test calculations using the modified ONEBFP code to assess its accuracy and efficiency for proton transport problems. The test calculations will be documented in a brief report. Appendix C of the paper describes the quadrature set capability installed in the ONEBFP code pertinent to the fulfillment of subtask 1. A portion of the body of the paper describes the source and modeling and Appendix A describes the extraction of the cross section data used in this study, fulfilling subtask 2. The bulk of the attached report describes the test problems, states the modeling used for each problem, shows the results in both graphical and tabular form, and discusses the implications of the results. This fulfills the requirements of subtask 3

  8. DC proton beam measurements in a single-solenoid low-energy beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Schafstall, P.; Schneider, J.D.; Sherman, J.; Zaugg, T.; Taylor, T.

    1994-01-01

    High current, CW proton accelerators are being considered for a number of applications including disposition of nuclear wastes, reduction of fissionable nuclear material inventories, safe production of critical nuclear materials, and energy production. All these applications require the development of high current, reliable, hydrogen ion injectors. In 1986, a program using CW RFQ technology was undertaken at CRL in collaboration with LANL and was continued there until 1993. During this time, an accelerator was built which produced 600 keV, 75 mA and 1,250 keV, 55 mA CW proton beams. The present program at Los Alamos using this accelerator is aimed at continuing the CRL work to demonstrate long-term reliability. In the present work, the authors are seeking to determine the optimal match to and the current limit of the 1,250-keV RFQ. This paper discusses the characterization of the 50 keV beams at the exit of the single-solenoid LEBT and presents both the experimental measurements and the beam simulations done to model this system

  9. Proton solvation and proton transfer in chemical and electrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, S.; Conway, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines the proton solvation and characterization of the H 3 O + ion, proton transfer in chemical ionization processes in solution, continuous proton transfer in conductance processes, and proton transfer in electrode processes. Topics considered include the condition of the proton in solution, the molecular structure of the H 3 O + ion, thermodynamics of proton solvation, overall hydration energy of the proton, hydration of H 3 O + , deuteron solvation, partial molal entropy and volume and the entropy of proton hydration, proton solvation in alcoholic solutions, analogies to electrons in semiconductors, continuous proton transfer in conductance, definition and phenomenology of the unusual mobility of the proton in solution, solvent structure changes in relation to anomalous proton mobility, the kinetics of the proton-transfer event, theories of abnormal proton conductance, and the general theory of the contribution of transfer reactions to overall transport processes

  10. Function and expression of the proton-coupled amino acid transporter Slc36a1 along the rat gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, M. L.; Holm, Rasmus Koldborg; Tønsberg, H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intestinal absorption via membrane transporters may determine the pharmacokinetics of drug compounds. The hypothesis is that oral absorption of gaboxadol (4, 5, 6, 7-tetrahydroisoxazolo [5,4-c] pyridine-3-ol) in rats occurs via the proton-coupled amino acid transporter, r....... The intestinal expression of rSlc36a1 mRNA was measured by quantitative real-time PCR (q-RT-PCR). Furthermore, the hPAT1-/rPAT1-mediated transport of gaboxadol or L-proline was studied in hPAT1-expressing X. laevis oocytes, Caco-2 cell monolayers and excised segments of the rat intestine. KEY RESULTS......). The in vitro carrier-mediated uptake rate of L-proline in the excised intestinal segments was highest in the mid jejunum and low in the colon. The in vitro uptake and the in vivo absorption correlated with the expression of rSlc36a1 mRNA along the rat intestine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: The results...

  11. Structural basis for polyspecificity in the POT family of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyons, Joseph A.; Parker, Joanne L.; Solcan, Nicolae

    2014-01-01

    An enigma in the field of peptide transport is the structural basis for ligand promiscuity, as exemplified by PepT1, the mammalian plasma membrane peptide transporter. Here, we present crystal structures of di‐ and tripeptide‐bound complexes of a bacterial homologue of PepT1, which reveal at least...... two mechanisms for peptide recognition that operate within a single, centrally located binding site. The dipeptide was orientated laterally in the binding site, whereas the tripeptide revealed an alternative vertical binding mode. The co‐crystal structures combined with functional studies reveal...... that biochemically distinct peptide‐binding sites likely operate within the POT/PTR family of proton‐coupled symporters and suggest that transport promiscuity has arisen in part through the ability of the binding site to accommodate peptides in multiple orientations for transport...

  12. [Role of proton-motive force in the conjugative DNA transport in Staphylococci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriliuk, V G; Vinnikov, A I

    1997-01-01

    Sensitivity of the conjugative process in staphylococci to the action of uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and inhibitors of electron transport systems have been proved, that testifies to the energy-dependent character of conjugative transport of DNA. Proceeding of the conjugation process depends upon the generation of delta microH+ on the membrane of both the donor and recipient cells. contribution of protonmotive forces to providing for the transfer of plasmids during conjugation to staphylococci has been defined.

  13. Active glucose transport and proton pumping in tonoplast membrane of Zea mays L. coleoptiles are inhibited by anti-H+-ATPase antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, T.; Butcher, D.N.; Taiz, L.

    1987-01-01

    A tonoplast enriched fraction was obtained from Zea mays L. coleoptiles by isopycnic centrifugation of microsomal membranes in a sucrose step gradient. At the 18/26% interface chloride-stimulated and nitrate-inhibited proton pumping activity coincided with a Mg 2+ -ATP dependent accumulation of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (OMG) as determined by a membrane filtration technique using 14 C-labeled substrate. OMG transport showed an apparently saturable component with a K/sub m/ of 110 micromolar, and was completely inhibited by 10 micromolar carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. Polyclonal antibodies against solubilized native tonoplast H + -ATPase and its 62 and 72 kilodalton subunits were assayed for their ability to inhibit proton pumping and OMG accumulation. Antibodies against both the native enzyme and the putative catalytic subunit strongly inhibited proton pumping and OMG transport whereas antibodies against the 62 kilodalton subunit had only a slight effect on both processes

  14. Coronal heating via nanoflares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletto, G.; Kopp, R.

    1993-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that the coronae of single late-type main sequence stars represent the radiative output from a large number of tiny energy release events, the so-called nanoflares. Although this suggestion is attractive and order of magnitude estimates of the physical parameters involved in the process are consistent with available data, nanoflares have not yet been observed and theoretical descriptions of these phenomena are still very crude. In this paper we examine the temporal behavior of a magnetic flux tube subject to the repeated occurrence of energy release events, randomly distributed in time, and we show that an originally empty cool loop may, in fact, reach typical coronal density and temperature values via nanoflare heating. By choosing physical parameters appropriate to solar conditions we also explore the possibilities for observationally detecting nanoflares. Although the Sun is the only star where nanoflares might be observed, present instrumentation appears to be inadequate for this purpose

  15. Development and Transition of the Radiation, Interplanetary Shocks, and Coronal Sources (RISCS) Toolset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, James F.; Zank, G.

    2014-01-01

    We outline a plan to develop and transition a physics based predictive toolset called The Radiation, Interplanetary Shocks, and Coronal Sources (RISCS) to describe the interplanetary energetic particle and radiation environment throughout the inner heliosphere, including at the Earth. To forecast and "nowcast" the radiation environment requires the fusing of three components: 1) the ability to provide probabilities for incipient solar activity; 2) the use of these probabilities and daily coronal and solar wind observations to model the 3D spatial and temporal heliosphere, including magnetic field structure and transients, within 10 Astronomical Units; and 3) the ability to model the acceleration and transport of energetic particles based on current and anticipated coronal and heliospheric conditions. We describe how to address 1) - 3) based on our existing, well developed, and validated codes and models. The goal of RISCS toolset is to provide an operational forecast and "nowcast" capability that will a) predict solar energetic particle (SEP) intensities; b) spectra for protons and heavy ions; c) predict maximum energies and their duration; d) SEP composition; e) cosmic ray intensities, and f) plasma parameters, including shock arrival times, strength and obliquity at any given heliospheric location and time. The toolset would have a 72 hour predicative capability, with associated probabilistic bounds, that would be updated hourly thereafter to improve the predicted event(s) and reduce the associated probability bounds. The RISCS toolset would be highly adaptable and portable, capable of running on a variety of platforms to accommodate various operational needs and requirements. The described transition plan is based on a well established approach developed in the Earth Science discipline that ensures that the customer has a tool that meets their needs

  16. THE CONTRIBUTION OF CORONAL JETS TO THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lionello, R.; Török, T.; Titov, V. S.; Mikić, Z.; Linker, J. A. [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Leake, J. E.; Linton, M. G., E-mail: lionel@predsci.com [US Naval Research Laboratory 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Transient collimated plasma eruptions in the solar corona, commonly known as coronal (or X-ray) jets, are among the most interesting manifestations of solar activity. It has been suggested that these events contribute to the mass and energy content of the corona and solar wind, but the extent of these contributions remains uncertain. We have recently modeled the formation and evolution of coronal jets using a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code with thermodynamics in a large spherical domain that includes the solar wind. Our model is coupled to 3D MHD flux-emergence simulations, i.e., we use boundary conditions provided by such simulations to drive a time-dependent coronal evolution. The model includes parametric coronal heating, radiative losses, and thermal conduction, which enables us to simulate the dynamics and plasma properties of coronal jets in a more realistic manner than done so far. Here, we employ these simulations to calculate the amount of mass and energy transported by coronal jets into the outer corona and inner heliosphere. Based on observed jet-occurrence rates, we then estimate the total contribution of coronal jets to the mass and energy content of the solar wind to (0.4–3.0)% and (0.3–1.0)%, respectively. Our results are largely consistent with the few previous rough estimates obtained from observations, supporting the conjecture that coronal jets provide only a small amount of mass and energy to the solar wind. We emphasize, however, that more advanced observations and simulations (including parametric studies) are needed to substantiate this conjecture.

  17. Human proton coupled folic acid transporter is a monodisperse oligomer in the lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol solubilized state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aduri, Nanda G; Ernst, Heidi A; Prabhala, Bala K; Bhatt, Shweta; Boesen, Thomas; Gajhede, Michael; Mirza, Osman

    2018-01-08

    The human proton coupled folic acid transporter PCFT is the major import route for dietary folates. Mutations in the gene encoding PCFT cause hereditary folic acid malabsorption, which manifests itself by compromised folate absorption from the intestine and also in impaired folate transport into the central nervous system. Since its recent discovery, PCFT has been the subject of numerous biochemical studies aiming at understanding its structure and mechanism. One major focus has been its oligomeric state, with some reports supporting oligomers and others a monomer. Here, we report the overexpression and purification of recombinant PCFT. Following detergent screening, n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside (DDM) and lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol (LMNG) were chosen for further work as they exhibited the most optimal solubilization. We found that purified detergent solubilized PCFT was able to bind folic acid, thus indicating a functionally active protein. Size exclusion chromatography showed that PCFT in DDM was polydisperse; the LMNG preparation was clearly monodisperse but with shorter retention time than the major DDM peak. To assess the oligomeric state negative stain electron microscopy was performed which showed a particle with the size of a PCFT dimer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. LBNE lattice and optics for proton extraction at MI-10 and transport to a target above grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, John A.

    2011-01-01

    For the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab 120 GeV/c protons will be transported from the Main Injector (MI) to an on-site production target. The lattice design and optics discussed here has the beam extracted vertically upwards from MI-10 and the keeps the majority of the line at an elevation above the glacial till/rock interface and terminates on a target at 10 ft above grade. The LBNE beamline discussed here is a modular optics design comprised of 3 distinct lattice configurations, including the specialized MI → LBNE matching section and Final Focus. The remainder of the line is defined by six FODO cells, in which the length and phase advance are chosen specifically such that beam size does not exceed that of the MI while also making the most efficient use of space for achromatic insertions. Dispersion generated by variations in the beam trajectory are corrected locally and can not bleed out to corrupt the optics elsewhere in the line. Aperture studies indicate that the line should be able to transport the worst quality beam that the Main Injector might provide. New IDS dipole correctors located at every focusing center provide high-quality orbit control and further ensure that LBNE meets the stringent requirements for environmental protection.

  19. Large-scale atomistic and quantum-mechanical simulations of a Nafion membrane: Morphology, proton solvation and charge transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V. Komarov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the structure formation in a hydrated Nafion membrane and the solvation and transport of protons in the water channel of the membrane. For the water/Nafion systems containing more than 4 million atoms, it is found that the observed microphase-segregated morphology can be classified as bicontinuous: both majority (hydrophobic and minority (hydrophilic subphases are 3D continuous and organized in an irregular ordered pattern, which is largely similar to that known for a bicontinuous double-diamond structure. The characteristic size of the connected hydrophilic channels is about 25–50 Å, depending on the water content. A thermodynamic decomposition of the potential of mean force and the calculated spectral densities of the hindered translational motions of cations reveal that ion association observed with decreasing temperature is largely an entropic effect related to the loss of low-frequency modes. Based on the results from the atomistic simulation of the morphology of Nafion, we developed a realistic model of ion-conducting hydrophilic channel within the Nafion membrane and studied it with quantum molecular dynamics. The extensive 120 ps-long density functional theory (DFT-based simulations of charge migration in the 1200-atom model of the nanochannel consisting of Nafion chains and water molecules allowed us to observe the bimodality of the van Hove autocorrelation function, which provides the direct evidence of the Grotthuss bond-exchange (hopping mechanism as a significant contributor to the proton conductivity.

  20. The importance of orientation in proton transport of a polymer film based on an oriented self-organized columnar liquid-crystalline polyether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tylkowski, Bartosz; Castelao, Nuria [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paiesos Catalans, 26, E-43007, Tarragona (Spain); Giamberini, Marta, E-mail: marta.giamberini@urv.net [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paiesos Catalans, 26, E-43007, Tarragona (Spain); Garcia-Valls, Ricard [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paiesos Catalans, 26, E-43007, Tarragona (Spain); Reina, Jose Antonio [Departament de Quimica Analitica i Quimica Organica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Carrer Marcel.li Domingo s/n, E-43007, Tarragona (Spain); Gumi, Tania [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paiesos Catalans, 26, E-43007, Tarragona (Spain)

    2012-02-01

    We prepared membranes based on a liquid-crystalline side-chain polyether obtained by chemical modification of commercial poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH) with dendrons. This polymer exhibited a columnar structure, which could form an ion channel in the inner part. The columns were successfully oriented by taking advantage of surface interactions between the polymer and hydrophilic substrates, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and optical microscopy between crossed polars (POM). Column orientation was found to be crucial for effective transport: the oriented membranes exhibited proton transport comparable to that of Nafion Registered-Sign N117 and no water uptake. An increase in sodium ion concentration in the feed phase suggested a proton/cation antiport. On the contrary, no proton transport was detected on unoriented membranes based on the same liquid-crystalline side-chain polyether or on unmodified PECH. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared oriented membranes based on a liquid crystalline columnar polyether. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this structure, the inner polyether chain could work as an ion channel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtained membranes by casting a chloroform solution in the presence of water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Membranes showed good proton permeability due to the presence of oriented channels.

  1. The importance of orientation in proton transport of a polymer film based on an oriented self-organized columnar liquid-crystalline polyether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylkowski, Bartosz; Castelao, Nuria; Giamberini, Marta; Garcia-Valls, Ricard; Reina, José Antonio; Gumí, Tània

    2012-01-01

    We prepared membranes based on a liquid-crystalline side-chain polyether obtained by chemical modification of commercial poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH) with dendrons. This polymer exhibited a columnar structure, which could form an ion channel in the inner part. The columns were successfully oriented by taking advantage of surface interactions between the polymer and hydrophilic substrates, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and optical microscopy between crossed polars (POM). Column orientation was found to be crucial for effective transport: the oriented membranes exhibited proton transport comparable to that of Nafion® N117 and no water uptake. An increase in sodium ion concentration in the feed phase suggested a proton/cation antiport. On the contrary, no proton transport was detected on unoriented membranes based on the same liquid-crystalline side-chain polyether or on unmodified PECH. - Highlights: ► We prepared oriented membranes based on a liquid crystalline columnar polyether. ► In this structure, the inner polyether chain could work as an ion channel. ► We obtained membranes by casting a chloroform solution in the presence of water. ► Membranes showed good proton permeability due to the presence of oriented channels.

  2. Interpretation of coronal synoptic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, R.H.; Fisher, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction techniques used to determine coronal density distributions from synoptic data are complicated and time consuming to employ. Current techniques also assume time invariant structures and thus mix both temporal and spatial variations present in the coronal data. The observed distribution of polarized brightness, pB, and brightness, B, of coronal features observed either at eclipses or with coronagraphs depends upon both the three-dimensional distribution of electron density within the structure and the location of the feature with respect to the plane-of-the-sky. By theoretically studying the signature of various coronal structures as they would appear during a limb transit, it is possible to recognize these patterns in real synoptic data as well as estimate temporal evolutionary effects

  3. Analogies between respiration and a light-driven proton pump as sources of energy for active glutamate transport in Halobacterium halobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belliveau, J. W.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    Halobacterium halobium is known to contain sheets of bacteriorhodopsin, a pigment which upon exposure to light undergoes cyclic protonation and deprotonation, resulting in net H(+) translocation. In this paper, experiments were conducted to test H. halobium cell envelope vesicles for respiration-induced glutamate uptake. It is shown that glutamate transport in H. halobium cell envelope vesicles can occur as a result of respiration, as well as light acting on bacteriorhodopsin. Glutamate transport can be energized by the oxidation of dimethyl phenylenediamine, and the properties of the transport system are entirely analogous to those observed with illumination as the source of energy. In the case of respiration-dependent glutamate transport, the transportation is also driven by a Na(+) gradient, thereby confirming the existence of a single glutamate transport system independent of the source of energy. The analogy observed is indirect evidence that the cytochrome oxidase of H. halobium functions as a H(+) pump.

  4. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  5. Solar Proton Transport within an ICRU Sphere Surrounded by a Complex Shield: Combinatorial Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    The 3DHZETRN code, with improved neutron and light ion (Z (is) less than 2) transport procedures, was recently developed and compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using simplified spherical geometries. It was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in general combinatorial geometry. A more complex shielding structure with internal parts surrounding a tissue sphere is considered and compared against MC simulations. It is shown that even in the more complex geometry, 3DHZETRN agrees well with the MC codes and maintains a high degree of computational efficiency.

  6. Conductivity and transport studies of plasticized chitosan-based proton conducting biopolymer electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukur, M F; Yusof, Y M; Zawawi, S M M; Illias, H A; Kadir, M F Z

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the conductivity and transport properties of chitosan-based solid biopolymer electrolytes containing ammonium thiocyanate (NH 4 SCN). The sample containing 40 wt% NH 4 SCN exhibited the highest conductivity value of (1.81 ± 0.50) × 10 −4  S cm −1 at room temperature. Conductivity has increased to (1.51 ± 0.12) × 10 −3  S cm −1 with the addition of 25 wt% glycerol. The temperature dependence of conductivity for both salted and plasticized systems obeyed the Arrhenius rule. The activation energy (E a ) was calculated for both systems and it is found that the sample with 40 wt% NH 4 SCN in the salted system obtained an E a value of 0.148 eV and that for the sample containing 25 wt% glycerol in the plasticized system is 0.139 eV. From the Fourier transform infrared studies, carboxamide and amine bands shifted to lower wavenumbers, indicating that chitosan has interacted with NH 4 SCN salt. Changes in the C–O stretching vibration band intensity are observed at 1067 cm −1 with the addition of glycerol. The Rice and Roth model was used to explain the transport properties of the salted and plasticized systems. (paper)

  7. Conductivity and transport studies of plasticized chitosan-based proton conducting biopolymer electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukur, M. F.; Yusof, Y. M.; Zawawi, S. M. M.; Illias, H. A.; Kadir, M. F. Z.

    2013-11-01

    This paper focuses on the conductivity and transport properties of chitosan-based solid biopolymer electrolytes containing ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN). The sample containing 40 wt% NH4SCN exhibited the highest conductivity value of (1.81 ± 0.50) × 10-4 S cm-1 at room temperature. Conductivity has increased to (1.51 ± 0.12) × 10-3 S cm-1 with the addition of 25 wt% glycerol. The temperature dependence of conductivity for both salted and plasticized systems obeyed the Arrhenius rule. The activation energy (Ea) was calculated for both systems and it is found that the sample with 40 wt% NH4SCN in the salted system obtained an Ea value of 0.148 eV and that for the sample containing 25 wt% glycerol in the plasticized system is 0.139 eV. From the Fourier transform infrared studies, carboxamide and amine bands shifted to lower wavenumbers, indicating that chitosan has interacted with NH4SCN salt. Changes in the C-O stretching vibration band intensity are observed at 1067 cm-1 with the addition of glycerol. The Rice and Roth model was used to explain the transport properties of the salted and plasticized systems.

  8. Liquid Water Transport in the Reactant Channels of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rupak

    Water management has been identified as a critical issue in the development of PEM fuel cells for automotive applications. Water is present inside the PEM fuel cell in three phases, i.e. liquid phase, vapor phase and mist phase. Liquid water in the reactant channels causes flooding of the cell and blocks the transport of reactants to the reaction sites at the catalyst layer. Understanding the behavior of liquid water in the reactant channels would allow us to devise improved strategies for removing liquid water from the reactant channels. In situ fuel cell tests have been performed to identify and diagnose operating conditions which result in the flooding of the fuel cell. A relationship has been identified between the liquid water present in the reactant channels and the cell performance. A novel diagnostic technique has been established which utilizes the pressure drop multiplier in the reactant channels to predict the flooding of the cell or the drying-out of the membrane. An ex-situ study has been undertaken to quantify the liquid water present in the reactant channels. A new parameter, the Area Coverage Ratio (ACR), has been defined to identify the interfacial area of the reactant channel which is blocked for reactant transport by the presence of liquid water. A parametric study has been conducted to study the effect of changing temperature and the inlet relative humidity on the ACR. The ACR decreases with increase in current density as the gas flow rates increase, removing water more efficiently. With increase in temperature, the ACR decreases rapidly, such that by 60°C, there is no significant ACR to be reported. Inlet relative humidity of the gases does change the saturation of the gases in the channel, but did not show any significant effect on the ACR. Automotive powertrains, which is the target for this work, are continuously faced with transient changes. Water management under transient operating conditions is significantly more challenging and has not

  9. Solar Proton Transport Within an ICRU Sphere Surrounded by a Complex Shield: Ray-trace Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code with enhanced neutron and light ion (Z is less than or equal to 2) propagation was recently developed for complex, inhomogeneous shield geometry described by combinatorial objects. Comparisons were made between 3DHZETRN results and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at locations within the combinatorial geometry, and it was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in ray-trace geometry. This latest extension enables the code to be used within current engineering design practices utilizing fully detailed vehicle and habitat geometries. Through convergence testing, it is shown that fidelity in an actual shield geometry can be maintained in the discrete ray-trace description by systematically increasing the number of discrete rays used. It is also shown that this fidelity is carried into transport procedures and resulting exposure quantities without sacrificing computational efficiency.

  10. Role of synthetic route on the transport properties of BaCe1-xYxO3 proton conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiodelli, Gaetano; Malavasi, Lorenzo; Tealdi, Cristina; Barison, Simona; Battagliarin, Marino; Doubova, Lioudmila; Fabrizio, Monica; Mortalo, Cecilia; Gerbasi, Rosalba

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the role of the preparation route on the transport properties of the BaCe 1-x Y x O 3-δ solid solution with x = 0, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 has been studied. In particular, the samples were synthesized by means of the solid-state reaction and by a modified Pechini method. The effect of grain size on the sintering behaviour of the two samples batches was investigated by means of impedance spectroscopy and electron microscopy. It was found that a good sintering of the pellets can be achieved at 1250 deg. C for the samples prepared through the Pechini method. The ceramic route, even at higher temperatures, does not lead to good density values. The extensive conductivity measurements as a function of doping and gas environment (pure oxygen and argon + 10% H 2 + water) we carried out showed that the optimal Y-doping is around 15% and that a significant proton conductivity can be achieved for T lower than 500 deg. C. Above this temperature, the role of oxygen defects starts becoming relevant. Finally, the presence of a slope change in all the Arrhenius plots, irrespective to the gas environment, at about 450-500 deg. C was observed and qualitatively interpreted as due to a change in the nature of the main charge carriers involved

  11. A-Site Cation Substitutions in Strained Y-Doped BaZrO3 Multilayer Films Leading to Fast Proton Transport Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruta, Carmela [Univ. of Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Han, Chu [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhou, Si [Dalian Univ. of Technology, Dalian (China); Cantoni, Claudia [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Nan [Univ. of Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Tebano, Antonello [Univ. of Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Lee, Tien -Lin [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Didcot (United Kingdom); Schlueter, Christoph [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Didcot (United Kingdom); Bongiorno, Angelo [College of Staten Island, Staten Island, NY (United States); The Graduate Center of the City Univ. of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Proton-conducting perovskite oxides form a class of solid electrolytes for novel electrochemical devices operating at moderate temperatures. Here, we use hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and density functional theory calculations to investigate the structure and elucidate the origin of the fast proton transport properties of strained ultrathin films of Y-doped BaZrO3 grown by pulsed lased deposition on NdGaO3. Our study shows that our BaZr0.8Y0.2O3 films incorporate a significant amount of Y dopants, and to a lesser extent also Zr ions, substituting for Ba2+, and that these substitutional defects agglomerate forming columnar regions crossing vertically from the surface to the interface the entire film. In conclusion, our calculations also show that, in regions rich in Y substitutions for both Zr and Ba, the proton transfer process involves nearly zero-energy barriers, indicating that A-site cation substitutions by Y lead to fast transport pathways and hence are responsible for the previously observed enhanced values of the proton conductivity of these perovskite oxide films.

  12. Crucial role of Asp408 in the proton translocation pathway of multidrug transporter AcrB: evidence from site-directed mutagenesis and carbodiimide labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Markus A; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Verrey, François; Pos, Klaas M

    2009-06-30

    The three-component AcrA/AcrB/TolC efflux system of Escherichia coli catalyzes the proton motive force-driven extrusion of a variety of cytotoxic compounds. The inner membrane pump component AcrB belongs to the resistance nodulation and cell division (RND) superfamily and is responsible for drug specificity and energy transduction of the entire tripartite efflux system. Systematic mutational analysis of titratable and polar membrane-located amino acids revealed four residues, D407, D408, K940, and, R971, to be of prime importance for AcrB function. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, D408 was shown to specifically react with dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) in a pH-dependent manner. The apparent pK(a) of D408 of 7.4 would enable binding and release of protons under physiological conditions. In contrast to other secondary transporters, D408 was not protected from carbodiimide modification in the presence of drugs, which supports the notion of spatially separated transport pathways for drugs and protons. This study provides evidence for a substantial role of membrane-located carboxylates as a central element of the proton translocation pathway in AcrB and other members of the RND superfamily.

  13. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  14. PONDEROMOTIVE ACCELERATION IN CORONAL LOOPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Obenschain, K. [LCP and FD, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Laming, J. M. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Taylor, B. D. [AFRL Eglin AFB, Pensacola, FL 32542 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the well-known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3–4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a “by-product” of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 to 0.02 T and lengths from 25,000 to 75,000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets, which act to heat the loop. As a consequence of coronal magnetic reconnection, small-scale, high-speed jets form. The familiar vortex quadrupoles form at reconnection sites. Between the magnetic footpoints and the corona the reconnection flow merges with the boundary flow. It is in this region that the ponderomotive acceleration occurs. Mirroring the character of the coronal reconnection, the ponderomotive acceleration is also found to be intermittent.

  15. PONDEROMOTIVE ACCELERATION IN CORONAL LOOPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Obenschain, K.; Laming, J. M.; Taylor, B. D.

    2016-01-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the well-known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3–4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a “by-product” of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 to 0.02 T and lengths from 25,000 to 75,000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets, which act to heat the loop. As a consequence of coronal magnetic reconnection, small-scale, high-speed jets form. The familiar vortex quadrupoles form at reconnection sites. Between the magnetic footpoints and the corona the reconnection flow merges with the boundary flow. It is in this region that the ponderomotive acceleration occurs. Mirroring the character of the coronal reconnection, the ponderomotive acceleration is also found to be intermittent.

  16. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Harvey, Karen

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is to study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and ground-based data. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of various features in the solar atmosphere at different heights ranging from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the, rocket flights, which took place during the declining phase of a solar cycle, 2-4 years before the minimum. The investigation is narrowly focused on comparing the physics of small- and medium-scale strong-field structures with that of large-scale, weak fields. As we close th is investigation, we have to recall that our present position in the understanding of basic solar physics problems (such as coronal heating) is much different from that in 1995 (when we proposed this investigation), due largely to the great success of SOHO and TRACE. In other words, several topics and techniques we proposed can now be better realized with data from these missions. For this reason, at some point of our work, we started concentrating on the 1992 data, which are more unique and have more supporting data. As a result, we discontinued the investigation on small-scale structures, i.e., bright points, since high-resolution TRACE images have addressed more important physics than SPDE EUV images could do. In the final year, we still spent long time calibrating the 1992 data. The work was complicated because of the old-fashioned film, which had problems not encountered with more modern CCD detectors. After our considerable effort on calibration, we were able to focus on several scientific topics, relying heavily on the SPDE UV images. They include the relation between filaments and filament channels, the identification of hot

  17. Coronal Mass Ejections An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    In times of growing technological sophistication and of our dependence on electronic technology, we are all affected by space weather. In its most extreme form, space weather can disrupt communications, damage and destroy spacecraft and power stations, and increase radiation exposure to astronauts and airline passengers. Major space weather events, called geomagnetic storms, are large disruptions in the Earth’s magnetic field brought about by the arrival of enormous magnetized plasma clouds from the Sun. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) contain billions of tons of plasma and hurtle through space at speeds of several million miles per hour. Understanding coronal mass ejections and their impact on the Earth is of great interest to both the scientific and technological communities. This book provides an introduction to coronal mass ejections, including a history of their observation and scientific revelations, instruments and theory behind their detection and measurement, and the status quo of theories describing...

  18. Observational Analysis of Coronal Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpeanu, D.-C.; Rachmeler, L; Mierla, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    Coronal fans (see Figure 1) are bright observational structures that extend to large distances above the solar surface and can easily be seen in EUV (174 angstrom) above the limb. They have a very long lifetime and can live up to several Carrington rotations (CR), remaining relatively stationary for many months. Note that they are not off-limb manifestation of similarly-named active region fans. The solar conditions required to create coronal fans are not well understood. The goal of this research was to find as many associations as possible of coronal fans with other solar features and to gain a better understanding of these structures. Therefore, we analyzed many fans and created an overview of their properties. We present the results of this statistical analysis and also a case study on the longest living fan.

  19. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  20. Coronal ``Wave'': Magnetic Footprint of a Coronal Mass Ejection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.; Harra, Louise K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Démoulin, Pascal

    2007-02-01

    We investigate the properties of two ``classical'' EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) coronal waves. The two source regions of the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) possess opposite helicities, and the coronal waves display rotations in opposite senses. We observe deep core dimmings near the flare site and also widespread diffuse dimming, accompanying the expansion of the EIT wave. We also report a new property of these EIT waves, namely, that they display dual brightenings: persistent ones at the outermost edge of the core dimming regions and simultaneously diffuse brightenings constituting the leading edge of the coronal wave, surrounding the expanding diffuse dimmings. We show that such behavior is consistent with a diffuse EIT wave being the magnetic footprint of a CME. We propose a new mechanism where driven magnetic reconnections between the skirt of the expanding CME magnetic field and quiet-Sun magnetic loops generate the observed bright diffuse front. The dual brightenings and the widespread diffuse dimming are identified as innate characteristics of this process.

  1. Analysis of coronal H I Lyman alpha measurements from a rocket flight on 1979 April 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Withbroe, G.L.; Kohl, J.L.; Weiser, H.; Noci, G.; Munro, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the profiles of resonantly scattered hydrogen Lyman-α coronal radiation have been used to determine hydrogen kinetic temperatures from 1.5 to 4 R/sub sun/ from Sun center in a quiet region of the corona. Proton temperatures derived from the line widths decrease with height from 2.6 x 10 6 K at r = 1.5 R/sub sun/ to 1.2 x 10 6 K at r = 4 R/sub sun/. These measurements combined with temperatures for lower heights determined from earlier Skylab and eclipse data suggest that there is a maximum in the quiet coronal proton temperature at about 1.5 R/sub sun/. Comparison of measured Lyman-α intensities with those calculated using a representative model for the radial variation of the coronal electron density provides information on the magnitude of the electron temperature gradient and suggests that the solar wind flow was subsonic for r<4 R/sub sun/ in the observed region. Comparison of the measured kinetic temperatures to the predictions of a simple two fluid model suggests that there is a small amount of proton heating and/or a nonthermal contribution to the motions of coronal protons between 1.5 and 4 R/sub sun/

  2. Steady three-fluid coronal expansion for nonspherical geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joselyn, J.; Holzer, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    A steady three-fluid model of the solar coronal expansionk in which 4 He ++ ions (alphas) are treated as a nonminor species, is developed for nonspherically symmetric flow geometries of the general sort thought to be characteristic of coronal holes. It is found that the very high mass fluxes in the low corona, which are associated with rapidly diverging flow geometries, lead to a locally enhanced frictional coupling between protons and alphas and consequently to a significant reduction of the He/H abundance ratio in the lower corona from that normally predicted by multifluid models. In the models considered, the frictional drag on the protons by the alphas (a process neglected in most studies) is found to play an important role near the sun. Heavy ions, other than alphas, are treated as minor species and are seen to exhibit varying responses to the rapidly diverging flow geometries, depending on the ion mass and charge. As for the protons, the frictional effect of the alphas on the heavier ions is found to be significant in the models considered

  3. The dynamics of coronal magnetic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis is made of the evolution of coronal magnetic fields due to the interaction with the solar wind. An analysis of the formation of coronal streamers, arising as a result of the stretching of bipolar fields, is given. Numerical simulations of the formation of coronal streamers are presented. Fast-mode shocks as triggers of microturbulence in the solar corona are discussed

  4. Dynamics of Coronal Hole Boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, A. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H. [Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R. [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wyper, P. F. [Universities Space Research Association, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2017-03-10

    Remote and in situ observations strongly imply that the slow solar wind consists of plasma from the hot, closed-field corona that is released onto open magnetic field lines. The Separatrix Web theory for the slow wind proposes that photospheric motions at the scale of supergranules are responsible for generating dynamics at coronal-hole boundaries, which result in the closed plasma release. We use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to determine the effect of photospheric flows on the open and closed magnetic flux of a model corona with a dipole magnetic field and an isothermal solar wind. A rotational surface motion is used to approximate photospheric supergranular driving and is applied at the boundary between the coronal hole and helmet streamer. The resulting dynamics consist primarily of prolific and efficient interchange reconnection between open and closed flux. The magnetic flux near the coronal-hole boundary experiences multiple interchange events, with some flux interchanging over 50 times in one day. Additionally, we find that the interchange reconnection occurs all along the coronal-hole boundary and even produces a lasting change in magnetic-field connectivity in regions that were not driven by the applied motions. Our results show that these dynamics should be ubiquitous in the Sun and heliosphere. We discuss the implications of our simulations for understanding the observed properties of the slow solar wind, with particular focus on the global-scale consequences of interchange reconnection.

  5. MHD aspects of coronal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzer, U.

    1979-10-01

    If one defines coronal transients as events which occur in the solar corona on rapid time scales (< approx. several hours) then one would have to include a large variety of solar phenomena: flares, sprays, erupting prominences, X-ray transients, white light transients, etc. Here we shall focus our attention on the latter two phenomena. (orig.) 891 WL/orig. 892 RDG

  6. The Coronal Place; Why is It Special?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Alkazwini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To prove the existence of arguments about the exact place that can bear the term ‘coronal’, it would be enough to check the explanatory dictionary’s entry. There are different arguments regarding the exact place of coronal. In this paper, some of the linguistic evidence regarding the coronal place shall be mentioned. Then, I shall discuss the classes of coronal that lend support to the fact that coronal place is believed to be special, and that is by discussing the different typologies of coronal consonants and giving their description.

  7. An equatorial coronal hole at solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromage, B. J. I.; DelZanna, G.; DeForest, C.; Thompson, B.; Clegg, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The large transequatorial coronal hole that was observed in the solar corona at the end of August 1996 is presented. It consists of a north polar coronal hole called the 'elephant's trunk or tusk'. The observations of this coronal hole were carried out with the coronal diagnostic spectrometer onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The magnetic field associated with the equatorial coronal hole is strongly connected to that of the active region at its base, resulting in the two features rotating at almost the same rate.

  8. SU-E-T-180: Fano Cavity Test of Proton Transport in Monte Carlo Codes Running On GPU and Xeon Phi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, E; Sorriaux, J; Souris, K; Lee, J; Vynckier, S; Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H; Jia, X; Jiang, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In proton dose calculation, clinically compatible speeds are now achieved with Monte Carlo codes (MC) that combine 1) adequate simplifications in the physics of transport and 2) the use of hardware architectures enabling massive parallel computing (like GPUs). However, the uncertainties related to the transport algorithms used in these codes must be kept minimal. Such algorithms can be checked with the so-called “Fano cavity test”. We implemented the test in two codes that run on specific hardware: gPMC on an nVidia GPU and MCsquare on an Intel Xeon Phi (60 cores). Methods: gPMC and MCsquare are designed for transporting protons in CT geometries. Both codes use the method of fictitious interaction to sample the step-length for each transport step. The considered geometry is a water cavity (2×2×0.2 cm 3 , 0.001 g/cm 3 ) in a 10×10×50 cm 3 water phantom (1 g/cm 3 ). CPE in the cavity is established by generating protons over the phantom volume with a uniform momentum (energy E) and a uniform intensity per unit mass I. Assuming no nuclear reactions and no generation of other secondaries, the computed cavity dose should equal IE, according to Fano's theorem. Both codes were tested for initial proton energies of 50, 100, and 200 MeV. Results: For all energies, gPMC and MCsquare are within 0.3 and 0.2 % of the theoretical value IE, respectively (0.1% standard deviation). Single-precision computations (instead of double) increased the error by about 0.1% in MCsquare. Conclusion: Despite the simplifications in the physics of transport, both gPMC and MCsquare successfully pass the Fano test. This ensures optimal accuracy of the codes for clinical applications within the uncertainties on the underlying physical models. It also opens the path to other applications of these codes, like the simulation of ion chamber response

  9. SU-E-T-180: Fano Cavity Test of Proton Transport in Monte Carlo Codes Running On GPU and Xeon Phi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterpin, E; Sorriaux, J; Souris, K; Lee, J; Vynckier, S [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Schuemann, J; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Jia, X; Jiang, S [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In proton dose calculation, clinically compatible speeds are now achieved with Monte Carlo codes (MC) that combine 1) adequate simplifications in the physics of transport and 2) the use of hardware architectures enabling massive parallel computing (like GPUs). However, the uncertainties related to the transport algorithms used in these codes must be kept minimal. Such algorithms can be checked with the so-called “Fano cavity test”. We implemented the test in two codes that run on specific hardware: gPMC on an nVidia GPU and MCsquare on an Intel Xeon Phi (60 cores). Methods: gPMC and MCsquare are designed for transporting protons in CT geometries. Both codes use the method of fictitious interaction to sample the step-length for each transport step. The considered geometry is a water cavity (2×2×0.2 cm{sup 3}, 0.001 g/cm{sup 3}) in a 10×10×50 cm{sup 3} water phantom (1 g/cm{sup 3}). CPE in the cavity is established by generating protons over the phantom volume with a uniform momentum (energy E) and a uniform intensity per unit mass I. Assuming no nuclear reactions and no generation of other secondaries, the computed cavity dose should equal IE, according to Fano's theorem. Both codes were tested for initial proton energies of 50, 100, and 200 MeV. Results: For all energies, gPMC and MCsquare are within 0.3 and 0.2 % of the theoretical value IE, respectively (0.1% standard deviation). Single-precision computations (instead of double) increased the error by about 0.1% in MCsquare. Conclusion: Despite the simplifications in the physics of transport, both gPMC and MCsquare successfully pass the Fano test. This ensures optimal accuracy of the codes for clinical applications within the uncertainties on the underlying physical models. It also opens the path to other applications of these codes, like the simulation of ion chamber response.

  10. Coronal Seismology: The Search for Propagating Waves in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Thomas A.; Seeley, D.; Keil, S. L.; Tomczyk, S.

    2007-05-01

    We report on Doppler observations of the solar corona obtained in the Fe XeXIII 1074.7nm coronal emission line with the HAO Coronal Multi-Channel Polarimeter (CoMP) mounted on the NSO Coronal One Shot coronagraph located in the Hilltop Facility of NSO/Sacramento Peak. The COMP is a tunable filtergraph instrument that records the entire corona from the edge of the occulting disk at approximately 1.03 Rsun out to 1.4 Rsun with a spatial resolution of about 4” x 4”. COMP can be rapidly scanned through the spectral line while recording orthogonal states of linear and circular polarization. The two dimensional spatial resolution allows us to correlate temporal fluctuations observed in one part of the corona with those seen at other locations, in particular along coronal loops. Using cross spectral analysis we find that the observations reveal upward propagating waves that are characterized by Doppler shifts with rms velocities of 0.3 km/s, peak wave power in the 3-5 mHz frequency range, and phase speeds 1-3 Mm/s. The wave trajectories are consistent with the direction of the magnetic field inferred from the linear polarization measurements. We discuss the phase and coherence of these waves as a function of height in the corona and relate our findings to previous observations. The observed waves appear to be Alfvenic in character. "Thomas Schad was supported through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) site program, which is co-funded by the Department of Defense in partnership with the National Science Foundation REU Program." Daniel Seeley was supported through the National Solar Observatory Research Experience for Teachers (RET) site program, which is funded by the National Science Foundation RET program.

  11. Plant proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaxiola, Roberto A.; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; Schumacher, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react...

