WorldWideScience

Sample records for coronal heating mechanisms

  1. Mechanisms of Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. R. Verma

    2006-06-01

    The Sun is a mysterious star. The high temperature of the chromosphere and corona present one of the most puzzling problems of solar physics. Observations show that the solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in solar corona. Recent observations show that Magnetic Carpet is a potential candidate for solar coronal heating.

  2. Observational Consequences of Coronal Heating Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan C.; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The coronal heating problem remains unsolved today, 80 years after its discovery, despite 50 years of suborbital and orbital coronal observatories. Tens of theoretical coronal heating mechanisms have been suggested, but only a few have been able to be ruled out. In this talk, we will explore the reasons for the slow progress and discuss the measurements that will be needed for potential breakthrough, including imaging the solar corona at small spatial scales, measuring the chromospheric magnetic fields, and detecting the presence of high temperature, low emission measure plasma. We will discuss three sounding rocket instruments developed to make these measurements: the High resolution Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP), and the Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS).

  3. A Contemporary View of Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Parnell, Clare E; 10.1098/rsta.2012.0113

    2012-01-01

    Determining the heating mechanism (or mechanisms) that causes the outer atmosphere of the Sun, and many other stars, to reach temperatures orders of magnitude higher than their surface temperatures has long been a key problem. For decades the problem has been known as the coronal heating problem, but it is now clear that `coronal heating' cannot be treated or explained in isolation and that the heating of the whole solar atmosphere must be studied as a highly coupled system. The magnetic field of the star is known to play a key role, but, despite significant advancements in solar telescopes, computing power and much greater understanding of theoretical mechanisms, the question of which mechanism or mechanisms are the dominant supplier of energy to the chromosphere and corona is still open. Following substantial recent progress, we consider the most likely contenders and discuss the key factors that have made, and still make, determining the actual (coronal) heating mechanism (or mechanisms) so difficult.

  4. Coronal Heating Driven by Magnetic-gradient Pumping Mechanism in Solar Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Baolin

    2014-01-01

    The solar coronal heating is a longstanding mystery in astrophysics. Considering that the solar magnetic field is spatially inhomogeneous with considerable magnetic gradient from solar surface to the corona, this work proposes a magnetic gradient pumping (MGP) mechanism and try to explain the formation of hot plasma upflows, such as the hot type II spicules and hot plasma ejections, etc. In MGP mechanism, the magnetic gradients drive the energetic particles to move upwards from the underlying solar atmosphere and form hot upflows. These upflow energetic particles deposit in corona and make it becoming very hot. Roughly estimations indicate that the solar corona can be heated to above 1 million degrees, and the upflow velocity is about 40 km/s in chromosphere and about 130 km/s in the corona. The solar magnetic flux tubes act as pumpers to extract energetic particles from the underlying thermal photosphere, convey them and deposit in the corona. The deposition of energetic particles will make the corona become...

  5. Recent advances in coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    De Moortel, Ineke

    2015-01-01

    The solar corona, the tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun, is orders of magnitude hotter than the solar surface. This 'coronal heating problem' requires the identification of a heat source to balance losses due to thermal conduction, radiation and (in some locations) convection. The review papers in this Theo Murphy meeting issue present an overview of recent observational findings, large- and small-scale numerical modelling of physical processes occurring in the solar atmosphere and other aspects which may affect our understanding of the proposed heating mechanisms. At the same time, they also set out the directions and challenges which must be tackled by future research. In this brief introduction, we summarize some of the issues and themes which reoccur throughout this issue.

  6. A unified theory of coronal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionson, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Solar coronal heating mechanisms are analyzed within the framework of a unified theory of heating processes. The theory is based on the standing wave equation of Ionson (1982) for the global current driven by emfs from the convection Beta less than 1. The equation has the same form as a driven LRC equation in which the equivalent inductance is scaled with the coronal loop length. The theory is used to classify various heating mechanisms inside the coronal loops. It is shown that the total global current can be obtained from an integration of the local currents, the degree of coherency between local currents being the dominant factor governing the global current amplitude. Active region loops appear to be heated by electrodynamic coupling to p-mode oscillations in the convection Beta less than 1.

  7. Role of Magnetic Carpet in Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. R. Verma; Diksha Chaudhary

    2008-03-01

    One of the fundamental questions in solar physics is how the solar corona maintains its high temperature of several million Kelvin above photosphere with a temperature of 6000 K. Observations show that solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in the solar corona. The separate kinds of coronal loops may also be heated by different mechanisms. Using data from instruments onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and from the more recent Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) scientists have identified small regions of mixed polarity, termed magnetic carpet contributing to solar activity on a short time scale. Magnetic loops of all sizes rise into the solar corona, arising from regions of opposite magnetic polarity in the photosphere. Energy released when oppositely directed magnetic fields meet in the corona is one likely cause for coronal heating. There is enough energy coming up from the loops of the “magnetic carpet” to heat the corona to its known temperature.

  8. Electroweak Hall Effect of Neutrino and Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Kenzo

    2015-01-01

    The inversion of temperature at the solar corona is hard to understand from classical physics, and the coronal heating mechanism remains unclear. The heating in the quiet region seems contradicting with the thermodynamics and is a keen problem for physicists. A new mechanism for the coronal heating based on the neutrino radiative transition unique in the corona region is studied. The probability is enormously amplified by an electroweak Chern-Simons form and overlapping waves, and the sufficient energy is transfered. Thus the coronal heating is understood from the quantum effects of the solar neutrino.

  9. MECHANICAL ENERGY FLUXES ASSOCIATED WITH SATURATED CORONAL HEATING IN M DWARFS: COMPARISON WITH PREDICTIONS OF A TURBULENT DYNAMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullan, D. J. [Bartol Research Institute, Dept of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); MacDonald, J., E-mail: mullan@udel.edu [Dept of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Empirically, the X-ray luminosity L{sub X} from M dwarfs has been found to have an upper limit of about 0.2% of the bolometric flux L{sub bol}. In the limit where magnetic fields in M dwarfs are generated in equipartition with convective motions, we use stellar models to calculate the energy flux of Alfvén waves F{sub A} as a function of depth in the sub-surface convection zone. Since Alfvén waves have the optimal opportunity for wave modes to reach the corona, we suggest that F{sub A} sets an upper limit on the mechanical flux F{sub mech} which causes coronal heating. This suggestion accounts quantitatively for the “saturated” values of L{sub X}/L{sub bol} which have been reported empirically for M dwarfs.

  10. A unified theory of electrodynamic coupling in coronal magnetic loops - The coronal heating problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionson, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The coronal heating problem is studied, and it is demonstrated that Ionson's (1982) LRC approach results in a unified theory of coronal heating which unveils a variety of new heating mechanisms and which links together previously proposed mechanisms. Ionson's LRC equation is rederived, focusing on various aspects that were not clarified in the original article and incorporating new processes that were neglected. A parameterized heating rate is obtained. It is shown that Alfvenic surface wave heating, stochastic magnetic pumping, resonant electrodynamic heating, and dynamical dissipation emerge as special cases of a much more general formalism. This generalized theory is applied to solar coronal loops and it is found that active region and large scale loops are underdamped systems. Young active region loops and (possibly) bright points are found to be overdamped systems.

  11. Relating magnetic reconnection to coronal heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longcope, D W; Tarr, L A

    2015-05-28

    It is clear that the solar corona is being heated and that coronal magnetic fields undergo reconnection all the time. Here we attempt to show that these two facts are related--i.e. coronal reconnection generates heat. This attempt must address the fact that topological change of field lines does not automatically generate heat. We present one case of flux emergence where we have measured the rate of coronal magnetic reconnection and the rate of energy dissipation in the corona. The ratio of these two, [Formula: see text], is a current comparable to the amount of current expected to flow along the boundary separating the emerged flux from the pre-existing flux overlying it. We can generalize this relation to the overall corona in quiet Sun or in active regions. Doing so yields estimates for the contribution to coronal heating from magnetic reconnection. These estimated rates are comparable to the amount required to maintain the corona at its observed temperature.

  12. MULTI-SHELL MAGNETIC TWISTERS AS A NEW MECHANISM FOR CORONAL HEATING AND SOLAR WIND ACCELERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murawski, K. [Group of Astrophysics, Institute of Physics, UMCS, ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Srivastava, A. K.; Dwivedi, B. N. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi-221005 (India); Musielak, Z. E. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    We perform numerical simulations of impulsively generated Alfvén waves in an isolated photospheric flux tube and explore the propagation of these waves along such magnetic structure that extends from the photosphere, where these waves are triggered, to the solar corona, and we analyze resulting magnetic shells. Our model of the solar atmosphere is constructed by adopting the temperature distribution based on the semi-empirical model and specifying the curved magnetic field lines that constitute the magnetic flux tube that is rooted in the solar photosphere. The evolution of the solar atmosphere is described by 3D, ideal MHD equations that are numerically solved by the FLASH code. Our numerical simulations reveal, based on the physical properties of the multi-shell magnetic twisters and the amount of energy and momentum associated with them, that these multi-shell magnetic twisters may be responsible for the observed heating of the lower solar corona and for the formation of solar wind. Moreover, it is likely that the existence of these twisters can be verified by high-resolution observations.

  13. Coronal heating in multiple magnetic threads

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, K V; Browning, P K; Cargill, P J

    2015-01-01

    Context. Heating the solar corona to several million degrees requires the conversion of magnetic energy into thermal energy. In this paper, we investigate whether an unstable magnetic thread within a coronal loop can destabilise a neighbouring magnetic thread. Aims. By running a series of simulations, we aim to understand under what conditions the destabilisation of a single magnetic thread can also trigger a release of energy in a nearby thread. Methods. The 3D magnetohydrodynamics code, Lare3d, is used to simulate the temporal evolution of coronal magnetic fields during a kink instability and the subsequent relaxation process. We assume that a coronal magnetic loop consists of non-potential magnetic threads that are initially in an equilibrium state. Results. The non-linear kink instability in one magnetic thread forms a helical current sheet and initiates magnetic reconnection. The current sheet fragments, and magnetic energy is released throughout that thread. We find that, under certain conditions, this ...

  14. Diagnostics of Coronal Heating in Active-region Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fludra, A.; Hornsey, C.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding coronal heating remains a central problem in solar physics. Many mechanisms have been proposed to explain how energy is transferred to and deposited in the corona. We summarize past observational studies that attempted to identify the heating mechanism and point out the difficulties in reproducing the observations of the solar corona from the heating models. The aim of this paper is to study whether the observed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission in individual coronal loops in solar active regions can provide constraints on the volumetric heating function, and to develop a diagnostic for the heating function for a subset of loops that are found close to static thermal equilibrium. We reconstruct the coronal magnetic field from Solar Dynamics Observatory/HMI data using a nonlinear force-free magnetic field model. We model selected loops using a one-dimensional stationary model, with a heating rate dependent locally on the magnetic field strength along the loop, and we calculate the emission from these loops in various EUV wavelengths for different heating rates. We present a method to measure a power index β defining the dependence of the volumetric heating rate EH on the magnetic field, {E}H\\propto {B}β , and controlling also the shape of the heating function: concentrated near the loop top, uniform and concentrated near the footpoints. The diagnostic is based on the dependence of the electron density on the index β. This method is free from the assumptions of the loop filling factor but requires spectroscopic measurements of the density-sensitive lines. The range of applicability for loops of different length and heating distributions is discussed, and the steps to solving the coronal heating problem are outlined.

  15. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-11-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfvén waves excited in the photosphere is the target of this study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfvén waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 per cent of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The importance of compressibility shown in this study would significantly impact on the prospects of successful MHD turbulence theory in the solar chromosphere.

  16. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfv\\'{e}n waves excited in the photosphere is the target of the present study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfv\\'{e}n waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 % of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The i...

  17. Microflares as Possible Sources for Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meera Gupta; Rajmal Jain; Jayshree Trivedi; A. P. Mishra

    2008-03-01

    We present a preliminary study of 27 microflares observed by Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) mission during July 2003 to August 2006. We found that all 27 microflares show the Fe-line feature peaking around 6.7 keV, which is an indicator of the presence of coronal plasma temperature ≥ 9 MK. On the other hand, the spectra of microflares showhybrid model of thermal and non-thermal emission, which further supports them as possible sources of coronal heating. Our results based on the analysis show that the energy relapsed by the microflares is good enough for heating of the active corona. We discuss our results in the light of the hybrid model of microflares production.

  18. Closed-Field Coronal Heating Driven by Wave Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Downs, Cooper; Mikić, Zoran; Linker, Jon A; Velli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    To simulate the energy balance of coronal plasmas on macroscopic scales, we often require the specification of the coronal heating mechanism in some functional form. To go beyond empirical formulations and to build a more physically motivated heating function, we investigate the wave-turbulence-driven (WTD) phenomenology for the heating of closed coronal loops. Our implementation is designed to capture the large-scale propagation, reflection, and dissipation of wave turbulence along a loop. The parameter space of this model is explored by solving the coupled WTD and hydrodynamic evolution in 1D for an idealized loop. The relevance to a range of solar conditions is also established by computing solutions for over one hundred loops extracted from a realistic 3D coronal field. Due to the implicit dependence of the WTD heating model on loop geometry and plasma properties along the loop and at the footpoints, we find that this model can significantly reduce the number of free parameters when compared to traditiona...

  19. Coronal Heating Observed with Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    The recent launch of the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) as a sounding rocket has offered a new, different view of the Sun. With approx 0.3" resolution and 5 second cadence, Hi-C reveals dynamic, small-scale structure within a complicated active region, including coronal braiding, reconnection regions, Alfven waves, and flows along active region fans. By combining the Hi-C data with other available data, we have compiled a rich data set that can be used to address many outstanding questions in solar physics. Though the Hi-C rocket flight was short (only 5 minutes), the added insight of the small-scale structure gained from the Hi-C data allows us to look at this active region and other active regions with new understanding. In this talk, I will review the first results from the Hi-C sounding rocket and discuss the impact of these results on the coronal heating problem.

  20. Network Coronal Bright Points: Coronal Heating Concentrations Found in the Solar Magnetic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1998-01-01

    We examine the magnetic origins of coronal heating in quiet regions by combining SOHO/EIT Fe xii coronal images and Kitt Peak magnetograms. Spatial filtering of the coronal images shows a network of enhanced structures on the scale of the magnetic network in quiet regions. Superposition of the filtered coronal images on maps of the magnetic network extracted from the magnetograms shows that the coronal network does indeed trace and stem from the magnetic network. Network coronal bright points, the brightest features in the network lanes, are found to have a highly significant coincidence with polarity dividing lines (neutral lines) in the network and are often at the feet of enhanced coronal structures that stem from the network and reach out over the cell interiors. These results indicate that, similar to the close linkage of neutral-line core fields with coronal heating in active regions (shown in previous work), low-lying core fields encasing neutral lines in the magnetic network often drive noticeable coronal heating both within themselves (the network coronal bright points) and on more extended field lines rooted around them. This behavior favors the possibility that active core fields in the network are the main drivers of the heating of the bulk of the quiet corona, on scales much larger than the network lanes and cells.

  1. The role of torsional Alfven waves in coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    Antolin, P

    2009-01-01

    In the context of coronal heating, among the zoo of MHD waves that exist in the solar atmosphere, Alfven waves receive special attention. Indeed, these waves constitute an attractive heating agent due to their ability to carry over the many different layers of the solar atmosphere sufficient energy to heat and maintain a corona. However, due to their incompressible nature these waves need a mechanism such as mode conversion (leading to shock heating), phase mixing, resonant absorption or turbulent cascade in order to heat the plasma. New observations with polarimetric, spectroscopic and imaging instruments such as those on board of the japanese satellite Hinode, or the SST or CoMP, are bringing strong evidence for the existence of energetic Alfven waves in the solar corona. In order to assess the role of Alfven waves in coronal heating, in this work we model a magnetic flux tube being subject to Alfven wave heating through the mode conversion mechanism. Using a 1.5-dimensional MHD code we carry out a paramete...

  2. Numerical Simulation of DC Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Einaudi, G.; Taylor, Brian D.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Recent research on observational signatures of turbulent heating of a coronal loop will be discussed. The evolution of the loop is is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. HYPERION calculates the full energy cycle involving footpoint convection, magnetic reconnection, nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are convected by random photospheric motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of thecoronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of the simulated loop is multi thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Typical simulated coronal loops are 50000 km length and have axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 Tesla. To connect these simulations to observations the computed number densities and temperatures are used to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. These intensities are then employed to compute differential emission measure distributions, which are found to be very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions.

  3. Plasma Heating Suring a Coronal Mass Ejection Observed by SOHO

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, N A; Korreck, K E

    2011-01-01

    We perform a time-dependent ionization analysis to constrain plasma heating requirements during a fast partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME) observed on 2000 June 28 by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). We use two methods to derive densities from the UVCS measurements, including a density sensitive O V line ratio at 1213.85 and 1218.35 Angstroms, and radiative pumping of the O VI 1032,1038 doublet by chromospheric emission lines. The most strongly constrained feature shows cumulative plasma heating comparable to or greater than the kinetic energy, while features observed earlier during the event show cumulative plasma heating comparable to or less than the kinetic energy. SOHO Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) observations are used to estimate the active region magnetic energy. We consider candidate plasma heating mechanisms and provide constraints when possible. Because this CME was associated with a relatively weak flare, the contribution b...

  4. Coronal Jet Plasma Properties and Acceleration Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Samaiyah; Reeves, Kathy; Savcheva, Antonia; Soto, Natalia

    2017-08-01

    Coronal jets are transient eruptions of plasma typically characterized by aprominent long spire and a bright base, and sometimes accompanied by a small filament. Jets are thought to be produced by magnetic reconnection when small-scale bipolar magnetic fields emerge into an overlying coronal field or move into a locally unipolar region. Coronal jets are commonly divided into two categories: standard jets and blowout jets, and are found in both quiet and active regions. The plasma properties of jets vary across type and location, therefore understanding the underlying acceleration mechanisms are difficult to pin down. In this work, we examine both blow-out and standard jets using high resolution multi-wavelength data. Although reconnection is commonly accepted as the primary acceleration mechanism, we also consider the contribution chromospheric evaporation to jet formation. We use seven coronal channels from SDO/AIA , Hinode/XRT Be-thin and IRIS slit-jaw data. In addition, we separate the Fe-XVIII line from the SDO/94Å channel. We calculate plasma properties including velocity, Alfven speed, and density as a function of wavelength and Differential Emission Measure (DEM). Finally, we explore the magnetic topology of the jets using Coronal Modeling System (CMS) to construct potential and non-linear force free models based on the flux rope insertion method.

  5. Self-Regulation of Solar Coronal Heating Process via Collisionless Reconnection Condition

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2007-01-01

    I propose a new paradigm for solar coronal heating viewed as a self-regulating process keeping the plasma marginally collisionless. The mechanism is based on the coupling between two effects. First, coronal density controls the plasma collisionality and hence the transition between the slow collisional Sweet-Parker and the fast collisionless reconnection regimes. In turn, coronal energy release leads to chromospheric evaporation, increasing the density and thus inhibiting subsequent reconnection of the newly-reconnected loops. As a result, statistically, the density fluctuates around some critical level, comparable to that observed in the corona. In the long run, coronal heating can be represented by repeating cycles of fast reconnection events (nano-flares), evaporation episodes, and long periods of slow magnetic stress build-up and radiative cooling of the coronal plasma.

  6. Observing Episodic Coronal Heating Events Rooted in Chromospheric Activity

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W

    2009-01-01

    We present results of a multi-wavelength study of episodic plasma injection into the corona of AR 10942. We exploit long-exposure images of the Hinode and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) spacecraft to study the properties of faint, episodic, "blobs" of plasma that are propelled upward along coronal loops that are rooted in the AR plage. We find that the source location and characteristic velocities of these episodic upflow events match those expected from recent spectroscopic observations of faint coronal upflows that are associated with upper chromospheric activity, in the form of highly dynamic spicules. The analysis presented ties together observations from coronal and chromospheric spectrographs and imagers, providing more evidence of the connection of discrete coronal mass heating and injection events with their source, dynamic spicules, in the chromosphere.

  7. Free Magnetic Energy and Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Moore, Ron; Falconer, David

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the coronal X-ray luminosity of an active region increases roughly in direct proportion to the total photospheric flux of the active region's magnetic field (Fisher et al. 1998). It is also observed, however, that the coronal luminosity of active regions of nearly the same flux content can differ by an order of magnitude. In this presentation, we analyze 10 active regions with roughly the same total magnetic flux. We first determine several coronal properties, such as X-ray luminosity (calculated using Hinode XRT), peak temperature (calculated using Hinode EIS), and total Fe XVIII emission (calculated using SDO AIA). We present the dependence of these properties on a proxy of the free magnetic energy of the active region

  8. Coronal Fourier power spectra: implications for coronal seismology and coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ireland, Jack; Inglis, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of regions of the solar corona are investigated using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 171\\AA\\ and 193\\AA\\ data. The coronal emission from the quiet Sun, coronal loop footprints, coronal moss, and from above a sunspot is studied. It is shown that the mean Fourier power spectra in these regions can be described by a power law at lower frequencies that tails to flat spectrum at higher frequencies, plus a Gaussian-shaped contribution that varies depending on the region studied. This Fourier spectral shape is in contrast to the commonly-held assumption that coronal time-series are well described by the sum of a long time-scale background trend plus Gaussian-distributed noise, with some specific locations also showing an oscillatory signal. The implications of this discovery to the field of coronal seismology and the automated detections of oscillations are discussed. The power law contribution to the shape of the Fourier power spectrum is interpreted as being due to the summation of a distribution ...

  9. Identification of coronal heating events in 3D simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanella, Charalambos; Gudiksen, Boris V.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The solar coronal heating problem has been an open question in the science community since 1939. One of the proposed models for the transport and release of mechanical energy generated in the sub-photospheric layers and photosphere is the magnetic reconnection model that incorporates Ohmic heating, which releases a part of the energy stored in the magnetic field. In this model many unresolved flaring events occur in the solar corona, releasing enough energy to heat the corona. Aims: The problem with the verification and quantification of this model is that we cannot resolve small scale events due to limitations of the current observational instrumentation. Flaring events have scaling behavior extending from large X-class flares down to the so far unobserved nanoflares. Histograms of observable characteristics of flares show powerlaw behavior for energy release rate, size, and total energy. Depending on the powerlaw index of the energy release, nanoflares might be an important candidate for coronal heating; we seek to find that index. Methods: In this paper we employ a numerical three-dimensional (3D)-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation produced by the numerical code Bifrost, which enables us to look into smaller structures, and a new technique to identify the 3D heating events at a specific instant. The quantity we explore is the Joule heating, a term calculated directly by the code, which is explicitly correlated with the magnetic reconnection because it depends on the curl of the magnetic field. Results: We are able to identify 4136 events in a volume 24 × 24 × 9.5 Mm3 (i.e., 768 × 786 × 331 grid cells) of a specific snapshot. We find a powerlaw slope of the released energy per second equal to αP = 1.5 ± 0.02, and two powerlaw slopes of the identified volume equal to αV = 1.53 ± 0.03 and αV = 2.53 ± 0.22. The identified energy events do not represent all the released energy, but of the identified events, the total energy of the largest events

  10. Evidence of Non-Thermal Particles in Coronal Loops Heated Impulsively by Nanoflares

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Allred, Joel; Carlsson, Mats; Reale, Fabio; Daw, Adrian; Hansteen, Viggo; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Liu, Wei; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; McKillop, Sean; Reeves, Kathy; Saar, Steve; Tian, Hui; Lemen, Jim; Title, Alan; Boerner, Paul; Hurlburt, Neal; Tarbell, Ted; Wuelser, J P; Kleint, Lucia; Kankelborg, Charles; Jaeggli, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The physical processes causing energy exchange between the Sun's hot corona and its cool lower atmosphere remain poorly understood. The chromosphere and transition region (TR) form an interface region between the surface and the corona that is highly sensitive to the coronal heating mechanism. High resolution observations with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reveal rapid variability (about 20 to 60 seconds) of intensity and velocity on small spatial scales at the footpoints of hot dynamic coronal loops. The observations are consistent with numerical simulations of heating by beams of non-thermal electrons, which are generated in small impulsive heating events called "coronal nanoflares". The accelerated electrons deposit a sizable fraction of their energy in the chromosphere and TR. Our analysis provides tight constraints on the properties of such electron beams and new diagnostics for their presence in the nonflaring corona.

  11. Fast Collisionless Reconnection Condition and Self-Organization of Solar Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2007-01-01

    I propose that solar coronal heating is a self-regulating process that keeps the coronal plasma roughly marginally collisionless. The self-regulating mechanism is based on the interplay of two effects. First, plasma density controls coronal energy release via the transition between the slow collisional Sweet--Parker regime and the fast collisionless reconnection regime. This transition takes place when the Sweet--Parker layer becomes thinner than the characteristic collisionless reconnection scale. I present a simple criterion for this transition in terms of the upstream plasma density and magnetic field and the global length of the reconnection layer. Second, coronal energy release by reconnection raises the ambient plasma density via chromospheric evaporation and this, in turn, temporarily inhibits subsequent reconnection involving the newly-reconnected loops. Over time, however, radiative cooling gradually lowers the density again below the critical value and fast reconnection again becomes possible. As a ...

  12. Coronal heating by resonant absorption: The effects of chromospheric coupling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belien, A. J. C.; Martens, P. C. H.; Keppens, R.

    1999-01-01

    We present the first 2.5 dimensional numerical model calculations of the nonlinear wave dynamics and heating by resonant absorption in coronal loops with thermal structuring of the transition region and higher chromosphere. The numerical calculations were done with the Versatile Advection Code. The

  13. A data driven kinetic approach to coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    Toutountzi, A; Isliker, H; Moraitis, K; Georgoulis, M; Chintzoglou, G

    2016-01-01

    Coronal heating through the explosive release of magnetic energy remains an open problem in solar physics. Several one-dimensional hydrodynamical models have been developed over the last decade, using simple approaches for the way energy is deposited and transported in the coronal plasma, namely by inserting 'nanoflares' in the form of 'hot spots' at random sites and times. Our aim in this work is to investigate the problem from a different perspective. With the help of a nonlinear force-free extrapolation method we reconstruct the coronal magnetic field of a well-studied solar active region using an observed photospheric vector magnetogram of the region as the required boundary condition. We then determine the locations, energy contents, and volumes of unstable areas within the active-region corona. These areas include strong gradients in the magnetic field and are naturally connected to three-dimensional current sheets. The statistical distributions of these volumes, their fractal structure and correspondin...

  14. Stellar Activity and Coronal Heating: an overview of recent results

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Drake, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the coronae of the Sun and of solar-like stars provide complementary information to advance our understanding of stellar magnetic activity, and of the processes leading to the heating of their outer atmospheres. While solar observations allow us to study the corona at high spatial and temporal resolution, the study of stellar coronae allows us to probe stellar activity over a wide range of ages and stellar parameters. Stellar studies therefore provide us with additional tools for understanding coronal heating processes, as well as the long-term evolution of solar X-ray activity. We discuss how recent studies of stellar magnetic fields and coronae contribute to our understanding of the phenomenon of activity and coronal heating in late-type stars.

  15. Nonlinear Dynamics of the Parker Scenario for Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Rappazzo, A F; Einaudi, G; Dahlburg, R B

    2007-01-01

    The Parker or field line tangling model of coronal heating is studied comprehensively via long-time high-resolution simulations of the dynamics of a coronal loop in cartesian geometry within the framework of reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD). Slow photospheric motions induce a Poynting flux which saturates by driving an anisotropic turbulent cascade dominated by magnetic energy. In physical space this corresponds to a magnetic topology where magnetic field lines are barely entangled, nevertheless current sheets (corresponding to the original tangential discontinuities hypothesized by Parker) are continuously formed and dissipated. Current sheets are the result of the nonlinear cascade that transfers energy from the scale of convective motions ($\\sim 1,000 km$) down to the dissipative scales, where it is finally converted to heat and/or particle acceleration. Current sheets constitute the dissipative structure of the system, and the associated magnetic reconnection gives rise to impulsive ``bursty'' heating ...

  16. Stellar activity and coronal heating: an overview of recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Paola; Saar, Steven H.; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the coronae of the Sun and of solar-like stars provide complementary information to advance our understanding of stellar magnetic activity, and of the processes leading to the heating of their outer atmospheres. While solar observations allow us to study the corona at high spatial and temporal resolution, the study of stellar coronae allows us to probe stellar activity over a wide range of ages and stellar parameters. Stellar studies therefore provide us with additional tools for understanding coronal heating processes, as well as the long-term evolution of solar X-ray activity. We discuss how recent studies of stellar magnetic fields and coronae contribute to our understanding of the phenomenon of activity and coronal heating in late-type stars. PMID:25897087

  17. Understanding Solar Coronal Heating through Atomic and Plasma Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Bose, Sayak; Hahn, Michael; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Recent solar observations suggest that the Sun's corona is heated by Alfven waves that dissipate at unexpectedly low heights in the corona. These observations raise a number of questions. Among them are the problems of accurately quantifying the energy flux of the waves and that of describing the physical mechanism that leads to the wave damping. We are performing laboratory experiments to address both of these issues.The energy flux depends on the electron density, which can be measured spectroscopically. However, spectroscopic density diagnostics have large uncertainties, because they depend sensitively on atomic collisional excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transition rates for multiple atomic levels. Essentially all of these data come from theory and have not been experimentally validated. We are conducting laboratory experiments using the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that will provide accurate empirical calibrations for spectroscopic density diagnostics and which will also help to guide theoretical calculations.The observed rapid wave dissipation is likely due to inhomogeneities in the plasma that drive flows and currents at small length scales where energy can be more efficiently dissipated. This may take place through gradients in the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, which causes wave reflection and generates turbulence. Alternatively, gradients in the Alfvén speed across the field can lead to dissipation through phase-mixing. Using the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California Los Angeles, we are studying both of these dissipation mechanisms in the laboratory in order to understand their potential roles in coronal heating.

  18. Acceleration of solar wind in polar coronal holes by induction heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertkov, A. D.; Shkrebets, A. E.; Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Soldatov, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    The universal induction heating mechanism supplying with the energy all the processes of coronal heating and the solar wind acceleration is developed. The observed relative 'trembling' of photospheric super-large scale magnetic fields with quasi-periods of 1-4 days amounts 30-40 percent in amplitude. The inductive electric field appears in the corona. The electric currents cause the Joule dissipation. The uneven heating leads to the solar wind acceleration. A model is suggested in which high-speed streams in space are caused by the combination of the enhanced inductive energy flux from the solar coronal active regions; the work against the regular magnetic field; losses from coronal emission. The consideration is made in terms of the dissipative solar wind theory with the finite electrical conductivity of plasma. The leakage of plasma and the energy flux across the magnetic field, caused by the induction heating processes, are taken into account. The polar coronal holes (and the mid-latitude ones) are indicators of energy transfer balance but not direct sources of high-speed streams in the solar wind.

  19. Huge Coronal Structure and Heating Constraints Determined from Serts Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Davila, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Intensities of the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral lines were measured as a function of radius off the solar limb by two flights of the Goddard's Solar Extreme-Ultraviolet Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) for three quiet-Sun regions. Density scale heights were determined for the different spectral lines. Limits on the filling factor were determined. In the one case where an upper limit was determined it was much less than unity. coronal heating above 1.15 solar radii is required for all three regions studied. For reasonable filling factors, local heating is needed.

  20. Turbulent coronal heating and the distribution of nanoflares

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitruk, P; Dmitruk, Pablo; Gomez, Daniel O.

    1997-01-01

    We perform direct numerical simulations of an externally driven two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic system over extended periods of time to simulate the dynamics of a transverse section of a solar coronal loop. A stationary and large-scale magnetic forcing was imposed, to model the photospheric motions at the magnetic loop footpoints. A turbulent stationary regime is reached, which corresponds to energy dissipation rates consistent with the heating requirements of coronal loops. The temporal behavior of quantities such as the energy dissipation rate show clear indications of intermittency, which are exclusively due to the strong nonlinearity of the system. We tentatively associate these impulsive events of magnetic energy dissipation to the so-called nanoflares. A statistical analysis of these events yields a power law distribution as a function of their energies with a negative slope of 1.5, which is consistent with those obtained for flare energy distributions reported from X-ray observations.

  1. Mechanisms of Plasma Acceleration in Coronal Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, N.; Reeves, K.; Savcheva, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Jets are small explosions that occur frequently in the Sun possibly driven by the local reconfiguration of the magnetic field, or reconnection. There are two types of coronal jets: standard jets and blowout jets. The purpose of this project is to determine which mechanisms accelerate plasma in two different jets, one that occurred in January 17, 2015 at the disk of the sun and another in October 24, 2015 at the limb. Two possible acceleration mechanisms are chromospheric evaporation and magnetic acceleration. Using SDO/AIA, Hinode/XRT and IRIS data, we create height-time plots, and calculate the velocities of each wavelength for both jets. We calculate the potential magnetic field of the jet and the general region around it to gain a more detailed understanding of its structure, and determine if the jet is likely to be either a standard or blowout jet. Finally, we calculate the magnetic field strength for different heights along the jet spire, and use differential emission measures to calculate the plasma density. Once we have these two values, we calculate the Alfven speed. When analyzing our results we are looking for certain patterns in our velocities. If the plasma in a jet is accelerated by chromospheric evaporation, we expect the velocities to increase as function of temperature, which is what we observed in the October 24th jet. The magnetic models for this jet also show the Eiffel Tower shaped structure characteristic of standard jets, which tend to have plasma accelerated by this mechanism. On the other hand, if the acceleration mechanism were magnetic acceleration, we would expect the velocities to be similar regardless of temperature. For the January 17th jet, we saw that along the spire, the velocities where approximately 200 km/s in all wavelengths, but the velocities of hot plasma detected at the base were closer to the Alfven speed, which was estimated to be about 2,000 km/s. These observations suggest that the plasma in the January 17th jet is

  2. A Mechanism for Coronal Hole Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, D A N

    2008-01-01

    Bald patches are magnetic topologies in which the magnetic field is concave up over part of a photospheric polarity inversion line. A bald patch topology is believed to be the essential ingredient for filament channels and is often found in extrapolations of the observed photospheric field. Using an analytic source-surface model to calculate the magnetic topology of a small bipolar region embedded in a global magnetic dipole field, we demonstrate that although common in closed-field regions close to the solar equator, bald patches are unlikely to occur in the open-field topology of a coronal hole. Our results give rise to the following question: What happens to a bald patch topology when the surrounding field lines open up? This would be the case when a bald patch moves into a coronal hole, or when a coronal hole forms in an area that encompasses a bald patch. Our magnetostatic models show that, in this case, the bald patch topology almost invariably transforms into a null point topology with a spine and a fa...

  3. An observationally-driven kinetic approach to coronal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraitis, K.; Toutountzi, A.; Isliker, H.; Georgoulis, M.; Vlahos, L.; Chintzoglou, G.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: Coronal heating through the explosive release of magnetic energy remains an open problem in solar physics. Recent hydrodynamical models attempt an investigation by placing swarms of "nanoflares" at random sites and times in modeled one-dimensional coronal loops. We investigate the problem in three dimensions, using extrapolated coronal magnetic fields of observed solar active regions. Methods: We applied a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation above an observed photospheric magnetogram of NOAA active region (AR) 11 158. We then determined the locations, energy contents, and volumes of "unstable" areas, namely areas prone to releasing magnetic energy due to locally accumulated electric current density. Statistical distributions of these volumes and their fractal dimension are inferred, investigating also their dependence on spatial resolution. Further adopting a simple resistivity model, we inferred the properties of the fractally distributed electric fields in these volumes. Next, we monitored the evolution of 105 particles (electrons and ions) obeying an initial Maxwellian distribution with a temperature of 10 eV, by following their trajectories and energization when subjected to the resulting electric fields. For computational convenience, the length element of the magnetic-field extrapolation is 1 arcsec, or 725 km, much coarser than the particles' collisional mean free path in the low corona (0.1-1 km). Results: The presence of collisions traps the bulk of the plasma around the unstable volumes, or current sheets (UCS), with only a tail of the distribution gaining substantial energy. Assuming that the distance between UCS is similar to the collisional mean free path we find that the low active-region corona is heated to 100-200 eV, corresponding to temperatures exceeding 2 MK, within tens of seconds for electrons and thousands of seconds for ions. Conclusions: Fractally distributed, nanoflare-triggening fragmented UCS in the active-region corona can

  4. Alfven Wave Solar Model: Part 1, Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    van der Holst, Bart; Meng, Xing; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas I

    2013-01-01

    We present the new Alfven Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), a global model from the upper chromosphere to the corona and the heliosphere. The coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are addressed with low-frequency Alfven wave turbulence. The injection of Alfven wave energy at the inner boundary is such that the Poynting flux is proportional to the magnetic field strength. The three-dimensional magnetic field topology is simulated using data from photospheric magnetic field measurements. This model does not impose open-closed magnetic field boundaries; those develop self-consistently. The physics includes: (1) The model employs three different temperatures, namely the isotropic electron temperature and the parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures. The firehose, mirror, and ion-cyclotron instabilities due to the developing ion temperature anisotropy are accounted for. (2) The Alfven waves are partially reflected by the Alfven speed gradient and the vorticity along the field lines. The resulting counter-propagat...

  5. Effect of a Radiation Cooling and Heating Function on Standing Longitudinal Oscillations in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Moon, Y.-J.

    2016-06-01

    Standing long-period (with periods longer than several minutes) oscillations in large, hot (with a temperature higher than 3 MK) coronal loops have been observed as the quasi-periodic modulation of the EUV and microwave intensity emission and the Doppler shift of coronal emission lines, and they have been interpreted as standing slow magnetoacoustic (longitudinal) oscillations. Quasi-periodic pulsations of shorter periods, detected in thermal and non-thermal emissions in solar flares could be produced by a similar mechanism. We present theoretical modeling of the standing slow magnetoacoustic mode, showing that this mode of oscillation is highly sensitive to peculiarities of the radiative cooling and heating function. We generalized the theoretical model of standing slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in a hot plasma, including the effects of the radiative losses and accounting for plasma heating. The heating mechanism is not specified and taken empirically to compensate the cooling by radiation and thermal conduction. It is shown that the evolution of the oscillations is described by a generalized Burgers equation. The numerical solution of an initial value problem for the evolutionary equation demonstrates that different dependences of the radiative cooling and plasma heating on the temperature lead to different regimes of the oscillations, including growing, quasi-stationary, and rapidly decaying. Our findings provide a theoretical foundation for probing the coronal heating function and may explain the observations of decayless long-period, quasi-periodic pulsations in flares. The hydrodynamic approach employed in this study should be considered with caution in the modeling of non-thermal emission associated with flares, because it misses potentially important non-hydrodynamic effects.

  6. Suppression of Heating of Coronal Loops Rooted in Opposite Polarity Sunspot Umbrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Thalmann, Julia K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2016-01-01

    EUV observations of active region (AR) coronae reveal the presence of loops at different temperatures. To understand the mechanisms that result in hotter or cooler loops, we study a typical bipolar AR, near solar disk center, which has moderate overall magnetic twist and at least one fully developed sunspot of each polarity. From AIA 193 and 94 Å images we identify many clearly discernible coronal loops that connect plage or a sunspot of one polarity to an opposite-­polarity plage region. The AIA 94 Å images show dim regions in the umbrae of the spots. To see which coronal loops are rooted in a dim umbral area, we performed a non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) modeling using photospheric vector magnetic field measurements obtained with the Heliosesmic Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard SDO. The NLFFF model, validated by comparison of calculated model field lines with observed loops in AIA 193 and 94 Å, specifies the photospheric roots of the model field lines. Some model coronal magnetic field lines arch from the dim umbral area of the positive-polarity sunspot to the dim umbral area of a negative-polarity sunspot. Because these coronal loops are not visible in any of the coronal EUV and X-ray images of the AR, we conclude they are the coolest loops in the AR. This result suggests that the loops connecting opposite polarity umbrae are the least heated because the field in umbrae is so strong that the convective braiding of the field is strongly suppressed.

  7. Observations and Numerical Models of Solar Coronal Heating Associated with Spicules

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pontieu, B.; De Moortel, I.; Martinez-Sykora, J.; McIntosh, S. W.

    2017-08-01

    Spicules have been proposed as significant contributors to the mass and energy balance of the corona. While previous observations have provided a glimpse of short-lived transient brightenings in the corona that are associated with spicules, these observations have been contested and are the subject of a vigorous debate both on the modeling and the observational side. Therefore, it remains unclear whether plasma is heated to coronal temperatures in association with spicules. We use high-resolution observations of the chromosphere and transition region (TR) with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and of the corona with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory to show evidence of the formation of coronal structures associated with spicular mass ejections and heating of plasma to TR and coronal temperatures. Our observations suggest that a significant fraction of the highly dynamic loop fan environment associated with plage regions may be the result of the formation of such new coronal strands, a process that previously had been interpreted as the propagation of transient propagating coronal disturbances. Our observations are supported by 2.5D radiative MHD simulations that show heating to coronal temperatures in association with spicules. Our results suggest that heating and strong flows play an important role in maintaining the substructure of loop fans, in addition to the waves that permeate this low coronal environment.

  8. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES AND CORONAL HEATING: UNIFYING EMPIRICAL AND MHD TURBULENCE MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Van der Holst, Bart; Oran, Rona; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B. IV; Gombosi, Tamas I. [Department of AOSS, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Downs, Cooper [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Roussev, Ilia I. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Evans, Rebekah M., E-mail: igorsok@umich.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Space Weather Lab, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    We present a new global model of the solar corona, including the low corona, the transition region, and the top of the chromosphere. The realistic three-dimensional magnetic field is simulated using the data from the photospheric magnetic field measurements. The distinctive feature of the new model is incorporating MHD Alfven wave turbulence. We assume this turbulence and its nonlinear dissipation to be the only momentum and energy source for heating the coronal plasma and driving the solar wind. The difference between the turbulence dissipation efficiency in coronal holes and that in closed field regions is because the nonlinear cascade rate degrades in strongly anisotropic (imbalanced) turbulence in coronal holes (no inward propagating wave), thus resulting in colder coronal holes, from which the fast solar wind originates. The detailed presentation of the theoretical model is illustrated with the synthetic images for multi-wavelength EUV emission compared with the observations from SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI instruments for the Carrington rotation 2107.

  9. Global Alfven Waves in Solar Physics: Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo, C. A.; de Assis, A. S.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se ha demostrado que Ia onda discreta de Alfven puede generar por lo memos un 20% de la energia coronal requerida con densidad de flujo de lO- erg 5 . Las ondas discretas de Alfven son una nueva clase `de ondas de Alfven las cuales pueden describirse por el modelo con que incluye un i6n finito, con frecuencia ciclotr6nica ( /uci # 0) y los efectos del equilibrio de plasma mostrados por Appert, Vaclavik and Villar 1984. ABSTRACT. It has been shown that the Discrete Alfven wave can power at least 20% of the required coronal energy flux density iO- Discrete Alfven waves are a new class of Alfven waves wich can be described by the model with the inclusion of finite ion cyclotron frequency (w/wci 0) and the equilibrium plasma current effects as shown by Appert, Vaclavik and Villar 1984. o,t :, HYDROMAGNETICS - SUN-CORONA

  10. Coronal heating by the partial relaxation of twisted loops

    CERN Document Server

    Bareford, Michael; Browning, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    Context: Relaxation theory offers a straightforward method for estimating the energy that is released when a magnetic field becomes unstable, as a result of continual convective driving. Aims: We present new results obtained from nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of idealised coronal loops. The purpose of this work is to determine whether or not the simulation results agree with Taylor relaxation, which will require a modified version of relaxation theory applicable to unbounded field configurations. Methods: A three-dimensional (3D) MHD Lagrangian-remap code is used to simulate the evolution of a line-tied cylindrical coronal loop model. This model comprises three concentric layers surrounded by a potential envelope; hence, being twisted locally, each loop configuration is distinguished by a piecewise-constant current profile. Initially, all configurations carry zero-net-current fields and are in ideally unstable equilibrium. The simulation results are compared with the predictions of helicity ...

  11. The mystery of coronal heating%日冕反常加热之谜新解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭宝林

    2016-01-01

    日冕加热之谜是当代天文学、天体物理学中的八大难题之一。自日冕高温发现七十多年以来,人们建立了许多模型试图解决这一难题,但到目前为止,现有的模型几乎都无法给出一个完整的解答。近年来,人们从观测上取得了一系列新的发现,如从光球到日冕的超精细磁通道中的快速上升热流、二型针状体、极紫外龙卷风等。这些发现给我们一个新的启示,即日冕的加热能量很可能是直接通过热物质上升并在日冕区域沉积而实现的。但是,这些上升热流又是如何形成的呢?鉴于太阳大气中普遍存在具有磁场梯度的磁通量管,作者最近提出了磁场梯度抽运机制(magnetic gradient pumping mechanism, MGP),每一磁通量管就像一个抽水机一般,将底层热分布的等离子体中的高能端粒子抽运到高层大气中沉积,并最终形成了高温的日冕大气。这一机制为我们探索日冕加热之谜提供了一个新的思路。%The problem of coronal heating is one the eight key mysteries in modern as-tronomy and astrophysics. Since the discovery of extremely hot corona more than 70 years ago, many theoretical models have attempted to explain this mystery. However, so far no model can ex-plain the coronal heating process perfectly. Recently, there have been several new discoveries, such as the observation of hot plasma ejections along the ultrafine magnetic channels from the so-lar surface upward to the corona, hot upflows of type II spicules, magnetic tornados, and EUV cy-clones, which imply that the hot corona may be heated by hot plasma upflows directly from the underlying atmosphere. But how do these hot upflows form? We notice the fact that the magnetic gradient is ubiquitous in the whole solar atmosphere, based on which we have proposed a new the-oretical model, the magnetic-gradient pumping mechanism, to explain the coronal heating pro-cess. In this

  12. Detection of Heating Processes in Coronal Loops by Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawate, Tomoko; Narukage, Noriyuki; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Imada, Shinsuke

    2017-08-01

    Imaging and Spectroscopic observations in the soft X-ray band will open a new window of the heating/acceleration/transport processes in the solar corona. The soft X-ray spectrum between 0.5 and 10 keV consists of the electron thermal free-free continuum and hot coronal lines such as O VIII, Fe XVII, Mg XI, Si XVII. Intensity of free-free continuum emission is not affected by the population of ions, whereas line intensities especially from highly ionized species have a sensitivity of the timescale of ionization/recombination processes. Thus, spectroscopic observations of both continuum and line intensities have a capability of diagnostics of heating/cooling timescales. We perform a 1D hydrodynamic simulation coupled with the time-dependent ionization, and calculate continuum and line intensities under different heat input conditions in a coronal loop. We also examine the differential emission measure of the coronal loop from the time-integrated soft x-ray spectra. As a result, line intensity shows a departure from the ionization equilibrium and shows different responses depending on the frequency of the heat input. Solar soft X-ray spectroscopic imager will be mounted in the sounding rocket experiment of the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI). This observation will deepen our understanding of heating processes to solve the “coronal heating problem”.

  13. The Foggy EUV Corona and Coronal Heating by MHD Waves From Explosive Reconnection Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Falconer, D. A.

    2008-05-01

    In 0.5 arcsec/pixel TRACE coronal EUV images, the corona rooted in active regions that are at the limb and are not flaring is seen to consist of (1) a complex array of discrete loops and plumes embedded in (2) a diffuse ambient component that shows no fine structure and gradually fades with height. For each of two not-flaring active regions, Cirtain et al (2006, Sol. Phys., 239, 295) found that the diffuse component is (1) approximately isothermal and hydrostatic and (2) emits well over half of the total EUV luminosity of the active-region corona. Here, from a TRACE Fe XII coronal image of another not-flaring active region, the large sunspot active region AR 10652 when it was at the west limb on 30 July 2004, we separate the diffuse component from the discrete-loop component by spatial filtering, and find that the diffuse component has about 60% of the total luminosity. If under much higher spatial resolution than that of TRACE (e.g., the 0.1 arcsec/pixel resolution of the Hi-C sounding- rocket experiment proposed by J. W. Cirtain et al), most of the diffuse component remains diffuse rather being resolved into very narrow loops and plumes, this will raise the possibility that the EUV corona in active regions consists of two basically different but comparably luminous components: one being the set of discrete bright loops and plumes and the other being a truly diffuse component filling the space between the discrete loops and plumes. This dichotomy would imply that there are two different but comparably powerful coronal heating mechanisms operating in active regions, one for the distinct loops and plumes and another for the diffuse component. We present a scenario in which (1) each discrete bright loop or plume is a flux tube that was recently reconnected in a burst of reconnection, and (2) the diffuse component is heated by MHD waves that are generated by these reconnection events and by other fine-scale explosive reconnection events, most of which occur in and

  14. The Foggy EUV Corona and Coronal Heating by MHD Waves from Explosive Reconnection Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ron L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Falconer, David A.

    2008-01-01

    In 0.5 arcsec/pixel TRACE coronal EUV images, the corona rooted in active regions that are at the limb and are not flaring is seen to consist of (1) a complex array of discrete loops and plumes embedded in (2) a diffuse ambient component that shows no fine structure and gradually fades with height. For each of two not-flaring active regions, found that the diffuse component is (1) approximately isothermal and hydrostatic and (2) emits well over half of the total EUV luminosity of the active-region corona. Here, from a TRACE Fe XII coronal image of another not-flaring active region, the large sunspot active region AR 10652 when it was at the west limb on 30 July 2004, we separate the diffuse component from the discrete loop component by spatial filtering, and find that the diffuse component has about 60% of the total luminosity. If under much higher spatial resolution than that of TRACE (e. g., the 0.1 arcsec/pixel resolution of the Hi-C sounding-rocket experiment proposed by J. W. Cirtain et al), most of the diffuse component remains diffuse rather being resolved into very narrow loops and plumes, this will raise the possibility that the EUV corona in active regions consists of two basically different but comparably luminous components: one being the set of discrete bright loops and plumes and the other being a truly diffuse component filling the space between the discrete loops and plumes. This dichotomy would imply that there are two different but comparably powerful coronal heating mechanisms operating in active regions, one for the distinct loops and plumes and another for the diffuse component. We present a scenario in which (1) each discrete bright loop or plume is a flux tube that was recently reconnected in a burst of reconnection, and (2) the diffuse component is heated by MHD waves that are generated by these reconnection events and by other fine-scale explosive reconnection events, most of which occur in and below the base of the corona where they are

  15. Observational Signatures of Coronal Loop Heating and Cooling Driven by Footpoint Shuffling

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlburg, R B; Taylor, B D; Ugarte-Urra, I; Warren, H P; Rappazzo, A F; Velli, M

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of a coronal loop is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are advected by random motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of the coronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of our simulated loop is multi-thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Numerical simulations of coronal loops of 50000 km length and axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01...

  16. Spectroscopy at the Solar Limb: II. Are Spicules Heated to Coronal Temperatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, C.; Rezaei, R.; Puschmann, K. G.; Fabbian, D.

    2016-10-01

    Spicules of the so-called type II were suggested to be relevant for coronal heating because of their ubiquity on the solar surface and their eventual extension into the corona. We investigate whether solar spicules are heated to transition-region or coronal temperatures and reach coronal heights ({≫} 6 Mm) using multiwavelength observations of limb spicules in different chromospheric spectral lines (Ca ii H, Hɛ, Hα, Ca ii IR at 854.2 nm, He i at 1083 nm) taken with slit spectrographs and imaging spectrometers. We determine the line width of spectrally resolved line profiles in individual spicules and throughout the field of view, and estimate the maximal height that different types of off-limb features reach. We derive estimates of the kinetic temperature and the non-thermal velocity from the line width of spectral lines from different chemical elements. We find that most regular, i.e. thin and elongated, spicules reach a height of at most about 6 Mm above the solar limb. The majority of features found at larger heights are irregularly shaped with a significantly larger lateral extension, of up to a few Mm, than spicules. Both individual and average line profiles in all spectral lines show a decrease in their line width with height above the limb with very few exceptions. The kinetic temperature and the non-thermal velocity decrease with height above the limb. We find no indications that the spicules in our data reach coronal heights or transition-region or coronal temperatures.

  17. Plasma Sloshing in Pulse-heated Solar and Stellar Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, F.

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that coronal heating is highly intermittent, and flares are the high energy extreme. The properties of the heat pulses are difficult to constrain. Here, hydrodynamic loop modeling shows that several large amplitude oscillations (˜20% in density) are triggered in flare light curves if the duration of the heat pulse is shorter than the sound crossing time of the flaring loop. The reason for this is that the plasma does not have enough time to reach pressure equilibrium during heating, and traveling pressure fronts develop. The period is a few minutes for typical solar coronal loops, dictated by the sound crossing time in the decay phase. The long period and large amplitude make these oscillations different from typical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. This diagnostic can be applied both to observations of solar and stellar flares and to future observations of non-flaring loops at high resolution.

  18. Plasma sloshing in pulse-heated solar and stellar coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Reale, F

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that coronal heating is highly intermittent, and flares are the high energy extreme. The properties of the heat pulses are difficult to constrain. Here hydrodynamic loop modeling shows that several large amplitude oscillations (~ 20% in density) are triggered in flare light curves if the duration of the heat pulse is shorter that the sound crossing time of the flaring loop. The reason is that the plasma has not enough time to reach pressure equilibrium during the heating and traveling pressure fronts develop. The period is a few minutes for typical solar coronal loops, dictated by the sound crossing time in the decay phase. The long period and large amplitude make these oscillations different from typical MHD waves. This diagnostic can be applied both to observations of solar and stellar flares and to future observations of non-flaring loops at high resolution.

  19. Electric currents and coronal heating in NOAA active region 6952

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, T. R.; Canfield, R. C.; Hudson, H. S.; Mickey, D. L.; Wulser, J. -P.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tsuneta, S.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the spatial and temporal relationship between coronal structures observed with the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on board the Yohkoh spacecraft and the vertical electric current density derived from photospheric vector magnetograms obtained using the Stokes Polarimeter at the Mees Solar Observatory. We focus on a single active region: AR 6952 which we observed on 7 days during 1991 December. For 11 independent maps of the vertical electric current density co-aligned with non-flaring X-ray images, we search for a morphological relationship between sites of high vertical current density in the photosphere and enhanced X-ray emission in the overlying corona. We find no compelling spatial or temporal correlation between the sites of vertical current and the bright X-ray structures in this active region.

  20. Microflaring in Low-Lying Core Fields and Extended Coronal Heating in the Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jason G.; Falconer, D. A.; Moore, Ronald L.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously reported analyses of Yohkoh SXT data examining the relationship between the heating of extended coronal loops (both within and stemming from active regions) and microflaring in core fields lying along neutral lines near their footpoints (J. G. Porter, D. A. Falconer, and R. L. Moore 1998, in Solar Jets and Coronal Plumes, ed. T. Guyenne, ESA SP-421, and references therein). We found a surprisingly poor correlation of intensity variations in the extended loops with individual microflares in the compact heated areas at their feet, despite considerable circumstancial evidence linking the heating processes in these regions. Now, a study of Fe XII image sequences from SOHO EIT show that similar associations of core field structures with the footpoints of very extended coronal features can be found in the quiet Sun. The morphology is consistent with the finding of Wang et al. (1997, ApJ 484, L75) that polar plumes are rooted at sites of mixed polarity in the magnetic network. We find that the upstairs/downstairs intensity variations often follow the trend, identified in the active region observations, of a weak correspondence. Apparently much of the coronal heating in the extended loops is driven by a type of core field magnetic activity that is "cooler" than the events having the coronal signature of microflares, i.e., activity that results in little heating within the core fields themselves. This work was funded by the Solar Physics Branch of NASA's Office of Space Science through the SR&T Program and the SEC Guest Investigator Program.

  1. Resonant Heating of Ions by Parallel Propagating Alfvén Waves in Solar Coronal Holes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Xi Zhang; Jing-Xiu Wang; Chi-Jie Xiao

    2005-01-01

    Resonant heating of H, O+5, and Mg+9 by parallel propagating ioncyclotron Alfven waves in solar coronal holes at a heliocentric distance is studied using the heating rate derived from the quasilinear theory. It is shown that the particle-Alfven-wave interaction is a significant microscopic process. The temperatures of the ions are rapidly increased up to the observed order in only microseconds, which implies that simply inserting the quasilinear heating rate into the fluid/MHD energy equation to calculate the radial dependence of ion temperatures may cause errors as the time scales do not match. Different species ions are heated by Alfven waves with a power law spectrum in approximately a mass order.To heat O+5 over Mg+9 as measured by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) in the solar coronal hole at a region≥ 1.9R⊙, the energy density of Alfven waves with a frequency close to the O+5-cyclotron frequency must be at least double of that at the Mg+9-cyclotron frequency. With an appropriate wave-energy spectrum, the heating of H, O+5 and Mg+9 can be consistent with the UVCS measurements in solar coronal holes at a heliocentric distance.

  2. OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF CORONAL LOOP HEATING AND COOLING DRIVEN BY FOOTPOINT SHUFFLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Taylor, B. D. [LCP and FD, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Einaudi, G. [Berkeley Research Associates, Inc., Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Ugarte-Urra, I. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Rappazzo, A. F. [Advanced Heliophysics, Pasadena, CA 91106 (United States); Velli, M., E-mail: rdahlbur@lcp.nrl.navy.mil [EPSS, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    The evolution of a coronal loop is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are advected by random motions. As a consequence, the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is nonuniformly distributed so that only a fraction of the coronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales that, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of our simulated loop is multithermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Numerical simulations of coronal loops of 50,000 km length and axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 T are presented. To connect these simulations to observations, we use the computed number densities and temperatures to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode. These intensities are used to compute differential emission measure distributions using the Monte Carlo Markov Chain code, which are very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions. We conclude that coronal heating is found to be strongly intermittent in space and time, with only small portions of the coronal loop being heated: in fact, at any given time, most of the corona is cooling down.

  3. Coronal Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Cranmer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations, and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are established in the extended corona. For example, the importance of kinetic plasma physics and turbulence in coronal holes has been affirmed by surprising measurements from the UVCS instrument on SOHO that heavy ions are heated to hundreds of times the temperatures of protons and electrons. These observations point to specific kinds of collisionless Alfvén wave damping (i.e., ion cyclotron resonance, but complete theoretical models do not yet exist. Despite our incomplete knowledge of the complex multi-scale plasma physics, however, much progress has been made toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms ultimately responsible for producing the observed properties of coronal holes.

