WorldWideScience

Sample records for corona solar

  1. Solar Indices - Solar Corona

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  2. Corona and solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withbroe, G. L.

    1986-04-01

    The Pinhole/Occulter Facility is a powerful tool for studying the physics of the extended corona and origins of the solar wind. Spectroscopic data acquired by the P/OF coronal instruments can greatly expand empirical information about temperatures, densities, flow velocities, magnetic fields, and chemical abundances in the corona out to r or approx. 10 solar radii. Such information is needed to provide tight empirical constraints on critical physical processes involved in the transport and dissipation of energy and momentum, the heating and acceleration of plasma, and the acceleration of energetic particles. Because of its high sensitivity, high spatial and temporal resolutions, and powerful capabilities for plasma diagnostics, P/OF can significantly increase our empirical knowledge about coronal streamers and transients and thereby advance the understanding of the physics of these phenomena. P/OF observations can be used to establish the role in solar wind generation, if any, of small-scale dynamical phenomena, such as spicules, macrospicules and coronal bullets, and the role of the fine-scale structures, such as polar plumes. Finally, simultaneous measurements by the P/OF coronal and hard X-ray instruments can provide critical empirical information concerning nonthermal energy releases and acceleration of energetic particles in the corona.

  3. Spectropolarimetry of Solar Corona during Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhongquan

    2017-08-01

    We present the results from spectropolarimetry of solar corona. These observations were conducted during solar eclipses in 2008 China, 2013 Gabon, and probably 2017 United States of America respectively. From the former two observations, it is shown that the patterns of linear polarization of radiation from the solar corona are very abundant, and the abundance may be related to the complexity of mass motions and magnetic configuration in the corona. And the spectropolarimetry during solar eclipses may open a new window to probe precisely the physical features of the local corona, especially its magnetic configuration.

  4. A guide to the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Billings, Donald E

    1966-01-01

    A Guide to the Solar Corona is specifically directed to the space scientist or engineer who is not a specialist in solar physics, but whose work requires a fairly detailed knowledge of the corona. It is hoped that the material may prove useful to most graduate students in astrophysics, while solar physicists may find some topics of interest and value to them. The book contains 12 chapters and begins with three descriptive chapters that provide the casual reader with a concept of the corona as it is evident through more or less direct observation. Topics covered include the development of coron

  5. Study of Solar Corona in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xueshang; ZHAO Xinhua

    2006-01-01

    Considerable progress for the study of solar corona physics has been achieved by China's space physics community. It involves the theoretical study of coronal process of solar active phenomena, solar wind origin, acceleration of solar wind and coronal mass ejections, observational and numerical study of these problems and prediction methods of solar eruptive activities (such as flares/CMEs). Here is a brief summary of the progress in this area. Main progress is put upon the following three topics: corona and solar wind, numerical method, prediction method.

  6. Nanoflare heating model for collisionless solar corona

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U L VISAKH KUMAR; BILIN SUSAN VARGHESE; P J KURIAN

    2017-02-01

    The problem of coronal heating remains one of the greatest unresolved problems in space science. Magnetic reconnection plays a significant role in heating the solar corona. When two oppositely directed magnetic fields come closer to form a current sheet, the current density of the plasma increases due to which magnetic reconnection and conversion of magnetic energy into thermal energy takes place. The present paper deals with a model for reconnection occurring in the solar corona under steady state in collisionless regime. The model predicts that reconnection time in the solar corona varies inversely with the cube of magnetic field and varies directly with the Lindquist number. Our analysis shows that reconnections are occurring within a time interval of600 s in the solar corona, producing nanoflares in the energy range $10^{21}–10^{23}$ erg/s which matches with Yohkoh X-ray observations.

  7. Nanoflare heating model for collisionless solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visakh Kumar, U. L.; Varghese, Bilin Susan; Kurian, P. J.

    2017-02-01

    The problem of coronal heating remains one of the greatest unresolved problems in space science. Magnetic reconnection plays a significant role in heating the solar corona. When two oppositely directed magnetic fields come closer to form a current sheet, the current density of the plasma increases due to which magnetic reconnection and conversion of magnetic energy into thermal energy takes place. The present paper deals with a model for reconnection occurring in the solar corona under steady state in collisionless regime. The model predicts that reconnection time in the solar corona varies inversely with the cube of magnetic field and varies directly with the Lindquist number. Our analysis shows that reconnections are occurring within a time interval of 600 s in the solar corona, producing nanoflares in the energy range 10 21-10 23 erg /s which matches with Yohkoh X-ray observations.

  8. Progress of Solar Corona Study in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xinhua; SONG Wenbin

    2008-01-01

    Solar corona study is an important aspect of space weather research.In recent years,great achieVements have been acquired on the solar corona study by the space physics group of China.This paper gives a brief outline of these progresses that have been made during 2006--2008.This kind of research includes observational study of the corona,theoretical investigations,statistical analysis based on a large number of data sets,numerical method for MHD modeling,numerical study of space weather events,and prediction methods for the complicated processes originating from the solar corona.Each is given as a separate part in the following.

  9. Global MHD Models of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, S. T.; Rose, Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the solar corona are computationally intensive, numerically complex simulations that have produced important new results over the past few years. After a brief overview of how these models usually work, I will address three topics: (1) How these models are now routinely used to predict the morphology of the corona and analyze Earth and space-based remote observations of the Sun; (2) The direct application of these models to the analysis of physical processes in the corona and chromosphere and to the interpretation of in situ solar wind observations; and (3) The use of results from global models to validate the approximations used to make detailed studies of physical processes in the corona that are not otherwise possible using the global models themselves.

  10. Hot Plasma Flows in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Solar Corona is a non-equilibrium open system. Energy and mass are supplied from the lower atmosphere and flow upwards through the corona into the interplanetary space. Steady state could be possible but not equilibrium state. Temperature of the corona varies depending on solar activities. However, even under very quite state, coronal temperature is still kept around million degrees. Coronal heating mechanisms have to work under such condition. Temperature of plasma is an averaged kinetic energy of random motion of particles. Motion of charged particles in magnetic field generates Lorenz force and particles gyrate around magnetic field lines. Gyration of charged particles generates magnetic moment which is directed anti-parallel to the surrounding magnetic field. This is the origin of diamagnetism of plasma. Each particle can be considered as a small magnet directed opposite to the surrounding magnetic field. When these magnets are put in inhomogeneous magnetic field, they are pushed toward weak field region. In case of open magnetic field region in the solar corona, plasma particles are pushed upwards. If this force (diamagnetic or mirror force) exceeds the gravity force, plasma flows upwards. Magnetic moment of each charged particle in thermal plasma is proportional to temperature and inversely proportional to magnetic field strength. The condition for plasma to flow upwards in an open magnetic field is that the scale length of the change of magnetic field strength is shorter than the hydrostatic scale length, which is determined by temperature and the gravity acceleration. This can be a mechanism to regulate the coronal temperature around million degree. The solar corona is filled with magnetic field, which is rooted at the photosphere in the form of flux tubes. Flux tubes connect directly the corona and the sub-photospheric layer where temperature is higher than the photosphere. Hot plasma, trapped in the flux tubes when they are generated around the bottom

  11. Probing the Solar Corona with VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, Benedikt; Sun, Jing; Heinkelmann, Robert; Schuh, Harald; Böhm, Johannes

    2013-04-01

    Radio observations close to the Sun are sensitive to the dispersive effects of the Sun corona. This has been used to determine (among other parameters) the electron density in the corona during solar conjunctions with spacecrafts. Although geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations close to the Sun have already been performed before 2002 (but suspended afterwards) they have not yet been used for calculations of corona electron densities. Almost 10 years later the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) decided to schedule twelve 24 hours VLBI sessions in 2011 and 2012 including observations closer than 15 degrees to the heliocenter. Both the recent and the earlier sessions are analysed in order to determine electron densities of the Sun corona. Based on the ionospheric delay corrections derived from two-frequency VLBI measurements, other dispersive effects like instrumental biases and, most important of all, the Earth's ionosphere effects are estimated and then eliminated. The residual delays are used to successfully determine power-law parameters of the electron density of the Sun corona for several of these sessions. In some cases, scheduled observations close to the Sun had failed, making it impossible to derive meaningful results from them. Both, the successful and the lost observations were analysed including external information like Sunspot numbers and flare occurrences. The estimated electron densities were compared to previous models of the Sun corona derived by radio measurements to spacecrafts during solar conjunctions. Our investigations show that it is possible to use geodetic VLBI sessions with observations close to the Sun to determine electron densities of the corona. The success depends on the geometry, i.e. the source position with respect to the Sun, and on the schedule, which can be optimized for such investigations. Unpredictable disturbances at the Sun's surface, such as flares, play also a role. So far

  12. Miniature loops in the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Barczynski, Krzysztof; Savage, Sabrina L

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic loops filled with hot plasma are the main building blocks of the solar corona. Usually they have lengths of the order of the barometric scale height in the corona that is 50 Mm. Previously it has been suggested that miniature versions of hot loops exist. These would have lengths of only 1 Mm barely protruding from the chromosphere and spanning across just one granule in the photosphere. Such short loops are well established at transition region temperatures (0.1 MK), and we investigate if such miniature loops also exist at coronal temperatures (>1 MK). We used extreme UV imaging (EUV) observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) at an unprecedented spatial resolution of 0.3" to 0.4". Together with EUV imaging and magnetogram data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) data from Hinode we investigated the spatial, temporal and thermal evolution of small loop-like structures in the solar corona above a plage region close to an active region and compared this ...

  13. Heating mechanisms of the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    The solar corona is a tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun. Its million-degree temperature was discovered spectroscopically in the 1940s, but its origin has been debated since then without complete convergence. Currently there are two classes of models; the wave theory and the microflare/nanoflare theory. Both models have merits and disadvantages, but the essential issues are nearly pinned down. Recent revival of the wave theory is one of the many contributions from Japanese solar observing satellite Hinode launched in 2006.

  14. High Energy Particles in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Larsen, L

    2008-01-01

    Collective Ampere law interactions producing magnetic flux tubes piercing through sunspots into and then out of the solar corona allow for low energy nuclear reactions in a steady state and high energy particle reactions if a magnetic flux tube explodes in a violent event such as a solar flare. Filamentous flux tubes themselves are vortices of Ampere currents circulating around in a tornado fashion in a roughly cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field lines are parallel to and largely confined within the core of the vortex. The vortices may thereby be viewed as long current carrying coils surrounding magnetic flux and subject to inductive Faraday and Ampere laws. These laws set the energy scales of (i) low energy solar nuclear reactions which may regularly occur and (ii) high energy electro-weak interactions which occur when magnetic flux coils explode into violent episodic events such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections.

  15. Radio seismology of the outer solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoliy; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Konovalenko, Alexander; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Rucker, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Observed oscillations of coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines have been successfully used to estimate plasma parameters in the inner corona ( 0.2R0). We used the large Ukrainian radio telescope URAN-2 to observe type IV radio bursts at the frequency range of 8-32 MHz during the time interval of 09:50-12:30 UT on April 14, 2011. The burst was connected to C2.3 flare, which occurred in AR 11190 during 09:38-09:49 UT. The dynamic spectrum of radio emission shows clear quasi-periodic variations in the emission intensity at almost all frequencies. Wavelet analysis at four different frequencies (29 MHz, 25 MHz, 22 MHz, and 14 MHz) shows the quasi-periodic variation of emission intensity with periods of ~ 34 min and ~ 23 min. The periodic variations can be explained by the first and second harmonics of vertical kink oscillation of transequatorial coronal loops, which were excited by the same flare. The apex of transequatorial loops may reach up to 1.2 R0 altitude. We derive and solve the dispersion relation of trapped magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a longitudinally inhomogeneous magnetic slab. The analysis shows that a thin (with width to length ratio of 0.1), dense (with the ratio of internal and external densities of ≥ 20) magnetic slab with weak longitudinal inhomogeneity may trap the observed oscillations. Seismologically estimated Alfvén speed inside the loop at the height of ~ 1 R0 is ~ 1000 km s-1. The magnetic field strength at this height is estimated as ~ 0.9 G. Extrapolation of magnetic field strength to the inner corona gives ~ 10 G at the height of 0.1 R0. Radio observations can be successfully used for the sounding of the outer solar corona, where EUV observations of coronal loops fail. Therefore, radio seismology of the outer solar corona is complementary to EUV seismology of the inner corona. The research leading to these results has received funding from the Austrian 'Fonds zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung' under

  16. Kinetic Physics of the Solar Corona and Solar Wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsch Eckart

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic plasma physics of the solar corona and solar wind are reviewed with emphasis on the theoretical understanding of the in situ measurements of solar wind particles and waves, as well as on the remote-sensing observations of the solar corona made by means of ultraviolet spectroscopy and imaging. In order to explain coronal and interplanetary heating, the microphysics of the dissipation of various forms of mechanical, electric and magnetic energy at small scales (e.g., contained in plasma waves, turbulences or non-uniform flows must be addressed. We therefore scrutinise the basic assumptions underlying the classical transport theory and the related collisional heating rates, and also describe alternatives associated with wave-particle interactions. We elucidate the kinetic aspects of heating the solar corona and interplanetary plasma through Landau- and cyclotron-resonant damping of plasma waves, and analyse in detail wave absorption and micro instabilities. Important aspects (virtues and limitations of fluid models, either single- and multi-species or magnetohydrodynamic and multi-moment models, for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are critically discussed. Also, kinetic model results which were recently obtained by numerically solving the Vlasov–Boltzmann equation in a coronal funnel and hole are presented. Promising areas and perspectives for future research are outlined finally.

  17. Nanoflares and Heating of the Solar Corona

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U. Narain; K. Pandey

    2006-06-01

    Coronal heating by nanoflares is presented by using observational, analytical, numerical simulation and statistical results. Numerical simulations show the formation of numerous current sheets if the magnetic field is sheared and bipoles have unequal pole strengths. This fact supports the generation of nanoflares and heating by them. The occurrence frequency of transients such as flares, nano/microflares, on the Sun exhibits a power-law distribution with exponent α varying between 1.4 and 3.3. For nanoflares heating must be greater than 2. It is likely that the nanoflare heating can be reproduced by dissipating Alfv´en waves. Only observations from future space missions such as Solar-B, to be launched in 2006, can shed further light on whether Alfvén waves or nanoflares, heat the solar corona.

  18. Nanoflares and Heating of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, U.; Pandey, K.

    2006-09-01

    Coronal heating by nanoflares is presented by using observational, analytical, numerical simulation and statistical results. Numerical simulations show the formation of numerous current sheets if the magnetic field is sheared and bipoles have unequal pole strengths. This fact supports the generation of nanoflares and heating by them. The occurrence frequency of transients such as flares, nano/microflares, on the Sun exhibits a power-law distribution with exponent α varying between 1.4 and 3.3. For nanoflares heating α must be greater than 2. It is likely that the nanoflare heating can be reproduced by dissipating Alfvén waves. Only observations from future space missions such as Solar-B, to be launched in 2006, can shed further light on whether Alfvén waves or nanoflares, heat the solar corona

  19. Time-Dependent Tomographic Reconstruction of the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Vibert, Didier; Lamy, Philippe; Frazin, Richard A; Wojak, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Solar rotational tomography (SRT) applied to white-light coronal images observed at multiple aspect angles has been the preferred approach for determining the three-dimensional (3D) electron density structure of the solar corona. However, it is seriously hampered by the restrictive assumption that the corona is time-invariant which introduces significant errors in the reconstruction. We first explore several methods to mitigate the temporal variation of the corona by decoupling the "fast-varying" inner corona from the "slow-moving" outer corona using multiple masking (either by juxtaposition or recursive combination) and radial weighting. Weighting with a radial exponential profile provides some improvement over a classical reconstruction but only beyond 3 Rsun. We next consider a full time-dependent tomographic reconstruction involving spatio-temporal regularization and further introduce a co-rotating regularization aimed at preventing concentration of reconstructed density in the plane of the sky. Crucial t...

  20. Shape parameters of the solar corona from 1991 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyatikanto, Rhorom

    2016-12-01

    The global structure of the solar corona observed in the optical window is governed by the global magnetic field with different characteristics over a solar activity cycle. The Ludendorff flattening index has become a popular measure of global structure of the solar corona as observed during an eclipse. In this study, 15 digital images of the solar corona from 1991 to 2016 were analyzed in order to construct coronal flattening profiles as a function of radius. In most cases, the profile can be modeled with a 2nd order polynomial function so that the radius with maximum flattening index (Rmax) can be determined. Along with this value, Ludendorff index (a + b) was also calculated. Both Ludendorff index and Rmax show anti-correlation with monthly sunspot number, though the Rmax values are more scattered. The variation in Rmax can be regarded as the impact of the changing coronal brightness profile over the equator.

  1. Shape Parameters of 1991 to 2016 Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Priyatikanto, Rhorom

    2016-01-01

    The global structure of solar corona observed in optical window is governed by the global magnetic field with different characteristics over solar activity cycle. Ludendorff flattening index becomes a popular measure of the global structure of solar corona as observed during eclipse. In this study, 15 digital images of solar corona from 1991 to 2016 were analyzed in order to construct the coronal flattening profiles as a function of radius. In most of the cases, the profile can be modeled with 2nd order polynomial function so that the radius with maximum flattening index ($R_{\\text{max}}$) can be determined. Along with this value, Ludendorff index ($a+b$) was also calculated. Both Ludendorff index and $R_{\\text{max}}$ show anti-correlation with monthly sunspot number, though the $R_{\\text{max}}$ values are more scattered. The variation of $R_{\\text{max}}$ can be regarded as the impact of changing coronal brightness profile over equator.

  2. Modeling Jets in the Corona and Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Torok, T; Titov, V S; Leake, J E; Mikic, Z; Linker, J A; Linton, M G

    2015-01-01

    Coronal jets are transient, collimated eruptions that occur in regions of predominantly open magnetic field in the solar corona. Our understanding of these events has greatly evolved in recent years but several open questions, such as the contribution of coronal jets to the solar wind, remain. Here we present an overview of the observations and numerical modeling of coronal jets, followed by a brief description of "next-generation" simulations that include an advanced description of the energy transfer in the corona ("thermodynamic MHD"), large spherical computational domains, and the solar wind. These new models will allow us to address some of the open questions.

  3. Peculiarities of propagation of charged particles in solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, E. I.; Pisarenko, N. F.; Mikryukova, N. A.; Klimenko, V. V.; Timofeev, V. E.; Shafer, Y. G.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of boundaries of the large scale unipolar magnetic regions (UMR) on the Sun upon the charged particle propagation in the solar corona and interplanetary space is investigated. Increases of the charged particle fluxes from solar flares on November 4 and 20, 1978 detected by Venera-11 and Prognoz-1 and on December 7, 1982 by Venera-13 and "GMS-2" were analyzed.

  4. Time-dependent tomographic reconstruction of the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibert, D.; Peillon, C.; Lamy, P.; Frazin, R. A.; Wojak, J.

    2016-10-01

    Solar rotational tomography (SRT) applied to white-light coronal images observed at multiple aspect angles has been the preferred approach for determining the three-dimensional (3D) electron density structure of the solar corona. However, it is seriously hampered by the restrictive assumption that the corona is time-invariant which introduces significant errors in the reconstruction. We first explore several methods to mitigate the temporal variation of the corona by decoupling the "fast-varying" inner corona from the "slow-moving" outer corona using multiple masking (either by juxtaposition or recursive combination) and radial weighting. Weighting with a radial exponential profile provides some improvement over a classical reconstruction but only beyond ≈ 3R⊙. We next consider a full time-dependent tomographic reconstruction involving spatio-temporal regularization and further introduce a co-rotating regularization aimed at preventing concentration of reconstructed density in the plane of the sky. Crucial to testing our procedure and properly tuning the regularization parameters is the introduction of a time-dependent MHD model of the corona based on observed magnetograms to build a time-series of synthetic images of the corona. Our procedure, which successfully reproduces the time-varying model corona, is finally applied to a set of 53 LASCO-C2 pB images roughly evenly spaced in time from 15 to 29 March 2009. Our procedure paves the way to a time-dependent tomographic reconstruction of the coronal electron density to the whole set of LASCO-C2 images presently spanning 20 years.

  5. Measuring the IR solar corona during the 2017 eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryans, Paul; Hannigan, James; Philip, Judge; Larson, Brandon; Sewell, Scott; McIntire, Lauren

    2016-05-01

    On 21 August 2017 a total solar eclipse will pass across the continental United States, offering a unique opportunity to conduct scientific research of the solar atmosphere. With the light from the Sun eclipsed, the solar corona becomes visible in a way not possible when swamped by the light from the photosphere. The infrared (IR) spectrum of the corona, in particular, is predicted to contain some of the most magnetically sensitive spectral lines. However, no comprehensive survey of this spectral range has been carried out to date. Here, we describe a Fourier Transform Spectrometer, currently under construction at NCAR, to measure the IR spectrum from 2 to 12 microns. We will discuss the operation of the experiment, which will be deployed along the path of totality in Wyoming, and the scientific results we hope to obtain.

  6. Heating of the Solar Corona and its Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2009-01-01

    At several million degrees, the solar corona is more than two orders of magnitude hotter than the underlying solar surface. The reason for these extreme conditions has been a puzzle for decades and is considered one of the fundamental problems in astrophysics. Much of the coronal plasma is organized by the magnetic field into arch-like structures called loops. Recent observational and theoretical advances have led to great progress in understanding the nature of these loops. In particular, we now believe they are bundles of unresolved magnetic strands that are heated by storms of impulsive energy bursts called nanoflares. Turbulent convection at the solar surface shuffles the footpoints of the strands and causes them to become tangled. A nanoflare occurs when the magnetic stresses reach a critical threshold, probably by way of a mechanism called the secondary instability. I will describe our current state of knowledge concerning the corona, its loops, and how they are heated.

  7. The Role of Magnetic Helicity in Structuring the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Two of the most widely observed and striking features of the Sun's magnetic field are coronal loops, which are smooth and laminar, and prominences or filaments, which are strongly sheared. Loops are puzzling because they show little evidence of tangling or braiding, at least on the quiet Sun, despite the chaotic nature of the solar surface convection. Prominences are mysterious because the origin of their underlying magnetic structure—filament channels—is poorly understood at best. These two types of features would seem to be quite unrelated and wholly distinct. We argue that, on the contrary, they are inextricably linked and result from a single process: the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona by photospheric motions and the subsequent evolution of this helicity by coronal reconnection. In this paper, we present numerical simulations of the response of a Parker (1972) corona to photospheric driving motions that have varying degrees of helicity preference. We obtain four main conclusions: (1) in agreement with the helicity condensation model of Antiochos (2013), the inverse cascade of helicity by magnetic reconnection in the corona results in the formation of filament channels localized about polarity inversion lines; (2) this same process removes most complex fine structure from the rest of the corona, resulting in smooth and laminar coronal loops; (3) the amount of remnant tangling in coronal loops is inversely dependent on the net helicity injected by the driving motions; and (4) the structure of the solar corona depends only on the helicity preference of the driving motions and not on their detailed time dependence. We discuss the implications of our results for high-resolution observations of the corona.

  8. The Role of Magnetic Helicity in Structuring the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Two of the most widely observed and striking features of the Suns magnetic field are coronal loops, which are smooth and laminar, and prominences or filaments, which are strongly sheared. Loops are puzzling because they show little evidence of tangling or braiding, at least on the quiet Sun, despite the chaotic nature of the solar surface convection. Prominences are mysterious because the origin of their underlying magnetic structure filament channels is poorly understood at best. These two types of features would seem to be quite unrelated and wholly distinct. We argue that, on the contrary, they are inextricably linked and result from a single process: the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona by photospheric motions and the subsequent evolution of this helicity by coronal reconnection. In this paper, we present numerical simulations of the response of a Parker (1972) corona to photospheric driving motions that have varying degrees of helicity preference. We obtain four main conclusions: (1) in agreement with the helicity condensation model of Antiochos (2013), the inverse cascade of helicity by magnetic reconnection in the corona results in the formation of filament channels localized about polarity inversion lines; (2) this same process removes most complex fine structure from the rest of the corona, resulting in smooth and laminar coronal loops; (3) the amount of remnant tangling in coronal loops is inversely dependent on the net helicity injected by the driving motions; and (4) the structure of the solar corona depends only on the helicity preference of the driving motions and not on their detailed time dependence. We discuss the implications of our results for high-resolution observations of the corona.

  9. The Magnetic Field of the Solar Corona from Pulsar Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ord, S M; Sarkissian, J

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel experiment with the capacity to independently measure both the electron density and the magnetic field of the solar corona. We achieve this through measurement of the excess Faraday rotation due to propagation of the polarised emission from a number of pulsars through the magnetic field of the solar corona. This method yields independent measures of the integrated electron density, via dispersion of the pulsed signal and the magnetic field, via the amount of Faraday rotation. In principle this allows the determination of the integrated magnetic field through the solar corona along many lines of sight without any assumptions regarding the electron density distribution. We present a detection of an increase in the rotation measure of the pulsar J1801$-$2304 of approximately 160 \\rad at an elongation of 0.95$^\\circ$ from the centre of the solar disk. This corresponds to a lower limit of the magnetic field strength along this line of sight of $> 393\\mu\\mathrm{G}$. The lack of precision in the i...

  10. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the third year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract "The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona," between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period June 16, 1998 to August 15, 1999. This is also the final report for this contract. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the three-year duration of this contract we have published 49 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 3 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles. We summarize our progress during the third year of the contract. Full descriptions of our work can be found in the cited publications, a few of which are attached to this report.

  11. Observational capabilities of solar satellite "Coronas-Photon"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Yu.

    Coronas-Photon mission is the third satellite of the Russian Coronas program on solar activity observation The main goal of the Coronas-Photon is the study of solar hard electromagnetic radiation in the wide energy range from UV up to high energy gamma-radiation sim 2000MeV Scientific payload for solar radiation observation consists of three type of instruments 1 monitors Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 Penguin-M BRM Phoka Sphin-X Sokol for spectral and timing measurements of full solar disk radiation with timing in flare burst mode up to one msec Instruments Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 will cover the wide energy range of hard X-rays and soft Gamma rays 15keV to 2000MeV and will together constitute the largest area detectors ever used for solar observations Detectors of gamma-ray monitors are based on structured inorganic scintillators with energy resolution sim 5 for nuclear gamma-line band to 35 for GeV-band PSD analysis is used for gamma neutron separation for solar neutron registration T 30MeV Penguin-M has capability to measure linear polarization of hard X-rays using azimuth are measured by Compton scattering asymmetry in case of polarization of an incident flux For X-ray and EUV monitors the scintillation phoswich detectors gas proportional counter CZT assembly and Filter-covered Si-diodes are used 2 Telescope-spectrometer TESIS for imaging solar spectroscopy in X-rays with angular resolution up to 1 in three spectral lines and RT-2 CZT assembly of CZT

  12. COMPOSITION OF THE SOLAR CORONA, SOLAR WIND, AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelz, J. T. [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Reames, D. V. [IPST, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Von Steiger, R. [ISSI, Hallerstrasse 6, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Basu, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    Along with temperature and density, the elemental abundance is a basic parameter required by astronomers to understand and model any physical system. The abundances of the solar corona are known to differ from those of the solar photosphere via a mechanism related to the first ionization potential of the element, but the normalization of these values with respect to hydrogen is challenging. Here, we show that the values used by solar physicists for over a decade and currently referred to as the 'coronal abundances' do not agree with the data themselves. As a result, recent analysis and interpretation of solar data involving coronal abundances may need to be revised. We use observations from coronal spectroscopy, the solar wind, and solar energetic particles as well as the latest abundances of the solar photosphere to establish a new set of abundances that reflect our current understanding of the coronal plasma.

  13. Magnetic tornadoes as energy channels into the solar corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer-Böhm, Sven; Scullion, Eamon; Steiner, Oskar; van der Voort, Luc Rouppe; de la Cruz Rodriguez, Jaime; Fedun, Viktor; Erdélyi, Robert

    2012-06-27

    Heating the outer layers of the magnetically quiet solar atmosphere to more than one million kelvin and accelerating the solar wind requires an energy flux of approximately 100 to 300 watts per square metre, but how this energy is transferred and dissipated there is a puzzle and several alternative solutions have been proposed. Braiding and twisting of magnetic field structures, which is caused by the convective flows at the solar surface, was suggested as an efficient mechanism for atmospheric heating. Convectively driven vortex flows that harbour magnetic fields are observed to be abundant in the photosphere (the visible surface of the Sun). Recently, corresponding swirling motions have been discovered in the chromosphere, the atmospheric layer sandwiched between the photosphere and the corona. Here we report the imprints of these chromospheric swirls in the transition region and low corona, and identify them as observational signatures of rapidly rotating magnetic structures. These ubiquitous structures, which resemble super-tornadoes under solar conditions, reach from the convection zone into the upper solar atmosphere and provide an alternative mechanism for channelling energy from the lower into the upper solar atmosphere.

  14. Energy distribution of nanoflares in the quiet solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyanov, Artyom

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of flare-like events in low layer of solar corona detected with TESIS instrument onboard CORONAS-PHOTON satellite in 171 {Å} during high-cadence (5 sec) time-series. The estimated thermal energies of these small events amount to 10^{23} - 10^{26} erg. According to modern classification flare-like events with such energies are usually referred to as nanoflares. The big number of registered events (above 2000) allowed us to obtain precise distributions of geometric and physical parameters of nanoflares, the most intriguing being energy distribution. Following Aschwanden et al. (2000) and other authors we approximated the calculated energy distribution with a single power law slope: N(E)dE ˜ N^{-α}dE. The power law index was derived to be α = 2.4 ± 0.2, which is very close to the value reported by Krucker & Benz (1998): α ≈ 2.3 - 2.4. The total energy input from registered events constitute about 10^4 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}, which is well beyond net losses in quiet corona (3 \\cdot 10^5 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}). However, the value of α > 2 indicates that nanoflares with lower energies dominate over nanoflares with bigger energies and could contribute considerably to quiet corona heating.

  15. The 2008 August 1 Eclipse Solar-Minimum Corona Unraveled

    CERN Document Server

    Pasachoff, Jay M; Druckmuller, Miloslav; Aniol, Peter; Saniga, Metod; Minarovjech, Milan

    2009-01-01

    We discuss results stemming from observations of the white-light and [Fe XIV] emission corona during the total eclipse of the Sun of 2008 August 1, in Mongolia (Altaj region) and in Russia (Akademgorodok, Novosibirsk, Siberia). Corresponding to the current extreme solar minimum, the white-light corona, visible up to 20 solar radii, was of a transient type with well-pronounced helmet streamers situated above a chain of prominences at position angles 48, 130, 241 and 322 degrees. A variety of coronal holes, filled with a number of thin polar plumes, were seen around the poles. Furthering an original method of image processing, stars up to 12 magnitude, a Kreutz-group comet (C/2008 O1), and a coronal mass ejection (CME) were also detected, with the smallest resolvable structures being of, and at some places even less than, 1 arcsec. Differences, presumably motions, in the corona and prominences are seen even with the 19-min time difference between our sites. In addition to the high-resolution coronal images, whi...

  16. Direct Measurements of Magnetic Twist in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Malanushenko, A; Longcope, D W

    2012-01-01

    In the present work we study evolution of magnetic helicity in the solar corona. We compare the rate of change of a quantity related to the magnetic helicity in the corona to the flux of magnetic helicity through the photosphere and find that the two rates are similar. This gives observational evidence that helicity flux across the photosphere is indeed what drives helicity changes in solar corona during emergence. For the purposes of estimating coronal helicity we neither assume a strictly linear force-free field, nor attempt to construct a non-linear force-free field. For each coronal loop evident in Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) we find a best-matching line of a linear force-free field and allow the twist parameter alpha to be different for each line. This method was introduced and its applicability was discussed in Malanushenko et. al. (2009). The object of the study is emerging and rapidly rotating AR 9004 over about 80 hours. As a proxy for coronal helicity we use the quantity averaged over many reconstruc...

  17. Joule heating and anomalous resistivity in the solar corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Spangler

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent radioastronomical observations of Faraday rotation in the solar corona can be interpreted as evidence for coronal currents, with values as large as 2.5×109 Amperes (Spangler, 2007. These estimates of currents are used to develop a model for Joule heating in the corona. It is assumed that the currents are concentrated in thin current sheets, as suggested by theories of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The Spitzer result for the resistivity is adopted as a lower limit to the true resistivity. The calculated volumetric heating rate is compared with an independent theoretical estimate by Cranmer et al. (2007. This latter estimate accounts for the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of the corona at a heliocentric distance of several solar radii. Our calculated Joule heating rate is less than the Cranmer et al estimate by at least a factor of 3×105. The currents inferred from the observations of Spangler (2007 are not relevant to coronal heating unless the true resistivity is enormously increased relative to the Spitzer value. However, the same model for turbulent current sheets used to calculate the heating rate also gives an electron drift speed which can be comparable to the electron thermal speed, and larger than the ion acoustic speed. It is therefore possible that the coronal current sheets are unstable to current-driven instabilities which produce high levels of waves, enhance the resistivity and thus the heating rate.

  18. RGB color photometry of the solar corona from total solar eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shopov, Y. Y.; Varonov, A.; Stoykova, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    In the following article we present some of our results from observations of two total solar eclipses (TSE). By combining appropriate photographic equipment and post-processing techniques we show that numerous solar phenomena can be captured in details during TSE. We use color slide RGB photometry technique to visualize invisible regions of the solar corona and to highlight some of the solar phenomena that are very difficult for observation by Earth-based observatories. In fact it reveals more details of the far solar corona than any original image taken from ground-based observations. RGB photometry visualizes different components of the solar corona in one image, which is impossible using conventional observations. This makes it valuable tool for studies of the solar corona. Here we first observe peculiar near infrared emission regions around the upper part of the solar limb during the 1999 TSE. So far its origin is unknown and they need further studies including observations during other solar eclipses. Our observational experiment was designed for other purposes and their registration was completely unexpected.

  19. Intermittent heating of the solar corona by MHD turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    É. Buchlin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available As the dissipation mechanisms considered for the heating of the solar corona would be sufficiently efficient only in the presence of small scales, turbulence is thought to be a key player in the coronal heating processes: it allows indeed to transfer energy from the large scales to these small scales. While Direct numerical simulations which have been performed to investigate the properties of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the corona have provided interesting results, they are limited to small Reynolds numbers. We present here a model of coronal loop turbulence involving shell-models and Alfvén waves propagation, allowing the much faster computation of spectra and turbulence statistics at higher Reynolds numbers. We also present first results of the forward-modelling of spectroscopic observables in the UV.

  20. The EUV Emission in Comet-Solar Corona Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryans, Paul; Pesnell, William Dean; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Brown, John C.; Battams, Karl; Saint-Hilaire, Pasal; Liu, Wei; Hudson, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AlA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) viewed a comet as it passed through the solar corona on 2011 July 5. This was the first sighting of a comet by a EUV telescope. For 20 minutes, enhanced emission in several of the AlA wavelength bands marked the path of the comet. We explain this EUV emission by considering the evolution of the cometary atmosphere as it interacts with the ambient solar atmosphere. Water ice in the comet rapidly sublimates as it approaches the Sun. This water vapor is then photodissociated, primarily by Ly-alpha, by the solar radiation field to create atomic Hand O. Other molecules present in the comet also evaporate and dissociate to give atomic Fe and other metals. Subsequent ionization of these atoms can be achieved by a number of means, including photoionization, electron impact, and charge exchange with coronal protons and other highly-charged species. Finally, particles from the cometary atmosphere are thermalized to the background temperature of the corona. Each step could cause emission in the AlA bandpasses. We will report here on their relative contribution to the emission seen in the AlA telescopes.

  1. Patchy Reconnection in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Guidoni, Silvina E

    2011-01-01

    Supra-arcade downflows (SADs) and supra-arcade downflowing loops (SADLs) descending from reconnection regions toward solar post-flare arcades seem to be two different observational signatures of retracting, isolated reconnected flux tubes with irreducible three-dimensional geometries. This dissertation describes work in refining and improving a novel model of patchy reconnection, where only a small bundle of field lines is reconnected across a current sheet and forms a reconnected thin flux tube. Traditional models have not been able to explain why some of the observed SADs appear to be hot and relatively devoid of plasma. The present work shows that plasma depletion naturally occurs in flux tubes that are reconnected across nonuniform current sheets and slide trough regions of decreasing magnetic field magnitude. Moreover, through a detailed theoretical analysis of generalized thin flux tube equations, we show that the addition to the model of pressure-driven parallel dynamics, as well as temperature-depende...

  2. The coronas-F space mission key results for solar terrestrial physics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This volume is the updated and extended translation of the Russian original. It presents the results of observations of solar activity and its effects in the Earth space environment carried out from July 2001 to December 2005 on board the CORONAS-F space mission. The general characteristics of the CORONAS-F scientific payload are provided with a description of the principal experiments. The main results focus on the global oscillations of the Sun (p-modes), solar corona, solar flares, solar cosmic rays, Earth’s radiation belts, and upper atmosphere. The book will be welcomed by students, post-graduates, and scientists working in the field of solar and solar-terrestrial physics. This English edition is supplemented by sections presenting new results of the SPIRIT and TESIS experiments under the CORONAS solar program, as well as from the SONG experiment onboard the CORONAS-F satellite.

  3. Identification of moon craters and solar corona during total solar eclipse on 9th March 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthfiandari; Ekawanti, N.; Purwati, F. G.; Herdiwijaya, D.

    2016-11-01

    Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) is a rare natural event in which the positions of Sun, Moon, and Earth are perfectly aligned. In the past by using this phenomenon, many researches have been done to understand characteristic of the corona. In this paper we carried out the study of TSE which crossed over Indonesia from West to East on 9th March 2016. We observed TSE which occured in Palembang (2.9883° S 104.7513° E), Indonesia. The aim of this research is to understand the effect of moon craters on the appearance of solar corona and identification of solar active regions during TSE. This research was done using Canon SX170 IS camera with ND 5 sun-filter. Although the sky was cloudy during the totality of the phase, coronal video was still taken. Camera also took solar images of partial eclipse phase. Coronal images for every frame were then extracted from the video. Image processing of coronal images was done using RegiStax and PhotoScape freewares. To study solar corona, images from Virtual Moon Atlas, Hinode XRT, and SOHO-LASCO were compared with the result of oriented coronal image. Wider and many more moon craters were found having positive correlation with the brighter effect on solar corona as shown at westward coronal streamer. Those craters are represented by Bel'kovich crater, the biggest one. We also found that only the eastward coronal streamer was correlated with active region, sunspot number 12519, from behind solar limb.

  4. A MHD-turbulence model for solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeou, Z.; Velli, M.; Einaudi, G.

    2009-02-01

    The disposition of energy in the solar corona has always been a problem of great interest. It remains an open question how the low temperature photosphere supports the occurence of solar extreme phenomena. In this work, a turbulent heating mechanism for the solar corona through the framework of reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) is proposed. Two-dimensional incompressible long time simulations of the average energy disposition have been carried out with the aim to reveal the characteristics of the long time statistical behavior of a two-dimensional cross-section of a coronal loop and the importance of the photospheric time scales in the understanding of the underlying mechanisms. It was found that for a slow, shear type photospheric driving the magnetic field in the loop self-organizes at large scales via an inverse MHD cascade. The system undergoes three distinct evolutionary phases. The initial forcing conditions are quickly “forgotten” giving way to an inverse cascade accompanied with and ending up to electric current dissipation. Scaling laws are being proposed in order to quantify the nonlinearity of the system response which seems to become more impulsive for decreasing resistivity. It is also shown that few, if any, qualitative changes in the above results occur by increasing spatial resolution.

  5. Neutral Hydrogen and Its Emission Lines in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Jean-Claude; Chane-Yook, Martine

    2016-12-01

    Since the Lyman-α rocket observations of Gabriel ( Solar Phys. 21, 392, 1971), it has been realized that the hydrogen (H) lines could be observed in the corona and that they offer an interesting diagnostic for the temperature, density, and radial velocity of the coronal plasma. Moreover, various space missions have been proposed to measure the coronal magnetic and velocity fields through polarimetry in H lines. A necessary condition for such measurements is to benefit from a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. The aim of this article is to evaluate the emission in three representative lines of H for three different coronal structures. The computations have been performed with a full non-local thermodynamic-equilibrium (non-LTE) code and its simplified version without radiative transfer. Since all collisional and radiative quantities (including incident ionizing and exciting radiation) are taken into account, the ionization is treated exactly. Profiles are presented at two heights (1.05 and 1.9 solar radii, from Sun center) in the corona, and the integrated intensities are computed at heights up to five solar radii. We compare our results with previous computations and observations ( e.g. Lα from Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer) and find a rough (model-dependent) agreement. Since the Hα line is a possible candidate for ground-based polarimetry, we show that in order to detect its emission in various coronal structures, it is necessary to use a very narrow (less than 2 Å wide) bandpass filter.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Helicity Condensation in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2015-01-01

    The helicity condensation model has been proposed by Antiochos (2013) to explain the observed smoothness of coronal loops and the observed buildup of magnetic shear at filament channels. The basic hypothesis of the model is that magnetic reconnection in the corona causes the magnetic stress injected by photospheric motions to collect only at those special locations where prominences form. In this work we present the first detailed quantitative MHD simulations of the reconnection evolution proposed by the helicity condensation model. We use the well-known ansatz of modeling the closed corona as an initially uniform field between two horizontal photospheric plates. The system is driven by applying photospheric rotational flows that inject magnetic helicity into the system. The flows are confined to a finite region on the photosphere so as to mimic the finite flux system of, for example, a bipolar active region. The calculations demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, coronal loops having opposite helicity do not reconnect, whereas loops having the same sense of helicity do reconnect. Furthermore, we find that for a given amount of helicity injected into the corona, the evolution of the magnetic shear is insensitive to whether the pattern of driving photospheric motions is fixed or quasi-random. In all cases, the shear propagates via reconnection to the boundary of the flow region while the total magnetic helicity is conserved, as predicted by the model. We discuss the implications of our results for solar observations and for future, more realistic simulations of the helicity condensation process.

  7. Exploring the prominence-corona connection and its expansion into the outer corona using total solar eclipse observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Morgan, Huw [Institute of Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science, Aberystwyth University, Ceredigion, Cymru SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom); Druckmüller, Miloslav, E-mail: shadia@ifa.hawaii.edu [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2014-10-01

    Prominences constitute the most complex magnetic structures in the solar corona. The ubiquitous presence of their seemingly confined dense and cool plasma in an otherwise million-degree environment remains a puzzle. Using a decade of white light total solar eclipse observations, we show how these images reveal an intricate relationship between prominences and coronal structures both in their immediate vicinity, known as coronal cavities, and in the extended corona out to several solar radii. Observations of suspended prominences and twisted helical structures spanning several solar radii are central to these findings. The different manifestations of the prominence-corona interface that emerge from this study underscore the fundamental role played by prominences in defining and controlling the complex expansion and dynamic behavior of the solar magnetic field in the neighborhood of magnetic polarity reversal regions. This study suggests that the unraveling of prominences and the outward expansion of the helical twisted field lines linked to them could be the solar origin of twisted magnetic flux ropes detected in interplanetary space, and of the mechanism by which the Sun sheds its magnetic helicity. This work also underscores the likely role of the prominence-corona interface as a source of the slow solar wind.

