WorldWideScience

Sample records for coronal proton transport

  1. Kinetic Distributions of Coronal Hole Protons in the Solar Wind Generation Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, P. A.; Vasquez, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    We solve the inhomogeneous kinetic guiding-center equation for the collisionless proton distribution function in a model polar coronal hole. The protons react to the local forces due to gravity, charge separation electric field, focusing in the decreasing magnetic field, and ponderomotive wave pressure. They are also heated through resonant cyclotron diffusion by a broad spectrum of obliquely-propagating ion cyclotron waves. We model the resonant wave intensities by a power-law extrapolation from the Alfvén wave results of Cranmer and van Ballegooijen (2005), multiplied by an additional scaling factor to represent the inefficient turbulent transport to resonant frequencies. We find that a scaling factor as low as 0.01 gives sufficient proton heating to yield a fast solar wind. The resulting proton distributions have a distinctive shape, compressed in the sunward half of velocity space, and more spread out (that is, hotter) in the anti-sunward half. Observation of similarly-shaped distributions in the fast wind by instruments on Solar Probe would provide evidence for resonant cyclotron heating as the generation mechanism for the solar wind. We will present results for the radial evolution of the model proton distribution, as well as moment quantities such as flow speed, temperatures and heating rates.

  2. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells...... of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic...... molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...

  3. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch-Pedersen, M J; Pedersen, B P; Veierskov, B; Nissen, P; Palmgren, M G

    2009-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK(a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires.

  4. The Acceleration of High-energy Protons at Coronal Shocks: The Effect of Large-scale Streamer-like Magnetic Field Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangliang; Guo, Fan; Giacalone, Joe; Li, Hui; Chen, Yao

    2017-12-01

    Recent observations have shown that coronal shocks driven by coronal mass ejections can develop and accelerate particles within several solar radii in large solar energetic particle (SEP) events. Motivated by this, we present an SEP acceleration study that including the process in which a fast shock propagates through a streamer-like magnetic field with both closed and open field lines in the low corona region. The acceleration of protons is modeled by numerically solving the Parker transport equation with spatial diffusion both along and across the magnetic field. We show that particles can be sufficiently accelerated to up to several hundred MeV within 2-3 solar radii. When the shock propagates through a streamer-like magnetic field, particles are more efficiently accelerated compared to the case with a simple radial magnetic field, mainly due to perpendicular shock geometry and the natural trapping effect of closed magnetic fields. Our results suggest that the coronal magnetic field configuration is an important factor for producing large SEP events. We further show that the coronal magnetic field configuration strongly influences the distribution of energetic particles, leading to different locations of source regions along the shock front where most high-energy particles are concentrated. This work may have strong implications for SEP observations. The upcoming Parker Solar Probe will provide in situ observations for the distribution of energetic particles in the coronal shock region, and test the results of the study.

  5. Electron and proton transport by NADPH oxidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaurex, Nicolas; Petheö, Gábor L

    2005-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase is the main weapon of phagocytic white blood cells that are the first line of defence of our body against invading pathogens, and patients lacking a functional oxidase suffer from severe and recurrent infections. The oxidase is a multisubunit enzyme complex that transports electrons from cytoplasmic NADPH to molecular oxygen in order to generate superoxide free radicals. Electron transport across the plasma membrane is electrogenic and is associated with the flux of protons through voltage-activated proton channels. Both proton and electron currents can be recorded with the patch-clamp technique, but whether the oxidase is a proton channel or a proton channel modulator remains controversial. Recently, we have used the inside–out configuration of the patch-clamp technique to record proton and electron currents in excised patches. This approach allows us to measure the oxidase activity under very controlled conditions, and has provided new information about the enzymatic activity of the oxidase and its coupling to proton channels. In this chapter I will discuss how the unique characteristics of the electron and proton currents associated with the redox activity of the NADPH oxidase have extended our knowledge about the thermodynamics and the physiological regulation of this remarkable enzyme. PMID:16321802

  6. Electron and proton transport by NADPH oxidases

    OpenAIRE

    Demaurex, Nicolas; Petheö, Gábor L

    2005-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase is the main weapon of phagocytic white blood cells that are the first line of defence of our body against invading pathogens, and patients lacking a functional oxidase suffer from severe and recurrent infections. The oxidase is a multisubunit enzyme complex that transports electrons from cytoplasmic NADPH to molecular oxygen in order to generate superoxide free radicals. Electron transport across the plasma membrane is electrogenic and is associated with the flux of protons ...

  7. PREFACE: Transport phenomena in proton conducting media Transport phenomena in proton conducting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikerling, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Proton transport phenomena are of paramount importance for acid-base chemistry, energy transduction in biological organisms, corrosion processes, and energy conversion in electrochemical systems such as polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The relevance for such a plethora of materials and systems, and the ever-lasting fascination with the highly concerted nature of underlying processes drive research across disciplines in chemistry, biology, physics and chemical engineering. A proton never travels alone. Proton motion is strongly correlated with its environment, usually comprised of an electrolyte and a solid or soft host material. For the transport in nature's most benign proton solvent and shuttle, water that is, insights from ab initio simulations, matured over the last 15 years, have furnished molecular details of the structural diffusion mechanism of protons. Excess proton movement in water consists of sequences of Eigen-Zundel-Eigen transitions, triggered by hydrogen bond breaking and making in the surrounding water network. Nowadays, there is little debate about the validity of this mechanism in water, which bears a stunning resemblance to the basic mechanistic picture put forward by de Grotthuss in 1806. While strong coupling of an excess proton with degrees of freedom of solvent and host materials facilitates proton motion, this coupling also creates negative synergies. In general, proton mobility in biomaterials and electrochemical proton conducting media is highly sensitive to the abundance and structure of the proton solvent. In polymer electrolyte membranes, in which protons are bound to move in nano-sized water-channels, evaporation of water or local membrane dehydration due to electro-osmotic coupling are well-known phenomena that could dramatically diminish proton conductivity. Contributions in this special issue address various vital aspects of the concerted nature of proton motion and they elucidate important structural and dynamic effects of solvent

  8. Human proton/oligopeptide transporter (POT) genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botka, C. W.; Wittig, T. W.; Graul, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    The proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POT) gene family currently consists of approximately 70 cloned cDNAs derived from diverse organisms. In mammals, two genes encoding peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2 have been cloned in several species including humans, in addition to a rat...... human orthologue of rPHT1 (expression largely confined to rat brain and retina) was represented by numerous ESTs originating from many tissues. Assembly of these ESTs resulted in a contiguous sequence covering approximately 95% of the suspected coding region. The contig sequences and analyses revealed...... the presence of several possible splice variants of hPHT1. A second closely related human EST-contig displayed high identity to a recently cloned mouse cDNA encoding cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-inducible 1 protein (gi:4580995). This contig served to identify a PAC clone containing deduced exons...

  9. An Initial Attempt to Measure Suprathermal Tails in Coronal Proton Velocity Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, J. L.; Cranmer, S. R.; Fineschi, S.; Gardner, L. D.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Raymond, J. C.; Uzzo, M.

    2005-12-01

    Test observations made with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on SOHO in August 2005 are being used to make an initial assessment of the possibility of measuring suprathermal tails in the proton velocity distribution functions. Any successful theory of solar energetic particle (SEP) production by CME shocks must account for the large observed variations in SEP spectral characteristics and elemental abundances. Some have proposed that this variability arises from an inherently variable population of suprathermal seed particles (e.g., Mason et al. 2005): some that exist all the time in the solar wind (with varying properties depending on wind speed) and some that are associated with prior flares and CME shocks (e.g., Kahler 2004; Tylka et al. 2005). As yet, though, the suprathermal particle population in the solar corona has never been measured. The seed particle number density predicted for typical gradual SEP events is about 0.002 - 0.01 times the thermal population (e.g., Lee 2005), and should, in at least some cases, correspond to a measurable enhancement in the wing of the H I Ly-alpha profile. In August 2005, the Ly-alpha channel of UVCS was recommissioned and used to observe HI Ly-alpha line profiles at 2.0 solar radii in coronal holes, helmet streamers, above active regions and after a CME. The holographically ruled diffraction grating provides the low stray light level needed to observe the tail of the line profile out to about 0.5 nm from line center. New observations as well as measurements from the original UVCS laboratory calibration and in flight measurements from earlier in the mission are being used to characterize the instrument response to monochromatic light so such instrument effects can be removed. Initial results will be reported. This work is supported by NASA Grant NNG05GG38G to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Kahler, S. W. 2004, ApJ, 603, 330. Lee, M. A. 2005, ApJ Supp., 158, 38. Mason, G., Desai, M., Mazur, J

  10. A comparative study of proton transport properties of zirconium (IV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical resistivity of these materials has been accessed in acids, bases and organic solvent media. The protons present in the structural hydroxyl groups indicate good potential for TMA salts to exhibit solid state proton conduction. The transport properties of these materials has been explored by measuring specific proton ...

  11. Recent Voyager Evidence for Rapid Transport of Flare-Generated Disturbances by Polar Coronal Hole Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Miller, W. D.; Intriligator, J.; Webber, W.; Sun, W.; Detman, T.; Dryer, M.; Deehr, C.

    2017-09-01

    Disturbances observed by Voyagers 1 and 2 during the past five years or more may have been transported by plasma emitted from polar coronal holes, thereby having travelled much faster from the Sun to the termination shock than previously recognized. Estimating the average speed to the shock as 750 km/s has produced consistently good associations between solar flares, or groups of them, and dynamic pressure increases at Voyager 2 and plasma wave events at Voyager 1. Furthermore, magnetograph observations confirm that polar coronal holes were present around the times of the flares to which the events at the Voyagers have been attributed. These calculations also provide revised estimates of the transport of heliospheric current sheet fluctuations. We discuss the possibilities that extrapolations from past observations and simulations based on them may provide insight into currently challenging issues and possible future developments.

  12. A Data-driven Analytic Model for Proton Acceleration by Large-scale Solar Coronal Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarev, Kamen A.; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2016-11-01

    We have recently studied the development of an eruptive filament-driven, large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) in the low solar corona, using remote observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes. In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of the OCBF parameters regulating the efficiency of charged particle acceleration within the theoretical framework of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent front size, speed, and strength, as well as the upstream coronal magnetic field orientations with respect to the front’s surface normal direction. Here we present an analytical particle acceleration model, specifically developed to incorporate the coronal shock/compressive front properties described above, derived from remote observations. We verify the model’s performance through a grid of idealized case runs using input parameters typical for large-scale coronal shocks, and demonstrate that the results approach the expected DSA steady-state behavior. We then apply the model to the event of 2011 May 11 using the OCBF time-dependent parameters derived by Kozarev et al. We find that the compressive front likely produced energetic particles as low as 1.3 solar radii in the corona. Comparing the modeled and observed fluences near Earth, we also find that the bulk of the acceleration during this event must have occurred above 1.5 solar radii. With this study we have taken a first step in using direct observations of shocks and compressions in the innermost corona to predict the onsets and intensities of solar energetic particle events.

  13. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan, E-mail: drgokhangokalp@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Demirag, Burak, E-mail: bdemirag@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih, E-mail: fatiha@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Yazici, Zeynep, E-mail: zyazici@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected for oblique coronal images when compared with arthroscopy results (p = 0.180). Sensitivity and specificity values for ACL tear diagnosis were 37.04% and 95.65% for sagittal images; 74.07% and 91.30% for oblique coronal images. There was no significant difference between arthroscopy and oblique coronal MR images in grading AMB and PLB injuries (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade.

  14. Protons Regulate Vesicular Glutamate Transporters through an Allosteric Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Jacob; Chang, Roger; McGregor, Matt; Silm, Katlin; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Edwards, Robert H

    2016-05-18

    The quantal nature of synaptic transmission requires a mechanism to transport neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles without promoting non-vesicular efflux across the plasma membrane. Indeed, the vesicular transport of most classical transmitters involves a mechanism of H(+) exchange, which restricts flux to acidic membranes such as synaptic vesicles. However, vesicular transport of the principal excitatory transmitter glutamate depends primarily on membrane potential, which would drive non-vesicular efflux, and the role of protons is unclear. Adapting electrophysiology to record currents associated with the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), we characterize a chloride conductance that is gated by lumenal protons and chloride and supports glutamate uptake. Rather than coupling stoichiometrically to glutamate flux, lumenal protons and chloride allosterically activate vesicular glutamate transport. Gating by protons serves to inhibit what would otherwise be substantial non-vesicular glutamate efflux at the plasma membrane, thereby restricting VGLUT activity to synaptic vesicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Protonic transport through solitons in hydrogen-bonded systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavitha, L; Jayanthi, S; Muniyappan, A [Department of Physics, Periyar University, Salem-636 011 (India); Gopi, D, E-mail: louiskavitha@yahoo.co.in [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Periyar University, Salem-636 011 (India)

    2011-09-15

    We offer an alternative route for investigating soliton solutions in hydrogen-bonded (HB) chains. We invoke the modified extended tangent hyperbolic function method coupled with symbolic computation to solve the governing equation of motion for proton dynamics. We investigate the dynamics of proton transfer in HB chains through bell-shaped soliton excitations, which trigger the bio-energy transport in most biological systems. This solitonic mechanism of proton transfer could play functional roles in muscular contraction, enzymatic activity and oxidative phosphorylation.

  16. Kinetics of proton transport in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornyshev, A.A.; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Spohr, E.

    2003-01-01

    +), (ii) proton transfer from hydronium to a neighboring water molecule, and (iii) structural diffusion of the Zundel complex (H5O2+), the processes all controlled by orientational fluctuations or hydrogen bond breaking in neighboring hydration shells. Spontaneous conversion of excess proton states...... are brought into the framework of quantum mechanical PT theory in condensed media. Both the nature of the elementary act and the reaction coordinates are, however, different for the two types of PT clusters. The corresponding rate constants are calculated and compared with MD simulations. Within the framework...

  17. Proton gradients and proton-dependent transport processes in the chloroplast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricarda eHöhner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Proton gradients are fundamental to chloroplast function. Across thylakoid membranes, the light induced proton gradient is essential for ATP synthesis. As a result of proton pumping into the thylakoid lumen, an alkaline stromal pH develops, which is required for full activation of pH-dependent Calvin Benson cycle enzymes. This implies that a pH gradient between the cytosol (pH 7 and the stroma (pH 8 is established upon illumination. To maintain this pH gradient chloroplasts actively extrude protons. More than 30 years ago it was already established that these proton fluxes are electrically counterbalanced by Mg2+, K+ or Cl- fluxes, but only recently the first transport systems that regulate the pH gradient were identified. Notably several (Na+,K+/H+ antiporter systems where identified, that play a role in pH gradient regulation, ion homeostasis, osmoregulation, or coupling of secondary active transport. The established pH gradients are important to drive uptake of essential ions and solutes, but not many transporters involved have been identified to date. In this mini review we summarize the current status in the field and the open questions that need to be addressed in order to understand how pH gradients are maintained, how this is interconnected with other transport processes and what this means for chloroplast function.

  18. Theory and Transport of Nearly Incompressible Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence. IV. Solar Coronal Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; Adhikari, L.; Hunana, P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Moore, R.; Shiota, D.; Bruno, R.; Telloni, D.

    2018-02-01

    A new model describing the transport and evolution of turbulence in the quiet solar corona is presented. In the low plasma beta environment, transverse photospheric convective fluid motions drive predominantly quasi-2D (nonpropagating) turbulence in the mixed-polarity “magnetic carpet,” together with a minority slab (Alfvénic) component. We use a simplified sub-Alfvénic flow velocity profile to solve transport equations describing the evolution and dissipation of turbulence from 1\\hspace{0.5em}{{t}}{{o}} 15 {R}ȯ (including the Alfvén surface). Typical coronal base parameters are used, although one model uses correlation lengths derived observationally by Abramenko et al., and the other assumes values 10 times larger. The model predicts that (1) the majority quasi-2D turbulence evolves from a balanced state at the coronal base to an imbalanced state, with outward fluctuations dominating, at and beyond the Alfvén surface, i.e., inward turbulent fluctuations are dissipated preferentially; (2) the initially imbalanced slab component remains imbalanced throughout the solar corona, being dominated by outwardly propagating Alfvén waves, and wave reflection is weak; (3) quasi-2D turbulence becomes increasingly magnetized, and beyond ∼ 6 {R}ȯ , the kinetic energy is mainly in slab fluctuations; (4) there is no accumulation of inward energy at the Alfvén surface; (5) inertial range quasi-2D rather than slab fluctuations are preferentially dissipated within ∼ 3 {R}ȯ ; and (6) turbulent dissipation of quasi-2D fluctuations is sufficient to heat the corona to temperatures ∼ 2× {10}6 K within 2 {R}ȯ , consistent with observations that suggest that the fast solar wind is accelerated most efficiently between ∼ 2\\hspace{0.5em}{{a}}{{n}}{{d}} 4 {R}ȯ .

  19. Reactive transport of aqueous protons in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    McNeece, Colin J.

    2016-10-09

    The sorption of protons determines the surface charge of natural media and is therefore a first-order control on contaminant transport. Significant effort has been extended to develop chemical models that quantify the sorption of protons at the mineral surface. To compare these models’ effect on predicted proton transport, we present analytic solutions for column experiments through silica sand. Reaction front morphology is controlled by the functional relationship between the total sorbed and total aqueous proton concentrations. An inflection point in this function near neutral pH leads to a reversal in the classic front formation mechanism under basic conditions, such that proton desorption leads to a self-sharpening front, while adsorption leads to a spreading front. A composite reaction front comprising both a spreading and self-sharpening segment can occur when the injected and initial concentrations straddle the inflection point. This behavior is unique in single component reactive transport and arises due to the auto-ionization of water rather than electrostatic interactions at the mineral surface. We derive a regime diagram illustrating conditions under which different fronts occur, highlighting areas where model predictions diverge. Chemical models are then compared and validated against a systematic set of column experiments.

  20. A comparative study of proton transport properties of metal (IV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    A comparative study of proton transport properties of metal (IV) phosphates. HEEMANSHU PATEL and UMA CHUDASAMA*. Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Technology and Engineering,. The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 001 e-mail: uvcres@yahoo.com. MS received 14 April 2006; revised 9 ...

  1. Superconductivity and Fast Proton Transport in Nanoconfined Water

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, K H

    2016-01-01

    A real-space molecular-orbital description of Cooper pairing in conjunction with the dynamic Jahn-Teller mechanism for high-Tc superconductivity predicts that electron-doped water confined to the nanoscale environment of a carbon nanotube or biological macromolecule should superconduct below and exhibit fast proton transport above the transition temperature, Tc = 230 degK (-43 degC).

  2. Transport of protons and lactate in cultured human fetal retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Cour, Morten la; Ming Lui, Ge

    2000-01-01

    Electron microscopy, intracellular pH, monocarboxylate transport, pigment epithelium of eye, proton-lactate cotransport, retinal metabolism, sodium/proton exchange......Electron microscopy, intracellular pH, monocarboxylate transport, pigment epithelium of eye, proton-lactate cotransport, retinal metabolism, sodium/proton exchange...

  3. A Fano cavity test for Monte Carlo proton transport algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterpin, Edmond, E-mail: esterpin@yahoo.fr [Université catholique de Louvain, Center of Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique, Avenue Hippocrate 54, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Sorriaux, Jefferson; Souris, Kevin [Université catholique de Louvain, Center of Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique, Avenue Hippocrate 54, 1200 Brussels, Belgium and Université catholique de Louvain, ICTEAM institute, Chemin du cyclotron 6, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Vynckier, Stefaan [Université catholique de Louvain, Center of Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique, Avenue Hippocrate 54, 1200 Brussels, Belgium and Département de Radiothérapie, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Avenue Hippocrate 54, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Bouchard, Hugo [Département de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1560 Sherbrooke est, Montréal, Québec H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: In the scope of reference dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to compute ionization chamber dose response accurately. Uncertainties related to the transport algorithm can be verified performing self-consistency tests, i.e., the so-called “Fano cavity test.” The Fano cavity test is based on the Fano theorem, which states that under charged particle equilibrium conditions, the charged particle fluence is independent of the mass density of the media as long as the cross-sections are uniform. Such tests have not been performed yet for MC codes simulating proton transport. The objectives of this study are to design a new Fano cavity test for proton MC and to implement the methodology in two MC codes: Geant4 and PENELOPE extended to protons (PENH). Methods: The new Fano test is designed to evaluate the accuracy of proton transport. Virtual particles with an energy ofE{sub 0} and a mass macroscopic cross section of (Σ)/(ρ) are transported, having the ability to generate protons with kinetic energy E{sub 0} and to be restored after each interaction, thus providing proton equilibrium. To perform the test, the authors use a simplified simulation model and rigorously demonstrate that the computed cavity dose per incident fluence must equal (ΣE{sub 0})/(ρ) , as expected in classic Fano tests. The implementation of the test is performed in Geant4 and PENH. The geometry used for testing is a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} parallel virtual field and a cavity (2 × 2 × 0.2 cm{sup 3} size) in a water phantom with dimensions large enough to ensure proton equilibrium. Results: For conservative user-defined simulation parameters (leading to small step sizes), both Geant4 and PENH pass the Fano cavity test within 0.1%. However, differences of 0.6% and 0.7% were observed for PENH and Geant4, respectively, using larger step sizes. For PENH, the difference is attributed to the random-hinge method that introduces an artificial energy

  4. Coronal Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Cranmer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations, and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are established in the extended corona. For example, the importance of kinetic plasma physics and turbulence in coronal holes has been affirmed by surprising measurements from the UVCS instrument on SOHO that heavy ions are heated to hundreds of times the temperatures of protons and electrons. These observations point to specific kinds of collisionless Alfvén wave damping (i.e., ion cyclotron resonance, but complete theoretical models do not yet exist. Despite our incomplete knowledge of the complex multi-scale plasma physics, however, much progress has been made toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms ultimately responsible for producing the observed properties of coronal holes.

  5. Anisotropic amplification of proton transport in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Fawaz, Mohammed; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Gautam, Manu; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2017-07-01

    Though graphene oxide (GO) membrane shuttles protons under humid conditions, it suffer severe disintegration and anhydrous conditions lead to abysmal ionic conductivity. The trade-off between mechanical integrity and ionic conductivity challenge the amplification of GO's ionic transport under anhydrous conditions. We show anisotropic amplification of GO's ionic transport with a selective amplification of in plane contribution under anhydrous conditions by doping it with a plant extract, phytic acid (PA). The hygroscopic nature of PA stabilized interlayer water molecules and peculiar geometry of sbnd OH functionalities around saturated hydrocarbon ring anisotropically enhanced ionic transport amplifying the fuel cell performance metrics.

  6. Computer modeling of electron and proton transport in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Alexander N; Vershubskii, Alexey V

    2014-07-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most important biological processes in biosphere, which provides production of organic substances from atmospheric CO2 and water at expense of solar energy. In this review, we contemplate computer models of oxygenic photosynthesis in the context of feedback regulation of photosynthetic electron transport in chloroplasts, the energy-transducing organelles of the plant cell. We start with a brief overview of electron and proton transport processes in chloroplasts coupled to ATP synthesis and consider basic regulatory mechanisms of oxygenic photosynthesis. General approaches to computer simulation of photosynthetic processes are considered, including the random walk models of plastoquinone diffusion in thylakoid membranes and deterministic approach to modeling electron transport in chloroplasts based on the mass action law. Then we focus on a kinetic model of oxygenic photosynthesis that includes key stages of the linear electron transport, alternative pathways of electron transfer around photosystem I (PSI), transmembrane proton transport and ATP synthesis in chloroplasts. This model includes different regulatory processes: pH-dependent control of the intersystem electron transport, down-regulation of photosystem II (PSII) activity (non-photochemical quenching), the light-induced activation of the Bassham-Benson-Calvin (BBC) cycle. The model correctly describes pH-dependent feedback control of electron transport in chloroplasts and adequately reproduces a variety of experimental data on induction events observed under different experimental conditions in intact chloroplasts (variations of CO2 and O2 concentrations in atmosphere), including a complex kinetics of P700 (primary electron donor in PSI) photooxidation, CO2 consumption in the BBC cycle, and photorespiration. Finally, we describe diffusion-controlled photosynthetic processes in chloroplasts within the framework of the model that takes into account complex architecture of

  7. Modeling Coronal Response in Decaying Active Regions with Magnetic Flux Transport and Steady Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.; Upton, Lisa A.; Young, Peter R.

    2017-09-01

    We present new measurements of the dependence of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiance on the total magnetic flux in active regions as obtained from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Using observations of nine active regions tracked along different stages of evolution, we extend the known radiance—magnetic flux power-law relationship (I\\propto {{{Φ }}}α ) to the AIA 335 Å passband, and the Fe xviii 93.93 Å spectral line in the 94 Å passband. We find that the total unsigned magnetic flux divided by the polarity separation ({{Φ }}/D) is a better indicator of radiance for the Fe xviii line with a slope of α =3.22+/- 0.03. We then use these results to test our current understanding of magnetic flux evolution and coronal heating. We use magnetograms from the simulated decay of these active regions produced by the Advective Flux Transport model as boundary conditions for potential extrapolations of the magnetic field in the corona. We then model the hydrodynamics of each individual field line with the Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops model with steady heating scaled as the ratio of the average field strength and the length (\\bar{B}/L) and render the Fe xviii and 335 Å emission. We find that steady heating is able to partially reproduce the magnitudes and slopes of the EUV radiance—magnetic flux relationships and discuss how impulsive heating can help reconcile the discrepancies. This study demonstrates that combined models of magnetic flux transport, magnetic topology, and heating can yield realistic estimates for the decay of active region radiances with time.

  8. Sodium and proton effects on inward proton transport through Na/K pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Travis J; Zugarramurdi, Camila; Olivera, J Fernando; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2014-06-17

    The Na/K pump hydrolyzes ATP to export three intracellular Na (Nai) as it imports two extracellular K (Ko) across animal plasma membranes. Within the protein, two ion-binding sites (sites I and II) can reciprocally bind Na or K, but a third site (site III) exclusively binds Na in a voltage-dependent fashion. In the absence of Nao and Ko, the pump passively imports protons, generating an inward current (IH). To elucidate the mechanisms of IH, we used voltage-clamp techniques to investigate the [H]o, [Na]o, and voltage dependence of IH in Na/K pumps from ventricular myocytes and in ouabain-resistant pumps expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Lowering pHo revealed that Ho both activates IH (in a voltage-dependent manner) and inhibits it (in a voltage-independent manner) by binding to different sites. Nao effects depend on pHo; at pHo where no Ho inhibition is observed, Nao inhibits IH at all concentrations, but when applied at pHo that inhibits pump-mediated current, low [Na]o activates IH and high [Na]o inhibits it. Our results demonstrate that IH is a property inherent to Na/K pumps, not linked to the oocyte expression environment, explains differences in the characteristics of IH previously reported in the literature, and supports a model in which 1), protons leak through site III; 2), binding of two Na or two protons to sites I and II inhibits proton transport; and 3), pumps with mixed Na/proton occupancy of sites I and II remain permeable to protons. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Calcium uptake and proton transport by acidocalcisomes of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rohloff

    Full Text Available Acidocalcisomes are acidic calcium stores found in diverse organisms, being conserved from bacteria to humans. They possess an acidic matrix that contains several cations bound to phosphates, which are mainly present in the form of short and long polyphosphate chains. Their matrix is acidified through the action of proton pumps such as a vacuolar proton ATPase and a vacuolar proton pyrophosphatase. Calcium uptake occurs through a Ca(2+/H(+ countertransporting ATPase located in the membrane of the organelle. Acidocalcisomes have been identified in a variety of microorganisms, including Apicomplexan parasites such as Plasmodium and Eimeria species, and in Toxoplasma gondii. We report the purification and characterization of an acidocalcisome fraction from T. gondii tachyzoites after subcellular fractionation and further discontinuous iodixanol gradient purification. Proton and calcium transport activities in the fraction were characterized by fluorescence microscopy and spectrophotometric methods using acridine orange and arsenazo III, respectively. This work will facilitate the understanding of the function of acidocalcisomes in Apicomplexan parasites, as we can now isolate highly purified fractions that could be used for proteomic analysis to find proteins that may clarify the biogenesis of these organelles.

  10. Peptide Selectivity of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Transporter from Neisseria meningitidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Neha; Aduri, Nanda G; Iqbal, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Peptide transport in living organisms is facilitated by either primary transport, hydrolysis of ATP, or secondary transport, cotransport of protons. In this study, we focused on investigating the ligand specificity of the Neisseria meningitidis proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (NmPOT). It ...

  11. Proton transport in carbonic anhydrase: Insights from molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, C Mark; Voth, Gregory A

    2010-02-01

    This article reviews the insights gained from molecular simulations of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) utilizing non-reactive and reactive force fields. The simulations with a reactive force field explore protein transfer and transport via Grotthuss shuttling, while the non-reactive simulations probe the larger conformational dynamics that underpin the various contributions to the rate-limiting proton transfer event. Specific attention is given to the orientational stability of the His64 group and the characteristics of the active site water cluster, in an effort to determine both of their impact on the maximal catalytic rate. The explicit proton transfer and transport events are described by the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) method, as are alternative pathways for the excess proton charge defect to enter/leave the active site. The simulation results are interpreted in light of experimental results on the wild-type enzyme and various site-specific mutations of HCA II in order to better elucidate the key factors that contribute to its exceptional efficiency. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations of proton acceleration in coronal shocks: Effect of anisotropic pitch-angle scattering of particles

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Vainio, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Context. Solar energetic particles observed in association with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are produced by the CME-driven shock waves. The acceleration of particles is considered to be due to diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Aims. We aim at a better understanding of DSA in the case of quasi-parallel shocks, in which self-generated turbulence in the shock vicinity plays a key role. Methods. We have developed and applied a new Monte Carlo simulation code for acceleration of protons in parallel coronal shocks. The code performs a self-consistent calculation of resonant interactions of particles with Alfv\\'en waves based on the quasi-linear theory. In contrast to the existing Monte Carlo codes of DSA, the new code features the full quasi-linear resonance condition of particle pitch-angle scattering. This allows us to take anisotropy of particle pitch-angle scattering into account, while the older codes implement an approximate resonance condition leading to isotropic scattering.We performed simulations with...

  13. The Ca(2+)-ATPase pump facilitates bidirectional proton transport across the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel

    2017-03-28

    Ca(2+) transport across the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR) plays an essential role in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, signalling, cell differentiation and muscle contractility. During SR Ca(2+) uptake and release, proton fluxes are required to balance the charge deficit generated by the exchange of Ca(2+) and other ions across the SR. During Ca(2+) uptake by the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), two protons are countertransported from the SR lumen to the cytosol, thus partially compensating for the charge moved by Ca(2+) transport. Studies have shown that protons are also transported from the cytosol to the lumen during Ca(2+) release, but a transporter that facilitates proton transport into the SR lumen has not been described. In this article we propose that SERCA forms pores that facilitate bidirectional proton transport across the SR. We describe the location and structure of water-filled pores in SERCA that form cytosolic and luminal pathways for protons to cross the SR membrane. Based on this structural information, we suggest mechanistic models for proton translocation to the cytosol during active Ca(2+) transport, and into the SR lumen during SERCA inhibition by endogenous regulatory proteins. Finally, we discuss the physiological consequences of SERCA-mediated bidirectional proton transport across the SR membrane of muscle and non-muscle cells.

  14. Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Wind Including Pickup Protons and Turbulence Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons.We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 deg - .90 deg and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

  15. Numerical modeling transport phenomena in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, DongMyung

    To study the coupled phenomena occurring in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, a two-phase, one-dimensional, non-isothermal model is developed in the chapter 1. The model includes water phase change, proton transport in the membrane and electro-osmotic effect. The thinnest, but most complex layer in the membrane electrode assembly, catalyst layer, is considered an interfacial boundary between the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Mass and heat transfer and electro-chemical reaction through the catalyst layer are formulated into equations, which are applied to boundary conditions for the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Detail accounts of the boundary equations and the numerical solving procedure used in this work are given. The polarization curve is calculated at different oxygen pressures and compared with the experimental results. When the operating condition is changed along the polarization curve, the change of physicochemical variables in the membrane electrode assembly is studied. In particular, the over-potential diagram presents the usage of the electrochemical energy at each layer of the membrane electrode assembly. Humidity in supplying gases is one of the most important factors to consider for improving the performance of PEMFE. Both high and low humidity conditions can result in a deteriorating cell performance. The effect of humidity on the cell performance is studied in the chapter 2. First, a numerical model based on computational fluid dynamics is developed. Second, the cell performances are simulated, when the relative humidity is changed from 0% to 100% in the anode and the cathode channel. The simulation results show how humidity in the reactant gases affects the water content distribution in the membrane, the over-potential at the catalyst layers and eventually the cell performance. In particular, the rapid enhancement in the cell performance caused by self-hydrating membrane is captured by the simulation. Fully humidifying either H2

  16. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swathirajan, S. [General Motors R& D Center, Warren, MI (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells are extremely promising as future power plants in the transportation sector to achieve an increase in energy efficiency and eliminate environmental pollution due to vehicles. GM is currently involved in a multiphase program with the US Department of Energy for developing a proof-of-concept hybrid vehicle based on a PEM fuel cell power plant and a methanol fuel processor. Other participants in the program are Los Alamos National Labs, Dow Chemical Co., Ballard Power Systems and DuPont Co., In the just completed phase 1 of the program, a 10 kW PEM fuel cell power plant was built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating a methanol fuel processor with a PEM fuel cell stack. However, the fuel cell power plant must overcome stiff technical and economic challenges before it can be commercialized for light duty vehicle applications. Progress achieved in phase I on the use of monolithic catalyst reactors in the fuel processor, managing CO impurity in the fuel cell stack, low-cost electrode-membrane assembles, and on the integration of the fuel processor with a Ballard PEM fuel cell stack will be presented.

  17. What Really Prevents Proton Transport through Aquaporin? Charge Self-Energy versus Proton Wire Proposals

    OpenAIRE

    Burykin, Anton; Warshel, Arieh

    2003-01-01

    The nature of the control of water/proton selectivity in biological channels is a problem of a fundamental importance. Most studies of this issue have proposed that an interference with the orientational requirements of the so-called proton wire is the source of selectivity. The elucidation of the structures of aquaporins, which have evolved to prevent proton transfer (PT), provided a clear benchmark for exploring the selectivity problem. Previous simulations of this system have not examined,...

  18. Beam collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harres, K; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Nuernberg, F; Otten, A; Schuetrumpf, J; Roth, M [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Tauschwitz, A; Bagnoud, V [GSI - Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Plasmaphysik and PHELIX, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Daido, H; Tampo, M [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa-city, Kyoto, 619-0215 (Japan); Schollmeier, M, E-mail: k.harres@gsi.d [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM 87185 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    A pulsed high field solenoid was used in a laser-proton acceleration experiment to collimate and transport the proton beam that was generated at the irradiation of a flat foil by a high intensity laser pulse. 10{sup 12} particles at an energy of 2.3 MeV could be caught and transported over a distance of more than 240 mm. Strong space charge effects occur, induced by the high field of the solenoid that forces all co-moving electrons down the the solenoid's axis, building up a strong negative space charge that interacts with the proton beam. This leads to an aggregation of the proton beam around the solenoid's axis and therefore to a stronger focusing effect. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications like post-acceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  19. On the transport and acceleration of solar flare particles in a coronal loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James M.; Lee, Martin A.

    1991-01-01

    The turbulent environment of a flaring solar coronal loop directly affects the population of particles to be accelerated or already accelerated. Under the assumption of a uniform turbulent MHD wave field within the loop, the behavior of a particle distribution as it interacts with the turbulence is discussed, including particle precipitation to the footpoints of the loop and the evolution of the energy distribution as the particles undergo second-order stochastic acceleration. Two cases are discussed in detail: (1) particles spatially diffusing within the loop and precipitating with minimal acceleration in the short time scale of an impulsive event and (2) particles diffusing in both real and momentum space in a long duration event. Collisional losses due to ambient electrons are included. The gamma-ray flare of June 3, 1982 is modeled, and good agreement is obtained between predicted and observed time profiles if the loop length is 100,000 km with an intrinsic spatial diffusion time of 100-450 s. It follows that the production of high-energy neutrons and pi mesons extends over a time scale of 1000 s as observed.

  20. Kinetics of proton transport into influenza virions by the viral M2 channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Ivanovic

    Full Text Available M2 protein of influenza A viruses is a tetrameric transmembrane proton channel, which has essential functions both early and late in the virus infectious cycle. Previous studies of proton transport by M2 have been limited to measurements outside the context of the virus particle. We have developed an in vitro fluorescence-based assay to monitor internal acidification of individual virions triggered to undergo membrane fusion. We show that rimantadine, an inhibitor of M2 proton conductance, blocks the acidification-dependent dissipation of fluorescence from a pH-sensitive virus-content probe. Fusion-pore formation usually follows internal acidification but does not require it. The rate of internal virion acidification increases with external proton concentration and saturates with a pK(m of ∼4.7. The rate of proton transport through a single, fully protonated M2 channel is approximately 100 to 400 protons per second. The saturating proton-concentration dependence and the low rate of internal virion acidification derived from authentic virions support a transporter model for the mechanism of proton transfer.

  1. The Large-scale Coronal Structure of the 2017 August 21 Great American Eclipse: An Assessment of Solar Surface Flux Transport Model Enabled Predictions and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Dibyendu; Bhowmik, Prantika; Yeates, Anthony R.; Panda, Suman; Tarafder, Rajashik; Dash, Soumyaranjan

    2018-01-01

    On 2017 August 21, a total solar eclipse swept across the contiguous United States, providing excellent opportunities for diagnostics of the Sun’s corona. The Sun’s coronal structure is notoriously difficult to observe except during solar eclipses; thus, theoretical models must be relied upon for inferring the underlying magnetic structure of the Sun’s outer atmosphere. These models are necessary for understanding the role of magnetic fields in the heating of the corona to a million degrees and the generation of severe space weather. Here we present a methodology for predicting the structure of the coronal field based on model forward runs of a solar surface flux transport model, whose predicted surface field is utilized to extrapolate future coronal magnetic field structures. This prescription was applied to the 2017 August 21 solar eclipse. A post-eclipse analysis shows good agreement between model simulated and observed coronal structures and their locations on the limb. We demonstrate that slow changes in the Sun’s surface magnetic field distribution driven by long-term flux emergence and its evolution governs large-scale coronal structures with a (plausibly cycle-phase dependent) dynamical memory timescale on the order of a few solar rotations, opening up the possibility for large-scale, global corona predictions at least a month in advance.

  2. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  3. What really prevents proton transport through aquaporin? Charge self-energy versus proton wire proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burykin, Anton; Warshel, Arieh

    2003-12-01

    The nature of the control of water/proton selectivity in biological channels is a problem of a fundamental importance. Most studies of this issue have proposed that an interference with the orientational requirements of the so-called proton wire is the source of selectivity. The elucidation of the structures of aquaporins, which have evolved to prevent proton transfer (PT), provided a clear benchmark for exploring the selectivity problem. Previous simulations of this system have not examined, however, the actual issue of PT, but only considered the much simpler task of the transfer of water molecules. Here we take aquaporin as a benchmark and quantify the origin of the water/proton selectivity in this and related systems. This is done by evaluating in a consistent way the free energy profile for transferring a proton along the channel and relating this profile to the relevant PT rate constants. It is found that the water/proton selectivity is controlled by the change in solvation free energy upon moving the charged proton from water to the channel. The reason for the focus on the elegant concept of the proton wire and the related Grotthuss-type mechanism is also considered. It is concluded that these mechanisms are clearly important in cases with flat free energy surfaces (e.g., in bulk water, in gas phase water chains, and in infinitely long channels). However, in cases of biological channels, the actual PT mechanism is much less important than the energetics of transferring the proton charge from water to different regions in the channels.

  4. QM/MM Dynamics of Proton Transport in Chitosan/Phosphotungstic Acid Composite Membrane for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Sundarti, Linda Windia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study proton transport in DMFC using chitosan/phosphotungstic acid (CS/PWA) composite membrane as Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). Model of proton transport mechanism was proposed in order to investigate the proton transport rationality in CSPWA composite membrane, which is indicated by energy models. QM/MM dynamics method on the basis of CP2K code was used to calculate energy of the models. Results showed that the model of proton transport mechanism produced ene...

  5. Proton transport in additives to the polymer electrolyte membrane for fuel cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelle, Pia

    2011-03-21

    The enhancement of proton transport in polymer electrolyte membranes is an important issue for the development of fuel cell technology. The objective is a material providing proton transport at a temperature range of 350 K to 450 K independent from a purely water based mechanism. To enhance the PEM properties of standard polymer materials, a class of additives is studied by means of atomistic simulations consisting of functionalised mesoporous silicon dioxide particles. The functional molecules are imidazole or sulphonic acid, covalently bound to the surface via a carbon chain with a surface density of about 1.0 nm{sup -2} groups. At first, the proton transport mechanism is explored in a system of functional molecules in vacuum. The molecules are constrained by the terminal carbon groups according to the geometric arrangement in the porous silicon dioxide. The proton transport mechanism is characterised by structural properties obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations and consists of the aggregation of two or more functional groups, a barrier free proton transport between these groups followed by the separation of the groups and formation of new aggregates due to fluctuations in the hydrogen bond network and movement of the carbon chain. For the different proton conducting groups, i.e. methyl imidazole, methyl sulphonic acid and water, the barrier free proton transport and the formation of protonated bimolecular complexes were addressed by potential energy calculations of the density functional based tight binding method (DFTB). For sulphonic acid even at a temperature of 450 K, relatively stable aggregates are formed, while most imidazole groups are isolated and the hydrogen bond fluctuations are high. However, high density of groups and elevated temperatures enhance the proton transport in both systems. Besides the anchorage and the density of the groups, the influence of the chemical environment on the proton transport was studied. Therefore, the

  6. Salt-bridge Swapping in the EXXERFXYY Motif of Proton Coupled Oligopeptide Transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aduri, Nanda G; Prabhala, Bala K; Ernst, Heidi A

    2015-01-01

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) couple the inwards transport of di- or tripeptides with an inwards-directed transport of protons. Evidence from several studies of different POTs have pointed towards involvement of a highly conserved sequence motif, E1XXE2RFXYY (from here on referred......-motif salt bridge, i.e. R-E2 to R-E1, which is consistent with previous structural studies. Molecular dynamics simulations of the motif variants E1XXE2R and E1XXQ2R support this mechanism. The simulations showed that upon changing conformation, arginine pushes Helix V, through interactions with the highly...... conserved FYING motif, further away from the central cavity, in what could be a stabilization of an inward-facing conformation. As E2 has been suggested to be the primary site for protonation, these novel findings show how protonation may drive conformational changes through interactions of two highly...

  7. Oxide-based protonic conductors: Point defects and transport properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonanos, N.

    2001-01-01

    , hydrogen pumps, fuel cells, etc. The extent to which protonic defects form depends mainly on the partial pressure of water vapour, temperature and basicity of the constituent oxides, while their mobility depends, among other factors, on the metal-oxygen bond length and bond energy. The defect equilibria......A variety of oxides doped with elements of lower valence acquire hydroxyl-type defects when exposed, at high temperature, to atmospheres containing water vapour. Since the hydrogen of the hydroxyl groups is mobile, the oxides display protonic conductivity and may be used as electrolytes in sensors...... that determine the protonic concentrations are considered, with emphasis on the regime of low oxygen partial pressure. The measurement of the thermoelectric power (TEP) and of the H+/D+ isotope effect in conductivity are discussed as a means of characterising the conduction process. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B...

  8. Ion transport in some solid state proton conducting composites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    mobile species Rb+ and interfacial proton (H+) con- duction in RbNO3 : Al2O3 system (Zhu and Mellander. 1995) or it may be due to various acid-base reactions occurring at the interface (Wieczorek et al 1996). From our above systematic and motivated studies, it appears that the existence of two percolation thresholds.

  9. Water and proton transport properties of hexafluorinated sulfonated poly(arylenethioethersulfone) copolymers for applications to proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalfan, Amish N.; Sanchez, Luz M.; Kodiweera, Chandana; Greenbaum, Steve G. [Hunter College of the City University of New York, Physics Department, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Bai, Zongwu [University of Dayton Research Institute, University of Dayton, 300 College Park Drive, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Dang, Thuy D. [Air Force Research Laboratory/MLBP, Material and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    In the present study, we examine the water and proton transport properties of hexafluorinated sulfonated poly(arylenethioethersulfone) (6F-SPTES) copolymer membranes for applications to proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The 6F-SPTES copolymer membranes build upon the structures of previously studied sulfonated poly(arylenethioethersulfone) (SPTES) copolymer membranes to include CF{sub 3} functional groups in efforts to strengthen water retention and extend membrane performance at elevated temperatures (above 120 C). The 6F-SPTES copolymer membranes sustain higher water self-diffusion and greater proton conductivities than the commercial Nafion {sup registered} membrane. Water diffusion studies of the 6F-SPTES copolymer membranes using the pulsed-field gradient spin-echo NMR technique reveal, however, the fluorinated membranes to be somewhat unfavorable over their non-fluorinated counterparts as high temperature membranes. In addition, proton conductivity measurements of the fluorinated membranes up to 85 C show comparable results with the non-fluorinated SPTES membranes. (author)

  10. Several hPepT1-transported drugs are substrates of the Escherichia coli proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YdgR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Aduri, Nanda G; Iqbal, Mazhar

    2017-01-01

    Proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters found in all kingdoms of life. POTs utilize the proton electrochemical gradient for the uptake of nutrient dipeptides and tripeptides. The human POT hPepT1 is known to transport a number of drugs. As part of ongoi...

  11. Srna - Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulation in combined and voxelized geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes new Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulations in complex geometrical forms and in materials of different composition. The SRNA codes were developed for three dimensional (3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry. The model of these codes is based on the theory of proton multiple scattering and a simple model of compound nucleus decay. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG and SRNA-VOX. The first code simulates proton transport in combined geometry that can be described by planes and second order surfaces. The second one uses the voxelized geometry of material zones and is specifically adopted for the application of patient computer tomography data. Transition probabilities for both codes are given by the SRNADAT program. In this paper, we will present the models and algorithms of our programs, as well as the results of the numerical experiments we have carried out applying them, along with the results of proton transport simulation obtained through the PETRA and GEANT programs. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by means of the Multi-Layer Faraday Cup and spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by our program indicate the imminent application of Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice.

  12. Ion transport in some solid state proton conducting composites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proton conducting composites of heteropolyacid hydrates (phosphomolybdic acid H3PMo12O40.H2O,PMA; phosphotungstic acid H3PW12O40.H2O, PTA) and salt hydrate like NiCl2.6H2O were prepared with insulating Al2O3 as dispersoid. The ionic conductivity peaks at two concentrations of Al2O3 indicating two ...

  13. Transport of intense proton beams in an induction linac by solenoid lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, W.; Choe, J. Y.; Uhm, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    In the proposed proton induction linac at NSWC, a 100 A and 3 μs proton beam is accelerated to 5 MeV through a series of accelerating gaps. This beam can be effectively focused by solenoid lenses in this low energy regime and can be transported by adjusting the focusing strength in each period. For the transport channel design to reduce the number of independently controlled lenses, a theory of matched beams in the space-charge dominated regime has been developed. This study can be applied to cost efficient designs of induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion and free electron lasers.

  14. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Applied for Transport Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Rokni, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of a PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) is investigated. PEMFC may be the most promising technology for fuel cell automotive systems, which is operating at quite low temperatures, (between 60 to 80℃). In this study the fuel cell motive power part of a lift truck has...... of the electricity will be consumed by pumps and compressors in the system. Generally the whole system can be separated in three parts, cathode circuit, anode circuit and cooling loops. In this paper the effect of operating conditions and anode recirculation on power production as well as system efficiency have been...

  15. Proton transport and the water environment in nafion fuel cell membranes and AOT reverse micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, D B; Goun, A; Glusac, K; Moilanen, David E; Fayer, M D

    2007-07-04

    The properties of confined water and diffusive proton-transfer kinetics in the nanoscopic water channels of Nafion fuel cell membranes at various hydration levels are compared to water in a series of well-characterized AOT reverse micelles with known water nanopool sizes using the photoacid pyranine as a molecular probe. The side chains of Nafion are terminated by sulfonate groups with sodium counterions that are arrayed along the water channels. AOT has sulfonate head groups with sodium counterions that form the interface with the reverse micelle's water nanopool. The extent of excited-state deprotonation is observed by steady-state fluorescence measurements. Proton-transfer kinetics and orientational relaxation are measured by time-dependent fluorescence using time-correlated single photon counting. The time dependence of deprotonation is related to diffusive proton transport away from the photoacid. The fluorescence reflecting the long time scale proton transport has an approximately t-0.8 power law decay in contrast to bulk water, which has a t-3/2 power law. For a given hydration level of Nafion, the excited-state proton transfer and the orientational relaxation are similar to those observed for a related size AOT water nanopool. The effective size of the Nafion water channels at various hydration levels are estimated by the known size of the AOT reverse micelles that display the corresponding proton-transfer kinetics and orientational relaxation.

  16. Proton transport properties in hybrid membranes investigated by ac-electrogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    To Thi Kim, L.; Debiemme-Chouvy, C.; Gabrielli, C.; Perrot, H. [CNRS, UPR 15 du CNRS, LISE, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France); Sel, O.; Laberty-Robert, C.; Sanchez, C. [LCMCP-CNRS-UMR-7574-College de France, Bat. C-D, 11, place Marcelin Berthelot, 75231 Paris (France)

    2010-08-15

    In this paper, a hybrid organic/inorganic membrane, based on poly(VDF-co-HFP) polymer associated to mesostructured modified silica and made through sol-gel techniques, was characterized by using ac-electrogravimetry. In order to perform experiments, a polypyrrole-heteropolyanion doped mediator film was inserted between the working electrode of the microbalance and the hybrid membrane. This mediator film, which is characterized by mixed conducting properties, is necessary to provide proton transfer between the different interfaces and in that way, the proton transport inside the hybrid film which is only an ionic conducting material. Proton transfer and transport was characterized through ac-electrogravimetry and an original theoretical approach was developed for extracting the attractive parameters. The change of the exchanged species concentration and the diffusion coefficient of the protons in the hybrid membrane, were estimated, for the first time, according to the applied potential. These studies pointed out that the low conductivity value in this hybrid membrane is related to (1) the low diffusion coefficient of proton (10{sup -} {sup 7} cm{sup 2} s{sup -} {sup 1}) in this membrane associated, (2) the low concentration of proton in the membrane (0.4 meq g{sup -} {sup 1}). (author)

  17. Proton-dependent coniferin transport, a common major transport event in differentiating xylem tissue of woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyama, Taku; Kawai, Ryo; Shitan, Nobukazu; Matoh, Toru; Sugiyama, Junji; Yoshinaga, Arata; Takabe, Keiji; Fujita, Minoru; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2013-06-01

    Lignin biosynthesis is an essential physiological activity of vascular plants if they are to survive under various environmental stresses on land. The biosynthesis of lignin proceeds in the cell wall by polymerization of precursors; the initial step of lignin polymerization is the transportation of lignin monomers from the cytosol to the cell wall, which is critical for lignin formation. There has been much debate on the transported form of the lignin precursor, either as free monolignols or their glucosides. In this study, we performed biochemical analyses to characterize the membrane transport mechanism of lignin precursors using angiosperms, hybrid poplar (Populus sieboldii × Populus grandidentata) and poplar (Populus sieboldii), as well gymnosperms, Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) and pine (Pinus densiflora). Membrane vesicles prepared from differentiating xylem tissues showed clear ATP-dependent transport activity of coniferin, whereas less than 4% of the coniferin transport activity was seen for coniferyl alcohol. Bafilomycin A1 and proton gradient erasers markedly inhibited coniferin transport in hybrid poplar membrane vesicles; in contrast, vanadate had no effect. Cis-inhibition experiments suggested that this transport activity was specific for coniferin. Membrane fractionation of hybrid poplar microsomes demonstrated that transport activity was localized to the tonoplast- and endomembrane-rich fraction. Differentiating xylem of Japanese cypress exhibited almost identical transport properties, suggesting the involvement of a common endomembrane-associated proton/coniferin antiport mechanism in the lignifying tissues of woody plants, both angiosperms and gymnosperms.

  18. Coronal magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jie; Bastian, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of research articles on the subject of the solar corona, and particularly, coronal magnetism. The book was motivated by the Workshop on Coronal Magnetism: Connecting Models to Data and the Corona to the Earth, which was held 21 - 23 May 2012 in Boulder, Colorado, USA. This workshop was attended by approximately 60 researchers. Articles from this meeting are contained in this topical issue, but the topical issue also contains contributions from researchers not present at the workshop. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in solar physics. Originally published in Solar Physics, Vol. 288, Issue 2, 2013 and Vol. 289, Issue 8, 2014.

  19. Coupling Protein Dynamics with Proton Transport in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraphder, Srabani; Maupin, C Mark; Swanson, Jessica M J; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-08-25

    The role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis is one of the most highly debated topics in enzymology. The main controversy centers around what may be defined as functionally significant conformational fluctuations and how, if at all, these fluctuations couple to enzyme catalyzed events. To shed light on this debate, the conformational dynamics along the transition path surmounting the highest free energy barrier have been herein investigated for the rate limiting proton transport event in human carbonic anhydrase (HCA) II. Special attention has been placed on whether the motion of an excess proton is correlated with fluctuations in the surrounding protein and solvent matrix, which may be rare on the picosecond and subpicosecond time scales of molecular motions. It is found that several active site residues, which do not directly participate in the proton transport event, have a significant impact on the dynamics of the excess proton. These secondary participants are shown to strongly influence the active site environment, resulting in the creation of water clusters that are conducive to fast, moderately slow, or slow proton transport events. The identification and characterization of these secondary participants illuminates the role of protein dynamics in the catalytic efficiency of HCA II.