  4. EUV flickering of solar coronal loops: a new diagnostic of coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    Tajfirouze, E; Peres, G; Testa, P

    2016-01-01

    A previous work of ours found the best agreement between EUV light curves observed in an active region core (with evidence of super-hot plasma) and those predicted from a model with a random combination of many pulse-heated strands with a power-law energy distribution. We extend that work by including spatially resolved strand modeling and by studying the evolution of emission along the loops in the EUV 94 A and 335 A channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Using the best parameters of the previous work as the input of the present one, we find that the amplitude of the random fluctuations driven by the random heat pulses increases from the bottom to the top of the loop in the 94 A channel and, viceversa, from the top to the bottom in the 335 A channel. This prediction is confirmed by the observation of a set of aligned neighbouring pixels along a bright arc of an active region core. Maps of pixel fluctuations may therefore provide easy diagnostics of nano-flaring ...

  5. EUV FLICKERING OF SOLAR CORONAL LOOPS: A NEW DIAGNOSTIC OF CORONAL HEATING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajfirouze, E.; Reale, F.; Peres, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 (Italy); Testa, P., E-mail: reale@astropa.unipa.it [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    A previous work of ours found the best agreement between EUV light curves observed in an active region core (with evidence of super-hot plasma) and those predicted from a model with a random combination of many pulse-heated strands with a power-law energy distribution. We extend that work by including spatially resolved strand modeling and by studying the evolution of emission along the loops in the EUV 94 Å and 335 Å channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Using the best parameters of the previous work as the input of the present one, we find that the amplitude of the random fluctuations driven by the random heat pulses increases from the bottom to the top of the loop in the 94 Å channel and from the top to the bottom in the 335 Å channel. This prediction is confirmed by the observation of a set of aligned neighboring pixels along a bright arc of an active region core. Maps of pixel fluctuations may therefore provide easy diagnostics of nanoflaring regions.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Coronal Heating through Footpoint Braiding

    CERN Document Server

    Hansteen, Viggo; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Advanced 3D radiative MHD simulations now reproduce many properties of the outer solar atmosphere. When including a domain from the convection zone into the corona, a hot chromosphere and corona are self-consistently maintained. Here we study two realistic models, with different simulated area, magnetic field strength and topology, and numerical resolution. These are compared in order to characterize the heating in the 3D-MHD simulations which self-consistently maintains the structure of the atmosphere. We analyze the heating at both large and small scales and find that heating is episodic and highly structured in space, but occurs along loop shaped structures, and moves along with the magnetic field. On large scales we find that the heating per particle is maximal near the transition region and that widely distributed opposite-polarity field in the photosphere leads to a greater heating scale height in the corona. On smaller scales, heating is concentrated in current sheets, the thicknesses of which are set ...

  7. Multifractal Solar EUV Intensity Fluctuations and their Implications for Coronal Heating Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Rivera, Y. J.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J.; Jennings, P. J.; Rappazzo, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the scaling properties of the long-range temporal evolution and intermittency of Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory intensity observations in four solar environments: an active region core, a weak emission region, and two core loops. We use two approaches: the probability distribution function (PDF) of time series increments and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). Noise taints the results, so we focus on the 171 Å waveband, which has the highest signal-to-noise ratio. The lags between pairs of wavebands distinguish between coronal versus transition region (TR) emission. In all physical regions studied, scaling in the range of 15-45 minutes is multifractal, and the time series are anti-persistent on average. The degree of anti-correlation in the TR time series is greater than that for coronal emission. The multifractality stems from long-term correlations in the data rather than the wide distribution of intensities. Observations in the 335 Å waveband can be described in terms of a multifractal with added noise. The multiscaling of the extreme-ultraviolet data agrees qualitatively with the radiance from a phenomenological model of impulsive bursts plus noise, and also from ohmic dissipation in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model for coronal loop heating. The parameter space must be further explored to seek quantitative agreement. Thus, the observational “signatures” obtained by the combined tests of the PDF of increments and the MF-DFA offer strong constraints that can systematically discriminate among models for coronal heating.

  8. What can large-scale magnetohydrodynamic numerical experiments tell us about coronal heating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, H

    2015-05-28

    The upper atmosphere of the Sun is governed by the complex structure of the magnetic field. This controls the heating of the coronal plasma to over a million kelvin. Numerical experiments in the form of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations are used to investigate the intimate interaction between magnetic field and plasma. These models allow one to synthesize the coronal emission just as it would be observed by real solar instrumentation. Large-scale models encompassing a whole active region form evolving coronal loops with properties similar to those seen in extreme ultraviolet light from the Sun, and reproduce a number of average observed quantities. This suggests that the spatial and temporal distributions of the heating as well as the energy distribution of individual heat deposition events in the model are a good representation of the real Sun. This provides evidence that the braiding of fieldlines through magneto-convective motions in the photosphere is a good concept to heat the upper atmosphere of the Sun.

  9. Signatures of Steady Heating in Time Lag Analysis of Coronal Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Viall, Nicholeen M

    2016-01-01

    Among the many ways of investigating coronal heating, the time lag method of Viall & Klimchuk (2012) is becoming increasingly prevalent as an analysis technique complementary to those traditionally used. The time lag method cross correlates light curves at a given spatial location obtained in spectral bands that sample different temperature plasmas. It has been used most extensively with data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We have previously applied the time lag method to entire active regions and surrounding quiet Sun and create maps of the results (Viall & Klimchuk 2012; Viall & Klimchuk 2015). We find that the majority of time lags are consistent with the cooling of coronal plasma that has been impulsively heated. Additionally, a significant fraction of the map area has a time lag of zero. This does not indicate a lack of variability. Rather, strong variability must be present, and it must occur in phase in the different channels. We have shown previous...

  10. A new approach for modelling chromospheric evaporation in response to enhanced coronal heating: 1 the method

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, C D; Cargill, P J; De Moortel, I

    2016-01-01

    We present a new computational approach that addresses the difficulty of obtaining the correct interaction between the solar corona and the transition region in response to rapid heating events. In the coupled corona, transition region and chromosphere system, an enhanced downward conductive flux results in an upflow (chromospheric evaporation). However, obtaining the correct upflow generally requires high spatial resolution in order to resolve the transition region. With an unresolved transition region, artificially low coronal densities are obtained because the downward heat flux jumps across the unresolved region to the chromosphere, underestimating the upflows. Here, we treat the lower transition region as a discontinuity that responds to changing coronal conditions through the imposition of a jump condition that is derived from an integrated form of energy conservation. To illustrate and benchmark this approach against a fully resolved one-dimensional model, we present field-aligned simulations of corona...

  11. Signatures of Steady Heating in Time Lag Analysis of Coronal Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Among the multitude of methods used to investigate coronal heating, the time lag method of Viall Klimchuk is becoming increasingly prevalent as an analysis technique that is complementary to those that are traditionally used.The time lag method cross correlates light curves at a given spatial location obtained in spectral bands that sample different temperature plasmas. It has been used most extensively with data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We have previously applied the time lag method to entire active regions and surrounding the quiet Sun and created maps of the results. We find that the majority of time lags are consistent with the cooling of coronal plasma that has been impulsively heated. Additionally, a significant fraction of the map area has a time lag of zero. This does not indicate a lack of variability. Rather, strong variability must be present, and it must occur in phase between the different channels. We have previously shown that these zero time lags are consistent with the transition region response to coronal nanoflares, although other explanations are possible. A common misconception is that the zero time lag indicates steady emission resulting from steady heating. Using simulated and observed light curves, we demonstrate here that highly correlated light curves at zero time lag are not compatible with equilibrium solutions. Such light curves can only be created by evolution

  12. Non-WKB Models of the FIP Effect: Implications for Solar Coronal Heating and the Coronal Helium and Neon Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Laming, J Martin

    2009-01-01

    We revisit in more detail a model for element abundance fractionation in the solar chromosphere, that gives rise to the "FIP Effect" in the solar corona and wind. Elements with first ionization potential below about 10 eV, i.e. those that are predominantly ionized in the chromosphere, are enriched in the corona by a factor 3-4. We model the propagation of Alfven waves through the chromosphere using a non-WKB treatment, and evaluate the ponderomotive force associated with these waves. Under solar conditions, this is generally pointed upwards in the chromosphere, and enhances the abundance of chromospheric ions in the corona. Our new approach captures the essentials of the solar coronal abundance anomalies, including the depletion of He relative to H, and also the putative depletion of Ne, recently discussed in the literature. We also argue that the FIP effect provides the strongest evidence to date for energy fluxes of Alfven waves sufficient to heat the corona. However it appears that these waves must also be...

  13. Heating and cooling of coronal loops observed by SDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. P.; Peter, H.; Chen, F.; Zhang, J.

    2015-11-01

    Context. One of the most prominent processes to have been suggested as heating the corona to well above 106 K builds on nanoflares, which are short bursts of energy dissipation. Aims: We compare observations to model predictions to test the validity of the nanoflare process. Methods: Using extreme UV data from AIA/SDO and HMI/SDO line-of-sight magnetograms, we study the spatial and temporal evolution of a set of loops in active region AR 11850. Results: We find a transient brightening of loops in emission from Fe xviii forming at about 7.2 MK, while at the same time these loops dim in emission from lower temperatures. This points to a fast heating of the loop that goes along with evaporation of material that we observe as apparent upward motions in the image sequence. After this initial phase lasting some 10 min, the loops brighten in a sequence of AIA channels that show progressively cooler plasma, indicating that this cooling of the loops lasts about one hour. A comparison to the predictions from a 1D loop model shows that this observation supports the nanoflare process in (almost) all aspects. In addition, our observations show that the loops get broader while getting brighter, which cannot be understood in a 1D model. Movie associated to Fig. 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Location of energy source for coronal heating on the photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhen-Xiang; Yang, Xu; Wang, Ya; Ji, Kai-Fan; Ji, Hai-Sheng; Cao, Wen-Da

    2017-02-01

    It is reported that ultra-fine dynamic ejections along magnetic loops of an active region originate from intergranular lanes and they are associated with subsequent heating in the corona. As continuing work, we analyze the same set of data but focus on a quiet region and the overlying EUV/UV emission as observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We find that there appear to be dark patches scattered across the quiet region and the dark patches always stay along intergranular lanes. Over the dark patches, the average UV/EUV emission at 131, 171, 304 and 1600 Å (middle temperature) is more intense than that of other regions and EUV brightness is negatively correlated with 10830 Å intensity, though, such a trend does not exist for high temperature lines at 94, 193, 211 and 335 Å. For the same quiet region, where both TiO 7057 Å broad band images and 10830 Å filtergrams are available, contours for the darkest lane areas on TiO images and dark patches on 10830 Å filtergrams frequently differ in space. The results suggest that the dark patches do not simply reflect the areas with the darkest lanes but are associated with a kind of enhanced absorption (EA) at 10830 Å. A strict definition for EA with narrow band 10830 Å filtergrams is found to be difficult. In this paper, we define enhanced absorption patches (EAPs) of a quiet region as the areas where emission is less than ∼90% of the mean intensity of the region. The value is equivalent to the average intensity along thin dark loops connecting two moss regions of the active region. A more strict definition for EAPs, say 88%, gives even more intense UV/EUV emission over those in the middle temperature range. The results provide further observational evidence that energy for heating the upper solar atmosphere comes from the intergranular lane area where the magnetic field is constantly brought in by convection motion in granules.

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF NUMERICAL RESOLUTION ON CORONAL DENSITY IN HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS OF IMPULSIVE HEATING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Cargill, P. J., E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.uk [Space and Atmospheric Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-10

    The effect of the numerical spatial resolution in models of the solar corona and corona/chromosphere interface is examined for impulsive heating over a range of magnitudes using one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. It is demonstrated that the principal effect of inadequate resolution is on the coronal density. An underresolved loop typically has a peak density of at least a factor of two lower than a resolved loop subject to the same heating, with larger discrepancies in the decay phase. The temperature for underresolved loops is also lower indicating that lack of resolution does not 'bottle up' the heat flux in the corona. Energy is conserved in the models to under 1% in all cases, indicating that this is not responsible for the low density. Instead, we argue that in underresolved loops the heat flux 'jumps across' the transition region to the dense chromosphere from which it is radiated rather than heating and ablating transition region plasma. This emphasizes the point that the interaction between corona and chromosphere occurs only through the medium of the transition region. Implications for three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic coronal models are discussed.

  16. Spectroscopy at the solar limb: II. Are spicules heated to coronal temperatures ?

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C; Puschmann, K G; Fabbian, D

    2016-01-01

    Spicules of the so-called type II were suggested to be relevant for coronal heating because of their ubiquity on the solar surface and their eventual extension into the corona. We investigate whether solar spicules are heated to transition-region or coronal temperatures and reach coronal heights (>6 Mm) using multi-wavelength observations of limb spicules in different chromospheric spectral lines (Ca II H, Hepsilon, Halpha, Ca II IR at 854.2 nm, He I at 1083 nm). We determine the line width of individual spicules and throughout the field of view and estimate the maximal height that different types of off-limb features reach. We derive estimates of the kinetic temperature and the non-thermal velocity from the line width of spectral lines from different chemical elements. We find that most regular spicules reach a maximal height of about 6 Mm above the solar limb. The majority of features found at larger heights are irregularly shaped with a significantly larger lateral extension than spicules. Both individual ...

  17. A new model for heating of the Solar North Polar Coronal Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlen, E.; Zengin Çamurdan, D.; Yardımcı, M.; Pekünlü, E. R.

    2017-05-01

    This article presents a new model of the North Polar Coronal Hole (NPCH) with the aim of revealing the dissipative/propagative characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. We investigate the effects of isotropic viscosity and anisotropic heat conduction on the propagation characteristics of MHD waves in the NPCH. We first model the NPCH by considering differences in the radial direction as well as in the direction perpendicular to the line of sight (los) in temperature, particle number density and non-thermal velocities between plumes and interplume lanes, for the specific case of O vi ions. This model includes parallel and perpendicular (to the magnetic field) heat conduction and viscous dissipation. Next, we derive the dispersion relations for MHD waves in cases of the absence and presence of parallel heat conduction. In the case of the absence of parallel heat conduction, we find that MHD wave dissipation depends strongly on viscosity for modified acoustic and Alfvén waves. The energy flux densities of acoustic waves vary between 104.7 and 107 erg cm-2 s-1, while the energy flux densities of Alfvén waves turn out to be between 106 and 108.6 erg cm-2 s-1. When there is parallel heat conduction, we calculate the damping length-scales and the energy flux densities of magnetoacoustic waves. Our results suggest that modified magnetoacoustic waves may provide a significant source for the observed preferential acceleration and heating of O vi ions, thus coronal plasma heating, and an extra accelerating agent for the fast solar wind in the NPCH, depending on the values of the transport coefficients.

  18. Heat flux in a non-Maxwellian plasma. [in realistic solar coronal loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljepojevic, N. N.; Macneice, P.

    1989-01-01

    A hybrid numerical scheme is applied to solve the Landau equation for the electron distribution function over all velocity space. Evidence is presented for the first time of the degree and character of the failure of the classical Spitzer-Haerm heat flux approximation in a realistic solar coronal loop structure. In the loop model used, the failure is so severe at some points that the role of the heat flux in the plasma's energy balance is completely misinterpreted. In the lower corona the Spitzer-Haerm approximation predicts that the heat flux should act as an energy source, whereas the more accurate distribution functions calculated here show this to be an energy sink.

  19. Can Large Time Delays Observed in Light Curves of Coronal Loops be Explained by Impulsive Heating?

    CERN Document Server

    Lionello, Roberto; Winebarger, Amy R; Linker, Jon A; Mikić, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    The light curves of solar coronal loops often peak first in channels associated with higher temperatures and then in those associated with lower. The time delays between the different narrowband EUV channels have been measured for many individual loops and recently for every pixel of an active region observation. Time delays between channels for an active region exhibit a wide range of values, with maxima $>$ 5,000\\,s. These large time delays make up 3-26\\% (depending on the channel pair) of the pixels where a significant, positive time delay is measured. It has been suggested that time delays can be explained by impulsive heating. In this paper, we investigate whether the largest observed time delays can be explained by this hypothesis by simulating a series of coronal loops with different heating rates, loop lengths, abundances, and geometries to determine the range of expected time delays between a set of four EUV channels. We find that impulsive heating cannot address the largest time delays observed in t...

  20. CAN LARGE TIME DELAYS OBSERVED IN LIGHT CURVES OF CORONAL LOOPS BE EXPLAINED IN IMPULSIVE HEATING?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikić, Zoran [Predictive Science, Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Rd., Ste. 170, San Diego, CA 92121-3933 (United States); Alexander, Caroline E.; Winebarger, Amy R., E-mail: lionel@predsci.com, E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com, E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com, E-mail: caroline.e.alexander@nasa.gov, E-mail: amy.r.winebarger@nasa.gov [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    The light curves of solar coronal loops often peak first in channels associated with higher temperatures and then in those associated with lower temperatures. The delay times between the different narrowband EUV channels have been measured for many individual loops and recently for every pixel of an active region observation. The time delays between channels for an active region exhibit a wide range of values. The maximum time delay in each channel pair can be quite large, i.e., >5000 s. These large time delays make-up 3%–26% (depending on the channel pair) of the pixels where a trustworthy, positive time delay is measured. It has been suggested that these time delays can be explained by simple impulsive heating, i.e., a short burst of energy that heats the plasma to a high temperature, after which the plasma is allowed to cool through radiation and conduction back to its original state. In this paper, we investigate whether the largest observed time delays can be explained by this hypothesis by simulating a series of coronal loops with different heating rates, loop lengths, abundances, and geometries to determine the range of expected time delays between a set of four EUV channels. We find that impulsive heating cannot address the largest time delays observed in two of the channel pairs and that the majority of the large time delays can only be explained by long, expanding loops with photospheric abundances. Additional observations may rule out these simulations as an explanation for the long time delays. We suggest that either the time delays found in this manner may not be representative of real loop evolution, or that the impulsive heating and cooling scenario may be too simple to explain the observations, and other potential heating scenarios must be explored.

  1. THERMAL NON-EQUILIBRIUM REVISITED: A HEATING MODEL FOR CORONAL LOOPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran [Predictive Science, Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Rd., Ste. 170, San Diego, CA 92121-2910 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Mok, Yung, E-mail: lionel@predsci.com, E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com, E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com, E-mail: amy.r.winebarger@nasa.gov, E-mail: ymok@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, 4129 Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2013-08-20

    The location and frequency of events that heat the million-degree corona are still a matter of debate. One potential heating scenario is that the energy release is effectively steady and highly localized at the footpoints of coronal structures. Such an energy deposition drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions in the hydrodynamic equations in longer loops. This heating scenario was considered and discarded by Klimchuk et al. on the basis of their one-dimensional simulations as incapable of reproducing observational characteristics of loops. In this paper, we use three-dimensional simulations to generate synthetic emission images, from which we select and analyze six loops. The main differences between our model and that of Klimchuk et al. concern (1) dimensionality, (2) resolution, (3) geometrical properties of the loops, (4) heating function, and (5) radiative function. We find evidence, in this small set of simulated loops, that the evolution of the light curves, the variation of temperature along the loops, the density profile, and the absence of small-scale structures are compatible with the characteristics of observed loops. We conclude that quasi-steady footpoint heating that drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions cannot yet be ruled out as a viable heating scenario for EUV loops.

  2. Heat release mechanism of energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, N. [Third Research Center, Technical Research and development Institute (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Determination of the heat release mechanism of energetic materials is a major subject of combustion study. In order to elucidate the combustion process of various types of energetic materials a generalized combustion wave structure was proposed and the heat release process was discussed. The heat release process was significantly different between the physical structures of the materials: homogeneous and heterogeneous materials. The thermal structure of an azide polymer was evaluated to demonstrate the heat release mechanism. (author) 6 refs.

  3. Non-negative Matrix Factorization as a Method for Studying Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Will; Bradshaw, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Many theoretical efforts have been made to model the response of coronal loops to nanoflare heating, but the theory has long suffered from a lack of direct observations. Nanoflares, originally proposed by Parker (1988), heat the corona through short, impulsive bursts of energy. Because of their short duration and comparatively low amplitude, emission signatures from nanoflare heating events are often difficult to detect. Past algorithms (e.g. Ugarte-Urra and Warren, 2014) for measuring the frequency of transient brightenings in active region cores have provided only a lower bound for such measurements. We present the use of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) to analyze spectral data in active region cores in order to provide more accurate determinations of nanoflare heating properties. NMF, a matrix deconvolution technique, has a variety of applications , ranging from Raman spectroscopy to face recognition, but, to our knowledge, has not been applied in the field of solar physics. The strength of NMF lies in its ability to estimate sources (heating events) from measurements (observed spectral emission) without any knowledge of the mixing process (Cichocki et al., 2009). We apply our NMF algorithm to forward-modeled emission representative of that produced by nanoflare heating events in an active region core. The heating events are modeled using a state-of-the-art hydrodynamics code (Bradshaw and Cargill, 2013) and the emission and active regions are synthesized using advanced forward modeling and visualization software (Bradshaw and Klimchuk, 2011; Reep et al., 2013). From these active region visualizations, our NMF algorithm is then able to predict the heating event frequency and amplitudes. Improved methods of nanoflare detection will help to answer fundamental questions regarding the frequency of energy release in the solar corona and how the corona responds to such impulsive heating. Additionally, development of reliable, automated nanoflare detection

  4. A new model for heating of Solar North Polar Coronal Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Devlen, E; Yardımcı, M; Pekünlü, E R

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new model of North Polar Coronal Hole (NPCH) to study dissipation/propagation of MHD waves. We investigate the effects of the isotropic viscosity and heat conduction on the propagation characteristics of the MHD waves in NPCH. We first model NPCH by considering the differences in radial as well as in the direction perpendicular to the line of sight (\\textit{los}) in temperature, particle number density and non-thermal velocities between plumes and interplume lanes for the specific case of \\ion{O}{VI} ions. This model includes parallel and perpendicular (to the magnetic field) heat conduction and viscous dissipation. Next, we derive the dispersion relations for the MHD waves in the case of absence and presence of parallel heat conduction. In the case of absence of parallel heat conduction, we find that MHD wave dissipation strongly depends on the viscosity for modified acoustic and Alfven waves. The energy flux density of acoustic waves varies between $10^{4.7}$ and $10^7 \\,erg\\,cm^{-2}\\,...

  5. Thermodynamic Structure of Collision-Dominated Expanding Plasma: Heating of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Richardson, J. D.; Belcher, J. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Elliott, H. A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic structure of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using combined surveys of the ejecta between 0.3 and 20 AU. ICMEs are shown to have a moderate expansion in the solar wind compared with theoretical predictions. The expansion seems to be governed by a polytrope with gamma approx. 1.3 in this distance range. We find that Coulomb collisions are important contributors to the ion-ion equilibration process in the ICME plasma. The alpha-proton differential speed quickly drops to below 10 km/s due to strong Coulomb collisions. However, the two species of particles are far from thermal equilibrium with a temperature ratio T(sub alpha/T(sub p) = 4-6, suggestive of a preferential heating of alpha particles. The plasma heating rate as a function of heliocentric &stance required for the temperature profile is deduced by taking into account the expansion and energy transfer between protons and alphas via Coulomb collisions. The turbulence dissipation rate is also inferred from the inertial range power spectrum of magnetic fluctuations within ICMEs. Comparison of the turbulence dissipation rate with the required heating rate shows that turbulence dissipation seems sufficient to explain the ICME heating. Sources powering the turbulence are also investigated by examining the instabilities induced by temperature anisotropies and energy deposition by pickup ions.

  6. Modeling solar coronal bright point oscillations with multiple nanoflare heated loops

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrashekhar, K

    2015-01-01

    Intensity oscillations of coronal bright points (BPs) have been studied for past several years. It has been known for a while that these BPs are closed magnetic loop like structures. However, initiation of such intensity oscillations is still an enigma. There have been many suggestions to explain these oscillations, but modeling of such BPs have not been explored so far. Using a multithreaded nanoflare heated loop model we study the behavior of such BPs in this work. We compute typical loop lengths of BPs using potential field line extrapolation of available data (Chandrashekhar et al. 2013), and set this as the length of our simulated loops. We produce intensity like observables through forward modeling and analyze the intensity time series using wavelet analysis, as was done by previous observers. The result reveals similar intensity oscillation periods reported in past observations. It is suggested these oscillations are actually shock wave propagations along the loop. We also show that if one considers di...

  7. Classical Heat-Flux Measurements in Coronal Plasmas from Collective Thomson-Scattering Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.; Rozmus, W.

    2016-10-01

    Collective Thomson scattering was used to measure heat flux in coronal plasmas. The relative amplitude of the Thomson-scattered power into the up- and downshifted electron plasma wave features was used to determine the flux of electrons moving along the temperature gradient at three to four times the electron thermal velocity. Simultaneously, the ion-acoustic wave features were measured. Their relative amplitude was used to measure the flux of the return-current electrons. The frequencies of these ion-acoustic and electron plasma wave features provide local measurements of the electron temperature and density. These spectra were obtained at five locations along the temperature gradient in a laser-produced blowoff plasma. These measurements of plasma parameters are used to infer the Spitzer-Härm flux (qSH = - κ∇Te ) and are in good agreement with the values of the heat flux measured from the scattering-feature asymmetries. Additional experiments probed plasma waves perpendicular to the temperature gradient. The data show small effects resulting from heat flux compared to probing waves along the temperature gradient. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Krucker, Säm [Also at Institute of 4-D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch, Switzerland. (Switzerland); Lin, Robert P., E-mail: glesener@ssl.berkeley.edu [Also at Physics Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ∼11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (∼100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  9. Modeling Coronal Response in Decaying Active Regions with Magnetic Flux Transport and Steady Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.; Upton, Lisa A.; Young, Peter R.

    2017-09-01

    We present new measurements of the dependence of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiance on the total magnetic flux in active regions as obtained from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Using observations of nine active regions tracked along different stages of evolution, we extend the known radiance—magnetic flux power-law relationship (I\\propto {{{Φ }}}α ) to the AIA 335 Å passband, and the Fe xviii 93.93 Å spectral line in the 94 Å passband. We find that the total unsigned magnetic flux divided by the polarity separation ({{Φ }}/D) is a better indicator of radiance for the Fe xviii line with a slope of α =3.22+/- 0.03. We then use these results to test our current understanding of magnetic flux evolution and coronal heating. We use magnetograms from the simulated decay of these active regions produced by the Advective Flux Transport model as boundary conditions for potential extrapolations of the magnetic field in the corona. We then model the hydrodynamics of each individual field line with the Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops model with steady heating scaled as the ratio of the average field strength and the length (\\bar{B}/L) and render the Fe xviii and 335 Å emission. We find that steady heating is able to partially reproduce the magnitudes and slopes of the EUV radiance—magnetic flux relationships and discuss how impulsive heating can help reconcile the discrepancies. This study demonstrates that combined models of magnetic flux transport, magnetic topology, and heating can yield realistic estimates for the decay of active region radiances with time.

  10. Alfvén wave solar model (AWSoM): Coronal heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Holst, B.; Sokolov, I. V.; Meng, X.; Jin, M.; Manchester, W. B. IV; Tóth, G.; Gombosi, T. I. [Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    We present a new version of the Alfvén wave solar model, a global model from the upper chromosphere to the corona and the heliosphere. The coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are addressed with low-frequency Alfvén wave turbulence. The injection of Alfvén wave energy at the inner boundary is such that the Poynting flux is proportional to the magnetic field strength. The three-dimensional magnetic field topology is simulated using data from photospheric magnetic field measurements. This model does not impose open-closed magnetic field boundaries; those develop self-consistently. The physics include the following. (1) The model employs three different temperatures, namely the isotropic electron temperature and the parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures. The firehose, mirror, and ion-cyclotron instabilities due to the developing ion temperature anisotropy are accounted for. (2) The Alfvén waves are partially reflected by the Alfvén speed gradient and the vorticity along the field lines. The resulting counter-propagating waves are responsible for the nonlinear turbulent cascade. The balanced turbulence due to uncorrelated waves near the apex of the closed field lines and the resulting elevated temperatures are addressed. (3) To apportion the wave dissipation to the three temperatures, we employ the results of the theories of linear wave damping and nonlinear stochastic heating. (4) We have incorporated the collisional and collisionless electron heat conduction. We compare the simulated multi-wavelength extreme ultraviolet images of CR2107 with the observations from STEREO/EUVI and the Solar Dynamics Observatory/AIA instruments. We demonstrate that the reflection due to strong magnetic fields in the proximity of active regions sufficiently intensifies the dissipation and observable emission.

  11. CORONAL HEATING BY SURFACE ALFVEN WAVE DAMPING: IMPLEMENTATION IN A GLOBAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS MODEL OF THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R. M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Space Weather Lab, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Opher, M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Oran, R.; Van der Holst, B.; Sokolov, I. V.; Frazin, R.; Gombosi, T. I. [Center for Space Environment Modeling, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Vasquez, A., E-mail: Rebekah.e.frolov@nasa.gov [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (CONICET-UBA) and FCEN (UBA), CC 67, Suc 28, Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-09-10

    The heating and acceleration of the solar wind is an active area of research. Alfven waves, because of their ability to accelerate and heat the plasma, are a likely candidate in both processes. Many models have explored wave dissipation mechanisms which act either in closed or open magnetic field regions. In this work, we emphasize the boundary between these regions, drawing on observations which indicate unique heating is present there. We utilize a new solar corona component of the Space Weather Modeling Framework, in which Alfven wave energy transport is self-consistently coupled to the magnetohydrodynamic equations. In this solar wind model, the wave pressure gradient accelerates and wave dissipation heats the plasma. Kolmogorov-like wave dissipation as expressed by Hollweg along open magnetic field lines was presented in van der Holst et al. Here, we introduce an additional dissipation mechanism: surface Alfven wave (SAW) damping, which occurs in regions with transverse (with respect to the magnetic field) gradients in the local Alfven speed. For solar minimum conditions, we find that SAW dissipation is weak in the polar regions (where Hollweg dissipation is strong), and strong in subpolar latitudes and the boundaries of open and closed magnetic fields (where Hollweg dissipation is weak). We show that SAW damping reproduces regions of enhanced temperature at the boundaries of open and closed magnetic fields seen in tomographic reconstructions in the low corona. Also, we argue that Ulysses data in the heliosphere show enhanced temperatures at the boundaries of fast and slow solar wind, which is reproduced by SAW dissipation. Therefore, the model's temperature distribution shows best agreement with these observations when both dissipation mechanisms are considered. Lastly, we use observational constraints of shock formation in the low corona to assess the Alfven speed profile in the model. We find that, compared to a polytropic solar wind model, the wave

  12. Mechanisms of Ocean Heat Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garuba, Oluwayemi

    An important parameter for the climate response to increased greenhouse gases or other radiative forcing is the speed at which heat anomalies propagate downward in the ocean. Ocean heat uptake occurs through passive advection/diffusion of surface heat anomalies and through the redistribution of existing temperature gradients due to circulation changes. Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) weakens in a warming climate and this should slow the downward heat advection (compared to a case in which the circulation is unchanged). However, weakening AMOC also causes a deep warming through the redistributive effect, thus increasing the downward rate of heat propagation compared to unchanging circulation. Total heat uptake depends on the combined effect of these two mechanisms. Passive tracers in a perturbed CO2 quadrupling experiments are used to investigate the effect of passive advection and redistribution of temperature anomalies. A new passive tracer formulation is used to separate ocean heat uptake into contributions due to redistribution and passive advection-diffusion of surface heating during an ocean model experiment with abrupt increase in surface temperature. The spatial pattern and mechanisms of each component are examined. With further experiments, the effects of surface wind, salinity and temperature changes in changing circulation and the resulting effect on redistribution in the individual basins are isolated. Analysis of the passive advection and propagation path of the tracer show that the Southern ocean dominates heat uptake, largely through vertical and horizontal diffusion. Vertical diffusion transports the tracer across isopycnals down to about 1000m in 100 years in the Southern ocean. Advection is more important in the subtropical cells and in the Atlantic high latitudes, both with a short time scale of about 20 years. The shallow subtropical cells transport the tracer down to about 500m along isopycnal surfaces, below this vertical

  13. Diagnosing Coronal Heating in a Survey of Active Regions using the Time Lag Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viall, Nicholeen; Klimchuk, James A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we examine 15 different active regions observed with the Solar Dynamics Observatory and analyze their nanoflare properties using the time lag method. The time lag method is a diagnostic of whether the plasma is maintained at a steady temperature, or if it is dynamic, undergoing heating and cooling cycles. An important aspect of our technique is that it analyses both observationally distinct coronal loops as well as the much more prevalent diffuse emission surrounding them. Warren et al. (2012) first studied these same 15 active regions, which are all quiescent and exhibit a broad range of characteristics, including age, total unsigned magnetic flux, area, hot emission, and emission measure distribution. We find that widespread cooling is a generic property of both loop and diffuse emission from all 15 active regions. However, the range of temperatures through which the plasma cools varies between active regions and within each active region, and only occasionally is there full cooling from above 7 MK to well below 1 MK. We find that the degree of cooling is not well correlated with slopes of the emission measure distribution measured by Warren et al. (2012). We show that these apparently contradictory observations can be reconciled with the presence of a distribution of nanoflare energies and frequencies along the line of sight, with the average delay between successive nanoflare events on a single flux tube being comparable to the plasma cooling timescale. Warren, H. P., Winebarger, A. R., & Brooks, D. H. 2012, ApJ, 759, 141

  14. Modeling Solar Coronal Bright-point Oscillations with Multiple Nanoflare Heated Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekhar, K.; Sarkar, Aveek

    2015-09-01

    Intensity oscillations of coronal bright points (BPs) have been studied for the past several years. It has been known for a while that these BPs are closed magnetic loop-like structures. However, the initiation of such intensity oscillations is still an enigma. There have been many suggestions to explain these oscillations, but so far modeling such BPs has not been explored. Using a multithreaded nanoflare heated loop model we study the behavior of such BPs in this work. We compute typical loop lengths of BPs using potential field-line extrapolation of available data, and set this as the length of our simulated loops. We produce intensity-like observables through forward modeling and analyze the intensity time series using wavelet analysis, as was done by previous observers. The result reveals similar intensity oscillation periods reported in past observations. It is suggested these oscillations are actually shock wave propagations along the loop. We also show that if one considers different background subtractions, one can extract adiabatic standing modes from the intensity time-series data as well, both from the observed and simulated data.

  15. CORONAL SOURCES, ELEMENTAL FRACTIONATION, AND RELEASE MECHANISMS OF HEAVY ION DROPOUTS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weberg, Micah J. [PhD Candidate in Space Science, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2134A Space Research Building, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, USA. (United States); Lepri, Susan T. [Associate Professor, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2429 Space Research Building, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, USA. (United States); Zurbuchen, Thomas H., E-mail: mjweberg@umich.edu, E-mail: slepri@umich.edu, E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu [Professor, Space Science and Aerospace Engineering, Associate Dean for Entrepreneurship Senior Counselor of Entrepreneurship Education, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2431 Space Research Building, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, USA. (United States)

    2015-03-10

    The elemental abundances of heavy ions (masses larger than He) in the solar wind provide information about physical processes occurring in the corona. Additionally, the charge state distributions of these heavy ions are sensitive to the temperature profiles of their respective source regions in the corona. Heavy ion dropouts are a relatively new class of solar wind events identified by both elemental and ionic charge state distributions. We have shown that their origins lie in large, closed coronal loops where processes such as gravitational settling dominate and can cause a mass-dependent fractionation pattern. In this study we consider and attempt to answer three fundamental questions concerning heavy ion dropouts: (1) 'where are the source loops located in the large-scale corona?'; (2) 'how does the interplay between coronal processes influence the end elemental abundances?'; and (3) 'what are the most probable release mechanisms'? We begin by analyzing the temporal and spatial variability of heavy ion dropouts and their correlation with heliospheric plasma and magnetic structures. Next we investigate the ordering of the elements inside dropouts with respect to mass, ionic charge state, and first ionization potential. Finally, we discuss these results in the context of the prevailing solar wind theories and the processes they posit that may be responsible for the release of coronal plasma into interplanetary space.

  16. Mechanical Autonomous Stochastic Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Garcia, Marc; Foehr, André; Molerón, Miguel; Lydon, Joseph; Chong, Christopher; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic heat engines are devices that generate work from random thermal motion using a small number of highly fluctuating degrees of freedom. Proposals for such devices have existed for more than a century and include the Maxwell demon and the Feynman ratchet. Only recently have they been demonstrated experimentally, using, e.g., thermal cycles implemented in optical traps. However, recent experimental demonstrations of classical stochastic heat engines are nonautonomous, since they require an external control system that prescribes a heating and cooling cycle and consume more energy than they produce. We present a heat engine consisting of three coupled mechanical resonators (two ribbons and a cantilever) subject to a stochastic drive. The engine uses geometric nonlinearities in the resonating ribbons to autonomously convert a random excitation into a low-entropy, nonpassive oscillation of the cantilever. The engine presents the anomalous heat transport property of negative thermal conductivity, consisting in the ability to passively transfer energy from a cold reservoir to a hot reservoir.

  17. Constraining a Model of Turbulent Coronal Heating for AU Microscopii with X-Ray, Radio, and Millimeter Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, Steven R; MacGregor, Meredith A

    2013-01-01

    Many low-mass pre-main-sequence stars exhibit strong magnetic activity and coronal X-ray emission. Even after the primordial accretion disk has been cleared out, the star's high-energy radiation continues to affect the formation and evolution of dust, planetesimals, and large planets. Young stars with debris disks are thus ideal environments for studying the earliest stages of non-accretion-driven coronae. In this paper we simulate the corona of AU Mic, a nearby active M dwarf with an edge-on debris disk. We apply a self-consistent model of coronal loop heating that was derived from numerical simulations of solar field-line tangling and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We also synthesize the modeled star's X-ray luminosity and thermal radio/millimeter continuum emission. A realistic set of parameter choices for AU Mic produces simulated observations that agree with all existing measurements and upper limits. This coronal model thus represents an alternative explanation for a recently discovered ALMA central em...

  18. CORONAL HEATING BY THE INTERACTION BETWEEN EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS AND THE QUIET SUN OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Yuzong; Li, Leping [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Chen, Feng; Peter, Hardi, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: yuzong@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: lepingli@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: chen@mps.mpg.de, E-mail: peter@mps.mpg.de [Max-Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS), D-37077, Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-02-01

    The question of what heats the solar corona remains one of the most important puzzles in solar physics and astrophysics. Here we report Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of coronal heating by the interaction between emerging active regions (EARs) and the surrounding quiet Sun (QS). The EARs continuously interact with the surrounding QS, resulting in dark ribbons which appear at the boundary of the EARs and the QS. The dark ribbons visible in extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths propagate away from the EARs with speeds of a few km s{sup −1}. The regions swept by the dark ribbons are brightening afterward, with the mean temperature increasing by one quarter. The observational findings demonstrate that uninterrupted magnetic reconnection between EARs and the QS occurs. When the EARs develop, the reconnection continues. The dark ribbons may be the track of the interface between the reconnected magnetic fields and the undisturbed QS’s fields. The propagating speed of the dark ribbons reflects the reconnection rate and is consistent with our numerical simulation. A long-term coronal heating which occurs in turn from nearby the EARs to far away from the EARs is proposed.

  19. Comments on "The Coronal Heating Paradox" by M.J. Aschwanden, A. Winebarger, D. Tsiklauri and H. Peter [2007, Astrophys J., 659, 1673

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, Swadesh M

    2007-01-01

    We point out the priority of our paper (Mahajan et al. 2001, Phys. Plasmas, 8, 1340) over (Aschwanden et al. 2007, Astrophys J., 659, 1673) in introducing the term "Formation and primary heating of the solar corona" working out explicit models (theory as well as simulation) for coronal structure formation and heating. On analyzing the Aschwanden et al. (2007) scenario of coronal heating process (shifted to the chromospheric heating) we stress, that for efficient loop formation, the primary upflows of plasma in chromosphere/transition region should be relatively cold and fast (as opposed to hot). It is during trapping and accumulation in closed field structures, that the flows thermalize (due to the dissipation of the short scale flow energy) leading to a bright and hot coronal structure. The formation and primary heating of a closed coronal structure (loop at the end) are simultaneous and a process like the "filling of the empty coronal loop by hot upflows" is purely speculative and totally unlikely.

  20. Dissection of Heat Tolerance Mechanisms in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat stress severely limits plant productivity and causes extensive economic loss to US agriculture. Understanding heat adaptation mechanisms in crop plants is crucial to the success of developing heat tolerant varieties. Heat waves (heat stress) often occur sporadically during the growing season o...

  1. Solar signatures and eruption mechanism of the August 14, 2010 coronal mass ejection (CME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Huys, Elke; Seaton, Daniel B.; De Groof, Anik; Berghmans, David; Poedts, Stefaan

    2017-03-01

    On August 14, 2010 a wide-angled coronal mass ejection (CME) was observed. This solar eruption originated from a destabilized filament that connected two active regions and the unwinding of this filament gave the eruption an untwisting motion that drew the attention of many observers. In addition to the erupting filament and the associated CME, several other low-coronal signatures that typically indicate the occurrence of a solar eruption were associated with this event. However, contrary to what was expected, the fast CME (v > 900 km s-1) was accompanied by only a weak C4.4 flare. We investigate the various eruption signatures that were observed for this event and focus on the kinematic evolution of the filament in order to determine its eruption mechanism. Had this solar eruption occurred just a few days earlier, it could have been a significant event for space weather. The risk of underestimating the strength of this eruption based solely on the C4.4 flare illustrates the need to include all eruption signatures in event analyses in order to obtain a complete picture of a solar eruption and assess its possible space weather impact.

  2. Comparison of Damping Mechanisms for Transverse Waves in Solar Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Solís, María; Arregui, Iñigo

    2017-09-01

    We present a method to assess the plausibility of alternative mechanisms to explain the damping of magnetohydrodynamic transverse waves in solar coronal loops. The considered mechanisms are resonant absorption of kink waves in the Alfvén continuum, phase mixing of Alfvén waves, and wave leakage. Our methods make use of Bayesian inference and model comparison techniques. We first infer the values for the physical parameters that control the wave damping, under the assumption of a particular mechanism, for typically observed damping timescales. Then, the computation of marginal likelihoods and Bayes factors enable us to quantify the relative plausibility between the alternative mechanisms. We find that, in general, the evidence is not large enough to support a single particular damping mechanism as the most plausible one. Resonant absorption and wave leakage offer the most probable explanations in strong damping regimes, while phase mixing is the best candidate for weak/moderate damping. When applied to a selection of 89 observed transverse loop oscillations, with their corresponding measurements of damping timescales and taking into account data uncertainties, we find that positive evidence for a given damping mechanism is only available in a few cases.

  3. Coronal Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations), and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are establish...

  4. Heat conduction mechanism in nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Changwei; Hong, Hi ki [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yong Tae; Lee, Jae Won [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Nanofluids are produced by dispersing nanoparticles in basefluid. Given its superior thermo-physical properties, nanofluids are gaining increasing attention and are showing promising potential in various applications. Numerous studies have been conducted in the past decade to experimentally and theoretically investigate thermal conductivity. The experimental finding is briefly summarized in this study; however, we do not intend to present a systematic summary of the available references from the literature. The primary objective of this study is to review and summarize the most debated mechanisms for heat conduction in nanofluids, such as the effects of a nanolayer, the Brownian motion of nanoparticles and aggregation, as well as induced convection. Finally, at a low concentration of nanoparticles, nanoconvection is the leading contributor to thermal conductivity enhancement, whereas at a higher concentration, the natural thermal transport along the backbone would aggregate, and the effects of the nanolayer would become significant and become ineligible.

  5. Generation of Electron Suprathermal Tails in the Upper Solar Atmosphere: Implications for Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Wong, Hung K.; Klimas, Alexander J.

    1999-01-01

    We present a mechanism for the generation of non-Maxwellian electron distribution function in the upper regions of the solar atmosphere in the presence of collisional damping. It is suggested that finite amplitude, low frequency, obliquely propagating electromagnetic waves can carry a substantial electric field component parallel to the mean magnetic field that can be significantly larger than the Dreicer electric field. This long wavelength electric fluctuation is capable of generating high frequency electron plasma oscillations and low frequency ion acoustic-like waves. The analysis has been performed using 1-1/2D Vlasov and PIC numerical simulations in which both electrons and ions are treated kinetically and self consistently. The simulation results indicate that high frequency electron plasma oscillations and low frequency ion acoustic-like waves are generated. The high frequency electron plasma oscillation drives electron plasma turbulence, which subsequently is damped out by the background electrons. The turbulence damping results in electron acceleration and the generation of non-Maxwellian suprathermal tails on time scales short compared to collisional damping. Bulk heating also occurs if the fluctuating parallel electric field is strong enough. This study suggests that finite amplitude, low frequency, obliquely propagating, electromagnetic waves can play a significant role in the acceleration and heating of the solar corona electrons and in the coupling of medium and small-scale phenomena.

  6. Multifractal Solar EUV Intensity Fluctuations and their Implications for Coronal Heating Models

    CERN Document Server

    Cadavid, Ana Cristina Cadavid; Lawrence, John K; Christian, Damian J; Jennings, Peter J; Rappazzo, A Franco

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the scaling properties of the long-range temporal evolution and intermittency of SDO/AIA intensity observations in four solar environments: active region core, a weak emission region, and two core loops. We use two approaches: the probability distribution function (PDF) of time series increments, and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). Noise taints the results, so we focus on the 171 Angstrom waveband , which has the highest signal-to-noise ratio. The lags between pairs of wavebands distinguish between coronal versus transition region (TR) emission. In all physical regions studied, scaling in the range 15-45 min is multifractal, and the time series are anti-persistent on the average. The degree of anti-correlation in the TR time series is greater than for coronal emission. The multifractality stems from long term correlations in the data rather than the wide distribution of intensities. Observations in the 335 Angstrom waveband can be described in terms of a multifractal with ...

  7. Effects of Plasma Drag on Low Earth Orbiting Satellites due to Heating of Earth's Atmosphere by Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Nwankwo, Victor U J

    2013-01-01

    Solar events, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, heat up the upper atmosphere and near-Earth space environment. Due to this heating and expansion of the outer atmosphere by the energetic ultraviolet, X-ray and particles expelled from the sun, the low Earth-Orbiting satellites (LEOS) become vulnerable to an enhanced drag force by the ions and molecules of the expanded atmosphere. Out of various types of perturbations, Earth directed CMEs play the most significant role. They are more frequent and intense during the active (solar maximum) phase of the sun's approximately 11-year cycle. As we are approaching another solar maximum later in 2013, it may be instructive to analyse the effects of the past solar cycles on the orbiting satellites using the archival data of space environment parameters as indicators. In this paper, we compute the plasma drag on a model LEOS due to the atmospheric heating by CMEs and other solar events as a function of the solar parameters. Using the current forecast ...

  8. Coronal vs chromospheric heating through co-spatial return currents during the 19 and 20 Jan 2005 solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.

    2016-05-01

    The high electron flux required to explain the bremsstrahlung X-ray emission observed from solar flares is expected to be accompanied by a neutralizing co-spatial return current. In addition to resupplying the acceleration region with electrons, this return current will both heat the coronal plasma and flatten the electron distribution at lower energies. This flattening in the electron distribution in turn flattens the X-ray spectrum. We have found that return-current collisional thick-target model (RCCTTM) of Holman (2012) provides an acceptable fit to X-ray spectra with strong breaks for 18 flares observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). This is a 1D model similar to the collisional thick-target model (CTTM) with two additional assumptions: (1) electrons lose some of their energy through return current losses along their path to the thick target, where they lose all their remaining energy through Coulomb collisions; (2) the non-thermal beam is streaming in a warm target, which means that electrons will be thermalized at a non-zero energy. We assume this energy to be equal to the analytical value derived by Kontar et al. 2015. We show that return-current heating in the corona is about an order of magnitude higher than the heating at the footpoints at times during the flare.

  9. Coronal Heating and Acceleration of the High/Low-Speed Solar Wind by Fast/Slow MHD Shock Trains

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T K

    2004-01-01

    We investigate coronal heating and acceleration of the high- and low-speed solar wind in the open field region by dissipation of fast and slow magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) waves through MHD shocks. Linearly polarized \\Alfven (fast MHD) waves and acoustic (slow MHD) waves travelling upwardly along with a magnetic field line eventually form fast switch-on shock trains and hydrodynamical shock trains (N-waves) respectively to heat and accelerate the plasma. We determine one dimensional structure of the corona from the bottom of the transition region (TR) to 1AU under the steady-state condition by solving evolutionary equations for the shock amplitudes simultaneously with the momentum and proton/electron energy equations. Our model reproduces the overall trend of the high-speed wind from the polar holes and the low-speed wind from the mid- to low-latitude streamer except the observed hot corona in the streamer. The heating from the slow waves is effective in the low corona to increase the density there, and plays ...

  10. Peeling mechanism of tomato under infrared heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical behaviors of peeling tomatoes using infrared heat are thermally induced peel loosening and subsequent cracking. However, the mechanism of peel loosening and cracking due to infrared heating remains unclear. This study aimed at investigating the mechanism of peeling tomatoes under infrared h...

  11. Mechanical autonomous stochastic heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Garcia, Marc; Foehr, Andre; Moleron, Miguel; Lydon, Joseph; Chong, Christopher; Daraio, Chiara; . Team

    Stochastic heat engines extract work from the Brownian motion of a set of particles out of equilibrium. So far, experimental demonstrations of stochastic heat engines have required extreme operating conditions or nonautonomous external control systems. In this talk, we will present a simple, purely classical, autonomous stochastic heat engine that uses the well-known tension induced nonlinearity in a string. Our engine operates between two heat baths out of equilibrium, and transfers energy from the hot bath to a work reservoir. This energy transfer occurs even if the work reservoir is at a higher temperature than the hot reservoir. The talk will cover a theoretical investigation and experimental results on a macroscopic setup subject to external noise excitations. This system presents an opportunity for the study of non equilibrium thermodynamics and is an interesting candidate for innovative energy conversion devices.

  12. Coronal heating and wind acceleration by nonlinear Alfvén waves – global simulations with gravity, radiation, and conduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Suzuki

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We review our recent results of global one-dimensional (1-D MHD simulations for the acceleration of solar and stellar winds. We impose transverse photospheric motions corresponding to the granulations, which generate outgoing Alfvén waves. We treat the propagation and dissipation of the Alfvén waves and consequent heating from the photosphere by dynamical simulations in a self-consistent manner. Nonlinear dissipation of Alfven waves becomes quite effective owing to the stratification of the atmosphere (the outward decrease of the density. We show that the coronal heating and the solar wind acceleration in the open magnetic field regions are natural consequence of the footpoint fluctuations of the magnetic fields at the surface (photosphere. We find that the properties of the solar wind sensitively depend on the fluctuation amplitudes at the solar surface because of the nonlinearity of the Alfvén waves, and that the wind speed at 1 AU is mainly controlled by the field strength and geometry of flux tubes. Based on these results, we point out that both fast and slow solar winds can be explained by the dissipation of nonlinear Alfvén waves in a unified manner. We also discuss winds from red giant stars driven by Alfvén waves, focusing on different aspects from the solar wind.

  13. Coronal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakariakov, V. M.

    2007-07-01

    The lectures present the foundation of solar coronal physics with the main emphasis on the MHD theory and on wave and oscillatory phenomena. We discuss major challenges of the modern coronal physics; the main plasma structures observed in the corona and the conditions for their equilibrium; phenomenology of large scale long period oscillatory coronal phenomena and their theoretical modelling as MHD waves. The possibility of the remote diagnostics of coronal plasmas with the use of MHD oscillations is demonstrated.

  14. Hard X-Ray Constraints on Small-Scale Coronal Heating Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Andrew; Smith, David M.; Glesener, Lindsay; Klimchuk, James A.; Bradshaw, Stephen; Hannah, Iain; Vievering, Juliana; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Krucker, Sam; Christe, Steven

    2017-08-01

    A large body of evidence suggests that the solar corona is heated impulsively. Small-scale heating events known as nanoflares may be ubiquitous in quiet and active regions of the Sun. Hard X-ray (HXR) observations with unprecedented sensitivity >3 keV have recently been enabled through the use of focusing optics. We analyze active region spectra from the FOXSI-2 sounding rocket and the NuSTAR satellite to constrain the physical properties of nanoflares simulated with the EBTEL field-line-averaged hydrodynamics code. We model a wide range of X-ray spectra by varying the nanoflare heating amplitude, duration, delay time, and filling factor. Additional constraints on the nanoflare parameter space are determined from energy constraints and EUV/SXR data.

  15. The role of turbulence in coronal heating and solar wind expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R; Asgari-Targhi, Mahboubeh; Miralles, Mari Paz; Raymond, John C; Strachan, Leonard; Tian, Hui; Woolsey, Lauren N

    2015-05-13

    Plasma in the Sun's hot corona expands into the heliosphere as a supersonic and highly magnetized solar wind. This paper provides an overview of our current understanding of how the corona is heated and how the solar wind is accelerated. Recent models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence have progressed to the point of successfully predicting many observed properties of this complex, multi-scale system. However, it is not clear whether the heating in open-field regions comes mainly from the dissipation of turbulent fluctuations that are launched from the solar surface, or whether the chaotic 'magnetic carpet' in the low corona energizes the system via magnetic reconnection. To help pin down the physics, we also review some key observational results from ultraviolet spectroscopy of the collisionless outer corona.

  16. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  17. High-frequency torsional Alfvén waves as an energy source for coronal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar; Shetye, Juie; Murawski, Krzysztof; Doyle, John Gerard; Stangalini, Marco; Scullion, Eamon; Ray, Tom; Wójcik, Dariusz Patryk; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2017-03-01

    The existence of the Sun’s hot atmosphere and the solar wind acceleration continues to be an outstanding problem in solar-astrophysics. Although magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and dissipation of magnetic energy contribute to heating and the mass cycle of the solar atmosphere, yet direct evidence of such processes often generates debate. Ground-based 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope (SST)/CRISP, Hα 6562.8 Å observations reveal, for the first time, the ubiquitous presence of high frequency (~12–42 mHz) torsional motions in thin spicular-type structures in the chromosphere. We detect numerous oscillating flux tubes on 10 June 2014 between 07:17 UT to 08:08 UT in a quiet-Sun field-of-view of 60” × 60” (1” = 725 km). Stringent numerical model shows that these observations resemble torsional Alfvén waves associated with high frequency drivers which contain a huge amount of energy (~105 W m‑2) in the chromosphere. Even after partial reflection from the transition region, a significant amount of energy (~103 W m‑2) is transferred onto the overlying corona. We find that oscillating tubes serve as substantial sources of Alfvén wave generation that provide sufficient Poynting flux not only to heat the corona but also to originate the supersonic solar wind.

  18. High-frequency torsional Alfvén waves as an energy source for coronal heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek Kumar; Shetye, Juie; Murawski, Krzysztof; Doyle, John Gerard; Stangalini, Marco; Scullion, Eamon; Ray, Tom; Wójcik, Dariusz Patryk; Dwivedi, Bhola N.

    2017-01-01

    The existence of the Sun’s hot atmosphere and the solar wind acceleration continues to be an outstanding problem in solar-astrophysics. Although magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes and dissipation of magnetic energy contribute to heating and the mass cycle of the solar atmosphere, yet direct evidence of such processes often generates debate. Ground-based 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope (SST)/CRISP, Hα 6562.8 Å observations reveal, for the first time, the ubiquitous presence of high frequency (~12–42 mHz) torsional motions in thin spicular-type structures in the chromosphere. We detect numerous oscillating flux tubes on 10 June 2014 between 07:17 UT to 08:08 UT in a quiet-Sun field-of-view of 60” × 60” (1” = 725 km). Stringent numerical model shows that these observations resemble torsional Alfvén waves associated with high frequency drivers which contain a huge amount of energy (~105 W m−2) in the chromosphere. Even after partial reflection from the transition region, a significant amount of energy (~103 W m−2) is transferred onto the overlying corona. We find that oscillating tubes serve as substantial sources of Alfvén wave generation that provide sufficient Poynting flux not only to heat the corona but also to originate the supersonic solar wind. PMID:28256538

  19. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  20. The Fundamental Structure of Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Warren, Harry; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Golub, Leon; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2012-01-01

    During the past ten years, solar physicists have attempted to infer the coronal heating mechanism by comparing observations of coronal loops with hydrodynamic model predictions. These comparisons often used the addition of sub ]resolution strands to explain the observed loop properties. On July 11, 2012, the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi ]C) was launched on a sounding rocket. This instrument obtained images of the solar corona was 0.2 ]0.3'' resolution in a narrowband EUV filter centered around 193 Angstroms. In this talk, we will compare these high resolution images to simultaneous density measurements obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on Hinode to determine whether the structures observed with Hi ]C are resolved.

  1. Coronal Partings

    CERN Document Server

    Nikulin, Igor F

    2015-01-01

    The basic observational properties of the 'coronal partings'--the special type of the coronal magnetic structures, identified by a comparison of the coronal X-ray images and solar magnetograms--are considered. They represent channels inside the unipolar large-scale magnetic fields, formed by the rows of magnetic arcs directed to the neighboring fields of opposite polarity. The most important characteristics of the partings are revealed. It is found that--from the evolutionary and spatial point of view--the partings can transform to the coronal holes and visa versa. The classes of global, intersecting, and complex partings are identified.

  2. Heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity flow boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Haruhiko

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to clarify the mechanisms of heat transfer and dryout phenomena in flow boiling under microgravity conditions. Liquid-vapor behavior in annular flow, encountered in the moderate quality region, has extreme significance for practical application in space. To clarify the gravity effect on the heat transfer observed for an upward flow in a tube, the research described here started from the measurement of pressure drop for binary gas-liquid mixture under various gravity conditions. The shear stress acting on the surface of the annular liquid film was correlated by an empirical method. Gravity effects on the heat transfer due to two-phase forced convection were investigated by the analysis of velocity and temperature profiles in the film. The results reproduce well the trends of heat transfer coefficients varying with the gravity level, quality, and mass velocity. Dryout phenomena in the moderate quality region were observed in detail by the introduction of a transparent heated tube. At heat fluxes just lower and higher than CHF value, a transition of the heat transfer coefficient was calculated from oscillating wall temperature, where a series of opposing heat transfer trends--the enhancement due to the quenching of dried areas or evaporation from thin liquid films and the deterioration due to the extension of dry patches--were observed between the passage of disturbance waves. The CHF condition that resulted from the insufficient decrease of wall temperature in the period of enhanced heat transfer was overcome by a temperature increase in the deterioration period. No clear effect of gravity on the mechanisms of dryout was observed within the range of experiments.