  12. Proton Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M H; Freeman, R R; Hatchett, S P; MacKinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B

    2006-04-01

    Fast ignition (FI) by a laser generated ballistically focused proton beam is a more recently proposed alternative to the original concept of FI by a laser generated beam of relativistic electrons. It has potential advantages in less complex energy transport into dense plasma. Recent successful target heating experiments motivate further investigation of the feasibility of proton fast ignition. The concept, the physics and characteristics of the proton beams, the recent experimental work on focusing of the beams and heating of solid targets and the overall prospects for proton FI are discussed

  13. Effects of clamping force on the water transport and performance of a PEM (proton electrolyte membrane) fuel cell with relative humidity and current density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Dowon; Ahn, Jae Hwan; Kim, Hyung Soon; Kim, Yongchan

    2015-01-01

    The clamping force should be applied to a proton electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell due to its structural characteristics. The clamping force affects the ohmic and mass transport resistances in the PEM fuel cell. In this study, the effects of the clamping force on the water transport and performance characteristics of a PEM fuel cell are experimentally investigated with variations in the relative humidity and current density. The water transport characteristics were analyzed by calculating the net drag coefficient. The ohmic resistance decreased with the increase in the clamping force due to the reduced contact resistance and more even membrane hydration. However, the mass transport resistance increased with the increase in the clamping force due to the gas diffusion layer compression. The net drag coefficient decreased with the increase in the clamping force due to high water back-diffusion. Additionally, the relationship between the total resistance and the net drag coefficient was investigated. - Highlights: • Effects of clamping force on the performance of a PEM fuel cell are investigated. • Water transport characteristics are analyzed using net drag coefficient. • Ohmic resistance decreased with clamping force, but mass transport resistance increased. • Net drag coefficient decreased with the increase in clamping force. • Total resistance was significantly degraded for a net drag coefficient below 0.2.

  14. Analysis of Solar Coronal Holes with Synoptic Magnetogram Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canner, A.; Kim, T. K.; Pogorelov, N.; Yalim, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Coronal holes are regions in which the magnetic field of the Sun is open with high magnetic flux and low plasma density. Because of the low plasma beta in these regions, the open field lines transport plasma from the Sun throughout the heliosphere. Coronal hole area is closely related to the expansion factor of the magnetic flux tube, as demonstrated by Tokumaru et al. (2017). Following the approach of Tokumaru et al. (2017), we employ a potential field source surface model to identify the open field regions on the photosphere and estimate the area and expansion factor for each coronal hole. While Tokumaru et al. (2017) analyzed synoptic maps from Kitt Peak National Observatory for the period 1995-2011, we use different magnetograph observations with higher spatial resolution (e.g., SOHO-MDI) for the same time period. We compare the coronal hole area - expansion factor relationship with the original results of Tokumaru et al (2017). This work was supported by the NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates program "Solar and Heliospheric Physics at UAH and MSFC" run by the University of Alabama in Huntsville in partnership with the Marshall Space Flight Center through grant AGS-1460767.

  15. On interplanetary coronal mass ejection identification at 1 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulligan, T.; Russell, C.T.; Gosling, J.T.

    1999-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections are believed to be produced in the corona from closed magnetic regions not previously participating in the solar wind expansion. At 1 AU their interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) generally have a number of distinct plasma and field signatures that distinguish them from the ambient solar wind. These include heat flux dropouts, bi-directional streaming, enhanced alpha particle events, times of depressed proton temperatures, intervals of distorted or enhanced magnetic field, and times of large magnetic field rotations characteristic of magnetic clouds. The first three of these signatures are phenomena that occur at some point within the ICME, but do not necessarily persist throughout the entire ICME. The large scale magnetic field rotations, distortions and enhancements, and the proton temperature depressions tend to mark more accurately the beginning and end of the ICME proper. We examine herein the reliability with which each of these markers identifies ICMEs utilizing ISEE-3 data from 1978 - 1980. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  16. Polarization of Coronal Forbidden Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hao; Qu, Zhongquan [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China); Landi Degl’Innocenti, Egidio, E-mail: sayahoro@ynao.ac.cn [Dipartimento di Astronomia e Scienza dello Spazio, Università di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2017-03-20

    Since the magnetic field is responsible for most manifestations of solar activity, one of the most challenging problems in solar physics is the diagnostics of solar magnetic fields, particularly in the outer atmosphere. To this end, it is important to develop rigorous diagnostic tools to interpret polarimetric observations in suitable spectral lines. This paper is devoted to analyzing the diagnostic content of linear polarization imaging observations in coronal forbidden lines. Although this technique is restricted to off-limb observations, it represents a significant tool to diagnose the magnetic field structure in the solar corona, where the magnetic field is intrinsically weak and still poorly known. We adopt the quantum theory of polarized line formation developed in the framework of the density matrix formalism, and synthesize images of the emergent linear polarization signal in coronal forbidden lines using potential-field source-surface magnetic field models. The influence of electronic collisions, active regions, and Thomson scattering on the linear polarization of coronal forbidden lines is also examined. It is found that active regions and Thomson scattering are capable of conspicuously influencing the orientation of the linear polarization. These effects have to be carefully taken into account to increase the accuracy of the field diagnostics. We also found that linear polarization observation in suitable lines can give valuable information on the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in the solar corona.

  17. Several hPepT1-transported drugs are substrates of the Escherichia coli proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YdgR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Aduri, Nanda G; Iqbal, Mazhar

    2017-01-01

    transported by hPepT1. The transport of these drugs was evaluated using the prototypical POT YdgR from E. coli. The transport studies were pursued through combining cell-based assays with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. These investigations revealed that YdgR from E. coli...

  18. Radio and white-light observations of coronal transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulk, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    Optical, radio and X-ray evidence of violent mass motions in the corona has existed for some years but only recently have the form, nature, frequency and implication of the transients become obvious. In this paper the observed properties of coronal transients are reviewed, with concentration on the white-light and radio manifestations. The classification according to speeds seems to be meaningful, with the slow transients having thermal emissions at radio wavelengths and the fast ones nonthermal. The possible mechanisms involved in the radio bursts are then discussed and estimates of various forms of energy are reviewed. It appears that the magnetic energy transported from the sun by the transient exceeds that of any other form, and that magnetic forces dominate in the dynamics of the motions. The conversion of magnetic energy into mechanical energy, by expansion of the field, provides a possible driving force for the coronal and interplanetary shock waves.

  19. Radio and white-light observations of coronal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulk, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    Optical, radio and X-ray evidence of violent mass motions in the corona has existed for some years but only recently have the form, nature, frequency and implication of the transients become obvious. The author reviews the observed properties of coronal transients, concentrating on the white-light and radio manifestations. The classification according to speeds seems to be meaningful, with the slow transients having thermal emissions at radio wavelengths and the fast ones non-thermal. The possible mechanisms involved in the radio bursts are discussed and the estimates of various forms of energy are reviewed. It appears that the magnetic energy transported from the Sun by the transient exceeds that of any other form, and that magnetic forces dominate in the dynamics of the motions. The conversion of magnetic energy into mechanical energy, by expansion of the fields, provides a possible driving force for the coronal and interplanetary shock waves. (Auth.)

  20. Transition region, coronal heating and the fast solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing

    2003-07-01

    It is assumed that magnetic flux tubes are strongly concentrated at the boundaries of supergranule convection cells. A power law spectrum of high frequency Alfvén waves with a spectral index -1 originating from the sun is assumed to supply all the energy needed to energize the plasma flowing in such magnetic flux tubes. At the high frequency end, the waves are eroded by ions due to ion cyclotron resonance. The magnetic flux concentration is essential since it allows a sufficiently strong energy flux to be carried by high frequency ion cyclotron waves and these waves can be readily released at the coronal base by cyclotron resonance. The main results are: 1. The waves are capable of creating a steep transition region, a hot corona and a fast solar wind if both the wave frequency is high enough and the magnetic flux concentration is sufficiently strong in the boundaries of the supergranule convection zone. 2. By primarily heating alpha particles only, it is possible to produce a steep transition region, a hot corona and a fast solar wind. Coulomb coupling plays a key role in transferring the thermal energy of alpha particles to protons and electrons at the corona base. The electron thermal conduction then does the remaining job to create a sharp transition region. 3. Plasma species (even ions) may already partially lose thermal equilibrium in the transition region, and minor ions may already be faster than protons at the very base of the corona. 4. The model predicts high temperature alpha particles (Talpha ~ 2 x 107 K) and low proton temperatures (Tp solar radii, suggesting that hydrogen Lyman lines observed by UVCS above coronal holes may be primarily broadened by Alfvén waves in this range.

  1. Focusing and transport of high-intensity multi-MeV proton bunches from a compact laser-driven source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Busold

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser ion acceleration provides for compact, high-intensity ion sources in the multi-MeV range. Using a pulsed high-field solenoid, for the first time high-intensity laser-accelerated proton bunches could be selected from the continuous exponential spectrum and delivered to large distances, containing more than 10^{9} particles in a narrow energy interval around a central energy of 9.4 MeV and showing ≤30  mrad envelope divergence. The bunches of only a few nanoseconds bunch duration were characterized 2.2 m behind the laser-plasma source with respect to arrival time, energy width, and intensity as well as spatial and temporal bunch profile.

  2. Focusing and transport of high-intensity multi-MeV proton bunches from a compact laser-driven source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busold, S.; Schumacher, D.; Deppert, O.; Brabetz, C.; Frydrych, S.; Kroll, F.; Joost, M.; Al-Omari, H.; Blažević, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Hofmann, I.; Bagnoud, V.; Cowan, T. E.; Roth, M.

    2013-10-01

    Laser ion acceleration provides for compact, high-intensity ion sources in the multi-MeV range. Using a pulsed high-field solenoid, for the first time high-intensity laser-accelerated proton bunches could be selected from the continuous exponential spectrum and delivered to large distances, containing more than 109 particles in a narrow energy interval around a central energy of 9.4 MeV and showing ≤30mrad envelope divergence. The bunches of only a few nanoseconds bunch duration were characterized 2.2 m behind the laser-plasma source with respect to arrival time, energy width, and intensity as well as spatial and temporal bunch profile.

  3. The Experimental Measurement of Local and Bulk Oxygen Transport Resistances in the Catalyst Layer of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Cheng, Xiaojing; Lu, Jiabin; Shen, Shuiyun; Yan, Xiaohui; Yin, Jiewei; Wei, Guanghua; Zhang, Junliang

    2017-12-07

    Remarkable progress has been made in reducing the cathodic Pt loading of PEMFCs; however, a huge performance loss appears at high current densities, indicating the existence of a large oxygen transport resistance associated with the ultralow Pt loading catalyst layer. To reduce the Pt loading without sacrificing cell performance, it is essential to illuminate the oxygen transport mechanism in the catalyst layer. Toward this goal, an experimental approach to measure the oxygen transport resistance in catalyst layers is proposed and realized for the first time in this study. The measuring approach involves a dual-layer catalyst layer design, which consists of a dummy catalyst layer and a practical catalyst layer, followed by changing the thickness of dummy layer to respectively quantify the local and bulk resistances via limiting current measurements combined with linear extrapolation. The experimental results clearly reveal that the local resistance dominates the total resistance in the catalyst layer.

  4. Space weather and coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Space weather has attracted a lot of attention in recent times. Severe space weather can disrupt spacecraft, and on Earth can be the cause of power outages and power station failure. It also presents a radiation hazard for airline passengers and astronauts. These ""magnetic storms"" are most commonly caused by coronal mass ejections, or CMES, which are large eruptions of plasma and magnetic field from the Sun that can reach speeds of several thousand km/s. In this SpringerBrief, Space Weather and Coronal Mass Ejections, author Timothy Howard briefly introduces the coronal mass ejection, its sc

  5. Quasi-three dimensional dynamic modeling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with consideration of two-phase water transport through a gas diffusion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sanggyu

    2015-01-01

    Water management is one of the challenging issues for low-temperature PEMFCs (proton exchange membrane fuel cells). When liquid water is formed at the GDL (gas diffusion layer), the pathway of reactant gas can be blocked, which inhibits the electrochemical reaction of PEMFC. Thus, liquid water transport through GDL is a critical factor determining the performance of a PEMFC. In present study, quasi-three dimensional dynamic modeling of PEMFC with consideration of two-phase water transport through GDL is developed. To investigate the distributions of PEMFC characteristics, including current density, species mole fraction, and membrane hydration, the PEMFC was discretized into twenty control volumes along the anode channel. To resolve the mass and energy conservation, the PEMFC is discretized into eleven and fifteen control volumes in the perpendicular direction, respectively. The dynamic variation of PEMFC characteristics of cell voltage, overvoltage of activation and ohmic, liquid water saturation through a GDL, and oxygen concentration were captured during transient behavior. - Highlights: • A quasi-three dimensional two-phase dynamic model of PEMFC is developed. • Presented model is validated by comparison with experimental data. • Two-phase model is compared with one-phase model at steady-states and transients.

  6. The Radiation, Interplanetary Shocks, and Coronal Sources (RISCS) Toolset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; Spann, James F.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project is to serve the needs of space system designers and operators by developing an interplanetary radiation environment model within 10 AU:Radiation, Interplanetary Shocks, and Coronal Sources (RISCS) toolset: (1) The RISCS toolset will provide specific reference environments for space system designers and nowcasting and forecasting capabilities for space system operators; (2) We envision the RISCS toolset providing the spatial and temporal radiation environment external to the Earth's (and other planets') magnetosphere, as well as possessing the modularity to integrate separate applications (apps) that can map to specific magnetosphere locations and/or perform the subsequent radiation transport and dosimetry for a specific target.

  7. Development of Superconducting Combined Function Magnets for the Proton Transport Line for the J-PARC Neutrino Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Anerella, Michael; Escallier, John; Fujii, T; Fukui, Yuji; Ganetis, George; Gupta, Ramesh C; Harrison, Michael; Hashiguchi, E; Higashi, Norio; Ichikawa, Atsuko; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Jain, Animesh K; Kanahara, T; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Kobayashi, Takashi; Makida, Yasuhiro; Muratore, Joseph F; Obana, Tetsuhiro; Ogitsu, T; Ohhata, Hirokatsu; Okamura, T; Orikasa, T; Parker, Brett; Sasaki, Ken Ichi; Takasaki, Minoru; Tanaka, Ken Ichi; Terashima, Akio; Tomaru, Takayuki; Wanderer, Peter; Yamamoto, Akira

    2005-01-01

    A second generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments has been proposed as one of the main projects at J-PARC jointly built by JAERI and KEK. Superconducting combined function magnets, SCFMs, will be utilized for the 50 GeV, 750 kW proton beam line for the neutrino experiment and an R&D program is in underway at KEK. The magnet is designed to provide a combined function of a dipole field of 2.6 T with a quadrupole field of 19 T/m in a coil aperture of 173.4 mm. A series of 28 magnets in the beam line will be operated DC in supercritical helium cooling below 5 K. A design feature of the SCFM is the left-right asymmetry of the coil cross section: current distributions for superimposed dipole- and quadrupole- fields are combined in a single layer coil. Another design feature is the adoption of glass-fiber reinforced phenolic plastic spacers to replace the conventional metallic collars. To evaluate this unique design, fabrication of full-scale prototype magnets is in progress at KEK and the fi...

  8. Coronal Magnetism and Forward Solarsoft Idl Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The FORWARD suite of Solar Soft IDL codes is a community resource for model-data comparison, with a particular emphasis on analyzing coronal magnetic fields. FORWARD may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare to existing data. FORWARD works with numerical model datacubes, interfaces with the web-served Predictive Science Inc MAS simulation datacubes and the Solar Soft IDL Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) package, and also includes several analytic models (more can be added). It connects to the Virtual Solar Observatory and other web-served observations to download data in a format directly comparable to model predictions. It utilizes the CHIANTI database in modeling UV/EUV lines, and links to the CLE polarimetry synthesis code for forbidden coronal lines. FORWARD enables "forward-fitting" of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties.

  9. Transport of polyamines in Drosophila S2 cells: kinetics, pharmacology and dependence on the plasma membrane proton gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Krantz, David E

    2006-01-15

    Polyamine transport activities have been described in diverse multicellular systems, but their bioenergetic mechanisms and molecular identity remain unclear. In the present paper, we describe a high-affinity spermine/spermidine transport activity expressed in Drosophila S2 cells. Ion-replacement experiments indicate that polyamine uptake across the cell membrane is Na+-, K+-, Cl-- and Ca2+-independent, but pH-sensitive. Additional experiments using ionophores suggest that polyamine uptake may be H+-coupled. Pharmacological experiments show that polyamine uptake in S2 cells is selectively blocked by MGBG {methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) or 1,1'-[(methylethanediylidine)-dinitrilo]diguanidine} and paraquat (N,N-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridylium), two known inhibitors of polyamine uptake in mammalian cells. In addition, inhibitors known to block the Slc22 (solute carrier 22) family of organic anion/cation transporters inhibit spermine uptake in S2 cells. These data and the genetic tools available in Drosophila will facilitate the molecular identification and further characterization of this activity.

  10. COMPOSITION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurbuchen, T. H.; Weberg, M.; Lepri, S. T. [Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Von Steiger, R. [International Space Science Institute, Bern (Switzerland); Mewaldt, R. A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Antiochos, S. K. [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2016-07-20

    We analyze the physical origin of plasmas that are ejected from the solar corona. To address this issue, we perform a comprehensive analysis of the elemental composition of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using recently released elemental composition data for Fe, Mg, Si, S, C, N, Ne, and He as compared to O and H. We find that ICMEs exhibit a systematic abundance increase of elements with first ionization potential (FIP) < 10 eV, as well as a significant increase of Ne as compared to quasi-stationary solar wind. ICME plasmas have a stronger FIP effect than slow wind, which indicates either that an FIP process is active during the ICME ejection or that a different type of solar plasma is injected into ICMEs. The observed FIP fractionation is largest during times when the Fe ionic charge states are elevated above Q {sub Fe} > 12.0. For ICMEs with elevated charge states, the FIP effect is enhanced by 70% over that of the slow wind. We argue that the compositionally hot parts of ICMEs are active region loops that do not normally have access to the heliosphere through the processes that give rise to solar wind. We also discuss the implications of this result for solar energetic particles accelerated during solar eruptions and for the origin of the slow wind itself.

  11. Evidence that the rabbit proton-peptide co-transporter PepT1 is a multimer when expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitsas, Konstantinos-E; Boyd, C A R; Meredith, David

    2006-04-01

    To test whether the rabbit proton-coupled peptide transporter PepT1 is a multimer, we have employed a combination of transport assays, luminometry and site-directed mutagenesis. A functional epitope-tagged PepT1 construct (PepT1-FLAG) was co-expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with a non-functional but normally trafficked mutant form of the same transporter (W294F-PepT1). The amount of PepT1-FLAG cRNA injected into the oocytes was kept constant, while the amount of W294F-PepT1 cRNA was increased over the mole fraction range of 0 to 1. The uptake of [(3)H]-D: -Phe-L: -Gln into the oocytes was measured at pH(out) 5.5, and the surface expression of PepT1-FLAG was quantified by luminometry. As the mole fraction of injected W294F-PepT1 increased, the uptake of D: -Phe-L: -Gln decreased. This occurred despite the surface expression of PepT1-FLAG remaining constant, and so we can conclude that PepT1 must be a multimer. Assuming that PepT1 acts as a homomultimer, the best fit for the modelling suggests that PepT1 could be a tetramer, with a minimum requirement of two functional subunits in each protein complex. Western blotting also showed the presence of higher-order complexes of PepT1-FLAG in oocyte membranes. It should be noted that we cannot formally exclude the possibility that PepT1 interacts with unidentified Xenopus protein(s). The finding that PepT1 is a multimer has important implications for the molecular modelling of this protein.

  12. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  13. Coronal rain in magnetic bipolar weak fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Fang, X.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We intend to investigate the underlying physics for the coronal rain phenomenon in a representative bipolar magnetic field, including the formation and the dynamics of coronal rain blobs. Methods: With the MPI-AMRVAC code, we performed three dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with strong heating localized on footpoints of magnetic loops after a relaxation to quiet solar atmosphere. Results: Progressive cooling and in-situ condensation starts at the loop top due to radiative thermal instability. The first large-scale condensation on the loop top suffers Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes fragmented into smaller blobs. The blobs fall vertically dragging magnetic loops until they reach low-β regions and start to fall along the loops from loop top to loop footpoints. A statistic study of the coronal rain blobs finds that small blobs with masses of less than 1010 g dominate the population. When blobs fall to lower regions along the magnetic loops, they are stretched and develop a non-uniform velocity pattern with an anti-parallel shearing pattern seen to develop along the central axis of the blobs. Synthetic images of simulated coronal rain with Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly well resemble real observations presenting dark falling clumps in hot channels and bright rain blobs in a cool channel. We also find density inhomogeneities during a coronal rain "shower", which reflects the observed multi-stranded nature of coronal rain. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 7 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  14. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  15. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  16. Study of coronal and interplanetary propagation of solar particles following the E450 solar flare on July 29, 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombosi, T.; Somogyi, A.J.; Kolesov, G.Ya.; Kurt, V.G.; Kuzhevskii, B.M.; Logachev, Yu.I.; Savenko, I.A.; Shestopalov, I.P.

    1977-01-01

    Intensity profiles of protons and electrons of various energies measured onboard the high-apogee Prognos-3 satellite are analysed as well as the energy balance between the various flare produced phenomena. The general behaviour of the solar particle event following the 3B flare at E45 0 can be well described in terms of a simple model which takes into account coronal diffusion with a leakage time and a Krimigis' type interplanetary diffusion. The results suggest an inverse dependence of coronal diffusion coefficient on rigidity. (author)

  17. Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling for Proton Exchange Membrane(PEM Fuel Cell with Micro Parallel Flow Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soon Hwang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro channel are beingused extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of thefundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype forengineering application. In this study, we used a single-phase, fully three dimensionalsimulation model for PEMFC that can deal with both anode and cathode flow field forexamining the micro flow channel with electrochemical reaction. The results show thathydrogen and oxygen were solely supplied to the membrane by diffusion mechanism ratherthan convection transport, and the higher pressure drop at cathode side is thought to becaused by higher flow rate of oxygen at cathode. And it is found that the amount of water incathode channel was determined by water formation due to electrochemical reaction pluselectro-osmotic mass flux directing toward the cathode side. And it is very important tomodel the back diffusion and electro-osmotic mass flux accurately since the two flux wasclosely correlated each other and greatly influenced for determination of ionic conductivityof the membrane which directly affects the performance of fuel cell.

  18. Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling for Proton Exchange Membrane(PEM) Fuel Cell with Micro Parallel Flow Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pil Hyong; Han, Sang Seok; Hwang, Sang Soon

    2008-03-03

    Modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro channel are beingused extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of thefundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype forengineering application. In this study, we used a single-phase, fully three dimensionalsimulation model for PEMFC that can deal with both anode and cathode flow field forexamining the micro flow channel with electrochemical reaction. The results show thathydrogen and oxygen were solely supplied to the membrane by diffusion mechanism ratherthan convection transport, and the higher pressure drop at cathode side is thought to becaused by higher flow rate of oxygen at cathode. And it is found that the amount of water incathode channel was determined by water formation due to electrochemical reaction pluselectro-osmotic mass flux directing toward the cathode side. And it is very important tomodel the back diffusion and electro-osmotic mass flux accurately since the two flux wasclosely correlated each other and greatly influenced for determination of ionic conductivityof the membrane which directly affects the performance of fuel cell.

  19. The proton-coupled amino acid transporter hPAT1 is the main transporter involved in vigabatrin uptake in intestinal Caco-2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Hansen, Steen Honore'; Brodin, Birger

    2012-01-01

    transporter hPAT1. The aim of the project was to identify if transporters are involved in cellular uptake of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells. Methods: The uptake rate of vigabatrin was measured in Caco-2 cells at pH 6.0 or 7.4 for 15 min after application of 0.1 – 25.0 mM vigabatrin. The inhibitory effect...... of selected amino acids and -derivatives on the apical vigabatrin uptake in Caco-2 cells was investigated. Vigabatrin samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to a mass selective detector (MSD). Results: The uptake rate of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells was pH-dependent. The uptake...... of vigabatrin was saturable at pH 6.0 with a Michaelis constant, Km of 12.7 ± 3.7 mM and a maximal flux, Jmax of 3.7 ± 0.5 nmol•min-1•cm-2. The presences of hPAT1 ligands significantly inhibited the uptake of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells at pH 6.0, whereas hPAT1 non-ligands did not. Discussion: The saturability...

  20. Intestinal drug transport via the proton-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1 (SLC36A1) is inhibited by Gly-X(aa) dipeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Sidsel; Langthaler, Louise; Kall, Morten A

    2012-01-01

    -Sar as substrates of the amino acid transporter PAT1. The aim of the present study is to investigate if other Gly-containing dipeptides interact with PAT1, and whether they can inhibit PAT1 mediated drug absorption, in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro methods included two-electrode voltage clamp measurements on h...... of different dipeptides. The in vivo part consisted of a pharmacokinetic study in rats following oral administration of gaboxadol and preadministration of 200 mg/kg dipeptide. The results showed that in hPAT1 expressing oocytes Gly-Tyr, Gly-Pro, and Gly-Phe inhibited currents induced by drug substances......, the present study identifies selected dipeptides as inhibitors of PAT1 mediated drug absorption in various in vitro models....

  1. Analysis of coronal H I Lyman alpha measurements from a rocket flight on 1979 April 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withbroe, G. L.; Kohl, J. L.; Weiser, H.; Noci, G.; Munro, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that measurements of the profiles of resonantly scattered hydrogen Lyman-alpha coronal radiation have been used in determining hydrogen kinetic temperatures from 1.5 to 4 solar radii from sun center in a quiet region of the corona. Proton temperatures derived using the line widths decrease with height from 2.6 x 10 to the 6th K at 1.5 solar radii to 1.2 x 10 to the 6th K at 4 solar radii. These measurements, together with temperatures for lower heights determined from earlier Skylab and eclipse data, suggest that there is a maximum in the quiet coronal proton temperature at about 1.5 solar radii. Comparison of measured Lyman-alpha intensities with those calculated using a representative model for the radial variation of the coronal electron density yields information on the magnitude of the electron temperature gradient and suggests that the solar wind flow was subsonic for distances less than 4 solar radii.

  2. A statistical mechanical theory of proton transport kinetics in hydrogen-bonded networks based on population correlation functions with applications to acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckerman, Mark E; Chandra, Amalendu; Marx, Dominik

    2010-09-28

    Extraction of relaxation times, lifetimes, and rates associated with the transport of topological charge defects in hydrogen-bonded networks from molecular dynamics simulations is a challenge because proton transfer reactions continually change the identity of the defect core. In this paper, we present a statistical mechanical theory that allows these quantities to be computed in an unbiased manner. The theory employs a set of suitably defined indicator or population functions for locating a defect structure and their associated correlation functions. These functions are then used to develop a chemical master equation framework from which the rates and lifetimes can be determined. Furthermore, we develop an integral equation formalism for connecting various types of population correlation functions and derive an iterative solution to the equation, which is given a graphical interpretation. The chemical master equation framework is applied to the problems of both hydronium and hydroxide transport in bulk water. For each case it is shown that the theory establishes direct links between the defect's dominant solvation structures, the kinetics of charge transfer, and the mechanism of structural diffusion. A detailed analysis is presented for aqueous hydroxide, examining both reorientational time scales and relaxation of the rotational anisotropy, which is correlated with recent experimental results for these quantities. Finally, for OH(-)(aq) it is demonstrated that the "dynamical hypercoordination mechanism" is consistent with available experimental data while other mechanistic proposals are shown to fail. As a means of going beyond the linear rate theory valid from short up to intermediate time scales, a fractional kinetic model is introduced in the Appendix in order to describe the nonexponential long-time behavior of time-correlation functions. Within the mathematical framework of fractional calculus the power law decay ∼t(-σ), where σ is a parameter of the

  3. Conceptual design of proton beam window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraoku, Takuji; Kaminaga, Masanori; Terada, Atsuhiko; Ishikura, Syuichi; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Hino, Ryutaro

    2001-01-01

    In a MW-scale neutron scattering facility coupled with a high-intensity proton accelerator, a proton beam window is installed as the boundary between a high vacuum region of the proton beam transport line and a helium environment around the target assembly working as a neutron source. The window is cooled by water so as to remove high volumetric heat generated by the proton beam. A concept of the flat-type proton beam window consisting of two plates of 3 mm thick was proposed, which was found to be feasible under the proton beam power of 5 MW through thermal-hydraulic and structural strength analyses. (authors)

  4. Introduction of hind foot coronal alignment view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Il Bong; Jeon, Ju Seob; Yoon, Kang Cheol; Choi, Nam Kil; Kim, Seung Kook

    2006-01-01

    Accurate clinical evaluation of the alignment of the calcaneus relative to the tibia in the coronal plane is essential in the evaluation and treatment of hind foot pathologic condition. Previously described standard anteroposterior, lateral, and oblique radiographic methods of the foot or ankle do not demonstrate alignment of the tibia relation to the calcaneus in the coronal plane. The purpose of this study was to introduce hind foot coronal alignment view. Both feet were imaged simultaneously on an elevated, radiolucent foot stand equipment. Both feet stood on a radiolucent platform with equal weight on both feet. Both feet are located foot axis longitudinal perpendicular to the platform. Silhouette tracing around both feet are made, and line is then drawn to bisect the silhouette of the second toe and the outline of the heel. The x-ray beam is angled down approximately 15 .deg. to 20 .deg. This image described tibial axis and medial, lateral tuberosity of calcaneus. Calcaneus do not rotated. The view is showed by talotibial joint space. Although computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging techniques are capable of demonstrating coronal hind foot alignment, they lack usefulness in most clinical situations because the foot is imaged in a non-weight bearing position. But hind foot coronal alignment view is obtained for evaluating position changing of inversion, eversion of the hind foot and varus, valgus deformity of calcaneus

  5. Developement of a large proton accelerator for innovative researches; development of low energy high current beam transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, In Soo; Namkung, Won; Cho, M. H.; Kim, K. N.; Kim, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, K. H.; Shim, K. Y. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    We have designed the beam transport system to connect the ion source and the RFQ. In this design, we have finalized the positions of solenoids and various beam diagnostic device. We have finalize the physical and mechanical designs of solenoids, and these designs are already adopted to produce the actual solenoids. We have also studied about EPICS, Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System, to control a stepper motor as a tuner of the RFQ designed for KOMACEPICS is a real time control system for a large scale system such as accelerators and tokamaks. The purpose of this thesis is to establish a test system based on the EPICS. A Sun UtraSPARC 5 workstation is used as the Operator Interface(OPI) console, and a VME chassis contained a Motorola MVME162 single board computer is used as the Input/Output Controller(IOC). A stepper motor controller is connected to the IOC via an RS-232C as a field bus. The EPICS base, extensions, and the real time OS vxWorks are installed on the workstation. The real time OS image can be downloaded to the IOC via the FTP when the test station is started. We have installed an IOC application as a device and driver support layer for the serial communication with an RS-232C on the workstation. We have designed the IOC database configuration files and a graphic user interface style OPI panel which was programmed by the MEDM. With this OPI, we can control the stepper motor using EPICS. 17 refs., 33 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  6. Free Magnetic Energy and Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Moore, Ron; Falconer, David

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the coronal X-ray luminosity of an active region increases roughly in direct proportion to the total photospheric flux of the active region's magnetic field (Fisher et al. 1998). It is also observed, however, that the coronal luminosity of active regions of nearly the same flux content can differ by an order of magnitude. In this presentation, we analyze 10 active regions with roughly the same total magnetic flux. We first determine several coronal properties, such as X-ray luminosity (calculated using Hinode XRT), peak temperature (calculated using Hinode EIS), and total Fe XVIII emission (calculated using SDO AIA). We present the dependence of these properties on a proxy of the free magnetic energy of the active region

  7. The first coronation churches of medieval Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalić Jovanka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The medieval ceremony of coronation as a rule took place in the most important church of a realm. The sites of the coronation of Serbian rulers before the establishment of the Žiča monastery church as the coronation church of Serbian kings in the first half of the thirteenth century have not been reliably identified so far. Based on the surviving medieval sources and the archaeological record, this paper provides background information about the titles of Serbian rulers prior to the creation of the Nemanjić state, and proposes that Stefan, son of the founder of the Nemanjić dynasty, was crowned king (1217 in the church of St Peter in Ras.

  8. A contemporary view of coronal heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Clare E; De Moortel, Ineke

    2012-07-13

    Determining the heating mechanism (or mechanisms) that causes the outer atmosphere of the Sun, and many other stars, to reach temperatures orders of magnitude higher than their surface temperatures has long been a key problem. For decades, the problem has been known as the coronal heating problem, but it is now clear that 'coronal heating' cannot be treated or explained in isolation and that the heating of the whole solar atmosphere must be studied as a highly coupled system. The magnetic field of the star is known to play a key role, but, despite significant advancements in solar telescopes, computing power and much greater understanding of theoretical mechanisms, the question of which mechanism or mechanisms are the dominant supplier of energy to the chromosphere and corona is still open. Following substantial recent progress, we consider the most likely contenders and discuss the key factors that have made, and still make, determining the actual (coronal) heating mechanism (or mechanisms) so difficult.

  9. Ulysses' rapid crossing of the polar coronal hole boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McComas, D.J.; Riley, P.; Gosling, J.T.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R.

    1998-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft crossed from the slow dense solar wind characteristic of the solar streamer belt into the fast, less dense flow from the northern polar coronal hole over a very short interval (several days) in late March 1995. The spacecraft, which was at 1.35 AU and ∼19 degree north heliographic latitude, moving northward in its orbit, remained in the fast solar wind from then through summer 1996. This boundary crossing is unique in that the combination of the spacecraft motion and rotation of the structure past the spacecraft caused Ulysses to move smoothly and completely from one regime into the other. In this study we examine this crossing in detail. The crossing is marked by a region of enhanced pressure, typical of stream interaction regions, which extends ∼2x10 7 km across. We find that the transition between the slow and fast regimes occurs on several temporal, and hence spatial, scales. On the shortest scale ( 4 km) the stream interface is a tangential discontinuity where the proton and core electron densities and ion and electron pressures all drop while the magnetic pressure jumps to maintain a rough pressure balance. The alpha to proton ratio also jumps across the stream interface to reach the comparatively constant polar hole value of ∼4.3%. On larger scales (a few x10 6 km) the proton and alpha temperatures rise to their high-speed wind values. Finally, on the largest scale (∼10 8 km) the solar wind speed ramps up from ∼400kms -1 to ∼750kms -1 , typical of polar hole flows. While it seems likely that the stream interface maps back to a sharp boundary near the Sun, the large region of increasing flow speed suggests that there is also an extended gradient in solar wind source speed close to the Sun. copyright 1998 American Geophysical Union

  10. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments

  11. Radio emission from coronal and interplanetary shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cane, H.V.

    1987-01-01

    Observational data on coronal and interplanetary (IP) type II burst events associated with shock-wave propagation are reviewed, with a focus on the past and potential future contributions of space-based observatories. The evidence presented by Cane (1983 and 1984) in support of the hypothesis that the coronal (metric) and IP (kilometric) bursts are due to different shocks is summarized, and the fast-drift kilometric events seen at the same time as metric type II bursts (and designated shock-accelerated or shock-associated events) are characterized. The need for further observations at 0.5-20 MHz is indicated. 20 references

  12. Long-duration high-energy proton events observed by GOES in October 1989

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anttila

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available We consider the prolonged injection of the high-energy (>10 MeV protons during the three successive events observed by GOES in October 1989. We apply a solar-rotation-stereoscopy approach to study the injection of the accelerated particles from the CME-driven interplanetary shock waves in order to find out how the effectiveness of the particle acceleration and/or escape depends on the angular distance from the shock axis. We use an empirical model for the proton injection at the shock and a standard model of the interplanetary transport. The model can reproduce rather well the observed intensity–time profiles of the October 1989 events. The deduced proton injection rate is highest at the nose of the shock; the injection spectrum is always harder near the Sun. The results seem to be consistent with the scheme that the CME-driven interplanetary shock waves accelerate a seed particle population of coronal origin.Key words. Interplanetary physics · Energetic particles · Solar physics · astrophysics and astronomy · Flares and mass ejections

  13. ON THE OBSERVATION AND SIMULATION OF SOLAR CORONAL TWIN JETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Quanhao [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, NO. 96, Jinzhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Fang, Fang [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1234 Innovation Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); McIntosh, Scott W.; Fan, Yuhong [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We present the first observation, analysis, and modeling of solar coronal twin jets, which occurred after a preceding jet. Detailed analysis on the kinetics of the preceding jet reveals its blowout-jet nature, which resembles the one studied in Liu et al. However, the erupting process and kinetics of the twin jets appear to be different from the preceding one. Lacking detailed information on the magnetic fields in the twin jet region, we instead use a numerical simulation using a three-dimensional (3D) MHD model as described in Fang et al., and find that in the simulation a pair of twin jets form due to reconnection between the ambient open fields and a highly twisted sigmoidal magnetic flux, which is the outcome of the further evolution of the magnetic fields following the preceding blowout jet. Based on the similarity between the synthesized and observed emission, we propose this mechanism as a possible explanation for the observed twin jets. Combining our observation and simulation, we suggest that with continuous energy transport from the subsurface convection zone into the corona, solar coronal twin jets could be generated in the same fashion addressed above.

  14. On the Observation and Simulation of Solar Coronal Twin Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiajia; Fang, Fang; Wang, Yuming; McIntosh, Scott W.; Fan, Yuhong; Zhang, Quanhao

    2016-02-01

    We present the first observation, analysis, and modeling of solar coronal twin jets, which occurred after a preceding jet. Detailed analysis on the kinetics of the preceding jet reveals its blowout-jet nature, which resembles the one studied in Liu et al. However, the erupting process and kinetics of the twin jets appear to be different from the preceding one. Lacking detailed information on the magnetic fields in the twin jet region, we instead use a numerical simulation using a three-dimensional (3D) MHD model as described in Fang et al., and find that in the simulation a pair of twin jets form due to reconnection between the ambient open fields and a highly twisted sigmoidal magnetic flux, which is the outcome of the further evolution of the magnetic fields following the preceding blowout jet. Based on the similarity between the synthesized and observed emission, we propose this mechanism as a possible explanation for the observed twin jets. Combining our observation and simulation, we suggest that with continuous energy transport from the subsurface convection zone into the corona, solar coronal twin jets could be generated in the same fashion addressed above.

  15. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole M ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-25

    May 25, 2015 ... coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also com- pute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength. 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and ...

  16. Higher-speed coronal mass ejections and their geoeffectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Bhargawa, Asheesh; Tonk, Apeksha

    2018-06-01

    We have attempted to examine the ability of coronal mass ejections to cause geoeffectiveness. To that end, we have investigated total 571 cases of higher-speed (> 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejection events observed during the years 1996-2012. On the basis of angular width (W) of observance, events of coronal mass ejection were further classified as front-side or halo coronal mass ejections (W = 360°); back-side halo coronal mass ejections (W = 360°); partial halo (120°mass ejections were much faster and more geoeffective in comparison of partial halo and non-halo coronal mass ejections. We also inferred that the front-sided halo coronal mass ejections were 67.1% geoeffective while geoeffectiveness of partial halo coronal mass ejections and non-halo coronal mass ejections were found to be 44.2% and 56.6% respectively. During the same period of observation, 43% of back-sided CMEs showed geoeffectiveness. We have also investigated some events of coronal mass ejections having speed > 2500 km/s as a case study. We have concluded that mere speed of coronal mass ejection and their association with solar flares or solar activity were not mere criterion for producing geoeffectiveness but angular width of coronal mass ejections and their originating position also played a key role.

  17. Magnetic Topology of Coronal Hole Linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    In recent work, Antiochos and coworkers argued that the boundary between the open and closed field regions on the Sun can be extremely complex with narrow corridors of open ux connecting seemingly disconnected coronal holes from the main polar holes, and that these corridors may be the sources of the slow solar wind. We examine, in detail, the topology of such magnetic configurations using an analytical source surface model that allows for analysis of the eld with arbitrary resolution. Our analysis reveals three important new results: First, a coronal hole boundary can join stably to the separatrix boundary of a parasitic polarity region. Second, a single parasitic polarity region can produce multiple null points in the corona and, more important, separator lines connecting these points. Such topologies are extremely favorable for magnetic reconnection, because it can now occur over the entire length of the separators rather than being con ned to a small region around the nulls. Finally, the coronal holes are not connected by an open- eld corridor of finite width, but instead are linked by a singular line that coincides with the separatrix footprint of the parasitic polarity. We investigate how the topological features described above evolve in response to motion of the parasitic polarity region. The implications of our results for the sources of the slow solar wind and for coronal and heliospheric observations are discussed.

  18. Simulating coronal condensation dynamics in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, S. P.; Keppens, R.; Xia, C.; Fang, X.

    2015-12-01

    We present numerical simulations in 3D settings where coronal rain phenomena take place in a magnetic configuration of a quadrupolar arcade system. Our simulation is a magnetohydrodynamic simulation including anisotropic thermal conduction, optically thin radiative losses, and parametrised heating as main thermodynamical features to construct a realistic arcade configuration from chromospheric to coronal heights. The plasma evaporation from chromospheric and transition region heights eventually causes localised runaway condensation events and we witness the formation of plasma blobs due to thermal instability, that evolve dynamically in the heated arcade part and move gradually downwards due to interchange type dynamics. Unlike earlier 2.5D simulations, in this case there is no large scale prominence formation observed, but a continuous coronal rain develops which shows clear indications of Rayleigh-Taylor or interchange instability, that causes the denser plasma located above the transition region to fall down, as the system moves towards a more stable state. Linear stability analysis is used in the non-linear regime for gaining insight and giving a prediction of the system's evolution. After the plasma blobs descend through interchange, they follow the magnetic field topology more closely in the lower coronal regions, where they are guided by the magnetic dips.