  8. Research Progress of Solar Corona and Interplanetary Physics in China: 2010-2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xinhua; XIANG Changqing

    2012-01-01

    The scientific objective of solar corona and interplanetary research is the understanding of the various phenomena related to solar activities and their effects on the space environments of the Earth. Great progress has been made in the study of solar corona and interplanetary physics by the Chinese space physics community during the past years. This paper will give a brief report about the latest progress of the corona and interplanetary research in China during the years of 2010--2012. The paper can be divided into the following parts: solar corona and solar wind, CME- ICME, magnetic reconnection, energetic particles, space plasma, space weather numerical modeling by 3D SIP-CESE MHD model, space weather prediction methods, and proposed missions. They constitute the abundant content of study for the complicated phenomena that originate from the solar corona, propagate in interplanetary space, and produce geomagnetic disturbances. All these progresses are acquired by the Chinese space physicists, either independently or through international collaborations.

  9. Radio sounding of the solar corona during 1995 solar conjunction of the Ulysses spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Karl, J.; Edenhofer, P.; Asmar, S. W.

    1995-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft will pass through superior solar conjunction on March 5 1995, a few days before its perihelion and passage through the ecliptic plane. Dual-frequency S/X-band ranging and Doppler observations will be conducted in support of the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment (SCE) during a three-week interval centered on the conjunction. The occultation geometry is unique in the annals of interplanetary exploration. As viewed from Earth, the spacecraft will appear to cut diagonally through the southwest quadrant of the solar corona from the South Pole to the equator. The minimum proximate distance to the Sun of the radio ray path will be 21.6 solar radius. The entire latitude scan from pole to equator occurs for a limited range of solar offset distances (is less than 30 solar radius thus facilitating the separation of latitudinal from radial variations in the coronal density and associated parameters of interest.

  10. Electron studies of acceleration processes in the corona. [solar probe mission planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    The solar probe mission can obtain unique and crucially important measurements of electron acceleration, storage, and propagation processes in the corona and can probe the magnetic field structure of the corona below the spacecraft. The various energetic electron phenomena which will be sampled by the Solar Probe are described and some new techniques to probe coronal structures are suggested.

  11. The global distribution of magnetic helicity in the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, A. R.; Hornig, G.

    2016-10-01

    By defining an appropriate field line helicity, we apply the powerful concept of magnetic helicity to the problem of global magnetic field evolution in the Sun's corona. As an ideal-magnetohydrodynamic invariant, the field line helicity is a meaningful measure of how magnetic helicity is distributed within the coronal volume. It may be interpreted, for each magnetic field line, as a magnetic flux linking with that field line. Using magneto-frictional simulations, we investigate how field line helicity evolves in the non-potential corona as a result of shearing by large-scale motions on the solar surface. On open magnetic field lines, the helicity injected by the Sun is largely output to the solar wind, provided that the coronal relaxation is sufficiently fast. But on closed magnetic field lines, helicity is able to build up. We find that the field line helicity is non-uniformly distributed, and is highly concentrated in twisted magnetic flux ropes. Eruption of these flux ropes is shown to lead to sudden bursts of helicity output, in contrast to the steady flux along the open magnetic field lines. Movies are available at http://www.aanda.org

  12. The global distribution of magnetic helicity in the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Yeates, A R

    2016-01-01

    By defining an appropriate field line helicity, we apply the powerful concept of magnetic helicity to the problem of global magnetic field evolution in the Sun's corona. As an ideal-magnetohydrodynamic invariant, the field line helicity is a meaningful measure of how magnetic helicity is distributed within the coronal volume. It may be interpreted, for each magnetic field line, as a magnetic flux linking with that field line. Using magneto-frictional simulations, we investigate how field line helicity evolves in the non-potential corona as a result of shearing by large-scale motions on the solar surface. On open magnetic field lines, the helicity injected by the Sun is largely output to the solar wind, provided that the coronal relaxation is sufficiently fast. But on closed magnetic field lines, helicity is able to build up. We find that the field line helicity is non-uniformly distributed, and is highly concentrated in twisted magnetic flux ropes. Eruption of these flux ropes is shown to lead to sudden burst...

  13. Corongraphic Observations and Analyses of The Ultraviolet Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, John L.

    2000-10-01

    The activities supported under NASA Grant NAG5-613 included the following: 1) reduction and scientific analysis of data from three sounding rocket flights of the Rocket Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer, 2) development of ultraviolet spectroscopic diagnostic techniques to provide a detailed empirical description of the extended solar corona, 3) extensive upgrade of the rocket instrument to become the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) for Spartan 201,4) instrument scientific calibration and characterization, 5) observation planning and mission support for a series of five Spartan 201 missions (fully successful except for STS 87 where the Spartan spacecraft was not successfully deployed and the instruments were not activated), and 6) reduction and scientific analysis of the UVCS/Spartan 201 observational data. The Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer for Spartan 201 was one unit of a joint payload and the other unit was a White Light Coronagraph (WLC) provided by the High Altitude Observatory and the Goddard Space Flight Center. The two instruments were used in concert to determine plasma parameters describing structures in the extended solar corona. They provided data that could be used individually or jointly in scientific analyses. The WLC provided electron column densities in high spatial resolution and high time resolution. UVCS/Spartan provided hydrogen velocity distributions, and line of sight hydrogen velocities. The hydrogen intensities from UVCS together with the electron densities from WLC were used to determine hydrogen outflow velocities. The UVCS also provided O VI intensities which were used to develop diagnostics for velocity distributions and outflow velocities of minor ions.

  14. Development of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model for solar corona and solar wind simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xingqiu; Trichtchenko, Larisa; Boteler, David

    Propagation of coronal mass ejections from solar surface to the Earth magnetosphere is strongly influenced by the conditions in solar corona and ambient solar wind. Thus, reliable simulation of the background solar wind is the primary task toward the development of numerical model for the transient events. In this paper we introduce a new numerical model which has been specifically designed for numerical study of the solar corona and ambient solar wind. This model is based on our recently developed three-dimensional Spherical Coordinate Adaptive Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) code (SCA-MHD-3D) [Yuan et al., 2009]. Modifications has been done to include the observed magnetic field at the photosphere as inner boundary conditions. The energy source term together with reduced plasma gamma are used in the nonlinear MHD equations in order to simulate the solar wind acceleration from subsonic speed at solar surface to supersonic speed at the inter-heliosphere region, and the absorbing boundary conditions are used at the solar surface. This model has been applied to simulate the background solar wind condition for several different solar rotations, and comparison between the observation and model output have shown that it reproduces many features of solar wind, including open and closed magnetic fields, fast and slow solar wind speed, sector boundaries, etc.

  15. The solar corona through the sunspot cycle: preparing for the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Seaton, Daniel; Rusin, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the evolution of the solar corona as seen at eclipses through the solar-activity cycle. In particular, we discuss the variations of the overall shape of the corona through the relative proportions of coronal streamers at equatorial and other latitudes vs. polar plumes. We analyze the two coronal mass ejections that we observed from Gabon at the 2013 total solar eclipse and how they apparently arose from polar crown filaments, one at each pole. We describe the change in the Ludendorff flattening index from solar maximum in one hemisphere as of the 2013 eclipse through the 2015 totality's corona we observed from Svalbard and, with diminishing sunspot and other magnetic activity in each hemisphere, through the 2016 corona we observed from Ternate, Indonesia.We discuss our observational plans for the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse from our main site in Salem, Oregon, and subsidiary sites in Madras, OR; Carbondale, IL; and elsewhere, our main site chosen largely by its favorable rating in cloudiness statistics. We discuss the overlapping role of simultaneous spacecraft observations, including those expected not only from NASA's SDO, ESA's SWAP on PROBA2, and NRL/NASA/ESA's LASCO on SOHO but also from the new SUVI (Solar Ultraviolet Imager) aboard NOAA's GOES-R satellite, scheduled as of this writing to have been launched by the time of this January 2017 meeting.Our research on the 2013 and 2015 total solar eclipses was supported by grants from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society (NG-CRE). Our research on the 2017 total solar eclipse is supported by both NG-CRE and the Solar Terrestrial Program of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation.

  16. Off-limb EUV observations of the solar corona and transients with the CORONAS-F/SPIRIT telescope-coronagraph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Slemzin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The SPIRIT telescope aboard the CORONAS-F satellite (in orbit from 26 July 2001 to 5 December 2005, observed the off-limb solar corona in the 175 Å (Fe IX, X and XI lines and 304 Å (He II and Si XI lines bands. In the coronagraphic mode the mirror was tilted to image the corona at the distance of 1.1...5 Rsun from the solar center, the outer occulter blocked the disk radiation and the detector sensitivity was enhanced. This intermediate region between the fields of view of ordinary extreme-ultraviolet (EUV telescopes and most of the white-light (WL coronagraphs is responsible for forming the streamer belt, acceleration of ejected matter and emergence of slow and fast solar wind. We present here the results of continuous coronagraphic EUV observations of the solar corona carried out during two weeks in June and December 2002. The images showed a "diffuse" (unresolved component of the corona seen in both bands, and non-radial, ray-like structures seen only in the 175 Å band, which can be associated with a streamer base. The correlations between latitudinal distributions of the EUV brightness in the corona and at the limb were found to be high in 304 Å at all distances and in 175 Å only below 1.5 Rsun. The temporal correlation of the coronal brightness along the west radial line, with the brightness at the underlying limb region was significant in both bands, independent of the distance. On 2 February 2003 SPIRIT observed an expansion of a transient associated with a prominence eruption seen only in the 304 Å band. The SPIRIT data have been compared with the corresponding data of the SOHO LASCO, EIT and UVCS instruments.

  17. The Astrophysics of the Solar Corona at the August 21, 2017, American Total Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay

    2017-01-01

    The first total solar eclipse to cross the United States from coast to coast in 99 years will occur on August 21, 2017, with a 70-mile-wide path of totality from Oregon to South Carolina, with cloudiness statistics more favorable in the northwest than in the southeast. I will discuss a series of observations of the solar corona made during recent solar eclipses and related spacecraft observations. I will further discuss plans for using the 2017 eclipse for furthering our studies of the heating of the solar corona to millions of kelvins, of the dynamics of coronal mass ejections and polar plumes, and of the response of the corona to the solar magnetic field. I will conclude by discussing public-education plans for the eclipse, during which the whole U.S., Mexico, Central America, and Canada will enjoy a partial eclipse. My work at solar eclipses has recently been supported by the NSF and the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society, and I thank them both for research grants for our scientific studies of the 2017 total eclipse, including AGS-1602461 from the NSF and 987816 from National Geographic.

  18. Plasma compression in magnetic reconnection regions in the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Provornikova, Elena; Lukin, Vyacheslav S

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that particles bouncing between magnetized flows converging in a reconnection region can be accelerated by the first order Fermi mechanism. Analytical considerations of this mechanism have shown that the spectral index of accelerated particles is related to the total plasma compression within the reconnection region similarly to the case of diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. As a first step to investigate the efficiency of Fermi acceleration in reconnection regions in producing hard energy spectra of particles in the solar corona, we explore the degree of plasma compression that can be achieved at reconnection sites. In particular, we aim to determine the conditions for the strong compressions to form. Using a two-dimensional resistive MHD numerical model we consider a set of magnetic field configurations where magnetic reconnection can occur including a Harris current sheet, a force-free current sheet, and two merging flux ropes. Plasma parameters are taken to be characteristic of t...

  19. Simultaneous Observation of High Temperature Plasma of Solar Corona By TESIS CORONAS-PHOTON and XRT Hinode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A.; Kuzin, S.; Bogachev, S.; Shestov, S.

    2012-05-01

    The Mg XII spectroheliograph is a part of instrumentation complex TESIS (satellite CORONAS-PHOTON). This instrument builds monochromatic images of hot plasma of the solar corona (λ = 8.42 Å, T>5 MK). The Mg XII spectroheliograph observed hot plasma in the non-flaring active-region NOAA 11019 during nine days. We reconstructed DEM of this active region with the help of genetic algorithm (we used data of the Mg XII spectroheliograph, XRT and EIT). Emission measure of the hot component amounts 1 % of the emission measure of the cool component.

  20. Absolute velocity measurements in the solar transition region and corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, D. M.; Rottman, G. J.; Orrall, F. Q.

    An experimental technique is presented to measure absolute velocities of minor ions formed in the solar transition region and corona. A sounding rocket experiment July 27 1987 obtained high resolution EUV spectra along a solar diameter with spatial resolution of 20 x 20 arcsec. The wavelengths of the 1533 Si II, 1548 C IV, and 770 Ne VIII emission lines were directly compared with wavelengths of known platinum lines generated by an inflight calibration lamp. On the assumption that horisontal motions cancel statistically so that the line-of-sight velocity approaches zero at the limb, a net radial downflow of approximately 7.5 + or - 1.0 km/s was found for C IV and upper limits were found on the radial flow for Si II and Ne VIII. This assumption was tested by direct comparison to the on-board wavelength reference using recently published laboratory rest wavelengths of the solar emission lines. Agreement was found within the published uncertainties of the laboratory wavelengths + or - 2 km/s in the case of C IV. It is suggested that improved laboratory wavelength measurements (+ or - 1 km/s) in conjunction with inflight wavelength calibration would improve constraints on models of transition region and coronal dynamics.

  1. The Temperature of the Corona as Derived from Total Solar Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, Shadia R.; Morgan, Huw; Druckmuller, Miloslav; Ding, Adalbert

    2016-05-01

    Multiwavelength imaging observations in a suite of coronal forbidden lines of the corona during total solar eclipses enables the empirical inference of the spatial distribution of temperature in the solar corona up to a few solar radii above the limb. The temperature sensitivity of coronal emission lines is such that temperature differences of 105 K can be detected in the images. Using high resolution multiwavelength and white light eclipse images acquired since 2006, covering almost a solar cycle, we show evidence for (1) how the distribution of the temperature in the corona is bimodal, with closed coronal structures dominated by 2 106 K plasma, while structures streaming away from the Sun are dominated by 106 K emission, (2) prominences are invariably enshrouded by the hottest material in the corona, and (3) that the dominance of one temperature versus the other is solar-cycle dependent.

  2. Solar Corona and plasma effects on Radio Frequency waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkono, C.; Rosenblatt, P.; Dehant, V. M.

    2009-12-01

    Solar corona (plasma) effects on radio signal waves for three different frequency bands S (2.3 GHz), X (8.4 GHz), and Ka (32 GHz), currently used to track probes in the solar system, have been computed using different models of the total electron content (TEC) along the propagation path between the Earth and Mars. The Earth-Mars-Sun configuration has been obtained from the planetary ephemerides DE421 (using SPICE kernels) for the period from September 2004 to September 2006. This configuration is expressed as a function of the Sun-Earth-Probe (SEP) angles (the probe being in close orbit to Mars). We used the TEC values provided by the different models proposed in the literature in order to estimate the TEC along the propagation path (STEC, for Slant TEC). From these model-dependent STEC estimates, the time delay on the wave propagation as well as the associated frequency shift with a 10 seconds sampling time have been obtained for each of the three frequency bands. For the X-band mostly used in radio science, we have obtained estimates differing by up to several orders of magnitude due to the different STEC values derived from different models of TEC. For example, if the propagation path passes near the Sun such that SEP angle is 1.55° the STEC is ranging from 4.6x1020 electron/m2 to 6.07x1016 electron/m2, which corresponds to a time delay range between 0.87 μs and 1.15x10-4 μs, respectively. For SEP angles between 2° and 8°, the range of the different time delay values reduces to 2.8x10-1 μs and becomes as small as 1.6x10-2 μs for SEP angles larger than 8° (1x10-2 μs is about the order of magnitude of the radioscience instrument precision). These results show that the correction of the solar corona effect on radio frequency waves can be reliably done on usual X-band tracking data of spacecraft for SEP angles >12°, but should be use with caution for lower SEP angles, especially lower than 2°.

  3. Neutral Hydrogen and its Emission Lines in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Vial, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Since the Lalpha rocket observations of (Gabriel, Solar Phys. 21, 392, 1971), it has been realized that the hydrogen (H) lines could be observed in the corona and offer an interesting diagnostic for the temperature, density, and radial velocity of the coronal plasma. Moreover, various space missions have been proposed to measure the coronal magnetic and velocity fields through polarimetry in H lines. A necessary condition for such measurements is to benefit from a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. The aim of this article is to evaluate the emission in three representative lines of H for three different coronal structures. The computations have been performed with a full non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) code and its simplified version without radiative transfer. Since all collisionnal and radiative quantities (including incident ionizing and exciting radiation) are taken into account, the ionization is treated exactly. Profiles are presented at two heights (1.05 and 1.9 solar radii, from Sun cente...

  4. Diagnostics of the solar corona from comparison between Faraday rotation measurements and magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Chat, G.; Cohen, O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kasper, J. C. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Spangler, S. R., E-mail: gaetan.lechat@obspm.fr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-07-10

    Polarized natural radio sources passing behind the Sun experience Faraday rotation as a consequence of the electron density and magnetic field strength in coronal plasma. Since Faraday rotation is proportional to the product of the density and the component of the magnetic field along the line of sight of the observer, a model is required to interpret the observations and infer coronal structures. Faraday rotation observations have been compared with relatively ad hoc models of the corona. Here for the first time we compare these observations with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the solar corona driven by measurements of the photospheric magnetic field. We use observations made with the NRAO Very Large Array of 34 polarized radio sources occulted by the solar corona between 5 and 14 solar radii. The measurements were made during 1997 May, and 2005 March and April. We compare the observed Faraday rotation values with values extracted from MHD steady-state simulations of the solar corona. We find that (1) using a synoptic map of the solar magnetic field just one Carrington rotation off produces poorer agreements, meaning that the outer corona changes in the course of one month, even in solar minimum; (2) global MHD models of the solar corona driven by photospheric magnetic field measurements are generally able to reproduce Faraday rotation observations; and (3) some sources show significant disagreement between the model and the observations, which appears to be a function of the proximity of the line of sight to the large-scale heliospheric current sheet.

  5. Destruction of Sun-Grazing Comet C-2011 N3 (SOHO) Within the Low Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Brown, J. C.; Battams, K.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Liu, W.; Hudson, H.; Pesnell, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of comets in Sun-grazing orbits that survive solar insolation long enough to penetrate into the Suns inner corona provide information on the solar atmosphere and magnetic field as well as on the makeup of the comet. On 6 July 2011, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed the demise of comet C2011 N3 (SOHO) within the low solar corona in five wavelength bands in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). The comet penetrated to within 0.146 solarradius (100,000 kilometers) of the solar surface before its EUV signal disappeared.

  6. A Space Weather mission concept: Observatories of the Solar Corona and Active Regions (OSCAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Janitzek, Nils; Lee, Arrow

    2015-01-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) are major sources of magnetic storms on Earth and are therefore considered to be the most dangerous space weather events. The Observatories of Solar Corona and Active Regions (OSCAR) mission is designed to identify the 3D str....... The spacecraft will be separated by an angle of 68 degrees to provide optimum stereoscopic view of the solar corona. We study the feasibility of such a mission and propose a preliminary design for OSCAR....

  7. Laboratory identification of MHD eruption criteria in the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Clayton E.

    2015-11-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities such as the kink and torus instabilities are believed to play an important role in driving ``storage-and-release'' eruptions in the solar corona. These instabilities act on long-lived, arched magnetic flux ropes that are ``line-tied'' to the solar surface. In spite of numerous observational and computational studies, the conditions under which these instabilities produce an eruption remain a subject of intense debate. In this paper, we use a line-tied, arched flux rope experiment to study storage-and-release eruptions in the laboratory. An in situ array of miniature magnetic probes is used to assess the equilibrium and stability of the laboratory flux ropes. Two major results are reported here: First, a new stability regime is identified where torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. In this ``failed torus'' regime, the flux rope is torus-unstable but kink-stable. Under these conditions, a dynamic ``toroidal field tension force'' surges in magnitude, causing the flux rope to contract. This tension force, which is missing from existing eruption models, is the J × B force between self-generated poloidal currents in the flux rope and the toroidal (guide) component of the vacuum field. Secondly, a clear torus instability threshold is observed in the kink-unstable regime. This latter result, which is consistent with existing theoretical and numerical results, verifies the key role of the torus instability in driving solar eruptions. In collaboration with M. Yamada, H. Ji, J. Yoo, W. Fox, J. Jara-Almonte, A. Savcheva, and E. E. DeLuca. This research is supported by DoE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by the NSF/DoE Center for Magnetic Self-Organization (CMSO).

  8. Solar release time of solar energetic particles and associated acceleration source in corona

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are accelerated in corona at an early phase of solar energetic particle events (SEPE). The acceleration mechanism of SEPs in corona can only be inferred from an analysis of multi-band observational data, as the observation of SEPs is usually made around 1AU. In this context,people have investigated spectrums, charge state, solar release time (SRT), and multi-band data of SEPEs, in an attempt to judge the acceleration mechanism of SEPs. The SRT computation of SEPs is an important and commonly used approach to study the acceleration mechanism of SEPs in corona.This paper reviews some important findings concerning the SRT computation of SEPs, and analyzes different merits of each approach for such calculation, based on a range of SEPE case studies. This paper also analyzes and discusses both possible and actual acceleration mechanisms of a number of SEPEs, by calculating the SRT of the SEPEs. Finally, the paper summarizes the possible problems in studying an acceleration mechanism of SEPEs inferred from the SRT of SEP.

  9. Spectral Line Non-thermal Broadening and MHD Waves in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaqarashvili, T. V.

    2009-04-01

    The rapid temperature rise from the solar surface (6000 K) up to the corona (1 MK) and acceleration of solar wind particles still are unresolved problems in solar physics. The energy source for the coronal heating and the wind acceleration probably lies in the solar photosphere. MHD waves are believed to carry the photospheric energy into the corona. Recent observations from space based telescopes made significant progress in understanding the process of MHD wave propagation from the solar surface towards the corona. Some of MHD wave modes have been observed through intensity variations and Doppler shift oscillations in spectral lines. Another powerful mechanism is to detect the waves through the non-thermal broadening of spectral lines. The lecture gives the basic points of wave induced effects in solar coronal spectral lines and recent progress in wave observations through spectral line non-thermal broadening.

  10. Element Abundances in Solar Energetic Particles and the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Reames, Donald V

    2013-01-01

    This is a study of abundances of the elements He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe in solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the 2 - 15 MeV amu-1 region measured on the Wind spacecraft during 54 large SEP events occurring between November 1994 and June 2012. The origin of most of the temporal and spatial variations in abundances of the heavier elements lies in rigidity-dependent scattering during transport of the particles away from the site of acceleration at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Variation in the abundance of Fe is correlated with the Fe spectral index, as expected from scattering theory but not previously noted. Clustering of Fe abundances during the "reservoir" period, late in SEP events, is also newly reported. Transport-induced enhancements in one region are balanced by depletions in another, thus, averaging over these variations produces SEP abundances that are energy independent, confirms previous SEP abundances in this energy region, and provides a c...

  11. Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona During the December 4, 2002 Total Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.; Riley, Pete; Lionello, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The solar magnetic field plays a key role in determining coronal. The principal input to MHD models is the observed solar magnetic field. 3D MHD models can be used to compare with eclipse and coronograph images, SOHO images (LOSCO, EIT), Ulysses and WIND spacecraft data, and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements. MHD computations can tell us about the structure of the corona. Eclipses can help us to verify the accuracy of the models. 4 December, 2002 total eclipce: visible in the southern hemisphere (South Atlantic, southern Africa, Indian Ocean, and Australia). Total in center Angola is at 06:00 UT.

  12. Co-existence of two plasma phases in solar and AGN coronas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubičela A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we have juxtaposed two distant cosmic locations of the Sun and AGN where neutral hydrogen appears in a close connection with hot coronas. Besides the solar photosphere, chromosphere and prominences where the presence of neutral hydrogen is well established, its emission quite high in hot solar corona is still puzzling. Some of earlier observations where Hα emission in solar corona was detected in eclipse and in daily coronagraphic observations are reviewed. A proper theoretical explanation of this cold chromospheric-type emission in the hot corona does not exist yet. On the other side, a similar emission of hydrogen lines is present in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs. Much research work is currently being done in this field. We outline some of the concepts of the AGN structure prevailing in the astrophysics today.

  13. More than mass proportional heating of heavy ions by supercritical collisionless shocks in the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new model for explaining the observations of more than mass proportional heating of heavy ions in the polar solar corona. We point out that a large number of small scale intermittent shock waves can be present in the solar corona. The energization mechanism is, essentially, the ion reflection off supercritical quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks in the corona and the subsequent acceleration by the motional electric field ${\\bf E} = - (1/c) {\\bf V} \\times {\\bf B}$. The acceleration due to ${\\bf E}$ is perpendicular to the magnetic field, in agreement with observations, and is more than mass proportional with respect to protons, because the heavy ion orbit is mostly upstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock foot. The observed temperature ratios between O$^{5+}$ ions and protons in the polar corona, and between $\\alpha$ particles and protons in the solar wind are easily recovered.

  14. Observations of the temperature, density and velocity structure of the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, Steven Neil

    1994-01-01

    The solar corona exists at a temperature of over 106 K while the underlying visible surface, the photosphere, is much cooler, about 6,000K. How this tenuous outer layer can be many orders of magnitude hotter than the photosphere is one of the principal enigmas of solar physics. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain coronal heating, but none have been completely successful in accounting for its observed characteristics. It is the purpose of this thesis to present observations of both the large scale velocity structure and the small scale density and temperature structure of the quiet corona which will constrain theories of coronal heating. Spatially resolved spectra of the solar corona were obtained in the extreme ultraviolet during a sounding rocket experiment on June 20, 1989. In order to obtain an accurate photometric calibration of the spectrometer, we developed a new technique using a synchrotron radiation source operated by the National Institute for Standards and Technology. With this calibration, along with the high spectral resolution and on-board wavelength calibration capability of the payload, we were able to develop a detailed picture of the density and velocity structure of a portion of the solar corona. Data from the sounding rocket experiment were then compared to white light observations made by the Mk-3 coronagraph operated by the High Altitude Observatory at Mauna Loa. The white light continuum intensity of the solar corona is proportional to the mean electron density along the line of sight, whereas the emission line intensity is proportional to the average value of the electron density squared. By comparing these two data sets, we find that the density irregularity factor is close to unity for the quiet corona. The irregularity analysis in this thesis is the first to consider the possibility of a non-isothermal corona. We also find that the systematic velocity structure seen in the transition region is not present in the solar corona.

  15. Structure of the Solar Dust Corona and its Interaction with the other Coronal Components

    CERN Document Server

    Shopov, Y Y; Stoitchkova, K; Tsankov, L T; Tanev, A; Burin, Kl; Belchev, St; Rusanov, V; Ivanov, D; Stoev, A; Muglova, P; Iliev, I

    2009-01-01

    We developed a new technique for registration of the far solar corona from ground-based observations at distances comparable to those obtained from space coronagraphs. It makes possible visualization of fine details of studied objects invisible by naked eye. Here we demonstrate that streamers of the electron corona sometimes punch the dust corona and that the shape of the dust corona may vary with time. We obtained several experimental evidences that the far coronal streamers (observed directly only from the space or stratosphere) emit only in discrete regions of the visible spectrum like resonance fluorescence of molecules and ions in comets. We found that interaction of the coronal streamers with the dust corona can produce molecules and radicals, which are known to cause the resonance fluorescence in comets.

  16. Intermittent heating in the solar corona employing a 3D MHD model

    CERN Document Server

    Bingert, Sven

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of the heating of the corona of a cool star such as our Sun in a three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (3D MHD) model. We solve the 3D MHD problem numerically in a box representing part of the (solar) corona. The energy balance includes Spitzer heat conduction along the magnetic field and optically thin radiative losses. The self-consistent heating mechanism is based on the braiding of magnetic field lines rooted in the convective photosphere. Magnetic stress induced by photospheric motions leads to currents in the atmosphere which heat the corona through Ohmic dissipation. While the horizontally averaged quantities, such as heating rate, temperature or density, are relatively constant in time, the simulated corona is highly variable and dynamic, on average reaching temperatures and densities as found in observations. The strongest heating per particle is found in the transition region from the chromosphere to the corona. The heating is concentrated in curren...

  17. Alfvénic waves with sufficient energy to power the quiet solar corona and fast solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Scott W; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo; Boerner, Paul; Goossens, Marcel

    2011-07-27

    Energy is required to heat the outer solar atmosphere to millions of degrees (refs 1, 2) and to accelerate the solar wind to hundreds of kilometres per second (refs 2-6). Alfvén waves (travelling oscillations of ions and magnetic field) have been invoked as a possible mechanism to transport magneto-convective energy upwards along the Sun's magnetic field lines into the corona. Previous observations of Alfvénic waves in the corona revealed amplitudes far too small (0.5 km s(-1)) to supply the energy flux (100-200 W m(-2)) required to drive the fast solar wind or balance the radiative losses of the quiet corona. Here we report observations of the transition region (between the chromosphere and the corona) and of the corona that reveal how Alfvénic motions permeate the dynamic and finely structured outer solar atmosphere. The ubiquitous outward-propagating Alfvénic motions observed have amplitudes of the order of 20 km s(-1) and periods of the order of 100-500 s throughout the quiescent atmosphere (compatible with recent investigations), and are energetic enough to accelerate the fast solar wind and heat the quiet corona.

  18. Laboratory Identification of MHD Eruption Criteria in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M.; Myers, C. E.; Ji, H.; Yoo, J.; Fox, W. R., II; Jara-Almonte, J.; Savcheva, A. S.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities such as the kink [1] and torus [2] instabilities are believed to play an important role in driving "storage-and-release" eruptions in the solar corona. These instabilities act on long-lived, arched magnetic flux ropes that are "line-tied" to the solar surface. In spite of numerous observational and computational studies, the conditions under which these instabilities produce an eruption remain a subject of intense debate. In this paper, we use a line-tied, arched flux rope experiment to study storage-and-release eruptions in the laboratory [3]. An in situ array of miniature magnetic probes is used to assess the equilibrium and stability of the laboratory flux ropes. Two major results are reported here: First, a new stability regime is identified where torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. In this "failed torus" regime, the flux rope is torus-unstable but kink-stable. Under these conditions, a dynamic "toroidal field tension force" surges in magnitude and causes the flux rope to contract. This tension force, which is missing from existing eruption models, is the J×B force between self-generated poloidal currents in the flux rope and the toroidal (guide) component of the vacuum field. Secondly, a clear torus instability threshold is observed in the kink-unstable regime. This latter result, which is consistent with existing theoretical [4] and numerical [5] findings, verifies the key role of the torus instability in driving some solar eruptions. This research is supported by DoE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by the NSF/DoE Center for Magnetic Self-Organization (CMSO). [1] Hood & Priest, Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dynamics 17, 297 (1981) [2] Kliem & Török, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 255002 (2006) [3] Myers, Ph.D. Thesis, Princeton University (2015) [4] Olmedo & Zhang, Astrophys. J. 718, 433 (2010) [5] Török & Kliem, Astrophys. J. 630, L97 (2005)

  19. On ion-cyclotron-resonance heating of the corona and solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marsch

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concisely summarizes and critically reviews recent work by the authors on models of the heating of the solar corona by resonance of ions with high-frequency waves (up to the proton cyclotron frequency. The quasi-linear theory of pitch angle diffusion is presented in connection with relevant solar wind proton observations. Hybrid fluid-kinetic model equations, which include wave-particle interactions and collisions, are derived. Numerical solutions are discussed, representative of the inner corona and near-Sun solar wind. A semi-kinetic model for reduced velocity distributions is presented, yielding kinetic results for heavy ions in the solar corona. It is concluded that a self-consistent treatment of particle distributions and wave spectra is required, in order to adequately describe coronal physics and to obtain agreement with observations.

  20. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeroek, T.; Berger, M. A.; Kliem, B.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of twist and writhe helicity. Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates to the writhe, which fraction of helicity is contained in writhe, and how much helicity is exchanged between twist and writhe when they erupt. Aims. Here we perform a quantitative investigation of these questions relevant for coronal flux ropes. Methods. The decomposition of the writhe of a curve into local and nonlocal components greatly facilitates its computation. We use it to study the relation between writhe and projected S shape of helical curves and to measure writhe and twist in numerical simulations of flux rope instabilities. The results are discussed with regard to filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results. (1) We demonstrate that the relation between writhe and projected S shape is not unique in principle, but that the ambiguity does not affect low-lying structures, thus supporting the established empirical rule which associates stable forward (reverse) S shaped structures low in the corona with positive (negative) helicity. (2) Kink-unstable erupting flux ropes are found to transform a far smaller fraction of their twist helicity into writhe helicity than often assumed. (3) Confined flux rope eruptions tend to show stronger writhe at low heights than ejective eruptions (CMEs). This argues against suggestions that the writhing facilitates the rise of the rope through the overlying field. (4) Erupting filaments which are S shaped already before the eruption and keep the sign of their axis writhe (which is expected if field of one chirality dominates the source volume of the eruption), must reverse their S shape in the course of the rise. Implications for the occurrence of the helical kink instability in such events are discussed.

  1. Shock Formation Height in the Solar Corona Estimated from SDO and Radio Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Nitta, N.

    2011-01-01

    Wave transients at EUV wavelengths and type II radio bursts are good indicators of shock formation in the solar corona. We use recent EUV wave observations from SDO and combine them with metric type II radio data to estimate the height in the corona where the shocks form. We compare the results with those obtained from other methods. We also estimate the shock formation heights independently using white-light observations of coronal mass ejections that ultimately drive the shocks.

  2. Turbulent heating in the solar wind and in the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, M K

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the turbulent heating rates in the solar wind using the Kolmogorov-like MHD turbulence phenomenology with Kolmogorov's constants calculated by {\\it Verma and Bhattacharjee }[1995b,c]. We find that the turbulent heating can not account for the total heating of the nonAlfv\\'enic streams in the solar wind. We show that dissipation due to thermal conduction is also a potential heating source. Regarding the Alfv\\'enic streams, the predicted turbulent heating rates using the constants of {\\it Verma and Bhattacharjee }[1995c] are higher than the observed heating rates; the predicted dissipation rates are probably overestimates because Alfv\\'enic streams have not reached steady-state. We also compare the predicted turbulent heating rates in the solar corona with the observations; the Kolmogorov-like phenomenology predicts dissipation rates comparable to the observed heating rates in the corona [{\\it Hollweg, }% 1984], but Dobrowoly et al.'s generalized Kraichnan model yields heating rates m...

  3. Broad band photometry of solar corona during the total solar eclipse of October 24, 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagare, S. P.; Aleem, P. S. M.; Singh, J.; Saxena, A. K.

    A 30 cm coelostat, a red broad band filter, and a 15 cm objective providing an f/15 beam were used to obtain high resolution pictures of the white light solar corona. In one of the frames, the presence of a loop structure is recorded with its top around 2 Rsun, in the near north polar region. The nearest YOHKOH soft X-ray picture shows the presence of a coronal hole with its border apparently beneath the loop structure. The preliminary results are discussed.

  4. Evidence for wave heating in the solar corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The temperature of the Sun increases over a short distance from a few thousand degrees in the photosphere to over a million degrees in the corona. To understand coronal heating is one of the major problems in astrophysics. There is general agreement that the energy source is convective motion in and below the photosphere. It remains to determine how this mechanical energy is transported outward into the corona and then deposited as heat. Two classes of models have been proposed, namely those that rely on magnetic reconnection and those that rely on waves, particularly Alfvén waves. There is increasing evidence that waves are ubiquitous in the corona. However, a difficulty for wave-driven models has been that most theories predict Alfvén waves to be undamped in the corona, and therefore they cannot dissipate their energy into heat. Our research has shown unambiguous observational evidence that the waves do damp at sufficiently low heights in the corona to be important for coronal heating.

  5. High Performance Computing Application: Solar Dynamo Model Project II, Corona and Heliosphere Component Initialization, Integration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-24

    allocate solar heating into any location of the corona . Its total contribution depended on the integration of the unsigned magnetic flux at 1 Rs...AFRL-RD-PS- TR-2015-0028 AFRL-RD-PS- TR-2015-0028 HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING APPLICATION: SOLAR DYNAMO MODEL PROJECT II; CORONA AND HELIOSPHERE...Dynamo Model Project II, Corona and Heliosphere Component Initialization, Integration and Validation 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  6. Ultra-fine-scale filamentary structures in the Outer Corona and the Solar Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Filamentary structures following magnetic field lines pervade the Sun's atmosphere and offer us insight into the solar magnetic field. Radio propagation measurements have shown that the smallest filamentary structures in the solar corona are more than 2 orders of magnitude finer than those seen in solar imaging. Here we use radio Doppler measurements to characterize their transverse density gradient and determine their finest scale in the outer corona at 20-30 R(circled dot operator), where open magnetic fields prevail. Filamentary structures overly active regions have the steepest gradient and finest scale, while those overlying coronal holes have the shallowest gradient and least finest scale. Their organization by the underlying corona implies that these subresolution structures extend radially from the entire Sun, confirming that they trace the coronal magnetic field responsible for the radial expansion of the solar wind. That they are rooted all over the Sun elucidates the association between the magnetic field of the photosphere and that of the corona, as revealed by the similarity between the power spectra of the photospheric field and the coronal density fluctuations. This association along with the persistence of filamentary structures far from the Sun demonstrate that subresolution magnetic fields must play an important role not only in magnetic coupling of the photosphere and corona, but also in coronal heating and solar wind acceleration through the process of small-scale magnetic reconnection. They also explain why current widely used theoretical models that extrapolate photospheric magnetic fields into the corona do not predict the correct source of the solar wind.

  7. "Measuring the Magnetic-Field Strength of the Quiet Solar Corona Using ""EIT Waves"""

    OpenAIRE

    Long, David M.; David R Williams; Régnier, Stéphane; Harra, Louise K.

    2013-01-01

    Variations in the propagation of globally-propagating disturbances (commonly called "EIT waves") through the low solar corona offer a unique opportunity to probe the plasma parameters of the solar atmosphere. Here, high-cadence observations of two "EIT wave" events taken using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) are combined with spectroscopic measurements from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) onboard the Hinode spac...

  8. Inbound waves in the solar corona: a direct indicator of Alfv\\'en Surface location

    CERN Document Server

    DeForest, C E; McComas, D J

    2014-01-01

    The tenuous supersonic solar wind that streams from the top of the corona passes through a natural boundary -- the Alfv\\'en surface -- that marks the causal disconnection of individual packets of plasma and magnetic flux from the Sun itself. The Alfv\\'en surface is the locus where the radial motion of the accelerating solar wind passes the radial Alfv\\'en speed, and therefore any displacement of material cannot carry information back down into the corona. It is thus the natural outer boundary of the solar corona, and the inner boundary of interplanetary space. Using a new and unique motion analysis to separate inbound and outbound motions in synoptic visible-light image sequences from the COR2 coronagraph on board the STEREO-A spacecraft, we have identified inbound wave motion in the outer corona beyond 6 solar radii for the first time, and used it to determine that the Alfv\\'en surface is at least 12.5 solar radii from the Sun over the polar coronal holes and 17 solar radii in the streamer belt, well beyond ...

  9. Hot Oxygen Corona at Mars and Its Effect on Solar Wind Deceleration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tie-Long; Lichtenegger Herbert; SHI Jian-Kui; WANG Xiao; Lammer Helmut

    2006-01-01

    @@ Phobos 2 plasma measurements have revealed solar wind deceleration of about 100 km/s upstream of the Martian bow shock. It is suggested that the deceleration is due to the mass loading by the ions originating from the hot oxygen corona of Mars. In this study, we use a gas-dynamic model to estimate the solar wind deceleration caused by the mass loading effect and the result shows that the deceleration is only about 10-15 km/s when we invoke the well established hot oxygen corona density profiles.

  10. Evolution of electron beam pulses of short duration in the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas-Pérez, G. A.; Jeyakumar, S.; Pérez-Enríquez, H. R.; Trinidad, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    Narrowband radio bursts with durations of the order of milliseconds, called spikes, are known to be associated with solar flares. In order to understand the particle beams responsible for the radio spike phenomena, evolution of electron beam pulses injected from a solar flare region into the corona is studied. Numerical integration of the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation is used to follow the evolution of the electron beam pulse. The simulations show that the short duration pulses lose most of their energy within a second of propagation into the corona. Electron beam with a small low energy cut off is thermalized faster than that with a high low energy cut off.

  11. Solar Coronal Mass Ejection as a Result of Magnetic Helicity Accumulation in the Corona

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Mei

    2011-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a major form of solar activities. A CME takes away 10^15-16 g of plasma from solar low corona, to disturb the near-Earth space if the CME direction is favorable. Here we summarize our understandings and reasoning that lead us to conclude that CMEs are the unavoidable products of magnetic helicity accumulation in the corona. Our study puts the formation of magnetic flux ropes and CME eruptions as natural and unavoidable results of coronal evolution.

  12. Exploration of the Transition Region-Corona Interface With the Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to observe the solar upper transition region and lower corona in Ne VII 46.5 nm with the Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) rocket payload. The...

  13. Preliminary results of the solar corona spectroscopic observation of 9th March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungging Mumpuni, Emanuel; Zamzam Nurzaman, Muhamad; Suryana, Nana

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopy observation of solar corona has been carried out from 9th March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse expedition in Maba, East Halmahera. Due to limitation by the weather condition during the observation, the obtained data were not favorable. Because of the low signal to noise ratio, the wavelength calibration was not straightforward. To obtain the optimum results, steps for data reduction were performed as the following: selecting the finest data, extracting the 1D spectrum from 2D spectrum, and calibrating spectrum wavelength (including careful interpolation). In this preliminary result, we discuss the instrumentation, the data under investigation, the extraction process of spectrum, and the polynomial interpolation that has been used for extracting information from our data.

  14. Observations of the White Light Corona from Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R. A.; Thernisien, A. F.; Vourlidas, A.; Plunkett, S. P.; Korendyke, C. M.; Sheeley, N. R.; Morrill, J. S.; Socker, D. G.; Linton, M. G.; Liewer, P. C.; De Jong, E. M.; Velli, M. M.; Mikic, Z.; Bothmer, V.; Lamy, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    The SoloHI instrument on Solar Orbiter and the WISPR instrument on Solar Probe+ will make white light coronagraphic images of the corona as the two spacecraft orbit the Sun. The minimum perihelia for Solar Orbiter is about 60 Rsun and for SP+ is 9.5 Rsun. The wide field of view of the WISPR instrument (about 105 degrees radially) corresponds to viewing the corona from 2.2 Rsun to 20 Rsun. Thus the entire Thomson hemisphere is contained within the telescope's field and we need to think of the instrument as being a traditional remote sensing instrument and then transitioning to a local in-situ instrument. The local behavior derives from the fact that the maximum Thomson scattering will favor the electron plasma close to the spacecraft - exactly what the in-situ instruments will be sampling. SoloHI and WISPR will also observe scattered light from dust in the inner heliosphere, which will be an entirely new spatial regime for dust observations from a coronagraph, which we assume to arise from dust in the general neighborhood of about half way between the observer and the Sun. As the dust grains approach the Sun, they evaporate and do not contribute to the scattering. A dust free zone has been postulated to exist somewhere inside of 5 Rsun where all dust is evaporated, but this has never been observed. The radial position where the evaporation occurs will depend on the precise molecular composition of the individual grains. The orbital plane of Solar Orbiter will gradually increase up to about 35 degrees, enabling a very different view through the zodiacal dust cloud to test the models generated from in-ecliptic observations. In this paper we will explore some of the issues associated with the observation of the dust and will present a simple model to explore the sensitivity of the instrument to observe such evaporations.