  3. Calculations in fundamental physics mechanics and heat

    CERN Document Server

    Heddle, T

    2013-01-01

    Calculations in Fundamental Physics, Volume I: Mechanics and Heat focuses on the mechanisms of heat. The manuscript first discusses motion, including parabolic, angular, and rectilinear motions, relative velocity, acceleration of gravity, and non-uniform acceleration. The book then discusses combinations of forces, such as polygons and resolution, friction, center of gravity, shearing force, and bending moment. The text looks at force and acceleration, energy and power, and machines. Considerations include momentum, horizontal or vertical motion, work and energy, pulley systems, gears and chai

  4. A fresh look on the heating mechanisms of the Solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiklauri, D

    2006-01-01

    Recently using Particle-In-Cell simulations i.e. in the kinetic plasma description Tsiklauri et al. and G\\'enot et al. reported on a discovery of a new mechanism of parallel electric field generation, which results in electron acceleration. In this work we show that the parallel (to the uniform unperturbed magnetic field) electric field generation can be obtained in much simpler framework using ideal Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description, i.e. without resorting to complicated wave particle interaction effects such as ion polarisation drift and resulting space charge separation which seems to be an ultimate cause of the electron acceleration. Further, in the context of the coronal heating problem a new {\\it two stage mechanism} of the plasma heating is presented by putting emphasis, first, on the generation of parallel electric fields within {\\it ideal MHD} description directly, rather than focusing on the enhanced dissipation mechanisms of the Alfv\\'en waves and, second, dissipation of these parallel electric...

  5. Coronal loops above an Active Region - observation versus model

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a high-resolution numerical simulation of the solar corona above a stable active region. The aim is to test the field-line braiding mechanism for a sufficient coronal energy input. We also check the applicability of scaling laws for coronal loop properties like the temperature and density. Our 3D-MHD model is driven from below by Hinode observations of the photosphere, in particular a high-cadence time series of line-of-sight magnetograms and horizontal velocities derived from the magnetograms. This driving applies stress to the magnetic field and thereby delivers magnetic energy into the corona, where currents are induced that heat the coronal plasma by Ohmic dissipation. We compute synthetic coronal emission that we directly compare to coronal observations of the same active region taken by Hinode. In the model, coronal loops form at the same places as they are found in coronal observations. Even the shapes of the synthetic loops in 3D space match those found from a stereoscopic reconstruction ...

  6. Heat Transfer Mechanisms and Clustering in Nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaufui V. Wong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper surveys heat transfer in nanofluids. It summarizes and analyzes the theories regarding heat transfer mechanisms in nanofluids, and it discusses the effects of clustering on thermal conductivity. The heat transfer associated with conduction is presented through various experiments followed by a discussion of the theories developed. Relationships between thermal conductivity and various factors such as temperature, concentration, and particle size are also displayed along with a discussion on clustering. There is a brief discussion on convection where the number of studies is limited. There is research currently being performed on the manipulation of the properties governing the thermal conductivity of nanofluids—the particle size, shape, and surface area. Other factors that affect heat transfer are the material of the nanoparticle, particle volume concentration, and the fluid used. Although the interest in this relatively new class of fluids has generated many experimental studies, there is still disagreement over several aspects of heat transfer in nanofluids, primarily concerning the mechanisms behind the increased thermal conductivity. Although nanoparticles have greatly decreased the risks, there is still evidence of unwanted agglomeration which causes erosion and affect the overall conductivity. Research is currently being conducted to determine how to minimize this unwanted clustering.

  7. Cathode heating mechanisms in pseudospark plasma switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerer, Timothy J.; Pak, Hoyoung; Kushner, Mark J.

    1992-10-01

    Pseudosparks, and the back-lighted thyratron (BLT) in particular, are finding increasing application as pulse power switches. An attractive feature of BLTs is that high current densities (≥ tens of kA cm-2) can be sustained from metal cathodes without auxiliary heating. The source of this current is believed to be electric-field-enhanced thermionic emission resulting from heating of the cathode by ion bombardment during commutation which ultimately melts the surface of the cathode. It is proposed that a photon-driven ionization mechanism in the interelectrode gap of the BLT is responsible for initiating the observed patterns of cathode surface melting and electron emission. A 21/2-dimensional computer model is presented that incorporates a photo-induced ionization mechanism to spread the plasma into the interelectrode gap. It predicts a melting of the cathode in a pattern similar to that which is experimentally observed, and predicts a rate of field-enhanced thermionic electron emission that is sufficient to explain the high BLT conduction current density. In the absence of these mechanisms, the model does not predict the observed large-area melting of the face of the cathode. The cathode heating rate during the BLT switching phase is maximum for operating parameters that are very close to the limit for which the switch will close (that is, the smallest possible pressure-electrode spacing product and smallest possible electrode holes).

  8. Heat and mechanical resistance of zinc coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Horák

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at studying the effect of temperature on structure of intermetallic phases of the protective zinc layer. The main objective of the article is a description of the structure and the changes that can occur during the heating process. The first part of the article deals with the description of the structure and mechanical properties of the interfacial phases and their arrangement. The main part of the article is aimed at study of brittle intermetallic phases, which arise due to increased temperature. For this reason, a set of samples of steel CSN 11 321 (DC01 was prepared. These samples were subjected to thermal heating in the tempering furnace. Subsequently metallographic cross sections were prepared, observed and assessed using SEM microscopy and EDS analysis. Also accelerated corrosion tests and pull off bend tests were performed. Conclusion of the article is trying to explain the influence of intermetallic phases on degradation of the protective layer.

  9. Coronal magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jie; Bastian, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of research articles on the subject of the solar corona, and particularly, coronal magnetism. The book was motivated by the Workshop on Coronal Magnetism: Connecting Models to Data and the Corona to the Earth, which was held 21 - 23 May 2012 in Boulder, Colorado, USA. This workshop was attended by approximately 60 researchers. Articles from this meeting are contained in this topical issue, but the topical issue also contains contributions from researchers not present at the workshop. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in solar physics. Originally published in Solar Physics, Vol. 288, Issue 2, 2013 and Vol. 289, Issue 8, 2014.

  10. Magnetic reconnection as a chondrule heating mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2010-12-01

    The origin of chondrules (sub-millimeter inclusions found in stony meteorites) remains today an open question despite over century of examination. The age of these proto-solar relics shows a well defined cutoff of around 4.5 billion years ago. This places them as the oldest solids in the solar system. Chemical examination indicates that they experienced heating events on the order of 5000 K/hr for periods of around 30 minutes, followed by extending periods of cooling. Additional examination indicates the presence of large magnetic fields during their formation. Most attempts to explain chondrule formation in the proto-solar nebula neglect the existence of a plasma environment, with even less mention of dust being a charge carrier (dusty plasma). Simulations of magnetic reconnection in a dusty plasma are forwarded as a mechanism for chondrule formation in the proto-solar nebula. Here large dust-neutral relative velocities are found in the reconnection region. These flows are associated with the dynamics of reconnection. The high Knudsen number of the dust particles allows for a direct calculation of frictional heating due to collisions with neutrals (allowing for the neglect of boundary layer formation around the particle). Test particle simulations produce heating equivalent to that recorded in the chondrule mineral record. It is shown that magnetic reconnection in a dusty plasma is of fundamental importance to the formation of the most primitive solids in the solar system.

  11. Mechanical properties of alumina porcelain during heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šín, Peter; Podoba, Rudolf; ŠtubÅa, Igor; Trník, Anton

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical strength and Young's modulus of green alumina porcelain (50 wt. % of kaolin, 25 wt. % of Al2O3, and 25 wt. % of feldspar) were measured during heating up to 900 °C and 1100 °C, respectively. To this end, we used the three point-bending method and modulated force thermomechanical analysis (mf-TMA). The loss liberation - of the physically bound water (20 - 250 °C) strengthens the sample and Young's modulus increases its values significantly. The dehydroxylation that takes place in the range of 400 - 650 °C causes a slight decrease in Young's modulus. On the other hand, the mechanical strength slightly increases in this temperature range, although it has a sudden drop at 420 °C. Beyond the dehydroxylation range, above 650 °C, both Young's modulus and mechanical strength increase. Above 950 °C, a sharp increase of Young's modulus is caused by the solid-state sintering and the new structure created by the high-temperature reactions in metakaolinite.

  12. A comparison of the heat and mechanical energy of a heat-pump wind turbine system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aybek, A.; Arslan, S.; Yildiz, E.; Atik, K. [University of Kahramanmaras (Turkey). Dept. of Agricultural Machinery

    2000-07-01

    While a variety of applications of wind energy have been studied in Turkey, no significant efforts have been made to utilize heat pumps for heat generation. The use of heat pumps in wind energy systems is worth considering because of the high efficiency of heat production. In this study, a directly coupled wind turbine-heat pump system was designed, constructed, and tested. Measurements determined the mechanical energy of the rotors of the wind turbine and the heat energy generated by the heat pump driven by the rotor shaft. Based on the comparisons between the power generated by the heat pump and the power of the Savonius rotors, it was found that the heat energy gained by the heat pump was four times greater than the mechanical energy obtained from the turbine. It was suggested that heat pumps could be efficiently used in wind energy systems. (Author)

  13. Optimized ground coupled heat pump mechanical package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catan, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    This project addresses the question of how well a ground coupled heat pump system could perform with a heat pump which was designed specifically for such systems operating in a northern climate. Conventionally, systems are designed around water source heat pumps which are not designed for ground coupled heat pump application. The objective of the project is to minimize the life cycle cost for a ground coupled system given the freedom to design the heat pump and the ground coil in concert. In order to achieve this objective a number of modeling tools were developed which will likely be of interest in their own right.

  14. Evaporative Heat Transfer Mechanisms within a Heat Melt Compactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Gotti, Daniel J.; Rymut, Joseph Edward; Nguyen, Brian K; Owens, Jay C.; Pace, Gregory S.; Fisher, John W.; Hong, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will discuss the status of microgravity analysis and testing for the development of a Heat Melt Compactor (HMC). Since fluids behave completely differently in microgravity, the evaporation process for the HMC is expected to be different than in 1-g. A thermal model is developed to support the design and operation of the HMC. Also, low-gravity aircraft flight data is described to assess the point at which water may be squeezed out of the HMC during microgravity operation. For optimum heat transfer operation of the HMC, the compaction process should stop prior to any water exiting the HMC, but nevertheless seek to compact as much as possible to cause high heat transfer and therefore shorter evaporation times.

  15. Mechanism and control of convective heat transfer-- Coordination of velocity and heat flow fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A second look has been given at the mechanism of convective heat transfer based on the analogy between convection and conduction with heat sources. The strength of convective heat transfer depends not only on the fluid velocity and fluid properties, but also on the coordination of fluid velocity and heat flow fields. Hence, based on the included angle of velocity and temperature gradient vectors, the presence of fluid motion may enhance or reduce heat transfer. With this concept, the known heat transfer phenomena may be understood in a deeper way. More important is that some novel approaches of heat transfer control can be developed.

  16. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Laming, J. M.; Taylor, B. D.; Obenschain, K.

    2016-11-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the well-known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a “by-product” of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 to 0.02 T and lengths from 25,000 to 75,000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets, which act to heat the loop. As a consequence of coronal magnetic reconnection, small-scale, high-speed jets form. The familiar vortex quadrupoles form at reconnection sites. Between the magnetic footpoints and the corona the reconnection flow merges with the boundary flow. It is in this region that the ponderomotive acceleration occurs. Mirroring the character of the coronal reconnection, the ponderomotive acceleration is also found to be intermittent.

  17. Optimized ground coupled heat pump mechanical package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catan, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    The system which was optimized was a horizontal earth coil in a given house in the Pittsburgh area. The types of components used in the heat pump are essentially conventional. The method of this study is derived from one used to optimize an air-source heat pump for operation at standard steady state conditions. A computer model, created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is used to predict heat pump performance for specified configuration and operating conditions. A predetermined set of design parameters is automatically altered by a constrained minimization program (a Numerical Algorithms Group library routine hereafter referred to as the optimizer) to find the combination for which the highest COP is predicted by the heat pump model. In the present study, the set of parameters to be varied include some pertaining to the ground coil as well as some pertaining to the heat pump. The optimizer, in this case, pursues a minimum life cycle cost which is calculated using the heat pump model, a ground coil model (called FTECM for Fast Transient Earth Coil model), and a parameterized cost model. The flow chart shows how the optimizer interacts with these programs to minimize life cycle cost.

  18. A Bayesian Approach to Period Searching in Solar Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Bryan; McKenzie, David

    2017-03-01

    We have applied a Bayesian generalized Lomb–Scargle period searching algorithm to movies of coronal loop images obtained with the Hinode X-ray Telescope (XRT) to search for evidence of periodicities that would indicate resonant heating of the loops. The algorithm makes as its only assumption that there is a single sinusoidal signal within each light curve of the data. Both the amplitudes and noise are taken as free parameters. It is argued that this procedure should be used alongside Fourier and wavelet analyses to more accurately extract periodic intensity modulations in coronal loops. The data analyzed are from XRT Observation Program #129C: “MHD Wave Heating (Thin Filters),” which occurred during 2006 November 13 and focused on active region 10293, which included coronal loops. The first data set spans approximately 10 min with an average cadence of 2 s, 2″ per pixel resolution, and used the Al-mesh analysis filter. The second data set spans approximately 4 min with a 3 s average cadence, 1″ per pixel resolution, and used the Al-poly analysis filter. The final data set spans approximately 22 min at a 6 s average cadence, and used the Al-poly analysis filter. In total, 55 periods of sinusoidal coronal loop oscillations between 5.5 and 59.6 s are discussed, supporting proposals in the literature that resonant absorption of magnetic waves is a viable mechanism for depositing energy in the corona.

  19. Kappa-distributions and coronal heating. (Slovak Title: Kappa-distribúcie a ohrev koróny)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudík, J.; Dzifčáková, E.; Kulinová, A.; Karlický, M.

    2010-12-01

    Particle energy kappa-distributions (distributions with non-thermal tails) have been diagnosed in plasma of the transition region and also in solar flares. Theoretical models suggest a link between kappa-distributions and dynamic heating of the corona. Since the presence of non-thermal distributions leads to changes in intensities of emission lines, we have examined their effect on the total radiation losses of the corona as well as responses of the EUV and X-ray filters. Temperature responses of the filters are wider for kappa-distributions than in the case of the Maxwell distribution, and their respective maxima are shifted towards higher temperatures. On the other hand, the total radiation losses of the corona are lower compared to the Maxwell distribution except for the extreme non-thermal case. This means that lower heating energy is needed to reach the same corona temperature in case of kappa-distributions. In this work we discuss the effect of element abundances and specific ions on the total radiation losses of the corona.

  20. Heat transfer mechanisms during short-pulse laser heating of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, T.Q.; Tien, C.L. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    This work studies heat transfer mechanisms during ultrafast laser heating of metals from a microscopic point of view. The heating process is composed of three processes: the deposition of radiation energy on electrons, the transport of energy by electrons, and the heating of the material lattice through electron-lattice interactions. The Boltzmann transport equation is used to model the transport of electrons and electron lattice interactions. The scattering term of the Boltzmann equation is evaluated from quantum mechanical considerations, which shows the different contributions of the elastic and inelastic electron-lattice scattering processes on energy transport. By solving the Boltzmann equation, a hyperbolic two-step radiation heating model is rigorously established. It reveals the hyperbolic nature of energy flux carried by electrons and the nonequilibrium between electrons and the lattice during fast heating processes. Predictions from the current model agree with available experimental data during subpicosecond laser heating. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Mechanical ventilation with heat recovery in cold climates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Jesper; Rose, Jørgen; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    Building ventilation is necessary to achieve a healthy and comfortable indoor environment, but as energy prices continue to rise it is necessary to reduce the energy consumption. Using mechanical ventilation with heat recovery reduces the ventilation heat loss significantly, but in cold climates...... freezes to ice. The analysis of measurements from existing ventilation systems with heat recovery used in single-family houses in Denmark and a test of a standard heat recovery unit in the laboratory have clearly shown that this problem occurs when the outdoor temperature gets below approximately –5º......C. Due to the ice problem mechanical ventilation systems with heat recovery are often installed with an extra preheating system reducing the energy saving potential significantly. New designs of high efficient heat recovery units capable of continuously defrosting the ice without using extra energy...

  2. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of fuel cells: Heat release mechanisms and voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilemski, G.

    1980-01-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics is used to analyze the spatial distribution of heat release mechanisms occurring in fuel cells operating under load in nonisothermal steady states. Novel contributions to heat release in the bulk electrolyte are found which are analogous to Peltier and Thomson effects in metallic conductors. Expresions for the heat release at individual electrodes are presented. An equation for the voltage of these cells is also derived.

  3. Students' Misconceptions about Heat Transfer Mechanisms and Elementary Kinetic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, S. R.; Pradhan, H. C.

    2010-01-01

    Heat and thermodynamics is a conceptually rich area of undergraduate physics. In the Indian context in particular there has been little work done in this area from the point of view of misconceptions. This prompted us to undertake a study in this area. We present a study of students' misconceptions about heat transfer mechanisms, i.e. conduction,…

  4. Science 101: What Are the Earth's Heating and Cooling Mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2015-01-01

    In this article, author Bill Robertson attempts to help readers understand some of the Earth's heating and cooling mechanisms and how they relate to global warming. Figures are provided to help facilitate learning.

  5. Mechanism of Heat and Irradiation Synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-11

    Gomez Assistant Professor of Food Mic obiology LEVEL( i~~~u u U.S. Army Research Of~~ce Contract Nu~ DAAcC’29—76—C-Ø,~d34 Department of Nutrition and...76-C-0034 I. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAM E AND ADDRESS IC. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT . TA S,~ Department of Nutrition and Food Sciend~eMassachusetts...can be sensitized to heat by gai~ua radiation treatments. The study employed spores of the public health significant anaerobic microorganism

  6. Coronal temperature profiles obtained from kinetic models and from coronal brightness measurements obtained during solar eclipses

    CERN Document Server

    Pierrard, V; Lemaire, J F

    2012-01-01

    Coronal density, temperature and heat flux distributions for the equatorial and polar corona have been deduced by Lemaire [2012] from Saito's model of averaged coronal white light (WL) brightness and polarization observations. They are compared with those determined from a kinetic collisionless/exospheric model of the solar corona. This comparison indicates rather similar distributions at large radial distances (> 7 Rs) in the collisionless region. However, rather important differences are found close to the Sun in the acceleration region of the solar wind. The exospheric heat flux is directed away from the Sun, while that inferred from all WL coronal observations is in the opposite direction, i.e., conducting heat from the inner corona toward the chromosphere. This could indicate that the source of coronal heating rate extends up into the inner corona where it maximizes at r > 1.5 Rs well above the transition region.

  7. Nonlinear propagation of Alfven waves driven by observed photospheric motions: Application to the coronal heating and spicule formation

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2010-01-01

    We have performed MHD simulations of Alfven wave propagation along an open flux tube in the solar atmosphere. In our numerical model, Alfven waves are generated by the photospheric granular motion. As the wave generator, we used a derived temporal spectrum of the photospheric granular motion from G-band movies of Hinode/SOT. It is shown that the total energy flux at the corona becomes larger and the transition region height becomes higher in the case when we use the observed spectrum rather than white/pink noise spectrum as the wave generator. This difference can be explained by the Alfven wave resonance between the photosphere and the transition region. After performing Fourier analysis on our numerical results, we have found that the region between the photosphere and the transition region becomes an Alfven wave resonant cavity. We have confirmed that there are at least three resonant frequencies, 1, 3 and 5 mHz, in our numerical model. Alfven wave resonance is one of the most effective mechanisms to explai...

  8. Slipping magnetic reconnection in coronal loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulanier, Guillaume; Golub, Leon; Deluca, Edward E; Cirtain, Jonathan W; Kano, Ryouhei; Lundquist, Loraine L; Narukage, Noriyuki; Sakao, Taro; Weber, Mark A

    2007-12-07

    Magnetic reconnection of solar coronal loops is the main process that causes solar flares and possibly coronal heating. In the standard model, magnetic field lines break and reconnect instantaneously at places where the field mapping is discontinuous. However, another mode may operate where the magnetic field mapping is continuous but shows steep gradients: The field lines may slip across each other. Soft x-ray observations of fast bidirectional motions of coronal loops, observed by the Hinode spacecraft, support the existence of this slipping magnetic reconnection regime in the Sun's corona. This basic process should be considered when interpreting reconnection, both on the Sun and in laboratory-based plasma experiments.

  9. Revealing the complex conduction heat transfer mechanism of nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergis, A; Hardalupas, Y

    2015-12-01

    Nanofluids are two-phase mixtures consisting of small percentages of nanoparticles (sub 1-10 %vol) inside a carrier fluid. The typical size of nanoparticles is less than 100 nm. These fluids have been exhibiting experimentally a significant increase of thermal performance compared to the corresponding carrier fluids, which cannot be explained using the classical thermodynamic theory. This study deciphers the thermal heat transfer mechanism for the conductive heat transfer mode via a molecular dynamics simulation code. The current findings are the first of their kind and conflict with the proposed theories for heat transfer propagation through micron-sized slurries and pure matter. The authors provide evidence of a complex new type of heat transfer mechanism, which explains the observed abnormal heat transfer augmentation. The new mechanism appears to unite a number of popular speculations for the thermal heat transfer mechanism employed by nanofluids as predicted by the majority of the researchers of the field into a single one. The constituents of the increased diffusivity of the nanoparticle can be attributed to mismatching of the local temperature profiles between parts of the surface of the solid and the fluid resulting in increased local thermophoretic effects. These effects affect the region surrounding the solid manifesting interfacial layer phenomena (Kapitza resistance). In this region, the activity of the fluid and the interactions between the fluid and the nanoparticle are elevated. Isotropic increased nanoparticle mobility is manifested as enhanced Brownian motion and diffusion effects.

  10. Mechanical ventilation with heat recovery in cold climates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Jesper; Rose, Jørgen; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    like the Northern Europe or in arctic climate like in Greenland or Alaska these ventilation systems will typically face problems with ice formation in the heat exchanger. When the warm humid room air comes in contact with the cold surfaces inside the exchanger (cooled by the outside air), the moisture......Building ventilation is necessary to achieve a healthy and comfortable indoor environment, but as energy prices continue to rise it is necessary to reduce the energy consumption. Using mechanical ventilation with heat recovery reduces the ventilation heat loss significantly, but in cold climates...... freezes to ice. The analysis of measurements from existing ventilation systems with heat recovery used in single-family houses in Denmark and a test of a standard heat recovery unit in the laboratory have clearly shown that this problem occurs when the outdoor temperature gets below approximately –5º...

  11. Development of a hybrid chemical/mechanical heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzyll, Lawrence R.; Silvestri, John J.; Scaringe, Robert P.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the current development status of a hybrid chemical/mechanical heat pump for low-lift applications. The heat pump provides electronics cooling by evaporating a pure refrigerant from an absorbent/refrigerant mixture in a generator/cold plate. The current development focused on evaluation of absorbent/refrigerant pairs, corrosion testing, pump and compressor design, and electronic cold plate design. Two cycle configurations were considered. The first configuration utilized a standard mechanical compressor and pump. The second cycle configuration investigated pumps and compressors with non-moving parts. An innovative generator/cold plate design is also presented. The development to date shows that this cycle has about the same performance as standard vapor compression heat pumps with standard refrigerants but may have some performance and reliability advantages over vapor compression heat pumps.

  12. Development of a hybrid chemical/mechanical heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzyll, Lawrence R.; Silvestri, John J.; Scaringe, Robert P.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the current development status of a hybrid chemical/mechanical heat pump for low-lift applications. The heat pump provides electronics cooling by evaporating a pure refrigerant from an absorbent/refrigerant mixture in a generator/cold plate. The current development focused on evaluation of absorbent/refrigerant pairs, corrosion testing, pump and compressor design, and electronic cold plate design. Two cycle configurations were considered. The first configuration utilized a standard mechanical compressor and pump. The second cycle configuration investigated pumps and compressors with non-moving parts. An innovative generator/cold plate design is also presented. The development to date shows that this cycle has about the same performance as standard vapor compression heat pumps with standard refrigerants but may have some performance and reliability advantages over vapor compression heat pumps.

  13. Mechanical analysis of a heat-shock induced developmental defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Sarah M.; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2014-03-01

    Embryonic development in Drosophila is a complex process involving coordinated movements of mechanically interacting tissues. Perturbing this system with a transient heat shock can result in a number of developmental defects. In particular, a heat shock applied during the earliest morphogenetic movements of gastrulation can lead to apparent recovery, but then subsequent morphogenetic failure 5-6 hours later during germ band retraction. The process of germ band retraction requires an intact amnioserosa - a single layered extra-embryonic epithelial tissue - and heat shock at gastrulation can induce the later opening of holes in the amnioserosa. These holes are highly correlated with failures of germ band retraction. These holes could be caused by a combination of mechanical weakness in the amnioserosa or local increases in mechanical stress. Here, we assess the role of mechanical stress using confocal imaging to compare cell and tissue morphology in the amnioserosa of normal and heat-shocked embryos and laser hole drilling to map the stress field around the times and locations at which heat-shock induced holes open.

  14. Mechanisms of heat transport across a nano-scale gap in heat assisted magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2012-06-01

    This paper compares different mechanisms of heat transport across nano-scale gaps and discusses the role of electromagnetic phenomena in heat transport in general nano-scale layered structures. The results of the analysis suggest that heat transfer across sub-5 nm gaps like that appearing in prototypes of heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) systems is dominated by direct intermolecular interactions between the separated bodies and is little affected by electromagnetic radiation. The analysis further suggests that local heating for HAMR with sub-5 nm spacing can be more efficiently achieved by a Joule heater that is simpler to fabricate than laser-based optical systems and is less destructive for the nano-scale transducers than laser radiation, which may lead to their structural damage and short duration life of nanoscale transducers.

  15. Mechanical ventilation with heat recovery in arctic climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Jesper; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical ventilations systems with highly effective heat recovery units in arctic climate have problems with condensing water from the extracted humid indoor air. If the condensing water freezes to ice in the heat recovery unit, the airflow rate will quickly diminish due to the increasing...... pressure drop. Preheating the inlet air (outdoor air) to a temperature just above 0ºC is typically used to solve the problem. To minimize the energy cost, a more efficient solution to the problem is therefore desirable. In this project a new design of a heat recovery unit has been developed to the low......-energy house in Sisimiut, which is capable of continuously defrosting itself. The disadvantage of the unit is that it is quite big compared with other units. In this paper the new heat recovery unit is described and laboratory measurements are presented showing that the unit is capable of continuously...

  16. MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODELING OF CORONAL RAIN DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-07-10

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  17. Heat transfer mechanisms in bubbly Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Presperetti, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The heat transfer mechanism in Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a liquid with a mean temperature close to its boiling point is studied through numerical simulations with pointlike vapor bubbles, which are allowed to grow or shrink through evaporation and condensation and which act back on the flow both

  18. Coronal ``Wave'': Magnetic Footprint of a Coronal Mass Ejection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.; Harra, Louise K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Démoulin, Pascal

    2007-02-01

    We investigate the properties of two ``classical'' EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) coronal waves. The two source regions of the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) possess opposite helicities, and the coronal waves display rotations in opposite senses. We observe deep core dimmings near the flare site and also widespread diffuse dimming, accompanying the expansion of the EIT wave. We also report a new property of these EIT waves, namely, that they display dual brightenings: persistent ones at the outermost edge of the core dimming regions and simultaneously diffuse brightenings constituting the leading edge of the coronal wave, surrounding the expanding diffuse dimmings. We show that such behavior is consistent with a diffuse EIT wave being the magnetic footprint of a CME. We propose a new mechanism where driven magnetic reconnections between the skirt of the expanding CME magnetic field and quiet-Sun magnetic loops generate the observed bright diffuse front. The dual brightenings and the widespread diffuse dimming are identified as innate characteristics of this process.

  19. A Solar Coronal Jet Event Triggers A Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiajia; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Kai; Pan, Zonghao; Wang, S

    2015-01-01

    We present the multi-point and multi-wavelength observation and analysis on a solar coronal jet and coronal mass ejection (CME) event in this paper. Employing the GCS model, we obtained the real (three-dimensional) heliocentric distance and direction of the CME and found it propagate in a high speed over 1000 km/s . The jet erupted before and shared the same source region with the CME. The temporal and spacial relation- ship between them guide us the possibility that the jet triggered the CME and became its core. This scenario could promisingly enrich our understanding on the triggering mechanism of coronal mass ejections and their relations with coronal large-scale jets. On the other hand, the magnetic field configuration of the source region observed by the SDO/HMI instrument and the off- limb inverse Y-shaped configuration observed by SDO/AIA 171 A passband, together provide the first detailed observation on the three-dimensional reconnection process of large-scale jets as simulated in Pariat et al. 2009. ...

  20. Coronal influence on dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    We report on turbulent dynamo simulations in a spherical wedge with an outer coronal layer. We apply a two-layer model where the lower layer represents the convection zone and the upper layer the solar corona. This setup is used to study the coronal influence on the dynamo action beneath the surface. Increasing the radial coronal extent gradually to three times the solar radius and changing the magnetic Reynolds number, we find that dynamo action benefits from the additional coronal extent in terms of higher magnetic energy in the saturated stage. The flux of magnetic helicity can play an important role in this context.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Heat Exchanger Tube Materials at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Sören; Zajac, Jozefa; Ekström, Hans-Erik

    Since automotive heat exchangers are operated at elevated temperatures and under varying pressures, both static and dynamic mechanical properties should be known at the relevant temperatures. We have collected elevated-temperature tensile test data, elevated-temperature stress amplitude-fatigue life data, and creep-rupture data in a systematic fashion over the past years. For thin, soft, and braze-simulated heat exchanger tube materials tested inside closed furnaces, none of the well-established methods for crack detection and observation can be applied. In our contribution, we present a simple statistical method to estimate the time required for crack initiation.

  2. Flow mechanism and heat transfer enhancement in longitudinal-flow tube bundle of shell-and-tube heat exchanger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The flow disturbance and heat transfer mechanism in the tube bundle of rod baffle shell-and-tube heat exchanger were analyzed, on the basis of which and combined with the concept of heat transfer enhancement in the core flow, a new type of shell-and-tube heat exchanger with combination of rod and van type spoiler was designed. Corresponding mathematical and physical models on the shell side about the new type heat exchanger were established, and fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics were numerically analyzed. The simulation results showed that heat transfer coefficient of the new type of heat exchanger approximated to that of rod baffle heat exchanger, but flow pressure drop was much less than the latter, indicating that comprehensive performance of the former is superior to that of the latter. Compared with rod baffle heat exchanger, heat transfer coefficient of the heat exchanger under investigation is higher under same pressure drop, especially under the high Reynolds numbers.

  3. AN MHD AVALANCHE IN A MULTI-THREADED CORONAL LOOP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, A. W.; Cargill, P. J.; Tam, K. V. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Browning, P. K., E-mail: awh@st-andrews.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-20

    For the first time, we demonstrate how an MHD avalanche might occur in a multithreaded coronal loop. Considering 23 non-potential magnetic threads within a loop, we use 3D MHD simulations to show that only one thread needs to be unstable in order to start an avalanche even when the others are below marginal stability. This has significant implications for coronal heating in that it provides for energy dissipation with a trigger mechanism. The instability of the unstable thread follows the evolution determined in many earlier investigations. However, once one stable thread is disrupted, it coalesces with a neighboring thread and this process disrupts other nearby threads. Coalescence with these disrupted threads then occurs leading to the disruption of yet more threads as the avalanche develops. Magnetic energy is released in discrete bursts as the surrounding stable threads are disrupted. The volume integrated heating, as a function of time, shows short spikes suggesting that the temporal form of the heating is more like that of nanoflares than of constant heating.

  4. Evidence for Steady Heating: Observations of an Active Region Core with Hinode and TRACE

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Harry P; Brooks, David H

    2009-01-01

    The timescale for energy release is an important parameter for constraining the coronal heating mechanism. Observations of "warm" coronal loops (~1 MK) have indicated that the heating is impulsive and that coronal plasma is far from equilibrium. In contrast, observations at higher temperatures (~3 MK) have generally been consistent with steady heating models. Previous observations, however, have not been able to exclude the possibility that the high temperature loops are actually composed of many small scale threads that are in various stages of heating and cooling and only appear to be in equilibrium. With new observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode we have the ability to investigate the properties of high temperature coronal plasma in extraordinary detail. We examine the emission in the core of an active region and find three independent lines of evidence for steady heating. We find that the emission observed in XRT is generally steady for hours, with a fluct...

  5. The Mechanisms of Electron Heating and Acceleration during Magnetic Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlin, J T; Swisdak, M

    2014-01-01

    The heating of electrons in collisionless magnetic reconnection is explored in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with non-zero guide fields so that electrons remain magnetized. In this regime electric fields parallel to B accelerate particles directly while those perpendicular to B do so through gradient-B and curvature drifts. The curvature drift drives parallel heating through Fermi reflection while the gradient B drift changes the perpendicular energy through betatron acceleration. We present simulations in which we evaluate each of these mechanisms in space and time in order to quantify their role in electron heating. For a case with a small guide field (20 % of the magnitude of the reconnecting component) the curvature drift is the dominant source of electron heating. However, for a larger guide field (equal to the magnitude of the reconnecting component) electron acceleration by the curvature drift is comparable to that of the parallel electric field. In both cases the heating by the gradient B drift i...

  6. Performance of a hybrid chemical/mechanical heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, John J.; Scaringe, Robert P.; Grzyll, Lawrence R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present the design and preliminary results of the performance of a hybrid chemical/mechanical, low-lift (20 C) heat pump. Studies have indicated that this heat pump has several advantages over the traditional single fluid vapor compression (reverse Rankine) heat pump. Included in these benefits are: 1) increased COPc due to the approximation of the cycle to the Lorenz cycle and due to the availability of the heat of solution, along with the heat of vaporization, to provide cooling; and 2) ease of variation in system cooling capacity by changing the fluid composition. The system performance is predicted for a variety of refrigerant-absorbent pairs. Cooling capacity is determined for systems operating with ammonia as the refrigerant and lithium nitrate and sodium thiocyanate as the absorbents and also with water as the refrigerant and magnesium chloride, potassium hydroxide, lithium bromide, sodium hydroxide, and sulfuric acid as the absorbents. Early indications have shown that the systems operating with water as the refrigerant operate at 2-4 times the capacity of the ammonia-refrigerant-based systems. Using existing working fluids in the proposed innovative design, a coefficient-of-performance improvement of 21 percent is possible when compared to the best vapor compression systems analyzed.

  7. Performance of a hybrid chemical/mechanical heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, John J.; Scaringe, Robert P.; Grzyll, Lawrence R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present the design and preliminary results of the performance of a hybrid chemical/mechanical, low-lift (20 C) heat pump. Studies have indicated that this heat pump has several advantages over the traditional single fluid vapor compression (reverse Rankine) heat pump. Included in these benefits are: 1) increased COPc due to the approximation of the cycle to the Lorenz cycle and due to the availability of the heat of solution, along with the heat of vaporization, to provide cooling; and 2) ease of variation in system cooling capacity by changing the fluid composition. The system performance is predicted for a variety of refrigerant-absorbent pairs. Cooling capacity is determined for systems operating with ammonia as the refrigerant and lithium nitrate and sodium thiocyanate as the absorbents and also with water as the refrigerant and magnesium chloride, potassium hydroxide, lithium bromide, sodium hydroxide, and sulfuric acid as the absorbents. Early indications have shown that the systems operating with water as the refrigerant operate at 2-4 times the capacity of the ammonia-refrigerant-based systems. Using existing working fluids in the proposed innovative design, a coefficient-of-performance improvement of 21 percent is possible when compared to the best vapor compression systems analyzed.

  8. Heat conduction in nanoscale materials: a statistical-mechanics derivation of the local heat flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiantao

    2014-09-01

    We derive a coarse-grained model for heat conduction in nanoscale mechanical systems. Starting with an all-atom description, this approach yields a reduced model, in the form of conservation laws of momentum and energy. The model closure is accomplished by introducing a quasilocal thermodynamic equilibrium, followed by a linear response approximation. Of particular interest is the constitutive relation for the heat flux, which is expressed nonlocally in terms of the spatial and temporal variation of the temperature. Nanowires made of copper and silicon are presented as examples.

  9. Coronal rain in magnetic bipolar weak fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Fang, X.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We intend to investigate the underlying physics for the coronal rain phenomenon in a representative bipolar magnetic field, including the formation and the dynamics of coronal rain blobs. Methods: With the MPI-AMRVAC code, we performed three dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with strong heating localized on footpoints of magnetic loops after a relaxation to quiet solar atmosphere. Results: Progressive cooling and in-situ condensation starts at the loop top due to radiative thermal instability. The first large-scale condensation on the loop top suffers Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes fragmented into smaller blobs. The blobs fall vertically dragging magnetic loops until they reach low-β regions and start to fall along the loops from loop top to loop footpoints. A statistic study of the coronal rain blobs finds that small blobs with masses of less than 1010 g dominate the population. When blobs fall to lower regions along the magnetic loops, they are stretched and develop a non-uniform velocity pattern with an anti-parallel shearing pattern seen to develop along the central axis of the blobs. Synthetic images of simulated coronal rain with Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly well resemble real observations presenting dark falling clumps in hot channels and bright rain blobs in a cool channel. We also find density inhomogeneities during a coronal rain "shower", which reflects the observed multi-stranded nature of coronal rain. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 7 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlburg, R B; Taylor, B D; Obenschain, K

    2016-01-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect, the by now well known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a "byproduct" of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of a coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 Teslas to 0.02 Teslas and lengths from 25000 km to 75000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets...

  11. Solar coronal jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyck, D.

    The solar jets were first observed by SOHO instruments (EIT, LASCO, UVCS) during the previous solar minimum. They were small, fast ejections originating from flaring UV bright points within large polar coronal holes. The obtained data provided us with estimates of the jet plasma conditions, dynamics, evolution of the electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed ionization state. To follow the polar jets through the solar cycle a special SOHO Joint Observing Program (JOP 155) was designed. It involves a number of SOHO instruments (EIT, CDS, UVCS, LASCO) as well as TRACE. The coordinated observations have been carried out since April 2002. The data enabled to identify counterparts of the 1996-1998 solar minimum jets. Their frequency of several events per day appear comparable to the frequency from the previous solar minimum. The jets are believed to be triggered by field line reconnection between emerging magnetic dipole and pre-existing unipolar field. Existing models predict that the hot jet is formed together with another jet of a cool material. The particular goal of the coordinated SOHO and TRACE observations was to look for possible association of the hot and cool plasma ejections. Currently there is observational evidence that supports these models.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Heat Affected Zone of High Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefcikova, K.; Brtnik, T.; Dolejs, J.; Keltamaki, K.; Topilla, R.

    2015-11-01

    High Strength Steels became more popular as a construction material during last decade because of their increased availability and affordability. On the other hand, even though general use of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) is expanding, the wide utilization is limited because of insufficient information about their behaviour in structures. The most widely used technique for joining steels is fusion welding. The welding process has an influence not only on the welded connection but on the area near this connection, the so-called heat affected zone, as well. For that reason it is very important to be able to determine the properties in the heat affected zone (HAZ). This area of investigation is being continuously developed in dependence on significant progress in material production, especially regarding new types of steels available. There are currently several types of AHSS on the world market. Two most widely used processes for AHSS production are Thermo-Mechanically Controlled Processing (TMCP) and Quenching in connection with Tempering. In the presented study, TMCP and QC steels grade S960 were investigated. The study is focused on the changes of strength, ductility, hardness and impact strength in heat affected zone based on the used amount of heat input.

  13. Heat transfer mechanisms in poplar wood undergoing torrefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sule, Idris O.; Mahmud, Shohel; Dutta, Animesh; Tasnim, Syeda Humaira

    2016-03-01

    Torrefaction, a thermal treatment process of biomass, has been proved to improve biomass combustible properties. Torrefaction is defined as a thermochemical process in reduced oxygen condition and at temperature range from 200 to 300 °C for shorter residence time whereby energy yield is maximized, can be a bridging technology that can lead the conventional system (e.g. coal-fired plants) towards a sustainable energy system. In efforts to develop a commercial operable torrefaction reactor, the present study examines the minimum input condition at which biomass is torrefied and explores the heat transfer mechanisms during torrefaction in poplar wood samples. The heat transfer through the wood sample is numerically modeled and analyzed. Each poplar wood is torrefied at temperature of 250, 270, and 300 °C. The experimental study shows that the 270 °C-treatment can be deduced as the optimal input condition for torrefaction of poplar wood. A good understanding of heat transfer mechanisms can facilitate the upscaling and downscaling of torrefaction process equipment to fit the feedstock input criteria and can help to develop treatment input specifications that can maximize process efficiency.

  14. Study on the specific heat of wood by statistical mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    From the microstructure of wood, theoretical expressions of the wood specific heat were derived by statistical mechanics. With the theoretical expressions derived, the theoretical values of specific heat for 33 tree species, with different moisture contents and under varied temperature conditions were calculated and comparison was also made to the experimental values under the same conditions. The results showed that the maximum error and mean error by the theoretical expressions of this paper are only 7.8% and 2.5% respectively, while those error of the theoretical values for 33 tree species calculated with Dunlap's empiric equation were 15.2% (max.) and 9.3% (mean), and forКириллов empiric equation, they were 20% (max.) and 11% (mean).

  15. The temporal evolution of coronal loops observed by GOES-SXI

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes, M C L; Mandrini, C H

    2006-01-01

    We study the temporal evolution of coronal loops using data from the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) on board of GOES-12. This instrument allows us to follow in detail the full lifetime of coronal loops. The observed light curves suggest three somewhat distinct evolutionary phases: rise, main, and decay. The durations and characteristic timescales of these phases are much longer than a cooling time and indicate that the loop-averaged heating rate increases slowly, reaches a maintenance level, and then decreases slowly. This suggests that a single heating mechanism operates for the entire lifetime of the loop. For monolithic loops, the loop-averaged heating rate is the intrinsic energy release rate of the heating mechanism. For loops that are bundles of impulsively heated strands, it is an indication of the frequency of occurrence of individual heating events, or nanoflares. We show that the timescale of the loop-averaged heating rate is proportional to the timescale of the observed intensity variation. The ratios of...

  16. Unravelling the Components of a Multi-thermal Coronal Loop using Magnetohydrodynamic Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Prasad, S.; Jess, D. B.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Banerjee, D.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal loops, constituting the basic building blocks of the active Sun, serve as primary targets to help understand the mechanisms responsible for maintaining multi-million Kelvin temperatures in the solar and stellar coronae. Despite significant advances in observations and theory, our knowledge on the fundamental properties of these structures is limited. Here, we present unprecedented observations of accelerating slow magnetoacoustic waves along a coronal loop that show differential propagation speeds in two distinct temperature channels, revealing the multi-stranded and multithermal nature of the loop. Utilizing the observed speeds and employing nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolations, we derive the actual temperature variation along the loop in both channels, and thus are able to resolve two individual components of the multithermal loop for the first time. The obtained positive temperature gradients indicate uniform heating along the loop, rather than isolated footpoint heating.

  17. Unravelling the components of a multi-thermal coronal loop using magnetohydrodynamic seismology

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, S Krishna; Klimchuk, J A; Banerjee, D

    2016-01-01

    Coronal loops, constituting the basic building blocks of the active Sun, serve as primary targets to help understand the mechanisms responsible for maintaining multi-million Kelvin temperatures in the solar and stellar coronae. Despite significant advances in observations and theory, our knowledge on the fundamental properties of these structures is limited. Here, we present unprecedented observations of accelerating slow magnetoacoustic waves along a coronal loop that show differential propagation speeds in two distinct temperature channels, revealing the multi-stranded and multi-thermal nature of the loop. Utilizing the observed speeds and employing nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolations, we derive the actual temperature variation along the loop in both channels, and thus are able to resolve two individual components of the multi-thermal loop for the first time. The obtained positive temperature gradients indicate uniform heating along the loop, rather than isolated footpoint heating.

  18. Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, Nancy; Joselyn, Jo Ann; Feynman, Joan

    The early 1970's can be said to mark the beginning of The Enlightenment in the history of the Space Age, literally as well as by analogy to European history. Instruments blinded by Earth's atmosphere were lifted above and, for the first time, saw clearly and continuously the ethereal white light and sparkling x-rays from the solar corona. From these two bands of the light spectrum came images of coronal mass ejections and coronal holes, respectively. But whereas coronal holes were immediately identified as the source of high-speed solar wind streams, at first coronal mass ejections were greeted only by a sense of wonder. It took years of research to identify their signatures in the solar wind before the fastest ones could be identified with the well-known shock disturbances that cause the most violent space storms.

  19. Coronal "wave": Magnetic Footprint Of A Cme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Gemma; Harra, L. K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Demoulin, P.; Wuelser, J.

    2007-05-01

    We propose a new mechanism for the generation of "EUV coronal waves". This work is based on new analysis of data from SOHO/EIT, SOHO/MDI & STEREO/EUVI. Although first observed in 1997, the interpretation of coronal waves as flare-induced or CME-driven remains a debated topic. We investigate the properties of two "classical" SOHO/EIT coronal waves in detail. The source regions of the associated CMEs possess opposite helicities & the coronal waves display rotations in opposite senses. We observe deep dimmings near the flare site & also widespread diffuse dimming, accompanying the expansion of the EIT wave. We report a new property of these EIT waves, namely, that they display dual brightenings: persistent ones at the outermost edge of the core dimming regions & simultaneously diffuse brightenings constituting the leading edge of the coronal wave, surrounding the expanding diffuse dimmings. We show that such behaviour is consistent with a diffuse EIT wave being the magnetic footprint of a CME. We propose a new mechanism where driven magnetic reconnections between the skirt of the expanding CME & quiet-Sun magnetic loops generate the observed bright diffuse front. The dual brightenings & widespread diffuse dimming are identified as innate characteristics of this process. In addition we present some of the first analysis of a STEREO/EUVI limb coronal wave. We show how the evolution of the diffuse bright front & dimmings can be understood in terms of the model described above. We show that an apparently stationary part of the bright front can be understood in terms of magnetic interchange reconnections between the expanding CME & the "open" magnetic field of a low-latitude coronal hole. We use both the SOHO/EIT & STEREO/EUVI events to demonstrate that through successive reconnections, this new model provides a natural mechanism via which CMEs can become large-scale in the lower corona.

  20. Simulations of Emerging Magnetic Flux. II. The Formation of Unstable Coronal Flux Ropes and the Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a twisted convection zone flux tube into a pre-existing coronal dipole field. As in previous simulations, following the partial emergence of the sub-surface flux into the corona, a combination of vortical motions and internal magnetic reconnection forms a coronal flux rope. Then, in the simulations presented here, external reconnection between the emerging field and the pre-existing dipole coronal field allows further expansion of the coronal flux rope into the corona. After sufficient expansion, internal reconnection occurs beneath the coronal flux rope axis, and the flux rope erupts up to the top boundary of the simulation domain (approximately 36 Mm above the surface).We find that the presence of a pre-existing field, orientated in a direction to facilitate reconnection with the emerging field, is vital to the fast rise of the coronal flux rope. The simulations shown in this paper are able to self-consistently create many of the surface and coronal signatures used by coronal mass ejection (CME) models. These signatures include surface shearing and rotational motions, quadrupolar geometry above the surface, central sheared arcades reconnecting with oppositely orientated overlying dipole fields, the formation of coronal flux ropes underlying potential coronal field, and internal reconnection which resembles the classical flare reconnection scenario. This suggests that proposed mechanisms for the initiation of a CME, such as "magnetic breakout," are operating during the emergence of new active regions.

  1. 太阳光球磁亮点的基本特征研究及其对日冕加热的贡献%Studies of Magnetic Bright Points in the Photosphere and Their Contribution to the Coronal Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳霄; 林隽; 吴宁

    2014-01-01

    flows. The temperature is an important parameter of the magnetic bright point as well. Studies have indicated that the whole volume of the bright point does not necessarily fill with magnetic field. Instead the magnetic field is confined in a fraction of the bright point volume. The temperature in the region filled with field could be 103 K higher than that without field, and displayed a weak dependence on the strength of the field. On the other hand, the temperature in the field-free region does not show such a dependence. Most of the numerical simulations and observations show that the formation mechanism of the bright points is related to the process of the convective collapse. Namely, magnetic bright points evolve as follows: strong plasma down flows in the flux tube, magnetic field strengthens, and then magnetic bright points appear. Some simulations and observations revealed that strong downflows bounce back when they reach the bottom of the flux tubes and turn into strong upflows. The upflow may develop a shock front that could be energetic enough to bring the chromospheric matter into the corona producing spicules. At the same time the flow move upward, the flux tube undergoes a kind of instability associated with the convective collapse. The upflowing gas leads to the magnetic field weakening in the flux tube, the gas density and the temperature increasing, and the flux tube eventually splits. In theory, Alfv´en waves are found to be excited by the oscillation of the flux tubes in the photosphere if the footpoints of the flux tubes move at a velocity of 1∼2 km·s-1. The Alfv´en wave is invoked in the photosphere and travels upward into the chromosphere and the corona, then dissipates its energy heating the chromosphere and the corona. However, as we have known, the Alfv´en wave has not been detected in the photosphere yet. Whether or not the coronal magnetic field footpoints in the photosphere could move at speed of 1∼2 km·s-1 is an important criterion

  2. Stellar Coronal Response to Differential Rotation and Flux Emergence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibb, G P S; Jardine, M M; Yeates, A R

    2016-01-01

    We perform a numerical parameter study to determine what effect varying differential rotation and flux emergence has on a star's non-potential coronal magnetic field. In particular we consider the effects on the star's surface magnetic flux, open magnetic flux, mean azimuthal field strength, coronal free magnetic energy, coronal heating and flux rope eruptions. To do this, we apply a magnetic flux transport model to describe the photospheric evolution, and couple this to the non-potential coronal evolution using a magnetofrictional technique. A flux emergence model is applied to add new magnetic flux onto the photosphere and into the corona. The parameters of this flux emergence model are derived from the solar flux emergence profile, however the rate of emergence can be increased to represent higher flux emergence rates than the Sun's. Overall we find that flux emergence has a greater effect on the non-potential coronal properties compared to differential rotation, with all the aforementioned properties incr...

  3. Physics of laser fusion. Vol. I. Theory of the coronal plasma in laser-fusion targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, C.E.

    1981-12-01

    This monograph deals with the physics of the coronal region in laser fusion targets. The corona consists of hot plasma which has been evaporated from the initially solid target during laser heating. It is in the corona that the laser light is absorbed by the target, and the resulting thermal energy is conducted toward cold high-density regions, where ablation occurs. The topics to be discussed are theoretical mechanisms for laser light absorption and reflection, hot-electron production, and the physics of heat conduction in laser-produced plasmas. An accompanying monograph by H. Ahlstrom (Vol.II) reviews the facilities, diagnostics, and data from recent laser fusion experiments.

  4. Observing coronal nanoflares in active region moss

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; DeLuca, Ed; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial (~0.3-0.4 arcsec) and temporal (5.5s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to ~15s, significantly shorter than the minute scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by SDO/AIA in the 94A channel, and by Hinode/XRT. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few $10^{23}rg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C...

  5. Experimental investigation and mechanism of critical heat flux enhancement in pool boiling heat transfer with nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatchi, R.; Venkatachalapathy, S.; Nithya, C.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is synthesized from graphite using modified Hummer and chemical reduction methods. Various characterizations techniques are carried out to study the in-plane crystallite size, number of layers, presence of functional groups and surface morphology. Different concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, and 0.3 g/l of rGO/water nanofluids are prepared by dispersing the flakes in DI water. The colloidal stability of 0.3 g/l concentration is measured after 5 days using Zetasizer and found to be stable. The rGO/water nanofluids are then used to study the effect on the enhancement of critical heat flux (CHF) in pool boiling heat transfer. Results indicate an enhancement in CHF ranging from 145 to 245 % for the tested concentrations. The mechanisms of CHF enhancement are analyzed based on surface wettability, surface roughness, and porous layer thickness. The macrolayer dryout model sufficiently supports the mechanism of CHF enhancement of thin wire with rGO deposits, which is not reported yet.

  6. A SOLAR CORONAL JET EVENT TRIGGERS A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Kai; Pan, Zonghao; Wang, S. [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Earh and Space Science School, University of Science and Technology of China, No. 96, JinZhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-11-10

    In this paper, we present multi-point, multi-wavelength observations and analysis of a solar coronal jet and coronal mass ejection (CME) event. Employing the GCS model, we obtained the real (three-dimensional) heliocentric distance and direction of the CME and found it to propagate at a high speed of over 1000 km s{sup −1}. The jet erupted before the CME and shared the same source region. The temporal and spacial relationship between these two events lead us to the possibility that the jet triggered the CME and became its core. This scenario hold the promise of enriching our understanding of the triggering mechanism of CMEs and their relations to coronal large-scale jets. On the other hand, the magnetic field configuration of the source region observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/HMI instrument along with the off-limb inverse Y-shaped configuration observed by SDO/AIA in the 171 Å passband provide the first detailed observation of the three-dimensional reconnection process of a large-scale jet as simulated in Pariat et al. The eruption process of the jet highlights the importance of filament-like material during the eruption of not only small-scale X-ray jets, but likely also of large-scale EUV jets. Based on our observations and analysis, we propose the most probable mechanism for the whole event, with a blob structure overlaying the three-dimensional structure of the jet, to describe the interaction between the jet and the CME.

  7. Thermal mechanical analysis of applications with internal heat generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Srisharan Garg

    control blade, spatial variations in temperature within the control blade occur from the non-uniform heat generation within the BORAL as a result of the non-uniform thermal neutron flux along the longitudinal direction when the control blade is partially withdrawn. There is also variation in the heating profile through the thickness and about the circumferential width of the control blade. Mathematical curve-fits are generated for the non-uniform volumetric heat generation profile caused by the thermal neutron absorption and the functions are applied as heating conditions within a finite element model of the control blade built using the commercial finite element code Abaqus FEA. The finite element model is solved as a fully coupled thermal mechanical problem as in the case of the annular target. The resulting deflection is compared with the channel gap to determine if there is a significant risk of the control blade binding during reactor operation. Hence, this dissertation will consist of two sections. The first section will seek to present the thermal and structural safety analyses of the annular targets for the production of molybdenum-99. Since there hasn't been any detailed, documented, study on these annular targets in the past, the work complied in this dissertation will help to understand the thermal-mechanical behavior and failure margins of the target during in-vessel irradiation. As the work presented in this dissertation provides a general performance analysis envelope for the annular target, the tools developed in the process can also be used as useful references for future analyses that are specific to any reactor. The numerical analysis approach adopted and the analytical models developed, can also be applied to other applications, outside the Mo-99 project domain, where internal heat generation exists such as in electronic components and nuclear reactor control blades. The second section will focus on estimating the thermally induced deflection and hence

  8. Condensate removal mechanisms in a constrained vapor bubble heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ling; Wang, Yingxin; Wayner, Peter C; Plawsky, Joel L

    2002-10-01

    Microgravity experiments on the constrained vapor bubble heat exchanger (CVB) are being developed for the space station. Herein, ground-based experimental studies on condensate removal in the condenser region of the vertical CVB were conducted and the mechanism of condensate removal in microgravity was found to be the capillary force. The effects of curvature and contact angle on the driving forces for condensate removal is studied. The Nusselt correlations are derived for the film condensation and the flow from the drop to the meniscus at the moment of merging. These new correlations scale as forced convection with h proportional to L(1/2) or h proportional to L(1/2)(cd). For the partially wetting ethanol system studied, the heat transfer coefficient for film condensation was found to be 4.25 x 10(4) W/m(2)K; for dropwise condensation at moment of merging it was found to be 9.64 x 10(4) W/m(2)K; and for single drops it was found to be 1.33 x 10(5) W/m(2)K.

  9. Self modulation of slow magnetosonic waves and turbulence generation in solar coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R. P.; Sharma, Prachi; Yadav, Nitin

    2017-01-01

    A mechanism based on turbulence for solar coronal heating has been introduced in the present work. Turbulence is considered as an important tool for heating. In the present work, turbulence generation takes place due to the nonlinear interaction of the magnetohydrodynamic waves. Slow magnetosonic waves get localized due to the density perturbations, which are assumed to be present in the background. These perturbations are associated with the low frequency slow magnetosonic waves that are supposed to be propagating in the coronal environment. The dynamics of high (0.01 Hz) and low frequency (0.001 Hz) slow magnetosonic waves have been studied by the two-fluid model and simulate numerically with the pseudo-spectral method. The power law index having a value of nearly -5/3 is obtained, which represents Kolmogorov scaling before the first break point. Based on the fact that the energy flux calculated from the Kolmogorov scaling is sufficient to heat the coronal loops as mentioned in the literature, the proposed interaction can be considered a source for turbulence generation having Kolmogorov scaling.

  10. Association of solar coronal loops to photospheric magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep Chitta, Lakshmi; Peter, Hardi; Solanki, Sami

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic connectivity and its evolution from the solar photosphere to the corona will play a crucial role in the energetics of the solar atmosphere. To explore this connectivity, we use high spatial resolution magnetic field observations of an active region from the balloon-borne SUNRISE telescope, in combination with the observations of coronal loops imaged in extreme ultraviolet by SDO/AIA. We show that photospheric magnetic field at the base of coronal loops is rapidly evolving through small-scale flux emergence and cancellation events with rates on the order of 10^15 Mx/s. When observed at high spatial resolution better than 0.5 arcsec, we find that basically all coronal loops considered so far are rooted in the photosphere above small-scale opposite polarity magnetic field patches. In the photosphere, the magnetic field threading coronal loops is interacting with opposite polarity parasitic magnetic concentrations leading to dynamic signatures in the upper atmosphere. Chromospheric small-scale jets aligned to coronal loops are observed at these locations. We will present preliminary results from 3D MHD simulations of coronal loops driven by realistic magneto-convection and discuss what role the magnetic interactions at coronal loop footpoints could play in the evolution of coronal loops and their heating.

  11. Global Coronal Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, P F

    2016-01-01

    After the {\\em Solar and Heliospheric Observatory} ({\\em SOHO}) was launched in 1996, the aboard Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) observed a global coronal wave phenomenon, which was initially named "EIT wave" after the telescope. The bright fronts are immediately followed by expanding dimmings. It has been shown that the brightenings and dimmings are mainly due to plasma density increase and depletion, respectively. Such a spectacular phenomenon sparked long-lasting interest and debates. The debates were concentrated on two topics, one is about the driving source, and the other is about the nature of this wavelike phenomenon. The controversies are most probably because there may exist two types of large-scale coronal waves that were not well resolved before the {\\em Solar Dynamics Observatory} ({\\em SDO}) was launched: one is a piston-driven shock wave straddling over the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME), and the other is an apparently propagating front, which may correspond to the CME frontal...

  12. Observing the formation of flare-driven coronal rain

    OpenAIRE

    Scullion, E.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Antolin, P.; Wedemeyer, S.; Vissers, G.; E. P. Kontar; Gallagher, P

    2016-01-01

    PA. GV are funded by the European Research Council under the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC grant agreement nr. 291058 Flare-driven coronal rain can manifest from rapidly cooled plasma condensations near coronal loop-tops in thermally unstable post-flare arcades. We detect 5 phases that characterise the post-flare decay:heating, evaporation, conductive cooling dominance for ~120 s, radiative/ enthalpy cooling dominance for ~4700 s and finally catastrophic ...