  20. Srna-Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulation in combined and voxelized geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Ilic, R D; Stankovic, S J

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes new Monte Carlo codes for proton transport simulations in complex geometrical forms and in materials of different composition. The SRNA codes were developed for three dimensional (3D) dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry. The model of these codes is based on the theory of proton multiple scattering and a simple model of compound nucleus decay. The developed package consists of two codes: SRNA-2KG and SRNA-VOX. The first code simulates proton transport in combined geometry that can be described by planes and second order surfaces. The second one uses the voxelized geometry of material zones and is specifically adopted for the application of patient computer tomography data. Transition probabilities for both codes are given by the SRNADAT program. In this paper, we will present the models and algorithms of our programs, as well as the results of the numerical experiments we have carried out applying them, along with the results of proton transport simulation obtaine...

  1. Quantum dynamics in continuum for proton transport II: Variational solvent-solute interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duan; Chen, Zhan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Proton transport plays an important role in biological energy transduction and sensory systems. Therefore, it has attracted much attention in biological science and biomedical engineering in the past few decades. The present work proposes a multiscale/multiphysics model for the understanding of the molecular mechanism of proton transport in transmembrane proteins involving continuum, atomic, and quantum descriptions, assisted with the evolution, formation, and visualization of membrane channel surfaces. We describe proton dynamics quantum mechanically via a new density functional theory based on the Boltzmann statistics, while implicitly model numerous solvent molecules as a dielectric continuum to reduce the number of degrees of freedom. The density of all other ions in the solvent is assumed to obey the Boltzmann distribution in a dynamic manner. The impact of protein molecular structure and its charge polarization on the proton transport is considered explicitly at the atomic scale. A variational solute-solvent interface is designed to separate the explicit molecule and implicit solvent regions. We formulate a total free-energy functional to put proton kinetic and potential energies, the free energy of all other ions, and the polar and nonpolar energies of the whole system on an equal footing. The variational principle is employed to derive coupled governing equations for the proton transport system. Generalized Laplace-Beltrami equation, generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and generalized Kohn-Sham equation are obtained from the present variational framework. The variational solvent-solute interface is generated and visualized to facilitate the multiscale discrete/continuum/quantum descriptions. Theoretical formulations for the proton density and conductance are constructed based on fundamental laws of physics. A number of mathematical algorithms, including the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping, matched interface and boundary method, Gummel iteration, and Krylov

  2. Elucidation of the proton transport mechanism in human carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, C Mark; McKenna, Robert; Silverman, David N; Voth, Gregory A

    2009-06-10

    Human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) is one of the fastest known enzymes, which utilizes a rate-limiting proton transport (PT) step in its enzymatic reaction. To evaluate the PT event at an atomistic level, the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) method has been utilized in this work. It is observed that the PT event in HCA II exploits a transient active site water cluster to transport the excess proton between the catalytic zinc-bound water/hydroxide and the proton shuttling residue, His64. This PT event is found to be dependent on the enzyme's ability to form and stabilize the active site water cluster in addition to its ability to orient His64 in a favorable conformation. Evaluation of the PT free energy barrier for different orientations of His64 reveals this residue's vital role as a proton transporter and elucidates its direct effect on the barrier to PT through the active site water. It is suggested that the rate-limiting step oscillates between the active site water PT event to His64 and the de/protonation of His64 depending on the exogenous buffer concentration and the orientation of His64. In the absence of a PT acceptor/donor at position 64, it is found that the excess proton will utilize one of three distinct paths to enter/leave the active site. This latter result not only allows for an increased understanding of how enzymes capitalize on the protein/solvent interface to guide excess protons to/from areas of interest, it also provides valuable insight into the chemical rescue experiments on HCA II mutants.

  3. Evaluating surface protonic transport on cerium oxide via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Ryo; Stub, Sindre Østby; Norby, Truls; Sekine, Yasushi

    2018-02-01

    Surface protonic transport on cerium oxide (CeO2) was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). CeO2 pellets showing low relative density: approximately 60%, was prepared for the purpose. The structure and morphology of the prepared CeO2 pellets were confirmed from XRD and SEM measurements. Results show that the pellets had a pure cubic phase, with open pores on which water can be adsorbed. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements were taken to evaluate the surface protonic transport on CeO2 as a function of temperature and as a function of partial pressure of water (PH2O) at 400 °C. Investigations of the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed that only the conductivities of surface grain bulk (σintra) and surface grain boundary (σinter) increased with decreasing temperatures under wet conditions (PH2O = 0.026 atm). The PH2O dependence of surface conductivities (σintra and σinter) revealed that σintra increases strongly with PH2O at 400 °C. These findings provide evidence that water adsorbates play an important role in surface protonic transport on CeO2 at low temperatures. Surface protonic transport at low temperatures can contribute to the expansion of applications for electrical and catalytic processes.

  4. Proton-linked L-fucose transport in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, S A; Tinsley, C R; Muiry, J A; Henderson, P J

    1987-01-01

    1. Addition of L-fucose to energy-depleted anaerobic suspensions of Escherichia coli elicited an uncoupler-sensitive alkaline pH change diagnostic of L-fucose/H+ symport activity. 2. L-Galactose or D-arabinose were also substrates, but not inducers, for the L-fucose/H+ symporter. 3. L-Fucose transport into subcellular vesicles was dependent upon respiration, displayed a pH optimum of about 5.5, and was inhibited by protonophores and ionophores. 4. These results showed that L-fucose transport ...

  5. A comparative study of proton transport properties of zirconium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    was assessed in acids, bases and organic solvent media. The transport properties of these materials were explored by measuring conductance at different temperatures in the range 30–120°C at 10°C intervals, using SOLARTRON. DATASET impedance analyser (SI 1260) over a frequency range 1 Hz–10 MHz at a signal ...

  6. A comparative study of proton transport properties of zirconium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is observed that conductivity decreases with increasing temperature in all cases and mechanism of transportation is proposed to be Grotthuss type. Conductivity performance ... Uma Chudasama1. Applied Chemistry Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 001, India ...

  7. Beam collimation and transport of quasineutral laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harres, K.; Alber, I.; Tauschwitz, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Daido, H.; Günther, M.; Nürnberg, F.; Otten, A.; Schollmeier, M.; Schütrumpf, J.; Tampo, M.; Roth, M.

    2010-02-01

    This article reports about controlling laser-accelerated proton beams with respect to beam divergence and energy. The particles are captured by a pulsed high field solenoid with a magnetic field strength of 8.6 T directly behind a flat target foil that is irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. Proton beams with energies around 2.3 MeV and particle numbers of 1012 could be collimated and transported over a distance of more than 300 mm. In contrast to the protons the comoving electrons are strongly deflected by the solenoid field. They propagate at a submillimeter gyroradius around the solenoid's axis which could be experimentally verified. The originated high flux electron beam produces a high space charge resulting in a stronger focusing of the proton beam than expected by tracking results. Leadoff particle-in-cell simulations show qualitatively that this effect is caused by space charge attraction due to the comoving electrons. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications such as postacceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  8. Influence of water and membrane microstructure on the transport properties of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Ana Rosa

    Proton transport in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) depends on interaction between water and acid groups covalently bound to the polymer. Although the presence of water is important in maintaining the PEM's functions, a thorough understanding of this topic is still lacking. The objective of this work is to provide a better understanding of how the nature water, confined to ionic domains of the polymer, influences the membrane's ability to transport protons, methanol and water. Understanding this topic will facilitate development of new materials with favorable transport properties for fuel cells use. Five classes of polymer membranes were used in this work: polyacrylonitrile-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (PAN-g-macPSSA); poly(vinylidene difluoride) irradiation-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (PVDF-g-PSSA); poly(ethylenetetrafluoroethylene) irradiation-graft-poly(styrenesulfonic) acid (ETFE-gPSSA); PVDF-g-PSSA with hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA); and perfluorosulfonic acid membrane (Nafion). The nature of water within the polymers (freezable versus non-freezable states) was measured by systematically freezing samples, and observing the temperature at which water freezes and the amount of heat released in the process. Freezing water-swollen membranes resulted in a 4-fold decrease in the proton conductivity of the PEM. Activation energies of proton transport before and after freezing were ˜ 0.15 eV and 0.5 eV, consistent with proton transport through liquid water and bound water, respectively. Reducing the content of water in membrane samples decreased the amount of freezable and non-freezable water. Calorimetric measurements of membranes in various degrees of hydration showed that water molecules became non-freezable when lambda, (water molecules per sulfonic acid group) was less than ˜14. Proton conduction through membranes containing only non-freezable water was demonstrated to be feasible. Diffusion experiments showed that the permeability of methanol

  9. Emulating proton-induced conformational changes in the vesicular monoamine transporter VMAT2 by mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Dana; Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Forrest, Lucy R; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2016-11-22

    Neurotransporters located in synaptic vesicles are essential for communication between nerve cells in a process mediated by neurotransmitters. Vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT), a member of the largest superfamily of transporters, mediates transport of monoamines to synaptic vesicles and storage organelles in a process that involves exchange of two H(+) per substrate. VMAT transport is inhibited by the competitive inhibitor reserpine, a second-line agent to treat hypertension, and by the noncompetitive inhibitor tetrabenazine, presently in use for symptomatic treatment of hyperkinetic disorders. During the transport cycle, VMAT is expected to occupy at least three different conformations: cytoplasm-facing, occluded, and lumen-facing. The lumen- to cytoplasm-facing transition, facilitated by protonation of at least one of the essential membrane-embedded carboxyls, generates a binding site for reserpine. Here we have identified residues in the cytoplasmic gate and show that mutations that disrupt the interactions in this gate also shift the equilibrium toward the cytoplasm-facing conformation, emulating the effect of protonation. These experiments provide significant insight into the role of proton translocation in the conformational dynamics of a mammalian H(+)-coupled antiporter, and also identify key aspects of the mode of action and binding of two potent inhibitors of VMAT2: reserpine binds the cytoplasm-facing conformation, and tetrabenazine binds the lumen-facing conformation.

  10. A FOUR-FLUID MHD MODEL OF THE SOLAR WIND/INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM INTERACTION WITH TURBULENCE TRANSPORT AND PICKUP PROTONS AS SEPARATE FLUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Goldstein, Melvyn L., E-mail: arcadi.usmanov@nasa.gov [Code 672, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    We have developed a four-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. The unique features of the model are: (a) a three-fluid description for the charged components of the solar wind and interstellar plasmas (thermal protons, electrons, and pickup protons), (b) the built-in turbulence transport equations based on Reynolds decomposition and coupled with the mean-flow Reynolds-averaged equations, and (c) a solar corona/solar wind model that supplies inner boundary conditions at 40 au by computing solar wind and magnetic field parameters outward from the coronal base. The three charged species are described by separate energy equations and are assumed to move with the same velocity. The fourth fluid in the model is the interstellar hydrogen which is treated by separate continuity, momentum, and energy equations and is coupled with the charged components through photoionization and charge exchange. We evaluate the effects of turbulence transport and pickup protons on the global heliospheric structure and compute the distribution of plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence parameters throughout the heliosphere for representative solar minimum and maximum conditions. We compare our results with Voyager 1 observations in the outer heliosheath and show that the relative amplitude of magnetic fluctuations just outside the heliopause is in close agreement with the value inferred from Voyager 1 measurements by Burlaga et al. The simulated profiles of magnetic field parameters in the outer heliosheath are in qualitative agreement with the Voyager 1 observations and with the analytical model of magnetic field draping around the heliopause of Isenberg et al.

  11. Transport of laser accelerated proton beams and isochoric heating of matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, M; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Harres, K [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Bagnoud, V [GSI Helmholtzzentrum f. Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brown, C; Gregori, G [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Clarke, R; Heathcote, R; Li, B [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX14 OQX (United Kingdom); Daido, H [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, Kizugawa-City, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Fernandez, J; Flippo, K; Gaillard, S; Gauthier, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Glenzer, S; Kritcher, A; Kugland, N; LePape, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Makita, M, E-mail: markus.roth@physik.tu-darmstadt.d [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    The acceleration of intense proton and ion beams by ultra-intense lasers has matured to a point where applications in basic research and technology are being developed. Crucial for harvesting the unmatched beam parameters driven by the relativistic electron sheath is the precise control of the beam. We report on recent experiments using the PHELIX laser at GSI, the VULCAN laser at RAL and the TRIDENT laser at LANL to control and use laser accelerated proton beams for applications in high energy density research. We demonstrate efficient collimation of the proton beam using high field pulsed solenoid magnets, a prerequisite to capture and transport the beam for applications. Furthermore we report on two campaigns to use intense, short proton bunches to isochorically heat solid targets up to the warm dense matter state. The temporal profile of the proton beam allows for rapid heating of the target, much faster than the hydrodynamic response time thereby creating a strongly coupled plasma at solid density. The target parameters are then probed by X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) to reveal the density and temperature of the heated volume. This combination of two powerful techniques developed during the past few years allows for the generation and investigation of macroscopic samples of matter in states present in giant planets or the interior of the earth.

  12. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  13. Correlating humidity-dependent ionically conductive surface area with transport phenomena in proton-exchange membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-10-13

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using direct-current voltammetry and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion membrane was examined.

  14. Critical role of a conserved transmembrane lysine in substrate recognition by the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YjdL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Johanne M; Aduri, Nanda Gowtham; Prabhala, Bala K

    2014-01-01

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) utilize an electrochemical proton gradient to accumulate peptides in the cytoplasm. Changing the highly conserved active-site Lys117 in the Escherichia coli POT YjdL to glutamine resulted in loss of ligand affinity as well as inability to distinguis...

  15. Coarse-grained model of nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton transport in Nafion membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Mao, Runfang; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Neimark, Alexander V

    2018-01-14

    We present a coarse-grained model of the acid form of Nafion membrane that explicitly includes proton transport. This model is based on a soft-core bead representation of the polymer implemented into the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation framework. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with water beads. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss hopping mechanism of proton transport. The proposed DPD model is parameterized to account for the specifics of the conformations and flexibility of the Nafion backbone and sidechains; it treats electrostatic interactions in the smeared charge approximation. The simulation results qualitatively, and in many respects quantitatively, predict the specifics of nanoscale segregation in the hydrated Nafion membrane into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from a collection of isolated water clusters to a 3D network of pores filled with water embedded in the hydrophobic matrix. The segregated morphology is characterized in terms of the pore size distribution with the average size growing with hydration from ∼1 to ∼4 nm. Comparison of the predicted water diffusivity with the experimental data taken from different sources shows good agreement at high and moderate hydration and substantial deviation at low hydration, around and below the percolation threshold. This discrepancy is attributed to the dynamic percolation effects of formation and rupture of merging bridges between the water clusters, which become progressively important at low hydration, when the coarse-grained model is unable to mimic the fine structure of water network that includes singe molecule bridges. Selected simulations of water diffusion are performed for the alkali metal substituted membrane which demonstrate the effects of the counter

  16. Coarse-grained model of nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton transport in Nafion membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Mao, Runfang; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2018-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained model of the acid form of Nafion membrane that explicitly includes proton transport. This model is based on a soft-core bead representation of the polymer implemented into the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation framework. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with water beads. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss hopping mechanism of proton transport. The proposed DPD model is parameterized to account for the specifics of the conformations and flexibility of the Nafion backbone and sidechains; it treats electrostatic interactions in the smeared charge approximation. The simulation results qualitatively, and in many respects quantitatively, predict the specifics of nanoscale segregation in the hydrated Nafion membrane into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from a collection of isolated water clusters to a 3D network of pores filled with water embedded in the hydrophobic matrix. The segregated morphology is characterized in terms of the pore size distribution with the average size growing with hydration from ˜1 to ˜4 nm. Comparison of the predicted water diffusivity with the experimental data taken from different sources shows good agreement at high and moderate hydration and substantial deviation at low hydration, around and below the percolation threshold. This discrepancy is attributed to the dynamic percolation effects of formation and rupture of merging bridges between the water clusters, which become progressively important at low hydration, when the coarse-grained model is unable to mimic the fine structure of water network that includes singe molecule bridges. Selected simulations of water diffusion are performed for the alkali metal substituted membrane which demonstrate the effects of the counter-ions on

  17. Proton transport inside the biofilm limits electrical current generation by anode-respiring bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, César I; Kato Marcus, Andrew; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2008-08-01

    Anode-respiring bacteria (ARB) in a biofilm anode carry out an oxidation half-reaction of organic matter, producing an electrical current from renewable biomass, including wastes. At the same time, ARB produce protons, usually one proton for every electron. Our study shows how current density generated by an acclimated ARB biofilm was limited by proton transport out of the biofilm. We determined that, at high current densities, protons were mainly transported out of the biofilm by protonating the conjugate base of the buffer system; the maximum current generation was directly related to the transport of the buffer, mainly by diffusion, into and out of the biofilm. With non-limiting acetate concentrations, the current density increased with higher buffer concentrations, going from 2.21 +/- 0.02 A m(-2) with 12.5-mM phosphate buffer medium to 9.3 +/- 0.4 A m(-2) using a 100-mM phosphate buffer at a constant anode potential of E(anode) = -0.35 V versus Ag/AgCl. Increasing the concentration of sodium chloride in the medium (0-100 mM) increased current density by only 15%, indicating that ion migration was not as important as diffusion of phosphate inside the biofilm. The current density also varied strongly with medium pH as a result of the buffer speciation: The current density was 10.0 +/- 0.8 A m(-2) at pH 8, and the pH giving one-half the maximum rate was 6.5. A j-V curve analysis using 100 mM phosphate buffer showed a maximum current density of 11.5 +/- 0.9 A m(-2) and half-saturation potential of -0.414 V versus Ag/AgCl, a value that deviated only slightly from the standard acetate potential, resulting in small anode-potential losses. We discuss the implications of the proton-transport limitation in the field of microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolytic cells. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. In vitro study to compare the coronal microleakage of Tempit UltraF, Tempit, IRM, and Cavit by using the fluid transport model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koagel, Susan O; Mines, Pete; Apicella, Michael; Sweet, Mark

    2008-04-01

    An adequate coronal seal is critical for the success of root canal therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the coronal microleakage of 4 temporary filling materials used to seal the access cavity in root canal treated teeth. Standardized access cavities were prepared in 55 extracted human, single canal teeth. They were instrumented by using a crown-down method to a size 45 file. The smear layer was removed with a 1-minute soak with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid followed by a 10-minute soak with 5.25% NaOCl and dried with paper points. All roots were obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer by using the continuous wave of condensation technique. The teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups of 10 teeth, with the remaining teeth serving as positive and negative controls. The access openings of the teeth in the experimental groups were filled with 4 mm of Cavit, IRM, Tempit, or Tempit-Ultra-F. All teeth were stored in 100% humidity at 37 degrees for 10 days, allowing sealer to set before testing. After thermocycling for 500 cycles (5 degrees C-55 degrees C), microleakage was measured by using the fluid transport model at 10 psi. All materials tested leaked. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U analysis indicated significantly less leakage (P Cavit and IRM. There were no statistically significant differences between Tempit Ultra-F and Tempit or between Cavit, IRM, and Tempit.

  19. A study on 3-GeV proton beam transport line for JSNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meigo, S.; Harada, M.; Konno, C. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-03-01

    For the neutron science and the muon science, experimental facilities are to be built in the JAERI/KEK joint project on multi purpose high intensity proton accelerator. In the first phase of the project the proton beam power is l MW which will be up graded to 5 MW in the second phase. In the first phase both neutron and muon facilities utilize a common proton beam from the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron. The muon science facility is located at upper stream of neutron facility. This configuration creates various technical problems. As in the first phase the intensity is high up to 333 {mu}A, optimization of beam optics is stringently requires to provide adequate beam profile on the targets and minimize the beam loss. Beam optics, profile and spill of 3-GeV proton beam are thoughtfully studied. At the initial stage a 2-cm thick carbon target for the muon experiment will be placed in the beam line. This scheme, so called cascade targets, shares the beam efficiently. The beam optics and beam spill were calculated with the TRANSPORT and DECAY-TURTLE codes. A reference beam line was established, which had about 70 m in length. The profile and spill of the beam were calculated by taking into account of the coulomb and nuclear elastic scattering. The beam can be shaped at 13 and 5 cm in full width and height, respectively, on the neutron target, these dimensions satisfy the requirement from the neutron target. (author)

  20. Transport properties of proton-exchange membranes: Effect of supercritical-fluid processing and chemical functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido Ayazo

    NafionRTM membranes commonly used in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), are tipically limited by high methanol permeability (also known as the cross-over limitation). These membranes have phase segregated sulfonated ionic domains in a perfluorinated backbone, which makes processing challenging and limited by phase equilibria considerations. This study used supercritical fluids (SCFs) as a processing alternative, since the gas-like mass transport properties of SCFs allow a better penetration into the membranes and the use of polar co-solvents influenced their morphology, fine-tuning the physical and transport properties in the membrane. Measurements of methanol permeability and proton conductivity were performed to the NafionRTM membranes processed with SCFs at 40ºC and 200 bar and the co-solvents as: acetone, tetrahydrofuran (THF), isopropyl alcohol, HPLC-grade water, acetic acid, cyclohexanone. The results obtained for the permeability data were of the order of 10 -8-10-9 cm2/s, two orders of magnitude lower than unprocessed Nafion. Proton conductivity results obtained using AC impedance electrochemical spectroscopy was between 0.02 and 0.09 S/cm, very similar to the unprocessed Nafion. SCF processing with ethanol as co-solvent reduced the methanol permeability by two orders of magnitude, while the proton conductivity was only reduced by 4%. XRD analysis made to the treated samples exhibited a decreasing pattern in the crystallinity, which affects the transport properties of the membrane. Also, SAXS profiles of the Nafion membranes processed were obtained with the goal of determining changes produced by the SCF processing in the hydrophilic domains of the polymer. With the goal of searching for new alternatives in proton exchange membranes (PEMs) triblock copolymer of poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) (SIBS) and poly(styrene-isobutylene-styrene) SEBS were studied. These sulfonated tri-block copolymers had lower methanol permeabilities, but also lower proton

  1. Proton-driven sucrose symport and antiport are provided by the vacuolar transporters SUC4 and TMT1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Alexander; Beyhl, Diana; Marten, Irene; Wormit, Alexandra; Neuhaus, Ekkehard; Poschet, Gernot; Büttner, Michael; Schneider, Sabine; Sauer, Norbert; Hedrich, Rainer

    2011-10-01

    The vacuolar membrane is involved in solute uptake into and release from the vacuole, which is the largest plant organelle. In addition to inorganic ions and metabolites, large quantities of protons and sugars are shuttled across this membrane. Current models suggest that the proton gradient across the membrane drives the accumulation and/or release of sugars. Recent studies have associated AtSUC4 with the vacuolar membrane. Some members of the SUC family are plasma membrane proton/sucrose symporters. In addition, the sugar transporters TMT1 and TMT2, which are localized to the vacuolar membrane, have been suggested to function in proton-driven glucose antiport. Here we used the patch-clamp technique to monitor carrier-mediated sucrose transport by AtSUC4 and AtTMTs in intact Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll vacuoles. In the whole-vacuole configuration with wild-type material, cytosolic sucrose-induced proton currents were associated with a proton/sucrose antiport mechanism. To identify the related transporter on one hand, and to enable the recording of symporter-mediated currents on the other hand, we electrophysiologically characterized vacuolar proteins recognized by Arabidopsis mutants of partially impaired sugar compartmentation. To our surprise, the intrinsic sucrose/proton antiporter activity was greatly reduced when vacuoles were isolated from plants lacking the monosaccharide transporter AtTMT1/TMT2. Transient expression of AtSUC4 in this mutant background resulted in proton/sucrose symport activity. From these studies, we conclude that, in the natural environment within the Arabidopsis cell, AtSUC4 most likely catalyses proton-coupled sucrose export from the vacuole. However, TMT1/2 probably represents a proton-coupled antiporter capable of high-capacity loading of glucose and sucrose into the vacuole. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Validation of Geant4 on Proton Transportation for Thick Absorbers: Study Based on Tschalär Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Gabriela; Denyak, Valeriy; Schelin, Hugo R.; Paschuk, Sergei

    2017-02-01

    Imaging techniques using protons as incident particles are currently being developed to substitute X-ray computer tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance methods in proton therapy. They deal with relatively thick targets, like the human head or trunk, where protons lose a significant part of their energy, however, they have enough energy to exit the target. The physical quantities important in proton imaging are kinetic energy, angle and coordinates of emerging proton from an absorber material. In recent times, many research groups use the Geant4 toolkit to simulate proton imaging devices. Most of the available publications about validation of Geant4 models are for thin or thick absorbers (Bragg Peak studies), that are not consistent with the contour conditions applied to proton imaging. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the kinetic energy spectrum for protons emerging from homogeneous absorbers slabs comparing it to the experimental results published by Tschalär and Maccabee, in 1970. Different models (standard and detailed) available on Geant4 (version 9.6.p03) are explored taking into account its accuracy and computational performance. This paper presents a validation for protons with incident kinetic energies of 19.68 MeV and 49.10 MeV. The validation results from the emerging protons kinetic energy spectra show that: (i) there are differences between the reference data and the data produced by different processes evoked for transportation and (ii) the validation energies are sensitive to sub-shell processes.

  3. Non-Linear Beam Transport System for the LENS 7 MeV Proton Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, William P; Derenchuk, Vladimir Peter; Rinckel, Thomas; Solberg, Keith

    2005-01-01

    A beam transport system has been designed to carry a high-intensity low-emittance proton beam from the exit of the RFQ-DTL acceleration system of the Indiana University Low Energy Neutron System (LENS)* to the neutron production target. The goal of the design was to provide a beam of uniform density over a 3cm by 3cm area at the target. Two octupole magnets** are employed in the beam line to provide the necessary beam phase space manipulations to achieve this goal. First order calculations were done using TRANSPORT and second order calculations have been performed using TURTLE. Second order simulations have been done using both a Gaussian beam distribution and a particle set generated by calculations of beam transport through the RFQ-DTL using PARMILA. Comparison of the design characteristics with initial measurements from the LENS commissioning process will be made.

  4. Reply to the 'Comment on "Proton transport in barium stannate: classical, semi-classical and quantum regime"'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneste, Grégory; Hermet, Jessica; Dezanneau, Guilhem

    2017-08-09

    We respond to the erroneous criticisms about our modeling of proton transport in barium stannate [G. Geneste et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 19104]. In this previous work, we described, on the basis of density-functional calculations, proton transport in the classical and semi-classical regimes, and provided arguments in favor of an adiabatic picture for proton transfer at low temperature. We re-explain here our article (with more detail and precision), the content of which has been distorted in the Comment, and reiterate our arguments in this reply. We refute all criticisms. They are completely wrong in the context of our article. Even though a few of them are based on considerations probably true in some metals, they make no sense here since they do not correspond to the content of our work. It has not been understood in the Comment that two competitive configurations, associated with radically different transfer mechanisms, have been studied in our work. It has also not been understood in the Comment that the adiabatic regime described for transfer occurs in the protonic ground state, in a very-low barrier configuration with the protonic ground state energy larger than the barrier. Serious confusion has been made in the Comment with the case of H in metals like Nb or Ta, leading to the introduction of the notion of (protonic) "excited-state proton transfer", relevant for H in some metals, but (i) that does not correspond to the (ground state) adiabatic transfers here described, and (ii) that does not correspond to what is commonly described as the "adiabatic limit for proton transfer" in the scientific literature. We emphasize, accordingly, the large differences between proton transfer in the present oxide and hydrogen jumps in metals like Nb or Ta, and the similarities between proton transfer in the present oxide and in acid-base solutions. We finally describe a scenario for proton transfer in the present oxide regardless of the temperature regime.

  5. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, L., E-mail: neri@lns.infn.it; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Ciavola, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Torrisi, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile, Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Via Graziella, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, Lund (Sweden); Galatà, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell' università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Patti, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Viale dell' università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Gozzo, A.; Lega, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Informatica e delle Telecomunicazioni, Università degli Studi di Catania, Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  6. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, L; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Mascali, D; Castro, G; Torrisi, G; Cheymol, B; Ponton, A; Galatà, A; Patti, G; Gozzo, A; Lega, L; Ciavola, G

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  7. Transport in Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications-A Systematic Non-Equilibrium Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Cárdenas, Angie L; Koper, Ger J M

    2017-05-25

    We hypothesize that the properties of proton-exchange membranes for fuel cell applications cannot be described unambiguously unless interface effects are taken into account. In order to prove this, we first develop a thermodynamically consistent description of the transport properties in the membranes, both for a homogeneous membrane and for a homogeneous membrane with two surface layers in contact with the electrodes or holder material. For each subsystem, homogeneous membrane, and the two surface layers, we limit ourselves to four parameters as the system as a whole is considered to be isothermal. We subsequently analyze the experimental results on some standard membranes that have appeared in the literature and analyze these using the two different descriptions. This analysis yields relatively well-defined values for the homogeneous membrane parameters and estimates for those of the surface layers and hence supports our hypothesis. As demonstrated, the method used here allows for a critical evaluation of the literature values. Moreover, it allows optimization of stacked transport systems such as proton-exchange membrane fuel cell units where interfacial layers, such as that between the catalyst and membrane, are taken into account systematically.

  8. Transport in Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications—A Systematic Non-Equilibrium Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie L. Rangel-Cárdenas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that the properties of proton-exchange membranes for fuel cell applications cannot be described unambiguously unless interface effects are taken into account. In order to prove this, we first develop a thermodynamically consistent description of the transport properties in the membranes, both for a homogeneous membrane and for a homogeneous membrane with two surface layers in contact with the electrodes or holder material. For each subsystem, homogeneous membrane, and the two surface layers, we limit ourselves to four parameters as the system as a whole is considered to be isothermal. We subsequently analyze the experimental results on some standard membranes that have appeared in the literature and analyze these using the two different descriptions. This analysis yields relatively well-defined values for the homogeneous membrane parameters and estimates for those of the surface layers and hence supports our hypothesis. As demonstrated, the method used here allows for a critical evaluation of the literature values. Moreover, it allows optimization of stacked transport systems such as proton-exchange membrane fuel cell units where interfacial layers, such as that between the catalyst and membrane, are taken into account systematically.

  9. Electrochemical Approach for Analyzing Electrolyte Transport Properties and Their Effect on Protonic Ceramic Fuel Cell Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Nikolay; Lyagaeva, Julia; Vdovin, Gennady; Medvedev, Dmitry; Demin, Anatoly; Tsiakaras, Panagiotis

    2017-08-16

    The design and development of highly conductive materials with wide electrolytic domain boundaries are among the most promising means of enabling solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to demonstrate outstanding performance across low- and intermediate-temperature ranges. While reducing the thickness of the electrolyte is an extensively studied means for diminishing the total resistance of SOFCs, approaches involving an improvement in the transport behavior of the electrolyte membranes have been less-investigated. In the present work, a strategy for analyzing the electrolyte properties and their effect on SOFC output characteristics is proposed. To this purpose, a SOFC based on a recently developed BaCe0.5Zr0.3Dy0.2O3-δ proton-conducting ceramic material was fabricated and tested. The basis of the strategy consists of the use of traditional SOFC testing techniques combined with the current interruption method and electromotive force measurements with a modified polarization-correction assessment. This allows one to determine simultaneously such important parameters as maximal power density; ohmic and polarization resistances; average ion transport numbers; and total, ionic, and electronic film conductivities and their activation energies. The proposed experimental procedure is expected to expand both fundamental and applied basics that could be further adopted to improve the technology of electrochemical devices based on proton-conducting electrolytes.

  10. Proton pump inhibitors inhibit metformin uptake by organic cation transporters (OCTs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne T Nies

    Full Text Available Metformin, an oral insulin-sensitizing drug, is actively transported into cells by organic cation transporters (OCT 1, 2, and 3 (encoded by SLC22A1, SLC22A2, or SLC22A3, which are tissue specifically expressed at significant levels in various organs such as liver, muscle, and kidney. Because metformin does not undergo hepatic metabolism, drug-drug interaction by inhibition of OCT transporters may be important. So far, comprehensive data on the interaction of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs with OCTs are missing although PPIs are frequently used in metformin-treated patients. Using in silico modeling and computational analyses, we derived pharmacophore models indicating that PPIs (i.e. omeprazole, pantoprazole, lansoprazole, rabeprazole, and tenatoprazole are potent OCT inhibitors. We then established stably transfected cell lines expressing the human uptake transporters OCT1, OCT2, or OCT3 and tested whether these PPIs inhibit OCT-mediated metformin uptake in vitro. All tested PPIs significantly inhibited metformin uptake by OCT1, OCT2, and OCT3 in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-maximal inhibitory concentration values (IC(50 were in the low micromolar range (3-36 µM and thereby in the range of IC(50 values of other potent OCT drug inhibitors. Finally, we tested whether the PPIs are also transported by OCTs, but did not identify PPIs as OCT substrates. In conclusion, PPIs are potent inhibitors of the OCT-mediated metformin transport in vitro. Further studies are needed to elucidate the clinical relevance of this drug-drug interaction with potential consequences on metformin disposition and/or efficacy.

  11. Characterization of loxoprofen transport in Caco-2 cells: the involvement of a proton-dependent transport system in the intestinal transport of loxoprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Masaki; Kondo, Ayuko; Furugen, Ayako; Yamada, Takehiro; Takahashi, Natsuko; Iseki, Ken

    2016-11-01

    Loxoprofen, a propionate non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is used widely in East Asian countries. However, little is known about the transport mechanisms contributing to its intestinal absorption. The objectives of this study were to characterize the intestinal transport of loxoprofen using the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. The transport of loxoprofen was investigated in cellular uptake studies. The uptake of loxoprofen into Caco-2 cells was pH- and concentration-dependent, and was described by a Michaelis-Menten equation with passive diffusion (Km : 4.8 mm, Vmax : 142 nmol/mg protein/30 s, and Kd : 2.2 μl/mg protein/30 s). Moreover, the uptake of loxoprofen was inhibited by a typical monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) inhibitor as well as by various monocarboxylates. The uptake of [(14) C] l-lactic acid, a typical MCT substrate, in Caco-2 cells was saturable with relatively high affinity for MCT. Because loxoprofen inhibited the uptake of [(14) C] l-lactic acid in a noncompetitive manner, it was unlikely that loxoprofen uptake was mediated by high-affinity MCT(s). Our results suggest that transport of loxoprofen in Caco-2 cells is, at least in part, mediated by a proton-dependent transport system. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Proton Gradients as a Key Physical Factor in the Evolution of the Forced Transport Mechanism Across the Lipid Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbak, Oliver; Kanuchova, Zuzana; Krafcik, Andrej

    2016-11-01

    A critical phase in the transition from prebiotic chemistry to biological evolution was apparently an asymmetric ion flow across the lipid membrane. Due to imbalance in the ion flow, the early lipid vesicles could selectively take the necessary molecules from the environment, and release the side-products from the vesicle. Natural proton gradients played a definitively crucial role in this process, since they remain the basis of energy transfer in the present-day cells. On the basis of this supposition, and the premise of the early vesicle membrane's impermeability to protons, we have shown that the emergence of the proton gradient in the lipid vesicle could be a key physical factor in the evolution of the forced transport mechanism (pore formation and active transport) across the lipid bilayer. This driven flow of protons across the membrane is the result of the electrochemical proton gradient and osmotic pressures on the integrity of the lipid vesicle. At a critical number of new lipid molecules incorporated into the vesicle, the energies associated with the creation of the proton gradient exceed the bending stiffness of the lipid membrane, and overlap the free energy of the lipid bilayer pore formation.

  13. Proton Gradients as a Key Physical Factor in the Evolution of the Forced Transport Mechanism Across the Lipid Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbak, Oliver; Kanuchova, Zuzana; Krafcik, Andrej

    2016-11-01

    A critical phase in the transition from prebiotic chemistry to biological evolution was apparently an asymmetric ion flow across the lipid membrane. Due to imbalance in the ion flow, the early lipid vesicles could selectively take the necessary molecules from the environment, and release the side-products from the vesicle. Natural proton gradients played a definitively crucial role in this process, since they remain the basis of energy transfer in the present-day cells. On the basis of this supposition, and the premise of the early vesicle membrane's impermeability to protons, we have shown that the emergence of the proton gradient in the lipid vesicle could be a key physical factor in the evolution of the forced transport mechanism (pore formation and active transport) across the lipid bilayer. This driven flow of protons across the membrane is the result of the electrochemical proton gradient and osmotic pressures on the integrity of the lipid vesicle. At a critical number of new lipid molecules incorporated into the vesicle, the energies associated with the creation of the proton gradient exceed the bending stiffness of the lipid membrane, and overlap the free energy of the lipid bilayer pore formation.

  14. Analysis of the proton beam in the DESY transport lines by video readout

    CERN Document Server

    Solodovnik, F; Wittenburg, K

    2000-01-01

    Injection efficiency, beam optic matching and emittance preservation are very important parameters in achieving a high luminosity in large proton accelerators. We improved the analysing system of the phosphor screen readout of the proton transport lines in the accelerator chain of HERA with respect to the parameters above. The screens are read out by simple CCD video cameras. The signals are stored in local frame grabbers. An analogue output of the stored image is multiplexed and read-out by a fast PCI frame grabber card in a PC. The beam orbit and the beam emittance can be measured from each screen. A Visual Basic program is used to displays the trajectory and the envelope of the beam from a single transfer. The same program helps to drive bumps to achieve a proper steering through the line. The beam width can be measured from selected screens to calculate the emittance and other beam parameters including their errors. The read out and analysing system will be described and measurements will be shown.

  15. Effects of Protons and HZE Particles on Glutamate Transport in Astrocytes, Neurons and Mixed Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Martha C.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Green, Lora M.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation-induced neurotoxicity is a well-characterized phenomenon. However, the underlying mechanism of this toxicity is poorly understood. In the central nervous system (CNS), excitotoxic mechanisms are implicated in many neurodegenerative disease processes. Pivotal to the excitotoxic pathway is dysfunction of glutamate signaling. We reported previously that exposure to low-LET γ radiation results in altered glutamate transport in neurons and astrocytes. In the present study, we sought to investigate the effects of various particle radiations of differing LET on glutamate transport as a measure of the neurochemical vulnerability of the CNS. NTera2-derived neurons and astrocytes isolated as pure and mixed cultures were exposed to doses of 10 cGy, 50 cGy or 2 Gy of 250 MeV protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions, or 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions. Transporter function was assessed at 3 h, 2 days and 7days after exposure. Functional assessment of glutamate transport revealed that neurons and astrocytes respond in a reciprocal manner after exposure to particle radiation. Uptake activity in neurons increased after particle irradiation. This effect was evident as late as our last time (7 days) after exposure (P < 0.05). In astrocytes, transporter activity decreased after exposure. The decrease in uptake observed in astrocytes was evident 7 days after exposure to carbon and iron ions. Uptake in mixed cultures after exposure to all three forms of radiation revealed a muted interactive response suggestive of the individual responses of each cellular phenotype acting in opposition. PMID:21128790

  16. Molecular-Level Modeling of the Structure and Proton Transport within the Membrane Electrode Assembly of Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvan, Myvizhi Esai; Keffer, David J.

    The creation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) in the early 1960's attracted great interest with the prospect of serving as a highly efficient and eco-friendly power source. This nascent technology found a broad range of applications spanning from spacecrafts to automobiles and electronic devices. The PEMFC in its simplest form consists of an anode, where the hydrogen fuel is catalytically electro-oxidized (dissociated into protons and electrons), a cathode, where oxygen is catalytically electro-reduced (combined with protons to form water) and a polymer electrolyte membrane, which serves as the structural framework of the cell and transports protons from anode to cathode, while the electrons are forced through the external circuit generating electricity. Today, fuel cell remains one of the most promising means of generating energy from alternative fuels, with tremendous potential to reduce oil dependence and carbon emissions. However, current PEMFCs have a relatively narrow operational range and a high cost of production, thus requiring significant experimental and theoretical research to develop a thorough understanding of this technology (at both the molecular and macroscopic scale), which will ultimately render the fuel cell as an economically viable option.

  17. New insights into the substrate specificities of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters from E. coli by a pH sensitive assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Aduri, Nanda Gowtham; Jensen, Johanne Mørch

    2014-01-01

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters that facilitate di- and tripeptide uptake by coupling it to an inward directed proton electrochemical gradient. Here the substrate specificities of E. coli POTs YdgR, YhiP and YjdL were investigated by means of a la...

  18. Fsy1, the sole hexose-proton transporter characterized in Saccharomyces yeasts, exhibits a variable fructose:H(+) stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Jorge; Rodrigues de Sousa, Helena; Roca, Christophe; Cássio, Fernanda; Luttik, Marijke; Pronk, Jack T; Salema-Oom, Madalena; Gonçalves, Paula

    2013-02-01

    In the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, hexose uptake is mediated exclusively by a family of facilitators (Hxt, hexose transporters). Some other Saccharomyces species (e.g. Saccharomyces bayanus and Saccharomyces pastorianus) possess, in addition, a specific fructose transporter (Fsy1, fructose symporter) that has been previously described to function as a proton symporter. In the present work, we compared growth of a yeast strain in which FSY1 occurs naturally in anaerobic, fructose- and glucose-limited chemostat cultures. Especially at low specific growth rates, fructose-proton symport was shown to have a strong impact on the biomass yield on sugar. We subsequently employed energized hybrid plasma membrane vesicles to confirm previous observations concerning the mode of operation and specificity of Fsy1 mediated transport. Surprisingly, these experiments suggested that the carrier exhibits an unusual fructose:H(+) stoichiometry of 1:2. This energetically expensive mode of operation was also found consistently in vivo, in shake flask and in chemostat cultures, and both when Fsy1 is the sole transporter and when the Hxt carriers are present. However, it is observed only when Fsy1 is operating at higher glycolytic fluxes, a situation that is normally prevented by downregulation of the gene. Taken together, our results suggest the possibility that fructose symport with more than one proton may constitute an energetically unfavorable mode of operation of the Fsy1 transporter that, in growing cultures, is prevented by transcriptional regulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Proton-transport mechanisms in cytochrome c oxidase revealed by studies of kinetic isotope effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ann-Louise; Chakrabarty, Suman; Siöberg, Catrine Berthold; Högbom, Martin; Warshel, Arieh; Brzezinski, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) is a membrane-bound enzyme, which catalyzes the reduction of di-oxygen to water and uses a major part of the free energy released in this reaction to pump protons across the membrane. In the Rhodobacter sphaeroides aa3 CytcO all protons that are pumped across the membrane, as well as one half of the protons that are used for O2 reduction, are transferred through one specific intraprotein proton pathway, which holds a highly conserved Glu286 residue. Key questions that need to be addressed in order to understand the function of CytcO at a molecular level are related to the timing of proton transfers from Glu286 to a “pump site” and the catalytic site, respectively. Here, we have investigated the temperature dependencies of the H/D kinetic-isotope effects of intramolecular proton-transfer reactions in the wild-type CytcO as well as in two structural CytcO variants, one in which proton uptake from solution is delayed and one in which proton pumping is uncoupled from O2 reduction. These processes were studied for two specific reaction steps linked to transmembrane proton pumping, one that involves only proton transfer (peroxy–ferryl, P→F, transition) and one in which the same sequence of proton transfers is also linked to electron transfer to the catalytic site (ferryl–oxidized, F→O, transition). An analysis of these reactions in the framework of theory indicates that that the simpler, P→F reaction is rate-limited by proton transfer from Glu286 to the catalytic site. When the same proton-transfer events are also linked to electron transfer to the catalytic site (F→O), the proton-transfer reactions are gated by a protein structural change, which presumably ensures that the proton-pumping stoichiometry is maintained also in the presence of a transmembrane electrochemical gradient. PMID:21463601

  20. Quantum-mechanical analysis of amino acid residues function in the proton transport during F0F1-ATP synthase catalytic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivontsin, L. A.; Mashkovtseva, E. V.; Nartsissov, Ya R.

    2017-11-01

    Implications of quantum-mechanical approach to the description of proton transport in biological systems are a tempting subject for an overlapping of fundamental physics and biology. The model of proton transport through the integrated membrane enzyme FoF1-ATP synthase responsible for ATP synthesis was developed. The estimation of the mathematical expectation of the proton transfer time through the half-channel was performed. Observed set of proton pathways through the inlet half-channel showed the nanosecond timescale highly dependable of some amino acid residues. There were proposed two types of crucial amino acids: critically localized (His245) and being a part of energy conserving system (Asp119).

  1. Concerted hydrogen-bond dynamics in the transport mechanism of the hydrated proton: a first-principles molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkelbach, Timothy C; Lee, Hee-Seung; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2009-12-04

    First-principles molecular dynamics calculations performed in a fully converged basis set are used to reveal new details about the mechanism of the anomalous proton-transport process in water, a fundamental question dating back over 200 years. By separating actual structural diffusion from simple rattling events, wherein a proton shuttles forth and back in a hydrogen bond, it is found that the former are driven by a concerted mechanism in which hydronium begins to accept a hydrogen bond from a donor water molecule while the proton-receiving water molecule simultaneously loses one of its acceptor hydrogen bonds. The kinetics of the process are found to be in good agreement with recent experiments.

  2. Involvement of a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter in the blood-brain barrier transport of amantadine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toyofumi; Aoyama, Takahiko; Suzuki, Naoto; Kobayashi, Masaru; Fukami, Toshiro; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Tomono, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    The blood-to-brain transport of amantadine, a weak N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, has been shown previously to participate in the cationic drug-sensitive transport system across the mouse blood-brain barrier (BBB). The purpose of the present study was to characterize the influx transport system by means of both an in situ mouse brain perfusion technique and in vitro studies using rat immortalized brain capillary endothelial cells (GPNT). The observed concentration-dependent initial uptake rate of [(3) H]amantadine suggested the involvement of a carrier-mediated transport mechanism. The normal uptake at physiological pH 7.4 was decreased by 72.9% in acidic perfusate, while it was increased by 35.3% in alkaline perfusate. These results suggest that pH-dependent transport is regulated by utilizing an oppositely directed proton gradient as a driving force. In addition, the [(3) H]amantadine uptake was moderately inhibited by the adamantane structural analogs (rimantadine and memantine) and other cationic drugs (pyrilamine, clonidine, nicotine, etc.), but not by substrates or inhibitors of the well-characterized organic cation transporters (tetraethylammonium, l-carnitine and choline). A similar inhibition pattern was observed between the in vivo studies and the in vitro experiments. These results indicate that the influx transport for amantadine across the BBB involves a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Structure and Mechanism of Proton Transport Through the Transmembrane Tetrameric M2 Protein Bundle of the Influenza A Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Acharya; V Carnevale; G Fiorin; B Levine; A Polishchuk; V Balannick; I Samish; R Lamb; L Pinto; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The M2 proton channel from influenza A virus is an essential protein that mediates transport of protons across the viral envelope. This protein has a single transmembrane helix, which tetramerizes into the active channel. At the heart of the conduction mechanism is the exchange of protons between the His37 imidazole moieties of M2 and waters confined to the M2 bundle interior. Protons are conducted as the total charge of the four His37 side chains passes through 2{sup +} and 3{sup +} with a pK{sub a} near 6. A 1.65 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the transmembrane protein (residues 25-46), crystallized at pH 6.5, reveals a pore that is lined by alternating layers of sidechains and well-ordered water clusters, which offer a pathway for proton conduction. The His37 residues form a box-like structure, bounded on either side by water clusters with well-ordered oxygen atoms at close distance. The conformation of the protein, which is intermediate between structures previously solved at higher and lower pH, suggests a mechanism by which conformational changes might facilitate asymmetric diffusion through the channel in the presence of a proton gradient. Moreover, protons diffusing through the channel need not be localized to a single His37 imidazole, but instead may be delocalized over the entire His-box and associated water clusters. Thus, the new crystal structure provides a possible unification of the discrete site versus continuum conduction models.

  4. Improved transport property of proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cell with multi-layered electrolyte structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Toshiaki; Sumi, Hirofumi; Nomura, Katsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Fujishiro, Yoshinobu

    2017-10-01

    A multi-layered electrolyte structure is proposed for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to achieve higher power density and higher open-circuit voltage (OCV). Although recent proton-conducting SOFCs have demonstrated high power density, their OCVs have been lower than that of conventional SOFCs with stabilized zirconia because proton-conducting oxides intrinsically have electron-hole conduction. The proposed electrolyte structure has a porous BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.1Yb0.1O3-δ (BZCYYb) layer deposited on a dense BZCYYb layer. This structure effectively improves both cathode polarization and ionic transport property, resulting in higher power density with higher OCV. Also, discussion based on an equivalent circuit model of proton-conducting SOFCs clearly reveals a mechanism that determines OCV, namely, higher ohmic resistance and lower electrode polarization resistance lead to higher OCV. Our results suggest that higher electrode performance is essential for proton-conducting SOFCs to achieve higher OCV, particularly in the case of anode-supported configurations with thin electrolyte.

  5. Proton transport in water and DNA components: A Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champion, C., E-mail: champion@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Université Bordeaux 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d’Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, CENBG, 33175 Gradignan (France); Incerti, S.; Tran, H.N.; Karamitros, M. [Université Bordeaux 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d’Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, CENBG, 33175 Gradignan (France); Shin, J.I.; Lee, S.B. [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 323 Ilsan-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyan (Korea, Republic of); Lekadir, H. [Laboratoire de Physique Moléculaire et des Collisions, Université de Lorraine (France); Bernal, M. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Francis, Z. [Université Saint Joseph, Science Faculty, Department of Physics, Beirut (Lebanon); Ivanchenko, V. [Ecoanalytica, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation); Fojón, O.A. [Instituto de Física Rosario, CONICET and Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Argentina); Hanssen, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Moléculaire et des Collisions, Université de Lorraine (France); Rivarola, R.D. [Instituto de Física Rosario, CONICET and Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Argentina)

    2013-07-01

    Accurate modeling of DNA damages resulting from ionizing radiation remains a challenge of today’s radiobiology research. An original set of physics processes has been recently developed for modeling the detailed transport of protons and neutral hydrogen atoms in liquid water and in DNA nucleobases using the Geant4-DNA extension of the open source Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit. The theoretical cross sections as well as the mean energy transfers during the different ionizing processes were taken from recent works based on classical as well as quantum mechanical predictions. Furthermore, in order to compare energy deposition patterns in liquid water and DNA material, we here propose a simplified cellular nucleus model made of spherical voxels, each containing randomly oriented nanometer-size cylindrical targets filled with either liquid water or DNA material (DNA nucleobases) both with a density of 1 g/cm{sup 3}. These cylindrical volumes have dimensions comparable to genetic material units of mammalian cells, namely, 25 nm (diameter) × 25 nm (height) for chromatin fiber segments, 10 nm (d) × 5 nm (h) for nucleosomes and 2 nm (d) × 2 nm (h) for DNA segments. Frequencies of energy deposition in the cylindrical targets are presented and discussed.

  6. Secondary Electron Production and Transport Induced by Fast Protons in Thin Foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toburen, L. H.; Friedland, W.; Dingfelder, M.; Ozturk, N.; Christou, C.; DuBois, R. D.; Lapicki, G.; Shinpaugh, J. L.; Drexler, C. G.; Justiniano, E. L. B.; Paretzke, H. G.

    2003-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of charged particle track structure has become an important tool in radiation biology. MC calculations provide detailed spatial information on the production of radiation damage to DNA and other cellular structures. To test the physical parameters used in these models and to explore details of electron transport in condensed matter we have initiated a comparison of MC results to measured doubly differential yields of electrons emitted from thin foils by the passage of fast charged particles. Our initial studies focus on the calculation of differential electron yields resulting from passage of 1-2 MeV protons through thin carbon foils using the MC code PARTRAC developed at the Institute of Radiation Protection — GSF, Neuherberg, Germany. Preliminary calculations are in relatively good agreement with spectra measured for secondary electrons with energies larger than about 50 eV, however large variations are observed for smaller energies. The effects of changes in such parameters as electron mean free path, elastic and inelastic electron scattering cross sections, and foil thickness are illustrated.

  7. Evolution of a beam dynamics model for the transport line in a proton therapy facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rizzoglio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During the conceptual design of an accelerator or beamline, first-order beam dynamics models are essential for studying beam properties. However, they can only produce approximate results. During commissioning, these approximate results are compared to measurements, which will rarely coincide if the model does not include the relevant physics. It is therefore essential that this linear model is extended to include higher-order effects. In this paper, the effects of particle-matter interaction have been included in the model of the transport lines in the proton therapy facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI in Switzerland. The first-order models of these beamlines provide an approximated estimation of beam size, energy loss and transmission. To improve the performance of the facility, a more precise model was required and has been developed with opal (Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library, a multiparticle open source beam dynamics code. In opal, the Monte Carlo simulations of Coulomb scattering and energy loss are performed seamless with the particle tracking. Beside the linear optics, the influence of the passive elements (e.g., degrader, collimators, scattering foils, and air gaps on the beam emittance and energy spread can be analyzed in the new model. This allows for a significantly improved precision in the prediction of beam transmission and beam properties. The accuracy of the opal model has been confirmed by numerous measurements.

  8. A computationally effcient moment-preserving Monte Carlo proton transport method in Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, D. A.; Prinja, A. K.; McCartney, A. P.; Hughes, H. G.

    2017-09-01

    The moment-preserving method, demonstrated as a viable alternative to condensed history for electrons, is extended to protons. Given the generality and the flexibility of the method, a discrete Coulomb scattering and discrete impactionization differential cross-section library for protons was readily developed and existing Geant4 electron discrete process and model classes were extended to make use of the new proton library. It is shown that levels of effciency and accuracy similar to those demonstrated for electrons are obtainable for protons in straight-ahead, energy-loss problems. However, in problems with deflection, agreement is strongly dependent on the proton energy. That is, good agreement was observed in the few MeV range, while unsatisfactory agreement was observed in problems with proton energies above 100-MeV.