  15. White light corona during total solar eclipse on March 9, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaduddin, Irfan; Akbar, Evan I.; Putri, Gerhana P.

    2016-11-01

    We observed the white-light corona during the total solar eclipse of 2016 March 9 from Corong Beach, East Borneo. The solar corona is nearly circular with exception on the southern part of the Sun. Coronal structures are clearly seen. Based on the data, we obtained the Ludendorff flattening index, Nikolsky geometric flattening index, and phases of solar activity (Φ and P) are 0.129, 1.32, -0.716, and 0.573 respectively. Relation between Ludendorff and Nikolsky index, sunspot number, and phases of solar activity were discussed. We also predicted the amplitude of solar cycle 25 to be 196 ± 52 (based on 13-month smoothed monthly data) and 130 ± 42 (based on monthly sunspot number data).

  16. Observaciones de la corona solar interior con un coronógrafo de espejo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenborg, G.; Schwenn, R.; Francile, C.; Rovira, M.

    El plasma de la corona solar es un buen indicador de las líneas de fuerza del campo magnético. Por lo tanto, el análisis de estructuras coronales cuasiestacionarias en la corona da importante información sobre el campo magnético y la actividad asociada. Se trata de poner límites a los modelos teóricos existentes mediante el estudio de distintas estructuras en la corona interior. En agosto de 1997 comenzó a operar el coronógrafo solar (MICA) en El Leoncito como parte del Observatorio Solar Alemán-Argentino. Desde su instalación obtiene imágenes de la corona solar (1.05 a 2.0 radios solares) en 2 líneas espectrales correspondientes a la emisión de Fe XIV y Fe X. El instrumento puede obtener imágenes cada minuto por lo que es ideal para estudiar procesos rápidos. Presentamos observaciones recientes que muestran la capacidad del coronógrafo así como la evolución de algunos eventos dinámicos observados por MICA.

  17. 3D electron density distributions in the solar corona during solar minima: assessment for more realistic solar wind modeling

    CERN Document Server

    de Patoul, Judith; Riley, Pete

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the electron density distribution in the solar corona put constraints on the magnetic field configurations for coronal modeling and on initial conditions for solar wind modeling. We work with polarized SOHO/LASCO-C2 images from the last two recent minima of solar activity (1996-1997 and 2008-2010), devoid of coronal mass ejections. The goals are to derive the 4D electron density distributions in the corona by applying a newly developed time-dependent tomographic reconstruction method and to compare the results between the two solar minima and with two magnetohydrodynamic models. First, we confirm that the values of the density distribution in thermodynamic models are more realistic than in polytropic ones. The tomography provides more accurate distributions in the polar regions, and we find that the density in tomographic and thermodynamic solutions varies with the solar cycle in both polar and equatorial regions. Second, we find that the highest-density structures do not always correspond to the...

  18. Research on dual spectrum solar-blind ultraviolet corona detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Gu, Yan; Sun, Jianning; Pan, Jingsheng; Zhu, Bo; Wang, Qi; Lu, Xiaoqing

    2015-04-01

    A dual spectrum solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) corona detection system is designed in this paper. A common optical axis using a dichroic mirror is applied to this system in order to make visible light and ultraviolet light spectroscopy to ultraviolet detector and visible detectors. A high speed circuit of image processing based on TMS320DM642 DSP and a circuit that is used into system control and power management based on microcontroller are designed for the presented system. On the basis of the multi-threaded programming ideas, real-time image acquisition of ultraviolet and visible detectors, ultraviolet image noise reduction, image registration, dual spectral integration, Characteristic superimposing, serial communication and image display are achieved by using the DSP image processing circuit. Experimental results show that the dual spectrum solar-blind ultraviolet corona detection system has a good performance of corona detection based on ultraviolet and visible image fusion.

  19. Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona for the Total Solar Eclipse of March 29,2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. a.; Lionello, R.; Riley, P.; TItov, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the use of a three-dimensional MHD model to predict the s tructure of the corona prior to the total solar eclipse of March 29, 2006. The calculation uses the observed photospheric radial magnetic f ield as a boundary condition. We use a new version of our model that has an improved description of energy transport in the corona. The mo del allows us to predict the emission of X-ray and EUV radiation in t he corona. We compare the predicted polarization brightness in the co rona with four observations of the eclipse from Greece, Egypt, and Li bya, and we demonstrate that the model accurately predicts the largescale structure of the corona. We also compare X-ray emission from the model with GOES/SXI images.

  20. Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona for the Total Solar Eclipse of March 29,2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. a.; Lionello, R.; Riley, P.; TItov, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the use of a three-dimensional MHD model to predict the s tructure of the corona prior to the total solar eclipse of March 29, 2006. The calculation uses the observed photospheric radial magnetic f ield as a boundary condition. We use a new version of our model that has an improved description of energy transport in the corona. The mo del allows us to predict the emission of X-ray and EUV radiation in t he corona. We compare the predicted polarization brightness in the co rona with four observations of the eclipse from Greece, Egypt, and Li bya, and we demonstrate that the model accurately predicts the largescale structure of the corona. We also compare X-ray emission from the model with GOES/SXI images.

  1. Signatures of Slow Solar Wind Streams from Active Regions in the Inner Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, V.; Harra, L.; Urnov, A.; Kuzin, S.; Goryaev, F.; Berghmans, D.

    2013-08-01

    The identification of solar-wind sources is an important question in solar physics. The existing solar-wind models ( e.g., the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model) provide the approximate locations of the solar wind sources based on magnetic field extrapolations. It has been suggested recently that plasma outflows observed at the edges of active regions may be a source of the slow solar wind. To explore this we analyze an isolated active region (AR) adjacent to small coronal hole (CH) in July/August 2009. On 1 August, Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observations showed two compact outflow regions in the corona. Coronal rays were observed above the active-region coronal hole (ARCH) region on the eastern limb on 31 July by STEREO-A/EUVI and at the western limb on 7 August by CORONAS- Photon/TESIS telescopes. In both cases the coronal rays were co-aligned with open magnetic-field lines given by the potential field source surface model, which expanded into the streamer. The solar-wind parameters measured by STEREO-B, ACE, Wind, and STEREO-A confirmed the identification of the ARCH as a source region of the slow solar wind. The results of the study support the suggestion that coronal rays can represent signatures of outflows from ARs propagating in the inner corona along open field lines into the heliosphere.

  2. On the Size of Structures in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    DeForest, C E

    2006-01-01

    Fine-scale structure in the corona appears not to be well resolved by current imaging instruments. Assuming this to be true offers a simple geometric explanation for several current puzzles in coronal physics, including: the apparent uniform cross-section of bright threadlike structures in the corona; the low EUV contrast (long apparent scale height) between the top and bottom of active region loops; the inconsistency between loop densities derived by spectral and photometric means; the rapid time scale of active region loop evolution; and the presence of tall, cool, FUV-bright loops in active regions and post-flare arcades. Treating coronal loops as a mixture of diffuse background and very dense, unresolved filamentary structures address these problems with a combination of high plasma density within the structures, shortening the radiative time and greatly increasing the emissivity of the structures, and geometric effects that attenuate the apparent brightness of the feature at low altitudes. Using the low-...

  3. Erratum: SDO-AIA Observation of Kelvin-helmholtz Instability in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Thompson, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    The first SDOAIA observation of the KelvinHelmholtz instability in the solar corona in the 2010 April 8 event was reported by Ofman Thompson (2010, 2011). Foullon et al. (2011), which was published prior to Ofman Thompson (2011), claimed the detection of the KelvinHelmholtz instability in a later event (2010 November 3), and should have been cited in Ofman Thompson (2011).

  4. Mass and Energy Transfer Between the Solar Photosphere and Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, H.

    2015-12-01

    The problem of chromospheric and coronal heating is also a problem of mass supply to the corona. On average we see redshifts at transition region temperatures of the order of 10 km/s. If interpreted as downflows, this would quickly empty the corona, and fresh material has to be transported into the corona. Several models have been proposed to understand this mass cycle between the different atmospheric layers. However, as of yet all these proposals have serious shortcomings. On the observational side open questions remain, too. With the new IRIS mission we can observe the transition region at unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution, but the observational results are still puzzling. In particular the finding that the spatial distribution of line widths and Doppler shifts do not change with increasing resolution is against physical intuition. This shows that even with IRIS we still have significant velocity gradients along the line-of-sight, indicating that shocks might play a significant role. Likewise the temporal evolution might be a key for our understanding of the mass cycle. It might well be that the filling and draining of hot plasma occurs on significantly different time scales, which might be part of the difficulty to arrive at a conclusive observational picture. Considering the progress made for the quiet Sun, it seems clear that the processes responsible for the mass exchange are not resolved (yet). Therefore one might wonder to what extent one could use larger and resolved individual events in more active parts of the Sun to understand the details of the mass transport. In particular a common understanding of reconnection events such as Ellerman bombs in the photosphere, explosive events in the transition region and the recently discovered IRIS bombs in-between might provide the key to better understand the mass cycle throughout the atmospheric layers from the photosphere to the corona.

  5. Prediction of the Solar Corona for the 2017 August 21 Total Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Zoran; Downs, Cooper; Linker, Jon A.; Caplan, Ronald M.; Lionello, Roberto; Torok, Tibor; Titov, Viacheslav; Riley, Pete; Mackay, Duncan; Upton, Lisa

    2017-08-01

    It has become our tradition to predict the structure of the corona prior to eclipses, using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model based on measurements of photospheric magnetic fields on the Sun. We plan to continue this tradition for the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse that will sweep across the United States. We will predict the structure of the corona using SDO/HMI photospheric magnetic field data, including images of polarization brightness, magnetic field line traces, and images of simulated emission in EUV and X-rays. These images can be compared directly with observations of the total eclipse, as well as observations from SDO/AIA, Hinode/XRT, and STEREO/EUVI. This year we will attempt to energize the magnetic field within filament channels for a more realistic prediction, by constructing flux ropes at the locations where filament channels are observed. The handedness of the flux ropes will be deduced from a magnetofrictional model driven by the evolving photospheric field produced by the Advective Flux Transport model.Research supported by NASA's Heliophysics Supporting Research and Living With a Star Programs.

  6. Quasi-stereoscopic imaging of the solar X-ray corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, David

    1994-01-01

    The first published three-dimensional images of the solar X-ray corona obtained by means of solar rotational parallax, are presented in stereographic form. Image pairs approximately 12 hours apart during times of stable coronal conditions were selected from the digitized images obtained with the Skylab X-ray Spectrographic Telescope. The image resolution limit is approximately 10 arc sec. Many coronal structures not visible in the separate images are clearly observed when the image pairs are viewed stereoscopically. This method gives a preview of the potential resources for solar research and forecasting of solar-geomagnetic interactions that could be provided by stereoscopic observations of the Sun using a small group of spacecraft. The method is also applicable to other X-ray, ultraviolet, or other wavebands in which the corona has extended, transparent structure.

  7. A Space Weather Mission Concept: Observatories of the Solar Corona and Active Regions (OSCAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, Antoine; Lee, Arrow; Löschl, Philipp; Seifert, Bernhard; Hoilijoki, Sanni; Kraaikamp, Emil; Mrigakshi, Alankrita Isha; Philippe, Thomas; Spina, Sheila; Bröse, Malte; Massahi, Sonny; O'Halloran, Liam; Blanco, Victor Pereira; Stausland, Christoffer; Escoubet, Philippe; Kargl, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) are major sources of magnetic storms on Earth and are therefore considered to be the most dangerous space weather events. The Observatories of Solar Corona and Active Regions (OSCAR) mission is designed to identify the 3D structure of coronal loops and to study the trigger mechanisms of CMEs in solar Active Regions (ARs) as well as their evolution and propagation processes in the inner heliosphere. It also aims to provide monitoring and forecasting of geo-effective CMEs and CIRs. OSCAR would contribute to significant advancements in the field of solar physics, improvements of the current CME prediction models, and provide data for reliable space weather forecasting. These objectives are achieved by utilising two spacecraft with identical instrumentation, located at a heliocentric orbital distance of 1~AU from the Sun. The spacecraft will be separated by an angle of 68$^{\\circ}$ to provide optimum stereoscopic view of the solar corona. We ...

  8. Numerical simulations of self-consistently generated κ distributions in the solar wind and solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randol, B. M.; Christian, E. R.

    2014-12-01

    In a previous study (Randol and Christian, submitted to JGR, April 2014), numerical simulations of protons and anti-protons obeying Coulomb's law provided key insight into the self-consistent generation of κ distributions in space plasmas. In that study, the velocity distribution function (VDF) first formed a tail with the common spectral index of -5 and then gradually became a κ-r distribution, with κ = 1.5, corresponding to the common spectrum. The form of this distribution was found to relate to the electric field distribution function (EDF). These results were robust to a range of initialized densities and thermal speeds; however, this range of parameters did not include values close to those of the solar wind at 1 AU. Here we report on simulations of the same type but for a broader range of parameters, including those of the solar wind and corona. Our earliest findings indicate a lack of consistency in the VDF with the common spectrum, the cause of which again lies in the EDF. The results are instructive for understanding the solar wind ion VDF core and tail, as well as for κ distributed plasmas in general.

  9. EIT: Solar corona synoptic observations from SOHO with an Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaboudiniere, J. P.; Gabriel, A. H.; Artzner, G. E.; Michels, D. J.; Dere, K. P.; Howard, R. A.; Catura, R.; Stern, R.; Lemen, J.; Neupert, W.

    1988-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) of SOHO (solar and heliospheric observatory) will provide full disk images in emission lines formed at temperatures that map solar structures ranging from the chromospheric network to the hot magnetically confined plasma in the corona. Images in four narrow bandpasses will be obtained using normal incidence multilayered optics deposited on quadrants of a Ritchey-Chretien telescope. The EIT is capable of providing a uniform one arc second resolution over its entire 50 by 50 arc min field of view. Data from the EIT will be extremely valuable for identifying and interpreting the spatial and temperature fine structures of the solar atmosphere. Temporal analysis will provide information on the stability of these structures and identify dynamical processes. EIT images, issued daily, will provide the global corona context for aid in unifying the investigations and in forming the observing plans for SOHO coronal instruments.

  10. Corona during the total solar eclipse on March 20, 2015, and 24 cycle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazev, Sergey; Mordvinov, Aleksandr; Dvorkina-Samarskaya, Antonina

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the structure of coronal features, using data on the March 20, 2015 total solar eclipse. The Ludendorff index characterizing the flattening of the corona is 0.09. The solar corona structure in the Northern and Southern hemispheres corresponds to the maximum and post-maximum phases of solar activity, respectively. The asynchronous development of magnetic activity in the Sun's Northern and Southern hemispheres caused a substantial asymmetry of coronal features observed at the reversal of polar magnetic fields in the current cycle. The polar ray structures in the Southern Hemisphere are associated with the polar coronal hole, while in the Northern Hemisphere a polar hole has not been formed yet. We examine the relation between large-scale magnetic fields and location of high coronal structures.

  11. Broadband Spectroscopy of the Corona during the Total Solar Eclipse of March 29, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggli, Sarah A.; Habbal, S. R.; Kuhn, J. R.; Nayfeh, M. H.

    2006-12-01

    We present coronal observations from the total solar eclipse of 29 March 2006 taken near Waw al Namus, Libya. During the 4 minutes and 6 seconds of totality, observations were made with a tracking collecting mirror and fiber-fed spectrograph. The spectrograph used is a high quantum efficiency commercial Ocean Optics QE65000 Spectrometer with a wavelength range of 350 to 1100 nm, and spectral resolution of about 0.75 nm. High quantum efficiency allowed for many short exposures of the inner (100 msec) and outer (10,000 msec) corona during the eclipse. Important spectral features, and the difference in color between the inner and outer corona are identified. Atmospheric contributions are discussed. Likely candidates for the nature of dust grains contributing to the F-corona measurements are also presented. These are compared with laboratory spectra of silicon nanoparticles.

  12. Heating of the Solar Corona by Alfven Waves: Self-Induced Opacity

    CERN Document Server

    Zahariev, N I

    2011-01-01

    There have been derived equations describing the static distributions of temperature and wind velocity at the transition region within the framework of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of fully ionized hydrogen plasma . We have also calculated the width of the transition between the chromosphere and corona as a self-induced opacity of the high-frequency Alfven waves (AWs). The domain wall is a direct consequence of the self-consistent MHD treatment of AWs propagation. We predict considerable spectral density of the high-frequency AWs in the photosphere. The idea that Alfven waves might heat the solar corona belong to Alfven - we simply derived the corresponding MHD equations. The comparison of the solutions to those equations with the observational/measured data will be crucial for revealing the heating mechanism. The analysis of those solutions will explain how Alfven waves brick unto the corona and dissipate their energy there.

  13. The Role of Magnetic Helicity in Structuring the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Knizhnik, Kalman J; DeVore, C Richard

    2016-01-01

    Two of the most widely observed and yet most puzzling features of the Sun's magnetic field are coronal loops that are smooth and laminar and prominences/filaments that are strongly sheared. These two features would seem to be quite unrelated in that the loops are near their minimum-energy current-free state, whereas filaments are regions of high magnetic stress and intense electric currents. We argue that, in fact, these two features are inextricably linked in that both are due to a single process: the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona by photospheric motions and the subsequent evolution of this helicity by coronal reconnection. In this paper, we present numerical simulations of the response of a \\citet{Parker72} corona to photospheric driving motions that have varying degrees of helicity preference. We obtain four main conclusions: 1) in agreement with the helicity condensation model of \\citet{Antiochos13}, the inverse cascade of helicity by magnetic reconnection results in the formation of prom...

  14. Detection of short period intensity oscillations in the solar corona observed during the total solar eclipse of august 11, 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rezaei

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available   An experiment to search for short-period intensity oscillations in the solar corona was conducted during the total solar eclipse of August 11, 1999 in Esfahan, Iran. The intensity in the continuum, centered about 4700 Å and with a passband having a half-width of 190 Å, was recorded at a counting rate of 5 Hz using six low-noise Hamamatsu R647 photomultiplier tubes. We recorded intensity values from 6 different regions on the image of the solar corona from 1.2 R ° to 1.5 R ° . The power spectrum analysis of all channels, except for a channel that failed to receive any coronal light, shows excess power in the frequency range 0.02-0.2 Hz. The results of analyzing all channels demonstrate various waves with some degree of coherence and amplitudes from 0.3 to 0.7 percent of the mean coronal brightness. There are some similarities between waves in various channels and it may show that these waves exist in a large region of the corona, of the order of a few hundred thousand kilometers, much larger than the fiber optic diaphragms. The energy flux of each wave was calculated by assuming them as the slow or fast mode waves for the active and quiet regions of the solar corona. The energy flux of the fast mode waves in the active regions is comparable with the required energy flux for heating up the solar corona. The intensity oscillations observed in this experiment are similar to those detected during the 1995 and 1997 eclipses.

  15. Spatiotemporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uritsky, Vadim M. [Catholic University of America at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: vadim.uritsky@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvénic interactions.

  16. Spatiotemporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Uritsky, Vadim M

    2014-01-01

    Using data from STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfv\\'{e}nic interactions.

  17. Spatiotemporal Organization of Energy Release Events in the Quiet Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvenic interactions.

  18. Spatiotemporal Organization of Energy Release Events in the Quiet Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvenic interactions.

  19. Alfvén waves in the structured solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cally, Paul S.

    2017-04-01

    A simple model of a periodic ensemble of closely packed flux tubes, sitting atop a vertically stratified layer, reveals that an incident fast wave from below preferentially converts almost immediately to Alfvén waves in the flux tubes, with kink waves restricted to at most a very few Fourier modes. This suggests that observations of coronal kink modes in such structured systems may greatly underestimate the net wave-energy flux being transported into and through the corona, much of which may reside in harder-to-observe Alfvén waves. The processes of mode conversion/resonant absorption and Alfvén phase mixing are implicated. It is suggested that the Sun's internal p-mode field - the 5-min oscillations - may contribute substantially to the process by supplying incident fast waves in the chromosphere that scatter and mode-convert in the tube ensemble.

  20. The Substructure of the Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore calculate how the intensity scales from a low-resolution (AIA) pixels to high-resolution (Hi-C) pixels for both the dynamic events and "background" emission (meaning, the steady emission over the 5 minutes of data acquisition time). We find there is no evidence of substructure in the background corona; the intensity scales smoothly from low-resolution to high-resolution Hi-C pixels. In transient events, however, the intensity observed with Hi-C is, on average, 2.6 times larger than observed with AIA. This increase in intensity suggests that AIA is not resolving these events. This result suggests a finely structured dynamic corona embedded in a smoothly varying background.

  1. Discovery of Finely Structured Dynamic Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e. have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70 percent of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  2. Radial distribution of compressive waves in the solar corona revealed by Akatsuki radio occultation observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Mayu [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 484-8601 (Japan); Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Häusler, Bernd [Institut für Raumfahrttechnik, Universität der Bundeswehr München, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Pätzold, Martin [Rheinisches Institut für Umweltforschung, Department Planetenforschung, Universität zu Köln, Aachener Str. 209, D-50931 Köln (Germany); Nabatov, Alexander [The Institute of Radio Astronomy, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Chervonoprapornaya, Str. 4, Kharkov 61002 (Ukraine)

    2014-12-10

    Radial variations of the amplitude and the energy flux of compressive waves in the solar corona were explored for the first time using a spacecraft radio occultation technique. By applying wavelet analysis to the frequency time series taken at heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 R{sub S} (solar radii), quasi-periodic density disturbances were detected at almost all distances. The period ranges from 100 to 2000 s. The amplitude of the fractional density fluctuation increases with distance and reaches ∼30% around 5 R{sub S} , implying that nonlinearity of the wave field is potentially important. We further estimate the wave energy flux on the assumption that the observed periodical fluctuations are manifestations of acoustic waves. The energy flux increases with distance below ∼6 R{sub S} and seems to saturate above this height, suggesting that the acoustic waves do not propagate from the low corona but are generated in the extended corona, probably through nonlinear dissipation of Alfvén waves. The compressive waves should eventually dissipate through shock generation to heat the corona.

  3. Suprathermal Electrons in the Solar Corona: Can Nonlocal Transport Explain Heliospheric Charge States?

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    There have been several ideas proposed to explain how the Sun's corona is heated and how the solar wind is accelerated. Some models assume that open magnetic field lines are heated by Alfven waves driven by photospheric motions and dissipated after undergoing a turbulent cascade. Other models posit that much of the solar wind's mass and energy is injected via magnetic reconnection from closed coronal loops. The latter idea is motivated by observations of reconnecting jets and also by similarities of ion composition between closed loops and the slow wind. Wave/turbulence models have also succeeded in reproducing observed trends in ion composition signatures versus wind speed. However, the absolute values of the charge-state ratios predicted by those models tended to be too low in comparison with observations. This letter refines these predictions by taking better account of weak Coulomb collisions for coronal electrons, whose thermodynamic properties determine the ion charge states in the low corona. A perturb...

  4. Exploring the Physics of the Corona with Total Solar Eclipse Observations

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This white paper is a call for a concerted effort to support total solar eclipse observations over the next decade, in particular for the 21 August 2017 eclipse which will traverse the US continent. With the recent advances in image processing techniques and detector technology, the time is ripe to capitalize on the unique diagnostic tools available in the visible and near infrared wavelength range to explore the physics of the corona. The advantage of coronal emission lines in this wavelengt...

  5. Three-Dimensional Propagation of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in the Solar Chromosphere and Corona

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李波; 郑惠南; 王水

    2002-01-01

    We study the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave propagation in the solar atmosphere consisting of the chromosphere and corona. Pressure enhancement and velocity shear are implemented simultaneously at the bottom of the chromosphere. The global propagation of the incurred MHD waves, including fast-mode and slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves as well as Alfvén wave, can be identified. Wave front positions obtained numerically with respect to specific waves fit well with those calculated with local MHD wave speeds.

  6. The FIP and Inverse FIP Effects in Solar and Stellar Coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Laming, J Martin

    2015-01-01

    We review our state of knowledge of coronal element abundance anomalies in the Sun and stars. We concentrate on the first ionization potential (FIP) effect observed in the solar corona and slow-speed wind, and in the coronae of solar-like dwarf stars, and the "inverse FIP" effect seen in the corona of stars of later spectral type; specifically M dwarfs. These effects relate to the enhancement or depletion, respectively, in coronal abundance with respect to photospheric values of elements with FIP below about 10~eV. They are interpreted in terms of the ponderomotive force due to the propagation and/or reflection of magnetohydrodynamic waves in the chromosphere. This acts on chromospheric ions, but not neutrals, and so can lead to ion-neutral fractionation. A detailed description of the model applied to closed magnetic loops, and to open field regions is given, accounting for the observed difference in solar FIP fractionation between the slow and fast wind. It is shown that such a model can also account for the...

  7. Destruction of Sun-grazing comet C/2011 N3 (SOHO) within the low solar corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, C J; Brown, J C; Battams, K; Saint-Hilaire, P; Liu, W; Hudson, H; Pesnell, W D

    2012-01-20

    Observations of comets in Sun-grazing orbits that survive solar insolation long enough to penetrate into the Sun's inner corona provide information on the solar atmosphere and magnetic field as well as on the makeup of the comet. On 6 July 2011, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed the demise of comet C/2011 N3 (SOHO) within the low solar corona in five wavelength bands in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). The comet penetrated to within 0.146 solar radius (~100,000 kilometers) of the solar surface before its EUV signal disappeared. Before that, material released into the coma--at first seen in absorption--formed a variable EUV-bright tail. During the final 10 minutes of observation by SDO's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, ~6 × 10(8) to 6 × 10(10) grams of total mass was lost (corresponding to an effective nucleus diameter of ~10 to 50 meters), as estimated from the tail's deceleration due to interaction with the surrounding coronal material; the EUV absorption by the comet and the brightness of the tail suggest that the mass was at the high end of this range. These observations provide evidence that the nucleus had broken up into a family of fragments, resulting in accelerated sublimation in the Sun's intense radiation field.

  8. Multi-wavelength Analysis to Solar Corona Heating Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Ji, Hai-sheng; Li, Hao-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    With the advent and successful operation of the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope of Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO/NST), solar observation has entered the era of high resolution better than 0.1". This permits us to carry out the case studies of single coronal heating events, to provide the original high-resolution observational evidence for finally solving the problem of coronal heating. By combining the high-resolution Helium I 10830 Å, TiO 7057 Å, and Ha blue-wing (-0.7 Å) imaging data from the NST with the imaging data of extreme ultraviolet and longitudinal magnetic field observed simultaneously by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we have analyzed the evolution of magnetic field in two tiny dynamical events of coronal heating (brightening of magnetic loops) that originate from the solar intergranular lanes. It is found that the footpoints of both brightening magnetic loops were all located in the one side of nearby neutral line of magnetic fields, the footpoints of one magnetic loop were accompanied by the disappearance of a small longitudinal magnetic element and the newly formed connection between two granulations, while the footpoints of another magnetic loop were accompanied by a weak variation of longitudinal magnetic field and the breakdown of a granulation. The observed result tends to suggest that the low-temperature and high-temperature outflows were produced simultaneously by the magnetic reconnection occurred among the solar granulations in the low-layer atmosphere. Meanwhile, it is noted that the high-resolution and high-accuracy polarization measurement of photospheric magnetic field is crucial for finally solving the problem of coronal heating.

  9. Q-Maps of the Solar Corona for Two Solar Cycles - 1996-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, Jon Todd; Liu, Yang; Sun, Xudong; Titov, Viacheslav; Mikic, Zoran

    2017-08-01

    Maps of magnetic field structures called Q-maps characterize the changing geometry of the solar corona. The geometrical Q parameter describes the ‘squashing factor’ of elemental flux tubes. Q-maps are computed from models based on observations of the photospheric magnetic field and provide intuitive visualization of large-scale magnetic topological structures where reconnection preferably occurs. We have applied the method developed by Titov et al. (e.g. ApJ, 2008) to standard synoptic maps from SDO/HMI and SOHO/MDI and are computing daily-update synoptic frames to characterize coronal field evolution for more than twenty years, from 1996 - 2017. We are making available the vector magnetic field and value of signed log Q at ten or more heights from 1.001 to 2.5 Rs computed using the PFSS (Potential Field - Source Surface) model and for some rotations at greater height using other coronal field models. Maps showing foot points of computed open field regions are also provided.

  10. Analysis of non-thermal velocities in the solar corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Contesse

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe new ground-based spectroscopic observations made using a 40-cm aperture coronagraph over a whole range of radial distances (up to heights of 12' above the limb and along four different heliocentric directions N, E, S and W. The analysis is limited to the study of the brightest forbidden emission line of Fe XIV at 530.3nm, in order to reach the best possible signal-to-noise ratio. To make the results statistically more significant, the extracted parameters are averaged over the whole length of the slit, and measurements are repeated fives times at each position; the corresponding dispersions in the results obtained along the slit are given. Central line profile intensities and full line widths (FWHM are plotted and compared to measurements published by other authors closer to the limb. We found widths and turbulent (non-thermal velocities of significantly higher values above the polar regions, especially when a coronal hole is present along the line of sight. We do not see a definitely decreasing behaviour of widths and turbulent velocities in equatorial directions for larger radial distances, as reported in the literature, although lower values are measured compared to the values in polar regions. The variation in the high corona is rather flat and a correlation diagram indicates that it is different for different regions and different radial distances. This seems to be the first analysis of the profiles of this coronal line, up to large heights above the limb for both equatorial and polar regions.

  11. Energy release in the solar corona from spatially resolved magnetic braids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtain, J W; Golub, L; Winebarger, A R; De Pontieu, B; Kobayashi, K; Moore, R L; Walsh, R W; Korreck, K E; Weber, M; McCauley, P; Title, A; Kuzin, S; DeForest, C E

    2013-01-24

    It is now apparent that there are at least two heating mechanisms in the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona. Wave heating may be the prevalent mechanism in quiet solar periods and may contribute to heating the corona to 1,500,000 K (refs 1-3). The active corona needs additional heating to reach 2,000,000-4,000,000 K; this heat has been theoretically proposed to come from the reconnection and unravelling of magnetic 'braids'. Evidence favouring that process has been inferred, but has not been generally accepted because observations are sparse and, in general, the braided magnetic strands that are thought to have an angular width of about 0.2 arc seconds have not been resolved. Fine-scale braiding has been seen in the chromosphere but not, until now, in the corona. Here we report observations, at a resolution of 0.2 arc seconds, of magnetic braids in a coronal active region that are reconnecting, relaxing and dissipating sufficient energy to heat the structures to about 4,000,000 K. Although our 5-minute observations cannot unambiguously identify the field reconnection and subsequent relaxation as the dominant heating mechanism throughout active regions, the energy available from the observed field relaxation in our example is ample for the observed heating.

  12. Dynamical Creation of Channels for Particle Escape in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, S M; Nikolskaya, K I; Shatashvili, N L; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Miklaszewski, Riszard; Nikol'skaya, Komunela I.; Shatashvili, Nana L.

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that the connection of sufficiently fast flows with dynamical channels for particle escape in the Solar Corona is rather direct: it depends on their ability to deform (in specific cases to distort) the ambient magnetic field lines to temporarily stretch (shrink, destroy) the closed field lines so that the flow can escape the local region. Using a dissipative two--fluid code in which the flows are treated at par with the currents, we have demonstrated channel creation in a variety of closed--field line structures. This self--induced transparency constitutes the active mode for the formation of the solar wind.

  13. Common observations of solar X-rays from SPHINX/CORONAS-PHOTON and XRS/MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepa, Anna; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Siarkowski, Marek; Mrozek, Tomasz; Gryciuk, Magdalena; Phillips, Kenneth

    SphinX was a soft X-ray spectrophotometer constructed in the Space Research Centre of Polish Academy of Sciences. The instrument was launched on 30 January 2009 aboard CORONAS-PHOTON satellite as a part of TESIS instrument package. SphinX measured total solar X-ray flux in the energy range from 1 to 15 keV during the period of very low solar activity from 20 February to 29 November 2009. For these times the solar detector (X-ray Spectrometer - XRS) onboard MESSENGER also observed the solar X-rays from a different vantage point. XRS measured the radiation in similar energy range. We present results of the comparison of observations from both instruments and show the preliminary results of physical analysis of spectra for selected flares.

  14. Magnetic Untwisting in Solar Jets that Go into the Outer Corona in Polar Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from 14 exceptionally high-reaching large solar jets observed in the polar coronal holes. EUV movies from SDO/AIA show that each jet is similar to many other similar-size and smaller jets that erupt in coronal holes, but each is exceptional in that it goes higher than most other jets, so high that it is observed in the outer corona beyond 2.2 R(sub Sun) in images from the SOHO/LASCO/C2 coronagraph. For these high-reaching jets, we find: (1) the front of the jet transits the corona below 2.2 R(sub Sun) at a speed typically several times the sound speed; (2) each jet displays an exceptionally large amount of spin as it erupts; (3) in the outer corona, most jets display oscillatory swaying having an amplitude of a few degrees and a period of order 1 hour. We conclude that these jets are magnetically driven, propose that the driver is a magnetic-untwisting wave that is grossly a large-amplitude (i.e., nonlinear) torsional Alfven wave that is put into the reconnected open magnetic field in the jet by interchange reconnection as the jet erupts, and estimate from the measured spinning and swaying that the magnetic-untwisting wave loses most of its energy in the inner corona below 2.2 R(sub Sun). From these results for these big jets, we reason that the torsional magnetic waves observed in Type-II spicules should dissipate in the corona in the same way and could thereby power much of the coronal heating in coronal holes.

  15. Shock–Cloud Interaction in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takuya

    2017-02-01

    Flare-associated coronal shock waves sometimes interact with solar prominences, leading to large-amplitude prominence oscillations (LAPOs). Such prominence activation gives us a unique opportunity to track the time evolution of shock–cloud interaction in cosmic plasmas. Although the dynamics of interstellar shock–cloud interaction has been extensively studied, coronal shock–solar prominence interaction is rarely studied in the context of shock–cloud interaction. Associated with the X5.4 class solar flare that occurred on 2012 March 7, a globally propagated coronal shock wave interacted with a polar prominence, leading to LAPO. In this paper, we studied bulk acceleration and excitation of the internal flow of the shocked prominence using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We studied eight MHD simulation runs, each with different mass density structure of the prominence, and one hydrodynamic simulation run, and we compared the result. In order to compare the observed motion of activated prominence with the corresponding simulation, we also studied prominence activation by injection of a triangular-shaped coronal shock. We found that the prominence is first accelerated mainly by magnetic tension force as well as direct transmission of the shock, and later decelerated mainly by magnetic tension force. The internal flow, on the other hand, is excited during the shock front sweeps through the prominence and damps almost exponentially. We construct a phenomenological model of bulk momentum transfer from the shock to the prominence, which agreed quantitatively with all the simulation results. Based on the phenomenological prominence activation model, we diagnosed physical parameters of the coronal shock wave. The estimated energy of the coronal shock is several percent of the total energy released during the X5.4 flare.

  16. Flares on A-type Stars: Evidence for Heating of Solar Corona by Nanoflares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švanda, Michal; Karlický, Marian

    2016-11-01

    We analyzed the occurrence rates of flares on stars of spectral types K, G, F, and A, observed by Kepler. We found that the histogram of occurrence frequencies of stellar flares is systematically shifted toward a high-energy tail for A-type stars compared to stars of cooler spectral types. We extrapolated the fitted power laws toward flares with smaller energies (nanoflares) and made estimates for total energy flux to stellar atmospheres by flares. We found that, for A-type stars, the total energy flux density was at least four-times smaller than for G stars. We speculate that this deficit in energy supply may explain the lack of hot coronae on A-type stars. Our results indicate the importance of nanoflares for heating and formation of the solar corona.

  17. Flares on A-type stars: Evidence for heating of solar corona by nanoflares?

    CERN Document Server

    Svanda, M

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the occurrence rates of flares on stars of spectral types K, G, F, and A, observed by Kepler. We found that the histogram of occurrence frequencies of stellar flares is systematically shifted towards a high-energy tail for A-type stars compared to stars of cooler spectral types. We extrapolated the fitted power laws towards flares with smaller energies (nanoflares) and made estimates for total energy flux to stellar atmospheres by flares. We found that for A-type stars the total energy flux density was at least 4-times smaller than for G-stars. We speculate that this deficit in energy supply may explain the lack of hot coronae on A-type stars. Our results indicate an importance of nanoflares for heating and formation of the solar corona.

  18. PROPAGATING DISTURBANCES IN THE SOLAR CORONA AND SPICULAR CONNECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Tanmoy; Pant, Vaibhav; Banerjee, Dipankar, E-mail: tsamanta@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India)

    2015-12-10

    Spicules are small, hairy-like structures seen at the solar limb, mainly at chromospheric and transition region lines. They generally live for 3–10 minutes. We study these spicules in a south polar region of the Sun with coordinated observations using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Propagating disturbances (PDs) are observed everywhere in the polar off-limb regions of the Sun at coronal heights. From these simultaneous observations, we show that the spicules and the PDs may have originated through a common process. From spacetime maps, we find that the start of the trajectory of PDs is almost cotemporal with the time of the rise of the spicular envelope as seen by IRIS slit-jaw images at 2796 and 1400 Å. During the return of spicular material, brightenings are seen in AIA 171 and 193 Å images. The quasi-periodic nature of the spicular activity, as revealed by the IRIS spectral image sequences, and its relation to coronal PDs, as recorded by the coronal AIA channels, suggest that they share a common origin. We propose that reconnection-like processes generate the spicules and waves simultaneously. The waves escape while the cool spicular material falls back.

  19. Hα Doppler shifts in a tornado in the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, B.; Mein, P.; Mein, N.; Levens, P. J.; Labrosse, N.; Ofman, L.

    2017-01-01

    Context. High resolution movies in 193 Å from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) show apparent rotation in the leg of a prominence observed during a coordinated campaign. Such structures are commonly referred to as tornadoes. Time-distance intensity diagrams of the AIA data show the existence of oscillations suggesting that the structure is rotating. Aims: The aim of this paper is to understand if the cool plasma at chromospheric temperatures inside the tornado is rotating around its central axis. Methods: The tornado was also observed in Hα with a cadence of 30 s by the MSDP spectrograph, operating at the Solar Tower in Meudon. The MSDP provides sequences of simultaneous spectra in a 2D field of view from which a cube of Doppler velocity maps is retrieved. Results: The Hα Doppler maps show a pattern with alternatively blueshifted and redshifted areas of 5 to 10'' wide. Over time the blueshifted areas become redshifted and vice versa, with a quasi-periodicity of 40 to 60 min. Weaker amplitude oscillations with periods of 4 to 6 min are superimposed onto these large period oscillations. Conclusions: The Doppler pattern observed in Hα cannot be interpreted as rotation of the cool plasma inside the tornado. The Hα velocity observations give strong constraints on the possible interpretations of the AIA tornado.

  20. Propagating Disturbances in The Solar Corona and Spicular Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, Tanmoy; Banerjee, Dipankar

    2015-01-01

    Spicules are small hairy like structures seen at the solar limb mainly at chromospheric and transition region lines. They generally live for 3-10 minutes. We observe these spicules in a south polar region of the Sun with a coordinated observations using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Propagating disturbances (PDs) are observed everywhere in the polar off-limb regions of the Sun at coronal heights. From this simultaneous observations we show that the spicules and the PDs may be originated by a common process. From space-time maps we find that the start of the trajectory of PDs is almost co-temporal with the time of the rise of the spicular envelope as seen by IRIS slit-jaw images at 2796 {\\deg}A and 1400 A{\\deg} . During the return of spicular material, brightenings are seen in AIA 171 {\\deg}A and 193 {\\deg}A images. The quasi-periodic nature of the spicular activity as revealed by the IRIS spectra...

  1. DISCOVERY OF FINELY STRUCTURED DYNAMIC SOLAR CORONA OBSERVED IN THE Hi-C TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Savage, Sabrina; Alexander, Caroline [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Golub, Leon; DeLuca, Edward [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Schuler, Timothy, E-mail: amy.r.winebarger@nasa.gov [State University of New York College at Buffalo, 1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    In the Summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew on board a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e., have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70% of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  2. A Space Weather mission concept: Observatories of the Solar Corona and Active Regions (OSCAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strugarek Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs are major sources of magnetic storms on Earth and are therefore considered to be the most dangerous space weather events. The Observatories of Solar Corona and Active Regions (OSCAR mission is designed to identify the 3D structure of coronal loops and to study the trigger mechanisms of CMEs in solar Active Regions (ARs as well as their evolution and propagation processes in the inner heliosphere. It also aims to provide monitoring and forecasting of geo-effective CMEs and CIRs. OSCAR would contribute to significant advancements in the field of solar physics, improvements of the current CME prediction models, and provide data for reliable space weather forecasting. These objectives are achieved by utilising two spacecraft with identical instrumentation, located at a heliocentric orbital distance of 1 AU from the Sun. The spacecraft will be separated by an angle of 68° to provide optimum stereoscopic view of the solar corona. We study the feasibility of such a mission and propose a preliminary design for OSCAR.

  3. A Comparison between Physics-based and Polytropic MHD Models for Stellar Coronae and Stellar Winds of Solar Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, O.

    2017-02-01

    The development of the Zeeman–Doppler Imaging (ZDI) technique has provided synoptic observations of surface magnetic fields of low-mass stars. This led the stellar astrophysics community to adopt modeling techniques that have been used in solar physics using solar magnetograms. However, many of these techniques have been neglected by the solar community due to their failure to reproduce solar observations. Nevertheless, some of these techniques are still used to simulate the coronae and winds of solar analogs. Here we present a comparative study between two MHD models for the solar corona and solar wind. The first type of model is a polytropic wind model, and the second is the physics-based AWSOM model. We show that while the AWSOM model consistently reproduces many solar observations, the polytropic model fails to reproduce many of them, and in the cases where it does, its solutions are unphysical. Our recommendation is that polytropic models, which are used to estimate mass-loss rates and other parameters of solar analogs, must first be calibrated with solar observations. Alternatively, these models can be calibrated with models that capture more detailed physics of the solar corona (such as the AWSOM model) and that can reproduce solar observations in a consistent manner. Without such a calibration, the results of the polytropic models cannot be validated, but they can be wrongly used by others.