  13. Are Spicules the Primary Source of Hot Coronal Plasma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The recent discovery of Type II spicules has generated considerable excitement. It has even been suggested that these ejections can account for a majority of the hot plasma observed in the corona, thus obviating the need for "coronal" heating. If this is the case, however, then there should be observational consequences. We have begun to examine some of these consequences and find reason to question the idea that spicules are the primary source of hot coronal plasma.

  14. COUPLED ELECTRICAL-THERMAL MECHANICAL ANALYSIS FOR ELECTRICAL/LASER HEATING ASSISTED BLANKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xianghe; QIN Yi

    2006-01-01

    A coupled electrical-thermal-mechanical analysis is conducted for electrical/laser heating assisted blanking. Two novel localized-heating methods, electrical heating and laser-heating, recently proposed for small-part blanking, are investigated with FE simulations. Results show that electrical heating would result in an advantageous distribution of temperature in a 316 stainless steel work-material. A desired temperature distribution may also be achievable for a copper work-material,if laser beam is used. Both electrical heating and laser-heating enable to reduce the blanking force and increase the aspect ratio achievable by blanking. The simulation also demonstrates that both electrical heating and laser-heating can result in desired temperature-distributions at sufficiently high heating-rates, ease of implementation and application. Comparatively, electrical heating could generate more favorable temperature distribution for small-part blanking.

  15. The relationship between the magnetic field and the coronal activities in the polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, Masumi

    The image of the polar region of the sun is changing based on the observations taken by the three telescopes aboard the Hinode satellite. Based on the data of Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard Hinode, Tsuneta et al. (2007) reported that there are many localized magnetic poles in the polar region, and the magnetic strength of the magnetic poles is over thousand Gauss. They called the strong magnetic pole in the polar region "kG-pathce". And, Cirtain, et al. (2007) and Savcheva, et al. (2007) presented that the occurrence rate of X-ray jets in the polar region is very high and 10 events/hour. Their result was obtained by the high resolution observations by X-ray Telescope (XRT) aboard Hinode. These results are very important for understanding the fast solar wind that blows from the polar region. On the other hand, in order to understand the activities in the polar region, it is very important to investigate the relationship between the magnetic environments and the coronal structures/activities. In the paper, for the purpose, we aligned the photospheric images (G-band, Stoke-IQUV of FeI), the chromospheric images (Ca II H line, Stokes-V of Na) and coronal images (X-ray) obtained by Hinode, and investigate the relationship. Basically, the co-alignment process was done based on the alignment information of the telescopes reported by Shimizu et al. (2007). And, we aligned the images using the curve of the solar limb, finally. As the result of the co-alignments, we found the following things. 1) On most kG-patches in the polar coronal hole, there is any coronal structure. 2) X-ray jets in the polar coronal hole are not always associated with the kG-patches. Some X-ray jets are associated with very weak magnetic field. And, the jets are strongly associated with the emerging/cancelling magnetic flux. The first one suggests that the coronal heating is not effective only in the magnetic field strong, such as the center of the sunspot. The second result indicates that the

  16. Indoor temperatures for calculating room heat loss and heating capacity of radiant heating systems combined with mechanical ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Fang, Lei;

    2016-01-01

    system were determined according to the principle of heat transfer. A model to predict indoor temperatures in the room was proposed, and it was determined that the predicted indoor temperatures agreed well with the measured data. Qualitative analyses of the effects of heated surface temperature and air...... change rates on the indoor temperatures were performed using the proposed model. When heated surface temperatures and air change rates were from 21.0 to 29.0 degrees C and from 0.5 to 4.0 h-1, the indoor temperatures for calculating the transmission heat loss and ventilation heat loss were between 20.......8% for calculating the transmission heat loss and ventilation heat loss, respectively, and between 16.0% and 17.4% for calculating the heating capacity of the hybrid system. Due to large relative calculation errors, it is necessary to consider the effect of heated surface and cool supply air on indoor temperatures...

  17. A Two-Fluid, MHD Coronal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.; McComas, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    We describe first results from a numerical two-fluid MHD model of the global structure of the solar Corona. The model is two-fluid in the sense that it accounts for the collisional energy exchange between protons and electrons. As in our single-fluid model, volumetric heat and Momentum sources are required to produce high speed wind from Corona] holes, low speed wind above streamers, and mass fluxes similar to the empirical solar wind. By specifying different proton and electron heating functions we obtain a high proton temperature in the coronal hole and a relatively low proton temperature above the streamer (in comparison with the electron temperature). This is consistent with inferences from SOHO/UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer instrument (UVCS), and with the Ulysses/Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun instrument (SWOOPS) proton and electron temperature measurements which we show from the fast latitude scan. The density in the coronal hole between 2 and 5 solar radii (2 and 5 R(sub S)) is similar to the density reported from SPARTAN 201.-01 measurements by Fisher and Guhathakurta [19941. The proton mass flux scaled to 1 AU is 2.4 x 10(exp 8)/sq cm s, which is consistent with Ulysses observations. Inside the closed field region, the density is sufficiently high so that the simulation gives equal proton and electron temperatures due to the high collision rate. In open field regions (in the coronal hole and above the streamer) the proton and electron temperatures differ by varying amounts. In the streamer the temperature and density are similar to those reported empirically by Li et al. [1998], and the plasma beta is larger than unity everywhere above approx. 1.5 R(sub S), as it is in all other MHD coronal streamer models [e.g., Steinolfson et al., 1982; also G. A. Gary and D. Alexander, Constructing the coronal magnetic field, submitted to Solar Physics, 1998].

  18. [Mechanism of heat transfer in various regions of human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchakov, Iu I; Nozdrachev, A D

    2009-01-01

    The processes of heat transfer in a human body were studied with the use of a mathematical model. It has been shown that only conductive or only convective heat transfer may occur in different body areas. The rate of blood-mediated heat transfer in the presence of blood circulation is many times higher than heat transfer due to temperature gradient; therefore, the convective process prevails over the conductive process. The body core contains a variety of blood vessels, and the bulk of blood concentrates there in the norm. Hence, heat transfer in it is mainly convective. In surface tissues, where the rate of blood circulation is lower and the vasculature has certain specific features, heat transfer is mainly conductive. Hence, the core and surface tissues are absolutely different body zones in terms of heat transfer.

  19. Characterization of Heat Waves in the Sahel and associated mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oueslati, Boutheina; Pohl, Benjamin; Moron, Vincent; Rome, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    Large efforts are made to investigate the heat waves (HW) in developed countries because of their devastating impacts on society, economy and environment. This interest increased after the intense event over Europe during summer 2003. However, HWs are still understudied over developing countries. This is particularly true in West Africa, and especially in the Sahel, where temperatures recurrently reach critical values, such as during the 2010 HW event. Understanding the Sahelian HWs and associated health risks constitute the main objective of ACASIS, a 4-year project funded by the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche. Our work contributes to this project and aims at characterizing the Sahelian HWs and understanding the mechanisms associated with such extreme events. There is no universal definition of a HW event, since it is highly dependent on the sector (human health, agriculture, transport...) and region of interest. In our case, a HW is defined when the heat index of the day and of the night exceeds the 90th percentile for at least 3 consecutive days (Rome et al. 2016, in preparation). This index combines temperature and relative humidity in order to determine the human-perceived equivalent temperature (definition adapted from Steadman, 1979). Intrinsic properties of Sahelian HW are analyzed from the Global Summary of the Day (GSOD) synoptic observations and ERA-interim reanalyses over 1979-2014 during boreal spring seasons (April-May-June), the warmest period of the year in the Central Sahel. ERA-interim captures well the observed interannual variability and seasonal cycle at the regional scale, as well as the 1979-2014 increasing linear trend of springtime HW occurrences in the Sahel. Reanalyses, however, overestimate the duration, spatial extent of HW, and underestimate their intensity. For both GSOD and ERA-interim, we show that, over the last three decades, Sahelian HWs tend to become more frequent, last longer, cover larger areas and reach higher

  20. Standing Slow-Mode Waves in Hot Coronal Loops: Observations, Modeling, and Coronal Seismology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tongjiang

    2010-01-01

    Strongly damped Doppler shift oscillations are observed frequently associated with flarelike events in hot coronal loops. In this paper, a review of the observed properties and the theoretical modeling is presented. Statistical measurements of physical parameters (period, decay time, and amplitude) have been obtained based on a large number of events observed by SOHO/SUMER and Yohkoh/BCS. Several pieces of evidence are found to support their interpretation in terms of the fundamental standing longitudinal slow mode. The high excitation rate of these oscillations in small- or micro-flares suggest that the slow mode waves are a natural response of the coronal plasma to impulsive heating in closed magnetic structure. The strong damping and the rapid excitation of the observed waves are two major aspects of the waves that are poorly understood, and are the main subject of theoretical modeling. The slow waves are found mainly damped by thermal conduction and viscosity in hot coronal loops. The mode coupling seems ...

  1. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Also at Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. (China)

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  2. Heat Transfer Mechanism of a Vertical Wall Inside a Two-Phase Closed Thermosiphon Evaporator and Its Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O-Uchi, Masaki; Hirose, Koichi; Saito, Futami

    The inside heat transfer coefficient, overall heat transfer coefficient, and heat flow rate at the heating section of the thermosiphon were determined for each heating method. In order to observe the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator, a thermosiphon unit made of glass was assembled and conducted separately. The results of these experiments with these two units are summarized as follows. (1) Nucleate boiling due to the internal heat transfer mechanism improves the heat transfer characteristics of the thermosiphon unit. Under the specific heating conditions with dropwise condensation, there are two types of heat transfer mechanism occur in the evaporator accompanying nucleate boiling, i. e. latent heat transfer and sensible heat transfer. (2) In the case of latent heat transfer, the inside heat transfer coefficient has an upper limit which can be used as a criterion to determine the type of internal heat transfer mechanism.

  3. Simulating the Environment Around Planet-Hosting Stars - I. Coronal Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarado-Gómez, J D; Cohen, O; Drake, J J; Garraffo, C; Grunhut, J; Gombosi, T I

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a detailed numerical simulation of the circumstellar environment around three exoplanet-hosting stars. A state-of-the-art global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is considered, including Alfv\\'en wave dissipation as a self-consistent coronal heating mechanism. This paper contains the description of the numerical set-up, evaluation procedure, and the simulated coronal structure of each system (HD 1237, HD 22049 and HD 147513). The simulations are driven by surface magnetic field maps, recovered with the observational technique of Zeeman Doppler Imaging (ZDI). A detailed comparison of the simulations is performed, where two different implementations of this mapping routine are used to generate the surface field distributions. Quantitative and qualitative descriptions of the coronae of these systems are presented, including synthetic high-energy emission maps in the Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) and Soft X-rays (SXR) ranges. Using the simulation results, we are able to recover similar trend...

  4. Anomalous Cooling of Coronal Loops with Turbulent Suppression of Thermal Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Watters, Jonathan M.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the impact of turbulent suppression of parallel heat conduction on the cooling of post-flare coronal loops. Depending on the value of the mean free path {λ }T associated with the turbulent scattering process, we identify four main cooling scenarios. The overall temperature evolution, from an initial temperature in excess of 107 K, is modeled in each case, highlighting the evolution of the dominant cooling mechanism throughout the cooling process. Comparison with observed cooling times allows the value of {λ }T to be constrained, and interestingly this range corresponds to situations where collision-dominated conduction plays a very limited role, or even no role at all, in the cooling of post-flare coronal loops.

  5. Anomalous Cooling of Coronal Loops with Turbulent Suppression of Thermal Conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Bian, Nicolas H; Kontar, Eduard P; Emslie, A Gordon

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the impact of turbulent suppression of parallel heat conduction on the cooling of post-flare coronal loops. Depending on the value of the mean free path $\\lambda_T$ associated with the turbulent scattering process, we identify four main cooling scenarios. The overall temperature evolution, from an initial temperature in excess of $10^7$~K, is modeled in each case, highlighting the evolution of the dominant cooling mechanism throughout the cooling process. Comparison with observed cooling times allows the value of $\\lambda_T$ to be constrained, and interestingly this range corresponds to situations where collision-dominated conduction plays a very limited role, or even no role at all, in the cooling of post-flare coronal loops.

  6. Shock Formation and Energy Dissipation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves in Coronal Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, M.; Suess, S. T.

    2003-01-01

    We study the shock formation and energy dissipation of slow magnetosonic waves in coronal plumes. The wave parameters and the spreading function of the plumes as well as the base magnetic field strength are given by empirical constraints mostly from SOHO/UVCS. Our models show that shock formation occurs at low coronal heights, i.e., within 1.3 bun, depending on the model parameters. In addition, following analytical estimates, we show that scale height of energy dissipation by the shocks ranges between 0.15 and 0.45 Rsun. This implies that shock heating by slow magnetosonic waves is relevant at most heights, even though this type of waves is apparently not a solely operating energy supply mechanism.

  7. The mechanical measuring method of welding heat source efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jianqiang; Zhang Guodong; He Jie; Wang Chengquan; Chen Bingquan

    2007-01-01

    Based on the principle of residual deformation induced by superposition of the welding residual stress and working stress, the welding heat source efficiency has been determined by measuring displacement changes of specimens under loading and unloading in tensile tests, and combining with calculating welding parameters. Meanwhile, the welding heat source efficiencies obtained are compared with those of the measuring-calculating method. The research results show that the welding heat source efficiencies are almost the same as those obtained by the measuring-calculating method. Therefore, the welding heat source efficiency can be determined accurately by this method, and a new determining method of the heat source efficiency for the welding heat process calculating has been provided.

  8. The Evolution and Space Weather Effects of Solar Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krista, Larisza; Gallagher, P.

    2011-05-01

    As solar activity is the foremost important aspect of space weather, the forecasting of flare and CME related transient geomagnetic storms has become a primary initiative. Minor magnetic storms caused by coronal holes (CHs) have also proven to be important due to their long-lasting and recurrent geomagnetic effects. In order to forecast CH related geomagnetic storms, the author developed the Coronal Hole Automated Recognition and Monitoring (CHARM) algorithm to replace the user-dependent CH detection methods commonly used. CHARM uses an intensity thresholding method to identify low intensity regions in EUV or X-ray images. Since CHs are regions of "open” magnetic field and predominant polarity, magnetograms were used to differentiate CHs from other low intensity regions. The Coronal Hole Evolution (CHEVOL) algorithm was developed and used in conjunction with CHARM to study the boundary evolution of CHs. It is widely accepted that the short-term changes in CH boundaries are due to the interchange reconnection between the CH open field lines and small loops. We determined the magnetic reconnection rate and the diffusion coefficient at CH boundaries in order to test the interchange reconnection model. The author also developed the Minor Storm (MIST) package to link CHs to high-speed solar wind (HSSW) periods detected at Earth. Using the algorithm the relationship between CHs, the corresponding HSSW properties, and geomagnetic indices were studied between 2000-2009. The results showed a strong correlation between the velocity and HSSW proton plasma temperature, which indicates that the heating and acceleration of the solar wind plasma in CHs are closely related, and perhaps caused by the same mechanism. The research presented here includes analysis of CHs on small and large spatial/temporal scales, allowing us to further our understanding of CHs as a whole.

  9. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  10. The heat transfer mechanisms in fluidized beds; Laemmoensiirtomekanismit leijukerroksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogelholm, C.J.; Blomster, A.M.; Kojola, H. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    The goal of the research project is to improve the accuracy of the heat transfer correlation in circulating fluidized beds and to define how the heat transfer is distributed in radiation and convection in the different parts of the fluidized bed. This will be carried out by studying the behaviour and heat transfer of the fluidized bed in the boundary layer near the wall. The total and radiative heat transfer as well as the particle concentration will be measured. Based on the data a correlation will be created. Two different measurement systems are used. The particle concentration is measured by a image-analysis system. A video camera and a Super VHS recorder are used to capture live images from the bed. The images are digitized and stored on a PC. The system has been used in previous research projects at our laboratory. In earlier projects all measurements have been carried out in cold environments. In this project the system will be modified for hot environments. The radiative heat transfer is measured by a radiative heat transfer probe connected to a PC via an A/D converter. The probe consists of a heat flow detector which is isolated from the bed by a sapphire window so that only the radiative part of the heat transfer is detected. The probe will be calibrated in a black body oven so that the effect of the conduction and the sapphire window can be separated. (author)

  11. Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Kunow, H; Linker, J. A; Schwenn, R; Steiger, R

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that the Sun gravitationally controls the orbits of planets and minor bodies. Much less known, however, is the domain of plasma fields and charged particles in which the Sun governs a heliosphere out to a distance of about 15 billion kilometers. What forces activates the Sun to maintain this power? Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants are the troops serving the Sun during high solar activity periods. This volume offers a comprehensive and integrated overview of our present knowledge and understanding of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants, Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). It results from a series of workshops held between 2000 and 2004. An international team of about sixty experimenters involved e.g. in the SOHO, ULYSSES, VOYAGER, PIONEER, HELIOS, WIND, IMP, and ACE missions, ground observers, and theoreticians worked jointly on interpreting the observations and developing new models for CME initiations, development, and interplanetary propagation. The book provides...

  12. Heat, work and subtle fluids: a commentary on Joule (1850) 'On the mechanical equivalent of heat'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John

    2015-04-13

    James Joule played the major role in establishing the conservation of energy, or the first law of thermodynamics, as a universal, all-pervasive principle of physics. He was an experimentalist par excellence and his place in the development of thermodynamics is unarguable. This article discusses Joule's life and scientific work culminating in the 1850 paper, where he presented his detailed measurements of the mechanical equivalent of heat using his famous paddle-wheel apparatus. Joule's long series of experiments in the 1840s leading to his realisation that the conservation of energy was probably of universal validity is discussed in context with the work of other pioneers, notably Sadi Carnot, who effectively formulated the principle of the second law of thermodynamics a quarter of a century before the first law was accepted. The story of Joule's work is a story of an uphill struggle against a critical scientific establishment unwilling to accept the mounting evidence until it was impossible to ignore. His difficulties in attracting funding and publishing in reputable journals despite the quality of his work will resonate with many young scientists and engineers of the present day. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.

  13. Mechanism of negative hydrogen ion emission from heated saline hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Serizawa, Naoshi; Takeda, Makiko; Hasegawa, Seiji [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-02-01

    To find a clue to the mechanism of negative hydrogen ion emission from a heated sample ({approx}10 mg) of powdery saline hydride (LiH or CaH{sub 2}) deposited on a molybdenum ribbon ({approx}0.1 cm{sup 2}), both the ionic and electronic emission currents were measured as a function of sample temperature ({approx}700 - 800 K), thereby yielding {approx}10{sup -15} - 10{sup -12} A of H{sup -} after mass analysis and {approx}10{sup -7} - 10{sup -5} A of thermal electron. Thermophysical analysis of these data indicates that the desorption energy (E{sup -}) of H{sup -} and work function ({phi}) of the emitting sample surface are 5.1 {+-} 0.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.2 eV for LiH, respectively, while E{sup -} is 7.7 {+-} 0.3 eV and {phi} is 5.0 {+-} 0.2 eV for CaH{sub 2}. Thermochemical analysis based on our simple model on the emissions indicates that the values of E{sup -} - {phi} are 2.35 and 2.31 eV for LiH and CaH{sub 2}, respectively, which are in fair agreement with the respective values (2.1 {+-} 0.3 and 2.6 {+-} 0.3 eV) determined experimentally. This agreement indicates that the emission of H{sup -} is reasonably explained by our model from the viewpoint of reaction energy. (author)

  14. Direct observations of magnetic flux rope formation during a solar coronal mass ejection

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hongqiang; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Yao; Cheng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most spectacular eruptive phenomena in the solar atmosphere. It is generally accepted that CMEs are results of eruptions of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs). However, a heated debate is on whether MFRs pre-exist before the eruptions or they are formed during the eruptions. Several coronal signatures, \\textit{e.g.}, filaments, coronal cavities, sigmoid structures and hot channels (or hot blobs), are proposed as MFRs and observed before the eruption, which suppor...

  15. Effect of Heat Treatment on Mechanical Property of High Cr-W Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jianping; Li Lixia

    2007-01-01

    The microstructure of high Cr-W cast iron after heat treatment were analyzed, and the effect of various heat treatment temperature and time on mechanical properties of high Cr-W cast iron were studied, and the best process parameter of heat treatment was provided in this paper. The results show that the heat treatment can improve the mechanical property of high Cr-W cast iron, and higher synthetic mechanical property of high Cr-W cast iron can be obtained when treated with normalization at 980℃ for 2h and tempered at 400℃ for 2h.

  16. Analysis of mechanical behavior and hysteresis heat generating mechanism of PDM motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Changshuai; Zhu, Xiaohua; Tang, Liping [Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu (China); Deng, Juan [Avic Chengdu Engine (Group) Co.,Ltd, Chengdu (China)

    2017-03-15

    Positive displacement motor (PDM), which is prone to high temperature fatigue failure, can be weakened in its application in deep and superdeep well. In order to study the forced state, deformation regularity and thermal hysteresis of PDM motor, the paper established the three-dimensional thermal-mechanical coupled Finite element model (FEM). Based on the theoretical research, experimental study and numerical simulation, the study found that the displacement of stator lining shows a sinusoidal variation under internal pressure, when adapting the general form of sine function to fitting inner contour line deformation function. Then the paper analyzed the hysteresis heat generating mechanism of the motor, learning that hysteresis thermogenous of stator lining occurs due to the viscoelastic of rubber material and cyclic loading of stator lining. A heartburn happens gradually in the center of the thickest part of the stator lining as temperature increases, which means work efficiency and service life of PDM will be decreased when used in deep or superdeep well. In this paper, we established a theory equation for the choice of interference fit and motor line type optimization design, showing hysteresis heat generating analyzing model and method are reasonable enough to significantly improve PDM’s structure and help better use PDM in deep and surdeep well.

  17. A novel compact heat exchanger using gap flow mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, D. Z.; Luo, T. P.; Ren, T. Q.

    2015-02-01

    A novel, compact gap-flow heat exchanger (GFHE) using heat-transfer fluid (HTF) was developed in this paper. The detail design of the GFHE coaxial structure which forms the annular gap passage for HTF is presented. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were introduced into the design to determine the impacts of the gap width and the HTF flow rate on the GFHE performance. A comparative study on the GFHE heating rate, with the gap widths ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 mm and the HTF flow rates ranged from 100 to 500 ml/min, was carried out. Results show that a narrower gap passage and a higher HTF flow rate can yield a higher average heating rate in GFHE. However, considering the compromise between the GFHE heating rate and the HTF pressure drop along the gap, a 0.4 mm gap width is preferred. A testing loop was also set up to experimentally evaluate the GFHE capability. The testing results show that, by using 0.4 mm gap width and 500 ml/min HTF flow rate, the maximum heating rate in the working chamber of the as-made GFHE can reach 18 °C/min, and the average temperature change rates in the heating and cooling processes of the thermal cycle test were recorded as 6.5 and 5.4 °C/min, respectively. These temperature change rates can well satisfy the standard of IEC 60068-2-14:2009 and show that the GFHE developed in this work has sufficient heat exchange capacity and can be used as an ideal compact heat exchanger in small volume desktop thermal fatigue test apparatus.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Heat-treated Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Patel, Bhavesh; Koenig, John; Cuneo, Jaques; Neveux, Michael G.; Demos, Chrystoph G.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon fibers are selected for ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are based on their as-fabricated properties or on "that is what we have always done" technical culture while citing cost and availability when there are others with similar cost and availability. However, the information is not available for proper selection of carbon fibers since heat-treated properties are not known for the fibers on the market currently. Heat-treating changes the fiber's properties. Therefore, an effort was undertaken to establish fiber properties on 19 different types of fibers from six different manufactures for both PAN and pitch fibers. Heat-treating has been done at three different temperatures.

  19. THERMAL STRUCTURE OF CORONAL LOOPS AS SEEN WITH NORIKURA CORONAGRAPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Singh, Jagdev [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Ichimoto, K., E-mail: krishna@iiap.res.in [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8417 (Japan)

    2013-03-10

    The thermal structure of a coronal loop, both along and across the loop, is vital in determining the exact plasma heating mechanism. High-resolution spectroscopic observations of the off-limb corona were made using the 25 cm Norikura coronagraph, located at Norikura, Japan. Observations on a number of days were made simultaneously in four forbidden iron emission lines, namely, the [Fe XI] 7892 A line, the [Fe XIII] 10747 A and 10798 A lines, and the [Fe XIV] 5303 A line and on some days made only in the [Fe XI] 7892 A and [Fe X] 6374 A lines. Using temperature sensitive emission line ratios [Fe XIV] 5303 A/[Fe XIII] 10747 A and [Fe XI] 7892 A/[Fe X] 6374 A, we compute the electron temperatures along 18 different loop structures observed on different days. We find a significant negative temperature gradient in all of the structures observed in Fe XIV and Fe XIII and a positive temperature gradient in the structures observed in Fe XI and Fe X. Combining these results with the previous investigations by Singh and his collaborators, we infer that the loop tops, in general, appear hotter when observed in colder lines and colder when observed in relatively hotter lines as compared to their coronal foot points. We suggest that this contrasting trend observed in the temperature variation along the loop structures can be explained by a gradual interaction of different temperature plasma. The exact mechanism responsible for this interaction must be investigated further and has the potential to constrain loop heating models.

  20. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Raouafi, N E; Pariat, E; Young, P R; Sterling, A C; Savcheva, A; Shimojo, M; Moreno-Insertis, F; DeVore, C R; Archontis, V; Török, T; Mason, H; Curdt, W; Meyer, K; Dalmasse, K; Matsui, Y

    2016-01-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  1. Solar coronal observations at high frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Katsiyannis, A C; Phillips, K J H; Williams, D R; Keenan, F P

    2001-01-01

    The Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (SECIS) is a simple and extremely fast, high-resolution imaging instrument designed for studies of the solar corona. Light from the corona (during, for example, a total solar eclipse) is reflected off a heliostat and passes via a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and beam splitter to two CCD cameras capable of imaging at 60 frames a second. The cameras are attached via SCSI connections to a purpose-built PC that acts as the data acquisition and storage system. Each optical channel has a different filter allowing observations of the same events in both white light and in the green line (Fe XIV at 5303 A). Wavelet analysis of the stabilized images has revealed high frequency oscillations which may make a significant contribution on the coronal heating process. In this presentation we give an outline of the instrument and its future development.

  2. Nanoscale structural and mechanical analysis of Bacillus anthracis spores inactivated with rapid dry heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yun; Li, Alex; Felker, Daniel L; Burggraf, Larry W

    2014-03-01

    Effective killing of Bacillus anthracis spores is of paramount importance to antibioterrorism, food safety, environmental protection, and the medical device industry. Thus, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of spore resistance and inactivation is highly desired for developing new strategies or improving the known methods for spore destruction. Previous studies have shown that spore inactivation mechanisms differ considerably depending upon the killing agents, such as heat (wet heat, dry heat), UV, ionizing radiation, and chemicals. It is believed that wet heat kills spores by inactivating critical enzymes, while dry heat kills spores by damaging their DNA. Many studies have focused on the biochemical aspects of spore inactivation by dry heat; few have investigated structural damages and changes in spore mechanical properties. In this study, we have inactivated Bacillus anthracis spores with rapid dry heating and performed nanoscale topographical and mechanical analysis of inactivated spores using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in spore morphology and nanomechanical properties after heat inactivation. In addition, we also found that these changes were different under different heating conditions that produced similar inactivation probabilities (high temperature for short exposure time versus low temperature for long exposure time). We attributed the differences to the differential thermal and mechanical stresses in the spore. The buildup of internal thermal and mechanical stresses may become prominent only in ultrafast, high-temperature heat inactivation when the experimental timescale is too short for heat-generated vapor to efficiently escape from the spore. Our results thus provide direct, visual evidences of the importance of thermal stresses and heat and mass transfer to spore inactivation by very rapid dry heating.

  3. Analysis of Coronal Rain Observed by IRIS, HINODE/SOT, and SDO/AIA: Transverse Oscillations, Kinematics, and Thermal Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohutova, P.; Verwichte, E.

    2016-08-01

    Coronal rain composed of cool plasma condensations falling from coronal heights along magnetic field lines is a phenomenon occurring mainly in active region coronal loops. Recent high-resolution observations have shown that coronal rain is much more common than previously thought, suggesting its important role in the chromosphere-corona mass cycle. We present the analysis of MHD oscillations and kinematics of the coronal rain observed in chromospheric and transition region lines by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). Two different regimes of transverse oscillations traced by the rain are detected: small-scale persistent oscillations driven by a continuously operating process and localized large-scale oscillations excited by a transient mechanism. The plasma condensations are found to move with speeds ranging from few km s-1 up to 180 km s-1 and with accelerations largely below the free-fall rate, likely explained by pressure effects and the ponderomotive force resulting from the loop oscillations. The observed evolution of the emission in individual SDO/AIA bandpasses is found to exhibit clear signatures of a gradual cooling of the plasma at the loop top. We determine the temperature evolution of the coronal loop plasma using regularized inversion to recover the differential emission measure (DEM) and by forward modeling the emission intensities in the SDO/AIA bandpasses using a two-component synthetic DEM model. The inferred evolution of the temperature and density of the plasma near the apex is consistent with the limit cycle model and suggests the loop is going through a sequence of periodically repeating heating-condensation cycles.

  4. Heat adaptations in reptiles and the mechanism of their formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherlin Vladimir

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the main concepts and other aspects of thermobiology of reptiles that must be taken into account considering the problems of reptiles’ thermal adaptation. The difference between the "thermobiological features” and "thermal adaptation" often used as synonyms is defined. It is shown, that in adapting reptiles to external conditions the complex of thermophysiological indicators and reactions responsible for the conditions of full activity is of great importance. The connection between the thermophysiological features defining the condition of full activity and the parameters of environment is not always unequivocal. There is an important intermediary between them - the behavioral and physiological thermoregulation, which significantly disturbs the unambiguity of this connection. Due to these thermoregulation reactions (basically behavioral the mesophilic species can successfully inhabit hot regions, but some reptiles, which need regular heating up to 30-34˚C, can inhabit cold regions. The significance of behavioral regulatory reactions, physiological temperature-dependent and thermoregulatory, temperature-controlling reactions in the complex of reptiles’ thermal adaptation is analyzed. It is determined, that the complex of thermophysiological, stabile (geographically and seasonally invariable thermoregulating indicators of homeostasis is of key value in reptiles’ adaptation to natural climatic conditions. The mechanisms forming space-time structure of daily and seasonal activity and regulation of endogenous annual feeding and breeding cycles are described. It is shown that the individual reptiles adapt to the thermal environment mainly not owing to modification of thermophysiological features, but due to the fine adjustment of space-time structures of daily and seasonal activity. It occurs with the help of behavioral regulatory reactions, which allow the homeostatic characters, included in the physiological

  5. Microstructural and mechanical properties of camel longissimus dorsi muscle during roasting, braising and microwave heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmand, M S; Nikmaram, P; Djomeh, Z Emam; Homayouni, A

    2013-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of various heating methods, including roasting, braising and microwave heating, on mechanical properties and microstructure of longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of the camel. Shear value and compression force increased during microwave heating more than roasting and braising. Results obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed more damage from roasting than in either braising or microwave heating. Granulation and fragmentation were clear in muscle fibers after roasting. The perimysium membrane of connective tissue was damaged during braising, while roasting left the perimysium membrane largely intact. The mechanical properties and microstructure of muscle can be affected by changes in water content during cooking.

  6. Heat Transfer Analysis for Peristaltic Mechanism in Variable Viscosity Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Hayat; F.M.Abbasi; Awatif A.Hendi

    2011-01-01

    An analysis is carried out for a peristaltic flow of a third-order fluid with heat transfer and variable viscosity when no-slip condition does not hold. Perturbation solution is discussed and a comparative study between the cases of constant and variable viscosities is presented and analyzed.%@@ An analysis is carried out for a peristaltic flow of a third-order fluid with heat transfer and variable viscosity when no-slip condition does not hold.Perturbation solution is discussed and a comparative stuity between the cases of constant and variable viscosities is presented and analyzed.

  7. Mechanical ventilation with heat recovery in arctic climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Jesper; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    pressure drop. Preheating the inlet air (outdoor air) to a temperature just above 0ºC is typically used to solve the problem. To minimize the energy cost, a more efficient solution to the problem is therefore desirable. In this project a new design of a heat recovery unit has been developed to the low......-energy house in Sisimiut, which is capable of continuously defrosting itself. The disadvantage of the unit is that it is quite big compared with other units. In this paper the new heat recovery unit is described and laboratory measurements are presented showing that the unit is capable of continuously...

  8. Coronal radiation belts

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, H S; Frewen, S F N; DeRosa, M L

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic field of the solar corona has a large-scale dipole character, which maps into the bipolar field in the solar wind. Using standard representations of the coronal field, we show that high-energy ions can be trapped stably in these large-scale closed fields. The drift shells that describe the conservation of the third adiabatic invariant may have complicated geometries. Particles trapped in these zones would resemble the Van Allen Belts and could have detectable consequences. We discuss potential sources of trapped particles.

  9. Frictional heat transfer regularity of the fluid film in mechanical seals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The frictional heat transfer regularity in the mechanical seal system consisting of the rotating ring, the stationary ring, the fluid film in the end faces and the sealed medium was investigated. The primary factors affecting the frictional heat transfer regularity, such as the heat transfer coefficients from the rings to the sealed medium, the frictional heat flux, the frictional heat distribution ratio and so on, were discussed. The equations for calculating the temperature field both in the sealing members and in the fluid film were derived. The coupling analysis of the frictional heat of the fluid film and the thermal deformation of the two end faces of the rings was carried out to obtain the separation angle of the two deformed end faces in consideration of the viscosity change of the fluid film. The results indicate that the frictional heat of the fluid film heavily affects its characteristic and the sealing performance of mechanical seals. The frictional heat changes not only the shape of the gap between the end faces but also the viscosity of the fluid film, and thereupon leads to the increase of the leakage rate. The maximum temperature of the system is at the inner radius of the fluid film, and most of the frictional heat is conducted by the rotating ring. Based on the heat transfer analysis method put forward in this paper, the parameterized design of mechanical seals can be realized to determine the best geometrical parameters and to select the appropriate material of the sealing members.

  10. Charge States of Solar Cosmic Rays and Constraints on Acceleration Times and Coronal Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffolo, D

    1997-01-01

    We examine effects on the charge states of energetic ions associated with gradual solar flares due to shock heating and stripping at high ion velocities. Recent measurements of the mean charges of various elements after the flares of 1992 Oct 30 and 1992 Nov 2 allow one to place limits on the product of the electron density times the acceleration or coronal residence time. In particular, any residence in coronal loops must be for < 0.03 s, which rules out models of coronal transport in loops, such as the bird cage model. The results do not contradict models of shock acceleration of energetic ions from coronal plasma at various solar longitudes.

  11. Boiling Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Earth and Low Gravity: Boundary Condition and Heater Aspect Ratio Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungho

    2004-01-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. Recently, time and space resolved heat transfer data were obtained in both earth and low gravity environments using an array of microheaters varying in size between 100 microns to 700 microns. These heaters were operated in both constant temperature as well as constant heat flux mode. Heat transfer under nucleating bubbles in earth gravity were directly measured using a microheater array with 100 m resolution operated in constant temperature mode with low and high subcooled bulk liquid along with images from below and from the side. The individual bubble departure diameter and energy transfer were larger with low subcooling but the departure frequency increased at high subcooling, resulting in higher overall heat transfer. The bubble growth for both subcoolings was primarily due to energy transfer from the superheated liquid layer relatively little was due to wall heat transfer during the bubble growth process. Oscillating bubbles and sliding bubbles were also observed in highly subcooled boiling. Transient conduction and/or microconvection was the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the above cases. A transient conduction model was developed and compared with the experimental data with good agreement. Data was also obtained with the heater array operated in a constant heat flux mode and measuring the temperature distribution across

  12. Improvement of the organizational-economic mechanism of developing heat supply city system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroshenko, Valentina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The article examines a complex of social and economic problems that accompany the development of heat supply systems in Ukraine. It is determined that the negative effects of district heating in the cities and towns are caused by the failure of current management mechanism to ensure the solution of basic problems and implement the heat supply system as life support system. The main goal of study was the development of theoretical, methodological and methodical principles of organizational-economic mechanism of development of heat supply system based on the analysis of problems and reserves of its formation and implementation. Application of the systematic approach methodology has allowed to conclude that the effectiveness of heat supply is determined by the interaction of a complex of interrelated and interdependent components that form the theoretical, methodological and methodical basis of its ensuring - concepts, strategies, programs, the mechanism of formation and development of heat supply system. The result of the study was developing of the conceptual foundations of improvement of organizational-economic mechanism of heat supply system development, based on the principles of civilized paradigm, methodology to improve its main basic elements - the mechanisms of information, organizational, infrastructural, legal, financial support, tariff setting, energy saving motivation, optimal development of heat supply system so as to satisfy individual requirements of consumers with high effectiveness as a combination of social, economic, energy, environmental effects.

  13. MHD Modeling of Differential Rotation in Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete

    2004-01-01

    The photosphere and the magnetic flux therein undergo differential rotation. Coronal holes appear to rotate almost rigidly. Magnetic reconnection has been invoked to reconcile these phenomena. Mechanism relevant to the formation of the slow solar wind. We have used our MHD model in spherical coordinates to study the effect of differential rotation on coronal holes. We have imposed a magnetic flux distribution similar to and applied differential rotation for the equivalent of 5 solar rotations.

  14. The mechanism of heat-induced damage of endothelial cells and its effect on vital organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei SU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As an important organ of the human body, vascular endothelial cells (VECs play a vital role in heat stress-induced tissue damage. Its integrity not only serves as a barrier for maintaining vascular permeability but also has major impact on cellular structure and function during acute phase response to heat stress. In heat stroke, a series of acute and complicated pathophysiological changes, including microcirculation change, damage VECs and thereby induce or aggravate multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS. Meanwhile, studies have shown that, during heat stroke, VECs are the major responding cells and one of the most common cells that experience morphological and functional changes. Therefore, VECs damage might be an important mechanism involved in heat stroke. This article reviews the mechanism of heat-induced damage of VECs and its effect on vital organs. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.04.01

  15. Optimizing Global Coronal Magnetic Field Models Using Image-Based Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Shaela I; Uritsky, Vadim M

    2015-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field directly or indirectly affects a majority of the phenomena studied in space physics. It provides energy for coronal heating, controls the release of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and drives heliospheric and magnetospheric activity, yet the coronal magnetic field itself has proven difficult to measure. This difficulty has prompted a decades-long effort to develop accurate, timely, models of the field - an effort that continues today. We have developed a method for improving global coronal magnetic field models by incorporating the type of morphological constraints which could be derived from coronal images. Here we report promising initial tests of this approach on two theoretical problems, and discuss opportunities for application.

  16. The Contribution of Coronal Jets To The Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Lionello, R; Titov, V S; Leake, J E; MikiĆ, Z; Linker, J A; Linton, M G

    2016-01-01

    Transient collimated plasma eruptions in the solar corona, commonly known as coronal (or X-ray) jets, are among the most interesting manifestations of solar activity. It has been suggested that these events contribute to the mass and energy content of the corona and solar wind, but the extent of these contributions remains uncertain. We have recently modeled the formation and evolution of coronal jets using a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code with thermodynamics in a large spherical domain that includes the solar wind. Our model is coupled to 3D MHD flux-emergence simulations, i.e, we use boundary conditions provided by such simulations to drive a time-dependent coronal evolution. The model includes parametric coronal heating, radiative losses, and thermal conduction, which enables us to simulate the dynamics and plasma properties of coronal jets in a more realistic manner than done so far. Here we employ these simulations to calculate the amount of mass and energy transported by coronal j...

  17. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2017-09-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  18. Characteristics of polar coronal hole jets

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrashekhar, K; Banerjee, D; Gupta, G R; Teriaca, L

    2013-01-01

    High spatial- and temporal-resolution images of coronal hole regions show a dynamical environment where mass flows and jets are frequently observed. These jets are believed to be important for the coronal heating and the acceleration of the fast solar wind. We studied the dynamics of two jets seen in a polar coronal hole with a combination of imaging from EIS and XRT onboard Hinode. We observed drift motions related to the evolution and formation of these small-scale jets, which we tried to model as well. We found observational evidence that supports the idea that polar jets are very likely produced by multiple small-scale reconnections occurring at different times in different locations. These eject plasma blobs that flow up and down with a motion very similar to a simple ballistic motion. The associated drift speed of the first jet is estimated to be $\\approx$ 27 km s$^{-1}$. The average outward speed of the first jet is $\\approx 171$ km s$^{-1}$, well below the escape speed, hence if simple ballistic motio...

  19. Analytical Study on Thermal and Mechanical Design of Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su-Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kim, Eung-Soo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The analytical methodologies for the thermal design, mechanical design and cost estimation of printed circuit heat exchanger are presented in this study. In this study, three flow arrangements of parallel flow, countercurrent flow and crossflow are taken into account. For each flow arrangement, the analytical solution of temperature profile of heat exchanger is introduced. The size and cost of printed circuit heat exchangers for advanced small modular reactors, which employ various coolants such as sodium, molten salts, helium, and water, are also presented.

  20. Thermal protection mechanism of heat pipe in leading edge under hypersonic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Wengen; He Yurong; Wang Xinzhi; Zhu Jiaqi; Han Jiecai

    2015-01-01

    Sharp local structure, like the leading edge of hypersonic aircraft, confronts a severe aerodynamic heating environment at a Mach number greater than 5. To eliminate the danger of a material failure, a semi-active thermal protection system is proposed by integrating a metallic heat pipe into the structure of the leading edge. An analytical heat-balance model is established from traditional aerodynamic theories, and then thermal and mechanical characteristics of the structure are studied at Ma...

  1. Study of the relation between evaluation of strain distribution on superconducting coil and mechanical heat generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Minoru; Herai, Toshiki; Suzuki, Eiji

    2002-10-01

    In the superconducting Maglev system, on-board superconducting magnets (SCMs) are vibrated at various frequencies according to the train speed by the electromagnetic disturbance which is caused when the train passes over ground coils. Then a mechanical loss is generated inside the inner vessel in the SCM. This phenomenon increases the heat load on the cryogenic equipment in the SCM. It has been surmised that the mechanical heat inside the inner vessel is generated by the frictional heat caused by the relative microscopic slips between fasteners and superconducting coil (SC coil). Nevertheless, heat generation mechanisms inside the inner vessel have not been studied sufficiently. In this study, we suggest a hypothesis that the frictional heat generated by the relative microscopic slips between fasteners and a SC coil will be indicated if the calculated strain distribution on the SC coil is evaluated. The results of this study supported this hypothesis.

  2. Mechanisms of Aerobic Performance Impairment With Heat Stress and Dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    uptake ( VO2max ), which leads to higher relative exercise intensity and an exponential decline in aerobic performance at any given exercise workload...reductions, which combine to accentuate cardiovascular strain and reduce VO2max . Importantly, the negative performance consequences of dehydration...environmental heat stress on aerobic exercise “performance” has been evaluated using time to exhaustion (TTE) tests (incremental or constant work rate) and

  3. The heat transfer mechanisms in fluidized beds; Laemmoensiirtomekanismit leijukerroksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogelholm, C.J.; Blomster, A.M.; Kojola, H. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Energy Technology and Environmental Protection

    1997-10-01

    The goal of the research project is to improve the accuracy of the heat transfer correlation in circulating fluidized beds and to define how the heat transfer is distributed in radiation and convection in the different parts of the fluidized bed. This will be carried out by studying the behaviour and the heat transfer of the fluidized bed in the boundary layer near the wall. During the project the concentration and the velocity of the sand particles are measured. The particle concentration and the particle velocity are measured by an image analysis system. A video camera and a Super VHS recorder are used to capture live images from the bed. The images are digitized and stored on a PC. The measured particle concentration was at highest slightly over 20 % on the straight wall. As expected, the velocity of the fluidizing gas had the most important role on the particle concentration. The experimental studies of the particle velocity were started last autumn 1996. The velocities of the particles were measured by using a multiple exposure technique. Afterwards the images captured were analyzed by performing a Fourier transform analysis. So far the results have been encouraging and the analyzing work will be ended this spring. (orig.)

  4. The mechanisms of electrical heating for the recovery of bitumen from oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, B.C.W. [McMillan-McGee Corp., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Vermeulen, F.E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper described the Electro-Thermal Dynamic Stripping Process (ET-DSP), a thermal recovery process in which oil sands are electrically heated. This technology has evolved since the 1970s as an alternative to steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) and surface mining of Alberta's oil sands. The heat and mass transfer mechanisms associated with electrical heating were examined along with the gravity forces to better understand how the heated bitumen is recovered from the oil sand. Initially, all fluids are immobile. Heat is created in the oil sand as a current flows through the connate water. This results in a pressure and temperature distribution that is characteristic to an electrical heating process. The electrical heating process changes as the temperature of the oil sand increases and as the bitumen is produced. The heat, mass and electromagnetic fields are strongly coupled and are in a transient state throughout the recovery process. This paper presented the main mechanism for electrical heating in terms of equations. A 3-dimensional quasi-harmonic finite element electromagnetic model was coupled to a mass and energy equation and solved in time. A thermal recovery strategy was then presented in terms of electrode spacing, duration of heating, energy supply and ideal operating conditions.

  5. Mechanisms of direct detonation initiation via thermal explosion of radiatively heated gas-particles layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, V. P.; Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.; Yakovenko, I. S.

    Conceptual approach of detonation wave direct initiation by external radiative heating of microparticles locally suspended in flammable gaseous mixture is proposed. Combustion waves and detonation initiation mechanisms in the congestion regions of microparticles heated by radiation are studied numerically. Necessary criteria on geometrical scales of gas-particles layer and spatial uniformity of particles distribution for successful detonation initiation are formulated.

  6. Using observations of slipping velocities to test the hypothesis that reconnection heats the active region corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Longcope, Dana; Guo, Yang; Ding, Mingde

    2017-08-01

    Numerous proposed coronal heating mechanisms have invoked magnetic reconnection in some role. Testing such a mechanism requires a method of measuring magnetic reconnection coupled with a prediction of the heat delivered by reconnection at the observed rate. In the absence of coronal reconnection, field line footpoints move at the same velocity as the plasma they find themselves in. The rate of coronal reconnection is therefore related to any discrepancy observed between footpoint motion and that of the local plasma — so-called slipping motion. We propose a novel method to measure this velocity discrepancy by combining a sequence of non-linear force-free field extrapolations with maps of photospheric velocity. We obtain both from a sequence of vector magnetograms of an active region (AR). We then propose a method of computing the coronal heating produced under the assumption the observed slipping velocity was due entirely to coronal reconnection. This heating rate is used to predict density and temperature at points along an equilibrium loop. This, in turn, is used to synthesize emission in EUV and SXR bands. We perform this analysis using a sequence of HMI vector magnetograms of a particular AR and compare synthesized images to observations of the same AR made by SDO. We also compare differential emission measure inferred from those observations to that of the modeled corona.

  7. Observing coronal nanoflares in active region moss

    OpenAIRE

    Testa, Paola; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; DeLuca, Ed; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; Title, Alan; Weber, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial (~0.3-0.4 arcsec) and temporal (5.5s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to ~15s, significantly shorter than the minute scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss r...

  8. Heat transfer augmentation in double pipe heat exchanger using mechanical turbulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Kushal; Singh, Gurjeet; Sharma, Rohit; Panchal, Dilbagh; Hira, Jaspreet

    2017-02-01

    The work presented here focuses on heat transfer augmentation by means of divergent-convergent spring turbulator (the enhancement device). Aim of the present work is to find such an optimum pitch at which the augmentation in heat transfer is maximum and the amount of power consumption is minimum, so that an economic design can be created with maximum thermal efficiency. So, the concept of pitch variation is introduced, which is defined as the horizontal distance between two consecutive turbulators. It describes that, the lesser is the pitch the more number of turbulators that can be inserted in inner pipe of double pipe heat exchanger, hence more will be the friction factor. This physics increases convective ability of the heat transfer process from the surface of inner pipe. There is a certain limit to which a pitch can be decreased, lesser the pitch the more the pressure drop and friction factor and hence the more will be the pumping power requirement to maintain a desired mass flow rate of hot water. Analysis of thermal factors such as Nusselts number, friction factor, with different pitches of divergent convergent spring turbulators of circular cross-section 15, 10, and 5 cm at Reynolds's number ranging between 9000 < Re < 40,000 is done graphically.

  9. Simulation of laser induced thermo-mechanical changes in tissue using RF heating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protsenko, Dmitriy E.; Zemek, Allison; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2007-02-01

    Successful application of laser cartilage reshaping (LCR) for the in-situ treatment of structural deformities in the nasal septum, external ear and trachea requires a better understanding of the evolution of cartilage mechanical properties with temperature. We develop a method of Radio Frequency (RF) heating for reliable evaluation of mechanical changes in septal cartilage undergoing heating and used obtained data to model the mechanical changes in cartilage at steady state following laser heating. Cartilage specimens harvested from porcine septum were secured between two flat parallel copper platens connected to a surgical radiofrequency source. The current was user-selectable and controlled to achieve any desired heating rate mimicking heating rate obtained during laser irradiation. Surface and internal temperatures were monitored by an IR camera and embedding a small electrically insulated thermocouple inside the specimen. Cylindrical and rectangular samples were fashioned from the heated specimens and their equilibrium elastic modulus was measured in a step unconfined compression and tension experiments, respectively. Functional dependencies of the elastic modulus and maximum temperature were interpolated from the measurements. The calculated elastic modulus profiles were incorporated into a numerical model of uniaxial unconfined compression and tension of laser irradiated samples. The reaction force to a 0.1 strain was calculated and compared with the reaction force obtained in analogous mechanical measurements experiment. The results of the numerical simulation of uniaxial compression of laser heated samples demonstrate good correlation with experimentally obtained reaction force. Generalization of this methodology to incorporate orthogonal mechanical properties may aid in optimizing clinical LCR procedures.

  10. The Mechanism and Influencing Factors of Corrosion in a Gas Heating-Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhi-gang; ZHANG Ning-sheng; WU Xin-min

    2005-01-01

    Natural gas should be heated and throttled for the purpose of purification and transportation at the first gas production factory of the Changqing field. The safe use and heat-transfer efficiency of a heating-furnace affect the safe and smooth production of natural gas directly. At gas collecting stations now, no measures of anticorrosion have been adopted in heating furnaces which erode and scale badly.In order to solve the corrosive problem of heating-furnaces, prolong operating life of heating-furnaces,assure safe and smooth production of natural gas, the mechanism and influencing factors of corrosion of the heating-furnace were analyzed and some corresponding measures were brought forward based on a field investigation of usage behavior and present operational status of heating-furnaces at the first gas production factory. The results show that the corrosive ion and soluble CO2 and O2 in water erode metal badly at the condition of being heated. Corrosion of a heating-furnace are mostly oxygen corrosion, corrosive ion corrosion, acid corrosion, iron encrustation corrosion, dry and wet interface corrosion, caustic corrosion, etc; The influencing factors of corrosion mainly include soluble O2 and CO2 in water, pH value, heat loading, corrosive ion, soluble solid (salinity) and non-flowing character of water, etc.

  11. Coronal Mass Ejections: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Webb

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar eruptive phenomena embrace a variety of eruptions, including flares, solar energetic particles, and radio bursts. Since the vast majority of these are associated with the eruption, development, and evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, we focus on CME observations in this review. CMEs are a key aspect of coronal and interplanetary dynamics. They inject large quantities of mass and magnetic flux into the heliosphere, causing major transient disturbances. CMEs can drive interplanetary shocks, a key source of solar energetic particles and are known to be the major contributor to severe space weather at the Earth. Studies over the past decade using the data sets from (among others the SOHO, TRACE, Wind, ACE, STEREO, and SDO spacecraft, along with ground-based instruments, have improved our knowledge of the origins and development of CMEs at the Sun and how they contribute to space weather at Earth. SOHO, launched in 1995, has provided us with almost continuous coverage of the solar corona over more than a complete solar cycle, and the heliospheric imagers SMEI (2003 – 2011 and the HIs (operating since early 2007 have provided us with the capability to image and track CMEs continually across the inner heliosphere. We review some key coronal properties of CMEs, their source regions and their propagation through the solar wind. The LASCO coronagraphs routinely observe CMEs launched along the Sun-Earth line as halo-like brightenings. STEREO also permits observing Earth-directed CMEs from three different viewpoints of increasing azimuthal separation, thereby enabling the estimation of their three-dimensional properties. These are important not only for space weather prediction purposes, but also for understanding the development and internal structure of CMEs since we view their source regions on the solar disk and can measure their in-situ characteristics along their axes. Included in our discussion of the recent developments in CME

  12. Mechanisms of aerobic performance impairment with heat stress and dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W; Montain, Scott J; Sawka, Michael N

    2010-12-01

    Environmental heat stress can challenge the limits of human cardiovascular and temperature regulation, body fluid balance, and thus aerobic performance. This minireview proposes that the cardiovascular adjustments accompanying high skin temperatures (T(sk)), alone or in combination with high core body temperatures (T(c)), provide a primary explanation for impaired aerobic exercise performance in warm-hot environments. The independent (T(sk)) and combined (T(sk) + T(c)) effects of hyperthermia reduce maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)), which leads to higher relative exercise intensity and an exponential decline in aerobic performance at any given exercise workload. Greater relative exercise intensity increases cardiovascular strain, which is a prominent mediator of rated perceived exertion. As a consequence, incremental or constant-rate exercise is more difficult to sustain (earlier fatigue) or requires a slowing of self-paced exercise to achieve a similar sensation of effort. It is proposed that high T(sk) and T(c) impair aerobic performance in tandem primarily through elevated cardiovascular strain, rather than a deterioration in central nervous system (CNS) function or skeletal muscle metabolism. Evaporative sweating is the principal means of heat loss in warm-hot environments where sweat losses frequently exceed fluid intakes. When dehydration exceeds 3% of total body water (2% of body mass) then aerobic performance is consistently impaired independent and additive to heat stress. Dehydration augments hyperthermia and plasma volume reductions, which combine to accentuate cardiovascular strain and reduce Vo(2max). Importantly, the negative performance consequences of dehydration worsen as T(sk) increases.

  13. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Ghafri, Khalil Salim

    2015-01-01

    The standing slow magneto-acoustic oscillations in cooling coronal loops are investigated. There are two damping mechanisms which are considered to generate the standing acoustic modes in coronal magnetic loops namely thermal conduction and radiation. The background temperature is assumed to change temporally due to optically thin radiation. In particular, the background plasma is assumed to be radiatively cooling. The effects of cooling on longitudinal slow MHD modes is analytically evaluated by choosing a simple form of radiative function that ensures the temperature evolution of the background plasma due to radiation coincides with the observed cooling profile of coronal loops. The assumption of low-beta plasma leads to neglect the magnetic field perturbation and eventually reduces the MHD equations to a 1D system modelling longitudinal MHD oscillations in a cooling coronal loop. The cooling is assumed to occur on a characteristic time scale much larger than the oscillation period that subsequently enables...

  14. Investigation of Mechanical Loss Components and Heat Transfer in an Axial-Flux PM Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Wrobel, Rafal; Vaniel, Gyula; Copeland, Colin; Duda, Tomasz; Staton, David; Mellor, Phil

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates components of mechanical loss together with heat transfer effects in an axial-flux permanent-magnet motor. The mechanical loss components generated within electrical machines are well known; however, their prediction or derivation has not been widely reported in the literature. These, together with the electromagnetic loss sources and heat transfer effects, are crucial and must be accounted for when considering high-power-density, high-speed, and/or compact machine des...

  15. Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer in Transitional Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to investigate the effects of elevated free-stream turbulence and streamwise acceleration on flow and thermal structures in transitional boundary layers. The free-stream turbulence ranges from 0.5 to 6.4% and the streamwise acceleration ranges from K = 0 to 0.8 x 10(exp -6). The onset of transition, transition length and the turbulent spot formation rate are determined. The statistical results and conditionally sampled results of th streamwise and cross-stream velocity fluctuations, temperature fluctuations, Reynolds stress and Reynolds heat fluxes are presented.

  16. The coronal fricative problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnsen, Daniel A.; Dow, Michael C.; Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.; Green, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines a range of predicted versus attested error patterns involving coronal fricatives (e.g. [s, z, θ, ð]) as targets and repairs in the early sound systems of monolingual English-acquiring children. Typological results are reported from a cross-sectional study of 234 children with phonological delays (ages 3 years; 0 months to 7;9). Our analyses revealed different instantiations of a putative developmental conspiracy within and across children. Supplemental longitudinal evidence is also presented that replicates the cross-sectional results, offering further insight into the life-cycle of the conspiracy. Several of the observed typological anomalies are argued to follow from a modified version of Optimality Theory with Candidate Chains (McCarthy, 2007). PMID:24790247

  17. Chemical Fractionation and Abundances in Coronal Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, J J

    2003-01-01

    Much of modern astrophysics is grounded on the observed chemical compositions of stars and the diffuse plasma that pervades the space between stars, galaxies and clusters of galaxies. X-ray and EUV spectra of the hot plasma in the outer atmospheres of stars have demonstrated that these environments are subject to chemical fractionation in which the abundances of elements can be enhanced and depleted by an order of magnitude or more. These coronal abundance anomalies are discussed and some of the physical mechanisms that might be responsible for producing them are examined. It is argued that coronal abundances can provide important new diagnostics on physical processes at work in solar and stellar coronae. It seems likely that other hot astrophysical plasmas will be subject to similar effects.

  18. An estimate of solar wind velocity profiles in an coronal hole and a coronal streamer area (6-40 solar radius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetzold, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Using the total electron content data obtained by the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment during the superior solar conjunction in summer 1991, we selected two data sets, one associated with a coronal hole and the other one with coronal streamer crossings. By doing this data splitting, we find two entirely different density profiles varying as r(exp -2.7) and r(exp -2.3) for the coronal hole and coronal streamers, respectively. Assuming mass flux conservation from the inner corona to one AU, an estimate for the velocity profiles or acceleration in these two different regions can be determined. The more negative exponent of the coronal hole density profile indicates a more extended heating and acceleration region or more flaring, or both. Various possible explanations will be discussed.