  9. The prototypical proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter YdgR from Escherichia coli facilitates chloramphenicol uptake into bacterial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Aduri, Nanda G; Sharma, Neha

    2017-01-01

    Chloramphenicol (Cam) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used to combat bacterial infections in humans and animals. Cam export from bacterial cells is one of the mechanisms by which pathogens resist Cam's antibacterial effects, and several different proteins are known to facilitate this process....... However, to date no report exists on any specific transport protein that facilitates Cam uptake. The proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (POT) YdgR from Escherichia coli is a prototypical member of the POT family, functioning in proton-coupled uptake of di- and tripeptides. By following bacterial...... growth and conducting LC-MS-based assays we show here that YdgR facilitates Cam uptake. Some YdgR variants displaying reduced peptide uptake also exhibited reduced Cam uptake, indicating that peptides and Cam bind YdgR at similar regions. Homology modeling of YdgR, Cam docking, and mutational studies...

  10. Erythromycin and azithromycin transport into Haemophilus influenzae ATCC 19418 under conditions of depressed proton motive force (delta mu H)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capobianco, J.O.; Goldman, R.C. (Abbott Laboratories, IL (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The effect of collapsing the electrochemical proton gradient (delta mu H) on ({sup 3}H)erythromycin and ({sup 14}C)azithromycin transport in Haemophilus influenzae ATCC 19418 was studied. The proton gradient and membrane potential were determined from the distribution of (2-{sup 14}C)dimethadione and rubidium-86, respectively. delta mu H was reduced from 124 to 3 mV in EDTA-valinomycin-treated cells at 22{degrees}C with 150 mM KCl and 0.1 mM carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. During the collapse of delta mu H, macrolide uptake increased. Erythromycin efflux studies strongly suggested that this increase was not due to an energy-dependent efflux pump but was likely due to increased outer membrane permeability. These data indicated that macrolide entry was not a delta mu H-driven active transport process but rather a passive diffusion process.

  11. A fast GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation of proton transport with detailed modeling of nonelastic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Chan Tseung, H; Ma, J; Beltran, C

    2015-06-01

    Very fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of proton transport have been implemented recently on graphics processing units (GPUs). However, these MCs usually use simplified models for nonelastic proton-nucleus interactions. Our primary goal is to build a GPU-based proton transport MC with detailed modeling of elastic and nonelastic proton-nucleus collisions. Using the cuda framework, the authors implemented GPU kernels for the following tasks: (1) simulation of beam spots from our possible scanning nozzle configurations, (2) proton propagation through CT geometry, taking into account nuclear elastic scattering, multiple scattering, and energy loss straggling, (3) modeling of the intranuclear cascade stage of nonelastic interactions when they occur, (4) simulation of nuclear evaporation, and (5) statistical error estimates on the dose. To validate our MC, the authors performed (1) secondary particle yield calculations in proton collisions with therapeutically relevant nuclei, (2) dose calculations in homogeneous phantoms, (3) recalculations of complex head and neck treatment plans from a commercially available treatment planning system, and compared with (GEANT)4.9.6p2/TOPAS. Yields, energy, and angular distributions of secondaries from nonelastic collisions on various nuclei are in good agreement with the (GEANT)4.9.6p2 Bertini and Binary cascade models. The 3D-gamma pass rate at 2%-2 mm for treatment plan simulations is typically 98%. The net computational time on a NVIDIA GTX680 card, including all CPU-GPU data transfers, is ∼ 20 s for 1 × 10(7) proton histories. Our GPU-based MC is the first of its kind to include a detailed nuclear model to handle nonelastic interactions of protons with any nucleus. Dosimetric calculations are in very good agreement with (GEANT)4.9.6p2/TOPAS. Our MC is being integrated into a framework to perform fast routine clinical QA of pencil-beam based treatment plans, and is being used as the dose calculation engine in a clinically

  12. Electrogenic steps of light-driven proton transport in ESR, a retinal protein from Exiguobacterium sibiricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siletsky, Sergey A; Mamedov, Mahir D; Lukashev, Evgeniy P; Balashov, Sergei P; Dolgikh, Dmitriy A; Rubin, Andrei B; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Petrovskaya, Lada E

    2016-11-01

    A retinal protein from Exiguobacterium sibiricum (ESR) functions as a light-driven proton pump. Unlike other proton pumps, it contains Lys96 instead of a usual carboxylic residue in the internal proton donor site. Nevertheless, the reprotonation of the Schiff base occurs fast, indicating that Lys96 facilitates proton transfer from the bulk. In this study we examined kinetics of light-induced transmembrane electrical potential difference, ΔΨ, generated in proteoliposomes reconstituted with ESR. We show that total magnitude of ΔΨ is comparable to that produced by bacteriorhodopsin but its kinetic components and their pH dependence are substantially different. The results are in agreement with the earlier finding that proton uptake precedes reprotonation of the Schiff base in ESR, suggesting that Lys96 is unprotonated in the initial state and gains a proton transiently in the photocycle. The electrogenic phases and the photocycle transitions related to proton transfer from the bulk to the Schiff base are pH dependent. At neutral pH, they occur with τ 0.5ms and 4.5ms. At alkaline pH, the fast component ceases and Schiff base reprotonation slows. At pH8.4, a spectrally silent electrogenic component with τ 0.25ms is detected, which can be attributed to proton transfer from the bulk to Lys96. At pH5.1, the amplitude of ΔΨ decreases 10 fold, reflecting a decreased yield and rate of proton transfer, apparently from protonation of the acceptor (Asp85-His57 pair) in the initial state. The features of the photoelectric potential generation correlate with the ESR structure and proposed mechanism of proton transfer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Function and expression of the proton-coupled amino acid transporter Slc36a1 along the rat gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, M. L.; Holm, Rasmus Koldborg; Tønsberg, H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intestinal absorption via membrane transporters may determine the pharmacokinetics of drug compounds. The hypothesis is that oral absorption of gaboxadol (4, 5, 6, 7-tetrahydroisoxazolo [5,4-c] pyridine-3-ol) in rats occurs via the proton-coupled amino acid transporter, r......: The absorption fraction of gaboxadol was high (81.3-91.3%) following administration in the stomach, duodenum and jejunum, but low (4.2%) after administration in the colon. The pharmacokinetics of gaboxadol was modified by the co-administration of L-tryptophan (a hPAT1 inhibitor) and L-proline (a hPAT1 substrate...

  14. A Deterministic Electron, Photon, Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation Transport Suite for the Study of the Jovian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    A deterministic suite of radiation transport codes, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), which describe the transport of electrons, photons, protons, and heavy ions in condensed media is used to simulate exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons, protons and carbon-oxygen-sulfur (C-O-S) trapped heavy ions in the Jovian radiation environment. The particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron and photon deterministic transport algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light particle and heavy ion deterministic transport algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means for the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, proton and heavy ion radiation exposure assessments in complex space structures. In this paper, the radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Galileo Interim Radiation Electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), the 105 days at Europa mission fluence energy spectra provided by JPL is used to produce the corresponding dose-depth curve in silicon behind an aluminum shield of 100 mils ( 0.7 g/sq cm). The transport suite can also accept ray-traced thickness files from a computer-aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point. In that regard, using a low-fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe, the transport suite was verified by comparing with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for orbits JOI--J35 of the Galileo extended mission (1996-2001). For the upcoming EJSM mission with a potential launch date of 2020, the transport suite is used to compute

  15. Importance of pH Homeostasis in Metabolic Health and Diseases: Crucial Role of Membrane Proton Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Aoi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protons dissociated from organic acids in cells are partly buffered. If not, they are transported to the extracellular fluid through the plasma membrane and buffered in circulation or excreted in urine and expiration gas. Several transporters including monocarboxylate transporters and Na+/H+ exchanger play an important role in uptake and output of protons across plasma membranes in cells of metabolic tissues including skeletal muscle and the liver. They also contribute to maintenance of the physiological pH of body fluid. Therefore, impairment of these transporters causes dysfunction of cells, diseases, and a decrease in physical performance associated with abnormal pH. Additionally, it is known that fluid pH in the interstitial space of metabolic tissues is easily changed due to little pH buffering capacitance in interstitial fluids and a reduction in the interstitial fluid pH may mediate the onset of insulin resistance unlike blood containing pH buffers such as Hb (hemoglobin and albumin. In contrast, habitual exercise and dietary intervention regulate expression/activity of transporters and maintain body fluid pH, which could partly explain the positive effect of healthy lifestyle on disease prognosis.

  16. Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-05

    This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

  17. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumaker, Karen S [Professor

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  18. Can coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjarska, M. S.; Vanninathan, K.; Doyle, J. G.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: The present study aims to provide observational evidence of whether coronal hole spicules reach coronal temperatures. Methods: We combine multi-instrument co-observations obtained with the SUMER/SoHO and with the EIS/SOT/XRT/Hinode. Results: The analysed three large spicules were found to be comprised of numerous thin spicules that rise, rotate, and descend simultaneously forming a bush-like feature. Their rotation resembles the untwisting of a large flux rope. They show velocities ranging from 50 to 250 kms-1. We clearly associated the red- and blue-shifted emissions in transition region lines not only with rotating but also with rising and descending plasmas. Our main result is that these spicules although very large and dynamic, are not present in the spectral lines formed at temperatures above 300 000 K. Conclusions: In this paper we present the analysis of three Ca ii H large spicules that are composed of numerous dynamic thin spicules but appear as macrospicules in lower resolution EUV images. We found no coronal counterpart of these and smaller spicules. We believe that the identification of phenomena that have very different origins as macrospicules is due to the interpretation of the transition region emission, and especially the He ii emission, wherein both chromospheric large spicules and coronal X-ray jets are present. We suggest that the recent observation of spicules in the coronal AIA/SDO 171 Å and 211 Å channels probably comes from the existence of transition region emission there. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, D.; Adams, J.A.; Kinnelly, A.A. [and others

    1997-07-01

    In partial fulfillment of the U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-ACO2-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this conceptual vehicle design report addresses the design and packaging of battery augmented fuel cell powertrain vehicles. This report supplements the {open_quotes}Conceptual Vehicle Design Report - Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes} and includes a cost study of the fuel cell power system. The three classes of vehicles considered in this design and packaging exercise are the same vehicle classes that were studied in the previous report: the Aspire, representing the small vehicle class; the AIV (Aluminum Intensive Vehicle) Sable, representing the mid-size vehicle; and the E-150 Econoline, representing the van-size class. A preliminary PEM fuel cell power system manufacturing cost study is also presented. As in the case of the previous report concerning the {open_quotes}Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes}, the same assumptions are made for the fuel cell power system. These assumptions are fuel cell system power densities of 0.33 kW/ka and 0.33 kW/l, platinum catalyst loading of less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total, and hydrogen tanks containing compressed gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The batteries considered for power augmentation of the fuel cell vehicle are based on the Ford Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) program. These are state-of-the-art high power lead acid batteries with power densities ranging from 0.8 kW/kg to 2 kW/kg. The results reported here show that battery augmentation provides the fuel cell vehicle with a power source to meet instant high power demand for acceleration and start-up. Based on the assumptions made in this report, the packaging of the battery augmented fuel cell vehicle appears to be as feasible as the packaging of the pure fuel cell powered vehicle.

  20. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming; Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  1. A coupled RL and transport model for mixed-field proton irradiation of Al2O3:C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler; Jain, Mayank

    2008-01-01

    Our main approach for in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy treatment and clinical imaging techniques is based on the radioluminescence and optically Stimulated luminescence response from Al2O3:C crystals attached to optical fibres. In contrast to high-energy photon beams, high-LET effects, geometry...... effects and inelastic hadronic scattering occur in proton therapy dosimetry. To investigate these aspects in relation to our system, we have combined simulation of particle transportation with a luminescence generation code based on track structure theory. The model was found to qualitatively reproduce...

  2. Path Integral Treatment of Proton Transport Processes in BaZrO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qianfan; Wahnstrom, Goran; Björketun, Mårten

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear quantum effects on proton transfer and reorientation in BaZrO3 is investigated theoretically using the ab initio path-integral molecular-dynamics simulation technique. The result demonstrates that adding quantum fluctuations has a large effect on, in particular, the transfer barrier. The ...

  3. Transport of amino acids and GABA analogues via the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter, hPAT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mie; Larsen, Birger Brodin; Frølund, Bente

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate transepithelial amino acid transport as a function of Caco-2 cell culture time. Furthermore, the objective was to investigate apical uptake characteristics of hPAT1-mediated transport under various experimental conditions. Apical amino acid uptake......, which has been shown to function as a carboxylic acid bioisostere for substrates of the GABA receptor and transport systems....

  4. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Compression on Water Transport in the Cathode of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional, multicomponent, two-fluid model developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS Inc.) is used to investigate the effect of porous media compression on water transport in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC model only consist of the cathode channel, gas....... Furthermore, the presence of irreducible liquid water is taken into account. In order to account for compression, porous media morphology variations are specified based on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) through-plane strain and intrusion which are stated as a function of compression. These morphology...... diffusion layer, microporous layer, and catalyst layer, excluding the membrane and anode. In the porous media liquid water transport is described by the capillary pressure gradient, momentum loss via the Darcy-Forchheimer equation, and mass transfer between phases by a nonequilibrium phase change model...

  5. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  6. Measured and simulated transport of 1.9 MeV laser-accelerated proton bunches through an integrated test beam line at 1 Hz

    OpenAIRE

    M. Nishiuchi; H. Sakaki; T. Hori; P. R. Bolton; K. Ogura; A. Sagisaka; A. Yogo; M. Mori; S. Orimo; A. S. Pirozhkov; I. Daito; H. Kiriyama; H. Okada; S. Kanazawa; S. Kondo

    2010-01-01

    A laser-driven repetition-rated 1.9 MeV proton beam line composed of permanent quadrupole magnets (PMQs), a radio frequency (rf) phase rotation cavity, and a tunable monochromator is developed to evaluate and to test the simulation of laser-accelerated proton beam transport through an integrated system for the first time. In addition, the proton spectral modulation and focusing behavior of the rf phase rotation cavity device is monitored with input from a PMQ triplet. In the 1.9 MeV region we...

  7. Effect of polymer morphology on proton and water transport through ionomeric polymers. [Perfluorosulfonic ionomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fales, J.L.; Springer, T.E.; Vanderborgh, N.E.; Stroeve, P.

    1985-01-01

    The rate of ionic transport through perfluorosulfonic acid membranes is set by water content within mass transfer channels of the polymer. Consequently, control of water flux is important to control transport rates. Experiments show the influence of cation type on water transport properties and on polymer physical properties. These results support the model that channel geometries are determined by the interaction of coulombic forces within the membrane. Description of these transport processes is accomplished through several mathematical routes.

  8. High field superconducting beam transport in a BNL primary proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allinger, J.; Brown, H.N.; Carroll, A.S.; Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Glenn, J.W.; Jackson, J.; Keith, W.; Lowenstein, D.; Prodell, A.G.

    1979-01-01

    Construction of a slow external beam switchyard at the BNL AGS requires a rapid 20.4/sup 0/ bend in the upstream end of the beam line. Two curved superconducting window dipole magnets, operating at 6.0 T and about 80% of short sample magnetic field, will be utilized with two small superconducting sextupoles to provide the necessary deflection for a 28.5 GeV/c primary proton beam. Because the magnets will operate in a primary proton beam environment, they are designed to absorb large amounts of radiation heating from the beam without quenching. The field quality of the superconducting magnets is extremely good. Computer field calculations indicate a field error, ..delta..B/B/sub 0/, equivalent to approx. = 1 x 10/sup -4/ up to 75% of the 8.26 cm full aperture diameter in the magnet.

  9. Proton transport in functionalised additives for PEM fuel cells: contributions from atomistic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tölle, Pia; Köhler, Christof; Marschall, Roland; Sharifi, Monir; Wark, Michael; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2012-08-07

    The conventional polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) materials for fuel cell applications strongly rely on temperature and pressure conditions for optimal performance. In order to expand the range of operating conditions of these conventional PEM materials, mesoporous functionalised SiO(2) additives are developed. It has been demonstrated that these additives themselves achieve proton conductivities approaching those of conventional materials. However, the proton conduction mechanisms and especially factors influencing charge carrier mobility under different hydration conditions are not well known and difficult to separate from concentration effects in experiments. This tutorial review highlights contributions of atomistic computer simulations to the basic understanding and eventual design of these materials. Some basic introduction to the theoretical and computational framework is provided to introduce the reader to the field, the techniques are in principle applicable to a wide range of other situations as well. Simulation results are directly compared to experimental data as far as possible.

  10. Abscisic acid accumulation modulates auxin transport in the root tip to enhance proton secretion for maintaining root growth under moderate water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weifeng; Jia, Liguo; Shi, Weiming; Liang, Jiansheng; Zhou, Feng; Li, Qianfeng; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of root growth is essential for plant adaptation to soil drying. Here, we tested the hypothesis that auxin transport is involved in mediating ABA's modulation by activating proton secretion in the root tip to maintain root growth under moderate water stress. Rice and Arabidopsis plants were raised under a hydroponic system and subjected to moderate water stress (-0.47 MPa) with polyethylene glycol (PEG). ABA accumulation, auxin transport and plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity at the root tip were monitored in addition to the primary root elongation and root hair density. We found that moderate water stress increases ABA accumulation and auxin transport in the root apex. Additionally, ABA modulation is involved in the regulation of auxin transport in the root tip. The transported auxin activates the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase to release more protons along the root tip in its adaption to moderate water stress. The proton secretion in the root tip is essential in maintaining or promoting primary root elongation and root hair development under moderate water stress. These results suggest that ABA accumulation modulates auxin transport in the root tip, which enhances proton secretion for maintaining root growth under moderate water stress. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Measured and simulated transport of 1.9 MeV laser-accelerated proton bunches through an integrated test beam line at 1 Hz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nishiuchi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A laser-driven repetition-rated 1.9 MeV proton beam line composed of permanent quadrupole magnets (PMQs, a radio frequency (rf phase rotation cavity, and a tunable monochromator is developed to evaluate and to test the simulation of laser-accelerated proton beam transport through an integrated system for the first time. In addition, the proton spectral modulation and focusing behavior of the rf phase rotation cavity device is monitored with input from a PMQ triplet. In the 1.9 MeV region we observe very weak proton defocusing by the phase rotation cavity. The final transmitted bunch duration and transverse profile are well predicted by the PARMILA particle transport code. The transmitted proton beam duration of 6 ns corresponds to an energy spread near 5% for which the transport efficiency is simulated to be 10%. The predictive capability of PARMILA suggests that it can be useful in the design of future higher energy transport beam lines as part of an integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system.

  12. Membrane Na+-pyrophosphatases Can Transport Protons at Low Sodium Concentrations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoto, Heidi H.; Nordbo, Erika; Baykov, Alexander A.; Lahti, Reijo; Malinen, Anssi M.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane-bound Na+-pyrophosphatase (Na+-PPase), working in parallel with the corresponding ATP-energized pumps, catalyzes active Na+ transport in bacteria and archaea. Each ∼75-kDa subunit of homodimeric Na+-PPase forms an unusual funnel-like structure with a catalytic site in the cytoplasmic part and a hydrophilic gated channel in the membrane. Here, we show that at subphysiological Na+ concentrations (transport activity was high at 0.1 mm Na+ but decreased progressively with increasing Na+ concentrations until virtually disappearing at 5 mm Na+. In contrast, 22Na+ transport activity changed little over a Na+ concentration range of 0.05–10 mm. Conservative substitutions of gate Glu242 and nearby Ser243 and Asn677 residues reduced the catalytic and transport functions of the enzyme but did not affect the Na+ dependence of H+ transport, whereas a Lys681 substitution abolished H+ (but not Na+) transport. All four substitutions markedly decreased PPase affinity for the activating Na+ ion. These results are interpreted in terms of a model that assumes the presence of two Na+-binding sites in the channel: one associated with the gate and controlling all enzyme activities and the other located at a distance and controlling only H+ transport activity. The inherent H+ transport activity of Na+-PPase provides a rationale for its easy evolution toward specific H+ transport. PMID:24158447

  13. Membrane Na+-pyrophosphatases can transport protons at low sodium concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoto, Heidi H; Nordbo, Erika; Baykov, Alexander A; Lahti, Reijo; Malinen, Anssi M

    2013-12-06

    Membrane-bound Na(+)-pyrophosphatase (Na(+)-PPase), working in parallel with the corresponding ATP-energized pumps, catalyzes active Na(+) transport in bacteria and archaea. Each ~75-kDa subunit of homodimeric Na(+)-PPase forms an unusual funnel-like structure with a catalytic site in the cytoplasmic part and a hydrophilic gated channel in the membrane. Here, we show that at subphysiological Na(+) concentrations (transport activity was high at 0.1 mM Na(+) but decreased progressively with increasing Na(+) concentrations until virtually disappearing at 5 mM Na(+). In contrast, (22)Na(+) transport activity changed little over a Na(+) concentration range of 0.05-10 mM. Conservative substitutions of gate Glu(242) and nearby Ser(243) and Asn(677) residues reduced the catalytic and transport functions of the enzyme but did not affect the Na(+) dependence of H(+) transport, whereas a Lys(681) substitution abolished H(+) (but not Na(+)) transport. All four substitutions markedly decreased PPase affinity for the activating Na(+) ion. These results are interpreted in terms of a model that assumes the presence of two Na(+)-binding sites in the channel: one associated with the gate and controlling all enzyme activities and the other located at a distance and controlling only H(+) transport activity. The inherent H(+) transport activity of Na(+)-PPase provides a rationale for its easy evolution toward specific H(+) transport.

  14. Structural basis for polyspecificity in the POT family of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyons, Joseph A.; Parker, Joanne L.; Solcan, Nicolae

    2014-01-01

    An enigma in the field of peptide transport is the structural basis for ligand promiscuity, as exemplified by PepT1, the mammalian plasma membrane peptide transporter. Here, we present crystal structures of di‐ and tripeptide‐bound complexes of a bacterial homologue of PepT1, which reveal at least...... that biochemically distinct peptide‐binding sites likely operate within the POT/PTR family of proton‐coupled symporters and suggest that transport promiscuity has arisen in part through the ability of the binding site to accommodate peptides in multiple orientations for transport...

  15. Mechanisms of Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Sun is a mysterious star. The high temperature of the chromosphere and corona present one of the most puzzling problems of solar physics. Observations show that the solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in solar corona.

  16. Transport-Relevant Protein Conformational Dynamics and Water Dynamics on Multiple Timescales in an Archetypal Proton Channel - Insights from Solid-State NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Venkata; Gelenter, Martin D; Hong, Mei

    2018-01-05

    The influenza M2 protein forms a tetrameric proton channel that conducts protons from the acidic endosome into the virion by shuttling protons between water and a transmembrane histidine. Previous NMR studies have shown that this histidine protonates and deprotonates on the microsecond timescale. However, M2's proton conduction rate is 10 - 1000 s-1, more than two orders of magnitude slower than the histidine-water proton-exchange rate. M2 is also known to be conformationally plastic. To address the disparity between the functional timescale and the timescales of protein conformational dynamics and water dynamics, we have now investigated a W41F mutant of the M2 transmembrane domain using solid-state NMR. 13C chemical shifts of the membrane-bound peptide indicate the presence of two distinct tetramer conformations, whose concentrations depend exclusively on pH and hence the charge-state distribution of the tetramers. High-temperature 2D correlation spectra indicate that these two conformations interconvert at a rate of ~400 s-1 when the +2 and +3 charge states dominate, which gives the first experimental evidence of protein conformational motion on the transport timescale. Protein 13C-detected water 1H T2 relaxation measurements show that channel water relaxes an order of magnitude faster than bulk water and membrane-associated water, indicating that channel water undergoes nanosecond motion in a pH-independent fashion. These results connect motions on three timescales to explain M2's proton-conduction mechanism: picosecond-to-nanosecond motions of water molecules facilitate proton Grotthuss hopping, microsecond motions of the histidine sidechain allow water-histidine proton transfer, while millisecond motions of the entire four-helix bundle constitute the rate-limiting step, dictating the number of protons released into the virion.

  17. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport. Progress report, 1 December 1988--31 May 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J.D.

    1991-06-10

    The objective of our research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period, including selenium-containing macrocycles, new crown-4 structures, and several new crown structures containing nitrogen based heterocycles as substituents in the principal macrocyclic ring. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction, and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. It was found that the dual hollow fiber system maintains the cation selectivity and permeability of supported liquid membranes, while enhancing membrane stability. The diffusion limited transport model was expanded to account for membrane solvent effects. Furthermore, Eu{sup 2+} transport was found to be similar to that of strontium and much higher than that of the lanthanides, in supported liquid membrane systems.

  18. Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Kunow, H; Linker, J. A; Schwenn, R; Steiger, R

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that the Sun gravitationally controls the orbits of planets and minor bodies. Much less known, however, is the domain of plasma fields and charged particles in which the Sun governs a heliosphere out to a distance of about 15 billion kilometers. What forces activates the Sun to maintain this power? Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants are the troops serving the Sun during high solar activity periods. This volume offers a comprehensive and integrated overview of our present knowledge and understanding of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants, Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). It results from a series of workshops held between 2000 and 2004. An international team of about sixty experimenters involved e.g. in the SOHO, ULYSSES, VOYAGER, PIONEER, HELIOS, WIND, IMP, and ACE missions, ground observers, and theoreticians worked jointly on interpreting the observations and developing new models for CME initiations, development, and interplanetary propagation. The book provides...

  19. Investigation of the substrate specificity of the proton coupled peptide transporter PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Aduri, Nanda Gowtham; Hald, Helle

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian proton coupled transporter (POT) hPepT1 has been studied intensively due to its role in nutrient and drug absorption in the small intestine. In the absence of a crystal structure of hPepT1, the available structures of bacterial POTs, among which PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis has...

  20. What do proton motive force driven multidrug resistance transporters have in common?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazurkiewicz, P.; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W.N

    2005-01-01

    The extensive progress of genome sequencing projects in recent years has demonstrated that multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters are widely spread among all domains of life. This indicates that they play crucial roles in the survival of organisms. Moreover, antibiotic and chemotherapeutic

  1. The structural basis of proton driven zinc transport by ZntB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gati, Cornelius; Stetsenko, Artem; Slotboom, Dirk; Scheres, Sjors; Guskov, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Zinc is an essential microelement to sustain all forms of life. However, excess of zinc is toxic, therefore dedicated import, export and storage proteins for tight regulation of the zinc concentration have evolved. In Enterobacteriaceae, several membrane transporters are involved in zinc homeostasis

  2. Photosynthetic Electron and Proton Transport in Chloroplasts: EPR Study of ΔpH Generation, an Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2017-12-01

    This is a brief overview focused on the electron paramagnetic resonance applications to the study of the proton transport processes in chloroplasts. After brief description of structural and functional organization of the chloroplast electron transport chain, our attention is focused on the measurements of trans-thylakoid pH difference (ΔpH) with pH-sensitive spin-probes. The use of spin-probes is based either (i) on measuring the ΔpH-partitioning of spin-probes between the thylakoid lumen and external volume, or (ii) on monitoring changes in the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of pH-sensitive nitroxide radicals located in the lumen. Along with the use of spin-probes, the intra-thylakoid pH (pHin) can be determined by the "kinetic" method, which relies on the fact that the rate-limiting step in the chain of photosynthetic electron transfer (plastoquinol oxidation by the cytochrome b 6 f complex) is controlled by pHin. The results of ΔpH determinations in chloroplasts based on the use of pH-sensitive spin-probes and measurements of post-illumination reduction of photoreaction centers of Photosystem I are discussed in the context of the problem of energy coupling in laterally heterogeneous lamellar system of chloroplasts.

  3. The importance of orientation in proton transport of a polymer film based on an oriented self-organized columnar liquid-crystalline polyether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tylkowski, Bartosz; Castelao, Nuria [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paiesos Catalans, 26, E-43007, Tarragona (Spain); Giamberini, Marta, E-mail: marta.giamberini@urv.net [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paiesos Catalans, 26, E-43007, Tarragona (Spain); Garcia-Valls, Ricard [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paiesos Catalans, 26, E-43007, Tarragona (Spain); Reina, Jose Antonio [Departament de Quimica Analitica i Quimica Organica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Carrer Marcel.li Domingo s/n, E-43007, Tarragona (Spain); Gumi, Tania [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paiesos Catalans, 26, E-43007, Tarragona (Spain)

    2012-02-01

    We prepared membranes based on a liquid-crystalline side-chain polyether obtained by chemical modification of commercial poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH) with dendrons. This polymer exhibited a columnar structure, which could form an ion channel in the inner part. The columns were successfully oriented by taking advantage of surface interactions between the polymer and hydrophilic substrates, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and optical microscopy between crossed polars (POM). Column orientation was found to be crucial for effective transport: the oriented membranes exhibited proton transport comparable to that of Nafion Registered-Sign N117 and no water uptake. An increase in sodium ion concentration in the feed phase suggested a proton/cation antiport. On the contrary, no proton transport was detected on unoriented membranes based on the same liquid-crystalline side-chain polyether or on unmodified PECH. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared oriented membranes based on a liquid crystalline columnar polyether. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this structure, the inner polyether chain could work as an ion channel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtained membranes by casting a chloroform solution in the presence of water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Membranes showed good proton permeability due to the presence of oriented channels.

  4. Magnetic fields and coronal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, L.; Maxson, C.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.; Serio, S.

    1980-01-01

    General considerations concerning the scaling properties of magnetic-field-related coronal heating mechanisms are used to build a two-parameter model for the heating of closed coronal regions. The model predicts the way in which coronal temperature and electron density are related to photospheric magnetic field strength and the size of the region, using the additional constraint provided by the scaling law of Rosner, Tucker, and Vaiana. The model duplicates the observed scaling of total thermal energy content with total longitudinal flux; it also predicts a relation between the coronal energy density (or pressure) and the longitudinal field strength modified by the region scale size.

  5. Insights into conformational regulation of PfMATE transporter from Pyrococcus furiosus induced by alternating protonation state of Asp41 residue: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaojie; Shao, Yonghua; Bai, Qifeng; Xue, Weiwei; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-06-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family transporters induce multiple-drug resistance (MDR) of bacterial pathogens and cancer cells, thus causing critical reductions in the therapeutic efficacies of antibiotics and anti-cancer drugs. Unfortunately, to date, the details and intrinsic reason about conformational regulation mechanism of MATE transporters remain elusive. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to explore the conformational regulation mechanism of PfMATE transporter from Pyrococcus furiosus based on different protonation state of Asp41. Two (MD) simulation systems were investigated: a system with protonation of Asp41 and a system without protonation of Asp41, which were named by D184(H)D41(H) system and D184(H) system, respectively. Firstly, MD simulation results indicate that conformational changes mainly happen in extracellular regions of PfMATE protein. Further analysis reveals that PfMATE protein experiences different motion mode and forms different conformation based on different protonation state of Asp41. In the D184(H)D41(H) system, PfMATE experiences an opening motion and forms a more outward-open conformation. As for the D184(H) system, the protein has an anticlockwise rotational motion with the channel axis of protein and the more outward-open conformation does not appear. It can be inferred that protonation of Asp41 is essential for conformational regulation of PfMATE during transporting substrates. These findings provide intrinsic information for understanding the conformational regulation mechanism of PfMATE and will be very meaningful to explore the MDR mechanism of PfMATE further. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Solar Proton Transport within an ICRU Sphere Surrounded by a Complex Shield: Combinatorial Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    The 3DHZETRN code, with improved neutron and light ion (Z (is) less than 2) transport procedures, was recently developed and compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using simplified spherical geometries. It was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in general combinatorial geometry. A more complex shielding structure with internal parts surrounding a tissue sphere is considered and compared against MC simulations. It is shown that even in the more complex geometry, 3DHZETRN agrees well with the MC codes and maintains a high degree of computational efficiency.

  7. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  8. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2017-09-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  9. Solar Proton Transport Within an ICRU Sphere Surrounded by a Complex Shield: Ray-trace Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code with enhanced neutron and light ion (Z is less than or equal to 2) propagation was recently developed for complex, inhomogeneous shield geometry described by combinatorial objects. Comparisons were made between 3DHZETRN results and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at locations within the combinatorial geometry, and it was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in ray-trace geometry. This latest extension enables the code to be used within current engineering design practices utilizing fully detailed vehicle and habitat geometries. Through convergence testing, it is shown that fidelity in an actual shield geometry can be maintained in the discrete ray-trace description by systematically increasing the number of discrete rays used. It is also shown that this fidelity is carried into transport procedures and resulting exposure quantities without sacrificing computational efficiency.

  10. Vitamin D is not linked to folate status and mRNA expression of intestinal proton-coupled folate transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsch, C; Zibolka, J; Frommhagen, M; Lehmann, U; Dierkes, J; Kühne, H; Hirche, F; Stangl, G I

    2014-06-01

    In vitro studies discovered intestinal proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) as a vitamin D hormone-responsive gene. In vivo effects of vitamin D on PCFT and folate status are currently not available. Three experiments were conducted. At first, vitamin D receptor knockout (VDR(-/-)) mice and corresponding wild-type (WT) mice were compared for their plasma and hepatic folate concentration and PCFT mRNA expression in intestinal mucosa. In a second experiment with rats, we analyzed the folate status of offspring in response to a maternal vitamin D-adequate (1,000 IU/kg) or vitamin D-deficient (0 IU/kg) diet that was fed for 11 weeks. Finally, the plasma folate concentration of healthy individuals was studied at baseline (in winter) and in response to an oral treatment for 8 weeks with 2,000 IU vitamin D3 per day or a placebo, respectively. Here, we show that folate status and intestinal PCFT mRNA abundance did not differ between the VDR(-/-) and the WT mice. No effect of vitamin D on folate status was also found in rat dams and their offspring, and plasma folate levels of individuals did not change in response to vitamin D. Current data from studies with model animals and humans provide no indication for a vitamin D effect on intestinal uptake and status of folate.

  11. Geant4 simulations of proton beam transport through a carbon or beryllium degrader and following a beam line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Goethem, M J; van der Meer, R; Reist, H W; Schippers, J M

    2009-10-07

    Monte Carlo simulations based on the Geant4 simulation toolkit were performed for the carbon wedge degrader used in the beam line at the Center of Proton Therapy of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The simulations are part of the beam line studies for the development and understanding of the GANTRY2 and OPTIS2 treatment facilities at PSI, but can also be applied to other beam lines. The simulated stopping power, momentum distributions at the degrader exit and beam line transmission have been compared to accurate benchmark measurements. Because the beam transport through magnetic elements is not easily modeled using Geant4a connection to the TURTLE beam line simulation program was made. After adjusting the mean ionization potential of the carbon degrader material from 78 eV to 95 eV, we found an accurate match between simulations and benchmark measurements, so that the simulation model could be validated. We found that the degrader does not completely erase the initial beam phase space even at low degraded beam energies. Using the validation results, we present a study of the usability of beryllium as a degrader material (mean ionization potential 63.7 eV). We found an improvement in the transmission of 30-45%, depending on the degraded beam energy, the higher value for the lower energies.

  12. A-Site Cation Substitutions in Strained Y-Doped BaZrO3 Multilayer Films Leading to Fast Proton Transport Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruta, Carmela [Univ. of Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Han, Chu [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhou, Si [Dalian Univ. of Technology, Dalian (China); Cantoni, Claudia [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Nan [Univ. of Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Tebano, Antonello [Univ. of Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Lee, Tien -Lin [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Didcot (United Kingdom); Schlueter, Christoph [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Didcot (United Kingdom); Bongiorno, Angelo [College of Staten Island, Staten Island, NY (United States); The Graduate Center of the City Univ. of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Proton-conducting perovskite oxides form a class of solid electrolytes for novel electrochemical devices operating at moderate temperatures. Here, we use hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and density functional theory calculations to investigate the structure and elucidate the origin of the fast proton transport properties of strained ultrathin films of Y-doped BaZrO3 grown by pulsed lased deposition on NdGaO3. Our study shows that our BaZr0.8Y0.2O3 films incorporate a significant amount of Y dopants, and to a lesser extent also Zr ions, substituting for Ba2+, and that these substitutional defects agglomerate forming columnar regions crossing vertically from the surface to the interface the entire film. In conclusion, our calculations also show that, in regions rich in Y substitutions for both Zr and Ba, the proton transfer process involves nearly zero-energy barriers, indicating that A-site cation substitutions by Y lead to fast transport pathways and hence are responsible for the previously observed enhanced values of the proton conductivity of these perovskite oxide films.

  13. Coronal Mass Ejections: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Webb

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar eruptive phenomena embrace a variety of eruptions, including flares, solar energetic particles, and radio bursts. Since the vast majority of these are associated with the eruption, development, and evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, we focus on CME observations in this review. CMEs are a key aspect of coronal and interplanetary dynamics. They inject large quantities of mass and magnetic flux into the heliosphere, causing major transient disturbances. CMEs can drive interplanetary shocks, a key source of solar energetic particles and are known to be the major contributor to severe space weather at the Earth. Studies over the past decade using the data sets from (among others the SOHO, TRACE, Wind, ACE, STEREO, and SDO spacecraft, along with ground-based instruments, have improved our knowledge of the origins and development of CMEs at the Sun and how they contribute to space weather at Earth. SOHO, launched in 1995, has provided us with almost continuous coverage of the solar corona over more than a complete solar cycle, and the heliospheric imagers SMEI (2003 – 2011 and the HIs (operating since early 2007 have provided us with the capability to image and track CMEs continually across the inner heliosphere. We review some key coronal properties of CMEs, their source regions and their propagation through the solar wind. The LASCO coronagraphs routinely observe CMEs launched along the Sun-Earth line as halo-like brightenings. STEREO also permits observing Earth-directed CMEs from three different viewpoints of increasing azimuthal separation, thereby enabling the estimation of their three-dimensional properties. These are important not only for space weather prediction purposes, but also for understanding the development and internal structure of CMEs since we view their source regions on the solar disk and can measure their in-situ characteristics along their axes. Included in our discussion of the recent developments in CME

  14. Development and transition of The Radiation, Interplanetary Shocks, and Coronal Sources (RISCS) Toolset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; Spann, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    We outline a plan to develop and transition a physics based predictive toolset called The Radiation, Interplanetary Shocks, and Coronal Sources (RISCS) to describe the interplanetary energetic particle and radiation environment throughout the inner heliosphere, including at the Earth. To forecast and "nowcast" the radiation environment requires the fusing of three components: 1) the ability to provide probabilities for incipient solar activity; 2) the use of these probabilities and daily coronal and solar wind observations to model the 3D spatial and temporal heliosphere, including magnetic field structure and transients, within 10 AU; and 3) the ability to model the acceleration and transport of energetic particles based on current and anticipated coronal and heliospheric conditions. We describe how to address 1) - 3) based on our existing, well developed, and validated codes and models. The goal of RISCS toolset is to provide an operational forecast and "nowcast" capability that will a) predict solar energetic particle (SEP) intensities; b) spectra for protons and heavy ions; c) predict maximum energies and their duration; d) SEP composition; e) cosmic ray intensities, and f) plasma parameters, including shock arrival times, strength and obliquity at any given heliospheric location and time. The toolset would have a 72 hour predicative capability, with associated probabilistic bounds, that would be updated hourly thereafter to improve the predicted event(s) and reduce the associated probability bounds. The RISCS toolset would be highly adaptable and portable, capable of running on a variety of platforms to accommodate various operational needs and requirements. The described transition plan is based on a well-established approach developed in the Earth Science discipline that ensures that the customer has a tool that meets their needs.

  15. The physics of proton therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Newhauser, Wayne D; ZHANG, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes a...

  16. A functional EXXEK motif is essential for proton coupling and active glucosinolate transport by NPF2.11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Geiger, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    The proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT/PTR) family shares a highly conserved E1X1X2E2RFXYY (E1X1X2E2R) motif across all kingdoms of life. This motif is suggested to have a role in proton coupling and active transport in bacterial homologs. For the plant POT/PTR family, also known......K motif variant in a plant NPF transporter. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based uptake assays and two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) electrophysiology, we demonstrate an essential role for the E1X1X2E2K motif for accumulation of substrate by NPF2.11. Our data suggest...... that the highly conserved E1, E2 and K residues are involved in translocation of protons, as has been proposed for the E1X1X2E2R motif in bacteria. Furthermore, we show that the two residues X1 and X2 in the E1X1X2E2[K/R] motif are conserved as uncharged amino acids in POT/PTRs from bacteria to mammals...

  17. An overview of coronal seismology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moortel, I

    2005-12-15

    The idea of exploiting observed oscillations as a diagnostic tool for determining the physical conditions of the coronal plasma was first suggested several decades ago (Roberts et al. 1984 Astrophys. J. 279, 857). Until recently, the application of this idea has been very limited by a lack of high-quality observations of coronal oscillations. However, during the last few years, this situation has changed dramatically, especially due to space-based observations by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and waves and oscillations have now been observed in a wide variety of solar structures, such as coronal loops, polar plumes and prominences. This paper will briefly summarize MHD wave theory, which forms the basis for coronal seismology, as well as present an overview of the variety of recently observed waves and oscillations in the solar corona. The present state of coronal seismology will also be discussed. Currently, the uncertainty associated with the obtained parameters is still considerable and, hence, the results require a cautious interpretation. However, these examples do show that coronal seismology is rapidly being transformed from a theoretical possibility to a viable technique.

  18. Metabolic targeting of oncogene MYC by selective activation of the proton-coupled monocarboxylate family of transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, L; Xiu, R; Ren, P; Yue, M; Su, H; Guo, G; Xiao, D; Yu, J; Jiang, H; Liu, H; Hu, G; Qing, G

    2016-06-09

    Deregulation of the MYC oncogene produces Myc protein that regulates multiple aspects of cancer cell metabolism, contributing to the acquisition of building blocks essential for cancer cell growth and proliferation. Therefore, disabling Myc function represents an attractive therapeutic option for cancer treatment. However, pharmacological strategies capable of directly targeting Myc remain elusive. Here, we identified that 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a drug candidate that primarily inhibits glycolysis, preferentially induced massive cell death in human cancer cells overexpressing the MYC oncogene, in vitro and in vivo, without appreciable effects on those exhibiting low MYC levels. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of glutamine metabolism synergistically potentiated the synthetic lethal targeting of MYC by 3-BrPA due in part to the metabolic disturbance caused by this combination. Mechanistically, we identified that the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and MCT2, which enable efficient 3-BrPA uptake by cancer cells, were selectively activated by Myc. Two regulatory mechanisms were involved: first, Myc directly activated MCT1 and MCT2 transcription by binding to specific recognition sites of both genes; second, Myc transcriptionally repressed miR29a and miR29c, resulting in enhanced expression of their target protein MCT1. Of note, expressions of MCT1 and MCT2 were each significantly elevated in MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas and C-MYC-overexpressing lymphomas than in tumors without MYC overexpression, correlating with poor prognosis and unfavorable patient survival. These results identify a novel mechanism by which Myc sensitizes cells to metabolic inhibitors and validate 3-BrPA as potential Myc-selective cancer therapeutics.

  19. Heating solar coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1991-01-01

    It has been shown that the coronal hole, and the associated high-speed stream in the solar wind, are powered by a heat input of the order of 500,000 ergs/sq cm s, with most of the heat injected in the first 1-2 solar radii, and perhaps 100,000 ergs/sq cm s introduced at distances of several solar radii to provide the high speed of the issuing solar wind. The traditional view has been that this energy is obtained from Alfven waves generated in the subphotospheric convection, which dissipate as they propagate outward, converting the wave energy into heat. This paper reviews the generation of waves and the known wave dissipation mechanisms, to show that the necessary Alfven waves are not produced under the conditions presently understood to exist in the sun, nor would such waves dissipate significantly in the first 1-2 solar radii if they existed. Wave dissipation occurs only over distances of the order of 5 solar radii or more.

  20. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  1. Plant proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaxiola, Roberto A.; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; Schumacher, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react...

  2. The Coronal Monsoon: Thermal Nonequilibrium Revealed by Periodic Coronal Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchère, Frédéric; Froment, Clara; Soubrié, Elie; Antolin, Patrick; Oliver, Ramon; Pelouze, Gabriel

    2018-02-01

    We report on the discovery of periodic coronal rain in an off-limb sequence of Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images. The showers are co-spatial and in phase with periodic (6.6 hr) intensity pulsations of coronal loops of the sort described by Auchère et al. and Froment et al. These new observations make possible a unified description of both phenomena. Coronal rain and periodic intensity pulsations of loops are two manifestations of the same physical process: evaporation/condensation cycles resulting from a state of thermal nonequilibrium. The fluctuations around coronal temperatures produce the intensity pulsations of loops, and rain falls along their legs if thermal runaway cools the periodic condensations down and below transition-region temperatures. This scenario is in line with the predictions of numerical models of quasi-steadily and footpoint heated loops. The presence of coronal rain—albeit non-periodic—in several other structures within the studied field of view implies that this type of heating is at play on a large scale.

  3. Key aspects of coronal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We highlight 10 key aspects of coronal heating that must be understood before we can consider the problem to be solved. (1) All coronal heating is impulsive. (2) The details of coronal heating matter. (3) The corona is filled with elemental magnetic stands. (4) The corona is densely populated with current sheets. (5) The strands must reconnect to prevent an infinite build-up of stress. (6) Nanoflares repeat with different frequencies. (7) What is the characteristic magnitude of energy release? (8) What causes the collective behaviour responsible for loops? (9) What are the onset conditions for energy release? (10) Chromospheric nanoflares are not a primary source of coronal plasma. Significant progress in solving the coronal heating problem will require coordination of approaches: observational studies, field-aligned hydrodynamic simulations, large-scale and localized three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and possibly also kinetic simulations. There is a unique value to each of these approaches, and the community must strive to coordinate better. PMID:25897094

  4. The physics of proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-04-21

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy.

  5. The physics of proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Zhang, Rui

    2015-04-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy.

  6. The influence of osmotic stress on the content of calcium ions in the red beet vacuoles and on the transport activity of tonoplast proton pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozolina N.V.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The contents of calcium ions in the isolated vacuoles and in intact red beets under the conditions of dormancy and osmotic stress was determined. It is demonstrated that the content of calcium ions in the red beet vacuoles not exposed to osmotic stress makes 13.3% of the total content these ions in intact red beets. Under the conditions of osmotic stress, this indicator increases substantially. Furthermore, under the conditions of hyperosmotic stress, the content of calcium ions in the vacuoles was 30%, while under hypoosmotic stress it was 49% of the total content of these ions in the intact red beet. The transition of calcium ions from the cytoplasm and other compartments into the vacuole under the conditions of osmotic stress is, probably, one of forms of participation of the vacuole in adaptation processes of the plant cell under this kind of abiotic stress. It has been demonstrated for the first time that tonoplast proton pumps, which actively participate in provision of calcium homeostasis in cytoplasm, substantially activate their transport activity under osmotic stress, what allows one to speak about their important role in the cell’s protective programs. Under normal (no stress conditions, artificial elevation of the content of calcium ions led to inhibition of activity of the tonoplast proton pumps, while under gipoosmotic stress the activity of tonoplast proton pumps increased, what might aid to restoring homeoctasis with respect to calcium ions in cytoplasm.

  7. Observational Analysis of Coronal Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpeanu, D.-C.; Rachmeler, L; Mierla, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    Coronal fans (see Figure 1) are bright observational structures that extend to large distances above the solar surface and can easily be seen in EUV (174 angstrom) above the limb. They have a very long lifetime and can live up to several Carrington rotations (CR), remaining relatively stationary for many months. Note that they are not off-limb manifestation of similarly-named active region fans. The solar conditions required to create coronal fans are not well understood. The goal of this research was to find as many associations as possible of coronal fans with other solar features and to gain a better understanding of these structures. Therefore, we analyzed many fans and created an overview of their properties. We present the results of this statistical analysis and also a case study on the longest living fan.

  8. Coronal Mass Ejections An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    In times of growing technological sophistication and of our dependence on electronic technology, we are all affected by space weather. In its most extreme form, space weather can disrupt communications, damage and destroy spacecraft and power stations, and increase radiation exposure to astronauts and airline passengers. Major space weather events, called geomagnetic storms, are large disruptions in the Earth’s magnetic field brought about by the arrival of enormous magnetized plasma clouds from the Sun. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) contain billions of tons of plasma and hurtle through space at speeds of several million miles per hour. Understanding coronal mass ejections and their impact on the Earth is of great interest to both the scientific and technological communities. This book provides an introduction to coronal mass ejections, including a history of their observation and scientific revelations, instruments and theory behind their detection and measurement, and the status quo of theories describing...

  9. Geant4 simulations of proton beam transport through a carbon or beryllium degrader and following a beam line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goethem, M. J.; van der Meer, R.; Reist, H. W.; Schippers, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations based on the Geant4 simulation toolkit were performed for the carbon wedge degrader used in the beam line at the Center of Proton Therapy of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The simulations are part of the beam line studies for the development and understanding of the

  10. Working group 3: Coronal streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Roger A.

    1994-10-01

    The working group on coronal streamers convened on the first day of the 2nd SOHO Workshop, which took place in Marciana Marina, Isola d'Elba, 27 September 1 October 1993. Recent progress in streamer observational techniques and theoretical modeling was reported. The contribution of streamers to the mass and energy supply for the solar wind was discussed. Moreover, the importance of thin electric current sheets for determining both the gross dynamical properties of streamers and the fine-scale filamentary structure within streamers, was strongly emphasized. Potential advances to our understanding of these areas of coronal physics that could be made by the contingent of instruments aboard SOHO were pointed out.

  11. Working group 1: Coronal streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, R. A.

    1994-02-01

    The working group on coronal streamers convened on the first day of the 2nd SOHO Workshop, which took place in Marciana Marina, Isola d'Elba, 27 September--1 October 1993. Recent progress in streamer observational techniques and theoretical modeling was reported. The contribution of streamers to the mass and energy supply for the solar wind was discussed. Moreover, the importance of thin electric current sheets for determining both the gross dynamical properties of streamers and the fine-scale filamentary structure within streamers, was strongly emphasized. Potential advances to our understanding of these areas of coronal physics that could be made by the contingent of instruments aboard SOHO were shown.

  12. Exploring Coronal Structures with SOHO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We applied advanced image enhancement techniques to explore in detail the characteristics of the small-scale structures and/or the low contrast structures in several Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO. We highlight here the results from our studies of the morphology and dynamical evolution of CME ...

  13. Mechanical and transport properties of layer-by-layer electrospun composite proton exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannarino, Matthew M; Liu, David S; Hammond, Paula T; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2013-08-28

    Composite membranes composed of highly conductive and selective layer-by-layer (LbL) films and electrospun fiber mats were fabricated and characterized for mechanical strength and electrochemical selectivity. The LbL component consists of a proton-conducting, methanol-blocking poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride)/sulfonated poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PDAC/sPPO) thin film. The electrospun fiber component consists of poly(trimethyl hexamethylene terephthalamide) (PA 6(3)T) fibers in a nonwoven mat of 60-90% porosity. The bare mats were annealed to improve their mechanical properties, which improvements are shown to be retained in the composite membranes. Spray LbL assembly was used as a means for the rapid formation of proton-conducting films that fill the void space throughout the porous electrospun matrix and create a fuel-blocking layer. Coated mats as thin as 15 μm were fabricated, and viable composite membranes with methanol permeabilities 20 times lower than Nafion and through-plane proton selectivity five and a half times greater than Nafion are demonstrated. The mechanical properties of the spray coated electrospun mats are shown to be superior to the LbL-only system and possess intrinsically greater dimensional stability and lower mechanical hysteresis than Nafion under hydrated conditions. The composite proton exchange membranes fabricated here were tested in an operational direct methanol fuel cell. The results show the potential for higher open circuit voltages (OCV) and comparable cell resistances when compared to fuel cells based on Nafion.

  14. Turbulent resistive heating of solar coronal arches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, G.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that coronal heating occurs by means of anomalous Joule heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is examined, with consideration given to currents running from foot of a loop to the other. It is assumed that self-fields generated by the currents are absent and currents follow the direction of the magnetic field, allowing the plasma cylinder to expand radially. Ion and electron heating rates are defined within the cylinder, together with longitudinal conduction and convection, radiation and cross-field transport, all in terms of Coulomb and turbulent effects. The dominant force is identified as electrostatic ion cyclotron instability, while ion acoustic modes remain stable. Rapid heating from an initial temperature of 10 eV to 100-1000 eV levels is calculated, with plasma reaching and maintaining a temperature in the 100 eV range. Strong heating is also possible according to the turbulent Ohm's law and by resistive heating.

  15. The Sun's Global Photospheric and Coronal Magnetic Fields: Observations and Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Mackay

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review, our present day understanding of the Sun’s global photospheric and coronal magnetic fields is discussed from both observational and theoretical viewpoints. Firstly, the large-scale properties of photospheric magnetic fields are described, along with recent advances in photospheric magnetic flux transport models. Following this, the wide variety of theoretical models used to simulate global coronal magnetic fields are described. From this, the combined application of both magnetic flux transport simulations and coronal modeling techniques to describe the phenomena of coronal holes, the Sun’s open magnetic flux and the hemispheric pattern of solar filaments is discussed. Finally, recent advances in non-eruptive global MHD models are described. While the review focuses mainly on solar magnetic fields, recent advances in measuring and modeling stellar magnetic fields are described where appropriate. In the final section key areas of future research are identified.

  16. A macroscopic model of proton transport through the membrane-ionomer interface of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Milan; Edwards, Brian J.; Paddison, Stephen J.

    2013-02-01

    The membrane-ionomer interface is the critical interlink of the electrodes and catalyst to the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM); together forming the membrane electrode assembly in current state-of-the-art PEM fuel cells. In this paper, proton conduction through the interface is investigated to understand its effect on the performance of a PEM fuel cell. The water containing domains at this interface were modeled as cylindrical pores/channels with the anionic groups (i.e., -SO3-) assumed to be fixed on the pore wall. The interactions of each species with all other species and an applied external field were examined. Molecular-based interaction potential energies were computed in a small test element of the pore and were scaled up in terms of macroscopic variables. Evolution equations of the density and momentum of the species (water molecules and hydronium ions) were derived within a framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The resulting evolution equations for the species were solved analytically using an order-of-magnitude analysis to obtain an expression for the proton conductivity. Results show that the conductivity increases with increasing water content and pore radius, and strongly depends on the separation distance between the sulfonate groups and their distribution on the pore wall. It was also determined that the conductivity of two similar pores of different radii in series is limited by the pore with the smaller radius.