  19. The physical structure of coronal holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pneuman, G.W.

    1978-11-01

    The longitudinal geometrical structure of solar wind streams as observed at the orbit of earth is governed by two mechanisms - solar rotation and, most importantly, the geometry of the inner coronal magnetic fields. Here, we study the influence of the latter for the polar coronal hole observed by Skylab in 1973 and modeled by Munro and Jackson (1977). The influence of coronal heating on the properties of the solar wind in this geometry is also investigated. To do this, a crude exponentially damped heating function similar to that used by Kopp and Orrall (1976) is introduced into the solar wind equations. We find that increased heating produces higher temperatures in the inner corona but has little effect upon the temperature at 1 A.U. However, the density at 1 A.U. is increased significantly due to the increase in scale height. The most surprising consequence of coronal heating is its effect on the solar wind velocity, being that the velocity at 1 A.U. is actually decreased by heating in the inner corona. Physical reasons for this effect are discussed. (orig./WL) [de

  20. Solar wind acceleration in coronal holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Past attempts to explain the large solar wind velocities in high speed streams by theoretical models of the expansion have invoked either extended nonthermal heating of the corona, heat flux inhibition, or direct addition of momentum to the expanding coronal plasma. Several workers have shown that inhibiting the heat flux at low coronal densities is probably not adequate to explain quantitatively the observed plasma velocities in high speed streams. It stressed that, in order to account for both these large plasma velocities and the low densities found in coronal holes (from which most high speed streams are believed to emanate), extended heating by itself will not suffice. One needs a nonthermal mechanism to provide the bulk acceleration of the high wind plasma close to the sun, and the most likely candidate at present is direct addition of the momentum carried by outward-propagating waves to the expanding corona. Some form of momentum addition appears to be absolutely necessary if one hopes to build quantitatively self-consistent models of coronal holes and high speed solar wind streams

  1. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Coronal holes and interplanetary disturbances are important aspects of the physics of the Sun and heliosphere. Interplanetary disturbances are identified as an increase in the density turbulence compared with the ambient solar wind. Erupting stream disturbances are transient large-scale structures of ...

  2. Role of Magnetic Carpet in Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... One of the fundamental questions in solar physics is how the solar corona maintains its high temperature of several million Kelvin above photosphere with a temperature of 6000 K. Observations show that solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different ...

  3. Mechanisms of Coronal Heating S. R. Verma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The Sun is a mysterious star. The high temperature of the chromosphere and corona present one of the most puzzling problems of solar physics. Observations show that the solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in solar ...

  4. Investigating the Origins of Two Extreme Solar Particle Events: Proton Source Profile and Associated Electromagnetic Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocharov, Leon; Usoskin, Ilya [Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory/Oulu Unit, University of Oulu, P.O.B. 3000, Oulu FI-90014 (Finland); Pohjolainen, Silja [Tuorla Observatory, University of Turku, Piikkiö FI-21500 (Finland); Mishev, Alexander [Space Climate Research Unit, University of Oulu, Oulu FI-90014 (Finland); Reiner, Mike J. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC, and NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Lee, Jeongwoo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Laitinen, Timo [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Didkovsky, Leonid V. [University of Southern California Space Sciences Center, 835 Bloom Walk, Los Angeles CA 90089 (United States); Pizzo, Victor J. [NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Kim, Roksoon; Cho, Kyung-Suk [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Klassen, Andreas [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Kiel D-24118 (Germany); Karlicky, Marian [Astronomical Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Fričova 258, Ondřejov 251 65 (Czech Republic); Gary, Dale E. [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Valtonen, Eino; Vainio, Rami [Space Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku FI-20014 (Finland)

    2017-04-20

    We analyze the high-energy particle emission from the Sun in two extreme solar particle events in which protons are accelerated to relativistic energies and can cause a significant signal even in the ground-based particle detectors. Analysis of a relativistic proton event is based on modeling of the particle transport and interaction, from a near-Sun source through the solar wind and the Earth’s magnetosphere and atmosphere to a detector on the ground. This allows us to deduce the time profile of the proton source at the Sun and compare it with observed electromagnetic emissions. The 1998 May 2 event is associated with a flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME), which were well observed by the Nançay Radioheliograph, thus the images of the radio sources are available. For the 2003 November 2 event, the low corona images of the CME liftoff obtained at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory are available. Those complementary data sets are analyzed jointly with the broadband dynamic radio spectra, EUV images, and other data available for both events. We find a common scenario for both eruptions, including the flare’s dual impulsive phase, the CME-launch-associated decimetric-continuum burst, and the late, low-frequency type III radio bursts at the time of the relativistic proton injection into the interplanetary medium. The analysis supports the idea that the two considered events start with emission of relativistic protons previously accelerated during the flare and CME launch, then trapped in large-scale magnetic loops and later released by the expanding CME.

  5. Proton dynamics in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Veronica; De Milito, Angelo; Harguindey, Salvador; Reshkin, Stephan J; Wahl, Miriam L; Rauch, Cyril; Chiesi, Antonio; Pouysségur, Jacques; Gatenby, Robert A; Rivoltini, Licia; Fais, Stefano

    2010-06-15

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth.Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC) in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology.

  6. Proton dynamics in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouysségur Jacques

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth. Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology.

  7. Nonlinear Force-free Coronal Magnetic Stereoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chifu, Iulia; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd, E-mail: chifu@mps.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2017-03-01

    Insights into the 3D structure of the solar coronal magnetic field have been obtained in the past by two completely different approaches. The first approach are nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolations, which use photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary condition. The second approach uses stereoscopy of coronal magnetic loops observed in EUV coronal images from different vantage points. Both approaches have their strengths and weaknesses. Extrapolation methods are sensitive to noise and inconsistencies in the boundary data, and the accuracy of stereoscopy is affected by the ability of identifying the same structure in different images and by the separation angle between the view directions. As a consequence, for the same observational data, the 3D coronal magnetic fields computed with the two methods do not necessarily coincide. In an earlier work (Paper I) we extended our NLFFF optimization code by including stereoscopic constrains. The method was successfully tested with synthetic data, and within this work, we apply the newly developed code to a combined data set from SDO /HMI, SDO /AIA, and the two STEREO spacecraft. The extended method (called S-NLFFF) contains an additional term that monitors and minimizes the angle between the local magnetic field direction and the orientation of the 3D coronal loops reconstructed by stereoscopy. We find that when we prescribe the shape of the 3D stereoscopically reconstructed loops, the S-NLFFF method leads to a much better agreement between the modeled field and the stereoscopically reconstructed loops. We also find an appreciable decrease by a factor of two in the angle between the current and the magnetic field. This indicates the improved quality of the force-free solution obtained by S-NLFFF.

  8. INTERCHANGE RECONNECTION AND CORONAL HOLE DYNAMICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Lynch, B. J.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of magnetic reconnection between open and closed fields, often referred to as 'interchange' reconnection, on the dynamics and topology of coronal hole boundaries. The most important and most prevalent three-dimensional topology of the interchange process is that of a small-scale bipolar magnetic field interacting with a large-scale background field. We determine the evolution of such a magnetic topology by numerical solution of the fully three-dimensional MHD equations in spherical coordinates. First, we calculate the evolution of a small-scale bipole that initially is completely inside an open field region and then is driven across a coronal hole boundary by photospheric motions. Next the reverse situation is calculated in which the bipole is initially inside the closed region and driven toward the coronal hole boundary. In both cases, we find that the stress imparted by the photospheric motions results in deformation of the separatrix surface between the closed field of the bipole and the background field, leading to rapid current sheet formation and to efficient reconnection. When the bipole is inside the open field region, the reconnection is of the interchange type in that it exchanges open and closed fields. We examine, in detail, the topology of the field as the bipole moves across the coronal hole boundary and find that the field remains well connected throughout this process. Our results, therefore, provide essential support for the quasi-steady models of the open field, because in these models the open and closed flux are assumed to remain topologically distinct as the photosphere evolves. Our results also support the uniqueness hypothesis for open field regions as postulated by Antiochos et al. On the other hand, the results argue against models in which open flux is assumed to diffusively penetrate deeply inside the closed field region under a helmet streamer. We discuss the implications of this work for coronal observations.

  9. DARK JETS IN SOLAR CORONAL HOLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Peter R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    A new solar feature termed a dark jet is identified from observations of an extended solar coronal hole that was continuously monitored for over 44 hr by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode spacecraft in 2011 February 8–10 as part of Hinode Operation Plan No. 177 (HOP 177). Line of sight (LOS) velocity maps derived from the coronal Fe xii λ195.12 emission line, formed at 1.5 MK, revealed a number of large-scale, jet-like structures that showed significant blueshifts. The structures had either weak or no intensity signal in 193 Å filter images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, suggesting that the jets are essentially invisible to imaging instruments. The dark jets are rooted in bright points and occur both within the coronal hole and at the quiet Sun–coronal hole boundary. They exhibit a wide range of shapes, from narrow columns to fan-shaped structures, and sometimes multiple jets are seen close together. A detailed study of one dark jet showed LOS speeds increasing along the jet axis from 52 to 107 km s{sup −1} and a temperature of 1.2–1.3 MK. The low intensity of the jet was due either to a small filling factor of 2% or to a curtain-like morphology. From the HOP 177 sample, dark jets are as common as regular coronal hole jets, but their low intensity suggests a mass flux around two orders of magnitude lower.

  10. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, James; Carr, Ron; Chebl, Maroun; Coleman, Robert; Costantini, William; Cox, Robert; Dial, William; Jenkins, Robert; McGovern, James; Mueller, Peter

    2006-01-01

    ...., trains, ships, etc.) and maximizing intermodal efficiency. A healthy balance must be achieved between the flow of international commerce and security requirements regardless of transportation mode...

  11. Energizing porters by proton-motive force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, N

    1994-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the chemistry of water was the most crucial determinant in shaping life on earth. Among the more important chemical features of water is its dissociation into protons and hydroxyl ions. The presence of relatively high proton concentrations in the ambient solution resulted in the evolution of proton pumps during the dawn of life on earth. These proton pumps maintained neutral pH inside the cells and generated electrochemical gradients of protons (proton-motive force) across their membranes. The existence of proton-motive force enabled the evolution of porters driven by it that are most probably among the more primitive porters in the world. The directionality of the substrate transport by the porters could be to both sides of the membranes because they can serve as proton symporters or antiporters. One of the most important subjects of this meeting is the mechanism by which proton-motive and other ion-motive forces drive the transport processes through porters. Is there a common mechanism of action for all proton-driven porters? Is there some common partial reaction by which we can identify the way that porters are energized by proton-motive force? Is there a common coupling between proton movement and uptake or secretion of certain molecules? Even a partial answer to one of these questions would advance our knowledge... or confusion. As my mentor Efraim Racker used to say: 'If you are not totally confused you do not understand the issue'.

  12. Sistemas primários de transporte de prótons integram os mecanismos de desintoxicação do mesotrione em plantas de milho Proton transport primary systems used as mechanisms of mesotrione detoxification in corn plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ogliari

    2009-01-01

    ão variaram mais do que 20 a 60% das atividades obtidas em vesículas de membranas oriundas de plantas não tratadas (controle. Os resultados demonstraram que o mesotrione promove uma ativação diferencial dos principais sistemas primários de transporte de H+, indicando que essas bombas iônicas são enzimas transportadoras essenciais aos mecanismos relacionados com o processo de desintoxicação das plantas de milho, possivelmente ao energizar a compartimentalização das moléculas do herbicida mesotrione no vacúolo ou a exceção celular através das membranas plasmáticas.The herbicide Mesotrione herbicides are very effective in the control of a wide range of weeds that infest corn (Zea mays fields. However, the biochemical and molecular bases of corn seedling tolerance to this herbicide have not been established so far. To understand the mechanisms of mesotrione detoxification in corn plants, the activities of the main primary proton (H+ ion transport systems of the vacuolar and plasma membranes (H+-ATPases V- and P-types, and H+-PPase of the cells from different tissues were analyzed, after post-emergence herbicide application. Thus, cell fractionation procedures on root, leaf and mesocotyl tissues were performed using differential membrane vesicle centrifugation and purification in sucrose density gradient. Hydrolytic activities of the proton pumps were measured by using a colorimetric method for phosphate released through enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrates adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP and pyrophosphate (PPi. Photosynthetic parameters were analyzed as physiological markers of the different stages of plant detoxification. Such analysis demonstrated that, three days after herbicide application (DAA, mesotrione induced a reduction in the photosynthetic rate and Fv/Fm ratio, but no significant effect could be found after the fifth DAA. These data suggest that the treatment with mesotrione promoted a spatial and temporal regulation of the H+ pump activities. In all

  13. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  14. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Jin Jung [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seunho [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology and UBITA, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chanho [Naraebio Research Laboratories, 177 Dangha-ri, Bongdam-eup, Hawseong-si 445-892 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  15. Coronal Heating: Testing Models of Coronal Heating by Forward-Modeling the AIA Emission of the Ansample of Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanushenko, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a systemic exploration of the properties of coronal heating, by forward-modeling the emission of the ensemble of 1D quasi-steady loops. This approximations were used in many theoretical models of the coronal heating. The latter is described in many such models in the form of power laws, relating heat flux through the photosphere or volumetric heating to the strength of the magnetic field and length of a given field line. We perform a large search in the parameter space of these power laws, amongst other variables, and compare the resulting emission of the active region to that observed by AIA. We use a recently developed magnetic field model which uses shapes of coronal loops to guide the magnetic model; the result closely resembles observed structures by design. We take advantage of this, by comparing, in individual sub-regions of the active region, the emission of the active region and its synthetic model. This study allows us to rule out many theoretical models and formulate predictions for the heating models to come.

  16. Effect of cytosolic pH on inward currents reveals structural characteristics of the proton transport cycle in the influenza A protein M2 in cell-free membrane patches of Xenopus oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia L DiFrancesco

    Full Text Available Transport activity through the mutant D44A of the M2 proton channel from influenza virus A was measured in excised inside-out macro-patches of Xenopus laevis oocytes at cytosolic pH values of 5.5, 7.5 and 8.2. The current-voltage relationships reveal some peculiarities: 1. "Transinhibition", i.e., instead of an increase of unidirectional outward current with increasing cytosolic H(+ concentration, a decrease of unidirectional inward current was found. 2. Strong inward rectification. 3. Exponential rise of current with negative potentials. In order to interpret these findings in molecular terms, different kinetic models have been tested. The transinhibition basically results from a strong binding of H(+ to a site in the pore, presumably His37. This assumption alone already provides inward rectification and exponential rise of the IV curves. However, it results in poor global fits of the IV curves, i.e., good fits were only obtained for cytosolic pH of 8.2, but not for 7.5. Assuming an additional transport step as e.g. caused by a constriction zone at Val27 resulted in a negligible improvement. In contrast, good global fits for cytosolic pH of 7.5 and 8.2 were immediately obtained with a cyclic model. A "recycling step" implies that the protein undergoes conformational changes (assigned to Trp41 and Val27 during transport which have to be reset before the next proton can be transported. The global fit failed at the low currents at pHcyt = 5.5, as expected from the interference of putative transport of other ions besides H(+. Alternatively, a regulatory effect of acidic cytosolic pH may be assumed which strongly modifies the rate constants of the transport cycle.

  17. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allshouse, Michael; Armstrong, Frederick Henry; Burns, Stephen; Courts, Michael; Denn, Douglas; Fortunato, Paul; Gettings, Daniel; Hansen, David; Hoffman, D. W; Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability of the global transportation industry to rapidly move passengers and products from one corner of the globe to another continues to amaze even those wise to the dynamics of such operations...

  18. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections detected by HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Alejandro

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is being constructed at the volcano Sierra Negra (4100 m a.s.l.) in Mexico. HAWC’s primary purpose is the study of both: galactic and extra-galactic sources of high energy gamma rays. HAWC will consist of 300 large water Cherenkov detectors (WCD), instrumented with 1200 photo-multipliers. The Data taking has already started while construction continues, with the completion projected for late 2014. The HAWC counting rate will be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above the geomagnetic cutoff of the site (˜ 8 GV). In particular, HAWC will detect solar energetic particles known as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs), and the effects of Coronal Mass Ejections on the galactic cosmic ray flux, known as Forbush Decreases. In this paper, we present a description of the instrument and its response to interplanetary coronal mass ejections, and other solar wind large scale structures, observed during the August-December 2013 period.

  19. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Patsourakos, S.; Pariat, E.; Young, P. R.; Sterling, A.; Savcheva, A.; Shimojo, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Devore, C. R.; Archontis, V.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Chromospheric and coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of signicant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of nominal solar ares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these major phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients closeor at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broadrange of solar-heliospheric problems.

  20. Sinonasal polyposis: investigation by direct coronal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drutman, J.; Harnsberger, H.R.; Babbel, R.W.; Sonkens, J.W.; Braby, D.

    1994-01-01

    To demonstrate the typical clinical and CT features of sinonasal polyposis, we reviewed the clinical records and preoperative direct coronal CT scans of 35 patients with surgically proven disease. Symptoms included progressive nasal stuffiness (100 %), rhinorrhea (69 %), facial pain (60 %), headache (43 %) and anosmia (17 %). We found associations with rhinitis (46 %), asthma (29 %) and aspirin sensitivity (9 %). Coronal CT features included polypoid masses in the nasal cavity (91 %), partial or complete pansinus opacification (90 %), enlargement of infundibula (89 %), bony attenuation of the ethmoid trabeculae (63 %) and nasal septum (37 %), opacified ethmoid sinuses with convex lateral walls (51 %) and air-fluid levels (43 %). The latter feature correlated with symptoms and signs of acute sinusitis in only 40 % of patients. Recognition of sinonasal polyposis is important to the endoscopic surgeon since it can be the most troubling sinonasal inflammatory disease to manage due to its aggressive nature and tendency to recur despite appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  1. Deriving the coronal hole electron temperature: electron density dependent ionization / recombination considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, John Gerard; Perez-Suarez, David; Singh, Avninda; Chapman, Steven; Bryans, Paul; Summers, Hugh; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of appropriate theoretically derived line ratios with observational data can yield estimates of a plasma's physical parameters, such as electron density or temperature. The usual practice in the calculation of the line ratio is the assumption of excitation by electrons/protons followed by radiative decay. Furthermore, it is normal to use the so-called coronal approximation, i.e. one only considers ionization and recombination to and from the ground-state. A more accurate treatment is to include ionization/recombination to and from metastable levels. Here, we apply this to two lines from adjacent ionization stages, Mg IX 368 A and Mg X 625 A, which has been shown to be a very useful temperature diagnostic. At densities typical of coronal hole conditions, the difference between the electron temperature derived assuming the zero density limit compared with the electron density dependent ionization/recombination is small. This, however, is not the case for flares where the electron density is orders of magnitude larger. The derived temperature for the coronal hole at solar maximum is around 1.04 MK compared to just below 0.82 MK at solar minimum.

  2. Fracture mechanism of coronal teenage dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfilov, P. E.; Kabanova, A. V.; Borodin, I. N.; Guo, J.; Zang, Z.

    2017-10-01

    The structure of coronal teenage dentin and the development of cracks in it are studied on microand nanolevels. The material is found to fail according to a ductile mechanism on a microlelvel and according to a ductile-brittle mechanism on a nanoscale. This behavior is similar to the failure of a polyethylene film and rubber, when significant elastic and irreversible deformation precedes crack growth. The viscoelastic behavior can be considered as the reaction of dentin to an applied mechanical load.

  3. Plasma Diagnostics of Coronal Dimming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanninathan, Kamalam; Veronig, Astrid M.; Dissauer, Karin; Temmer, Manuela

    2018-04-01

    Coronal mass ejections are often associated with coronal dimmings, i.e., transient dark regions that are most distinctly observed in Extreme Ultra-violet wavelengths. Using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data, we apply Differential Emission Measure diagnostics to study the plasma characteristics of six coronal dimming events. In the core dimming region, we find a steep and impulsive decrease of density with values up to 50%–70%. Five of the events also reveal an associated drop in temperature of 5%–25%. The secondary dimming regions also show a distinct decrease in density, but less strong, decreasing by 10%–45%. In both the core and the secondary dimming the density changes are much larger than the temperature changes, confirming that the dimming regions are mainly caused by plasma evacuation. In the core dimming, the plasma density reduces rapidly within the first 20–30 minutes after the flare start and does not recover for at least 10 hr later, whereas the secondary dimming tends to be more gradual and starts to replenish after 1–2 hr. The pre-event temperatures are higher in the core dimming (1.7–2.6 MK) than in the secondary dimming regions (1.6–2.0 MK). Both core and secondary dimmings are best observed in the AIA 211 and 193 Å filters. These findings suggest that the core dimming corresponds to the footpoints of the erupting flux rope rooted in the AR, while the secondary dimming represents plasma from overlying coronal structures that expand during the CME eruption.

  4. The transition region and coronal explorer (TRACE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title, Alan; Bruner, M.; Jurcevich, B.; Lemen, J.; Strong, K.; Tarbell, Ted; Wolfson, C. Jacob; Golub, L.; Bookbinder, J.; Fisher, R.

    1995-01-01

    The transition region and coronal explorer (TRACE) NASA small explorer mission and instrument are presented. The TRACE scientific investigation explores the relationships between fine-scale magnetic fields and the associated solar plasma structures. The instrument collects images of solar plasmas at temperatures from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 7) K with one arcsec spatial resolution. The design specifications of the trace instrument are presented.

  5. A SURVEY OF CORONAL CAVITY DENSITY PROFILES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-01-01

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 R sun and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 R sun than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height-indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions-except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  6. CORONAL DENSITY STRUCTURE AND ITS ROLE IN WAVE DAMPING IN LOOPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cargill, P. J. [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); De Moortel, I.; Kiddie, G., E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-20

    It has long been established that gradients in the Alfvén speed, and in particular the plasma density, are an essential part of the damping of waves in the magnetically closed solar corona by mechanisms such as resonant absorption and phase mixing. While models of wave damping often assume a fixed density gradient, in this paper the self-consistency of such calculations is assessed by examining the temporal evolution of the coronal density. It is shown conceptually that for some coronal structures, density gradients can evolve in a way that the wave-damping processes are inhibited. For the case of phase mixing we argue that (a) wave heating cannot sustain the assumed density structure and (b) inclusion of feedback of the heating on the density gradient can lead to a highly structured density, although on long timescales. In addition, transport coefficients well in excess of classical are required to maintain the observed coronal density. Hence, the heating of closed coronal structures by global oscillations may face problems arising from the assumption of a fixed density gradient, and the rapid damping of oscillations may have to be accompanied by a separate (non-wave-based) heating mechanism to sustain the required density structuring.

  7. Critical Magnetic Field Strengths for Unipolar Solar Coronal Plumes In Quiet Regions and Coronal Holes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avallone, Ellis; Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Coronal plumes are bright magnetic funnels that are found in quiet regions and coronal holes that extend high into the solar corona whose lifetimes can last from hours to days. The heating processes that make plumes bright involve the magnetic field at the base of the plume, but their intricacies remain mysterious. Raouafi et al. (2014) infer from observation that plume heating is a consequence of magnetic reconnection at the base, whereas Wang et al. (2016) infer that plume heating is a result of convergence of the magnetic flux at the plume's base, or base flux. Both papers suggest that the base flux in their plumes is of mixed polarity, but do not quantitatively measure the base flux or consider whether a critical magnetic field strength is required for plume production. To investigate the magnetic origins of plume heating, we track plume luminosity in the 171 Å wavelength as well as the abundance and strength of the base flux over the lifetimes of six unipolar coronal plumes. Of these, three are in coronal holes and three are in quiet regions. For this sample, we find that plume heating is triggered when convergence of the base flux surpasses a field strength of approximately 300 - 500 Gauss, and that the luminosity of both quiet region and coronal hole plumes respond similarly to the strength of the magnetic field in the base.

  8. Coronal Heating Observed with Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    The recent launch of the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) as a sounding rocket has offered a new, different view of the Sun. With approx 0.3" resolution and 5 second cadence, Hi-C reveals dynamic, small-scale structure within a complicated active region, including coronal braiding, reconnection regions, Alfven waves, and flows along active region fans. By combining the Hi-C data with other available data, we have compiled a rich data set that can be used to address many outstanding questions in solar physics. Though the Hi-C rocket flight was short (only 5 minutes), the added insight of the small-scale structure gained from the Hi-C data allows us to look at this active region and other active regions with new understanding. In this talk, I will review the first results from the Hi-C sounding rocket and discuss the impact of these results on the coronal heating problem.

  9. Forward Modeling of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, T. A.; Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    We apply a forward model of emission from a coronal cavity in an effort to determine the temperature and density distribution in the cavity. Coronal cavities are long, low-density structures located over filament neutral lines and are often seen as dark elliptical features at the solar limb in white light, EUV and X-rays. When these structures erupt they form the cavity portions of CMEs The model consists of a coronal streamer model with a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. Temperature and density can be varied as a function of altitude both in the cavity and streamer. We apply this model to a cavity observed in Aug. 2007 by a wide array of instruments including Hinode/EIS, STEREO/EUVI and SOHO/EIT. Studies such as these will ultimately help us understand the the original structures which erupt to become CMEs and ICMES, one of the prime Solar Orbiter objectives.

  10. Temperature Structure of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, T. A.; Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    we analyze the temperature structure of a coronal cavity observed in Aug. 2007. coronal cavities are long, low-density structures located over filament neutral lines and are often seen as dark elliptical features at the solar limb in white light, EUV and x-rays. when these structures erupt they form the cavity portions of CMEs. It is important to establish the temperature structure of cavities in order to understand the thermodynamics of cavities in relation to their three-dimensional magnetic structure. To analyze the temperature we compare temperature ratios of a series of iron lines observed by the Hinode/EUv Imaging spectrometer (EIS). We also use those lines to constrain a forward model of the emission from the cavity and streamer. The model assumes a coronal streamer with a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel lenth. Temperature and density can be varied as a function of altitude both in the cavity and streamer. The general cavity morphology and the cavity and streamer density have already been modeled using data from STEREO's SECCHI/EUVI and Hinode/EIS (Gibson et al 2010 and Schmit & Gibson 2011).

  11. Solar origins of coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    The large scale properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), such as morphology, leading edge speed, and angular width and position, have been cataloged for many events observed with coronagraphs on the Skylab, P-78, and SMM spacecraft. While considerable study has been devoted to the characteristics of the SMEs, their solar origins are still only poorly understood. Recent observational work has involved statistical associations of CMEs with flares and filament eruptions, and some evidence exists that the flare and eruptive-filament associated CMEs define two classes of events, with the former being generally more energetic. Nevertheless, it is found that eruptive-filament CMEs can at times be very energetic, giving rise to interplanetary shocks and energetic particle events. The size of the impulsive phase in a flare-associated CME seems to play no significant role in the size or speed of the CME, but the angular sizes of CMEs may correlate with the scale sizes of the 1-8 angstrom x-ray flares. At the present time, He 10830 angstrom observations should be useful in studying the late development of double-ribbon flares and transient coronal holes to yield insights into the CME aftermath. The recently available white-light synoptic maps may also prove fruitful in defining the coronal conditions giving rise to CMEs.

  12. [Development of electroforming apparatus for coronal restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, M; Sawada, T; Ukiya, M

    1989-03-01

    As dental technologies become highly developed, techniques have been more diversified. From as aspect of prosthodontic practice, both esthetic and functional requirements are emphasized for coronal restoration and consequently, these should be considered in the routine procedure. In fabrication of coronal restorations, metal, porcelain and resin are commonly used, and there exists the various disadvantages for metal cast method due to complicated processes by using different dental materials. Therefore, an electroforming apparatus was developed by us to replace the conventional procedure by a cathode rotary system. It was applied for coronal restorations to allow an electroforming directly on a working model. An experiment was successfully conducted to apply for a veneer crown on abutment tooth of upper central incisor on plaster model. The results were obtained as follows, 1. It was become possible to construct a metal framework by the electroforming. 2. Metal framework can be constructed on the same working model without a duplication of it. 3. The combined system for cathode rotation and liquid circulation could shorten the electroposition time, and allows a high current density extending to 50 A/dm2.

  13. SUNQUAKE GENERATION BY CORONAL MAGNETIC RESTRUCTURING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Mooney, M. K. [School of Science and Engineering, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Leake, J. E. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Hudson, H. S. [Space Sciences Lab, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Sunquakes are the surface signatures of acoustic waves in the Sun’s interior that are produced by some but not all flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This paper explores a mechanism for sunquake generation by the changes in magnetic field that occur during flares and CMEs, using MHD simulations with a semiempirical FAL-C atmosphere to demonstrate the generation of acoustic waves in the interior in response to changing magnetic tilt in the corona. We find that Alfvén–sound resonance combined with the ponderomotive force produces acoustic waves in the interior with sufficient energy to match sunquake observations when the magnetic field angle changes of the order of 10° in a region where the coronal field strength is a few hundred gauss or more. The most energetic sunquakes are produced when the coronal field is strong, while the variation of magnetic field strength with height and the timescale of the change in tilt are of secondary importance.

  14. SUNQUAKE GENERATION BY CORONAL MAGNETIC RESTRUCTURING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, A. J. B.; Mooney, M. K.; Leake, J. E.; Hudson, H. S.

    2016-01-01

    Sunquakes are the surface signatures of acoustic waves in the Sun’s interior that are produced by some but not all flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This paper explores a mechanism for sunquake generation by the changes in magnetic field that occur during flares and CMEs, using MHD simulations with a semiempirical FAL-C atmosphere to demonstrate the generation of acoustic waves in the interior in response to changing magnetic tilt in the corona. We find that Alfvén–sound resonance combined with the ponderomotive force produces acoustic waves in the interior with sufficient energy to match sunquake observations when the magnetic field angle changes of the order of 10° in a region where the coronal field strength is a few hundred gauss or more. The most energetic sunquakes are produced when the coronal field is strong, while the variation of magnetic field strength with height and the timescale of the change in tilt are of secondary importance.

  15. THE CORONAL ABUNDANCE ANOMALIES OF M DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Karovska, Margarita, E-mail: brian.wood@nrl.navy.mil [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance anomalies related to first ionization potential (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low-FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called FIP effect. For other stars, particularly very active ones, an 'inverse FIP effect' is often observed, with low-FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step toward modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD waves coursing through coronal loops can lead to a ponderomotive force that fractionates elements in a manner consistent with the FIP effect. We demonstrate that in certain circumstances this model can also lead to an inverse FIP effect, pointing the way to more detailed modeling of M dwarf coronal abundances in the future.

  16. The Coronal Abundance Anomalies of M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin; Karovska, Margarita

    2012-07-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance anomalies related to first ionization potential (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low-FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called FIP effect. For other stars, particularly very active ones, an "inverse FIP effect" is often observed, with low-FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step toward modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD waves coursing through coronal loops can lead to a ponderomotive force that fractionates elements in a manner consistent with the FIP effect. We demonstrate that in certain circumstances this model can also lead to an inverse FIP effect, pointing the way to more detailed modeling of M dwarf coronal abundances in the future.

  17. THE CORONAL ABUNDANCE ANOMALIES OF M DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin; Karovska, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance anomalies related to first ionization potential (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low-FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called FIP effect. For other stars, particularly very active ones, an 'inverse FIP effect' is often observed, with low-FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step toward modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD waves coursing through coronal loops can lead to a ponderomotive force that fractionates elements in a manner consistent with the FIP effect. We demonstrate that in certain circumstances this model can also lead to an inverse FIP effect, pointing the way to more detailed modeling of M dwarf coronal abundances in the future.

  18. EIT Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, J. B.; Fisher, Richard B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Before the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we had only the sketchiest of clues as to the nature and topology of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) below 1.1 - 1.2 solar radii. Occasionally, dimmings (or 'transient coronal holes') were observed in time series of soft X-ray images, but they were far less frequent than CME's. Simply by imaging the Sun frequently and continually at temperatures of 0.9 - 2.5 MK we have stumbled upon a zoo of CME phenomena in this previously obscured volume of the corona: (1) waves, (2) dimmings, and (3) a great variety of ejecta. In the three and a half years since our first observations of coronal waves associated with CME's, combined Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) and extreme ultra-violet imaging telescope (EIT) synoptic observations have become a standard prediction tool for space weather forecasters, but our progress in actually understanding the CME phenomenon in the low corona has been somewhat slower. I will summarize the observations of waves, hot (> 0.9 MK) and cool ejecta, and some of the interpretations advanced to date. I will try to identify those phenomena, analysis of which could most benefit from the spectroscopic information available from ultraviolet coronograph spectrometer (UVCS) observations.

  19. Hereditary folate malabsorption: A positively charged amino acid at position 113 of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) is required for folic acid binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasry, Inbal; Berman, Bluma; Glaser, Fabian; Jansen, Gerrit; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2009-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) mediates intestinal folate uptake at acidic pH. Some loss of folic acid (FA) transport mutations in PCFT from hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM) patients cluster in R113, thereby suggesting a functional role for this residue. Herein, unlike non-conservative substitutions, an R113H mutant displayed 80-fold increase in the FA transport Km while retaining parental Vmax, hence indicating a major fall in folate substrate affinity. Furthermore, consistent with the preservation of 9% of parental transport activity, R113H transfectants displayed a substantial decrease in the FA growth requirement relative to mock transfectants. Homology modeling based on the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli transporter homologues EmrD and glycerol-3-phosphate transporter revealed that the R113H rotamer properly protrudes into the cytoplasmic face of the minor cleft normally occupied by R113. These findings constitute the first demonstration that a basic amino acid at position 113 is required for folate substrate binding.

  20. ROLE OF THE CORONAL ALFVÉN SPEED IN MODULATING THE SOLAR-WIND HELIUM ABUNDANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.-M., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The helium abundance He/H in the solar wind is relatively constant at ∼0.04 in high-speed streams, but varies in phase with the sunspot number in slow wind, from ∼0.01 at solar minimum to ∼0.04 at maximum. Suggested mechanisms for helium fractionation have included frictional coupling to protons and resonant interactions with high-frequency Alfvénic fluctuations. We compare He/H measurements during 1995–2015 with coronal parameters derived from source-surface extrapolations of photospheric field maps. We find that the near-Earth helium abundance is an increasing function of the magnetic field strength and Alfvén speed v {sub A} in the outer corona, while being only weakly correlated with the proton flux density. Throughout the solar cycle, fast wind is associated with short-term increases in v {sub A} near the source surface; resonance with Alfvén waves, with v {sub A} and the relative speed of α -particles and protons decreasing with increasing heliocentric distance, may then lead to enhanced He/H at 1 au. The modulation of helium in slow wind reflects the tendency for the associated coronal Alfvén speeds to rise steeply from sunspot minimum, when this wind is concentrated around the source-surface neutral line, to sunspot maximum, when the source-surface field attains its peak strengths. The helium abundance near the source surface may represent a balance between collisional decoupling from protons and Alfvén wave acceleration.

  1. The acceleration of electrons at a spherical coronal shock in a streamer-like coronal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Xiangliang, E-mail: kongx@sdu.edu.cn; Chen, Yao, E-mail: yaochen@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China); Guo, Fan, E-mail: guofan.ustc@gmail.com [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-03-25

    We study the effect of large-scale coronal magnetic field on the electron acceleration at a spherical coronal shock using a test-particle method. The coronal field is approximated by an analytical solution with a streamer-like magnetic field featured by partially open magnetic field and a current sheet at the equator atop the closed region. It shows that the closed field plays the role of a trapping agency of shock-accelerated electrons, allowing for repetitive reflection and acceleration, therefore can greatly enhance the shock-electron acceleration efficiency. It is found that, with an ad hoc pitch-angle scattering, electron injected in the open field at the shock flank can be accelerated to high energies as well. In addition, if the shock is faster or stronger, a relatively harder electron energy spectrum and a larger maximum energy can be achieved.

  2. Evidence of thermal conduction depression in hot coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Sun, Xudong; Provornikova, Elena; Davila, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Slow magnetoacoustic waves were first detected in hot (>6 MK) flare loops by the SOHO/SUMER spectrometer as Doppler shift oscillations in Fe XIX and Fe XXI lines. These oscillations are identified as standing slow-mode waves because the estimated phase speeds are close to the sound speed in the loop and some cases show a quarter period phase shift between velocity and intensity oscillations. The observed very rapid excitation and damping of standing slow mode waves have been studied by many authors using theories and numerical simulations, however, the exact mechanisms remain not well understood. Recently, flare-induced longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot post-flare loops have been detected by SDO/AIA. These oscillations have the similar physical properties as SUMER loop oscillations, and have been interpreted as the slow-mode waves. The multi-wavelength AIA observations with high spatio-temporal resolution and wide temperature coverage allow us to explore the wave excitation and damping mechanisms with an unprecedented detail to develope new coronal seismology. In this paper, we present accurate measurements of the effective adiabatic index (γeff) in the hot plasma from the electron temperature and density wave signals of a flare-induced longitudinal wave event using SDO/AIA data. Our results strikingly and clearly reveal that thermal conduction is highly depressed in hot (˜10 MK) post-flare loops and suggest that the compressive viscosity is the dominant wave damping mechanism which allows determination of the viscosity coefficient from the observables by coronal seismology. This new finding challenges our current understanding of thermal energy transport in solar and stellar flares, and may provide an alternative explanation of long-duration events and enhance our understand of coronal heating mechanism. We will discuss our results based on non-ideal MHD theory and simulations. We will also discuss the flare trigger mechanism based on magnetic topology

  3. Proton decay theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay

  4. An introduction to proton conduction in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, F.W.

    1980-09-01

    Proton conducting solids have been studied intensively in recent years due to their potential use as ion conducting separators in efficient fuel cells for electricity generation. This report describes fuel cell - and other possible applications of solid proton conductors. The best performing materials known today are listed. Typical synthetic routes and some models for proton transport in solids are discussed. Hints to future research are given. The litterature collected for this report covers mainly the period 1974-1980. (author)

  5. A Proton-Cyclotron Wave Storm Generated by Unstable Proton Distribution Functions in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, R. T.; Alexander, R. L.; Stevens, M.; Wilson, L. B., III; Moya, P. S.; Vinas, A.; Jian, L. K.; Roberts, D. A.; O’Modhrain, S.; Gilbert, J. A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We use audification of 0.092 seconds cadence magnetometer data from the Wind spacecraft to identify waves with amplitudes greater than 0.1 nanoteslas near the ion gyrofrequency (approximately 0.1 hertz) with duration longer than 1 hour during 2008. We present one of the most common types of event for a case study and find it to be a proton-cyclotron wave storm, coinciding with highly radial magnetic field and a suprathermal proton beam close in density to the core distribution itself. Using linear Vlasov analysis, we conclude that the long-duration, large-amplitude waves are generated by the instability of the proton distribution function. The origin of the beam is unknown, but the radial field period is found in the trailing edge of a fast solar wind stream and resembles other events thought to be caused by magnetic field footpoint motion or interchange reconnection between coronal holes and closed field lines in the corona.

  6. Interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament into the medial compartment of the knee joint on coronal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Ki Jeong; Wang, Joon Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bong Keun [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the overall prevalence and clinical significance of interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) into the medial compartment of the knee joint in coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We retrospectively reviewed 317 consecutive patients referred for knee MRI at our institution between October 2009 and December 2009. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint on proton coronal MRI was evaluated dichotomously (i.e., present or absent). We analyzed the interposition according to its prevalence as well as its relationship with right-left sidedness, gender, age, and disease categories (osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament tear, and medial meniscus tear). Prevalence of interposition of PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint was 47.0% (149/317). There was no right (50.0%, 83/166) to left (43.7%, 66/151) or male (50.3%, 87/173) to female (43.1%, 62/144) differences in the prevalence. There was no significant association between the prevalence and age, or the disease categories. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint is observed in almost half of patients on proton coronal MRI of the knee. Its presence is not associated with any particular factors including knee pathology and may be regarded as a normal MR finding.

  7. Progress towards vertical transport study of proton-irradiated InAs/GaSb type-II strained-layer superlattice materials for space-based infrared detectors using magnetoresistance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Mitchell C.; Morath, Christian P.; Fahey, Stephen; Klein, Brianna; Cowan, Vincent M.; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II strained-layer superlattice (T2SLS) materials are being considered for space-based infrared detector applications. However, an inadequate understanding of the role of carrier transport, specifically the vertical mobility, in the radiation tolerance of T2SLS detectors remains. Here, progress towards a vertical transport study of proton-irradiated, p-type InAs/GaSb T2SLS materials using magnetoresistance measurements is reported. Measurements in the growth direction of square mesas formed from InAs/GaSb superlattice material were performed using two distinct contact geometries in a Kelvin mode setup at variable magnetic fields, ranging from -9 T to 9 T, and temperatures, ranging from 5 K and 300 K. The results here suggested multi-carrier conduction and a field-dependent series resistance from the contact layer were present. The implications of these results and the plans for future magnetoresistance measurements on proton-irradiated T2SLS materials are discussed.

  8. Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Faculty ii INDUSTRY TRAVEL Domestic Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Transportation Policy), Washington, DC Department of...developed between the railroad and trucking industries. Railroads: Today’s seven Class I freight railroad systems move 42% of the nation’s intercity ...has been successfully employed in London to reduce congestion and observed by this industry study during its travels . It is currently being

  9. Density Fluctuations in a Polar Coronal Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Michael; D’Huys, Elke; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2018-06-01

    We have measured the root-mean-square (rms) amplitude of intensity fluctuations, ΔI, in plume and interplume regions of a polar coronal hole. These intensity fluctuations correspond to density fluctuations. Using data from the Sun Watcher using the Active Pixel System detector and Image Processing on the Project for Onboard Autonomy (Proba2), our results extend up to a height of about 1.35 R ⊙. One advantage of the rms analysis is that it does not rely on a detailed evaluation of the power spectrum, which is limited by noise levels to low heights in the corona. The rms approach can be performed up to larger heights where the noise level is greater, provided that the noise itself can be quantified. At low heights, both the absolute ΔI, and the amplitude relative to the mean intensity, ΔI/I, decrease with height. However, starting at about 1.2 R ⊙, ΔI/I increases, reaching 20%–40% by 1.35 R ⊙. This corresponds to density fluctuations of Δn e/n e ≈ 10%–20%. The increasing relative amplitude implies that the density fluctuations are generated in the corona itself. One possibility is that the density fluctuations are generated by an instability of Alfvén waves. This generation mechanism is consistent with some theoretical models and with observations of Alfvén wave amplitudes in coronal holes. Although we find that the energy of the observed density fluctuations is small, these fluctuations are likely to play an important indirect role in coronal heating by promoting the reflection of Alfvén waves and driving turbulence.