  19. [Heat-responsive mechanisms in plants revealed by proteomic analysis: A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-ming; Zhao, Qi; Yin, Ze-peng; Xu, Chen-xi; Wang, Quan-hua; Dai, Shao-jun

    2015-08-01

    Heat stress is a major abiotic stress that limits plant growth and productivity. In recent years, proteomic investigations provide more information for understanding the sophisticated heat-responsive molecular mechanism in plants at systematic biological level. The heat-responsive proteomic patterns in several plants, i. e., model plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), staple food crops (soybean, rice and wheat), heat-tolerant plants (Agrostis stolonifera, Portulaca oleracea, and Carissa spinarum), grapevine, Populus euphratica, Medicago sativa, and Pinellia ternate, were reported. A total of 838 heat-responsive proteins have been identified in these studies. Among them, 534 proteins were induced and the expression of 304 proteins was reduced in plants under heat stress. In this paper, the diverse protein patterns in plants under various heat stress conditions (30-45 °C for 0-10 d) were analyzed integratively. This provided new evidences and clues for further interpreting the signaling and metabolic pathways, e.g., signaling, stress and defense, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, photosynthesis, transcription, protein synthesis and fate, membrane and transport, in heat-responsive networks, and laid a foundation for a holistic understanding of the molecular regulatory mechanism in plants in response to heat stress.

  20. Heat protective role and mechanism of heat shock protein Hpc60

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A cytosolic heat shock protein named Hpc60 has been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography from pea leaves and its function has been examined in vitro. Results show that Hpc60 may suppress the aggregation of luciferase (LUC), protect lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) from thermal inactivation. It also shows that Mg2+, ATP and pH affect the protective function of Hpc60 in different manners.

  1. MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAT-TREATED ASH WOOD IN RELATION WITH STRUCTURAL TIMBER STANDARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon HANNOUZ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat treatment is an attractive method to enhance wood durability, and valorize local hardwood species with natural low durability. Yet no standard allows the certification of such products. This study first aims to observe the influence of heat treatment on the different mechanical properties. The standard mechanical tests; bending, tension parallel and perpendicular to grain, compression parallel and perpendicular to grain and shear, have been performed on native and heat-treated woods samples. The measurements are then compared to values of EN 338 standard. Results reveal that shear strength is the property most affected by heat treatment and that the modulus of elasticity perpendicular to grain is increased. The values given by EN 338 standard are generally safe with the exception of shear strength which is underestimated by current relationships. It is suggested that new relationships have to be provided for heat-treated wood, taking into account the loss of shear resistance.

  2. Effect of heat treatment on mechanical dissipation in Ta$_2$O$_5$ coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, I W; Nawrodt, R; Fejer, M M; Gretarsson, A; Gustafson, E; Harry, G; Hough, J; MacLaren, I; Penn, S; Reid, S; Route, R; Rowan, S; Schwar, C; Seidel, P; Scott, J; Woodcraft, A L

    2010-01-01

    Thermal noise arising from mechanical dissipation in dielectric reflective coatings is expected to critically limit the sensitivity of precision measurement systems such as high-resolution optical spectroscopy, optical frequency standards and future generations of interferometric gravitational wave detectors. We present measurements of the effect of post-deposition heat treatment on the temperature dependence of the mechanical dissipation in ion-beam sputtered tantalum pentoxide between 11\\,K and 300\\,K. We find the temperature dependence of the dissipation is strongly dependent on the temperature at which the heat treatment was carried out, and we have identified three dissipation peaks occurring at different heat treatment temperatures. At temperatures below 200\\,K, the magnitude of the loss was found to increase with higher heat treatment temperatures, indicating that heat treatment is a significant factor in determining the level of coating thermal noise.

  3. The Mechanical Greenhouse: Burial of Heat by Turbulence in Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Youdin, Andrew N

    2010-01-01

    The intense irradiation received by hot Jupiters suppresses convection in the outer layers of their atmospheres and lowers their cooling rates. "Inflated" hot Jupiters, i.e., those with anomalously large transit radii, require additional sources of heat or suppressed cooling. We consider the effect of forced turbulent mixing in the radiative layer, which could be driven by atmospheric circulation or by another mechanism. Due to stable stratification in the atmosphere, forced turbulence drives a downward flux of heat. Weak turbulent mixing slows the cooling rate by this process, as if the planet was irradiated more intensely. Stronger turbulent mixing buries heat into the convective interior, provided the turbulence extends to the radiative-convective boundary. This inflates the planet until a balance is reached between the heat buried into and radiated from the interior. We also include the direct injection of heat due to the dissipation of turbulence or other effects. Such heating is already known to slow pl...

  4. Measurements of coronal Faraday rotation at 4.6 R {sub ☉}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, Patrick D.; Buffo, Jacob J.; Spangler, Steven R., E-mail: jason-kooi@uiowa.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52240 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    Many competing models for the coronal heating and acceleration mechanisms of the high-speed solar wind depend on the solar magnetic field and plasma structure in the corona within heliocentric distances of 5 R {sub ☉}. We report on sensitive Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations made in 2011 August, at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz) of the radio galaxy 3C 228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6-5.0 R {sub ☉}. Observations at 5.0 GHz permit measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. These Faraday rotation observations provide unique information on the magnetic field in this region of the corona. The measured Faraday rotation on this day was lower than our a priori expectations, but we have successfully modeled the measurement in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. Our data on 3C 228 provide two lines of sight (separated by 46'', 33,000 km in the corona). We detected three periods during which there appeared to be a difference in the Faraday rotation measure between these two closely spaced lines of sight. These measurements (termed differential Faraday rotation) yield an estimate of 2.6-4.1 GA for coronal currents. Our data also allow us to impose upper limits on rotation measure fluctuations caused by coronal waves; the observed upper limits were 3.3 and 6.4 rad m{sup –2} along the two lines of sight. The implications of these results for Joule heating and wave heating are briefly discussed.

  5. Control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plants

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-01-05

    Various examples are provided that are related to boundary control in membrane distillation (MD) processes. In one example, a system includes a membrane distillation (MD) process comprising a feed side and a permeate side separated by a membrane boundary layer; and processing circuitry configured to control a water production rate of the MD process based at least in part upon a distributed heat transfer across the membrane boundary layer. In another example, a method includes determining a plurality of estimated temperature states of a membrane boundary layer separating a feed side and a permeate side of a membrane distillation (MD) process; and adjusting inlet flow rate or inlet temperature of at least one of the feed side or the permeate side to maintain a difference temperature along the membrane boundary layer about a defined reference temperature based at least in part upon the plurality of estimated temperature states.

  6. A mechanism for deep chromospheric heating during solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, M. E.; Emslie, A. G.; Mauas, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the negative hydrogen ion, H(-), in the energy balance of the deep solar chromosphere is reexamined and it is found, in contrast with earlier authors, that H(-) is a source of heating at these levels. The response of this region to an ionizing flux of flare-associated UV radiation (1500 to 1900 A) is then addressed: it is found that the excess ionization of Si to Si(+) increases the local electron number density considerably, since most species are largely neutral at deep chromospheric levels. This in turn increases the electron-hydrogen atom association rate, the H(-) abundance, and the rate of absorption of photospheric radiation by this ion. It is found that the excess absorption by this process may lead to a substantial temperature enhancement at temperature minimum levels during flares.

  7. Effects of induction heat treatment on mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭超群; 黄伯云; 贺跃辉

    2002-01-01

    The effects of rapid heating cyclic heat treatment on mechanical properties of a TiAl-based alloy (Ti-33Al-3Cr) were studied by means of an induction heating machine. The results show that: 1) fine fully-lamellar microstructure with colony size of about 50 μm and lamellar spacing of about 0.12 μm can be obtained; 2) the compression mechanical properties can be improved to a large extent and the best comprehensive compression mechanical properties can reach the yield stress 745 MPa, the large flow stress 1 672 MPa and the compression ratio 19.4%; and 3) the compression fracture at room temperature after induction heat treatment and aging is still typical cleavage fracture.

  8. Coronal seismology waves and oscillations in stellar coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, Alexander; Nakariakov, Valery M

    2012-01-01

    This concise and systematic account of the current state of this new branch of astrophysics presents the theoretical foundations of plasma astrophysics, magneto-hydrodynamics and coronal magnetic structures, taking into account the full range of available observation techniques -- from radio to gamma. The book discusses stellar loops during flare energy releases, MHD waves and oscillations, plasma instabilities and heating and charged particle acceleration. Current trends and developments in MHD seismology of solar and stellar coronal plasma systems are also covered, while recent p

  9. MHD modeling of coronal loops: the transition region throat

    CERN Document Server

    Guarrasi, M; Orlando, S; Mignone, A; Klimchuk, J A

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of coronal loops in the transition region may considerably influence the diagnostics of the plasma emission measure. The cross sectional area of the loops is expected to depend on the temperature and pressure, and might be sensitive to the heating rate. The approach here is to study the area response to slow changes in the coronal heating rate, and check the current interpretation in terms of steady heating models. We study the area response with a time-dependent 2D MHD loop model, including the description of the expanding magnetic field, coronal heating and losses by thermal conduction and radiation from optically thin plasma. We run a simulation for a loop 50 Mm long and quasi-statically heated to about 4 MK. We find that the area can change substantially with the quasi-steady heating rate, e.g. by ~40% at 0.5 MK as the loop temperature varies between 1 and 4 MK, and, therefore, affects the interpretation of DEM(T) curves.

  10. Non-equilibrium ionization by a periodic electron beam. I. Synthetic coronal spectra and implications for interpretation of observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dudik, Jaroslav; Mackovjak, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Context. Coronal heating is currently thought to proceed via the mechanism of nanoflares, small-scale and possibly recurring heating events that release magnetic energy. Aims. We investigate the effects of a periodic high-energy electron beam on the synthetic spectra of coronal Fe ions. Methods. Initially, the coronal plasma is assumed to be Maxwellian with a temperature of 1 MK. The high-energy beam, described by a kappa-distribution, is then switched on every period $P$ for the duration of P/2. The periods are on the order of several tens of seconds, similar to exposure times or cadences of space-borne spectrometers. Ionization, recombination, and excitation rates for the respective distributions are used to calculate the resulting non-equilibrium ionization state of Fe and the instantaneous and period-averaged synthetic spectra. Results. Under the presence of the periodic electron beam, the plasma is out of ionization equilibrium at all times. The resulting spectra averaged over one period are almost alway...

  11. Non-equilibrium ionization by a periodic electron beam. I. Synthetic coronal spectra and implications for interpretation of observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzifčáková, E.; Dudík, J.; Mackovjak, Š.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Coronal heating is currently thought to proceed via the mechanism of nanoflares, small-scale and possibly recurring heating events that release magnetic energy. Aims: We investigate the effects of a periodic high-energy electron beam on the synthetic spectra of coronal Fe ions. Methods: Initially, the coronal plasma is assumed to be Maxwellian with a temperature of 1 MK. The high-energy beam, described by a κ-distribution, is then switched on every period P for the duration of P/ 2. The periods are on the order of several tens of seconds, similar to exposure times or cadences of space-borne spectrometers. Ionization, recombination, and excitation rates for the respective distributions are used to calculate the resulting non-equilibrium ionization state of Fe and the instantaneous and period-averaged synthetic spectra. Results: Under the presence of the periodic electron beam, the plasma is out of ionization equilibrium at all times. The resulting spectra averaged over one period are almost always multithermal if interpreted in terms of ionization equilibrium for either a Maxwellian or a κ-distribution. Exceptions occur, however; the EM-loci curves appear to have a nearly isothermal crossing-point for some values of κs. The instantaneous spectra show fast changes in intensities of some lines, especially those formed outside of the peak of the respective EM(T) distributions if the ionization equilibrium is assumed. Movies 1-5 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Leaf Proteome Analysis Reveals Prospective Drought and Heat Stress Response Mechanisms in Soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aayudh Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drought and heat are among the major abiotic stresses that affect soybean crops worldwide. During the current investigation, the effect of drought, heat, and drought plus heat stresses was compared in the leaves of two soybean varieties, Surge and Davison, combining 2D-DIGE proteomic data with physiology and biochemical analyses. We demonstrated how 25 differentially expressed photosynthesis-related proteins affect RuBisCO regulation, electron transport, Calvin cycle, and carbon fixation during drought and heat stress. We also observed higher abundance of heat stress-induced EF-Tu protein in Surge. It is possible that EF-Tu might have activated heat tolerance mechanisms in the soybean. Higher level expressions of heat shock-related protein seem to be regulating the heat tolerance mechanisms. This study identifies the differential expression of various abiotic stress-responsive proteins that regulate various molecular processes and signaling cascades. One inevitable outcome from the biochemical and proteomics assays of this study is that increase of ROS levels during drought stress does not show significant changes at the phenotypic level in Davison and this seems to be due to a higher amount of carbonic anhydrase accumulation in the cell which aids the cell to become more resistant to cytotoxic concentrations of H2O2.

  13. Phase change driving mechanism and modeling for heat pipe with porous wick

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; LIU ZhiChun; YANG Kun; TU ZhengKai

    2009-01-01

    According to heat pipe theory,capillary force is the only driving force for the circle of working fluid in heat pipe with porous wick.By developing a simulating circuit of liquid and vapor flow in heat pipe with porous wick,this paper presents a new driving mechanism which is from phase change of fluid.Furthermore,by analyzing transport process of working fluid between evaporation and condensation in terfaces,a mathematical model is developed to describe this driving mechanism.Besides,calculating examples are given for heat pipe with water as working fluid to predict its driving force and flow resis tance.By applying the model presented in the paper,thermal design and calculation for heat pipe with porous wick,especially for miniature heat pipe,can be made correctly,and phase change driving me chanism of working fluid can be explained,which thereby leads to a better understanding of heat transfer limitation of heat pipe with porous wick.

  14. Spatiotemporal study of gas heating mechanisms in a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia eGreig

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A spatiotemporal study of neutral gas temperature during the first 100 s of operation for a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster operating on nitrogen at 60 W and 1.5 Torr is performed to identify the heating mechanisms involved. Neutral gas temperature is estimated from rovibrational band fitting of the nitrogen second positive system. A set of baffles are used to restrict the optical image and separate the heating mechanisms occurring in the central bulk discharge region and near the thruster walls.For each spatial region there are three distinct gas heating mechanisms being fast heating from ion-neutral collisions with timescales of tens of milliseconds, intermediate heating with timescales of 10 s from ion bombardment on the inner thruster tube surface creating wall heating, and slow heating with timescales of 100 s from gradual warming of the entire thruster housing. The results are discussed in relation to optimising the thermal properties of future thruster designs.

  15. Packed bed heat storage: Continuum mechanics model and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knödler, Philipp; Dreißigacker, Volker; Zunft, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are key elements for various types of new power plant concepts. As possible cost-effective storage inventory option, packed beds of miscellaneous material come into consideration. However, high technical risks arise due to thermal expansion and shrinking of the packed bed's particles during cyclic thermal operation, possibly leading to material failure. Therefore, suitable tools for designing the heat storage system are mandatory. While particle discrete models offer detailed simulation results, the computing time for large scale applications is inefficient. In contrast, continuous models offer time-efficient simulation results but are in need of effective packed bed parameters. This work focuses on providing insight into some basic methods and tools on how to obtain such parameters and on how they are implemented into a continuum model. In this context, a particle discrete model as well as a test rig for carrying out uniaxial compression tests (UCT) is introduced. Performing of experimental validation tests indicate good agreement with simulated UCT results. In this process, effective parameters required for a continuous packed bed model were identified and used for continuum simulation. This approach is validated by comparing the simulated results with experimental data from another test rig. The presented method significantly simplifies subsequent design studies.

  16. Effect of heat treatments on precipitate microstructure and mechanical properties of CuCrZr alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N; Edwards, D.J.; Tähtinen, S.

    2004-01-01

    A number of specimens of CuCrZr alloy was prime aged and then overaged at 600oC for 1, 2 and 4 hours and for 4 hours at 700 and 850oC. After different heat treatments, both the precipitate microstructure and mechanical properties were characterized.Mechanical properties were determined at 50...

  17. Finite element procedures for coupled linear analysis of heat transfer, fluid and solid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    Coupled finite element formulations for fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and solid mechanics are derived from the conservation laws for energy, mass, and momentum. To model the physics of interactions among the participating disciplines, the linearized equations are coupled by combining domain and boundary coupling procedures. Iterative numerical solution strategy is presented to solve the equations, with the partitioning of temporal discretization implemented.

  18. The formation of an equatorial coronal hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Zhang, Jun

    2010-02-01

    The formation of an equatorial coronal hole (CH) from 2006 January 9 to 12 was simultaneously observed by GOES-12/SXI, SOHO/EIT and SOHO/MDI instruments. The varieties of soft X-ray and EUV brightness, coronal temperature, and total magnetic flux in the CH were examined and compared with that of a quiet-sun (QS) region nearby. The following results are obtained. (1) A preexisting dark lane appeared on the location of the followed CH and was reinforced by three enhanced networks. (2) The CH gradually formed in about 81 hours and was predominated by positive magnetic flux. (3) During the formation, the soft X-ray and EUV brightness, coronal temperature, and total magnetic flux obviously decreased in the CH, but were almost no change in the QS region. The decrease of the total magnetic flux may be the result of magnetic reconnection between the open and closed magnetic lines, probably indicating the physical mechanism for the birth of the CH.

  19. Characterizing the Properties of Coronal Magnetic Null Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Graham; DeRosa, Marc; Wagner, Eric

    2015-08-01

    The topology of the coronal magnetic field plays a role in a wide range of phenomena, from Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) through heating of the corona. One fundamental topological feature is the null point, where the magnetic field vanishes. These points are natural sites of magnetic reconnection, and hence the release of energy stored in the magnetic field. We present preliminary results of a study using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to characterize the properties and evolution of null points in a Potential Field Source Surface model of the coronal field. The main properties considered are the lifetime of the null points, their distribution with height, and how they form and subsequently vanish.This work is supported by NASA/LWS Grant NNX14AD45G, and by NSF/SHINE grant 1357018.

  20. Damping of Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves in an Inhomogeneous Coronal Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nagendra Kumar; Pradeep Kumar; Shiv Singh; Anil Kumar

    2008-03-01

    We study the propagation and dissipation of slow magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous viscous coronal loop plasma permeated by uniform magnetic field. Only viscosity and thermal conductivity are taken into account as dissipative processes in the coronal loop. The damping length of slow-mode waves exhibit varying behaviour depending upon the physical parameters of the loop in an active region AR8270 observed by TRACE. The wave energy flux associated with slow magnetoacoustic waves turns out to be of the order of 106 erg cm-2 s-1 which is high enough to replace the energy lost through optically thin coronal emission and the thermal conduction belowto the transition region. It is also found that only those slow-mode waves which have periods more than 240 s provide the required heating rate to balance the energy losses in the solar corona. Our calculated wave periods for slow-mode waves nearly match with the oscillation periods of loop observed by TRACE.

  1. Using Coronal Hole Maps to Constrain MHD Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Ronald M.; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2017-08-01

    In this presentation, we explore the use of coronal hole maps (CHMs) as a constraint for thermodynamic MHD models of the solar corona. Using our EUV2CHM software suite (predsci.com/chd), we construct CHMs from SDO/AIA 193Å and STEREO-A/EUVI 195Å images for multiple Carrington rotations leading up to the August 21st, 2017 total solar eclipse. We then contruct synoptic CHMs from synthetic EUV images generated from global thermodynamic MHD simulations of the corona for each rotation. Comparisons of apparent coronal hole boundaries and estimates of the net open flux are used to benchmark and constrain our MHD model leading up to the eclipse. Specifically, the comparisons are used to find optimal parameterizations of our wave turbulence dissipation (WTD) coronal heating model.

  2. Physical and mechanical characteristics of poor-quality wood after heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romagnoli M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Poor-quality Corsican pine (Pinus nigra subsp. laricio (Poir. Maire and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco wood samples were heat treated with the aim of testing the improvement of wood quality that could increase their economic value. Wood properties were measured to assess quality in treated and non-treated materials, including density, hardness, anti-swelling efficiency (ASE, modulus of elasticity (MOE, modulus of rupture (MOR, and compression strength. The results showed higher dimensional stability in heat-treated wood, yet mechanical performance in compression and bending strength were only marginally affected by loss of density. Despite having a re­latively low density after heat treatment, Corsican pine sapwood has potential in manufacturing higher-value products. In contrast, heat treatment applied to Douglas fir wood did not appear economically viable; insufficient differences were detected between the naturally desirable characteristics of this species and heat-treated samples.

  3. Fundamental mechanisms that influence the estimate of heat transfer to gas turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Estimates of the heat transfer from the gas to stationary (vanes) or rotating blades poses a major uncertainty due to the complexity of the heat transfer processes. The gas flow through these blade rows is three dimensional with complex secondary viscous flow patterns that interact with the endwalls and blade surfaces. In addition, upstream disturbances, stagnation flow, curvature effects, and flow acceleration complicate the thermal transport mechanisms in the boundary layers. Some of these fundamental heat transfer effects are discussed. The chief purpose of the discussion is to acquaint those in the heat transfer community, not directly involved in gas turbines, of the seriousness of the problem and to recommend some basic research that would improve the capability for predicting gas-side heat transfer on turbine blades and vanes.

  4. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  5. The Effect of Heat Treatment and Mechanical Polishing on Nitinol Stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Soo; Lee, Se Chol; Kim, Kyu Suk; Choi, Seong Hoon; Park, Chan Soo [Eulji University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    To understand the effect of heat treatment and mechanical polishing of a Nitinol wire on the chemical composition and physical morphology of the wire surface. Stents with a diameter of 1.0 cm, length of 8-10 cm, and composed of a Nitinol wire, were heat-treated at 500 .deg. C for 30 minutes, and mechanically polished with walnut shell granules. The wire surface morphology was studied with both an optical and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In addition, an elemental analysis was performed by Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Long microcracks along the wire direction and short microcracks across the wire were observed by SEM from the raw Nitinol wire. Upon heat treatment, the color of the wire turned blue, and Na, K, Cl, Si, Al atoms were seen from the EDX of the heat treated wire, which were absent in the original wire. The microcracks disappeared with the mechanical polishing, and the Na, K, Cl, Si, Al atoms all disappeared after the mechanical polishing. Mechanical polishing using walnut shell granules effectively removed the microcracks of a nitinol wire and impurities produced from the heat treatment.

  6. Mechanical Alterations Associated with Repeated Treadmill Sprinting under Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocherie, Franck; Morin, Jean-Benoit; Racinais, Sébastien; Millet, Grégoire P.; Périard, Julien D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Examine the mechanical alterations associated with repeated treadmill sprinting performed in HOT (38°C) and CON (25°C) conditions. Methods Eleven recreationally active males performed a 30-min warm-up followed by three sets of five 5-s sprints with 25-s recovery and 3-min between sets in each environment. Constant-velocity running for 1-min at 10 and 20 km.h-1 was also performed prior to and following sprinting. Results Mean skin (37.2±0.7 vs. 32.7±0.8°C; P<0.001) and core (38.9±0.2 vs. 38.8±0.3°C; P<0.05) temperatures, together with thermal comfort (P<0.001) were higher following repeated sprinting in HOT vs. CON. Step frequency and vertical stiffness were lower (-2.6±1.6% and -5.5±5.5%; both P<0.001) and contact time (+3.2±2.4%; P<0.01) higher in HOT for the mean of sets 1–3 compared to CON. Running distance per sprint decreased from set 1 to 3 (-7.0±6.4%; P<0.001), with a tendency for shorter distance covered in HOT vs. CON (-2.7±3.4%; P = 0.06). Mean vertical (-2.6±5.5%; P<0.01), horizontal (-9.1±4.4%; P<0.001) and resultant ground reaction forces (-3.0±2.8%; P<0.01) along with vertical stiffness (-12.9±2.3%; P<0.001) and leg stiffness (-8.4±2.7%; P<0.01) decreased from set 1 to 3, independently of conditions. Propulsive power decreased from set 1 to 3 (-16.9±2.4%; P<0.001), with lower propulsive power values in set 2 (-6.6%; P<0.05) in HOT vs. CON. No changes in constant-velocity running patterns occurred between conditions, or from pre-to-post repeated-sprint exercise. Conclusions Thermal strain alters step frequency and vertical stiffness during repeated sprinting; however without exacerbating mechanical alterations. The absence of changes in constant-velocity running patterns suggests a strong link between fatigue-induced velocity decrements during sprinting and mechanical alterations. PMID:28146582

  7. Effect of cladding procedures on mechanical properties of heat treated dissimilar joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mateša

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The specimens plated by different cladding procedures (hot rolling, submerged arc welding surfacing using strip electrode (SAW and explosion welding were heat treated by annealing (650 ºC through 2 hours. Charpy impact energy testing, as well as shear strength testing of clad joints were performed. Testing results indicated significance of cladding procedure and determined heat treatment infl uences on stated mechanical properties.

  8. Heat Loss Mechanisms In Transparent Insulation With Honeycomb Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, V.; Stahl, W.; Pfluger, A.; Goetzberger, A.; Schmid, J.

    1983-12-01

    The development of highly transparent insulation materials is an important step in raising the efficiency of flat plate collectors and for passive use of solar energy in buildings. The problem in combining selective absorbers and honeycomb structures is that the radiation losses due to thermal emission of the material of the structure may be larger than the losses due to convection which are present without the structure. Therefore a thorough analysis of the different loss mechanisms has been made. There are two possibilities for overcoming these difficulties. The first is the use of materials with low absorptance in the infrared or with selective surfaces for the honeycomb structure. The second possibility is the use of highly IR-absorbing materials. In the latter case a selective absorber is not needed. Results from both approaches will be presented.

  9. Energetic characterisation and statistics of solar coronal brightenings

    CERN Document Server

    Joulin, Vincent; Solomon, Jacques; Guennou, Chloé

    2016-01-01

    To explain the high temperature of the corona, much attention has been paid to the distribution of energy in dissipation events. Indeed, if the event energy distribution is steep enough, the smallest, unobservable events could be the largest contributors to the total energy dissipation in the corona. Previous observations have shown a wide distribution of energies but remain inconclusive about the precise slope. Furthermore, these results rely on a very crude estimate of the energy. On the other hand, more detailed spectroscopic studies of structures such as coronal bright points do not provide enough statistical information to derive their total contribution to heating. We aim at getting a better estimate of the distributions of the energy dissipated in coronal heating events using high-resolution, multi-channel Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) data. To estimate the energies corresponding to heating events and deduce their distribution, we detect brightenings in five EUV channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembl...

  10. Perspectives on deciphering mechanisms underlying plant heat stress response and thermotolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Lucia Bokszczanin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is a major threat for agriculture and food safety and in many cases the negative effects are already apparent. The current challenge of basic and applied plant science is to decipher the molecular mechanisms of heat stress response and thermotolerance in detail and use this information to identify genotypes that will withstand unfavorable environmental conditions. Nowadays X-omics approaches complement the findings of previous targeted studies and highlight the complexity of heat stress response mechanisms giving information for so far unrecognized genes, proteins and metabolites as potential key players of thermotolerance. Even more, roles of epigenetic mechanisms and the involvement of small RNAs in thermotolerance are currently emerging and thus open new directions of yet unexplored areas of plant heat stress response. In parallel it is emerging that although the whole plant is vulnerable to heat, specific organs are particularly sensitive to elevated temperatures. This has redirected research from the vegetative to generative tissues. The sexual reproduction phase is considered as the most sensitive to heat and specifically pollen exhibits the highest sensitivity and frequently an elevation of the temperature just a few degrees above the optimum during pollen development can have detrimental effects for crop production. Compared to our knowledge on heat stress response of vegetative tissues, the information on pollen is still scarce. Nowadays, several techniques for high-throughput X-omics approaches provide major tools to explore the principles of pollen heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms in specific genotypes. The collection of such information will provide an excellent support for improvement of breeding programs to facilitate the development of tolerant cultivars. The review aims at describing the current knowledge of thermotolerance mechanisms and the technical advances which will foster new insights into

  11. Mechanism of financial support in reforming the heat supply sphere: problems and prospects of improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroshenko, Valentina Viktorivna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The problems of financial support for reforming the heat supply sphere arediscussed in the article. The current state of heat supply sphere causes aggravation of many socioeconomicproblems, connected with low quality, low reliability and excessive power consumption ofheat supply system. The main reason for this is the high level of depreciation of main funds at allstages of the production cycle – from production to consumption of heat energy. The currentlegislation defined the priority of modernization of heat supply sphere, but it requires the significantamount of financial resources for the implementation of relevant investment projects. Due to theanalysis the domestic sources of financial support are very limited, but the use of foreign fundsincreases the financial dependence on external borrowings. This situation provides a high relevance of searching for domestic funds and it became the main objective of this research. Thefinal goal was to make a set of suggestions on improving the current mechanism of financialsupport for reforming the heat supply sphere at the expense of implementation of reserve not beinginvolved nowadays, namely, public funds. People are eager and able to spend their own savings tointroduce the most effective modern energy saving technology – per-apartment heating. Accordingto the wide experience, this technology meets each person needs in heat with a significantreduction of natural gas consumption spent on heating (including solving the problem of energytariffs, budget funds for compensation benefits, subsidies, difference in fees, for finance investmentprojects, etc.

  12. Mechanisms and efficacy of heat and cold therapies for musculoskeletal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Gerard A; Yan, Ning; Stark, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Nonpharmacological treatment strategies for acute musculoskeletal injury revolve around pain reduction and promotion of healing in order to facilitate a return to normal function and activity. Heat and cold therapy modalities are often used to facilitate this outcome despite prevalent confusion about which modality (heat vs cold) to use and when to use it. Most recommendations for the use of heat and cold therapy are based on empirical experience, with limited evidence to support the efficacy of specific modalities. This literature review provides information for practitioners on the use of heat and cold therapies based on the mechanisms of action, physiological effects, and the medical evidence to support their clinical use. The physiological effects of cold therapy include reductions in pain, blood flow, edema, inflammation, muscle spasm, and metabolic demand. There is limited evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) supporting the use of cold therapy following acute musculoskeletal injury and delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The physiological effects of heat therapy include pain relief and increases in blood flow, metabolism, and elasticity of connective tissues. There is limited overall evidence to support the use of topical heat in general; however, RCTs have shown that heat-wrap therapy provides short-term reductions in pain and disability in patients with acute low back pain and provides significantly greater pain relief of DOMS than does cold therapy. There remains an ongoing need for more sufficiently powered high-quality RCTs on the effects of cold and heat therapy on recovery from acute musculoskeletal injury and DOMS.

  13. Energy Release in Driven Twisted Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareford, M. R.; Gordovskyy, M.; Browning, P. K.; Hood, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection in twisted magnetic fluxtubes, representing coronal loops. The main goal is to establish the influence of the field geometry and various thermodynamic effects on the stability of twisted fluxtubes and on the size and distribution of heated regions. In particular, we aim to investigate to what extent the earlier idealised models, based on the initially cylindrically symmetric fluxtubes, are different from more realistic models, including the large-scale curvature, atmospheric stratification, thermal conduction and other effects. In addition, we compare the roles of Ohmic heating and shock heating in energy conversion during magnetic reconnection in twisted loops. The models with straight fluxtubes show similar distribution of heated plasma during the reconnection: it initially forms a helical shape, which subsequently becomes very fragmented. The heating in these models is rather uniformly distributed along fluxtubes. At the same time, the hot plasma regions in curved loops are asymmetric and concentrated close to the loop tops. Large-scale curvature has a destabilising influence: less twist is needed for instability. Footpoint convergence normally delays the instability slightly, although in some cases, converging fluxtubes can be less stable. Finally, introducing a stratified atmosphere gives rise to decaying wave propagation, which has a destabilising effect.

  14. Experimental research on the mechanical property of prestressing steel wire during and after heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Wenzhong; HU Qiong; ZHANG Haoyu

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical property of prestressing steel wire during and after heating is the key factor in the design of fire resistance and after-fire damage evaluation of prestressed structures. Tensile experiment of 16 prestressing steel wires (fptk= 1770 N/mm2, d = 5 mm, low relaxation of stress) at high temperature and tensile experiment of 14 prestressed steel wires after heating are carried out. According to the experiment, the shapes of stress-strain curves of steel wire at high temperature go smooth and the mechanical property indexes of the steel wire such as strength, modulus of elastic- ity, etc., degenerate continuously as temperature increased. According to the experiment after heating, the mechanical property of steel wire varies little when the highest tempera- ture that the steel wire has ever been heated to is lower than 300℃; while the stress-strain curves of steel wire become more ductile and the mechanical property indexes of the steel wire degenerate gradually when the highest temperature is higher than 300℃. By applying the theory of viscoelastic mechanics, stress-strain curves of steel wire at high tempera- tures without loading rate influence are obtained. The law of mechanical property indexes of the wire is presented. The mathematical models of the stress-strain relationship of the pre-stressed steel wire are established. All can serve as basic data for the analysis of fire resistance and after-fire damage evaluation ofpre-stressed structures.

  15. High-spatial-resolution microwave and related observations as diagnostics of coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1986-01-01

    High spatial resolution microwave observations of coronal loops, together with theoretical models for the loop emission, can provide detailed information about the temperature, density, and magnetic field within the loop, as well as the environment around the loop. The capability for studying magnetic fields is particularly important, since there is no comparable method for obtaining direct information about coronal magnetic fields. Knowledge of the magnetic field strength and structure in coronal loops is important for understanding both coronal heating and flares. With arc-second-resolution microwave observations from the Very Large Array (VLA), supplemental high-spectral-resolution microwave data from a facility such as the Owens Valley frequency-agile interferometer, and the ability to obtain second-of-arc resolution EUV aor soft X ray images, the capability already exists for obtaining much more detailed information about coronal plasma and magnetic structures than is presently available. This capability is discussed.

  16. Chromospheric Nanoflares as a Source of Coronal Plasma: II. Repeating Nanoflares

    CERN Document Server

    Bradshaw, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The million degree plasma of the solar corona must be supplied by the underlying layers of the atmosphere. The mechanism and location of energy release, and the precise source of coronal plasma, remain unresolved. In earlier work we pursued the idea that warm plasma is supplied to the corona via direct heating of the chromosphere by nanoflares, contrary to the prevailing belief that the corona is heated in-situ and the chromosphere is subsequently energized and ablated by thermal conduction. We found that single (low-frequency) chromospheric nanoflares could not explain the observed intensities, Doppler-shifts, and red/blue asymmetries in Fe XII and XIV emission lines. In the present work we follow up on another suggestion that the corona could be powered by chromospheric nanoflares that repeat on a timescale substantially shorter than the cooling/draining timescale. That is, a single magnetic strand is re-supplied with coronal plasma before the existing plasma has time to cool and drain. We perform a series ...

  17. Thermophysical property data - Who needs them. [similarity principle applications in fluid mechanics and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Specific examples are cited herein to illustrate the universal needs and demands for thermophysical property data. Applications of the principle of similarity in fluid mechanics and heat transfer and extensions of the principle to fluid mixtures are discussed. It becomes quite clear that no matter how eloquent theories or experiments in fluid mechanics or heat transfer are, the results of their application can be no more accurate than the thermophysical properties required to transform these theories into practice, or in the case of an experiment, to reduce the data. Present-day projects take place on such a scale that the need for international standards and mutual cooperation is evident.

  18. Methods for Increasing Power Efficiency of Heating Furnaces Applied in Metallurgical and Mechanical Engineering Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. German

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available  The paper analyzes experimental data and results of balance tests of two continuous heating furnaces applied in mechanical engineering and metallurgical industries. Furnace power technological characteristics  and dependences of these characteristics on equipment productivity have been determined in the paper. The analysis has made it possible to reveal reasons of higher efficiency of a heating furnace used at BSW Rolling Mill-320 and formulate recommendations on reduction of fuel consumption in operating and designed combustion furnaces applied in mechanical engineering and metallurgical industries.

  19. Quantifying the Significance of Substructure in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeough, K. B. D.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2014-12-01

    A method to infer the presence of small-scale substructure in SDO/AIA (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory) images of coronal loops is developed. We can classify visible loop structure based on this propensity to show substructure which puts constraints on contemporary solutions to the coronal heating problem. The method uses the Bayesian algorithm Low-count Image Reconstruction and Analysis (LIRA) to infer the multi-scale component of the loops which describes deviations from a smooth model. The increase in contrast of features in this multi-scale component is determined using a statistic that estimates the sharpness across the image. Regions with significant substructure are determined using p-value upper bounds. We are able to locate substructure visible in Hi-C (High-Resolution Coronal Imager) data that are not salient features in the corresponding AIA image. Looking at coronal loops at different regions of the Sun (e.g., low-lying structure and loops in the upper corona) we are able to map where detectable substructure exists and thus the influence of the nanoflare heating process. We acknowledge support from AIA under contract SP02H1701R from Lockheed-Martin to SAO.

  20. Coronal Seismology -- Achievements and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Michael

    Coronal seismology is a new and fast developing branch of the solar physics. The main idea of coronal seismology is the same as of any branches of seismology: to determine basic properties of a medium using properties of waves propagating in this medium. The waves and oscillations in the solar corona are routinely observed in the late space missions. In our brief review we concentrate only on one of the most spectacular type of oscillations observed in the solar corona - the transverse oscillations of coronal magnetic loops. These oscillations were first observed by TRACE on 14 July 1998. At present there are a few dozens of similar observations. Shortly after the first observation of the coronal loop transverse oscillations they were interpreted as kink oscillations of magnetic tubes with the ends frozen in the dense photospheric plasma. The frequency of the kink oscillation is proportional to the magnetic field magnitude and inversely proportional to the tube length times the square root of the plasma density. This fact was used to estimate the magnetic field magnitude in the coronal loops. In 2004 the first simultaneous observation of the fundamental mode and first overtone of the coronal loop transverse oscillation was reported. If we model a coronal loop as a homogeneous magnetic tube, then the ratio of the frequencies of the first overtone and the fundamental mode should be equal to 2. However, the ratio of the observed frequencies was smaller than 2. This is related to the density variation along the loop. If we assume that the corona is isothermal and prescribe the loop shape (usually it is assumed that it has the shape of half-circle), then, using the ratio of the two frequencies, we can determine the temperature of the coronal plasma. The first observation of transverse oscillations of the coronal loops showed that they were strongly damped. This phenomenon was confirmed by the subsequent observations. At present, the most reliable candidate for the

  1. Extension of the MURaM radiative MHD code for coronal simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rempel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    We present a new version of the MURaM radiative MHD code that allows for simulations spanning from the upper convection zone into the solar corona. We implemented the relevant coronal physics in terms of optically thin radiative loss, field aligned heat conduction and an equilibrium ionization equation of state. We artificially limit the coronal Alfv{\\'e}n and heat conduction speeds to computationally manageable values using an approximation to semi-relativistic MHD with an artificially reduced speed of light (Boris correction). We present example solutions ranging from quiet to active Sun in order to verify the validity of our approach. We quantify the role of numerical diffusivity for the effective coronal heating. We find that the (numerical) magnetic Prandtl number determines the ratio of resistive to viscous heating and that owing to the very large magnetic Prandtl number of the solar corona, heating is expected to happen predominantly through viscous dissipation. We find that reasonable solutions can be...

  2. Geometry of solar coronal rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B. P.; Martsenyuk, O. V.; Platov, Yu. V.; Den, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal helmet streamers are the most prominent large-scale elements of the solar corona observed in white light during total solar eclipses. The base of the streamer is an arcade of loops located above a global polarity inversion line. At an altitude of 1-2 solar radii above the limb, the apices of the arches sharpen, forming cusp structures, above which narrow coronal rays are observed. Lyot coronagraphs, especially those on-board spacecrafts flying beyond the Earth's atmosphere, enable us to observe the corona continuously and at large distances. At distances of several solar radii, the streamers take the form of fairly narrow spokes that diverge radially from the Sun. This radial direction displays a continuous expansion of the corona into the surrounding space, and the formation of the solar wind. However, the solar magnetic field and solar rotation complicate the situation. The rotation curves radial streams into spiral ones, similar to water streams flowing from rotating tubes. The influence of the magnetic field is more complex and multifarious. A thorough study of coronal ray geometries shows that rays are frequently not radial and not straight. Coronal streamers frequently display a curvature whose direction in the meridional plane depends on the phase of the solar cycle. It is evident that this curvature is related to the geometry of the global solar magnetic field, which depends on the cycle phase. Equatorward deviations of coronal streamers at solar minima and poleward deviations at solar maxima can be interpreted as the effects of changes in the general topology of the global solar magnetic field. There are sporadic temporal changes in the coronal rays shape caused by remote coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagating through the corona. This is also a manifestation of the influence of the magnetic field on plasma flows. The motion of a large-scale flux rope associated with a CME away from the Sun creates changes in the structure of surrounding field

  3. Expression of HSPs: an adaptive mechanism during long-term heat stress in goats ( Capra hircus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangi, Satyaveer Singh; Gupta, Mahesh; Dangi, Saroj K.; Chouhan, Vikrant Singh; Maurya, V. P.; Kumar, Puneet; Singh, Gyanendra; Sarkar, Mihir

    2015-08-01

    Menacing global rise in surface temperature compelled more focus of research over understanding heat stress response mechanism of animals and mitigation of heat stress. Twenty-four goats divided into four groups ( n = 6) such as NHS (non-heat-stressed), HS (heat-stressed), HS + VC (heat-stressed administered with vitamin C), and HS + VE + Se (heat-stressed administered with vitamin E and selenium). Except NHS group, other groups were exposed to repeated heat stress (42 °C) for 6 h on 16 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected at the end of heat exposure on days 1, 6, 11, and 16. When groups compared between days, expression of all heat shock proteins (HSPs) showed a similar pattern as first peak on day 1, reached to basal level on the sixth day, and followed by second peak on day 16. The relative messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of HSP 60, HSP70, and HSP90 was observed highest ( P < 0.05) in HS group, followed by antioxidant-administered group on days 1 and 16, which signifies that antioxidants have dampening effect on HSP expression. HSP105/110 expression was highest ( P < 0.05) on day 16. We conclude that HSP expression pattern is at least two-peak phenomenon, i.e., primary window of HSP protection on the first day followed by second window of protection on day 16. HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90 play an important role during the initial phase of heat stress acclimation whereas HSP105/110 joins this cascade at later phase. Antioxidants may possibly attenuate the HSP expression by reducing the oxidative stress.

  4. Development, Testing, and Failure Mechanisms of a Replicative Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Hansen, Scott; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM's have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. Wax PCM units have been baselined for the Orion thermal control system and also provide risk mitigation for the Altair Lander. However, the use of water as a PCM has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. An ice PCM heat exchanger that replicates the thermal energy storage capacity of an existing wax PCM unit was fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion are investigated. This paper presents the results to date of this investigation. Nomenclature

  5. Testing and Failure Mechanisms of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Hawkins-Reynolds, Ebony

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as specific spacecraft orientations in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and low beta angle Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM s have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents the results of testing that occurred from March through September of 2010 and builds on testing that occurred during the previous year.

  6. Evaluation of major heat waves' mechanisms in EURO-CORDEX RCMs over Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotka, Ondřej; Kyselý, Jan; Plavcová, Eva

    2017-09-01

    The main aim of the study is to evaluate the capability of EURO-CORDEX regional climate models (RCMs) to simulate major heat waves in Central Europe and their associated meteorological factors. Three reference major heat waves (1994, 2006, and 2015) were identified in the E-OBS gridded data set, based on their temperature characteristics, length and spatial extent. Atmospheric circulation, precipitation, net shortwave radiation, and evaporative fraction anomalies during these events were assessed using the ERA-Interim reanalysis. The analogous major heat waves and their links to the aforementioned factors were analysed in an ensemble of EURO-CORDEX RCMs driven by various global climate models in the 1970-2016 period. All three reference major heat waves were associated with favourable circulation conditions, precipitation deficit, reduced evaporative fraction and increased net shortwave radiation. This joint contribution of large-scale circulation and land-atmosphere interactions is simulated with difficulties in majority of the RCMs, which affects the magnitude of modelled major heat waves. In some cases, the seemingly good reproduction of major heat waves' magnitude is erroneously achieved through extremely favourable circulation conditions compensated by a substantial surplus of soil moisture or vice versa. These findings point to different driving mechanisms of major heat waves in some RCMs compared to observations, which should be taken into account when analysing and interpreting future projections of these events.

  7. Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of Textile Heating Fabric Based on Silver Coated Polymeric Yarn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anura Fernando

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study conducted on the thermo-mechanical properties of knitted structures, the methods of manufacture, effect of contact pressure at the structural binding points, on the degree of heating. The test results also present the level of heating produced as a function of the separation between the supply terminals. The study further investigates the rate of heating and cooling of the knitted structures. The work also presents the decay of heating properties of the yarn due to overheating. Thermal images were taken to study the heat distribution over the surface of the knitted fabric. A tensile tester having constant rate of extension was used to stretch the fabric. The behavior of temperature profile of stretched fabric was observed. A comparison of heat generation by plain, rib and interlock structures was studied. It was observed from the series of experiments that there is a minimum threshold force of contact at binding points of a knitted structure is required to pass the electricity. Once this force is achieved, stretching the fabric does not affect the amount of heat produced.

  8. Modelling the mechanical response of an idealized ice stream to variations in geothermal heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Johnsen, Silje; de Fleurian, Basile; Hestnes Nisancioglu, Kerim

    2017-04-01

    The spatial distribution of geothermal heat flux beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet is largely unknown partly due to difficulties in accessing the bed, and bore hole data providing point measurements only. Studies using tectonic, seismic and magnetic models to retrieve the geothermal heat flux show very different results indicating large uncertainties. However, modelling studies point to a geothermal heat flux anomaly that may influence the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream (NEGIS). Previous studies have investigated the impact of the uncertainty in geothermal heatflux on ice dynamics. These studies are mainly focusing on the impact on the ice rheology as the basal condition are derived from inverse modelling methods (including the geothermal heat flux variability in the variability of the friction coefficient). Another important feedback is the increase in subglacial meltwater production which may affect the sliding velocities of an ice stream, and has not been taken into account in preceding studies. In this study we investigate the impact of variations in geothermal heat flux on ice dynamics by analysing the mechanical response of a synthetic ice stream simulating NEGIS using the Ice Sheet System Model (Larour et al. 2012). We present results from model experiments using different heat flux configurations, friction laws and a hydrology model, showing the importance of geothermal heat flux on basal conditions of fast flowing ice.

  9. Mechanism and numerical analysis of heat transfer enhancement in the core flow along a tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The present study introduces the principles of enhanced heat transfer in the core flow to form an equivalent thermal boundary layer in the fully developed laminar tube flow, which consequently enlarges the temperature gradient of the fluid near the tube wall, and thereby enhances the heat transfer between the fluid and the tube wall. At the same time, the increase of flow resistance in the tube is not so obvious. Mechanism analysis and numerical calculation based on air and water have been carried out to verify the principle and method presented in this paper, which may bring positive effects to the design of heat exchanger with high heat transfer efficiency and low flow resistance.

  10. Wind- and stack-assisted mechanical ventilation with heat recovery and night cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    presented the outline of a heat recovery concept suitable for stack and wind-assisted mechanical ventilation systems with total system pressure losses of 74Pa. The heat recovery concept is based on two air-to-water exchangers connected by a liquid loop powered by a pump. The core element of the concept......, a prototype of a heat exchanger, was developed based on design criteria about pressure drop, eciency and production concerns. The exchanger is based on banks of plastic tubing cris-crossing the air flow, thus creating approximate counter flow between air and water. Round PE plastic tubing is used. The tubing...... fittings. Multiple design proposals were modeled and investigated to determine the optimal solution with respect to pressure drop, heat transfer, and production feasibility. Software models were developed to simulate the temperature distribution within the tube bank. The final design involves two parallel...

  11. Noninvasive induction implant heating: an approach for contactless altering of mechanical properties of shape memory implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Ronny; Hustedt, Michael; Wesling, Volker; Hurschler, Christoph; Olender, Gavin; Mach, Martin; Gösling, Thomas; Müller, Christian W

    2013-01-01

    This article shows an approach to change the properties of an orthopaedic shape memory implant within biological tissue, using contactless induction heating. Due to inducing the one way-memory effect, triggered by the rise of temperature within the implant, the geometry and hence the mechanical properties of the implant itself, are altered. The power uptake of the implant, depending on the induction parameters as well as on its position within the induction coil, is shown. Thermographic measurements are carried out in order to determine the surface temperature distribution of the implant. In order to simulate biological tissue, the implant was embedded in agarose gel. Suitable heating parameters, in terms of a short heating process in combination with a reduced heat impact on the surrounding environment, were determined.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Mechanical Properties of PVC Polymer under Different Heating and Cooling Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkawt Rostam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to a widely increasing usage of polymers in various industrial applications, there should be a continuous need in doing research investigations for better understanding of their properties. These applications require the usage of the polymer in different working environments subjecting the material to various temperature ranges. In this paper, an experimental investigation of mechanical properties of polyvinyl chloride (PVC polymer under heating and cooling conditions is presented. For this purpose standard samples are prepared and tested in laboratory using universal material testing apparatus. The samples are tested under different conditions including the room temperature environment, cooling in a refrigerator, and heating at different heating temperatures. It is observed that the strength of the tested samples decreases with the increasing of heating temperature and accordingly the material becomes softer. Meanwhile the cooling environments give a clear increasing to the strength of the material.

  13. Emission Baselines for Clean Development Mechanism Projects: Residential Heating Case in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To explore emission baseline, technically the most difficult issue for Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project development, as well as to examine whether CDM is a possible way to help Beijing restructure its heating energy consumption, this paper conducts a CDM baseline case study on residential heating in Beijing. Based on investigation, energy consumption forecast and economic analysis of future technology options, the technology benchmark and site-specific baselines for both retrofit projects and new heating projects have been discussed. The results indicate that fuel switching from coal to natural gas can meet the additionality criteria in many cases and will be the main type of CDM project. In addition, it also proves that the technology benchmark and the case-by-case baseline setting approach are applicable for future CDM cooperation projects on heating in Beijing.

  14. Energetic characterisation and statistics of solar coronal brightenings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchlin, Eric; Solomon, Jacques; Joulin, Vincent; Guennou, Chloé

    2016-07-01

    To explain the high temperature of the corona, much attention has been paid to the distribution of energy in dissipation events, which might be caused by turbulent reconnection. Indeed, if the event energy distribution is steep enough, the smallest, unobservable events could be the largest contributors to the total energy dissipation in the corona. Previous observations have shown a wide distribution of energies but remain inconclusive about the precise slope. Furthermore, these results rely on a very crude estimate of the energy. On the other hand, more detailed spectroscopic studies of structures such as coronal bright points do not provide enough statistical information to derive their total contribution to heating. We aim at getting a better estimate of the distributions of the energy dissipated in coronal heating events using high-resolution, multi-channel Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) data. To estimate the energies corresponding to heating events and deduce their distribution, we detect brightenings in five EUV channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We combine the results of these detections and we use maps of temperature and emission measure derived from the same observations to compute the energies. We obtain distributions of areas, durations, intensities, and energies (thermal, radiative, and conductive) of events. These distributions are power-laws, and we find also power-law correlations between event parameters. The energy distributions indicate that the energy from a population of events like the ones we detect represents a small contribution to the total coronal heating, even when extrapolating to smaller scales. The main explanations for this are how heating events can be extracted from observational data, and the incomplete knowledge of the thermal structure and processes in the coronal plasma attainable from available observations.

  15. Effects of material properties on the competition mechanism of heat transfer of a granular bed in rotary cylinders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Zhi-Yin; Feng Jun-Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Mixing and heat transfer processes of the granular materials within rotary cylinders play a key role in industrial processes.The numerical simulation is carried out by using the discrete element method (DEM) to investigate the influences of material properties on the bed mixing and heat transfer process,including heat conductivity,heat capacity,and shear modulus.Moreover,a new Péclet number is derived to determine the dominant mechanism of the heating rate within the particle bed,which is directly related to thermal and mechanical properties.The system exhibits a faster heating rate with the increase of ratio of thermal conductivity and heat capacity,or the decrease of shear modulus when inter-particle conduction dominates the heating rate; conversely,it shows a fast-mixing bed when particle convection governs the heating rate.The simulation results show good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  16. The Fate of Cool Material in the Hot Corona: Solar Prominences and Coronal Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Antolin, Patrick; Sun, Xudong; Vial, Jean-Claude; Berger, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    As an important chain of the chromosphere-corona mass cycle, some of the million-degree hot coronal mass undergoes a radiative cooling instability and condenses into material at chromospheric or transition-region temperatures in two distinct forms - prominences and coronal rain (some of which eventually falls back to the chromosphere). A quiescent prominence usually consists of numerous long-lasting, filamentary downflow threads, while coronal rain consists of transient mass blobs falling at comparably higher speeds along well-defined paths. It remains puzzling why such material of similar temperatures exhibit contrasting morphologies and behaviors. We report recent SDO/AIA and IRIS observations that suggest different magnetic environments being responsible for such distinctions. Specifically, in a hybrid prominence-coronal rain complex structure, we found that the prominence material is formed and resides near magnetic null points that favor the radiative cooling process and provide possibly a high plasma-beta environment suitable for the existence of meandering prominence threads. As the cool material descends, it turns into coronal rain tied onto low-lying coronal loops in a likely low-beta environment. Such structures resemble to certain extent the so-called coronal spiders or cloud prominences, but the observations reported here provide critical new insights. We will discuss the broad physical implications of these observations for fundamental questions, such as coronal heating and beyond (e.g., in astrophysical and/or laboratory plasma environments).

  17. Distinct Testicular Steroidogenic Response Mechanisms Between Neonatal and Adult Heat-Acclimated Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Kurowicka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In comparison to short-term gonad heat exposure, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate testicular steroidogenesis during long-term whole body heat acclimation. Material and Methods: Testicular slices from neonatal (NHA and adult (AHA heat-acclimated Wistar rats were analysed in vitro to assess the mRNA expression and enzymatic activity of steroidogenic enzymes under basal and luteinising hormone (LH or prolactin (PRL stimulated conditions compared with control rats (CR. Furthermore, a de-acclimated group (DA was created by transferring adult NHA rats to control conditions. Results: Heat acclimation significantly increased plasma LH levels in the AHA group and LH and PRL in the NHA group compared with the CR group; however, after heat acclimation, the T and E2 levels did not differ from the control levels. All heat-acclimated groups showed high basal intra-testicular steroid production in vitro. Moreover, basal Cyp11a1 and Hsd3b1 levels were upregulated in vitro in the NHA and DA groups versus the CR group. LH in vitro stimulation upregulated Cyp11a1 expression in the NHA and AHA groups and PRL stimulation upregulated Cyp17a1 levels in the NHA and DA groups compared with the basal expression levels. In the AHA group, decreased basal Star and CYP11A activities but increased HSD3B1 and CYP17A1 activities were found. Conclusion: Our data revealed that despite the similar steroid levels in plasma and secreted in vitro by neonatal and adult heat-acclimated rat testicular slices, the molecular mechanisms underlying the steroidogenic response to heat acclimation during these different developmental stages were distinct.

  18. Flow mechanism and heat transfer enhancement in longitudinal-flow tube bundle of shell-and-tube heat exchanger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; LIU ZhiChun; WANG YingShuang; HUANG SuYi

    2009-01-01

    ormer is superior to that of the latter.Compared with rod baffle heat exchanger,heat transfer coefficient of the heat exchanger under investigation is higher under same pressure drop,especially under the high Reynolds numbers.

  19. Coronal Mass Ejections An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    In times of growing technological sophistication and of our dependence on electronic technology, we are all affected by space weather. In its most extreme form, space weather can disrupt communications, damage and destroy spacecraft and power stations, and increase radiation exposure to astronauts and airline passengers. Major space weather events, called geomagnetic storms, are large disruptions in the Earth’s magnetic field brought about by the arrival of enormous magnetized plasma clouds from the Sun. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) contain billions of tons of plasma and hurtle through space at speeds of several million miles per hour. Understanding coronal mass ejections and their impact on the Earth is of great interest to both the scientific and technological communities. This book provides an introduction to coronal mass ejections, including a history of their observation and scientific revelations, instruments and theory behind their detection and measurement, and the status quo of theories describing...

  20. Motion magnification in coronal seismology

    CERN Document Server

    Anfinogentov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new method for the investigation of low-amplitude transverse oscillations of solar plasma non-uniformities, such as coronal loops, individual strands in coronal arcades, jets, prominence fibrils, polar plumes, and other contrast features, observed with imaging instruments. The method is based on the two-dimensional dual tree complex wavelet transform (DT$\\mathbb{C}$WT). It allows us to magnify transverse, in the plane-of-the-sky, quasi-periodic motions of contrast features in image sequences. The tests performed on the artificial data cubes imitating exponentially decaying, multi-periodic and frequency-modulated kink oscillations of coronal loops showed the effectiveness, reliability and robustness of this technique. The algorithm was found to give linear scaling of the magnified amplitudes with the original amplitudes provided they are sufficiently small. Also, the magnification is independent of the oscillation period in a broad range of the periods. The application of this technique to SDO/A...

  1. Observational Analysis of Coronal Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpeanu, D.-C.; Rachmeler, L; Mierla, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    Coronal fans (see Figure 1) are bright observational structures that extend to large distances above the solar surface and can easily be seen in EUV (174 angstrom) above the limb. They have a very long lifetime and can live up to several Carrington rotations (CR), remaining relatively stationary for many months. Note that they are not off-limb manifestation of similarly-named active region fans. The solar conditions required to create coronal fans are not well understood. The goal of this research was to find as many associations as possible of coronal fans with other solar features and to gain a better understanding of these structures. Therefore, we analyzed many fans and created an overview of their properties. We present the results of this statistical analysis and also a case study on the longest living fan.

  2. Variation of Mechanical Properties of High RRR And Reactor Grade Niobium With Heat Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapati Myneni; H. Umezawa

    2003-06-01

    Superconducting rf cavities used as accelerating structures in particle accelerators are made from high purity niobium with residual resistance ratios greater than 250. Reactor grade niobium is also used to make wave-guide and/or end group components for these accelerating structures. The major impurities in this type of niobium are interstitially dissolved gases such as hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen in addition to carbon. After fabricating the niobium accelerating structures, they are subjected to heat treatments for several hours in vacuum at temperatures of up to 900 C for degassing hydrogen or up to 1400 C for improving the thermal conductivity of niobium considerably. These heat treatments are affecting the mechanical properties of niobium drastically. In this paper the variation of the mechanical properties of high purity and reactor grade niobium with heat treatments in a vacuum of {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr and temperatures from 600 C to 1250 C for periods of 10 to 6 hours are presented.

  3. Effect of Heat Treatment on Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Performance of Cold-Sprayed Tantalum Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Vidyasagar, V.; Jyothirmayi, A.; Joshi, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The cold-spray technique is of significant interest to deposit refractory metals with relatively high melting point for a variety of demanding applications. In the present study, mechanical properties of cold-sprayed tantalum coatings heat treated at different temperatures were investigated using microtensile testing, scratch testing, and nanoindentation. The corrosion performance of heat-treated coatings was also evaluated in 1 M KOH solution, and potentiodynamic polarization as well as impedance spectroscopy studies were carried out. Assessment of structure-property correlations was attempted based on microstructure, porosity, and intersplat bonding state, together with mechanical and corrosion properties of the heat-treated cold-sprayed tantalum coatings. Coatings annealed at 1500 °C, which is very close to the recrystallization temperature of tantalum, were found to perform almost as bulk tantalum, with exciting implications for various applications.