  17. Effects of proton irradiation of the lumbar intumescence on intra-axonal transport of acetylcholine and cholinergic enzymes in rat sciatic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeoej, S.; Dahlstroem, A.; Larsson, P.A.; Rosander, K.; Rosengren, B. (Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Institutionen foer Neurobiologi)

    1980-01-01

    The content and intra-axonal transport of acetylcholine (ACh) and the cholinergic enzymes cholineacetyl-transferase (CAT) and ACh-esterase (AChE) in sciatic nerve were investigated in rats following single dose proton irradiation of the lumbar intumescence of the spinal cord with 60 Gy or 200 Gy. One, 7 or 30 days after irradiation nerve-crush operations were performed 12 hours before killing and the levels of ACh and enzyme activities in nerve segments relative to the crushes were estimated by biologic (ACh) to chemical (enzyme) methods. The results indicate that alterations in intra-neuronal dynamics of ACh and related enzymes are not a major cause for the development of neurologic symptoms of the motor system after irradiation, and that descending myelinated axons are of minor importance for the regulation of cholinergic substances in rat motor nerves.

  18. Vacuolar transport of the medicinal alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus is mediated by a proton-driven antiport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carqueijeiro, Inês; Noronha, Henrique; Duarte, Patrícia; Gerós, Hernâni; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2013-07-01

    Catharanthus roseus is one of the most studied medicinal plants due to the interest in their dimeric terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) vinblastine and vincristine, which are used in cancer chemotherapy. These TIAs are produced in very low levels in the leaves of the plant from the monomeric precursors vindoline and catharanthine and, although TIA biosynthesis is reasonably well understood, much less is known about TIA membrane transport mechanisms. However, such knowledge is extremely important to understand TIA metabolic fluxes and to develop strategies aimed at increasing TIA production. In this study, the vacuolar transport mechanism of the main TIAs accumulated in C. roseus leaves, vindoline, catharanthine, and α-3',4'-anhydrovinblastine, was characterized using a tonoplast vesicle system. Vindoline uptake was ATP dependent, and this transport activity was strongly inhibited by NH4(+) and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine and was insensitive to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter inhibitor vanadate. Spectrofluorimetry assays with a pH-sensitive fluorescent probe showed that vindoline and other TIAs indeed were able to dissipate an H(+) gradient preestablished across the tonoplast by either vacuolar H(+)-ATPase or vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase. The initial rates of H(+) gradient dissipation followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, suggesting the involvement of mediated transport, and this activity was species and alkaloid specific. Altogether, our results strongly support that TIAs are actively taken up by C. roseus mesophyll vacuoles through a specific H(+) antiport system and not by an ion-trap mechanism or ABC transporters.

  19. Vacuolar Transport of the Medicinal Alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus Is Mediated by a Proton-Driven Antiport1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carqueijeiro, Inês; Noronha, Henrique; Duarte, Patrícia; Gerós, Hernâni; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus is one of the most studied medicinal plants due to the interest in their dimeric terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) vinblastine and vincristine, which are used in cancer chemotherapy. These TIAs are produced in very low levels in the leaves of the plant from the monomeric precursors vindoline and catharanthine and, although TIA biosynthesis is reasonably well understood, much less is known about TIA membrane transport mechanisms. However, such knowledge is extremely important to understand TIA metabolic fluxes and to develop strategies aimed at increasing TIA production. In this study, the vacuolar transport mechanism of the main TIAs accumulated in C. roseus leaves, vindoline, catharanthine, and α-3′,4′-anhydrovinblastine, was characterized using a tonoplast vesicle system. Vindoline uptake was ATP dependent, and this transport activity was strongly inhibited by NH4+ and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine and was insensitive to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter inhibitor vanadate. Spectrofluorimetry assays with a pH-sensitive fluorescent probe showed that vindoline and other TIAs indeed were able to dissipate an H+ gradient preestablished across the tonoplast by either vacuolar H+-ATPase or vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase. The initial rates of H+ gradient dissipation followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, suggesting the involvement of mediated transport, and this activity was species and alkaloid specific. Altogether, our results strongly support that TIAs are actively taken up by C. roseus mesophyll vacuoles through a specific H+ antiport system and not by an ion-trap mechanism or ABC transporters. PMID:23686419

  20. The Experimental Measurement of Local and Bulk Oxygen Transport Resistances in the Catalyst Layer of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Cheng, Xiaojing; Lu, Jiabin; Shen, Shuiyun; Yan, Xiaohui; Yin, Jiewei; Wei, Guanghua; Zhang, Junliang

    2017-12-07

    Remarkable progress has been made in reducing the cathodic Pt loading of PEMFCs; however, a huge performance loss appears at high current densities, indicating the existence of a large oxygen transport resistance associated with the ultralow Pt loading catalyst layer. To reduce the Pt loading without sacrificing cell performance, it is essential to illuminate the oxygen transport mechanism in the catalyst layer. Toward this goal, an experimental approach to measure the oxygen transport resistance in catalyst layers is proposed and realized for the first time in this study. The measuring approach involves a dual-layer catalyst layer design, which consists of a dummy catalyst layer and a practical catalyst layer, followed by changing the thickness of dummy layer to respectively quantify the local and bulk resistances via limiting current measurements combined with linear extrapolation. The experimental results clearly reveal that the local resistance dominates the total resistance in the catalyst layer.

  1. Insights into the role of wettability in cathode catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cell; pore scale immiscible flow and transport processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, H.; Raoof, A.; Mansouri, S. H.

    2017-05-01

    The production of liquid water in cathode catalyst layer, CCL, is a significant barrier to increase the efficiency of proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Here we present, for the first time, a direct three-dimensional pore-scale modelling to look at the complex immiscible two-phase flow in CCL. After production of the liquid water at the surface of CCL agglomerates due to the electrochemical reactions, water spatial distribution affects transport of oxygen through the CCL as well as the rate of reaction at the agglomerate surfaces. To explore the wettability effects, we apply hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties using different surface contact angles. Effective diffusivity is calculated under several water saturation levels. Results indicate larger diffusive transport values for hydrophilic domain compared to the hydrophobic media where the liquid water preferentially floods the larger pores. However, hydrophobic domain showed more available surface area and higher oxygen consumption rate at the reaction sites under various saturation levels, which is explained by the effect of wettability on pore-scale distribution of water. Hydrophobic domain, with a contact angle of 150, reveals efficient water removal where only 28% of the pore space stays saturated. This condition contributes to the enhanced available reaction surface area and oxygen diffusivity.

  2. The influence of humidification and temperature differences between inlet gases on water transport through the membrane of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuan-Jen; Hwang, Sheng-Jye; Lai, Wei-Hsiang

    2015-06-01

    This paper discusses the effects of humidification and temperature differences of the anode and cathode on water transport in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Heaters are used to cause a difference in gas temperature between two electrodes before the gases enter the fuel cell. The results show that when the temperature of the cathode is higher than that of the anode, the electro-osmotic drag is suppressed. In contrast, when the temperature of the anode is higher than that of cathode, it is enhanced. These effects are more significant when the temperature difference between the anode and cathode is greater. The same trends are seen with back diffusion. Three cases are tested, and the results show that the suppression due to the temperature difference occurs even when the relative humidity is low at the hotter side. The water transport tendencies of electro-osmotic drag and back diffusion in different situations can be expressed as dominant percentages calculated by the water masses collected at the anode and cathode. The suppression effect due to the temperature difference is relatively insignificant with regard to back diffusion compared to electro-osmosis, so water tends to accumulate on the anode rather than the cathode side.

  3. Study of coupled transport and its effect on different electrochemical systems: Implications in high temperature energy storage batteries and proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Preethy

    Coupled transport is studied on two electrochemical systems: Na-ZnCl 2 batteries and Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC). The energy storage system of interest here is based on sodium β"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE): Na/BASE/ZnCl2. BASE is an excellent Na+ conductor with a very high conductivity at 300°C. Its high Na+ ion conductivity and high stability are the principal reasons for its application in electrochemical storage systems. A novel vapor phase process was invented facilitating the fabrication of high strength and moisture/CO 2 resistant BASE. A two-phase composite of alumiNa+YSZ is formed by sintering and exposed to Na2O vapor, keeping the activity of Na2O lower than that in NaAlO2. This prevents the formation of hygroscopic NaAlO2 at the grain boundaries. A thin layer of β"-alumina is formed on the surface upon exposure. Further reaction occurs by transporting Na+ ions through the formed β"-alumina and a parallel transport of O2- ions through YSZ. This occurs by a coupled transport of Na+ through β"-alumina and O 2- ions through YSZ, thus expediting the process. The second electrochemical system of interest is PEMFC. The degradation mechanism of catalysts is studied using inexpensive copper particles. The mechanism of growth involves a coupled transport of Cu2+ through the aqueous medium and an electron transport through the direct particle-to-particle contact. Effect of applied stress on coarsening of platinum was also investigated. Two platinum wires/foils were immersed in a PtCl4+DMSO (Dimethyl sulfoxide) solution. A tensile load was applied to one wire/foil and the other one was left load-free. The wire/foil subjected to a tensile load became cathodic with respect to the unstressed wire/foil. Thus, under a tensile stress, the chemical potential of Pt decreases. This result suggests design strategies for core-shell catalysts used in PEMFCs: stable core-shell catalysts for PEMFC with Pt shell should be designed such that the shell is

  4. Development of Superconducting Combined Function Magnets for the Proton Transport Line for the J-PARC Neutrino Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Anerella, Michael; Escallier, John; Fujii, T; Fukui, Yuji; Ganetis, George; Gupta, Ramesh C; Harrison, Michael; Hashiguchi, E; Higashi, Norio; Ichikawa, Atsuko; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Jain, Animesh K; Kanahara, T; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Kobayashi, Takashi; Makida, Yasuhiro; Muratore, Joseph F; Obana, Tetsuhiro; Ogitsu, T; Ohhata, Hirokatsu; Okamura, T; Orikasa, T; Parker, Brett; Sasaki, Ken Ichi; Takasaki, Minoru; Tanaka, Ken Ichi; Terashima, Akio; Tomaru, Takayuki; Wanderer, Peter; Yamamoto, Akira

    2005-01-01

    A second generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments has been proposed as one of the main projects at J-PARC jointly built by JAERI and KEK. Superconducting combined function magnets, SCFMs, will be utilized for the 50 GeV, 750 kW proton beam line for the neutrino experiment and an R&D program is in underway at KEK. The magnet is designed to provide a combined function of a dipole field of 2.6 T with a quadrupole field of 19 T/m in a coil aperture of 173.4 mm. A series of 28 magnets in the beam line will be operated DC in supercritical helium cooling below 5 K. A design feature of the SCFM is the left-right asymmetry of the coil cross section: current distributions for superimposed dipole- and quadrupole- fields are combined in a single layer coil. Another design feature is the adoption of glass-fiber reinforced phenolic plastic spacers to replace the conventional metallic collars. To evaluate this unique design, fabrication of full-scale prototype magnets is in progress at KEK and the fi...

  5. Heating of coronal plasma by anomalous current dissipation. [induced by solar magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Golub, L.; Coppi, B.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that there exist heating mechanisms which connect the observed radiative properties of the inner corona in a simple way to the underlying solar magnetic field. The mechanisms considered involve the generation and consequent dissipation of coronal currents. It is argued that the spatially and temporally inhomogeneous nature of the erupting solar magnetic field is an essential element of coronal heating. Unlike heating theories conceived in the context of the 'homogeneous' corona, this class of current heating models incorporates the observed stochastic coronal structuring at the onset, and does not view it as a complication of an otherwise straightforward model. Attention is given to the generation of coronal currents, the flux-tube emergence, the gradual growth and decay of active regions, the energetics of current dissipation, current sheath geometry and heat transport, and anomalous current dissipation.

  6. Intestinal drug transport via the proton-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1 (SLC36A1) is inhibited by Gly-X(aa) dipeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Sidsel; Langthaler, Louise; Kall, Morten A

    2012-01-01

    -Sar as substrates of the amino acid transporter PAT1. The aim of the present study is to investigate if other Gly-containing dipeptides interact with PAT1, and whether they can inhibit PAT1 mediated drug absorption, in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro methods included two-electrode voltage clamp measurements on h......, the present study identifies selected dipeptides as inhibitors of PAT1 mediated drug absorption in various in vitro models....

  7. On the Relation between the In Situ Properties and the Coronal Sources of the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.; Lepri, S. T.; Gilbert, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Raines, J. M.

    2017-09-01

    We categorize the types of solar wind using a new classification scheme based on the location of the wind’s coronal source regions in the solar atmosphere and near-solar heliosphere. We first trace the solar wind measured by ACE/SWEPAM and SWICS from 1998 to 2011 at 1 au back to a 2.5{R}{{s}} solar surface using ballistic mapping at constant proton speed; then we map them back to their magnetic footpoints on the 1{R}{{s}} solar surface via the potential field source surface (PFSS) model. Coronal structures are identified using a classification scheme based on the pixel brightness in the SOHO or STEREO EUV Carrington images. The angular distances between each mapped solar wind footpoint to the different coronal structure pixels are calculated and used as a criterion to identify the type of solar wind source region. Depending on the proximity of the solar wind footpoints to a given coronal or heliospheric structure, we classify the solar wind into six types: active region (AR), AR-boundary, quiet Sun (QS), coronal hole (CH), CH-boundary, and helmet-streamer associated wind. The in situ properties of these six types of solar winds are then examined and compared, and their solar cycle dependences are also discussed.

  8. Research and Development of Proton-Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications: Initial Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-30

    This report addresses Task 1.1, model development and application, and Task 1.2, vehicle mission definition. Overall intent is to produce a methanol-fueled 10-kW power source, and to evaluate electrochemical engine (ECE) use in transportation. Major achievements include development of an ECE power source model and its integration into a comprehensive power source/electric vehicle propulsion model, establishment of candidate FCV (fuel cell powered electric vehicle) mission requirements, initial FCV studies, and a candidate FCV recommendation for further study.

  9. Research and development of Proton-Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications: Initial conceptual design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This report addresses Task 1.1, model development and application, and Task 1.2, vehicle mission definition. Overall intent is to produce a methanol-fueled 10-kW power source and to evaluate electrochemical engine (ECE) use in transportation. Major achievements include development of an ECE power source model and its integration into a comprehensive power source/electric vehicle propulsion model, establishment of candidate FCV (fuel cell powered electric vehicle) mission requirements, initial FCV studies, and a candidate FCV recommendation for further study.

  10. Evolving Coronal Holes and Interplanetary Erupting Stream ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The newborn coronal hole emerges on the Sun, owing to the changes in magnetic field configuration leading to the opening of closed magnetic structure into the corona. The fundamental activity for the onset of an erupting stream seems to be a transient opening of pre-existing closed magnetic structures into a new coronal ...

  11. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 21; Issue 3-4. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties. Ν. Gopalswamy Κ. Shibasaki Μ. Salem. Session X – Cycle Variation in the Quiet Corona & Coronal Holes Volume 21 Issue 3-4 September-December 2000 pp 413-417 ...

  12. Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling for Proton Exchange Membrane(PEM Fuel Cell with Micro Parallel Flow Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soon Hwang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro channel are beingused extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of thefundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype forengineering application. In this study, we used a single-phase, fully three dimensionalsimulation model for PEMFC that can deal with both anode and cathode flow field forexamining the micro flow channel with electrochemical reaction. The results show thathydrogen and oxygen were solely supplied to the membrane by diffusion mechanism ratherthan convection transport, and the higher pressure drop at cathode side is thought to becaused by higher flow rate of oxygen at cathode. And it is found that the amount of water incathode channel was determined by water formation due to electrochemical reaction pluselectro-osmotic mass flux directing toward the cathode side. And it is very important tomodel the back diffusion and electro-osmotic mass flux accurately since the two flux wasclosely correlated each other and greatly influenced for determination of ionic conductivityof the membrane which directly affects the performance of fuel cell.

  13. Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling for Proton Exchange Membrane(PEM) Fuel Cell with Micro Parallel Flow Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pil Hyong; Han, Sang Seok; Hwang, Sang Soon

    2008-03-03

    Modeling and simulation for heat and mass transport in micro channel are beingused extensively in researches and industrial applications to gain better understanding of thefundamental processes and to optimize fuel cell designs before building a prototype forengineering application. In this study, we used a single-phase, fully three dimensionalsimulation model for PEMFC that can deal with both anode and cathode flow field forexamining the micro flow channel with electrochemical reaction. The results show thathydrogen and oxygen were solely supplied to the membrane by diffusion mechanism ratherthan convection transport, and the higher pressure drop at cathode side is thought to becaused by higher flow rate of oxygen at cathode. And it is found that the amount of water incathode channel was determined by water formation due to electrochemical reaction pluselectro-osmotic mass flux directing toward the cathode side. And it is very important tomodel the back diffusion and electro-osmotic mass flux accurately since the two flux wasclosely correlated each other and greatly influenced for determination of ionic conductivityof the membrane which directly affects the performance of fuel cell.

  14. The proton-coupled amino acid transporter hPAT1 is the main transporter involved in vigabatrin uptake in intestinal Caco-2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Hansen, Steen Honore'; Brodin, Birger

    2012-01-01

    transporter hPAT1. The aim of the project was to identify if transporters are involved in cellular uptake of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells. Methods: The uptake rate of vigabatrin was measured in Caco-2 cells at pH 6.0 or 7.4 for 15 min after application of 0.1 – 25.0 mM vigabatrin. The inhibitory effect...... of selected amino acids and -derivatives on the apical vigabatrin uptake in Caco-2 cells was investigated. Vigabatrin samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to a mass selective detector (MSD). Results: The uptake rate of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells was pH-dependent. The uptake...... of vigabatrin was saturable at pH 6.0 with a Michaelis constant, Km of 12.7 ± 3.7 mM and a maximal flux, Jmax of 3.7 ± 0.5 nmol•min-1•cm-2. The presences of hPAT1 ligands significantly inhibited the uptake of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells at pH 6.0, whereas hPAT1 non-ligands did not. Discussion: The saturability...

  15. Effects of various heavy metal nanoparticles on Enterococcus hirae and Escherichia coli growth and proton-coupled membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardanyan, Zaruhi; Gevorkyan, Vladimir; Ananyan, Michail; Vardapetyan, Hrachik; Trchounian, Armen

    2015-10-16

    Due to bacterial resistance to antibiotics there is a need for new antimicrobial agents. In this respect nanoparticles can be used as they have expressed antibacterial activity simultaneously being more reactive compared to their bulk material. The action of zinc (II), titanium (IV), copper (II) and (I) oxides thin films with nanostructured surface and silver nanoscale particles on Enterococcus hirae and Escherichia coli growth and membrane activity was studied by using microbiological, potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods. It was revealed that sapphire base plates with deposited ZnO, TiO2, CuO and Cu2O nanoparticles had no effects neither on E. hirae nor E. coli growth both on agar plates and in liquid medium. Concentrated Ag nanoparticles colloid solution markedly affected bacterial growth which was expressed by changing growth properties. E. hirae was able to grow only at E. coli grew even at 1:10 dilution. At the same time Ag nanoparticles directly affected membranes, as the FOF1-ATPase activity and H(+)-coupled transport was changed either (E. coli were less susceptible to nanoparticles compared to E. hirae). Ag nanoparticles increased H(+) and K(+) transport even in the presence of N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), inhibitor of FOF1. The stoichiometry of DCCD-inhibited ion fluxes was disturbed. These results point out to distinguishing antibacterial effects of Ag nanoparticles on different bacteria; the difference between effects can be explained by peculiarities in bacterial membrane structure and properties. H(+)-K(+)-exchange disturbance by Ag nanoparticles might be involved in antibacterial effects on E. hirae. The role of FOF1 in antibacterial action of Ag nanoparticles was shown using atpD mutant lacked β subunit in F1.

  16. Coronal Mass Ejections travel time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Carlos Roberto; Souza de Mendonça, Rafael Rodrigues; Dal Lago, Alisson; Echer, Ezequiel

    2017-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main source of intense geomagnetic storms when they are earthward directed. Studying their travel time is a key-point to understand when the disturbance will be observed at Earth. In this work, we study the CME that originated the interplanetary disturbance observed on 2013/10/02. According to the observations, the CME that caused the interplanetary disturbance was ejected on 2013/09/29. We obtained the CME speed and estimate of the time of arrival at the Lagrangian Point L1 using the concept of expansion speed. We found that observed and estimated times of arrival of the shock differ between 2 and 23 hours depending on method used to estimate the radial speed.

  17. A statistical mechanical theory of proton transport kinetics in hydrogen-bonded networks based on population correlation functions with applications to acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckerman, Mark E; Chandra, Amalendu; Marx, Dominik

    2010-09-28

    Extraction of relaxation times, lifetimes, and rates associated with the transport of topological charge defects in hydrogen-bonded networks from molecular dynamics simulations is a challenge because proton transfer reactions continually change the identity of the defect core. In this paper, we present a statistical mechanical theory that allows these quantities to be computed in an unbiased manner. The theory employs a set of suitably defined indicator or population functions for locating a defect structure and their associated correlation functions. These functions are then used to develop a chemical master equation framework from which the rates and lifetimes can be determined. Furthermore, we develop an integral equation formalism for connecting various types of population correlation functions and derive an iterative solution to the equation, which is given a graphical interpretation. The chemical master equation framework is applied to the problems of both hydronium and hydroxide transport in bulk water. For each case it is shown that the theory establishes direct links between the defect's dominant solvation structures, the kinetics of charge transfer, and the mechanism of structural diffusion. A detailed analysis is presented for aqueous hydroxide, examining both reorientational time scales and relaxation of the rotational anisotropy, which is correlated with recent experimental results for these quantities. Finally, for OH(-)(aq) it is demonstrated that the "dynamical hypercoordination mechanism" is consistent with available experimental data while other mechanistic proposals are shown to fail. As a means of going beyond the linear rate theory valid from short up to intermediate time scales, a fractional kinetic model is introduced in the Appendix in order to describe the nonexponential long-time behavior of time-correlation functions. Within the mathematical framework of fractional calculus the power law decay ∼t(-σ), where σ is a parameter of the

  18. Memantine transport by a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter in hCMEC/D3 cells, an in vitro human blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Kei; Kitamura, Atsushi; Okura, Takashi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2015-04-01

    Memantine is clinically used for the treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease and is highly distributed to the brain. The aim of this study is to characterize memantine transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) using hCMEC/D3 cells, a human BBB model. The initial uptake velocity of memantine in hCMEC/D3 cells was concentration-dependent, and was reduced by metabolic inhibitors, but was independent of extracellular sodium ion and membrane potential. Intracellular alkalization and intracellular acidification markedly reduced and enhanced the uptake, respectively. The uptake was strongly inhibited by quinidine, pyrilamine and verapamil, and was moderately inhibited by TEA (substrate of OCTs and OCTNs) and l-carnitine (substrate of OCTN2), but was not inhibited by MPP(+) (substrate of OCTs and PMAT) or ergothioneine (substrate of OCTN1). Although relatively abundant expression of OCTN2 gene has been observed in hCMEC/D3 cells, knockdown of OCTN2 with siRNA did not decrease memantine uptake. Memantine and diphenhydramine each showed inhibition of the other's uptake in a competitive manner. Thus, proton-coupled organic cation antiporter(s) appears to be involved in the transport of memantine in hCMEC/D3 cells, at least in part. Our results indicate that the in vivo BBB permeability of memantine in humans can be predicted from the in vitro uptake clearance in hCMEC/D3 cells. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dual Targeting of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Via Folate Receptor α and the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter with 6-Substituted Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine Antifolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhanjun; Gattoc, Leda; O'Connor, Carrie; Yang, Si; Wallace-Povirk, Adrianne; George, Christina; Orr, Steve; Polin, Lisa; White, Kathryn; Kushner, Juiwanna; Morris, Robert T; Gangjee, Aleem; Matherly, Larry H

    2017-05-01

    Folate uptake in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) involves the reduced folate carrier (RFC) and the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT), both facilitative transporters and folate receptor (FR) α. Although in primary EOC specimens, FRα is widely expressed and increases with tumor stage, PCFT was expressed independent of tumor stage (by real-time RT-PCR and IHC). EOC cell line models, including cisplatin sensitive (IGROV1 and A2780) and resistant (SKOV3 and TOV112D) cells, expressed a 17-fold range of FRα and similar amounts (within ∼2-fold) of PCFT. Novel 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine thienoyl antifolates AGF94 and AGF154 exhibited potent antiproliferative activities toward all of the EOC cell lines, reflecting selective cellular uptake by FRα and/or PCFT over RFC. When IGROV1 cells were pretreated with AGF94 at pH 6.8, clonogenicity was potently inhibited, confirming cell killing. FRα was knocked down in IGROV1 cells with lentiviral shRNAs. Two FRα knockdown clones (KD-4 and KD-10) showed markedly reduced binding and uptake of [(3)H]folic acid and [(3)H]AGF154 by FRα, but maintained high levels of [(3)H]AGF154 uptake by PCFT compared to nontargeted control cells. In proliferation assays, KD-4 and KD-10 cells preserved in vitro inhibition by AGF94 and AGF154, compared to a nontargeted control, attributable to residual FRα- and substantial PCFT-mediated uptake. KD-10 tumor xenografts in severe-compromised immune-deficient mice were likewise sensitive to AGF94 Collectively, our results demonstrate the substantial therapeutic potential of novel 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolates with dual targeting of PCFT and FRα toward EOCs that express a range of FRα, along with PCFT, as well as cisplatin resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(5); 819-30. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Research and development of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Phase I final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    Objective during Phase I was to develop a methanol-fueled 10-kW fuel cell power source and evaluate its feasibility for transportation applications. This report documents research on component (fuel cell stack, fuel processor, power source ancillaries and system sensors) development and the 10-kW power source system integration and test. The conceptual design study for a PEM fuel cell powered vehicle was documented in an earlier report (DOE/CH/10435-01) and is summarized herein. Major achievements in the program include development of advanced membrane and thin-film low Pt-loaded electrode assemblies that in reference cell testing with reformate-air reactants yielded performance exceeding the program target (0.7 V at 1000 amps/ft{sup 2}); identification of oxidation catalysts and operating conditions that routinely result in very low CO levels ({le} 10 ppm) in the fuel processor reformate, thus avoiding degradation of the fuel cell stack performance; and successful integrated operation of a 10-kW fuel cell stack on reformate from the fuel processor.

  1. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nisticò

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  2. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  3. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eGibson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  4. Developement of a large proton accelerator for innovative researches; development of low energy high current beam transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, In Soo; Namkung, Won; Cho, M. H.; Kim, K. N.; Kim, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, K. H.; Shim, K. Y. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    We have designed the beam transport system to connect the ion source and the RFQ. In this design, we have finalized the positions of solenoids and various beam diagnostic device. We have finalize the physical and mechanical designs of solenoids, and these designs are already adopted to produce the actual solenoids. We have also studied about EPICS, Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System, to control a stepper motor as a tuner of the RFQ designed for KOMACEPICS is a real time control system for a large scale system such as accelerators and tokamaks. The purpose of this thesis is to establish a test system based on the EPICS. A Sun UtraSPARC 5 workstation is used as the Operator Interface(OPI) console, and a VME chassis contained a Motorola MVME162 single board computer is used as the Input/Output Controller(IOC). A stepper motor controller is connected to the IOC via an RS-232C as a field bus. The EPICS base, extensions, and the real time OS vxWorks are installed on the workstation. The real time OS image can be downloaded to the IOC via the FTP when the test station is started. We have installed an IOC application as a device and driver support layer for the serial communication with an RS-232C on the workstation. We have designed the IOC database configuration files and a graphic user interface style OPI panel which was programmed by the MEDM. With this OPI, we can control the stepper motor using EPICS. 17 refs., 33 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  5. Protonated nitrosamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, H.; Carlsen, L.; Øgaard Madsen, J.

    1994-01-01

    The protonated nitrosamide, NH3NO+, has been generated by chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Although a direct search for this species in ammonia flames has proved negative, fast proton transfer to major flame constituents is supported experimentally as well as by MO calculations....

  6. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy is one of the most precise and advanced forms of radiation treatment available. How Proton Therapy is Delivered The patient is positioned on a table with a head frame or face mask covering the head. As the cyclotron smashes atoms, the protons released are directed toward ...

  7. Space weather and coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Space weather has attracted a lot of attention in recent times. Severe space weather can disrupt spacecraft, and on Earth can be the cause of power outages and power station failure. It also presents a radiation hazard for airline passengers and astronauts. These ""magnetic storms"" are most commonly caused by coronal mass ejections, or CMES, which are large eruptions of plasma and magnetic field from the Sun that can reach speeds of several thousand km/s. In this SpringerBrief, Space Weather and Coronal Mass Ejections, author Timothy Howard briefly introduces the coronal mass ejection, its sc

  8. Energy conversion in the coronal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Solar and stellar X-ray emission are the observed waste products of the interplay between magnetic fields and the motion of stellar plasma. Theoretical understanding of the process of coronal heating is of utmost importance, since the high temperature is what defines the corona in the first place. Most of the research described deals with the aspects of the several rivalling theories for coronal heating. The rest of the papers deal with processes of energy conversion related to flares.

  9. Composition of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbuchen, T. H.; Weberg, M.; von Steiger, R.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Lepri, S. T.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the physical origin of plasmas that are ejected from the solar corona. To address this issue, we perform a comprehensive analysis of the elemental composition of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using recently released elemental composition data for Fe, Mg, Si, S, C, N, Ne, and He as compared to O and H. We find that ICMEs exhibit a systematic abundance increase of elements with first ionization potential (FIP) less than 10 electronvolts, as well as a significant increase of Ne as compared to quasi-stationary solar wind. ICME plasmas have a stronger FIP effect than slow wind, which indicates either that an FIP process is active during the ICME ejection or that a different type of solar plasma is injected into ICMEs. The observed FIP fractionation is largest during times when the Fe ionic charge states are elevated above Q (sub Fe) is greater than 12.0. For ICMEs with elevated charge states, the FIP effect is enhanced by 70 percent over that of the slow wind. We argue that the compositionally hot parts of ICMEs are active region loops that do not normally have access to the heliosphere through the processes that give rise to solar wind. We also discuss the implications of this result for solar energetic particles accelerated during solar eruptions and for the origin of the slow wind itself.

  10. Proton interrogation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  11. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  12. Coronal rain in magnetic bipolar weak fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Fang, X.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We intend to investigate the underlying physics for the coronal rain phenomenon in a representative bipolar magnetic field, including the formation and the dynamics of coronal rain blobs. Methods: With the MPI-AMRVAC code, we performed three dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with strong heating localized on footpoints of magnetic loops after a relaxation to quiet solar atmosphere. Results: Progressive cooling and in-situ condensation starts at the loop top due to radiative thermal instability. The first large-scale condensation on the loop top suffers Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes fragmented into smaller blobs. The blobs fall vertically dragging magnetic loops until they reach low-β regions and start to fall along the loops from loop top to loop footpoints. A statistic study of the coronal rain blobs finds that small blobs with masses of less than 1010 g dominate the population. When blobs fall to lower regions along the magnetic loops, they are stretched and develop a non-uniform velocity pattern with an anti-parallel shearing pattern seen to develop along the central axis of the blobs. Synthetic images of simulated coronal rain with Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly well resemble real observations presenting dark falling clumps in hot channels and bright rain blobs in a cool channel. We also find density inhomogeneities during a coronal rain "shower", which reflects the observed multi-stranded nature of coronal rain. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 7 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Long-duration high-energy proton events observed by GOES in October 1989

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anttila

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available We consider the prolonged injection of the high-energy (>10 MeV protons during the three successive events observed by GOES in October 1989. We apply a solar-rotation-stereoscopy approach to study the injection of the accelerated particles from the CME-driven interplanetary shock waves in order to find out how the effectiveness of the particle acceleration and/or escape depends on the angular distance from the shock axis. We use an empirical model for the proton injection at the shock and a standard model of the interplanetary transport. The model can reproduce rather well the observed intensity–time profiles of the October 1989 events. The deduced proton injection rate is highest at the nose of the shock; the injection spectrum is always harder near the Sun. The results seem to be consistent with the scheme that the CME-driven interplanetary shock waves accelerate a seed particle population of coronal origin.Key words. Interplanetary physics · Energetic particles · Solar physics · astrophysics and astronomy · Flares and mass ejections

  14. Particle Acceleration Due to Coronal Non-null Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threlfall, James; Neukirch, Thomas; Parnell, Clare Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    Various topological features, for example magnetic null points and separators, have been inferred as likely sites of magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration in the solar atmosphere. In fact, magnetic reconnection is not constrained to solely take place at or near such topological features and may also take place in the absence of such features. Studies of particle acceleration using non-topological reconnection experiments embedded in the solar atmosphere are uncommon. We aim to investigate and characterise particle behaviour in a model of magnetic reconnection which causes an arcade of solar coronal magnetic field to twist and form an erupting flux rope, crucially in the absence of any common topological features where reconnection is often thought to occur. We use a numerical scheme that evolves the gyro-averaged orbit equations of single electrons and protons in time and space, and simulate the gyromotion of particles in a fully analytical global field model. We observe and discuss how the magnetic and electric fields of the model and the initial conditions of each orbit may lead to acceleration of protons and electrons up to 2 MeV in energy (depending on model parameters). We describe the morphology of time-dependent acceleration and impact sites for each particle species and compare our findings to those recovered by topologically based studies of three-dimensional (3D) reconnection and particle acceleration. We also broadly compare aspects of our findings to general observational features typically seen during two-ribbon flare events.

  15. Modelling coronal electron density and temperature profiles based on solar magnetic field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Gómez, J. M.; Antunes Vieira, L. E.; Dal Lago, A.; Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Stekel, T.

    2017-10-01

    The density and temperature profiles in the solar corona are complex to describe, the observational diagnostics is not easy. Here we present a physics-based model to reconstruct the evolution of the electron density and temperature in the solar corona based on the configuration of the magnetic field imprinted on the solar surface. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated from Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) based on magnetic field from both observational synoptic charts and a magnetic flux transport model. We use an emission model based on the ionization equilibrium and coronal abundances from CHIANTI atomic database 8.0. The preliminary results are discussed in details.

  16. Sistemas primários de transporte de prótons integram os mecanismos de desintoxicação do mesotrione em plantas de milho Proton transport primary systems used as mechanisms of mesotrione detoxification in corn plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ogliari

    2009-01-01

    ão variaram mais do que 20 a 60% das atividades obtidas em vesículas de membranas oriundas de plantas não tratadas (controle. Os resultados demonstraram que o mesotrione promove uma ativação diferencial dos principais sistemas primários de transporte de H+, indicando que essas bombas iônicas são enzimas transportadoras essenciais aos mecanismos relacionados com o processo de desintoxicação das plantas de milho, possivelmente ao energizar a compartimentalização das moléculas do herbicida mesotrione no vacúolo ou a exceção celular através das membranas plasmáticas.The herbicide Mesotrione herbicides are very effective in the control of a wide range of weeds that infest corn (Zea mays fields. However, the biochemical and molecular bases of corn seedling tolerance to this herbicide have not been established so far. To understand the mechanisms of mesotrione detoxification in corn plants, the activities of the main primary proton (H+ ion transport systems of the vacuolar and plasma membranes (H+-ATPases V- and P-types, and H+-PPase of the cells from different tissues were analyzed, after post-emergence herbicide application. Thus, cell fractionation procedures on root, leaf and mesocotyl tissues were performed using differential membrane vesicle centrifugation and purification in sucrose density gradient. Hydrolytic activities of the proton pumps were measured by using a colorimetric method for phosphate released through enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrates adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP and pyrophosphate (PPi. Photosynthetic parameters were analyzed as physiological markers of the different stages of plant detoxification. Such analysis demonstrated that, three days after herbicide application (DAA, mesotrione induced a reduction in the photosynthetic rate and Fv/Fm ratio, but no significant effect could be found after the fifth DAA. These data suggest that the treatment with mesotrione promoted a spatial and temporal regulation of the H+ pump activities. In all

  17. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Jin Jung [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seunho [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology and UBITA, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chanho [Naraebio Research Laboratories, 177 Dangha-ri, Bongdam-eup, Hawseong-si 445-892 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  18. Coroners and death certification law reform: the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 and its aftermath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Tom

    2010-10-01

    After considering various different options for half a decade, the last Government legislated in 2009 to reform the England and Wales coroner and death certification systems. The Coroners and Justice Act 2009 provides for the creation of a new Chief Coroner post to lead the jurisdiction and for local medical examiners to oversee a new death certification scheme applicable equally to burial and cremation cases. In October 2010 the new Government announced that it judges the main coroner reform to be unaffordable, will not proceed with it and plans to repeal the provisions. It intends to implement the new death certification arrangements, which is welcome. The decision to abort the main coroner reform in spite of longstanding and widespread recognition of the need for major change is deplorable though in line with other failures over the last century to properly modernise this neglected service.

  19. Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    container. It now permits free transit of shipping containers from their western ports, if transported by rail directly to the U.S. ( Mireles , 2005, p...Transportation Industry Study Seminar. Mireles , Richard, Castillo. (2005, January). A Cure for West Coast Congestion. Logistics Today, Vol. 46, Issue 1. 1

  20. Coronal tissue loss in endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A O; Shaba, O P; Dosumu, O O; Ajayi, D M

    2012-12-01

    To categorize the endodontically treated teeth according to the extent of coronal tissue loss in order to determine the appropriate restoration required. A two year descriptive study was done at the Conservative Clinic of the Department of Restorative Dentistry, Dental Centre, University College Hospital, Ibadan. Successful endodontically treated teeth were assessed and categorized according to the extent of tissue loss based on standard criteria proposed by Smith and Schuman. Two hundred and ninety endodontically treated teeth were assessed for success both clinically and radiographically. Eighty (27.6%) were anterior teeth, 78 (26.9%) were premolars while 132 (45.5%) were molars. Dental caries was found to be the most common (61.4%) indication for endodontic treatment and caused more coronal tissue damage (moderate and significant) when compared with other indications for endodontic treatment. Two hundred and twenty seven (78.3%) endodontically treated teeth had moderate coronal tissue loss, 41 (14.1%) had minimal damage while 22 (7.6%) had significant tissue damage. Dental caries was the most common indication for endodontic treatment of the posterior teeth while trauma was the most common indication for the anterior teeth. Majority of the endodontically treated teeth that were evaluated for tissue loss had moderate coronal tissue damage. It is therefore recommended that proper and prompt evaluation of the remaining coronal tooth tissue following successful endodontic treatment be carried out in order to determine the appropriate definitive restoration required that will be easy for the clinician and less expensive to the patients.

  1. Effect of water on the transport properties of protic and aprotic imidazolium ionic liquids - an analysis of self-diffusivity, conductivity, and proton exchange mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghini, N; Nordstierna, L; Martinelli, A

    2014-05-28

    In this paper we report on the transport properties of protic and aprotic ionic liquids of the imidazolium cation (C2C1Im(+) or C2HIm(+)) and the TFSI(-) or TfO(-) anion as a function of added water. We observe that the self-diffusion coefficient of the ionic species increases upon addition of water, and that the cation diffuses faster than the anion in the entire water concentration range investigated. We also observe that the overall increase of anionic and cationic diffusion coefficients is significant for C2HImTfO while it is rather weak for C2C1ImTFSI, the former being more hydrophilic. Moreover, the difference between cationic and anionic self-diffusivity specifically depends on the structure of the ionic liquid's ions. The degree of ion-ion association has been investigated by comparing the molar conductivity obtained by impedance measurements with the molar conductivity calculated from NMR data using the Nernst-Einstein equation. Our data indicate that the ions are partly dissociated (Λimp/ΛNMR in the range 0.45-0.75) but also that the degree of association decreases in the order C2HImTfO > C2HImTFSI ≈ C2C1ImTfO > C2C1ImTFSI. From these results, it seems that water finds different sites of interaction in the protic and aprotic ionic liquids, with a strong preference for hydrogen bonding to the -NH group (when available) and a stronger affinity to the TfO anion as compared to the TFSI. For the protic ionic liquids, the analysis of (1)H NMR chemical shifts (upon addition of H2O and D2O, respectively) indicates a water-cation interaction of hydrogen bonding nature. In addition, we could probe proton exchange between the -NH group and deuterated water for the protic cation, which occurs at a significantly faster rate if associated with the TfO anion as compared to the TFSI.

  2. Density and Morphology of Coronal Prominence Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sarah; Fuller, J.

    2009-05-01

    Coronal prominence cavities are fundamental parts of prominences. They hold clues to the magnetic structure of pre-CME equilibria, and better represent the coronal source of the expanding volume in CMEs and magnetic clouds than a prominence does alone. However, prominence cavities have not been nearly as comprehensively observed and studied as prominences. This is in part due to projection effects which can complicate interpretation of observations, and in part because spectroscopic diagnostic studies require targeted observations, which have only recently been attempted. I will present recent work using white-light observations of cavities to model the morphological and density properties of polar crown filament cavities, with projection effects taken into account. I will also comment on recent attempts to obtain spectral diagnostics of coronal prominence cavities, and will discuss the implications of all of these observations for cavity stability and thermal and magnetic properties.

  3. Free Magnetic Energy and Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Moore, Ron; Falconer, David

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the coronal X-ray luminosity of an active region increases roughly in direct proportion to the total photospheric flux of the active region's magnetic field (Fisher et al. 1998). It is also observed, however, that the coronal luminosity of active regions of nearly the same flux content can differ by an order of magnitude. In this presentation, we analyze 10 active regions with roughly the same total magnetic flux. We first determine several coronal properties, such as X-ray luminosity (calculated using Hinode XRT), peak temperature (calculated using Hinode EIS), and total Fe XVIII emission (calculated using SDO AIA). We present the dependence of these properties on a proxy of the free magnetic energy of the active region

  4. Knowledge of coronal heating and solar-wind acceleration obtained from observations of the solar wind near 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, M.

    1992-01-01

    Clues to the nature of the mechanisms responsible for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind can be obtained by contrasting the properties of the quasi-stationary and transient states of the solar wind. Substantial differences exist in the proton temperatures and anisotropies, the entropy, the field strength, the Alfvenicity of fluctuations in the field, the distribution of MHD discontinuities, and the helium abundance of the two types of flow. Those differences are displayed as a function of the solar wind speed. Several signals of wave acceleration can be found in the data for quasi-stationary flows. The relatively smooth velocity dependences of proton temperature, helium abundance, and frequency of occurrence of rotational discontinuities suggest that the acceleration mechanisms for flow from coronal holes, coronal streamers, and the quasi-stationary low-speed flows between them may be basically the same, differing only in degree.

  5. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramar, M. [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Lin, H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 34 Ohia Ku Street, Pukalani, Maui, HI 96768 (United States); Tomczyk, S., E-mail: kramar@cua.edu, E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: tomczyk@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  6. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic waves in coronal polar plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakariakov, Valery M

    2006-02-15

    Polar plumes are cool, dense, linear, magnetically open structures that arise from predominantly unipolar magnetic footpoints in the solar polar coronal holes. As the Alfvén speed is decreased in plumes in comparison with the surrounding medium, these structures are natural waveguides for fast and slow magnetoacoustic waves. The simplicity of the geometry of polar plumes makes them an ideal test ground for the study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave interaction with solar coronal structures. The review covers recent observational findings of compressible and incompressible waves in polar plumes with imaging and spectral instruments, and interpretation of the waves in terms of MHD theory.

  8. Coronal Fractures of the Scaphoid: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, David J; Herzberg, Guillaume; Shin, Alexander Y; Buijze, Geert A; Ring, David C; Mudgal, Chaitanya S; Leung, Yuen-Fai; Dumontier, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Coronal (or frontal plane) fractures of the scaphoid are distinctly uncommon. There are few published reports of coronal fractures of the scaphoid. This fracture is often missed on the initial X-ray films. A high index of suspicion should exist when there is a double contour of the proximal scaphoid pole on the anteroposterior X-ray view. A computed tomography scan is integral in making the diagnosis. Early recognition is key in salvaging the scaphoid fracture and in preventing articular damage. Level of Evidence IV. Retrospective case series.

  9. Nocturnal Accumulation of Malic Acid Occurs in Mesophyll Tissue without Proton Transport to Epidermal Tissue in the Inducible Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Mesembryanthemum crystallinum1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Klaus; Edwards, Gerald E.; Holtum, Joseph A. M.

    1981-01-01

    The inducible Crassulacean acid metabolism plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, accumulates malic acid, i.e. equivalent amounts of malate anions and protons in the mesophyll cells at night. Levels of malate and titratable acidity are low in the epidermal tissue and do not change significantly during the day/night cycle. This result is in contrast to a recent report (Bloom 1979 Plant Physiol 64: 919-923) that the synthesis of malic acid during dark CO2 fixation is associated with an equivalent exchange of inorganic cations from epidermal tissue with protons in the mesophyll cells. PMID:16661916

  10. Proton therapy - Present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Radhe; Grosshans, David

    2017-01-15

    In principle, proton therapy offers a substantial clinical advantage over conventional photon therapy. This is because of the unique depth-dose characteristics of protons, which can be exploited to achieve significant reductions in normal tissue doses proximal and distal to the target volume. These may, in turn, allow escalation of tumor doses and greater sparing of normal tissues, thus potentially improving local control and survival while at the same time reducing toxicity and improving quality of life. Protons, accelerated to therapeutic energies ranging from 70 to 250MeV, typically with a cyclotron or a synchrotron, are transported to the treatment room where they enter the treatment head mounted on a rotating gantry. The initial thin beams of protons are spread laterally and longitudinally and shaped appropriately to deliver treatments. Spreading and shaping can be achieved by electro-mechanical means to treat the patients with "passively-scattered proton therapy" (PSPT) or using magnetic scanning of thin "beamlets" of protons of a sequence of initial energies. The latter technique can be used to treat patients with optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), the most powerful proton modality. Despite the high potential of proton therapy, the clinical evidence supporting the broad use of protons is mixed. It is generally acknowledged that proton therapy is safe, effective and recommended for many types of pediatric cancers, ocular melanomas, chordomas and chondrosarcomas. Although promising results have been and continue to be reported for many other types of cancers, they are based on small studies. Considering the high cost of establishing and operating proton therapy centers, questions have been raised about their cost effectiveness. General consensus is that there is a need to conduct randomized trials and/or collect outcomes data in multi-institutional registries to unequivocally demonstrate the advantage of protons. Treatment planning and plan

  11. Insights into the role of wettability in cathode catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cell : pore scale immiscible flow and transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fathi, H.; Raoof, A.; Mansouri, S.H.

    2017-01-01

    The production of liquid water in cathode catalyst layer, CCL, is a significant barrier to increase the efficiency of proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Here we present, for the first time, a direct three-dimensional pore-scale modelling to look at the complex immiscible two-phase flow in CCL.

  12. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole M ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-25

    May 25, 2015 ... coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also com- pute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength. 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and ...

  13. Exercising 'Race' Through the Coronation Physical Training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... through their concern with race. The Coronation Physical Training Competition fitted into this agenda. Despite betrayal by the English during the post South African War negotiations, Black political movements and individuals continued seeking means to prove themselves loyal subjects of the King. Black schools therefore ...

  14. Frontoorbital advancement in coronal suture craniosynostosis: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Surgical therapy of coronal craniosynostosis in the modern era has evolved with the adoption of frontoorbital advancement and forehead reshaping to correct the supraorbital rim recession and the abnormal form of the cranium. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of quantitative preoperative ...

  15. Frontoorbital advancement in coronal suture craniosynostosis: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The frontal bone was then removed as indicated. The most lateral aspect of the coronal suture was radically removed with rongeurs, including a part of the greater and lesser wings of the sphenoid bone. The frontal and temporal lobes of the brain were gently repositioned to allow for safe upper orbital osteotomies through ...

  16. Magnetic Topology of Coronal Hole Linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Lionello, R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    In recent work, Antiochos and coworkers argued that the boundary between the open and closed field regions on the Sun can be extremely complex with narrow corridors of open ux connecting seemingly disconnected coronal holes from the main polar holes, and that these corridors may be the sources of the slow solar wind. We examine, in detail, the topology of such magnetic configurations using an analytical source surface model that allows for analysis of the eld with arbitrary resolution. Our analysis reveals three important new results: First, a coronal hole boundary can join stably to the separatrix boundary of a parasitic polarity region. Second, a single parasitic polarity region can produce multiple null points in the corona and, more important, separator lines connecting these points. Such topologies are extremely favorable for magnetic reconnection, because it can now occur over the entire length of the separators rather than being con ned to a small region around the nulls. Finally, the coronal holes are not connected by an open- eld corridor of finite width, but instead are linked by a singular line that coincides with the separatrix footprint of the parasitic polarity. We investigate how the topological features described above evolve in response to motion of the parasitic polarity region. The implications of our results for the sources of the slow solar wind and for coronal and heliospheric observations are discussed.

  17. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Also at Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. (China)

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  18. Microflares as Possible Sources for Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present a preliminary study of 27 microflares observed by Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) mission during July 2003 to August 2006. We found that all 27 microflares show the Fe-line feature peaking around 6.7 keV, which is an indicator of the presence of coronal plasma temperature ≥ 9 MK. On the other hand, the ...

  19. Mechanisms of Coronal Heating S. R. Verma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The Sun is a mysterious star. The high temperature of the chromosphere and corona present one of the most puzzling problems of solar physics. Observations show that the solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in solar ...

  20. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Warmuth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the “classical” interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which “pseudo waves” are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  1. Transportes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidalgo Fernández-Cano, Amalio

    1960-01-01

    Full Text Available El movimiento de materiales dentro de la Factoría está atendido por tres principales medios de transporte, en consonancia con las características del material y de los desplazamientos. Así se han establecido: sistemas de cintas transportadoras, una red ferroviaria de ancho normal y una completa malla de caminos enlazando funcionalmente las instalaciones.

  2. Management of distal humeral coronal shear fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Shahram S; Bowers, Nathan L; Craig, Miguel A; Reichel, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    Coronal shear fractures of the distal humerus are rare, complex fractures that can be technically challenging to manage. They usually result from a low-energy fall and direct compression of the distal humerus by the radial head in a hyper-extended or semi-flexed elbow or from spontaneous reduction of a posterolateral subluxation or dislocation. Due to the small number of soft tissue attachments at this site, almost all of these fractures are displaced. The incidence of distal humeral coronal shear fractures is higher among women because of the higher rate of osteoporosis in women and the difference in carrying angle between men and women. Distal humeral coronal shear fractures may occur in isolation, may be part of a complex elbow injury, or may be associated with injuries proximal or distal to the elbow. An associated lateral collateral ligament injury is seen in up to 40% and an associated radial head fracture is seen in up to 30% of these fractures. Given the complex nature of distal humeral coronal shear fractures, there is preference for operative management. Operative fixation leads to stable anatomic reduction, restores articular congruity, and allows initiation of early range-of-motion movements in the majority of cases. Several surgical exposure and fixation techniques are available to reconstruct the articular surface following distal humeral coronal shear fractures. The lateral extensile approach and fixation with countersunk headless compression screws placed in an anterior-to-posterior fashion are commonly used. We have found a two-incision approach (direct anterior and lateral) that results in less soft tissue dissection and better outcomes than the lateral extensile approach in our experience. Stiffness, pain, articular incongruity, arthritis, and ulnohumeral instability may result if reduction is non-anatomic or if fixation fails. PMID:25984515

  3. Genesis Solar Wind Interstream, Coronal Hole and Coronal Mass Ejection Samples: Update on Availability and Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2017-01-01

    Recent refinement of analysis of ACE/SWICS data (Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer) and of onboard data for Genesis Discovery Mission of 3 regimes of solar wind at Earth-Sun L1 make it an appropriate time to update the availability and condition of Genesis samples specifically collected in these three regimes and currently curated at Johnson Space Center. ACE/SWICS spacecraft data indicate that solar wind flow types emanating from the interstream regions, from coronal holes and from coronal mass ejections are elementally and isotopically fractionated in different ways from the solar photosphere, and that correction of solar wind values to photosphere values is non-trivial. Returned Genesis solar wind samples captured very different kinds of information about these three regimes than spacecraft data. Samples were collected from 11/30/2001 to 4/1/2004 on the declining phase of solar cycle 23. Meshik, et al is an example of precision attainable. Earlier high precision laboratory analyses of noble gases collected in the interstream, coronal hole and coronal mass ejection regimes speak to degree of fractionation in solar wind formation and models that laboratory data support. The current availability and condition of samples captured on collector plates during interstream slow solar wind, coronal hole high speed solar wind and coronal mass ejections are de-scribed here for potential users of these samples.

  4. Progress towards vertical transport study of proton-irradiated InAs/GaSb type-II strained-layer superlattice materials for space-based infrared detectors using magnetoresistance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Mitchell C.; Morath, Christian P.; Fahey, Stephen; Klein, Brianna; Cowan, Vincent M.; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    InAs/GaSb type-II strained-layer superlattice (T2SLS) materials are being considered for space-based infrared detector applications. However, an inadequate understanding of the role of carrier transport, specifically the vertical mobility, in the radiation tolerance of T2SLS detectors remains. Here, progress towards a vertical transport study of proton-irradiated, p-type InAs/GaSb T2SLS materials using magnetoresistance measurements is reported. Measurements in the growth direction of square mesas formed from InAs/GaSb superlattice material were performed using two distinct contact geometries in a Kelvin mode setup at variable magnetic fields, ranging from -9 T to 9 T, and temperatures, ranging from 5 K and 300 K. The results here suggested multi-carrier conduction and a field-dependent series resistance from the contact layer were present. The implications of these results and the plans for future magnetoresistance measurements on proton-irradiated T2SLS materials are discussed.