  10. Coronal Loops: Evolving Beyond the Isothermal Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Allen, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Are coronal loops isothermal? A controversy over this question has arisen recently because different investigators using different techniques have obtained very different answers. Analysis of SOHO-EIT and TRACE data using narrowband filter ratios to obtain temperature maps has produced several key publications that suggest that coronal loops may be isothermal. We have constructed a multi-thermal distribution for several pixels along a relatively isolated coronal loop on the southwest limb of the solar disk using spectral line data from SOHO-CDS taken on 1998 Apr 20. These distributions are clearly inconsistent with isothermal plasma along either the line of sight or the length of the loop, and suggested rather that the temperature increases from the footpoints to the loop top. We speculated originally that these differences could be attributed to pixel size -- CDS pixels are larger, and more `contaminating' material would be expected along the line of sight. To test this idea, we used CDS iron line ratios from our data set to mimic the isothermal results from the narrowband filter instruments. These ratios indicated that the temperature gradient along the loop was flat, despite the fact that a more complete analysis of the same data showed this result to be false! The CDS pixel size was not the cause of the discrepancy; rather, the problem lies with the isothermal approximation used in EIT and TRACE analysis. These results should serve as a strong warning to anyone using this simplistic method to obtain temperature. This warning is echoed on the EIT web page: ``Danger! Enter at your own risk!'' In other words, values for temperature may be found, but they may have nothing to do with physical reality. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University.

  11. A multi-channel coronal spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, D. A.; Orrall, F. Q.; Zane, R.

    1973-01-01

    We describe a new multi-channel coronal spectrophotometer system, presently being installed at Mees Solar Observatory, Mount Haleakala, Maui. The apparatus is designed to record and interpret intensities from many sections of the visible and near-visible spectral regions simultaneously, with relatively high spatial and temporal resolution. The detector, a thermoelectrically cooled silicon vidicon camera tube, has its central target area divided into a rectangular array of about 100,000 pixels and is read out in a slow-scan (about 2 sec/frame) mode. Instrument functioning is entirely under PDP 11/45 computer control, and interfacing is via the CAMAC system.

  12. Evolution of coronal and interplanetary magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous studies have provided the detailed information necessary for a substantive synthesis of the empirical relation between the magnetic field of the sun and the structure of the interplanetary field. The author points out the latest techniques and studies of the global solar magnetic field and its relation to the interplanetary field. The potential to overcome most of the limitations of present methods of analysis exists in techniques of modelling the coronal magnetic field using observed solar data. Such empirical models are, in principle, capable of establishing the connection between a given heliospheric point and its magnetically-connected photospheric point, as well as the physical basis for the connection. (Auth.)

  13. Solar radio bursts of spectral type II, coronal shocks, and optical coronal transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, A.; Dryer, M.

    1981-01-01

    An examination is presented of the association of solar radio bursts of spectral type II and coronal shocks with solar flare ejecta observed in H-alpha, the green coronal line, and white-light coronagraphs. It is suggested that fast-moving optical coronal transients should for the most part be identified with piston-type phenomena well behind the outward-traveling shock waves that generate type II radio bursts. A general model is presented which relates type II radio bursts and coronal shocks to optically observed ejecta and consists of three main velocity regimes: (1) a quasi-hemispherical shock wave moving outward from the flare at speeds of 1000-2000 km/sec and Alfven Mach number of about 1.5; (2) the velocity of the piston driving the shock, on the order of 0.8 that of the shock; and (3) the regime of the slower-moving H-alpha ejecta, with velocities of 300-500 km/sec.

  14. THE CONTRACTION OF OVERLYING CORONAL LOOP AND THE ROTATING MOTION OF A SIGMOID FILAMENT DURING ITS ERUPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, X. L.; Qu, Z. Q.; Xue, Z. K.; Deng, L. H.; Ma, L.; Kong, D. F. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Pan, G. M. [College of Mathematics Physics and Information Engineering, Jiaxing University, Jiaxing 314001 (China); Liu, J. H. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2013-06-15

    We present an observation of overlying coronal loop contraction and rotating motion of the sigmoid filament during its eruption on 2012 May 22 observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Our results show that the twist can be transported into the filament from the lower atmosphere to the higher atmosphere. The successive contraction of the coronal loops was due to a suddenly reduced magnetic pressure underneath the filament, which was caused by the rising of the filament. Before the sigmoid filament eruption, there was a counterclockwise flow in the photosphere at the right feet of the filament and the contraction loops and a convergence flow at the left foot of the filament. The hot and cool materials have inverse motion along the filament before the filament eruption. Moreover, two coronal loops overlying the filament first experienced brightening, expansion, and contraction successively. At the beginning of the rising and rotation of the left part of the filament, the second coronal loop exhibited rapid contraction. The top of the second coronal loop also showed counterclockwise rotation during the contraction process. After the contraction of the second loop, the left part of the filament rotated counterclockwise and expanded toward the right of NOAA AR 11485. During the filament expansion, the right part of the filament also exhibited counterclockwise rotation like a tornado.

  15. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

  16. Evaluation of the Minifilament-Eruption Scenario for Solar Coronal Jets in Polar Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikie, Tomi K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David; Moore, Ronald L.; Savage, Sabrina L.

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are suspected to result from magnetic reconnection low in the Sun's atmosphere. Sterling et al. (2015) looked as 20 jets in polar coronal holes, using X-ray images from the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). They suggested that each jet was driven by the eruption of twisted closed magnetic field carrying a small-scale filament, which they call a 'minifilament', and that the jet was produced by reconnection of the erupting field with surrounding open field. In this study, we carry out a more extensive examination of polar coronal jets. From 180 hours of XRT polar coronal hole observations spread over two years (2014-2016), we identified 130 clearly-identifiable X-ray jet events and thus determined an event rate of over 17 jets per day per in the Hinode/XRT field of view. From the broader set, we selected 25 of the largest and brightest events for further study in AIA 171, 193, 211, and 304 Angstrom images. We find that at least the majority of the jets follow the minifilament-eruption scenario, although for some cases the evolution of the minifilament in the onset of its eruption is more complex than presented in the simplified schematic of Sterling et al. (2015). For all cases in which we could make a clear determination, the spire of the X-ray jet drifted laterally away from the jet-base-edge bright point; this spire drift away from the bright point is consistent with expectations of the minifilament-eruption scenario for coronal-jet production. This work was supported with funding from the NASA/MSFC Hinode Project Office, and from the NASA HGI program.

  17. Liposome Model Systems to Study the Endosomal Escape of Cell-Penetrating Peptides: Transport across Phospholipid Membranes Induced by a Proton Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Madani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Detergent-mediated reconstitution of bacteriorhodopsin (BR into large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs was investigated, and the effects were carefully characterized for every step of the procedure. LUVs were prepared by the extrusion method, and their size and stability were examined by dynamic light scattering. BR was incorporated into the LUVs using the detergent-mediated reconstitution method and octyl glucoside (OG as detergent. The result of measuring pH outside the LUVs suggested that in the presence of light, BR pumps protons from the outside to the inside of the LUVs, creating acidic pH inside the vesicles. LUVs with 20% negatively charged headgroups were used to model endosomes with BR incorporated into the membrane. The fluorescein-labeled cell-penetrating peptide penetratin was entrapped inside these BR-containing LUVs. The light-induced proton pumping activity of BR has allowed us to observe the translocation of fluorescein-labeled penetratin across the vesicle membrane.

  18. Porters and neurotransmitter transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelson, Nathan; Lill, H

    1994-01-01

    Uptake of neurotransmitters involves multiple transporters acting in different brain locations under different physiological conditions. The vesicular transporters are driven by a proton-motive force generated by a V-ATPase and their substrates are taken up via proton/substrate exchange. The plasma

  19. Net-baryon-, net-proton-, and net-charge kurtosis in heavy-ion collisions within a relativistic transport approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrgang, Marlene; Schuster, Tim; Stock, Reinhard; Mitrovski, Michael; Bleicher, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    We explore the potential of net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis measurements to investigate the properties of hot and dense matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Contrary to calculations in a grand-canonical ensemble we explicitly take into account exact electric and baryon charge conservation on an event-by-event basis. This drastically limits the width of baryon fluctuations. A simple model to account for this is to assume a grand-canonical distribution with a sharp cut-off at the tails. We present baseline predictions of the energy dependence of the net-baryon, net-proton and net-charge kurtosis for central (b≤2.75 fm) Pb+Pb/Au+Au collisions from E lab =2A GeV to √(s NN )=200 GeV from the UrQMD model. While the net-charge kurtosis is compatible with values around zero, the net-baryon number decreases to large negative values with decreasing beam energy. The net-proton kurtosis becomes only slightly negative for low √(s NN ). (orig.)

  20. Extreme ultraviolet observations of coronal holes. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, J.D.; Sheeley, N.R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet Skylab and ground-based solar magnetic field data have been combined to study the origin and evolution of coronal holes. It is shown that holes exist only within the large-scale unipolar magnetic cells into which the solar surface is divided at any given time. A well-defined boundary zone usually exists between the edge of a hole and the neutral line which marks the edge of its magnetic cell. This boundary zone is the region across which a cell is connected by magnetic arcades with adjacent cells of opposite polarity. Three pieces of observational evidence are offered to support the hypothesis that the magnetic lines of force from a hole are open. Kitt Peak magnetograms are used to show that, at least on a relative scale, the average field strengths within holes are quite variable, but indistinguishable from the field strengths in other quiet parts of the Sun's surface. Finally it is shown that the large, equatorial holes characteristic of the declining phase of the last solar cycle during Skylab (1973-74) were all formed as a result of the mergence of bipolar magnetic regions (BMR's), confirming an earlier hypothesis by Timothy et al. (1975). Systematic application of this model to the different aspects of the solar cycle correctly predicts the occurrence of both large, equatorial coronal holes (the 'M-regions' which cause recurrent geomagnetic storms) and the polar cap holes. (Auth.)

  1. Plasma Evolution within an Erupting Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, David M.; Harra, Louise K.; Matthews, Sarah A.; Warren, Harry P.; Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Doschek, George A.; Hara, Hirohisa; Jenkins, Jack M.

    2018-03-01

    Coronal cavities have previously been observed to be associated with long-lived quiescent filaments and are thought to correspond to the associated magnetic flux rope. Although the standard flare model predicts a coronal cavity corresponding to the erupting flux rope, these have only been observed using broadband imaging data, restricting an analysis to the plane-of-sky. We present a unique set of spectroscopic observations of an active region filament seen erupting at the solar limb in the extreme ultraviolet. The cavity erupted and expanded rapidly, with the change in rise phase contemporaneous with an increase in nonthermal electron energy flux of the associated flare. Hot and cool filamentary material was observed to rise with the erupting flux rope, disappearing suddenly as the cavity appeared. Although strongly blueshifted plasma continued to be observed flowing from the apex of the erupting flux rope, this outflow soon ceased. These results indicate that the sudden injection of energy from the flare beneath forced the rapid eruption and expansion of the flux rope, driving strong plasma flows, which resulted in the eruption of an under-dense filamentary flux rope.

  2. BAYESIAN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SEISMOLOGY OF CORONAL LOOPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arregui, I.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2011-01-01

    We perform a Bayesian parameter inference in the context of resonantly damped transverse coronal loop oscillations. The forward problem is solved in terms of parametric results for kink waves in one-dimensional flux tubes in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. For the inverse problem, we adopt a Bayesian approach to infer the most probable values of the relevant parameters, for given observed periods and damping times, and to extract their confidence levels. The posterior probability distribution functions are obtained by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating observed uncertainties in a consistent manner. We find well-localized solutions in the posterior probability distribution functions for two of the three parameters of interest, namely the Alfven travel time and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The obtained estimates for the Alfven travel time are consistent with previous inversion results, but the method enables us to additionally constrain the transverse inhomogeneity length scale and to estimate real error bars for each parameter. When observational estimates for the density contrast are used, the method enables us to fully constrain the three parameters of interest. These results can serve to improve our current estimates of unknown physical parameters in coronal loops and to test the assumed theoretical model.

  3. Precipitation and Release of Solar Energetic Particles from the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Lulu, E-mail: mzhang@fit.edu [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 W. University Blvd., Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2017-09-10

    Most solar energetic particles (SEPs) are produced in the corona. They propagate through complex coronal magnetic fields subject to scattering and diffusion across the averaged field lines by turbulence. We examine the behaviors of particle transport using a stochastic 3D focused transport simulation in a potential field source surface model of coronal magnetic field. The model is applied to an SEP event on 2010 February 7. We study three scenarios of particle injection at (i) the compact solar flare site, (ii) the coronal mass ejection (CME) shock, and (iii) the EUV wave near the surface. The majority of particles injected on open field lines are able to escape the corona. We found that none of our models can explain the observations of wide longitudinal SEP spread without perpendicular diffusion. If the perpendicular diffusion is about 10% of what is derived from the random walk of field lines at the rate of supergranular diffusion, particles injected at the compact solar flare site can spread to a wide range of longitude and latitude, very similar to the behavior of particles injected at a large CME shock. Stronger pitch-angle scattering results in a little more lateral spread by holding the particles in the corona for longer periods of time. Some injected particles eventually end up precipitating onto the solar surface. Even with a very small perpendicular diffusion, the pattern of the particle precipitation can be quite complicated depending on the detailed small-scale coronal magnetic field structures, which could be seen with future sensitive gamma-ray telescopes.

  4. Precipitation and Release of Solar Energetic Particles from the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Lulu

    2017-01-01

    Most solar energetic particles (SEPs) are produced in the corona. They propagate through complex coronal magnetic fields subject to scattering and diffusion across the averaged field lines by turbulence. We examine the behaviors of particle transport using a stochastic 3D focused transport simulation in a potential field source surface model of coronal magnetic field. The model is applied to an SEP event on 2010 February 7. We study three scenarios of particle injection at (i) the compact solar flare site, (ii) the coronal mass ejection (CME) shock, and (iii) the EUV wave near the surface. The majority of particles injected on open field lines are able to escape the corona. We found that none of our models can explain the observations of wide longitudinal SEP spread without perpendicular diffusion. If the perpendicular diffusion is about 10% of what is derived from the random walk of field lines at the rate of supergranular diffusion, particles injected at the compact solar flare site can spread to a wide range of longitude and latitude, very similar to the behavior of particles injected at a large CME shock. Stronger pitch-angle scattering results in a little more lateral spread by holding the particles in the corona for longer periods of time. Some injected particles eventually end up precipitating onto the solar surface. Even with a very small perpendicular diffusion, the pattern of the particle precipitation can be quite complicated depending on the detailed small-scale coronal magnetic field structures, which could be seen with future sensitive gamma-ray telescopes.

  5. Precipitation and Release of Solar Energetic Particles from the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Lulu

    2017-09-01

    Most solar energetic particles (SEPs) are produced in the corona. They propagate through complex coronal magnetic fields subject to scattering and diffusion across the averaged field lines by turbulence. We examine the behaviors of particle transport using a stochastic 3D focused transport simulation in a potential field source surface model of coronal magnetic field. The model is applied to an SEP event on 2010 February 7. We study three scenarios of particle injection at (I) the compact solar flare site, (II) the coronal mass ejection (CME) shock, and (III) the EUV wave near the surface. The majority of particles injected on open field lines are able to escape the corona. We found that none of our models can explain the observations of wide longitudinal SEP spread without perpendicular diffusion. If the perpendicular diffusion is about 10% of what is derived from the random walk of field lines at the rate of supergranular diffusion, particles injected at the compact solar flare site can spread to a wide range of longitude and latitude, very similar to the behavior of particles injected at a large CME shock. Stronger pitch-angle scattering results in a little more lateral spread by holding the particles in the corona for longer periods of time. Some injected particles eventually end up precipitating onto the solar surface. Even with a very small perpendicular diffusion, the pattern of the particle precipitation can be quite complicated depending on the detailed small-scale coronal magnetic field structures, which could be seen with future sensitive gamma-ray telescopes.

  6. Properties of Coronal Shocks at the Origin of SEP events Observed by Only One Single Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lario, D.; Kwon, R.

    2017-12-01

    The simultaneous observation of solar energetic particle (SEP) events by multiple spacecraft distributed in the interplanetary medium depends not only on the spatial separation among the different spacecraft, but also on the properties of the particle sources and the characteristics of the SEP transport in interplanetary space. Among the SEP events observed by STEREO-A, STEREO-B and/or near-Earth spacecraft during solar cycle 24, we select SEP events observed by a single spacecraft (specifically, the SEP events observed only by near-Earth spacecraft on 2012 April 5, 2011 September 4, and 2013 August 17). We analyze whether the properties of the coronal shock associated with the origin of the events (as seen in extreme-ultraviolet and white-light coronal images) differ from those associated with SEP events observed by two or three spacecraft. For the selected events we find that the associated CMEs are, in general, narrower than those associated with SEP events observed by two or three spacecraft. The confined extension of the parent coronal shock and the absence of magnetic connection between distant spacecraft and the regions of the expanding coronal shock able to efficiently accelerate SEPs seem to be the conditions leading to intense SEP events observed only over narrow regions of interplanetary space by spacecraft magnetically connected to regions close to the parent eruption site. Weak and gradual intensity increases observed in extended regions of space might involve transport processes and/or later connections established with interplanetary shocks. Systematic analyses of a larger number of events are required before drawing firm conclusions.

  7. Mid-term periodicities and heliospheric modulation of coronal index ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRITHVI RAJ SINGH

    2018-03-06

    Mar 6, 2018 ... long-term periodicity of ∼11 years, with different solar activities. The physical processes that occur inside the. Sun are reflected by a periodic character in terms of coronal index of coronal emission (Fe XIV 530.3 nm) during solar activity cycles. Recently, a link between the strength of photospheric magnetic ...

  8. Coronal Mass Ejection Data Clustering and Visualization of Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruizhe; Angryk, Rafal A.; Riley, Pete; Filali Boubrahimi, Soukaina

    2018-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be categorized as either “magnetic clouds” (MCs) or non-MCs. Features such as a large magnetic field, low plasma-beta, and low proton temperature suggest that a CME event is also an MC event; however, so far there is neither a definitive method nor an automatic process to distinguish the two. Human labeling is time-consuming, and results can fluctuate owing to the imprecise definition of such events. In this study, we approach the problem of MC and non-MC distinction from a time series data analysis perspective and show how clustering can shed some light on this problem. Although many algorithms exist for traditional data clustering in the Euclidean space, they are not well suited for time series data. Problems such as inadequate distance measure, inaccurate cluster center description, and lack of intuitive cluster representations need to be addressed for effective time series clustering. Our data analysis in this work is twofold: clustering and visualization. For clustering we compared the results from the popular hierarchical agglomerative clustering technique to a distance density clustering heuristic we developed previously for time series data clustering. In both cases, dynamic time warping will be used for similarity measure. For classification as well as visualization, we use decision trees to aggregate single-dimensional clustering results to form a multidimensional time series decision tree, with averaged time series to present each decision. In this study, we achieved modest accuracy and, more importantly, an intuitive interpretation of how different parameters contribute to an MC event.

  9. Quality of coroner's post-mortems in a UK hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mahdy, Husayn

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was, principally, to look at the coroner's post-mortem report quality regarding adult medical patients admitted to an English hospital; and to compare results with Royal College of Pathologists guidelines. Hospital clinical notes of adult medical patients dying in 2011 and who were referred to the coroner's office to determine the cause of death were scrutinised. Their clinical care was also reviewed. There needs to be a comprehensive approach to coroner's post-mortems such as routinely taking histological and microbiological specimens. Acute adult medical patient care needs to improve. Steps should be taken to ensure that comprehensive coroner's post-mortems are performed throughout the UK, including with routine histological and microbiological specimens examination. Additionally, closer collaboration between clinicians and pathologists needs to occur to improve emergency adult medical patient clinical care. The study highlights inadequacies in coroner's pathology services.

  10. Coronal oblique imaging of the knee: Can it increase radiologists' confidence in diagnosing posterior root meniscal tears?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagranda, B.U.; Leeman, J.; Costello, J.M.; Rafiee, B.; Harner, C.D.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the utility of the coronal oblique sequence in the interrogation of posterior root meniscal lesions. Materials and methods: Following international review board approval, 62 consecutive knee arthroscopy cases were referred to the musculoskeletal (MSK) radiologists from the same orthopaedic surgeon for imaging/surgical correlation of the posterior meniscal roots. Of 62 cases, 45 lateral and 46 medial menisci met the inclusion criteria. Imaging evaluation was performed with standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, including a coronal oblique proton density sequence. Two blinded fellowship-trained MSK radiologists independently evaluated the menisci on standard sequences indicating whether a tear was identified and then specifying a confidence score using a scale of 1–3 on each study interpreted. Immediately thereafter, the coronal oblique sequence was evaluated using the same method. Statistics were performed on meniscal lesions involving the posterior horn/root junction or isolated root tears comparing confidence scores. Results: Reader A identified nine posterior horn/root junction tears and 14 isolated root tears. Following the addition of the coronal oblique sequence, confidence scores increased in three of 14 (21.4%) isolated root tears. All three final reads were concordant with arthroscopy. Reader B identified 10 posterior horn/root junction tears and 19 isolated root tears. The confidence score increased in six cases: five of 19 (26.3%) isolated root tears and one of 10 (10%) posterior horn/root junction tears. All six final reads were concordant with arthroscopy. Kappa coefficients indicated near perfect agreement. Conclusion: The coronal oblique sequence increased reader confidence in nearly 24% of the posterior root cases identified in this series

  11. Assessment of Coronal Radiographic Parameters of the Spine in the Treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Karami

    2016-10-01

    Preoperative coronal balance is very important to make a balanced spine after surgery. Other parameters like Lenke classification or main thoracic overcorrection did not affect postoperative coronal decompensation.

  12. Proton therapy project at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.; Akanuma, A.; Karasawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    Particle radiation which might present steeper dose distribution has received much attention as the third particle facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. Proton conformation with sharp fall-off is considered to be the radiation beam suitable for confining high doses to a target volume without complications and for verifying which factor out of high RBE or physical dose distribution is more essential for local control in malignant tumors. This paper discusses the current status of the spot scanning method, which allows three dimensional conformation radiotherapy, and preliminary results. Preliminary dose distribution with proton conformation technique was acquired by modifying a computer program for treatment planning in pion treatment. In a patient with prostate carcinoma receiving both proton and pion radiation therapy, proton conformation was found to confine high doses to the target area and spare both the bladder and rectum well; and pion therapy was found to deliver non-homogeneous radiation to these organs. Although there are some obstacles in the proton project at PSI, experimental investigations are encouraging. The dynamic spot scanning method with combination of the kicker magnet, wobbler magnet, range shifter, patient transporter, and position sensitive monitor provides highly confined dose distribution, making it possible to increase total doses and thus to improve local control rate. Proton confirmation is considered to be useful for verifying possible biological effectiveness of negative pion treatment of PSI as well. (N.K.)

  13. Proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  14. A model for a stable coronal loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoven, G.V.; Chiuderi, C.; Giachetti, R.

    1977-01-01

    We present here a new plasma-physics model of a stable active-region arch which corresponds to the structure observed in the EUV. Pressure gradients are seen, so that the equilibrium magnetic field must depart from the force-free form valid in the surrounding corona. We take advantage of the data and of the approximate cylindrical symmetry to develop a modified form of the commonly assumed sheared-spiral structure. The dynamic MHD behavior of this new pressure/field model is then evaluated by the Newcomb criterion, taken from controlled-fusion physics, and the results show short-wavelength stability in a specific parameter range. Thus we demonstrate the possibility, for pressure profiles with widths of the order of the magnetic-field scale, that such arches can persist for reasonable periods. Finally, the spatial proportions and magnetic fields of a characteristic stable coronal loop are described

  15. Image-Optimized Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Shaela I.; Uritsky, Vadim; Davila, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    We have reported previously on a new method we are developing for using image-based information to improve global coronal magnetic field models. In that work we presented early tests of the method which proved its capability to improve global models based on flawed synoptic magnetograms, given excellent constraints on the field in the model volume. In this follow-up paper we present the results of similar tests given field constraints of a nature that could realistically be obtained from quality white-light coronagraph images of the lower corona. We pay particular attention to difficulties associated with the line-of-sight projection of features outside of the assumed coronagraph image plane, and the effect on the outcome of the optimization of errors in localization of constraints. We find that substantial improvement in the model field can be achieved with this type of constraints, even when magnetic features in the images are located outside of the image plane.

  16. Endogenous Magnetic Reconnection in Solar Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari-Targhi, M.; Coppi, B.; Basu, B.; Fletcher, A.; Golub, L.

    2017-12-01

    We propose that a magneto-thermal reconnection process occurring in coronal loops be the source of the heating of the Solar Corona [1]. In the adopted model, magnetic reconnection is associated with electron temperature gradients, anisotropic electron temperature fluctuations and plasma current density gradients [2]. The input parameters for our theoretical model are derived from the most recent observations of the Solar Corona. In addition, the relevant (endogenous) collective modes can produce high energy particle populations. An endogenous reconnection process is defined as being driven by factors internal to the region where reconnection takes place. *Sponsored in part by the U.S. D.O.E. and the Kavli Foundation* [1] Beafume, P., Coppi, B. and Golub, L., (1992) Ap. J. 393, 396. [2] Coppi, B. and Basu, B. (2017) MIT-LNS Report HEP 17/01.

  17. Image-optimized Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Shaela I.; Uritsky, Vadim; Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: shaela.i.jones-mecholsky@nasa.gov, E-mail: shaela.i.jonesmecholsky@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 670, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    We have reported previously on a new method we are developing for using image-based information to improve global coronal magnetic field models. In that work, we presented early tests of the method, which proved its capability to improve global models based on flawed synoptic magnetograms, given excellent constraints on the field in the model volume. In this follow-up paper, we present the results of similar tests given field constraints of a nature that could realistically be obtained from quality white-light coronagraph images of the lower corona. We pay particular attention to difficulties associated with the line-of-sight projection of features outside of the assumed coronagraph image plane and the effect on the outcome of the optimization of errors in the localization of constraints. We find that substantial improvement in the model field can be achieved with these types of constraints, even when magnetic features in the images are located outside of the image plane.

  18. Characteristics of polar coronal hole jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekhar, K.; Bemporad, A.; Banerjee, D.; Gupta, G. R.; Teriaca, L.

    2014-01-01

    Context. High spatial- and temporal-resolution images of coronal hole regions show a dynamical environment where mass flows and jets are frequently observed. These jets are believed to be important for the coronal heating and the acceleration of the fast solar wind. Aims: We studied the dynamics of two jets seen in a polar coronal hole with a combination of imaging from EIS and XRT onboard Hinode. We observed drift motions related to the evolution and formation of these small-scale jets, which we tried to model as well. Methods: Stack plots were used to find the drift and flow speeds of the jets. A toymodel was developed by assuming that the observed jet is generated by a sequence of single reconnection events where single unresolved blobs of plasma are ejected along open field lines, then expand and fall back along the same path, following a simple ballistic motion. Results: We found observational evidence that supports the idea that polar jets are very likely produced by multiple small-scale reconnections occurring at different times in different locations. These eject plasma blobs that flow up and down with a motion very similar to a simple ballistic motion. The associated drift speed of the first jet is estimated to be ≈27 km s-1. The average outward speed of the first jet is ≈171 km s-1, well below the escape speed, hence if simple ballistic motion is considered, the plasma will not escape the Sun. The second jet was observed in the south polar coronal hole with three XRT filters, namely, C-poly, Al-poly, and Al-mesh filters. Many small-scale (≈3″-5″) fast (≈200-300 km s-1) ejections of plasma were observed on the same day; they propagated outwards. We observed that the stronger jet drifted at all altitudes along the jet with the same drift speed of ≃7 km s-1. We also observed that the bright point associated with the first jet is a part of sigmoid structure. The time of appearance of the sigmoid and that of the ejection of plasma from the bright

  19. EUV and radio spectrum of coronal holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiuderi Drago, F [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Florence (Italy)

    1980-03-01

    From the intensity of 19 EUV lines whose formation temperature anti T ranges from 3 x 10/sup 4/ to 1.4 x 10/sup 6/, two different models of the transition region and corona for the cell-centre and the network are derived. It is shown that both these models give radio brightness temperatures systematically higher than the observed ones. An agreement with radio data can be found only with lines formed at low temperature (anti T < 8.5 x 10/sup 5/) by decreasing the coronal temperature and the emission measure. The possibility of resolving the discrepancy by using different ion abundances has also been investigated with negative results.

  20. Coronal mass ejections and large geomagnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosling, J.T.; Bame, S.J.; McComas, D.J.; Phillips, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Previous work indicates that coronal mass ejection (CME) events in the solar wind at 1 AU can be identified by the presence of a flux of counterstreaming solar wind halo electrons (above about 80 eV). Using this technique to identify CMEs in 1 AU plasma data, the authors find that most large geomagnetic storms during the interval surrounding the last solar maximum (Aug. 1978-Oct. 1982) were associated with Earth-passage of interplanetary disturbances in which the Earth encountered both a shock and the CME driving the shock. However, only about one CME in six encountered by Earth was effective in causing a large geomagnetic storm. Slow CMEs which did not interact strongly with the ambient solar wind ahead were particularly ineffective in a geomagnetic sense

  1. Determination of Coronal Magnetic Fields from Vector Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1997-01-01

    During the course of the present contract we developed an 'evolutionary technique' for the determination of force-free coronal magnetic fields from vector magnetograph observations. The method can successfully generate nonlinear force- free fields (with non-constant-a) that match vector magnetograms. We demonstrated that it is possible to determine coronal magnetic fields from photospheric measurements, and we applied it to vector magnetograms of active regions. We have also studied theoretical models of coronal fields that lead to disruptions. Specifically, we have demonstrated that the determination of force-free fields from exact boundary data is a well-posed mathematical problem, by verifying that the computed coronal field agrees with an analytic force-free field when boundary data for the analytic field are used; demonstrated that it is possible to determine active-region coronal magnetic fields from photospheric measurements, by computing the coronal field above active region 5747 on 20 October 1989, AR6919 on 15 November 1991, and AR7260 on 18 August 1992, from data taken with the Stokes Polarimeter at Mees Solar Observatory, University of Hawaii; started to analyze active region 7201 on 19 June 1992 using measurements made with the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter at NSO/Sac Peak; investigated the effects of imperfections in the photospheric data on the computed coronal magnetic field; documented the coronal field structure of AR5747 and compared it to the morphology of footpoint emission in a flare, showing that the 'high- pressure' H-alpha footpoints are connected by coronal field lines; shown that the variation of magnetic field strength along current-carrying field lines is significantly different from the variation in a potential field, and that the resulting near-constant area of elementary flux tubes is consistent with observations; begun to develop realistic models of coronal fields which can be used to study flare trigger mechanisms; demonstrated that

  2. PROMINENCE ACTIVATION BY CORONAL FAST MODE SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takuya [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Asai, Ayumi [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: takahashi@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2015-03-01

    An X5.4 class flare occurred in active region NOAA11429 on 2012 March 7. The flare was associated with a very fast coronal mass ejection (CME) with a velocity of over 2500 km s{sup −1}. In the images taken with the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-B/COR1, a dome-like disturbance was seen to detach from an expanding CME bubble and propagated further. A Type-II radio burst was also observed at the same time. On the other hand, in extreme ultraviolet images obtained by the Solar Dynamic Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), the expanding dome-like structure and its footprint propagating to the north were observed. The footprint propagated with an average speed of about 670 km s{sup −1} and hit a prominence located at the north pole and activated it. During the activation, the prominence was strongly brightened. On the basis of some observational evidence, we concluded that the footprint in AIA images and the ones in COR1 images are the same, that is, the MHD fast mode shock front. With the help of a linear theory, the fast mode Mach number of the coronal shock is estimated to be between 1.11 and 1.29 using the initial velocity of the activated prominence. Also, the plasma compression ratio of the shock is enhanced to be between 1.18 and 2.11 in the prominence material, which we consider to be the reason for the strong brightening of the activated prominence. The applicability of linear theory to the shock problem is tested with a nonlinear MHD simulation.

  3. A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR THE PHOTOSPHERIC DRIVING OF NON-POTENTIAL SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinzierl, Marion; Yeates, Anthony R. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Mackay, Duncan H. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Henney, Carl J.; Arge, C. Nick, E-mail: marion.weinzierl@durham.ac.uk [Air Force Research Lab/Space Vehicles Directorate, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM (United States)

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we develop a new technique for driving global non-potential simulations of the Sun’s coronal magnetic field solely from sequences of radial magnetic maps of the solar photosphere. A primary challenge to driving such global simulations is that the required horizontal electric field cannot be uniquely determined from such maps. We show that an “inductive” electric field solution similar to that used by previous authors successfully reproduces specific features of the coronal field evolution in both single and multiple bipole simulations. For these cases, the true solution is known because the electric field was generated from a surface flux-transport model. The match for these cases is further improved by including the non-inductive electric field contribution from surface differential rotation. Then, using this reconstruction method for the electric field, we show that a coronal non-potential simulation can be successfully driven from a sequence of ADAPT maps of the photospheric radial field, without including additional physical observations which are not routinely available.

  4. Polar and equatorial coronal hole winds at solar minima: From the heliosphere to the inner corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E., E-mail: lzh@umich.edu [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Fast solar wind can be accelerated from at least two different sources: polar coronal holes and equatorial coronal holes. Little is known about the relationship between the wind coming from these two different latitudes and whether these two subcategories of fast wind evolve in the same way during the solar cycle. Nineteen years of Ulysses observations, from 1990 to 2009, combined with ACE observations from 1998 to the present provide us with in situ measurements of solar wind properties that span two entire solar cycles. These missions provide an ideal data set to study the properties and evolution of the fast solar wind originating from equatorial and polar holes. In this work, we focus on these two types of fast solar wind during the minima between solar cycles 22 and 23 and 23 and 24. We use data from SWICS, SWOOPS, and VHM/FGM on board Ulysses and SWICS, SWEPAM, and MAG on board ACE to analyze the proton kinetic, thermal, and dynamic characteristics, heavy ion composition, and magnetic field properties of these two fast winds. The comparison shows that: (1) their kinetic, thermal, compositional, and magnetic properties are significantly different at any time during the two minima and (2) they respond differently to the changes in solar activity from cycle 23 to 24. These results indicate that equatorial and polar fast solar wind are two separate subcategories of fast wind. We discuss the implications of these results and relate them to remote-sensing measurements of the properties of polar and equatorial coronal holes carried out in the inner corona during these two solar minima.

  5. Polar and equatorial coronal hole winds at solar minima: From the heliosphere to the inner corona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.

    2014-01-01

    Fast solar wind can be accelerated from at least two different sources: polar coronal holes and equatorial coronal holes. Little is known about the relationship between the wind coming from these two different latitudes and whether these two subcategories of fast wind evolve in the same way during the solar cycle. Nineteen years of Ulysses observations, from 1990 to 2009, combined with ACE observations from 1998 to the present provide us with in situ measurements of solar wind properties that span two entire solar cycles. These missions provide an ideal data set to study the properties and evolution of the fast solar wind originating from equatorial and polar holes. In this work, we focus on these two types of fast solar wind during the minima between solar cycles 22 and 23 and 23 and 24. We use data from SWICS, SWOOPS, and VHM/FGM on board Ulysses and SWICS, SWEPAM, and MAG on board ACE to analyze the proton kinetic, thermal, and dynamic characteristics, heavy ion composition, and magnetic field properties of these two fast winds. The comparison shows that: (1) their kinetic, thermal, compositional, and magnetic properties are significantly different at any time during the two minima and (2) they respond differently to the changes in solar activity from cycle 23 to 24. These results indicate that equatorial and polar fast solar wind are two separate subcategories of fast wind. We discuss the implications of these results and relate them to remote-sensing measurements of the properties of polar and equatorial coronal holes carried out in the inner corona during these two solar minima.

  6. Formation of an intense proton beam of microsecond duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelko, V [Efremov Inst. of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Giese, H; Schalk, S [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The proton beam facility PROFA serves as a test installation for ion source development and beam transport optimization for an intense pulsed proton beam of low kinetic energy, envisaged for ITER divertor load simulation. The present state of the investigations is discussed with emphasis on the diode operation parameters, beam divergence and beam transport efficiency. (author). 7 figs., 5 refs.

  7. Measurements of EUV coronal holes and open magnetic flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowder, C.; Qiu, J.; Leamon, R.; Liu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Coronal holes are regions on the Sun's surface that map the footprints of open magnetic field lines. We have developed an automated routine to detect and track boundaries of long-lived coronal holes using full-disk extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images obtained by SOHO/EIT, SDO/AIA, and STEREO/EUVI. We measure coronal hole areas and magnetic flux in these holes, and compare the measurements with calculations by the potential field source surface (PFSS) model. It is shown that, from 1996 through 2010, the total area of coronal holes measured with EIT images varies between 5% and 17% of the total solar surface area, and the total unsigned open flux varies between (2-5)× 10 22 Mx. The solar cycle dependence of these measurements is similar to the PFSS results, but the model yields larger hole areas and greater open flux than observed by EIT. The AIA/EUVI measurements from 2010-2013 show coronal hole area coverage of 5%-10% of the total surface area, with significant contribution from low latitudes, which is under-represented by EIT. AIA/EUVI have measured much enhanced open magnetic flux in the range of (2-4)× 10 22 Mx, which is about twice the flux measured by EIT, and matches with the PFSS calculated open flux, with discrepancies in the location and strength of coronal holes. A detailed comparison between the three measurements (by EIT, AIA-EUVI, and PFSS) indicates that coronal holes in low latitudes contribute significantly to the total open magnetic flux. These low-latitude coronal holes are not well measured with either the He I 10830 line in previous studies, or EIT EUV images; neither are they well captured by the static PFSS model. The enhanced observations from AIA/EUVI allow a more accurate measure of these low-latitude coronal holes and their contribution to open magnetic flux.

  8. Measurements of EUV coronal holes and open magnetic flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowder, C.; Qiu, J.; Leamon, R. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Liu, Y., E-mail: clowder@solar.physics.montana.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    Coronal holes are regions on the Sun's surface that map the footprints of open magnetic field lines. We have developed an automated routine to detect and track boundaries of long-lived coronal holes using full-disk extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images obtained by SOHO/EIT, SDO/AIA, and STEREO/EUVI. We measure coronal hole areas and magnetic flux in these holes, and compare the measurements with calculations by the potential field source surface (PFSS) model. It is shown that, from 1996 through 2010, the total area of coronal holes measured with EIT images varies between 5% and 17% of the total solar surface area, and the total unsigned open flux varies between (2-5)× 10{sup 22} Mx. The solar cycle dependence of these measurements is similar to the PFSS results, but the model yields larger hole areas and greater open flux than observed by EIT. The AIA/EUVI measurements from 2010-2013 show coronal hole area coverage of 5%-10% of the total surface area, with significant contribution from low latitudes, which is under-represented by EIT. AIA/EUVI have measured much enhanced open magnetic flux in the range of (2-4)× 10{sup 22} Mx, which is about twice the flux measured by EIT, and matches with the PFSS calculated open flux, with discrepancies in the location and strength of coronal holes. A detailed comparison between the three measurements (by EIT, AIA-EUVI, and PFSS) indicates that coronal holes in low latitudes contribute significantly to the total open magnetic flux. These low-latitude coronal holes are not well measured with either the He I 10830 line in previous studies, or EIT EUV images; neither are they well captured by the static PFSS model. The enhanced observations from AIA/EUVI allow a more accurate measure of these low-latitude coronal holes and their contribution to open magnetic flux.

  9. Identification of coronal heating events in 3D simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanella, Charalambos; Gudiksen, Boris V.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The solar coronal heating problem has been an open question in the science community since 1939. One of the proposed models for the transport and release of mechanical energy generated in the sub-photospheric layers and photosphere is the magnetic reconnection model that incorporates Ohmic heating, which releases a part of the energy stored in the magnetic field. In this model many unresolved flaring events occur in the solar corona, releasing enough energy to heat the corona. Aims: The problem with the verification and quantification of this model is that we cannot resolve small scale events due to limitations of the current observational instrumentation. Flaring events have scaling behavior extending from large X-class flares down to the so far unobserved nanoflares. Histograms of observable characteristics of flares show powerlaw behavior for energy release rate, size, and total energy. Depending on the powerlaw index of the energy release, nanoflares might be an important candidate for coronal heating; we seek to find that index. Methods: In this paper we employ a numerical three-dimensional (3D)-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation produced by the numerical code Bifrost, which enables us to look into smaller structures, and a new technique to identify the 3D heating events at a specific instant. The quantity we explore is the Joule heating, a term calculated directly by the code, which is explicitly correlated with the magnetic reconnection because it depends on the curl of the magnetic field. Results: We are able to identify 4136 events in a volume 24 × 24 × 9.5 Mm3 (I.e., 768 × 786 × 331 grid cells) of a specific snapshot. We find a powerlaw slope of the released energy per second equal to αP = 1.5 ± 0.02, and two powerlaw slopes of the identified volume equal to αV = 1.53 ± 0.03 and αV = 2.53 ± 0.22. The identified energy events do not represent all the released energy, but of the identified events, the total energy of the largest events

  10. Theoretical Analysis of Proton Relays in Electrochemical Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auer, Benjamin; Fernandez, Laura; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The coupling of long-range electron transfer to proton transport over multiple sites plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. Recently a molecule with a hydrogen-bond relay inserted between the proton donor and acceptor sites in a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) system was studied electrochemically. The standard rate constants and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were measured experimentally for this system and a related single proton transfer system. In the present paper, these systems are studied theoretically using vibronically nonadiabatic rate constant expressions for electrochemical PCET. Application of this approach to proton relays requires the calculation of multidimensional proton vibrational wavefunctions and incorporation of multiple proton donor-acceptor motions. The calculated KIEs and relative standard rate constants for the single and double proton transfer systems are in agreement with the experimental data. The calculations indicate that the standard rate constant is lower for the double proton transfer system because of the smaller overlap integral between the ground state reduced and oxidized proton vibrational wavefunctions for this system, resulting in greater contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states with higher free energy barriers. The decrease in proton donor-acceptor distances due to thermal fluctuations and the contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states play important roles in proton relay systems. The theory suggests that the PCET rate constant may be increased by decreasing the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distances or modifying the thermal motions of the molecule to facilitate the concurrent decrease of these distances. The submission of this journal article in ERIA is a requirement of the EFRC subcontract with Pennsylvania State University collaborators to get publications to OSTI.