  4. Thermal and mechanical effect during rapid heating of astroloy for improving structural integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popoolaa, A.P.I., E-mail: popoolaapi@tut.ac.za [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Oluwasegun, K.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); Olorunniwo, O.E., E-mail: segun_nniwo@yahoo.com [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); Atanda, P.O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); Aigbodion, V.S. [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Nigeria, Nsukka (Nigeria)

    2016-05-05

    The behaviour of γ′ phase to thermal and mechanical effects during rapid heating of Astroloy(Turbine Disc alloy) a Powder metallurgy (PM) nickel base superalloy has been investigated. The thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure of an inertia friction welded Astroloy were simulated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulation system. Detailed microstructural examination of the simulated TMAZ and HAZ and those present in actual inertial friction welded specimens showed that γ′ particles persisted during rapid heating up to a temperature where the formation of liquid is thermodynamically favoured, and subsequently re-solidified eutectically. The result obtained showed that forging during the thermo-mechanical simulation significantly enhanced resistance to weld liquation cracking of the alloy. This is attributable to strain-induced rapid isothermal dissolution of the constitutional liquation products within 150 μm from the centre of the forged sample. This was not observed in purely thermally simulated samples. The microstructure within the TMAZ of the as-welded alloy is similar to the microstructure in the forged Gleeble specimens. - Highlights: • The behaviour of γ′ phase to thermal and mechanical effects during rapid heating of Astrology • The thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ). • significantly enhanced resistance to weld liquation cracking of the alloy. • This was not observed in purely thermally simulated samples. • The microstructure within the TMAZ of the as-welded alloy is similar to the microstructure in the forged Gleeble specimens.

  5. Loop heating by D.C. electric current and electromagnetic wave emissions simulated by 3-D EM particle zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, J. I.; Zhao, J.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that a current-carrying plasma loop can be heated by magnetic pinch driven by the pressure imbalance between inside and outside the loop, using a 3-dimensional electromagnetic (EM) particle code. Both electrons and ions in the loop can be heated in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, therefore the perpendicular temperature can be increased about 10 times compared with the parallel temperature. This temperature anisotropy produced by the magnetic pinch heating can induce a plasma instability, by which high-frequency electromagnetic waves can be excited. The plasma current which is enhanced by the magnetic pinch can also excite a kinetic kink instability, which can heat ions perpendicular to the magnetic field. The heating mechanism of ions as well as the electromagnetic emission could be important for an understanding of the coronal loop heating and the electromagnetic wave emissions from active coronal regions.

  6. Effects of Heat-treatments on the Mechanical Strength of Coated YSZ: An Experimental Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Helmuth Langmaack; Sørensen, Bent F.; Linderoth, Søren;

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical strength of thin, symmetric sandwich specimens consisting of a dense yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate coated with a porous NiO–YSZ layer at both major faces was investigated. Specimens were loaded in uniaxial tension to failure following heat treatments at various...

  7. Star formation in extreme environments : The effects of cosmic rays and mechanical heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; Loenen, A. F.; van der Werf, Paul P.

    Context. The molecular interstellar medium in extreme environments, such as Arp 220, but also NGC 253 appears to have extremely high cosmic ray (CR) rates (10(3)-10(4) x Milky Way) and substantial mechanical heating from supernova driven turbulence. Aims. We explore the consequences of high CR rates

  8. Analysis of the solar coronal green line profiles from eclipse observations

    CERN Document Server

    Prabhakar, Maya; Chandrasekhar, T

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the solar coronal green line profiles reveals information regarding the physical conditions of the solar corona like temperature, density, Doppler velocity, non-thermal velocity etc. It provides insights to the unresolved problems like the coronal heating and the acceleration of the solar winds. Recent studies have reported excess blueshifts in the coronal line profiles and are interpreted as due to nanoflare heating, type II spicules and nascent solar wind flow. We have analyzed a time series of Fabry-Perot interferograms of the solar corona obtained during the total solar eclipse of 2001 June 21 from Lusaka, Zambia. The spatial behavior of the coronal green line profiles were examined and variations in intensity, linewidth, Doppler velocity and line asymmetry were obtained. Several line profiles showed asymmetry indicating the presence of multicomponents. Such line profiles were fitted with double Gaussian curves. It has been found that 42% of the line profiles were single components, 34% were b...

  9. Thermal and non-thermal emission from reconnecting twisted coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, R; Browning, P K; Vilmer, N

    2016-01-01

    Twisted magnetic fields should be ubiquitous in the solar corona. The magnetic energy contained in such twisted fields can be released during solar flares and other explosive phenomena. Reconnection in helical magnetic coronal loops results in plasma heating and particle acceleration distributed within a large volume, including the lower coronal and chromospheric sections of the loops, and can be a viable alternative to the standard flare model, where particles are accelerated only in a small volume located in the upper corona. The goal of this study is to investigate the observational signatures of plasma heating and particle acceleration in kink-unstable twisted coronal loops using combination of MHD simulations and test-particle methods. The simulations describe the development of kink instability and magnetic reconnection in twisted coronal loops using resistive compressible MHD, and incorporate atmospheric stratification and large-scale loop curvature. The resulting distributions of hot plasma let us est...

  10. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. S. Al-Ghafri

    2015-06-01

    The standing slow magneto-acoustic oscillations in cooling coronal loops are investigated. There are two damping mechanisms which are considered to generate the standing acoustic modes in coronal magnetic loops, namely, thermal conduction and radiation. The background temperature is assumed to change temporally due to optically thin radiation. In particular, the background plasma is assumed to be radiatively cooling. The effects of cooling on longitudinal slow MHD modes is analytically evaluated by choosing a simple form of radiative function, that ensures the temperature evolution of the background plasma due to radiation, coincides with the observed cooling profile of coronal loops. The assumption of low-beta plasma leads to neglecting the magnetic field perturbation and, eventually, reduces the MHD equations to a 1D system modelling longitudinal MHD oscillations in a cooling coronal loop. The cooling is assumed to occur on a characteristic time scale, much larger than the oscillation period that subsequently enables using the WKB theory to study the properties of standing wave. The governing equation describing the time-dependent amplitude of waves is obtained and solved analytically. The analytically derived solutions are numerically evaluated to give further insight into the evolution of the standing acoustic waves. We find that the plasma cooling gives rise to a decrease in the amplitude of oscillations. In spite of the reduction in damping rate caused by rising the cooling, the damping scenario of slow standing MHD waves strongly increases in hot coronal loops.

  11. Heating mechanisms in the low solar atmosphere through magnetic reconnection in current sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Lei; Roussev, Ilia I; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    We simulate several magnetic reconnection processes in the low solar chromosphere/photosphere, the radiation cooling, heat conduction and ambipolar diffusion are all included. Our numerical results indicate that both the high temperature($ \\gtrsim 8\\times10^4$~K) and low temperature($\\sim 10^4$~K) magnetic reconnection events can happen in the low solar atmosphere ($100\\sim600$~km above the solar surface). The plasma $\\beta$ controlled by plasma density and magnetic fields is one important factor to decide how much the plasma can be heated up. The low temperature event is formed in a high $\\beta$ magnetic reconnection process, Joule heating is the main mechanism to heat plasma and the maximum temperature increase is only several thousand Kelvin. The high temperature explosions can be generated in a low $\\beta$ magnetic reconnection process, slow and fast-mode shocks attached at the edges of the well developed plasmoids are the main physical mechanisms to heat the plasma from several thousand Kelvin to over $8...

  12. On a Thermodynamic Mechanism of Dissipation of Mechanical Energy in Porous Elastomers as Applied to the Problem of Heating of Automobile Tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinchuk, P. S.; Shnip, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    It has been shown that in the case of cyclic mechanical loads on a porous elastomer there are regimes in which irreversible processes of heat transfer between the gas and the elastomer are responsible for the appearance of a nonzero heat flux averaged over the period and directed from the gas into the condensed phase; this heat flux is compensated for with the dissipation of mechanical energy from the loading source. A possible influence of this mechanism of dissipation on the heating of automobile tires is assessed. Possible methods of recording of this effect are discussed.

  13. A Long Look at MCG-5-23-16 with NuSTAR. I. Relativistic Reflection and Coronal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Matt, G.; Miller, J. M.; Lohfink, A. M.; Walton, D. J.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Garcia, J. A.; Stern, D.; Koss, M. J.; Farrah, D.; hide

    2017-01-01

    MCG-5-23-16 was targeted in early 2015 with a half mega-second observing campaign using NuSTAR. Here we present the spectral analysis of these data sets along with an earlier observation and study the relativistic reflection and the primary coronal source. The data show strong reflection features in the form of both narrow and broad iron lines plus a Compton reflection hump. A cutoff energy is significantly detected in all exposures. The shape of the reflection spectrum does not change in the two years spanned by the observations, suggesting a stable geometry. A strong positive correlation is found between the cutoff energy and both the hard X-ray flux and spectral index. The measurements imply that the coronal plasma is not at the runaway electron-positron pair limit, and instead contains mostly electrons. The observed variability in the coronal properties is driven by a variable optical depth. A constant heating-to-cooling ratio is measured, implying that there is a feedback mechanism in which a significant fraction of the photons cooling the corona are due to reprocessed hard X-rays.

  14. Characteristics of the Heat Island Effect in Shanghai and Its Possible Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈隆勋; 朱文琴; 周秀骥; 周自江

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of the urban heat island effect and the climate change in Shanghai and its possible mechanism are analyzed based on monthly meteorological data from 1961 to 1997 at 16 stations in Shanghai and its adjacent areas. The results indicate that Shanghai City has the characteristics of a heat island of air temperature and maximum and minimum air temperature, a cold island of surface soil temperature, a weak rainy island of precipitation, and a turbid island of minimum visibility and aerosols, with centers at or near Longhua station (the urban station of Shanghai). Besides theses, the characteristics of a cloudy island and sunshine duration island are also obvious, but their centers are located in the southern part of the urban area and in the southern suburbs. A linear trend analysis suggests that all of the above urban effects intensified from 1961 to 1997. So far as the heat island effect is concerned, the heat island index (difference of annual temperature between Longhua and Songjiang stations) strengthens (weakens) as the economic development increases (decreases). The authors suggest that the heating increase caused by increasing energy consumption due to economic development is a main factor in controlling the climate change of Shanghai besides natural factors. On the other hand, increasing pollution aerosols contribute to the enhancement of the turbid island and cooling. On the whole, the heating effect caused by increasing energy consumption is stronger than the cooling effect caused by the turbid island and pollution aerosols.

  15. Heating and melting mechanism of stainless steelmaking dust pellet in liquid slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG ji; TANG Mo-tang; PENG Bing; YU Di; J.A.KOZINSKl; TANG Chao-bo

    2007-01-01

    The heating and melting mechanisms of the pellets immersed in liquid slag were investigated. and the effect of the pellet heating and the melting conditions were studied. The results show that the dust component in the pellet is melted from the surface and no metallic elements are melted before the dust component, the time for the pellet completely melted is reduced as the iron powder content increases since the metallic iron has high thermal conductivity. These are four stages of heating and melting of pellet in liquid slag, they are the growth and melt of solid slag shell, penetration of liquid slag, dissolving of dust component and melring of reduced metals.The lifetime of the solid slag shell is in the range of 7-16 s and increasing the pre-heating temperature of the pellet and the slag temperature can shorten the slag shell liretime. The time for the dust component in the pellet to be melted completely is in the range of 20-45 s and increasing the pre-heating temperature, especially in the range of 600-800 ℃.can obviously reduce the melting time. A higher slag temperature can also improvethe pellet melting and the melting time is reduced by l0-15 s when the slag temperature is increased from 1 450 to 1 550 ℃.The pellet with higher content of iron powder is beneficial to the melting by improving the heat conductivity.

  16. Heating Mechanisms in the Low Solar Atmosphere through Magnetic Reconnection in Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lei; Lin, Jun; Roussev, Ilia I.; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2016-12-01

    We simulate several magnetic reconnection processes in the low solar chromosphere/photosphere; the radiation cooling, heat conduction and ambipolar diffusion are all included. Our numerical results indicate that both the high temperature (≳8 × 104 K) and low temperature (˜104 K) magnetic reconnection events can happen in the low solar atmosphere (100-600 km above the solar surface). The plasma β controlled by plasma density and magnetic fields is one important factor to decide how much the plasma can be heated up. The low temperature event is formed in a high β magnetic reconnection process, Joule heating is the main mechanism to heat plasma and the maximum temperature increase is only several thousand Kelvin. The high temperature explosions can be generated in a low β magnetic reconnection process, slow and fast-mode shocks attached at the edges of the well developed plasmoids are the main physical mechanisms to heat the plasma from several thousand Kelvin to over 8 × 104 K. Gravity in the low chromosphere can strongly hinder the plasmoid instability and the formation of slow-mode shocks in a vertical current sheet. Only small secondary islands are formed; these islands, however, are not as well developed as those in the horizontal current sheets. This work can be applied to understand the heating mechanism in the low solar atmosphere and could possibly be extended to explain the formation of common low temperature Ellerman bombs (˜104 K) and the high temperature Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) bombs (≳8 × 104) in the future.

  17. EFFECT OF STEAM-HEAT TREATMENT ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CHINESE FIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjian Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat treatment often brings about some negative effects on mechanical properties of wood. Chinese fir is currently underutilized due to some inherent properties that limit its further applications. Using steam as a heating medium and a shielding gas, the heartwood and sapwood of Chinese fir were treated at a temperature ranging from 170ºC to 230ºC and time from 1 to 5 hours in an airtight chamber. Both the modulus of rupture (MOR and modulus of elasticity (MOE were increased for the sapwood specimens under the temperature less than 200ºC for short treatment times. The hardness was increased for both two kinds of specimens under the temperature less than or about 200ºC, compared to the untreated specimens. The temperature has a stronger effect on mechanical properties of wood than the time, and the temperature of 200 ºC is a critical point in modifying mechanical properties of wood.

  18. Enhancing water repellence and mechanical properties of antibacterialgelatin/Ce(lll) fiber by heat treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lin; WANG Shiqi; HUANG Yaqin; ZHOU Yating; TONG Yuanjian; CHEN Xiaonong

    2011-01-01

    The water repellence and mechanical properties of the gelatin/Ce(Ⅲ) fiber (GCe fiber) were improved by heat treatment,which was an easy and non-toxic method.The microscopic morphology,mechanical properties,antibacterial activity,and cell culture of the GCe fibers by heat treatment (HGCe fiber) were investigated.It was found that the water repellence and mechanical properties of the HGCe fibers increased significantly along with temperature increase.SEM observation showed that HGCe fibers had a fairly smooth surface and a compact structure.Detailed characterization revealed that the HGCe fibers exhibited similar antibacterial activity with the GCe fibers against Staphylococcus aureus.In addition,the results of cell culture by morphological assessment and methylthiazolyl tetrazolium assay (MTT assay)indicated the good biocompatibility of GCe fibers.Therefore,the HGCe fibers could be a promising candidate biomaterial for biomedicine applications.

  19. Is there a layer deep in the Earth that uncouples heat from mechanical work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Burns

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermal expansion coefficient is presented as the coupling between heat energy and mechanical work. It is shown that when heat and work are uncoupled then very unusual material properties occurs: for example, acoustic p waves are not damped and heat is not generated from mechanical motion. It is found that at pressures defined by the bulk modulus divided by the Anderson–Grüneisen parameter, then the thermal expansion coefficient approaches zero in linear-elastic models. Very large pressures always reduce thermal expansion coefficients; the importance of a very small or even negative thermal expansion coefficient is discussed in relation to physical processes deep in the core and mantle of Earth. Models of the thermal expansion coefficients based on interatomic potentials which are always relegated to isometric conditions preclude any changes in volume due to temperature changes. However, it is known that the pressures in the Earth are large enough to effectively reduce thermal expansion coefficients to near zero which decouples heat from mechanical work.

  20. Exploring the molecular mechanism of acute heat stress exposure in broiler chickens using gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Q B; Song, X Y; Ji, C L; Zhang, X Q; Zhang, D X

    2014-08-10

    The process of heat regulation is complex and its exact molecular mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, to investigate the global gene regulation response to acute heat exposure, gene microarrays were exploited to analyze the effects of heat stress on three tissues (brain, liver, leg muscle) of the yellow broiler chicken (Gallus gallus). We detected 166 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the brain, 219 in the leg muscle and 317 in the liver. Six of these genes were differentially expressed in all three tissues and were validated by qRT-PCR, and included heat shock protein genes (HSPH1, HSP25), apoptosis-related genes (RB1CC1, BAG3), a cell proliferation and differentiation-related gene (ID1) and the hunger and energy metabolism related gene (PDK). All these genes might be important factors in chickens suffering from heat stress. We constructed gene co-expression networks using the DEGs of the brain, leg muscle and liver and two, four and two gene co-expression modules were identified in these tissues, respectively. Functional enrichment of these gene modules revealed that various functional clusters were related to the effects of heat stress, including those for cytoskeleton, extracellular space, ion binding and energy metabolism. We concluded that these genes and functional clusters might be important factors in chickens under acute heat stress. Further in-depth research on the newly discovered heat-related genes and functional clusters is required to fully understand their molecular functions in thermoregulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Study on Heat Hardening Mechanism of Starch Composite Binder for Sand Mold (Core) by IR Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia ZHOU; Jinzong YANG; Qin GAO; Guohui QU

    2001-01-01

    The heat hardening mechanism of starch composite binder for sand mold (core) was studied by way of IR spectra. It is thought that the bonding strength of molding sand is mainly depended on the strength of the adhesive membrane itself. During heating the binder at certain temperature between 160~200℃ for one hour, a special composite structure is formed because of the interactions between different components, thus, it has higher low-temperature drying strength,better humidity resistance and higher high-temperature strength.

  2. Nanostructures obtained from a mechanically alloyed and heat treated molybdenum carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Barriga Arceo, L. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, I.M.P. Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico) and ESIQIE-UPALM, IPN Apdo Postal 118-395, C.P. 07051 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: luchell@yahoo.com; Orozco, E. [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apdo Postal 20-364, C.P. 01000 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: eorozco@fisica.unam.mx; Mendoza-Leon, H. [ESIQIE-UPALM, IPN Apdo Postal 118-395, C.P. 07051 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: luchell@yahoo.com; Palacios Gonzalez, E. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, I.M.P. Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: epalacio@imp.mx; Leyte Guerrero, F. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, I.M.P. Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: fleyte@imp.mx; Garibay Febles, V. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, I.M.P. Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: vgaribay@imp.mx

    2007-05-31

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare molybdenum carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. Molybdenum carbide was heated at 800 {sup o}C for 15 min in order to produce carbon nanotubes. Nanoparticles of about 50-140 nm in diameter and nanotubes with diameters of about 70-260 nm and 0.18-0.3 {mu}m in length were obtained after heating at 800 {sup o}C, by means of this process.

  3. Exploring Coronal Structures with SOHO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Μ. Karovska; Β. Wood; J. Chen; J. Cook; R. Howard

    2000-09-01

    We applied advanced image enhancement techniques to explore in detail the characteristics of the small-scale structures and/or the low contrast structures in several Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO. We highlight here the results from our studies of the morphology and dynamical evolution of CME structures in the solar corona using two instruments on board SOHO: LASCO and EIT.

  4. MICROSTRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL STUDY OF ALUMINIUM ALLOYS SUBMITTED TO DISTINCT SOAKING TIMES DURING SOLUTION HEAT TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valmir Martins Monteiro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work studies the microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties for different aluminium alloys (1100, 3104 and 8011 hot rolled sheets that were subjected to a solution heat treatment with distinct soaking times, in order to promote microstructural and mechanical changes on these alloys with solute fractions slightly above the maximum solubility limit. Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM / Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy X-Ray (EDS, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and Hardness Tests were employed to observe the microstructural / compositional and mechanical evaluation. For the 1100 and 8011 alloys the more suitable soaking time occur between 1 and 2 hours, and for the 3104 alloy occurs between 2 and 3 hours.

  5. Chromospheric and Coronal Wave Generation in a Magnetic Flux Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Steiner, Oskar; Hansteen, Viggo; Gudiksen, Boris; Wedemeyer, Sven; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-08-01

    Using radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmospheric layers from the upper convection zone to the lower corona, we investigate the self-consistent excitation of slow magneto-acoustic body waves (slow modes) in a magnetic flux concentration. We find that the convective downdrafts in the close surroundings of a two-dimensional flux slab “pump” the plasma inside it in the downward direction. This action produces a downflow inside the flux slab, which encompasses ever higher layers, causing an upwardly propagating rarefaction wave. The slow mode, excited by the adiabatic compression of the downflow near the optical surface, travels along the magnetic field in the upward direction at the tube speed. It develops into a shock wave at chromospheric heights, where it dissipates, lifts the transition region, and produces an offspring in the form of a compressive wave that propagates further into the corona. In the wake of downflows and propagating shock waves, the atmosphere inside the flux slab in the chromosphere and higher tends to oscillate with a period of ν ≈ 4 mHz. We conclude that this process of “magnetic pumping” is a most plausible mechanism for the direct generation of longitudinal chromospheric and coronal compressive waves within magnetic flux concentrations, and it may provide an important heat source in the chromosphere. It may also be responsible for certain types of dynamic fibrils.

  6. Investigation of Coronal Large Scale Structures Utilizing Spartan 201 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, Madhulika

    1998-01-01

    Two telescopes aboard Spartan 201, a small satellite has been launched from the Space Shuttles, on April 8th, 1993, September 8th, 1994, September 7th, 1995 and November 20th, 1997. The main objective of the mission was to answer some of the most fundamental unanswered questions of solar physics-What accelerates the solar wind and what heats the corona? The two telescopes are 1) Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) provided by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory which uses ultraviolet emissions from neutral hydrogen and ions in the corona to determine velocities of the coronal plasma within the solar wind source region, and the temperature and density distributions of protons and 2) White Light Coronagraph (WLC) provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center which measures visible light to determine the density distribution of coronal electrons within the same region. The PI has had the primary responsibility in the development and application of computer codes necessary for scientific data analysis activities, end instrument calibration for the white-light coronagraph for the entire Spartan mission. The PI was responsible for the science output from the WLC instrument. PI has also been involved in the investigation of coronal density distributions in large-scale structures by use of numerical models which are (mathematically) sufficient to reproduce the details of the observed brightness and polarized brightness distributions found in SPARTAN 201 data.

  7. Non-Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics of Anharmonic Chains Coupled to Two Heat Baths at Different Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Eckmann, Jean-Pierre; Rey-Bellet, L; Eckmann, Jean-Pierre; Pillet, Claude-Alain; Rey-Bellet, Luc

    1999-01-01

    We study the statistical mechanics of a finite-dimensional non-linear Hamiltonian system (a chain of anharmonic oscillators) coupled to two heat baths (described by wave equations). Assuming that the initial conditions of the heat baths are distributed according to the Gibbs measures at two different temperatures we study the dynamics of the oscillators. Under suitable assumptions on the potential and on the coupling between the chain and the heat baths, we prove the existence of an invariant measure for any temperature difference, i.e., we prove the existence of steady states. Furthermore, if the temperature difference is sufficiently small, we prove that the invariant measure is unique and mixing. In particular, we develop new techniques for proving the existence of invariant measures for random processes on a non-compact phase space. These techniques are based on an extension of the commutator method of Hörmander used in the study of hypoelliptic differential operators.

  8. A thermo-mechanically coupled finite strain model considering inelastic heat generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunić, Vladimir; Busarac, Nenad; Slavković, Vukašin; Rosić, Bojana; Niekamp, Rainer; Matthies, Hermann; Slavković, Radovan; Živković, Miroslav

    2016-07-01

    The procedure for reuse of finite element method (FEM) programs for heat transfer and structure analysis to solve advanced thermo-mechanical problems is presented as powerful algorithm applicable for coupling of other physical fields (magnetic, fluid flow, etc.). In this case, nonlinear Block-Gauss-Seidel partitioned algorithm strongly couples the heat transfer and structural FEM programs by a component-based software engineering. Component template library provides possibility to exchange the data between the components which solve the corresponding subproblems. The structural component evaluates the dissipative energy induced by inelastic strain. The heat transfer component computes the temperature change due to the dissipation. The convergence is guaranteed by posing the global convergence criterion on the previously locally converged coupled variables. This enables reuse of software and allows the numerical simulation of thermo-sensitive problems.

  9. Effects of heat treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 6061 aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maisonnette, D. [Universite de Lyon, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, LaMCoS UMR5259, F-69621 (France); Suery, M. [Universite de Grenoble, SIMaP, UMR CNRS 5266, BP46, Domaine Universitaire, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Nelias, D., E-mail: daniel.nelias@insa-lyon.fr [Universite de Lyon, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, LaMCoS UMR5259, F-69621 (France); Chaudet, P. [Universite de Lyon, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, LaMCoS UMR5259, F-69621 (France); Epicier, T. [Universite de Lyon, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, Mateis UMR5510, F-69621 (France)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Description of the mechanical behavior of AA6061-T6 at RT after various thermal histories. {yields} A fast-heating device has been designed to reproduce those thermal histories on tensile specimens. {yields} The thermal loadings are representative of the temperature change observed in the HAZ during welding. {yields} The variation of mechanical properties is the result of metallurgical evolution observed by TEM. {yields} The yield stress at RT decreases with the maximum temperature reached during the thermal cycle. - Abstract: This paper describes the mechanical behavior of the 6061-T6 aluminium alloy at room temperature for various previous thermal histories representative of an electron beam welding. A fast-heating device has been designed to control and apply thermal loadings on tensile specimens. Tensile tests show that the yield stress at ambient temperature decreases if the maximum temperature reached increases or if the heating rate decreases. This variation of the mechanical properties is the result of microstructural changes which have been observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).

  10. Effect of different heating methods on deformation of metal plate under upsetting mechanism in laser forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongjun; Liu, Yancong; Yi, Peng; Hu, Jun

    2012-03-01

    In a laser forming process, different forming mechanisms have different deformation behaviors. The aim of laser forming is to acquire plane strain under an upsetting mechanism, while a plate undergoes a small bending deformation. In some industrial applications, the bending strain should not occur. To achieve high-precision forming, the deformation behaviors of a metal plate when an upsetting mechanism plays a dominant role are studied in the paper. Several heating methods are proposed to reduce the plane strain difference along the thickness direction and little bending deformation resulting from a small temperature difference between the top and bottom surfaces of the plate. The results show that negligible bending deformation and a uniform plastic plane strain field can be obtained by simultaneously heating the top and bottom surfaces with the same process parameters. A conventional scanning method needs a larger spot diameter and slower scanning speed under the upsetting mechanism, but a smaller spot diameter and quicker scanning speed may be selected using the simultaneous heating method, which can greatly widen the potential scope of process parameters.

  11. A new method to select appropriate countermeasures against heat-island effects according to the regional characteristics of heat balance mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Kiyoshi [Institute of Technology, SHIMIZU Corporation, 3-4-17 Etchujima, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8530 (Japan); Mochida, Akashi; Yoshino, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aoba 6-6-11-1202, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Watanabe, Hironori [Department of Architecture, Tohoku Institute of Technology, 35-1 Kasumi-cho, Yagiyama, Taihaku-ku, Sendai 982-8577 (Japan); Yoshida, Tomohiro [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 1-1-11 Babadori, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 320-0026 (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    This study aims at clarifying the regional heat balance characteristics in an urban space of a city. CFD analyses of mesoscale climates of Tokyo, Sendai and Haramachi were carried out. The influence of regional characteristics on urban climates was examined, based on the results of CFD analyses, by considering the heat balance mechanism in the central part of each city. It was confirmed that the factors greatly contributing to air temperature increasing and decreasing in each city was different. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of heat budget inside Sendai city was drawn, as 'Heat Balance Map'. The map illustrated the areas where influence of sea breeze was significant in contrast with heat generated from ground surfaces and anthropogenic heat release in this city. (author)

  12. Mechanical properties and development of supersolvus heat treated new nickel base superalloy AD730TM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaux A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The enhancement of efficiency in power generation gas turbine requires the development of new superalloys capable of withstanding higher temperatures. The development of AD730TM superalloy was achieved to provide to this new cast & wrought (C&W superalloy a higher combination between mechanical properties, microstructural stability and cost than that of other C&W superalloys with a temperature capability up to 750 ∘C. Supersolvus heat-treatment of AD730TM was studied to improve the creep properties of fine grain AD730TM superalloy which were not high enough to reach the foreseen conditions of future power generation gas turbine disks. Firstly, the grain growth was studied to select the supersolvus temperature 1120 ∘C and to obtain a homogeneous coarse grain microstructure. Then, various supersolvus heat-treatments with different cycles were tested and applied on a forged pancake with a section representative of power generation gas turbine disk. The average grain size was evaluated to be close to 200 μm for all heat-treatments. Tensile, creep, fatigue and fatigue crack growth tests were performed to compare the various heat-treatments. FEG-SEM examinations were also realized to discuss the relationships between heat-treatment, intragranular gamma prime precipitation and mechanical properties. Finally, a comparison made with other supersolvus heat treated C&W superalloys shows that AD730TM properties obtained with coarse grain microstructure are at the expected level and enable applications for power generation gas turbine discs.

  13. Study on eruption of heat for Escherichia coil B aroused by lanthanum nitrate and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guosheng LIU; Zhilin RAN; Hailei WANG; Yi LIU; Ping SHEN; Yan LU

    2008-01-01

    Biological effect of rare-earth lanthanum nitrate on the growth of Escherichia coli B was studied using the calorimetric method. There were exceptional changes on the growth thermogenic curves for high concentrations of lanthanum nitrate. For example, the peak high, the total quantity of heat (Q) of cultures and the growth rate constants (k) are evidently increased when compared with normal E. Coli B cultures. When the concentration of lanthanum nitrate was at 300 mg/L and 500 rag/L, the Q of the cultures reached 3.89 and 2.54 times of normal cultures, respectively. The survivability of cells and the biomass of the cultures were measured using biological methods and the results show that the growth and multiplication of cells were inhibited and that the biomass decreased at high concentration of lanthanum nitrate. These revealed that the inhibiting cells discharged more quantity of heat than the normal growing cells. We named this phenomenon as "eruption of heat". It was suggested that the mechanism for the eruption of heat was that La3+ ion damages the outer cell membrane and increases its permeability and the proton-electron poten-tial energy across the cell membrane was reduced or couldn't even be initiated. Energy could not be translated into ATP effectively in the course of oxidative phosphor-ylation resulting in heat release. So, the growth of the cells was inhibited due to scarceness of energy ATP.

  14. Heat flux reduction mechanism induced by a combinational opposing jet and cavity concept in supersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Jiang, Yan-ping; Yan, Li; Liu, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The thermal protection on the surface of hypersonic vehicles attracts an increasing attention worldwide, especially when the vehicle enters the atmosphere at high speed. In the current study, the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations coupled with the Menter's shear stress transport (SST) model have been employed to investigate the heat flux reduction mechanism induced by the variations of the cavity configuration, the jet pressure ratio and the injectant molecular weight in the combinational opposing jet and cavity concept. The length of the cavity is set to be 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm in order to make sure that the cavity configuration is the "open" cavity, and the jet pressure ratio is set to be 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 in order to make sure that the flow field is steady. The injectant is set to be nitrogen and helium. The obtained results show that the aft angle of the cavity only has a slight impact on the heat flux reduction, and the heat flux peak decreases with the decrease of the length of the cavity. The design of the thermal protection system for the hypersonic blunt body is a multi-objective design exploration problem, and the heat flux distribution depends on the jet pressure ratio, the aft wall of the cavity and the injectant molecular weight. The heat flux peak decreases with the increase of the jet pressure ratio when the aft angle of the cavity is large enough, and this value is 45°.

  15. Keeping your cool: possible mechanisms for enhanced exercise performance in the heat with internal cooling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Rodney; Laursen, Paul B

    2012-02-01

    Exercising in hot environments results in a rise in core body temperature; an effect associated with impaired performance over a variety of exercise modes and durations. Precooling has become a popular strategy to combat this impairment, as evidence has shown it to be an effective method for lowering pre-exercise core temperature, increasing heat storage capacity and improving exercise performance in the heat. To date, the majority of precooling manoeuvres have been achieved via external means, such as cold water immersion and the application of cooling garments. However, these methods have been criticized for their lack of practicality for use in major sporting competitions. Recent evidence has shown that internal or endogenous cooling methods, such as drinking cold fluids or ice slurries, are able to lower core temperature and enhance endurance performance in the heat. These methods may be more advantageous than current forms of precooling, as ingesting cold fluids or ice slurries can be easily implemented in the field and provide the additional benefit of hydrating athletes. While the precise mechanisms responsible for these performance enhancements are yet to be fully explained, the effect of ice ingestion on brain temperature, internal thermoreception and sensory responses may be involved. This article addresses the evidence supporting the use of endogenous cooling methods for improving endurance performance in the heat, as well as discussing the potential mechanisms behind the improvements observed and providing practical recommendations to optimize their success.

  16. Effect of grain orientation and heat treatment on mechanical properties of pure W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Matsuo, Satoru; Ukita, Takashi; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Kimura, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    The effect of grain orientation, heat-treatment temperature and test temperature on the mechanical properties of tungsten (W), which vary depending on plastic working and fabrication process, was investigated by mechanical testing of tensile or bending. Heavily worked W samples (1.5-2.0 mm in the final thickness) exhibit degradation of fracture strength due to recrystallization embrittlement after heat-treatment at 1240 °C (temperature of diffusion bonding between W and a candidate material of the Fe base support structure). On the other hand, W samples with lower thickness reduction rates do not suffer degradation of fracture strength after heating up to around 1300 °C, and show somewhat higher fracture strength by heat-treatment below 1300 °C than the samples in the as-received state. The observed behavior is a reflection of recovery of dislocations introduced by plastic working. High temperature tensile testing of ITER grade W with an anisotropic grain structure and S-TUN with an equiaxed grain structure revealed that both W grades exhibit plastic elongation at temperatures higher than 200 °C with essentially the same temperature dependence of yield strength, which is relatively insensitive to grain orientation in the structure at 200-1300 °C.

  17. Evidence for Steady Heating: Observations of an Active Region Core with Hinode and TRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Brooks, David H.

    2010-03-01

    The timescale for energy release is an important parameter for constraining the coronal heating mechanism. Observations of "warm" coronal loops (~1 MK) have indicated that the heating is impulsive and that coronal plasma is far from equilibrium. In contrast, observations at higher temperatures (~3 MK) have generally been consistent with steady heating models. Previous observations, however, have not been able to exclude the possibility that the high temperature loops are actually composed of many small-scale threads that are in various stages of heating and cooling and only appear to be in equilibrium. With new observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode we have the ability to investigate the properties of high temperature coronal plasma in extraordinary detail. We examine the emission in the core of an active region and find three independent lines of evidence for steady heating. We find that the emission observed in XRT is generally steady for hours, with a fluctuation level of approximately 15% in an individual pixel. Short-lived impulsive heating events are observed, but they appear to be unrelated to the steady emission that dominates the active region. Furthermore, we find no evidence for warm emission that is spatially correlated with the hot emission, as would be expected if the high temperature loops are the result of impulsive heating. Finally, we also find that intensities in the "moss," the footpoints of high temperature loops, are consistent with steady heating models provided that we account for the local expansion of the loop from the base of the transition region to the corona. In combination, these results provide strong evidence that the heating in the core of an active region is effectively steady, that is, the time between heating events is short relative to the relevant radiative and conductive cooling times.

  18. Structure and mechanical properties of high-temperature titanium alloys after rapid heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivasishin, O.M. (Inst. for Metal Physics, Kiev (Ukraine)); Luetjering, G. (Technical Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany))

    1993-08-30

    In this study a new approach to optimizing the mechanical properties of high-temperature titanium alloys was developed. It is based on using rapid heating of equiaxed structures into the [beta]-field to achieve a fine [beta] grain size (less than or equal to 100 [mu]m), transforming on subsequent cooling into a fully lamellar structure. This fine [beta] grain size is an order of magnitude smaller than the grain sizes achieved by conventional furnace [beta]-treatment. Structures and mechanical properties (tensile, fatigue and creep) of high temperature alloys after rapid and conventional furnace heat treatments were compared. The results are discussed in terms of structure-property relationships. (orig.)

  19. Heat generation and thermo-mechanical effect modeling in longitudinally diode-pumped solid state lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhdari, Fouad; Osmani, Ismahen; Tabet, Saida

    2015-09-01

    Thermal management in solid state laser is a challenge to the high power laser industry's ability to provide continued improvements in device and system performance. In this work an investigation of heat generation and thermo-mechanical effect in a high-power Nd:YAG and Yb:YAG cylindrical-type solid state laser pumped longitudinally with different power by fibre coupled laser diode is carried out by numerical simulation based on the finite element method (FEM). Impact of the dopant concentration on the power conversion efficiency is included in the simulation. The distribution of the temperature inside the lasing material is resolute according to the thermal conductivity. The thermo-mechanical effect is explored as a function of pump power in order to determine the maximum pumping power allowed to prevent the crystal's fracture. The presented simulations are in broad agreement with analytical solutions; provided that the boundary condition of the pump induced heat generation is accurately modelled.

  20. Unveiling the dominant gas heating mechanism in local LIRGs and ULIRGs

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Torres, Miguel A; Romero-Canizales, Cristina; Colina, Luis; Bondi, Marco; Giroletti, Marcello; Torrelles, Jose Maria; Polatidis, Antonis

    2008-01-01

    We show preliminary results from a sample of Luminous and Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs, respectively) in the local universe, obtained from observations using the Very Large Array (VLA), the Multi-Element Radio Link Interferometer Network (MERLIN), and the European VLBI Network (EVN). The main goal of our high-resolution, high-sensitivity radio observations is to unveil the dominant gas heating mechanism in the central regions of local (U)LIRGs. The main tracer of recent star-formation in (U)LIRGs is the explosion of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), which are the endproducts of the explosion of massive stars and yield bright radio events. Therefore, our observations will not only allow us to answer the question of the dominant heating mechanism in (U)LIRGs, but will yield also the CCSN rate and the star-formation rate (SFR) for the galaxies of the sample.

  1. Wavefront sensors for optical diagnostics in fluid mechanics: Application to heated flow, turbulence and droplet evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, D.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Warren, M.E.; Shul, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKechnie, T.S. [POD Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Optical measurement techniques are extremely useful in fluid mechanics because of their non-invasive nature. However, it is often difficult to separate measurement effects due to pressure, temperature and density in real flows. Using a variation of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, we have made density measurements that have extremely large dynamic range coupled with excellent sensitivity at high temporal and spatial resolution. We have examined several classes of flow including volumetrically heated gas, turbulence and droplet evaporation.

  2. The heat is on: Molecular mechanisms of drug-induced hyperthermia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Thermoregulation is an essential homeostatic process in which critical mechanisms of heat production and dissipation are controlled centrally in large part by the hypothalamus and peripherally by activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Drugs that disrupt the components of this highly orchestrated multi-organ process can lead to life-threatening hyperthermia. In most cases, hyperthermic agents raise body temperature by increasing the central and peripheral release of thermoregulatory neu...

  3. Large size superelastic SMA bars: heat treatment strategy, mechanical property and seismic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Fang, Cheng; Liu, Jia

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports a comprehensive study on the mechanical performance of large size superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) bars, with the main focus given to their potential applications for seismic-resistant connections. A series of practical issues, including heat treatment, mechanical property assessment, and connection design/evaluation, were discussed aiming to benefit both material and civil engineering communities. The study commenced with a detailed discussion on the heat treatment strategy for SMA bars and the resulting mechanical properties including strength/stiffness, self-centring ability, energy dissipation, and fractural resistance. It was observed that the mechanical performance of the bars were quite sensitive to both annealing temperature and duration, and size effect was also evident, resulting in different appropriate heat treatment procedures for the bars with varying diameters. The optimally heat-treated SMA bars were machined to the bolt form and were then used for two types of practical self-centring connections, namely, connection with all SMA bars and that with combined angles and SMA bars. Through conducting full-scale tests, both connections were shown to have stable and controllable hysteretic responses till 5% loading drift. Up to 3% drift, the self-centring performance was satisfactory for both connection types, but beyond that the presence of the angles could lead to accumulated residual rotation. Importantly, for both connections, the deformation was accommodated by the SMA bolts or angles, whereas no plastic deformation was observed at any other structural members. This confirmed the feasibility of using such connections for highly resilient structures where minimal repair work is required after earthquakes.

  4. Coronal Mass Ejections and Dimmings: A Comparative Study using MHD Simulations and SDO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meng; Cheung, Mark; DeRosa, Marc L.; Nitta, Nariaki; Schrijver, Karel

    2017-08-01

    Solar coronal dimmings have been observed extensively in the past two decades. Due to their close association with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), there is a critical need to improve our understanding of the physical processes that cause dimmings and determine their relationship with CMEs. In this study, we investigate coronal dimmings by combining simulation and observational efforts. By utilizing a data-driven global magnetohydrodynamics model (AWSoM: Alfven-wave Solar Model), we simulate coronal dimmings resulting from different CME energetics and flux rope configurations. We synthesize the emissions of different EUV spectral bands/lines and compare with SDO/AIA and EVE observations. A detailed analysis of simulation and observation data suggests that the “core” dimming is mainly caused by the mass loss from the CME, while the “remote” dimming could have a different origin (e.g., plasma heating). Moreover, the interaction between the erupting flux rope with different orientations and the global solar corona could significantly influence the coronal dimming patterns. Using metrics such as dimming depth, dimming slope, and recovery time, we investigate the relationship between dimmings and CME properties (e.g., CME mass, CME speed) in the simulation. Our result suggests that coronal dimmings encode important information about CMEs. We also discuss how our knowledge about solar coronal dimmings could be extended to the study of stellar CMEs.

  5. Exploring Coronal Dynamics: A Next Generation Solar Physics Mission white paper

    CERN Document Server

    Morton, R J; Bloomfield, D S; McLaughlin, J A; Regnier, S; McIntosh, S W; Tomczyk, S; Young, P

    2016-01-01

    Determining the mechanisms responsible for the heating of the coronal plasma and maintaining and accelerating the solar wind are long standing goals in solar physics. There is a clear need to constrain the energy, mass and momentum flux through the solar corona and advance our knowledge of the physical process contributing to these fluxes. Furthermore, the accurate forecasting of Space Weather conditions at the near-Earth environment and, more generally, the plasma conditions of the solar wind throughout the heliosphere, require detailed knowledge of these fluxes in the near-Sun corona. Here we present a short case for a space-based imaging-spectrometer coronagraph, which will have the ability to provide synoptic information on the coronal environment and provide strict constraints on the mass, energy, and momentum flux through the corona. The instrument would ideally achieve cadences of $\\sim10$~s, spatial resolution of 1" and observe the corona out to 2~$R_{\\sun}$. Such an instrument will enable significant...

  6. DENSIFICATION OF WOOD VENEERS COMBINED WITH OIL-HEAT TREATMENT. PART II: HYGROSCOPICITY AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hua Fang,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to achieve high mechanical performance and improved dimensional stability, densification combined with oil-heat treatment (OHT was performed. In our previous study, OHT was successfully applied to densified veneer, which resulted in improved dimensional stability. In the present study, the impact of OHT on densified wood veneer hygroscopicity and mechanical properties was determined. OHT at 180, 200, and 220ºC for 1, 2, and 3 hours was applied to densified Aspen (Populus tremuloides veneers. OHT was found to be an efficient treatment to reduce the hygroscopicity of densified aspen veneers, although OHT had a negative impact on Brinell hardness. However, due to the contribution of densification, the hardness of oil-heat treated veneers was still two to three times higher than that of non-densified veneers. Similar results were found for tensile strength. Bending strength increased slightly at low OHT temperature, and then decreased at high temperature. Bending strength of oil-heat treated densified veneer samples was higher than that of non-densified ones. No significant effect of OHT was found on tensile MOE, but bending MOE increased after OHT. Compared to OHT duration, OHT temperature had a larger impact on densified wood hygroscopicity and mechanical properties.

  7. An Equivalent Mechanical Model for Representing the Entropy Generation in Heat Exchangers. Application to Power Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Ramírez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    One of the most common difficulties students face in learning Thermodynamics lies in grasping the physical meaning of concepts such as lost availability and entropy generation. This explains the quest for new approaches for explaining and comprehending these quantities, as suggested by diagrams from different authors. The difficulties worsen in the case of irreversibilities associated with heat transfer processes driven by a finite temperature difference, where no work transfer takes place. An equivalent mechanical model is proposed in this paper. Heat exchangers are modelled by means of Carnot heat engines and mechanical transmissions; the use of mechanical models allows an easy visualization of thermal irreversibilities. The proposed model is further applied to a power cycle, thus obtaining an “equivalent arrangement” where irreversibilities become clearly apparent.

  8. Intrinsic Instability of Coronal Streamers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y; Song, H Q; Shi, Q Q; Feng, S W; Xia, L D; 10.1088/0004-637X/691/2/1936

    2009-01-01

    Plasma blobs are observed to be weak density enhancements as radially stretched structures emerging from the cusps of quiescent coronal streamers. In this paper, it is suggested that the formation of blobs is a consequence of an intrinsic instability of coronal streamers occurring at a very localized region around the cusp. The evolutionary process of the instability, as revealed in our calculations, can be described as follows: (1) through the localized cusp region where the field is too weak to sustain the confinement, plasmas expand and stretch the closed field lines radially outward as a result of the freezing-in effect of plasma-magnetic field coupling; the expansion brings a strong velocity gradient into the slow wind regime providing the free energy necessary for the onset of a subsequent magnetohydrodynamic instability; (2) the instability manifests itself mainly as mixed streaming sausage-kink modes, the former results in pinches of elongated magnetic loops to provoke reconnections at one or many loc...

  9. Motion Magnification in Coronal Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfinogentov, Sergey; Nakariakov, Valery M.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a new method for the investigation of low-amplitude transverse oscillations of solar plasma non-uniformities, such as coronal loops, individual strands in coronal arcades, jets, prominence fibrils, polar plumes, and other contrast features that have been observed with imaging instruments. The method is based on the two-dimensional dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTℂWT). It allows us to magnify transverse, in the plane-of-the-sky, quasi-periodic motions of contrast features in image sequences. The tests performed on the artificial data cubes that imitated exponentially decaying, multi-periodic and frequency-modulated kink oscillations of coronal loops showed the effectiveness, reliability, and robustness of this technique. The algorithm was found to give linear scaling of the magnified amplitudes with the original amplitudes, provided these are sufficiently small. In addition, the magnification is independent of the oscillation period in a broad range of the periods. The application of this technique to SDO/AIA EUV data cubes of a non-flaring active region allowed for the improved detection of low-amplitude decay-less oscillations in the majority of loops.

  10. A low-frequency wave motion mechanism enables efficient energy transport in carbon nanotubes at high heat fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-07-11

    The great majority of investigations of thermal transport in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the open literature focus on low heat fluxes, that is, in the regime of validity of the Fourier heat conduction law. In this paper, by performing nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we investigated thermal transport in a single-walled CNT bridging two Si slabs under constant high heat flux. An anomalous wave-like kinetic energy profile was observed, and a previously unexplored, wave-dominated energy transport mechanism is identified for high heat fluxes in CNTs, originated from excited low frequency transverse acoustic waves. The transported energy, in terms of a one-dimensional low frequency mechanical wave, is quantified as a function of the total heat flux applied and is compared to the energy transported by traditional Fourier heat conduction. The results show that the low frequency wave actually overtakes traditional Fourier heat conduction and efficiently transports the energy at high heat flux. Our findings reveal an important new mechanism for high heat flux energy transport in low-dimensional nanostructures, such as one-dimensional (1-D) nanotubes and nanowires, which could be very relevant to high heat flux dissipation such as in micro/nanoelectronics applications.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Laser Heat Treated 6 mm Thick UHSS-Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvenpää, Antti; Mäntyjärvi, Kari; Merklein, Marion; määttä, Antti; Hietala, Mikko; Karjalainen, Jussi

    2011-05-01

    In this work abrasion resistant (AR) steel with a sheet thickness of 6 mm was heat treated by a 4 kW Nd:YAG and a 4 kW Yb:Yag-laser, followed by self-quenching. In the delivered condition, test material blank (B27S) is water quenched from 920° C. In this condition, fully martensitic microstructure provides excellent hardness of over 500 HB. The test material is referred to AR500 from now onwards. Laser heat treatment was carried out only on top surface of the AR500 sheet: the achieved maximum temperature in the cross-section varies as a function of the depth. Consequently, the microstructure and mechanical properties differ between the surfaces and the centre of the cross-section (layered microstructure). For better understanding, all layers were tested in tensile tests. For a wide heat treatment track, the laser beam was moved by scanning. Temperatures were measured using thermographic camera and thermocouples. Laser heat treated AR500 samples were tested in hardness tests and by air bending using a press brake machine. Microstructures were studied using a light microscope and FE-SEM/SEM-EBSD. At least three kind of microstructure layers were observed: 1) Dual-Phase ferritic/martensitic (T = AC1-AC3), 2) ferritic (T˜AC3) and 3) bainitic/martensitic (T>AC3).

  12. Thermo-mechanical modeling of turbulent heat transfer in gas-solid flows including particle collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansoori, Zohreh; Saffar-Avval, Majid; Basirat-Tabrizi, Hassan; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Lain, Santiago

    2002-12-01

    A thermo-mechanical turbulence model is developed and used for predicting heat transfer in a gas-solid flow through a vertical pipe with constant wall heat flux. The new four-way interaction model makes use of the thermal k{sub {theta}}-{tau}{sub {theta}} equations, in addition to the hydrodynamic k-{tau} transport, and accounts for the particle-particle and particle-wall collisions through a Eulerian/Lagrangian formulation. The simulation results indicate that the level of thermal turbulence intensity and the heat transfer are strongly affected by the particle collisions. Inter-particle collisions attenuate the thermal turbulence intensity near the wall but somewhat amplify the temperature fluctuations in the pipe core region. The hydrodynamic-to-thermal times-scale ratio and the turbulent Prandtl number in the region near the wall increase due to the inter-particle collisions. The results also show that the use of a constant or the single-phase gas turbulent Prandtl number produces error in the thermal eddy diffusivity and thermal turbulent intensity fields. Simulation results also indicate that the inter-particle contact heat conduction during collision has no significant effect in the range of Reynolds number and particle diameter studied.

  13. Coronal Streamers and Their Associated Solar Wind Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, M. P.; Landi, E.; Cranmer, S. R.; Cohen, O.; Raymond, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    We use the EUV spectrometers aboard SOHO and Hinode and white-light coronagraphs to characterize the physical properties of coronal streamers during Earth/Ulysses quadrature configurations for the previous two solar minimum periods. In addition, comparisons between coronal observations and in situ measurements of solar wind plasma properties are being used to further characterize the origins of slow wind streams. In order to investigate slow solar wind heating and acceleration, we also compare with predictions from three-dimensional MHD models. We aim to use the empirical measurements to distinguish between different proposed physical processes for slow wind acceleration (e.g., waves/turbulence versus reconnection). This work is supported by NASA grant NNX10AQ58G to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  14. Is Coronal X-ray Emission Energized By Electric Currents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Kazunori; Metcalf, T.; Lites, B.

    2007-05-01

    We examine the spatial correlation between coronal X-ray emission observed with the Hinode X-Ray Telescope and electric currents observed with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope Spectro-polarimeter. We determine to what extent the X-ray brightness is correlated with electric current density and hence to what extent the hot corona is energized by electric currents which flow through the photosphere. We will also consider whether the currents reach the corona to heat the coronal plasma or whether they predominantly close below the corona. Hinode is an international project supported by JAXA, NASA, PPARC and ESA. We are grateful to the Hinode team for all their efforts in the design, development and operation of the mission.

  15. Inferring the Coronal Density Irregularity from EUV Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the density structure of the solar corona is important for modeling both coronal heating and the solar wind. Direct measurements are difficult because of line-of-sight integration and possible unresolved structures. We present a new method for quantifying such structure using density-sensitive EUV line intensities to derive a density irregularity parameter, a relative measure of the amount of structure along the line of sight. We also present a simple model to relate the inferred irregularities to physical quantities, such as the filling factor and density contrast. For quiet Sun regions and interplume regions of coronal holes, we find a density contrast of at least a factor of three to ten and corresponding filling factors of about 10-20%. Our results are in rough agreement with other estimates of the density structures in these regions. The irregularity diagnostic provides a useful relative measure of unresolved structure in various regions of the corona.

  16. Thermo-mechanical study of high heat flux component mock-ups for ITER TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonelli, Flavia [Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Dipartimento Energia, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Boccaccini, Lorenzo Virgilio, E-mail: lorenzo.boccaccini@kit.edu [Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Kunze, André; Maione, Ivan Alessio [Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany); Savoldi, Laura; Zanino, Roberto [Dipartimento Energia, Politecnico di Torino (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Infrared radiation heaters for test of plasma facing component available at KIT. • Numerical model developed and validated to check uniformity of heat flux. • Thermo-mechanical calculations performed on a mock-up of the HCPB TBM FW. • Assessment done of representativity of stress conditions for the ITER TBMs. - Abstract: Commercial infrared heaters have been proposed to be used in the HELOKA facility under construction at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) to test a mock-up of the first wall (FW), called thermo-cycle mock-up (TCM) plate, under stress loading comparable to those experienced by the test blanket modules (TBMs) in ITER. Two related issues are analyzed in this paper, in relation to the ongoing European project aimed at the design of the two EU TBMs: (1) the possibility to reproduce, by means of those heaters, high heat flux loading conditions on the TCM plate similar to those expected on the ITER TBMs, and (2) the thermo-mechanical analysis of the TCM itself, in order to define a suitable choice of experimental parameters and mechanical constraints leading to a relevant stress condition. A suitable heater model is developed and validated against experimental data from an ad-hoc test campaign. A thermo-mechanical study of the TCM plate is presented, showing that the structure is able to withstand high thermal loads, even in the most constrained case, reaching stress levels comparable to the ITER TBM.

  17. Pool Boiling of FC 770 on Graphene Oxide Coatings: A Study of Critical Heat Flux and Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Sayee Mohan, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    This thesis investigates pool boiling heat transfer from bare and graphene-coated NiCr wires in a saturated liquid of FC 770, a fluorocarbon fluid. Of particular interest was the effect of graphene-oxide platelets, dip-coated onto the heater surface, in enhancing the nucleate boiling heat transfer (BHT) rates and the critical heat flux (CHF) value. In the course of the pool boiling experiment, the primary focus was on the reduction mechanism of graphene oxide. The transition from hydrophilic ...

  18. Intermittent heating of the solar corona by MHD turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    É. Buchlin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available As the dissipation mechanisms considered for the heating of the solar corona would be sufficiently efficient only in the presence of small scales, turbulence is thought to be a key player in the coronal heating processes: it allows indeed to transfer energy from the large scales to these small scales. While Direct numerical simulations which have been performed to investigate the properties of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the corona have provided interesting results, they are limited to small Reynolds numbers. We present here a model of coronal loop turbulence involving shell-models and Alfvén waves propagation, allowing the much faster computation of spectra and turbulence statistics at higher Reynolds numbers. We also present first results of the forward-modelling of spectroscopic observables in the UV.

  19. Evolution of an equatorial coronal hole structure and the released coronal hole wind stream: Carrington rotations 2039 to 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich-Meisner, Verena; Peleikis, Thies; Kruse, Martin; Berger, Lars; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2017-07-01

    configuration, the minimal temperature profiles allow to constrain the radial structure. We find that the shape of the open field line region and to some extent also the solar wind properties are influenced by surrounding more dynamic closed loop regions. We show that the freeze-in order can change within a coronal hole wind stream on small timescales and illustrate a mechanism that can cause changes in the freeze-in order. The inferred minimal temperature profile is variable even within coronal hole wind and is in particular most variable in the outer corona.

  20. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of a API 5CT J55 Pipeline Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soria-Aguilar Ma. de Jesús

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of two different post-weld heat treatment cycles on the microstructure and mechanical properties of welded API 5CT J55 steels were investigated in the present work. Experiments were carried out based on a Taguchi experimental design. Ortogonal arrays (L9 of Taguchi and statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA were employed to determine the impact of the heat treatment parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of experimental steel. From the results of ANOVA, there were obtained the empirical equations for optimizing the heat treating conditions that lead to the best mechanical properties.

  1. Effect Mechanism of Structure-Changed Water on Heat Stability of Lysozyme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵林; 谭欣

    2003-01-01

    Based on the mechanism of the effect of hydration on the heat stability of lysozyme and the theory of water molecule clusters, the effect of structure-changed water on heat stability of lysozyme has been studied. The results obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that the thermal denaturation temperature of lysozyme had been elevated 8.47 K through hydration of lysozyme with processed water whose structure had been changed so it was called "structured water" compared to ordinary water. The reason is that structured water changed the dipole moment of water molecules and easily formed cyclic water hexamer or cage-like water hexamer, so that the interacting force of maintaining three-dimensional conformation of lysozyme could be reinforced.

  2. Study of Transient Heat Transport Mechanisms in Superfluid Helium Cooled Rutherford-Cables

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2100615

    The Large Hadron Collider leverages superconducting magnets to focus the particle beam or keep it in its circular track. These superconducting magnets are composed of NbTi-cables with a special insulation that allows superfluid helium to enter and cool the superconducting cable. Loss mechanisms, e.g. continuous random loss of particles escaping the collimation system heating up the magnets. Hence, a local temperature increase can occur and lead to a quench of the magnets when the superconductor warms up above the critical temperature. A detailed knowledge about the temperature increases in the superconducting cable (Rutherford type) ensures a secure operation of the LHC. A sample of the Rutherford cable has been instrumented with temperature sensors. Experiments with this sample have been performed within this study to investigate the cooling performance of the helium in the cable due to heat deposition. The experiment uses a superconducting coil, placed in a cryostat, to couple with the magnetic field loss m...

  3. Mechanical properties and heat shrinkability of electron beam crosslinked polyethylene octene copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Joy K.; Chang, Young-Wook; Lee, Byung Chul; Ryu, Sung Hun

    2008-05-01

    The mechanical properties and heat shrinkability of electron beam crosslinked polyethylene-octene copolymer were studied. It was found that gel content increases with increased radiation dose. The analysis of results by the Charlesby-Pinner equation revealed that crosslinking was dominant over chain scission upon irradiation. Formation of a crosslinked structure in the electron beam irradiated sample was confirmed by the presence of a plateau of dynamic storage modulus above the melting point of the polymer. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction revealed that there was little change in crystallinity for the irradiated samples, indicating that radiation crosslinking occurs in the amorphous region of the polymer. The tensile modulus increases, whereas the elongation at break decreases with increased radiation dose. The heat shrinkability of the material increased with an increased radiation dose because the radiation-induced crosslinks serve as memory points during the shrinking process.