  5. A Proton-Cyclotron Wave Storm Generated by Unstable Proton Distribution Functions in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, R. T.; Alexander, R. L.; Stevens, M.; Wilson, L. B., III; Moya, P. S.; Vinas, A.; Jian, L. K.; Roberts, D. A.; O’Modhrain, S.; Gilbert, J. A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We use audification of 0.092 seconds cadence magnetometer data from the Wind spacecraft to identify waves with amplitudes greater than 0.1 nanoteslas near the ion gyrofrequency (approximately 0.1 hertz) with duration longer than 1 hour during 2008. We present one of the most common types of event for a case study and find it to be a proton-cyclotron wave storm, coinciding with highly radial magnetic field and a suprathermal proton beam close in density to the core distribution itself. Using linear Vlasov analysis, we conclude that the long-duration, large-amplitude waves are generated by the instability of the proton distribution function. The origin of the beam is unknown, but the radial field period is found in the trailing edge of a fast solar wind stream and resembles other events thought to be caused by magnetic field footpoint motion or interchange reconnection between coronal holes and closed field lines in the corona.

  6. Energy balance in coronal funnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    The energy balance in magnetic flux tubes is examined semianalytically for the case in which thermal conduction balances radiation or in which enthalpy transport occurs. Different values are considered for areal constriction, shape, length, and maximum temperature. The overall energy budget of the solar corona is not significantly affected by magnetic constriction. A bowl-shaped funnel with a constriction factor of 4 describes the empirical differential-emission measure for log-T values between approximately 5.3 and 6.0. Loop-scaling relationships are derived for the full range of models to illustrate the dependence of the constant of proportionality on the properties of the magnetic constriction. Constriction can reduce the total energy requirement of the funnel by a factor of 5 and not affect the differential emission in flow-dominated models.

  7. Liposome Model Systems to Study the Endosomal Escape of Cell-Penetrating Peptides: Transport across Phospholipid Membranes Induced by a Proton Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Madani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Detergent-mediated reconstitution of bacteriorhodopsin (BR into large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs was investigated, and the effects were carefully characterized for every step of the procedure. LUVs were prepared by the extrusion method, and their size and stability were examined by dynamic light scattering. BR was incorporated into the LUVs using the detergent-mediated reconstitution method and octyl glucoside (OG as detergent. The result of measuring pH outside the LUVs suggested that in the presence of light, BR pumps protons from the outside to the inside of the LUVs, creating acidic pH inside the vesicles. LUVs with 20% negatively charged headgroups were used to model endosomes with BR incorporated into the membrane. The fluorescein-labeled cell-penetrating peptide penetratin was entrapped inside these BR-containing LUVs. The light-induced proton pumping activity of BR has allowed us to observe the translocation of fluorescein-labeled penetratin across the vesicle membrane.

  8. Nuclear interaction cross sections for proton radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, M B; Arendse, G J; Cowley, A A; Richter, W A; Lawrie, J J; Newman, R T; Pilcher, J V; Smit, F D; Steyn, G F; Koen, J W; Stander, J A

    1999-01-01

    Model calculations of proton-induced nuclear reaction cross sections are described for biologically-important targets. Measurements made at the National Accelerator Centre are presented for double-differential proton, deuteron, triton, helium-3 and alpha particle spectra, for 150 and 200 MeV protons incident on C, N, and O. These data are needed for Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport and absorbed dose in proton therapy. Data relevant to the use of positron emission tomography to locate the Bragg peak are also described.

  9. A comparative study of divergence cleaning methods of magnetic field in the solar coronal numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueshang eFeng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative study of divergence cleaning methods of magnetic field in the solar coronal three-dimensional numerical simulation. For such purpose, the diffusive method, projection method, generalized Lagrange multiplier method and constrained-transport method are used. All these methods are combined with a finite-volume scheme based on a six-component grid system in spherical coordinates. In order to see the performance between the four divergence cleaning methods, solar coronal numerical simulation for Carrington rotation 2056 has been studied. Numerical results show that the average relative divergence error is around $10^{-4.5}$ for the constrained-transport method, while about $10^{-3.1}- 10^{-3.6}$ for the other three methods. Although there exist some differences in the average relative divergence errors for the four employed methods, our tests show they can all produce basic structured solar wind.

  10. Suprathermal oxygen atoms in the Martian upper atmosphere: Contribution of the proton and hydrogen atom precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, V. I.

    2017-07-01

    This is a study of the kinetics and transport of hot oxygen atoms in the transition region (from the thermosphere to the exosphere) of the Martian upper atmosphere. It is assumed that the source of the hot oxygen atoms is the transfer of momentum and energy in elastic collisions between thermal atmospheric oxygen atoms and the high-energy protons and hydrogen atoms precipitating onto the Martian upper atmosphere from the solar-wind plasma. The distribution functions of suprathermal oxygen atoms by the kinetic energy are calculated. It is shown that the exosphere is populated by a large number of suprathermal oxygen atoms with kinetic energies up to the escape energy 2 eV; i.e., a hot oxygen corona is formed around Mars. The transfer of energy from the precipitating solar-wind plasma protons and hydrogen atoms to the thermal oxygen atoms leads to the formation of an additional nonthermal escape flux of atomic oxygen from the Martian atmosphere. The precipitation-induced escape flux of hot oxygen atoms may become dominant under the conditions of extreme solar events, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, as shown by recent observations onboard NASA's MAVEN spacecraft (Jakosky et al., 2015).

  11. ROLE OF THE CORONAL ALFVÉN SPEED IN MODULATING THE SOLAR-WIND HELIUM ABUNDANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.-M., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The helium abundance He/H in the solar wind is relatively constant at ∼0.04 in high-speed streams, but varies in phase with the sunspot number in slow wind, from ∼0.01 at solar minimum to ∼0.04 at maximum. Suggested mechanisms for helium fractionation have included frictional coupling to protons and resonant interactions with high-frequency Alfvénic fluctuations. We compare He/H measurements during 1995–2015 with coronal parameters derived from source-surface extrapolations of photospheric field maps. We find that the near-Earth helium abundance is an increasing function of the magnetic field strength and Alfvén speed v {sub A} in the outer corona, while being only weakly correlated with the proton flux density. Throughout the solar cycle, fast wind is associated with short-term increases in v {sub A} near the source surface; resonance with Alfvén waves, with v {sub A} and the relative speed of α -particles and protons decreasing with increasing heliocentric distance, may then lead to enhanced He/H at 1 au. The modulation of helium in slow wind reflects the tendency for the associated coronal Alfvén speeds to rise steeply from sunspot minimum, when this wind is concentrated around the source-surface neutral line, to sunspot maximum, when the source-surface field attains its peak strengths. The helium abundance near the source surface may represent a balance between collisional decoupling from protons and Alfvén wave acceleration.

  12. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Patsourakos, S.; Pariat, E.; Young, P. R.; Sterling, A.; Savcheva, A.; Shimojo, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Devore, C. R.; Archontis, V.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Chromospheric and coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of signicant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of nominal solar ares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these major phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients closeor at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broadrange of solar-heliospheric problems.

  13. Plasma Heating During the Parametric Excitation of Acoustic Waves in Coronal Magnetic Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Kislyakova, K. G.

    When studying microwave emission of active regions on the Sun, an effect of parametric resonance between 5-min velocity oscillations in the solar photosphere and sound oscillations of coronal magnetic loops modulating the microwave emission has been discovered for the first time. The effect shows itself as simultaneous excitation in coronal magnetic loop oscillations with periods 5, 10, and 3 min, which correspond to the pumping frequency, subharmonic, and the first upper frequency of parametric resonance. The parametric resonance can serve as an effective channel of transporting the energy of photospheric oscillations into the upper layers of the solar atmosphere. The energy of acoustic waves excited in a coronal magnetic loop, rate of dissipation of acoustic waves, and rate of heating of the coronal plasma are determined. The maximum temperature predicted for the apex of the loop is calculated as a function of velocity of photospheric oscillations, length of the loop, and electric current in the loop. It is shown that the mechanism proposed can explain the origin of quasi-stationary X-ray loops with temperatures of 3-6 MK. The lengths of these loops are resonant for acoustic waves excited by the 5-min photospheric oscillations. The use of the proposed mechanism to explain heating of the X-ray loops expected to be on stars of late spectral types is discussed.

  14. Proton scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, Gregory H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    This note presents analytic estimates of the performance of proton beams in remote surveillance for nuclear materials. The analysis partitions the analysis into the eight steps used by a companion note: (1) Air scattering, (2) Neutron production in the ship and cargo, (3) Target detection probability, (4) Signal produced by target, (5) Attenuation of signal by ship and cargo, (6) Attenuation of signal by air, (7) Geometric dilution, and (8) Detector Efficiency. The above analyses indicate that the dominant air scattering and loss mechanisms for particle remote sensing are calculable with reliable and accepted tools. They make it clear that the conversion of proton beams into neutron sources rapidly goes to completion in all but thinnest targets, which means that proton interrogation is for all purposes executed by neutrons. Diffusion models and limiting approximations to them are simple and credible - apart from uncertainty over the cross sections to be used in them - and uncertainty over the structure of the vessels investigated. Multiplication is essentially unknown, in part because it depends on the details of the target and its shielding, which are unlikely to be known in advance. Attenuation of neutron fluxes on the way out are more complicated due to geometry, the spectrum of fission neutrons, and the details of their slowing down during egress. The attenuation by air is large but less uncertain. Detectors and technology are better known. The overall convolution of these effects lead to large but arguably tolerable levels of attenuation of input beams and output signals. That is particularly the case for small, mobile sensors, which can more than compensate for size with proximity to operate reliably while remaining below flux limits. Overall, the estimates used here appear to be of adequate accuracy for decisions. That assessment is strengthened by their agreement with companion calculations.

  15. A Survey of Coronal Cavity Density Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-08-01

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 R sun and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 R sun than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height—indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions—except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  16. Coronal Heating Observed with Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    The recent launch of the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) as a sounding rocket has offered a new, different view of the Sun. With approx 0.3" resolution and 5 second cadence, Hi-C reveals dynamic, small-scale structure within a complicated active region, including coronal braiding, reconnection regions, Alfven waves, and flows along active region fans. By combining the Hi-C data with other available data, we have compiled a rich data set that can be used to address many outstanding questions in solar physics. Though the Hi-C rocket flight was short (only 5 minutes), the added insight of the small-scale structure gained from the Hi-C data allows us to look at this active region and other active regions with new understanding. In this talk, I will review the first results from the Hi-C sounding rocket and discuss the impact of these results on the coronal heating problem.

  17. Observing the Unobservable? Modeling Coronal Cavity Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.; de Toma, G.; Fan, Y.

    2008-05-01

    Prominence cavities in coronal helmet streamers are readily detectable in white-light coronagraph images, yet their interpretation may be complicated by projection effects. In order to determine a cavity's density structure, it is essential to quantify the contribution of noncavity features along the line of sight. We model the coronal cavity as an axisymmetric torus that encircles the Sun at constant latitude and fit it to observations of a white-light cavity observed by the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) MK4 coronagraph from 2006 January 25 to 30. We demonstrate that spurious noncavity contributions (including departures from axisymmetry) are minimal enough to be incorporated in a density analysis as conservatively estimated uncertainties in the data. We calculate a radial density profile for cavity material and for the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the "cavity rim") and find that the cavity density is depleted by a maximum of 40% compared to the surrounding helmet streamer at low altitudes (1.18 R⊙) but is consistently higher (double or more) than in coronal holes. We also find that the relative density depletion between cavity and surrounding helmet decreases as a function of height. We show that both increased temperature in the cavity relative to the surrounding helmet streamer and a magnetic flux rope configuration might lead to such a flattened density profile. Finally, our model provides general observational guidelines that can be used to determine when a cavity is sufficiently unobstructed to be a good candidate for plasma diagnostics.

  18. Interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament into the medial compartment of the knee joint on coronal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Yoon, Young Cheol; Park, Ki Jeong; Wang, Joon Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bong Keun [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the overall prevalence and clinical significance of interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) into the medial compartment of the knee joint in coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We retrospectively reviewed 317 consecutive patients referred for knee MRI at our institution between October 2009 and December 2009. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint on proton coronal MRI was evaluated dichotomously (i.e., present or absent). We analyzed the interposition according to its prevalence as well as its relationship with right-left sidedness, gender, age, and disease categories (osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament tear, and medial meniscus tear). Prevalence of interposition of PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint was 47.0% (149/317). There was no right (50.0%, 83/166) to left (43.7%, 66/151) or male (50.3%, 87/173) to female (43.1%, 62/144) differences in the prevalence. There was no significant association between the prevalence and age, or the disease categories. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint is observed in almost half of patients on proton coronal MRI of the knee. Its presence is not associated with any particular factors including knee pathology and may be regarded as a normal MR finding.

  19. Transequatorial Coronal Cloud Prominences Versus Transequatorial Channel Prominence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S. F.; Daga, K.

    2016-12-01

    Seven transequatorial channel prominences were identified in the McCauley et al. catalog of erupting prominences from June 2010 - Sep 2014 (2015 Solar Phys. 290, 1703). A comparable number of transequatorial coronal cloud prominences were identified in the Martin et al. study of coronal cloud prominences from May 2010 - April 2012 (IAU Symposium 320, 2016, p. 276). The similar locations of these two subsets of two primary prominence classifications make them nearly ideal candidates for comparison of their properties. Coronal rain is an integral dynamic in coronal cloud prominences whereas counterstreaming motion is characteristic of channel prominences. The two subsets are representative of the the differing magnetic structure, mass origin, evolution, and environmental properties of coronal cloud prominences and channel prominences in general. These samples illustrate how coronal cloud prominences require different models than channel prominences. However, both types of prominences appear to be dependent upon pre-existing environments that largely control their structure and dynamics.

  20. Proton channels and exchangers in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Sonveaux, Pierre; Stock, Christian; Perez-Sayans, Mario; De Milito, Angelo; Avnet, Sofia; Garcìa, Abel Garcìa; Harguindey, Salvador; Fais, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Although cancer is characterized by an intratumoral genetic heterogeneity, a totally deranged pH control is a common feature of most cancer histotypes. Major determinants of aberrant pH gradient in cancer are proton exchangers and transporters, including V-ATPase, Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE), monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and carbonic anhydrases (CAs). Thanks to the activity of these proton transporters and exchangers, cancer becomes isolated and/or protected not only from the body reaction against the growing tumor, but also from the vast majority of drugs that when protonated into the acidic tumor microenvironment do not enter into cancer cells. Proton transporters and exchangers represent a key feature tumor cells use to survive in the very hostile microenvironmental conditions that they create and maintain. Detoxifying mechanisms may thus represent both a key survival option and a selection outcome for cells that behave as unicellular microorganisms rather than belonging to an organ, compartment or body. It is, in fact, typical of malignant tumors that, after a clinically measurable yet transient initial response to a therapy, resistant tumor clones emerge and proliferate, thus bursting a more malignant behavior and rapid tumor progression. This review critically presents the background of a novel and efficient approach that aims to fight cancer through blocking or inhibiting well characterized proton exchangers and transporters active in human cancer cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetic topological analysis of coronal bright points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galsgaard, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Huang, Z.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2017-10-01

    Context. We report on the first of a series of studies on coronal bright points which investigate the physical mechanism that generates these phenomena. Aims: The aim of this paper is to understand the magnetic-field structure that hosts the bright points. Methods: We use longitudinal magnetograms taken by the Solar Optical Telescope with the Narrowband Filter Imager. For a single case, magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager were added to the analysis. The longitudinal magnetic field component is used to derive the potential magnetic fields of the large regions around the bright points. A magneto-static field extrapolation method is tested to verify the accuracy of the potential field modelling. The three dimensional magnetic fields are investigated for the presence of magnetic null points and their influence on the local magnetic domain. Results: In nine out of ten cases the bright point resides in areas where the coronal magnetic field contains an opposite polarity intrusion defining a magnetic null point above it. We find that X-ray bright points reside, in these nine cases, in a limited part of the projected fan-dome area, either fully inside the dome or expanding over a limited area below which typically a dominant flux concentration resides. The tenth bright point is located in a bipolar loop system without an overlying null point. Conclusions: All bright points in coronal holes and two out of three bright points in quiet Sun regions are seen to reside in regions containing a magnetic null point. An as yet unidentified process(es) generates the brigh points in specific regions of the fan-dome structure. The movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Coronal Loops: Evolving Beyond the Isothermal Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Allen, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Are coronal loops isothermal? A controversy over this question has arisen recently because different investigators using different techniques have obtained very different answers. Analysis of SOHO-EIT and TRACE data using narrowband filter ratios to obtain temperature maps has produced several key publications that suggest that coronal loops may be isothermal. We have constructed a multi-thermal distribution for several pixels along a relatively isolated coronal loop on the southwest limb of the solar disk using spectral line data from SOHO-CDS taken on 1998 Apr 20. These distributions are clearly inconsistent with isothermal plasma along either the line of sight or the length of the loop, and suggested rather that the temperature increases from the footpoints to the loop top. We speculated originally that these differences could be attributed to pixel size -- CDS pixels are larger, and more `contaminating' material would be expected along the line of sight. To test this idea, we used CDS iron line ratios from our data set to mimic the isothermal results from the narrowband filter instruments. These ratios indicated that the temperature gradient along the loop was flat, despite the fact that a more complete analysis of the same data showed this result to be false! The CDS pixel size was not the cause of the discrepancy; rather, the problem lies with the isothermal approximation used in EIT and TRACE analysis. These results should serve as a strong warning to anyone using this simplistic method to obtain temperature. This warning is echoed on the EIT web page: ``Danger! Enter at your own risk!'' In other words, values for temperature may be found, but they may have nothing to do with physical reality. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University.

  3. A multi-channel coronal spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, D. A.; Orrall, F. Q.; Zane, R.

    1973-01-01

    We describe a new multi-channel coronal spectrophotometer system, presently being installed at Mees Solar Observatory, Mount Haleakala, Maui. The apparatus is designed to record and interpret intensities from many sections of the visible and near-visible spectral regions simultaneously, with relatively high spatial and temporal resolution. The detector, a thermoelectrically cooled silicon vidicon camera tube, has its central target area divided into a rectangular array of about 100,000 pixels and is read out in a slow-scan (about 2 sec/frame) mode. Instrument functioning is entirely under PDP 11/45 computer control, and interfacing is via the CAMAC system.

  4. Fast-mode Coronal EUV Wave Trains Associated with Solar Flares and CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Downs, Cooper; Karlicky, Marian; Chen, Bin

    2017-08-01

    As a new observational phenomenon, Quasi-periodic, Fast Propagating EUV wave trains (QFPs) are fast-mode magnetosonic waves closely related to quasi-periodic pulsations commonly detected in solar flares (traditionally with non-imaging observations). They can provide critical clues to flare energy release and serve as new tools for coronal seismology. We report recent advances in observing and modeling QFPs, including evidence of heating and cooling cycles revealed with differential emission measure (DEM) analysis that are consistent with alternating compression and rarefaction expected for magnetosonic waves. Through a statistical survey, we found a preferential association of QFPs with eruptive flares (with CMEs) rather than confined flares (without CMEs). We also identified some correlation with quasi-periodic radio bursts observed at JVLA and Ondrejov observatories. We will discuss the implications of these results and the potential roles of QFPs in coronal heating and energy transport.

  5. Restrained Proton Indicator in Combined Quantum-Mechanics/Molecular-Mechanics Dynamics Simulations of Proton Transfer through a Carbon Nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duster, Adam W; Lin, Hai

    2017-09-14

    Recently, a collective variable "proton indicator" was purposed for tracking an excess proton solvated in bulk water in molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing the position of this proton indicator as a reaction coordinate to model an excess proton migrating through a hydrophobic carbon nanotube in combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics simulations. Our results indicate that applying a harmonic restraint to the proton indicator in the bulk solvent near the nanotube pore entrance leads to the recruitment of water molecules into the pore. This is consistent with an earlier study that employed a multistate empirical valence bond potential and a different representation (center of excess charge) of the proton. We attribute this water recruitment to the delocalized nature of the solvated proton, which prefers to be in high-dielectric bulk solvent. While water recruitment into the pore is considered an artifact in the present simulations (because of the artificially imposed restraint on the proton), if the proton were naturally restrained, it could assist in building water wires prior to proton transfer through the pore. The potential of mean force for a proton translocation through the water-filled pore was computed by umbrella sampling, where the bias potentials were applied to the proton indicator. The free energy curve and barrier heights agree reasonably with those in the literature. The results suggest that the proton indicator can be used as a reaction coordinate in simulations of proton transport in confined environments.

  6. Relationship of EUV Irradiance Coronal Dimming Slope and Depth to Coronal Mass Ejection Speed and Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, James Paul; Woods, Thomas N.; Webb, David F.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Colaninno, Robin C.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal dimmings are often observed in response to solar eruptive events. These phenomena can be generated via several different physical processes. For space weather, the most important of these is the temporary void left behind by a coronal mass ejection (CME). Massive, fast CMEs tend to leave behind a darker void that also usually corresponds to minimum irradiance for the cooler coronal emissions. If the dimming is associated with a solar are, as is often the case, the are component of the irradiance light curve in the cooler coronal emission can be isolated and removed using simultaneous measurements of warmer coronal lines. We apply this technique to 37dimming events identified during two separate two-week periods in 2011, plus an event on 2010 August 7 analyzed in a previous paper, to parameterize dimming in terms of depth and slope. We provide statistics on which combination of wavelengths worked best for the flare-removal method, describe the fitting methods applied to the dimming light curves, and compare the dimming parameters with corresponding CME parameters of mass and speed. The best linear relationships found are nu(sub CME) [km/s] approx. equals 2.36 x 10 6 [km/%] x s(sub dim) [%/s] m(sub CME) [g] approx. equals 2.59 x 10(exp.15 [g/%] x the square root of d(sub dim) [%].These relationships could be used for space weather operations of estimating CME mass and speed using near-real-time irradiance dimming measurements.

  7. Precipitation and Release of Solar Energetic Particles from the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Lulu

    2017-09-01

    Most solar energetic particles (SEPs) are produced in the corona. They propagate through complex coronal magnetic fields subject to scattering and diffusion across the averaged field lines by turbulence. We examine the behaviors of particle transport using a stochastic 3D focused transport simulation in a potential field source surface model of coronal magnetic field. The model is applied to an SEP event on 2010 February 7. We study three scenarios of particle injection at (I) the compact solar flare site, (II) the coronal mass ejection (CME) shock, and (III) the EUV wave near the surface. The majority of particles injected on open field lines are able to escape the corona. We found that none of our models can explain the observations of wide longitudinal SEP spread without perpendicular diffusion. If the perpendicular diffusion is about 10% of what is derived from the random walk of field lines at the rate of supergranular diffusion, particles injected at the compact solar flare site can spread to a wide range of longitude and latitude, very similar to the behavior of particles injected at a large CME shock. Stronger pitch-angle scattering results in a little more lateral spread by holding the particles in the corona for longer periods of time. Some injected particles eventually end up precipitating onto the solar surface. Even with a very small perpendicular diffusion, the pattern of the particle precipitation can be quite complicated depending on the detailed small-scale coronal magnetic field structures, which could be seen with future sensitive gamma-ray telescopes.

  8. Proton movies

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A humorous short film made by three secondary school students received an award at a Geneva film festival. Even without millions of dollars or Hollywood stars at your disposal, it is still possible to make a good science fiction film about CERN. That is what three students from the Collège Madame de Staël in Carouge, near Geneva, demonstrated. For their amateur short film on the LHC, they were commended by the jury of the video and multimedia festival for schools organised by the "Media in education" service of the Canton of Geneva’s Public Education Department. The film is a spoof of a television news report on the LHC start-up. In sequences full of humour and imagination, the reporter conducts interviews with a very serious "Professor Sairne", some protons preparing for their voyage and even the neutrons that were rejected by the LHC. "We got the idea of making a film about CERN at the end of the summer," explains Lucinda Päsche, one of the three students. "We did o...

  9. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elangovan, S [South Jordan, UT; Nair, Balakrishnan G [Sandy, UT; Small, Troy [Midvale, UT; Heck, Brian [Salt Lake City, UT

    2011-09-06

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  10. Analytical investigations on the Coronation Gospels manuscript

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceto, Maurizio; Agostino, Angelo; Fenoglio, Gaia; Idone, Ambra; Crivello, Fabrizio; Griesser, Martina; Kirchweger, Franz; Uhlir, Katharina; Puyo, Patricia Roger

    2017-01-01

    The Coronation Gospels or Krönungsevangeliar is a manuscript kept in Vienna at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, datable to the end of VIII century A.D. and produced at Charlemagne court. It is an example of a purple codex, i.e. its parchment is coloured in purple. It has to be considered as one of the most important medieval codices, according to its use to take oath in the coronation ceremony of kings and emperors of the Holy Roman Empire up to 1792. In order to gather information of the manufacture of the manuscript and its present conservation state, a diagnostic investigation campaign has been carried out in situ with totally non-invasive techniques. X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF), UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry with optical fibres (FORS), spectrofluorimetry, optical microscopy and multispectral analysis have been applied in order to identify the colourants used in the decoration of the manuscript, with the main concern to the dye used to impart the purple hue to the parchment. The information collected was useful in order to address some of the questions raised by art historians concerning its history.

  11. Closed coronal structures. II - Generalized hydrostatic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio, S.; Peres, G.; Vaiana, G. S.; Golub, L.; Rosner, R.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical computations of stationary solar coronal loop atmospheres are used to extend earlier analytical work. Two classes of loops are examined, namely symmetric loops with a temperature maximum at the top but now having a length greater than the pressure scale height and loops which have a local temperature minimum at the top. For the first class, new scaling laws are found which relate the base pressure and loop length to the base heating, the heating deposition scale height, and the pressure scale height. It is found that loops for which the length is greater than about two to three times the pressure scale height do not have stable solutions unless they have a temperature minimum at the top. Computed models with a temperature inversion at the top are permitted in a wider range of heating deposition scale height values than are loops with a temperature maximum at the top. These results are discussed in relation to observations showing a dependence of prominence formation and stability on the state of evolution of magnetic structures, and a general scenario is suggested for the understanding of loop evolution from emergence in active regions through the large-scale structure phase to opening in coronal holes.

  12. Featured Image: Waves in a Coronal Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-09-01

    The inset in this Solar Dynamics Observatory image shows a close-up view of a stunning coronal fan extending above the Suns atmosphere. These sweeping loops were observed on 7 March 2012 by a number of observatories, revealing the first known evidence of standing slow magnetoacoustic waves in cool coronal fan loops. The oscillations of the loops, studied in a recent article led by Vaibhav Pant (Indian Institute of Astrophysics), were triggered by blast waves that were generated by X-class flares from the distant active region AR 11429 (marked withthe yellow box at left). The overplotted X-ray curve in the top right corner of the image (click for the full view) shows the evolution of the flares that perturbed the footpoints of the loops. You can check out the video of the action below, and follow the link to the original article to read more about what these oscillations tell us about the Suns activity. CitationV. Pant et al 2017 ApJL 847 L5. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa880f

  13. Magnetism Matters: Coronal Magnetometry Using Multi-Wavelength Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sarah E.

    2015-08-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is key both to solving fundamental problems in solar physics such as coronal heating and solar wind acceleration, and to predicting the internal magnetic structure and thus space-weather impact of coronal mass ejections. I will describe the current state of the art in coronal magnetometry, and present results from the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) at Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), which since 2011 has taken polarimetric observations of the solar corona in the near-infrared on a near-daily basis. I will discuss work in progress that utilizes forward modeling to synthesize polarimetric data at multiple heights and vantage points, and at wavelengths from radio to infrared to visible to ultraviolet. The goal is to use such synthetic testbeds to determine the ideal set of observations for constraining the coronal magnetic field, and to establish a Data-Optimized Coronal Field Model (DOC-FM) that efficiently incorporates these data into global magnetic models. This work will provide essential tools and motivation for the planning and implementation of future coronal polarimetric projects and missions spanning a broad range of wavelengths.

  14. Magnetic Field in the Gravitationally Stratified Coronal Loops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We study the effect of gravitational stratification on the estimation of magnetic fields in the coronal loops. By using the method of MHD seismology of kink waves for the estimation of magnetic field of coronal loops, we derive a new formula for the magnetic field considering the effect of gravitational ...

  15. Solar Cycle Variation of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-08-25

    Aug 25, 2010 ... Spörer's sunspot law at low latitudes (thus, no 'butterfly diagram'); how- ever, at high latitudes, there may be a poleward motion and an equator- ward motion from the rise to the maximum to the declining phases. Key words. Sun: activity, coronal mass ejections (CMEs). 1. Introduction. Interplanetary coronal ...

  16. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We find a strong association between different parameters of coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also compute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of ...

  17. Characterization of the IOTA Proton Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Samantha [Chicago U.

    2017-08-11

    This project focuses on characterizing the IOTA proton source through changing the parameters of four various components of the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT). Because of an inecient lament, current was limited to 2 mA when 40 mA is ultimately desired. Through an investigation of the solenoids and trims of the LEBT, we sought more knowledge about the optimum settings for running the IOTA proton source.

  18. Seismology of Transversely Oscillating Coronal Loops with Siphon Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terradas, J.; Arregui, I.; Verth, G.; Goossens, M.

    2011-03-01

    There are ubiquitous flows observed in the solar atmosphere of sub-Alfvénic speeds; however, after flaring and coronal mass ejection events flows can become Alfvénic. In this Letter, we derive an expression for the standing kink mode frequency due to siphon flow in coronal loops, valid for both low and high speed regimes. It is found that siphon flow introduces a linear, spatially dependent phase shift along coronal loops and asymmetric eigenfunctions. We demonstrate how this theory can be used to determine the kink and flow speed of oscillating coronal loops with reference to an observational case study. It is shown that the presence of siphon flow can cause the underestimation of magnetic field strength in coronal loops using the traditional seismological methods.

  19. Assessment of Coronal Radiographic Parameters of the Spine in the Treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Karami

    2016-10-01

    Preoperative coronal balance is very important to make a balanced spine after surgery. Other parameters like Lenke classification or main thoracic overcorrection did not affect postoperative coronal decompensation.

  20. SNS Proton Beam Window Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Trotter, Steven

    2017-09-01

    In order to support the disposal of the proton beam window assembly of the Spallation Neutron Source beamline to the target station, waste classification analyses are performed. The window has a limited life-time due to radiation-induced material damage. Analyses include calculation of the radionuclide inventory and shielding analyses for the transport package/container to ensure that the container is compliant with the transportation and waste management regulations. In order to automate this procedure and minimize manual work a script in Perl language was written.

  1. SNS Proton Beam Window Disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popova Irina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to support the disposal of the proton beam window assembly of the Spallation Neutron Source beamline to the target station, waste classification analyses are performed. The window has a limited life-time due to radiation-induced material damage. Analyses include calculation of the radionuclide inventory and shielding analyses for the transport package/container to ensure that the container is compliant with the transportation and waste management regulations. In order to automate this procedure and minimize manual work a script in Perl language was written.

  2. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  3. Flux Accretion and Coronal Mass Ejection Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the primary drivers of severe space weather disturbances in the heliosphere. The equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) have been used to model the onset and, in some cases, the subsequent acceleration of ejections. Both observations and numerical modeling, however, suggest that magnetic reconnection likely plays a major role in most, if not all, fast CMEs. Here, we theoretically investigate the dynamical effects of accretion of magnetic flux onto a rising ejection by reconnection involving the ejection's background field. This reconnection alters the magnetic structure of the ejection and its environment, thereby modifying forces acting during the eruption, generically leading to faster acceleration of the CME. Our ultimate aim is to characterize changes in CME acceleration in terms of observable properties of magnetic reconnection, such as the amount of reconnected flux, deduced from observations of flare ribbons and photospheric magnetic fields.

  4. Coronal temperatures, heating, and energy flow in a polar region of the sun at solar maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withbroe, G. L.; Kohl, J. L.; Weiser, H.; Munro, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The profiles of resonantly scattered Lyman-alpha coronal radiation have been used to determine the hydrogen kinetic temperature from 1.5 to 4 solar radius from the center of the polar region of the corona observed in 1980 at solar maximum. Hydrogen temperatures derived from the line profiles were found to decrease with height from 1.2 million K at r = 1.5 solar radii to 600,000 K at r = 4 solar radius. Comparison of the measured kinetic temperatures with predictions from a semiempirical two-fluid model showed evidence of a small amount of heating or a nonthermal contribution to the motions of coronal protons between 1.5 and 4 solar radius. The widths of the profiles confirmed an upper limit of 110 + or - 15 km/s on the rms magnitude of the line-of-sight component of velocities between 1.5 and 4 solar radius. Density measurements obtained in situ in the solar wind in the ecliptic were used to locate the sources of low speed and high-speed winds in the polar region. An eclipse photograph of the corona at solar maximum is provided.

  5. Multi-fluid Global Coronal Model with Alfven Wave Turbulence: Validation with SOHO/SUMER data

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Holst, B.

    2016-12-01

    We present a generalization of the AWSoM model, a global solar corona model with low-frequency Alfven wave turbulence (van der Holst et al., 2014). The new extended model includes electron and multi-ion temperatures (proton, alpha particles and heavy ions). The coronal heating is addressed via outward propagating Alfven waves that are partially reflected by the Alfven speed gradients. The resulting counter-propagating waves are responsible for the nonlinear turbulent cascade. To apportion the wave dissipation to the electron and ion temperatures, we employ the results of the theories of linear wave damping and nonlinear stochastic heating as described by Chandran et al. (2011, 2013). This heat partitioning results in a more than mass proportional heating among ions. We validate the model result with SOHO/SUMER data.

  6. Identification of coronal heating events in 3D simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanella, Charalambos; Gudiksen, Boris V.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The solar coronal heating problem has been an open question in the science community since 1939. One of the proposed models for the transport and release of mechanical energy generated in the sub-photospheric layers and photosphere is the magnetic reconnection model that incorporates Ohmic heating, which releases a part of the energy stored in the magnetic field. In this model many unresolved flaring events occur in the solar corona, releasing enough energy to heat the corona. Aims: The problem with the verification and quantification of this model is that we cannot resolve small scale events due to limitations of the current observational instrumentation. Flaring events have scaling behavior extending from large X-class flares down to the so far unobserved nanoflares. Histograms of observable characteristics of flares show powerlaw behavior for energy release rate, size, and total energy. Depending on the powerlaw index of the energy release, nanoflares might be an important candidate for coronal heating; we seek to find that index. Methods: In this paper we employ a numerical three-dimensional (3D)-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation produced by the numerical code Bifrost, which enables us to look into smaller structures, and a new technique to identify the 3D heating events at a specific instant. The quantity we explore is the Joule heating, a term calculated directly by the code, which is explicitly correlated with the magnetic reconnection because it depends on the curl of the magnetic field. Results: We are able to identify 4136 events in a volume 24 × 24 × 9.5 Mm3 (I.e., 768 × 786 × 331 grid cells) of a specific snapshot. We find a powerlaw slope of the released energy per second equal to αP = 1.5 ± 0.02, and two powerlaw slopes of the identified volume equal to αV = 1.53 ± 0.03 and αV = 2.53 ± 0.22. The identified energy events do not represent all the released energy, but of the identified events, the total energy of the largest events

  7. Proton pump inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by glands in ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  8. Seismology of transversely oscillating coronal loops with siphon flows

    OpenAIRE

    Terradas, J.; Arregui, I.; Verth, G.; Goossens, M.

    2011-01-01

    There are ubiquitous flows observed in the solar atmosphere of sub-Alfv\\'{e}nic speeds, however after flaring and coronal mass ejection events flows can become Alfv\\'{e}nic. In this Letter, we derive an expression for the standing kink mode frequency due to siphon flow in coronal loops, valid for both low and high speed regimes. It is found that siphon flow introduces a linear spatially dependent phase shift along coronal loops and asymmetric eigenfunctions. We demonstrate how this theory can...

  9. Case report: pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucencies revisited.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Counihan, K P

    2012-08-01

    Pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucency (PEIR) describes a radiolucent lesion located in the coronal dentine, just beneath the enamel-dentine junction of unerupted teeth. The prevalence of this lesion varies depending on the type and quality of radiographic exposure and age of patients used for assessment. The aetiology of pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucent lesions is not fully understood, but published clinical and histological evidence suggest that these lesions are resorptive in nature. Issues around the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of this lesion are explored using previously unreported cases.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic waves and coronal seismology: an overview of recent results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moortel, Ineke; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-07-13

    Recent observations have revealed that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, with a wide range of periods. We give a brief review of some aspects of MHD waves and coronal seismology that have recently been the focus of intense debate or are newly emerging. In particular, we focus on four topics: (i) the current controversy surrounding propagating intensity perturbations along coronal loops, (ii) the interpretation of propagating transverse loop oscillations, (iii) the ongoing search for coronal (torsional) Alfvén waves, and (iv) the rapidly developing topic of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares.

  11. Heating of solar coronal holes by reflected Alfven waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.; An, C.-H.

    1992-01-01

    As a continuation of the work of Moore et al. (1991), who found evidence that coronal holes are heated by Alfven waves that are reflected back down within the coronal holes, this paper shows that to demonstrate this evidence, it is only necessary to consider a subset of the Moore et al. models, namely, those having radial magnetic field. Using these models, it is shown that the Alfven velocity is not constant in the atmosphere of coronal holes, but changes with height (or radius), causing downward reflection of all upward Alfven waves of sufficiently long wavelength (or period).

  12. Proton: The Particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  13. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  14. Prevalence of a Loss-of-Function Mutation in the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter Gene (PCFT-SLC46A1) Causing Hereditary Folate Malabsorption in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeo, Kris M.; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Ramirez, Sonia I.; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Rivera, Enid; Martin, Madelena; Lerner, Norma B.; DiAntonio, Lisa; Duva, Salvatore; Santiago-Borrero, Pedro J.; Goldman, I. David

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether subjects of Puerto Rican heritage are at increased risk for a specific mutation of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) causing hereditary folate malabsorption (HFM). Study design Three percent of the births in Puerto Rico in 2005, with additional regional oversampling, were screened for the prevalence of the c.1082G>A; p.Y362_G389 del PCFT gene mutation. Six new subjects of Puerto Rican heritage with the clinical diagnosis of HFM were also assessed for this mutation. Results Six subjects of Puerto Rican heritage with the clinical diagnosis of HFM were all homozygous for the c.1082G>A; p.Y362_G389 del PCFT mutation. Three heterozygote carriers were identified from the 1582 newborn samples randomly selected from births in Puerto Rico in 2005. The carrier frequency for the mutated allele was 0.2% island-wide and 6.3% in Villalba. Conclusion These findings are consistent with a common mutation in the PCFT gene causing HFM that has disseminated to Puerto Ricans who have migrated to mainland United States. Because prompt diagnosis and treatment of infants with HFM can prevent the consequences of this disorder, newborn screening should be considered in high-risk populations and physicians should be aware of its prevalence in infants of Puerto Rican ancestry. PMID:21489556

  15. Grain and grain boundary transport in BaCe0.5Zr0.3Ln0.2O3-δ (Ln - Y or lanthanide) electrolytes attractive for protonic ceramic fuel cells application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, N.; Pikalova, E.; Lyagaeva, J.; Antonov, B.; Medvedev, D.; Demin, A.; Tsiakaras, P.

    2017-10-01

    Protonic ceramic fuel cells (PCFCs) belong to very attractive energy conversion systems, which are able to operate effectively at low- and intermediate temperature ranges. The improvement of their electrochemical characteristics is feasible through the optimization of their functional materials. In the present work, emphasis is given to the highly conductive and stable cerate-zirconate electrolytes of BaCe0.5Zr0.3Ln0.2O3-δ (where Ln = Y, Dy, Sm and Nd). Studying the transport properties of these materials in individual form and in PCFC assembly, it is shown that the Dy-doped sample exhibits higher grain (bulk) and grain boundary conductivity in comparison with the most studied Y-doped ones. The single PCFC based on a rather thick 30 μm electrolyte displays about 160 and 290 mW cm-2 at 600 and 700 °C, respectively. These values are comparative with those obtained for PCFCs fabricated with similar electrolytes and Co-free cathode materials, confirming the perspective of cerate-zirconates doped by other lanthanides.

  16. Impact of the growing use of narrative verdicts by coroners on geographic variations in suicide: analysis of coroners' inquest data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, R; Hawton, K; Kapur, N; Bennewith, O; Gunnell, D

    2012-08-01

    Coroners' death certificates form the basis of suicide statistics in England and Wales. Recent increases in coroners' use of narrative verdicts may affect the reliability of local and national suicide rates. We used Ministry of Justice data on inquests held between 2008 and 2009 and Local Authority suicide data (2001-02 and 2008-09) to investigate variations between coroners in their use of narrative verdicts and the impact of these on suicide rates, using 'other' verdicts (79% of which are narratives) as a proxy for narrative verdicts. There was wide geographic variation in Coroners' use of 'other' (mainly narrative) verdicts--they comprised between 0 and 50% (median = 9%) of verdicts given by individual coroners in 2008-09. Coroners who gave more 'other' verdicts gave fewer suicide verdicts (r = - 0.41; P narratives the least. Variation in Coroners' use of narrative verdicts influences the validity of reported regional suicide rates. Small-area suicide rates, and changes in these rates over time in the last decade, should be interpreted with caution.

  17. Perfluorinated surfactants as model charged systems for understanding the effect of confinement on proton transport and water mobility in fuel cell membranes. A study by QENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyonnard, S.; Berrod, Q.; Brüning, B.-A.; Gebel, G.; Guillermo, A.; Ftouni, H.; Ollivier, J.; Frick, B.

    2010-10-01

    We have investigated the dynamical properties of water confined in mesomorphous phases of perfluorinated sulfonic surfactants. These systems mimic the physico-chemical properties of the perfluorinated Nafion membranes which are used as electrolyte in fuel cells. As the surfactants offer the advantage to self-assemble in well defined organized phases (such as hexagonal and lamellar phases), they could be used as model charged systems to understand the structure-transport relationship in complex real materials. Indeed, the geometry as well as the typical confinement size can be easily controlled and tuned through water concentration and temperature. A QENS study of hexagonal and lamellar phases has been performed on both time-of-flight and backscattering spectrometers to cover a dynamic range from picoseconds to nanoseconds. Analysis of the data with localized translational diffusion models shows the existence of a strong confinement effect that depends on the geometry. Typical confinement sizes and diffusion coefficients can be extracted from the QENS analysis and compared to the Nafion membrane.

  18. Coronal Dynamics at Recent Total Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B.; Demianski, M.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Seaton, D. B.; Lucas, R.; Babcock, B. A.; Dantowitz, R.; Gaintatzis, P.; Seeger, C. H.; Malamut, C.; Steele, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our composite images of the solar corona based on extensive imaging at the total solar eclipses of 2010 (Easter Island), 2012 (Australia), and 2013 (Gabon) reveal several coronal mass ejections and other changes in coronal streamers and in polar plumes. Our resultant spatial resolution is finer than that available in imaging from spacecraft, including that from SOHO/LASCO or STEREO. We trace the eruptions back to their footpoints on the sun using imaging from SDO and SWAP, and follow them upwards through the corona, measuring velocities. The high-resolution computer compositing by Miloslav Druckmüller and Hana Druckmüllerová (2010 and 2013) and Pavlos Gaintatzis (2012) allows comparison of our images with those taken at intervals of minutes or hours along the totality path. Williams College's 2013 eclipse expedition was supported in part by grant 9327-13 from National Geographic Society/Committee for Research and Exploration. Our work on the 2012 eclipse is supported in part by grant AGS-1047726 from Solar Terrestrial Research/NSF AGS. V.R. and M.S. were partially supported by the VEGA grant agency project 2/0098/10 and 2/0003/13 (Slovak Academy of Sciences) and Grant 0139-12 from NG/CRE, and Hana Druckmüllerová by grant 205/09/1469 of the Czech Science Foundation. M.L. was supported by Sigma Xi. C.M. was a Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium Summer Fellow, supported at Williams College by REU/NSF grant AST-1005024. Partial support was provided by U.S. Department of Defense's ASSURE program. J.M.P. thanks Caltech's Planetary Sciences Department for hospitality. Support for D.B.S. and SWAP came from PRODEX grant C90345 managed by ESA in collaboration with the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO) in support of the PROBA2/SWAP mission, and from the EC's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant 218816 (SOTERIA project, www.soteria-space.eu). SWAP is a project of the Centre Spatial de Liège and the Royal Observatory of Belgium funded by

  19. Photospheric magnetic field of an eroded-by-solar-wind coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Saiz, E.; Guerrero, A.

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated the case of a coronal mass ejection that was eroded by the fast wind of a coronal hole in the interplanetary medium. When a solar ejection takes place close to a coronal hole, the flux rope magnetic topology of the coronal mass ejection (CME) may become misshapen at 1 AU as a result of the interaction. Detailed analysis of this event reveals erosion of the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) magnetic field. In this communication, we study the photospheric magnetic roots of the coronal hole and the coronal mass ejection area with HMI/SDO magnetograms to define their magnetic characteristics.

  20. Properties and applications of perovskite proton conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Caetano Camilo de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A brief overview is given of the main types and principles of solid-state proton conductors with perovskite structure. Their properties are summarized in terms of the defect chemistry, proton transport and chemical stability. A good understanding of these subjects allows the manufacturing of compounds with the desired electrical properties, for application in renewable and sustainable energy devices. A few trends and highlights of the scientific advances are given for some classes of protonic conductors. Recent results and future prospect about these compounds are also evaluated. The high proton conductivity of barium cerate and zirconate based electrolytes lately reported in the literature has taken these compounds to a highlight position among the most studied conductor ceramic materials.

  1. Cyclical Variation of the Quiet Corona and Coronal Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recent advances in the understanding of the quiet corona and coronal holes are reviewed. The review is based on long-term accumulation of data from eclipse observations, coronagraph observations, helium 10830 Å spectroheliograms, and X-ray observations.

  2. Initiation and Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections P. F. Chen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , which is generated at the tachocline layer, emerges throughout the convection zone and the lower atmosphere into the tenuous corona. The coronal field keeps adjusting to a more and more complex magnetic structure in a quasi-steady way.

  3. [A study on the experiences of nurse coroners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin Sook; Park, In Sook

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the essential structure of the postmortem- examination experiences of nurse career coroners (forensic investigators), to have a profound understanding of their experiences, and ultimately to lay the foundation for nurses' entry into the field of forensic nursing. The subjects in this study were six coroners. After an in-depth interview from January to June 2007, the collected data were analyzed by Colaizzi as qualitative research. Four categories emerged from seven theme clusters. The four categories were: attracted by being dubbed a stabilized public official, a sense of achievement due to having clarified false death, self-confidence after distinguishing the victim and the wrongdoer, eternal developmental potential is seen. It is expected that this study will provide useful information for nurses who are interested in becoming coroners. It will be helpful for career nurses to extend their nursing science into emerging fields like coroners and select a follow-up career.

  4. Production planning and coronal stop deletion in spontaneous speech

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James Tanner; Morgan Sonderegger; Michael Wagner

    2017-01-01

    .... We examine coronal stop deletion (CSD), a variable process conditioned by preceding and upcoming phonological context, in a corpus of spontaneous British English speech, as a means of investigating a number of variables associated with planning...

  5. Percolation Model for Proton Immobility in Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikrajuddin Abdullah

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A simple Ising model and a statistical theory of gel formation in a polymer matrix were combined to explain the effect of temperature on the mobility of protons in ice. Cowin et al observed that protons in ice bulk were immobile at temperatures below 190 K, and suddenly become mobile at temperatures above 190 K [Nature 398, 405 (1999]. We proposed here that the transport of protons is controlled by a percolation mechanism. The proton transport is facilitated by the occurrence of easily reoriented water molecules in the ice bulk. The fraction of this molecule depends on temperature and was calculated using a simple Ising model. The formation of network of these molecules which provides pathways for proton transport was calculated using a statistical theory of gel formation in a polymeric system. Our model succeeded to reproduce the variation of potential difference between the ice film surfaces with respect to temperature as observed by Cowin et al based on a soft landing experiment.

  6. Substrate and Cation Binding Mechanism of Glutamate Transporter Homologs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate transporters and their homologs are membrane proteins that transport glutamate and aspartate together with sodium ions and/or protons. Human glutamate transporters remove the neurotransmitter glutamate after signal transmission. Therefore, glutamate transporters play a great role in

  7. Stereochemistry-Dependent Proton Conduction in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Tiwari, Omshanker; Gaikwad, Pramod; Paswan, Bhuneshwar; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2016-01-12

    Graphene oxide (GO) is impermeable to H2 and O2 fuels while permitting H(+) shuttling, making it a potential candidate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), albeit with a large anisotropy in their proton transport having a dominant in plane (σIP) contribution over the through plane (σTP). If GO-based membranes are ever to succeed in PEMFC, it inevitably should have a dominant through-plane proton shuttling capability (σTP), as it is the direction in which proton gets transported in a real fuel-cell configuration. Here we show that anisotropy in proton conduction in GO-based fuel cell membranes can be brought down by selectively tuning the geometric arrangement of functional groups around the dopant molecules. The results show that cis isomer causes a selective amplification of through-plane proton transport, σTP, pointing to a very strong geometry angle in ionic conduction. Intercalation of cis isomer causes significant expansion of GO (001) planes involved in σTP transport due to their mutual H-bonding interaction and efficient bridging of individual GO planes, bringing down the activation energy required for σTP, suggesting the dominance of a Grotthuss-type mechanism. This isomer-governed amplification of through-plane proton shuttling resulted in the overall boosting of fuel-cell performance, and it underlines that geometrical factors should be given prime consideration while selecting dopant molecules for bringing down the anisotropy in proton conduction and enhancing the fuel-cell performance in GO-based PEMFC.

  8. Coroner consistency - The 10-jurisdiction, 10-year, postcode lottery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclean, Maxwell

    2015-04-01

    The investigation and classification of deaths in England and Wales relies upon the application by medical practitioners of diverse reporting standards set locally by coroners and thereafter upon the effectively unconstrained decision process of those same coroners. The author has conducted extensive comparative analysis of Ministry of Justice data on reports to the coroner and their inquest and verdict returns alongside Office of National Statistics data pertaining to the numbers of registered deaths in equivalent local jurisdictions. Here, he analyses 10 jurisdictions characterised by almost identical inquest return numbers in 2011. Substantial variation was found in reporting rates to the coroner and in the profile of inquest verdicts. The range of deaths reported varied from 34% to 62% of all registered deaths. Likewise only 2 of the 10 jurisdictions shared the same ranking of proportions in which the six common verdicts were reached. Individual jurisdictions tended to be consistent over time in their use of verdicts. In all cases, proportionately more male deaths were reported to the coroner. Coroners generally seemed prima facie to be 'gendered' in their approach to verdicts; that is, they were consistently more likely to favour a particular verdict when dealing with a death, according to the sex of the deceased. The extent to which coroners seemed gendered varied widely. While similar services such as the criminal courts or the Crown Prosecution Service are subject to extensive national guidance in an attempt to constrain idiosyncratic decision making, there seems no reason why this should apply less to the process of death investigation and classification. Further analysis of coroners' local practices and their determinants seems necessary. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Hunting for Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Heidi; Vida, Krisztián; Leitzinger, Martin; Odert, Petra; Kovács, Orsolya Eszter

    2017-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are explosive events that occur basically daily on the Sun. It is thought that these events play a crucial role in the angular momentum and mass loss of late-type stars, and also shape the environment in which planets form and live. Stellar CMEs can be detected in optical spectra in the Balmer lines, especially in Hα, as blue-shifted extra emission/absorption. To increase the detection probability one can monitor young open clusters, in which the stars are due to their youth still rapid rotators, and thus magnetically active and likely to exhibit a large number of CMEs. Using ESO facilities and the Nordic Optical Telescope we have obtained time series of multi-object spectroscopic observations of late-type stars in six open clusters with ages ranging from 15 Myrs to 300 Myrs. Additionally, we have studied archival data of numerous active stars. These observations will allow us to obtain information on the occurrence rate of CMEs in late-type stars with different ages and spectral types. Here we report on the preliminary outcome of our studies.

  10. Guided flows in coronal magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Testa, P.

    2018-01-01

    Context. There is evidence that coronal plasma flows break down into fragments and become laminar. Aims: We investigate this effect by modelling flows confined along magnetic channels. Methods: We consider a full magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of a solar atmosphere box with a dipole magnetic field. We compare the propagation of a cylindrical flow perfectly aligned with the field to that of another flow with a slight misalignment. We assume a flow speed of 200 km s-1 and an ambient magnetic field of 30 G. Results: We find that although the aligned flow maintains its cylindrical symmetry while it travels along the magnetic tube, the misaligned one is rapidly squashed on one side, becoming laminar and eventually fragmented because of the interaction and back-reaction of the magnetic field. This model could explain an observation made by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory of erupted fragments that fall back onto the solar surface as thin and elongated strands and end up in a hedge-like configuration. Conclusions: The initial alignment of plasma flow plays an important role in determining the possible laminar structure and fragmentation of flows while they travel along magnetic channels. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Coronal microleakage assessed by polymicrobial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Leandro Rodrigues; Grimaudo, Nicholas J; Vertucci, Frank J

    2003-08-15

    Studies have shown significant bacterial leakage following exposure of sealed root canals to artificial and natural saliva. The objective of this study was to determine contamination via bacterial migration in artificial saliva in endodontically treated teeth using different obturation techniques and sealers. A total of 144 extracted, human mandibular anterior teeth were cleaned and shaped to a #40 master apical file using hand and rotary instrumentation. One hundred and twenty teeth were divided into two experimental groups. The teeth in Group 1 were obturated with gutta-percha using lateral compaction and five different sealers, and the teeth in Group 2 were obturated with gutta-percha using thermomechanical compaction and five different sealers. The remaining 24 teeth were prepared as positive and negative controls. All specimens, except the negative controls, were inoculated every five days with Anaerobic streptococci (NCTC 9891) related to Peptostreptococcus micros and Prevotella intermedia (ATCC 25611). The contamination onset time was continuously recorded and turbid broths cultured for bacteria identification. The controls behaved as expected. Regardless of the combination between obturation techniques and different sealers, all broths became turbid during this experiment. The correlation between the obturation techniques and the sealers revealed statistical significance using ANOVA (psealer allowed a slower rate of coronal-apical bacterial migration.