  11. Proton imaging apparatus for proton therapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipala, V.; Lo Presti, D.; Brianzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Scaringella, M.; Talamonti, C.; Bucciolini, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Randazzo, N.; Stancampiano, C.; Tesi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy with protons, due to the physical properties of these particles, offers several advantages for cancer therapy as compared to the traditional radiotherapy and photons. In the clinical use of proton beams, a p CT (Proton Computer Tomography) apparatus can contribute to improve the accuracy of the patient positioning and dose distribution calculation. In this paper a p CT apparatus built by the Prima (Proton Imaging) Italian Collaboration will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  12. Proton radioactivity from proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, F.; Goncalves, M.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.

    1999-03-01

    Half-lives for proton emission from proton-rich nuclei have been calculated by using the effective liquid drop model of heavy-particle decay of nuclei. It is shown that this model is able to offer results or spontaneous proton-emission half-life-values in excellent agreement with the existing experimental data. Predictions of half-life-values for other possible proton-emission cases are present for null orbital angular momentum. (author)

  13. Case report: pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucencies revisited.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Counihan, K P

    2012-08-01

    Pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucency (PEIR) describes a radiolucent lesion located in the coronal dentine, just beneath the enamel-dentine junction of unerupted teeth. The prevalence of this lesion varies depending on the type and quality of radiographic exposure and age of patients used for assessment. The aetiology of pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucent lesions is not fully understood, but published clinical and histological evidence suggest that these lesions are resorptive in nature. Issues around the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of this lesion are explored using previously unreported cases.

  14. Flare particle acceleration in the interaction of twisted coronal flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threlfall, J.; Hood, A. W.; Browning, P. K.

    2018-03-01

    Aim. The aim of this work is to investigate and characterise non-thermal particle behaviour in a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) model of unstable multi-threaded flaring coronal loops. Methods: We have used a numerical scheme which solves the relativistic guiding centre approximation to study the motion of electrons and protons. The scheme uses snapshots from high resolution numerical MHD simulations of coronal loops containing two threads, where a single thread becomes unstable and (in one case) destabilises and merges with an additional thread. Results: The particle responses to the reconnection and fragmentation in MHD simulations of two loop threads are examined in detail. We illustrate the role played by uniform background resistivity and distinguish this from the role of anomalous resistivity using orbits in an MHD simulation where only one thread becomes unstable without destabilising further loop threads. We examine the (scalable) orbit energy gains and final positions recovered at different stages of a second MHD simulation wherein a secondary loop thread is destabilised by (and merges with) the first thread. We compare these results with other theoretical particle acceleration models in the context of observed energetic particle populations during solar flares.

  15. Proton channels and exchangers in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Sonveaux, Pierre; Stock, Christian; Perez-Sayans, Mario; De Milito, Angelo; Avnet, Sofia; Garcìa, Abel Garcìa; Harguindey, Salvador; Fais, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Although cancer is characterized by an intratumoral genetic heterogeneity, a totally deranged pH control is a common feature of most cancer histotypes. Major determinants of aberrant pH gradient in cancer are proton exchangers and transporters, including V-ATPase, Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE), monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Thanks to the activity of these proton transporters and exchangers, cancer becomes isolated and/or protected not only from the body reaction against the growing tumor, but also from the vast majority of drugs that when protonated into the acidic tumor microenvironment do not enter into cancer cells. Proton transporters and exchangers represent a key feature tumor cells use to survive in the very hostile microenvironmental conditions that they create and maintain. Detoxifying mechanisms may thus represent both a key survival option and a selection outcome for cells that behave as unicellular microorganisms rather than belonging to an organ, compartment or body. It is, in fact, typical of malignant tumors that, after a clinically measurable yet transient initial response to a therapy, resistant tumor clones emerge and proliferate, thus bursting a more malignant behavior and rapid tumor progression. This review critically presents the background of a novel and efficient approach that aims to fight cancer through blocking or inhibiting well characterized proton exchangers and transporters active in human cancer cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mapping return currents in laser-generated Z-pinch plasmas using proton deflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Sinenian, N.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Petrasso, R. D.; Beg, F. N.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic return currents and electromagnetic field structure in laser-generated Z-pinch plasmas have been measured using proton deflectometry. Experiments were modeled to accurately interpret deflections observed in proton radiographs. Current flow is shown to begin on axis and migrate outwards with the expanding coronal plasma. Magnetic field strengths of ∼1 T are generated by currents that increase from ∼2 kA to ∼7 kA over the course of the laser pulse. Proton deflectometry has been demonstrated to be a practical alternative to other magnetic field diagnostics for these types of plasmas.

  17. Fast Breakdown as Coronal/Ionization Waves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, P. R.; Petersen, D.; da Silva, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    Studies of high-power narrow bipolar events (NBEs) have shown they are produced by a newly-recognized breakdown process called fast positive breakdown (FPB, Rison et al., 2016, doi:10.1038/ncomms10721). The breakdown was inferred to be produced by a system of positive streamers that propagate at high speed ( ˜3-6 x 107 m/s) due to occurring in a localized region of strong electric field. The polarity of the breakdown was determined from broadband interferometer (INTF) observations of the propagation direction of its VHF radiation, which was downward into the main negative charge region of a normally-electrified storm. Subsequent INTF observations being conducted in at Kennedy Space Center in Florida have shown a much greater incidence of NBEs than in New Mexico. Among the larger dataset have been clear-cut instances of some NBEs being produced by upward breakdown that would be of negative polarity. The speed and behavior of the negative breakdown is the same as that of the fast positive, leading to it being termed fast negative breakdown (FNB). The similarity (not too mention its occurrence) is surprising, given the fact that negative streamers and breakdown develops much differently than that of positive breakdown. The question is how this happens. In this study, we compare fast breakdown characteristics to well-known streamer properties as inferred from laboratory experiments and theoretical analysis. Additionally, we begin to explore the possibility that both polarities of fast breakdown are produced by what may be called coronal or ionization waves, in which the enhanced electric field produced by streamer or coronal breakdown of either polarity propagates away from the advancing front at the speed of light into a medium that is in a metastable condition of being at the threshold of hydrometeor-mediated corona onset or other ionization processes. The wave would develop at a faster speed than the streamer breakdown that gives rise to it, and thus would be

  18. LONG-TERM TREND OF SOLAR CORONAL HOLE DISTRIBUTION FROM 1975 TO 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiki, K.; Tokumaru, M.; Hayashi, K.; Satonaka, D. [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research (ISEE), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Hakamada, K., E-mail: fujiki@isee.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Natural Science and Mathematics, Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto-cho, Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)

    2016-08-20

    We developed an automated prediction technique for coronal holes using potential magnetic field extrapolation in the solar corona to construct a database of coronal holes appearing from 1975 February to 2015 July (Carrington rotations from 1625 to 2165). Coronal holes are labeled with the location, size, and average magnetic field of each coronal hole on the photosphere and source surface. As a result, we identified 3335 coronal holes and found that the long-term distribution of coronal holes shows a similar pattern known as the magnetic butterfly diagram, and polar/low-latitude coronal holes tend to decrease/increase in the last solar minimum relative to the previous two minima.

  19. Coronal Magnetic Field Lines and Electrons Associated with Type III

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coronal Magnetic Field Lines and Electrons Associated with Type III–V Radio Bursts in a Solar Flare ... velocities of the electron streams associated with the above two types of bursts indicate ... Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy | News ...

  20. Coroner Autopsy Findings Among Children and Adolescents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    year retrospective study of coroner autopsies carried out on children I adolescents aged between 0-19 years, evaluated the pattern, causes and demographic features of childhood deaths in Rivers state, Nigeria. Methods A retrospective remew of ...

  1. Energy released by the interaction of coronal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheeley, N.R. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Comparisons between coronal spectroheliograms and photospheric magnetograms are presented to support the idea that as coronal magnetic fields interact, a process of field line reconnection usually takes place as a natural way of preventing magnetic stresses from building up in the lower corona. This suggests that the energy which would have been stored in stressed fields in continuously released as kinetic energy of material being driven aside to make way for the reconnecting fields. However, this kinetic energy is negligible compared to the thermal energy of the coronal plasma. Therefore, it appears that these slow adjustments of coronal magnetic fields cannot account for even the normal heating of the corona, much less the energetic events associated with solar flares. (Auth.)

  2. The X-ray signature of solar coronal mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. A.; Waggett, P. W.; Bentley, R. D.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Bruner, M.

    1985-01-01

    The coronal response to six solar X-ray flares has been investigated. At a time coincident with the projected onset of the white-light coronal mass ejection associated with each flare, there is a small, discrete soft X-ray enhancement. These enhancements (precursors) precede by typically about 20 m the impulsive phase of the solar flare which is dominant by the time the coronal mass ejection has reached an altitude above 0.5 solar radii. Motions of hot X-ray emitting plasma, during the precursors, which may well be a signature of the mass ejection onsets, are identified. Further investigations have also revealed a second class of X-ray coronal transient, during the main phase of the flare. These appear to be associated with magnetic reconnection above post-flare loop systems.

  3. Cyclical Variation of the Quiet Corona and Coronal Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Key words. Coronagraphs—solar activity cycle—solar corona—total ... can be divided into the quiet sun (including coronal holes) and active regions. The ... regions has attracted attention and is termed as 'the extended solar cycle'. Here the.

  4. Coronal Structures as Tracers of Sub-Surface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    dramatic differences in appearance and physical processes, all these structures share a common ... mena that indicate a close relationship between coronal and sub-photo- spheric processes. .... 8) maintaining the same chirality. Large scale ...

  5. The nature of micro CMEs within coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothmer, Volker; Nistico, Giuseppe; Zimbardo, Gaetano; Patsourakos, Spiros; Bosman, Eckhard

    Whilst investigating the origin and characteristics of coronal jets and large-scale CMEs identi-fied in data from the SECCHI (Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation) instrument suites on board the two STEREO satellites, we discovered transient events that originated in the low corona with a morphology resembling that of typical three-part struc-tured coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, the CMEs occurred on considerably smaller spatial scales. In this presentation we show evidence for the existence of small-scale CMEs from inside coronal holes and present quantitative estimates of their speeds and masses. We interprete the origin and evolution of micro CMEs as a natural consequence of the emergence of small-scale magnetic bipoles related to the Sun's ever changing photospheric magnetic flux on various scales and their interactions with the ambient plasma and magnetic field. The analysis of CMEs is performed within the framework of the EU Erasmus and FP7 SOTERIA projects.

  6. Restrained Proton Indicator in Combined Quantum-Mechanics/Molecular-Mechanics Dynamics Simulations of Proton Transfer through a Carbon Nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duster, Adam W; Lin, Hai

    2017-09-14

    Recently, a collective variable "proton indicator" was purposed for tracking an excess proton solvated in bulk water in molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing the position of this proton indicator as a reaction coordinate to model an excess proton migrating through a hydrophobic carbon nanotube in combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics simulations. Our results indicate that applying a harmonic restraint to the proton indicator in the bulk solvent near the nanotube pore entrance leads to the recruitment of water molecules into the pore. This is consistent with an earlier study that employed a multistate empirical valence bond potential and a different representation (center of excess charge) of the proton. We attribute this water recruitment to the delocalized nature of the solvated proton, which prefers to be in high-dielectric bulk solvent. While water recruitment into the pore is considered an artifact in the present simulations (because of the artificially imposed restraint on the proton), if the proton were naturally restrained, it could assist in building water wires prior to proton transfer through the pore. The potential of mean force for a proton translocation through the water-filled pore was computed by umbrella sampling, where the bias potentials were applied to the proton indicator. The free energy curve and barrier heights agree reasonably with those in the literature. The results suggest that the proton indicator can be used as a reaction coordinate in simulations of proton transport in confined environments.

  7. MHD Simulations of the Eruption of Coronal Flux Ropes under Coronal Streamers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yuhong, E-mail: yfan@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2017-07-20

    Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, we investigate the eruption of coronal flux ropes underlying coronal streamers and the development of a prominence eruption. We initialize a quasi-steady solution of a coronal helmet streamer, into which we impose at the lower boundary the slow emergence of a part of a twisted magnetic torus. As a result, a quasi-equilibrium flux rope is built up under the streamer. With varying streamer sizes and different lengths and total twists of the flux rope that emerges, we found different scenarios for the evolution from quasi-equilibrium to eruption. In the cases with a broad streamer, the flux rope remains well confined until there is sufficient twist such that it first develops the kink instability and evolves through a sequence of kinked, confined states with increasing height until it eventually develops a “hernia-like” ejective eruption. For significantly twisted flux ropes, prominence condensations form in the dips of the twisted field lines due to runaway radiative cooling. Once formed, the prominence-carrying field becomes significantly non-force-free due to the weight of the prominence, despite having low plasma β . As the flux rope erupts, the prominence erupts, showing substantial draining along the legs of the erupting flux rope. The prominence may not show a kinked morphology even though the flux rope becomes kinked. On the other hand, in the case with a narrow streamer, the flux rope with less than one wind of twist can erupt via the onset of the torus instability.

  8. Calcium K-line network in coronal holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, K A [Hale Observatories, Pasadena, Calif. (USA)

    1977-05-01

    Microphotometry of calcium K-line photographs in the regions of polar coronal holes shows that the chromospheric network exterior to a hole has a slightly broader intensity distribution than that inside the hole itself, a fact which can be attributed to a greater number of bright network elements outside the hole. These bright elements presumably represent the enhanced network resulting from the dispersal of magnetic flux from old active regions, a hypothesis which is consistent with current ideas of coronal hole formation.

  9. Photospheric Driving of Non-Potential Coronal Magnetic Field Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-19

    synthesize observable emission . In future, the computational speed of the MF model makes it a potential avenue for near- real time and/or ensemble...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0030 PHOTOSPHERIC DRIVING OF NON-POTENTIAL CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD SIMULATIONS Anthony Yeates UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report...Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To)  15 Sep 2014 to 14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PHOTOSPHERIC DRIVING OF NON-POTENTIAL CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD

  10. Culex coronator in coastal Georgia and South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulis, Robert A; Russell, Jennifer D; Lewandowski, Henry B; Thompson, Pamela S; Heusel, Jeffrey L

    2008-12-01

    In 2007, adult Culex coronator were collected in Chatham County, Georgia, and Jasper County, South Carolina, during nuisance and disease vector surveillance efforts. A total of 75 specimens of this species were collected at 8 widely separated locations in Chatham County, Georgia, and 4 closely situated sites in Jasper County, South Carolina. These represent the first Atlantic coastal records of this species in Georgia and the first confirmed records of Cx. coronator in South Carolina.

  11. Reconstructing the Morphology of an Evolving Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    694, 707 Wood, B. E., Howard, R. A ., Thernisien, A ., Plunkett, S. P., & Socker, D. G. 2009b, Sol. Phys., 259, 163 Wood, B. E., Karovska , M., Chen, J...Reconstructing the Morphology of an Evolving Coronal Mass Ejection B. E. Wood, R. A . Howard, D. G. Socker Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science...mission, we empirically reconstruct the time-dependent three-dimensional morphology of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from 2008 June 1, which exhibits

  12. Proton movies

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A humorous short film made by three secondary school students received an award at a Geneva film festival. Even without millions of dollars or Hollywood stars at your disposal, it is still possible to make a good science fiction film about CERN. That is what three students from the Collège Madame de Staël in Carouge, near Geneva, demonstrated. For their amateur short film on the LHC, they were commended by the jury of the video and multimedia festival for schools organised by the "Media in education" service of the Canton of Geneva’s Public Education Department. The film is a spoof of a television news report on the LHC start-up. In sequences full of humour and imagination, the reporter conducts interviews with a very serious "Professor Sairne", some protons preparing for their voyage and even the neutrons that were rejected by the LHC. "We got the idea of making a film about CERN at the end of the summer," explains Lucinda Päsche, one of the three students. "We did o...

  13. Active Longitude and Coronal Mass Ejection Occurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyenge, N.; Kiss, T. S.; Erdélyi, R.; Singh, T.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The spatial inhomogeneity of the distribution of coronal mass ejection (CME) occurrences in the solar atmosphere could provide a tool to estimate the longitudinal position of the most probable CME-capable active regions in the Sun. The anomaly in the longitudinal distribution of active regions themselves is often referred to as active longitude (AL). In order to reveal the connection between the AL and CME spatial occurrences, here we investigate the morphological properties of active regions. The first morphological property studied is the separateness parameter, which is able to characterize the probability of the occurrence of an energetic event, such as a solar flare or CME. The second morphological property is the sunspot tilt angle. The tilt angle of sunspot groups allows us to estimate the helicity of active regions. The increased helicity leads to a more complex buildup of the magnetic structure and also can cause CME eruption. We found that the most complex active regions appear near the AL and that the AL itself is associated with the most tilted active regions. Therefore, the number of CME occurrences is higher within the AL. The origin of the fast CMEs is also found to be associated with this region. We concluded that the source of the most probably CME-capable active regions is at the AL. By applying this method, we can potentially forecast a flare and/or CME source several Carrington rotations in advance. This finding also provides new information for solar dynamo modeling.

  14. Active Longitude and Coronal Mass Ejection Occurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyenge, N.; Kiss, T. S.; Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasmas Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Singh, T.; Srivastava, A. K., E-mail: n.g.gyenge@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi (India)

    2017-03-20

    The spatial inhomogeneity of the distribution of coronal mass ejection (CME) occurrences in the solar atmosphere could provide a tool to estimate the longitudinal position of the most probable CME-capable active regions in the Sun. The anomaly in the longitudinal distribution of active regions themselves is often referred to as active longitude (AL). In order to reveal the connection between the AL and CME spatial occurrences, here we investigate the morphological properties of active regions. The first morphological property studied is the separateness parameter, which is able to characterize the probability of the occurrence of an energetic event, such as a solar flare or CME. The second morphological property is the sunspot tilt angle. The tilt angle of sunspot groups allows us to estimate the helicity of active regions. The increased helicity leads to a more complex buildup of the magnetic structure and also can cause CME eruption. We found that the most complex active regions appear near the AL and that the AL itself is associated with the most tilted active regions. Therefore, the number of CME occurrences is higher within the AL. The origin of the fast CMEs is also found to be associated with this region. We concluded that the source of the most probably CME-capable active regions is at the AL. By applying this method, we can potentially forecast a flare and/or CME source several Carrington rotations in advance. This finding also provides new information for solar dynamo modeling.

  15. Active Longitude and Coronal Mass Ejection Occurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyenge, N.; Singh, T.; Kiss, T. S.; Srivastava, A. K.; Erdélyi, R.

    2017-03-01

    The spatial inhomogeneity of the distribution of coronal mass ejection (CME) occurrences in the solar atmosphere could provide a tool to estimate the longitudinal position of the most probable CME-capable active regions in the Sun. The anomaly in the longitudinal distribution of active regions themselves is often referred to as active longitude (AL). In order to reveal the connection between the AL and CME spatial occurrences, here we investigate the morphological properties of active regions. The first morphological property studied is the separateness parameter, which is able to characterize the probability of the occurrence of an energetic event, such as a solar flare or CME. The second morphological property is the sunspot tilt angle. The tilt angle of sunspot groups allows us to estimate the helicity of active regions. The increased helicity leads to a more complex buildup of the magnetic structure and also can cause CME eruption. We found that the most complex active regions appear near the AL and that the AL itself is associated with the most tilted active regions. Therefore, the number of CME occurrences is higher within the AL. The origin of the fast CMEs is also found to be associated with this region. We concluded that the source of the most probably CME-capable active regions is at the AL. By applying this method, we can potentially forecast a flare and/or CME source several Carrington rotations in advance. This finding also provides new information for solar dynamo modeling.

  16. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  17. Guided flows in coronal magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Testa, P.

    2018-01-01

    Context. There is evidence that coronal plasma flows break down into fragments and become laminar. Aims: We investigate this effect by modelling flows confined along magnetic channels. Methods: We consider a full magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of a solar atmosphere box with a dipole magnetic field. We compare the propagation of a cylindrical flow perfectly aligned with the field to that of another flow with a slight misalignment. We assume a flow speed of 200 km s-1 and an ambient magnetic field of 30 G. Results: We find that although the aligned flow maintains its cylindrical symmetry while it travels along the magnetic tube, the misaligned one is rapidly squashed on one side, becoming laminar and eventually fragmented because of the interaction and back-reaction of the magnetic field. This model could explain an observation made by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory of erupted fragments that fall back onto the solar surface as thin and elongated strands and end up in a hedge-like configuration. Conclusions: The initial alignment of plasma flow plays an important role in determining the possible laminar structure and fragmentation of flows while they travel along magnetic channels. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. ANATOMY OF DEPLETED INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, M.; Lepri, S. T.; Landi, E.; Zhao, L.; Manchester, W. B. IV, E-mail: mkocher@umich.edu [Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We report a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) containing distinct periods of anomalous heavy-ion charge state composition and peculiar ion thermal properties measured by ACE /SWICS from 1998 to 2011. We label them “depleted ICMEs,” identified by the presence of intervals where C{sup 6+}/C{sup 5+} and O{sup 7+}/O{sup 6+} depart from the direct correlation expected after their freeze-in heights. These anomalous intervals within the depleted ICMEs are referred to as “Depletion Regions.” We find that a depleted ICME would be indistinguishable from all other ICMEs in the absence of the Depletion Region, which has the defining property of significantly low abundances of fully charged species of helium, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Similar anomalies in the slow solar wind were discussed by Zhao et al. We explore two possibilities for the source of the Depletion Region associated with magnetic reconnection in the tail of a CME, using CME simulations of the evolution of two Earth-bound CMEs described by Manchester et al.

  19. A Catalog of Coronal "EIT Wave" Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, B. J.; Myers, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) data have been visually searched for coronal "EIT wave" transients over the period beginning from 1997 March 24 and extending through 1998 June 24. The dates covered start at the beginning of regular high-cadence (more than one image every 20 minutes) observations, ending at the four-month interruption of SOHO observations in mid-1998. One hundred and seventy six events are included in this catalog. The observations range from "candidate" events, which were either weak or had insufficient data coverage, to events which were well defined and were clearly distinguishable in the data. Included in the catalog are times of the EIT images in which the events are observed, diagrams indicating the observed locations of the wave fronts and associated active regions, and the speeds of the wave fronts. The measured speeds of the wave fronts varied from less than 50 to over 700 km s(exp -1) with "typical" speeds of 200-400 km s(exp -1).

  20. A CATALOG OF CORONAL 'EIT WAVE' TRANSIENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Myers, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) data have been visually searched for coronal 'EIT wave' transients over the period beginning from 1997 March 24 and extending through 1998 June 24. The dates covered start at the beginning of regular high-cadence (more than 1 image every 20 minutes) observations, ending at the four-month interruption of SOHO observations in mid-1998. One hundred and seventy six events are included in this catalog. The observations range from 'candidate' events, which were either weak or had insufficient data coverage, to events which were well defined and were clearly distinguishable in the data. Included in the catalog are times of the EIT images in which the events are observed, diagrams indicating the observed locations of the wave fronts and associated active regions, and the speeds of the wave fronts. The measured speeds of the wave fronts varied from less than 50 to over 700 km s -1 with 'typical' speeds of 200-400 km s -1 .

  1. Evidence linking coronal mass ejections with interplanetary magnetic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.M.; Hildner, E.

    1983-12-01

    Using proxy data for the occurrence of those mass ejections from the solar corona which are directed earthward, we investigate the association between the post-1970 interplanetary magnetic clouds of Klein and Burlaga and coronal mass ejections. The evidence linking magnetic clouds following shocks with coronal mass ejections is striking. Six of nine clouds observed at Earth were preceded an appropriate time earlier by meter-wave type II radio bursts indicative of coronal shock waves and coronal mass ejections occurring near central meridian. During the selected periods when no clouds were detected near Earth, the only type II bursts reported were associated with solar activity near the limbs. Where the proxy solar data to be sought are not so clearly suggested, that is, for clouds preceding interaction regions and clouds within cold magnetic enhancements, the evidence linking the clouds and coronal mass ejections is not as clear proxy data usually suggest many candidate mass-ejection events for each cloud. Overall, the data are consistent with and support the hypothesis suggested by Klein and Burlaga that magnetic clouds observed with spacecraft at 1 AU are manifestations of solar coronal mass ejection transients

  2. New Evidence that Magnetoconvection Drives Solar–Stellar Coronal Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Mail Code ST 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Thalmann, Julia K., E-mail: sanjivtiwari80@gmail.com [Institute of Physics/IGAM, University of Graz, Universittsplatz 5/II, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2017-07-10

    How magnetic energy is injected and released in the solar corona, keeping it heated to several million degrees, remains elusive. Coronal heating generally increases with increasing magnetic field strength. From a comparison of a nonlinear force-free model of the three-dimensional active region coronal field to observed extreme-ultraviolet loops, we find that (1) umbra-to-umbra coronal loops, despite being rooted in the strongest magnetic flux, are invisible, and (2) the brightest loops have one foot in an umbra or penumbra and the other foot in another sunspot’s penumbra or in unipolar or mixed-polarity plage. The invisibility of umbra-to-umbra loops is new evidence that magnetoconvection drives solar-stellar coronal heating: evidently, the strong umbral field at both ends quenches the magnetoconvection and hence the heating. Broadly, our results indicate that depending on the field strength in both feet, the photospheric feet of a coronal loop on any convective star can either engender or quench coronal heating in the loop’s body.

  3. THE CORONAL ABUNDANCES OF MID-F DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin

    2013-01-01

    A Chandra spectrum of the moderately active nearby F6 V star π 3 Ori is used to study the coronal properties of mid-F dwarfs. We find that π 3 Ori's coronal emission measure distribution is very similar to those of moderately active G and K dwarfs, with an emission measure peak near log T = 6.6 seeming to be ubiquitous for such stars. In contrast to coronal temperature, coronal abundances are known to depend on spectral type for main sequence stars. Based on this previously known relation, we expected π 3 Ori's corona to exhibit an extremely strong ''first ionization potential (FIP) effect'', a phenomenon first identified on the Sun where elements with low FIP are enhanced in the corona. We instead find that π 3 Ori's corona exhibits a FIP effect essentially identical to that of the Sun and other early G dwarfs, perhaps indicating that the increase in FIP bias toward earlier spectral types stops or at least slows for F stars. We find that π 3 Ori's coronal characteristics are significantly different from two previously studied mid-F stars, Procyon (F5 IV-V) and τ Boo (F7 V). We believe π 3 Ori is more representative of the coronal characteristics of mid-F dwarfs, with Procyon being different because of luminosity class, and τ Boo being different because of the effects of one of two close companions, one stellar (τ Boo B: M2 V) and one planetary.

  4. Database of episode-integrated solar energetic proton fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Zachary D.; Adams, James H.; Xapsos, Michael A.; Stauffer, Craig A.

    2018-04-01

    A new database of proton episode-integrated fluences is described. This database contains data from two different instruments on multiple satellites. The data are from instruments on the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-8 (IMP8) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) series. A method to normalize one set of data to one another is presented to create a seamless database spanning 1973 to 2016. A discussion of some of the characteristics that episodes exhibit is presented, including episode duration and number of peaks. As an example of what can be understood about episodes, the July 4, 2012 episode is examined in detail. The coronal mass ejections and solar flares that caused many of the fluctuations of the proton flux seen at Earth are associated with peaks in the proton flux during this episode. The reasoning for each choice is laid out to provide a reference for how CME and solar flares associations are made.

  5. Database of episode-integrated solar energetic proton fluences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Zachary D.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A new database of proton episode-integrated fluences is described. This database contains data from two different instruments on multiple satellites. The data are from instruments on the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-8 (IMP8 and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES series. A method to normalize one set of data to one another is presented to create a seamless database spanning 1973 to 2016. A discussion of some of the characteristics that episodes exhibit is presented, including episode duration and number of peaks. As an example of what can be understood about episodes, the July 4, 2012 episode is examined in detail. The coronal mass ejections and solar flares that caused many of the fluctuations of the proton flux seen at Earth are associated with peaks in the proton flux during this episode. The reasoning for each choice is laid out to provide a reference for how CME and solar flares associations are made.

  6. Role of the Coronal Alfvén Speed in Modulating the Solar-wind Helium Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-M.

    2016-12-01

    The helium abundance He/H in the solar wind is relatively constant at ˜0.04 in high-speed streams, but varies in phase with the sunspot number in slow wind, from ˜0.01 at solar minimum to ˜0.04 at maximum. Suggested mechanisms for helium fractionation have included frictional coupling to protons and resonant interactions with high-frequency Alfvénic fluctuations. We compare He/H measurements during 1995-2015 with coronal parameters derived from source-surface extrapolations of photospheric field maps. We find that the near-Earth helium abundance is an increasing function of the magnetic field strength and Alfvén speed v A in the outer corona, while being only weakly correlated with the proton flux density. Throughout the solar cycle, fast wind is associated with short-term increases in v A near the source surface; resonance with Alfvén waves, with v A and the relative speed of α-particles and protons decreasing with increasing heliocentric distance, may then lead to enhanced He/H at 1 au. The modulation of helium in slow wind reflects the tendency for the associated coronal Alfvén speeds to rise steeply from sunspot minimum, when this wind is concentrated around the source-surface neutral line, to sunspot maximum, when the source-surface field attains its peak strengths. The helium abundance near the source surface may represent a balance between collisional decoupling from protons and Alfvén wave acceleration.

  7. Characterization of the IOTA Proton Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Samantha [Chicago U.

    2017-08-11

    This project focuses on characterizing the IOTA proton source through changing the parameters of four various components of the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT). Because of an inecient lament, current was limited to 2 mA when 40 mA is ultimately desired. Through an investigation of the solenoids and trims of the LEBT, we sought more knowledge about the optimum settings for running the IOTA proton source.

  8. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CORONAL MAGNETIC DECAY INDEX AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SPEED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yan; Liu Chang; Jing Ju; Wang Haimin, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    Numerical simulations suggest that kink and torus instabilities are two potential contributors to the initiation and prorogation of eruptive events. A magnetic parameter called the decay index (i.e., the coronal magnetic gradient of the overlying fields above the eruptive flux ropes) could play an important role in controlling the kinematics of eruptions. Previous studies have identified a threshold range of the decay index that distinguishes between eruptive and confined configurations. Here we advance the study by investigating if there is a clear correlation between the decay index and coronal mass ejection (CME) speed. Thirty-eight CMEs associated with filament eruptions and/or two-ribbon flares are selected using the H{alpha} data from the Global H{alpha} Network. The filaments and flare ribbons observed in H{alpha} associated with the CMEs help to locate the magnetic polarity inversion line, along which the decay index is calculated based on the potential field extrapolation using Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms as boundary conditions. The speeds of CMEs are obtained from the LASCO C2 CME catalog available online. We find that the mean decay index increases with CME speed for those CMEs with a speed below 1000 km s{sup -1} and stays flat around 2.2 for the CMEs with higher speeds. In addition, we present a case study of a partial filament eruption, in which the decay indices show different values above the erupted/non-erupted part.

  9. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  10. The Longitudinal Evolution of Equatorial Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krista, Larisza D.; McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.

    2018-04-01

    In 2011, three satellites—the Solar-Terrestrial RElations Observatory A & B, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)—were in a unique spatial alignment that allowed a 360° view of the Sun. This alignment lasted until 2014, the peak of solar cycle 24. Using extreme ultraviolet images and Hovmöller diagrams, we studied the lifetimes and propagation characteristics of coronal holes (CHs) in longitude over several solar rotations. Our initial results show at least three distinct populations of “low-latitude” or “equatorial” CHs (below 65^\\circ latitude). One population rotates in retrograde direction and coincides with a group of long-lived (over sixty days) CHs in each hemisphere. These are typically located between 30° and 55^\\circ , and display velocities of ∼55 m s‑1 slower than the local differential rotation rate. A second, smaller population of CHs rotate prograde, with velocities between ∼20 and 45 m s‑1. This population is also long-lived, but observed ±10° from the solar equator. A third population of CHs are short-lived (less than two solar rotations), and they appear over a wide range of latitudes (±65°) and exhibit velocities between ‑140 and 80 m s‑1. The CH “butterfly diagram” we developed shows a systematic evolution of the longer-lived holes; however, the sample is too short in time to draw conclusions about possible connections to dynamo-related phenomena. An extension of the present work to the 22 years of the combined SOHO–SDO archives is necessary to understand the contribution of CHs to the decadal-scale evolution of the Sun.

  11. Coronal mass ejections and solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of coronal mass ejection (CME) events and their radio signatures are discussed. These signatures are mostly in the form of type II and type IV burst emissions. Although type II bursts are temporally associated with CMEs, it is shown that there is no spatial relationship between them. Type II's associated with CMEs have in most cases a different origin, and they are not piston-driven by CMEs. Moving type IV and type II bursts can be associated with slow CMEs with speeds as low as 200 km/s, contrary to the earlier belief that only CMEs with speeds >400 km/s are associated with radio bursts. A specific event has been discussed in which the CME and type IV burst has nearly the same speed and direction, but the type II burst location was behind the CME and its motion was transverse. The speed and motion of the type II burst strongly suggest that the type II shock was decoupled from the CME and was probably due to a flare behind the limb. Therefore only the type IV source could be directly associated with the slow CME. The electrons responsble for the type IV emission could be produced in the flare or in the type II and then become trapped in a plasmoid associated with the CME. The reconnected loop could then move outwards as in the usual palsmoid model. Alternatively, the type IV emission could be interpreted as due to electrons produced by acceleration in wave turbulence driven by currents in the shock front driven by the CME. The lower-hybrid model Lampe and Papadopoulos (1982), which operates at both fast and slow mode shocks, could be applied to this situation. (author). 31 refs., 12 figs

  12. CME Interaction with Coronal Holes and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.

    2008-01-01

    A significant number of interplanetary (IP) shocks (-17%) during cycle 23 were not followed by drivers. The number of such "driverless" shocks steadily increased with the solar cycle with 15%, 33%, and 52% occurring in the rise, maximum, and declining phase of the solar cycle. The solar sources of 15% of the driverless shocks were very close the central meridian of the Sun (within approx.15deg), which is quite unexpected. More interestingly, all the driverless shocks with their solar sources near the solar disk center occurred during the declining phase of solar cycle 23. When we investigated the coronal environment of the source regions of driverless shocks, we found that in each case there was at least one coronal hole nearby suggesting that the coronal holes might have deflected the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) away from the Sun-Earth line. The presence of abundant low-latitude coronal holes during the declining phase further explains why CMEs originating close to the disk center mimic the limb CMEs, which normally lead to driverless shocks due to purely geometrical reasons. We also examined the solar source regions of shocks with drivers. For these, the coronal holes were located such that they either had no influence on the CME trajectories. or they deflected the CMEs towards the Sun-Earth line. We also obtained the open magnetic field distribution on the Sun by performing a potential field source surface extrapolation to the corona. It was found that the CMEs generally move away from the open magnetic field regions. The CME-coronal hole interaction must be widespread in the declining phase, and may have a significant impact on the geoeffectiveness of CMEs.

  13. Space- and Ground-based Coronal Spectro-Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Bemporad, Alessandro; Rybak, Jan; Capobianco, Gerardo

    This presentation gives an overview of the near-future perspectives of ultraviolet and visible-light spectro-polarimetric instrumentation for probing coronal magnetism from space-based and ground-based observatories. Spectro-polarimetric imaging of coronal emission-lines in the visible-light wavelength-band provides an important diagnostics tool of the coronal magnetism. The interpretation in terms of Hanle and Zeeman effect of the line-polarization in forbidden emission-lines yields information on the direction and strength of the coronal magnetic field. As study case, this presentation will describe the Torino Coronal Magnetograph (CorMag) for the spectro-polarimetric observation of the FeXIV, 530.3 nm, forbidden emission-line. CorMag - consisting of a Liquid Crystal (LC) Lyot filter and a LC linear polarimeter - has been recently installed on the Lomnicky Peak Observatory 20cm Zeiss coronagraph. The preliminary results from CorMag will be presented. The linear polarization by resonance scattering of coronal permitted line-emission in the ultraviolet (UV)can be modified by magnetic fields through the Hanle effect. Space-based UV spectro-polarimeters would provide an additional tool for the disgnostics of coronal magnetism. As a case study of space-borne UV spectro-polarimeters, this presentation will describe the future upgrade of the Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment (SCORE) to include the capability of imaging polarimetry of the HI Lyman-alpha, 121.6 nm. SCORE is a multi-wavelength imager for the emission-lines, HeII 30.4 nm and HI 121.6 nm, and visible-light broad-band emission of the polarized K-corona. SCORE has flown successfully in 2009. This presentation will describe how in future re-flights SCORE could observe the expected Hanle effect in corona with a HI Lyman-alpha polarimeter.

  14. Evaluation of uterine peristalsis using cine MRI on the coronal plane in comparison with the sagittal plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitano, Fuki; Kido, Aki; Kataoka, Masako; Fujimoto, Koji; Kiguchi, Kayo; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Uterine peristalsis is supposed to be closely related to the early stages of reproduction. Sperms are preferentially transported from the uterine cervix to the side of the tube with the dominant follicle. However, with respect to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), uterine peristalsis has only been evaluated at the sagittal plane of cine MRI. To evaluate and compare uterine peristalsis both on sagittal and coronal planes using cine MRI. Internal ethics committee approval was obtained, and subjects provided informed written consent. Thirty-one women underwent MRI scans in the periovulatory phase of the menstrual cycle. Cine MR images obtained by fast advanced spin echo sequence at 3-T field strength magnet (Toshiba Medical Systems) were visually evaluated by two independent radiologists. The frequency and the direction of peristalsis, and the presence of outer myometrium conduction of signal intensities (OMC), were evaluated. The laterality of the dominant follicle was determined on axial images and compared with the peristaltic direction in fundus. The subjects in which peristaltic directions were more clearly recognized were significantly frequent in coronal planes than in sagittal planes (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the peristaltic frequency between the sagittal and the coronal plane. However, the OMC was more recognized in the coronal plane than in the sagittal plane (P < 0.05). Peristaltic waves conducted toward the possible ovulation side were observed in only three of the 10 subjects. OMC of uterine peristalsis was better demonstrated in the coronal plane compared to the sagittal plane. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  15. Proton therapy device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  16. INTERACTION BETWEEN TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE 2013 MAY 22 LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Liu-Guan; Xu, Fei; Gu, Bin; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Li, Gang; Jiang, Yong; Le, Gui-Ming; Shen, Cheng-Long; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yao

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the eruption and interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the large 2013 May 22 solar energetic particle event using multiple spacecraft observations. Two CMEs, having similar propagation directions, were found to erupt from two nearby active regions (ARs), AR11748 and AR11745, at ∼08:48 UT and ∼13:25 UT, respectively. The second CME was faster than the first CME. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, we reconstructed the propagation of these two CMEs and found that the leading edge of the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME at a height of ∼6 solar radii. After about two hours, the leading edges of the two CMEs merged at a height of ∼20 solar radii. Type II solar radio bursts showed strong enhancement during this two hour period. Using the velocity dispersion method, we obtained the solar particle release (SPR) time and the path length for energetic electrons. Further assuming that energetic protons propagated along the same interplanetary magnetic field, we also obtained the SPR time for energetic protons, which were close to that of electrons. These release times agreed with the time when the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME, indicating that the CME-CME interaction (and shock-CME interaction) plays an important role in the process of particle acceleration in this event

  17. Light induced generation of a proton motive force and Ca++- transport in membrane vesicles of Streptococcus cremoris fused with bacteriorhodopsin proteoliposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driessen, A.J.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Konings, W.N.

    1985-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that S. cremoris membrane vesicles efficiently fuse with Brh proteoliposomes at low pH which leads to a functional incorporation of Brh into S. cremoris membrane vesicle. The growth of the cells and preparation of the membrane vesicles are described. Fusion, binding, and calcium transport assays were examined. In order to test fusion between S. cremoris membrane vesicles and Brh proteoliposomes the authors applied the resonance energy transfer fusion assay which monitors changes in the spatial organization of two fluorescent lipid probes in the membrane. It is shown that mixing of equal quantities of S. cremoris membrane vesicles and Brh proteoliposomes at low pH resulted in a decrease of the fluorescence energy transfer efficiency, monitored as a nincrease in NBD fluorescence

  18. Exchangers man the pumps: Functional interplay between proton pumps and proton-coupled Ca(2+) exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonoplast-localised proton-coupled Ca(2+) transporters encoded by cation/H(+) exchanger (CAX) genes play a critical role in sequestering Ca(2+) into the vacuole. These transporters may function in coordination with Ca(2+) release channels, to shape stimulus-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Recen...

  19. New technique for levitating solid particles using a proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misconi, N.Y.

    1996-01-01

    A new technique for levitating solid particles inside a vacuum chamber is developed using a proton beam. This new technique differs from the classical laser-levitation technique invented by Ashkin in that it does not heat up light-absorbing levitated particles to vaporization. This unique property of the method will make it possible to levitate real interplanetary dust particles in a vacuum chamber and study their spin-up dynamics in a ground-based laboratory. It is found that a flux of protons from a proton gun of ∼ 10 15 cm -2 sec -1 is needed to levitate a 10-mm particle. Confinement of the levitated particle can be achieved by a Z or θ pinch to create a gravity well, or by making the beam profile doughnut in shape. In levitating real interplanetary particles, two spin-up mechanisms can be investigated using this technique: one is the Paddack Effect and the other is a spin-up mechanism by the interaction of F-coronal dust with CMEs (Coronal Mass Ejections). The real interplanetary particles were collected by Brownie and associates (also known as the Brownie Particles) from the earth's upper atmosphere. (author)

  20. Optimizing Global Coronal Magnetic Field Models Using Image-Based Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Mecholsky, Shaela I.; Davila, Joseph M.; Uritskiy, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field directly or indirectly affects a majority of the phenomena studied in the heliosphere. It provides energy for coronal heating, controls the release of coronal mass ejections, and drives heliospheric and magnetospheric activity, yet the coronal magnetic field itself has proven difficult to measure. This difficulty has prompted a decades-long effort to develop accurate, timely, models of the field, an effort that continues today. We have developed a method for improving global coronal magnetic field models by incorporating the type of morphological constraints that could be derived from coronal images. Here we report promising initial tests of this approach on two theoretical problems, and discuss opportunities for application.