  4. Mechanical properties and heat shrinkability of electron beam crosslinked polyethylene-octene copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Joy K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Young-Wook [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ywchang@hanyang.ac.kr; Lee, Byung Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Dukjin-Dong, Yusong-Gu, Daejon 305-354 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Sung Hun [College of Environmental and Applied Chemistry, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 449-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    The mechanical properties and heat shrinkability of electron beam crosslinked polyethylene-octene copolymer were studied. It was found that gel content increases with increased radiation dose. The analysis of results by the Charlesby-Pinner equation revealed that crosslinking was dominant over chain scission upon irradiation. Formation of a crosslinked structure in the electron beam irradiated sample was confirmed by the presence of a plateau of dynamic storage modulus above the melting point of the polymer. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction revealed that there was little change in crystallinity for the irradiated samples, indicating that radiation crosslinking occurs in the amorphous region of the polymer. The tensile modulus increases, whereas the elongation at break decreases with increased radiation dose. The heat shrinkability of the material increased with an increased radiation dose because the radiation-induced crosslinks serve as memory points during the shrinking process.

  5. Molecular action mechanisms of solar infrared radiation and heat on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhalaya, M Ya; Maksimov, G V; Rubin, A B; Lademann, J; Darvin, M E

    2014-07-01

    The generation of ROS underlies all solar infrared-affected therapeutic and pathological cutaneous effects. The signaling pathway NF-kB is responsible for the induced therapeutic effects, while the AP-1 for the pathological effects. The different signaling pathways of infrared-induced ROS and infrared-induced heat shock ROS were shown to act independently multiplying the influence on each other by increasing the doses of irradiation and/or increasing the temperature. The molecular action mechanisms of solar infrared radiation and heat on human skin are summarized and discussed in detail in the present paper. The critical doses are determined. Protection strategies against infrared-induced skin damage are proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of several heat transfer mechanisms on the enhancement of thermal conductivity in nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machrafi, H.; Lebon, G.

    2016-09-01

    A modelling of the thermal conductivity of nanofluids based on extended irreversible thermodynamics is proposed with emphasis on the role of several coupled heat transfer mechanisms: liquid interfacial layering between nanoparticles and base fluid, particles agglomeration and Brownian motion. The relative importance of each specific mechanism on the enhancement of the effective thermal conductivity is examined. It is shown that the size of the nanoparticles and the liquid boundary layer around the particles play a determining role. For nanoparticles close to molecular range, the Brownian effect is important. At nanoparticles of the order of 1-100 nm, both agglomeration and liquid layering are influent. Agglomeration becomes the most important mechanism at nanoparticle sizes of the order of 100 nm and higher. The theoretical considerations are illustrated by three case studies: suspensions of alumina rigid spherical nanoparticles in water, ethylene glycol and a 50/50w% water/ethylene glycol mixture, respectively, good agreement with experimental data is observed.

  7. Effect of heat treatments on failure mechanism of SiCp/2124 Al composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Murato(g)lu

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical response of a 17% (volume fraction) silicon carbide particles reinforced 2124 Al composite prepared by powder metallurgy techniques was studied by altering the matrix strength with different heat treatments. The fracture mechanisms and the deformation microstructure were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that matrix strength appears to play an important role in influcing the behaviour of the composite under hardness and tensile loading conditions and also fracture mechanisms. The high matrix strength results in a larger decrease in yield strength due to the increasing damage probability. The tensile yield strength values decrease under peak aged and overaged condition whereas under the solutinized condition the opposite effect can be seen.

  8. Mechanisms of heat transfer enhancement and slow decay of swirl in tubes using tangential injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, F.; Dhir, V. K.

    1995-04-01

    The turbulent flowfield in a tube heated uniformly from the wall has been experimentally studied when fluid is injected tangentially. The experiments were conducted by injecting air through injectors placed on the periphery of a 88.9-mm inside diameter and 2.5-m long acrylic tube. Six injectors of 22.23-mm inside diameter were used and tangential to total momentum flux ratio of 2.67 was obtained in the experiments. Temperature profiles were measured with a resistance thermometer probe. Profiles for mean velocities in the axial and tangential directions, as well as the Reynolds stresses were obtained using a single rotated straight hot wire and a single rotated slanted hot wire anemometer. No significant difference in mean velocities and Reynolds stresses were found between the adiabatic experiments and diabatic ones. Two major mechanisms for enhancement of heat transfer are identified: (1) high maximum axial velocity near the wall produces higher heat flux from the wall; and (2) high turbulence level in the middle region of the tube improves mixing and, thus, rate of heat transfer. Furthermore, it is observed that both the kinetic energy of the mean flow and the turbulence level decrease as swirl decays. However, during the decay process, the high turbulence-energy-production from Reynolds stresses is necessary to transfer the kinetic energy of the mean flow to the turbulence energy. This high turbulence-production, in turn, slows down the rate of decrease of the turbulence level. As a result, the swirl and the heat transfer enhancement are preserved for a long distance.

  9. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Investigation of the Viscoelastic Heating Mechanism in Ultrasonic Plasticizing of Amorphous Polymers for Micro Injection Molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingyan Jiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic plasticizing of polymers for micro-injection molding has been proposed and studied for its unique potential in materials and energy-saving. In our previous work, we have demonstrated the characteristics of the interfacial friction heating mechanism in ultrasonic plasticizing of polymer granulates. In this paper, the other important heating mechanism in ultrasonic plasticizing, i.e., viscoelastic heating for amorphous polymer, was studied by both theoretical modeling and experimentation. The influence mechanism of several parameters, such as the initial temperature of the polymer, the ultrasonic frequency, and the ultrasonic amplitude, was investigated. The results from both numerical simulation and experimentation indicate that the heat generation rate of viscoelastic heating can be significantly influenced by the initial temperature of polymer. The glass transition temperature was found to be a significant shifting point in viscoelastic heating. The heat generation rate is relatively low at the beginning and can have a steep increase after reaching glass transition temperature. In comparison with the ultrasonic frequency, the ultrasonic amplitude has much greater influence on the heat generation rate. In light of the quantitative difference in the viscoelastic heating rate, the limitation of the numerical simulation was discussed in the aspect of the assumptions and the applied mathematical models.

  10. Implementation of a Modular Hands-on Learning Pedagogy: Student Attitudes in a Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgher, J. K.; Finkel, D.; Adesope, O. O.; Van Wie, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a within-subjects experimental design to compare the effects of learning with lecture and hands-on desktop learning modules (DLMs) in a fluid mechanics and heat transfer class. The hands-on DLM implementation included the use of worksheets and one of two heat exchangers: an evaporative cooling device and a shell and tube heat…

  11. Implementation of a Modular Hands-on Learning Pedagogy: Student Attitudes in a Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgher, J. K.; Finkel, D.; Adesope, O. O.; Van Wie, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a within-subjects experimental design to compare the effects of learning with lecture and hands-on desktop learning modules (DLMs) in a fluid mechanics and heat transfer class. The hands-on DLM implementation included the use of worksheets and one of two heat exchangers: an evaporative cooling device and a shell and tube heat…

  12. Impulsively Generated Linear and Non-linear Alfven Waves in the Coronal Funnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Murawski, K.; Musielak, Z. E.

    2014-01-01

    We present simulation results of the impulsively generated linear and non-linear Alfvén waves in the weakly curved coronal magnetic flux-tubes (coronal funnels) and discuss their implications for the coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. We solve numerically the time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic equations to find the temporal signatures of the small and large-amplitude Alfvén waves in the model atmosphere of open and expanding magnetic field configuration with a realistic temperature distribution. We compute the maximum transversal velocity of both linear and non-linear Alfvén waves at different heights of the model atmosphere, and study their response in the solar corona during the time of their propagation. We infer that the pulse-driven non-linear Alfvén waves may carry sufficient wave energy fluxes to heat the coronal funnels and also to power the solar wind that originates in these funnels. Our study of linear Alfvén waves shows that they can contribute only to the plasma dynamics and heating of the funnel-like magnetic flux-tubes associated with the polar coronal holes.

  13. Integrated Physiological Mechanisms of Exercise Performance, Adaptation, and Maladaptation to Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    of thermal signals Thermal comfort and effector signal for behavior Cerebral cortex Sweat glands Skin arterioles Superficial veins Skeletal muscle...327). 20 18 16 14 100 90 80 70 160 140 180 200 4 5 6 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.0 1.8 Oxygen uptake (Iiters · min–1) 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.0 A or tic m ea n pr es su...heat stress may compromise this protective mechanism. Under homeostatic conditions, a small amount of endotoxin enters the portal blood and through

  14. Influence of austempering heat treatment on mechanical and corrosion properties of ductile iron samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Janjić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of metals are closely related to the microstructure characteristics of the material. The paper compares the results of these two sets of properties after investigating samples of base ductile iron and heat-treated samples of the base austempered ductile iron (ADI. The basic material is perlite ferritic iron alloyed with copper and nickel. To test the corrosion rate of the base material (ductile iron and the heattreated samples (ADI, electrochemical techniques of potentiostatic polarization were used (the technique of Tafel curves extrapolation and the potentiodynamic polarization technique.

  15. Determination of Heat Transport Mechanism in Aqueous Nanofluids Using Regime Diagram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.CHANDRASEKAR; S.SURESH

    2009-01-01

    We provide an approximate method to determine the dominant heat transport mechanism responsible for the anomalous enhancement of thermal conductivity in aqueous nanofluids.Due to a large degree of randomness and scatter observed in the published experimental data,limits to nanofluid thermal conductivity are fixed analytically by taking into account the contribution of particle Brownian motion and clustering,and a regime diagram is developed.Experimental data from a range of independent published sources is used for validation of the developed regime diagram.

  16. Conceptual design of two-phase fluid mechanics and heat transfer facility for spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, B. F.; Hill, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Five specific experiments were analyzed to provide definition of experiments designed to evaluate two phase fluid behavior in low gravity. The conceptual design represents a fluid mechanics and heat transfer facility for a double rack in Spacelab. The five experiments are two phase flow patterns and pressure drop, flow boiling, liquid reorientation, and interface bubble dynamics. Hardware was sized, instrumentation and data recording requirements defined, and the five experiments were installed as an integrated experimental package. Applicable available hardware was selected in the experiment design and total experiment program costs were defined.

  17. From Forbidden Coronal Lines to Meaningful Coronal Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Judge, Philip G; Landi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    We review methods to measure magnetic fields within the corona using the polarized light in magnetic-dipole (M1) lines. We are particularly interested in both the global magnetic-field evolution over a solar cycle, and the local storage of magnetic free energy within coronal plasmas. We address commonly held skepticisms concerning angular ambiguities and line-of-sight confusion. We argue that ambiguities are in principle no worse than more familiar remotely sensed photospheric vector-fields, and that the diagnosis of M1 line data would benefit from simultaneous observations of EUV lines. Based on calculations and data from eclipses, we discuss the most promising lines and different approaches that might be used. We point to the S-like [Fe {\\sc XI}] line (J=2 to J=1) at 789.2nm as a prime target line (for ATST for example) to augment the hotter 1074.7 and 1079.8 nm Si-like lines of [Fe {\\sc XIII}] currently observed by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP). Significant breakthroughs will be made possibl...

  18. Development of pulsating twin jets mechanism for mixing flow heat transfer analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitan, Ali Ahmed; Zulkifli, Rozli; Abdullah, Shahrir; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman

    2014-01-01

    Pulsating twin jets mechanism (PTJM) was developed in the present work to study the effect of pulsating twin jets mixing region on the enhancement of heat transfer. Controllable characteristics twin pulsed jets were the main objective of our design. The variable nozzle-nozzle distance was considered to study the effect of two jets interaction at the mixing region. Also, the phase change between the frequencies of twin jets was taken into account to develop PTJM. All of these factors in addition to the ability of producing high velocity pulsed jet led to more appropriate design for a comprehensive study of multijet impingement heat transfer problems. The performance of PTJM was verified by measuring the pulse profile at frequency of 20 Hz, where equal velocity peak of around 64 m/s for both jets was obtained. Moreover, the jet velocity profile at different pulsation frequencies was tested to verify system performance, so the results revealed reasonable velocity profile configuration. Furthermore, the effect of pulsation frequency on surface temperature of flat hot plate in the midpoint between twin jets was studied experimentally. Noticeable enhancement in heat transfer was obtained with the increasing of pulsation frequency.

  19. Thermal protection mechanism of heat pipe in leading edge under hypersonic conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wengen; He Yurong; Wang Xinzhi; Zhu Jiaqi; Han Jiecai

    2015-01-01

    Sharp local structure, like the leading edge of hypersonic aircraft, confronts a severe aerodynamic heating environment at a Mach number greater than 5. To eliminate the danger of a material failure, a semi-active thermal protection system is proposed by integrating a metallic heat pipe into the structure of the leading edge. An analytical heat-balance model is established from tra-ditional aerodynamic theories, and then thermal and mechanical characteristics of the structure are studied at Mach number 6–8 for three refractory alloys, Inconel 625, C-103, and T-111. The feasi-bility of this simple analytical method as an initial design tool for hypersonic aircraft is assessed through numerical simulations using a finite element method. The results indicate that both the iso-thermal and the maximum temperatures fall but the von Mises stress increases with a longer design length of the leading edge. These two temperatures and the stress rise remarkably at a higher Mach number. Under all investigated hypersonic conditions, with a 3 mm leading edge radius and a 0.15 m design length, the maximum stress exceeds the yield strength of Inconel 625 at Mach num-bers greater than 6, which means a material failure. Moreover, both C-103 and T-111 meet all requirements at Mach number 6–8.

  20. Thermal protection mechanism of heat pipe in leading edge under hypersonic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wengen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sharp local structure, like the leading edge of hypersonic aircraft, confronts a severe aerodynamic heating environment at a Mach number greater than 5. To eliminate the danger of a material failure, a semi-active thermal protection system is proposed by integrating a metallic heat pipe into the structure of the leading edge. An analytical heat-balance model is established from traditional aerodynamic theories, and then thermal and mechanical characteristics of the structure are studied at Mach number 6–8 for three refractory alloys, Inconel 625, C-103, and T-111. The feasibility of this simple analytical method as an initial design tool for hypersonic aircraft is assessed through numerical simulations using a finite element method. The results indicate that both the isothermal and the maximum temperatures fall but the von Mises stress increases with a longer design length of the leading edge. These two temperatures and the stress rise remarkably at a higher Mach number. Under all investigated hypersonic conditions, with a 3 mm leading edge radius and a 0.15 m design length, the maximum stress exceeds the yield strength of Inconel 625 at Mach numbers greater than 6, which means a material failure. Moreover, both C-103 and T-111 meet all requirements at Mach number 6–8.

  1. Extension of the MURaM Radiative MHD Code for Coronal Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new version of the MURaM radiative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that allows for simulations spanning from the upper convection zone into the solar corona. We implement the relevant coronal physics in terms of optically thin radiative loss, field aligned heat conduction, and an equilibrium ionization equation of state. We artificially limit the coronal Alfvén and heat conduction speeds to computationally manageable values using an approximation to semi-relativistic MHD with an artificially reduced speed of light (Boris correction). We present example solutions ranging from quiet to active Sun in order to verify the validity of our approach. We quantify the role of numerical diffusivity for the effective coronal heating. We find that the (numerical) magnetic Prandtl number determines the ratio of resistive to viscous heating and that owing to the very large magnetic Prandtl number of the solar corona, heating is expected to happen predominantly through viscous dissipation. We find that reasonable solutions can be obtained with values of the reduced speed of light just marginally larger than the maximum sound speed. Overall this leads to a fully explicit code that can compute the time evolution of the solar corona in response to photospheric driving using numerical time steps not much smaller than 0.1 s. Numerical simulations of the coronal response to flux emergence covering a time span of a few days are well within reach using this approach.

  2. A fast and powerful release mechanism based on pulse heating of shape memory wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malka, Yoav; Shilo, Doron

    2017-09-01

    This article presents a novel actuator and a new concept for a release mechanism that are especially useful in applications that require fast motion of large masses over long distances. The actuator is based on ultra-fast pulse heating of NiTi wires, which provide a unique combination of large work per volume, short response time and enhanced energy efficiency. The release mechanism utilizes the fast and powerful actuator to form conditions in which the latch (safety pin) moves faster than the deployed device. As a result, the contact between these two masses is disconnected and the resulting friction forces are decreased to approximately zero. The actuator and release mechanism address the two major drawbacks of conventional shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators: slow actuation time and low energy efficiency. Using a dedicated setup, the experimental results validate the disconnection between the masses and map the effects of several variables on the performance of the actuator and release mechanism. In particular, we map the energetic efficiency and find the optimal operating conditions for a successful release using a minimal amount of input energy. At the optimal conditions, the actuator response time and the consumed input energy are smaller by an order of magnitude with respect to performances of previous SMA-based release mechanisms with comparable requirements.

  3. Pool boiling characteristics and critical heat flux mechanisms of microporous surfaces and enhancement through structural modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Minseok; Graham, Samuel

    2017-08-01

    Experimental studies have shown that microporous surfaces induce one of the highest enhancements in critical heat flux (CHF) during pool boiling. However, microporous surfaces may also induce a very large surface superheat (>100 °C) which is not desirable for applications such as microelectronics cooling. While the understanding of the CHF mechanism is the key to enhancing boiling heat transfer, a comprehensive understanding is not yet available. So far, three different theories for the CHF of microporous surfaces have been suggested: viscous-capillary model, hydrodynamic instability model, and dryout of the porous coatings. In general, all three theories account for some aspects of boiling phenomena. In this study, the theories are examined through their correlations with experimental data on microporous surfaces during pool boiling using deionized (DI) water. It was found that the modulation of the vapor-jet through the pore network enables a higher CHF than that of a flat surface based on the hydrodynamic instability theory. In addition, it was found that as the heat flux increases, a vapor layer grows in the porous coatings described by a simple thermal resistance model which is responsible for the large surface superheat. Once the vapor layer grows to fill the microporous structure, transition to film boiling occurs and CHF is reached. By disrupting the formation of this vapor layer through the fabrication of channels to allow vapor escape, an enhancement in the CHF and heat transfer coefficient was observed, allowing CHF greater than 3500 kW/m2 at a superheat less than 50 °C.

  4. GT1_cdedes_1: Heating and cooling mechanics in massive star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedes, C.

    2010-03-01

    Massive stars are important constituents of the interstellar medium (ISM) in our Galaxy and beyond. Their strong feedback processes influence the dynamics, energetics and chemistry of the surrounding interstellar medium both locally and on large scales. An important question to be answered is the one of cooling and heating mechanisms in regions of massive star formation. In the vicinity of massive stars, heating is provided mostly by far-UV (FUV) and infra-red radiation. Cooling is mostly provided by emission in the fine structure lines of CII. There are however other atomic and molecular lines such as OI, CO, OH and H_2O which can become significant coolants in the dense, embedded regions of massive star formation. This early phase when the forming massive star is still deeply embedded in its natal envelope, yet already interacting with, and potentially destroying, its environment through copious amounts of UV radiation, massive outflows and ultra compact HII (UCHII) regions, is an important phase in the star formation process. To understand the heating and cooling balance in this phase, one has to consider the contributions of various radiative and dynamical processes such as the FUV radiation from the young star itself, shocks created by strong stellar winds and the photon dominated regions (PDRs) where the radiation impinges on the molecular material. The tracers of these processes can be observed in the far-infrared, a wavelength range that is now accessible at unprecedented high spectral and spatial resolution with the Herschel Space Observatory. We propose to observe the aformentioned tracers of cooling and heating in the massive star forming region IRAS 12326-6245 to obtain a complete picture of the different processes, the regions they originate from and how they interact. This proposal is for time granted to the HIFI hardware team (PI: Frank Helmich) and to be accounted as part of the Swiss guaranteed time (Lead-Co-I: Arnold O. Benz).

  5. Numerical Investigation on the Thermo-mechanical Behavior of a Quadratic Cross Section Pile Heat Exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagola, Maria Alberdi; Madsen, Søren; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2017-01-01

    and shaft resistances; ii) the maximum upward/downward displacements. A one-year time span is considered under operational and extreme thermal boundary conditions. The results show that a typical geothermal utilization of the energy foundation does not generate significant structural implications...... and, therefore, there is a need to develop guidelines to design them properly. This paper contributes by studying the thermo-mechanical behavior of the precast piles which are 15-meter long and have a quadratic cross section and a W-shape pipe heat exchanger. This article aims to numerically assess...... on the geotechnical capacity of a single energy pile. However, ground thermal loads need to be considered in the design phase to account for potential extreme temperature changes, which could generate thermal stresses that equalize the mechanically generated ones....

  6. Modelling heat and mass transfer in bread baking with mechanical deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, V.; Salagnac, P.; Glouannec, P.; Ploteau, J.-P.; Jury, V.; Boillereaux, L.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the thermo-hydric behaviour of bread during baking is studied. A numerical model has been developed with Comsol Multiphysics© software. The model takes into account the heat and mass transfers in the bread and the phenomenon of swelling. This model predicts the evolution of temperature, moisture, gas pressure and deformation in French "baguette" during baking. Local deformation is included in equations using solid phase conservation and, global deformation is calculated using a viscous mechanic model. Boundary conditions are specified with the sole temperature model and vapour pressure estimation of the oven during baking. The model results are compared with experimental data for a classic baking. Then, the model is analysed according to physical properties of bread and solicitations for a better understanding of the interactions between different mechanisms within the porous matrix.

  7. Dynamic Modeling and Control of Distributed Heat Transfer Mechanisms: Application to a Membrane Distillation Module

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-12-01

    Sustainable desalination technologies are the smart solution for producing fresh water and preserve the environment and energy by using sustainable renewable energy sources. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology which can be driven by renewable energy. It is an innovative method for desalinating seawater and brackish water with high quality production, and the gratitude is to its interesting potentials. MD includes a transfer of water vapor from a feed solution to a permeate solution through a micro-porous hydrophobic membrane, rejecting other non-volatile constituents present in the influent water. The process is driven by the temperature difference along the membrane boundaries. Different control applications and supervision techniques would improve the performance and the efficiency of the MD process, however controlling the MD process requires comprehensive mathematical model for the distributed heat transfer mechanisms inside the process. Our objective is to propose a dynamic mathematical model that accounts for the time evolution of the involved heat transfer mechanisms in the process, and to be capable of hosting intermittent energy supplies, besides managing the production rate of the process, and optimizing its energy consumption. Therefore, we propose the 2D Advection-Diffusion Equation model to account for the heat diffusion and the heat convection mechanisms inside the process. Furthermore, experimental validations have proved high agreement between model simulations and experiments with less than 5% relative error. Enhancing the MD production is an anticipated goal, therefore, two main control strategies are proposed. Consequently, we propose a nonlinear controller for a semi-discretized version of the dynamic model to achieve an asymptotic tracking for a desired temperature difference. Similarly, an observer-based feedback control is used to track sufficient temperature difference for better productivity. The second control strategy

  8. The Dynamics of Coronal-Hole Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, A. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Wyper, P. F.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2015-12-01

    The source of the slow solar wind at the Sun is the subject of intense debate in solar and heliospheric physics. Because the majority of the solar wind observed at Earth is slow wind, understanding its origin is essential for understanding and predicting Earth's space weather environment. In-situ and remote observations show that, compared to the fast wind, the slow solar wind corresponds to higher freeze-in temperatures, as indicated by charge-state ratios, and more corona-like elemental abundances. These results indicate that the most likely source for the slow wind is the hot plasma in the closed-field corona; however, the release mechanism for the wind from the closed-field regions is far from understood. Here we present the first fully dynamic, 3D MHD simulations of a coronal-hole boundary driven by photospheric convective flows. We determine in detail the opening and closing of coronal flux due to photospheric motions at the base of a helmet streamer. These changes should lead to the release of plasma from the closed magnetic field at the edge of the streamer. Our analysis demonstrates that the bulk of the release is due to interchange reconnection. We calculate the effective of numerical Lundquist number on the dynamics and discuss the implications of our results for theories of slow-wind origin, in particular the S-Web model. We also discuss the implications of our results for observations, in particular from the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions. This work was supported by the NASA SR&T and TR&T Programs.

  9. Survey of failure mechanisms for tube heat exchangers in heat pumps; Sammanstaellning av skadeorsaker och skadefoerlopp i tubvaermevaexlare till vaermepumpar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Leif; Haegerstedt, Lars-Erik [AaF-Energi och Miljoe AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Larger heat pumps have been used for district heating production during 10-20 years and have become an important complement to other heat production sources. However, after a long time of problem free operation, the heat pumps start to show an increasing amount of ageing problems, especially in the heat exchangers, which can result in damages and leaks of cooling media. Because of this, Vaermeforsk has financed a survey over the most predominant damages and how they depend on heat exchanger tube materials and testing techniques. The result is based on an inquiry to more than 20 heat pump owners with pumps larger than 5 MW (nominal capacity), and the results of tests and damages of ca. 200 heat exchangers have been assembled. The data has been collected by inquiries but almost every production person has also been contacted by phone or e-mail. The result has been compiled in tables and an Access database. The result shows that the service life of stainless tubes in evaporator tube exchangers is much longer than for Cu-alloyed tubes. Titanium tubes in the same application will even resist in the most difficult environments such as geothermal waters. Condenser tubes of carbon steel in district heating water applications show damages from pitting corrosion already after a few years of service. Cu-alloyed tubes show a considerable longer time before damages and stainless steel tubes give a very long service life and very few damages are reported. It must be noticed that by regularly scheduled tests of the tube bundles, attacks on the tube material can be located and taken care of before they result in leakage, and the life time of the heat exchangers is by that prolonged. Smooth tubes may give advantages in comparison to finned tubes. This is based on the fact that the finned tubes show an unlucky combination of a high notch effect and a weak structure in the bottom of the fins. Smooth tubes also decrease the possibility of tube decontamination from impurities in the

  10. Coronal energy input and dissipation in a solar active region 3D MHD model

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, Philippe-A; Peter, Hardi

    2015-01-01

    Context. We have conducted a 3D MHD simulation of the solar corona above an active region in full scale and high resolution, which shows coronal loops, and plasma flows within them, similar to observations. Aims. We want to find the connection between the photospheric energy input by field-line braiding with the coronal energy conversion by Ohmic dissipation of induced currents. Methods. To this end we compare the coronal energy input and dissipation within our simulation domain above different fields of view, e.g. for a small loops system in the active region (AR) core. We also choose an ensemble of field lines to compare, e.g., the magnetic energy input to the heating per particle along these field lines. Results. We find an enhanced Ohmic dissipation of currents in the corona above areas that also have enhanced upwards-directed Poynting flux. These regions coincide with the regions where hot coronal loops within the AR core are observed. The coronal density plays a role in estimating the coronal temperatur...

  11. Formation and evolution of coronal rain observed by SDO/AIA on February 22, 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Vashalomidze, Z; Zaqarashvili, T V; Oliver, R; Shergelashvili, B; Ramishvili, G; Poedts, S; De Causmaecker, P

    2015-01-01

    The formation and dynamics of coronal rain are currently not fully understood. Coronal rain is the fall of cool and dense blobs formed by thermal instability in the solar corona towards the solar surface with acceleration smaller than gravitational free fall. We aim to study the observational evidence of the formation of coronal rain and to trace the detailed dynamics of individual blobs. We used time series of the 171 \\AA\\, and 304 \\AA\\, spectral lines obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) above active region AR 11420 on February 22, 2012. Observations show that a coronal loop disappeared in the 171 \\AA\\ channel and appeared in the 304 \\AA\\ line$\\text{}\\text{}$ more than one hour later, which indicates a rapid cooling of the coronal loop from 1 MK to 0.05 MK. An energy estimation shows that the radiation is higher than the heat input, which indicates so-called catastrophic cooling. The cooling was accompanied by the formation of coronal rain in the fo...

  12. Characteristics of EUV Coronal Jets Observed with STEREO/SECCHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, G.; Bothmer, V.; Patsourakos, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present the first comprehensive statistical study of EUV coronal jets observed with the SECCHI (Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation) imaging suites of the two STEREO spacecraft. A catalogue of 79 polar jets is presented, identified from simultaneous EUV and white-light coronagraph observations, taken during the time period March 2007 to April 2008, when solar activity was at a minimum. The twin spacecraft angular separation increased during this time interval from 2 to 48 degrees. The appearances of the coronal jets were always correlated with underlying small-scale chromospheric bright points. A basic characterization of the morphology and identification of the presence of helical structure were established with respect to recently proposed models for their origin and temporal evolution. Though each jet appeared morphologically similar in the coronagraph field of view, in the sense of a narrow collimated outward flow of matter, at the source region in the low corona the jet showed different characteristics, which may correspond to different magnetic structures. A classification of the events with respect to previous jet studies shows that amongst the 79 events there were 37 Eiffel tower-type jet events, commonly interpreted as a small-scale (˜35 arc sec) magnetic bipole reconnecting with the ambient unipolar open coronal magnetic fields at its loop tops, and 12 lambda-type jet events commonly interpreted as reconnection with the ambient field happening at the bipole footpoints. Five events were termed micro-CME-type jet events because they resembled the classical coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but on much smaller scales. The remaining 25 cases could not be uniquely classified. Thirty-one of the total number of events exhibited a helical magnetic field structure, indicative for a torsional motion of the jet around its axis of propagation. A few jets are also found in equatorial coronal holes. In this study we present sample

  13. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Heat and Moisture Exchangers in Mechanically Ventilated Critically Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegueti, Mayra Goncalves; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Nunes, Altacilio Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    Background Moisturizing, heating and filtering gases inspired via the mechanical ventilation (MV) circuits help to reduce the adverse effects of MV. However, there is still no consensus regarding whether these measures improve patient prognosis, shorten MV duration, decrease airway secretion and lower the incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) and other complications. Objectives The aim of this study was to study the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio associated with the use of heat and moisture exchangers (HME) filter to prevent VAP compared with the heated humidifiers (HH) presently adopted by intensive care unit (ICU) services within the Brazilian Healthcare Unified System. Patients and Methods This study was a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) comparing HME and HH in preventing VAP (outcome) in mechanically ventilated adult patients admitted to an ICU of a public university hospital. Results The analysis considered a period of 12 months; MV duration of 11 and 12 days for patients in HH and HME groups, respectively and a daily cost of R$ 16.46 and R$ 13.42 for HH and HME, respectively. HME was more attractive; costs ranged from R$ 21,000.00 to R$ 22,000.00 and effectiveness was close to 0.71, compared with a cost of R$ 30,000.00 and effectiveness between 0.69 and 0.70 for HH. HME and HH differed significantly for incremental effectiveness. Even after an effectiveness gain of 1.5% in favor of HH, and despite the wide variation in the VAP rate, the HME effectiveness remained stable. The mean HME cost-effectiveness was lower than the mean HH cost-effectiveness, being the HME value close to R$ 44,000.00. Conclusions Our findings revealed that HH and HME differ very little regarding effectiveness, which makes interpretation of the results in the context of clinical practice difficult. Nonetheless, there is no doubt that HME is advantageous. This technology incurs lower direct cost. PMID:27843770

  14. A Viscous Heating Mechanism for the Hot Plasma in the Galactic Center Region

    CERN Document Server

    Belmont, R

    2006-01-01

    In addition to lines originating in a soft phase at ~0.8 keV and to cold molecular clouds, the X-ray spectra from the Galactic center region also exhibit properties similar to those of a diffuse, thin, very hot plasma at 8 keV on a scale of hundreds of parsecs. This phase is surprising for more than one reason. First, such a hot plasma should not be bound to the Galactic plane and the power needed to sustain the escaping matter would be higher then any known source. Second, there is no known mechanism able to heat the plasma to more than a few keV. Recently we have suggested that, hydrogen having escaped, the hot plasma could be a helium plasma, heavy enough to be gravitationally confined. In this case, the required power is much more reasonable. We present here a possible heating mechanism which taps the gravitational energy of the molecular clouds. We note that the 8 keV plasma is highly viscous and we show how viscous friction of molecular clouds flowing within the hot phase can dissipate energy in the gas...

  15. Effect of heat treatment on Fe-B-Si-Nb alloy powder prepared by mechanical alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Estevam Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat treatment on crystallization behavior of Fe73.5B15Si10Nb1.5 alloy powder prepared by mechanical alloying was studied. The powder samples were prepared by mechanical alloying (MA and for different milling times (1, 5, 25, 70 and 100 hours. Crystalline powders of iron, boron, silicon and niobium were sealed with tungsten carbide balls in a cylindrical vial under nitrogen atmosphere. The ball-to-powder weight ratio was 20 to 1. A Fritsch Pulverizette 5 planetary ball mill was used for MA the powders at room temperature and at 250 rpm. To study the microstructural evolution, a small amount of powder was collected after different milling times and examined by X-ray diffraction, using CuKalpha radiation (lambda = 0.15418 nm. The crystallization behavior was studied by differential thermal analysis, from 25 up to 1000 °C at a heating rate of 25 °C min-1.

  16. Post-Heat Treatment and Mechanical Assessment of Polyvinyl Alcohol Nanofiber Sheet Fabricated by Electrospinning Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Es-saheb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA sheets based nanofibers were produced by electrospinning technique. Postheat treatment of the produced PVA sheets with temperatures both below and above Tg to improve the mechanical properties of this material is conducted. The morphology, microstructures, and thermal degradation of the nanofibers sheets produced were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. Produced nanofibers are compact, and entangled with each other, with diameters from around 150 to 210. Some mechanical characteristics of the successfully produced PVA sheets, and heat-treated, are then conducted and assessed employing uniaxial tensile tests at different speeds ranging from 1 mm/min to 100 mm/min. The tensile test results obtained show that the PVA sheets are strain rate sensitive with increasing strength as the speed (i.e., strain rate increases. The yield tensile stress ranges from 2.411 to 6.981 MPa, the ductility (i.e., elongation percent from ∼21 to 60%, and Young modulus ranges from 103 to 0.137 KPa. However, for heat-treated samples, it is found that the yield strength increases almost by ∼35–40% more than the values of untreated cases with values reaching up to about 3.627–9.63 MPa.

  17. Magnetic shuffling of coronal downdrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Channelled fragmented downflows are ubiquitous in magnetized atmospheres, and have recently been addressed based on an observation after a solar eruption. Aims: We study the possible back-effect of the magnetic field on the propagation of confined flows. Methods: We compared two 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of dense supersonic plasma blobs that fall down along a coronal magnetic flux tube. In one, the blobs move strictly along the field lines; in the other, the initial velocity of the blobs is not perfectly aligned with the magnetic field and the field is weaker. Results: The aligned blobs remain compact while flowing along the tube, with the generated shocks. The misaligned blobs are disrupted and merge through the chaotic shuffling of the field lines. They are structured into thinner filaments. Alfvén wave fronts are generated together with shocks ahead of the dense moving front. Conclusions: Downflowing plasma fragments can be chaotically and efficiently mixed if their motion is misaligned with field lines, with broad implications for disk accretion in protostars, coronal eruptions, and rain, for example. Movies associated to Figs. 2 and 3 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Pre-flare coronal dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q M; Ji, H S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the pre-flare coronal dimmings. We report our multiwavelength observations of the GOES X1.6 solar flare and the accompanying halo CME produced by the eruption of a sigmoidal magnetic flux rope (MFR) in NOAA active region (AR) 12158 on 2014 September 10. The eruption was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms were observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard SDO. The soft X-ray (SXR) fluxes were recorded by the GOES spacecraft. The halo CME was observed by the white light coronagraphs of the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) aboard SOHO.} {About 96 minutes before the onset of flare/CME, narrow pre-flare coronal dimmings appeared at the two ends of the twisted MFR. They extended very slowly with their intensities decreasing with time, while their apparent widths (8$-$9 Mm) nearly kept constant. During the impulsive and decay phases of flare, typical fanlike ...

  19. Professionalism in practice: the Coroner's Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    2017-01-02

    A coroner recently declared a district nursing service as unfit for purpose following the death of a patient and held the care given by district nurses was unprofessional and contributed to the patient's decline and death. In this article Richard Griffith considers the coroners concerns in relation to the professional standards imposed on district nurses.

  20. Deep coronal hole associated with quiescent filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesumaningrum, Rasdewita; Herdiwidjaya, Dhani

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the morphology of quiescent filament observed by H-alpha Solar Telescope at Bosscha Observatory in association with coronal hole observed by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in 193 Å from Solar Dynamics Observatory. H-alpha images were processed by imaging softwares, namely Iris 5.59 and ImageJ, to enhance the signal to noise ratio and to identify the filament features associated with coronal hole. For images observed on October 12, 2011, November 14, 2011 and January 2, 2012, we identified distinct features of coronal holes above the quiescent filaments. This associated coronal holes have filament-like morphology with a thick long thread as it's `spine', defined as Deep Coronal Hole. Because of strong magnetic field of sunspot, these filaments and coronal holes emerged far from active region and lasted for several days. It is interesting as for segmented filament, deep coronal holes above the filaments lasted for a quite long period of time and merged. This association between filament and deep coronal hole can be explained by filament magnetic loop.

  1. The Temperature-Dependent Nature of Coronal Dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    Robbrecht, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The opening-up of the magnetic field during solar eruptive events is often accompanied by a dimming of the local coronal emission. From observations of filament eruptions recorded with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager on STEREO during 2008-2009, it is evident that these dimmings are much more pronounced in 19.5 nm than in the lower-temperature line 17.1 nm, as viewed either on the disk or above the limb. We conclude that most of the cooler coronal plasma is not ejected but remains gravitationally bound when the loops open up. This result is consistent with Doppler measurements by Imada and coworkers, who found that the upflow speeds in a transient coronal hole increased dramatically above a temperature of 1 MK; it is also consistent with the quasistatic behavior of polar plumes, as compared with the hotter interplume regions that are the main source of the fast solar wind. When the open flux reconnects and closes down again, the trapped plasma is initially heated to such high temperatures that it is no longer v...

  2. Structure-mechanical function relations at nano-scale in heat-affected human dental tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Tan; Sandholzer, Michael A; Le Bourhis, Eric; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2014-04-01

    The knowledge of the mechanical properties of dental materials related to their hierarchical structure is essential for understanding and predicting the effect of microstructural alterations on the performance of dental tissues in the context of forensic and archaeological investigation as well as laser irradiation treatment of caries. So far, few studies have focused on the nano-scale structure-mechanical function relations of human teeth altered by chemical or thermal treatment. The response of dental tissues to thermal treatment is thought to be strongly affected by the mineral crystallite size, their spatial arrangement and preferred orientation. In this study, synchrotron-based small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques were used to investigate the micro-structural alterations (mean crystalline thickness, crystal perfection and degree of alignment) of heat-affected dentine and enamel in human dental teeth. Additionally, nanoindentation mapping was applied to detect the spatial and temperature-dependent nano-mechanical properties variation. The SAXS/WAXS results revealed that the mean crystalline thickness distribution in dentine was more uniform compared with that in enamel. Although in general the mean crystalline thickness increased both in dentine and enamel as the temperature increased, the local structural variations gradually reduced. Meanwhile, the hardness and reduced modulus in enamel decreased as the temperature increased, while for dentine, the tendency reversed at high temperature. The analysis of the correlation between the ultrastructure and mechanical properties coupled with the effect of temperature demonstrates the effect of mean thickness and orientation on the local variation of mechanical property. This structural-mechanical property alteration is likely to be due to changes of HAp crystallites, thus dentine and enamel exhibit different responses at different temperatures. Our results enable an improved understanding of

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel relative to different heat input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Hakan, E-mail: hakanay@uludag.edu.tr [Engineering and Architecture Faculty, Mechanical Engineering Department, Uludag University, 16059 Gorukle-Bursa (Turkey); Nelson, Tracy W. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Brigham Young University, 435 CTB, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties of the hard zone in friction stir welded X80 pipeline steel at different heat inputs. Microstructural analysis of the welds was carried out using optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and microhardness. Heat input during friction stir welding process had a significant influence on the microstructure and mechanical properties in the hard zone along the advancing side of the weld nugget. Based on the results, the linear relationships between heat input and post-weld microstructures and mechanical properties in the hard zone of friction stir welded X80 steels were established. It can be concluded that with decrease in heat input the bainitic structure in the hard zone becomes finer and so hard zone strength increases.

  4. Bootstrapping the Coronal Magnetic Field with STEREO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2010-05-01

    The 3D coronal magnetic field obtained from stereoscopically triangulated loops has been compared with standard photospheric magnetogram extrapolations. We found a large misalignment of 20-40 deg, depending on the complexity of an AR (Sandman et al. 2009; DeRosa et al. 2009). These studies prove that the magnetic field in the photosphere is not force-free and fundamentally cannot reproduce the coronal magnetic field. Bootstrapping with coronal loop 3D geometries are required to improve modeling of the coronal field. Such coronal field bootstrapping methods are currently developed using stereoscopically triangulated loops from STEREO/EUVI and preliminary results show already a significantly reduced misalignment of 10-20 deg.

  5. Blind Stereoscopy of the Coronal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J; Malanushenko, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We test the feasibility of 3D coronal-loop tracing in stereoscopic EUV image pairs, with the ultimate goal of enabling efficient 3D reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field that drives flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We developed an automated code designed to perform triangulation of coronal loops in pairs (or triplets) of EUV images recorded from different perspectives. The automated (or blind) stereoscopy code includes three major tasks: (i) automated pattern recognition of coronal loops in EUV images, (ii) automated pairing of corresponding loop patterns from two different aspect angles, and (iii) stereoscopic triangulation of 3D loop coordinates. We perform tests with simulated stereoscopic EUV images and quantify the accuracy of all three procedures. In addition we test the performance of the blind stereoscopy code as a function of the spacecraft-separation angle and as a function of the spatial resolution. We also test the sensitivity to magnetic non-potentiality. The automated code develo...

  6. The Inconvenient Truth About Coronal Dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of a coronal dimming using a combination of high resolution spectro-polarimetric, spectral and broadband images which span from the deep photosphere into the corona. These observations reinforce the belief that coronal dimmings, or transient coronal holes as they are also known, are indeed the locations of open magnetic flux in the corona resulting from the launch of a CME. We will see that, as open magnetic regions, they must act just as coronal holes and be sources of the fast solar wind, but only temporarily. An inescapable question therefore arises - what impact does this source of fast wind have on the propagation and in-flight characteristics of the CME that initiates the coronal dimming in the first place?

  7. EIT waves and coronal magnetic field diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN PengFei

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic field in the solar lower atmosphere can be measured by the use of the Zeeman and Hanle effects. By contrast, the coronal magnetic field well above the solar surface, which directly controls various eruptive phenomena, can not be precisely measured with the traditional techniques. Several attempts are being made to probe the coronal magnetic field, such as force-free extrapolation based on the photospheric magnetograms, gyroresonance radio emissions, and coronal seismology based on MHD waves in the corona. Compared to the waves trapped in the localized coronal loops, EIT waves are the only global-scale wave phenomenon, and thus are the ideal tool for the coronal global seismology. In this paper, we review the observations and modelings of EIT waves, and illustrate how they can be applied to probe the global magnetic field in the corona.

  8. Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer in Mechanically Contstrained Ultra Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Drost; Jim Liburdy; Brian Paul; Richard Peterson

    2005-01-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to conduct research focused on resolving the key technical issues that limited the deployment of efficient and extremely compact microtechnology based heat actuated absorption heat pumps and gas absorbers. Success in demonstrating these technologies will reduce the main barriers to the deployment of a technology that can significantly reduce energy consumption in the building, automotive and industrial sectors while providing a technology that can improve our ability to sequester CO{sub 2}. The proposed research cost $939,477. $539,477 of the proposed amount funded research conducted at OSU while the balance ($400,000) was used at PNNL. The project lasted 42 months and started in April 2001. Recent developments at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oregon State University suggest that the performance of absorption and desorption systems can be significantly enhanced by the use of an ultra-thin film gas/liquid contactor. This device employs microtechnology-based structures to mechanically constrain the gas/liquid interface. This technology can be used to form very thin liquid films with a film thickness less then 100 microns while still allowing gas/liquid contact. When the resistance to mass transfer in gas desorption and absorption is dominated by diffusion in the liquid phase the use of extremely thin films (<100 microns) for desorption and absorption can radically reduce the size of a gas desorber or absorber. The development of compact absorbers and desorbers enables the deployment of small heat-actuated absorption heat pumps for distributed space heating and cooling applications, heat-actuated automotive air conditioning, manportable cooling, gas absorption units for the chemical process industry and the development of high capacity CO{sub 2} absorption devices for CO{sub 2} collection and sequestration. The energy

  9. Three-Dimensional Modeling of the Solar Wind: From the Coronal Base to the Outer Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, A. V; Goldstein, M. L.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a global fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model for the region that extends from the coronal base to 100 AU. The simulation domain consists of tree spherical shell subdomains with computational boundaries between them placed at 20 solar radii and 0.3 AU. The location of the first boundary ensures that the flow at the boundary is both supersonic and super-Alfvenic. A steady-state solution in the innermost (coronal) region is obtained by the time-relaxation method. The solution uses a tilted dipole model or solar magnetograms as the boundary condition at the coronal base and includes a flux of Alfven waves in the WKB approximation which provide additional acceleration for the coronal outflow in the open field regions. The intermediate region solution is constructed by the integration of steady-state equations along radius using a marching scheme. The outer region solution (0.3-100 AU) is obtained again by the time relaxation and takes into account turbulence transport and heating as well as heating, flow deceleration, and other effects due to the interstellar pickup protons treated as a separate fluid. We use the model to simulate the global steady-state structure of the solar wind from the coronal base to the heliospheric boundary and compare the results with Ulysses and Voyager observations.

  10. Fundamental Studies of Phase Transformations and Mechanical Properties in the Heat Affected Zone of 10 wt% Nickel Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Erin J.

    United States naval applications require the use of steels with high strength and resistance to fracture at low temperatures to provide good ballistic properties. In recent years, 10 wt% Ni steel has been developed with strength and toughness values exceeding those of steels currently used, and is now being considered as a candidate material to replace existing high-strength, low alloy steels. This steel has excellent toughness from the mechanically induced transformation of interlath austenite films to martensite. These austenite films are formed via a carefully developed quenching, lamellarizing, and tempering heat treatment. However, before 10 wt% Ni steel can be implemented for full-scale applications, the effects of the rapid heating and cooling rates associated with welding thermal cycles on phase transformations and mechanical properties must be understood. In this research, a fundamental understanding of phase transformations and mechanical properties in the heat-affected zone of fusion welds in 10 wt% Ni steel was developed through heating and cooling rate dilatometry experiments, gas tungsten arc welding, and simulation of gas metal arc welding. First, an investigation into the effects of heating and cooling rate on the phase transformations in 10 wt% Ni steel was performed. The Ac1 and Ac3 temperatures during heating were determined as a function of heating rate, and sluggish transformation during fast heating rates manifested itself as a high Ac3 temperature of 1050°C as opposed to a temperature of 850°C at slow heating rates. A continuous cooling transformation diagram produced for 10 wt% Ni steel reveals that martensite will form over a very wide range of cooling rates, which reflects a very high hardenability of this alloy. This is significant because the range of cooling rates for which the diagram was constructed over easily covers the range associated with fusion welding, so there would not be the need for precise control over the weld

  11. Physical-mechanical properties and bonding quality of heat treated poplar (I-214 clone and ceiba plywood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goli G

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates the physical and mechanical modifications of both poplar (I-214 clone and ceiba veneers and plywood after heat treatments of different intensities (5 and 7 % of dry mass losses. Plywood panels were glued before and after heat treatment with urea-formaldehyde (UF and melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF resins. In order to assess the treatments’ effects on both the wood and the glues, the dry mass, the density, the bending strength, the Young’s modulus and the bonding quality were measured before and after heat treatment. The results of the different treatments were compared as well. Results showed that the loss in cell wall polymers due to the heat treatment caused a significant reduction of the equilibrium moisture content of the samples. From a mechanical point of view the treatment resulted in an important reduction of strength and in a small reduction of stiffness. Bonding quality as well as mechanical properties were widely affected by the heat treatment. The different intensities of the treatments (the treatment range was up to 5% and 7% of dry mass loss did not show significant differences for most of the features assessed. The mechanical performance as well as the bonding quality of treated samples suggested that veneers should be glued after heat treatment. Apparent cohesive wood failure showed that different degradations affect wood and glues with a prominent effect on the glues for UF resins and a prominent effect on the wood for MUF resins.

  12. Effect of heat treatment on the physical and mechanical properties of compression and opposite wood of Black pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Türker Dündar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of commercial heat treatment on physical and mechanical properties of compression wood (CW and opposite wood (OW of black pine (Pinus nigra Arnold was investigated. Black pine logs containing CW were cut parallel to the pith and separated into CW and OW sections. A commercial heat treatment process was applied to pine lumber at 180 and 210 ºC for 3 hours. Water absorption (WA, contact angle (CA, swelling, modulus of rupture (MOR, modulus of elasticity (MOE, and impact bending strength (IBS were measured. The results showed that heat treatment decreased water absorption and swelling of the CW and OW of black pine. Heat treatment at 210 °C temperature decreased the longitudinal swelling of CW by 51.4%. Higher immersion time lowered the effect of heat treatment on the WA values. The CA values of the CW and OW increased due to heat treatment. Heat treatment reduced the MOR, MOE, and IBS values. The results indicated that MOR, MOE, and CA values were highly affected in the CW; on the other hand, the IBS value was highly affected in the OW by heat treatment compared to control groups. The results indicate that heat-stabilized CW can be used more widely and effectively in the forest products industry.

  13. Coronal Mass Ejections travel time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Carlos Roberto; Souza de Mendonça, Rafael Rodrigues; Dal Lago, Alisson; Echer, Ezequiel

    2017-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main source of intense geomagnetic storms when they are earthward directed. Studying their travel time is a key-point to understand when the disturbance will be observed at Earth. In this work, we study the CME that originated the interplanetary disturbance observed on 2013/10/02. According to the observations, the CME that caused the interplanetary disturbance was ejected on 2013/09/29. We obtained the CME speed and estimate of the time of arrival at the Lagrangian Point L1 using the concept of expansion speed. We found that observed and estimated times of arrival of the shock differ between 2 and 23 hours depending on method used to estimate the radial speed.

  14. Microstructural evolution and formation mechanism of FCC titanium during heat treatment processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, R.; Liu, C.Y.; Ma, M.Z. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Liu, R.P., E-mail: riping@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2013-03-05

    Highlights: ► The alloy with ST underwent the transformations: β → α + β + α″ + fcc phase. ► The lattice parameter “a” of the fcc phase was about 0.4385 nm. ► After aging at 450 °C, the highest strength was attained about 1740 MPa. ► The transus temperature of fcc-Ti was between 650 °C and 700 °C. -- Abstract: The phase transformation of Ti–20Zr–6.5Al–4V alloy was studied during different heat treatment processes. Due to the addition of zirconium possessing the high-stacking-fault energy, a small amount of Ti underwent allotropic transformation from hcp-Ti to face-centered cubic (fcc) Ti during heat treatment. The alloy, which was subjected to solid solution treatment at 950 °C for 60 min and subsequent water quenched, underwent the following phase transformations: β → α + β (residual) + α″ + fcc phase. The fcc phase was also found in the subsequent aging process, and when aging temperature reached 700 °C, the fcc-Ti completely decomposed into hexagonal close-packed α phase. The transus temperature of fcc-Ti was between 650 °C and 700 °C. It was found that the mechanical properties of the alloy are remarkably dependent on fcc phase content.

  15. Heat insulation performance, mechanics and hydrophobic modification of cellulose-SiO2 composite aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianjun; Lu, Lingbin; Guo, Wantao; Zhang, Jingying; Cao, Yang

    2013-10-15

    Cellulose-SiO2 composite hydrogel was prepared by combining the NaOH/thiourea/H2O solvent system and the immersion method with controlling the hydrolysis-fasculation rate of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). The hydrophobic composite aerogels were obtained through the freeze-drying technology and the cold plasma modification technology. Composite SiO2 could obviously reduce the thermal conductivity of cellulose aerogel. The thermal conductivity could be as low as 0.026 W/(mK). The thermal insulation mechanism of the aerogel material was discussed. Composite SiO2 reduced hydrophilicity of cellulose aerogel, but environmental humidity had a significant influence on heat insulation performance. After hydrophobic modification using CCl4 as plasma was conducted, the surface of composite aerogel was changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic and water contact angle was as high as 132°. The modified composite aerogel still kept good heat insulation performance. This work provided a foundation for the possibility of applying cellulose-SiO2 composite aerogel in the insulating material field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mitigating the surface urban heat island: Mechanism study and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chunlei

    2017-08-01

    In a surface urban heat island (SUHI), the urban land surface temperature (LST) is usually higher than the temperature of the surrounding rural areas due to human activities and surface characteristics. Because a SUHI has many adverse impacts on urban environment and human health, SUHI mitigation strategies are very important. This paper investigates the mechanism of a SUHI based on the basic physical laws that control the formation of a SUHI; five mitigation strategies are proposed, namely: sprinkling and watering; paving a pervious surface; reducing the anthropogenic heat (AH) release; using a "white roof"; increasing the fractional vegetation cover or leaf area index (LAI). To quantify the effect of these mitigation strategies, 26 sets of experiments are designed and implemented by running the integrated urban land model (IUM). The results of the sensitivity analysis indicate that sprinkling and watering is an effective measure for mitigating a SUHI for an entire day. Decreasing the AH release is also useful for both night- and daytime SUHI mitigation; however, the cooling extent is proportional to the diurnal cycle of AH. Increasing the albedo can reduce the LST in the daytime, especially when the solar radiation is significant; the cooling extent is approximately proportional to the diurnal cycle of the net radiation. Increasing the pervious surface percentage can mitigate the SUHI especially in the daytime. Increasing the fractional vegetation cover can mitigate the SUHI in the daytime but may aggravate the SUHI at night.

  17. A study on dynamic heat assisted magnetization reversal mechanisms under insufficient reversal field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. J.; Yang, H. Z.; Leong, S. H.; Wu, B. L.; Asbahi, M.; Yu Ko, Hnin Yu; Yang, J. K. W.; Ng, V.

    2014-10-01

    We report an experimental study on the dynamic thermomagnetic (TM) reversal mechanisms at around Curie temperature (Tc) for isolated 60 nm pitch single-domain [Co/Pd] islands heated by a 1.5 μm spot size laser pulse under an applied magnetic reversal field (Hr). Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) observations with high resolution MFM tips clearly showed randomly trapped non-switched islands within the laser irradiated spot after dynamic TM reversal process with insufficient Hr strength. This observation provides direct experimental evidence by MFM of a large magnetization switching variation due to increased thermal fluctuation/agitation over magnetization energy at the elevated temperature of around Tc. The average percentage of non-switched islands/magnetization was further found to be inversely proportional to the applied reversal field Hr for incomplete magnetization reversal when Hr is less than 13% of the island coercivity (Hc), showing an increased switching field distribution (SFD) at elevated temperature of around Tc (where main contributions to SFD broadening are from Tc distribution and stronger thermal fluctuations). Our experimental study and results provide better understanding and insight on practical heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) process and recording performance, including HAMR writing magnetization dynamics induced SFD as well as associated DC saturation noise that limits areal density, as were previously observed and investigated by theoretical simulations.

  18. Enhancing the mechanical properties of electrospun polyester mats by heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kancheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfibrous materials with a targeted design based on poly(L-lactic acid (PLA and poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL were prepared by electrospinning and by combining electrospinning and electrospraying. Several approaches were used: (i electrospinning of a common solution of the two polymers, (ii simultaneous electrospinning of two separate solutions of PLA and PCL, (iii electrospinning of PLA solution in conjunction with electrospraying of PCL solution, and (iv alternating layer-by-layer deposition by electrospinning of separate PLA and PCL solutions. The mats were heated at the melting temperature of PCL (60°", thus achieving melting of PCL fibers/particles and thermal sealing of the fibers. The mats subjected to thermal treatment were characterized by greater mean fiber diameters and reduced values of the water contact angle compared to the pristine mats. Heat treatment of the mats affected their thermal stability and led to an increase in the crystallinity degree of PLA incorporated in the mats, whereas that of PCL was reduced. All mats were characterized by enhanced mechanical properties after thermal treatment as compared to the non-treated fibrous materials.

  19. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eGibson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  20. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sarah; Kucera, Therese; White, Stephen; Dove, James; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake; Rachmeler, Laurel; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine

    2016-03-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  1. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  2. Nonlinear Lyapunov-based boundary control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plant

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear Lyapunov-based boundary control for the temperature difference of a membrane distillation boundary layers. The heat transfer mechanisms inside the process are modeled with a 2D advection-diffusion equation. The model is semi-descretized in space, and a nonlinear state-space representation is provided. The control is designed to force the temperature difference along the membrane sides to track a desired reference asymptotically, and hence a desired flux would be generated. Certain constraints are put on the control law inputs to be within an economic range of energy supplies. The effect of the controller gain is discussed. Simulations with real process parameters for the model, and the controller are provided. © 2015 American Automatic Control Council.

  3. Relaxation time diagram for identifying heat generation mechanisms in magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Enio, E-mail: lima@cab.cnea.gov.ar; De Biasi, Emilio; Zysler, Roberto D.; Vasquez Mansilla, Marcelo; Mojica-Pisciotti, Mary L. [Centro Atómico Bariloche/CONICET (Argentina); Torres, Teobaldo E.; Calatayud, M. Pilar; Marquina, C.; Ricardo Ibarra, M.; Goya, Gerardo F. [Universidad de Zaragoza, Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón INA (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    We present a versatile diagram to envisage the dominant relaxation mechanism of single-domain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) under alternating magnetic fields, as those used in magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The diagram allows estimating the heating efficiency, measured by the Specific Power Absorption (SPA), originated in the magnetic and viscous relaxation times of single-domain MNPs for a given frequency of the ac magnetic field (AFM). The diagram has been successfully applied to different colloids, covering a wide variety of MNPs with different magnetic anisotropy and particle size, and dispersed in different viscous liquid carriers. From the general diagram, we derived a specific chart based on the Linear Response Theory in order to easily estimate the experimental condition for the optimal SPA values of most colloids currently used in MFH.