  12. Guided flows in coronal magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Testa, P.

    2017-12-01

    Context. There is evidence that coronal plasma flows break down into fragments and become laminar. Aims: We investigate this effect by modelling flows confined along magnetic channels. Methods: We consider a full magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of a solar atmosphere box with a dipole magnetic field. We compare the propagation of a cylindrical flow perfectly aligned with the field to that of another flow with a slight misalignment. We assume a flow speed of 200 km s-1 and an ambient magnetic field of 30 G. Results: We find that although the aligned flow maintains its cylindrical symmetry while it travels along the magnetic tube, the misaligned one is rapidly squashed on one side, becoming laminar and eventually fragmented because of the interaction and back-reaction of the magnetic field. This model could explain an observation made by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory of erupted fragments that fall back onto the solar surface as thin and elongated strands and end up in a hedge-like configuration. Conclusions: The initial alignment of plasma flow plays an important role in determining the possible laminar structure and fragmentation of flows while they travel along magnetic channels. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  14. Are chromospheric nanoflares a primary source of coronal plasma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimchuk, J. A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bradshaw, S. J., E-mail: James.A.Klimchuk@nasa.gov, E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    It has been suggested that the hot plasma of the solar corona comes primarily from impulsive heating events, or nanoflares, that occur in the lower atmosphere, either in the upper part of the ordinary chromosphere or at the tips of type II spicules. We test this idea with a series of hydrodynamic simulations. We find that synthetic Fe XII (195) and Fe XIV (274) line profiles generated from the simulations disagree dramatically with actual observations. The integrated line intensities are much too faint; the blueshifts are much too fast; the blue-red asymmetries are much too large; and the emission is confined to low altitudes. We conclude that chromospheric nanoflares are not a primary source of hot coronal plasma. Such events may play an important role in producing the chromosphere and powering its intense radiation, but they do not, in general, raise the temperature of the plasma to coronal values. Those cases where coronal temperatures are reached must be relatively uncommon. The observed profiles of Fe XII and Fe XIV come primarily from plasma that is heated in the corona itself, either by coronal nanoflares or a quasi-steady coronal heating process. Chromospheric nanoflares might play a role in generating waves that provide this coronal heating.

  15. New Evidence that Magnetoconvection Drives Solar–Stellar Coronal Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Mail Code ST 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Thalmann, Julia K., E-mail: sanjivtiwari80@gmail.com [Institute of Physics/IGAM, University of Graz, Universittsplatz 5/II, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2017-07-10

    How magnetic energy is injected and released in the solar corona, keeping it heated to several million degrees, remains elusive. Coronal heating generally increases with increasing magnetic field strength. From a comparison of a nonlinear force-free model of the three-dimensional active region coronal field to observed extreme-ultraviolet loops, we find that (1) umbra-to-umbra coronal loops, despite being rooted in the strongest magnetic flux, are invisible, and (2) the brightest loops have one foot in an umbra or penumbra and the other foot in another sunspot’s penumbra or in unipolar or mixed-polarity plage. The invisibility of umbra-to-umbra loops is new evidence that magnetoconvection drives solar-stellar coronal heating: evidently, the strong umbral field at both ends quenches the magnetoconvection and hence the heating. Broadly, our results indicate that depending on the field strength in both feet, the photospheric feet of a coronal loop on any convective star can either engender or quench coronal heating in the loop’s body.

  16. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CORONAL MAGNETIC DECAY INDEX AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SPEED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yan; Liu Chang; Jing Ju; Wang Haimin, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    Numerical simulations suggest that kink and torus instabilities are two potential contributors to the initiation and prorogation of eruptive events. A magnetic parameter called the decay index (i.e., the coronal magnetic gradient of the overlying fields above the eruptive flux ropes) could play an important role in controlling the kinematics of eruptions. Previous studies have identified a threshold range of the decay index that distinguishes between eruptive and confined configurations. Here we advance the study by investigating if there is a clear correlation between the decay index and coronal mass ejection (CME) speed. Thirty-eight CMEs associated with filament eruptions and/or two-ribbon flares are selected using the H{alpha} data from the Global H{alpha} Network. The filaments and flare ribbons observed in H{alpha} associated with the CMEs help to locate the magnetic polarity inversion line, along which the decay index is calculated based on the potential field extrapolation using Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms as boundary conditions. The speeds of CMEs are obtained from the LASCO C2 CME catalog available online. We find that the mean decay index increases with CME speed for those CMEs with a speed below 1000 km s{sup -1} and stays flat around 2.2 for the CMEs with higher speeds. In addition, we present a case study of a partial filament eruption, in which the decay indices show different values above the erupted/non-erupted part.

  17. Simulation of Proton Beam Effects in Thin Insulating Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubinko Timotijevic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of exposing several insulators, commonly used for various purposes in integrated circuits, to beams of protons have been investigated. Materials considered include silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, aluminium nitride, alumina, and polycarbonate (Lexan. The passage of proton beams through ultrathin layers of these materials has been modeled by Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport. Parameters that have been varied in simulations include proton energy and insulating layer thickness. Materials are compared according to both ionizing and nonionizing effects produced by the passage of protons.

  18. Nanodust dynamics during a coronal mass ejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Czechowski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of nanometer-sized grains (nanodust is strongly affected by electromagnetic forces. High-velocity nanodust was proposed as an explanation for the voltage bursts observed by STEREO. A study of nanodust dynamics based on a simple time-stationary model has shown that in the vicinity of the Sun the nanodust is trapped or, outside the trapped region, accelerated to high velocities. We investigate the nanodust dynamics for a time-dependent solar wind and magnetic field configuration in order to find out what happens to nanodust during a coronal mass ejection (CME. The plasma flow and the magnetic field during a CME are obtained by numerical simulations using a 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD code. The equations of motion for the nanodust particles are solved numerically, assuming that the particles are produced from larger bodies moving in near-circular Keplerian orbits within the circumsolar dust cloud. The charge-to-mass ratios for the nanodust particles are taken to be constant in time. The simulation is restricted to the region within 0.14 AU from the Sun. We find that about 35 % of nanodust particles escape from the computational domain during the CME, reaching very high speeds (up to 1000 km s−1. After the end of the CME the escape continues, but the particle velocities do not exceed 300 km s−1. About 30 % of all particles are trapped in bound non-Keplerian orbits with time-dependent perihelium and aphelium distances. Trapped particles are affected by plasma ion drag, which causes contraction of their orbits.

  19. Nanodust dynamics during a coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Andrzej; Kleimann, Jens

    2017-09-01

    The dynamics of nanometer-sized grains (nanodust) is strongly affected by electromagnetic forces. High-velocity nanodust was proposed as an explanation for the voltage bursts observed by STEREO. A study of nanodust dynamics based on a simple time-stationary model has shown that in the vicinity of the Sun the nanodust is trapped or, outside the trapped region, accelerated to high velocities. We investigate the nanodust dynamics for a time-dependent solar wind and magnetic field configuration in order to find out what happens to nanodust during a coronal mass ejection (CME). The plasma flow and the magnetic field during a CME are obtained by numerical simulations using a 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. The equations of motion for the nanodust particles are solved numerically, assuming that the particles are produced from larger bodies moving in near-circular Keplerian orbits within the circumsolar dust cloud. The charge-to-mass ratios for the nanodust particles are taken to be constant in time. The simulation is restricted to the region within 0.14 AU from the Sun. We find that about 35 % of nanodust particles escape from the computational domain during the CME, reaching very high speeds (up to 1000 km s-1). After the end of the CME the escape continues, but the particle velocities do not exceed 300 km s-1. About 30 % of all particles are trapped in bound non-Keplerian orbits with time-dependent perihelium and aphelium distances. Trapped particles are affected by plasma ion drag, which causes contraction of their orbits.

  20. Forecasting Coronal Mass Ejections from Vector Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a 17 vector magnetogram study of 12 bipolar active regions (Falconer, Moore, & Gary, 2002, ApJ in press), we correlated four quantitative global magnetic measures with the Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) productivity of the active region. The global measures included a measure of active region size, the total magnetic flux phi and three measures of an active region global nonpotentiality 1) the net current (I (sub N)), 2) the length of the strong-shear, strong-field main neutral line (L(sub SS)) and 3) and the normalized twist (alpha = muIN/PHI). The CME productivity was determined from YOHKOH/SXT observations, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), and when possible Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (SOHO/LASCO) observations within 12 days of the day of the magnetogram. We found that the three measures of global nonpotentiality (I(sub N), L(sub SS), alpha) were all well correlated (greater than 99% confidence level) with an active region's CME productivity. The sample size was to small to confirm if there was a statistical significant correlation of the globally nonscientist measures with future CME activity (i.e. from the date of the magnetogram forward). We are doubling our sample, and will report on the statistical significance of global nonpotentiality as a predictor of future CME productivity. The new active regions are all from the first year of the upgraded MSFC vector magnetograms. This work, is funded by NSF through the Space Weather Program, by NASA through the Living with the Star, Targeted Research and Technology, and by NASA Solar Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program. The upgrade to the MSFC vector magnetograph was supported by the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) mission.

  1. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  2. Evaluation of uterine peristalsis using cine MRI on the coronal plane in comparison with the sagittal plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitano, Fuki; Kido, Aki; Kataoka, Masako; Fujimoto, Koji; Kiguchi, Kayo; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Uterine peristalsis is supposed to be closely related to the early stages of reproduction. Sperms are preferentially transported from the uterine cervix to the side of the tube with the dominant follicle. However, with respect to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), uterine peristalsis has only been evaluated at the sagittal plane of cine MRI. To evaluate and compare uterine peristalsis both on sagittal and coronal planes using cine MRI. Internal ethics committee approval was obtained, and subjects provided informed written consent. Thirty-one women underwent MRI scans in the periovulatory phase of the menstrual cycle. Cine MR images obtained by fast advanced spin echo sequence at 3-T field strength magnet (Toshiba Medical Systems) were visually evaluated by two independent radiologists. The frequency and the direction of peristalsis, and the presence of outer myometrium conduction of signal intensities (OMC), were evaluated. The laterality of the dominant follicle was determined on axial images and compared with the peristaltic direction in fundus. The subjects in which peristaltic directions were more clearly recognized were significantly frequent in coronal planes than in sagittal planes (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the peristaltic frequency between the sagittal and the coronal plane. However, the OMC was more recognized in the coronal plane than in the sagittal plane (P < 0.05). Peristaltic waves conducted toward the possible ovulation side were observed in only three of the 10 subjects. OMC of uterine peristalsis was better demonstrated in the coronal plane compared to the sagittal plane. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  3. Protons in Jupiter's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodisch, K. M.; Bagenal, F.; Dougherty, L.

    2016-12-01

    The solar wind, the icy moons and Jupiter's ionosphere are all potential sources of protons found in the Jovian magnetosphere. In an attempt to quantify the relative importance of these different sources we explore the spatial distribution of density and temperature of the protons in Jupiter's magnetosphere. Through re-analysis of Voyager 1 and 2 Plasma Science (PLS) data obtained between 4 and 40 RJ we produce temperature and density profiles of protons in those regions. By combining profiles of protons and heavy ions (under the assumption of anisotropic Maxwellian distributions) we extrapolate the ion densities along the magnetic field to create global maps of proton density and temperature. Using these models of plasma distributions in the Jovian magnetosphere we predict the proton conditions likely encountered by the Juno spacecraft along its trajectory.

  4. The proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Gil

    2017-09-01

    In 2010 the proton charge radius was extracted for the first time from muonic hydrogen, a bound state of a muon and a proton. The value obtained was five standard deviations away from the regular hydrogen extraction. Taken at face value, this might be an indication of a new force in nature coupling to muons, but not to electrons. It also forces to reexamine our understanding of the structure of the proton. In this talk I will describe an ongoing theoretical research effort that seeks to address and resolve this ''proton radius puzzle''. In particular, I will present a reevaluation of the proton structure effects, correcting 40 years of such calculations, and the development of new effective field theoretical tools that would allow to directly connect muonic hydrogen and muon-proton scattering.

  5. High-Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-12-27

    Analysis is presented for an eight-cavity proton cyclotron accelerator that could have advantages as compared with other accelerators because of its potentially high acceleration gradient. The high gradient is possible since protons orbit in a sequence of TE111 rotating mode cavities of equally diminishing frequencies with path lengths during acceleration that greatly exceed the cavity lengths. As the cavities operate at sequential harmonics of a basic repetition frequency, phase synchronism can be maintained over a relatively wide injection phase window without undue beam emittance growth. It is shown that use of radial vanes can allow cavity designs with significantly smaller radii, as compared with simple cylindrical cavities. Preliminary beam transport studies show that acceptable extraction and focusing of a proton beam after cyclic motion in this accelerator should be possible. Progress is also reported on design and tests of a four-cavity electron counterpart accelerator for experiments to study effects on beam quality arising from variations injection phase window width. This device is powered by four 500-MW pulsed amplifiers at 1500, 1800, 2100, and 2400 MHz that provide phase synchronous outputs, since they are driven from a with harmonics derived from a phase-locked 300 MHz source.

  6. Relativistic Electron Response to the Combined Magnetospheric Impact of a Coronal Mass Ejection Overlapping with a High-Speed Stream: Van Allen Probes Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, W.; Fennell, J. F.; Zheng, Y.; Richardson, I. G.; Jones, A.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; hide

    2015-01-01

    During early November 2013, the magnetosphere experienced concurrent driving by a coronal mass ejection (CME) during an ongoing high-speed stream (HSS) event. The relativistic electron response to these two kinds of drivers, i.e., HSS and CME, is typically different, with the former often leading to a slower buildup of electrons at larger radial distances, while the latter energizing electrons rapidly with flux enhancements occurring closer to the Earth. We present a detailed analysis of the relativistic electron response including radial profiles of phase space density as observed by both Magnetic Electron and Ion Sensor (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope instruments on the Van Allen Probes mission. Data from the MagEIS instrument establish the behavior of lower energy (electrons which span both intermediary and seed populations during electron energization. Measurements characterizing the plasma waves and magnetospheric electric and magnetic fields during this period are obtained by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science instrument on board Van Allen Probes, Search Coil Magnetometer and Flux Gate Magnetometer instruments on board Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, and the low-altitude Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites. These observations suggest that during this time period, both radial transport and local in situ processes are involved in the energization of electrons. The energization attributable to radial diffusion is most clearly evident for the lower energy (electrons, while the effects of in situ energization by interaction of chorus waves are prominent in the higher-energy electrons.

  7. Maskless proton beam writing in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, P. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom) and Nano-Electronics Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.mistry@surrey.ac.uk; Gomez-Morilla, I. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Smith, R.C. [Nano-Electronics Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thomson, D. [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Grime, G.W. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Webb, R.P. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gwilliam, R. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jeynes, C. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Cansell, A. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Merchant, M. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Kirkby, K.J. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    Proton beam writing (PBW) is a direct write technique that employs a focused MeV proton beam which is scanned in a pre-determined pattern over a target material which is subsequently electrochemically etched or chemically developed. By changing the energy of the protons the range of the protons can be changed. The ultimate depth of the structure is determined by the range of the protons in the material and this allows structures to be formed to different depths. PBW has been successfully employed on etchable glasses, polymers and semiconductor materials such as silicon (Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs). This study reports on PBW in p-type GaAs and compares experimental results with computer simulations using the Atlas (copy right) semiconductor device package from SILVACO. It has already been proven that hole transport is required for the electrochemical etching of GaAs using Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-m-benzenedisulfonic acid, di-sodium salt). PBW in GaAs results in carrier removal in the irradiated regions and consequently minimal hole transport (in these regions) during electrochemical etching. As a result the irradiated regions are significantly more etch resistant than the non-irradiated regions. This allows high aspect ratio structures to be formed.

  8. Fuel-Cell Electrolytes Based on Organosilica Hybrid Proton Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sri R.; Yen, Shiao-Pin S.

    2008-01-01

    A new membrane composite material that combines an organosilica proton conductor with perfluorinated Nafion material to achieve good proton conductivity and high-temperature performance for membranes used for fuel cells in stationary, transportation, and portable applications has been developed. To achieve high proton conductivities of the order of 10(exp -1)S/cm over a wide range of temperatures, a composite membrane based on a new class of mesoporous, proton-conducting, hydrogen-bonded organosilica, used with Nafion, will allow for water retention and high proton conductivity over a wider range of temperatures than currently offered by Nafion alone. At the time of this reporting, this innovation is at the concept level. Some of the materials and processes investigated have shown good proton conductivity, but membranes have not yet been prepared and demonstrated.

  9. A Conserved Asparagine in a P-type Proton Pump Is Required for Efficient Gating of Protons*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Kira; Wielandt, Alex G.; Buch-Pedersen, Morten J.; Palmgren, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    The minimal proton pumping machinery of the Arabidopsis thaliana P-type plasma membrane H+-ATPase isoform 2 (AHA2) consists of an aspartate residue serving as key proton donor/acceptor (Asp-684) and an arginine residue controlling the pKa of the aspartate. However, other important aspects of the proton transport mechanism such as gating, and the ability to occlude protons, are still unclear. An asparagine residue (Asn-106) in transmembrane segment 2 of AHA2 is conserved in all P-type plasma membrane H+-ATPases. In the crystal structure of the plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase, this residue is located in the putative ligand entrance pathway, in close proximity to the central proton donor/acceptor Asp-684. Substitution of Asn-106 resulted in mutant enzymes with significantly reduced ability to transport protons against a membrane potential. Sensitivity toward orthovanadate was increased when Asn-106 was substituted with an aspartate residue, but decreased in mutants with alanine, lysine, glutamine, or threonine replacement of Asn-106. The apparent proton affinity was decreased for all mutants, most likely due to a perturbation of the local environment of Asp-684. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Asn-106 is important for closure of the proton entrance pathway prior to proton translocation across the membrane. PMID:23420846

  10. Coronal and apical sealing ability of a new endodontic cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Morvarid; Iravani, Maryam; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This in vitro study aims to evaluate the coronal and apical sealing ability of gutta-percha (GP) root filling used with either mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), new endodontic cement (NEC) or AH26 as filler/sealers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty eight single-rooted extracted teeth were selected, decoronated and then instrumented. Samples were randomly divided into three experimental (n=12) and two control groups (n=6). In group 1, root canals were filled using lateral condensation technique (L); while single cone technique (S) was used for groups 2 and 3. AH26, MTA and NEC were the root canal sealer/fillers in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Samples were immersed in 1% methylene-blue dye and then independently centrifuged apically and coronally. The roots were split longitudinally and linear extent of dye penetration was measured with a stereomicroscope from apical and coronal directions. Data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and T-test. RESULTS: No statistical differences in mean apical dye penetration between groups LGP/AH26, SGP/MTA and SGP/NEC were found; SGP/NEC group showed significantly less coronal dye penetration (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Considering the limitations of this in vitro study, it was concluded that the simple single cone technique with NEC can provide favorable coronal and apical seal. PMID:23864871

  11. A query into the source of proton emission from solar flares, report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    Seven solar flares that were followed by major proton events were examined to determine the diverse and common properties of major flares. The most probable site of primary proton acceleration is cospatial with the site and instant of formation of coronal loops. Because loop formation occurs through the entire duration of major solar flares over significantly large areas of active centers, it is proposed that proton injection occurs from a relatively large volume of space in the corona of active centers and is continuous throughout, and possibly even after, the visible duration of the related chromospheric flare. The flare veil is hypothesized to occur as a result of proton charge exchange taking place in the white-light transient. The Kopp and Pneuman model of loop formation by magnetic reconnection is suggested as an adequate and satisfactory model for all major flares with the provision that the beginning of rapid magnetic field reconnection is coincident with flare start.

  12. Unraveling the mechanism of a reversible photoactivated molecular proton crane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Loop, Tibert H; Ruesink, Freek; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Sanders, Hans J; Buma, Wybren J; Woutersen, S

    2014-11-13

    We study the structural dynamics of the photoactivated molecular proton crane 7-hydroxy-8-(morpholinomethyl)quinoline using femtosecond UV-pump IR-probe spectroscopy. Upon electronic excitation, a proton is transferred from the hydroxy to the amine group located on the rotatable morpholino side group. This morpholino group subsequently delivers the proton to the aromatic quinoline nitrogen by rotation around the C-C bond. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy allows us to study this process in unprecedented detail. We find that the transport of the proton involves multiple time scales. Upon photoexcitation, the OH proton is transferred within <300 fs to the morpholino side group. After this, the intramolecular hydrogen bond that locks the crane arm breaks with a time constant of 36 ± 1 ps. Subsequently, the protonated crane arm rotates with a time constant of 334 ± 12 ps to deliver the proton at the quinoline moiety. After the proton crane has returned to its electronic ground state with a time constant 700 ± 22 ps, the proton is transferred back from the quinoline nitrogen to the negatively charged O atom. The time constant of the back rotation is 39.8 ± 0.2 ns, about 200 times slower than the forward proton transfer.

  13. Hydrated Excess Protons Can Create Their Own Water Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuxing; Swanson, Jessica M J; Kang, Seung-gu; Zhou, Ruhong; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-07-23

    Grotthuss shuttling of an excess proton charge defect through hydrogen bonded water networks has long been the focus of theoretical and experimental studies. In this work we show that there is a related process in which water molecules move ("shuttle") through a hydrated excess proton charge defect in order to wet the path ahead for subsequent proton charge migration. This process is illustrated through reactive molecular dynamics simulations of proton transport through a hydrophobic nanotube, which penetrates through a hydrophobic region. Surprisingly, before the proton enters the nanotube, it starts "shooting" water molecules into the otherwise dry space via Grotthuss shuttling, effectively creating its own water wire where none existed before. As the proton enters the nanotube (by 2-3 Å), it completes the solvation process, transitioning the nanotube to the fully wet state. By contrast, other monatomic cations (e.g., K(+)) have just the opposite effect, by blocking the wetting process and making the nanotube even drier. As the dry nanotube gradually becomes wet when the proton charge defect enters it, the free energy barrier of proton permeation through the tube via Grotthuss shuttling drops significantly. This finding suggests that an important wetting mechanism may influence proton translocation in biological systems, i.e., one in which protons "create" their own water structures (water "wires") in hydrophobic spaces (e.g., protein pores) before migrating through them. An existing water wire, e.g., one seen in an X-ray crystal structure or MD simulations without an explicit excess proton, is therefore not a requirement for protons to transport through hydrophobic spaces.

  14. The Search for Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, Jacqueline Rose

    2017-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may dramatically impact habitability and atmospheric composition of planets around magnetically active stars, including young solar analogs and many M dwarfs. Theoretical predictions of such effects are limited by the lack of observations of stellar CMEs. This thesis addresses this gap through a search for the spectral and spatial radio signatures of CMEs on active M dwarfs. Solar CMEs produce radio bursts with a distinctive spectral signature, narrow-band plasma emission that drifts to lower frequency as a CME expands outward. To search for analogous events on nearby stars, I worked on system design, software, and commissioning for the Starburst project, a wideband single-baseline radio interferometry backend dedicated to stellar observations. In addition, I led a survey of nearby active M dwarfs with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), detecting coherent radio bursts in 13 out of 23 epochs, over a total of 58 hours. This survey's ultra-wide bandwidth (0.23-6.0 GHz) dynamic spectroscopy, unprecedented for stellar observations, revealed diverse behavior in the time-frequency plane. Flare star UV Ceti produced complex, luminous events reminiscent of brown dwarf aurorae; AD Leo sustained long-duration, intense, narrow-band "storms"; and YZ CMi emitted a burst with substructure with rapid frequency drift, resembling solar Type III bursts, which are attributed to electrons moving at speeds of order 10% of the speed of light. To search for the spatial signature of CMEs, I led 8.5-GHz observations with the Very Long Baseline Array simultaneous to 24 hours of the VLA survey. This program detected non-thermal continuum emission from the stars in all epochs, as well as continuum flares on AD Leo and coherent bursts on UV Ceti, enabling measurement of the spatial offset between flaring and quiescent emission. These observations demonstrate the diversity of stellar transients that can be expected in time-domain radio surveys, especially

  15. Cyclic Evolution of Coronal Fields from a Coupled Dynamo Potential-Field Source-Surface Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Suresh, Akshaya; Burkepile, Joan

    The structure of the Sun's corona varies with the solar-cycle phase, from a near spherical symmetry at solar maximum to an axial dipole at solar minimum. It is widely accepted that the large-scale coronal structure is governed by magnetic fields that are most likely generated by dynamo action in the solar interior. In order to understand the variation in coronal structure, we couple a potential-field source-surface model with a cyclic dynamo model. In this coupled model, the magnetic field inside the convection zone is governed by the dynamo equation; these dynamo-generated fields are extended from the photosphere to the corona using a potential-field source-surface model. Assuming axisymmetry, we take linear combinations of associated Legendre polynomials that match the more complex coronal structures. Choosing images of the global corona from the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory at each Carrington rotation over half a cycle (1986 - 1991), we compute the coefficients of the associated Legendre polynomials up to degree eight and compare with observations. We show that at minimum the dipole term dominates, but it fades as the cycle progresses; higher-order multipolar terms begin to dominate. The amplitudes of these terms are not exactly the same for the two limbs, indicating that there is a longitude dependence. While both the 1986 and the 1996 minimum coronas were dipolar, the minimum in 2008 was unusual, since there was a substantial departure from a dipole. We investigate the physical cause of this departure by including a North-South asymmetry in the surface source of the magnetic fields in our flux-transport dynamo model, and find that this asymmetry could be one of the reasons for departure from the dipole in the 2008 minimum.

  16. Extreme-ultraviolet observations of global coronal wave rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attrill, G. D. R. [Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Dstl Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JQ (United Kingdom); Long, D. M.; Green, L. M.; Harra, L. K.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L., E-mail: gdrattrill@dstl.gov.uk [University College London, Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-20

    We present evidence of global coronal wave rotation in EUV data from SOHO/EIT, STEREO/EUVI, and SDO/AIA. The sense of rotation is found to be consistent with the helicity of the source region (clockwise for positive helicity, anticlockwise for negative helicity), with the source regions hosting sigmoidal structures. We also study two coronal wave events observed by SDO/AIA where no clear rotation (or sigmoid) is observed. The selected events show supporting evidence that they all originate with flux rope eruptions. We make comparisons across this set of observations (both with and without clear sigmoidal structures). On examining the magnetic configuration of the source regions, we find that the nonrotation events possess a quadrupolar magnetic configuration. The coronal waves that do show a rotation originate from bipolar source regions.

  17. Solar transition region and coronal response to heating rate perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariska, John T.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of Doppler shifts in UV emission lines formed in the solar transition region show continual plasma downflows and impulsive plasma upflows. Using numerical simulations, the authors examine the conjecture that areas of downflowing plasma are the base regions of coronal loops in which the heating is gradually decreasing and that areas of upflowing plasma are the base regions of coronal loops in which the heating rate is gradually increasing. Beginning with a coronal loop in equilibrium, the heating rate is reduced on time scales of 100, 1000, and 2000 s to 10 percent and 1 percent of the initial value, and the loop is allowed to evolve to a new equilibrium. The heating rate for the cooled models is then increased back to the initial value on the same time scales. While significant mass motions do develop in the simulations, both the emission measure and the velocity at 100,000 K do not show the characteristics present in UV observations.

  18. Coronal Loop Evolution Observed with AIA and Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Kobayashi, K.; Korreck, K.; Golub, L.; Kuzin. S.; Walsh, R.; DeForest, C.; DePontieu, B.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Despite much progress toward understanding the dynamics of the solar corona, the physical properties of coronal loops are not yet fully understood. Recent investigations and observations from different instruments have yielded contradictory results about the true physical properties of coronal loops. In the past, the evolution of loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this poster we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data. We find signatures of cooling in a pixel selected along a loop structure in the AIA multi-filter observations. However, unlike previous studies, we find that the cooling time is much longer than the draining time. This is inconsistent with previous cooling models.

  19. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  20. Thermal instabilities in magnetically confined plasmas - Solar coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, S. R.; Rosner, R.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal stability of confined solar coronal structures ('loops') is investigated, following both normal mode and a new, global instability analysis. It is demonstrated that: (1) normal mode analysis shows modes with size scales comparable to that of loops to be unstable, but to be strongly affected by the loop boundary conditions; (2) a global analysis, based upon variation of the total loop energy losses and gains, yields loop stability conditions for global modes dependent upon the coronal loop heating process, with magnetically coupled heating processes giving marginal stability. The connection between the present analysis and the minimum flux corona of Hearn is also discussed.

  1. Hydrostatic and dynamic models of solar coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of a sequence of one-dimensional fluid flow models of the transition zone and the inner corona. A hydrostatic model atmosphere in reasonable agreement with observations of closed, large-scale coronal structures found in the quiet sun is considered and various physical effects are introduced, one at a time, observing the response of the model. As a result of the investigations, a model is developed of the plasma flow in a coronal hole. It is shown that the data severely circumscribe the allowable range of possible models.

  2. Automatic measurement of orbital volume in unilateral coronal synostosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Vedrana Andersen; Einarsson, Gudmundur; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2016-01-01

    Premature fusion of the coronal suture on one side of the calvaria (unilateral coronal synostosis, UCS) results in asymmetric craniofacial development and the deformation of the orbits. Often this necessitates surgery, where CT scanning is employed to obtain measures of the bony orbit. These meas...... segmentations. We obtain similar measures, as well as high Dice scores, compared to the experts. The run time for the proposed approach with a prototype implementation is around 3 minutes on a standard laptop, making the method suitable for rapid evaluation of orbital volume in UCS....

  3. Coronal seismology waves and oscillations in stellar coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, Alexander; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-01-01

    This concise and systematic account of the current state of this new branch of astrophysics presents the theoretical foundations of plasma astrophysics, magneto-hydrodynamics and coronal magnetic structures, taking into account the full range of available observation techniques -- from radio to gamma. The book discusses stellar loops during flare energy releases, MHD waves and oscillations, plasma instabilities and heating and charged particle acceleration. Current trends and developments in MHD seismology of solar and stellar coronal plasma systems are also covered, while recent p

  4. Proton-Proton Physics with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the ALICE experiment at LHC is to study strongly interacting matter at high energy densities as well as the signatures and properties of the quark-gluon plasma. This goal manifests itself in a rich physics program. Although ALICE will mainly study heavy-ion collisions, a dedicated program will concentrate on proton-proton physics. The first part will introduce the ALICE experiment from a pp measurement's point of view. Two unique properties are its low pT cut-off and the excellent PID capabilities. The various topics of the proton-proton physics program, which will allow a close scrutiny of existing theoretical models, will be described. Furthermore, the interpretation of measurements of heavy-ion collisions necessitates the comparison to measurements of pp collisions. The second part will concentrate on the day-1 physics program of ALICE. At startup, neither the LHC luminosity nor its energy will have their nominal values. Furthermore, the ALICE detector is in the process of being aligned and cal...

  5. Hydrogen Energy by Means of Proton Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    If we dare to take serious what we know today about climate issues the challenges to our energy systems are immense. If we really chose - also in practice - to phase out the fossil fuels major changes to the way we handle energy are required. The renewable energy resources are by far sufficient......, but matching supply and demand in time as well as in form calls for new engineering solutions. Hydrogen as energy carrier and energy storage medium has often been mentioned as an option for the future. A protons is an elementary particles, but at the same time the ion of hydrogen. When hydrogen (H2......) is extracted from water (H2O) it can happen via formation of protons (hydrogen ions, H+) which must be transported away by proton conducting materials to form molecular hydrogen (H2). This process is called electrolysis and converts electrical energy into the chemical energy of a fuel. The reverse process...

  6. Molecular mechanisms controlling proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ebrey, Thomas G.

    2000-02-10

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is the simplest biological system for the transduction of light energy. Light energy is directly converted to transmembrane proton gradient by a single, small membrane protein. The extraordinary stability of bR makes it an outstanding subject for bioenergetic studies. This project has focused on the role of interactions between key residues of the pigment involved in light-induced proton transfer. Methods to estimate the strength of these interactions and their correlation with the rate and efficiency of proton transfer have been developed. The concept of the coupling of the protonation states of key groups has been applied to individual steps of the proton transfer with the ultimate goal of understanding on the molecular level the driving forces for proton transport and the pathway of the transported proton in bT. The mechanism of light-induced proton release, uptake and the mechanism of recovery of initial state of bT has been examined. The experiments were performed with genetically engineered, site-specific mutants of bR. This has enabled us to characterize the role of individual amino acid residues in bR. Time resolved and low temperature absorption spectroscopy and light-induced photocurrent measurements were used in order to study the photochemical cycle and proton transfer in mutant pigments. Chemical modification and crosslinking of both the specific amino acids to the chromophore or to other amino acids were used to elucidate the role of light-induced conformational changes in the photocycle and the structure of the protein in the ground state. The results of this project provided new knowledge on the architecture of the proton transfer pathways inside the protein, on the mechanism of proton release in bR, and on the role of specific amino acid residues in the structure and function of bR.

  7. Evolution of an equatorial coronal hole structure and the released coronal hole wind stream: Carrington rotations 2039 to 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich-Meisner, Verena; Peleikis, Thies; Kruse, Martin; Berger, Lars; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The Sun is a highly dynamic environment that exhibits dynamic behavior on many different timescales. Variability is observed both in closed and in open field line regions in the solar corona. In particular, coronal holes exhibit temporal and spatial variability. Signatures of these coronal dynamics are inherited by the coronal hole wind streams that originate in these regions and can effect the Earth's magnetosphere. Both the cause of the observed variabilities and how these translate to fluctuations in the in situ observed solar wind is not yet fully understood. Aims: During solar activity minimum the structure of the magnetic field typically remains stable over several Carrington rotations (CRs). But how stable is the solar magnetic field? Here, we address this question by analyzing the evolution of a coronal hole structure and the corresponding coronal hole wind stream emitted from this source region over 12 consecutive CRs in 2006. Methods: To this end, we link in situ observations of Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) with synoptic maps of Michelson Doppler imager (MDI) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) at the photospheric level through a combination of ballistic back-mapping and a potential field source surface (PFSS) approach. Together, these track the evolution of the open field line region that is identified as the source region of a recurring coronal hole wind stream. Under the assumptions of the freeze-in scenario for charge states in the solar wind, we derive freeze-in temperatures and determine the order in which the different charge state ratios of ion pairs appear to freeze-in. We call the combination of freeze-in temperatures derived from in situ observed ion density ratios and freeze-in order a minimal electron temperature profile and investigate its variability. Results: The in situ properties and the PFSS model together probe the lateral magnetic field

  8. Coronal Mass Ejections and Their Effect on the Venusian Nightglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, C. L.; Chanover, N.; Slanger, T. G.

    2012-12-01

    Earth, Venus, and Mars all formed close to the Sun under similar conditions and with similar materials. While having common origins of formation, they have very different atmospheres. These difference are due to various evolutionary paths taken by each planet, resulting in two CO2 dominated atmospheres and a one N2/O2 dominated atmosphere. In order to understand the processes that led to the evolution of these atmospheres we need to understand the present chemistry. Knowing the chemical reactions occurring in the mesosphere and ionosphere of these two types of atmospheres leads to a greater understanding of physical processes, such as winds and transport mechanisms. These chemical reactions can be determined by observing nightglow. Nightglow is caused by recombination of atoms into molecules, or electrons with ions, producing excited molecules and atoms, respectively. Venus has several strong nightglow features, one of which is the O(1S-1D) transition at 5577.3 Å (oxygen green line). This feature is known to be highly temporally variable. When it was first seen in 1999, it had an intensity greater than the terrestrial nightglow, but it was too weak to be detected after 2004. The reason for this variability, and the chemistry producing the emission, have both been poorly understood. Literature review of past observations show that a week prior to every detection, at least one high energy solar flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) occurred directed at Venus. Solar flares produce large amounts of extreme ultra violet light and charged particles. CMEs are large plasma ejections usually connected with solar flares. We propose that the oxygen green line emission is due to CME impacts from the Sun. The charged particles of the plasma can interact with the atmosphere of Venus to produce nightglow/aurora, where dissociative recombination of O2+ is the mostly likely source of O(1S). To test our hypothesis, we observed Venus as a Target of Opportunity with the ARCES high

  9. Proton Transfer in Nucleobases is Mediated by Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khistyaev, Kirill; Golan, Amir; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Orms, Natalie; Krylov, Anna I.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-08-08

    Water plays a central role in chemistry and biology by mediating the interactions between molecules, altering energy levels of solvated species, modifying potential energy proles along reaction coordinates, and facilitating ecient proton transport through ion channels and interfaces. This study investigates proton transfer in a model system comprising dry and microhydrated clusters of nucleobases. With mass spectrometry and tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation, we show that water shuts down ionization-induced proton transfer between nucleobases, which is very ecient in dry clusters. Instead, a new pathway opens up in which protonated nucleo bases are generated by proton transfer from the ionized water molecule and elimination of a hydroxyl radical. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the shape of the potential energy prole along the proton transfer coordinate depends strongly on the character of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed, i.e., the proton transfer from water to nucleobases is barrierless when an ionized state localized on water is accessed. The computed energetics of proton transfer is in excellent agreement with the experimental appearance energies. Possible adiabatic passage on the ground electronic state of the ionized system, while energetically accessible at lower energies, is not ecient. Thus, proton transfer is controlled electronically, by the character of the ionized state, rather than statistically, by simple energy considerations.

  10. A new way to convert Alfven waves into heat in solar coronal holes - Intermittent magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Hammer, R.; Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.; An, C.-H.

    1992-01-01

    In our recent analysis of Alfven wave reflection in solar coronal holes, we found evidence that coronal holes are heated by reflected Alfven waves. This result suggests that the reflection is inherent to the process that dissipates these Alfven waves into heat. We propose a novel dissipation process that is driven by the reflection, and that plausibly dominates the heating in coronal holes.

  11. Cyclical Variation of the Quiet Corona and Coronal Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    spectroheliograms obtained at Kitt Peak since the 1970s provides a proxy to the X- ray corona, with continuity and time span superior to X-ray observations. The rotation rate of coronal holes has been studied based on the helium 10830 Å spectroheliograms by Navarro-Peralta & Sanchez-Ibarra (1994), and by Insley et al.

  12. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties Ν ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Astr. (2000) 21, 413 417. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties. Ν. Gopalswamy1,2*, Κ. Shibasaki3, & Μ. Salem4. 1. Bldg 26, Room Gl, Code 682.3, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt MD, USA. 2 Center for Solar Physics and Space Weather, The Catholic University of America,. Washington DC 20064.

  13. African Culture and Communication Systems in the Coronation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African culture cannot be detached from the mode of communication of Africans. In this study, the writer examined the aspects of African culture communicated during the coronation of the 27th Ata Igala of Kogi State, North-central Nigeria. The study was motivated by the fact that the Ata, Idakwo Michael Ameh Oboni, rather ...

  14. Non-Equilibrium Ionization Effects Induced During Coronal Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Reale, F.; Rosner, R.; Siegel, A.

    We present preliminary results of hydrodynamic modeling of flares occurring in plasma confined in coronal loops. Our analysis focuses on the deviations from ionization equilibrium on the population fractions of the most abundant elements in astrophysical plasmas, and on the possible implications for plasma diagnostics.

  15. Solar Coronal Plumes and the Fast Solar Wind

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in Polar Coronal Holes (PCHs) can be further investigated with the instrument Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), it is mandatory to summarize the results of the ...

  16. Solar wind heavy ions from energetic coronal events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bame, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Ions heavier than those of He can be resolved in the solar wind with electrostatic E/q analyzers when the local thermal temperatures are low. Ordinarily this condition prevails in the low speed solar wind found between high speed streams, i.e. the interstream, IS, solar wind. Various ions of O, Si and Fe are resolved in IS heavy ion spectra. Relative ion peak intensities indicate that the O ionization state is established in the IS coronal source regions at approx. 2.1 x 10/sup 6/K while the state of Fe is frozen in at approx. 1.5 x 10/sup 6/K farther out. Occasionally, anomalous spectra are observed in which the usually third most prominent ion peak, O/sup 8 +/, is depressed as are the Fe peaks ranging from Fe/sup 12 +/ to Fe/sup 7 +/. A prominent peak in the usual Si/sup 8 +/ position of IS spectra is self-consistently shown to be Fe/sup 16 +/. These features demonstrate that the ionization states were frozen in at higher than usual coronal temperatures. The source regions of these hot heavy ion spectra are identified as energetic coronal events including flares and nonflare coronal mass ejections. 24 references.

  17. RADIOLOGICAL TIPS Coronal views of the paediatric mandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We discuss 4 cases seen over the last 18 months at Red Cross War. Memorial Children's Hospital in an effort to highlight the importance of routinely reviewing coronal views of the mandibular condyle when interpreting trauma-related computerised tomography brain (CTB) studies in a paediatric setting. The mandible is the ...

  18. A Bayesian Approach to Period Searching in Solar Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Bryan; McKenzie, David

    2017-03-01

    We have applied a Bayesian generalized Lomb-Scargle period searching algorithm to movies of coronal loop images obtained with the Hinode X-ray Telescope (XRT) to search for evidence of periodicities that would indicate resonant heating of the loops. The algorithm makes as its only assumption that there is a single sinusoidal signal within each light curve of the data. Both the amplitudes and noise are taken as free parameters. It is argued that this procedure should be used alongside Fourier and wavelet analyses to more accurately extract periodic intensity modulations in coronal loops. The data analyzed are from XRT Observation Program #129C: “MHD Wave Heating (Thin Filters),” which occurred during 2006 November 13 and focused on active region 10293, which included coronal loops. The first data set spans approximately 10 min with an average cadence of 2 s, 2″ per pixel resolution, and used the Al-mesh analysis filter. The second data set spans approximately 4 min with a 3 s average cadence, 1″ per pixel resolution, and used the Al-poly analysis filter. The final data set spans approximately 22 min at a 6 s average cadence, and used the Al-poly analysis filter. In total, 55 periods of sinusoidal coronal loop oscillations between 5.5 and 59.6 s are discussed, supporting proposals in the literature that resonant absorption of magnetic waves is a viable mechanism for depositing energy in the corona.

  19. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the individual and combined effects of radiation and thermal conduction are studied by displaying the analytical solution numerically. Our discussions and conclusions are presented in Section 5. 2. The model and governing equations. We model a straight coronal loop, in which the magnetic field is uniform and in.

  20. Distribution of Latitudes and Speeds of Coronal Mass Ejections in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Distribution of latitudes and speeds of Coronal Mass Ejec- tions (CMEs) in the northern and southern hemispheres in cycle 23, from. September 1996 to December 2006, have been analyzed. By calculating the actual probability of the hemispheric distribution of the activity of the. CME, we find that a southern ...

  1. Heating coronal holes and accelerating the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1992-01-01

    The special energy requirements of a coronal hole combined with current knowledge of the limited dissipation of Alfven and fast mode MHD waves in the solar corona suggest a unique source of heat for the coronal hole. The near coronal hole requires approximately 3 - 4 x 10 exp 5 ergs/sq cm s, which can come only from the fluid jets, fast particles, and short period MHD waves from the network activity. The high speed streams of solar wind from coronal holes show that there is substantial heating, of 1 - 2 x 10 exp 5 ergs/sq cm s, beyond the sonic point in the wind, which can come only from the dissipation by thermal conduction of long period (approximately equal or greater than 100 sec) MHD waves from subphotospheric convection. Although the Alfven wave flux from the photosphere is generally taken for granted in the literature, we point out that it is a crucial phenomenon that has yet to be established on either a theoretical or observational scientific basis.

  2. Do slow shocks precede some coronal mass ejections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundhausen, A.J.; Holzer, T.E.; Low, B.C.

    1987-10-01

    The observed speeds of coronal mass ejections are often below the estimated Alfven speed but above the sound speed for the background solar corona. This suggets that slow magnetohydrodynamic shocks may form as mass ejections sweep through the corona. We argue on the basis of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and the propagation of small-amplitude slow mode waves that the shape of a slow shock front would be flattened (with respect to a sun-centered sphere) or perhaps even concave outward (from the sun) and thus present a very different appearance from the fast coronal shock waves that have been commonly modeled as wrapping around a mass ejection. The region behind a slow shock front standing just off the top of a coronal mass ejection would extend well out beyond the visible flanks of the ejection. The deflections of coronal structures that are commonly observed well outside of these flanks (and which are inconsistent with a fast shock wrapped around the mass ejection) are consistent with the presence of the slow shock, whether they lie in the enlarged postshock region or in a region still further beyond. Although the flattering of the tops of some mass ejections suggests our proposed slow shock configuration, a true test of its existence awaits formulation of quantitative models and detailed comparison with observations. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  3. The Enhanced Coronal Green Line Intensity and the Magnetic Field ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Sun: Corona—emergence of magnetic flux. Extended abstract. Ramesh, Nagabhushana and Varghese (1999) have shown that the green line intensity enhancement does not depend entirely on the strength of the underlying spot magnetic field though the coronal intensity enhanced feature is almost sure to occur at the.

  4. Oblique Propagation and Dissipation of Alfven Waves in Coronal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 28; Issue 1 ... Sun: Alfvén waves; coronal holes; solar wind. ... For any propagation angle, the energy flux density and damping length scale also show a decrement in the source region of the solar wind (< 1.05 R⊙) where these may be one of the primary ...

  5. Microflares as Possible Sources for Coronal Heating Meera Gupta ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solar flares: microflares, Fe-line feature—coronal heating. 1. Introduction. The solar corona is some 200 times .... standard OSPEX software in SolarSoft package. Fig. 1 shows, as an example, the light .... that the microflare reveals Fe line complex (red colour) peaking at 6.7 keV. However,. Fe/Ni line complex was not visible ...

  6. Case report: pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucencies revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counihan, K P; O'Connell, A C

    2012-08-01

    Pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucency (PEIR) describes a radiolucent lesion located in the coronal dentine, just beneath the enamel-dentine junction of unerupted teeth. The prevalence of this lesion varies depending on the type and quality of radiographic exposure and age of patients used for assessment. The aetiology of pre-eruptive intra-coronal radiolucent lesions is not fully understood, but published clinical and histological evidence suggest that these lesions are resorptive in nature. Issues around the diagnosis, treatment planning and clinical management of this lesion are explored using previously unreported cases. Case 1: A ten-year-old girl attended for a routine check-up. An intra-coronal radiolucency in the unerupted lower right second premolar was an incidental finding on orthopantomograph (OPT). The tooth erupted and removal of enamel revealed a space filled with soft red tissue, unlike carious dentine in appearance. The tooth was restored with an indirect pulp cap, resin modified glass ionomer base and composite resin. Tissue from the lesion was removed for histopathological investigation. Root development continued to completion and the tooth remained asymptomatic and vital. Case 2: A six-year-old girl attended for her first dental visit. An intra-coronal radiolucency in a lower right first permanent molar was noted on baseline bitewing radiographs. The lesion was monitored and fissured sealed upon eruption. The lesion was monitored annually radiographically. The tooth remained symptom free for 5 years. The patient presented on an emergency basis having fractured the distolingual cusp overlying the lesion. There was no pain and the tooth was vital. The softened dentine was removed and the tooth was restored using a preformed metal crown. Case 3: A 12-year-old girl was referred for restoration of mandibular left second permanent molar. Clinically there was extensive occlusal destruction. Review of a previous OPT showed that an intra-coronal

  7. Three-dimensional multi-fluid model of a coronal streamer belt with a tilted magnetic dipole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ofman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of streamers in extreme ultraviolet (EUV emission with SOHO/UVCS show dramatic differences in line profiles and latitudinal variations in heavy ion emission compared to hydrogen Ly-α emission. In order to use ion emission observations of streamers as the diagnostics of the slow solar wind properties, an adequate model of a streamer including heavy ions is required. We extended a previous 2.5-D multi-species magnetohydrodynamics (MHD model of a coronal streamer to 3-D spherical geometry, and in the first approach we consider a tilted dipole configuration of the solar magnetic field. The aim of the present study is to test the 3-D results by comparing to previous 2.5-D model result for a 3-D case with moderate departure from azimuthal symmetry. The model includes O5+ ions with preferential empirical heating and allows for calculation of their density, velocity and temperature in coronal streamers. We present the first results of our 3-D multi-fluid model showing the parameters of protons, electrons and heavy ions (O5+ at the steady-state solar corona with a tilted steamer belt. We find that the 3-D results are in qualitative agreement with our previous 2.5-D model, and show longitudinal variation in the variables in accordance with the tilted streamer belt structure. Properties of heavy coronal ions obtained from the 3-D model together with EUV spectroscopic observations of streamers will help understanding the 3-D structures of streamers reducing line-of-sight integration ambiguities and identifying the sources of the slow solar wind in the lower corona. This leads to improved understanding of the physics of the slow solar wind.

  8. Coronal Electron Confinement by Double Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Li, T C; Swisdak, M

    2014-01-01

    In observations of flare-heated electrons in the solar corona, a longstanding problem is the unexplained prolonged lifetime of the electrons compared to their transit time across the source. This suggests confinement. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which explored the transport of pre-accelerated hot electrons through ambient cold plasma, showed that the formation of a highly localized electrostatic potential drop, in the form of a double layer (DL), significantly inhibited the transport of hot electrons (T.C. Li, J.F. Drake, and M. Swisdak, 2012, ApJ, 757, 20). The effectiveness of confinement by a DL is linked to the strength of the DL as defined by its potential drop. In this work, we investigate the scaling of the DL strength with the hot electron temperature by PIC simulations, and find a linear scaling. We demonstrate that the strength is limited by the formation of parallel shocks. Based on this, we analytically determine the maximum DL strength, and find also a linear scaling with the hot e...

  9. Lorentz contracted proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierro, D. Bedoya; Kelkar, N.G.; Nowakowski, M. [Dept. de Fisica, Universidad de los Andes, Cra. 1E No. 18A-10, Santafe de Bogota (Colombia)

    2015-09-30

    The proton charge and magnetization density distributions can be related to the well known Sachs electromagnetic form factors G{sub E,M}(/emph {q}{sup 2}) through Fourier transforms, only in the Breit frame. The Breit frame however moves with relativistic velocities in the Lab and a Lorentz boost must be applied before extracting the static properties of the proton from the corresponding densities. Apart from this, the Fourier transform relating the densities and form factors is inherently a non-relativistic expression. We show that the relativistic corrections to it can be obtained by extending the standard Breit equation to higher orders in its 1/c{sup 2} expansion. We find that the inclusion of the above corrections reduces the size of the proton as determined from electron proton scattering data by about 4%.

  10. Inauguration of Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    On 5 February 1960, the Proton Synchrotron (PS) was formally inaugurated. The great Danish physicist, Niels Bohr, releases a bottle of champagne against a shielding block to launch the PS on its voyage in physics.

  11. Proton computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible.

  12. Jovian proton aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, M. G.; Edgar, B. C.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Auroral and polar cap emissions in a model Jovian atmosphere are determined for proton precipitation. The incident protons, which are characterized by representative spectra, are degraded in energy by applying the continuous slowing down approximation. All secondary and higher generation electrons are assumed to be absorbed locally and their contributions to the total emissions are included. Volume emission rates are calculated from the total direct excitation rates with corrections for cascading applied. Results show that most molecular hydrogen and helium emissions for polar cap precipitation are below the ambient dayglow values. Charge capture by precipitating protons is an important source of Lyman alpha and Balmer alpha emissions and offers a key to the detection of large fluxes of low energy protons.

  13. Proton conduction in phosphatidylethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, N; Gonda, K; Kagami, I; Koga, S

    1977-08-01

    The dc conductivity of polycrystalline phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was measured in the temperature range 60-120 degrees C. Since no conclusive evidence had so far been obtained for the presence of proteon conduction in this phospholipid, hydrogen gas was shown in the present experiment to evolve during the electrolysis in its premelted state between 91 and 124 degrees C. In this temperature range molecules assume rotation around the molecular axes and proton conduction of the Grotthus type takes place possibly along two chains of intermolecular hydrogen bonds running in parallel. Zwitter-ions behave cooperatively as proton donors and acceptors in transferring proton from molecule and molecule via the hydrogen bond networks. This efficient push-pull way of proton transferring seems to account for the fact that no polarization was observed in the dc conduction experiments. The amount of devolved gas appears to be not exactly in accordance with Faraday's law and discussions are made on possible causes for this slight deviation.

  14. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  15. Multicavity proton cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hirshfield

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for acceleration of protons is described, in which energy gain occurs near cyclotron resonance as protons drift through a sequence of rotating-mode TE_{111} cylindrical cavities in a strong nearly uniform axial magnetic field. Cavity resonance frequencies decrease in sequence from one another with a fixed frequency interval Δf between cavities, so that synchronism can be maintained between the rf fields and proton bunches injected at intervals of 1/Δf. An example is presented in which a 122 mA, 1 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 961 MeV using a cascade of eight cavities in an 8.1 T magnetic field, with the first cavity resonant at 120 MHz and with Δf=8 MHz. Average acceleration gradient exceeds 40 MV/m, average effective shunt impedance is 223 MΩ/m, but maximum surface field in the cavities does not exceed 7.2 MV/m. These features occur because protons make many orbital turns in each cavity and thus experience acceleration from each cavity field many times. Longitudinal and transverse stability appear to be intrinsic properties of the acceleration mechanism, and an example to illustrate this is presented. This acceleration concept could be developed into a proton accelerator for a high-power neutron spallation source, such as that required for transmutation of nuclear waste or driving a subcritical fission burner, provided a number of significant practical issues can be addressed.

  16. New techniques for the characterisation of dynamical phenomena in solar coronal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbrecht, E.