  1. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  2. Baryon production in proton-proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, F.M.; Werner, K.

    2002-01-01

    Motivated by the recent rapidity spectra of baryons and antibaryons in pp collisions at 158 GeV and the Ω-bar/Ω ratio discussion, we reviewed string formation mechanism and some string models. This investigation told us how color strings are formed in ultrarelativistic proton-proton collisions

  3. Relativistic Electron Response to the Combined Magnetospheric Impact of a Coronal Mass Ejection Overlapping with a High-Speed Stream: Van Allen Probes Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, W.; Fennell, J. F.; Zheng, Y.; Richardson, I. G.; Jones, A.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; hide

    2015-01-01

    During early November 2013, the magnetosphere experienced concurrent driving by a coronal mass ejection (CME) during an ongoing high-speed stream (HSS) event. The relativistic electron response to these two kinds of drivers, i.e., HSS and CME, is typically different, with the former often leading to a slower buildup of electrons at larger radial distances, while the latter energizing electrons rapidly with flux enhancements occurring closer to the Earth. We present a detailed analysis of the relativistic electron response including radial profiles of phase space density as observed by both Magnetic Electron and Ion Sensor (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope instruments on the Van Allen Probes mission. Data from the MagEIS instrument establish the behavior of lower energy (electrons which span both intermediary and seed populations during electron energization. Measurements characterizing the plasma waves and magnetospheric electric and magnetic fields during this period are obtained by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science instrument on board Van Allen Probes, Search Coil Magnetometer and Flux Gate Magnetometer instruments on board Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, and the low-altitude Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites. These observations suggest that during this time period, both radial transport and local in situ processes are involved in the energization of electrons. The energization attributable to radial diffusion is most clearly evident for the lower energy (electrons, while the effects of in situ energization by interaction of chorus waves are prominent in the higher-energy electrons.

  4. Evaluation of the Induced Activity in Air by the External Proton Beam in the Target Room of the Proton Accelerator Facility of Proton Engineering Frontier Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Woo; Lee, Young Ouk; Cho, Young Sik; Ahn, So Hyun

    2007-01-01

    One of the radiological concerns is the worker's exposure level and the concentration of the radionuclides in the air after shutdown, for the safety analysis on the proton accelerator facility. Although, the primary radiation source is the protons accelerated up to design value, all of the radio-nuclide is produced from the secondary neutron and photon induced reaction in air. Because, the protons don't penetrate the acceleration equipment like the DTL tank wall or BTL wall, secondary neutrons or photons are only in the air in the accelerator tunnel building because of the short range of the proton in the materials. But, for the case of the target rooms, external proton beams are occasionally used in the various experiments. When these external proton beams travel through air from the end of the beam transport line to the target, they interact directly with air and produce activation products from the proton induced reaction. The external proton beam will be used in the target rooms in the accelerator facility of the Proton Accelerator Frontier Project (PEFP). In this study, interaction characteristics of the external proton beam with air and induced activity in air from the direct interaction of the proton beam were evaluated

  5. A Proton Flare Triggered the Mw 8.1 Chiapos Mexican Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfaki, H.; Yousef, S.

    2017-12-01

    In a 2015 Cairo University M.Sc. thesis by Sarah Khodairy, very strong earthquakes were found to be highly correlated with proton flares. Strange blue and green bright flashes of light across Mexico accompanied the 8th of September 2017 Mw 1.8 Chiapas earthquake. Those lights were contemporary with a solar proton flare. Those green and blue lights are indicative of the arrival of proton streams over Mexico and their interaction with atmospheric Oxygen and Nitrogen atoms respectively in analogy with aurora lights. The proton streams attacked the weak spots of tectonic plates where the Coscos plate is being subducted below the North American plate. It is suggested that they induced telluric electric currents in the ground and in the magma thus caused motion and more subduction in the tectonic plates. Such motion immediately trigged the Chiapas earthquake in the near vicinity. The Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field was highly negative, a door was opened in the magnetosphere and the proton stream easily leaked inside and targeted Mexico. This proton flare was accompanied by coronal mass ejection and extremely strong X.9.3- class X-ray flare as well as magnetic storms. On the other hand, the 19th of September Mw 7.1 Puebla central Mexico earthquake was initiated by fast solar wind coronal hole stream. Such stream if they hit ground they cause earthquakes, if they hit narrow seas like the Red Sea they cause flash floods. However if they target Oceans they initiate hurricanes.

  6. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation.

  7. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation

  8. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  9. Proton: The Particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  10. Coronal Loop Evolution Observed with AIA and Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Kobayashi, K.; Korreck, K.; Golub, L.; Kuzin. S.; Walsh, R.; DeForest, C.; DePontieu, B.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Despite much progress toward understanding the dynamics of the solar corona, the physical properties of coronal loops are not yet fully understood. Recent investigations and observations from different instruments have yielded contradictory results about the true physical properties of coronal loops. In the past, the evolution of loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this poster we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data. We find signatures of cooling in a pixel selected along a loop structure in the AIA multi-filter observations. However, unlike previous studies, we find that the cooling time is much longer than the draining time. This is inconsistent with previous cooling models.

  11. Examining the Properties of Jets in Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulle, Owen; Adams, Mitzi L.; Tennant, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    We examined both X-ray and Magnetic field data in order to determine if there is a correlation between emerging magnetic flux and the production of Coronal jets. It was proposed that emerging flux can be a trigger to a coronal jet. The jet is thought to be caused when local bipoles reconnect or when a region of magnetic polarity emerges through a uniform field. In total we studied 15 different jets that occurred over a two day period starting 2011-02-27 00:00:00 UTC and ending 2011-02-28 23:59:55 UTC. All of the jets were contained within a coronal hole that was centered on the disk. Of the 15 that we studied 6 were shown to have an increase of magnetic flux within one hour prior to the creation of the jet and 10 were within 3 hours before the event.

  12. Influence of coronal holes on CMEs in causing SEP events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Chenglong; Yao Jia; Wang Yuming; Ye Pinzhong; Wang Shui; Zhao Xuepu

    2010-01-01

    The issue of the influence of coronal holes (CHs) on coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in causing solar energetic particle (SEP) events is revisited. It is a continuation and extension of our previous work, in which no evident effects of CHs on CMEs in generating SEPs were found by statistically investigating 56 CME events. This result is consistent with the conclusion obtained by Kahler in 2004. We extrapolate the coronal magnetic field, define CHs as the regions consisting of only open magnetic field lines and perform a similar analysis on this issue for 76 events in total by extending the study interval to the end of 2008. Three key parameters, CH proximity, CH area and CH relative position, are involved in the analysis. The new result confirms the previous conclusion that CHs did not show any evident effect on CMEs in causing SEP events. (research papers)

  13. The origin of coronal lines in Seyfert galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korista, K.T.; Ferland, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the possibility that the coronal line region in Seyfert galaxies may be the result of an interstellar medium (ISM) exposed to, and subsequently photoionized by, a 'bare' Seyfert nucleus. It is shown that a 'generic' AGN continuum illuminating the warm-phase of the ISM of a spiral galaxy can produce the observed emission. In this picture the same UV-radiation cone that is responsible for the high-excitation extended narrow-line emission clouds observed out to 1-2 kpc or farther from the nuclei of some Seyfert galaxies also produces the coronal lines. Soft X-rays originating in the nucleus are Compton-scattered off the ISM, thus producing extended soft X-ray emission, as observed in NGC 4151. The results of the calculations show a basic insensitivity to the ISM density, which explains why similar coronal line spectra are found in many Seyfert galaxies of varying physical environments. 60 refs

  14. CORONAL MASS EJECTION INDUCED OUTFLOWS OBSERVED WITH HINODE/EIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, M.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.; Fang, C.; Imada, S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the outflows associated with two halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that occurred on 2006 December 13 and 14 in NOAA 10930, using the Hinode/EIS observations. Each CME was accompanied by an EIT wave and coronal dimmings. Dopplergrams in the dimming regions are obtained from the spectra of seven EIS lines. The results show that strong outflows are visible in the dimming regions during the CME eruption at different heights from the lower transition region to the corona. It is found that the velocity is positively correlated with the photospheric magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the dimming. We estimate the mass loss based on height-dependent EUV dimmings and find it to be smaller than the CME mass derived from white-light observations. The mass difference is attributed partly to the uncertain atmospheric model, and partly to the transition region outflows, which refill the coronal dimmings.

  15. An Efficient Approximation of the Coronal Heating Rate for use in Global Sun-Heliosphere Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2010-02-01

    The origins of the hot solar corona and the supersonically expanding solar wind are still the subject of debate. A key obstacle in the way of producing realistic simulations of the Sun-heliosphere system is the lack of a physically motivated way of specifying the coronal heating rate. Recent one-dimensional models have been found to reproduce many observed features of the solar wind by assuming the energy comes from Alfvén waves that are partially reflected, then dissipated by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. However, the nonlocal physics of wave reflection has made it difficult to apply these processes to more sophisticated (three-dimensional) models. This paper presents a set of robust approximations to the solutions of the linear Alfvén wave reflection equations. A key ingredient of the turbulent heating rate is the ratio of inward-to-outward wave power, and the approximations developed here allow this to be written explicitly in terms of local plasma properties at any given location. The coronal heating also depends on the frequency spectrum of Alfvén waves in the open-field corona, which has not yet been measured directly. A model-based assumption is used here for the spectrum, but the results of future measurements can be incorporated easily. The resulting expression for the coronal heating rate is self-contained, computationally efficient, and applicable directly to global models of the corona and heliosphere. This paper tests and validates the approximations by comparing the results to exact solutions of the wave transport equations in several cases relevant to the fast and slow solar wind.

  16. Do interacting coronal mass ejections play a role in solar energetic particle events?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Vourlidas, A.

    2014-01-01

    Gradual solar energetic (E > 10 MeV) particle (SEP) events are produced in shocks driven by fast and wide coronal mass ejections (CMEs). With a set of western hemisphere 20 MeV SEP events, we test the possibility that SEP peak intensities, Ip, are enhanced by interactions of their associated CMEs with preceding CMEs (preCMEs) launched during the previous 12 hr. Among SEP events with no, 1, or 2 or more (2+) preCMEs, we find enhanced Ip for the groups with preCMEs, but no differences in TO+TR, the time from CME launch to SEP onset and the time from onset to SEP half-peak Ip. Neither the timings of the preCMEs relative to their associated CMEs nor the preCME widths W pre , speeds V pre , or numbers correlate with the SEP Ip values. The 20 MeV Ip of all the preCME groups correlate with the 2 MeV proton background intensities, consistent with a general correlation with possible seed particle populations. Furthermore, the fraction of CMEs with preCMEs also increases with the 2 MeV proton background intensities. This implies that the higher SEP Ip values with preCMEs may not be due primarily to CME interactions, such as the 'twin-CME' scenario, but are explained by a general increase of both background seed particles and more frequent CMEs during times of higher solar activity. This explanation is not supported by our analysis of 2 MeV proton backgrounds in two earlier preCME studies of SEP events, so the relevance of CME interactions for larger SEP event intensities remains unclear.

  17. Coronal seismology waves and oscillations in stellar coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, Alexander; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-01-01

    This concise and systematic account of the current state of this new branch of astrophysics presents the theoretical foundations of plasma astrophysics, magneto-hydrodynamics and coronal magnetic structures, taking into account the full range of available observation techniques -- from radio to gamma. The book discusses stellar loops during flare energy releases, MHD waves and oscillations, plasma instabilities and heating and charged particle acceleration. Current trends and developments in MHD seismology of solar and stellar coronal plasma systems are also covered, while recent p

  18. Thermal instabilities in magnetically confined plasmas: Solar coronal loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habbal, S.R.; Rosner, R.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal stability of confined solar coronal structures (''loops'') is investigated, following both normal mode and a new, global instability analysis. We demonstrate that: (a) normal mode analysis shows modes with size scales comparable to that of loops to be unstable, but to be strongly affected by the loop boundary conditions; (b) a global analysis, based upon variation of the total loop energy losses and gains, yields loop stability conditions for global modes dependent upon the coronal loop heating process, with magnetically coupled heating processes giving marginal stability. The connection between the present analysis and the minimum flux corona of Hearn is also discussed

  19. Recircular accelerator to proton ocular therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo, Luisa A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: luisarabelo88@gmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Proton therapy has been used for the treatment of Ocular Tumors, showing control in most cases as well as conservation of the eyeball, avoiding the enucleation. The protons provide higher energetic deposition in depth with reduced lateral spread, compared to the beam of photons and electrons, with characteristic dose deposition peak (Bragg peak). This technique requires large particle accelerators hampering the deployment a Proton Therapy Center in some countries due to the need for an investment of millions of dollars. This study is related to a new project of an electromagnetic unit of proton circular accelerator to be coupled to the national radiopharmaceutical production cyclotrons, to attend ocular therapy. This project evaluated physical parameters of proton beam circulating through classical and relativistic mechanical formulations and simulations based on an ion transport code in electromagnetic fields namely CST (Computer Simulation Technology). The structure is differentiated from other circular accelerations (patent CTIT/UFMG NRI research group/UFMG). The results show the feasibility of developing compact proton therapy equipment that works like pre-accelerator or post-accelerator to cyclotrons, satisfying the interval energy of 15 MeV to 64 MeV. Methods of reducing costs of manufacture, installation and operation of this equipment will facilitate the dissemination of the proton treatment in Brazil and consequently advances in fighting cancer. (author)

  20. Recircular accelerator to proton ocular therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabelo, Luisa A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy has been used for the treatment of Ocular Tumors, showing control in most cases as well as conservation of the eyeball, avoiding the enucleation. The protons provide higher energetic deposition in depth with reduced lateral spread, compared to the beam of photons and electrons, with characteristic dose deposition peak (Bragg peak). This technique requires large particle accelerators hampering the deployment a Proton Therapy Center in some countries due to the need for an investment of millions of dollars. This study is related to a new project of an electromagnetic unit of proton circular accelerator to be coupled to the national radiopharmaceutical production cyclotrons, to attend ocular therapy. This project evaluated physical parameters of proton beam circulating through classical and relativistic mechanical formulations and simulations based on an ion transport code in electromagnetic fields namely CST (Computer Simulation Technology). The structure is differentiated from other circular accelerations (patent CTIT/UFMG NRI research group/UFMG). The results show the feasibility of developing compact proton therapy equipment that works like pre-accelerator or post-accelerator to cyclotrons, satisfying the interval energy of 15 MeV to 64 MeV. Methods of reducing costs of manufacture, installation and operation of this equipment will facilitate the dissemination of the proton treatment in Brazil and consequently advances in fighting cancer. (author)

  1. Proton conduction based on intracrystalline chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuck, G.; Lechner, R.E.; Langer, K.

    2002-01-01

    Proton conductivity in M 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 crystals (M=K, Rb, Cs) is shown to be due to a dynamic disorder in the form of an intracrystalline chemical equilibrium reaction: alternation between the association of the monomers [HSeO 4 ] 1- and [SeO 4 ] 2- resulting in the dimer [H(SeO 4 ) 2 ] 3- (H-bond formation) and the dissociation of the latter into the two monomers (H-bond breaking). By a combination of quasielastic neutron scattering and FTIR spectroscopy, reaction rates were obtained, as well as rates of proton exchange between selenate ions, leading to diffusion. The results demonstrate that this reaction plays a central role in the mechanism of proton transport in these solid-state protonic conductors. (orig.)

  2. Properties and applications of perovskite proton conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Caetano Camilo de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A brief overview is given of the main types and principles of solid-state proton conductors with perovskite structure. Their properties are summarized in terms of the defect chemistry, proton transport and chemical stability. A good understanding of these subjects allows the manufacturing of compounds with the desired electrical properties, for application in renewable and sustainable energy devices. A few trends and highlights of the scientific advances are given for some classes of protonic conductors. Recent results and future prospect about these compounds are also evaluated. The high proton conductivity of barium cerate and zirconate based electrolytes lately reported in the literature has taken these compounds to a highlight position among the most studied conductor ceramic materials.

  3. Stereochemistry-Dependent Proton Conduction in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Tiwari, Omshanker; Gaikwad, Pramod; Paswan, Bhuneshwar; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2016-01-12

    Graphene oxide (GO) is impermeable to H2 and O2 fuels while permitting H(+) shuttling, making it a potential candidate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), albeit with a large anisotropy in their proton transport having a dominant in plane (σIP) contribution over the through plane (σTP). If GO-based membranes are ever to succeed in PEMFC, it inevitably should have a dominant through-plane proton shuttling capability (σTP), as it is the direction in which proton gets transported in a real fuel-cell configuration. Here we show that anisotropy in proton conduction in GO-based fuel cell membranes can be brought down by selectively tuning the geometric arrangement of functional groups around the dopant molecules. The results show that cis isomer causes a selective amplification of through-plane proton transport, σTP, pointing to a very strong geometry angle in ionic conduction. Intercalation of cis isomer causes significant expansion of GO (001) planes involved in σTP transport due to their mutual H-bonding interaction and efficient bridging of individual GO planes, bringing down the activation energy required for σTP, suggesting the dominance of a Grotthuss-type mechanism. This isomer-governed amplification of through-plane proton shuttling resulted in the overall boosting of fuel-cell performance, and it underlines that geometrical factors should be given prime consideration while selecting dopant molecules for bringing down the anisotropy in proton conduction and enhancing the fuel-cell performance in GO-based PEMFC.

  4. Comparison of Two Coronal Magnetic Field Models to Reconstruct a Sigmoidal Solar Active Region with Coronal Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Aiying; Zhang, Huai [Key Laboratory of Computational Geodynamics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jiang, Chaowei [Institute of Space Science and Applied Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Hu, Qiang; Gary, G. Allen; Wu, S. T. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Cao, Jinbin, E-mail: duanaiying@ucas.ac.cn, E-mail: hzhang@ucas.ac.cn, E-mail: chaowei@hit.edu.cn [School of Space and Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2017-06-20

    Magnetic field extrapolation is an important tool to study the three-dimensional (3D) solar coronal magnetic field, which is difficult to directly measure. Various analytic models and numerical codes exist, but their results often drastically differ. Thus, a critical comparison of the modeled magnetic field lines with the observed coronal loops is strongly required to establish the credibility of the model. Here we compare two different non-potential extrapolation codes, a nonlinear force-free field code (CESE–MHD–NLFFF) and a non-force-free field (NFFF) code, in modeling a solar active region (AR) that has a sigmoidal configuration just before a major flare erupted from the region. A 2D coronal-loop tracing and fitting method is employed to study the 3D misalignment angles between the extrapolated magnetic field lines and the EUV loops as imaged by SDO /AIA. It is found that the CESE–MHD–NLFFF code with preprocessed magnetogram performs the best, outputting a field that matches the coronal loops in the AR core imaged in AIA 94 Å with a misalignment angle of ∼10°. This suggests that the CESE–MHD–NLFFF code, even without using the information of the coronal loops in constraining the magnetic field, performs as good as some coronal-loop forward-fitting models. For the loops as imaged by AIA 171 Å in the outskirts of the AR, all the codes including the potential field give comparable results of the mean misalignment angle (∼30°). Thus, further improvement of the codes is needed for a better reconstruction of the long loops enveloping the core region.

  5. Exchangers man the pumps: Functional interplay between proton pumps and proton-coupled Ca2+ exchangers

    OpenAIRE

    Barkla, Bronwyn J; Hirschi, Kendal D; Pittman, Jon K

    2008-01-01

    Tonoplast-localised proton-coupled Ca2+ transporters encoded by cation/H+ exchanger (CAX) genes play a critical role in sequestering Ca2+ into the vacuole. These transporters may function in coordination with Ca2+ release channels, to shape stimulus-induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevations. Recent analysis of Arabidopsis CAX knockout mutants, particularly cax1 and cax3, identified a variety of phenotypes including sensitivity to abiotic stresses, which indicated that these transporters might play a ...

  6. Spherical proton emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, S.; Semmes, P.B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    1997-01-01

    Various theoretical approaches to proton emission from spherical nuclei are investigated, and it is found that all the methods employed give very similar results. The calculated decay widths are found to be qualitatively insensitive to the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential, i.e., changing the potential parameters over a fairly large range typically changes the decay width by no more than a factor of ∼3. Proton half-lives of observed heavy proton emitters are, in general, well reproduced by spherical calculations with the spectroscopic factors calculated in the independent quasiparticle approximation. The quantitative agreement with experimental data obtained in our study requires that the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential be chosen carefully. It also suggests that deformed proton emitters will provide invaluable spectroscopic information on the angular momentum decomposition of single-proton orbitals in deformed nuclei. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  7. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  8. Association of 3He-rich solar energetic particles with large-scale coronal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucik, Radoslav; Innes, Davina; Guo, Lijia; Mason, Glenn M.; Wiedenbeck, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Impulsive or 3He-rich solar energetic particle (SEP) events have been typically associated with jets or small EUV brightenings. We identify 30 impulsive SEP events from ACE at L1 during the solar minimum period 2007-2010 and examine their solar sources with high resolution STEREO-A EUV images. At beginning of 2007, STEREO-A was near the Earth while at the end of the investigated period, when there were more events, STEREO-A was leading the Earth by 90°. Thus STEREO-A provided a better (more direct) view on 3He-rich flares generally located on the western Sun's hemisphere. Surprisingly, we find that about half of the events are associated with large-scale EUV coronal waves. This finding provides new insights on acceleration and transport of 3He-rich SEPs in solar corona. It is believed that elemental and isotopic fractionation in impulsive SEP events is caused by more localized processes operating in the flare sites. The EUV waves have been reported in gradual SEP events in association with fast coronal mass ejections. To examine their role on 3He-rich SEPs production the energy spectra and relative abundances are discussed. R. Bucik is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft under grant BU 3115/2-1.

  9. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  10. More Macrospicule Jets in On-Disk Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. L.; Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the magnetic structure and dynamics of multiple jets found in coronal holes close to or on disk center. All data are from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We report on observations of about ten jets in an equatorial coronal hole spanning 2011 February 27 and 28. We show the evolution of these jets in AIA 193 A, examine the magnetic field configuration and flux changes in the jet area, and discuss the probable trigger mechanism of these events. We reported on another jet in this same coronal hole on 2011 February 27, (is) approximately 13:04 UT (Adams et al 2014, ApJ, 783: 11). That jet is a previously-unrecognized variety of blowout jet, in which the base-edge bright point is a miniature filament-eruption flare arcade made by internal reconnection of the legs of the erupting field. In contrast, in the presently-accepted 'standard' picture for blowout jets, the base-edge bright point is made by interchange reconnection of initially-closed erupting jet-base field with ambient open field. This poster presents further evidence of the production of the base-edge bright point in blowout jets by internal reconnection. Our observations suggest that most of the bigger and brighter EUV jets in coronal holes are blowout jets of the new-found variety.

  11. CLOSED-FIELD CORONAL HEATING DRIVEN BY WAVE TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downs, Cooper; Lionello, Roberto; Mikić, Zoran; Linker, Jon A [Predictive Science Incorporated, 9990 Mesa Rim Rd. Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Velli, Marco, E-mail: cdowns@predsci.com [EPSS, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    To simulate the energy balance of coronal plasmas on macroscopic scales, we often require the specification of the coronal heating mechanism in some functional form. To go beyond empirical formulations and to build a more physically motivated heating function, we investigate the wave-turbulence-driven (WTD) phenomenology for the heating of closed coronal loops. Our implementation is designed to capture the large-scale propagation, reflection, and dissipation of wave turbulence along a loop. The parameter space of this model is explored by solving the coupled WTD and hydrodynamic evolution in 1D for an idealized loop. The relevance to a range of solar conditions is also established by computing solutions for over one hundred loops extracted from a realistic 3D coronal field. Due to the implicit dependence of the WTD heating model on loop geometry and plasma properties along the loop and at the footpoints, we find that this model can significantly reduce the number of free parameters when compared to traditional empirical heating models, and still robustly describe a broad range of quiet-Sun and active region conditions. The importance of the self-reflection term in producing relatively short heating scale heights and thermal nonequilibrium cycles is also discussed.

  12. Magnetic Source Regions of Coronal Mass Ejections Brigitte ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2003) or two rows of opposite polarity field extending to ... sional Alfvén waves which bring up helicity from the sub-photospheric part of the flux tube ... Figure 1. Loss of equilibrium model: sketches of coronal field lines showing ... lines of the quadrupolar reconnection before the flare, (bottom left): TRACE observations of the.

  13. Automated coronal hole identification via multi-thermal intensity segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garton, Tadhg M.; Gallagher, Peter T.; Murray, Sophie A.

    2018-01-01

    Coronal holes (CH) are regions of open magnetic fields that appear as dark areas in the solar corona due to their low density and temperature compared to the surrounding quiet corona. To date, accurate identification and segmentation of CHs has been a difficult task due to their comparable intensity to local quiet Sun regions. Current segmentation methods typically rely on the use of single Extreme Ultra-Violet passband and magnetogram images to extract CH information. Here, the coronal hole identification via multi-thermal emission recognition algorithm (CHIMERA) is described, which analyses multi-thermal images from the atmospheric image assembly (AIA) onboard the solar dynamics observatory (SDO) to segment coronal hole boundaries by their intensity ratio across three passbands (171 Å, 193 Å, and 211 Å). The algorithm allows accurate extraction of CH boundaries and many of their properties, such as area, position, latitudinal and longitudinal width, and magnetic polarity of segmented CHs. From these properties, a clear linear relationship was identified between the duration of geomagnetic storms and coronal hole areas. CHIMERA can therefore form the basis of more accurate forecasting of the start and duration of geomagnetic storms.

  14. A Bayesian Approach to Period Searching in Solar Coronal Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherrer, Bryan; McKenzie, David [Montana State University, P.O. Box 173840 Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    We have applied a Bayesian generalized Lomb–Scargle period searching algorithm to movies of coronal loop images obtained with the Hinode X-ray Telescope (XRT) to search for evidence of periodicities that would indicate resonant heating of the loops. The algorithm makes as its only assumption that there is a single sinusoidal signal within each light curve of the data. Both the amplitudes and noise are taken as free parameters. It is argued that this procedure should be used alongside Fourier and wavelet analyses to more accurately extract periodic intensity modulations in coronal loops. The data analyzed are from XRT Observation Program 129C: “MHD Wave Heating (Thin Filters),” which occurred during 2006 November 13 and focused on active region 10293, which included coronal loops. The first data set spans approximately 10 min with an average cadence of 2 s, 2″ per pixel resolution, and used the Al-mesh analysis filter. The second data set spans approximately 4 min with a 3 s average cadence, 1″ per pixel resolution, and used the Al-poly analysis filter. The final data set spans approximately 22 min at a 6 s average cadence, and used the Al-poly analysis filter. In total, 55 periods of sinusoidal coronal loop oscillations between 5.5 and 59.6 s are discussed, supporting proposals in the literature that resonant absorption of magnetic waves is a viable mechanism for depositing energy in the corona.

  15. Microflares as Possible Sources for Coronal Heating Meera Gupta ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    around 6.7 keV, which is an indicator of the presence of coronal plasma tem- perature ≥ 9 MK. On the other ... Key words. Solar flares: ... Details of SOXS mission, in-flight performance, calibration, instrumental response and background are ...

  16. Magnetic Field in the Gravitationally Stratified Coronal Loops B. N. ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    field for the longest (L = 406 Mm) coronal loops. The magnetic fields Bstr and Babs also increase with the number density, if the loop length does not vary much. The increment in the magnetic field due to gravitational stratification is small at the lower number densities, however, it is large at the higher number densities.

  17. Initiation and Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections P. F. Chen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been observed for over 30 years. They keep being an intriguing research topic, not only because they are now realized to be the major driver for space weather disturbances, which are intimately connected to human activities, but also because they themselves are full of ...

  18. Photometric Variability of Four Coronally Active Stars J. C. Pandey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    ray surveys with the Einstein and the ROSAT observatories and found to be associated with bright late- type stars. Many of these stars have not been studied in detail for their chromospheric and coronal activity, and their nature is not fully ...

  19. RADIOLOGICAL TIPS Coronal views of the paediatric mandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imaging. None of the cases subsequently revealed any evidence of traumatic brain injury on CTB but they all demonstrated mandibular condyle fractures best appreciated on coronal views. Axial (Fig. 1) ... T Peedikayil, MB ChB. Department of Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town.

  20. Automated Identification of Coronal Holes from Synoptic EUV Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Amr; Asikainen, Timo; Virtanen, Ilpo; Mursula, Kalevi

    2018-04-01

    Coronal holes (CHs) are regions of open magnetic field lines in the solar corona and the source of the fast solar wind. Understanding the evolution of coronal holes is critical for solar magnetism as well as for accurate space weather forecasts. We study the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) synoptic maps at three wavelengths (195 Å/193 Å, 171 Å and 304 Å) measured by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (SOHO/EIT) and the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) instruments. The two datasets are first homogenized by scaling the SDO/AIA data to the SOHO/EIT level by means of histogram equalization. We then develop a novel automated method to identify CHs from these homogenized maps by determining the intensity threshold of CH regions separately for each synoptic map. This is done by identifying the best location and size of an image segment, which optimally contains portions of coronal holes and the surrounding quiet Sun allowing us to detect the momentary intensity threshold. Our method is thus able to adjust itself to the changing scale size of coronal holes and to temporally varying intensities. To make full use of the information in the three wavelengths we construct a composite CH distribution, which is more robust than distributions based on one wavelength. Using the composite CH dataset we discuss the temporal evolution of CHs during the Solar Cycles 23 and 24.

  1. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The standing slow magneto-acoustic oscillations in cooling coronal loops ... turbation and, eventually, reduces the MHD equations to a 1D system modelling ..... where the function Q is expanded in power series with respect to ǫ, i.e.,. Q = Q0 + ...

  2. OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF THE CORONAL KINK INSTABILITY WITH THERMAL CONDUCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botha, G. J. J.; Arber, T. D.; Srivastava, Abhishek K.

    2012-01-01

    It is known from numerical simulations that thermal conduction along magnetic field lines plays an important role in the evolution of the kink instability in coronal loops. This study presents the observational signatures of the kink instability in long coronal loops when parallel thermal conduction is included. The three-dimensional nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic equations are solved numerically to simulate the evolution of a coronal loop that is initially in an unstable equilibrium. The loop has length 80 Mm, width 8 Mm, and an initial maximum twist of Φ = 11.5π, where Φ is a function of the radius. The initial loop parameters are obtained from a highly twisted loop observed in the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) 171 Å wave band. Synthetic observables are generated from the data. These observables include spatial and temporal averaging to account for the resolution and exposure times of TRACE images. Parallel thermal conduction reduces the maximum local temperature by up to an order of magnitude. This means that different spectral lines are formed and different internal loop structures are visible with or without the inclusion of thermal conduction. However, the response functions sample a broad range of temperatures. The result is that the inclusion of parallel thermal conductivity does not have as large an impact on observational signatures as the order of magnitude reduction in the maximum temperature would suggest; the net effect is a blurring of internal features of the loop structure.

  3. Coronal Activity in the R CrA T Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Brian M.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Brian Patten is the Principal Investigator of the NASA ROSS-ADP project Coronal Activity in the R CrA T Association. For this project we have extracted net counts and variability information for all of the X-ray sources found in 23 archival ROSAT PSPC and HRI images in the region of the R CrA T association. These data have been merged with an extensive database of optical and near-infrared photometry, optical spectroscopy, and parallax data. These data have been used to (1) identify new association members and clarify the membership status of a number of previously suspected members of the association, and (2) derive, for the first time, an accurate coronal luminosity function for the T Tauri members of this T association and make direct comparisons between the coronal luminosity functions for other T associations and those of large clusters. We have used our survey data to assess (a) the importance of the star-formation environment in initial coronal activity levels, (b) the effects of PMS evolution on dynamo activity as a function of mass and age, and (c) the level of contamination by field post-T Tauri stars on association membership surveys.

  4. Merging of coronal and heliospheric numerical two dimensional MHD models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Odstrčil, Dušan; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Pizzo, J. V.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 107, A12 (2002), s. SSH14-1 - SSH14-11 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : coronal mass ejection * interplanetary shock * numerical MHD simulation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.245, year: 2002

  5. Solar wind heavy ions from energetic coronal events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bame, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Ions heavier than those of He can be resolved in the solar wind with electrostatic E/q analyzers when the local thermal temperatures are low. Ordinarily this condition prevails in the low speed solar wind found between high speed streams, i.e. the interstream, IS, solar wind. Various ions of O, Si and Fe are resolved in IS heavy ion spectra. Relative ion peak intensities indicate that the O ionization state is established in the IS coronal source regions at approx. 2.1 x 10 6 K while the state of Fe is frozen in at approx. 1.5 x 10 6 K farther out. Occasionally, anomalous spectra are observed in which the usually third most prominent ion peak, O 8+ , is depressed as are the Fe peaks ranging from Fe 12+ to Fe 7+ . A prominent peak in the usual Si 8+ position of IS spectra is self-consistently shown to be Fe 16+ . These features demonstrate that the ionization states were frozen in at higher than usual coronal temperatures. The source regions of these hot heavy ion spectra are identified as energetic coronal events including flares and nonflare coronal mass ejections. 24 references

  6. Solar Magnetic Carpet III: Coronal Modelling of Synthetic Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K. A.; Mackay, D. H.; van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Parnell, C. E.

    2013-09-01

    This article is the third in a series working towards the construction of a realistic, evolving, non-linear force-free coronal-field model for the solar magnetic carpet. Here, we present preliminary results of 3D time-dependent simulations of the small-scale coronal field of the magnetic carpet. Four simulations are considered, each with the same evolving photospheric boundary condition: a 48-hour time series of synthetic magnetograms produced from the model of Meyer et al. ( Solar Phys. 272, 29, 2011). Three simulations include a uniform, overlying coronal magnetic field of differing strength, the fourth simulation includes no overlying field. The build-up, storage, and dissipation of magnetic energy within the simulations is studied. In particular, we study their dependence upon the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field and the strength of the overlying coronal field. We also consider where energy is stored and dissipated within the coronal field. The free magnetic energy built up is found to be more than sufficient to power small-scale, transient phenomena such as nanoflares and X-ray bright points, with the bulk of the free energy found to be stored low down, between 0.5 - 0.8 Mm. The energy dissipated is currently found to be too small to account for the heating of the entire quiet-Sun corona. However, the form and location of energy-dissipation regions qualitatively agree with what is observed on small scales on the Sun. Future MHD modelling using the same synthetic magnetograms may lead to a higher energy release.

  7. Coronal holes and high-speed wind streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirker, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Coronal holes low have been identified as Bartel's M regions, i.e., sources of high-speed wind streams that produce recurrent geomagnetic variations. Throughout the Skylab period the polar caps of the Sun were coronal holes, and at lower latitudes the most persistent and recurrent holes were equatorial extensions of the polar caps. The holes rotated 'rigidly' at the equatorial synodic rate. They formed in regions of unipolar photospheric magnetic field, and their internal magnetic fields diverged rapidly with increasing distance from the sun. The geometry of the magnetic field in the inner corona seems to control both the physical properties of the holes and the global distribution of high-speed wind streams in the heliosphere. The latitude variation of the divergence of the coronal magnetic field lines produces corresponding variations in wind speed.During the years of declining solar activity the global field of the corona approximates a perturbed dipole. The divergence of field lines in each hemisphere produces a high-speed wind near the poles and low-speed wind in a narrow belt that coincides with the magnetic neutral sheet. The analysis of electron density measurements within a polar hole indicates that solar wind is accelerated principally in the region between 2 and 5 R/sub s/ and that mechanical wave pressure (possibly Alfven wave) may be responsible for the accleration of the wind. Phenomenological models for the birth and decay of coronal holes have been proposed. Attempts to explain the birth and rigid rotation of holes through dynamo action have been only partially successful. The 11-year variation of cosmic ray intensities at the earth may result from cyclic variation of open field regions associated with coronal holes

  8. FAST CONTRACTION OF CORONAL LOOPS AT THE FLARE PEAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rui; Wang Haimin

    2010-01-01

    On 2005 September 8, a coronal loop overlying the active region NOAA 10808 was observed in TRACE 171 A to contract at ∼100 km s -1 at the peak of an X5.4-2B flare at 21:05 UT. Prior to the fast contraction, the loop underwent a much slower contraction at ∼6 km s -1 for about 8 minutes, initiating during the flare preheating phase. The sudden switch to fast contraction is presumably corresponding to the onset of the impulsive phase. The contraction resulted in the oscillation of a group of loops located below, with the period of about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, the contracting loop exhibited a similar oscillatory pattern superimposed on the dominant downward motion. We suggest that the fast contraction reflects a suddenly reduced magnetic pressure underneath due either to (1) the eruption of magnetic structures located at lower altitudes or to (2) the rapid conversion of magnetic free energy in the flare core region. Electrons accelerated in the shrinking trap formed by the contracting loop can theoretically contribute to a late-phase hard X-ray burst, which is associated with Type IV radio emission. To complement the X5.4 flare which was probably confined, a similar event observed in SOHO/EIT 195 A on 2004 July 20 in an eruptive, M8.6 flare is briefly described, in which the contraction was followed by the expansion of the same loop leading up to a halo coronal mass ejection. These observations further substantiate the conjecture of coronal implosion and suggest coronal implosion as a new exciter mechanism for coronal loop oscillations.

  9. Features of solar wind streams on June 21-28, 2015 as a result of interactions between coronal mass ejections and recurrent streams from coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugay, Yu. S.; Slemzin, V. A.; Rod'kin, D. G.

    2017-11-01

    Coronal sources and parameters of solar wind streams during a strong and prolonged geomagnetic disturbance in June 2015 have been considered. Correspondence between coronal sources and solar wind streams at 1 AU has been determined using an analysis of solar images, catalogs of flares and coronal mass ejections, solar wind parameters including the ionic composition. The sources of disturbances in the considered period were a sequence of five coronal mass ejections that propagated along the recurrent solar wind streams from coronal holes. The observed differences from typical in magnetic and kinetic parameters of solar wind streams have been associated with the interactions of different types of solar wind. The ionic composition has proved to be a good additional marker for highlighting components in a mixture of solar wind streams, which can be associated with different coronal sources.

  10. Moving protons with pendant amines: proton mobility in a nickel catalyst for oxidation of hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Molly; Shaw, Wendy J; Raugei, Simone; Chen, Shentan; Yang, Jenny Y; Kilgore, Uriah J; DuBois, Daniel L; Bullock, R Morris

    2011-09-14

    Proton transport is ubiquitous in chemical and biological processes, including the reduction of dioxygen to water, the reduction of CO(2) to formate, and the production/oxidation of hydrogen. In this work we describe intramolecular proton transfer between Ni and positioned pendant amines for the hydrogen oxidation electrocatalyst [Ni(P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2)H)(2)](2+) (P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2) = 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-dicyclohexyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane). Rate constants are determined by variable-temperature one-dimensional NMR techniques and two-dimensional EXSY experiments. Computational studies provide insight into the details of the proton movement and energetics of these complexes. Intramolecular proton exchange processes are observed for two of the three experimentally observable isomers of the doubly protonated Ni(0) complex, [Ni(P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2)H)(2)](2+), which have N-H bonds but no Ni-H bonds. For these two isomers, with pendant amines positioned endo to the Ni, the rate constants for proton exchange range from 10(4) to 10(5) s(-1) at 25 °C, depending on isomer and solvent. No exchange is observed for protons on pendant amines positioned exo to the Ni. Analysis of the exchange as a function of temperature provides a barrier for proton exchange of ΔG(‡) = 11-12 kcal/mol for both isomers, with little dependence on solvent. Density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental observations, suggesting metal-mediated intramolecular proton transfers between nitrogen atoms, with chair-to-boat isomerizations as the rate-limiting steps. Because of the fast rate of proton movement, this catalyst may be considered a metal center surrounded by a cloud of exchanging protons. The high intramolecular proton mobility provides information directly pertinent to the ability of pendant amines to accelerate proton transfers during catalysis of hydrogen oxidation. These results may also have broader implications for proton movement in

  11. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  12. The Relation between Coronal Holes and Coronal Mass Ejections during the Rise, Maximum, and Declining Phases of Solar Cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, A. A.; Gopalswamy, N; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Jung, H.

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction between coronal holes (CHs) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using a resultant force exerted by all the coronal holes present on the disk and is defined as the coronal hole influence parameter (CHIP). The CHIP magnitude for each CH depends on the CH area, the distance between the CH centroid and the eruption region, and the average magnetic field within the CH at the photospheric level. The CHIP direction for each CH points from the CH centroid to the eruption region. We focus on Solar Cycle 23 CMEs originating from the disk center of the Sun (central meridian distance =15deg) and resulting in magnetic clouds (MCs) and non-MCs in the solar wind. The CHIP is found to be the smallest during the rise phase for MCs and non-MCs. The maximum phase has the largest CHIP value (2.9 G) for non-MCs. The CHIP is the largest (5.8 G) for driverless (DL) shocks, which are shocks at 1 AU with no discernible MC or non-MC. These results suggest that the behavior of non-MCs is similar to that of the DL shocks and different from that of MCs. In other words, the CHs may deflect the CMEs away from the Sun-Earth line and force them to behave like limb CMEs with DL shocks. This finding supports the idea that all CMEs may be flux ropes if viewed from an appropriate vantage point.

  13. Proton NMR imaging in experimental ischemic infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, F.S.; Pykett, I.L.; Brady, T.J.; Vielma, J.; Burt, C.T.; Goldman, M.R.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Pohost, G.M.; Kistler, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images depict the distribution and concentration of mobile protons modified by the relaxation times T1 and T2. Using the steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) technique, serial coronal images were obtained sequentially over time in laboratory animals with experimental ischemic infarction. Image changes were evident as early as 2 hours after carotid artery ligation, and corresponded to areas of ischemic infarction noted pathologically. Resulting SSFP images in experimental stroke are contrasted to inversion-recovery NMR images in an illustrative patient with established cerebral infarction. Bulk T1 and T2 measurements were made in vitro in three groups of gerbils: normal, those with clinical evidence of infarction, and those clinically normal after carotid ligature. Infarcted hemispheres had significantly prolonged T1 and T2 (1.47 +/- .12 sec, 76.0 +/- 9.0 msec, respectively) when compared to the contralateral hemisphere (T1 . 1.28 +/- .05 sec, T2 . 58.7 +/- 3.9 msec) or to the other two groups. These data suggest that changes in NMR parameters occur and can be detected by NMR imaging as early as two hours after carotid artery ligation

  14. Microbial transport : Adaptations to natural environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, W.N

    2006-01-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria is the matrix for metabolic energy transducing processes such as proton motive force generation and solute transport. Passive permeation of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane is a crucial determinant in the proton motive generating capacity of the organisms.