  4. The Funnel Geometry of Open Flux Tubes in the Low Solar Corona Constrained by O VI and Ne VIII Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byhring, Hanne S.; Esser, Ruth; Lie-Svendsen, Oystein

    2008-01-01

    Model calculations show that observed outflow velocities of order 7-10 km/s of C IV and O VI ions, and 15-20 km/s of Ne VIII ions, are not only consistent with models of the solar wind from coronas holes, but also place unique constraints on the degree of flow tube expansion as well as the location of the expansion in the transition region/lower corona.

  5. Spectro-Imaging Polarimetry of the Local Corona During Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Z. Q.; Dun, G. T.; Chang, L.; Murray, G.; Cheng, X. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Deng, L. H.

    2017-02-01

    Results are presented from spectro-imaging polarimetry of radiation from the local solar corona during the 2013 total solar eclipse in Gabon. This polarimetric observation was performed from 516.3 nm to 532.6 nm using a prototype Fiber Arrayed Solar Optical Telescope (FASOT). A polarimetric noise level on the order of 10^{-3} results from a reduced polarimetric optical switching demodulation (RPOSD) procedure for data reduction. It is revealed that the modality of fractional linear polarization profiles of the green coronal line shows a diversity, which may indicate complex mechanisms. The polarization degree can approach 3.2 % above the continuum polarization level on a scale of 1500 km, and the nonuniform spatial distribution in amplitude and polarization direction is found even within a small field of view of 7500 km. All of this implies that the coronal polarization is highly structured and complex even on a small scale.

  6. The Origin of Non-Maxwellian Solar Wind Electron Velocity Distribution Function: Connection to Nanoflares in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Che, H

    2014-01-01

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this letter based on the current knowledge of nanoflares we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfv\\'en wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This rel...

  7. Generalized Squashing Factors for Covariant Description of Magnetic Connectivity in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V. S.

    2007-01-01

    The study of magnetic connectivity in the solar corona reveals a need to generalize the field line mapping technique to arbitrary geometry of the boundaries and systems of coordinates. Indeed, the global description of the connectivity in the corona requires the use of the photospheric and solar wind boundaries. Both are closed surfaces and therefore do not admit a global regular system of coordinates. At least two overlapping regular systems of coordinates for each of the boundaries are necessary in this case to avoid spherical-pole-like singularities in the coordinates of the footpoints. This implies that the basic characteristic of magnetic connectivity-the squashing degree or factor Q of elemental flux tubes, according to Titov and coworkers-must be rewritten in covariant form. Such a covariant expression of Q is derived in this work. The derived expression is very flexible and highly efficient for describing the global magnetic connectivity in the solar corona. In addition, a general expression for a new characteristic Q1, which defines a squashing of the flux tubes in the directions perpendicular to the field lines, is determined. This new quantity makes it possible to filter out the quasi-separatrix layers whose large values of Q are caused by a projection effect at the field lines nearly touching the photosphere. Thus, the value Q1 provides a much more precise description of the volumetric properties of the magnetic field structure. The difference between Q and Q1 is illustrated by comparing their distributions for two configurations, one of which is the Titov-Demoulin model of a twisted magnetic field.

  8. Electron velocity distribution functions from the solar wind to the corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimovic, M.; Pierrard, V.; Lemaire, J.; Larson, D.

    1999-06-01

    Typical electron velocity distribution functions observed at 1 AU from the Sun by the instrument 3DP aboard of WIND are used as boundary conditions to determine the electron velocity distribution function at 4 solar radii in the corona. The velocity distribution functions (VDF) at low altitude are obtained by solving the Fokker-Planck equation, using two different sets of boundary conditions. The first set typically corresponds to a VDF observed in a low speed solar wind flow (i.e., characterized by ``core'' and ``halo'' electrons); the second one corresponds to high speed solar wind (i.e. characterized by ``core,'' ``halo'' and ``strahl'' populations). We use the observed electron VDFs as test particles which are submitted to external forces and Coulomb collisions with a background plasma. Closer to the Sun, the relative density of the core electrons is found to increase compared to the densities of the halo population. Nevertheless, we find that in order to match the observed distributions at 1 AU, suprathermal tails have to be present in the VDF of the test electron at low altitudes in the corona. Note that the present work has been submitted to Journal of Geophysical Research [6]. This is the reason why we present here only an extended summary.

  9. Low frequency radio observations of bi-directional electron beams in the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Carley, Eoin P; Vilmer, Nicole; Gallagher, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    The radio signature of a shock travelling through the solar corona is known as a type II solar radio burst. In rare cases these bursts can exhibit a fine structure known as `herringbones', which are a direct indicator of particle acceleration occurring at the shock front. However, few studies have been performed on herringbones and the details of the underlying particle acceleration processes are unknown. Here, we use an image processing technique known as the Hough transform to statistically analyse the herringbone fine structure in a radio burst at $\\sim$20-90 MHz observed from the Rosse Solar-Terrestrial Observatory on 2011 September 22. We identify 188 individual bursts which are signatures of bi-directional electron beams continuously accelerated to speeds of 0.16$_{-0.10}^{+0.11} c$. This occurs at a shock acceleration site initially at a constant altitude of $\\sim$0.6 R$_{\\odot}$ in the corona, followed by a shift to $\\sim$0.5 R$_{\\odot}$. The anti-sunward beams travel a distance of 170$_{-97}^{+174}$ ...

  10. Propagation of Alfv\\'enic Waves From Corona to Chromosphere and Consequences for Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Alexander J B

    2013-01-01

    How do magnetohydrodynamic waves travel from the fully ionized corona, into and through the underlying partially ionized chromosphere, and what are the consequences for solar flares? To address these questions, we have developed a 2-fluid model (of plasma and neutrals) and used it to perform 1D simulations of Alfv\\'en waves in a solar atmosphere with realistic density and temperature structure. Studies of a range of solar features (faculae, plage, penumbra and umbra) show that energy transmission from corona to chromosphere can exceed 20% of incident energy for wave periods of one second or less. Damping of waves in the chromosphere depends strongly on wave frequency: waves with periods 10 seconds or longer pass through the chromosphere with relatively little damping, however, for periods of 1 second or less, a substantial fraction (37%-100%) of wave energy entering the chromosphere is damped by ion-neutral friction in the mid and upper chromosphere, with electron resistivity playing some role in the lower ch...

  11. Signatures of the slow solar wind streams from active regions in the inner corona

    CERN Document Server

    Slemzin, V; Urnov, A; Kuzin, S; Goryaev, F; Berghmans, D

    2012-01-01

    Some of local sources of the slow solar wind can be associated with spectroscopically detected plasma outflows at edges of active regions accompanied with specific signatures in the inner corona. The EUV telescopes (e.g. SPIRIT/CORONAS-F, TESIS/CORONAS-Photon and SWAP/PROBA2) sometimes observed extended ray-like structures seen at the limb above active regions in 1MK iron emission lines and described as "coronal rays". To verify the relationship between coronal rays and plasma outflows, we analyze an isolated active region (AR) adjacent to small coronal hole (CH) observed by different EUV instruments in the end of July - beginning of August 2009. On August 1 EIS revealed in the AR two compact outflows with the Doppler velocities V =10-30 km/s accompanied with fan loops diverging from their regions. At the limb the ARCH interface region produced coronal rays observed by EUVI/STEREO-A on July 31 as well as by TESIS on August 7. The rays were co-aligned with open magnetic field lines expanded to the streamer sta...

  12. SWAP OBSERVATIONS OF THE LONG-TERM, LARGE-SCALE EVOLUTION OF THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SOLAR CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaton, Daniel B.; De Groof, Anik; Berghmans, David; Nicula, Bogdan [Royal Observatory of Belgium-SIDC, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Shearer, Paul [Department of Mathematics, 2074 East Hall, University of Michigan, 530 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1043 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) EUV solar telescope on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 spacecraft has been regularly observing the solar corona in a bandpass near 17.4 nm since 2010 February. With a field of view of 54 × 54 arcmin, SWAP provides the widest-field images of the EUV corona available from the perspective of the Earth. By carefully processing and combining multiple SWAP images, it is possible to produce low-noise composites that reveal the structure of the EUV corona to relatively large heights. A particularly important step in this processing was to remove instrumental stray light from the images by determining and deconvolving SWAP's point-spread function from the observations. In this paper, we use the resulting images to conduct the first-ever study of the evolution of the large-scale structure of the corona observed in the EUV over a three year period that includes the complete rise phase of solar cycle 24. Of particular note is the persistence over many solar rotations of bright, diffuse features composed of open magnetic fields that overlie polar crown filaments and extend to large heights above the solar surface. These features appear to be related to coronal fans, which have previously been observed in white-light coronagraph images and, at low heights, in the EUV. We also discuss the evolution of the corona at different heights above the solar surface and the evolution of the corona over the course of the solar cycle by hemisphere.

  13. Surface and body waves in magnetic flux tubes. [in solar convection zone, photosphere, and corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelatif, T. E.

    1988-01-01

    The dispersion relation of surface and body waves in a magnetic flux tube is studied in detail. The properties of the fast and slow bodywaves are described in terms of the filtering characteristics of the flux tube. In addition to the axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric distinction between the modes, an additional distinction is made between the fundamental mode and the rest of the modes. New results concerning the thin and large flux tube approximation are derived. The behavior of surface and body waves in the solar convection zone, photosphere, and corona is discussed.

  14. Formation and Reconnection of Three-Dimensional Current Sheets in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    Current-sheet formation and magnetic reconnection are believed to be the basic physical processes responsible for much of the activity observed in astrophysical plasmas, such as the Sun s corona. We investigate these processes for a magnetic configuration consisting of a uniform background field and an embedded line dipole, a topology that is expected to be ubiquitous in the corona. This magnetic system is driven by a uniform horizontal flow applied at the line-tied photosphere. Although both the initial field and the driver are translationally symmetric, the resulting evolution is calculated using a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) simulation with adaptive mesh refinement that resolves the current sheet and reconnection dynamics in detail. The advantage of our approach is that it allows us to apply directly the vast body of knowledge gained from the many studies of 2D reconnection to the fully 3D case. We find that a current sheet forms in close analogy to the classic Syrovatskii 2D mechanism, but the resulting evolution is different than expected. The current sheet is globally stable, showing no evidence for a disruption or a secondary instability even for aspect ratios as high as 80:1. The global evolution generally follows the standard Sweet- Parker 2D reconnection model except for an accelerated reconnection rate at a very thin current sheet, due to the tearing instability and the formation of magnetic islands. An interesting conclusion is that despite the formation of fully 3D structures at small scales, the system remains close to 2D at global scales. We discuss the implications of our results for observations of the solar corona. Subject Headings: Sun: corona Sun: magnetic fields Sun: reconnection

  15. NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program: The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the fourth quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period May 16,2001 to August 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model.

  16. Physical properties of the quiet solar chromosphere-corona transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunin-Barkovskaya, O. V.; Somov, B. V.

    2016-12-01

    The physical properties of the quiet solar chromosphere-corona transition region are studied. Here the structure of the solar atmosphere is governed by the interaction of magnetic fields above the photosphere. Magnetic fields are concentrated into thin tubes inside which the field strength is great. We have studied how the plasma temperature, density, and velocity distributions change along a magnetic tube with one end in the chromosphere and the other one in the corona, depend on the plasma velocity at the chromospheric boundary of the transition region. Two limiting cases are considered: horizontally and vertically oriented magnetic tubes. For various plasma densities we have determined the ranges of plasma velocities at the chromospheric boundary of the transition region for which no shock waves arise in the transition region. The downward plasma flows at the base of the transition region are shown to be most favorable for the excitation of shock waves in it. For all the considered variants of the transition region we show that the thermal energy transfer along magnetic tubes can be well described in the approximation of classical collisional electron heat conduction up to very high velocities at its base. The calculated extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission agrees well with the present-day space observations of the Sun.

  17. The Effect of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on the Solar Minimum Corona and Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Vásquez, A M; Raymond, J C; Vasquez, Alberto M.; Ballegooijen, Adriaan A. van; Raymond., John C.

    2003-01-01

    A semi-empirical, axisymmetric model of the solar minimum corona is developed by solving the equations for conservation of mass and momentum with prescribed anisotropic temperature distributions. In the high-latitude regions, the proton temperature anisotropy is strong and the associated mirror force plays an important role in driving the fast solar wind; the critical point where the outflow velocity equals the parallel sound speed is reached already at 1.5 Rsun from Sun center. The slow wind arises from a region with open field lines and weak anisotropy surrounding the equatorial streamer belt. The model parameters were chosen to reproduce the observed latitudinal extent of the equatorial streamer in the corona and at large distance from the Sun. We find that the magnetic cusp of the closed-field streamer core lies at about 1.95 Rsun. The transition from fast to slow wind is due to a decrease in temperature anisotropy combined with the non-monotonic behavior of the non-radial expansion factor in flow tubes t...

  18. Threaded-Field-Lines Model for the Low Solar Corona Powered by the Alfven Wave Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolov, Igor V; Manchester, Ward B; Ozturk, Doga Can Su; Szente, Judit; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Tóth, Gabor; Jin, Meng; Gombosi, Tamas I

    2016-01-01

    We present an updated global model of the solar corona, including the transition region. We simulate the realistic tree-dimensional (3D) magnetic field using the data from the photospheric magnetic field measurements and assume the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Alfv\\'en wave turbulence and its non-linear dissipation to be the only source for heating the coronal plasma and driving the solar wind. In closed field regions the dissipation efficiency in a balanced turbulence is enhanced. In the coronal holes we account for a reflection of the outward propagating waves, which is accompanied by generation of weaker counter-propagating waves. The non-linear cascade rate degrades in strongly imbalanced turbulence, thus resulting in colder coronal holes. The distinctive feature of the presented model is the description of the low corona as almost-steady-state low-beta plasma motion and heat flux transfer along the magnetic field lines. We trace the magnetic field lines through each grid point of the lower boundary of the g...

  19. A study of line widths and kinetic parameters of ions in the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, G Q; Wang, C B

    2014-01-01

    Solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines emitted by highly charged ions have been extensively studied to discuss the issue of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Based on observations of the polar corona by the SUMER/SOHO spectrometer, this paper investigates the relation between the line widths and kinetic parameters of ions. It is shown that there exists a strongly linear correlation between two variables $(\\sigma/\\lambda)^2$ and $M^{-1}$, where $\\sigma$, $\\lambda$ and $M$ are the half-width of the observed line profile at $1/\\sqrt{e}$, the wavelength and the ion mass, respectively. The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients exceed 0.9. This finding tends to suggest that the ions from a given height of polar corona have a common temperature and a common non-thermal velocity in terms of existing equation. The temperature and non-thermal velocity are obtained by linear least-square fit. The temperature is around $2.8$ MK at heights of 57$''$ and 102$''$. The non-thermal velocity is typical 21.6...

  20. Exploring the Physics of the Corona with Total Solar Eclipse Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Habbal, Shadia R; Daw, Adrian; Ding, Adalbert; Druckmuller, Miloslav; Esser, Ruth; Johnson, Judd; Morgan, Huw

    2011-01-01

    This white paper is a call for a concerted effort to support total solar eclipse observations over the next decade, in particular for the 21 August 2017 eclipse which will traverse the US continent. With the recent advances in image processing techniques and detector technology, the time is ripe to capitalize on the unique diagnostic tools available in the visible and near infrared wavelength range to explore the physics of the corona. The advantage of coronal emission lines in this wavelength range, over their extreme ultraviolet counterparts, is (1) the significant radiative component in their excitation process (in addition to the collisional excitation), which allows for observations out to a few solar radii, (2) the higher spectral selectivity available for imaging, giving well-defined temperature responses for each bandpass (one line as opposed to many), and (3) the capability of polarization measurements in a number of spectral lines. Consequently, the evolution of the thermodynamic and magnetic proper...

  1. Sparse Bayesian Inference and the Temperature Structure of the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Harry P; Crump, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the temperature structure of the solar atmosphere is critical to understanding how it is heated to high temperatures. Unfortunately, the temperature of the upper atmosphere cannot be observed directly, but must be inferred from spectrally resolved observations of individual emission lines that span a wide range of temperatures. Such observations are "inverted" to determine the distribution of plasma temperatures along the line of sight. This inversion is ill-posed and, in the absence of regularization, tends to produce wildly oscillatory solutions. We introduce the application of sparse Bayesian inference to the problem of inferring the temperature structure of the solar corona. Within a Bayesian framework a preference for solutions that utilize a minimum number of basis functions can be encoded into the prior and many ad hoc assumptions can be avoided. We demonstrate the efficacy of the Bayesian approach by considering a test library of 40 assumed temperature distributions.

  2. Sparse Bayesian Inference and the Temperature Structure of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Byers, Jeff M.; Crump, Nicholas A.

    2017-02-01

    Measuring the temperature structure of the solar atmosphere is critical to understanding how it is heated to high temperatures. Unfortunately, the temperature of the upper atmosphere cannot be observed directly, but must be inferred from spectrally resolved observations of individual emission lines that span a wide range of temperatures. Such observations are “inverted” to determine the distribution of plasma temperatures along the line of sight. This inversion is ill posed and, in the absence of regularization, tends to produce wildly oscillatory solutions. We introduce the application of sparse Bayesian inference to the problem of inferring the temperature structure of the solar corona. Within a Bayesian framework a preference for solutions that utilize a minimum number of basis functions can be encoded into the prior and many ad hoc assumptions can be avoided. We demonstrate the efficacy of the Bayesian approach by considering a test library of 40 assumed temperature distributions.

  3. Diffusive transport of energetic electrons in the solar corona: X-ray and radio diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musset, Sophie; Kontar, Eduard; Vilmer, Nicole

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares are associated with efficient particle acceleration. In particular, energetic electrons are diagnosed through X-ray and radio emissions produced as they interact with the solar atmosphere. Particle transport from the acceleration region to the emission sites remains one of the challenging topics in the field of high energy solar physics and has a crucial impact on the interpretation of particles emissions in the context of acceleration models.In order to address the transport of flare associated energetic electrons in the low corona, we used the imaging spectroscopy capabilities of the RHESSI spacecraft to analyze the X-ray emission during the 2004 May 21 solar flare. We show that non-thermal X-ray emitting energetic electrons are trapped in the coronal part of the flaring loop. In the hypothesis of turbulent pitch-angle scattering of energetic electrons (Kontar et al. 2014), diffusive transport can lead to a confinement of energetic electrons in the coronal part of the loop. We show that this model can explain the X-ray observations with a scattering mean free path of the order of 10^8 cm, much smaller than the length of the loop itself.Such results are compared with the study by Kuznetsov and Kontar (2015) of the gyrosynchrotron emission of the same flare. The diffusive transport model can explain the radio observations with a scattering mean free path of the order of 10^7 cm. This combination of X-ray and radio observations during a flare leads to the first estimate of the energy dependence of the scattering mean free path of energetic electrons in the low corona. This result is comparable with studies of the energy dependence of the scattering mean free path of electrons in the interplanetary medium.

  4. THE ORIGIN OF NON-MAXWELLIAN SOLAR WIND ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: CONNECTION TO NANOFLARES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    The formation of the observed core-halo feature in the solar wind electron velocity distribution function is a long-time puzzle. In this Letter, based on the current knowledge of nanoflares, we show that the nanoflare-accelerated electron beams are likely to trigger a strong electron two-stream instability that generates kinetic Alfvén wave and whistler wave turbulence, as we demonstrated in a previous paper. We further show that the core-halo feature produced during the origin of kinetic turbulence is likely to originate in the inner corona and can be preserved as the solar wind escapes to space along open field lines. We formulate a set of equations to describe the heating processes observed in the simulation and show that the core-halo temperature ratio of the solar wind is insensitive to the initial conditions in the corona and is related to the core-halo density ratio of the solar wind and to the quasi-saturation property of the two-stream instability at the time when the exponential decay ends. This relation can be extended to the more general core-halo-strahl feature in the solar wind. The temperature ratio between the core and hot components is nearly independent of the heliospheric distance to the Sun. We show that the core-halo relative drift previously reported is a relic of the fully saturated two-stream instability. Our theoretical results are consistent with the observations while new tests for this model are provided.

  5. Reconstructing the open-field magnetic geometry of solar corona using coronagraph images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.; Jones, Shaela; Burkepile, Joan

    2015-04-01

    The upcoming Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter missions will provide an new insight into the inner heliosphere magnetically connected with the topologically complex and eruptive solar corona. Physical interpretation of these observations will be dependent on the accurate reconstruction of the large-scale coronal magnetic field. We argue that such reconstruction can be performed using photospheric extrapolation codes constrained by white-light coronagraph images. The field extrapolation component of this project is featured in a related presentation by S. Jones et al. Here, we focus on our image-processing algorithms conducting an automated segmentation of coronal loop structures. In contrast to the previously proposed segmentation codes designed for detecting small-scale closed loops in the vicinity of active regions, our technique focuses on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal features observed at significant radial distances from the solar surface. Coronagraph images are transformed into a polar coordinate system and undergo radial detrending and initial noise reduction followed by an adaptive angular differentiation. An adjustable threshold is applied to identify candidate coronagraph features associated with the large-scale coronal field. A blob detection algorithm is used to identify valid features against a noisy background. The extracted coronal features are used to derive empirical directional constraints for magnetic field extrapolation procedures based on photospheric magnetograms. Two versions of the method optimized for processing ground-based (Mauna Loa Solar Observatory) and satellite-based (STEREO Cor1 and Cor2) coronagraph images are being developed.

  6. The Time-Dependent Chemistry of Cometary Debris in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Bryans, P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent improvements in solar observations have greatly progressed the study of sungrazing comets. They can now be imaged along the entirety of their perihelion passage through the solar atmosphere, revealing details of their composition and structure not measurable through previous observations in the less volatile region of the orbit further from the solar surface. Such comets are also unique probes of the solar atmosphere. The debris deposited by sungrazers is rapidly ionized and subsequently influenced by the ambient magnetic field. Measuring the spectral signature of the deposited material highlights the topology of the magnetic field and can reveal plasma parameters such as the electron temperature and density. Recovering these variables from the observable data requires a model of the interaction of the cometary species with the atmosphere through which they pass. The present paper offers such a model by considering the time-dependent chemistry of sublimated cometary species as they interact with the solar radiation field and coronal plasma. We expand on a previous simplified model by considering the fully time-dependent solutions of the emitting species' densities. To compare with observations, we consider a spherically symmetric expansion of the sublimated material into the corona and convert the time-dependent ion densities to radial profiles. Using emissivities from the CHIANTI database and plasma parameters derived from a magnetohydrodynamic simulation leads to a spatially dependent emission spectrum that can be directly compared with observations. We find our simulated spectra to be consistent with observation.

  7. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere II. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The K-corona, a significant portion of the solar atmosphere, displays a continuous spectrum which closely parallels photospheric emission, though without the presence of overlying Fraunhofer lines. The E-corona exists in the same region and is characterized by weak emission lines from highly ionized atoms. For instance, the famous green emission line from coronium (FeXIV is part of the E-corona. The F-corona exists beyond the K/E-corona and, like the photospheric spectrum, is characterized by Fraunhofer lines. The F-corona represents photospheric light scattered by dust particles in the interplanetary medium. Within the gaseous models of the Sun, the K-corona is viewed as photospheric radiation which has been scattered by relativistic electrons. This scattering is thought to broaden the Fraunhofer lines of the solar spectrum such that they can no longer be detected in the K-corona. Thus, the gaseous models of the Sun account for the appearance of the K-corona by distorting photospheric light, since they are unable to have recourse to condensed matter to directly produce such radiation. Conversely, it is now advanced that the continuous emission of the K-corona and associated emission lines from the E-corona must be interpreted as manifestations of the same phenomenon: condensed matter exists in the corona. It is well-known that the Sun expels large amounts of material from its surface in the form of flares and coronal mass ejections. Given a liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun, it is logical to assume that such matter, which exists in the condensed state on the solar surface, continues to manifest its nature once expelled into the corona. Therefore, the continuous spectrum of the K-corona provides the twenty-seventh line of evidence that the Sun is composed of condensed matter.

  8. Low-Frequency Radio Observations of the Solar Corona with Arcminute Angular Resolution: Implications for Coronal Turbulence and Weak Energy Releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugundhan, V.; Ramesh, R.; Barve, Indrajit V.; Kathiravan, C.; Gireesh, G. V. S.; Kharb, P.; Misra, Apurva

    2016-11-01

    We report on the first long baseline interferometer (length ≈8 km) observations of the solar corona at 37 MHz that were carried out recently with an angular resolution of ≈ {1}\\prime . The results indicate that, (1) discrete radio sources of the aforesaid angular size or even lesser are present in the solar corona from where radiation at the above frequency originates. This constrains the angular broadening of radio sources at low frequencies due to scattering by density turbulence in the solar corona; and (2) the observed sources in the present case correspond to the weakest energy releases in the solar atmosphere reported so far.

  9. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere V. On the Nature of the Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The E-corona is the site of numerous emission lines associated with high ionization states (i.e. FeXIV-FeXXV. Modern gaseous models of the Sun require that these states are produced by atomic irradiation, requiring the sequential removal of electrons to infinity, without an associated electron acceptor. This can lead to computed temperatures in the corona which are unrealistic (i.e. ∼30–100 MK contrasted to solar core values of ∼16 MK. In order to understand the emission lines of the E-corona, it is vital to recognize that they are superimposed upon the K-corona, which produces a continuous spectrum, devoid of Fraunhofer lines, arising from this same region of the Sun. It has been advanced that the K-corona harbors self-luminous condensed matter (Robitaille P.M. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere II. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Corona. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L8–L10; Robitaille P.M. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere III. Importance of Continuous Emission Spectra from Flares, Coronal Mass Ejections, Prominences, and Other Coronal Structures. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L11–L14. Condensed matter can possess elevated electron affinities which may strip nearby atoms of their electrons. Such a scenario accounts for the high ionization states observed in the corona: condensed matter acts to harness electrons, ensuring the electrical neutrality of the Sun, despite the flow of electrons and ions in the solar winds. Elevated ionization states reflect the presence of materials with high electron affinities in the corona, which is likely to be a form of metallic hydrogen, and does not translate into elevated temperatures in this region of the solar atmosphere. As a result, the many mechanisms advanced to account for coronal heating in the gaseous models of the Sun

  10. Kinetic Simulation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Quasi-periodic Upflows in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, Wenzhi; Zhang, Lei; Vocks, Christian; Marsch, Eckart; Tu, Chuanyi; Peter, Hardi; Wang, Linghua

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-periodic disturbances of emission-line parameters are frequently observed in the corona. These disturbances propagate upward along the magnetic field with speeds $\\sim100~\\rm{km~s}^{-1}$. This phenomenon has been interpreted as evidence of the propagation of slow magnetosonic waves or argued to be signature of the intermittent outflows superposed on the background plasmas. Here we aim to present a new "wave + flow" model to interpret these observations. In our scenario, the oscillatory motion is a slow mode wave, and the flow is associated with a beam created by the wave-particle interaction owing to Landau resonance. With the help of a Vlasov model, we simulate the propagation of the slow mode wave and the generation of the beam flow. We find that weak periodic beam flows can be generated owing to Landau resonance in the solar corona, and the phase with strongest blueward asymmetry is ahead of that with strongest blueshift by about 1/4 period. We also find that the slow wave damps to the level of 1/e a...

  11. Observationally driven 3D MHD model of the solar corona above an active region

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdin, Ph -A; Peter, H

    2013-01-01

    Aims. The goal is to employ a 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model including spectral synthesis to model the corona in an observed solar active region. This will allow us to judge the merits of the coronal heating mechanism built into the 3D model. Methods. Photospheric observations of the magnetic field and horizontal velocities in an active region are used to drive our coronal simulation from the bottom. The currents induced by this heat the corona through Ohmic dissipation. Heat conduction redistributes the energy that is lost in the end through optically thin radiation. Based on the MHD model, we synthesized profiles of coronal emission lines which can be directly compared to actual coronal observations of the very same active region. Results. In the synthesized model data we find hot coronal loops which host siphon flows or which expand and lose mass through draining. These synthesized loops are at the same location as and show similar dynamics in terms of Doppler shifts to the observed structures. This m...

  12. Time-Dependent Turbulent Heating of Open Flux Tubes in the Chromosphere, Corona, and Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Woolsey, Lauren N

    2015-01-01

    We investigate several key questions of plasma heating in open-field regions of the corona that connect to the solar wind. We present results for a model of Alfven-wave-driven turbulence for three typical open magnetic field structures: a polar coronal hole, an open flux tube neighboring an equatorial streamer, and an open flux tube near a strong-field active region. We compare time-steady, one-dimensional turbulent heating models (Cranmer et al., 2007) against fully time-dependent three-dimensional reduced-magnetohydrodynamics modeling of BRAID (van Ballegooijen et al., 2011). We find that the time-steady results agree well with time-averaged results from BRAID. The time-dependence allows us to investigate the variability of the magnetic fluctuations and of the heating in the corona. The high-frequency tail of the power spectrum of fluctuations forms a power law whose exponent varies with height, and we discuss the possible physical explanation for this behavior. The variability in the heating rate is bursty...

  13. SDO/AIA Observation of Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Thompson, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present observations of the formation, propagation and decay of vortex-shaped features in coronal images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) associated with an eruption starting at about 2:30UT on Apr 8, 2010. The series of vortices formed along the interface between an erupting (dimming) region and the surrounding corona. They ranged in size from several to ten arcseconds, and traveled along the interface at 6-14 km s-1. The features were clearly visible in six out of the seven different EUV wavebands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). Based on the structure, formation, propagation and decay of these features, we identified these features as the first observations of the Kelvin- Helmholtz (KH) instability in the corona in EUV. The interpretation is supported by linear analysis and by MHD model of KH instability. We conclude that the instability is driven by the velocity shear between the erupting and closed magnetic field of the Coronal Mass Ejection (CME).

  14. Long-term Cyclic Variations of Prominences, Green and Red Coronae over Solar Cycles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vojtech Rusin; Milan Minarovjech; Milan Rybansky

    2000-09-01

    Long-term cyclic variations in the distribution of prominences and intensities of green (530.3 nm) and red (637.4 nm) coronal emission lines over solar cycles 18-23 are presented. Polar prominence branches will reach the poles at different epochs in cycle 23: the north branch at the beginning in 2002 and the south branch a year later (2003), respectively. The local maxima of intensities in the green line show both poleward- and equatorward-migrating branches. The poleward branches will reach the poles around' cycle maxima like prominences, while the equatorward branches show a duration of 18 years and will end in cycle minima (2007). The red corona shows mostly equatorward branches. The possibility that these branches begin to develop at high latitudes in the preceding cycles cannot be excluded.

  15. On the Role of Repetitive Magnetic Reconnections in Evolution of Magnetic Flux Ropes in Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Bhattacharyya, R.; Joshi, Bhuwan; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2016-10-01

    Parker's magnetostatic theorem, extended to astrophysical magnetofluids with large magnetic Reynolds number, supports ceaseless regeneration of current sheets and, hence, spontaneous magnetic reconnections recurring in time. Consequently, a scenario is possible where the repeated reconnections provide an autonomous mechanism governing emergence of coherent structures in astrophysical magnetofluids. In this work, such a scenario is explored by performing numerical computations commensurate with the magnetostatic theorem. In particular, the computations explore the evolution of a flux rope governed by repeated reconnections in a magnetic geometry resembling bipolar loops of solar corona. The revealed morphology of the evolution process—including onset and ascent of the rope, reconnection locations, and the associated topology of the magnetic field lines—agrees with observations, and thus substantiates physical realizability of the advocated mechanism.

  16. Evidence for Small-Scale Filamentation and Dynamics in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, H.

    2004-05-01

    Observations with the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) have revealed that the solar corona is both highly dynamic and highly filamented. In this talk I will discuss how dynamics and filamentation play an important role in explaining some of the observational properties of the Sun's atmosphere. TRACE observations have shown, for example, that many relatively cool ( ˜1 MK), long-lived active region loops have density and temperature profiles that are difficult to reconcile with static models. By modeling these loops as a sequence of impulsively heated filaments, in contrast, it is possible to account for the high densities, flat temperature profiles, and the temporal evolution of these structures. A similar approach to modeling the evolution of flare emission yields much better agreement with observation than treating the flare as a single loop.

  17. Tracking Type III Radio Burst Sources in the Solar Corona by Heliographic Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, A. A.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.

    We present the preliminary results of heliographic measurements of solar type III radio bursts in the low-frequency range (16.5-33 MHz) using the UTR-2 radio heliograph. The radio astronomy tools permit us to obtain two-dimensional spatial structures of burst sources in dependence of frequency and time. Each heliogram consists of 40 pixels (beams) as a result of the serial sweep in UV-plane wherein signals of each beam are recorded in a dynamic spectrum with both high temporal (˜ 2.482 ms) and top spectral (˜ 4 kHz) resolutions. The rate of output heliograph is one image per 3 seconds. Over a session in April, 2013 many type III radio and IIIb-III bursts were observed. On the heliograms the source motion direction in the upper corona is clearly detectable. The heliogram features are discussed.

  18. Synthetic spectral analysis of a kinetic model for slow-magnetosonic waves in solar corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, Wenzhi; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China, E-mail: jshept@gmail.com (China); Zhang, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Vocks, Christian [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, 14482, Potsdam (Germany); Marsch, Eckart [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Peter, Hardi [Max Plank Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-03-25

    We propose a kinetic model of slow-magnetosonic waves to explain various observational features associated with the propagating intensity disturbances (PIDs) occurring in the solar corona. The characteristics of slow mode waves, e.g, inphase oscillations of density, velocity, and thermal speed, are reproduced in this kinetic model. Moreover, the red-blue (R-B) asymmetry of the velocity distribution as self-consistently generated in the model is found to be contributed from the beam component, as a result of the competition between Landau resonance and Coulomb collisions. Furthermore, we synthesize the spectral lines and make the spectral analysis, based on the kinetic simulation data of the flux tube plasmas and the hypothesis of the surrounding background plasmas. It is found that the fluctuations of parameters of the synthetic spectral lines are basically consistent with the observations: (1) the line intensity, Doppler shift, and line width are fluctuating in phase; (2) the R-B asymmetry usually oscillate out of phase with the former three parameters; (3) the blueward asymmetry is more evident than the redward asymmetry in the R-B fluctuations. The oscillations of line parameters become weakened for the case with denser surrounding background plasmas. Similar to the observations, there is no doubled-frequency oscillation of the line width for the case with flux-tube plasmas flowing bulkly upward among the static background plasmas. Therefore, we suggest that the “wave + beam flow” kinetic model may be a viable interpretation for the PIDs observed in the solar corona.

  19. Three-Dimensional MHD Modeling of The Solar Corona and Solar Wind: Comparison with The Wang-Sheeley Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, A. V.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    We present simulation results from a tilted-dipole steady-state MHD model of the solar corona and solar wind and compare the output from our model with the Wang-Sheeley model which relates the divergence rate of magnetic flux tubes near the Sun (inferred from solar magnetograms) to the solar wind speed observed near Earth and at Ulysses. The boundary conditions in our model specified at the coronal base and our simulation region extends out to 10 AU. We assumed that a flux of Alfven waves with amplitude of 35 km per second emanates from the Sun and provides additional heating and acceleration for the coronal outflow in the open field regions. The waves are treated in the WKB approximation. The incorporation of wave acceleration allows us to reproduce the fast wind measurements obtained by Ulysses, while preserving reasonable agreement with plasma densities typically found at the coronal base. We find that our simulation results agree well with Wang and Sheeley's empirical model.

  20. The Rate of Flux Pile-up Magnetic Reconnection in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Y. E.

    2000-05-01

    The rate of two-dimensional flux pile-up magnetic reconnection is known to be severely limited by gas pressure in a low-beta plasma of the solar corona. For a two-dimensional stagnation point flow with nonzero vorticity, for example, the rate cannot exceed the Sweet-Parker scaling. The limitation should be less restrictive, however, for three-dimensional flux pile-up. This paper examines the maximum rate of three-dimensional pile-up reconnection in the approximation of reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD), which is valid in the solar coronal loops. Gas pressure effects are ignored in RMHD, but a similar limitation on the rate of magnetic merging exists. Both the magnetic energy dissipation rate and the reconnection electric field are shown to increase by several orders of magnitude in RMHD as compared with strictly two-dimensional pile-up. This is enough to explain small solar flares and slow coronal transients with energy release rates of order 1025 - 1026 erg s-1, as well as heating of quiet coronal loops. Notably, the reconnection electric field is several orders of magnitude greater than the Dreicer field, hence it can efficiently accelerate charged particles in flares. This work was supported by NSF grant ATM-9813933.

  1. Validation of the Earth atmosphere models using the EUV solar occultation data from the CORONAS and PROBA 2 instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Kuzin, Sergey; Berghmans, David; Pertsov, Andrey; Dominique, Marie; Ulyanov, Artyom; Gaikovich, Konstantin

    Absorption in the atmosphere below 500 km results in attenuation of the solar EUV flux, variation of its spectra and distortion of solar images acquired by solar EUV instruments operating on LEO satellites even on solar synchronous orbits. Occultation measurements are important for planning of solar observations from these satellites, and can be used for monitoring the upper atmosphere as well as for studying its response to the solar activity. We present the results of the occultation measurements of the solar EUV radiation obtained by the CORONAS-F/SPIRIT telescope at high solar activity (2002), by the CORONAS-Photon/TESIS telescope at low activity (2009), and by the SWAP telescope and LYRA radiometer onboard the PROBA 2 satellite at moderate activity (2010). The measured attenuation profiles and the retrieved linear extinction coefficients at the heights 200-500 km are compared with simulations by the NRLMSIS-00 and DTM2013 atmospheric models. It was shown that the results of simulations by the DTM2013 model are well agreed with the data of measurements at all stages of solar activity and in presence of the geomagnetic storm, whereas the results of the NRLMSISE-00 model significantly diverge from the measurements, in particular, at high and low activity. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Programme for Research, Technological Development and Demonstration under Grant Agreement “eHeroes” (project № 284461, www.eheroes.eu).

  2. New Techniques Used in Modeling the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse: Energizing and Heating the Large-Scale Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Cooper; Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.; Caplan, Ronald M.; Lionello, Roberto; Torok, Tibor; Titov, Viacheslav; Riley, Pete; Mackay, Duncan; Upton, Lisa

    2017-08-01

    Over the past two decades, our group has used a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the corona to predict the appearance of total solar eclipses. In this presentation we detail recent innovations and new techniques applied to our prediction model for the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse. First, we have developed a method for capturing the large-scale energized fields typical of the corona, namely the sheared/twisted fields built up through long-term processes of differential rotation and flux-emergence/cancellation. Using inferences of the location and chirality of filament channels (deduced from a magnetofrictional model driven by the evolving photospheric field produced by the Advective Flux Transport model), we tailor a customized boundary electric field profile that will emerge shear along the desired portions of polarity inversion lines (PILs) and cancel flux to create long twisted flux systems low in the corona. This method has the potential to improve the morphological shape of streamers in the low solar corona. Second, we apply, for the first time in our eclipse prediction simulations, a new wave-turbulence-dissipation (WTD) based model for coronal heating. This model has substantially fewer free parameters than previous empirical heating models, but is inherently sensitive to the 3D geometry and connectivity of the coronal field---a key property for modeling/predicting the thermal-magnetic structure of the solar corona. Overall, we will examine the effect of these considerations on white-light and EUV observables from the simulations, and present them in the context of our final 2017 eclipse prediction model.Research supported by NASA's Heliophysics Supporting Research and Living With a Star Programs.

  3. Solar Energetic Particle Acceleration in the Solar Corona with Simulated Field Line Random Walk and Wave Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, A. D.; le Roux, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) events associated with coronal mass ejection driven shocks have detected particle energies up to a few GeV at 1 AU within the first ~10 minutes to 1 hour of shock acceleration. It is currently not well understood whether or not shock acceleration can act alone in these events or if some combination of successive shocks or solar flares is required. To investigate this, we updated our current model which has been successfully applied to the termination shock and traveling interplanetary shocks. The model solves the time-dependent Focused Transport Equation including particle preheating due to the cross shock electric field and the divergence, adiabatic compression, and acceleration of the solar wind. Particle interaction with MHD wave turbulence is modeled in terms of gyro-resonant interactions with parallel propagating Alfvén waves and diffusive shock acceleration is included via the first-order Fermi mechanism for parallel shocks. The observed onset times of the extreme SEP events place the shock in the corona when the particles escape upstream, therefore, we extended our model to include coronal conditions for the solar wind and magnetic field. Additional features were introduced to investigate two aspects of MHD wave turbulence in contributing to efficient particle acceleration at a single fast parallel shock; (1) We simulate field-line random walk on time scales much larger than a particle gyro-period to investigate how the stochastic element added to particle injection and the first-order Fermi mechanism affects the efficiency of particle acceleration. (2) Previous modeling efforts show that the ambient solar wind turbulence is too weak to quickly accelerate SEPs to GeV energies. To improve the efficiency of acceleration for a single shock, we included upstream Alfvén wave amplification due to gyro-resonant interactions with SEPs and we constrained the wave growth to not violate the Bohm limit.

  4. Electron Acceleration by Cascading Reconnection in the Solar Corona. II. Resistive Electric Field Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Büchner, J.; Bárta, M.; Gan, W.; Liu, S.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate electron acceleration by electric fields induced by cascading reconnections in current sheets trailing coronal mass ejections via a test particle approach in the framework of the guiding-center approximation. Although the resistive electric field is much weaker than the inductive electric field, the electron acceleration is still dominated by the former. Anomalous resistivity η is switched on only in regions where the current carrier’s drift velocity is large enough. As a consequence, electron acceleration is very sensitive to the spatial distribution of the resistive electric fields, and electrons accelerated in different segments of the current sheet have different characteristics. Due to the geometry of the 2.5-dimensional electromagnetic fields and strong resistive electric field accelerations, accelerated high-energy electrons can be trapped in the corona, precipitating into the chromosphere or escaping into interplanetary space. The trapped and precipitating electrons can reach a few MeV within 1 s and have a very hard energy distribution. Spatial structure of the acceleration sites may also introduce breaks in the electron energy distribution. Most of the interplanetary electrons reach hundreds of keV with a softer distribution. To compare with observations of solar flares and electrons in solar energetic particle events, we derive hard X-ray spectra produced by the trapped and precipitating electrons, fluxes of the precipitating and interplanetary electrons, and electron spatial distributions.