    2007-02-01

    ) was an important step on the way to subarcsecond telescopes. It allows a spatial resolution of 1" in the EUV and UV bands and, simultaneously, a temporal resolution of the order of a few seconds. Coronal physics studies are dominated by two major and interlinked problems: coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Above the chromosphere there is a thin transition layer in which the temperature suddenly increases and density drops. How can the temperature of the solar corona be three orders of magnitude higher than the temperature of the photosphere? In order for this huge temperature gradient to be stationary, non-thermal energy must be transported from below the photosphere towards the chromosphere and corona and converted into heat to balance the radiative and conductive losses. This puzzle of origin, transport and conversion of energy is referred to as the "coronal heating problem". Due to its fundamental role in the structuring of the corona, the magnetic field is supposed to play an important role in the heating. In this dissertation we describe two aspects of solar coronal dynamics: waves in coronal loops (Part I) and coronal mass ejections (Part II). We investigate the influence of (semi-) automated techniques on solar coronal research. This is a timely discussion since the observation of solar phenomena is transitioning from manual detection to "Solar Image Processing". Our results are mainly based on images from the Extreme UV Imaging Telescope (EIT) and the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO), two instruments onboard the satellite SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) of which we recently celebrated its 11th anniversary. The high quality of the images together with the long timespan created a valuable database for solar physics research. Part I reports on the first detection of slow magnetoacoustic waves in transequatorial coronal loops observed in high cadence image sequences simultaneously produced by EIT and TRACE (Transition Region

  17. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. [University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine; Castro, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  18. Interfacial water molecules at biological membranes: Structural features and role for lateral proton diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hai; Zhang, Chao; Weichselbaum, Ewald; Knyazev, Denis G; Pohl, Peter; Carloni, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Proton transport at water/membrane interfaces plays a fundamental role for a myriad of bioenergetic processes. Here we have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of proton transfer along two phosphatidylcholine bilayers. As found in previous theoretical studies, the excess proton is preferably located at the water/membrane interface. Further, our simulations indicate that it interacts not only with phosphate head groups, but also with water molecules at the interfaces. Interfacial water molecules turn out to be oriented relative to the lipid bilayers, consistently with experimental evidence. Hence, the specific water-proton interaction may help explain the proton mobility experimentally observed at the membrane interface.

  19. Characteristics of Low-latitude Coronal Holes near the Maximum of Solar Cycle 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmeister, Stefan J.; Veronig, Astrid; Reiss, Martin A.; Temmer, Manuela [University of Graz, Institute of Physics, IGAM-Kanzelhöhe Observatory, Graz (Austria); Vennerstrom, Susanne [National Space Institute, DTU Space (Denmark); Vršnak, Bojan [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Zagreb (Croatia); Heber, Bernd, E-mail: stefan.hofmeister@uni-graz.at [Universität Kiel, Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Kiel (Germany)

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the statistics of 288 low-latitude coronal holes extracted from SDO /AIA-193 filtergrams over the time range of 2011 January 01–2013 December 31. We analyze the distribution of characteristic coronal hole properties, such as the areas, mean AIA-193 intensities, and mean magnetic field densities, the local distribution of the SDO /AIA-193 intensity and the magnetic field within the coronal holes, and the distribution of magnetic flux tubes in coronal holes. We find that the mean magnetic field density of all coronal holes under study is 3.0 ± 1.6 G, and the percentaged unbalanced magnetic flux is 49 ± 16%. The mean magnetic field density, the mean unsigned magnetic field density, and the percentaged unbalanced magnetic flux of coronal holes depend strongly pairwise on each other, with correlation coefficients cc > 0.92. Furthermore, we find that the unbalanced magnetic flux of the coronal holes is predominantly concentrated in magnetic flux tubes: 38% (81%) of the unbalanced magnetic flux of coronal holes arises from only 1% (10%) of the coronal hole area, clustered in magnetic flux tubes with field strengths >50 G (10 G). The average magnetic field density and the unbalanced magnetic flux derived from the magnetic flux tubes correlate with the mean magnetic field density and the unbalanced magnetic flux of the overall coronal hole (cc>0.93). These findings give evidence that the overall magnetic characteristics of coronal holes are governed by the characteristics of the magnetic flux tubes.

  20. Quantification of osseous facial dysmorphology in untreated unilateral coronal synostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, A A; Kim, Y O; Eaton, A; Pilgram, T K; Marsh, J L; Zonneveld, F; Larsen, P; Kreiborg, S

    2000-08-01

    Unilateral coronal synostosis results in dysmorphology of the midface in addition to well-characterized cranial and orbital deformities. Because most American infants with this problem have undergone cranio-orbital surgery within their first year of life for the past 25 years, a paucity of data exist regarding the natural history of untreated unilateral coronal synostosis. In an attempt to remedy this void, an international search was conducted to identify computed tomography data sets of living individuals with untreated unilateral coronal synostosis; data were obtained from two European centers and one center in the United States. Results limited to the study of the midface are presented here. Digital data from high-resolution head computed tomography scans of 11 living, white individuals with untreated unilateral coronal synostosis were obtained from three craniofacial centers (in Denmark, The Netherlands, and the United States). Image volumes were constructed from each scan using ANALYZE biomedical imaging software. Fourteen pairs of three-dimensional distances were calculated on the ipsilateral (the side of the synostosis) and the contralateral (the side opposite to the synostosis) hemifaces using 11 osseous landmarks. The resulting measurements were expressed as a ratio of the ipsilateral: contralateral sides. Descriptive statistics were derived for the untreated unilateral coronal synostosis population and compared with analogous measurements performed on dried skulls. Age at computed tomography ranged from 1.1 to 21.1 years (mean, 6.6 years; median, 4.1 years). Twelve of the 14 measured distances differed by greater than 5 percent on the ipsilateral side, and all but one of these measurements were decreased on the ipsilateral side when compared with contralateral values. The results of this study support the following conclusions: (1) There are discrete and measurable differences in the facial morphology between patients with untreated unilateral coronal

  1. Neutral escape at Mars induced by the precipitation of high-energy protons and hydrogen atoms of the solar wind origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, Valery I.

    2017-04-01

    One of the first surprises of the NASA MAVEN mission was the observation by the SWIA instrument of a tenuous population of protons with solar wind energies travelling anti-sunward near periapsis, at altitudes of 150-250 km (Halekas et al., 2015). While the penetration of solar wind protons to low altitude is not completely unexpected given previous Mars Express results, this population maintains exactly the same velocity as the solar wind observed. From previous studies it was known that some fraction of the solar wind can interact with the extended corona of Mars. By charge exchange with the neutral particles in this corona, some fraction of the incoming solar wind protons can gain an electron and become an energetic neutral hydrogen atom. Once neutral, these particles penetrate through the Martian induced magnetosphere with ease, with free access to the collisional atmosphere/ionosphere. The origin, kinetics and transport of the suprathermal O atoms in the transition region (from thermosphere to exosphere) of the Martian upper atmosphere due to the precipitation of the high-energy protons and hydrogen atoms are discussed. Kinetic energy distribution functions of suprathermal and superthermal (ENA) oxygen atoms formed in the Martian upper atmosphere were calculated using the kinetic Monte Carlo model (Shematovich et al., 2011, Shematovich, 2013) of the high-energy proton and hydrogen atom precipitation into the atmosphere. These functions allowed us: (a) to estimate the non-thermal escape rates of neutral oxygen from the Martian upper atmosphere, and (b) to compare with available MAVEN measurements of oxygen corona. Induced by precipitation the escape of hot oxygen atoms may become dominant under conditions of extreme solar events - solar flares and coronal mass ejections, - as it was shown by recent observations of the NASA MAVEN spacecraft (Jakosky et al., 2015). This work is supported by the RFBR project and by the Basic Research Program of the Praesidium of

  2. Proton therapy Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most powerful feature of the Monte Carlo method is the possibility of simulating all individual particle interactions in three dimensions and performing numerical experiments with a preset error. These facts were the motivation behind the development of a general-purpose Monte Carlo SRNA program for proton transport simulation in technical systems described by standard geometrical forms (plane, sphere, cone, cylinder, cube. Some of the possible applications of the SRNA program are: (a a general code for proton transport modeling, (b design of accelerator-driven systems, (c simulation of proton scattering and degrading shapes and composition, (d research on proton detectors; and (e radiation protection at accelerator installations. This wide range of possible applications of the program demands the development of various versions of SRNA-VOX codes for proton transport modeling in voxelized geometries and has, finally, resulted in the ISTAR package for the calculation of deposited energy distribution in patients on the basis of CT data in radiotherapy. All of the said codes are capable of using 3-D proton sources with an arbitrary energy spectrum in an interval of 100 keV to 250 MeV.

  3. Method and apparatus for laser-controlled proton beam radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Carol J.

    1998-01-01

    A proton beam radiology system provides cancer treatment and proton radiography. The system includes an accelerator for producing an H.sup.- beam and a laser source for generating a laser beam. A photodetachment module is located proximate the periphery of the accelerator. The photodetachment module combines the H.sup.- beam and laser beam to produce a neutral beam therefrom within a subsection of the H.sup.- beam. The photodetachment module emits the neutral beam along a trajectory defined by the laser beam. The photodetachment module includes a stripping foil which forms a proton beam from the neutral beam. The proton beam is delivered to a conveyance segment which transports the proton beam to a patient treatment station. The photodetachment module further includes a laser scanner which moves the laser beam along a path transverse to the cross-section of the H.sup.- beam in order to form the neutral beam in subsections of the H.sup.- beam. As the scanning laser moves across the H.sup.- beam, it similarly varies the trajectory of the proton beam emitted from the photodetachment module and in turn varies the target location of the proton beam upon the patient. Intensity modulation of the proton beam can also be achieved by controlling the output of the laser.

  4. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Xia, Xinli [Beijing Forestry University, China; Yin, Weilun [Beijing Forestry University, China

    2013-01-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant specieswas reported.We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240members are separated into three families, i.e., Na+/H+ exchangers, K+ efflux antiporters, and cation/H+ exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H+ exchangers in the examined angiospermspecies. Sliding windowanalysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and foundmostmotifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants.

  5. The magnetic connectivity of coronal shocks from behind-the-limb flares to the visible solar surface during γ-ray events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, I.; Rouillard, A. P.; Share, G. H.

    2017-12-01

    Context. The observation of >100 MeV γ-rays in the minutes to hours following solar flares suggests that high-energy particles interacting in the solar atmosphere can be stored and/or accelerated for long time periods. The occasions when γ-rays are detected even when the solar eruptions occurred beyond the solar limb as viewed from Earth provide favorable viewing conditions for studying the role of coronal shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the acceleration of these particles. Aims: In this paper, we investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of the coronal shocks inferred from stereoscopic observations of behind-the-limb flares to determine if they could be the source of the particles producing the γ-rays. Methods: We analyzed the CMEs and early formation of coronal shocks associated with γ-ray events measured by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) from three eruptions behind the solar limb as viewed from Earth on 2013 Oct. 11, 2014 Jan. 06 and Sep. 01. We used a 3D triangulation technique, based on remote-sensing observations to model the expansion of the CME shocks from above the solar surface to the upper corona. Coupling the expansion model to various models of the coronal magnetic field allowed us to derive the time-dependent distribution of shock Mach numbers and the magnetic connection of particles produced by the shock to the solar surface visible from Earth. Results: The reconstructed shock fronts for the three events became magnetically connected to the visible solar surface after the start of the flare and just before the onset of the >100 MeV γ-ray emission. The shock surface at these connections also exhibited supercritical Mach numbers required for significant particle energization. The strongest γ-ray emissions occurred when the flanks of the shocks were connected in a quasi-perpendicular geometry to the field lines reaching the visible surface. Multipoint, in situ, measurements of solar energetic particles (SEPs) were

  6. Diversity of transport mechanisms: common structural principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, A.J.M.; Rosen, B.P.; Konings, W.N

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, prokaryotic solute transport systems are classified into major groups based on the energetic requirement of the transport process. These include the secondary transporters that are driven by a proton or sodium motive force, and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) primary transporters,

  7. Journal of Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Proton Therapy (JPT is an international open access, peer-reviewed journal, which publishes original research, technical reports, reviews, case reports, editorials, and other materials on proton therapy with focus on radiation oncology, medical physics, medical dosimetry, and radiation therapy.No article processing/submission feeNo publication feePeer-review completion within 3-6 weeksImmediate publication after the completion of final author proofreadDOI assignment for each published articleFree access to published articles for all readers without any access barriers or subscriptionThe views and opinions expressed in articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the Journal of Proton Therapy.Authors are encouraged to submit articles for publication in the inaugural issue of the Journal of Proton Therapy by online or email to editor@protonjournal.comOfficial Website of Journal of Proton Therapy: http://www.protonjournal.org/

  8. The magnetic connectivity of coronal shocks to the visible disk during long-duration gamma-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Illya; Rouillard, Alexis; Share, Gerald

    2017-04-01

    Solar gamma-ray emissions are attributed to energetic particles accelerated in the low corona during solar flares and generally associated to the concomitant eruption of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Solar flares and coronal shocks are two strong candidate accelerators for energetic particles that produce γ-rays. For many γ-ray events that last more than an hour, the so-called Long Duration Gamma Ray Flares (LDGRFs), a broad source location is invoked to explain the observations, this is particularly true in events associated with solar eruptions that emerged on the far side of the Sun since the flare loop and foot-points are not visible from Earth. Such configurations provide favorable case studies to investigate the possible role of shocks driven by CMEs in producing the energetic particles that lead to LDGRFs. We analyse three CMEs that (1) erupted behind the solar limb viewed from Earth, (2) were associated with the early formation of coronal shocks measured by ground-based radio spectrographs, (3) were associated with γ-ray events measured by the Fermi-LAT instrument. A 3D triangulation technique, based on observation in the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and visible light, is employed to model the expansion of these three CME shocks from above the solar surface to the upper corona. We then used the HELCATS catalogue of CMEs to follow the interplanetary propagation of these CMEs. Coupling it with different models of the coronal magnetic field allows us to derive the time-dependent distribution of shock Mach numbers and the magnetic connection of the shock to the solar surface visible from Earth. In all of the three events, the shock front associated with the impulsive flare was magnetically connected to the visible solar surface rapidly after the start of the flare and before the onset of gamma-ray emission observed by Fermi-LAT γ-ray emission. These early connected parts of the shock surface are mainly the flanks of the pressure wave and are therefore quasi

  9. Relation between incremental lines and tensile strength of coronal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Toshiko; Saito, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masato; Nishimura, Fumio; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In one aspect, this study examined the tensile strength of coronal dentin, as a function of the location of incremental lines, in two types of teeth: human molar versus bovine incisor. In another aspect, tensile strength in coronal dentin was examined with tensile loading in two different orientations to the incremental lines: parallel versus perpendicular. There were four experimental groups in this study: HPa, human molar dentin with tensile orientation parallel to the incremental lines; HPe, human molar dentin with tensile orientation perpendicular to the incremental lines; BPa, bovine incisor dentin with tensile orientation parallel to the incremental lines; BPe, bovine incisor dentin with tensile orientation perpendicular to the incremental lines. Tensile strengths of the parallel group (HPa and BPa) were significantly higher (pdentin. However, there were no differences in anisotropy effect between the two tooth types.

  10. A Breakout Model for Solar Coronal Jets with Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyper, P. F.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2018-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed that many solar coronal jets involve the eruption of miniature versions of large-scale filaments. Such “mini-filaments” are observed to form along the polarity inversion lines of strong, magnetically bipolar regions embedded in open (or distantly closing) unipolar field. During the generation of the jet, the filament becomes unstable and erupts. Recently we described a model for these mini-filament jets, in which the well-known magnetic-breakout mechanism for large-scale coronal mass ejections is extended to these smaller events. In this work we use 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study in detail three realizations of the model. We show that the breakout-jet generation mechanism is robust and that different realizations of the model can explain different observational features. The results are discussed in relation to recent observations and previous jet models.

  11. Proton relativistic model; Modelo relativistico do proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1995-12-31

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author) 42 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Heating by transverse waves in simulated coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampelas, K.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Antolin, P.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Recent numerical studies of oscillating flux tubes have established the significance of resonant absorption in the damping of propagating transverse oscillations in coronal loops. The nonlinear nature of the mechanism has been examined alongside the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which is expected to manifest in the resonant layers at the edges of the flux tubes. While these two processes have been hypothesized to heat coronal loops through the dissipation of wave energy into smaller scales, the occurring mixing with the hotter surroundings can potentially hide this effect. Aims: We aim to study the effects of wave heating from driven and standing kink waves in a coronal loop. Methods: Using the MPI-AMRVAC code, we perform ideal, three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of both (a) footpoint driven and (b) free standing oscillations in a straight coronal flux tube, in the presence of numerical resistivity. Results: We have observed the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz eddies at the loop boundary layer of all three models considered here, as well as an increase of the volume averaged temperature inside the loop. The main heating mechanism in our setups was Ohmic dissipation, as indicated by the higher values for the temperatures and current densities located near the footpoints. The introduction of a temperature gradient between the inner tube and the surrounding plasma, suggests that the mixing of the two regions, in the case of hotter environment, greatly increases the temperature of the tube at the site of the strongest turbulence, beyond the contribution of the aforementioned wave heating mechanism. Three movies associated to Fig. 1 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Coronal and heliospheric imagers for solar wind phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Kevin F.; Bourdelle, Anthony; Davies, Jackie A.; Eyles, Chris J.; Griffin, Doug K.; Harrison, Richard A.; Richards, Tony R.; Rogers, J. Kevin; Tappin, S. James; Tosh, Ian A. J.; Waltham, Nick R.

    2015-09-01

    RAL Space is enhancing its program to lead the development of European capabilities in space-based visible-light coronal and heliospheric imaging instrumentation in the light of emerging opportunities such as the European Space Agency's Space Situational Awareness program and recent S2 small-mission call. Visible-light coronal and heliospheric imaging of solar wind phenomena, such as coronal mass ejections and interaction regions, is of critical importance to space weather studies, both operationally and in terms of enabling the underpinning science. This work draws on heritage from scientific instruments such as LASCO (Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph) on the SOHO spacecraft, SMEI (Solar Mass Ejection Imager) on the Coriolis spacecraft and the HI (Heliospheric Imager) instruments on STEREO. Such visible-light observation of solar wind structures relies on the detection of sunlight that has been Thomson-scattered by electrons (the so-called K-corona). The Thomson-scattered signal must be extracted from other signals that can be many orders of magnitude greater (such as that from the F-corona and the solar disc itself) and this places stringent constraints on stray-light rejection, as well as pointing stability and accuracy. We discuss the determination of instrument requirements, key design trade-offs and the evolution of base-line designs for the coronal and heliospheric regimes. We explain how the next generation of instruments will build on this heritage while also, in some cases, meeting the challenges on resources imposed on operational space weather imagers. In particular, we discuss the optical engineering challenges involved in the design of these instruments.

  14. Extended HXR Sources - Albedo Patches or Coronal Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    Extended HXR sources in the presence of compact footpoints have been reported based on visibility amplitudes from different detectors. Attempts have been made to determine the location and extent of these sources through direct imaging. Results of this work will be described for simulated sources and for specific flares at different solar longitudes, with a discussion of the possible nature of the extended sources as either albedo patches or coronal sources or a combination of the two.

  15. Acquisition of thin coronal sectional dataset of cadaveric liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Li; Liu, Shu Wei; Zhao, Zhen Mei; Tang, Yu Chun; Lin, Xiang Tao

    2014-04-01

    To obtain the thin coronal sectional anatomic dataset of the liver by using digital freezing milling technique. The upper abdomen of one Chinese adult cadaver was selected as the specimen. After CT and MRI examinations verification of absent liver lesions, the specimen was embedded with gelatin in stand erect position and frozen under profound hypothermia, and the specimen was then serially sectioned from anterior to posterior layer by layer with digital milling machine in the freezing chamber. The sequential images were captured by means of a digital camera and the dataset was imported to imaging workstation. The thin serial section of the liver added up to 699 layers with each layer being 0.2 mm in thickness. The shape, location, structure, intrahepatic vessels and adjacent structures of the liver was displayed clearly on each layer of the coronal sectional slice. CT and MR images through the body were obtained at 1.0 and 3.0 mm intervals, respectively. The methodology reported here is an adaptation of the milling methods previously described, which is a new data acquisition method for sectional anatomy. The thin coronal sectional anatomic dataset of the liver obtained by this technique is of high precision and good quality.

  16. Spatial damping of propagating sausage waves in coronal cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Context. Sausage modes are important in coronal seismology. Spatially damped propagating sausage waves were recently observed in the solar atmosphere. Aims: We examine how wave leakage influences the spatial damping of sausage waves propagating along coronal structures modeled by a cylindrical density enhancement embedded in a uniform magnetic field. Methods: Working in the framework of cold magnetohydrodynamics, we solve the dispersion relation (DR) governing sausage waves for complex-valued, longitudinal wavenumber k at given real angular frequencies ω. For validation purposes, we also provide analytical approximations to the DR in the low-frequency limit and in the vicinity of ωc, the critical angular frequency separating trapped from leaky waves. Results: In contrast to the standing case, propagating sausage waves are allowed for ω much lower than ωc. However, while able to direct their energy upward, these low-frequency waves are subject to substantial spatial attenuation. The spatial damping length shows little dependence on the density contrast between the cylinder and its surroundings, and depends only weakly on frequency. This spatial damping length is of the order of the cylinder radius for ω ≲ 1.5vAi/a, where a and vAi are the cylinder radius and the Alfvén speed in the cylinder, respectively. Conclusions: If a coronal cylinder is perturbed by symmetric boundary drivers (e.g., granular motions) with a broadband spectrum, wave leakage efficiently filters out the low-frequency components.

  17. MHD Modeling of Coronal Loops: the Transition Region Throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarrasi, M.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Mignone, A.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The expansion of coronal loops in the transition region may considerably influence the diagnostics of the plasma emission measure. The cross-sectional area of the loops is expected to depend on the temperature and pressure, and might be sensitive to the heating rate. Aims. The approach here is to study the area response to slow changes in the coronal heating rate, and check the current interpretation in terms of steady heating models. Methods. We study the area response with a time-dependent 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) loop model, including the description of the expanding magnetic field, coronal heating and losses by thermal conduction, and radiation from optically thin plasma. We run a simulation for a loop 50 Mm long and quasi-statically heated to about 4 millikelvin. Results. We find that the area can change substantially with the quasi-steady heating rate, e.g., by approx. 40% at 0.5 millikelvin as the loop temperature varies between 1 millikelvin and 4 millikelvin, and, therefore, affects the interpretation of the differential emission measure vs. temperature (DEM(T)) curves.

  18. MHD modeling of coronal loops: the transition region throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarrasi, M.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Mignone, A.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The expansion of coronal loops in the transition region may considerably influence the diagnostics of the plasma emission measure. The cross-sectional area of the loops is expected to depend on the temperature and pressure, and might be sensitive to the heating rate. Aims: The approach here is to study the area response to slow changes in the coronal heating rate, and check the current interpretation in terms of steady heating models. Methods: We study the area response with a time-dependent 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) loop model, including the description of the expanding magnetic field, coronal heating and losses by thermal conduction, and radiation from optically thin plasma. We run a simulation for a loop 50 Mm long and quasi-statically heated to about 4 MK. Results: We find that the area can change substantially with the quasi-steady heating rate, e.g., by ~40% at 0.5 MK as the loop temperature varies between 1 MK and 4 MK, and, therefore, affects the interpretation of the differential emission measure vs. temperature (DEM(T)) curves. The movie associated to Fig. 4 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Mission Prospects: Remote Sensing of Coronal Suprathermal Seed Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J.; Laming, J. M.; Ko, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A new perspective on the feasibility of remote sensing detection and characterization of suprathermal particles serving the role of seeds in solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration has recently been achieved via a combination of theoretical (Laming et al. 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0004-637X/770/1/73) and experimental (Kohl et al. 2011 http://arxiv.org/abs/1104.3817, Moses et al. 2011 http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.896868) developments. The location, density and velocity distribution of these seed particles can now be established as science observing requirements for instrument specification. The most promising instrumentation for these observations is a UV coronal spectrometer. While the spectroscopic and spatial resolution of the one existing, spaceflight UV coronal spectrometer - SOHO UVCS - meets this specification; the effective area of this instrument is two orders of magnitude too low. Initial attempts at achieving increased effective area by directly scaling UVCS have not been successfully transitioned into flight programs (e.g. Gardner et al. 1999, 'Advanced Solar Coronal Explorer Mission (ASCE)', SPIE 3764, 134). With the recent development of instrument designs achieving the requisite increase in effective area within a volume envelope comparable to UVCS, the options for achieving a successful flight program have been increased. This work is supported in part by the Office of Naval Research/Naval Research Laboratory Basic Research (6.1) Program and NASA-DoD PR 12SHP12/2-0151.

  20. Ultraviolet Thomson Scattering from Direct-Drive Coronal Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchen, R. J.; Goncharov, V. N.; Michel, D. T.; Follett, R. K.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.

    2013-10-01

    Ultraviolet (λ4 ω = 263 nm) Thomson scattering (TS) was used to probe ion-acoustic waves (IAW's) and electron plasma waves (EPW's) from direct-drive coronal plasmas. Fifty-nine drive beams (λ3 ω = 351 nm) illuminate a spherical target with a radius of ~860 μm. Advances in the ultraviolet (UV) TS diagnostic at the Omega Laser Facility provide the ability to detect deep UV photons (~190 nm) and allow access to scattered light from EPW's propagating near the 3 ω quarter-critical surface (~2.5 × 1021 cm-3) . A series of experiments studied the effects of ablator materials on coronal plasma conditions. Electron temperatures and densities were measured from 150 μm to 400 μm from the initial target surface. Standard CH shells were compared to three-layered shells consisting of Si doped CH, Si, and Be. Early analysis indicates that these multilayered targets have less hot-electron energy as a result of higher electron temperature in the coronal plasma. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  1. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particle event characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Athanasios; Sandberg, Ingmar; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Kouloumvakos, Athanasios; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Tziotziou, Kostas; Tsiropoula, Georgia; Jiggens, Piers; Hilgers, Alain

    2016-12-01

    A new catalogue of 314 solar energetic particle (SEP) events extending over a large time span from 1984 to 2013 has been compiled. The properties as well as the associations of these SEP events with their parent solar sources have been thoroughly examined. The properties of the events include the proton peak integral flux and the fluence for energies above 10, 30, 60 and 100 MeV. The associated solar events were parametrized by solar flare (SF) and coronal mass ejection (CME) characteristics, as well as related radio emissions. In particular, for SFs: the soft X-ray (SXR) peak flux, the SXR fluence, the heliographic location, the rise time and the duration were exploited; for CMEs the plane-of-sky velocity as well as the angular width were utilized. For radio emissions, type III, II and IV radio bursts were identified. Furthermore, we utilized element abundances of Fe and O. We found evidence that most of the SEP events in our catalogue do not conform to a simple two-class paradigm, with the 73% of them exhibiting both type III and type II radio bursts, and that a continuum of event properties is present. Although, the so-called hybrid or mixed events are found to be present in our catalogue, it was not possible to attribute each SEP event to a mixed/hybrid sub-category. Moreover, it appears that the start of the type III burst most often precedes the maximum of the SF and thus falls within the impulsive phase of the associated SF. At the same time, type III bursts take place within ≈5.22 min, on average, in advance from the time of maximum of the derivative of the SXR flux (Neupert effect). We further performed a statistical analysis and a mapping of the logarithm of the proton peak flux at E > 10 MeV, on different pairs of the parent solar source characteristics. This revealed correlations in 3-D space and demonstrated that the gradual SEP events that stem from the central part of the visible solar disk constitute a significant radiation risk. The velocity of

  2. Interplay of vacuolar transporters for coupling primary and secondary active transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Siek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Secondary active transporters are driven by the proton motif force which is generated by primary active transporters such as the vacuolar proton pumps V-ATPase and V-PPase. The vacuole occupies up to 90 % of the mature cell and acidification of the vacuolar lumen is a challenging and energy-consuming task for the plant cell. Therefore, a direct coupling of primary and secondary active transporters is expected to enhance transport efficiency and to reduce energy consumption by transport processes across the tonoplast. This has been addressed by analyzing physical and functional interactions between the V-ATPase and a selection of vacuolar transporters including the primary active proton pump AVP1, the calcium ion/proton exchanger CAX1, the potassium ion/proton symporter KUP5, the sodium ion/proton exchanger NHX1, and the anion/proton exchanger CLC-c. Physical interaction was demonstrated in vivo for the V-ATPase and the secondary active transporters CAX1 and CLC-c, which are responsible for calcium- and anion-accumulation in the vacuole, respectively. Measurements of V-ATPase activity and vacuolar pH revealed a functional interaction of V-ATPase and CAX1, CLC-c that is likely caused by the observed physical interaction. The complex of the V-ATPase further interacts with the nitrate reductase 2, and as a result, nitrate assimilation is directly linked to the energization of vacuolar nitrate accumulation by secondary active anion/proton exchangers.

  3. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  4. Direct view on nanoionic proton mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wing K.; Haverkate, Lucas A.; Wagemaker, Marnix; Mulder, Fokko M. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Department of Radiation, Radionuclides, and Reactors, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Borghols, Wouter J.H. [Juelich Center for Neutron Science at FRM II, Garching (DE). Inst. of Solid State Research (IFF); Picken, Stephen J. [Nano structured Materials, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Van Eck, Ernst R.H.; Kentgens, Arno P.M. [Department of Physical Chemistry - Solid State NMR, IMM, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Johnson, Mark R. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble(France); Kearley, Gordon J. [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB Menai, NSW (Australia)

    2011-04-22

    The field of nanoionics is of great importance for the development of superior materials for devices that rely on the transport of charged ions, like fuel cells, batteries, and sensors. Often nanostructuring leads to enhanced ionic mobilities due to the induced space-charge effects. Here these large space-charge effects occurring in composites of the proton-donating solid acid CsHSO{sub 4} and the proton-accepting TiO{sub 2} or SiO{sub 2} are studied. CsHSO{sub 4} is chosen for this study because it can operate effectively as a fuel-cell electrolyte at elevated temperature while its low-temperature conductivity is increased upon nano-structuring. The composites have a negative enthalpy of formation for defects involving the transfer of protons from the acid to the acceptor. Very high defect densities of up to 10% of the available sites are observed by neutron diffraction. The effect on the mobility of the protons is observed directly using quasielastic neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Surprisingly large fractions of up to 25% of the hydrogen ions show orders-of-magnitude enhanced mobility in the nanostructured composites of TiO{sub 2} or SiO{sub 2}, both in crystalline CsHSO{sub 4} and an amorphous fraction. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Current systems of coronal loops in 3D MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnecke, J.; Chen, F.; Bingert, S.; Peter, H.

    2017-11-01

    Aims: We study the magnetic field and current structure associated with a coronal loop. Through this we investigate to what extent the assumptions of a force-free magnetic field break down and where they might be justified. Methods: We analyze a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the solar corona in an emerging active region with the focus on the structure of the forming coronal loops. The lower boundary of this simulation is taken from a model of an emerging active region. As a consequence of the emerging magnetic flux and the horizontal motions at the surface a coronal loop forms self-consistently. We investigate the current density along magnetic field lines inside (and outside) this loop and study the magnetic and plasma properties in and around this loop. The loop is defined as the bundle of field lines that coincides with enhanced emission in extreme UV. Results: We find that the total current along the emerging loop changes its sign from being antiparallel to parallel to the magnetic field. This is caused by the inclination of the loop together with the footpoint motion. Around the loop, the currents form a complex non-force-free helical structure. This is directly related to a bipolar current structure at the loop footpoints at the base of the corona and a local reduction of the background magnetic field (I.e., outside the loop) caused by the plasma flow into and along the loop. Furthermore, the locally reduced magnetic pressure in the loop allows the loop to sustain a higher density, which is crucial for the emission in extreme UV. The action of the flow on the magnetic field hosting the loop turns out to also be responsible for the observed squashing of the loop. Conclusions: The complex magnetic field and current system surrounding it can only be modeled in 3D MHD models where the magnetic field has to balance the plasma pressure. A one-dimensional coronal loop model or a force-free extrapolation cannot capture the current system

  6. Proton Radiography (pRad)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose more than 300 dynamic experiments in support...

  7. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  8. Polarity governed selective amplification of through plane proton shuttling in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Manu; Chattanahalli Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Raja Kottaichamy, Alagar; Pottachola Shafi, Shahid; Gaikwad, Pramod; Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh, Harish; Ottakam Thotiyl, Musthafa

    2017-03-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) anisotropically conducts protons with directional dominance of in plane ionic transport (σ IP) over the through plane (σ TP). In a typical H 2 -O 2 fuel cell, since the proton conduction occurs through the plane during its generation at the fuel electrode, it is indeed inevitable to selectively accelerate GO's σ TP for advancement towards a potential fuel cell membrane. We successfully achieved ∼7 times selective amplification of GO's σ TP by tuning the polarity of the dopant molecule in its nanoporous matrix. The coexistence of strongly non-polar and polar domains in the dopant demonstrated a synergistic effect towards σ TP with the former decreasing the number of water molecules coordinated to protons by ∼3 times, diminishing the effects of electroosmotic drag exerted on ionic movements, and the latter selectively accelerating σ TP across the catalytic layers by bridging the individual GO planes via extensive host guest H-bonding interactions. When they are decoupled, the dopant with mainly non-polar or polar features only marginally enhances the σ TP, revealing that polarity factors contribute to fuel cell relevant transport properties of GO membranes only when they coexist. Fuel cell polarization and kinetic analyses revealed that these multitask dopants increased the fuel cell performance metrics of the power and current densities by ∼3 times compared to the pure GO membranes, suggesting that the functional group factors of the dopants are of utmost importance in GO-based proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  9. Proton-pump inhibitors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) work by binding irreversibly to the. H+/K+-ATPase pump of the parietal cell, leading to inhibition of acid production in approximately 70% of active pumps.1The result is a dramatic increase in gastric pH mitigating the deleterious effects of acid in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and.

  10. Demonstration of the double Penning Trap technique with a single proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooser, A.; Bräuninger, S.; Franke, K.; Kracke, H.; Leiteritz, C.; Rodegheri, C. C.; Nagahama, H.; Schneider, G.; Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Quint, W.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.

    2013-06-01

    Spin flips of a single proton were driven in a Penning trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. For the spin-state analysis the proton was transported into a second Penning trap with a superimposed magnetic bottle, and the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect was applied. This first demonstration of the double Penning trap technique with a single proton suggests that the antiproton magnetic moment measurement can potentially be improved by three orders of magnitude or more.

  11. Demonstration of the double Penning Trap technique with a single proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mooser, A. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Bräuninger, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, D-69047 Heidelberg (Germany); Franke, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); RIKEN, Ulmer Initiative Research Unit, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kracke, H. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Leiteritz, C. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Rodegheri, C.C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, D-69047 Heidelberg (Germany); Nagahama, H. [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Schneider, G. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität D-55099 Mainz (Germany); RIKEN, Ulmer Initiative Research Unit, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Smorra, C. [RIKEN, Ulmer Initiative Research Unit, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Matsuda, Y. [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); and others

    2013-06-10

    Spin flips of a single proton were driven in a Penning trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. For the spin-state analysis the proton was transported into a second Penning trap with a superimposed magnetic bottle, and the continuous Stern–Gerlach effect was applied. This first demonstration of the double Penning trap technique with a single proton suggests that the antiproton magnetic moment measurement can potentially be improved by three orders of magnitude or more.

  12. Demonstration of the Double Penning Trap Technique with a Single Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Mooser, A; Franke, K.; Kracke, H.; Leiteritz, C.; Rodegheri, C.C.; Nagahama, H.; Schneider, G.; Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Quint, W.; Walz, J.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ulmer, S.; Yamazaki, Y; Ulmer, S

    2013-01-01

    Spin flips of a single proton were driven in a Penning trap with a homogeneous magnetic field. For the spin-state analysis the proton was transported into a second Penning trap with a superimposed magnetic bottle, and the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect was applied. This first demonstration of the double Penning trap technique with a single proton suggests that the antiproton magnetic moment measurement can potentially be improved by three orders of magnitude or more.

  13. Proton transfer events in GFP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Donato, M.; van Wilderen, L.J.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Stuart, T. C.; Kennis, J.T.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; van Grondelle, R.; Groot, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton

  14. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamonti, C., E-mail: cinzia.talamonti@unifi.i [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Reggioli, V. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Civinini, C. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Marrazzo, L. [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Menichelli, D. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Pallotta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2010-01-11

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  15. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  16. The world's largest proton accelerator takes shape

    CERN Document Server

    Persson, L

    1974-01-01

    The European Organization for Nuclear Research, Established in Geneva, decided in February 1971 to build such an accelerator at a cost of 1150 million Swiss francs over an 8-year period. In something over three years the number of persons directly or indirectly employed by this organization (CERN) has risen to around 4700, including around 80 from the Swedish universities of Gothernburg, Lund, and Stockholm, and from research establishments in Uppsala and Studsvik. The project will provide for a maximum proton energy of 400 GeV, an intensity of 10/sup 13/ protons per pulse, and an accelerator step frequency of 200 MHz. The accelerator is located 40 m underground in a circular tunnel with a circumference of 6.9 km. A large assembly hall, laboratory buildings, and research departments were taken into operation in 1973. More than half the accelerator tunnel is already bored out and the steel transport tunnels are blasted out to the extent of 80%.

  17. Compact superconducting synchrocyclotron systems for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, H. G.

    1989-04-01

    Conventional room temperature synchrocyclotrons are widely used as a source for medical proton beams. If the synchrocyclotron is changed to a superconducting design, weight is reduced more than tenfold and the resulting accelerator is beautifully compact and of moderate cost. Engineering studies indicate that the traditional reliability of the synchrocyclotron will not be impinged by the change to a much smaller structure. Design studies for 70 and 250 MeV systems have been made. The 70 MeV machine would be a stond-alone facility for eye treatment, whereas the 250 MeV unit is for general, anywhere-in-the-body proton therapy. The 250 MeV machine is small enough to permit the option of directly mounting the cyclotron on an isocentric gantry, thereby greatly reducing the complexity of the beam transport system.

  18. Antideuteron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Duperray, R. P.; K. V. Protasov; Voronin, A. Yu.(P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, 53 Leninsky Prospekt, 117924 Moscow, Russia)

    2002-01-01

    The experimental data of the antideuteron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions are analyzed within a simple model based on the diagrammatic approach to the coalescence model. This model is shown to be able to reproduce most of existing data without any additional parameter.

  19. Proton beam deflection in MRI fields: Implications for MRI-guided proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oborn, B M; Dowdell, S; Metcalfe, P E; Crozier, S; Mohan, R; Keall, P J

    2015-05-01

    beam axis and those fired from a point source. This is indicative of the 3D spatially variant nature of the MRI fringe field. For the first time, accurate magnetic and Monte Carlo modeling have been used to assess the transport of generic proton beams toward a 1 T split-bore MRI. Significant rotation is observed in the inline orientation, while more complex deflection and distortion are seen in the perpendicular orientation. The results of this study suggest that due to the complexity and energy-dependent nature of the magnetic deflection and distortion, the pencil beam scanning method will be the only choice for delivering a therapeutic proton beam inside a potential MRI-guided proton therapy system in either the inline or perpendicular orientation. Further to this, significant correction strategies will be required to account for the MRI fringe fields.

  20. Multi-block sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer proton exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Cy H [Albuquerque, NM; Hibbs, Michael [Albuquerque, NM; Ambrosini, Andrea [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-02-07

    Improved multi-block sulfonated poly(phenylene) copolymer compositions, methods of making the same, and their use as proton exchange membranes (PEM) in hydrogen fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cells, in electrode casting solutions and electrodes. The multi-block architecture has defined, controllable hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. These improved membranes have better ion transport (proton conductivity) and water swelling properties.

  1. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered, and therefore topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses loop classification and populations, and then describes the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the concept of loops as multi-stranded structures. The following part of this section is devoted to the characteristics of the loop plasma and of its thermal structure in particular, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics and flows are illustrated. In the modeling section some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying some fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are distinguished between those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. Then, more specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar X-ray emitting structures related to coronal loops is included and followed by conclusions and open questions.

  2. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  3. Structure and dynamics of the coronal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanHoven, Gerard; Schnack, Dalton D.

    1996-01-01

    The last few years have seen a marked increase in the sophistication of models of the solar corona. This has been brought about by a confluence of three key elements. First, the collection of high-resolution observations of the Sun, both in space and time, has grown tremendously. The SOHO (Solar Heliospheric Observatory) mission is providing additional correlated high-resolution magnetic, white-light and spectroscopic observations. Second, the power and availability of supercomputers has made two- and three-dimensional modeling routine. Third, the sophistication of the models themselves, both in their geometrical realism and in the detailed physics that has been included, has improved significantly. The support from our current Space Physics Theory grant has allowed us to exploit this confluence of capabilities. We have carried out direct comparisons between observations and models of the solar corona. The agreement between simulated coronal structure and observations has verified that the models are mature enough for detailed analysis, as we will describe. The development of this capability is especially timely, since observations obtained from three space missions that are underway (Ulysses, WIND and SOHO) offer an opportunity for significant advances in our understanding of the corona and heliosphere. Through this interplay of observations and theory we can improve our understanding of the Sun. Our achievements thus far include progress modeling the large-scale structure of the solar corona, three-dimensional models of active region fields, development of emerging flux and current, formation and evolution of coronal loops, and coronal heating by current filaments.

  4. Coronal pulp biomarker: A lesser known age estimation modality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smrithi D Veera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The evolving state of art digital technology currently available is opening new avenues in forensic odontology for age estimation methods which are subject to debate in terms of accuracy and precision. A study was carried to analyze efficacy and practical application for age estimation using digital panoramic radiographs on South Indian population. Aims and Objectives: 1. To study reduction of coronal pulp chamber using Tooth Coronal Index (TCI on panoramic radiographs and correlate with chronologic age. 2. To establish accuracy of digital panoramic radiographs as a simple, non-invasive tool. Materials and Methods: The study illustrates the potential value of a little known aging method. The study groups comprised a total of 100 subjects of both sexes in age range of 20 and 60 years each who were subjected to panoramic radiography. A panoramic radiographic examination using digital panoramic machine was conducted on selected individuals. The TCI was calibrated using AGFA computer software for accuracy and precision. The values obtained were subjected to regression analysis, results calculated and correlated with chronologic age. In the present study a population of known age was studied and subjected to digital panoramic radiographic examination. The correlation between reduction of coronal pulp cavity and chronological age was examined. TCI was computed for each tooth and regressed on real age. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson correlation co-efficient was used to find the significance of relationship between age and TCI. Regression analysis has been used for predicting age using TCI for premolar and molar. Inaccuracy and bias have been determined to assess the precision of prediction equations. Results and Conclusion: Prediction potential of TCI comes down for ages above 50 years and is comfortably good below 50 years without much difference between premolars and molars. This study demonstrates the potential value of TCI for age

  5. Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles at a Fast Traveling Shock in Non-uniform Coronal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, J. A.; Arthur, A. D.

    2017-09-01

    Time-dependent solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration is investigated at a fast, nearly parallel spherical traveling shock in the strongly non-uniform corona by solving the standard focused transport equation for SEPs and transport equations for parallel propagating Alfvén waves that form a set of coupled equations. This enables the modeling of self-excitation of Alfvén waves in the inertial range by SEPs ahead of the shock and its role in enhancing the efficiency of the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of SEPs in a self-regulatory fashion. Preliminary results suggest that, because of the highly non-uniform coronal conditions that the shock encounters, both DSA and wave excitation are highly time-dependent processes. Thus, DSA spectra of SEPs strongly deviate from the simple power-law prediction of standard steady-state DSA theory and initially strong wave excitation weakens rapidly. Consequently, the ability of DSA to produce high energy SEPs in the corona of ∼1 GeV, as observed in the strongest gradual SEP events, appears to be strongly curtailed at a fast nearly parallel shock, but further research is needed before final conclusions can be drawn.

  6. The effects of resistivity and viscosity on the Kelvin- Helmholtz instability in oscillating coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, T. A.; De Moortel, I.; Antolin, P.

    2017-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the effects of resistivity and viscosity on the onset and growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) in an oscillating coronal loop. Methods: We modelled a standing kink wave in a density-enhanced loop with the three dimensional (3D), resistive magnetohydrodynamics code, Lare3d. We conducted a parameter study on the viscosity and resistivity coefficients to examine the effects of dissipation on the KHI. Results: Enhancing the viscosity (ν) and resistivity (η) acts to suppress the KHI. Larger values of η and ν delay the formation of the instability and, in some cases, prevent the onset completely. This leads to the earlier onset of heating for smaller values of the transport coefficients. We note that viscosity has a greater effect on the development of the KHI than resistivity. Furthermore, when using anomalous resistivity, the Ohmic heating rate associated with the KHI may be greater than that associated with the phase mixing that occurs in an instability-suppressed regime (using uniform resistivity). Conclusions: From our study, it is clear that the heating rate crucially depends on the formation of small length scales (influenced by the numerical resolution) as well as the values of resistivity and viscosity. As larger values of the transport coefficients suppress the KHI, the onset of heating is delayed but the heating rate is larger. As increased numerical resolution allows smaller length scales to develop, the heating rate will be higher even for the same values of η and ν.

  7. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTION ON 2011 MARCH 7: ONE-TEMPERATURE AND TWO-TEMPERATURE MODEL COMPARISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, M.; Manchester, W. B.; Van der Holst, B.; Oran, R.; Sokolov, I.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T. I. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Liu, Y.; Sun, X. D., E-mail: jinmeng@umich.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    During Carrington rotation (CR) 2107, a fast coronal mass ejection (CME; >2000 km s{sup -1}) occurred in active region NOAA 11164. This event is also associated with a solar energetic particle event. In this study, we present simulations of this CME with one-temperature (1T) and two-temperature (2T: coupled thermodynamics of the electron and proton populations) models. Both the 1T and 2T models start from the chromosphere with heat conduction and radiative cooling. The background solar wind is driven by Alfven-wave pressure and heated by Alfven-wave dissipation in which we have incorporated the balanced turbulence at the top of the closed field lines. The magnetic field of the inner boundary is set up using a synoptic map from Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The Titov-Demoulin flux-rope model is used to initiate the CME event. We compare the propagation of fast CMEs and the thermodynamics of CME-driven shocks in both the 1T and 2T CME simulations. Also, the synthesized white light images are compared with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph observations. Because there is no distinction between electron and proton temperatures, heat conduction in the 1T model creates an unphysical temperature precursor in front of the CME-driven shock and makes the shock parameters (e.g., shock Mach number, compression ratio) incorrect. Our results demonstrate the importance of the electron heat conduction in conjunction with proton shock heating in order to produce the physically correct CME structures and CME-driven shocks.

  8. Low Earth orbit assessment of proton anisotropy using AP8 and AP9 trapped proton models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavi, Francis F; Walker, Steven A; Santos Koos, Lindsey M

    2015-04-01

    The completion of the International Space Station (ISS) in 2011 has provided the space research community with an ideal evaluation and testing facility for future long duration human activities in space. Ionized and secondary neutral particles radiation measurements inside ISS form the ideal tool for validation of radiation environmental models, nuclear reaction cross sections and transport codes. Studies using thermo-luminescent detectors (TLD), tissue equivalent proportional counter (TPEC), and computer aided design (CAD) models of early ISS configurations confirmed that, as input, computational dosimetry at low Earth orbit (LEO) requires an environmental model with directional (anisotropic) capability to properly describe the exposure of trapped protons within ISS. At LEO, ISS encounters exposure from trapped electrons, protons and geomagnetically attenuated galactic cosmic rays (GCR). For short duration studies at LEO, one can ignore trapped electrons and ever present GCR exposure contributions during quiet times. However, within the trapped proton field, a challenge arises from properly estimating the amount of proton exposure acquired. There exist a number of models to define the intensity of trapped particles. Among the established trapped models are the historic AE8/AP8, dating back to the 1980s and the recently released AE9/AP9/SPM. Since at LEO electrons have minimal exposure contribution to ISS, this work ignores the AE8 and AE9 components of the models and couples a measurement derived anisotropic trapped proton formalism to omnidirectional output from the AP8 and AP9 models, allowing the assessment of the differences between the two proton models. The assessment is done at a target point within the ISS-11A configuration (circa 2003) crew quarter (CQ) of Russian Zvezda service module (SM), during its ascending and descending nodes passes through the south Atlantic anomaly (SAA). The anisotropic formalism incorporates the contributions of proton narrow

  9. The coronation of Christian monarchs: historical and sacramentological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legeyev Mikhail Viktorovich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a history of inaugural ceremonies of the Christian monarchs reveals the origins of the rite of coronation. Specifically it is noted that there was a reception of the Old Testament tradition, when the Emperor before the accession to the Throne used the Holy oil or Myrrh (depending on the ethnic or confessional tradition. In addition, there was a so-called “churching” of social rituals, which existed in the Roman Empire and other pagan monarchies almost since the dawn of civilization. In summary, it is proved that the anointing on a Kingdom is one of the Church sacraments.

  10. VLA Measurements of Faraday Rotation through Coronal Mass Ejections

    OpenAIRE

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, Patrick D.; Buffo, Jacob J.; Spangler, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun that play an important role in space weather. Faraday rotation (FR) is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma such as a CME. FR observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch. We report on simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of three CMEs in August...

  11. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Artificial Photosynthetic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, S Jimena; Odella, Emmanuel; Moore, Gary F; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L

    2018-01-08

    Artificial photosynthetic constructs can in principle operate more efficiently than natural photosynthesis because they can be rationally designed to optimize solar energy conversion for meeting human demands rather than the multiple needs of an organism competing for growth and reproduction in a complex ecosystem. The artificial photosynthetic constructs described in this Account consist primarily of covalently linked synthetic chromophores, electron donors and acceptors, and proton donors and acceptors that carry out the light absorption, electron transfer, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes characteristic of photosynthetic cells. PCET is the movement of an electron from one site to another accompanied by proton transfer. PCET and the transport of protons over tens of angstroms are important in all living cells because they are a fundamental link between redox processes and the establishment of transmembrane gradients of proton electrochemical potential, known as proton-motive force (PMF), which is the unifying concept in bioenergetics. We have chosen a benzimidazole phenol (BIP) system as a platform for the study of PCET because with appropriate substitutions it is possible to design assemblies in which one or multiple proton transfers can accompany oxidation of the phenol. In BIP, oxidation of the phenol increases its acidity by more than ten pKa units; thus, electrochemical oxidation of the phenol is associated with a proton transfer to the imidazole. This is an example of a PCET process involving transfer of one electron and one proton, known as electron-proton transfer (EPT). When the benzimidazole moiety of BIP is substituted at the 4-position with good proton acceptor groups such as aliphatic amines, experimental and theoretical results indicate that two proton transfers occur upon one-electron oxidation of the phenol. This phenomenon is described as a one-electron-two-proton transfer (E2PT) process and results in translocation of

  12. Proton therapy in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The clinical advantage for proton radiotherapy over photon approaches is the marked reduction in integral dose to the patient, due to the absence of exit dose beyond the proton Bragg peak. The integral dose with protons is approximately 60% lower than that with any external beam photon technique. Pediatric patients, because of their developing normal tissues and anticipated length of remaining life, are likely to have the maximum clinical gain with the use of protons. Proton therapy may also allow treatment of some adult tumors to much more effective doses, because of normal tissue sparing distal to the tumor. Currently, the most commonly available proton treatment technology uses 3D conformal approaches based on (a) distal range modulation, (b) passive scattering of the proton beam in its x- and y-axes, and (c) lateral beam-shaping. It is anticipated that magnetic pencil beam scanning will become the dominant mode of proton delivery in the future, which will lower neutron scatter associated with passively scattered beam lines, reduce the need for expensive beam-shaping devices, and allow intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy. Proton treatment plans are more sensitive to variations in tumor size and normal tissue changes over the course of treatment than photon plans, and it is expected that adaptive radiation therapy will be increasingly important for proton therapy as well. While impressive treatment results have been reported with protons, their cost is higher than for photon IMRT. Hence, protons should ideally be employed for anatomic sites and tumors not well treated with photons. While protons appear cost-effective for pediatric tumors, their cost-effectiveness for treatment of some adult tumors, such as prostate cancer, is uncertain. Comparative studies have been proposed or are in progress to more rigorously assess their value for a variety of sites. The utility of proton therapy will be enhanced by technological developments that reduce its cost

  13. Fast proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianjun; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Walker, Joel W.

    2010-10-01

    We consider proton decay in the testable flipped SU(5)×U(1)X models with TeV-scale vector-like particles which can be realized in free fermionic string constructions and F-theory model building. We significantly improve upon the determination of light threshold effects from prior studies, and perform a fresh calculation of the second loop for the process p→eπ from the heavy gauge boson exchange. The cumulative result is comparatively fast proton decay, with a majority of the most plausible parameter space within reach of the future Hyper-Kamiokande and DUSEL experiments. Because the TeV-scale vector-like particles can be produced at the LHC, we predict a strong correlation between the most exciting particle physics experiments of the coming decade.

  14. The proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognini, A.; Amaro, F. D.; Biraben, F.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Covita, D. S.; Dax, A.; Dhawan, S.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Giesen, A.; Graf, T.; Hänsch, T. W.; Indelicato, P.; Julien, L.; Kao, C.-Y.; Knowles, P.; Kottmann, F.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Liu, Y.-W.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Ludhova, L.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mulhauser, F.; Nebel, T.; Nez, F.; Rabinowitz, P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Schaller, L. A.; Schuhmann, K.; Schwob, C.; Taqqu, D.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Pohl, R.

    2011-09-01

    By means of pulsed laser spectroscopy applied to muonic hydrogen (μ- p) we have measured the 2SF = 11/2 - 2PF = 23/2 transition frequency to be 49881.88(76) GHz [1]. By comparing this measurement with its theoretical prediction [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] based on bound-state QED we have determined a proton radius value of rp = 0.84184(67) fm. This new value differs by 5.0 standard deviations from the COD ATA value of 0.8768(69) fm [8], and 3 standard deviation from the e-p scattering results of 0.897(18) fm [9]. The observed discrepancy may arise from a computational mistake of the energy levels in μp or H, or a fundamental problem in bound-state QED, an unknown effect related to the proton or the muon, or an experimental error.