  15. Microbial transport : Adaptations to natural environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, W.N

    The cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria is the matrix for metabolic energy transducing processes such as proton motive force generation and solute transport. Passive permeation of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane is a crucial determinant in the proton motive generating capacity of the organisms.

  16. New techniques for the characterisation of dynamical phenomena in solar coronal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbrecht, E.

    2007-02-01

    ) was an important step on the way to subarcsecond telescopes. It allows a spatial resolution of 1" in the EUV and UV bands and, simultaneously, a temporal resolution of the order of a few seconds. Coronal physics studies are dominated by two major and interlinked problems: coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Above the chromosphere there is a thin transition layer in which the temperature suddenly increases and density drops. How can the temperature of the solar corona be three orders of magnitude higher than the temperature of the photosphere? In order for this huge temperature gradient to be stationary, non-thermal energy must be transported from below the photosphere towards the chromosphere and corona and converted into heat to balance the radiative and conductive losses. This puzzle of origin, transport and conversion of energy is referred to as the "coronal heating problem". Due to its fundamental role in the structuring of the corona, the magnetic field is supposed to play an important role in the heating. In this dissertation we describe two aspects of solar coronal dynamics: waves in coronal loops (Part I) and coronal mass ejections (Part II). We investigate the influence of (semi-) automated techniques on solar coronal research. This is a timely discussion since the observation of solar phenomena is transitioning from manual detection to "Solar Image Processing". Our results are mainly based on images from the Extreme UV Imaging Telescope (EIT) and the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO), two instruments onboard the satellite SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) of which we recently celebrated its 11th anniversary. The high quality of the images together with the long timespan created a valuable database for solar physics research. Part I reports on the first detection of slow magnetoacoustic waves in transequatorial coronal loops observed in high cadence image sequences simultaneously produced by EIT and TRACE (Transition Region

  17. PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF CORONAL PLASMA AT THE TRANSIT OF A SHOCK DRIVEN BY A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susino, R.; Bemporad, A.; Mancuso, S., E-mail: susino@oato.inaf.it [INAF–Turin Astrophysical Observatory, via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy)

    2015-10-20

    We report here on the determination of plasma physical parameters across a shock driven by a coronal mass ejection using white light (WL) coronagraphic images and radio dynamic spectra (RDS). The event analyzed here is the spectacular eruption that occurred on 2011 June 7, a fast CME followed by the ejection of columns of chromospheric plasma, part of them falling back to the solar surface, associated with a M2.5 flare and a type-II radio burst. Images acquired by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/LASCO coronagraphs (C2 and C3) were employed to track the CME-driven shock in the corona between 2–12 R{sub ⊙} in an angular interval of about 110°. In this interval we derived two-dimensional (2D) maps of electron density, shock velocity, and shock compression ratio, and we measured the shock inclination angle with respect to the radial direction. Under plausible assumptions, these quantities were used to infer 2D maps of shock Mach number M{sub A} and strength of coronal magnetic fields at the shock's heights. We found that in the early phases (2–4 R{sub ⊙}) the whole shock surface is super-Alfvénic, while later on (i.e., higher up) it becomes super-Alfvénic only at the nose. This is in agreement with the location for the source of the observed type-II burst, as inferred from RDS combined with the shock kinematic and coronal densities derived from WL. For the first time, a coronal shock is used to derive a 2D map of the coronal magnetic field strength over intervals of 10 R{sub ⊙} altitude and ∼110° latitude.

  18. Maskless proton beam writing in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, P. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom) and Nano-Electronics Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.mistry@surrey.ac.uk; Gomez-Morilla, I. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Smith, R.C. [Nano-Electronics Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thomson, D. [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Grime, G.W. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Webb, R.P. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gwilliam, R. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jeynes, C. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Cansell, A. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Merchant, M. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Kirkby, K.J. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    Proton beam writing (PBW) is a direct write technique that employs a focused MeV proton beam which is scanned in a pre-determined pattern over a target material which is subsequently electrochemically etched or chemically developed. By changing the energy of the protons the range of the protons can be changed. The ultimate depth of the structure is determined by the range of the protons in the material and this allows structures to be formed to different depths. PBW has been successfully employed on etchable glasses, polymers and semiconductor materials such as silicon (Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs). This study reports on PBW in p-type GaAs and compares experimental results with computer simulations using the Atlas (copy right) semiconductor device package from SILVACO. It has already been proven that hole transport is required for the electrochemical etching of GaAs using Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-m-benzenedisulfonic acid, di-sodium salt). PBW in GaAs results in carrier removal in the irradiated regions and consequently minimal hole transport (in these regions) during electrochemical etching. As a result the irradiated regions are significantly more etch resistant than the non-irradiated regions. This allows high aspect ratio structures to be formed.

  19. Maskless proton beam writing in gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistry, P.; Gomez-Morilla, I.; Smith, R.C.; Thomson, D.; Grime, G.W.; Webb, R.P.; Gwilliam, R.; Jeynes, C.; Cansell, A.; Merchant, M.; Kirkby, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    Proton beam writing (PBW) is a direct write technique that employs a focused MeV proton beam which is scanned in a pre-determined pattern over a target material which is subsequently electrochemically etched or chemically developed. By changing the energy of the protons the range of the protons can be changed. The ultimate depth of the structure is determined by the range of the protons in the material and this allows structures to be formed to different depths. PBW has been successfully employed on etchable glasses, polymers and semiconductor materials such as silicon (Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs). This study reports on PBW in p-type GaAs and compares experimental results with computer simulations using the Atlas (copy right) semiconductor device package from SILVACO. It has already been proven that hole transport is required for the electrochemical etching of GaAs using Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-m-benzenedisulfonic acid, di-sodium salt). PBW in GaAs results in carrier removal in the irradiated regions and consequently minimal hole transport (in these regions) during electrochemical etching. As a result the irradiated regions are significantly more etch resistant than the non-irradiated regions. This allows high aspect ratio structures to be formed

  20. Characteristics of Low-latitude Coronal Holes near the Maximum of Solar Cycle 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmeister, Stefan J.; Veronig, Astrid; Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela [University of Graz, Institute of Physics, IGAM-Kanzelhöhe Observatory, Graz (Austria); Vennerstrom, Susanne [National Space Institute, DTU Space (Denmark); Vršnak, Bojan [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Zagreb (Croatia); Heber, Bernd, E-mail: stefan.hofmeister@uni-graz.at [Universität Kiel, Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Kiel (Germany)

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the statistics of 288 low-latitude coronal holes extracted from SDO /AIA-193 filtergrams over the time range of 2011 January 01–2013 December 31. We analyze the distribution of characteristic coronal hole properties, such as the areas, mean AIA-193 intensities, and mean magnetic field densities, the local distribution of the SDO /AIA-193 intensity and the magnetic field within the coronal holes, and the distribution of magnetic flux tubes in coronal holes. We find that the mean magnetic field density of all coronal holes under study is 3.0 ± 1.6 G, and the percentaged unbalanced magnetic flux is 49 ± 16%. The mean magnetic field density, the mean unsigned magnetic field density, and the percentaged unbalanced magnetic flux of coronal holes depend strongly pairwise on each other, with correlation coefficients cc > 0.92. Furthermore, we find that the unbalanced magnetic flux of the coronal holes is predominantly concentrated in magnetic flux tubes: 38% (81%) of the unbalanced magnetic flux of coronal holes arises from only 1% (10%) of the coronal hole area, clustered in magnetic flux tubes with field strengths >50 G (10 G). The average magnetic field density and the unbalanced magnetic flux derived from the magnetic flux tubes correlate with the mean magnetic field density and the unbalanced magnetic flux of the overall coronal hole (cc>0.93). These findings give evidence that the overall magnetic characteristics of coronal holes are governed by the characteristics of the magnetic flux tubes.

  1. TU-EF-304-10: Efficient Multiscale Simulation of the Proton Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for DNA Double Strand Break (DSB) Induction and Bio-Effective Dose in the FLUKA Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, V; Tsiamas, P; Axente, M; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Stewart, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: One of the more critical initiating events for reproductive cell death is the creation of a DNA double strand break (DSB). In this study, we present a computationally efficient way to determine spatial variations in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton therapy beams within the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. Methods: We used the independently tested Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) developed by Stewart and colleagues (Radiat. Res. 176, 587–602 2011) to estimate the RBE for DSB induction of monoenergetic protons, tritium, deuterium, hellium-3, hellium-4 ions and delta-electrons. The dose-weighted (RBE) coefficients were incorporated into FLUKA to determine the equivalent {sup 6}°60Co γ-ray dose for representative proton beams incident on cells in an aerobic and anoxic environment. Results: We found that the proton beam RBE for DSB induction at the tip of the Bragg peak, including primary and secondary particles, is close to 1.2. Furthermore, the RBE increases laterally to the beam axis at the area of Bragg peak. At the distal edge, the RBE is in the range from 1.3–1.4 for cells irradiated under aerobic conditions and may be as large as 1.5–1.8 for cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. Across the plateau region, the recorded RBE for DSB induction is 1.02 for aerobic cells and 1.05 for cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. The contribution to total effective dose from secondary heavy ions decreases with depth and is higher at shallow depths (e.g., at the surface of the skin). Conclusion: Multiscale simulation of the RBE for DSB induction provides useful insights into spatial variations in proton RBE within pristine Bragg peaks. This methodology is potentially useful for the biological optimization of proton therapy for the treatment of cancer. The study highlights the need to incorporate spatial variations in proton RBE into proton therapy treatment plans.

  2. Catalogue of {>} 55 MeV Wide-longitude Solar Proton Events Observed by SOHO, ACE, and the STEREOs at {≈} 1 AU During 2009 - 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paassilta, Miikka; Papaioannou, Athanasios; Dresing, Nina; Vainio, Rami; Valtonen, Eino; Heber, Bernd

    2018-04-01

    Based on energetic particle observations made at {≈} 1 AU, we present a catalogue of 46 wide-longitude ({>} 45°) solar energetic particle (SEP) events detected at multiple locations during 2009 - 2016. The particle kinetic energies of interest were chosen as {>} 55 MeV for protons and 0.18 - 0.31 MeV for electrons. We make use of proton data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Energetic and Relativistic Nuclei and Electron Experiment (SOHO/ERNE) and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory/High Energy Telescopes (STEREO/HET), together with electron data from the Advanced Composition Explorer/Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (ACE/EPAM) and the STEREO/ Solar Electron and Proton Telescopes (SEPT). We consider soft X-ray data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and coronal mass ejection (CME) observations made with the SOHO/ Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and STEREO/ Coronagraphs 1 and 2 (COR1, COR2) to establish the probable associations between SEP events and the related solar phenomena. Event onset times and peak intensities are determined; velocity dispersion analysis (VDA) and time-shifting analysis (TSA) are performed for protons; TSA is performed for electrons. In our event sample, there is a tendency for the highest peak intensities to occur when the observer is magnetically connected to solar regions west of the flare. Our estimates for the mean event width, derived as the standard deviation of a Gaussian curve modelling the SEP intensities (protons {≈} 44°, electrons {≈} 50°), largely agree with previous results for lower-energy SEPs. SEP release times with respect to event flares, as well as the event rise times, show no simple dependence on the observer's connection angle, suggesting that the source region extent and dominant particle acceleration and transport mechanisms are important in defining these characteristics of an event. There is no marked difference between the speed

  3. Proton flux under radiation belts: near-equatorial zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, O.R.; Panasyuk, M.I.; Petrov, A.N.; Kudela, K.

    2005-01-01

    In this work the features of low-energy proton flux increases in near-equatorial region (McIlvein parameter L th the proton flux (with energy from tens keV up to several MeV) increases are registering regularly. However modern proton flux models (for example AP8 model) works at L>1.15 only and does not take into account near-equatorial protons. These fluxes are not too big, but the investigation of this phenomenon is important in scope of atmosphere-ionosphere connections and mechanisms of particles transport in magnetosphere. In according to double charge-exchange model the proton flux in near-equatorial region does not depend on geomagnetic local time (MLT) and longitude. However the Azur satellite data and Kosmos-484, MIR station and Active satellite data revealed the proton flux dependence on longitude. The other feature of near-equatorial proton flux is the dependence on geomagnetic local time revealed in the Sampex satellite experiment and other experiments listed above. In this work the dependences on MLT and longitude are investigated using the Active satellite (30-500 keV) and Sampex satellite (>800 keV). This data confirms that main sources of near-equatorial protons are radiation belts and ring current. The other result is that near-equatorial protons are quasi-trapped. The empirical proton flux dependences on L, B at near-equatorial longitudes are presented. (author)

  4. Proton decay: spectroscopic probe beyond the proton drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seweryniak, D; Davids, C N; Robinson, A; Woods, P J; Blank, B; Carpenter, M P; Davinson, T; Freeman, S J; Hammond, N; Hoteling, N; Janssens, R V F; Khoo, T L; Liu, Z; Mukherjee, G; Shergur, J; Sinha, S; Sonzogni, A A; Walters, W B; Woehr, A

    2005-01-01

    Proton decay has been transformed in recent years from an exotic phenomenon into a powerful spectroscopic tool. The frontiers of experimental and theoretical proton-decay studies will be reviewed. Different aspects of proton decay will be illustrated with recent results on the deformed proton emitter 135 Tb, the odd-odd deformed proton emitter 130 Eu, the complex fine structure in the odd-odd 146 Tm nucleus and on excited states in the transitional proton emitter 145 Tm

  5. Review of inelastic proton-proton reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston

    1973-01-01

    The most important new results on inelastic proton-proton scattering obtained with the new machines, I.S.R. and N.A.L., are: (1) The inelastic cross-section increases monotonically with energy from threshold to 1500 GeV/c. Above 6 GeV/c the energy variation has a s /sup +0.04/ behaviour. (2) Scaling is observed at I.S.R. energies in pion production. Confirmation is obtained of the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation. (3) The results are in general, consistent with the two-component model-one class of events being produced by diffraction dissociation and the other by a short-range-order process (e.g. the multiperipheral model). (4) There are indications that the protons have a granular structure; this from observation of secondaries of large transverse momenta. (33 refs).

  6. H+-type and OH−-type biological protonic semiconductors and complementary devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yingxin; Josberger, Erik; Jin, Jungho; Rousdari, Anita Fadavi; Helms, Brett A.; Zhong, Chao; Anantram, M. P.; Rolandi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Proton conduction is essential in biological systems. Oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin, and uncoupling membrane potentials by the antibiotic Gramicidin are examples. In these systems, H+ hop along chains of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and hydrophilic residues – proton wires. These wires also support the transport of OH− as proton holes. Discriminating between H+ and OH− transport has been elusive. Here, H+ and OH− transport is achieved in polysaccharide- based proton wires and devices. A H+- OH− junction with rectifying behaviour and H+-type and OH−-type complementary field effect transistors are demonstrated. We describe these devices with a model that relates H+ and OH− to electron and hole transport in semiconductors. In turn, the model developed for these devices may provide additional insights into proton conduction in biological systems. PMID:24089083

  7. H+-type and OH- -type biological protonic semiconductors and complementary devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yingxin; Josberger, Erik; Jin, Jungho; Roudsari, Anita Fadavi; Rousdari, Anita Fadavi; Helms, Brett A; Zhong, Chao; Anantram, M P; Rolandi, Marco

    2013-10-03

    Proton conduction is essential in biological systems. Oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin, and uncoupling membrane potentials by the antibiotic Gramicidin are examples. In these systems, H(+) hop along chains of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and hydrophilic residues - proton wires. These wires also support the transport of OH(-) as proton holes. Discriminating between H(+) and OH(-) transport has been elusive. Here, H(+) and OH(-) transport is achieved in polysaccharide- based proton wires and devices. A H(+)- OH(-) junction with rectifying behaviour and H(+)-type and OH(-)-type complementary field effect transistors are demonstrated. We describe these devices with a model that relates H(+) and OH(-) to electron and hole transport in semiconductors. In turn, the model developed for these devices may provide additional insights into proton conduction in biological systems.

  8. A model for radio emission from solar coronal shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J., E-mail: djwu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Solar coronal shocks are very common phenomena in the solar atmosphere and are believed to be the drivers of solar type II radio bursts. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open question. This paper proposes that electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is responsible for the generation of radiation from the coronal shocks. In the present model, an energetic ion beam accelerated by the shock first excites the Alfvén wave (AW), then the excited AW leads to the formation of a density-depleted duct along the foreshock boundary of the shock. In this density-depleted duct, the energetic electron beam produced via the shock acceleration can effectively excite radio emission by ECM instability. Our results show that this model may potentially be applied to solar type II radio bursts.

  9. A model for radio emission from solar coronal shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Solar coronal shocks are very common phenomena in the solar atmosphere and are believed to be the drivers of solar type II radio bursts. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open question. This paper proposes that electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is responsible for the generation of radiation from the coronal shocks. In the present model, an energetic ion beam accelerated by the shock first excites the Alfvén wave (AW), then the excited AW leads to the formation of a density-depleted duct along the foreshock boundary of the shock. In this density-depleted duct, the energetic electron beam produced via the shock acceleration can effectively excite radio emission by ECM instability. Our results show that this model may potentially be applied to solar type II radio bursts.

  10. Shear-induced inflation of coronal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimchuk, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Using numerical models of force-free magnetic fields, the shearing of footprints in arcade geometries leading to an inflation of the coronal magnetic field was examined. For each of the shear profiles considered, all of the field lines become elevated compared with the potential field. This includes cases where the shear is concentrated well away from the arcade axis, such that B(sub z), the component of field parallel to the axis, increases outward to produce an inward B(sub z) squared/8 pi magnetic pressure gradient force. These results contrast with an earlier claim, shown to be incorrect, that field lines can sometimes become depressed as a result of shear. It is conjectured that an inflation of the entire field will always result from the shearing of simple arcade configurations. These results have implications for prominence formation, the interplanetary magnetic flux, and possibly also coronal holes. 38 refs

  11. PLASMA HEATING INSIDE INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS BY ALFVÉNIC FLUCTUATIONS DISSIPATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Chi; Zhang, Lingqian [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, CAS, Beijing, 100190 (China); He, Jiansen [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); Richardson, John D.; Belcher, John W. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tu, Cui, E-mail: hli@spaceweather.ac.cn [Laboratory of Near Space Environment, National Space Science Center, CAS, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2016-11-10

    Nonlinear cascade of low-frequency Alfvénic fluctuations (AFs) is regarded as one of the candidate energy sources that heat plasma during the non-adiabatic expansion of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). However, AFs inside ICMEs were seldom reported in the literature. In this study, we investigate AFs inside ICMEs using observations from Voyager 2 between 1 and 6 au. It has been found that AFs with a high degree of Alfvénicity frequently occurred inside ICMEs for almost all of the identified ICMEs (30 out of 33 ICMEs) and for 12.6% of the ICME time interval. As ICMEs expand and move outward, the percentage of AF duration decays linearly in general. The occurrence rate of AFs inside ICMEs is much less than that in ambient solar wind, especially within 4.75 au. AFs inside ICMEs are more frequently presented in the center and at the boundaries of ICMEs. In addition, the proton temperature inside ICME has a similar “W”-shaped distribution. These findings suggest significant contribution of AFs on local plasma heating inside ICMEs.

  12. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  13. On the proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, L.; Ghirardi, G.C.; Weber, T.

    1983-07-01

    The problem of the proton decay is considered taking into account that in actual experiments there is an interaction of the proton with its environment which could imply an increase of its theoretical lifetime. It is seen that, by application of the time-energy uncertainty relation, no prolongation of the lifetime is obtained in this case. (author)

  14. Swift X-ray monitoring of stellar coronal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brendan; Hagen, Cedric; Gallo, Elena; Wright, Jason T.

    2018-01-01

    We used California Planet Search Ca II H and K core emission measurements to identify and characterize chromospheric activity cycles in a sample of main-sequence FGK stars. About a dozen of these with existing ROSAT archival data were targeted with Swift to obtain a current epoch X-ray flux. We find that coronal variability by a factor of several is common on decade-long timescales (we attempt to link to the chromospheric cycle phase) but can also occur on short timescales between Swift visits to a given target, presumably related to stellar rotation and coronal inhomogeneity or to small flares. Additionally, we present new Swift monitoring observations of two M dwarfs with known exoplanets: GJ 15A and GJ 674. GJ 15A b is around 5.3 Earth masses with an 11.4 day orbital period, while GJ 674 is around 11.1 Earth masses with a 4.7 day orbital period. GJ 15A was observed several times in late 2014 and then monitored at approximately weekly intervals for several months in early 2016, for a total exposure of 18 ks. GJ 674 was monitored at approximately weekly intervals for most of 2016, for a total exposure of 40 ks. We provide light curves and hardness ratios for both sources, and also compare to earlier archival X-ray data. Both sources show significant X-ray variability, including between consecutive observations. We quantify the energy distribution for coronal flaring, and compare to optical results for M dwarfs from Kepler. Finally, we discuss the implications of M dwarf coronal activity for exoplanets orbiting within the nominal habitable zone.

  15. Morphology and physical properties of solar coronal holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozelot, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    By their peculiar characteristics, coronal holes induce on Earth climatic variations and cyclic effects, not well known nowadays. Because of low electronical density and very low temperature, study of these holes was neglected. The author presents the results of the observations from discovery in the fifteens. He gives some new results, a theoretical model and not well resolved questions which can conduct to new methods of searching [fr

  16. The evolution of coronal activity in main sequence cool stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Stars spend most of their lifetime and show the least amount of nuclear evolution on the main sequence. However, the x-ray luminosities of cool star coronas change by orders of magnitude as a function of main sequence age. Such coronal evolution is discussed in relation to our knowledge of the solar corona, solar and stellar flares, stellar rotation and binarity. The relevance of X-ray observations to current speculations on stellar dynamos is also considered

  17. PROJECTION EFFECTS IN CORONAL DIMMINGS AND ASSOCIATED EUV WAVE EVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissauer, K.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Vanninathan, K. [IGAM/Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5/II, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Magdalenić, J., E-mail: karin.dissauer@uni-graz.at [Solar-Terrestrial Center of Excellence-SIDC, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Av. Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-10-20

    We investigate the high-speed ( v > 1000 km s{sup −1}) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from NOAA active region 11283 on 2011 September 6 (SOL2011-09-06T22:12). This EUV wave features peculiar on-disk signatures; in particular, we observe an intermittent “disappearance” of the front for 120 s in Solar Dynamics Observatory ( SDO )/AIA 171, 193, 211 Å data, whereas the 335 Å filter, sensitive to hotter plasmas ( T ∼ 2.5 MK), shows a continuous evolution of the wave front. The eruption was also accompanied by localized coronal dimming regions. We exploit the multi-point quadrature position of SDO and STEREO-A , to make a thorough analysis of the EUV wave evolution, with respect to its kinematics and amplitude evolution and reconstruct the SDO line-of-sight (LOS) direction of the identified coronal dimming regions in STEREO-A . We show that the observed intensities of the dimming regions in SDO /AIA depend on the structures that are lying along their LOS and are the combination of their individual intensities, e.g., the expanding CME body, the enhanced EUV wave, and the CME front. In this context, we conclude that the intermittent disappearance of the EUV wave in the AIA 171, 193, and 211 Å filters, which are channels sensitive to plasma with temperatures below ∼2 MK is also caused by such LOS integration effects. These observations clearly demonstrate that single-view image data provide us with limited insight to correctly interpret coronal features.

  18. PS proton source

    CERN Multimedia

    1959-01-01

    The first proton source used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron (PS) which started operation in 1959. This is CERN's oldest accelerator still functioning today (2018). It is part of the accelerator chain that supplies proton beams to the Large Hadron Collider. The source is a Thonemann type. In order to extract and accelerate the protons at high energy, a high frequency electrical field is used (140Mhz). The field is transmitted by a coil around a discharge tube in order to maintain the gas hydrogen in an ionised state. An electrical field pulse, in the order of 15kV, is then applied via an impulse transformer between anode and cathode of the discharge tube. The electrons and protons of the plasma formed in the ionised gas in the tube, are then separated. Currents in the order of 200mA during 100 microseconds have benn obtained with this type of source.

  19. Unambiguous Evidence of Coronal Implosions during Solar Eruptions and Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juntao; Simões, P. J. A.; Fletcher, L.

    2018-05-01

    In the implosion conjecture, coronal loops contract as the result of magnetic energy release in solar eruptions and flares. However, after almost two decades, observations of this phenomenon are still rare and most previous reports are plagued by projection effects so that loop contraction could be either true implosion or just a change in loop inclination. In this paper, to demonstrate the reality of loop contractions in the global coronal dynamics, we present four events with the continuously contracting loops in an almost edge-on geometry from the perspective of SDO/AIA, which are free from the ambiguity caused by the projection effects, also supplemented by contemporary observations from STEREO for examination. In the wider context of observations, simulations and theories, we argue that the implosion conjecture is valid in interpreting these events. Furthermore, distinct properties of the events allow us to identify two physical categories of implosion. One type demonstrates a rapid contraction at the beginning of the flare impulsive phase, as magnetic free energy is removed rapidly by a filament eruption. The other type, which has no visible eruption, shows a continuous loop shrinkage during the entire flare impulsive phase, which we suggest shows the ongoing conversion of magnetic free energy in a coronal volume. Corresponding scenarios are described that can provide reasonable explanations for the observations. We also point out that implosions may be suppressed in cases when a heavily mass-loaded filament is involved, possibly serving as an alternative account for their observational rarity.

  20. Macrospicule Jets in On-Disk Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M. L.; Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the magnetic structure and dynamics of multiple jets found in coronal holes close to or on disk center. All data are from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We report on observations of six jets in an equatorial coronal hole spanning 2011 February 27 and 28. We show the evolution of these jets in AIA 193 A, examine the magnetic field configuration, and postulate the probable trigger mechanism of these events. We recently reported on another jet in the same coronal hole on 2011 February 27, approximately 13:04 Universal Time (Adams et al 2014, Astrophysical Journal, 783: 11); this jet is a previously-unrecognized variety of blowout jet. In this variety, the reconnection bright point is not made by interchange reconnection of initially-closed erupting field in the base of the jet with ambient open field. Instead, there is a miniature filament-eruption flare arcade made by internal reconnection of the legs of the erupting field.

  1. THE NATURE OF CME-FLARE-ASSOCIATED CORONAL DIMMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, J. X. [Key Laboratory of Planetary Sciences, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Shanghai 200030 (China); Qiu, J., E-mail: chengjx@shao.ac.cn [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman MT 59717-3840 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming that is evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect the properties of CMEs in the early phase of their eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on 2011 December 26. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure the magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons, and it is observed in multiple EUV passbands. Rapid dimming starts after the onset of fast reconnection and CME acceleration, and its evolution tracks the CME height and flare reconnection. The spatial distribution of dimming exhibits cores of deep dimming with a rapid growth, and their light curves are approximately linearly scaled with the CME height profile. From the dimming analysis we infer the process of the CME expansion, and estimate properties of the CME.

  2. Observable Signatures of Energy Release in Braided Coronal Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontin, D. I. [University of Dundee, Nethergate, Dundee, DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Janvier, M. [Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Bât. 121, F-91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Tiwari, S. K.; Winebarger, A. R.; Cirtain, J. W. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Galsgaard, K. [Niels Bohr Institute, Geological Museum Østervoldgade 5-7, DK-1350, Copenhagen K (Denmark)

    2017-03-10

    We examine the turbulent relaxation of solar coronal loops containing non-trivial field line braiding. Such field line tangling in the corona has long been postulated in the context of coronal heating models. We focus on the observational signatures of energy release in such braided magnetic structures using MHD simulations and forward modeling tools. The aim is to answer the following question: if energy release occurs in a coronal loop containing braided magnetic flux, should we expect a clearly observable signature in emissions? We demonstrate that the presence of braided magnetic field lines does not guarantee a braided appearance to the observed intensities. Observed intensities may—but need not necessarily—reveal the underlying braided nature of the magnetic field, depending on the degree and pattern of the field line tangling within the loop. However, in all cases considered, the evolution of the braided loop is accompanied by localized heating regions as the loop relaxes. Factors that may influence the observational signatures are discussed. Recent high-resolution observations from Hi-C have claimed the first direct evidence of braided magnetic fields in the corona. Here we show that both the Hi-C data and some of our simulations give the appearance of braiding at a range of scales.

  3. Do coronal holes influence cosmic ray daily harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    Coronal holes are identified by their low emissivity in either EUV (Munro and Withrobe, 1973) or in X-rays (Krieger et al, 1973). They are seats of unidirectional magnetic fields. Also, high speed solar wind streams originate in them. Also, high speed solar wind streams originate in then (Krieger et al, 1973; Neupert and Pizzo, 1974; Nolte et al, 1976). Coronal holes often extend over a wide range of heliolatitudes (Timothy et al, 1975). Elsewhere in the Proceedings we have presented results on the long term changes observed in the amplitudes and the times of maximum of the diurnal, the semidiurnal and the tridiurnal variations of cosmic rays, at low (neutrons) and at high (underground muons) primary rigidities (Ahluwalia, 1977). We have shown that a dramatic shift to early hours is noticeable in the times of maxima of the harmonics during 1971-72 period. In this paper we examine the nature of the contributions of off-ecliptic cosmic rays of high enough rigidity, streaming under the influence of large scale ordered interplanetary magnetic field set up by the coronal holes, to the cosmic ray daily harmonics. Some models are presented and discussed in a preliminary fashion. (author)

  4. MHD modeling of coronal loops: the transition region throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarrasi, M.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Mignone, A.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The expansion of coronal loops in the transition region may considerably influence the diagnostics of the plasma emission measure. The cross-sectional area of the loops is expected to depend on the temperature and pressure, and might be sensitive to the heating rate. Aims: The approach here is to study the area response to slow changes in the coronal heating rate, and check the current interpretation in terms of steady heating models. Methods: We study the area response with a time-dependent 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) loop model, including the description of the expanding magnetic field, coronal heating and losses by thermal conduction, and radiation from optically thin plasma. We run a simulation for a loop 50 Mm long and quasi-statically heated to about 4 MK. Results: We find that the area can change substantially with the quasi-steady heating rate, e.g., by ~40% at 0.5 MK as the loop temperature varies between 1 MK and 4 MK, and, therefore, affects the interpretation of the differential emission measure vs. temperature (DEM(T)) curves. The movie associated to Fig. 4 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Comparison between two models of energy balance in coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Cormack, C.; López Fuentes, M.; Vásquez, A. M.; Nuevo, F. A.; Frazin, R. A.; Landi, E.

    2017-10-01

    In this work we compare two models to analyze the energy balance along coronal magnetic loops. For the first stationary model we deduce an expression of the energy balance along the loops expressed in terms of quantities provided by the combination of differential emission measure tomography (DEMT) applied to EUV images time series and potential extrapolations of the coronal magnetic field. The second applied model is a 0D hydrodynamic model that provides the evolution of the average properties of the coronal plasma along the loops, using as input parameters the loop length and the heating rate obtained with the first model. We compare the models for two Carrington rotations (CR) corresponding to different periods of activity: CR 2081, corresponding to a period of minimum activity observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) on board of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), and CR 2099, corresponding to a period of activity increase observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The results of the models are consistent for both rotations.

  6. Numerically modelling the large scale coronal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, Mayukh; Nandi, Dibyendu

    2016-07-01

    The solar corona spews out vast amounts of magnetized plasma into the heliosphere which has a direct impact on the Earth's magnetosphere. Thus it is important that we develop an understanding of the dynamics of the solar corona. With our present technology it has not been possible to generate 3D magnetic maps of the solar corona; this warrants the use of numerical simulations to study the coronal magnetic field. A very popular method of doing this, is to extrapolate the photospheric magnetic field using NLFF or PFSS codes. However the extrapolations at different time intervals are completely independent of each other and do not capture the temporal evolution of magnetic fields. On the other hand full MHD simulations of the global coronal field, apart from being computationally very expensive would be physically less transparent, owing to the large number of free parameters that are typically used in such codes. This brings us to the Magneto-frictional model which is relatively simpler and computationally more economic. We have developed a Magnetofrictional Model, in 3D spherical polar co-ordinates to study the large scale global coronal field. Here we present studies of changing connectivities between active regions, in response to photospheric motions.

  7. Coronal Physics and the Chandra Emission Line Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickhouse, N. S.; Drake, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    With the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of cosmic sources has begun. Early, deep observations of three stellar coronal sources Capella, Procyon, and HR 1099 are providing not only invaluable calibration data, but also benchmarks for plasma spectral models. These models are needed to interpret data from stellar coronae, galaxies and clusters of galaxies, supernova, remnants and other astrophysical sources. They have been called into question in recent years as problems with understanding low resolution ASCA and moderate resolution Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE) data have arisen. The Emission Line Project is a collaborative effort, to improve the models, with Phase I being the comparison of models with observed spectra of Capella, Procyon, and HR 1099. Goals of these comparisons are (1) to determine and verify accurate and robust diagnostics and (2) to identify and prioritize issues in fundamental spectroscopy which will require further theoretical and/or laboratory work. A critical issue in exploiting the coronal data for these purposes is to understand the extent, to which common simplifying assumptions (coronal equilibrium, negligible optical depth) apply. We will discuss recent, advances in our understanding of stellar coronae, in this context.

  8. THE NATURE OF CME-FLARE-ASSOCIATED CORONAL DIMMING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, J. X.; Qiu, J.

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming that is evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect the properties of CMEs in the early phase of their eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on 2011 December 26. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure the magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons, and it is observed in multiple EUV passbands. Rapid dimming starts after the onset of fast reconnection and CME acceleration, and its evolution tracks the CME height and flare reconnection. The spatial distribution of dimming exhibits cores of deep dimming with a rapid growth, and their light curves are approximately linearly scaled with the CME height profile. From the dimming analysis we infer the process of the CME expansion, and estimate properties of the CME.

  9. The magnetic connectivity of coronal shocks from behind-the-limb flares to the visible solar surface during γ-ray events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, I.; Rouillard, A. P.; Share, G. H.

    2017-12-01

    Context. The observation of >100 MeV γ-rays in the minutes to hours following solar flares suggests that high-energy particles interacting in the solar atmosphere can be stored and/or accelerated for long time periods. The occasions when γ-rays are detected even when the solar eruptions occurred beyond the solar limb as viewed from Earth provide favorable viewing conditions for studying the role of coronal shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the acceleration of these particles. Aims: In this paper, we investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of the coronal shocks inferred from stereoscopic observations of behind-the-limb flares to determine if they could be the source of the particles producing the γ-rays. Methods: We analyzed the CMEs and early formation of coronal shocks associated with γ-ray events measured by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) from three eruptions behind the solar limb as viewed from Earth on 2013 Oct. 11, 2014 Jan. 06 and Sep. 01. We used a 3D triangulation technique, based on remote-sensing observations to model the expansion of the CME shocks from above the solar surface to the upper corona. Coupling the expansion model to various models of the coronal magnetic field allowed us to derive the time-dependent distribution of shock Mach numbers and the magnetic connection of particles produced by the shock to the solar surface visible from Earth. Results: The reconstructed shock fronts for the three events became magnetically connected to the visible solar surface after the start of the flare and just before the onset of the >100 MeV γ-ray emission. The shock surface at these connections also exhibited supercritical Mach numbers required for significant particle energization. The strongest γ-ray emissions occurred when the flanks of the shocks were connected in a quasi-perpendicular geometry to the field lines reaching the visible surface. Multipoint, in situ, measurements of solar energetic particles (SEPs) were

  10. An Estimate of Solar Wind Velocity Profiles in a Coronal Hole and a Coronal Streamer Area (6-40 R(radius symbol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzold, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Total electron content data obtained from the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment (SCE) in 1991 were used to select two data sets, one associated with a coronal hole and the other with coronal streamer crossings. (This is largely equatorial data shortly after solar maximum.) The solar wind velocity profile is estimated for these areas.

  11. NO TRACE LEFT BEHIND: STEREO OBSERVATION OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION WITHOUT LOW CORONAL SIGNATURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbrecht, Eva; Patsourakos, Spiros; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2009-01-01

    The availability of high-quality synoptic observations of the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) and visible corona during the SOHO mission has advanced our understanding of the low corona manifestations of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The EUV imager/white light coronagraph connection has been proven so powerful, it is routinely assumed that if no EUV signatures are present when a CME is observed by a coronagraph, then the event must originate behind the visible limb. This assumption carries strong implications for space weather forecasting but has not been put to the test. This paper presents the first detailed analysis of a frontside, large-scale CME that has no obvious counterparts in the low corona as observed in EUV and Hα wavelengths. The event was observed by the SECCHI instruments onboard the STEREO mission. The COR2A coronagraph observed a slow flux-rope-type CME, while an extremely faint partial halo was observed in COR2B. The event evolved very slowly and is typical of the streamer-blowout CME class. EUVI A 171 A images show a concave feature above the east limb, relatively stable for about two days before the eruption, when it rises into the coronagraphic fields and develops into the core of the CME. None of the typical low corona signatures of a CME (flaring, EUV dimming, filament eruption, waves) were observed in the EUVI B images, which we attribute to the unusually large height from which the flux rope lifted off. This interpretation is supported by the CME mass measurements and estimates of the expected EUV dimming intensity. Only thanks to the availability of the two viewpoints we were able to identify the likely source region. The event originated along a neutral line over the quiet-Sun. No active regions were present anywhere on the visible (from STEREO B) face of the disk. Leaving no trace behind on the solar disk, this observation shows unambiguously that a CME eruption does not need to have clear on-disk signatures. Also it sheds light on the

  12. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed

  13. Computer codes for designing proton linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takao

    1992-01-01

    Computer codes for designing proton linear accelerators are discussed from the viewpoint of not only designing but also construction and operation of the linac. The codes are divided into three categories according to their purposes: 1) design code, 2) generation and simulation code, and 3) electric and magnetic fields calculation code. The role of each category is discussed on the basis of experience at KEK (the design of the 40-MeV proton linac and its construction and operation, and the design of the 1-GeV proton linac). We introduce our recent work relevant to three-dimensional calculation and supercomputer calculation: 1) tuning of MAFIA (three-dimensional electric and magnetic fields calculation code) for supercomputer, 2) examples of three-dimensional calculation of accelerating structures by MAFIA, 3) development of a beam transport code including space charge effects. (author)

  14. FIELD TOPOLOGY ANALYSIS OF A LONG-LASTING CORONAL SIGMOID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savcheva, A. S.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first field topology analysis based on nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models of a long-lasting coronal sigmoid observed in 2007 February with the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode. The NLFFF models are built with the flux rope insertion method and give the three-dimensional coronal magnetic field as constrained by observed coronal loop structures and photospheric magnetograms. Based on these models, we have computed horizontal maps of the current and the squashing factor Q for 25 different heights in the corona for all six days of the evolution of the region. We use the squashing factor to quantify the degree of change of the field line linkage and to identify prominent quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). We discuss the major properties of these QSL maps and devise a way to pick out important QSLs since our calculation cannot reach high values of Q. The complexity in the QSL maps reflects the high degree of fragmentation of the photospheric field. We find main QSLs and current concentrations that outline the flux rope cavity and that become characteristically S-shaped during the evolution of the sigmoid. We note that, although intermittent bald patches exist along the length of the sigmoid during its whole evolution, the flux rope remains stable for several days. However, shortly after the topology of the field exhibits hyperbolic flux tubes (HFT) on February 7 and February 12 the sigmoid loses equilibrium and produces two B-class flares and associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The location of the most elevated part of the HFT in our model coincides with the inferred locations of the two flares. Therefore, we suggest that the presence of an HFT in a coronal magnetic configuration may be an indication that the system is ready to erupt. We offer a scenario in which magnetic reconnection at the HFT drives the system toward the marginally stable state. Once this state is reached, loss of equilibrium occurs via the torus instability, producing a CME.

  15. Diagnostics of Coronal Heating in Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fludra, Andrzej; Hornsey, Christopher; Nakariakov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    We aim to develop a diagnostic method for the coronal heating mechanism in active region loops. Observational constraints on coronal heating models have been sought using measurements in the X-ray and EUV wavelengths. Statistical analysis, using EUV emission from many active regions, was done by Fludra and Ireland (2008) who studied power-law relationships between active region integrated magnetic flux and emission line intensities. A subsequent study by Fludra and Warren (2010) for the first time compared fully resolved images in an EUV spectral line of OV 63.0 nm with the photospheric magnetic field, leading to the identification of a dominant, ubiquitous variable component of the transition region EUV emission and a discovery of a steady basal heating, and deriving the dependence of the basal heating rate on the photospheric magnetic flux density. In this study, we compare models of single coronal loops with EUV observations. We assess to what degree observations of individual coronal loops made in the EUV range are capable of providing constraints on the heating mechanism. We model the coronal magnetic field in an active region using an NLFF extrapolation code applied to a photospheric vector magnetogram from SDO/HMI and select several loops that match an SDO/AIA 171 image of the same active region. We then model the plasma in these loops using a 1D hydrostatic code capable of applying an arbitrary heating rate as a function of magnetic field strength along the loop. From the plasma parameters derived from this model, we calculate the EUV emission along the loop in AIA 171 and 335 bands, and in pure spectral lines of Fe IX 17.1 nm and Fe XVI 33.5 nm. We use different spatial distributions of the heating function: concentrated near the loop top, uniform and concentrated near the footpoints, and investigate their effect on the modelled EUV intensities. We find a diagnostics based on the dependence of the total loop intensity on the shape of the heating function

  16. FLARE VERSUS SHOCK ACCELERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY PROTONS IN SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliver, E. W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have presented evidence for a significant to dominant role for a flare-resident acceleration process for high-energy protons in large (“gradual”) solar energetic particle (SEP) events, contrary to the more generally held view that such protons are primarily accelerated at shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The new support for this flare-centric view is provided by correlations between the sizes of X-ray and/or microwave bursts and associated SEP events. For one such study that considered >100 MeV proton events, we present evidence based on CME speeds and widths, shock associations, and electron-to-proton ratios that indicates that events omitted from that investigation’s analysis should have been included. Inclusion of these outlying events reverses the study’s qualitative result and supports shock acceleration of >100 MeV protons. Examination of the ratios of 0.5 MeV electron intensities to >100 MeV proton intensities for the Grechnev et al. event sample provides additional support for shock acceleration of high-energy protons. Simply scaling up a classic “impulsive” SEP event to produce a large >100 MeV proton event implies the existence of prompt 0.5 MeV electron events that are approximately two orders of magnitude larger than are observed. While classic “impulsive” SEP events attributed to flares have high electron-to-proton ratios (≳5 × 10 5 ) due to a near absence of >100 MeV protons, large poorly connected (≥W120) gradual SEP events, attributed to widespread shock acceleration, have electron-to-proton ratios of ∼2 × 10 3 , similar to those of comparably sized well-connected (W20–W90) SEP events.