  4. Deformation mechanisms, defects, heat treatment, and thermal conductivity in large grain niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieler, Thomas R., E-mail: bieler@egr.msu.edu; Kang, Di, E-mail: kangdi@msu.edu; Baars, Derek C., E-mail: baarsder@gmail.com [Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824-1226, US (United States); Chandrasekaran, Saravan, E-mail: saravan@fnal.gov [Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824-1226, US (United States); Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606, US (United States); Mapar, Aboozar, E-mail: maparabo@egr.msu.edu; Wright, Neil T., E-mail: ntwright@egr.msu.edu [Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824-1226, US (United States); Ciovati, Gianluigi, E-mail: gciovati@jlab.org; Myneni, Ganapati Rao, E-mail: rao@jlab.org [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606, US (United States); Pourboghrat, Farhang, E-mail: pourboghrat.2@osu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, US (United States); Murphy, James E., E-mail: jim@unr.edu [Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Nevada at Reno, Reno NV, 89557, US (United States); Compton, Chris C., E-mail: compton@frib.msu.edu [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing MI 48824-1226, US (United States)

    2015-12-04

    The physical and mechanical metallurgy underlying fabrication of large grain cavities for superconducting radio frequency accelerators is summarized, based on research of 1) grain orientations in ingots, 2) a metallurgical assessment of processing a large grain single cell cavity and a tube, 3) assessment of slip behavior of single crystal tensile samples extracted from a high purity ingot slice before and after annealing at 800 °C / 2 h, 4) development of crystal plasticity models based upon the single crystal experiments, and 5) assessment of how thermal conductivity is affected by strain, heat treatment, and exposure to hydrogen. Because of the large grains, the plastic anisotropy of deformation is exaggerated, and heterogeneous strains and localized defects are present to a much greater degree than expected in polycrystalline material, making it highly desirable to computationally anticipate potential forming problems before manufacturing cavities.

  5. Molecular mechanisms involved in adaptive responses to radiation, UV light, and heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2009-09-01

    Viable organisms recognize and respond to environmental changes or stresses. When these environmental changes and their responses by organisms are extreme, they can limit viability. However, organisms can adapt to these different stresses by utilizing different possible responses via signal transduction pathways when the stress is not lethal. In particular, prior mild stresses can provide some aid to prepare organisms for subsequent more severe stresses. These adjustments or adaptations for future stresses have been called adaptive responses. These responses are present in bacteria, plants and animals. The following review covers recent research which can help describe or postulate possible mechanisms which may be active in producing adaptive responses to radiation, ultraviolet light, and heat.

  6. The operation of stochastic heating mechanisms in an electromagnetic standing wave configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, Y.; Nakach, R.

    1991-10-01

    The possibility of the operation of stochastic heating mechanisms of charged particles in a configuration consisting of a left-handed circularly polarized standing electromagnetic wave and a uniform magnetic field, has been studied numerically and theoretically. It is found that such a configuration induces stochasticity, the threshold of which is dependent on two independent parameters, determined by the frequency and the amplitude of the wave and the strength of the magnetic field. From the theoretical analysis, it emerges that the origin of onset of large scale stochasticity is the destabilization of fixed points associated with an equation describing the motion of the particles in an electrostatic-type potential having standing wave characteristics. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with the numerical results is found to be quite satisfactory. Possible applications to realistic plasmas have been discussed.

  7. Analytical solutions for transport processes fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Brenn, Günter

    2017-01-01

    This book provides analytical solutions to a number of classical problems in transport processes, i.e. in fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer. Expanding computing power and more efficient numerical methods have increased the importance of computational tools. However, the interpretation of these results is often difficult and the computational results need to be tested against the analytical results, making analytical solutions a valuable commodity. Furthermore, analytical solutions for transport processes provide a much deeper understanding of the physical phenomena involved in a given process than do corresponding numerical solutions. Though this book primarily addresses the needs of researchers and practitioners, it may also be beneficial for graduate students just entering the field. .

  8. Spectral mapping of heat transfer mechanisms at liquid-solid interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Sääskilahti, K; Tulkki, J; Volz, S

    2015-01-01

    Thermal transport through liquid-solid interfaces plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes, and better understanding of liquid-solid energy transfer is expected to enable improving the efficiency of thermally driven applications. We determine the spectral distribution of thermal current at liquid-solid interfaces from nonequilibrium molecular dynamics, delivering a detailed picture of the contributions of different vibrational modes to liquid-solid energy transfer. Our results show that surface modes located at the Brillouin zone edge and polarized along the liquid-solid surface normal play a crucial role in liquid-solid energy transfer. Strong liquid-solid adhesion allows also for the coupling of in-plane polarized modes in the solid with the liquid, enhancing the heat transfer rate and enabling efficient energy transfer up to the cut-off frequency of the solid. Our results provide fundamental understanding of the energy transfer mechanisms in liquid-solid systems and enable detailed...

  9. Effect of T6 heat treatment on mechanical properties and microstructure of EN AB-42000 alloy modified with strontium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pezda

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Process of silumin properties perfection in scope of classic (simple and cheap methods is connected with change of morphology ofsilumin precipitations through: process of alloy modification, maintaining suitable temperature of superheating treatment and pouring into moulds, as well as perfection of heat treatment operations. In the paper are presented results of a tests aimed at investigation of an effects of performed heat treatment operations on change of tensile strength of EN AC-42000 silumin modified with strontium. Investigated alloy was melted in electric resistance furnace. Course of crystallization process was recorded with use of thermal-derivative analysis (ATD, and on base of this analysis one determined temperatures range of heat treatment operations of the alloy. Performed heat treatment operation resulted in change of mechanical properties (Rm, A5 of the investigated alloy, whereas performed tests enabled determination of temperature and duration of solutioning and ageing treatments, which condition improvement of its mechanical properties.

  10. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Sebastián; Svoboda, Hernán; Surian, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have good weldability and adequate tensile property, toughness and corrosion resistance. They have been developed as an alternative technology, mainly for oil and gas industries. The final properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit depend on its chemical composition and microstructure: martensite, tempered martensite, ferrite, retained austenite and carbides and/or nitrides. In these steels, the post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) are usually double tempering ones, to ensure both complete tempering of martensite and high austenite content, to increase toughness and decrease hardness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of post-weld heat treatments (solution treatment with single and double tempering) on the mechanical properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit. An all-weld metal test coupon was welded according to standard ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 using a GMAW supermartensitic stainless steel metal cored wire, under gas shielding. PWHTs were carried out varying the temperature of the first tempering treatment with and without a second tempering one, after solution treatment. All-weld metal chemical composition analysis, metallurgical characterization, hardness and tensile property measurements and Charpy-V tests were carried out. There are several factors which can be affected by the PWHTs, among them austenite content is a significant one. Different austenite contents (0-42%) were found. Microhardness, tensile property and toughness were affected with up to 15% of austenite content, by martensite tempering and carbide precipitation. The second tempering treatment seemed not to have had an important effect on the mechanical properties measured in this work.

  11. [Arc spectrum diagnostic and heat coupling mechanism analysis of double wire pulsed MIG welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-qiang; Li, Huan; Yang, Li-jun; Zheng, Kai; Gao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A double wire pulsed MIG welding test system was built in the present paper, in order to analyze the heat-coupling mechanism of double wire pulsed MIG welding, and study are temperature field. Spectroscopic technique was used in diagnostic analysis of the are, plasma radiation was collected by using hollow probe method to obtain the arc plasma optical signal The electron temperature of double wire pulsed MIG welding arc plasma was calculated by using Boltzmann diagram method, the electron temperature distribution was obtained, a comprehensive analysis of the arc was conducted combined with the high speed camera technology and acquisition means of electricity signal. The innovation of this paper is the combination of high-speed camera image information of are and optical signal of arc plasma to analyze the coupling mechanism for dual arc, and a more intuitive analysis for are temperature field was conducted. The test results showed that a push-pull output was achieved and droplet transfer mode was a drop in a pulse in the welding process; Two arcs attracted each other under the action of a magnetic field, and shifted to the center of the arc in welding process, so a new heat center was formed at the geometric center of the double arc, and flowing up phenomenon occurred on the arc; Dual arc electronic temperature showed an inverted V-shaped distribution overall, and at the geometric center of the double arc, the arc electron temperature at 3 mm off the workpiece surface was the highest, which was 16,887.66 K, about 4,900 K higher than the lowest temperature 11,963.63 K.

  12. Microstructure, cold rolling, heat treatment, and mechanical properties of Mg-Li alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haibin Ji; Guangchun Yao; Hongbin Li

    2008-01-01

    The magnesium-lithium (Mg-Li) alloy exhibits two phase structures between 5.7wt% and 10.3wt% Li contents, consisting of the a (hcp) Mg-rich and the β (bee) Li-rich phases, at room temperature. In the experiment, Mg-5Li-2Zn, Mg-9Li-2Zn,Mg-16Li-2Zn, Mg-22Li-2Zn, Mg-5Li-2Zn-2Ca, Mg-9Li-2Zn-2Ca, Mg-16Li-2Zn-2Ca, and Mg-22Li-2Zn-2Ca (wt%) were melted.During the melting process, the flux, which was composed of lithium chloride (LiCI) and lithium fluoride (LiF) in the proportion of 3:1 (mass ratio) and argon gas were used to protect the alloys from oxidation. The mierostructure, mechanical properties, and cold-rolling workability of the wrought alloys were studied. The crystal grain of the alloys (adding Ga) is fine. The hardness of the studied alloys decreases with an increase in element Li. The density of the studied alloys is in the range of 1.187 to 1.617 g/cm3 The reduction of the Mg-16Li-2Zn and Mg-22Li-2Zn alloys can exceed 85% at room temperature. The Mg-9Li-2Zn-2Ca alloy was heat treated at 300℃ for 8, 12, 16, and 24 h, respectively. The optimum heat treatment of the Mg-9Li-2Zn-2Ca alloy is 300~Cx12h by metallographic observation and by studying the mechanical properties of the alloys.

  13. Coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical modeling of heat extraction from the Tattapani geothermal field, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nand Pandey, Sachchida; Vishal, Vikram

    2017-04-01

    Modeling of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in enhanced geothermal systems is presented using the finite element method of modeling for a 3-D domain. The reservoir consists of a single horizontal fracture surrounded by low permeable rock matrix. The flow is imposed on a fracture plane, consisting of a doublet system. The reservoir rock mechanical properties were taken from the field data of the Tattapani geothermal field, India. We investigate the effects of injection temperature and mass flow rate on the energy output. The results indicate that temperature and pressure changes within the reservoirs occur due to injection of cold water. The temperature drop and fluid overpressure inside the reservoirs/fracture affect the transport properties of the fracture. The spatial-temporal variations of fracture aperture inside the reservoir greatly impact the thermal drawdown and therefore net energy output. The results showed that maximum aperture evolution occurs near the injection zone than the production zone. The fracture aperture evolution is a result of combined effects of thermal stress and fluid overpressure inside the fracture. The fracture opening reduces the injection pressure required to circulate the fixed volume of water. The effects of the injection temperature on heat extraction were also analyzed under different reservoir formations. The results indicate that reservoir permeability plays a significant role on heat extraction, highlighting the important effect of water losses. For each factor, it is concluded that thermal breakthrough primarily depends on injection temperate, mass flow rate, reservoir permeability and well distances. The results of this study can help in choosing the operational parameters for successful operation of geothermal system. The study will also be helpful to optimize the EGS performance under varying reservoir conditions.

  14. Multiscale Modeling of Solar Coronal Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is widely believed to be the primary process by which the magnetic field releases energy to plasma in the Sun's corona. For example, in the breakout model for the initiation of coronal mass ejections/eruptive flares, reconnection is responsible for the catastrophic destabilizing of magnetic force balance in the corona, leading to explosive energy release. A critical requirement for the reconnection is that it have a "switch-on' nature in that the reconnection stays off until a large store of magnetic free energy has built up, and then it turn on abruptly and stay on until most of this free energy has been released. We discuss the implications of this requirement for reconnection in the context of the breakout model for CMEs/flares. We argue that it imposes stringent constraints on the properties of the flux breaking mechanism, which is expected to operate in the corona on kinetic scales. We present numerical simulations demonstrating how the reconnection and the eruption depend on the effective resistivity, i.e., the effective Lundquist number, and propose a model for incorporating kinetic flux-breaking mechanisms into MHO calculation of CMEs/flares.

  15. Space weather and coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Space weather has attracted a lot of attention in recent times. Severe space weather can disrupt spacecraft, and on Earth can be the cause of power outages and power station failure. It also presents a radiation hazard for airline passengers and astronauts. These ""magnetic storms"" are most commonly caused by coronal mass ejections, or CMES, which are large eruptions of plasma and magnetic field from the Sun that can reach speeds of several thousand km/s. In this SpringerBrief, Space Weather and Coronal Mass Ejections, author Timothy Howard briefly introduces the coronal mass ejection, its sc

  16. Drift waves in the corona: heating and acceleration of ions at frequencies far below the gyro frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Vranjes, J

    2010-01-01

    In the solar corona, several mechanisms of the drift wave instability can make the mode growing up to amplitudes at which particle acceleration and stochastic heating by the drift wave take place. The stochastic heating, well known from laboratory plasma physics where it has been confirmed in numerous experiments, has been completely ignored in past studies of coronal heating. However, in the present study and in our very recent works it has been shown that the inhomogeneous coronal plasma is, in fact, a perfect environment for fast growing drift waves. As a matter of fact, the large growth rates are typically of the same order as the plasma frequency. The consequent heating rates may exceed the required values for a sustained coronal heating by several orders of magnitude. Some aspects of these phenomena are investigated here. In particular the analysis of the particle dynamics within the growing wave is compared with the corresponding fluid analysis. While both of them predict the stochastic heating, the th...

  17. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  18. Biomechanical, biochemical, and morphological mechanisms of heat shock-mediated germination in Carica papaya seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Rachel E.; Waterworth, Wanda M.; Stuppy, Wolfgang; West, Christopher E.; Ennos, Roland; Bray, Clifford M.; Pritchard, Hugh W.

    2016-01-01

    Carica papaya (papaya) seed germinate readily fresh from the fruit, but desiccation induces a dormant state. Dormancy can be released by exposure of the hydrated seed to a pulse of elevated temperature, typical of that encountered in its tropical habitat. Carica papaya is one of only a few species known to germinate in response to heat shock (HS) and we know little of the mechanisms that control germination in tropical ecosystems. Here we investigate the mechanisms that mediate HS-induced stimulation of germination in pre-dried and re-imbibed papaya seed. Exogenous gibberellic acid (GA3 ≥250 µM) overcame the requirement for HS to initiate germination. However, HS did not sensitise seeds to GA3, indicative that it may act independently of GA biosynthesis. Seed coat removal also overcame desiccation-imposed dormancy, indicative that resistance to radicle emergence is coat-imposed. Morphological and biomechanical studies identified that neither desiccation nor HS alter the physical structure or the mechanical strength of the seed coat. However, cycloheximide prevented both seed coat weakening and germination, implicating a requirement for de novo protein synthesis in both processes. The germination antagonist abscisic acid prevented radicle emergence but had no effect on papaya seed coat weakening. Desiccation therefore appears to reduce embryo growth potential, which is reversed by HS, without physically altering the mechanical properties of the seed coat. The ability to germinate in response to a HS may confer a competitive advantage to C. papaya, an opportunistic pioneer species, through detection of canopy removal in tropical forests. PMID:27811004

  19. Study of the formation and thermal stability of Mg{sub 2}Co obtained by mechanical alloying and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, Carola, E-mail: carola.martinezu@usach.cl [Escuela de Ingeniería Mecánica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Los Carrera 01567, Casilla de correo 4059, Quilpué (Chile); Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 10233, Santiago (Chile); Ordoñez, Stella, E-mail: stella.ordonez@usach.cl [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 10233, Santiago (Chile); Serafini, Daniel [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 307, Santiago (Chile); Guzmán, Danny [Departamento de Metalurgia, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Atacama y CRIDESAT, Av. Copayapu 485, Casilla de correo 240, Copiapó (Chile); Rojas, Paula [Escuela de Ingeniería Mecánica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Los Carrera 01567, Casilla de correo 4059, Quilpué (Chile)

    2014-03-25

    Highlights: • Study of phase evolution of elemental powders Mg and Co by MA and heat treatment. • The activation energies and apparent enthalpies for crystallization were obtained. • The phase transformation during the mechanical alloying process was determined. • The feasibility to obtain Mg{sub 2}Co by MA plus heat treatment has been established. -- Abstract: The microstructural evolution of Mg and Co in a 2:1 atomic ratio was investigated during mechanical alloying and subsequent heat treatments. Microstructural characterization was determined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, while thermal stability was studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry. The results show that mechanical alloying produces amorphization and promotes greater microstructural refinement. Formation of Mg{sub 2}Co requires an additional heat treatment at temperatures between 679 and 705 K, depending on milling time. Additionally, it was determined that the activation energy for Mg{sub 2}Co crystallization decreases from 206 to 184 kJ/mol when the milling time increases from 12 to 36 h, respectively. Finally, a combination of the mechanical alloying process and heat treatment phase evolutions was proposed as an optimal processing route in order to obtain the Mg{sub 2}Co compound.

  20. The effect of single and double quenching heat treatments on the mechanical properties of low alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeongpil; Kim, Byung Jun; Lee, Sanghui; Jang, Jaeho; Nam, Daegeun [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Gichan [Sehwa M and P Co., LTD, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Dry cask storage is a method of storing high-level radioactive waste, such as spent nuclear fuel that has already been cooled in the spent fuel pool for at least one year. For spent fuel storage, low alloy steel is widely used for shielding materials for dry storage cask of spent fuel because of their excellent mechanical properties, weldability and low price. However, they may suffer embrittlement by high levels of radiation and heat for a long period. Therefore, it is important to improve mechanical properties of low alloy steel for the integrity of structure materials. Generally, conventional single quenching and tempering (CQT) heat treatment process is used to improve the mechanical properties by controlling the temperature and time of heat treatment. In this study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of DQT heat treated specimens were investigated to improve the mechanical properties of low alloy steels comparing the CQT heat treated specimen. The following conclusions were obtained. The grain size of DQT process has a fine average grain size comparing the CQT process. A fine grain structure with DQT specimen affects the mechanical properties such as the reduction of hardness and increments of elongation. The DBTT after DQT process is shifted to lower temperatures. Especially, the DBTT of steel-3 is shifted to lower temperature about -40 .deg. C comparing the CQT specimen(Steel-1). The reason for the reduction of DBTT and USE after the DQT process is related to the changes of microstructure which are transformed from bainite to pearlite phase and the reduction of grain size with decreasing the temperature of heat treatment.

  1. On the Nuclear Mechanisms Underlying the Heat Production by the E-Cat

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, Norman D

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the isotopic abundances found in the E-Cat reactor with regard to the nuclear mechanisms responsible for excess heat. We argue that a major source of energy is a reaction between the first excited-state of 7Li4 and a proton, followed by the breakdown of 8Be4 into two alphas with high kinetic energy, but without gamma radiation. The unusual property of the 7Li4 isotope that allows this reaction is similar to the property that underlies the Mossbauer effect: the presence of unusually low-lying excited states in stable, odd-Z and/or odd-N nuclei. We use the lattice version of the independent-particle model (IPM) of nuclear theory to show how the geometrical structure of isotopes indicate nuclear reactions that are not predicted in the conventional version of the IPM. Finally, we speculate on similar mechanisms that may be involved in other low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR).

  2. Physiological, biochemical, and molecular mechanisms of heat stress tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Nahar, Kamrun; Alam, Md Mahabub; Roychowdhury, Rajib; Fujita, Masayuki

    2013-05-03

    High temperature (HT) stress is a major environmental stress that limits plant growth, metabolism, and productivity worldwide. Plant growth and development involve numerous biochemical reactions that are sensitive to temperature. Plant responses to HT vary with the degree and duration of HT and the plant type. HT is now a major concern for crop production and approaches for sustaining high yields of crop plants under HT stress are important agricultural goals. Plants possess a number of adaptive, avoidance, or acclimation mechanisms to cope with HT situations. In addition, major tolerance mechanisms that employ ion transporters, proteins, osmoprotectants, antioxidants, and other factors involved in signaling cascades and transcriptional control are activated to offset stress-induced biochemical and physiological alterations. Plant survival under HT stress depends on the ability to perceive the HT stimulus, generate and transmit the signal, and initiate appropriate physiological and biochemical changes. HT-induced gene expression and metabolite synthesis also substantially improve tolerance. The physiological and biochemical responses to heat stress are active research areas, and the molecular approaches are being adopted for developing HT tolerance in plants. This article reviews the recent findings on responses, adaptation, and tolerance to HT at the cellular, organellar, and whole plant levels and describes various approaches being taken to enhance thermotolerance in plants.

  3. Experimental Study of a Small Scale Hydraulic System for Mechanical Wind Energy Conversion into Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Zdankus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Significant potential for reducing thermal energy consumption in buildings of moderate and cold climate countries lies within wind energy utilisation. Unlike solar irradiation, character of wind speeds in Central and Northern Europe correspond to the actual thermal energy demand in buildings. However, mechanical wind energy undergoes transformation into electrical energy before being actually used as thermal energy in most wind energy applications. The study presented in this paper deals with hydraulic systems, designed for small-scale applications to eliminate the intermediate energy transformation as it converts mechanical wind energy into heat directly. The prototype unit containing a pump, flow control valve, oil tank and piping was developed and tested under laboratory conditions. Results of the experiments showed that the prototype system is highly efficient and adjustable to a broad wind velocity range by modifying the definite hydraulic system resistance. Development of such small-scale replicable units has the potential to promote “bottom-up” solutions for the transition to a zero carbon society.

  4. Signaling mechanisms in alcoholic liver injury: Role of transcription factors,kinases and heat shock proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Alcoholic liver injury comprises of interactions of various intracellular signaling events in the liver. Innate immune responses in the resident Kupffer cells of the liver, oxidative stress-induced activation of hepatocytes,fibrotic events in liver stellate cells and activation of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells all contribute to alcoholic liver injury. The signaling mechanisms associated with alcoholic liver injury vary based on the cell type involved and the extent of alcohol consumption. In this review we will elucidate the oxidative stress and signaling pathways affected by alcohol in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells in the liver by alcohol. The toll-like receptors and their down-stream signaling events that play an important role in alcohol-induced inflammation will be discussed. Alcohol-induced alterations of various intracellular transcription factors such as NFκB, PPARs and AP-1, as well as MAPK kinases in hepatocytes and macrophages leading to induction of target genes that contribute to liver injury will be reviewed. Finally, we will discuss the significance of heat shock proteins as chaperones and their functional regulation in the liver that could provide new mechanistic insights into the contributions of stress-induced signaling mechanisms in alcoholic liver injury.

  5. Alkali-etched heated clay: Microstructure and physical/mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenza El Hafid

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of alkali-etched heated kaolinitic-illitic clay, which was cured in wet atmosphere at different temperatures and times, was investigated by using X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscope. The flexural strength, density and water absorption of the cured samples were correlated to curing time, ageing temperature and alkaline solution concentration by using the response surface methodology. It was found that hydro-sodalite and zeolite P were essentially formed from metakaolinite, the products of chlorite and illite. The geopolymer was almost absent mainly because of excessive hydration. The assemblage of neoformed zeolites differed partially from that predicted using the stability diagram Na2O–SiO2–Al2O3. Polynomial models described well the change of the physical/mechanical properties against the experimental factors. Based on the results of the models, the increase of any factor among the studied ones had an adverse effect on the mechanical strength and contributed to the increase of water absorption. The weight of the effect of the factors on density was less significant. These results were discussed in relation to the microstructure investigation.

  6. Influence of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of DZ951 alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Pengcheng; YU Jingjiang; SUN Xiaofeng; GUAN Hengrong; HU Zhuangqi

    2008-01-01

    DZ951 directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy is mainly strengthened by y phase.Regularly aligned cuboidal and bimodal γ precipitates were attained by two heat treatments.The effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties of DZ951 alloy has been investigated.The results indicate that MC carbide changes to little blocks during aging treatment at 1050℃ (HT1).MC carbide partly degrades into M23c6 and there is a layer of γ around the carbide during aging treatment at 115℃ (HT2),which is beneficial to the elongation of DZ951 alloy.Small γ volume fraction and the uneven deformation structure are contributed to low mechanical propexties of the as-cast alloy.HT1 alloy has a better stress rupture life at 1100℃50 MPa and yield stress at 20℃,800℃ and 1100℃,which is attributed to regularly aligned cuboidal γ phase and even deformation structure.HT2 alloy has a good combination of strength and ductility.This arises fi'om the bimodal γ precitates and the degeneration of MC carbide.

  7. Impulsively Generated Linear and Non-linear Alfven Waves in the Coronal Funnels

    CERN Document Server

    Chmielewski, P; Murawski, K; Musielak, Z E

    2014-01-01

    We present simulation results of the impulsively generated linear and non-linear Alfven waves in the weakly curved coronal magnetic flux-tubes (coronal funnels) and discuss their implications for the coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. We solve numerically the time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic equations to find the temporal signatures of the small and large-amplitude Alfven waves in the model atmosphere of open and expanding magnetic field configuration with a realistic temperature distribution. We compute the maximum transversal velocity of both linear and non-linear Alfven waves at different heights of the model atmosphere, and study their response in the solar corona during the time of their propagation. We infer that the pulse-driven non-linear Alfven waves may carry sufficient wave energy fluxes to heat the coronal funnels and also to power the solar wind that originates in these funnels. Our study of linear Alfven waves show that they can contribute only to the plasma dynamics and heating of t...

  8. Physical properties of erupting plasma associated with coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Raymond, J. C.; Reeves, K. K.; Moon, Y.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the physical properties (temperature, density, and mass) of erupting plasma observed in X-rays and EUV, which are all associated with coronal mass ejections observed by SOHO/LASCO. The erupting plasmas are observed as absorption or emission features in the low corona. The absorption feature provides a lower limit to the cold mass while the emission feature provides an upper limit to the mass of observed plasma in X-ray and EUV. We compare the mass constraints for each temperature response and find that the mass estimates in EUV and XRT are smaller than the total mass in the coronagraph. Several events were observed by a few passbands in the X-rays, which allows us to determine the temperature of the eruptive plasma using a filter ratio method. The temperature of one event is estimated at about 8.6 MK near the top of the erupting plasma. This measurement is possibly an average temperature for higher temperature plasma because the XRT is more sensitive at higher temperatures. In addition, a few events show that the absorption features of a prominence or a loop change to emission features with the beginning of their eruptions in all EUV wavelengths of SDO/AIA, which indicates the heating of the plasma. By estimating the physical properties of the erupting plasmas, we discuss the heating of the plasmas associated with coronal mass ejections in the low corona.

  9. Soft X-ray emission in flaring coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, R F; Brun, A S

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares are associated with intense soft X-ray emission generated by the hot flaring plasma in coronal magnetic loops. Kink unstable twisted flux-ropes provide a source of magnetic energy which can be released impulsively and account for the heating of the plasma in flares. We investigate the temporal, spectral and spatial evolution of the properties of the thermal X-ray emission produced in such kink-unstable magnetic flux-ropes using a series of MHD simulations. We deduce emission diagnostics and their temporal evolution and discuss the results of the simulations with respect to observations. The numerical setup used consists of a highly twisted loop embedded in a region of uniform and untwisted background coronal magnetic field. We let the kink instability develop, compute the evolution of the plasma properties in the loop (density, temperature) and deduce the X-ray emission properties of the plasma during the whole flaring episode. During the initial phase of the instability plasma heating is mostly ...

  10. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ν. Gopalswamy; Κ. Shibasaki; Μ. Salem

    2000-09-01

    We report on the statistical properties of the microwave enhancement (brightness temperature, area, fine structure, life time and magnetic field strength) in coronal holes observed over a period of several solar rotations.

  11. Multidimensional modeling of coronal rain dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, X; Keppens, R

    2013-01-01

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations which capture the initial formation and the long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in-situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match with modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into $V$-shaped like features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views on blobs which evaporate in situ, or get siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys o...

  12. Coronal Magnetism and Forward Solarsoft Idl Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The FORWARD suite of Solar Soft IDL codes is a community resource for model-data comparison, with a particular emphasis on analyzing coronal magnetic fields. FORWARD may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare to existing data. FORWARD works with numerical model datacubes, interfaces with the web-served Predictive Science Inc MAS simulation datacubes and the Solar Soft IDL Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) package, and also includes several analytic models (more can be added). It connects to the Virtual Solar Observatory and other web-served observations to download data in a format directly comparable to model predictions. It utilizes the CHIANTI database in modeling UV/EUV lines, and links to the CLE polarimetry synthesis code for forbidden coronal lines. FORWARD enables "forward-fitting" of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties.

  13. Food crops face rising temperatures: An overview of responses, adaptive mechanisms, and approaches to improve heat tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeru Kaushal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rising temperatures are resulting in heat stress for various agricultural crops to limit their growth, metabolism, and leading to significant loss of yield potential worldwide. Heat stress adversely affects normal plant growth and development depending on the sensitivity of each crop species. Each crop species has its own range of temperature maxima and minima at different developmental stages beyond which all these processes get inhibited. The reproductive stage is on the whole more sensitive to heat stress, resulting in impaired fertilization to cause abortion of flowers. During seed filling, heat stress retards seed growth by affecting all the biochemical events to reduce seed size. Unfavorable temperature may significantly affect photosynthesis, respiration, water balance, and membrane stability of leaves. To combat heat stress, plants acquire various defense mechanisms for their survival such as maintaining membrane stability, and scavenging reactive oxygen species by generating antioxidants and stress proteins. Thermo-tolerance can be improved by the accumulation of various compounds of low molecular mass known as thermo-protectants as well as phyto-hormones. Exogenous application of these molecules has benefited plants growing under heat stress. Alternatively, transgenic plants over-expressing the enzymes catalyzing the synthesis of these molecules may be raised to increase their endogenous levels to improve heat tolerance. In recent times, various transgenics have been developed with improved thermo-tolerance having potential benefits for inducing heat tolerance in food crops. Updated information about of the effects of heat stress on various food crops and their responses as well as adaptive mechanisms is reviewed here.

  14. Comparing High-speed Transition Region Jets in Coronal Holes and Quiet Sun Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate Arbacher, Rebecca; Tian, Hui; Cranmer, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The complicated energy transfer and plasma motion in the transition region, between the photosphere and the corona, may play a significant role in the formation and acceleration of the solar wind. New observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have revealed unprecedented levels of detail in this less-studied region. Coronal holes in particular are a likely source of solar wind material, though the formation and acceleration mechanisms of the fast solar wind are still largely unknown. In our previous work, we have reported the prevalence of small-scale high-speed (~80-250 km/s) jets with transition region temperatures from the network structures of coronal holes. Here we undertake a comparative study of these short-lived episodic network jets in a coronal hole region and a quiet sun region using IRIS sit-and-stare slit-jaw imaging in the 1330 Angstrom (C II) passband. The pointing coordinates, exposure time, observing cadence, and field of view of both observations are all identical. Our preliminary study suggests that the speeds and lengths of the network jets may differ between quiet sun and coronal hole regions. The quiet sun region exhibits many compact bright regions with sizes of 5-10 arcseconds which produce very few jets. The jets that do exist tend to propagate at much slower speeds over smaller distances than their coronal hole counterparts. Comparatively, in the coronal hole, such compact regions are almost absent and all network patches are permeated by the intermittent high-reaching jets. Such a difference suggests that magnetic loops are much smaller in the coronal hole and the network jets are produced at low heights. The recurrence frequency seems to be higher in the coronal hole region, with many of the isolated quiet sun region jets demonstrating curved trajectories.This work is supported under contract 8100002705 from Lockheed-Martin to SAO and by the NSF-REU solar physics program at SAO, grant number AGS-1263241.

  15. Observational Properties of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    2003. Peameis, D.V., Magntetic topology of imspumlsive assd gradutal solar energetic particle Xic. H., L. Ofmran, and G. Lawvrence, Cone model for...425, 1097, 2004. Yashiro, S., N. Gopalssvamy, G. Michalek, assd R.A. Hosvard, Properties of narrow coronal Sltatstnigara~jU, A., Y.-i. Mootn, M. Dryer...G.M.,’FTit relatiomtslip hetwseen prominence ermtptions assd coronal mnass ejections.. 107(A8), 1223, doi: 10. 1029/2001 JAOO9 143, 2002. .1. Atssnn.s

  16. Investigating the reliability of coronal emission measure distribution diagnostics using 3D radiative MHD simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Determining the temperature distribution of coronal plasmas can provide stringent constraints on coronal heating. Current observations with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph onboard Hinode and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide diagnostics of the emission measure distribution (EMD) of the coronal plasma. Here we test the reliability of temperature diagnostics using 3D radiative MHD simulations. We produce synthetic observables from the models, and apply the Monte Carlo Markov chain EMD diagnostic. By comparing the derived EMDs with the "true" distributions from the model we assess the limitations of the diagnostics, as a function of the plasma parameters and of the signal-to-noise of the data. We find that EMDs derived from EIS synthetic data reproduce some general characteristics of the true distributions, but usually show differences from the true EMDs that are much larger than the estimated uncertainties suggest, especially when structures with signif...

  17. Non-inductive current driven by Alfvén waves in solar coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfimov, A. G.; de Azevedo, C. A.; de Assis, A. S.

    1996-08-01

    It has been shown that Alfvén waves can drive non-inductive current in solar coronal loops via collisional or collisionless damping. Assuming that all the coronal-loop density of dissipated wave power (W= 10-3 erg cm-3 s-1), which is necessary to keep the plasma hot, is due to Alfvén wave electron heating, we have estimated the axial current density driven by Alfvén waves to be ≈ 103 105 statA cm-2. This current can indeed support the quasi-stationary equilibrium and stability of coronal loops and create the poloidal magnetic field up to B θ≈1-5 G.

  18. Alkali halide solutions under thermal gradients: soret coefficients and heat transfer mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römer, Frank; Wang, Zilin; Wiegand, Simone; Bresme, Fernando

    2013-07-11

    We report an extensive analysis of the non-equilibrium response of alkali halide aqueous solutions (Na(+)/K(+)-Cl(-)) to thermal gradients using state of the art non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and thermal diffusion forced Rayleigh scattering experiments. The coupling between the thermal gradient and the resulting ionic salt mass flux is quantified through the Soret coefficient. We find the Soret coefficient is of the order of 10(-3) K(-1) for a wide range of concentrations. These relatively simple solutions feature a very rich behavior. The Soret coefficient decreases with concentration at high temperatures (higher than T ∼ 315 K), whereas it increases at lower temperatures. In agreement with previous experiments, we find evidence for sign inversion in the Soret coefficient of NaCl and KCl solutions. We use an atomistic non-equilibrium molecular dynamics approach to compute the Soret coefficients in a wide range of conditions and to attain further microscopic insight on the heat transport mechanism and the behavior of the Soret coefficient in aqueous solutions. The models employed in this work reproduce the magnitude of the Soret coefficient, and the general dependence of this coefficient with temperature and salt concentration. We use the computer simulations as a microscopic approach to establish a correlation between the sign and magnitude of the Soret coefficients and ionic solvation and hydrogen bond structure of the solutions. Finally, we report an analysis of heat transport in ionic solution by quantifying the solution thermal conductivity as a function of concentration. The simulations accurately reproduce the decrease of the thermal conductivity with increasing salt concentration that is observed in experiments. An explanation of this behavior is provided.

  19. Protective Response Mechanisms to Heat Stress in Interaction with High [CO2] Conditions in Coffea spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Madlles Q.; Rodrigues, Weverton P.; Fortunato, Ana S.; Leitão, António E.; Rodrigues, Ana P.; Pais, Isabel P.; Martins, Lima D.; Silva, Maria J.; Reboredo, Fernando H.; Partelli, Fábio L.; Campostrini, Eliemar; Tomaz, Marcelo A.; Scotti-Campos, Paula; Ribeiro-Barros, Ana I.; Lidon, Fernando J. C.; DaMatta, Fábio M.; Ramalho, José C.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling studies have predicted that coffee crop will be endangered by future global warming, but recent reports highlighted that high [CO2] can mitigate heat impacts on coffee. This work aimed at identifying heat protective mechanisms promoted by CO2 in Coffea arabica (cv. Icatu and IPR108) and Coffea canephora cv. Conilon CL153. Plants were grown at 25/20°C (day/night), under 380 or 700 μL CO2 L−1, and then gradually submitted to 31/25, 37/30, and 42/34°C. Relevant heat tolerance up to 37/30°C for both [CO2] and all coffee genotypes was observed, likely supported by the maintenance or increase of the pools of several protective molecules (neoxanthin, lutein, carotenes, α-tocopherol, HSP70, raffinose), activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT), and the upregulated expression of some genes (ELIP, Chaperonin 20). However, at 42/34°C a tolerance threshold was reached, mostly in the 380-plants and Icatu. Adjustments in raffinose, lutein, β-carotene, α-tocopherol and HSP70 pools, and the upregulated expression of genes related to protective (ELIPS, HSP70, Chape 20, and 60) and antioxidant (CAT, CuSOD2, APX Cyt, APX Chl) proteins were largely driven by temperature. However, enhanced [CO2] maintained higher activities of GR (Icatu) and CAT (Icatu and IPR108), kept (or even increased) the Cu,Zn-SOD, APX, and CAT activities, and promoted a greater upregulation of those enzyme genes, as well as those related to HSP70, ELIPs, Chaperonins in CL153, and Icatu. These changes likely favored the maintenance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at controlled levels and contributed to mitigate of photosystem II photoinhibition at the highest temperature. Overall, our results highlighted the important role of enhanced [CO2] on the coffee crop acclimation and sustainability under predicted future global warming scenarios. PMID:27446174

  20. An Ab Initio approach to Solar Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Gudiksen, B V

    2004-01-01

    Data from recent numerical simulations of the solar corona and transition region are analysed and the magnetic field connection between the low corona and the photosphere is found to be close to that of a potential field. The fieldline to fieldline displacements follow a power law distribution with typical displacements of just a few Mm. Three loops visible in emulated Transition Region And Coronal Explorer (TRACE) filters are analysed in detail and found to have significantly different heating rates and distributions thereof, one of them showing a small scale heating event. The dynamical structure is complicated even though all the loops are visible in a single filter along most of their lengths. None of the loops are static, but are in the process of evolving into loops with very different characteristics. Differential Emission Measure (DEM) curves along one of the loops illustrate that DEM curves have to be treated carefully if physical characteristics are to be extracted.

  1. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    CERN Document Server

    Nistico', G; Patsourakos, S; Zimbardo, G

    2010-01-01

    Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km/s, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km/s2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 minutes, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and eq...

  2. Tissue-specific defense and thermo-adaptive mechanisms of soybean seedlings under heat stress revealed by proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Nagib; Donnart, Tifenn; Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2010-08-06

    A comparative proteomic approach was employed to explore tissue-specific protein expression patterns in soybean seedlings under heat stress. The changes in the protein expression profiles of soybean seedling leaves, stems, and roots were analyzed after exposure to high temperatures. A total of 54, 35, and 61 differentially expressed proteins were identified from heat-treated leaves, stems, and roots, respectively. Differentially expressed heat shock proteins (HSPs) and proteins involved in antioxidant defense were mostly up-regulated, whereas proteins associated with photosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and amino acid and protein biosynthesis were down-regulated in response to heat stress. A group of proteins, specifically low molecular weight HSPs and HSP70, were up-regulated and expressed in a similar manner in all tissues. Proteomic analysis indicated that the responses of HSP70, CPN-60 beta, and ChsHSP were tissue specific, and this observation was validated by immunoblot analysis. The heat-responsive sHSPs were not induced by other stresses such as cold and hydrogen peroxide. Taken together, these results suggest that to cope with heat stress soybean seedlings operate tissue-specific defenses and adaptive mechanisms, whereas a common defense mechanism associated with the induction of several HSPs was employed in all three tissues. In addition, tissue-specific proteins may play a crucial role in defending each type of tissues against thermal stress.

  3. Heat generation in an elastic binder system with embedded discrete energetic particles due to high-frequency, periodic mechanical excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, J. O.; Miller, J. K.; Gunduz, I. E.; Rhoads, J. F.; Son, S. F.

    2014-11-01

    High-frequency mechanical excitation can induce heating within energetic materials and may lead to advances in explosives detection and defeat. In order to examine the nature of this mechanically induced heating, samples of an elastic binder (Sylgard 184) were embedded with inert and energetic particles placed in a fixed spatial pattern and were subsequently excited with an ultrasonic transducer at discrete frequencies from 100 kHz to 20 MHz. The temperature and velocity responses of the sample surfaces suggest that heating due to frictional effects occurred near the particles at excitation frequencies near the transducer resonance of 215 kHz. An analytical solution involving a heat point source was used to estimate heating rates and temperatures at the particle locations in this frequency region. Heating located near the sample surface at frequencies near and above 1 MHz was attributed to viscoelastic effects related to the surface motion of the samples. At elevated excitation parameters near the transducer resonance frequency, embedded particles of ammonium perchlorate and cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine were driven to chemical decomposition.

  4. MAGNETIC FLUX SUPPLEMENT TO CORONAL BRIGHT POINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mou, Chaozhou; Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Fu, Hui; Jiao, Fangran; Hou, Zhenyong [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, 264209 Shandong (China); Madjarska, Maria S., E-mail: z.huang@sdu.edu.cn [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-10

    Coronal bright points (BPs) are associated with magnetic bipolar features (MBFs) and magnetic cancellation. Here we investigate how BP-associated MBFs form and how the consequent magnetic cancellation occurs. We analyze longitudinal magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to investigate the photospheric magnetic flux evolution of 70 BPs. From images taken in the 193 Å passband of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) we dermine that the BPs’ lifetimes vary from 2.7 to 58.8 hr. The formation of the BP MBFs is found to involve three processes, namely, emergence, convergence, and local coalescence of the magnetic fluxes. The formation of an MBF can involve more than one of these processes. Out of the 70 cases, flux emergence is the main process of an MBF buildup of 52 BPs, mainly convergence is seen in 28, and 14 cases are associated with local coalescence. For MBFs formed by bipolar emergence, the time difference between the flux emergence and the BP appearance in the AIA 193 Å passband varies from 0.1 to 3.2 hr with an average of 1.3 hr. While magnetic cancellation is found in all 70 BPs, it can occur in three different ways: (I) between an MBF and small weak magnetic features (in 33 BPs); (II) within an MBF with the two polarities moving toward each other from a large distance (34 BPs); (III) within an MBF whose two main polarities emerge in the same place simultaneously (3 BPs). While an MBF builds up the skeleton of a BP, we find that the magnetic activities responsible for the BP heating may involve small weak fields.

  5. An Estimate of Solar Wind Density and Velocity Profiles in a Coronal Hole and a Coronal Streamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzold, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Bird, M. K.

    1996-01-01

    Using the total electron content data obtained by the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment (SCE) during the first solar conjunction in summer 1991, two data sets were selected, one associated with a coronal hole and the other associated with coronal streamer crossings. In order to determine coronal streamer density profiles, the electron content of the tracking passes embedded in a coronal streamer were corrected for the contributions from coronal hole densities.

  6. Characteristics of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, F.; Marchese, A. K.; Tulsee, T.

    2014-12-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) is a release of charged particles resulting from solar activity. These charged particles can affect electronics on spacecraft, airplanes, global positioning systems, and communication satellites. The purpose of this research was to study CME data from satellites and correlate these to other properties. Solar wind data collected by STEREO A/B and ACE satellites were analyzed. The data consisted of solar wind flux for various elements (helium through iron), as well as the components of the interplanetary magnetic field. CME events are known to cause a surge in the helium flux, as well as other particles. It is hypothesized that a CME event will cause an increase in the number of lighter elements relative to heavier particles. This is because for a given input of energy, lighter elements are expected to be accelerated to a greater extent than heavier elements. A significant increase was observed in the ratio between helium to oxygen (He/O) prior to intense CMEs. A CME event on November 4, 2003 caused an eleven-fold increase in the He/O ratio, while for another event on April 2, 2001 the He/O ratio increased from 80 to 700. A significant increase in He/O ratio is not observed during weaker CMEs. Furthermore, it was also observed that not all increases in the ratio were accompanied by CMEs. The increase in He/O ratio prior to the CME arrival might be used as a way to predict future events.

  7. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of PIP-SiC/SiC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Shuang, E-mail: zhsh6007@126.com [Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibres and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); School of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Zhou, Xingui; Yu, Jinshan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Ceramic Fibres and Composites, College of Aerospace and Materials Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Mummery, Paul [School of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-01

    Continuous SiC fibre reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiC/SiC) have been studied as materials for heat resistant and nuclear applications. Thermal stability is one of the key issues for SiC/SiC composites. In this study, 3D SiC/SiC composites are fabricated via the polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) process, and then heat treated at 1400 Degree-Sign C, 1600 Degree-Sign C and 1800 Degree-Sign C in an inert atmosphere for 1 h, respectively. The effect of heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of the composites is investigated. The results indicate that the mechanical properties of the SiC/SiC composites are significantly improved after heat treatment at 1400 Degree-Sign C mainly because the mechanical properties of the matrix are greatly improved due to crystallisation. With the increasing of heat treatment temperature, the properties of the composites are conversely decreased because of severe damage of the fibres and the matrix.

  8. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties and erosion resistance of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Avnish, E-mail: avnishmnit@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur 302017 (India); Sharma, Ashok, E-mail: ashok.mnit12@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur 302017 (India); Goel, S.K. [Star Wire India Ltd., Ballabgarh, Haryana 121404 (India)

    2015-06-18

    Effects of heat treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties and erosion behavior of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel were studied. A series of heat treatments were carried out in the temperature range of 1180–1240 °C to observe the effect on microstructure. Optimum heat treatment cycle was obtained at 1220 °C for holding time of 150 min, which leads to dissolution of carbides, formation of equiaxed grains and twins. Heat treatment has shown improvement in tensile strength, toughness, impact strength and work hardening capacity, however at the cost of marginal reduction in hardness and yield strength. This resulted in improvement of erosion resistance of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel. The microstructures, fractured surfaces and phases were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis respectively.

  9. Review of the correlation developments and a new concept based on mixing mechanism for heat transfer enhancement of spacer grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, H.; Yang, B.W.; Liu, X. [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China). Science and Technology Center for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Research

    2016-07-15

    Spacer grids could cause heat transfer enhancement both at the spacer grid regions and downstream of the spacer grids as a result of mixing promoted by the spacer grids in the rod bundle. This phenomenon has been demonstrated by many experiments, and several correlations have been developed based on these experimental data. This paper gives a review of the grid-enhanced heat transfer correlation developments in single phase flow. Following the exploration of the correlation development history, a predictive formulation of grid-enhanced heat transfer in single phase flow is established taking into account the effect of both swirl flow and crossflow. With emphasis on modeling of the mixing mechanism associated with the mixing vane grid, the new correlation could better reflect the physical process of the heat transfer augmentation, while a large number of experimental data are needed to determine the coefficients of the new correlation.

  10. Molecular programs induced by heat acclimation confer neuroprotection against TBI and hypoxic insults via cross-tolerance mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eHorowitz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprotection following prolonged exposure to high ambient temperatures (heat acclimation HA develops via altered molecular programs such as cross-tolerance (Heat Acclimation -Neuroprotection Cross-Tolerance -HANCT. The mechanisms underlying cross-tolerance depend on enhanced on-demand protective pathways evolving during acclimation. The protection achieved is long lasting and limits the need for de novo recruitment of cytoprotective pathways upon exposure to novel stressors. Using mouse and rat acclimated phenotypes, we will focus on the impact of heat acclimation on Angiotensin II-AT2 receptors in neurogenesis and on HIF-1 as key mediators in spontaneous recovery and HANCT after traumatic brain injury (TBI. The neuroprotective consequences of heat acclimation on NMDA and AMPA receptors will be discussed using the global hypoxia model. A behavioral-molecular link will be crystallized. The differences between HANCT and consensus preconditioning will be reviewed.

  11. [Effect of different heat treatment on mechanical properties and microstructure of laser welding CoCr-NiCr dissimilar alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rui-ying; Li, Chang-yi; Han, Ya-jing; Hu, Xin; Zhang, Lian-yun

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of heat treatment and porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) processing on mechanical properties and microstructure of laser welding CoCr-NiCr dissimilar alloys. Samples of CoCr-NiCr dissimilar alloys with 0.5 mm thickness were laser-welded single-side under the setting parameters of 280 V, 10 ms pulse duration. After being welded, samples were randomly assigned to three groups, 10 each. Group1 and 2 received heat treatment and PFM processing, respectively. Group 3 was control group without any treatment. Tensile strength, microstructure and element distribution of samples in the three groups were tested and observed using tensile test, metallographic examinations, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. After heat treatment and PFM processing, tensile strength of the samples were (537.15 +/- 43.91) MPa and (534.58 +/- 48.47) MPa respectively, and elongation rates in Group 1 and 2 were (7.65 +/- 0.73)% and (7.40 +/- 0.45)%. Ductile structure can be found on tensile fracture surface of samples and it was more obvious in heat treatment group than in PFM group. The results of EDS analysis indicated that certain CoCr alloy diffused towards fusion zone and NiCr side after heat treatment and PFM processing. Compared with PFM processing group, the diffusion in the heat treatment group was more obvious. Heat treatment and PFM processing can improve the mechanical properties and microstructure of welded CoCr-NiCr dissimilar alloy to a certain degree. The improvements are more obvious with heat treatment than with porcelain treatment.

  12. Effect of heat treatment on microstructures and mechanical behavior of porous Sr-Ca-P coatings on titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Kuan-Chen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Yuan Kuo [Institute of Oral Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tzer-Min, E-mail: tmlee@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Oral Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Medical Device Innovation Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lui, Truan-Sheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used an efficient technique to coat porous Sr-Ca-P coatings on titanium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The heat treatment method accelerates mechanical properties and crystallinity of the coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After heat treatment at various temperatures, all specimens show the same morphologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion strength between the coating and the substrate increases with increasing heat treatment temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The heat treatment is beneficial method for improving coatings adhesion in medical applications. - Abstract: Titanium and its alloys are widely used in dental and orthopedic fields due to their excellent chemical stability. The micro-arc oxidation (MAO) technique is an effective method for coating strontium, calcium, and phosphorus onto titanium. In clinical application, the adhesion between the coating and the substrate is important factor for dental implants and artificial joint prosthesis. The present study investigates the effects of heat treatment on the properties of MAO coatings. The physicochemical characteristics are investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, thin film X-ray diffraction (TF-XRD) analysis, and the scratch test. After heat treatment, the TF-XRD results indicate that the tricalcium phosphate phase appears at a temperature of 800 Degree-Sign C. SEM results show that the surface morphology does not change. The scratch test results reveal that the adhesion strength between the coatings and the substrate increases with increasing heat treatment temperature. Consequently, all findings in this study indicated that MAO coatings with heat treatment have good mechanical properties for clinical applications.

  13. Heat shock protein 90 in plants: molecular mechanisms and roles in stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhao-Shi; Li, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Yang; Chen, Ming; Li, Lian-Cheng; Ma, You-Zhi

    2012-11-23

    The heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) family mediates stress signal transduction, and plays important roles in the control of normal growth of human cells and in promoting development of tumor cells. Hsp90s have become a currently important subject in cellular immunity, signal transduction, and anti-cancer research. Studies on the physiological functions of Hsp90s began much later in plants than in animals and fungi. Significant progress has been made in understanding complex mechanisms of HSP90s in plants, including ATPase-coupled conformational changes and interactions with cochaperone proteins. A wide range of signaling proteins interact with HSP90s. Recent studies revealed that plant Hsp90s are important in plant development, environmental stress response, and disease and pest resistance. In this study, the plant HSP90 family was classified into three clusters on the basis of phylogenetic relationships, gene structure, and biological functions. We discuss the molecular functions of Hsp90s, and systematically review recent progress of Hsp90 research in plants.

  14. Failure Mechanism of a Stellite Coating on Heat-Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhao, Haixing; Wang, Huang; Li, Yuyan; Liu, Xia; He, Guo

    2017-09-01

    The Stellite 21 coating on the heat-resistant steel X12CrMoWVNbN10-1-1 (so-called COSTE) used in a steam turbine valve was found to be fatigue broken after service at around 873 K (600 °C) for about 8 years. In order to investigate the failure mechanism, a fresh Stellite 21 coating was also prepared on the same COSTE steel substrate by using the similar deposition parameters for comparison. It was found that the Stellite 21 coating was significantly diluted by the steel, resulting in a thin Fe-rich layer in the coating close to the fusion line. Such high Fe concentration together with the incessant Fe diffusion from the steel substrate to the coating during the service condition (about 873 K (600 °C) for long time) induced the eutectoid decomposition of the fcc α-Co(Fe,Cr,Mo) solid solution, forming an irregular eutectoid microstructure that was composed of the primitive cubic α'-FeCo(Cr,Mo) phase and the tetragonal σ-CrCo(Fe,Mo) phase. The brittle nature of such α'/ σ eutectoid microstructure contributed to the fatigue fracture of the Stellite 21 coating, resulting in an intergranular rupture mode.

  15. Theoretical studies on the heats of formation, detonation properties, and pyrolysis mechanisms of energetic cyclic nitramines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Guixiang; Du, Hongchen; Zhang, Jianying; Gong, Xuedong

    2011-12-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to find comprehensive relationships between the structures and performance of a series of highly energetic cyclic nitramines. The isodesmic reaction method was employed to estimate the heat of formation. The detonation properties were evaluated by using the Kamlet-Jacobs equations based on the theoretical densities and HOFs. Results indicate the N-NO(2) group and aza N atom are effective substituents for enhancing the detonation performance. All cyclic nitramines except C11 and C21 exhibit better detonation performance than HMX. The decomposition mechanism and thermal stability of these cyclic nitramines were analyzed via the bond dissociation energies. For most of these nitramines, the homolysis of N-NO(2) is the initial step in the thermolysis, and the species with the bridged N-N bond are more sensitive than others. Considering the detonation performance and thermal stability, twelve derivatives may be the promising candidates of high energy density materials (HEDMs). The results of this study may provide basic information for the further study of this kind of compounds and molecular design of novel HEDMs.

  16. Diagnostics of the molecular component of PDRs with mechanical heating. II: line intensities and ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Kazandjian, M V; Pelupessy, I; Israel, F P; Spaans, M

    2014-01-01

    CO observations in active galactic nuclei and star-bursts reveal high kinetic temperatures. Those environments are thought to be very turbulent due to dynamic phenomena such as outflows and high supernova rates. We investigate the effect of mechanical heating (MH) on atomic fine-structure and molecular lines, and their ratios. We use those ratios as a diagnostic to constrain the amount of MH in an object and also study its significance on estimating the H2 mass. Equilibrium PDRs models were used to compute the thermal and chemical balance for the clouds. The equilibria were solved for numerically using the optimized version of the Leiden PDR-XDR code. Large velocity gradient calculations were done as post-processing on the output of the PDR models using RADEX. High-J CO line ratios are very sensitive to MH. Emission becomes at least one order of magnitude brighter in clouds with n~10^5~cm^-3 and a star formation rate of 1 Solar Mass per year (corresponding to a MH rate of 2 * 10^-19 erg cm^-3 s^-1). Emission ...

  17. Heat Shock Protein 90 in Plants: Molecular Mechanisms and Roles in Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Zhi Ma

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 family mediates stress signal transduction, and plays important roles in the control of normal growth of human cells and in promoting development of tumor cells. Hsp90s have become a currently important subject in cellular immunity, signal transduction, and anti-cancer research. Studies on the physiological functions of Hsp90s began much later in plants than in animals and fungi. Significant progress has been made in understanding complex mechanisms of HSP90s in plants, including ATPase-coupled conformational changes and interactions with cochaperone proteins. A wide range of signaling proteins interact with HSP90s. Recent studies revealed that plant Hsp90s are important in plant development, environmental stress response, and disease and pest resistance. In this study, the plant HSP90 family was classified into three clusters on the basis of phylogenetic relationships, gene structure, and biological functions. We discuss the molecular functions of Hsp90s, and systematically review recent progress of Hsp90 research in plants.

  18. Spectral mapping of heat transfer mechanisms at liquid-solid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sääskilahti, K; Oksanen, J; Tulkki, J; Volz, S

    2016-05-01

    Thermal transport through liquid-solid interfaces plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes, and better understanding of liquid-solid energy transfer is expected to enable improving the efficiency of thermally driven applications. We determine the spectral distribution of thermal current at liquid-solid interfaces from nonequilibrium molecular dynamics, delivering a detailed picture of the contributions of different vibrational modes to liquid-solid energy transfer. Our results show that surface modes located at the Brillouin zone edge and polarized along the liquid-solid surface normal play a crucial role in liquid-solid energy transfer. Strong liquid-solid adhesion allows also for the coupling of in-plane polarized modes in the solid with the liquid, enhancing the heat-transfer rate and enabling efficient energy transfer up to the cutoff frequency of the solid. Our results provide fundamental understanding of the energy-transfer mechanisms in liquid-solid systems and enable detailed investigations of energy transfer between, e.g., water and organic molecules.

  19. Mechanical properties of dental zirconia ceramics changed with sandblasting and heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hideo; Yamada, Kiyotaka; Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Nawa, Masahiro; Ban, Seiji

    2008-05-01

    Two types of tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (TZP), a ceria-stabilized TZP/Al2O3 nanocomposite (CZA) and a conventional yttria-stabilized TZP (Y-TZP), were sandblasted with 70-microm alumina and 125-microm SiC powders, then partially annealed at 500-1200 degrees C for five minutes. Monoclinic ZrO2 content was determined by X-ray diffractometry and Raman spectroscopy. Biaxial flexure test was conducted on the specimens before and after the treatments. Monoclinic ZrO2 content and biaxial flexure strength increased after sandblasting, but decreased after heat treatment. However, in both cases, the strength of CZA was higher than that of Y-TZP. Raman spectroscopy showed that a compressive stress field was introduced on the sample surface after sandblasting. It was concluded that sandblasting induced tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation and that the volume expansion associated with such a phase transformation gave rise to an increase in compressive stress on the surface of CZA. With the occurrence of such a strengthening mechanism in the microstructure, it was concluded that CZA was more susceptible to stress-induced transformation than Y-TZP.

  20. Magnetic properties of doped Mn-Ga alloys made by mechanical milling and heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Brown

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mn-Ga alloys have shown hard magnetic properties, even though these alloys contain no rare-earth metals. However, much work is needed before rare-earth magnets can be replaced. We have examined the magnetic properties of bulk alloys made with partial replacement of both the Mn and Ga elements in the Mn0.8Ga0.2 system. Bulk samples of Mn-Ga-Bi, Mn-Ga-Al, Mn-Fe-Ga and Mn-(FeB-Ga alloys were fabricated and studied using mechanically milling and heat treatments while altering the atomic percentage of the third element between 2.5 and 20 at%. The ternary alloy exhibits all hard magnetic properties at room temperature with large coercivity. Annealed Mn-Ga-X bulk composites exhibit high coercivities up to 16.6 kOe and remanence up to 9.8 emu/g, that is increased by 115% over the binary system.