  5. Early Evaluation of the Corona at the 2016 March 9 Total Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Seaton, Daniel B.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2016-05-01

    We observed the corona on 2016 March 9 with a variety of assets on the ground and in space. The umbra of the total eclipse swept across Indonesia and into the Pacific, with totality at our Indonesian observation sites lasting 2 min 45 s at Ternate in the Spice Islands (Malukus) and 2 min 10 at Belitung. We compare our ground-based results with the coronal configurations observed with PROBA2/SWAP and Hinode XRT. One of our scientific goals is to follow the coronal configuration over the solar-activity cycle, with the sunspot number now half its maximum of either its 2012 or 2014 peak. We are evaluating temporal changes by comparing eclipse observations made at several ground-based sites along the path, with the longest span being 75 min from Belitung to the Woleia atoll in mid-Pacific, 1:25 UTC to 2:40 UTC; we are evaluating whether the airborne observations made at 3:35 UTC on March 8 (across the International Dateline) are of suitable quality to provide further comparison at high spatial resolution. We also compare our images with the near-simultaneous coronal observations made with SOHO/LASCO, SDO/AIA, STEREO-A/SECCHI, and the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory's K-cor coronagraph. ACS received support for image analysis from the Hinode project.

  6. Electric Current Filamentation Induced by 3D Plasma Flows in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickeler, Dieter H.; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Karlický, Marian; Kraus, Michaela

    2017-03-01

    Many magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere evolve rather slowly, so they can be assumed as (quasi-)static or (quasi-)stationary and represented via magnetohydrostatic (MHS) or stationary magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, respectively. While exact 3D solutions would be desired, they are extremely difficult to find in stationary MHD. We construct solutions with magnetic and flow vector fields that have three components depending on all three coordinates. We show that the noncanonical transformation method produces quasi-3D solutions of stationary MHD by mapping 2D or 2.5D MHS equilibria to corresponding stationary MHD states, that is, states that display the same field-line structure as the original MHS equilibria. These stationary MHD states exist on magnetic flux surfaces of the original 2D MHS states. Although the flux surfaces and therefore also the equilibria have a 2D character, these stationary MHD states depend on all three coordinates and display highly complex currents. The existence of geometrically complex 3D currents within symmetric field-line structures provides the basis for efficient dissipation of the magnetic energy in the solar corona by ohmic heating. We also discuss the possibility of maintaining an important subset of nonlinear MHS states, namely force-free fields, by stationary flows. We find that force-free fields with nonlinear flows only arise under severe restrictions of the field-line geometry and of the magnetic flux density distribution.

  7. Reduction of Light-induced Degradation of Boron-doped Solar-grade Czochralski Silicon by Corona Charging

    OpenAIRE

    Boulfrad, Yacine; Lindroos, Jeanette; Inglese, Alessandro; Yli-Koski, Marko; Savin, Hele

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study aims at the reduction of light-induced degradation of boron-doped solar-grade Czochralski silicon wafers by corona charging. The method consists of deposition of negative charges on both surface sides of wafer and keeping the wafer in dark for 24 hours to allow the diffusion of positively-charged interstitial copper towards the surfaces. This method proves to be useful to reduce or eliminate light-induced degradation caused by copper. The degradation was significantly redu...

  8. Set of instruments for solar EUV and soft X-ray monitoring onboard satellite Coronas-Photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Yury; Kochemasov, Alexey; Kuzin, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Sylwester, Janusz; Yurov, Vitaly

    Coronas-Photon mission is the third satellite of the Russian Coronas program on solar activity observation. The main goal of the "Coronas-Photon" is the study of solar hard electromagnetic radiation in the wide energy range from UV up to high energy gamma-radiation (2000MeV). Scientific payload for solar radiation observation consists of three types of instruments: Monitors (Natalya-2M, Konus-RF, RT-2, Penguin-M, BRM, PHOKA, Sphin-X, SOKOL spectral and timing measurements of full solar disk radiation have timing in flare/burst mode up to one msec. Instruments Natalya-2M, Konus-RF, RT-2 will cover the wide energy range of hard X-rays and soft gamma-rays (15keV to 2000MeV) and will together constitute the largest area detectors ever used for solar observations. Detectors of gamma-ray monitors are based on structured inorganic scintillators. For X-ray and EUV monitors the scintillation phoswich detectors, gas proportional counter, CdZnTe assembly and filter-covered Si-diodes are used. Telescope-spectrometer TESIS for imaging solar spectroscopy in X-rays has angular resolution up to 1arcsec in three spectral lines. Satellite platform and scientific payload is under construction to be launched in autumn 2008. Satellite orbit is circular with initial height 550km and inclination 82.5degrees. Accuracy of the spacecraft orientation to the Sun is better 3arcmin. In the report the capability of PHOKA, SphinX, SOKOL and TESIS as well as the observation program are described and discussed.

  9. Anomalous Surge of the White-Light Corona at the Onset of the Declining Phase of Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, P.; Boclet, B.; Wojak, J.; Vibert, D.

    2017-04-01

    In late 2014, when the current Solar Cycle 24 entered its declining phase, the white-light corona as observed by the LASCO-C2 coronagraph underwent an unexpected surge that increased its global radiance by 60%, reaching a peak value comparable to the peak values of the more active Solar Cycle 23. A comparison of the temporal variation of the white-light corona with the variations of several indices and proxies of solar activity indicate that it best matches the variation of the total magnetic field. The daily variations point to a localized enhancement or bulge in the electron density that persisted for several months. Carrington maps of the radiance and of the HMI photospheric field allow connecting this bulge to the emergence of the large sunspot complex AR 12192 in October 2014, the largest since AR 6368 observed in November 1990. The resulting unusually high increase of the magnetic field and the distortion of the neutral sheet in a characteristic inverse S-shape caused the coronal plasma to be trapped along a similar pattern. A 3D reconstruction of the electron density based on time-dependent solar rotational tomography supplemented by 2D inversion of the coronal radiance confirms the morphology of the bulge and reveals that its level was well above the standard models of a corona of the maximum type, by typically a factor of 3. A rather satisfactory agreement is found with the results of the thermodynamic MHD model produced by Predictive Sciences, although discrepancies are noted. The specific configuration of the magnetic field that led to the coronal surge resulted from the interplay of various factors prevailing at the onset of the declining phase of the solar cycles, which was particularly efficient in the case of Solar Cycle 24.

  10. On Anisotropy in Expansion of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Malanushenko, A

    2013-01-01

    Most 1d hydrodynamic models of plasma confined to magnetic flux tubes assume circular cross-section of these tubes. We use potential field models to show that flux tubes in circumstances relevant to the solar corona do not in general maintain the same cross-sectional shape through their length and therefore the assumption of a circular cross-section is rarely true. We support our hypothesis with mathematical reasoning and numeric experiments. We demonstrate that lifting this assumption in realistic non-circular loops make apparent expansion of magnetic flux tubes consistent with that of observed coronal loops. We propose that in a bundle of ribbon-like loops those that are viewed along the wide direction would stand out against those that are viewed across the wide direction, due to the difference in their column depths. That would impose a bias towards selecting loops that appear not to be expanding seen projected in the plane of sky. An implication of this selection bias is that the preferentially selected ...

  11. Solar Micro-Type III Burst Storms and Long Dipolar Magnetic Field in the Outer Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, A.; Miyoshi, Y.; Iwai, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Masuda, S.; Misawa, H.; Obara, T.

    2015-08-01

    Solar micro-type III radio bursts are elements of the so-called type III storms and are characterized by short-lived, continuous, and weak emissions. Their frequency of occurrence with respect to radiation power is quite different from that of ordinary type III bursts, suggesting that the generation process is not flare-related, but due to some recurrent acceleration processes around the active region. We examine the relationship of micro-type III radio bursts with coronal streamers. We also explore the propagation channel of bursts in the outer corona, the acceleration process, and the escape route of electron beams. It is observationally confirmed that micro-type III bursts occur near the edge of coronal streamers. The magnetic field line of the escaping electron beams is tracked on the basis of the frequency drift rate of micro-type III bursts and the electron density distribution model. The results demonstrate that electron beams are trapped along closed dipolar field lines in the outer coronal region, which arise from the interface region between the active region and the coronal hole. A 22 year statistical study reveals that the apex altitude of the magnetic loop ranges from 15 to 50 RS. The distribution of the apex altitude has a sharp upper limit around 50 RS suggesting that an unknown but universal condition regulates the upper boundary of the streamer dipolar field.

  12. From solar to stellar corona: the role of wind, rotation and magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Réville, Victor; Strugarek, Antoine; Matt, Sean P; Bouvier, Jérôme; Folsom, Colin P; Petit, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Observations of surface magnetic fields are now within reach for many stellar types thanks to the development of Zeeman-Doppler Imaging. These observations are extremely useful for constraining rotational evolution models of stars, as well as for characterizing the generation of magnetic field. We recently demonstrated that the impact of coronal magnetic field topology on the rotational braking of a star can be parametrized with a scalar parameter: the open magnetic flux. However, without running costly numerical simulations of the stellar wind, reconstructing the coronal structure of the large scale magnetic field is not trivial. An alternative -broadly used in solar physics- is to extrapolate the surface magnetic field assuming a potential field in the corona, to describe the opening of the field lines by the magnetized wind. This technique relies on the definition of a so-called source surface radius, which is often fixed to the canonical value of 2.5Rsun. However this value likely varies from star to star...

  13. R Coronae Borealis Stars are Viable Factories of Pre-solar Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Karakas, Amanda I; Hampel, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    We present a new theoretical estimate for the birthrate of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars that is in agreement with recent observational data. We find the current Galactic birthrate of RCB stars to be $\\approx$ 25% of the Galactic rate of Type Ia supernovae, assuming that RCB stars are formed through the merger of carbon-oxygen and helium-rich white dwarfs. Our new RCB birthrate ($1.8 \\times 10^{-3}$ yr$^{-1}$) is a factor of 10 lower than previous theoretical estimates. This results in roughly 180--540 RCB stars in the Galaxy, depending on the RCB lifetime. From the theoretical and observational estimates, we calculate the total dust production from RCB stars and compare this rate to dust production from novae and born-again asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We find that the amount of dust produced by RCB stars is comparable to the amounts produced by novae or born-again post-AGB stars, indicating that these merger objects are a viable source of carbonaceous pre-solar grains in the Galaxy. There are graph...

  14. EUV Spectra of Solar Flares from the EUV Spectroheliograph SPIRIT aboard CORONAS-F satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Shestov, Sergey; Kuzin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    We present detailed EUV spectra of 4 large solar flares: M5.6, X1.3, X3.4, and X17 classes in the spectral ranges 176-207 \\AA\\ and 280-330 \\AA. These spectra were obtained {by the slitless} spectroheliograph SPIRIT aboard the CORONAS-F satellite. To our knowledge these are the first detailed EUV spectra of large flares obtained with spectral resolution of $\\sim 0.1$ \\AA. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the obtained spectra and provide identification of the observed spectral lines. The identification was performed based {on the calculation} of synthetic spectra (CHIANTI database was used), with simultaneous {calculations of DEM} and density of the emitting plasma. More than 50 intense lines are present in the spectra that correspond to a temperature range of $T=0.5-16$ MK; most of the lines belong to Fe, Ni, Ca, Mg, Si ions. In all the considered flares intense hot lines from Ca XVII, Ca XVIII, Fe XX, Fe XXII, and Fe XXIV are observed. The calculated DEMs have a peak at $T \\sim 10$ MK. The densities w...

  15. Burgulence and Alfv\\'en waves heating mechanism of solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Mishonov, T M

    2006-01-01

    Heating of magnetized turbulent plasma is calculated in the framework of Burgers turbulence [A.M. Polyakov, Phys. Rev. E. 52, 6183, (1995)]. There is calculated the energy flux of Alfv\\'en waves along the magnetic field. The Alfven waves are considered as intermediary between the turbulent energy and the heat. The derived results are related to wave channel of the heating of solar corona. After incorporating dissipation of convective plasma waves instabilities [G.D. Chagelishvili, R.G. Chanishvili, T.S. Hristov, and J.G. Lominadze, Phys. Rev. E 47, 366 (1993)] and [A.D. Rogava, S.M. Mahajan, G. Bodo, and S. Marsaglia, Astronomy & Astrophysics, 399, 421-431 (2003)] the suggested model of heating can be applied to analysis of the missing viscosity of accretion discs and to reveal why the quasars are the most powerful sources of light in the universe. We suppose that applied Langevin-Burgers approach to turbulence can be helpful for other systems where we have intensive interaction between a stochastic turbu...

  16. Explaining Inverted-temperature Loops in the Quiet Solar Corona with Magnetohydrodynamic Wave-mode Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Avery J.; Cranmer, Steven R.

    2016-11-01

    Coronal loops trace out bipolar, arch-like magnetic fields above the Sun’s surface. Recent measurements that combine rotational tomography, extreme-ultraviolet imaging, and potential-field extrapolation have shown the existence of large loops with inverted-temperature profiles, i.e., loops for which the apex temperature is a local minimum, not a maximum. These “down loops” appear to exist primarily in equatorial quiet regions near solar minimum. We simulate both these and the more prevalent large-scale “up loops” by modeling coronal heating as a time-steady superposition of (1) dissipation of incompressible Alfvén wave turbulence and (2) dissipation of compressive waves formed by mode conversion from the initial population of Alfvén waves. We found that when a large percentage (>99%) of the Alfvén waves undergo this conversion, heating is greatly concentrated at the footpoints and stable “down loops” are created. In some cases we found loops with three maxima that are also gravitationally stable. Models that agree with the tomographic temperature data exhibit higher gas pressures for “down loops” than for “up loops,” which is consistent with observations. These models also show a narrow range of Alfvén wave amplitudes: 3 to 6 km s‑1 at the coronal base. This is low in comparison to typical observed amplitudes of 20–30 km s‑1 in bright X-ray loops. However, the large-scale loops we model are believed to compose a weaker diffuse background that fills much of the volume of the corona. By constraining the physics of loops that underlie quiescent streamers, we hope to better understand the formation of the slow solar wind.

  17. INFERRING THE STRUCTURE OF THE SOLAR CORONA AND INNER HELIOSPHERE DURING THE MAUNDER MINIMUM USING GLOBAL THERMODYNAMIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Pete; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A., E-mail: pete@predsci.com, E-mail: lionel@predsci.com, E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com [Predictive Science, 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); and others

    2015-04-01

    Observations of the Sun’s corona during the space era have led to a picture of relatively constant, but cyclically varying solar output and structure. Longer-term, more indirect measurements, such as from {sup 10}Be, coupled by other albeit less reliable contemporaneous reports, however, suggest periods of significant departure from this standard. The Maunder Minimum was one such epoch where: (1) sunspots effectively disappeared for long intervals during a 70 yr period; (2) eclipse observations suggested the distinct lack of a visible K-corona but possible appearance of the F-corona; (3) reports of aurora were notably reduced; and (4) cosmic ray intensities at Earth were inferred to be substantially higher. Using a global thermodynamic MHD model, we have constructed a range of possible coronal configurations for the Maunder Minimum period and compared their predictions with these limited observational constraints. We conclude that the most likely state of the corona during—at least—the later portion of the Maunder Minimum was not merely that of the 2008/2009 solar minimum, as has been suggested recently, but rather a state devoid of any large-scale structure, driven by a photospheric field composed of only ephemeral regions, and likely substantially reduced in strength. Moreover, we suggest that the Sun evolved from a 2008/2009-like configuration at the start of the Maunder Minimum toward an ephemeral-only configuration by the end of it, supporting a prediction that we may be on the cusp of a new grand solar minimum.

  18. Using the EUV to Weigh a Sun-Grazing Comet as it Disappears in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnell, William Dean; Schrijiver, Carolus J.; Brown, John C.; Battams, Karl; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Hudson Hugh S.; Lui, Wei

    2012-01-01

    On July 6,2011, the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AlA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed a comet in most of its EUY passbands. The comet disappeared while moving through the solar corona. The comet penetrated to 0.146 solar radii ($\\simapprox.100,000 km) above the photosphere before its EUY faded. Before then, the comet's coma and a tail were observed in absorption and emission, respectively. The material in the variable tail quickly fell behind the nucleus. An estimate of the comet's mass based on this effect, one derived from insolation, and one using the tail's EUY brightness, all yield $\\sim 50$ giga-grams some 10 minutes prior to the end of its visibility. These unique first observations herald a new era in the study of Sun-grazing comets close to their perihelia and of the conditions in the solar corona and solar wind. We will discuss the observations and interpretation of the comet by SDO as well as the coronagraph observations from SOHO and STEREO. A search of the SOHO comet archive for other comets that could be observed in the SDO; AlA EUY channels will be described

  19. Thermodynamics of the Solar Corona and Evolution of the Solar Magnetic Field as Inferred from the Total Solar Eclipse Observations of 11 July 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Druckmueller, Miloslav; Morgan, Huw; Ding, Adalbert; Johnson, Judd; Druckmuellerova, Hana; Daw, Adrian; Arndt, Martina B.; Dietzel, Martin; Saken, Jon

    2011-01-01

    We report on multi-wavelength observations of the corona taken simultaneously in broadband white light, and in seven spectral lines, H-alpha 656.3 nm, Fe IX 435.9 nm, Fe X 637.4 nm, Fe XI 789.2 nm, Fe XIII 1074.7 nm, Fe XIV 530.3 nm and Ni XV 670.2 nm. The observations were made during the total solar eclipse of 11 July 2010 from the atoll of Tatakoto in French Polynesia. Simultaneous imaging with narrow bandpass filters in each of these spectral lines and in their corresponding underlying continua maximized the observing time during less than ideal observing conditions and yielded outstanding quality data. The application of two complementary image processing techniques revealed the finest details of coronal structures at 1" resolution in white light, and 6.5" in each of the spectral lines. This comprehensive wavelength coverage confirmed earlier eclipse findings that the solar corona has a clear two-temperature structure: The open field lines, expanding outwards from the solar surface, are characterized by electron temperatures near 1 X 10(exp 6) K, while the hottest plasma around 2X 10(exp 6) K resides in loop-like structures forming the bulges of streamers. The first images of the corona in the forbidden lines of Fe IX and Ni XV, showed that there was very little coronal plasma at temperatures below 5 X 10(exp 5) K and above 2.5X 10(exp 6) K. The data also enabled temperature differentiations as low as 0:2 X 10(exp 6) K in different density structures. These observations showed how the passage of CMEs through the corona, prior to totality, produced large scale ripples and very sharp streaks, which could be identified with distinct temperatures for the first time. The ripples were most prominent in emission from spectral lines associated with temperatures around 10(exp 6) K. The most prominent streak was associated with a conical-shaped void in the emission from the coolest line of Fe IX and from the hottest line of Ni XV. A prominence, which erupted prior to

  20. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VII. Further Insights into the Chromosphere and Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun, the chromosphere is responsible for the capture of atomic hydrogen in the solar atmosphere and its eventual re-entry onto the photospheric surface (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L15–L21. As for the corona, it represents a diffuse region containing both gaseous plasma and condensed matter with elevated electron affinity (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere V. On the Nature of the Corona. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L22–L25. Metallic hydrogen in the corona is thought to enable the continual harvest of electrons from the outer reaches of the Sun, thereby preserving the neutrality of the solar body. The rigid rotation of the corona is offered as the thirty-third line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter. Within the context of the gaseous models of the Sun, a 100 km thick transition zone has been hypothesized to exist wherein temperatures increase dramatically from 104–106 K. Such extreme transitional temperatures are not reasonable given the trivial physical scale of the proposed transition zone, a region adopted to account for the ultra-violet emission lines of ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV. In this work, it will be argued that the transition zone does not exist. Rather, the intermediate ionization states observed in the solar atmosphere should be viewed as the result of the simultaneous transfer of protons and electrons onto condensed hydrogen structures, CHS. Line emissions from ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV are likely to be the result of condensation reactions, manifesting the involvement of species such as CH4, SiH4, H3O+ in the synthesis of CHS in the chromosphere. In addition, given the presence of a true solar surface at the level of the photosphere in the liquid metallic hydrogen model

  1. Energy Buildup, Flux Confinement and Helicity Accumulation in the Solar Corona

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Qiu Hu; Wen Li

    2006-01-01

    Starting from a dipole field and a given distribution of footpoint displacement of field lines on the photosphere, we find axisymmetric, force-free field solutions in spherical coordinates that have the same distribution of normal field on the photosphere and magnetic topology as the dipole field. A photospheric shear is introduced in the azimuthal direction in a region that strides across the equator and ends at latitude λs. The footpoint displacement has a sine distribution in latitude and a peak amplitude of ψm. The magnetic energy E, azimuthal flux Fψ, and magnetic helicity HT in the solar corona are then calculated for each force-free field solution. It is found that for a given shear region range λs, all of the three quantities increase monotonically with increasing ψm. In particular, both Fψ and HT have a linear dependence on ψm. When ψm reaches a certain critical value ψmc, the force-free field loses equilibrium, leading to a partial opening of the field and the appearance of a current sheet in the equatorial plane. At this point, E, Fψ and HT reach their maximum values,Ec, Fψc and HTc. Ec increases, and Fψc and HTc decrease with decreasing λs. It is found that Ec is always smaller than the open field energy, in agreement with the Aly conjecture. Of the three critical parameters, Ec has the weakest dependence on λs. Therefore, if one is interested in the transition of a magnetic configuration from a stable state to a dynamic one, the magnetic energy is probably the most appropriate marker of the transition.

  2. Polarized Light from the Sun: Unification of the Corona and Analysis of the Second Solar Spectrum — Further Implications of a Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Solar Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to account for the slight polarization of the continuum towards the limb, propo- nents of the Standard Solar Model (SSM must have recourse to electron or hydrogen- based scattering of light, as no other mechanism is possible in a gaseous Sun. Con- versely, acceptance that the solar body is comprised of condensed matter opens up new avenues in the analysis of this problem, even if the photospheric surface itself is viewed as incapable of emitting polarized light. Thus, the increased disk polarization, from the center to the limb, can be explained by invoking the scattering of light by the at- mosphere above the photosphere. The former is reminiscent of mechanisms which are known to account for the polarization of sunlight in the atmosphere of the Earth. Within the context of the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Solar Model (LMHSM, molecules and small particles, not electrons or hydrogen atoms as required by the SSM, would primarily act as scattering agents in regions also partially comprised of condensed hy- drogen structures (CHS. In addition, the well-known polarization which characterizes the K-corona would become a sign of emission polarization from an anisotropic source, without the need for scattering. In the LMHSM, the K, F, and T- coronas can be viewed as emissive and reflective manifestations of a single corona l entity adopting a radially anisotropic structure, while slowly cooling with altitude above the photosphere. The presence of “dust particles”, advanced by proponents of the SSM, would no longer be required to explain the F and T-corona, as a single cooling structure would account for the properties of the K, F, and T coronas. At the same time, the polarized “Second Solar Spectrum”, characterized by the dominance of certain elemental or ionic spectral lines and an abundance of molecular lines, could be explained in the LMHSM, by first invoking interface polarization and coordination of these species with condensed matter

  3. Coupling the solar dynamo and the corona: wind properties, mass and momentum losses during an activity cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, Rui F; Jouve, Laurène; Grappin, Roland

    2011-01-01

    We study the connections between the sun's convection zone and the evolution of the solar wind and corona. We let the magnetic fields generated by a 2.5D axisymmetric kinematic dynamo code (STELEM) evolve in a 2.5D axisymmetric coronal isothermal MHD code (DIP). The computations cover an 11 year activity cycle. The solar wind's asymptotic velocity varies in latitude and in time in good agreement with the available observations. The magnetic polarity reversal happens at different paces at different coronal heights. Overall sun's mass loss rate, momentum flux and magnetic braking torque vary considerably throughout the cycle. This cyclic modulation is determined by the latitudinal distribution of the sources of open flux and solar wind and the geometry of the Alfv\\'en surface. Wind sources and braking torque application zones also vary accordingly.

  4. Induced emission of Alfvén waves in inhomogeneous streaming plasma: implications for solar corona heating and solar wind acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, V L; Shevchenko, V I

    2013-07-05

    The results of a self-consistent kinetic model of heating the solar corona and accelerating the fast solar wind are presented for plasma flowing in a nonuniform magnetic field configuration of near-Sun conditions. The model is based on a scale separation between the large transit or inhomogeneity scales and the small dissipation scales. The macroscale instability of the marginally stable particle distribution function compliments the resonant frequency sweeping dissipation of transient Alfvén waves by their induced emission in inhomogeneous streaming plasma that provides enough energy for keeping the plasma temperature decaying not faster than r(-1) in close agreement with in situ heliospheric observations.

  5. On the Origin of Coronal Mass Ejections: How Does the Emergence of a Magnetic Flux Rope Reorganize the Solar Corona?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussev, I. I.; Galsgaard, K.; Lugaz, N.; Sokolov, I.

    2010-12-01

    The physical causes leading to the occurrence of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun have been debated for almost four decades now. One of the leading mechanisms suggests that a CME may occur as the result of the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux rope from the convection zone into the solar corona. This process have been investigated by a number of researchers over the years, and it has been demonstrated that an eruption of the coronal magnetic field can in principle occur. The majority of these studies, however, involve some ad-hoc prescription of the electric field at the photosphere resembling flux emergence, and they neglect the ambient coronal magnetic field. In addition, most of these flux-emergence simulations are performed in a Cartesian domain, which extends only to a few dozen pressure scale-heights into the corona. Thus, it is difficult to assess the role of boundary driving and limited computational domain on the resulting evolution of the erupting coronal magnetic field. In this paper, we present a new model of CMEs that mitigates these two effects. To achieve this, we couple the "local" magnetic-flux-emergence (MFE) model of Archontis et al. (2004) with a global MHD model of the solar corona and solar wind. The model coupling is performed using the Space Weather Modeling Framework. In the coupled model, the MFE simulation provides time-dependent boundary conditions for all MHD quantities into the global model, where the physical coupling is done at the photospheric boundary. The physical evolution of the system is followed using the BATS-R-US "ideal" MHD code well beyond the complete emergence of the magnetic flux from the convection zone. We discuss the dynamics of the flux emergence process and the related response of the pre-existing coronal magnetic field in the context of CME production.

  6. Radio Diagnostics of Electron Acceleration Sites During the Eruption of a Flux Rope in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Eoin P.; Vilmer, Nicole; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2016-12-01

    Electron acceleration in the solar corona is often associated with flares and the eruption of twisted magnetic structures known as flux ropes. However, the locations and mechanisms of such particle acceleration during the flare and eruption are still subject to much investigation. Observing the exact sites of particle acceleration can help confirm how the flare and eruption are initiated and how they evolve. Here we use the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to analyze a flare and erupting flux rope on 2014 April 18, while observations from the Nançay Radio Astronomy Facility allow us to diagnose the sites of electron acceleration during the eruption. Our analysis shows evidence of a pre-formed flux rope that slowly rises and becomes destabilized at the time of a C-class flare, plasma jet, and the escape of ≳75 keV electrons from the rope center into the corona. As the eruption proceeds, continued acceleration of electrons with energies of ˜5 keV occurs above the flux rope for a period over 5 minutes. At the flare peak, one site of electron acceleration is located close to the flare site, while another is driven by the erupting flux rope into the corona at speeds of up to 400 km s-1. Energetic electrons then fill the erupting volume, eventually allowing the flux rope legs to be clearly imaged from radio sources at 150-445 MHz. Following the analysis of Joshi et al. (2015), we conclude that the sites of energetic electrons are consistent with flux rope eruption via a tether cutting or flux cancellation scenario inside a magnetic fan-spine structure. In total, our radio observations allow us to better understand the evolution of a flux rope eruption and its associated electron acceleration sites, from eruption initiation to propagation into the corona.

  7. Electron Temperatures and Flow Speeds of the Low Solar Corona: MACS Results from the Total Solar Eclipse of 29 March 2006 in Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginald, Nelson L.; Davila, Joseph M.; SaintCyr, O.; Rabin, Douglas M.; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Hassler, Donald M.; Gashut, Hadi

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in conjunction with the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Libya to measure both the electron temperature and its flow speed simultaneously at multiple locations in the low solar corona by measuring the visible K-coronal spectrum. Coronal model spectra incorporating the effects of electron temperature and its flow speed were matched with the measured K-coronal spectra to interpret the observations. Results show electron temperatures of (1.10 +/- 0.05) MK, (0.70 +/- 0.08) MK, and (0.98 +/- 0.12) MK, at 1.1 Solar Radius from Sun center in the solar north, east and west, respectively, and (0.93 +/- 0.12) MK, at 1.2 Solar Radius from Sun center in the solar west. The corresponding outflow speeds obtained from the spectral fit are (103 +/- 92) km/s, (0 + 10) km/s, (0+10) km/s, and (0+10) km/s. Since the observations were taken only at 1.1 Solar Radius and 1.2 Solar Radius from Sun center, these speeds, consistent with zero outflow, are in agreement with expectations and provide additional confirmation that the spectral fitting method is working. The electron temperature at 1.1 Solar Radius from Sun center is larger at the north (polar region) than the east and west (equatorial region).

  8. Electron Temperatures and Flow Speeds of the Low Solar Corona: MACS Results from the Total Solar Eclipse of 29 March 2006 in Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginald, Nelson L.; Davila, Joseph M.; SaintCyr, O.; Rabin, Douglas M.; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Hassler, Donald M.; Gashut, Hadi

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in conjunction with the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Libya to measure both the electron temperature and its flow speed simultaneously at multiple locations in the low solar corona by measuring the visible K-coronal spectrum. Coronal model spectra incorporating the effects of electron temperature and its flow speed were matched with the measured K-coronal spectra to interpret the observations. Results show electron temperatures of (1.10 +/- 0.05) MK, (0.70 +/- 0.08) MK, and (0.98 +/- 0.12) MK, at 1.1 Solar Radius from Sun center in the solar north, east and west, respectively, and (0.93 +/- 0.12) MK, at 1.2 Solar Radius from Sun center in the solar west. The corresponding outflow speeds obtained from the spectral fit are (103 +/- 92) km/s, (0 + 10) km/s, (0+10) km/s, and (0+10) km/s. Since the observations were taken only at 1.1 Solar Radius and 1.2 Solar Radius from Sun center, these speeds, consistent with zero outflow, are in agreement with expectations and provide additional confirmation that the spectral fitting method is working. The electron temperature at 1.1 Solar Radius from Sun center is larger at the north (polar region) than the east and west (equatorial region).

  9. Towards a Realistic, Data-Driven Thermodynamic MHD Model of the Global Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Downs, Cooper; van der Holst, Bart; Lugaz, Noé; Sokolov, Igor V; Gombosi, Tamas I

    2009-01-01

    In this work we describe our implementation of a thermodynamic energy equation into the global corona model of the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), and its development into the new Lower Corona (LC) model. This work includes the integration of the additional energy transport terms of coronal heating, electron heat conduction, and optically thin radiative cooling into the governing magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy equation. We examine two different boundary conditions using this model; one set in the upper transition region (the Radiative Energy Balance model), as well as a uniform chromospheric condition where the transition region can be modeled in its entirety. Via observation synthesis from model results and the subsequent comparison to full sun extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-Ray observations of Carrington Rotation (CR) 1913 centered on Aug 27, 1996, we demonstrate the need for these additional considerations when using global MHD models to describe the unique conditions in the low corona. Th...

  10. MHD simulation of the evolution of the solar corona around August 1st 2010 using the HMI solar magnetic field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K.; Hmi Team

    2010-12-01

    We will report results of the MHD simulation of the solar corona and solar wind using the HMI magnetic field data, especially focusing on a simulated eruption of a coronal streamer that reasonably corresponds to a large-scale coronal eruption event observed on August 1, 2010. The pre-event coronal situation is prepared through the time-relaxation MHD simulation using the synoptic map data of the solar surface magnetic field for a period of the Carrington Rotation 2098. Then, the global magnetic field evolutions from CR 2098 to 2099 are introduced in the simulation by means of a boundary model we recently developed, which enable to trace the sub-Alfvenic MHD responses of the corona numerically. The simulated coronal features include the formation of the two twisted coronal magnetic field structures along the magnetically inversion lines at the lowermost corona (coinciding the two observed filaments at west-north part of the solar disk) and the large-scale outward motions and decay of the closed-field streamer above the two twisted-field regions. Our MHD simulation model did not include the triggering event directly, and our simulations were done in somewhat low resolution in space. However, the reasonable success in reproducing coronal features relating a specific event in a well-known manner (using the synoptic map format data and the MHD simulation model) shows that the new dataset from HMI will be useful for the models, such as the MHD and the potential field models, as the previous dataset by SOHO/MDI.

  11. GLOBAL CORONAL SEISMOLOGY IN THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA THROUGH FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY STEREO SECCHI COR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Kramar, Maxim; Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon [Department of Physics, Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Chae, Jongchul [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Jie [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2013-10-10

    We present global coronal seismology for the first time, which allows us to determine inhomogeneous magnetic field strength in the extended corona. From the measurements of the propagation speed of a fast magnetosonic wave associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the coronal background density distribution derived from the polarized radiances observed by the STEREO SECCHI COR1, we determined the magnetic field strengths along the trajectories of the wave at different heliocentric distances. We found that the results have an uncertainty less than 40%, and are consistent with values determined with a potential field model and reported in previous works. The characteristics of the coronal medium we found are that (1) the density, magnetic field strength, and plasma β are lower in the coronal hole region than in streamers; (2) the magnetic field strength decreases slowly with height but the electron density decreases rapidly so that the local fast magnetosonic speed increases while plasma β falls off with height; and (3) the variations of the local fast magnetosonic speed and plasma β are dominated by variations in the electron density rather than the magnetic field strength. These results imply that Moreton and EIT waves are downward-reflected fast magnetosonic waves from the upper solar corona, rather than freely propagating fast magnetosonic waves in a certain atmospheric layer. In addition, the azimuthal components of CMEs and the driven waves may play an important role in various manifestations of shocks, such as type II radio bursts and solar energetic particle events.

  12. The solar interface from the photosphere to the chromosphere and corona : contribution of eclipses and EUV filtergrams

    CERN Document Server

    Bazin, Cyrille

    2013-01-01

    Eclipses are very favourable for the photosphere- chromosphere and corona interface observation as the occultation takes place in space, free of parasitic light coming from the occulting disk (the Moon). Independently, EUV filtergrams of the limb region obtained in space were analyzed using one dimensional hydrostatic VAL models but this method ignores the ubiquitous magnetic field emergence phenomenon associated with the chromospheric network. A jump of temperature from 0.01 to 1 MK is observed near the 2 Mm heights and higher, further producing a permanent solar wind flow. The heating processes responsible for this temperature jump and for the flow are not yet fully understood. In this thesis, we reconsider these problems with new high cadence CCD flash spectra, white light (W-L) eclipse images and new EUV images obtained with space-borne instruments. We illustrate the mechanisms of low First Ionisation Potential (FIP) emission lines present in the low layers of the solar atmosphere, and nearby prominences....

  13. Simultaneous Observations of a Large-Scale Wave Event in the Solar Atmosphere: From Photosphere to Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yuandeng

    2012-01-01

    For the first time, we report a large-scale wave that was observed simultaneously in the photosphere, chromosphere, transition region and low corona layers of the solar atmosphere. Using the high temporal and high spatial resolution observations taken by the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope at Hida Observatory and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard Solar Dynamic Observatory, we find that the wave evolved synchronously at different heights of the solar atmosphere, and it propagated at a speed of 605 km/s and showed a significant deceleration (-424 m/s2) in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations. During the initial stage, the wave speed in the EUV observations was 1000 km/s, similar to those measured from the AIA 1700 {\\AA} (967 km/s) and 1600 {\\AA} (893 km/s) observations. The wave was reflected by a remote region with open fields, and a slower wave-like feature at a speed of 220 km/s was also identified following the primary fast wave. In addition, a type-II radio burst was observed ...

  14. Height of Shock Formation in the Solar Corona Inferred from Observations of Type II Radio Bursts and Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Makela, P.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Uddin, W.; Srivastava, A. K.; Joshi, N. C.; Chandra, R.; Manoharan, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    Employing coronagraphic and EUV observations close to the solar surface made by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission, we determined the heliocentric distance of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the starting time of associated metric type II bursts. We used the wave diameter and leading edge methods and measured the CME heights for a set of 32 metric type II bursts from solar cycle 24. We minimized the projection effects by making the measurements from a view that is roughly orthogonal to the direction of the ejection. We also chose image frames close to the onset times of the type II bursts, so no extrapolation was necessary. We found that the CMEs were located in the heliocentric distance range from 1.20 to 1.93 solar radii (Rs), with mean and median values of 1.43 and 1.38 Rs, respectively. We conclusively find that the shock formation can occur at heights substantially below 1.5 Rs. In a few cases, the CME height at type II onset was close to 2 Rs. In these cases, the starting frequency of the type II bursts was very low, in the range 25-40 MHz, which confirms that the shock can also form at larger heights. The starting frequencies of metric type II bursts have a weak correlation with the measured CME/shock heights and are consistent with the rapid decline of density with height in the inner corona.

  15. Radio Diagnostics of Electron Acceleration Sites During the Eruption of a Flux Rope in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Carley, Eoin P; Gallagher, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    Electron acceleration in the solar corona is often associated with flares and the eruption of twisted magnetic structures known as flux ropes. However, the locations and mechanisms of such particle acceleration during the flare and eruption are still subject to much investigation. Observing the exact sites of particle acceleration can help confirm how the flare and eruption are initiated are initiated and how they evolve. Here we use the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to analyse a flare and erupting flux rope on 2014-April-18, while observations from the Nancay Radio Astronomy Facility allows us to diagnose the sites of electron acceleration during the eruption. Our analysis shows evidence for a pre-formed flux rope which slowly rises and becomes destabilised at the time of a C-class flare, plasma jet and the escape of >75 keV electrons from rope center into the corona. As the eruption proceeds, continued acceleration of electrons with energies of ~5 keV occurs above the flux rope for a period over 5 minutes. A...

  16. Time delays in the nonthermal radiation of solar flares according to observations of the CORONAS-F satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsap, Yu. T.; Stepanov, A. V.; Kashapova, L. K.; Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Kopylova, Yu. G.; Goldvarg, T. B.

    2016-07-01

    In 2001-2003, the X-ray and microwave observations of ten solar flares of M- and X-classes were carried out by the CORONAS-F orbital station, the RSTN Sun service, and Nobeyama radio polarimeters. Based on these observations, a correlation analysis of time profiles of nonthermal radiation was performed. On average, hard X-ray radiation outstrips the microwave radiation in 9 events, i.e., time delays are positive. The appearance of negative delays is associated with effective scattering of accelerated electrons in pitch angles, where the length of the free path of a particle is less than the half-length of a flare loop. The additional indications are obtained in favor of the need to account for the effect of magnetic mirrors on the dynamics of energetic particles in the coronal arches.

  17. On the role of repetitive magnetic reconnections in evolution of magnetic flux-ropes in solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Sanjay; Joshi, Bhuwan; Smolarkiewicz, P K

    2016-01-01

    Parker's magnetostatic theorem extended to astrophysical magnetofluids with large magnetic Reynolds number supports ceaseless regeneration of current sheets and hence, spontaneous magnetic reconnections recurring in time. Consequently, a scenario is possible where the repeated reconnections provide an autonomous mechanism governing emergence of coherent structures in astrophysical magnetofluids. In this work, such a scenario is explored by performing numerical computations commensurate with the magnetostatic theorem. In particular, the computations explore the evolution of a flux-rope governed by repeated reconnections in a magnetic geometry resembling bipolar loops of solar corona. The revealed morphology of the evolution process, including onset and ascent of the rope, reconnection locations and the associated topology of the magnetic field lines, agrees with observations, and thus substantiates physical realisability of the advocated mechanism.

  18. Self-similar signature of the active solar corona within the inertial range of solar-wind turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, K; Chapman, S C; Hnat, B; Nicol, R M

    2007-05-25

    We quantify the scaling of magnetic energy density in the inertial range of solar-wind turbulence seen in situ at 1 AU with respect to solar activity. At solar maximum, when the coronal magnetic field is dynamic and topologically complex, we find self-similar scaling in the solar wind, whereas at solar minimum, when the coronal fields are more ordered, we find multifractality. This quantifies the solar-wind signature that is of direct coronal origin and distinguishes it from that of local MHD turbulence, with quantitative implications for coronal heating of the solar wind.

  19. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation Module for the Global Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, Keiji; Liu, Yang; Bobra, Monica G; Sun, Xudong D; Norton, Aimee A

    2015-01-01

    Time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation modules are implemented at the Joint Science Operation Center (JSOC) of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The modules regularly produce three-dimensional data of the time-relaxed minimum-energy state of the solar corona using global solar-surface magnetic-field maps created from Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) full-disk magnetogram data. With the assumption of polytropic gas with specific heat ratio of 1.05, three types of simulation products are currently generated: i) simulation data with medium spatial resolution using the definitive calibrated synoptic map of the magnetic field with a cadence of one Carrington rotation, ii) data with low spatial resolution using the definitive version of the synchronic frame format of the magnetic field, with a cadence of one day, and iii) low-resolution data using near-real-time (NRT) synchronic format of the magnetic field on daily basis. The MHD data available in the JSOC database are three-dimen...

  20. Heating of the quiet solar corona from measurements of the FET/TESIS instrument on-board the KORONAS-FOTON satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybák, J.; Gömöry, P.; Benz, A.; Bogachev, P.; Brajša, R.

    2010-12-01

    The paper presents the first results of the observations of time evolution of the quiet solar corona brightenings obtained due to very rapid photography of the corona with full-disk EUV telescopes of the FET/TESIS instrument onboard the KORONA FOTON satellite. The measurements were performed simultaneously in the emission of the Fe IX / X 17.1 and Fe VIII 13.1 spectral lines with 10 second temporal cadence and spatial scale of 1.7 arc seconds within one hour. This test observation, carried out on 15 July 2009, was analyzed in order to determine whether this type of observation can be used to identify individual microevents in the solar corona heating that are above the tresholds of spatial and temporal resolutions of the observations of non-active regions in the solar atmosphere. For this purpose, a simple method was used involving cross-correlation of the plasma emission time evolution at different temperatures, each time from observations of identical elements. The results obtained are confronted with the expected observable manifestations of the corona heating via nanoflares. TESIS is a set of instruments for the Sun photography developed in the Lebedev Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences that was launched into orbit in January 2009.

  1. Photometric analysis of the corona during the 20 March 2015 total solar eclipse: density structures, hydrostatic temperatures and magnetic field inference

    CERN Document Server

    Bazin, C; Wittich, R; Koutchmy, S; Mouette, J; Nitschelm, C

    2015-01-01

    We present some new accurate CCD photometry analysis of the white light solar corona at the time of the last 20 March 2015 total eclipse (airborne observations on a Falcon 7X and at ground-based Svalbard). We measured coronal brightness profiles taken along radial directions from 1.001 to 3 solar radii in the northern, southern and equatorial regions, after removing the F corona and the sky background. These studies allow to evaluate the density gradients, structures and temperature heterogeneity, by considering the Thomson scattering in white light of the K corona and also emissions of the EUV Fe XII 193A (1 to 2 MK) and Fe XI 171/174 (lower temperature) simultaneously observed by SDO/AIA and SWAP Proba2 space missions. Some dispersion between the regions is noticed. The limitation of the hydrostatic equilibrium assumption in the solar atmosphere is discussed as well as the contribution of the magnetic field pressure gradients as illustrated by a comparison with the model stationary magnetic corona from Pred...