  17. Molecular mechanisms controlling proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ebrey, Thomas G.

    2000-02-10

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is the simplest biological system for the transduction of light energy. Light energy is directly converted to transmembrane proton gradient by a single, small membrane protein. The extraordinary stability of bR makes it an outstanding subject for bioenergetic studies. This project has focused on the role of interactions between key residues of the pigment involved in light-induced proton transfer. Methods to estimate the strength of these interactions and their correlation with the rate and efficiency of proton transfer have been developed. The concept of the coupling of the protonation states of key groups has been applied to individual steps of the proton transfer with the ultimate goal of understanding on the molecular level the driving forces for proton transport and the pathway of the transported proton in bT. The mechanism of light-induced proton release, uptake and the mechanism of recovery of initial state of bT has been examined. The experiments were performed with genetically engineered, site-specific mutants of bR. This has enabled us to characterize the role of individual amino acid residues in bR. Time resolved and low temperature absorption spectroscopy and light-induced photocurrent measurements were used in order to study the photochemical cycle and proton transfer in mutant pigments. Chemical modification and crosslinking of both the specific amino acids to the chromophore or to other amino acids were used to elucidate the role of light-induced conformational changes in the photocycle and the structure of the protein in the ground state. The results of this project provided new knowledge on the architecture of the proton transfer pathways inside the protein, on the mechanism of proton release in bR, and on the role of specific amino acid residues in the structure and function of bR.

  18. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particle event characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Athanasios; Sandberg, Ingmar; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Kouloumvakos, Athanasios; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Tziotziou, Kostas; Tsiropoula, Georgia; Jiggens, Piers; Hilgers, Alain

    2016-12-01

    A new catalogue of 314 solar energetic particle (SEP) events extending over a large time span from 1984 to 2013 has been compiled. The properties as well as the associations of these SEP events with their parent solar sources have been thoroughly examined. The properties of the events include the proton peak integral flux and the fluence for energies above 10, 30, 60 and 100 MeV. The associated solar events were parametrized by solar flare (SF) and coronal mass ejection (CME) characteristics, as well as related radio emissions. In particular, for SFs: the soft X-ray (SXR) peak flux, the SXR fluence, the heliographic location, the rise time and the duration were exploited; for CMEs the plane-of-sky velocity as well as the angular width were utilized. For radio emissions, type III, II and IV radio bursts were identified. Furthermore, we utilized element abundances of Fe and O. We found evidence that most of the SEP events in our catalogue do not conform to a simple two-class paradigm, with the 73% of them exhibiting both type III and type II radio bursts, and that a continuum of event properties is present. Although, the so-called hybrid or mixed events are found to be present in our catalogue, it was not possible to attribute each SEP event to a mixed/hybrid sub-category. Moreover, it appears that the start of the type III burst most often precedes the maximum of the SF and thus falls within the impulsive phase of the associated SF. At the same time, type III bursts take place within ≈5.22 min, on average, in advance from the time of maximum of the derivative of the SXR flux (Neupert effect). We further performed a statistical analysis and a mapping of the logarithm of the proton peak flux at E > 10 MeV, on different pairs of the parent solar source characteristics. This revealed correlations in 3-D space and demonstrated that the gradual SEP events that stem from the central part of the visible solar disk constitute a significant radiation risk. The velocity of

  19. Proton Transfer in Nucleobases is Mediated by Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khistyaev, Kirill; Golan, Amir; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Orms, Natalie; Krylov, Anna I.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-08-08

    Water plays a central role in chemistry and biology by mediating the interactions between molecules, altering energy levels of solvated species, modifying potential energy proles along reaction coordinates, and facilitating ecient proton transport through ion channels and interfaces. This study investigates proton transfer in a model system comprising dry and microhydrated clusters of nucleobases. With mass spectrometry and tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation, we show that water shuts down ionization-induced proton transfer between nucleobases, which is very ecient in dry clusters. Instead, a new pathway opens up in which protonated nucleo bases are generated by proton transfer from the ionized water molecule and elimination of a hydroxyl radical. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the shape of the potential energy prole along the proton transfer coordinate depends strongly on the character of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed, i.e., the proton transfer from water to nucleobases is barrierless when an ionized state localized on water is accessed. The computed energetics of proton transfer is in excellent agreement with the experimental appearance energies. Possible adiabatic passage on the ground electronic state of the ionized system, while energetically accessible at lower energies, is not ecient. Thus, proton transfer is controlled electronically, by the character of the ionized state, rather than statistically, by simple energy considerations.

  20. Proton storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, R.R.

    1978-04-01

    A discussion is given of proton storage ring beam dynamic characteristics. Topics considered include: (1) beam energy; (2) beam luminosity; (3) limits on beam current; (4) beam site; (5) crossing angle; (6) beam--beam interaction; (7) longitudinal instability; (8) effects of scattering processes; (9) beam production; and (10) high magnetic fields. Much of the discussion is related to the design parameters of ISABELLE, a 400 x 400 GeV proton---proton intersecting storage accelerator to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  1. ATLAS Forward Proton Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Grieco, Chiara; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector system is the measurement of protons scattered diffractively or electromagnetically at very small angles. The full two-arm setup was installed during the 2016/2017 EYETS. This allows measurements of processes with two forward protons: central diffraction, exclusive production, and two-photon processes. In 2017, AFP participated in the ATLAS high-luminosity data taking on the day-by-day basis. In addition, several special runs with reduced luminosity were taken. The poster will present the AFP detectors and the lessons learned from the last year operation and some performance from 2016 and 2017.

  2. Upgrade of the Proton West secondary beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel, L.

    1989-01-01

    As originally designed and operated, protons entering PW6 were steered by a series of EPB dipoles into a single interaction length beryllium target, some 43 feet from the enclosure wall. Ensuing secondary beams, either p + /π + or p - /π - , were collected by a string of quadrupoles following the target, steered westward, away from the Proton Center line, through PW6 and PW7, and ultimately focussed on experiment production targets located within the large PW8 hall. Around the Spring of 1988 it was decided to upgrade the existing Proton West secondary beamline to allow for transport of a primary proton beam, anticipated to be either 800 or 900 GeV/c, through PW8. This upgrade project, which is now nearing completion, was largely motivated by the then recent approval of E-771, a hadronic beauty production experiment located in PW8. E-771 represents the third in a series of experiments for the large-acceptance dimuon spectrometer presently located at the end of the Proton West beamline. This Technical Memo is a summary of the upgrade --- an explanation of the underlying strategy and a documentation of the final locations of the secondary beamline elements. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  3. DISPELLING ILLUSIONS OF REFLECTION: A NEW ANALYSIS OF THE 2007 MAY 19 CORONAL 'WAVE' EVENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.

    2010-01-01

    A new analysis of the 2007 May 19 coronal wave-coronal mass ejection-dimmings event is offered employing base difference extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images. Previous work analyzing the coronal wave associated with this event concluded strongly in favor of purely an MHD wave interpretation for the expanding bright front. This conclusion was based to a significant extent on the identification of multiple reflections of the coronal wave front. The analysis presented here shows that the previously identified 'reflections' are actually optical illusions and result from a misinterpretation of the running difference EUV data. The results of this new multiwavelength analysis indicate that two coronal wave fronts actually developed during the eruption. This new analysis has implications for our understanding of diffuse coronal waves and questions the validity of the analysis and conclusions reached in previous studies.

  4. Porters and neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, N; Lill, H

    1994-11-01

    Uptake of neurotransmitters involves multiple transporters acting in different brain locations under different physiological conditions. The vesicular transporters are driven by a proton-motive force generated by a V-ATPase and their substrates are taken up via proton/substrate exchange. The plasma membrane transporters are driven by an electrochemical gradient of sodium generated by a Na+/K(+)-ATPase. Two distinct families of transporters were identified in this group. One cotransports sodium with glutamate and other amino acids and requires additionally an outwardly directed potassium gradient. The second cotransports sodium, chloride and a variety of neurotransmitters, including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine and monoamines. Genes and cDNA encoding several members of the latter family have been cloned and studied in detail. The structure and function as well as the evolutionary relationships among these neurotransmitter transporters are discussed.

  5. Solar energetic particle anisotropies and insights into particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leske, R. A., E-mail: ral@srl.caltech.edu; Cummings, A. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Labrador, A. W.; Stone, E. C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wiedenbeck, M. E. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Christian, E. R.; Rosenvinge, T. T. von [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-03-25

    As solar energetic particles (SEPs) travel through interplanetary space, their pitch-angle distributions are shaped by the competing effects of magnetic focusing and scattering. Measurements of SEP anisotropies can therefore reveal information about interplanetary conditions such as magnetic field strength, topology, and turbulence levels at remote locations from the observer. Onboard each of the two STEREO spacecraft, the Low Energy Telescope (LET) measures pitch-angle distributions for protons and heavier ions up to iron at energies of about 2-12 MeV/nucleon. Anisotropies observed using LET include bidirectional flows within interplanetary coronal mass ejections, sunward-flowing particles when STEREO was magnetically connected to the back side of a shock, and loss-cone distributions in which particles with large pitch angles underwent magnetic mirroring at an interplanetary field enhancement that was too weak to reflect particles with the smallest pitch angles. Unusual oscillations in the width of a beamed distribution at the onset of the 23 July 2012 SEP event were also observed and remain puzzling. We report LET anisotropy observations at both STEREO spacecraft and discuss their implications for SEP transport, focusing exclusively on the extreme event of 23 July 2012 in which a large variety of anisotropies were present at various times during the event.

  6. Solar energetic particle anisotropies and insights into particle transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leske, R. A.; Cummings, A. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Labrador, A. W.; Stone, E. C.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Christian, E. R.; Rosenvinge, T. T. von

    2016-03-01

    As solar energetic particles (SEPs) travel through interplanetary space, their pitch-angle distributions are shaped by the competing effects of magnetic focusing and scattering. Measurements of SEP anisotropies can therefore reveal information about interplanetary conditions such as magnetic field strength, topology, and turbulence levels at remote locations from the observer. Onboard each of the two STEREO spacecraft, the Low Energy Telescope (LET) measures pitch-angle distributions for protons and heavier ions up to iron at energies of about 2-12 MeV/nucleon. Anisotropies observed using LET include bidirectional flows within interplanetary coronal mass ejections, sunward-flowing particles when STEREO was magnetically connected to the back side of a shock, and loss-cone distributions in which particles with large pitch angles underwent magnetic mirroring at an interplanetary field enhancement that was too weak to reflect particles with the smallest pitch angles. Unusual oscillations in the width of a beamed distribution at the onset of the 23 July 2012 SEP event were also observed and remain puzzling. We report LET anisotropy observations at both STEREO spacecraft and discuss their implications for SEP transport, focusing exclusively on the extreme event of 23 July 2012 in which a large variety of anisotropies were present at various times during the event.

  7. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0-255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal

  8. Proton computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible

  9. Electron - proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiik, B.H.

    1985-01-01

    Electron-proton storage rings allow us to study the interaction between the two basic constituents of matter, electrons and quarks at very short distances. Such machines were first discussed in connection with the ISR but the idea was abandoned because of the anticipated low counting rate. The interest in electron-proton storage rings was rekindeled by the discovery of large pointlike cross sections in lepton-hardon interactions and several/sup 2-15/ projects have been discussed during the past decade. However, despite a glorious past, which includes the discovery of quarks and neutral currents, and a multitude of proposals no electron-proton storage ring has ever been built. What we might learn by studying electron-proton collisions at high energies is discussed. After some brief comments on present proposals the proposed DESY ep project HERA is described as an example of how to realize such a machine

  10. Apparatus for proton radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors. 10 claims, 7 drawing figures

  11. Inauguration of Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    On 5 February 1960, the Proton Synchrotron (PS) was formally inaugurated. The great Danish physicist, Niels Bohr, releases a bottle of champagne against a shielding block to launch the PS on its voyage in physics.

  12. Proton beam therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs

  13. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  14. Proton production, neutralisation and reduction in a floating water bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammer, Martina; Wexler, Adam D.; Kuntke, Philipp; Wiltsche, Helmar; Stanulewicz, Natalia; Lankmayr, Ernst; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C.

    2015-10-01

    This work reports on proton production, transport, reduction and neutralization in floating aqueous bridges under the application of a high dc voltage (‘floating water bridge’). Recently possible mechanisms for proton transfer through the bridge were suggested. In this work we visualize and describe the production of protons in the anolyte and their neutralization in the catholyte. Apart from that, protons are reduced to hydrogen due to electrolysis. Microbubbles are detached instantly, due to the electrohydrodynamic flow at the electrode surface. No larger, visible bubbles are formed and the system degasses through the bridge due to its higher local temperature. A detailed analysis of trace elements originating from beaker material, anode or the atmosphere is presented, showing that their influence on the overall conduction compared to the contribution of protons is negligible. Finally, an electrochemical rationale of high voltage electrolysis of low ionic strength solutions is presented.

  15. Proton production, neutralisation and reduction in a floating water bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammer, Martina; Wexler, Adam D; Kuntke, Philipp; Stanulewicz, Natalia; Lankmayr, Ernst; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C; Wiltsche, Helmar

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on proton production, transport, reduction and neutralization in floating aqueous bridges under the application of a high dc voltage (‘floating water bridge’). Recently possible mechanisms for proton transfer through the bridge were suggested. In this work we visualize and describe the production of protons in the anolyte and their neutralization in the catholyte. Apart from that, protons are reduced to hydrogen due to electrolysis. Microbubbles are detached instantly, due to the electrohydrodynamic flow at the electrode surface. No larger, visible bubbles are formed and the system degasses through the bridge due to its higher local temperature. A detailed analysis of trace elements originating from beaker material, anode or the atmosphere is presented, showing that their influence on the overall conduction compared to the contribution of protons is negligible. Finally, an electrochemical rationale of high voltage electrolysis of low ionic strength solutions is presented. (paper)

  16. Neutral escape at Mars induced by the precipitation of high-energy protons and hydrogen atoms of the solar wind origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, Valery I.

    2017-04-01

    One of the first surprises of the NASA MAVEN mission was the observation by the SWIA instrument of a tenuous population of protons with solar wind energies travelling anti-sunward near periapsis, at altitudes of 150-250 km (Halekas et al., 2015). While the penetration of solar wind protons to low altitude is not completely unexpected given previous Mars Express results, this population maintains exactly the same velocity as the solar wind observed. From previous studies it was known that some fraction of the solar wind can interact with the extended corona of Mars. By charge exchange with the neutral particles in this corona, some fraction of the incoming solar wind protons can gain an electron and become an energetic neutral hydrogen atom. Once neutral, these particles penetrate through the Martian induced magnetosphere with ease, with free access to the collisional atmosphere/ionosphere. The origin, kinetics and transport of the suprathermal O atoms in the transition region (from thermosphere to exosphere) of the Martian upper atmosphere due to the precipitation of the high-energy protons and hydrogen atoms are discussed. Kinetic energy distribution functions of suprathermal and superthermal (ENA) oxygen atoms formed in the Martian upper atmosphere were calculated using the kinetic Monte Carlo model (Shematovich et al., 2011, Shematovich, 2013) of the high-energy proton and hydrogen atom precipitation into the atmosphere. These functions allowed us: (a) to estimate the non-thermal escape rates of neutral oxygen from the Martian upper atmosphere, and (b) to compare with available MAVEN measurements of oxygen corona. Induced by precipitation the escape of hot oxygen atoms may become dominant under conditions of extreme solar events - solar flares and coronal mass ejections, - as it was shown by recent observations of the NASA MAVEN spacecraft (Jakosky et al., 2015). This work is supported by the RFBR project and by the Basic Research Program of the Praesidium of

  17. PROTON MICROSCOPY AT FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, F. E.; Mariam, F. G.; Golubev, A. A.; Turtikov, V. I.; Varentsov, D.

    2009-01-01

    Proton radiography was invented in the 1990's at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a diagnostic to study dynamic material properties under extreme pressures, strain and strain rate. Since this time hundreds of dynamic proton radiography experiments have been performed at LANL and a facility has been commissioned at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in Russia for similar applications in dynamic material studies. Recently an international effort has investigated a new proton radiography capability for the study of dynamic material properties at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) located in Darmstadt, Germany. This new Proton microscope for FAIR(PRIOR) will provide radiographic imaging of dynamic systems with unprecedented spatial, temporal and density resolution, resulting in a window for understanding dynamic material properties at new length scales. It is also proposed to install the PRIOR system at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung before installation at FAIR for dynamic experiments with different drivers including high explosives, pulsed power and lasers. The design of the proton microscope and expected radiographic performance is presented.

  18. Multicavity proton cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hirshfield

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for acceleration of protons is described, in which energy gain occurs near cyclotron resonance as protons drift through a sequence of rotating-mode TE_{111} cylindrical cavities in a strong nearly uniform axial magnetic field. Cavity resonance frequencies decrease in sequence from one another with a fixed frequency interval Δf between cavities, so that synchronism can be maintained between the rf fields and proton bunches injected at intervals of 1/Δf. An example is presented in which a 122 mA, 1 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 961 MeV using a cascade of eight cavities in an 8.1 T magnetic field, with the first cavity resonant at 120 MHz and with Δf=8 MHz. Average acceleration gradient exceeds 40 MV/m, average effective shunt impedance is 223 MΩ/m, but maximum surface field in the cavities does not exceed 7.2 MV/m. These features occur because protons make many orbital turns in each cavity and thus experience acceleration from each cavity field many times. Longitudinal and transverse stability appear to be intrinsic properties of the acceleration mechanism, and an example to illustrate this is presented. This acceleration concept could be developed into a proton accelerator for a high-power neutron spallation source, such as that required for transmutation of nuclear waste or driving a subcritical fission burner, provided a number of significant practical issues can be addressed.

  19. Coronal pulp biomarker: A lesser known age estimation modality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smrithi D Veera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The evolving state of art digital technology currently available is opening new avenues in forensic odontology for age estimation methods which are subject to debate in terms of accuracy and precision. A study was carried to analyze efficacy and practical application for age estimation using digital panoramic radiographs on South Indian population. Aims and Objectives: 1. To study reduction of coronal pulp chamber using Tooth Coronal Index (TCI on panoramic radiographs and correlate with chronologic age. 2. To establish accuracy of digital panoramic radiographs as a simple, non-invasive tool. Materials and Methods: The study illustrates the potential value of a little known aging method. The study groups comprised a total of 100 subjects of both sexes in age range of 20 and 60 years each who were subjected to panoramic radiography. A panoramic radiographic examination using digital panoramic machine was conducted on selected individuals. The TCI was calibrated using AGFA computer software for accuracy and precision. The values obtained were subjected to regression analysis, results calculated and correlated with chronologic age. In the present study a population of known age was studied and subjected to digital panoramic radiographic examination. The correlation between reduction of coronal pulp cavity and chronological age was examined. TCI was computed for each tooth and regressed on real age. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson correlation co-efficient was used to find the significance of relationship between age and TCI. Regression analysis has been used for predicting age using TCI for premolar and molar. Inaccuracy and bias have been determined to assess the precision of prediction equations. Results and Conclusion: Prediction potential of TCI comes down for ages above 50 years and is comfortably good below 50 years without much difference between premolars and molars. This study demonstrates the potential value of TCI for age

  20. Expansion and broadening of coronal loop transients: A theoretical explanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouschovias, T.C.; Poland, A.I.

    1978-01-01

    We explore the consequences of the assumption that a coronal loop transient (observed by the white-light coronagraph aboard Skylab) is a twisted rope of magnetic field lines expanding and broadening in the background coronal plasma and magnetic field. We show that the expansion (i.e., the outward motion of the loop top) can be accounted for by the azimuthal component of the field, B/sub az/; the observed broadening of the loop as it moves outward can be accounted for by the longitudinal component of the field, B/sub l/. In order to have a net outward force and at the same time avoid a classicial pinch (sausage) instability, the two components of the field must satisfy the inequality 1.41 B/sub l/>B/sub az/>B/sub l/.We predict that, as the loop rises, the width (h) of its top portion should vary proportionally with the distance (R) from the Sun's center. This is in good agreement with measurements that show hproportionalR/sup 0.8/. Our prediction, that the radius of curvature (R/sub c/) of the top portion of the loop should be proportional to R, differs from the measured variation R/sub c/proportionalR/sup 1.6/. The difference could be accounted for by a drag due to the background coronal field that flattens the loop's top. A statistical study that can test this possibility is suggested. We also calculate the magnetic field within the top section of the loop. It is approximately equal to 1 gauss at R=2 R/sub sun/ and varies somewhat more slowly than R -2 during expansion

  1. ON THE NATURE OF THE SOLAR WIND FROM CORONAL PSEUDOSTREAMERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R. J.R.; Grappin, R.; Robbrecht, E.

    2012-01-01

    Coronal pseudostreamers, which separate like-polarity coronal holes, do not have current sheet extensions, unlike the familiar helmet streamers that separate opposite-polarity holes. Both types of streamers taper into narrow plasma sheets that are maintained by continual interchange reconnection with the adjacent open magnetic field lines. White-light observations show that pseudostreamers do not emit plasma blobs; this important difference from helmet streamers is due to the convergence of like-polarity field lines above the X-point, which prevents the underlying loops from expanding outward and pinching off. The main component of the pseudostreamer wind has the form of steady outflow along the open field lines rooted just inside the boundaries of the adjacent coronal holes. These flux tubes are characterized by very rapid expansion below the X-point, followed by reconvergence at greater heights. Analysis of an idealized pseudostreamer configuration shows that, as the separation between the underlying holes increases, the X-point rises and the expansion factor f ss at the source surface increases. In situ observations of pseudostreamer crossings indicate wind speeds v ranging from ∼350 to ∼550 km s –1 , with O 7+ /O 6+ ratios that are enhanced compared with those in high-speed streams but substantially lower than in the slow solar wind. Hydrodynamic energy-balance models show that the empirical v-f ss relation overestimates the wind speeds from nonmonotonically expanding flux tubes, particularly when the X-point is located at low heights and f ss is small. We conclude that pseudostreamers produce a 'hybrid' type of outflow that is intermediate between classical slow and fast solar wind.

  2. The Prospect for Detecting Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osten, Rachel A.; Crosley, Michael Kevin

    2018-06-01

    The astrophysical study of mass loss, both steady-state and transient, on the cool half of the HR diagram has implications bothfor the star itself and the conditions created around the star that can be hospitable or inimical to supporting life. Recent results from exoplanet studies show that planets around M dwarfs are exceedingly common, which together with the commonality of M dwarfs in our galaxy make this the dominant mode of star and planet configurations. The closeness of the exoplanets to the parent M star motivate a comprehensive understanding of habitability for these systems. Radio observations provide the most clear signature of accelerated particles and shocks in stars arising as the result of MHD processes in the stellar outer atmosphere. Stellar coronal mass ejections have not been conclusively detected, despite the ubiquity with which their radiative counterparts in an eruptive event (stellar flares) have. I will review some of the different observational methods which have been used and possibly could be used in the future in the stellar case, emphasizing some of the difficulties inherent in such attempts. I will provide a framework for interpreting potential transient stellar mass loss in light of the properties of flares known to occur on magnetically active stars. This uses a physically motivated way to connect the properties of flares and coronal mass ejections and provides a testable hypothesis for observing or constraining transient stellar mass loss. I will describe recent results using radio observations to detect stellar coronal mass ejections, and what those results imply about transient stellar mass loss. I will provide some motivation for what could be learned in this topic from space-based low frequency radio experiments.

  3. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. [University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine; Castro, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  4. The COronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) Large Aperture Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, Steve; Gallagher, Dennis; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Haiying; Nelson, Pete; Burkepile, Joan; Kolinksi, Don; Sutherland, Lee

    2013-04-01

    The COSMO is a facility dedicated to observing coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields. It will be located on a mountaintop in the Hawaiian Islands and will replace the current Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO). COSMO will provide unique observations of the global coronal magnetic fields and its environment to enhance the value of data collected by other observatories on the ground (e.g. SOLIS, BBO NST, Gregor, ATST, EST, Chinese Giant Solar Telescope, NLST, FASR) and in space (e.g. SDO, Hinode, SOHO, GOES, STEREO, Solar-C, Solar Probe+, Solar Orbiter). COSMO will employ a fleet of instruments to cover many aspects of measuring magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere. The dynamics and energy flow in the corona are dominated by magnetic fields. To understand the formation of CMEs, their relation to other forms of solar activity, and their progression out into the solar wind requires measurements of coronal magnetic fields. The large aperture coronagraph, the Chromospheric and Prominence Magnetometer and the K-Coronagraph form the COSMO instrument suite to measure magnetic fields and the polarization brightness of the low corona used to infer electron density. The large aperture coronagraph will employ a 1.5 meter fuse silica singlet lens, birefringent filters, and a spectropolarimeter to cover fields of view of up to 1 degree. It will observe the corona over a wide range of emission lines from 530.3 nm through 1083.0 nm allowing for magnetic field measurements over a wide range of coronal temperatures (e.g. FeXIV at 530.3 nm, Fe X at 637.4 nm, Fe XIII at 1074.7 and 1079.8 nm. These lines are faint and require the very large aperture. NCAR and NSF have provided funding to bring the large aperture coronagraph to a preliminary design review state by the end of 2013. As with all data from Mauna Loa, the data products from COSMO will be available to the community via the Mauna Loa website: http://mlso.hao.ucar.edu

  5. Paraboloidal X-ray telescope mirror for solar coronal spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W. A.; Bruner, E. C., Jr.; Acton, L. W.; Franks, A.; Stedman, M.; Speer, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The telescope mirror for the X-ray Spectrograph Spectrometer Telescope System is a sixty degree sector of an extreme off-axis paraboloid of revolution. It was designed to focus a coronal region 1 by 10 arc seconds in size on the entrance slit of the spectrometer after reflection from the gold surface. This paper discusses the design, manufacture, and metrology of the mirror, the methods of precision mechanical metrology used to focus the system, and the mounting system which locates the mirror and has proven itself through vibration tests. In addition, the results of reflection efficiency measurements, alignment tolerances, and ray trace analysis of the effects of misalignment are considered.

  6. Proton Radiography to Improve Proton Radiotherapy : Simulation Study at Different Proton Beam Energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; van Beuzekom, Martin; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a

  7. Coronal Seismology of Flare-Excited Standing Slow-Mode Waves Observed by SDO/AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.

    2016-05-01

    Flare-excited longitudinal intensity oscillations in hot flaring loops have been recently detected by SDO/AIA in 94 and 131 Å bandpasses. Based on the interpretation in terms of a slow-mode wave, quantitative evidence of thermal conduction suppression in hot (>9 MK) loops has been obtained for the first time from measurements of the polytropic index and phase shift between the temperature and density perturbations (Wang et al. 2015, ApJL, 811, L13). This result has significant implications in two aspects. One is that the thermal conduction suppression suggests the need of greatly enhanced compressive viscosity to interpret the observed strong wave damping. The other is that the conduction suppression provides a reasonable mechanism for explaining the long-duration events where the thermal plasma is sustained well beyond the duration of impulsive hard X-ray bursts in many flares, for a time much longer than expected by the classical Spitzer conductive cooling. In this study, we model the observed standing slow-mode wave in Wang et al. (2015) using a 1D nonlinear MHD code. With the seismology-derived transport coefficients for thermal conduction and compressive viscosity, we successfully simulate the oscillation period and damping time of the observed waves. Based on the parametric study of the effect of thermal conduction suppression and viscosity enhancement on the observables, we discuss the inversion scheme for determining the energy transport coefficients by coronal seismology.

  8. Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles at a Fast Traveling Shock in Non-uniform Coronal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, J. A.; Arthur, A. D.

    2017-09-01

    Time-dependent solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration is investigated at a fast, nearly parallel spherical traveling shock in the strongly non-uniform corona by solving the standard focused transport equation for SEPs and transport equations for parallel propagating Alfvén waves that form a set of coupled equations. This enables the modeling of self-excitation of Alfvén waves in the inertial range by SEPs ahead of the shock and its role in enhancing the efficiency of the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of SEPs in a self-regulatory fashion. Preliminary results suggest that, because of the highly non-uniform coronal conditions that the shock encounters, both DSA and wave excitation are highly time-dependent processes. Thus, DSA spectra of SEPs strongly deviate from the simple power-law prediction of standard steady-state DSA theory and initially strong wave excitation weakens rapidly. Consequently, the ability of DSA to produce high energy SEPs in the corona of ∼1 GeV, as observed in the strongest gradual SEP events, appears to be strongly curtailed at a fast nearly parallel shock, but further research is needed before final conclusions can be drawn.

  9. Proton therapy analysis using the Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshad, Houshyar [Center for Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, AEOI, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: hnoshad@aeoi.org.ir; Givechi, Nasim [Islamic Azad University, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-10-01

    The range and straggling data obtained from the transport of ions in matter (TRIM) computer program were used to determine the trajectories of monoenergetic 60 MeV protons in muscle tissue by using the Monte Carlo technique. The appropriate profile for the shape of a proton pencil beam in proton therapy as well as the dose deposited in the tissue were computed. The good agreements between our results as compared with the corresponding experimental values are presented here to show the reliability of our Monte Carlo method.

  10. Does correction of preoperative coronal imbalance make a difference in outcomes of adult patients with deformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubs, Michael D; Lenke, Lawrence G; Bridwell, Keith H; Kim, Yongjung J; Hung, Man; Cheh, Gene; Koester, Linda A

    2013-03-15

    Retrospective study with prospectively collected outcomes data. Determine the significance of coronal balance on spinal deformity surgery outcomes. Sagittal balance has been confirmed as an important radiographic parameter correlating with adult deformity treatment outcomes. The significance of coronal balance on functional outcomes is less clear. Eighty-five patients with more than 4 cm of coronal imbalance who underwent reconstructive spinal surgery were evaluated to determine the significance of coronal balance on functional outcomes as measured with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Scoliosis Research Society outcomes questionnaires. Sixty-two patients had combined coronal (>4 cm) and sagittal imbalance (>5 cm), while 23 patients had coronal imbalance alone. Postoperatively, 85% of patients demonstrated improved coronal balance. The mean improvement in the coronal C7 plumb line was 26 mm for a mean correction of 42%. The mean preoperative sagittal C7 plumb line in patients with combined coronal and sagittal imbalance was 118 mm (range, 50-310 mm) and improved to a mean 49 mm. The mean preoperative and postoperative ODI scores were 42 (range, 0-90) and 27 (range, 0-78), for a mean improvement of 15 (36%) (P = 0.00001; 95% CI, 12-20). The mean Scoliosis Research Society scores improved by 17 points (29%) (P = 0.00). Younger age (P = 0.008) and improvement in sagittal balance (P = 0.014) were positive predictors for improved ODI scores. Improvement in sagittal balance (P = 0.010) was a positive predictor for improved Scoliosis Research Society scores. In patients with combined coronal and sagittal imbalance, improvement in sagittal balance was the most significant predictor for improved ODI scores (P = 0.009). In patients with preoperative coronal imbalance alone, improvement in coronal balance trended toward, but was not a significant predictor for improved ODI (P = 0.092). Sagittal balance improvement is the strongest predictor of improved outcomes in

  11. Proton therapy Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most powerful feature of the Monte Carlo method is the possibility of simulating all individual particle interactions in three dimensions and performing numerical experiments with a preset error. These facts were the motivation behind the development of a general-purpose Monte Carlo SRNA program for proton transport simulation in technical systems described by standard geometrical forms (plane, sphere, cone, cylinder, cube. Some of the possible applications of the SRNA program are: (a a general code for proton transport modeling, (b design of accelerator-driven systems, (c simulation of proton scattering and degrading shapes and composition, (d research on proton detectors; and (e radiation protection at accelerator installations. This wide range of possible applications of the program demands the development of various versions of SRNA-VOX codes for proton transport modeling in voxelized geometries and has, finally, resulted in the ISTAR package for the calculation of deposited energy distribution in patients on the basis of CT data in radiotherapy. All of the said codes are capable of using 3-D proton sources with an arbitrary energy spectrum in an interval of 100 keV to 250 MeV.

  12. ON THE FOURIER AND WAVELET ANALYSIS OF CORONAL TIME SERIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchère, F.; Froment, C.; Bocchialini, K.; Buchlin, E.; Solomon, J.

    2016-01-01

    Using Fourier and wavelet analysis, we critically re-assess the significance of our detection of periodic pulsations in coronal loops. We show that the proper identification of the frequency dependence and statistical properties of the different components of the power spectra provides a strong argument against the common practice of data detrending, which tends to produce spurious detections around the cut-off frequency of the filter. In addition, the white and red noise models built into the widely used wavelet code of Torrence and Compo cannot, in most cases, adequately represent the power spectra of coronal time series, thus also possibly causing false positives. Both effects suggest that several reports of periodic phenomena should be re-examined. The Torrence and Compo code nonetheless effectively computes rigorous confidence levels if provided with pertinent models of mean power spectra, and we describe the appropriate manner in which to call its core routines. We recall the meaning of the default confidence levels output from the code, and we propose new Monte-Carlo-derived levels that take into account the total number of degrees of freedom in the wavelet spectra. These improvements allow us to confirm that the power peaks that we detected have a very low probability of being caused by noise.

  13. Examining the Properties of Jets in Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulle, Owen; Adams, Mitzi L.; Tennant, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used to look for triggers of jets in a coronal hole. It has been proposed that bright points affiliated with the jets are caused by either random collisions between magnetic elements or by magnetic flux emerging from the photosphere; either of which can give rise to magnetic reconnection. Images from the 193AA filter of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) were searched to identify and locate jets. Changes in the line-of-sight magnetic field prior to the time of the jet were sought in data from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI). In total we studied 15 different jets that occurred over a two day period starting 2011-02-27 00:00:00 UTC and ending 2011-02-28 23:59:55 UTC. All of the jets were contained within a coronal hole that was close to disk center. Of the 15 that we studied 6 were shown to have an increase of the parameter B2 (where B is the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field), within one hour prior to the creation of the jet and 10 were within 3 hours before the event.

  14. Filament shape versus coronal potential magnetic field structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B.

    2016-01-01

    Solar filament shape in projection on disc depends on the structure of the coronal magnetic field. We calculate the position of polarity inversion lines (PILs) of coronal potential magnetic field at different heights above the photosphere, which compose the magnetic neutral surface, and compare with them the distribution of the filament material in Hα chromospheric images. We found that the most of the filament material is enclosed between two PILs, one at a lower height close to the chromosphere and one at a higher level, which can be considered as a height of the filament spine. Observations of the same filament on the limb by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft confirm that the height of the spine is really very close to the value obtained from the PIL and filament border matching. Such matching can be used for filament height estimations in on-disc observations. Filament barbs are housed within protruding sections of the low-level PIL. On the base of simple model, we show that the similarity of the neutral surfaces in potential and non-potential fields with the same sub-photospheric sources is the reason for the found tendency for the filament material to gather near the potential-field neutral surface.

  15. Posterior coronal plating for tibial fractures: technique and advantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montu Jain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Tibial shaft fractures are straightforward to treat but when associated with soft tissue injury particularly at the nail entry/plate insertion site or there is significant comminution proximally or a large butterfly fragment/a second split component in the posterior coronal plane, it is a challenge to the treating surgeon. The aim of the present report is to describe the technique of posterior coronal plating in such a scenario and its advantages. Methods:Between July 2008 and June 2011, 12 patients were pro spectively treated by this approach using 4.5 mm broad dynamic compression plates. Results:The time of bony consolidation and full weight bearing averaged 21.7 weeks (range, 16-26 weeks. Patients were followed up for at least 24 months (range, 24-48 months. At 1 year postoper atively, no loss in reduction or alignment was observed. Mean Hospital for Lower Extremity Measurement Functional Score was 72.8 (range, 64-78. All patients were satisfied with their treatment outcomes. Conclusion:Direct posterior approach and fixation using prone position helps to visualise the fracture fragments and provide rigid fixation. The approach is simple and extensile easily, apart from advantages of less soft tissue and hardware problems compared to standard medial or lateral plating. Key words: Tibial fractures; Bone plates; Orthopedic procedures

  16. Electron acceleration and radiation signatures in loop coronal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahos, L.; Gergely, T.E.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1982-01-01

    A model for electron aceleration in loop coronal transients is suggested. We propose that in these transients an erupting loop moves away from the solar surface, with a velocity greater than the local Alfven speed, pushing against the overlying magnetic fields and driving a shock in the front of the moving part of the loop. We suggest that lower hybrid waves are excited at the shock front and propagate radially toward the center of the loop with phase velocity along the magnetic field which exceeds the thermal velocity. The lower hybrid waves stochastically accelerate the tail of the electron distribution inside the loop. We discuss how the accelerated electrons are trapped in the moving loop and give a rough estimate of their radiation signature. We find that plasma radiation can explain the power observed in stationary and moving type IV bursts. We discuss some of the conditions under which moving or stationary type IV bursts are expected to be associated with loop coronal transients

  17. SAUSAGE WAVES IN TRANSVERSELY NONUNIFORM MONOLITHIC CORONAL TUBES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopin, I. [Ussuriisk astrophysical observatory, Russion Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Nagorny, I., E-mail: lopin78@mail.ru [Institute of Automation and Control Processes FEB RAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-10

    We investigate fast sausage waves in a monolithic coronal magnetic tube, modeled as a local density inhomogeneity with a continuous radial profile. This work is a natural extension of our previous results, obtained for a slab loop model for the case of cylindrical geometry. Using Kneser’s oscillating theorem, we provided the criteria for the existence of trapped and leaky wave regimes as a function of the profile features. For a number of density profiles there are only trapped modes for the entire range of longitudinal wave numbers. The phase speed of these modes tends toward the external Alfvén speed in the long wavelength limit. The generalized results were supported by the analytic solution of the wave equation for the specific density profiles. The approximate Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin solutions allowed us to obtain the desired dispersion relations and to study their properties as a function of the profile parameters. The multicomponent quasi-periodic pulsations in flaring loops, observed on 2001 May 2 and 2002 July 3, are interpreted in terms of the transversely fundamental trapped fast sausage mode with several longitudinal harmonics in a smooth coronal waveguide.

  18. Activity associated with the solar origin of coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, D. F.; Hundhausen, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    Solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed in 1980 with the HAO Coronagraph/Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite are compared with other forms of solar activity that might be physically related to the ejections. The solar phenomena checked and the method of association used were intentionally patterned after those of Munro et al.'s (1979) analysis of mass ejections observed with the Skylab coronagraph to facilitate comparison of the two epochs. Comparison of the results reveals that the types and degree of CME associations are similar near solar activity minimum and at maximum. For both epochs, most CMEs with associations had associated eruptive prominences, and the proportions of association of all types of activity were similar. A high percentage of association between SMM CMEs and X-ray long duration events is also found, in agreement with Skylab results. It is concluded that most CMEs are the result of the destabilization and eruption of a prominence and its overlying coronal structure, or of a magnetic structure capable of supporting a prominence.

  19. Cannabis, possible cardiac deaths and the coroner in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tormey, W P

    2012-01-10

    BACKGROUND: The elevated risk of triggering a myocardial infarction by smoking cannabis is limited to the first 2 h after smoking. AIM: To examine the possible role of cannabis in cardiac deaths. CASES AND RESULTS: From 3,193 coroners\\' cases over 2 years, there were 13 cases where the clinical information was compatible with a primary cardiac cause of death. An inquest was held in three cases. Myocardial infarction was the primary cause of death in 54%. Other causes were sudden adult death syndrome, sudden death in epilepsy, and poisoning by alcohol and diazepam. Cannabis was mentioned once only on a death certificate, but not as a cause of death. Blood delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-carboxylic acid was recorded in one case and in no case was plasma tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) measured. CONCLUSIONS: To attribute sudden cardiac death to cannabis, plasma THC should be measured in the toxicology screen in coroners\\' cases where urine cannabinoids are positive. A positive urine cannabinoids immunoassay alone is insufficient evidence in the linkage of acute cardiac death and cannabis.

  20. ON THE FOURIER AND WAVELET ANALYSIS OF CORONAL TIME SERIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchère, F.; Froment, C.; Bocchialini, K.; Buchlin, E.; Solomon, J., E-mail: frederic.auchere@ias.u-psud.fr [Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Bât. 121, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2016-07-10

    Using Fourier and wavelet analysis, we critically re-assess the significance of our detection of periodic pulsations in coronal loops. We show that the proper identification of the frequency dependence and statistical properties of the different components of the power spectra provides a strong argument against the common practice of data detrending, which tends to produce spurious detections around the cut-off frequency of the filter. In addition, the white and red noise models built into the widely used wavelet code of Torrence and Compo cannot, in most cases, adequately represent the power spectra of coronal time series, thus also possibly causing false positives. Both effects suggest that several reports of periodic phenomena should be re-examined. The Torrence and Compo code nonetheless effectively computes rigorous confidence levels if provided with pertinent models of mean power spectra, and we describe the appropriate manner in which to call its core routines. We recall the meaning of the default confidence levels output from the code, and we propose new Monte-Carlo-derived levels that take into account the total number of degrees of freedom in the wavelet spectra. These improvements allow us to confirm that the power peaks that we detected have a very low probability of being caused by noise.