  15. Crystal structure of the plasma membrane proton pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn P.; Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Morth, J. Preben

    2007-01-01

    A prerequisite for life is the ability to maintain electrochemical imbalances across biomembranes. In all eukaryotes the plasma membrane potential and secondary transport systems are energized by the activity of P-type ATPase membrane proteins: H1-ATPase (the proton pump) in plants and fungi1......-3, and Na1,K1-ATPase (the sodium-potassium pump) in animals4. The name P-type derives from the fact that these proteins exploit a phosphorylated reaction cycle intermediate of ATP hydrolysis5.The plasma membrane proton pumps belong to the type III P-type ATPase subfamily, whereas Na1,K1-ATPase and Ca21...... the functional unit of ATP-coupled proton transport across the plasma membrane, and the structure is locked in a functional state not previously observed in P-type ATPases. The transmembrane domain reveals a large cavity, which is likely to be filled with water, located near the middle of the membrane plane...

  16. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  17. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  18. Heavy quarks in proton

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)655637

    The measurement of prompt photon associated with a b jet in proton-proton interactions can provide us insight into the inner structure of proton. This is because precision of determination of parton distribution functions of b quark and gluon can be increased by such a measurement. The measurement of cross-section of prompt photon associated with a b jet (process $pp\\longrightarrow \\gamma + b + X$) at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector is presented. Full 8 TeV dataset collected by ATLAS during the year 2012 was used in this analysis. Corresponding integrated luminosity is 20.3 $fb^{-1}$. Fiducial differential cross-section as a function of photon transverse momentum at particle level was extracted from data and compared with the prediction of leading order event generator Pythia 8. Cross-section extracted from data is normalised independently on the Monte Carlo prediction. Values of data distribution lie above Monte Carlo values. The difference can be explained by presence of higher order effects not ...

  19. Laser-accelerated proton beams as a new particle source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuernberg, Frank

    2010-11-15

    The framework of this thesis is the investigation of the generation of proton beams using high-intensity laser pulses. In this work, an experimental method to fully reconstruct laser-accelerated proton beam parameters, called radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy (RIS), was developed. Since the proton beam expansion is a plasma expansion with accompanying electrons, a low-energy electron spectrometer was developed, built and tested to study the electron distribution matching to the proton beam energy distribution. Two experiments were carried out at the VULCAN Petawatt laser with the aim of showing dynamic control and enhancement of proton acceleration using multiple or defocused laser pulses. Irradiating the target with a long pulse, low-intensity laser (10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}) prior to the main pulse ({proportional_to}ns), an optimum pre-plasma density scale length of 60 {mu}m is generated leading to an enhancement of the maximum proton energy ({proportional_to}25%), the proton flux (factor of 3) and the beam uniformity. Proton beams were generated more efficiently than previously by driving thinner target foils at a lower intensity over a large area. The optimum condition was a 2 {mu}m foil irradiated with an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} onto a 60 {mu}m spot. Laser to proton beam efficiencies of 7.8% have been achieved (2.2% before) - one of the highest conversion efficiencies ever achieved. In the frame of this work, two separate experiments at the TRIDENT laser system have shown that these laser-accelerated proton beams, with their high number of particles in a short pulse duration, are well-suited for creating isochorically heated matter in extreme conditions. Besides the manipulation of the proton beam parameters directly during the generation, the primary aim of this thesis was the capture, control and transport of laser-accelerated proton beams by a solenoidal magnetic field lense for further purpose. In a joint project proposal, the laser and

  20. Protonic conductors for proton exchange membrane fuel cells: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurado Ramon Jose

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, Nation, which is a perfluorinated polymer, is one of the few materials that deliver the set of chemical and mechanical properties required to perform as a good electrolyte in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. However, Nation presents some disadvantages, such as limiting the operational temperature of the fuel system (So°C, because of its inability to retain water at higher temperatures and also suffers chemical crossover. In addition to these restrictions, Nation membranes are very expensive. Reducing costs and using environmentally friendly materials are good reasons to make a research effort in this field in order to achieve similar or even better fuel-cell performances. Glass materials of the ternary system SiO2-ZrO2-P2O5, hybrid materials based on Nation, and nanopore ceramic membranes based on SiO2 TiO2, Al2O3, etc. are considered at present, as promising candidates to replace Nation as the electrolyte in PEMFCs. These types of materials are generally prepared by sol-gel processes in order to tailor their channel-porous structure and pore size. In this communication, the possible candidates in the near future as electrolytes (including other polymers different than Nation in PEMFCs are briefly reviewed. Their preparation methods, their electrical transport properties and conduction mechanisms are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of these materials with respect to Nation are also discussed.

  1. Comparing Coronal Structure Predictions to CATE Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Sarah A.; Citizen CATE Experiment 2017 Team

    2018-01-01

    The total solar eclipse of the sun on 21 August 2017 crossed the entire continental United States, giving the opportunity for millions of people to see this spectacular celestial event. The Citizen Continental America Telescopic Eclipse Experiment, or Citizen CATE, captured roughly 90 minutes of totality data from 62 identical setups along the path. Prior to the eclipse, the appearance of the corona was predicted using images from ground and satellite telescopes. The size of the coronal holes on the surface of the sun and the polar plumes extending out into the corona have been examined to predict the features in the corona during totality. By looking at trends in large-scale features, such as streamers, and long-lasting features, such as coronal holes, the atmosphere of the sun can be predicted with reasonable accuracy. This prediction is then compared to other forecast models and what was captured on eclipse day. This experiment imaged the total solar eclipse in 2016 and developed a prediction method extrapolating from the data gathered in Indonesia. The same prediction method was used to forecast the structures expected in the corona on 21 August 2017.

  2. Posterior coronal plating for tibial fractures: technique and advantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montu Jain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Tibial shaft fractures are straightforward to treat but when associated with soft tissue injury particularly at the nail entry/plate insertion site or there is significant comminution proximally or a large butterfly fragment/a second split component in the posterior coronal plane, it is a challenge to the treating surgeon. The aim of the present report is to describe the technique of posterior coronal plating in such a scenario and its advantages. Methods:Between July 2008 and June 2011, 12 patients were pro spectively treated by this approach using 4.5 mm broad dynamic compression plates. Results:The time of bony consolidation and full weight bearing averaged 21.7 weeks (range, 16-26 weeks. Patients were followed up for at least 24 months (range, 24-48 months. At 1 year postoper atively, no loss in reduction or alignment was observed. Mean Hospital for Lower Extremity Measurement Functional Score was 72.8 (range, 64-78. All patients were satisfied with their treatment outcomes. Conclusion:Direct posterior approach and fixation using prone position helps to visualise the fracture fragments and provide rigid fixation. The approach is simple and extensile easily, apart from advantages of less soft tissue and hardware problems compared to standard medial or lateral plating. Key words: Tibial fractures; Bone plates; Orthopedic procedures

  3. The Parker Problem and the Theory of Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, I. J. D.; Sneyd, A. D.

    2005-11-01

    To illustrate his theory of coronal heating, Parker initially considers the problem of disturbing a homogeneous vertical magnetic field that is line-tied across two infinite horizontal surfaces. It is argued that, in the absence of resistive effects, any perturbed equilibrium must be independent of z. As a result random footpoint perturbations give rise to magnetic singularities, which generate strong Ohmic heating in the case of resistive plasmas. More recently these ideas have been formalized in terms of a magneto-static theorem but no formal proof has been provided. In this paper we investigate the Parker hypothesis by formulating the problem in terms of the fluid displacement. We find that, contrary to Parker's assertion, well-defined solutions for arbitrary compressibility can be constructed which possess non-trivial z-dependence. In particular, an analytic treatment shows that small-amplitude Fourier disturbances violate the symmetry ∂z = 0 for both compact and non-compact regions of the (x, y) plane. Magnetic relaxation experiments at various levels of gas pressure confirm the existence and stability of the Fourier mode solutions. More general footpoint displacements that include appreciable shear and twist are also shown to relax to well-defined non-singular equilibria. The implications for Parker's theory of coronal heating are discussed.

  4. Automated Coronal Loop Identification Using Digital Image Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong K.; Gary, G. Allen; Newman, Timothy S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of a master thesis project on a study of computer algorithms for automatic identification of optical-thin, 3-dimensional solar coronal loop centers from extreme ultraviolet and X-ray 2-dimensional images will be presented. These center splines are proxies of associated magnetic field lines. The project is pattern recognition problems in which there are no unique shapes or edges and in which photon and detector noise heavily influence the images. The study explores extraction techniques using: (1) linear feature recognition of local patterns (related to the inertia-tensor concept), (2) parametric space via the Hough transform, and (3) topological adaptive contours (snakes) that constrains curvature and continuity as possible candidates for digital loop detection schemes. We have developed synthesized images for the coronal loops to test the various loop identification algorithms. Since the topology of these solar features is dominated by the magnetic field structure, a first-order magnetic field approximation using multiple dipoles provides a priori information in the identification process. Results from both synthesized and solar images will be presented.

  5. Very large array faraday rotation studies of the coronal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason Earl

    Knowledge of the coronal magnetic field is crucial for understanding (1) the heating mechanism(s) of the solar corona, (2) the acceleration of the fast solar wind, and (3) the structure and dynamics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Observation of Faraday rotation (FR) is one of the best remote-sensing techniques for determining plasma properties in the corona and can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch, shedding light on the initiation process. I used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to make sensitive Faraday rotation measurements to investigate the general plasma structure of the corona, properties of coronal plasma inhomogeneities and waves, and transients associated with coronal mass ejections. To enhance my measurements of FR transients, I also developed an algorithm in the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package to mitigate ionospheric Faraday rotation. In August, 2011, I made FR observations at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz of the radio galaxy 3C 228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6-5.0 solar radii using the VLA. Observations at 5.0 GHz permit measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. These FR observations provided unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. My data on 3C 228 provide two lines of sight (separated by 46 arcseconds, 33,000 km in the corona). I detected three periods during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation measure between these two closely spaced lines of sight, which I used to estimate coronal currents; these values (ranging from 2.6 to 4.1 GA) are several orders of magnitude below that which is necessary for significant coronal heating (assuming the Spitzer resistivity). I also used the data to determine upper limits (3.3 and 6.4 rad/m2 along the two lines of sight) on FR fluctuations caused by coronal waves. These upper limits are comparable to and, thus, not inconsistent

  6. Comparing Coronal Discoloration Between AH26 and ZOE Sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Jahromi, Maryam; Navabi, Amir Arsalan; Ekhtiari, Mahsa

    2011-01-01

    Intrinsic tooth discolorations after endodontic treatment are principally attributed to the composition of necrotic pulp tissue, hemorrhage within the pulp cavity, endodontic medicaments and/or filling materials. Residual sealer left in pulp chamber after obturation can cause discoloration. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate coronal discoloration created by AH26 and ZOE sealers after four months. Fifty intact human extracted maxillary central incisors were employed. Access cavities were prepared in all samples and root canals were instrumented; coronal orifices were then sealed using self-cure glass ionomer. The teeth were divided into two experimental groups (n=20) according to utilized sealer in pulp chambers including AH26 and Dorifill (ZOE). The remaining 10 teeth served as negative and positive controls (n=5). The access cavities were sealed with self-cure glass ionomer. Teeth were kept in incubator for four month. Preliminary digital images of the teeth were taken and then compared with those related to 4-month follow-up. The images were assessed using Photoshop software. Data was analyzed using paired t-test and independent samples t-test. The teeth which were filled with AH26 sealer showed significantly greater discoloration than those filled with ZOE sealer (Dorifill) (Pdiscoloration of the crown compared to ZOE sealer. Despite the other disadvantage of AH26 sealer, it seems that Dorifill is more esthetically considerate.

  7. Cannabis, possible cardiac deaths and the coroner in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tormey, W P

    2012-01-10

    BACKGROUND: The elevated risk of triggering a myocardial infarction by smoking cannabis is limited to the first 2 h after smoking. AIM: To examine the possible role of cannabis in cardiac deaths. CASES AND RESULTS: From 3,193 coroners\\' cases over 2 years, there were 13 cases where the clinical information was compatible with a primary cardiac cause of death. An inquest was held in three cases. Myocardial infarction was the primary cause of death in 54%. Other causes were sudden adult death syndrome, sudden death in epilepsy, and poisoning by alcohol and diazepam. Cannabis was mentioned once only on a death certificate, but not as a cause of death. Blood delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-carboxylic acid was recorded in one case and in no case was plasma tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) measured. CONCLUSIONS: To attribute sudden cardiac death to cannabis, plasma THC should be measured in the toxicology screen in coroners\\' cases where urine cannabinoids are positive. A positive urine cannabinoids immunoassay alone is insufficient evidence in the linkage of acute cardiac death and cannabis.

  8. [Why proton therapy? And how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariat, Juliette; Habrand, Jean Louis; Lesueur, Paul; Chaikh, Abdulhamid; Kammerer, Emmanuel; Lecomte, Delphine; Batalla, Alain; Balosso, Jacques; Tessonnier, Thomas

    2018-02-05

    Proton therapy is a radiotherapy, based on the use of protons, charged subatomic particles that stop at a given depth depending on their initial energy (pristine Bragg peak), avoiding any output beam, unlike the photons used in most of the other modalities of radiotherapy. Proton therapy has been used for 60 years, but has only become ubiquitous in the last decade because of recent major advances in particle accelerator technology. This article reviews the history of clinical implementation of protons, the nature of the technological advances that now allows its expansion at a lower cost. It also addresses the technical and physical specificities of proton therapy and the clinical situations for which proton therapy may be relevant but requires evidence. Different proton therapy techniques are possible. These are explained in terms of their clinical potential by explaining the current terminology (such as cyclotrons, synchrotrons or synchrocyclotrons, using superconducting magnets, fixed line or arm rotary with passive diffusion delivery or active by scanning) in basic words. The requirements associated with proton therapy are increased due to the precision of the depth dose deposit. The learning curve of proton therapy requires that clinical indications be prioritized according to their associated uncertainties (such as range uncertainties and movement in lung tumors). Many clinical indications potentially fall under proton therapy ultimately. Clinical strategies are explained in a paralleled manuscript. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Proton Radiography Imager:Generates Synthetic Proton Radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-09-12

    ProRad is a computer program that is used to generate synthetic images of proton (or other charged particles) radiographs. The proton radiographs arc images that arc obtained by sending energetic protons (or electrons or positrons, for example) through 11 plasma where electric and/or magnetic fields alter the particles trajectory, Dnd the variations me imaged on RC film, image plate, or equivalent

  10. Differential Cross Sections for Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering is investigated within the framework of the one pion exchange model in an attempt to model nucleon-nucleon interactions spanning the large range of energies important to cosmic ray shielding. A quantum field theoretic calculation is used to compute both differential and total cross sections. A scalar theory is then presented and compared to the one pion exchange model. The theoretical cross sections are compared to proton-proton scattering data to determine the validity of the models.

  11. Crown-ether linked ruthenium-coronates a new type of photostable electron transfer-sensitizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossmann, S.; Duerr, H. (Universitaet des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken (Germany))

    1992-07-01

    A new interesting class of Ru-coronates was prepared containing a cage tritopic ligand bound to Ru. They have a high photostability and the bimolecular electron transfer of cage complexes is demonstrated for the first time by employing the new Ru coronates in a sacrificial hydrogen producing system.

  12. Characteristics of Low-latitude Coronal Holes near the Maximum of Solar Cycle 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmeister, Stefan J.; Veronig, Astrid; Reiss, Martin A.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the statistics of 288 low-latitude coronal holes extracted from SDO/AIA-193 filtergrams over the time range of 2011 January 01–2013 December 31. We analyze the distribution of characteristic coronal hole properties, such as the areas, mean AIA-193 intensities, and mean magnetic fie...

  13. Local variations in reporting deaths to the coroner in England and Wales: a postcode lottery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclean, Maxwell; Roach, Jason; Armitage, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    In England and Wales, doctors are charged with a responsibility either to report a death to the coroner or issue a medical certificate specifying cause of death. A lack of formal prescriptive or presumptive oversight has resulted in the promulgation by individual coroners of local reporting regimes. The study reported here identified overall and gendered variations in local reporting rates to coroners across the jurisdictions of England and Wales, consistent over time. Analysis was performed on Ministry of Justice (MOJ) data pertaining to the numbers and proportions of deaths reported to the coroner by jurisdiction over a 10-year period (2001-2010). Office of National Statistics (ONS) data provided the numbers of deaths registered in England and Wales over the same period to serve as a denominator for the calculation of proportions. Where coroner jurisdictions (and local authorities) had been amalgamated during this period, the combined reported and registered death figures have been included in line with the current jurisdiction areas. While reporting rates for individual jurisdictions were found to be stable over the 10-year period, wide local variations in reporting deaths to coroners were found with no obvious demographic explanation. The gender of the deceased was identified as a major factor in local variation. The decision to report a death to the coroner varies across jurisdictions. Implications for coronial investigations are discussed and the need for wider research into coroners' decision-making is proposed.

  14. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  15. Physics controversies in proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsman, Martijn; Schwarz, Marco; Dong, Lei

    2013-04-01

    The physical characteristics of proton beams are appealing for cancer therapy. The rapid increase in operational and planned proton therapy facilities may suggest that this technology is a "plug-and-play" valuable addition to the arsenal of the radiation oncologist and medical physicist. In reality, the technology is still evolving, so planning and delivery of proton therapy in patients face many practical challenges. This review article discusses the current status of proton therapy treatment planning and delivery techniques, indicates current limitations in dealing with range uncertainties, and proposes possible developments for proton therapy and supplementary technology to try to realize the actual potential of proton therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  17. Diagnostic values of coronal section with MPR method in magnetic resonance imaging of canal stenotic change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Mana; Haruhara, Shoutaro; Soh, Katsuhiro; Yokouchi, Junichi; Matsuda, Hiromichi; Inoue, Shingo; Kakizaki, Dai; Abe, Kimihiko (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    During a 2-year period, 300 patients were screened for canal stenotic change with surface-coil MR images, and T1-weighted coronal scan was performed on 65 patients with typical radiculopathy including 45 cases of lumbar disk herniation to evaluate the effectiveness of coronal section with MPR (multi-planar reconstruction) method in pre and post-operative assessment of canal stenotic change. Coronal section with MPR method in MRI of lumbar spine has advantages in patients with radiculopathy. Although it is as sensitive as myelography in detecting the pathological site, nerve root damage can be detected more obviously by MRI coronal section with MPR method than by myelography. As bilateral nerve roots and other contents of the foramen are figurized in the same image, the shift of the root and the decrease of the fat layer surrounding the roots can be more easily detected. Adding coronal imaging to MR examination is a viable alternative to pre-operative myelography. (author).

  18. Proton and oxide ion conductivity of doped LaScO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lybye, D.; Bonanos, N.

    1999-01-01

    The conductivity of La0.9Sr0.1Sc0.9Mg0.1O3 has been studied by impedance spectroscopy in controlled atmospheres. The material was found to be a mixed conductor with p-type conduction at high oxygen partial pressures and a combined proton and oxide ion conductor at low oxygen partial pressures....... At temperatures below 800 degrees C and low partial pressure of oxygen, proton conduction was dominant. Above this temperature, the ionic conductivity is dominated by oxide ion transport. The protonic transport number was estimated from the conductivities measured in dry and in water-moisturised gas. An isotope...

  19. An 800-MeV proton radiography facility for dynamic experiments

    CERN Document Server

    King, N S P; Adams, K; Alrick, K R; Amann, J F; Balzar, S; Barnes, P D J; Crow, M L; Cushing, S B; Eddleman, J C; Fife, T T; Flores, P; Fujino, D; Gallegos, R A; Gray, N T; Hartouni, E P; Hogan, G E; Holmes, V H; Jaramillo, S A; Knudsson, J N; London, R K; Lopez, R R; McDonald, T E; McClelland, J B; Merrill, F E; Morley, K B; Morris, C L; Naivar, F J; Parker, E L; Park, H S; Pazuchanics, P D; Pillai, C; Riedel, C M; Sarracino, J S; Shelley, F E J; Stacy, H L; Takala, B E; Thompson, R; Tucker, H E; Yates, G J; Ziock, H J; Zumbro, J D

    1999-01-01

    The capability has successfully been developed at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) to utilize a spatially and temporally prepared 800 MeV proton beam to produce proton radiographs. A series of proton bursts are transmitted through a dynamic object and transported, via a unique magnetic lens system, to an image plane. The magnetic lens system permits correcting for the effects of multiple coulomb scattering which would otherwise completely blur the spatially transmitted information at the image plane. The proton radiographs are recorded either on a time integrating film plate or with a recently developed multi-frame electronic imaging camera system. The latter technique permits obtaining a time dependent series of proton radiographs with time intervals (modulo 358 ns) up to many microseconds and variable time intervals between images. One electronically shuttered, intensified, CCD camera is required per image. These cameras can detect single protons interacting with a scintillating fiber optic ar...

  20. Ultrafast vibrational and structural dynamics of the proton in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J

    2006-04-07

    The dynamical behavior of excess protons in liquid water is investigated using femtosecond vibrational pump-probe spectroscopy. By resonantly exciting the O-H+-stretching mode of the H9O4(+) (Eigen) hydration structure of the proton and probing the subsequent absorption change over a broad frequency range, the dynamics of the proton is observed in real time. The lifetime of the protonic stretching mode is found to be approximately 120 fs, shorter than for any other vibration in liquid water. We also observe the interconversion between the H9O4(+) (Eigen) and H5O2(+) (Zundel) hydration structures of the proton. This interconversion, which constitutes an essential step of proton transport in water, is found to occur on an extremely fast (< 100 fs) time scale.

  1. Proton-Exchange-Induced Configuration Rearrangement in a Poly(ionic liquid) Solution: A NMR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haijin; Yang, Hengrui; Li, Jiaye; Barlow, Kristine J; Kong, Lingxue; Mecerreyes, David; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Forsyth, Maria

    2017-11-02

    Polymeric ionic liquids have emerged recently as a promising alternative to traditional polymers as the polymer electrolyte membrane materials of choice because of their strongly decoupled dynamics between the polymer backbone and the counterions. Knowledge of proton exchange and transport mechanism in such materials is critical to the design and development of new poly(ionic liquid) materials with improved electrochemical properties. Our NMR results show that the proton exchange between the labile proton of the diethylmethylammonium (NH122) cation and H2O molecules is accompanied by a concerted configuration rearrangement of the ammonium. Through a combination of PFG-NMR and proton relaxation (line width) analysis, we demonstrate that at lower temperatures the labile proton diffuses along with the NH122 ammonium cation as an integral unit, whereas at higher temperatures the NH/H2O proton exchange sets in gradually, and the PFG-NMR measured diffusion coefficient is a population-averaged value between the two exchanging sites.

  2. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  3. Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnappa, Vijayakumar; Raveesha, K. H.; Subramanian, K. R.

    Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts Vijayakumar H Doddamani1*, Raveesha K H2 and Subramanian3 1Bangalore University, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 2CMR Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 3 Retd, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India Abstract Magnetic fields play an important role in the astrophysical processes occurring in solar corona. In the solar atmosphere, magnetic field interacts with the plasma, producing abundant eruptive activities. They are considered to be the main factors for coronal heating, particle acceleration and the formation of structures like prominences, flares and Coronal Mass Ejections. The magnetic field in solar atmosphere in the range of 1.1-3 Rsun is especially important as an interface between the photospheric magnetic field and the solar wind. Its structure and time dependent change affects space weather by modifying solar wind conditions, Cho (2000). Type II doublet bursts can be used for the estimation of the strength of the magnetic field at two different heights. Two type II bursts occur sometimes in sequence. By relating the speed of the type II radio burst to Alfven Mach Number, the Alfven speed of the shock wave generating type II radio burst can be calculated. Using the relation between the Alfven speed and the mean frequency of emission, the magnetic field strength can be determined at a particular height. We have used the relative bandwidth and drift rate properties of multiple type II radio bursts to derive magnetic field strengths at two different heights and also the gradient of the magnetic field in the outer corona. The magnetic field strength has been derived for different density factors. It varied from 1.2 to 2.5 gauss at a solar height of 1.4 Rsun. The empirical relation of the variation of the magnetic field with height is found to be of the form B(R) = In the present case the power law index ‘γ’ varied from -3 to -2 for variation of

  4. Proton Transfer in Perfluorosulfonic Acid Fuel Cell Membranes with Differing Pendant Chains and Equivalent Weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Joseph E; Lawler, Christian M; Fayer, Michael D

    2017-05-04

    Proton transfer in the nanoscopic water channels of polyelectrolyte fuel cell membranes was studied using a photoacid, 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid sodium salt (HPTS), in the channels. The local environment of the probe was determined using 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid sodium salt (MPTS), which is not a photoacid. Three fully hydrated membranes, Nafion (DuPont) and two 3M membranes, were studied to determine the impact of different pendant chains and equivalent weights on proton transfer. Fluorescence anisotropy and excited state population decay data that characterize the local environment of the fluorescent probes and proton transfer dynamics were measured. The MPTS lifetime and anisotropy results show that most of the fluorescent probes have a bulk-like water environment with a relatively small fraction interacting with the channel wall. Measurements of the HPTS protonated and deprotonated fluorescent bands' population decays provided information on the proton transport dynamics. The decay of the protonated band from ∼0.5 ns to tens of nanoseconds is in part determined by dissociation and recombination with the HPTS, providing information on the ability of protons to move in the channels. The dissociation and recombination is manifested as a power law component in the protonated band fluorescence decay. The results show that equivalent weight differences between two 3M membranes resulted in a small difference in proton transfer. However, differences in pendant chain structure did significantly influence the proton transfer ability, with the 3M membranes displaying more facile transfer than Nafion.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy on protons and deuterons in proton conducting perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, M.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR-microscopy exper...

  6. Effects of relativity in proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, G.H.; Scholten, O.; Tjon, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the influence of negative-energy states in proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a fully relativistic framework using the T matrix of Fleischer and Tjon. The contribution from negative-energy states in the single-scattering diagrams is shown to be large, indicating that relativistic effects

  7. Proton-proton virtual bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, GH; Scholten, O; Tjon, J

    1999-01-01

    Lepton-pair production (virtual bremsstrahlung) in proton-proton scattering is investigated using a relativistic covariant model. The effects of negative-energy slates and two-body currents are studied. These are shown to have large effects in some particular structure functions, even at the

  8. Electromagnetic off-shell effects in proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kondratyuk, S.A.; Martinus, G.H.; Scholten, O.

    1998-01-01

    We study the influence of the off-shell structure of the nucleon electromagnetic vertex on proton-proton bermsstrahlung observables. Realistic choices for the off-shell behavior are found to have considerable influences on observables such as cross sections and analyzing powers. The rescattering

  9. [Proton imaging applications for proton therapy: state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblard, R; Floquet, V; Angellier, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Hérault, J

    2015-04-01

    Proton therapy allows a highly precise tumour volume irradiation with a low dose delivered to the healthy tissues. The steep dose gradients observed and the high treatment conformity require a precise knowledge of the proton range in matter and the target volume position relative to the beam. Thus, proton imaging allows an improvement of the treatment accuracy, and thereby, in treatment quality. Initially suggested in 1963, radiographic imaging with proton is still not used in clinical routine. The principal difficulty is the lack of spatial resolution, induced by the multiple Coulomb scattering of protons with nuclei. Moreover, its realization for all clinical locations requires relatively high energies that are previously not considered for clinical routine. Abandoned for some time in favor of X-ray technologies, research into new imaging methods using protons is back in the news because of the increase of proton radiation therapy centers in the world. This article exhibits a non-exhaustive state of the art in proton imaging. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Slope analysis for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Okorokov, V. A.

    2008-01-01

    The diffraction slope parameter is investigated for elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering based on the all available experimental data at intermediate square of momentum transfer in the main. Energy dependence of the elastic diffraction slope is approximated by various analytic functions in a model-independent fashion. The expanded standard logarithmic approximations allow to describe experimental slopes in all available energy range at qualitative level reasonably. Various f...

  11. Changes in the subgingival biofilm composition after coronally positioned flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadson Almeida Lima

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of coronally positioned flap (CPF on the subgingival biofilm composition. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-two subjects with gingival recessions were treated with CPF. Clinical parameters were assessed before and at 6 months after surgery. Subgingival biofilms were analyzed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique for 40 bacterial species. RESULTS: Recession height, clinical attachment level and bleeding on probing improved significantly (p<0.05 at 6 months post-CPF. The proportions of 10 periodontal pathogens and the proportions of red and orange complexes decreased at 6 months. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, CPF can induce beneficial effects on the composition of the subgingival microbiota after 6 months.

  12. Magnetic Evolution of Mini-Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarbakhsh, L.; Alipour, N.; Safari, H.

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between mini-coronal mass ejections (mini-CMEs) and the evolution of their magnetic fluxes. An automatic detection algorithm was used to detect mini-dimmings in 171 Å images taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Using the difference images for the dimmings, 131 events that satisfied mini-CME signatures were selected. Changes in their magnetic structure using photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms taken with the Heliospheric and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on SDO were investigated. It was found that 27 % of the events had slight changes and 73 % showed considerable changes in magnetic flux. About 18 % of the magnetic structures evolved by cancellation and 38 % by complex flux changes.

  13. Einstein Observatory coronal temperatures of late-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Collura, A.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of a survey of the coronal temperatures of late-type stars using the Einstein Observatory IPC. The spectral analysis shows that the frequently found one- and two-temperature descriptions are mainly influenced by the SNR of the data and that models using continuous emission measure distributions can provide equally adequate and physically more meaningful and more plausible descriptions. Intrinsic differences in differential emission measure distributions are found for four groups of stars. M dwarfs generally show evidence for high-temperature gas in conjunction with lower-temperature material, while main-sequence stars of types F and G have the high-temperature component either absent or very weak. Very hot coronae without the lower-temperature component appearing in dwarf stars are evident in most of the giant stars studied. RS CVn systems show evidence for extremely hot coronae, sometimes with no accompanying lower-temperature material.

  14. Prominence condensation and magnetic levitation in a coronal loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoven, G.; Mok, Y.; Drake, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a model dynamic simulation of the formation and support of a narrow prominence at the apex of a coronal magnetic loop or arcade are described. The condensation process proceeds via an initial radiative cooling and pressure drop, and a secondary siphon flow from the dense chromospheric ends. The antibuoyancy effect as the prominence forms causes a bending of the confining magnetic field, which propagates toward the semirigid ends of the magnetic loop. Thus, a wide magnetic 'hammock' or well (of the normal-polarity Kippenhahn-Schlueter-type) is formed, which supports the prominence at or near the field apex. The simplicity of this 1.5-dimensional model, with its accompanying diagnostics, elucidates the various contributions to the nonlinear dynamics of prominence condensation and levitation.

  15. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    CERN Document Server

    Good, S W

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER (MES) and Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MES data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed VEX data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MES, VEX, STEREO-A, STEREO-B ...

  16. Geoeffectiveness of Coronal Mass Ejections in the SOHO Era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumbovic, M.; Devos, A.; Vrsnak, B.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the study is to determine the probability distributions of the geomagnetic Dst index as a function of the coronal mass ejection (CME) and solar flare parameters for the purpose of establishing a probabilistic forecast tool for the geomagnetic storm intensity. Several CME...... and flare parameters as well as the effect of successive-CME occurrence in changing the probability for a certain range of Dst index values, were examined. The results confirm some of already known relationships between remotely-observed properties of solar eruptive events and geomagnetic storms, namely...... the importance of initial CME speed, apparent width, source position, and the associated solar flare class. In this paper we quantify these relationships in a form to be used for space weather forecasting in future. The results of the statistical study are employed to construct an empirical statistical model...

  17. An ice-cream cone model for coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, X. H.; Wang, C. B.; Dou, X. K.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we use an ice-cream cone model to analyze the geometrical and kinematical properties of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Assuming that in the early phase CMEs propagate with near-constant speed and angular width, some useful properties of CMEs, namely the radial speed (v), the angular width (α), and the location at the heliosphere, can be obtained considering the geometrical shapes of a CME as an ice-cream cone. This model is improved by (1) using an ice-cream cone to show the near real configuration of a CME, (2) determining the radial speed via fitting the projected speeds calculated from the height-time relation in different azimuthal angles, (3) not only applying to halo CMEs but also applying to nonhalo CMEs.

  18. Anterior ethmoidal artery evaluation on coronal CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Soraia Ale; Souza, Marcia Maria Ale de; Gregório, Luís Carlos; Ajzen, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) is an important point for frontal and ethmoid sinuses surgery. CT scans can identify landmarks to help the surgeon find the AEA. To identify the landmarks of the AEA on the orbital medial wall and on the lateral wall of the olfactory fossa. and to correlate the presence of supraorbital ethmoidal cells with spotting the anterior ethmoidal artery canal. Retrospective review of 198 direct coronal paranasal sinuses computed tomography (CT) scans from August to December, 2006. Supraorbital pneumatization was seen in 35% (70 scans). The AEA canal was seen in 41% (81 scans). The anterior ethmoidal sulcus was seen in 98% (194 scans) and the anterior ethmoidal foramen was seen in all the scans (100%). The anterior ethmoidal foramen and the anterior ethmoidal sulcus were anatomical landmarks present in almost 100% of the scans studied. There was a correlation between the presence of supraorbital pneumatization and AEA canal visualization.

  19. Coronal Polarization of Pseudostreamers and the Solar Polar Field Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmeler, L. A.; Guennou, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Gibson, S. E.; Auchere, F.

    2016-01-01

    The reversal of the solar polar magnetic field is notoriously hard to pin down due to the extreme viewing angle of the pole. In Cycle 24, the southern polar field reversal can be pinpointed with high accuracy due to a large-scale pseudostreamer that formed over the pole and persisted for approximately a year. We tracked the size and shape of this structure with multiple observations and analysis techniques including PROBA2/SWAP EUV images, AIA EUV images, CoMP polarization data, and 3D tomographic reconstructions. We find that the heliospheric field reversed polarity in February 2014, whereas in the photosphere, the last vestiges of the previous polar field polarity remained until March 2015. We present here the evolution of the structure and describe its identification in the Fe XII 1074nm coronal emission line, sensitive to the Hanle effect in the corona.

  20. Preliminary diagnosis of areal density in the deuterium fuel capsule by proton measurement at SG-III facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Luo, Xing; Zheng, Jianhua; Chen, Zhongjing; Yan, Ji; Pu, Yudong; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Tianxuan; Yang, Zhenghua; Yang, Pin; Tang, Qi; Song, Zifeng; Jiang, Shao'en; Liu, Shenye; Yang, Jiamin; Wang, Feng

    2017-05-01

    Areal density (ρR) is one of the crucial parameters in the inertial confinement fusion. Measurement of the fusion products is a more feasible method to diagnose ρR than other methods, such as X-ray. In the capsules filled with D2 fuel or D-3He fuel, proton is an ideal probe to diagnose the implosion ρR in different emission times and directions by measurements of the proton yields and spectra. By D-D reaction protons and D-3He reaction protons, the diagnostics of the total and fuel ρR, ρR evolution, implosion asymmetry and mix effect have been demonstrated at OMEGA and NIF facilities. Also some advanced proton diagnostics instruments are developed with a high level capability. Preliminary diagnosis of ρR in the deuterium involved fuel capsules by measurement of protons at SG-III facility was implemented. A fusion product emission and transport code by Monte-Carlo method was developed. The primary and secondary protons emission and transport in the fuel and shell plasmas were able to be simulated. The relations of the proton energy loss and the secondary proton yields with the areal density were inspected. Several proton spectrometers have been built up at SG-III facility, such as a step ranged filter (SRF) proton spectrometer and a wedged range filter (WRF) proton spectrometer. Some proton response simulation codes and the codes for proton spectra reconstruction were also developed. The demonstrations of ρR diagnostics at SG-III facility by D-D reaction and D-3He reaction proton spectra measurements are presented.

  1. Transverse spin effects in proton-proton scattering and $Q \\bar Q$ production

    OpenAIRE

    Goloskokov, S. V.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss transverse spin effects caused by the spin-flip part of the Pomeron coupling with the proton. The predicted spin asymmetries in proton-proton scattering and QQ production in proton-proton and lepton-proton reactions are not small and can be studied in future polarized experiments.

  2. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  3. Evolution of Proton and Alpha Particle Velocities through the Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďurovcová, T.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Richardson, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    Relative properties of solar wind protons and α particles are often used as indicators of a source region on the solar surface, and analysis of their evolution along the solar wind path tests our understanding of physics of multicomponent magnetized plasma. The paper deals with the comprehensive analysis of the difference between proton and α particle bulk velocities at 1 au with a special emphasis on interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). A comparison of about 20 years of Wind observations at 1 au with Helios measurements closer to the Sun (0.3–0.7 au) generally confirms the present knowledge that (1) the differential speed between both species increases with the proton speed; (2) the differential speed is lower than the local Alfvén speed; (3) α particles are faster than protons near the Sun, and this difference decreases with the increasing distance. However, we found a much larger portion of observations with protons faster than α particles in Wind than in Helios data and attributed this effect to a preferential acceleration of the protons in the solar wind. A distinct population characterized by a very small differential velocity and nearly equal proton and α particle temperatures that is frequently observed around the maximum of solar activity was attributed to ICMEs. Since this population does not exhibit any evolution with increasing collisional age, we suggest that, by contrast to the solar wind from other sources, ICMEs are born in an equilibrium state and gradually lose this equilibrium due to interactions with the ambient solar wind.

  4. Three-Dimensional Morphology of a Coronal Prominence Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hill, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional density model of coronal prominence cavities, and a morphological fit that has been tightly constrained by a uniquely well-observed cavity. Observations were obtained as part of an International Heliophysical Year campaign by instruments from a variety of space- and ground-based observatories, spanning wavelengths from radio to soft-X-ray to integrated white light. From these data it is clear that the prominence cavity is the limb manifestation of a longitudinally-extended polar-crown filament channel, and that the cavity is a region of low density relative to the surrounding corona. As a first step towards quantifying density and temperature from campaign spectroscopic data, we establish the three-dimensional morphology of the cavity. This is critical for taking line-of-sight projection effects into account, since cavities are not localized in the plane of the sky and the corona is optically thin. We have augmented a global coronal streamer model to include a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. We have developed a semi-automated routine that fits ellipses to cross-sections of the cavity as it rotates past the solar limb, and have applied it to Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) observations from the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. This defines the morphological parameters of our model, from which we reproduce forward-modeled cavity observables. We find that cavity morphology and orientation, in combination with the viewpoints of the observing spacecraft, explains the observed variation in cavity visibility for the east vs. west limbs

  5. Chromospheric and coronal variation across stellar activity cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Cedric; Miller, Brendan P.; Gallo, Elena; Wright, Jason; Isaacson, Howard T.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate cyclic chromospheric and coronal activity in main-sequence stars, using Ca II H and K core emission and X-ray luminosities, respectively. From a sample of 244 nearby stars with high-cadence Keck optical spectroscopy spanning up to 17 years (obtained for the California Planet Search program), we use automated sinusoid modeling and goodness-of-fit criteria to identify 33 stars with highly significant cyclic R'HK variability. The cycle periods are refined using mmag APT optical photometry. We also construct a comparison sample of 23 stars that show virtually no R'HK variability. The cyclic and flat stars have similar B-V and absolute magnitude distributions but the cyclic stars tend to be more active, with greater median R'HK values. We present new Swift/XRT observations of 10 cyclic stars and 1 flat star, totaling 32.6 ks; 5/11 are detected in this snapshot pilot survey. A comparison of their current-epoch X-ray luminosities to archival ROSAT values shows variation by a factor of 2-3 is common on decade-long timescales. Several stars also show suggestive evidence for X-ray variability on much shorter timescales, perhaps related to stellar rotation and coronal inhomogeneity or to small flares. We use the chromospheric activity cycles to calculate the phase of each X-ray observation. Additional Swift observations are ongoing and with this larger dataset we will measure the typical amplitude of cyclic X-ray variation. We discuss our initial results in the context of magnetic dynamo activity and consider the implications for exoplanet atmosphere heating and evaporation.

  6. Dextrocardia and coronal alignment of thoracic curve: a population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallroth, Kaj; Lohman, Martina; Heliövaara, Markku; Aromaa, Arpo; Knekt, Paul; Standertskjöld-Nordenstam, Carl-Gustaf

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the coronal alignment of the thoracic spine in persons with dextrocardia. Generally, the thoracic spine is slightly curved to the right. It has been suggested that the curve could be triggered by pulsation forces from the descending aorta. Since no population study has focused on the alignment of the thoracic spine in persons with situs inversus, dextrocardia, and right-sided descending aorta, we compared the radiographs of the thoracic spine in persons with dextrocardia to those having normal levocardia. Among 57,440 persons in a health survey, 11 cases of dextrocardia were identified through standard radiological screening. The miniature chest radiographs of eight persons were eligible for the present study. The study was carried out as a nested case-control study. Four individually matched (age, gender, and municipality) controls with levocardia were chosen for each case. Coronal alignment of the thoracic spine was analyzed without knowledge of whether the person had levo- or dextrocardia. A mild convexity to the left was found in all persons with dextrocardia and right-sided descending aorta (mean Cobb angle 6.6 degrees to the left, SD 2.9). Of the 32 normal levocardia persons, 29 displayed a convexity to the right, and the remaining three had a straight spine (mean Cobb angle 5.2 degrees to the right, SD 2.3). The difference (mean 11.8 degrees , SD 3.5) differed significantly from unity (P = 0.00003). In conclusion, it seems that a slight left convexity of the thoracic spine is frequent in dextrocardia. We assume that the effect of the repetitive pulsatile pressure of the descending thoracic aorta, and the mass effect of the heart may cause the direction of the convexity to develop opposite to the side of the aortic arch.

  7. Heating and Cooling of Coronal Loops with Turbulent Suppression of Parallel Heat Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Nicolas; Emslie, A. Gordon; Horne, Duncan; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2018-01-01

    Using the “enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops” (EBTEL) model, we investigate the hydrodynamics of the plasma in a flaring coronal loop in which heat conduction is limited by turbulent scattering of the electrons that transport the thermal heat flux. The EBTEL equations are solved analytically in each of the two (conduction-dominated and radiation-dominated) cooling phases. Comparison of the results with typical observed cooling times in solar flares shows that the turbulent mean free path {λ }T lies in a range corresponding to a regime in which classical (collision-dominated) conduction plays at most a limited role. We also consider the magnitude and duration of the heat input that is necessary to account for the enhanced values of temperature and density at the beginning of the cooling phase and for the observed cooling times. We find through numerical modeling that in order to produce a peak temperature ≃ 1.5× {10}7 K and a 200 s cooling time consistent with observations, the flare-heating profile must extend over a significant period of time; in particular, its lingering role must be taken into consideration in any description of the cooling phase. Comparison with observationally inferred values of post-flare loop temperatures, densities, and cooling times thus leads to useful constraints on both the magnitude and duration of the magnetic energy release in the loop, as well as on the value of the turbulent mean free path {λ }T.

  8. Coronal Mass Ejection Initiation by Converging Photospheric Flows: Toward a Realistic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, T.; Aly, J.-J.; Luciani, J.-F.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J.

    2011-12-01

    In the context of coronal mass ejections triggering, we reconsider the class of models in which the evolution of an active region (AR) is driven by imposed boundary motions converging toward the polarity inversion line (PIL). We introduce a new model problem in which there is a large-scale flow with a diverging structure on the photosphere. This flow is reminiscent of that of the well-known moat flow around each of the two spots of a bipolar AR and transports only part of the magnetic flux toward the PIL. It is thus more compatible with observations than the one used in our previous study, which forced the whole positive and negative polarity parts of the AR approaching each other. We also include a diffusion term associated with small-scale turbulent photospheric motions, but keep the associated diffusivity at a low value in the particular study described here. We show that the evolution of an initial sheared force-free field first leads to the formation of a twisted flux rope which stays in equilibrium for some time. Eventually, however, the configuration suffers a global disruption whose underlying mechanism is found by energetic considerations to be nonequilibrium. It begins indeed when the magnetic energy becomes of the order of the energy of an accessible partially open field. For triggering an eruption by converging flows, it is thus not necessary to advect the whole AR toward the PIL, but only its central part.

  9. Comparative Gene Expression Analysis of the Coronal Pulp and Apical Pulp Complex in Human Immature Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Seunghye; Shin, Yooseok; Lee, Hyo-Seol; Jeon, Mijeong; Kim, Seong-Oh; Cho, Sung-Won; Ruparel, Nikita B; Song, Je Seon

    2016-05-01

    This study determined the gene expression profiles of the human coronal pulp (CP) and apical pulp complex (APC) with the aim of explaining differences in their functions. Total RNA was isolated from the CP and APC, and gene expression was analyzed using complementary DNA microarray technology. Gene ontology analysis was used to classify the biological function. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining were performed to verify microarray data. In the microarray analyses, expression increases of at least 2-fold were present in 125 genes in the APC and 139 genes in the CP out of a total of 33,297 genes. Gene ontology class processes found more genes related to immune responses, cell growth and maintenance, and cell adhesion in the APC, whereas transport and neurogenesis genes predominated in the CP. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining confirmed the microarray results, with DMP1, CALB1, and GABRB1 strongly expressed in the CP, whereas SMOC2, SHH, BARX1, CX3CR1, SPP1, COL XII, and LAMC2 were strongly expressed in the APC. The expression levels of genes related to dentin mineralization, neurogenesis, and neurotransmission are higher in the CP in human immature teeth, whereas those of immune-related and tooth development-related genes are higher in the APC. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. On the variation of solar flare coronal X-ray source sizes with energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom); Emslie, A. Gordon, E-mail: n.jeffrey@physics.gla.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Observations with RHESSI have enabled the detailed study of the structure of dense hard X-ray coronal sources in solar flares. The variation of source extent with electron energy has been discussed in the context of streaming of non-thermal particles in a one-dimensional cold target model and the results used to constrain both the physical extent of, and density within, the electron acceleration region. Here, we extend this investigation to a more physically realistic model of electron transport that takes into account the finite temperature of the ambient plasma, the initial pitch angle distribution of the accelerated electrons, and the effects of collisional pitch angle scattering. The finite temperature results in the thermal diffusion of electrons, which leads to the observationally inferred value of the acceleration region volume being an overestimate of its true value. The different directions of the electron trajectories, a consequence of both the non-zero injection pitch angle and scattering within the target, cause the projected propagation distance parallel to the guiding magnetic field to be reduced, so that a one-dimensional interpretation can overestimate the actual density by a factor of up to ∼6. The implications of these results for the determination of acceleration region properties (specific acceleration rate, filling factor, etc.) are discussed.

  11. Neutron-decay Protons from Solar Flares as Seed Particles for CME-shock Acceleration in the Inner Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ronald J.; Ko, Yuan-Kuen

    2017-09-01

    The protons in large solar energetic particle events are accelerated in the inner heliosphere by fast shocks produced by coronal mass ejections. Unless there are other sources, the protons these shocks act upon would be those of the solar wind (SW). The efficiency of the acceleration depends on the kinetic energy of the protons. For a 2000 km s-1 shock, the most effective proton energies would be 30-100 keV; I.e., within the suprathermal tail component of the SW. We investigate one possible additional source of such protons: those resulting from the decay of solar-flare-produced neutrons that escape from the Sun into the low corona. The neutrons are produced by interactions of flare-accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere. We discuss the production of low-energy neutrons in flares and their decay on a interplanetary magnetic field line near the Sun. We find that even when the flaring conditions are optimal, the 30-100 keV neutron-decay proton density produced by even a very large solar flare would be only about 10% of that of the 30-100 keV SW suprathermal tail. We discuss the implication of a seed-particle source of more frequent, small flares.

  12. Suicide and the Therapeutic Coroner: Inquests, Governance and the Grieving Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Tait

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study of English Coronial practice raises a number of questions about the role played by the Coroner within contemporary governance. Following observations at over 20 inquests into possible suicides and in-depth interviews with six Coroners, three preliminary issue emerged, all of which pointed to a broader and, in many ways, more significant issue. These preliminary issues are concerned with (1 the existence of considerable slippages between different Coroners over which deaths are likely to be classified as suicide; (2 the high standard of proof required and immense pressure faced by Coroners from family members at inquest to reach any verdict other than suicide, which significantly depresses likely suicide rates; and (3 Coroners feeling no professional obligation, either individually or collectively, to contribute to the production of consistent and useful social data regarding suicide, arguably rendering comparative suicide statistics relatively worthless. These concerns lead, ultimately, to the second more important question about the role expected of Coroners within social governance and within an effective, contemporary democracy. That is, are Coroners the principal officers in the public administration of death; or are they, first and foremost, a crucial part of the grieving process, one that provides important therapeutic interventions into the mental and emotional health of the community?

  13. Observations and Numerical Models of Solar Coronal Heating Associated with Spicules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontieu, B. De; Martinez-Sykora, J. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. A021S, Building 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Moortel, I. De [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); McIntosh, S. W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    Spicules have been proposed as significant contributors to the mass and energy balance of the corona. While previous observations have provided a glimpse of short-lived transient brightenings in the corona that are associated with spicules, these observations have been contested and are the subject of a vigorous debate both on the modeling and the observational side. Therefore, it remains unclear whether plasma is heated to coronal temperatures in association with spicules. We use high-resolution observations of the chromosphere and transition region (TR) with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and of the corona with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory to show evidence of the formation of coronal structures associated with spicular mass ejections and heating of plasma to TR and coronal temperatures. Our observations suggest that a significant fraction of the highly dynamic loop fan environment associated with plage regions may be the result of the formation of such new coronal strands, a process that previously had been interpreted as the propagation of transient propagating coronal disturbances. Our observations are supported by 2.5D radiative MHD simulations that show heating to coronal temperatures in association with spicules. Our results suggest that heating and strong flows play an important role in maintaining the substructure of loop fans, in addition to the waves that permeate this low coronal environment.

  14. Decay of Activity Complexes, Formation of Unipolar Magnetic Regions, and Coronal Holes in Their Causal Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, E. M.; Mordvinov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The peculiar development of solar activity in the current cycle resulted in an asynchronous reversal of the Sun's polar fields. The asymmetry is also observed in the formation of polar coronal holes. A stable coronal hole was first formed at the South Pole, despite the later polar-field reversal there. The aim of this study is to understand the processes making this situation possible. Synoptic magnetic maps from the Global Oscillation Network Group and corresponding coronal-hole maps from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory are analyzed here to study the causal relationship between the decay of activity complexes, evolution of large-scale magnetic fields, and formation of coronal holes. Ensembles of coronal holes associated with decaying active regions and activity complexes are presented. These ensembles take part in global rearrangements of the Sun's open magnetic flux. In particular, the south polar coronal hole was formed from an ensemble of coronal holes that came into existence after the decay of multiple activity complexes observed during 2014.

  15. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Kramar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131 to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D coronal electron density in the range of heights from $1.5$ to $4 R_odot$ using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 AA band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below $sim 2.5 R_odot$. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the accuracy of the magnetic field approximations for coronal modeling.

  16. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  17. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  18. Turbulent Density Fluctuations and Proton Heating Rate in the Solar Wind from 9–20 R ⊙

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar Raja, K.; Subramanian, Prasad; Ramesh, R.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Ingale, Madhusudan

    2017-12-01

    We obtain scatter-broadened images of the Crab Nebula at 80 MHz as it transits through the inner solar wind in 2017 and 2016 June. These images are anisotropic, with the major axis oriented perpendicular to the radially outward coronal magnetic field. Using these data, we deduce that the density modulation index (δ {N}e/{N}e) caused by turbulent density fluctuations in the solar wind ranges from 1.9× {10}-3 to 7.7× {10}-3 between 9 and 20 R ⊙. We also find that the heating rate of solar wind protons at these distances ranges from 2.2× {10}-13 to 1.0× {10}-11 {erg} {{cm}}-3 {{{s}}}-1. On two occasions, the line of sight intercepted a coronal streamer. We find that the presence of the streamer approximately doubles the thickness of the scattering screen.

  19. Solar Energetic Particle Acceleration by a Shock Wave Accompanying a Coronal Mass Ejection in the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhova, A. S.; Petukhov, I. S.; Petukhov, S. I.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2017-02-01

    Solar energetic particle acceleration by a shock wave accompanying a coronal mass ejection (CME) is studied. The description of the accelerated particle spectrum evolution is based on the numerical calculation of the diffusive transport equation with a set of realistic parameters. The relation between the CME and shock speeds, which depend on the initial CME radius, is determined. Depending on the initial CME radius, its speed, and the magnetic energy of the scattering Alfvén waves, the accelerated particle spectrum is established 10-60 minutes from the beginning of CME motion. The maximum energies of particles reach 0.1-10 GeV. The CME radii of 3-5 {R}⊙ and the shock radii of 5-10 {R}⊙ agree with observations. The calculated particle spectra agree with the observed ones in events registered by ground-based detectors if the turbulence spectrum in the solar corona significantly differs from the Kolmogorov one.

  20. ERNE observations of energetic particles associated with Earth-directed coronal mass ejections in April and May, 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anttila

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Two Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs, which were most effective in energetic (~1–50 MeV particle acceleration during the first 18 months since the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO launch, occurred on April 7 and May 12, 1997. In the analysis of these events we have deconvoluted the injection spectrum of energetic protons by using the method described by Anttila et al. In order to apply the method developed earlier for data of a rotating satellite (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, GOES, we first had to develop a method to calculate the omnidirectional energetic particle intensities from the observations of Energetic and Relativistic Nuclei and Electrons (ERNE, which is an energetic particle detector onboard the three-axis stabilized SOHO spacecraft. The omnidirectional intensities are calculated by fitting an exponential pitch angle distribution from directional information of energetic protons observed by ERNE. The results of the analysis show that, compared to a much faster and more intensive CMEs observed during the previous solar maximum, the acceleration efficiency decreases fast when the shock propagates outward from the Sun. The particles injected at distances <0.5 AU from the Sun dominate the particle flux during the whole period, when the shock propagates to the site of the spacecraft. The main portion of particles injected by the shock during its propagation further outward from the Sun are trapped around the shock, and are seen as an intensity increase at the time of the shock passage.Key words: Interplanetary physics (interplanetary shocks – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (energetic particles; flares and mass ejections