  2. Magnetic Diagnostics of the Solar Corona: Synthesizing Optical and Radio Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, R.; White, S. M.; Judge, P. G.

    2017-09-01

    In this contribution we review the current state-of-the-art of coronal magnetometry, in both optical and radio domains. We address the achievable objectives and the challenges of present measurement techniques and interpretation tools. In particular, we focus on the role that these observations can play for constraining and validating numerical models of the global coronal magnetic field. With regard to optical techniques, we mainly focus on the use of M1 diagnostics, further developing the theory of the formation of their polarization signatures in the magnetized corona.

  3. Validation of Spherically Symmetric Inversion by Use of a Tomographically Reconstructed Three-Dimensional Electron Density of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the coronal electron density by the inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) measurements by coronagraphs is a classic problem in solar physics. An inversion technique based on the spherically symmetric geometry (spherically symmetric inversion, SSI) was developed in the 1950s and has been widely applied to interpret various observations. However, to date there is no study of the uncertainty estimation of this method. We here present the detailed assessment of this method using a three-dimensional (3D) electron density in the corona from 1.5 to 4 solar radius as a model, which is reconstructed by a tomography method from STEREO/COR1 observations during the solar minimum in February 2008 (Carrington Rotation, CR 2066).We first show in theory and observation that the spherically symmetric polynomial approximation (SSPA) method and the Van de Hulst inversion technique are equivalent. Then we assess the SSPA method using synthesized pB images from the 3D density model, and find that the SSPA density values are close to the model inputs for the streamer core near the plane of the sky (POS) with differences generally smaller than about a factor of two; the former has the lower peak but extends more in both longitudinal and latitudinal directions than the latter. We estimate that the SSPA method may resolve the coronal density structure near the POS with angular resolution in longitude of about 50 deg. Our results confirm the suggestion that the SSI method is applicable to the solar minimum streamer (belt), as stated in some previous studies. In addition, we demonstrate that the SSPA method can be used to reconstruct the 3D coronal density, roughly in agreement with the reconstruction by tomography for a period of low solar activity (CR 2066). We suggest that the SSI method is complementary to the 3D tomographic technique in some cases, given that the development of the latter is still an ongoing research effort.

  4. Design of a solar-blind ultraviolet zoom lens in corona detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sirui; Fan, Wenwen; Chen, Yu

    2016-11-01

    Based on the requirements of corona detection on searching targets with large field of view and detecting objects with small field of view, a refractive zoom optical system using mechanical compensation technology, which operates at 0.24μm~0.28μm wavelength ,is designed with aspherical surfaces. S8844-0909 ultraviolet CCD is selected as a sensor with pixel size 24μm×24μm. The zooming region is 35mm~70mm with F number of 3.5 and the corresponding field of view of 7°~14°.The zoom lens consists of seven lenses with two aspherical surfaces, so it has the advantages of compact size and simple structure. The results show that in full zooming range, the MTF values over all fields of view are above 0.8 at cut-off frequency 21lp/mm. The distortion is less than 5%.The zoom lens system has good image quality and stable image plane, which meets the overall design requirements of the optical system. Keywords: Corona detection, Zoom lens, Aspheric surface

  5. Fine strand-like structure in the solar corona from MHD transverse oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Antolin, P; Van Doorsselaere, T

    2014-01-01

    Current analytical and numerical modelling suggest the existence of ubiquitous thin current sheets in the corona that could explain the observed heating requirements. On the other hand, new high resolution observations of the corona indicate that its magnetic field may tend to organise itself in fine strand-like structures of few hundred kilometres widths. The link between small structure in models and the observed widths of strand-like structure several orders of magnitude larger is still not clear. A popular theoretical scenario is the nanoflare model, in which each strand is the product of an ensemble of heating events. Here, we suggest an alternative mechanism for strand generation. Through forward modelling of 3D MHD simulations we show that small amplitude transverse MHD waves can lead in a few periods time to strand-like structure in loops in EUV intensity images. Our model is based on previous numerical work showing that transverse MHD oscillations can lead to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities that defor...

  6. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation Module for the Global Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Bobra, M. G.; Sun, X. D.; Norton, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation modules are implemented at the Joint Science Operation Center (JSOC) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The modules regularly produce three-dimensional data of the time-relaxed minimum-energy state of the solar corona using global solar-surface magnetic-field maps created from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) full-disk magnetogram data. With the assumption of a polytropic gas with specific-heat ratio of 1.05, three types of simulation products are currently generated: i) simulation data with medium spatial resolution using the definitive calibrated synoptic map of the magnetic field with a cadence of one Carrington rotation, ii) data with low spatial resolution using the definitive version of the synchronic frame format of the magnetic field, with a cadence of one day, and iii) low-resolution data using near-real-time (NRT) synchronic format of the magnetic field on a daily basis. The MHD data available in the JSOC database are three-dimensional, covering heliocentric distances from 1.025 to 4.975 solar radii, and contain all eight MHD variables: the plasma density, temperature, and three components of motion velocity, and three components of the magnetic field. This article describes details of the MHD simulations as well as the production of the input magnetic-field maps, and details of the products available at the JSOC database interface. To assess the merits and limits of the model, we show the simulated data in early 2011 and compare with the actual coronal features observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the near-Earth in-situ data.

  7. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation Module for the Global Solar Corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K; Hoeksema, J T; Liu, Y; Bobra, M G; Sun, X D; Norton, A A

    Time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation modules are implemented at the Joint Science Operation Center (JSOC) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The modules regularly produce three-dimensional data of the time-relaxed minimum-energy state of the solar corona using global solar-surface magnetic-field maps created from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) full-disk magnetogram data. With the assumption of a polytropic gas with specific-heat ratio of 1.05, three types of simulation products are currently generated: i) simulation data with medium spatial resolution using the definitive calibrated synoptic map of the magnetic field with a cadence of one Carrington rotation, ii) data with low spatial resolution using the definitive version of the synchronic frame format of the magnetic field, with a cadence of one day, and iii) low-resolution data using near-real-time (NRT) synchronic format of the magnetic field on a daily basis. The MHD data available in the JSOC database are three-dimensional, covering heliocentric distances from 1.025 to 4.975 solar radii, and contain all eight MHD variables: the plasma density, temperature, and three components of motion velocity, and three components of the magnetic field. This article describes details of the MHD simulations as well as the production of the input magnetic-field maps, and details of the products available at the JSOC database interface. To assess the merits and limits of the model, we show the simulated data in early 2011 and compare with the actual coronal features observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the near-Earth in-situ data.

  8. Entropy mode at a magnetic null point as a possible tool for indirect observation of nanoflares in the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, K.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2011-09-01

    Aims: We aim to explore the dynamics of the entropy mode perturbation excited by an energy release in the vicinity of a magnetic null point that is embedded in a gravitationally stratified solar corona. Methods: We solve two-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic equations numerically to find spatial and temporal signatures of the entropy mode that is triggered impulsively by a spatially localized pulse of the gas pressure. Results: We find that the properties of the entropy mode are determined by the sign of the initial pressure pulse. The initial increase in the gas pressure creates, together with the magnetoacoustic-gravity waves, a stationary void of the rarefied plasma at the launching place, associated with the entropy mode. In contrast, an initial decrease in the gas pressure, which corresponds to a rapid (or catastrophic) cooling, forms a blob of the dense plasma at the launching place. Conclusions: The cool, dense blobs at magnetic null points may be observed in transition region and chromospheric spectral lines at coronal heights off the solar limb and may be associated with the places of nanoflare occurrence. Therefore, extensions of entropy mode studies may produce a diagnostic tool for indirect observations of nanoflares. The dense cool blobs may be affected by the gravity or carried by downflows, hence may initiate a coronal rain.

  9. Generation of Electrostatic Waves via Parametric Instability and Heating of Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnoselskikh, George Machabeli Giorgi Dalakishvili Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    In the upper layers of the solar atmosphere the temperature increases sharply. We studied possibility of the transfer of neutrals motion energy into the electrostatic waves.Electrostatic waves could damp in the upper layers of the solar atmosphere and their energy could be transformed into the thermal energy of the solar atmosphere plasma. When studying the plasma dynamics in the low altitudes of the solar atmosphere, we investigated hydrodynamics of the plasma which consists of thee components-electrons, ions and neutrals. In order to study evolution of disturbances of high amplitudes the parametric resonance technique is used. The dispersion relation for the electrostatic waves excited due tot he motion of neutrals is derived. The frequencies of electromagnetic waves which could be excited due to existence of the acoustic wave are found. The increment of excited electrostatic waves are determined. The motion of the neutrals in the lower solar atmosphere, where ionization rate is low, could excite electrosta...

  10. Validation of Earth atmosphere models using solar EUV observations from the CORONAS and PROBA2 satellites in occultation mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slemzin Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Knowledge of properties of the Earth’s upper atmosphere is important for predicting the lifetime of low-orbit spacecraft as well as for planning operation of space instruments whose data may be distorted by atmospheric effects. The accuracy of the models commonly used for simulating the structure of the atmosphere is limited by the scarcity of the observations they are based on, so improvement of these models requires validation under different atmospheric conditions. Measurements of the absorption of the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation in the upper atmosphere below 500 km by instruments operating on low-Earth orbits (LEO satellites provide efficient means for such validation as well as for continuous monitoring of the upper atmosphere and for studying its response to the solar and geomagnetic activity. Method: This paper presents results of measurements of the solar EUV radiation in the 17 nm wavelength band made with the SPIRIT and TESIS telescopes on board the CORONAS satellites and the SWAP telescope on board the PROBA2 satellite in the occulted parts of the satellite orbits. The transmittance profiles of the atmosphere at altitudes between 150 and 500 km were derived from different phases of solar activity during solar cycles 23 and 24 in the quiet state of the magnetosphere and during the development of a geomagnetic storm. We developed a mathematical procedure based on the Tikhonov regularization method for solution of ill-posed problems in order to retrieve extinction coefficients from the transmittance profiles. The transmittance profiles derived from the data and the retrieved extinction coefficients are compared with simulations carried out with the NRLMSISE-00 atmosphere model maintained by Naval Research Laboratory (USA and the DTM-2013 model developed at CNES in the framework of the FP7 project ATMOP. Results: Under quiet and slightly disturbed magnetospheric conditions during high and low solar activity the

  11. Validation of Earth atmosphere models using solar EUV observations from the CORONAS and PROBA2 satellites in occultation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Ulyanov, Artyom; Gaikovich, Konstantin; Kuzin, Sergey; Pertsov, Andrey; Berghmans, David; Dominique, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Aims: Knowledge of properties of the Earth's upper atmosphere is important for predicting the lifetime of low-orbit spacecraft as well as for planning operation of space instruments whose data may be distorted by atmospheric effects. The accuracy of the models commonly used for simulating the structure of the atmosphere is limited by the scarcity of the observations they are based on, so improvement of these models requires validation under different atmospheric conditions. Measurements of the absorption of the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation in the upper atmosphere below 500 km by instruments operating on low-Earth orbits (LEO) satellites provide efficient means for such validation as well as for continuous monitoring of the upper atmosphere and for studying its response to the solar and geomagnetic activity. Method: This paper presents results of measurements of the solar EUV radiation in the 17 nm wavelength band made with the SPIRIT and TESIS telescopes on board the CORONAS satellites and the SWAP telescope on board the PROBA2 satellite in the occulted parts of the satellite orbits. The transmittance profiles of the atmosphere at altitudes between 150 and 500 km were derived from different phases of solar activity during solar cycles 23 and 24 in the quiet state of the magnetosphere and during the development of a geomagnetic storm. We developed a mathematical procedure based on the Tikhonov regularization method for solution of ill-posed problems in order to retrieve extinction coefficients from the transmittance profiles. The transmittance profiles derived from the data and the retrieved extinction coefficients are compared with simulations carried out with the NRLMSISE-00 atmosphere model maintained by Naval Research Laboratory (USA) and the DTM-2013 model developed at CNES in the framework of the FP7 project ATMOP. Results: Under quiet and slightly disturbed magnetospheric conditions during high and low solar activity the extinction coefficients

  12. Charge States of Solar Cosmic Rays and Constraints on Acceleration Times and Transport within the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffolo, David

    1997-04-01

    We examine effects on the charge states of solar cosmic ray ions due to shock heating or stripping at suprathermal ion velocities. Recent measurements of the mean charges of various elements after the gradual solar flares of 1992 Oct 30 and 1992 Nov 2 allow one to place limits on the product of the electron density times the acceleration or coronal residence time experienced by the escaping ions. In particular, any residence in coronal loops must be for bird cage model) in which escaping ions travel to distant solar longitudes within coronal loops. The results do not contradict models of distributed shock acceleration of energetic ions from coronal plasma at various solar longitudes, followed by prompt injection into the interplanetary medium.

  13. On the Remote Detection of Suprathermal Ions in the Solar Corona and their Role as Seeds for Solar Energetic Particle Production (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laming, J. M.; Moses, J.; Ko, Y.; Ng, C. K.; Rakowski, C. E.; Tylka, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    We calculate the growth rate for field aligned Alfven waves generated by streaming preshock ions. The ions are assumed to be in a "kappa" distribution, and we calculate growth rates as a function of shock obliquity and kappa, for shocks of different Alfven Mach number. As the shock Alfven Mach number increases, the constraints on kappa and the shock obliquity lessen. Less significant departures from a Maxwellian distribution in the upstream medium are required for wave growth, which may also extend out to quasi-perpendicular shocks of higher obliquity. Taking a positive wave growth in such conditions ahead of a shock as a necessary condition for particle acceleration, we use the derived values of kappa to predict the detectability of a seed particle distribution upstream of shocks of various parameters through spectroscopic observations of the Lyman alpha line profile. Within 3-4 solar radii, suprathermal protons can charge exchange with neutral H in the solar corona giving rise to a kappa distribution of neutral H, that scatters disk Lyman alpha radiation into a line profile with extended wings. We define the essential characteristics of a spectrometer designed to detect such a seed particle population, as a means of forecasting the likely solar energetic particle effectiveness of any following coronal mass ejection. Work supported by basic research funds of the Office of Naval Research and by NASA ADAP grant NNH10A009I.

  14. On the Remote Detection of Suprathermal Ions in the Solar Corona and their Role as Seeds for Solar Energetic Particle Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laming, J. Martin; Moses, Daniel; Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Ng, Chee; Tylka, Allan; Rakowski, Cara

    We calculate the growth rate for field aligned Alfven waves generated by streaming preshock ions. The ions are assumed to be in a "kappa" distribution, and we calculate growth rates as a function of shock obliquity and kappa, for shocks of different Alfven Mach number. As the shock Alfven Mach number increases, the constraints on kappa and the shock obliquity lessen. Less significant departures from a Maxwellian distribution in the upstream medium are required for wave growth, which may also extend out to quasi-perpendicular shocks of higher obliquity. Taking a positive wave growth in such conditions ahead of a shock as a necessary condition for particle acceleration, we use the derived values of kappa to predict the detectability of a seed particle distribution upstream of shocks of various parameters through spectroscopic observations of the Lyman alpha line profile. Within 3-4 solar radii, suprathermal protons can charge exchange with neutral H in the solar corona giving rise to a kappa distribution of neutral H, that scatters disk Lyman alpha radiation into a line profile with extended wings. We define the essential characteristics of a spectrometer designed to detect such a seed particle population, as a means of forecasting the likely solar energetic particle effectiveness of any following coronal mass ejection. Work supported by basic research funds of the Office of Naval Research and by NASA ADAP grant NNH10A009I.

  15. Stereoscopic observations of a solar flare hard X-ray source in the high corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, S. R.; Mctiernan, J.; Loran, J.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    The vertical structure of the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray sources in high coronae and the characteristics of the impulsive soft X-ray emission are investigated on the basis of PVE, ICE, and GOES observations of the energetic flare on February 16, 1984. The average photon spectra observed by these instruments during the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray bursts are summarized. A comparison of these unocculted and partially occulted spectra shows that the sources of the impulsive hard X-ray (greater than about 25 keV) and impulsive soft X-ray (2-5 keV) emissions in this flare extended to coronal altitudes greater than about 200,000 km above the photosphere. At about 100 keV, the ratio of the coronal source brightness to the total source brightness was 0.001 during the impulsive phase and less than about 0.01 during the gradual hard X-ray burst. The sources of the gradual hard X-ray burst and gradual soft X-ray burst were almost completely occulted, indicating that these sources were located at heights less than 200,000 km above the photosphere.

  16. Understanding CME and associated shock in the solar corona by merging multi wavelengths observation

    CERN Document Server

    Zucca, Pietro; Demoulin, Pascal; Kerdraon, Alain; Lecacheux, Alain; Gallagher, Peter T

    2014-01-01

    Using multi-wavelength imaging observations, in EUV, white light and radio, and radio spectral data over a large frequency range, we analyzed the triggering and development of a complex eruptive event. This one includes two components, an eruptive jet and a CME which interact during more than 30 min, and can be considered as physically linked. This was an unusual event. The jet is generated above a typical complex magnetic configuration which has been investigated in many former studies related to the build-up of eruptive jets; this configuration includes fan-field lines originating from a corona null point above a parasitic polarity, which is embedded in one polarity region of large Active Region (AR). The initiation and development of the CME, observed first in EUV, does not show usual signatures. In this case, the eruptive jet is the main actor of this event. The CME appears first as a simple loop system which becomes destabilized by magnetic reconnection between the outer part of the jet and the ambient m...

  17. The Fate of Cool Material in the Hot Corona: Solar Prominences and Coronal Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Antolin, Patrick; Sun, Xudong; Vial, Jean-Claude; Berger, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    As an important chain of the chromosphere-corona mass cycle, some of the million-degree hot coronal mass undergoes a radiative cooling instability and condenses into material at chromospheric or transition-region temperatures in two distinct forms - prominences and coronal rain (some of which eventually falls back to the chromosphere). A quiescent prominence usually consists of numerous long-lasting, filamentary downflow threads, while coronal rain consists of transient mass blobs falling at comparably higher speeds along well-defined paths. It remains puzzling why such material of similar temperatures exhibit contrasting morphologies and behaviors. We report recent SDO/AIA and IRIS observations that suggest different magnetic environments being responsible for such distinctions. Specifically, in a hybrid prominence-coronal rain complex structure, we found that the prominence material is formed and resides near magnetic null points that favor the radiative cooling process and provide possibly a high plasma-beta environment suitable for the existence of meandering prominence threads. As the cool material descends, it turns into coronal rain tied onto low-lying coronal loops in a likely low-beta environment. Such structures resemble to certain extent the so-called coronal spiders or cloud prominences, but the observations reported here provide critical new insights. We will discuss the broad physical implications of these observations for fundamental questions, such as coronal heating and beyond (e.g., in astrophysical and/or laboratory plasma environments).

  18. On the Shape of Force-Free Field Lines in the Solar Corona

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, C.

    2012-02-02

    This paper studies the shape parameters of looped field lines in a linear force-free magnetic field. Loop structures with a sufficient amount of kinking are generally seen to form S or inverse S (Z) shapes in the corona (as viewed in projection). For a single field line, we can ask how much the field line is kinked (as measured by the writhe), and how much neighbouring flux twists about the line (as measured by the twist number). The magnetic helicity of a flux element surrounding the field line can be decomposed into these two quantities. We find that the twist helicity contribution dominates the writhe helicity contribution, for field lines of significant aspect ratio, even when their structure is highly kinked. These calculations shed light on some popular assumptions of the field. First, we show that the writhe of field lines of significant aspect ratio (the apex height divided by the footpoint width) can sometimes be of opposite sign to the helicity. Secondly, we demonstrate the possibility of field line structures which could be interpreted as Z-shaped, but which have a helicity value sign expected of an S-shaped structure. These results suggest that caution should be exercised in using two-dimensional images to draw conclusions on the helicity value of field lines and flux tubes. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  19. Observational Evidence for the Associated Formation of Blobs and Raining Inflows in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Diaz, E.; Rouillard, A. P.; Davies, J. A.; Lavraud, B.; Sheeley, N. R.; Pinto, R. F.; Kilpua, E.; Plotnikov, I.; Genot, V.

    2017-01-01

    The origin of the slow solar wind is still a topic of much debate. The continual emergence of small transient structures from helmet streamers is thought to constitute one of the main sources of the slow wind. Determining the height at which these transients are released is an important factor in determining the conditions under which the slow solar wind forms. To this end, we have carried out a multipoint analysis of small transient structures released from a north–south tilted helmet streamer into the slow solar wind over a broad range of position angles during Carrington Rotation 2137. Combining the remote-sensing observations taken by the Solar-TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) mission with coronagraphic observations from the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft, we show that the release of such small transient structures (often called blobs), which subsequently move away from the Sun, is associated with the concomitant formation of transient structures collapsing back toward the Sun; the latter have been referred to by previous authors as “raining inflows.” This is the first direct association between outflowing blobs and raining inflows, which locates the formation of blobs above the helmet streamers and gives strong support that the blobs are released by magnetic reconnection.

  20. Structure, Dynamics, and Spectra of the Solar Corona at the 2013 and 2015 Total Eclipses and Plans for 2017's American Totality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Dantowitz, Ronald; Voulgaris, Aristeidis

    2016-01-01

    We observed the total solar eclipses of 3 November 2013 from Gabon and of 20 March 2015 from Svalbard in clear skies with cameras to image the solar corona at high resolution and with spectrographs for coronal emission lines. We report on the composite images showing coronal structure and (in comparison with other sites' images) dynamics, as well as the relation of our inner- and middle-corona composite images with surface EUV images from SDO and SWAP and with the outer-corona images from the coronagraphs on SOHO/LASCO. Our spectra show not only the common forbidden lines of Fe XIV (green line) and Fe X (red line) but also rarer species such as Ca XV. Finally, we describe our planned suite of observations for the 21 August 2017 solar eclipse, whose path of totality will cross the United States from Pacific to Atlantic, with more-favorable cloudiness statistics for western sites.Our Gabon and Svalbard expeditions were supported by grants from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

  1. Long-duration neutron production by nonflaring transients in the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, William C.; Lawrence, David J.; Vestrand, W. Thomas; Baker, Daniel N.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Rodgers, Douglas J.

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to study neutron enhancements observed using the Neutron Spectrometer aboard MESSENGER in order to identify events that may have been generated at/or near the Sun by solar transients. To securely establish an origin of the observed neutrons that is nonlocal to the MESSENGER spacecraft, a measurement of the energetic ion environment local to MESSENGER is needed. For this purpose, we use energetic ion spectrometers on several spacecraft at 1 AU when they were magnetically connected to MESSENGER during an event. We report strong evidence that for six neutron events studied in detail, the detected neutrons do not likely have a local spacecraft origin. By implication, most of the detected neutrons for these six events may have originated near the Sun, generated by many moderate-level solar eruptive events that produce an extended solar exosphere of moderate-energy neutrons, protons, and electrons.

  2. The Effects of Differential Rotation on the Magnetic Structure of the Solar Corona: MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionello, Roberto; Riley, Pete; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2004-01-01

    Coronal holes are magnetically open regions from which the solar wind streams. Magnetic reconnection has been invoked to reconcile the apparently rigid rotation of coronal holes with the differential rotation of magnetic flux in the photosphere. This mechanism might also be relevant to the formation of the slow solar wind, the properties of which seem to indicate an origin from the opening of closed magnetic field lines. We have developed a global MHD model to study the effect of differential rotation on the coronal magnetic field. Starting from a magnetic flux distribution similar to that of Wang et al., which consists of a bipolar magnetic region added to a background dipole field, we applied differential rotation over a period of 5 solar rotations. The evolution of the magnetic field and of the boundaries of coronal holes are in substantial agreement with the findings of Wang et al.. We identified examples of interchange reconnection and other changes of topology of the magnetic field. Possible consequences for the origin of the slow solar wind are also discussed.

  3. Mode Conversion of Langmuir to Electromagnetic Waves with Parallel Inhomogeneity in the Solar Wind and the Corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Hwa; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, Peter A.

    2008-06-09

    Linear mode conversion of Langmuir waves to radiation near the plasma frequency at density gradients is potentially relevant to multiple solar radio emissions, ionospheric radar experiments, laboratory plasma devices, and pulsars. Here we study mode conversion in warm magnetized plasmas using a numerical electron fluid simulation code with the density gradient parallel to the ambient magnetic field B0 for a range of incident Langmuir wavevectors. Our results include: (1) Both o- and x-mode waves are produced for Ω ∝ (ωL)1/3(ωc/ω) somewhat less than 1, contrary to previous ideas. Only o mode is produced for Ω and somewhat greater than 1.5. Here ωc is the (angular) electron cyclotron frequency, ω the angular wave frequency, and L the length scale of the (linear) density gradient. (2) In the unmagnetized limit, equal amounts of o- and x-mode radiation are produced. (3) The mode conversion window narrows as Ω increases. (4) As Ω increases the total electromagnetic field changes from linear to circular polarization, with the o- and x- mode signals remaining circularly polarized. (5) The conversion efficiency to the x mode decreases monotonically as Ω increases while the o-mode conversion efficiency oscillates due to an interference phenomenon between incoming and reflected Langmuir/z modes. (6) The total conversion efficiency for wave energy from the Langmuir/z mode to radiation is typically less than 10%, but the corresponding power efficiencies differ by the ratio of the group speeds for each mode and are of order 50 – 70%. (7) The interference effect and the disappearance of the x mode at Ω somewhat greater than 1 can be accounted for semiquantitatively using a WKB-like analysis. (8) Constraints on density turbulence are developed for the x mode to be generated and be able to propagate from the source. (9) Standard parameters for the corona and the solar wind near 1 AU suggest that linear mode conversion should produce both o- and x- mode radiation for

  4. Studies of acceleration processes in the corona using ion measurements on the solar probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1978-01-01

    The energy spectra and composition of particles escaping from the Sun provide essential information on mechanisms responsible for their acceleration, and may also be used to characterize the regions where they are accelerated and confined and through which they propagate. The suprathermal energy range, which extends from solar wind energies (approximately 1 KeV) to about 1 MeV/nucleon, is of special interest to studies of nonthermal acceleration processes because a large fraction of particles is likely to be accelerated into this energy range. Data obtained from near earth observations of particles in the suprathermal energy range are reviewed. The necessary capabilities of an a ion composition experiment in the solar probe mission and the required ion measurements are discussed. A possible configuration of an instrument consisting of an electrostatic deflection system, modest post acceleration, and a time of flight versus energy system is described as well as its possible location on the spacecraft.

  5. Modelling the Global Solar Corona II: Coronal Evolution and Filament Chirality Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Yeates, A R; Van Ballegooijen, A A

    2007-01-01

    The hemispheric pattern of solar filaments is considered using newly-developed simulations of the real photospheric and 3D coronal magnetic fields over a 6-month period, on a global scale. The magnetic field direction in the simulation is compared directly with the chirality of observed filaments, at their observed locations. In our model the coronal field evolves through a continuous sequence of nonlinear force-free equilibria, in response to the changing photospheric boundary conditions and the emergence of new magnetic flux. In total 119 magnetic bipoles with properties matching observed active regions are inserted. These bipoles emerge twisted and inject magnetic helicity into the solar atmosphere. When we choose the sign of this active-region helicity to match that observed in each hemisphere, the model produces the correct chirality for up to 96% of filaments, including exceptions to the hemispheric pattern. If the emerging bipoles have zero helicity, or helicity of the opposite sign, then this percenta...

  6. Fragmentation of electric currents in the solar corona by plasma flows

    CERN Document Server

    Nickeler, Dieter H; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Kraus, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    We consider a magnetic configuration consisting of an arcade structure and a detached plasmoid, resulting from a magnetic reconnection process, as is typically found in connection with solar flares. We study spontaneous current fragmentation caused by shear and vortex plasma flows. An exact analytical transformation method was applied to calculate self-consistent solutions of the nonlinear stationary MHD equations. The assumption of incompressible field-aligned flows implies that both the Alfven Mach number and the mass density are constant on field lines. We first calculated nonlinear MHS equilibria with the help of the Liouville method, emulating the scenario of a solar eruptive flare configuration with plasmoids and flare arcade. Then a Mach number profile was constructed that describes the upflow along the open magnetic field lines and implements a vortex flow inside the plasmoid. This Mach number profile was used to map the MHS equilibrium to the stationary one. We find that current fragmentation takes p...

  7. North-south asymmetric solar cycle evolution: Signatures in the photosphere and consequences in the corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, I. I.; Mursula, K., E-mail: ilpo.virtanen@oulu.fi [University of Oulu, P. O. Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2014-02-01

    The heliospheric current sheet is the continuum of the coronal magnetic equator that divides the heliospheric magnetic field into two sectors (polarities). Several recent studies have shown that the heliospheric current sheet is southward shifted during approximately 3 years in the solar declining phase (the so-called bashful ballerina phenomenon). In this article we study the hemispherical asymmetry in the photospheric and coronal magnetic fields using Wilcox Solar Observatory measurements of the photospheric magnetic field since 1976 as well as the potential field source surface model. Multipole analysis of the photospheric magnetic field shows that during the late declining phase of solar cycles since the 1970s, the 'bashful ballerina phenomenon' is a consequence of the g{sub 2}{sup 0} quadrupole term, signed oppositely to the dipole moment. Surges of new flux transport magnetic field from low latitudes to the poles, thus leading to a systematically varying contribution to the g{sub 2}{sup 0}-term from different latitudes. In the case of a north-south asymmetric flux production, this is seen as a quadrupole contribution traveling toward higher latitudes. When the quadrupole term is largest, the main contribution comes from the polar latitudes. At least during the four recent solar cycles, the g{sub 2}{sup 0}-term arises because the magnitude of the southern polar field is larger than the magnitude found in the north in the declining phase of the cycle. In the heliosphere this hemispheric asymmetry of the coronal fields is seen as a southward shift of the heliospheric current sheet by about 2°.

  8. North-South Asymmetric Solar Cycle Evolution: Signatures in the Photosphere and Consequences in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, I. I.; Mursula, K.

    2014-02-01

    The heliospheric current sheet is the continuum of the coronal magnetic equator that divides the heliospheric magnetic field into two sectors (polarities). Several recent studies have shown that the heliospheric current sheet is southward shifted during approximately 3 years in the solar declining phase (the so-called bashful ballerina phenomenon). In this article we study the hemispherical asymmetry in the photospheric and coronal magnetic fields using Wilcox Solar Observatory measurements of the photospheric magnetic field since 1976 as well as the potential field source surface model. Multipole analysis of the photospheric magnetic field shows that during the late declining phase of solar cycles since the 1970s, the "bashful ballerina phenomenon" is a consequence of the g^{0}_{2} quadrupole term, signed oppositely to the dipole moment. Surges of new flux transport magnetic field from low latitudes to the poles, thus leading to a systematically varying contribution to the g^{0}_{2}-term from different latitudes. In the case of a north-south asymmetric flux production, this is seen as a quadrupole contribution traveling toward higher latitudes. When the quadrupole term is largest, the main contribution comes from the polar latitudes. At least during the four recent solar cycles, the g^{0}_{2}-term arises because the magnitude of the southern polar field is larger than the magnitude found in the north in the declining phase of the cycle. In the heliosphere this hemispheric asymmetry of the coronal fields is seen as a southward shift of the heliospheric current sheet by about 2°.

  9. Modeling the Corona and Solar Wind using ADAPT Maps that Include Far-Side Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    document for any purpose other than Government procurement does not in any way obligate the U.S. Government. The fact that the Government formulated...Government’s approval or disapproval of its ideas or findings. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE...Los Alamos National Laboratory ( LANL ) and the National Solar Observatory (NSO), has developed a model that produces more realistic estimates of the

  10. Comparing the solar magnetic field in the corona and in the inner heliosphere during solar cycles 21-23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, I. I.; Mursula, K.

    2009-04-01

    We compare the open solar magnetic field estimated by the PFSS model based on the WSO photospheric field observations, with the inner heliospheric magnetic field. We trace the observed radial HMF into the coronal PFSS boundary at 2.5 solar radii using the observed solar wind velocity, and determine the PFSS model field at the line-of-sight footpoint. Comparing the two field values, we calculate the power n of the apparent decrease of the radial field. According to expectations based on Maxwell's equations, also reproduced by Parker's HMF model, the radial HMF field should decrease with n=2. However, comparison gives considerably lower values of n, indicating the effect of HCS in the PFSS model and the possible superexpansion. The n values vary with solar cycle, being roughly 1.3-1.4 at minima and about 1.7 at maxima. Interestingly, the n values for the two HMF sectors show systematic differences in the late declining to minimum phase, with smaller n values for the HMF sector dominant in the northern hemisphere. This is in agreement with the smaller field value in the northern hemisphere and the southward shifted HCS, summarized by the concept of the bashful ballerina. We also find that the values of n during the recent years, in the late declining phase of solar cycle 23, are significantly larger than during the same phase of the previous cycles. This agrees with the exceptionally large tilt of the solar dipole at the end of cycle 23. We also find that the bashful ballerina appears even during SC 23 but the related hemispheric differences are smaller than during the previous cycles.

  11. Using the ionospheric response to the solar eclipse on 20 March 2015 to detect spatial structure in the solar corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C J; Bradford, J; Bell, S A; Wilkinson, J; Barnard, L; Smith, D; Tudor, S

    2016-09-28

    The total solar eclipse that occurred over the Arctic region on 20 March 2015 was seen as a partial eclipse over much of Europe. Observations of this eclipse were used to investigate the high time resolution (1 min) decay and recovery of the Earth's ionospheric E-region above the ionospheric monitoring station in Chilton, UK. At the altitude of this region (100 km), the maximum phase of the eclipse was 88.88% obscuration of the photosphere occurring at 9:29:41.5 UT. In comparison, the ionospheric response revealed a maximum obscuration of 66% (leaving a fraction, Φ, of uneclipsed radiation of 34±4%) occurring at 9:29 UT. The eclipse was re-created using data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory to estimate the fraction of radiation incident on the Earth's atmosphere throughout the eclipse from nine different emission wavelengths in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray spectrum. These emissions, having varying spatial distributions, were each obscured differently during the eclipse. Those wavelengths associated with coronal emissions (94, 211 and 335 Å) most closely reproduced the time varying fraction of unobscured radiation observed in the ionosphere. These results could enable historic ionospheric eclipse measurements to be interpreted in terms of the distribution of EUV and X-ray emissions on the solar disc.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  12. Interacting Coronae of Two T Tauri Stars: First Observational Evidence for Solar-Like Helmet Streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    km s−1 and 41.9 km s−1 ( Welty 1995), assuming that the spin axes of the stars are par- allel to the axis of the orbit and using the orbital inclination...Magnetic Fields in the Universe: From Laboratory and Stars to Primordial Structures, AIPC, 784, 183 Feigelson, E. D., Welty , A. D., Imhoff, C., et al...894 Vourlidas, A. 2006, Solar Activity and its Magnetic Origin, ed. V. Bothmer, & A. Hady (Cambridge University Press), 197 Welty , A. D. 1995, AJ

  13. Forbidden lines of the solar corona and transition zone - 975-3000 A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, G. D.; Brueckner, G. E.; Tousey, R.

    1977-01-01

    Forbidden lines characteristic of plasmas at temperatures of 50,000 to 3 million K are observed in ATM UV spectra. Identifications, accurate wavelengths, ionization classes, intensities, and half-widths are presented. Coronal blends with He II at 1640 A are noted. Variations in nonthermal velocities with limb distance are observed. Doppler shifts in the coronal lines observed on the disk may be related to the solar wind. The coincidence of two lines with F IV(3P-5S) is evidence for atomic fluorine in the sun.

  14. NUMERICAL STUDY ON IN SITU PROMINENCE FORMATION BY RADIATIVE CONDENSATION IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, T.; Yokoyama, T., E-mail: kaneko@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-06-10

    We propose an in situ formation model for inverse-polarity solar prominences and demonstrate it using self-consistent 2.5 dimensional MHD simulations, including thermal conduction along magnetic fields and optically thin radiative cooling. The model enables us to form cool dense plasma clouds inside a flux rope by radiative condensation, which is regarded as an inverse-polarity prominence. Radiative condensation is triggered by changes in the magnetic topology, i.e., formation of the flux rope from the sheared arcade field, and by thermal imbalance due to the dense plasma trapped inside the flux rope. The flux rope is created by imposing converging and shearing motion on the arcade field. Either when the footpoint motion is in the anti-shearing direction or when heating is proportional to local density, the thermal state inside the flux rope becomes cooling-dominant, leading to radiative condensation. By controlling the temperature of condensation, we investigate the relationship between the temperature and density of prominences and derive a scaling formula for this relationship. This formula suggests that the proposed model reproduces the observed density of prominences, which is 10–100 times larger than the coronal density. Moreover, the time evolution of the extreme ultraviolet emission synthesized by combining our simulation results with the response function of the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly filters agrees with the observed temporal and spatial intensity shift among multi-wavelength extreme ultraviolet emission during in situ condensation.

  15. The Coronal Global Evolutionary Model (CGEM): Using HMI Vector Magnetogram and Doppler Data to Model the Buildup of Free Magnetic Energy in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, George H; Bercik, David J; Kazachenko, Maria D; Lynch, Benjamin J; Welsch, Brian T; Hoeksema, J Todd; Hayashi, Keiji; Liu, Yang; Norton, Aimee A; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Sun, Xudong; DeRosa, Marc L; Cheung, Mark C M

    2015-01-01

    The most violent space weather events (eruptive solar flares and coronal mass ejections) are driven by the release of free magnetic energy stored in the solar corona. Energy can build up on timescales of hours to days, and then may be suddenly released in the form of a magnetic eruption, which then propagates through interplanetary space, possibly impacting the Earth's space environment. Can we use the observed evolution of the magnetic and velocity fields in the solar photosphere to model the evolution of the overlying solar coronal field, including the storage and release of magnetic energy in such eruptions? The objective of CGEM, the Coronal Global Evolutionary Model, funded by the NASA/NSF Space Weather Modeling program, is to develop and evaluate such a model for the evolution of the coronal magnetic field. The evolving coronal magnetic field can then be used as a starting point for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the corona, which can then be used to drive models of heliospheric evolution and predi...

  16. The Coronal Global Evolutionary Model: Using HMI Vector Magnetogram and Doppler Data to Model the Buildup of Free Magnetic Energy in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, G. H.; Abbett, W. P.; Bercik, D. J.; Kazachenko, M. D.; Lynch, B. J.; Welsch, B. T.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Hayashi, K.; Liu, Y.; Norton, A. A.; Dalda, A. Sainz; Sun, X.; DeRosa, M. L.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2015-06-01

    The most violent space weather events (eruptive solar flares and coronal mass ejections) are driven by the release of free magnetic energy stored in the solar corona. Energy can build up on timescales of hours to days, and then may be suddenly released in the form of a magnetic eruption, which then propagates through interplanetary space, possibly impacting the Earth's space environment. Can we use the observed evolution of the magnetic and velocity fields in the solar photosphere to model the evolution of the overlying solar coronal field, including the storage and release of magnetic energy in such eruptions? The objective of CGEM, the Coronal Global Evolutionary Model, funded by the NASA/NSF Space Weather Modeling program, is to develop and evaluate such a model for the evolution of the coronal magnetic field. The evolving coronal magnetic field can then be used as a starting point for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the corona, which can then be used to drive models of heliospheric evolution and predictions of magnetic field and plasma density conditions at 1AU.

  17. Intermittent heating of the corona as an alternative to generate fast solar wind flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grappin, R. [Observatoire de Meudon, DAEC, 92195 Meudon (France); Mangeney, A. [Observatoire de Meudon, DESPA, 92195 Meudon (France); Schwartz, S.J. [Centre dEtude Spatial des Rayonnements, BP 4346, 31028 Toulouse (France); Feldman, W.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS D466, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1999-06-01

    We discuss a new alternative to the generation of fast streams which does not require momentum addition beyond the critical point. We consider the consequences on the solar wind of temporally intermittent heat depositions at the base of the wind. With the help of 1d hydrodynamic simulations we show that the instantaneous wind velocity profile fluctuates around an average profile well above the one corresponding to the Parker solution with a coronal temperature equal to the average coronal temperature imposed at the bottom of the numerical domain. The origin of this result lies in a previously overlooked phenomenon, the overexpansion of hot plasma regions in the subsonic wind. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Decayless low-amplitude kink oscillations: a common phenomenon in the solar corona?

    CERN Document Server

    Anfinogentov, S A; Nisticò, G

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the decayless regime of coronal kink oscillations recently discovered in the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA data. In contrast to decaying kink oscillations that are excited by impulsive dynamical processes, this type of transverse oscillations is not connected to any external impulsive impact, such as a flare or CME, and does not show any significant decay. Moreover the amplitude of these decayless oscillations is typically lower than that of decaying oscillations. The aim of this research is to estimate the prevalence of this phenomenon and its characteristic signatures. We analysed 21 active regions (NOAA 11637--11657) observed in January 2013 in the 171 A channel of SDO/AIA. For each active region we inspected six hours of observations, constructing time-distance plots for the slits positioned across pronounced bright loops. The oscillatory patterns in time-distance plots were visually identified and the oscillation periods and amplitudes were measured. We also estimated the length of ...

  19. Evidence for shock generation in the solar corona in the absence of coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eselevich, V. G.; Eselevich, M. V.; Zimovets, I. V.; Sharykin, I. N.

    2017-09-01

    The solar event SOL2012-10-23T03:13, which was associated with a X1.8 flare without an accompanying coronal mass ejection (CME) and with a Type II radio burst, is analyzed. A method for constructing the spatial and temporal profiles of the difference brightness detected in the AIA/SDOUVand EUV channels is used together with the analysis of the Type II radio burst. The formation and propagation of a region of compression preceded by a collisional shock detected at distances R shock could be due to a transient (impulsive) action exerted on the surrounding plasma by an eruptive, high-temperature magnetic rope. The initial instability and eruption of this rope could be initiated by emerging magnetic flux, and its heating from magnetic reconnection. The cessation of the eruption of the rope could result from its interaction with surrounding magnetic structures (coronal loops).

  20. Fast magnetoacoustic wave trains of sausage symmetry in cylindrical waveguides of the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Shestov, S; Kuzin, S

    2015-01-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves guided along the magnetic field by plasma non-uniformities, in particular coronal loops, fibrils and plumes, are known to be highly dispersive, which leads to the formation of quasi-periodic wave trains excited by a broadband impulsive driver, e.g. a solar flare. We investigated effects of cylindrical geometry on the fast sausage wave train formation. We performed magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of fast magnetoacoustic perturbations of a sausage symmetry, propagating from a localised impulsive source along a field-aligned plasma cylinder with a smooth radial profile of the fast speed. The wave trains are found to have pronounced period modulation, with the longer instant period seen in the beginning of the wave train. The wave trains have also a pronounced amplitude modulation. Wavelet spectra of the wave trains have characteristic tadpole features, with the broadband large-amplitude heads preceding low-amplitude quasi-monochromatic tails. The mean period of the wave train...

  1. Explaining Inverted Temperature Loops in the Quiet Solar Corona with Magnetohydrodynamic Wave Mode Conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Schiff, Avery J

    2016-01-01

    Coronal loops trace out bipolar, arch-like magnetic fields above the Sun's surface. Recent measurements that combine rotational tomography, extreme ultraviolet imaging, and potential-field extrapolation have shown the existence of large loops with inverted temperature profiles; i.e., loops for which the apex temperature is a local minimum, not a maximum. These "down loops" appear to exist primarily in equatorial quiet regions near solar minimum. We simulate both these and the more prevalent large-scale "up loops" by modeling coronal heating as a time-steady superposition of: (1) dissipation of incompressible Alfven-wave turbulence, and (2) dissipation of compressive waves formed by mode conversion from the initial population of Alfven waves. We found that when a large percentage (> 99%) of the Alfven waves undergo this conversion, heating is greatly concentrated at the footpoints and stable "down loops" are created. In some cases we found loops with three maxima that are also gravitationally stable. Models th...

  2. CORONAS-F observation of gamma-ray emission from the solar flare on 2003 October 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Victoria G.; Yushkov, Boris Yu.; Galkin, Vladimir I.; Kudela, Karel; Kashapova, Larisa K.

    2017-10-01

    Appreciable hard X-ray (HXR) and gamma-ray emissions in the 0.04-150 MeV energy range associated with the 2003 October 29 solar flare (X10/3B) were observed at 20:38-20:58 UT by the SONG instrument onboard the CORONAS-F mission. To restore flare gamma-ray spectra we fitted the SONG energy loss spectra with a three-component model of the incident spectrum: (1) a power law in energy, assumed to be due to electron bremsstrahlung; (2) a broad continuum produced by prompt nuclear de-excitation gamma-lines; and (3) a broad gamma-line generated from pion-decay. We also restored spectra from the RHESSI data, compared them with the SONG spectra and found a reasonable agreement between these spectra in the 0.1-10 MeV energy range. The pion-decay emission was observed from 20:44:20 UT and had its maximum at 20:48-20:51 UT. The power-law spectral index of accelerated protons estimated from the ratio between intensities of different components of gamma rays changed with time. The hardest spectrum with a power-law index S = -3.5 - 3.6 was observed at 20:48-20:51 UT. Time histories of the pion-decay emission and proton spectrum were compared with changes of the locations of flare energy release as shown by RHESSI hard X-ray images and remote and remote Hα brightenings. An apparent temporal correlation between processes of particle acceleration and restructuring of flare magnetic field was found. In particular, the protons were accelerated to subrelativistic energies after radical change of the character of footpoint motion from a converging motion to a separation motion.

  3. Core and Wing Densities of Asymmetric Coronal Spectral Profiles: Implications for the Mass Supply of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Young, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent solar spectroscopic observations have shown that coronal spectral lines can exhibit asymmetric profiles, with enhanced emissions at their blue wings. These asymmetries correspond to rapidly upflowing plasmas at speeds exceeding approximately equal to 50 km per sec. Here, we perform a study of the density of the rapidly upflowing material and compare it with that of the line core that corresponds to the bulk of the plasma. For this task, we use spectroscopic observations of several active regions taken by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer of the Hinode mission. The density sensitive ratio of the Fe(sub XIV) lines at 264.78 and 274.20 Angstroms is used to determine wing and core densities.We compute the ratio of the blue wing density to the core density and find that most values are of order unity. This is consistent with the predictions for coronal nanoflares if most of the observed coronal mass is supplied by chromospheric evaporation driven by the nanoflares. However, much larger blue wing-to-core density ratios are predicted if most of the coronal mass is supplied by heated material ejected with type II spicules. Our measurements do not rule out a spicule origin for the blue wing emission, but they argue against spicules being a primary source of the hot plasma in the corona. We note that only about 40% of the pixels where line blends could be safely ignored have blue wing asymmetries in both Fe(sub XIV) lines. Anticipated sub-arcsecond spatial resolution spectroscopic observations in future missions could shed more light on the origin of blue, red, and mixed asymmetries.

  4. Long term changes in EUV and X-ray emissions from the solar corona and chromosphere as measured by the response of the Earth’s ionosphere during total solar eclipses from 1932 to 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Davis

    Full Text Available Measurements of the ionospheric E region during total solar eclipses in the period 1932–1999 have been used to investigate the fraction of Extreme Ultra Violet and soft X-ray radiation, 8, that is emitted from the limb corona and chromosphere. The relative apparent sizes of the Moon and the Sun are different for each eclipse, and techniques are presented which correct the measurements and, therefore, allow direct comparisons between different eclipses. The results show that the fraction of ionising radiation emitted by the limb corona has a clear solar cycle variation and that the underlying trend shows this fraction has been increasing since 1932. Data from the SOHO spacecraft are used to study the effects of short-term variability and it is shown that the observed long-term rise in 8 has a negligible probability of being a chance occurrence.

    Key words. Ionosphere (solar radiation and cosmic ray effects – Solar physics, astrophysics, and astronomy (corona and transition region

  5. Insensitivity of Line-Ratio Diagnostics to Steady-State Non-Maxwellian Electron Distributions in Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Davila, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    We examine the idea that the corona is heated by a population of nonthermal particles. An upper limit on the size of the nonthermal population is derived by assuming that all of the radiation and conduction losses in the corona are provided by the nonthermal tail of the particle distribution. Only a very small percentage of nonthermal particles are allowed. These particles have a negligable effect on temperature sensitive line ratios typically observed in the EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation).

  6. Numerical Simulation of Fast-mode Magnetosonic Waves Excited by Plasmoid Ejections in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Zhang, Lei; He, Jiansen; Peter, Hardi; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Shaohua; Feng, Xueshang

    2015-02-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory has directly imaged the fast-propagating magnetosonic waves (FMWs) successively propagating outward along coronal magnetic funnels. In this study we perform a numerical investigation of the excitation of FMWs in the interchange reconnection scenario, with footpoint shearing flow being used to energize the system and drive the reconnection. The modeling results show that as a result of magnetic reconnection, the plasma in the current sheet is heated up by Joule dissipation to ~10 MK and is ejected rapidly, developing the hot outflows. Meanwhile, the current sheet is torn into plasmoids, which are shot quickly both upward and downward. When the plasmoids reach the outflow regions, they impact and collide with the ambient magnetic field there, which consecutively launches FMWs. The FMWs propagate outward divergently away from the impact regions, with a phase speed of the Alfvén speed of ~1000 km s-1. In the k - ω diagram of the Fourier wave power, the FMWs display a broad frequency distribution with a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation. With the WKB approximation, at the distance of 15 Mm from the wave source region, we estimate the energy flux of FMWs to be E ~ 7.0 × 106 erg cm-2 s-1, which is ~50 times smaller than the energy flux related to the tube-channeled reconnection outflow. These simulation results indicate that energetically and dynamically the outflow is far more important than the waves.

  7. Solar Corona Loop Studies with AIA: I. Cross-Sectional Temperature Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2011-01-01

    We present a first systematic study on the cross-sectional temperature structure of coronal loops using the six coronal temperature filters of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We analyze a sample of 100 loop snapshots measured at 10 different locations and 10 different times in active region NOAA 11089 on 2010 July 24, 21:00-22:00 UT. The cross-sectional flux profiles are measured and a cospatial background is subtracted in 6 filters in a temperature range of $T \\approx 0.5-16$ MK, and 4 different parameterizations of differential emission measure (DEM) distributions are fitted. We find that the reconstructed DEMs consist predominantly of narrowband peak temperature components with a thermal width of $\\sigma_{log(T)} \\le 0.11\\pm0.02$, close to the temperature resolution limit of the instrument, consistent with earlier triple-filter analysis from TRACE by Aschwanden and Nightingale (2005) and from EIS/Hinode by Warren et al. (2008) or Tripathi et al. (2...

  8. Potential Magnetic Field around a Helical Flux-rope Current Structure in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Petrie, G J D

    2007-01-01

    We consider the potential magnetic field associated with a helical electric line current flow, idealizing the near-potential coronal field within which a highly localized twisted current structure is embedded. It is found that this field has a significant axial component off the helical magnetic axis where there is no current flow, such that the flux winds around the axis. The helical line current field, in including the effects of flux rope writhe, is therefore more topologically complex than straight line and ring current fields sometimes used in solar flux rope models. The axial flux in magnetic fields around confined current structures may be affected by the writhe of these current structures such that the field twists preferentially with the same handedness as the writhe. This property of fields around confined current structures with writhe may be relevant to classes of coronal magnetic flux rope, including structures observed to have sigmoidal forms in soft X-rays and prominence magnetic fields. For ex...

  9. The Solar Corona as probed by Comet Lovejoy (C/2011 W3)

    CERN Document Server

    Raymond, J C; Cranmer, S R; Downs, C

    2014-01-01

    EUV images of Comet Lovejoy (C/2011 W3) from the AIA show striations related to the magnetic field structure in both open and closed magnetic regions. The brightness contrast implies coronal density contrasts of at least a factor of 6 between neighboring flux tubes over scales of a few thousand km. These density structures imply variations in the Alfven speed on a similar scale. They will drastically affect the propagation and dissipation of Alfven waves, and that should be taken into account in models of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. In each striation, the cometary emission moves along the magnetic field and broadens with time. The speed and the rate of broadening are related to the parallel and perpendicular components of the velocities of the cometary neutrals when they become ionized. We use an MHD model of the coronal magnetic field and the theory of pickup ions to compare the measurements with theoretical predictions, in particular with the energy lost to Alfven waves as the cometary ions...

  10. Numerical Study on In-Situ Prominence Formation by Radiative Condensation in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    We propose an in-situ formation model for inverse-polarity solar prominence and demonstrate it using self-consistent 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations, including thermal conduction along magnetic fields and optically thin radiative cooling. The model enables us to form cool dense plasma clouds inside a flux rope by radiative condensation, which is regarded as an inverse-polarity prominence. Radiative condensation is triggered by changes in the magnetic topology, i.e., formation of the flux rope from the sheared arcade field, and by thermal imbalance due to the dense plasma trapped inside the flux rope. The flux rope is created by imposing converging and shearing motion on the arcade field. Either when the footpoint motion is in the anti-shearing direction or when heating is proportional to local density, the thermal state inside the flux rope becomes cooling-dominant, leading to radiative condensation. By controlling the temperature of condensation, we investigate the relationship between the t...

  11. The Kinematics of a Globally Propagating Disturbance in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Long, David M; McAteer, R T James; Bloomfield, D Shaun

    2008-01-01

    The kinematics of a globally propagating disturbance (also known as an ``EIT wave") is discussed using Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) data Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). We show for the first time that an impulsively generated propagating disturbance has similar kinematics in all four EUVI passbands (304, 171, 195, and 284 A). In the 304 A passband the disturbance shows a velocity peak of 238+/-20 kms-1 within ~28 minutes of its launch, varying in acceleration from 76 ms-2 to -102 ms-2. This passband contains a strong contribution from a Si XI line (303.32 A) with a peak formation temperature of ~1.6 MK. The 304 A emission may therefore be coronal rather than chromospheric in origin. Comparable velocities and accelerations are found in the coronal 195 A passband, while lower values are found in the lower cadence 284 A passband. In the higher cadence 171 A passband the velocity varies significantly, peaking at 475+/-47 kms-1 within ~20 minutes of launch, with a variation in acceleration f...

  12. Observational Evidence of Sausage-Pinch Instability in Solar Corona by SDO/AIA

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, A K; Tripathi, Durgesh; Fedun, V; Joshi, N C; Kayshap, P

    2013-01-01

    We present the first observational evidence of the evolution of sausage-pinch instability in Active Region 11295 during a prominence eruption using data recorded on 12 September 2011 by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We have identified a magnetic flux tube visible in AIA 304 \\AA\\ that shows curvatures on its surface with variable cross-sections as well as enhanced brightness. These curvatures evolved and thereafter smoothed out within a time-scale of a minute. The curved locations on the flux tube exhibit a radial outward enhancement of the surface of about 1-2 Mm (factor of 2 larger than the original thickness of the flux tube) from the equilibrium position. AIA 193 \\AA\\ snapshots also show the formation of bright knots and narrow regions inbetween at the four locations as that of 304 \\AA\\ along the flux tube where plasma emission is larger compared to the background. The formation of bright knots over an entire flux tube as well as the narrow regions in ...

  13. Nonlinear Force-Free Magnetic Field Modeling of the Solar Corona: A Critical Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, M. L.; Schrijver, C. J.; Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Lites, B. W.; Aschwanden, M. J.; McTiernan, J. M.; Régnier, S.; Thalmann, J.; Valori, G.; Wheatland, M. S.; Wiegelmann, T.; Cheung, M.; Conlon, P. A.; Fuhrmann, M.; Inhester, B.; Tadesse, T.

    2008-12-01

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) modeling promises to provide accurate representations of the structure of the magnetic field above solar active regions, from which estimates of physical quantities of interest (e.g., free energy and helicity) can be made. However, the suite of NLFFF algorithms have so far failed to arrive at consistent solutions when applied to cases using the highest-available-resolution vector magnetogram data from Hinode/SOT-SP (in the region of the modeling area of interest) and line-of-sight magnetograms from SOHO/MDI (where vector data were not been available). It is our view that the lack of robust results indicates an endemic problem with the NLFFF modeling process, and that this process will likely continue to fail until (1) more of the far-reaching, current-carrying connections are within the observational field of view, (2) the solution algorithms incorporate the measurement uncertainties in the vector magnetogram data, and/or (3) a better way is found to account for the Lorentz forces within the layer between the photosphere and coronal base. In light of these issues, we conclude that it remains difficult to derive useful and significant estimates of physical quantities from NLFFF models.

  14. FAST MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVE TRAINS OF SAUSAGE SYMMETRY IN CYLINDRICAL WAVEGUIDES OF THE SOLAR CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestov, S.; Kuzin, S. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninskii prospekt, 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nakariakov, V. M., E-mail: sshestov@gmail.com [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves guided along the magnetic field by plasma non-uniformities, in particular coronal loops, fibrils, and plumes, are known to be highly dispersive, which lead to the formation of quasi-periodic wave trains excited by a broadband impulsive driver, e.g., a solar flare. We investigated the effects of cylindrical geometry on the fast sausage wave train formation. We performed magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of fast magnetoacoustic perturbations of a sausage symmetry, propagating from a localized impulsive source along a field-aligned plasma cylinder with a smooth radial profile of the fast speed. The wave trains are found to have pronounced period modulation, with the longer instant period seen in the beginning of the wave train. The wave trains also have a pronounced amplitude modulation. Wavelet spectra of the wave trains have characteristic tadpole features, with the broadband large-amplitude heads preceding low-amplitude quasi-monochromatic tails. The mean period of the wave train is about the transverse fast magnetoacoustic transit time across the cylinder. The mean parallel wavelength is about the diameter of the wave-guiding plasma cylinder. Instant periods are longer than the sausage wave cutoff period. The wave train characteristics depend on the fast magnetoacoustic speed in both the internal and external media, the smoothness of the transverse profile of the equilibrium quantities, and also the spatial size of the initial perturbation. If the initial perturbation is localized at the axis of the cylinder, the wave trains contain higher radial harmonics that have shorter periods.

  15. Fast Magnetoacoustic Wave Trains of Sausage Symmetry in Cylindrical Waveguides of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestov, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kuzin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves guided along the magnetic field by plasma non-uniformities, in particular coronal loops, fibrils, and plumes, are known to be highly dispersive, which lead to the formation of quasi-periodic wave trains excited by a broadband impulsive driver, e.g., a solar flare. We investigated the effects of cylindrical geometry on the fast sausage wave train formation. We performed magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of fast magnetoacoustic perturbations of a sausage symmetry, propagating from a localized impulsive source along a field-aligned plasma cylinder with a smooth radial profile of the fast speed. The wave trains are found to have pronounced period modulation, with the longer instant period seen in the beginning of the wave train. The wave trains also have a pronounced amplitude modulation. Wavelet spectra of the wave trains have characteristic tadpole features, with the broadband large-amplitude heads preceding low-amplitude quasi-monochromatic tails. The mean period of the wave train is about the transverse fast magnetoacoustic transit time across the cylinder. The mean parallel wavelength is about the diameter of the wave-guiding plasma cylinder. Instant periods are longer than the sausage wave cutoff period. The wave train characteristics depend on the fast magnetoacoustic speed in both the internal and external media, the smoothness of the transverse profile of the equilibrium quantities, and also the spatial size of the initial perturbation. If the initial perturbation is localized at the axis of the cylinder, the wave trains contain higher radial harmonics that have shorter periods.

  16. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF SAUSAGE-PINCH INSTABILITY IN SOLAR CORONA BY SDO/AIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Joshi, N. C.; Kayshap, P. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 129 (India); Erdelyi, R.; Fedun, V. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Tripathi, Durgesh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2013-03-10

    We present the first observational evidence of the evolution of sausage-pinch instability in active region 11295 during a prominence eruption using data recorded on 2011 September 12 by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We have identified a magnetic flux tube visible in AIA 304 A that shows curvatures on its surface with variable cross-sections as well as enhanced brightness. These curvatures evolved and thereafter smoothed out within a timescale of a minute. The curved locations on the flux tube exhibit a radial outward enhancement of the surface of about 1-2 Mm (a factor of two larger than the original thickness of the flux tube) from the equilibrium position. AIA 193 A snapshots also show the formation of bright knots and narrow regions in-between at the four locations as that of 304 A along the flux tube where plasma emission is larger compared to the background. The formation of bright knots over an entire flux tube as well as the narrow regions in <60 s may be the morphological signature of the sausage instability. We also find the flows of confined plasma (propagation of brightness) in these bright knots along the field lines, which indicates the dynamicity of the flux tube that probably causes the dominance of the longitudinal field component over short temporal scales. The observed longitudinal motion of the plasma frozen in the magnetic field lines further vanishes the formed curvatures and plasma confinements as well as growth of instability to stabilize the flux tube.

  17. Realistic simulation of the emergence of magnetic field generated in a solar convective dynamo from the convection zone into the corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Rempel, Matthias D.; Fan, Yuhong

    2017-08-01

    We present a comprehensive realistic numerical model of emergence of magnetic flux generated in a solar convective dynamo from the convection zone to the corona. The magnetic and velocity fields in a horizontal layer near the top boundary of the solar convective dynamo simulation are used as a time-dependent bottom boundary to drive the radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of the flux bundles through the upper most convection zone to more than 100 Mm above the surface of the Sun. The simualtion allows a direct comparison bewtween model synthesized observable and real obervations of flux emergence processes through different layers of the solar atmopshere.Emerging flux bundles bring more than 1e23 Mx flux to the photosphere in a period of about 50 hours and give rise to several active regions in a horizontal domain of 200 Mm. The mean corona temperature is about 1 MK for the quiet Sun and is significantly increased after active regions form at the photosphere. The flux emergence process produces a lot of dynamical features, such as coronal bright points, jets, waves and propagating disturbances, as well as flares and mass ejections. The biggest flare reaches M2.5 as indicated by synthetic GOES-15 soft X-ray flux. The total magnetic energy released during the eruption is about 5e31 ergs. The flare leads to a significant corona heating. The mean temperature in the coronal reaches more than 5 MK. And plasma in cusp-shaped post-flare loops is heated to several tens MK. The flare is accompanied by the ejection of a giant flux rope that carries cool and dense plasma. The flux rope is formed during the eruption by the reconnection between a sheared arcade that rises up from the low atmosphere above a bipolar sunspot pair and overlying fieldlines that are mostly perpendicular to the axis of the sheared arcade.

  18. Vlasov - Maxwell, Self-consistent Electromagnetic Wave Emission Simulations in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiklauri, David

    2010-12-01

    1.5D Vlasov - Maxwell simulations are employed to model electromagnetic emission generation in a fully self-consistent plasma kinetic model for the first time in the context of solar physics. The simulations mimic the plasma emission mechanism and Larmor-drift instability in a plasma thread that connects the Sun to Earth with the spatial scales compressed appropriately. The effects of spatial density gradients on the generation of electromagnetic radiation are investigated. It is shown that a 1.5D inhomogeneous plasma with a uniform background magnetic field directed transverse to the density gradient is aperiodically unstable to the Larmor-drift instability. The latter results in a novel effect of generation of electromagnetic emission at plasma frequency. The generated perturbations consist of two parts: i) non-escaping (trapped) Langmuir type oscillations, which are localised in the regions of density inhomogeneity, and are highly filamentary, with the period of appearance of the filaments close to electron plasma frequency in the dense regions; and ii) escaping electromagnetic radiation with phase speeds close to the speed of light. When the density gradient is removed ( i.e. when plasma becomes stable to the Larmor-drift instability) and a low density super-thermal, hot beam is injected along the domain, in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, the plasma emission mechanism generates non-escaping Langmuir type oscillations, which in turn generate escaping electromagnetic radiation. It is found that in the spatial location where the beam is injected, standing waves, oscillating at the plasma frequency, are excited. These can be used to interpret the horizontal strips (the narrow-band line emission) observed in some dynamical spectra. Predictions of quasilinear theory are: i) the electron free streaming and ii) the long relaxation time of the beam, in accord with the analytic expressions. These are corroborated via direct, fully-kinetic simulation

  19. Evolution and Activity in the Solar Corona: A Comparison of Coronal and Chromospheric Structures Seen in Soft X-Rays, White Light and H-Alpha Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, Fran

    2001-01-01

    The work completed under this project, 'Evolution and Activity in the Solar Corona: A Comparison of Coronal and Chromospheric Structures Seen in Soft X-Rays, White Light and H-Alpha Emission', includes the following presentations: (1) Analysis of H-alpha Observations of High-altitude Coronal Condensations; (2) Multi-spectral Imaging of Coronal Activity; (3) Measurement and Modeling of Soft X-ray Loop Arcades; (4) A Study of the Origin and Dynamics of CMEs; and various poster presentations and thesis dissertations.

  20. Detection of plasma fluctuations in white-light images of the outer solar corona: investigation of the spatial and temporal evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Telloni, D; Romano, P; Spadaro, D; Antonucci, E

    2013-01-01

    This work focus on the first results on the identification and characterization of periodic plasma density fluctuations in the outer corona, observed in STEREO-A COR1 white-light image time series. A 2D reconstruction of the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the coronal fluctuation power has been performed over the whole plane of the sky, from 1.4 to 4.0 solar radii. The adopted diagnostic tool is based on wavelet transforms. This technique, with respect to the standard Fourier analysis, has the advantage of localizing non-persistent fluctuating features and exploring the variations of the relating wavelet power in both space and time. The map of the variance of the coronal brightness clearly outlines intermittent, spatially coherent fluctuating features, localized along, or adjacent to, the strongest magnetic field lines. In most cases they do not correspond to the coronal structures visible in the brightness maps. The results obtained provide a scenario in which the solar corona shows quasi-per...

  1. Solar corona during the total solar eclipse of 2009. (Czech Title: Sluneční koróna během zatmění Slunce v roce 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marková, E.; Bělík, M.; Křivský, L.; Druckmüller, M.

    2010-12-01

    This work is focused on primary processing of the solar eclipse observations of July 22, 2009. As part of the "Shadow-tracking expedition" project several expeditions were organized to observe the phenomenon. Unfortunately, bad weather conditions prevented a successful observation in the China region. Pre-processing was carried out from images taken at Envetak Atoll in Marshall Islands. From the isophot evolution a corona flattening was found, and from the processed fine structure images a parameter called "source area radius", used mainly for calculations in models of the coronal magnetic fields, was determined. Both of these parameters supplement the data obtained during the previous eclipses, and the first conclusions on the state of the corona during an eclipse are deduced.

  2. The solar flare catalog in the low-energy gamma-ray range based on the AVS-F instrument data onboard the CORONAS-F satellite in 2001-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkhangelskaja, [No Value; Arkhangelsky, AI; Kotov, YD; Kuznetsov, SN; Glyanenko, AS

    2006-01-01

    TheAVS-F apparatus onboard the CORONAS-F satellite (operated from July 31, 2001, to December 6, 2005) was intended for investigation of solar hard X-ray and gamma-ray radiation and for registration of gamma-ray bursts. The AVS-F apparatus constitutes a system for processing the data from two detecto

  3. The solar flare catalog in the low-energy gamma-ray range based on the AVS-F instrument data onboard the CORONAS-F satellite in 2001-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkhangelskaja, [No Value; Arkhangelsky, AI; Kotov, YD; Kuznetsov, SN; Glyanenko, AS

    2006-01-01

    TheAVS-F apparatus onboard the CORONAS-F satellite (operated from July 31, 2001, to December 6, 2005) was intended for investigation of solar hard X-ray and gamma-ray radiation and for registration of gamma-ray bursts. The AVS-F apparatus constitutes a system for processing the data from two detecto

  4. mxCSM: A 100-slit, 6-wavelength wide-field coronal spectropolarimeter for the study of the dynamics and the magnetic fields of the solar corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haosheng eLin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available remendous progress has been made in the field of observational coronal magnetometry in the first decade of the 21st century. With the successful construction of the Coronal Multichannel Magnetometer (CoMP instrument, observations of the linear polarization of the coronal emission lines (CELs, which carry information about the azimuthal direction of the coronal magnetic fields, are now routinely available. However, reliable and regular measurements of the circular polarization signals of the CELs remain illusive. The CEL circular polarization signals allow us to infer the magnetic field strength in the corona, and is critically important {bf of} our understanding of the solar corona. Current telescopes and instrument can only measure the coronal magnetic field strength over a small field of view. Furthermore, the observations require very long integration time that preclude the study of dynamic events even when only a small field of view is required. This paper describes a new instrument concept that employees large-scale multiplexing technology to enhance the efficiency of current coronal spectropolarimeter by more than two orders of magnitude. This will allow for the instrument to increase of the integration time at each spatial location by the same factor, while also achieving a large field of view coverage. We will present the conceptual design of a 100-slit coronal spectropolarimeter that can observe six coronal emission lines simultaneously. Instruments based on this concept will allow us to study the evolution of the coronal magnetic field even with coronagraphs with modest aperture.

  5. Ka-band and X-band observations of the solar corona acquired during the Cassini 2001 superior conjunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous dual-frequency Ka-band (32 GHz) and X-band (8.4 GHz) carrier signal data have been acquired during the superior conjunction of the Cassini spacecraft June 2001, using the NASA Deep Space Network's facilities located in Goldstone, California. The solar elongation angle of the observations varied from -4.1 degrees (-16 solar radii) to -0.6 degrees (-2.3 solar radii). The observed coronal and solar effects on the signals include spectral broadening, amplitude scintillation, phase scintillation, and increased noise. The measurements were generally consistent with existing solar models, except during solar transient events when the signatures of the measurements were observed to increase significantly above the quiet background levels. This is the second solar conjunction of Cassini for which simultaneous X/Ka data were acquired. Both solar conjunctions, conducted in May 2000 and June 2001, occurred near the peak of the current 11 year solar cycle.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamics of atmospheric transients. IV - Nonplane two-dimensional analyses of energy conversion and magnetic field evolution. [during corona following solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.; Nakagawa, Y.; Han, S. M.; Dryer, M.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of the magnetic field and the manner of conversion of thermal energy into different forms in the corona following a solar flare are investigated by means of a nonplane magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) analysis. All three components of magnetic field and velocity are treated in a physically self-consistent manner, with all physical variables as functions of time (t) and two spatial coordinates (r, theta). The difference arising from the initial magnetic field, either twisted (force-free) or non-twisted (potential), is demonstrated. Consideration is given to two initial field topologies (open vs. closed). The results demonstrate that the conversion of magnetic energy is faster for the case of the initially twisted (force-free) field than for the initially untwisted (potential) field. In addition, the twisted field is found to produce a complex structure of the density enhancements.

  7. Corona Borealis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Northern Crown; abbrev. CrB, gen. Coronae Borealis; area 179 sq. deg.) A northern constellation which lies between Boötes and Hercules, and culminates at midnight in mid-May. It represents the crown that in Greek mythology was made by Hephaestus, god of fire, and worn by Princess Ariadne of Crete. Its brightest stars were cataloged by Ptolemy (c. AD 100-175) in the Almagest....

  8. First Detection of Prominence Material Embedded within a 2 × 106 K CME Front Streaming away at 100-1500 km s-1 in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Adalbert; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    2017-06-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the largest and most dynamic explosions detected in the million degree solar corona, with speeds reaching up to 3000 km s-1 at Earth’s orbit. Triggered by the eruption of prominences, in most cases, one of the outstanding questions pertaining to the dynamic CME-prominence system is the fate of the cool {10}4{--}{10}5 {{K}} ejected filaments. We present spectroscopic observations acquired during the 2015 March 20 total solar eclipse, which captured a plethora of redshifted plasmoids from Fe xiv emission at 2× {10}6 {{K}}. Approximately 10% of these plasmoids enshrouded the same neutral and singly ionized plasma below 2× {10}5 {{K}}, observed in prominences anchored at the Sun at that time. This discovery was enabled by the novel design of a dual-channel spectrometer and the exceptionally clear sky conditions on the island of Svalbard during totality. The Doppler redshifts corresponded to speeds ranging from under 100 to over 1500 km s-1. These are the first comprehensive spectroscopic observations to unambiguously detect a 2× {10}6 {{K}} filamentary CME front with inclusions of cool prominence material. The CME front covered a projected area of 2.5× 1.5 {R}{{s}}2 starting from the solar surface. These observations imply that cool prominence inclusions within a CME front maintain their ionic composition during expansion away from the Sun.

  9. Solar Wind Five

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, M. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Topics of discussion were: solar corona, MHD waves and turbulence, acceleration of the solar wind, stellar coronae and winds, long term variations, energetic particles, plasma distribution functions and waves, spatial dependences, and minor ions.

  10. Intensity of the Fe XV emission line corona, the level of geomagnetic activity, and the velocity of the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, B.; Noci, G.

    1976-01-01

    The method of superposed epochs is used to determine the average solar wind velocity and the Kp index following central meridian passage of coronal weak and bright features identified from OSO 7 isophotograms of the Fe XV (284 A) emission line. It is found that bright coronal regions possess magnetic fields of closed configuration, thus reducing particle escape, while coronal holes possess open magnetic field lines favorable to particle escape or enhanced outflow of the solar wind.

  11. On the Discovery of Fast Chromospheric Ejecta of up to 1500 km/s in the Corona within one Radius above the Solar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, Shadia R.; Ding, Adalbert

    2016-05-01

    Using a dual channel imaging spectrograph, centered on the Fe XIV 530.3 nm and Fe XI 789.2 nm coronal forbidden lines, spectral observations were made during the total solar eclipse of 20 March 2015. The slit of the spectrograph covered approximately 8 Rs and was positioned parallel to, and starting at central meridian. The slit scanned the corona out to approximately 1.5 Rs above the limb throughout the duration of totality of approximately 2.5 minutes. Concentrations of Doppler redshifted coronal material ranging from 100 to 1500 km/s, with a spatial extent of up to 0.5 Rs, were detected at different locations along the slit and at the different slit positions. Surprisingly, chromospheric material, characterized by He I 587.6 nm, Mg I triplet 516.7, 517.2 and 518.4 nm, and Fe II 516.9 nm emission, was often associated with the Doppler shifts detected in Fe XIV. Mapping the location of these concentrations on the corresponding white light eclipse image renders a distribution reminiscent of a complex coronal mass ejection front moving away from the observer. Unfortunately, no STEREO observations were available during that time. The LASCO/C2 coronagraph showed very faint outflows, consistent with the bulk of the Doppler-shifted material moving away from the observer. The presence of cool chromospheric material moving away from the Sun provides the first corroboration of the solar origin of reported detection of neutral and low ionization state atoms in the solar wind.

  12. Search for Rapid Changes in the Visible-Light Corona during the 21 June 2001 Total Solar Eclipse

    OpenAIRE

    Rudawy, P.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Buczylko, A.; D. R., William; F. P. Keenan

    2010-01-01

    Some 8000 images obtained with the Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (SECIS) fast-frame CCD camera instrument located at Lusaka, Zambia, during the total eclipse of 21 June 2001 have been analysed to search for short-period oscillations in intensity that could be a signature of solar coronal heating mechanisms by MHD wave dissipation. Images were taken in white-light and Fe xiv green-line (5303 ) channels over 205 seconds (frame rate 39 s(-1)), approximately the length of eclipse totality ...

  13. Plasma Properties and Magnetic Field Structure of the Solar Corona, Based on Coordinated Max '91 Observations from SERTS, the VLA, and Magnetographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The plasma properties and magnetic field structure of the solar corona were determined using coordinated observations obtained with NASA/GSFC's Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS), the Very Large Array (VLA), and Kitt Peak photospheric longitudinal magnetograms. A problem was identified with the SERTS calibration as determined from laboratory measurements. A revised calibration curve was derived by requiring that the numerous available measured line intensity ratios agreed with their respective theoretical values. Densities were derived from line intensity ratios, and active region densities were found to typically exceed quiet Sun densities by factors of only about 2. The active region density was found to remain constant across the SERTS slit, despite the fact that the emission line intensities vary significantly. This indicates that the product of the path length and the volume filling factor must vary significantly from the active region outskirts to the central core. Filling factors were derived and found to range from much less than one to nearly unity. Wavelength shifts were examined along the SERTS slit in the spatially resolved spectra, but no evidence was found for significant Doppler shifts in active region 7563 or in the quiet Sun. The numerical procedure developed by Monsignori-Fossi and Landini was used to derive the active region and quiet sun differential emission measure (DEM) from the spatially averaged spectra. A DEM was estimated for each spatial pixel in the two dimensional active region images by scaling the averaged active region DEM based upon corresponding pixel intensities of SERTS Mg IX, Fe XV, and Fe XVI images. These results, along with density measurements, were used in an IDL computer code which calculated the temperature dependence of the coronal magnetic field in each spatial pixel by minimizing the difference between the observed and calculated 20 and 6 cm microwave brightness temperatures.

  14. Plasma properties and magnetic field structure of the solar corona, based on coordinated Max 1991 observations from SERTS, the VLA, and magnetographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    1995-01-01

    The purposes of this investigation are to determine the plasma properties and magnetic field structure of the solar corona using coordinated observations obtained with NASA/GSFC's Solar EUV rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS), the Very Large Array (VLA), and magnetographs. The observations were obtained under the auspices of NASA's Max '91 program. The methods of achieving the stated purposes of this investigation are: (1) to use SERTS spectra and spectroheliograms to determine coronal plasma properties such as temperature, density, and emission measure; (2) to use the coronal plasma properties to calculate the intensity of the thermal bremsstrahlung microwave emission from the coronal plasma (the minimum microwave intensity expected from the emitting plasma); (3) to establish which emission mechanism(s) contribute to the observed microwave emission by comparing the calculated thermal bremsstrahlung intensity with the observed microwave intensity; (4) to derive the coronal magnetic field for regions in which gyroemission contributes to the microwave emission by determining the appropriate harmonic of the local electron gyrofrequency; (5) to derive the coronal magnetic field for regions in which thermal bremsstrahlung emission alone is responsible for the observed microwave emission by calculating the magnetic field which yields the observed microwave polarization; (6) to derive three-dimensional models of the coronal plasma and magnetic field which are consistent with all of the EUV spectra and spectroheliograms, as well as with the intensity and polarization maps at all of the microwave observing frequencies; and (7) to compare the coronal magnetic field derived from the coordinated multiwaveband observations with extrapolations from photospheric magnetograms.

  15. Detection of Plasma Fluctuations in White-light Images of the Outer Solar Corona: Investigation of the Spatial and Temporal Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telloni, D.; Ventura, R.; Romano, P.; Spadaro, D.; Antonucci, E.

    2013-04-01

    This work focuses on the first results from the identification and characterization of periodic plasma density fluctuations in the outer corona, observed in STEREO-A COR1 white-light image time series. A two-dimensional reconstruction of the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the coronal fluctuation power has been performed over the whole plane of the sky, from 1.4 to 4.0 R ⊙. The adopted diagnostic tool is based on wavelet transforms. This technique, with respect to the standard Fourier analysis, has the advantage of localizing non-persistent fluctuating features and exploring variations of the relating wavelet power in both space and time. The map of the variance of the coronal brightness clearly outlines intermittent spatially coherent fluctuating features, localized along, or adjacent to, the strongest magnetic field lines. In most cases, they do not correspond to the visible coronal structures in the brightness maps. The results obtained provide a scenario in which the solar corona shows quasi-periodic, non-stationary density variations characterized by a wide range of temporal and spatial scales and strongly confined by the magnetic field topology. In addition, structures fluctuating with larger power are larger in size and evolve more slowly. The characteristic periodicities of the fluctuations are comparable to their lifetimes. This suggests that plasma fluctuations lasting only one or two wave periods and initially characterized by a single dominant periodicity either rapidly decay into a turbulent mixed flow via nonlinear interactions with other plasma modes, or they are damped by thermal conduction. The periodic non-stationary coronal fluctuations outlined by the closed field lines at low and mid latitudes might be associated with the existence of slow standing magneto-acoustic waves excited by the convective supergranular motion. The fluctuating ray-like structures observed along open field lines appear to be linked either to the

  16. Magnetic Energy and Helicity Budgets in the Active-Region Solar Corona. I. Linear Force-Free Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Georgoulis, M K

    2007-01-01

    We self-consistently derive the magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets of a three-dimensional linear force-free magnetic structure rooted in a lower boundary plane. For the potential magnetic energy we derive a general expression that gives results practically equivalent to those of the magnetic Virial theorem. All magnetic energy and helicity budgets are formulated in terms of surface integrals applied to the lower boundary, thus avoiding computationally intensive three-dimensional magnetic field extrapolations. We analytically and numerically connect our derivations with classical expressions for the magnetic energy and helicity, thus presenting a so-far lacking unified treatment of the energy/helicity budgets in the constant-alpha approximation. Applying our derivations to photospheric vector magnetograms of an eruptive and a noneruptive solar active regions, we find that the most profound quantitative difference between these regions lies in the estimated free magnetic energy and relative ...

  17. Two-fluid and magnetohydrodynamic modelling of magnetic reconnection in the MAST spherical tokamak and the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Browning, P K; Evans, M; Lucini, F Arese; Lukin, V S; McClements, K G; Stanier, A

    2015-01-01

    Twisted magnetic flux ropes are ubiquitous in space and laboratory plasmas, and the merging of such flux ropes through magnetic reconnection is an important mechanism for restructuring magnetic fields and releasing free magnetic energy. The merging-compression scenario is one possible start up scheme for spherical tokamaks, which has been used on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak MAST. Two current-carrying plasma rings, or flux ropes, approach each other through the mutual attraction of their like currents, and merge, through magnetic reconnection, into a single plasma torus, with substantial plasma heating. 2D resistive MHD and Hall MHD simulations of this process are reported, and new results for the temperature distribution of ions and electrons are presented. A model of the based on relaxation theory is also described, which is now extended to tight aspect ratio geometry. This model allows prediction of the final merged state and the heating. The implications of the relaxation model for heating of the solar ...

  18. Ultrasonic corona sensor study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to determine the feasibility of using ultrasonic (above 20 kHz) corona detection techniques to detect low order (non-arcing) coronas in varying degrees of vacuum within large high vacuum test chambers, and to design, fabricate, and deliver a prototype ultrasonic corona sensor.

  19. Possibility of Determining the Magnetic Field Intensity in the Outer Solar Corona by Examining the Propagation of the Polarized Radiation of Discrete Sources - USSR -

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    the corona. First of all, it is a question of the emissions of the Crab nebula which perforate the corona in the month of June (in principle...polarization of emissions of the Crab nebula is p ~ Tp 13/.? and the direction of the pre-eminent polarization is characterized by the positioned angle...source (the angular dimension of the Crab nebula ~5* ) must lead to some distortion of the polarized picture, for example,, by virtue of the

  20. Search for Rapid Changes in the Visible-Light Corona during the 21 June 2001 Total Solar Eclipse

    CERN Document Server

    Rudawy, P; Buczylko, A; Williams, D R; Keenan, F P

    2010-01-01

    Some 8000 images obtained with the SECIS fast-frame CCD camera instrument located at Lusaka, Zambia, during the total eclipse of 21 June 2001 have been analyzed to search for short-period oscillations in intensity that could be a signature of solar coronal heating mechanisms by MHD wave dissipation. Images were taken in white- light and Fe XIV green-line (5303 A) channels over 205 seconds (frame rate 39 s-1), approximately the length of eclipse totality at this location, with a pixel size of four arcseconds square. The data are of considerably better quality than were obtained during the 11 August 1999 total eclipse, observed by us (Rudawy et al.: Astron. Astrophys. 416, 1179, 2004), in that the images are much better exposed and enhancements in the drive system of the heliostat used gave a much improved image stability. Classical Fourier and wavelet techniques have been used to analyze the emission at 29518 locations, of which 10714 had emission at reasonably high levels, searching for periodic fluctuations ...

  1. The TESIS experiment on the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, S. V.; Zhitnik, I. A.; Shestov, S. V.; Bogachev, S. A.; Bugaenko, O. I.; Ignat'ev, A. P.; Pertsov, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Reva, A. A.; Slemzin, V. A.; Sukhodrev, N. K.; Ivanov, Yu. S.; Goncharov, L. A.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Popov, S. G.; Shergina, T. A.; Solov'ev, V. A.; Oparin, S. N.; Zykov, A. M.

    2011-04-01

    On February 26, 2009, the first data was obtained in the TESIS experiment on the research of the solar corona using imaging spectroscopy. The TESIS is a part of the scientific equipment of the CORONAS-PHO-TON spacecraft and is designed for imaging the solar corona in soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet regions of the spectrum with high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions at altitudes from the transition region to three solar radii. The article describes the main characteristics of the instrumentation, management features, and operation modes.

  2. The Sun's Corona Observed by the Skylab Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    The Sun's corona stretches far beyond the dense, irner corona seen in x-rays and ultraviolet light, and beyond the limits of what we normally see in the dark sky of a total solar eclipse. Its farthest reaches are delineated by tapered streamers that stretch into interplanetary space, extending the domain of our nearest star much farther than its visible disk. We see the outer corona briefly at total eclipses of the Sun, where it appears white and delicate against the starry background of a temporarily darkened, daytime sky. Even then, Earth's intervening atmosphere is bright enough to limit our view of the outer corona. At Skylab's orbital altitude, where almost no air was left and where the sky was starkly black, the outer corona was at last clearly seen. In the thousands of coronal portraits made by Skylab, in which the corona was observed more extensively than in all the centuries of humanity's interest in the Sun, the corona was constantly altering its form, ever adjusting to the shifting magnetic fields from the Sun's surface that so obviously gave it its distinctive shape. Skylab's coronagraph observations coupled with x-ray pictures of the inner corona helped establish the origin of the corona's varied forms and the important connection between coronal holes and high-speed streams in the solar wind.

  3. On the Remote Detection of Suprathermal Ions in the Solar Corona and their Role as Seeds for Solar Energetic Particle Production

    CERN Document Server

    Laming, J Martin; Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Ng, Chee K; Rakowski, Cara E; Tylka, Allan J

    2013-01-01

    Forecasting large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events associated with shocks driven by fast coronal mass ejections (CME) pose a major difficulty in the field of Space Weather. Besides issues associated with CME initiation, the SEP intensities are difficult to predict, spanning 3 orders of magnitude at any given CME speed. Many lines of indirect evidence point to the pre-existence of suprathermal seed particles for injection into the acceleration process as a key ingredient limiting the SEP intensity of a given event. This paper outlines the observational and theoretical basis for the inference that a suprathermal particle population is present prior to large SEP events, explores various scenarios for generating seed particles and their observational signatures, and explains how such suprathermals could be detected through measuring the wings of the H I Ly-alpha line.

  4. Corona helps curb losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, M.; Lahtinen, M.; Lustre, L.

    1996-11-01

    The greatest power losses in electricity transmission arise through a phenomenon called load losses. Corona losses caused by the surface discharge of electricity also constitute a considerable cost item. IVS, the nationwide network company, is investigating corona- induced losses, and has also commissioned similar research from IVO International, the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and from Tampere University of Technology. The research work strives to gain more in-depth knowledge on the phenomenon of frosting and its impact on corona losses. The correct prediction of frost helps reduce corona losses, while also cutting costs considerably. (orig.)

  5. Corona helps curb losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, M.; Lahtinen, M.; Lustre, L.

    1996-11-01

    The greatest power losses in electricity transmission arise through a phenomenon called load losses. Corona losses caused by the surface discharge of electricity also constitute a considerable cost item. IVS, the nationwide network company, is investigating corona- induced losses, and has also commissioned similar research from IVO International, the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and from Tampere University of Technology. The research work strives to gain more in-depth knowledge on the phenomenon of frosting and its impact on corona losses. The correct prediction of frost helps reduce corona losses, while also cutting costs considerably. (orig.)

  6. Electric Current Equilibrium in the Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Filippov, Boris

    2013-01-01

    A hyperbolic flux-tube configuration containing a null point below the flux rope is considered as a pre-eruptive state of coronal mass ejections that start simultaneously with flares. We demonstrate that this configuration is unstable and cannot exist for a long time in the solar corona. The inference follows from general equilibrium conditions and from analyzing simple models of the flux-rope equilibrium. A direct consequence of the stable flux-rope equilibrium in the corona are separatrices in the horizontal-field distribution in the chromosphere. They can be recognized as specific "herring-bone structures" in a chromospheric fibril pattern.

  7. Electric Current Equilibrium in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Boris

    2013-04-01

    A hyperbolic flux-tube configuration containing a null point below the flux rope is considered as a pre-eruptive state of coronal mass ejections that start simultaneously with flares. We demonstrate that this configuration is unstable and cannot exist for a long time in the solar corona. The inference follows from general equilibrium conditions and from analyzing simple models of the flux-rope equilibrium. A direct consequence of the stable flux-rope equilibrium in the corona are separatrices in the horizontal-field distribution in the chromosphere. They can be recognized as specific "herring-bone structures" in a chromospheric fibril pattern.

  8. Disease specific protein corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-03-01

    It is now well accepted that upon their entrance into the biological environments, the surface of nanomaterials would be covered by various biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and lipids). The absorption of these biomolecules, so called `protein corona', onto the surface of (nano)biomaterials confers them a new `biological identity'. Although the formation of protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles has been widely investigated, there are few reports on the effect of various diseases on the biological identity of nanoparticles. As the type of diseases may tremendously changes the composition of the protein source (e.g., human plasma/serum), one can expect that amount and composition of associated proteins in the corona composition may be varied, in disease type manner. Here, we show that corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles (after interaction with in the plasma of the healthy individuals) could induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes release of the inflammatory cytokines. However, no considerable releases of inflammatory cytokines were observed for corona coated graphene sheets. In contrast, the obtained corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles from the hypofibrinogenemia patients could not induce inflammatory cytokine release where graphene sheets do. Therefore, one can expect that disease-specific protein coronas can provide a novel approach for applying nanomedicine to personalized medicine, improving diagnosis and treatment of different diseases tailored to the specific conditions and circumstances.

  9. Corona SDK hotshot

    CERN Document Server

    Flanagan, Nevin

    2013-01-01

    Using a project based approach you will learn the coolest aspects of Corona SDK development. Each project contains step bystep explanations, diagrams, screenshots, and downloadable materials.This book is for users who already have completed at least one simple app using Corona and are familiar with mobile development using another platform and have done Lua programming in another context. Knowledge of the basic functions of Corona routines, as well as an understanding of the Lua programming language's syntax and common libraries, is assumed throughout.

  10. Recent Studies of the Behavior of the Sun's White-Light Corona Over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    SaintCyr, O. C.; Young, D. E.; Pesnell, W. D.; Lecinski, A.; Eddy, J.

    2008-01-01

    Predictions of upcoming solar cycles are often related to the nature and dynamics of the Sun's polar magnetic field and its influence on the corona. For the past 30 years we have a more-or-less continuous record of the Sun's white-light corona from groundbased and spacebased coronagraphs. Over that interval, the large scale features of the corona have varied in what we now consider a 'predictable' fashion--complex, showing multiple streamers at all latitudes during solar activity maximum; and a simple dipolar shape aligned with the rotational pole during solar minimum. Over the past three decades the white-light corona appears to be a better indicator of 'true' solar minimum than sunspot number since sunspots disappear for months (even years) at solar minimum. Since almost all predictions of the timing of the next solar maximum depend on the timing of solar minimum, the white-light corona is a potentially important observational discriminator for future predictors. In this contribution we describe recent work quantifying the large-scale appearance of the Sun's corona to correlate it with the sunspot record, especially around solar minimum. These three decades can be expanded with the HAO archive of eclipse photographs which, although sparse compared to the coronagraphic coverage, extends back to 1869. A more extensive understanding of this proxy would give researchers confidence in using the white-light corona as an indicator of solar minimum conditions.

  11. Persistent Doppler shift oscillations observed with HINODE/EIS in the solar corona: spectroscopic signatures of Alfvenic waves and recurring upflows

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Hui; Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; De Pontieu, Bart; Innes, Davina E; Peter, Hardi

    2012-01-01

    Using data obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) onboard Hinode, we have per- formed a survey of obvious and persistent (without significant damping) Doppler shift oscillations in the corona. We have found mainly two types of oscillations from February to April in 2007. One type is found at loop footpoint regions, with a dominant period around 10 minutes. They are characterized by coherent behavior of all line parameters (line intensity, Doppler shift, line width and profile asymmetry), apparent blue shift and blueward asymmetry throughout almost the en- tire duration. Such oscillations are likely to be signatures of quasi-periodic upflows (small-scale jets, or coronal counterpart of type-II spicules), which may play an important role in the supply of mass and energy to the hot corona. The other type of oscillation is usually associated with the upper part of loops. They are most clearly seen in the Doppler shift of coronal lines with forma- tion temperatures between one and two million degrees. The ...

  12. Low-frequency heliographic observations of the quiet Sun corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Koval, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results of heliographic observations of quiet-Sun radio emission fulfilled by the UTR-2 radio telescope. The solar corona investigations have been made close to the last solar minimum (Cycle 23) in the late August and early September of 2010 by means of the two-dimensional heliograph within 16.5-33 MHz. Moreover, the UTR-2 radio telescope was used also as an 1-D heliograph for one-dimensional scanning of the Sun at the beginning of September 2010 as well as in short-time observational campaigns in April and August of 2012. The average values of integral flux density of the undisturbed Sun continuum emission at different frequencies have been found. Using the data, we have determined the spectral index of quiet-Sun radio emission in the range 16.5-200 MHz. It is equal to -2.1±0.1. The brightness distribution maps of outer solar corona at frequencies 20.0 MHz and 26.0 MHz have been obtained. The angular sizes of radio Sun were estimated. It is found that the solar corona at these frequencies is stretched-out along equatorial direction. The coefficient of corona ellipticity varies slightly during above period. Its mean magnitudes are equal to ≈ 0.75 and ≈ 0.73 at 20.0 MHz and 26.0 MHz, respectively. The presented results for continuum emission of solar corona conform with being ones at higher frequencies.

  13. Solar Radio

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists monitor the structure of the solar corona, the outer most regions of the Sun's atmosphere, using radio waves (100?s of MHz to 10?s of GHz). Variations in...

  14. Persistent Doppler Shift Oscillations Observed with HINODE-EIS in the Solar Corona: Spectroscopic Signatures of Alfvenic Waves and Recurring Upflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; McIntosh, Scott W.; Wang, Tongjiang; Offman, Leon; De Pontieu, Bart; Innes, Davina E.; Peter, Hardi

    2012-01-01

    Using data obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, we have performed a survey of obvious and persistent (without significant damping) Doppler shift oscillations in the corona. We have found mainly two types of oscillations from February to April in 2007. One type is found at loop footpoint regions, with a dominant period around 10 minutes. They are characterized by coherent behavior of all line parameters (line intensity, Doppler shift, line width, and profile asymmetry), and apparent blueshift and blueward asymmetry throughout almost the entire duration. Such oscillations are likely to be signatures of quasi-periodic upflows (small-scale jets, or coronal counterpart of type-II spicules), which may play an important role in the supply of mass and energy to the hot corona. The other type of oscillation is usually associated with the upper part of loops. They are most clearly seen in the Doppler shift of coronal lines with formation temperatures between one and two million degrees. The global wavelets of these oscillations usually peak sharply around a period in the range of three to six minutes. No obvious profile asymmetry is found and the variation of the line width is typically very small. The intensity variation is often less than 2%. These oscillations are more likely to be signatures of kink/Alfv´en waves rather than flows. In a few cases, there seems to be a p/2 phase shift between the intensity and Doppler shift oscillations, which may suggest the presence of slow-mode standing waves according to wave theories. However, we demonstrate that such a phase shift could also be produced by loops moving into and out of a spatial pixel as a result of Alfv´enic oscillations. In this scenario, the intensity oscillations associated with Alfv´enic waves are caused by loop displacement rather than density change. These coronal waves may be used to investigate properties of the coronal plasma and magnetic field.

  15. RECONNECTION-DRIVEN DOUBLE LAYERS IN THE STRATIFIED PLASMA OF THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION: SUPPLY OF HOT PLASMA INTO THE CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nagendra [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A novel mechanism for the supply of hot plasma into the corona from the chromosphere is suggested here; the mechanism involves collisionless magnetic reconnection (CMR) in the transition region (TR) followed by double layer (DL) formation in the enhanced expansion of the chromospheric cold plasma mixed with CMR-heated hot electrons. It is well known that (i) the CMR produces energetic electrons and (ii) DLs naturally form in expanding dense plasmas containing a minor population of hot electrons. We apply these plasma physics facts to the dynamics of stratified plasma in the TR. In the TR where densities fall below ∼10{sup 16} m{sup −3}, all collisional mean-free paths, electron–ion, ion–neutral, and electron–neutral, become long enough to render plasma collisionless at kinetic scale lengths, making CMR and DL formation possible. The DLs accelerate the chromospheric cold ions to energies comparable to the energy of the hot electrons. When the upflowing energized ions neutralized by the escaping hot electrons thermalize, the resulting hot tenuous plasma supplies an energy flux ∼3 × 10{sup 5} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} = 3 × 10{sup 2} J m{sup −2} s{sup −1} into the corona. The CMR–DL mechanism introduces sudden transitions in the TR as microstructures in both density and energy. The global transition in the TR could be a fractal structure containing such microscopic features. If not impossible, it is difficult to measure such microstructures, but it seems that the coronal heating begins in the nearly collisionless TR by CMR and DL formation.

  16. Polarization Observation of White Light Corona during the Total Solar Eclipse on 2006 March 29%2006年3月29日日全食白光日冕偏振测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐稚; 张蜀新; Sin Sun Ae; Pak Hye yong

    2006-01-01

    The digital photographic records of the white light corona polarization were made during the total solar eclipse on March 29, 2006 in El-Saloum (Egypt). By means of a reflector telescope,f=640 mm (f/D = 8), 20 pictures were obtained with different exposure time and successive rotation of a polaroid by 45°. The main results about the degree and direction of polarization in the range of 1.3 R⊙<r<3.0 R⊙ are discussed and graphically presented.%报告了在埃及赛路姆观测到的2006年3月29日日全食白光偏振测量的基本结果.我们使用的是一架便携式反射望远镜,焦距为640mm(F/D=8).在物镜前方安置可旋转线偏振片,每次旋转角度45°,终端为尼康数码相机.观测过程中,改变曝光时间并旋转偏振片,总共获取20张数码照片.文中讨论并呈现了介于 1.3 R⊙<r <3.0 R⊙范围内的白光偏振方向和偏振度的大小分布.

  17. Reconnection Processes in the Chromosphere and Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Kazunari

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental key physical process in magnetized plasmas. Recent space solar observations revealed that magnetic reconnection is ubiquitous in the solar chromospheres and corona. Especially recent Hinode observations has found various types of tiny chromospheric jets, such as chromospheric anemone jets (Shibata et al. 2007), penumbral microjets (Katsukawa et al. 2007), light bridge jets from sunspot umbra (Shimizu et al. 2009), etc. It was also found that the corona is full of tiny X-ray jets (Cirtain et al. 2007). Often they are seen as helical spinning jets (Shimojo et al. 2007, Patsourakos et al. 2008, Pariat et al. 2009, Filippov et al. 2009, Kamio et al. 2010) with Alfvenic waves (Nishizuka et al. 2008, Liu et al. 2009) and there are increasing evidence of magnetic reconnection in these tiny jets. We can now say that as spatial resolution of observations become better and better, smaller and smaller flares and jets have been discovered, which implies that the magnetized solar atmosphere consist of fractal structure and dynamics, i.e., fractal reconnection. Bursty radio and hard X-ray emissions from flares also suggest the fractal reconnection and associated particle acceleration. Since magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) does not contain any characteristic length and time scale, it is natural that MHD structure, dynamics, and reconnection, tend to become fractal in ideal MHD plasmas with large magnetic Reynolds number such as in the solar atmosphere. We would discuss recent observations and theories related to fractal reconnection in the chromospheres and corona, and discuss possible implication to chromospheric and coronal heating.

  18. Corona SDK application design

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A step by step tutorial that focuses on everything from setup to deployment of basic apps.Have you ever wanted to create your own app? Then this book is for you. You will learn how to create apps using Corona SDK and how to publish your app so others can get a glimpse of your creation. This book is aimed at both Android and iOS app developers. The reader must have basic knowledge of app development.

  19. The Structure and Dynamics of the Corona - Heliosphere Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Linker, Jon A.; Lionello, Roberto; Mikic, Zoran; Titov, Viacheslav; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    Determining the source at the Sun of the slow solar wind is one of the major unsolved problems in solar and heliospheric physics. First, we review the existing theories for the slow wind and argue that they have difficulty accounting for both the observed composition of the wind and its large angular extent. A new theory in which the slow wind originates from the continuous opening and closing of narrow open field corridors, the S-Web model, is described. Support for the S-Web model is derived from MHD solutions for the quasisteady corona and wind during the time of the August 1, 2008 eclipse. Additionally, we perform fully dynamic numerical simulations of the corona and heliosphere in order to test the S-Web model as well as the interchange model proposed by Fisk and co-workers. We discuss the implications of our simulations for the competing theories and for understanding the corona - heliosphere connection, in general.

  20. Monitoring Holes in the Sun's Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Coronal holes are where the fast solar wind streams out of the Suns atmosphere, sending charged particles on rapid trajectories out into the solar system. A new study examines how the distribution of coronal holes has changed over the last 40 years.Coronal holes form where magnetic field lines open into space (B) instead of looping back to the solar surface (A). [Sebman81]Source of the Fast Solar WindAs a part of the Suns natural activity cycle, extremely low-density regions sometimes form in the solar corona. These coronal holes manifest themselves as dark patches in X-ray and extreme ultraviolet imaging, since the corona is much hotter than the solar surface that peeks through from underneath it.Coronal holes form when magnetic field lines open into space instead of looping back to the solar surface. In these regions, the solar atmosphere escapes via these field lines, rapidly streaming away from the Suns surface in whats known as the fast solar wind.Coronal Holes Over Space and TimeAutomated detection of coronal holes from image-based analysis is notoriously difficult. Recently, a team of scientists led by Kenichi Fujiki (ISEE, Nagoya University, Japan) has developed an automated prediction technique for coronal holes that relies instead on magnetic-field data for the Sun, obtained at the National Solar Observatorys Kitt Peak between 1975 and 2014. The team used these data to produce a database of 3335 coronal hole predictions over nearly 40 years.Latitude distribution of 2870 coronal holes (each marked by an x; color indicates polarity), overlaid on the magnetic butterfly map of the Sun. The low-latitude coronal holes display a similar butterfly pattern, in which they move closer to the equator over the course of the solar cycle. Polar coronal holes are more frequent during solar minima. [Fujiki et al. 2016]Examining trends in the coronal holes distribution in latitude and time, Fujiki and collaborators find a strong correlation between the total area covered

  1. White light coronal structures and flattening during six total solar eclipses

    OpenAIRE

    B.A. Marzouk; P. Stoeva; Stoev, A.

    2016-01-01

    Solar corona is very important part of the solar atmosphere, which is not available every time and it is very difficult to observe it. From solar corona we can get more information about outer sun layers. Large-scale structure of the solar corona can be studied during total solar eclipses. The structure, shape and brightness of the solar corona significantly change from eclipse to eclipse. They depend on activity of the sun. At maximum solar activity, the corona is very bright and uniform ...

  2. High-cadence observations of CME initiation and plasma dynamics in the corona with TESIS on board CORONAS-Photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev, Sergey; Kuzin, Sergey; Zhitnik, I. A.; Bugaenko, O. I.; Goncharov, A. L.; Ignatyev, A. P.; Krutov, V. V.; Lomkova, V. M.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Nasonkina, T. P.; Oparin, S. N.; Petzov, A. A.; Shestov, S. V.; Slemzin, V. A.; Soloviev, V. A.; Suhodrev, N. K.; Shergina, T. A.

    The TESIS is an ensemble of space instruments designed in Lebedev Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences for spectroscopic and imaging investigation of the Sun in EUV and soft X-ray spectral range with high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution. From 2009 January, when TESIS was launched onboard the Coronas-Photon satellite, it provided about 200 000 new images and spectra of the Sun, obtained during one of the deepest solar minimum in last century. Because of the wide field of view (4 solar radii) and high sensitivity, TESIS provided high-quality data on the origin and dynamics of eruptive prominences and CMEs in the low and intermediate solar corona. TESIS is also the first EUV instrument which provided high-cadence observations of coronal bright points and solar spicules with temporal resolution of a few seconds. We present first results of TESIS observations and discuss them from a scientific point of view.

  3. THE NONPOTENTIALITY OF CORONAE OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS, THE DYNAMICS OF THE SURFACE MAGNETIC FIELD, AND THE POTENTIAL FOR LARGE FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrijver, Carolus J., E-mail: schrijver@lmsal.com [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center (A021S, Bldg. 252), 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Flares and eruptions from solar active regions (ARs) are associated with atmospheric electrical currents accompanying distortions of the coronal field away from a lowest-energy potential state. In order to better understand the origin of these currents and their role in M- and X-class flares, I review all AR observations made with Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and SDO/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly from 2010 May through 2014 October within ≈40° from the disk center. I select the roughly 4% of all regions that display a distinctly nonpotential coronal configuration in loops with a length comparable to the scale of the AR, and all that emit GOES X-class flares. The data for 41 regions confirm, with a single exception, that strong-field, high-gradient polarity inversion lines (SHILs) created during emergence of magnetic flux into, and related displacement within, pre-existing ARs are associated with X-class flares. Obvious nonpotentiality in the AR-scale loops occurs in six of ten selected regions with X-class flares, all with relatively long SHILs along their primary polarity inversion line, or with a long internal filament there. Nonpotentiality can exist in ARs well past the flux-emergence phase, often with reduced or absent flaring. I conclude that the dynamics of the flux involved in the compact SHILs is of pre-eminent importance for the large-flare potential of ARs within the next day, but that their associated currents may not reveal themselves in AR-scale nonpotentiality. In contrast, AR-scale nonpotentiality, which can persist for many days, may inform us about the eruption potential other than those from SHILs which is almost never associated with X-class flaring.

  4. Dynamics of the Transition Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Sophie; McCauley, Patrick; Golub, Leon; Reeves, Katharine K.; DeLuca, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection between the open and closed magnetic fields in the corona is believed to play a crucial role in the corona/heliosphere coupling. At large scale, the exchange of open/closed connectivity is expected to occur in pseudo-streamer (PS) structures. However, there is neither clear observational evidence of how such coupling occurs in PSs, nor evidence for how the magnetic reconnection evolves. Using a newly developed technique, we enhance the off-limb magnetic fine structures observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and identify a PS-like feature located close to the northern coronal hole. We first identify that the magnetic topology associated with the observation is a PS, null-point (NP) related topology bounded by the open field. By comparing the magnetic field configuration with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission regions, we determined that most of the magnetic flux associated with plasma emission are small loops below the PS basic NP and open field bounding the PS topology. In order to interpret the evolution of the PS, we referred to a three-dimensional MHD interchange reconnection modeling the exchange of connectivity between small closed loops and the open field. The observed PS fine structures follow the dynamics of the magnetic field before and after reconnecting at the NP obtained by the interchange model. Moreover, the pattern of the EUV plasma emission is the same as the shape of the expected plasma emission location derived from the simulation. These morphological and dynamical similarities between the PS observations and the results from the simulation strongly suggest that the evolution of the PS, and in particular the opening/closing of the field, occurs via interchange/slipping reconnection at the basic NP of the PS. Besides identifying the mechanism at work in the large-scale coupling between the open and closed fields, our results highlight that interchange reconnection in PSs is a gradual physical process that differs

  5. Frequency fluctuations in the solar corona investigated with radio sounding experiments on the spacecraft ROSETTA and MARS EXPRESS in 2010/2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.

    2017-03-01

    Coronal radio-sounding experiments were carried out using two-way coherent dual-frequency carrier signals of the ESA spacecraft ROSETTA in 2010 and MARS EXPRESS in 2010/2011. Differential frequency measurements recorded at both NASA and ESA tracking stations (sample rate: 1 Hz) are analyzed in this paper. Spectral analysis of the S-band, X-band, and differential frequency records has shown that the r.m.s. frequency fluctuation of each signal can be described by a radial power-law function of the form σi = Ai(R/R⊙)-βi, where i = s, x, sx. The ratio of the coefficients As and Ax differs from the expected theoretical value As/Ax = fs/fx. This occurs because the X-band fluctuations underlie two-way propagation conditions while the S-band fluctuations are essentially the product of a one-way propagation experiment. The intensity of the frequency fluctuations decreases sharply at high heliolatitudes. The asymmetry of the frequency fluctuation intensity between ingress and egress is exploited to determine the solar wind speed at small heliocentric distances.

  6. The nonpotentiality of coronae of solar active regions, the dynamics of the surface magnetic field, and the potential for large flares

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, C J

    2016-01-01

    Flares and eruptions from solar active regions are associated with atmospheric electrical currents accompanying distortions of the coronal field away from a lowest-energy potential state. In order to better understand the origin of these currents and their role in M- and X-class flares, I review all active-region observations made with SDO/HMI and SDO/AIA from 2010/05 through 2014/10 within approximately 40 degrees from disk center. I select the roughly 4% of all regions that display a distinctly nonpotential coronal configuration in loops with a length comparable to the scale of the active region, and all that emit GOES X-class flares. The data for 41 regions confirm, with a single exception, that strong-field, high-gradient polarity inversion lines (SHILs) created during emergence of magnetic flux into, and related displacement within, pre-existing active regions are associated with X-class flares. Obvious nonpotentiality in the active region-scale loops occurs in 6 of 10 selected regions with X-class flare...

  7. The Flattening Index of the Eclipse White-Light Corona and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rušin, V.

    2017-01-01

    From observations of the solar white-light corona at 65 eclipses from 1851 to 2015 we confirm earlier findings that the flattening index of the white-light corona depends on the phase, rather than the magnitude of solar cycles, which is in contrast with behavior of other major solar activity indices like the sunspot number, the 2800 MHz radio flux, etc. This indicates that mechanisms responsible for creation and distribution of helmet streamers, the most essential coronal structures influencing the flattening index, could be of different magnetic nature from those of other manifestations of solar surface activity.

  8. Imaging the structure of the low K-corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, I. S.; Nasonova, L. P.; Lisin, D. V.; Popov, V. V.; Krusanova, N. L.

    2017-01-01

    The first 2-D distributions of the polarization angle and of the relative color index for the K-corona of 29 March 2006 are presented. The distributions illustrate the efficiency of the total solar eclipse approach for high-precision measurements of the K-corona continuum in the range planets are discussed. Calculations of the eclipse magnitude m are carried out to show ideal conditions for total solar eclipse observations in space from Lagrange point L2 for Mars (m ≈ 1.025). The illumination in Mars' shadow is estimated to equal 5.6 × 10-11 for the wavelength of 550 nm. No internal or external occulting coronagraphs are needed. Partial solar eclipses with m > 0.91 can be observed from Lagrange points L2 for Mercury, Venus, and Earth.

  9. Ground-based observation of emission lines from the corona of a red-dwarf star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J H; Wichmann, R

    2001-08-02

    All 'solar-like' stars are surrounded by coronae, which contain magnetically confined plasma at temperatures above 106 K. (Until now, only the Sun's corona could be observed in the optical-as a shimmering envelope during a total solar eclipse.) As the underlying stellar 'surfaces'-the photospheres-are much cooler, some non-radiative process must be responsible for heating the coronae. The heating mechanism is generally thought to be magnetic in origin, but is not yet understood even for the case of the Sun. Ultraviolet emission lines first led to the discovery of the enormous temperature of the Sun's corona, but thermal emission from the coronae of other stars has hitherto been detectable only from space, at X-ray wavelengths. Here we report the detection of emission from highly ionized iron (Fe XIII at 3,388.1 A) in the corona of the red-dwarf star CN Leonis, using a ground-based telescope. The X-ray flux inferred from our data is consistent with previously measured X-ray fluxes, and the non-thermal line width of 18.4 km s-1 indicates great similarities between solar and stellar coronal heating mechanisms. The accessibility and spectral resolution (45,000) of the ground-based instrument are much better than those of X-ray satellites, so a new window to the study of stellar coronae has been opened.

  10. A note on magnetized coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Belmont, R

    2008-01-01

    X-ray binaries and AGN show observational evidence for magnetized hot plasmas. Despite years of data, very little is known on these {\\it coronae} especially on the mechanisms responsible for their heating, and most models simply assume their existence. However, understanding its properties has now become a key issue of the AGN and microquasars modelling. Here we consider the effect of a strong vertical magnetic field on the corona AGN and X-ray binaries and show that its modeling (structure, heating) must be reconsidered. As a first step, we present one mechanism that could extract energy from the accretion disks and deposits it in the coronae: the {\\it magnetic pumping

  11. Snowfall induced by corona discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Ju, Jingjing; Li, Ruxin; Du, Shengzhe; Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Tian, Ye; Bai, Yafeng; Liu, Yaoxiang; Chen, Na; Wang, Jingwei; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, S L; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated for the first time the condensation and precipitation (or snowfall) induced by a corona discharge inside a cloud chamber. Ionic wind was found to have played a more significant role than ions as extra Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). 2.25 g of net snow enhancement was measured after applying a 30 kV corona discharge for 25 min. In comparison with another newly emerging femtosecond laser filamentation method, the snow precipitation induced by the corona discharge has about 4 orders of magnitude higher wall-plug efficiency under similar conditions.

  12. Measuring the Electron Temperature in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Joseph; SaintCyr, Orville C.; Reginald, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    We report on an experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of a new method to obtain the electron temperature and flow speed in the solar corona by observing the visible Kcoronal spectrum during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Libya. Results show that this new method is indeed feasible, giving electron temperatures and speeds of 1.10 $\\pm$ 0.05 MK, 103.0 $\\pm$ 92.0 $kmsA{-l}$; 0.98 $\\pm$ 0.12 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-1)s; 0.70 $\\pm$ 0.08 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-l)$ at l.l{\\it R)$ {\\odot}$ in the solar north, east and west, respectively, and 0.93 $\\pm$ 0.12 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-l}$ at 1.2{\\it R}$ {\\odot}$ in the solar east. This new technique could be easily used from a space-based platform in a coronagraph to produce two dimensional maps of the electron temperature and bulk flow speed at the base of the solar wind useful for the study of heliospheric structure and space weather.

  13. An XMM-Newton Study of the Coronae of $\\sigma^2$ Coronae Borealis

    CERN Document Server

    Suh, J A; Güdel, M; Paerels, F B S

    2005-01-01

    (Abridged) We present results of XMM-Newton observations of the RS CVn binary $\\sigma^2$ Coronae Borealis. The RGS and EPIC MOS2 spectra were simultaneously fitted with collisional ionization equilibrium plasma models to determine coronal abundances of various elements. Contrary to the solar first ionization potential (FIP) effect in which elements with a low FIP are overabundant in the corona compared to the solar photosphere, and contrary to the ``inverse'' FIP effect observed in several active RS CVn binaries, coronal abundance ratios in $\\sigma^2$ CrB show a complex pattern as supported by similar findings in the Chandra HETGS analysis of $\\sigma^2$ CrB with a different methodology (Osten et al. 2003). Low-FIP elements ($<10$ eV) have their abundance ratios relative to Fe consistent with the solar photospheric ratios, whereas high-FIP elements have their abundance ratios increase with increasing FIP. We find that the coronal Fe abundance is consistent with the stellar photospheric value, indicating tha...

  14. Comment on "Are periodic solar wind number density structures formed in the solar corona?" by N. M. Viall et al., 2009, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L23102, doi:10.1029/2009GL041191

    CERN Document Server

    Yermolaev, Yuri I

    2010-01-01

    Location of formation of periodic solar wind number density structures is discussed. Observation of proton and alpha anticorrelation in these structures [Viall et al., 2009] indicates that taking into account that bulk velocity of aplha-particles is higher than that of proton the place of formation for these structures should be located at distance less 0.002 AU from place of observation.

  15. Coronae of Stars with Supersolar Elemental Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Uria; Behar, Ehud; Drake, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the first ionization potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with supersolar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, iota Hor, HR 7291, tau Boo, and alpha Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances we measured were obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra onboard the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and tau Boo no FIP effect is present, while iota Hor, HR 7291, and alpha Cen A and B show a clear FIP trend. These conclusions hold whether the comparison is made with solar abundances or the individual stellar abundances. Unlike the solar corona, where low-FIP elements are enriched, in these stars the FIP effect is consistently due to a depletion of high-FIP elements with respect to actual photospheric abundances. A comparison with solar (instead of stellar) abundances yields the same fractionation trend as on the Sun. In both cases, a similar FIP bias is inferred, but different fractionation mechanisms need to be invoked.

  16. Thomson Scattering in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Inhester, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The fundaments of the application of Thomson scattering to the analysis of coronagraph images has been laid decades ago. Even though the basic formulation is undebated, a discussion has grown in recent years about the spatial distribution of Thomson scatter sensitivity in space. These notes are an attempt to clarify the understanding about this topic. We reformulate the classical calculations in a more transparent way using modern SI-compatible quantities and extend the scattering calculations to the case of relativistic electrons. Many mathematical and some basic physical ingredients are made explicit in several chapters of the appendix.

  17. The H Corona of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Michael Scott

    The atmosphere of every planet is surrounded by a tenuous cloud of hydrogen gas, referred to as a hydrogen corona. At Mars, a substantial fraction of the H present in the corona is moving fast enough to escape the planet's gravity, permanently removing H from the Martian atmosphere. Because this H is ultimately derived from lower atmospheric water, loss of H from Mars is capable of drying and oxidizing the planet over geologic time. Understanding the processes that supply the H corona and control its escape is therefore essential for a complete understanding of the climate history of Mars and for assessing its habitability. In this thesis, I present the most complete analysis of the H corona ever attempted, surveying eight years of data gathered by the ultraviolet spectrograph SPICAM on Mars Express. Using a coupled radiative transfer and physical density model, I interpret brightness measurements of the corona in terms of escape rates of H from the planet, uncovering an order-of-magnitude variability in the H escape rate never before detected. These variations are interpreted using a completely new photochemical model of the atmosphere, demonstrating that newly discovered high altitude water vapor layers are sufficient to produce the observed variation. Finally, I present first results of the SPICAM successor instrument IUVS, an imaging ultraviolet spectrograph carried by NASA's MAVEN spacecraft. IUVS measurements are producing the most complete dataset ever gathered for the Martian H corona, enabling supply and loss processes to be assessed in more complete detail than ever before. This dataset will allow present-day loss rates to be extrapolated into the past, determining the absolute amount of water Mars has lost to space over the course of its history. Planets the size of Mars may be common throughout the universe; the work of this thesis is one step toward assessing the habitability of such planets in general.

  18. Simulating halos and coronas in their atmospheric environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Gedzelman, Stanley

    2008-12-01

    Models are developed that simulate the light and color of the sky and of circular halos and coronas as a function of atmospheric pressure, cloud height, width, and optical depth, solar zenith angle, aerosol concentration and size, and ozone content. Halos, coronas, and skylight are treated as singly scattered sunbeams that are depleted in their passage through the atmosphere and cloud. Multiple scattering is included only for background cloud light. Halos produced by hexagonal crystal prisms and coronas produced by monodisperse droplets are visible for cloud optical depths in the range 0.0003 coronas can be bright only at smaller cloud optical depths and tend to be faint at their bottoms when produced in high cloud layers but can be bright at the horizon when produced by narrow cloud cells near ground level.

  19. Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection in the Extended Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina; West, Matthew J.; Seaton, Daniel B.; Kobelski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Observational signatures of reconnection have been studied extensively in the lower corona for decades, successfully providing insight into energy release mechanisms in the region above post-flare arcade loops and below 1.5 solar radii. During large eruptive events, however, energy release continues to occur well beyond the presence of reconnection signatures at these low heights. Supra-Arcade Downflows (SADs) and Supra-Arcade Downflowing Loops (SADLs) are particularly useful measures of continual reconnection in the corona as they may indicate the presence and path of retracting post-reconnection loops. SADs and SADLs have been faintly observed up to 18 hours beyond the passage of coronas mass ejections through the SOHO/LASCO field of view, but a recent event from 2014 October 14 associated with giant arches provides very clear observations of these downflows for days after the initial eruption. We report on this unique event and compare these findings with observational signatures of magnetic reconnection in the extended corona for more typical eruptions.

  20. Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection in the Extended Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina; West, Matthew J.; Seaton, Danial B.; Kobelski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Observational signatures of reconnection have been studied extensively in the lower corona for decades, successfully providing insight into energy release mechanisms in the region above post-flare arcade loops and below 1.5 solar radii. During large eruptive events, however, energy release continues to occur well beyond the presence of reconnection signatures at these low heights. Supra-Arcade Downflows (SADs) and Supra-Arcade Downflowing Loops (SADLs) are particularly useful measures of continual reconnection in the corona as they may indicate the presence and path of retracting post-reconnection loops. SADs and SADLs have been faintly observed up to 18 hours beyond the passage of corona mass ejections through the SOHO/LASCO field of view, but a recent event from 2014 October 14 associated with giant arches provides very clear observations of these downflows for days after the initial eruption. We report on this unique event and compare these findings with observational signatures of magnetic reconnection in the extended corona for more typical eruptions.

  1. Evaluating the Uncertainties in the Electron Temperature and Radial Speed Measurements Using White Light Corona Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginald, Nelson L.; Davilla, Joseph M.; St. Cyr, O. C.; Rastaetter, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    We examine the uncertainties in two plasma parameters from their true values in a simulated asymmetric corona. We use the Corona Heliosphere (CORHEL) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around the Sphere (MAS) models in the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) to investigate the differences between an assumed symmetric corona and a more realistic, asymmetric one. We were able to predict the electron temperatures and electron bulk flow speeds to within +/-0.5 MK and +/-100 km s(exp-1), respectively, over coronal heights up to 5.0 R from Sun center.We believe that this technique could be incorporated in next-generation white-light coronagraphs to determine these electron plasma parameters in the low solar corona. We have conducted experiments in the past during total solar eclipses to measure the thermal electron temperature and the electron bulk flow speed in the radial direction in the low solar corona. These measurements were made at different altitudes and latitudes in the low solar corona by measuring the shape of the K-coronal spectra between 350 nm and 450 nm and two brightness ratios through filters centered at 385.0 nm/410.0 nm and 398.7 nm/423.3 nm with a bandwidth of is approximately equal to 4 nm. Based on symmetric coronal models used for these measurements, the two measured plasma parameters were expected to represent those values at the points where the lines of sight intersected the plane of the solar limb.

  2. Fundamental Physical Processes in Coronae: Waves, Turbulence, Reconnection, and Particle Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2007-01-01

    Our understanding of fundamental processes in the solar corona has been greatly progressed based on the space observations of SMM, Yohkoh, Compton GRO, SOHO, TRACE, RHESSI, and STEREO. We observe now acoustic waves, MHD oscillations, turbulence-related line broadening, magnetic configurations related to reconnection processes, and radiation from high-energy particles on a routine basis. We review a number of key observations in EUV, soft X-rays, and hard X-rays that innovated our physical understanding of the solar corona, in terms of hydrodynamics, MHD, plasma heating, and particle acceleration processes.

  3. High-resolution spectroscopy of the R Coronae Borealis Star V Coronae Australis

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, N Kameswara

    2007-01-01

    Optical high-resolution spectra of the R Coronae Borealis star V CrA at light maximum and during minimum light arediscussed. Abundance analysis confirms previous results showing that V CrA has the composition of the small subclass of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars know as `minority' RCBs, i.e., the Si/Fe and S/Fe ratios are 100 times their solar values. A notable novel result for RCBs is the detection of the 1-0 Swan system $^{12}$C$^{13}$C bandhead indicating that $^{13}$C is abundant: spectrum synthesis shows that $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C is about 3 to 4. Absorption line profiles are variable at maximum light with some lines showing evidence of splitting by about 10 km s$^{-1}$. A spectrum obtained as the star was recovering from a deep minimum shows the presence of cool C$_2$ molecules with a rotational temperature of about 1200K, a temperature suggestive of gas in which carbon is condensing into soot. The presence of rapidly outflowing gas is shown by blue-shifted absorption components of the Na {\\sc i} D and K ...

  4. The Slowly Varying Corona. I. Daily Differential Emission Measure Distributions Derived from EVE Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, S. J.; White, S. M.; Hock-Mysliwiec, R. A.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2017-08-01

    Daily differential emission measure (DEM) distributions of the solar corona are derived from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) over a 4 yr period starting in 2010 near solar minimum and continuing through the maximum of solar cycle 24. The DEMs are calculated using six strong emission features dominated by Fe lines of charge states viii, ix, xi, xii, xiv, and xvi that sample the nonflaring coronal temperature range 0.3-5 MK. A proxy for the non-Fe xviii emission in the wavelength band around the 93.9 Å line is demonstrated. There is little variability in the cool component of the corona (T 2.0 MK) varies by more than an order of magnitude. A discontinuity in the behavior of coronal diagnostics in 2011 February-March, around the time of the first X-class flare of cycle 24, suggests fundamentally different behavior in the corona under solar minimum and maximum conditions. This global state transition occurs over a period of several months. The DEMs are used to estimate the thermal energy of the visible solar corona (of order 1031 erg), its radiative energy loss rate ((2.5-8) × {10}27 erg s-1), and the corresponding energy turnover timescale (about an hour). The uncertainties associated with the DEMs and these derived values are mostly due to the coronal Fe abundance and density and the CHIANTI atomic line database.

  5. Current Sheets in the Corona and the Complexity of Slow Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the slow solar wind has long been one of the most important problems in solar/heliospheric physics. Two observational constraints make this problem especially challenging. First, the slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, unlike the fast wind that originates on open field lines. Second, the slow wind has substantial angular extent, of order 30 degrees, which is much larger than the widths observed for streamer stalks or the widths expected theoretically for a dynamic heliospheric current sheet. We propose that the slow wind originates from an intricate network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that emanate from the polar coronal hole regions. Using topological arguments, we show that these corridors must be ubiquitous in the solar corona. The total solar eclipse in August 2008, near the lowest point of cycle 23 affords an ideal opportunity to test this theory by using the ultra-high resolution Predictive Science's (PSI) eclipse model for the corona and wind. Analysis of the PSI eclipse model demonstrates that the extent and scales of the open-field corridors can account for both the angular width of the slow wind and its closed-field composition. We discuss the implications of our slow wind theory for the structure of the corona and heliosphere at solar minimum and describe further observational and theoretical tests.

  6. Nebula around R Corona Borealis

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, N Kameswara

    2011-01-01

    The star R Corona Borealis (R CrB) shows forbidden lines of [O II], [N II], and [S II] during the deep minimum when the star is fainter by about 8 to 9 magnitudes from normal brightness, suggesting the presence of nebular material around it. We present low and high spectral resolution observations of these lines during the ongoing deep minimum of R CrB, which started in July 2007. These emission lines show double peaks with a separation of about 170 km/s. The line ratios of [S II] and [O II] suggest an electron density of about 100 cm$^{-3}$. We discuss the physical conditions and possible origins of this low density gas. These forbidden lines have also been seen in other R Coronae Borealis stars during their deep light minima and this is a general characteristic of these stars, which might have some relevance to their origins.

  7. White light coronal structures and flattening during six total solar eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouk, B. A.; Stoeva, P.; Stoev, A.

    2016-12-01

    Solar corona is very important part of the solar atmosphere, which is not available every time and it is very difficult to observe it. From solar corona we can get more information about outer sun layers. Large-scale structure of the solar corona can be studied during total solar eclipses. The structure, shape and brightness of the solar corona significantly change from eclipse to eclipse. They depend on activity of the sun. At maximum solar activity, the corona is very bright and uniform around the solar limb. There are a lot of bright coronal streamers and other active regions on it. During minimum of solar activity the solar corona stretches at the equator and become elliptical. Flattening index is the first quantitative parameter introduced for analyses of the global structure of the solar corona. It varies with respect to the phase of the solar activity and sunspot number. In this paper we study the solar corona during the 1990, 1999, 2006, 2008, 2009 and 2012 total solar eclipses. We obtain flattening coefficients for all the six eclipses by using a new computer program. Our results are in a good agreement with published results.

  8. Research on Nanosecond Pulse Corona Discharge Attenuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zheng-hao; XU Huai-li; BAI Jing; YU Fu-sheng; HU Feng; LI Jin

    2007-01-01

    A line-to-plate reactor was set-up in the experimental study on the application of nanosecond pulsed corona discharge plasma technology in environmental pollution control.Investigation on the attenuation and distortion of the amplitude of the pulse wave front and the discharge image as well as the waveform along the corona wire was conducted.The results show that the wave front decreases sharply during the corona discharge along the corona wire.The higher the amplitude of the applied pulse is,the more the amplitude of the wave front decreased.The wave attenuation responds in a lower corona discharge inversely.To get a higher efficiency of the line-to-plate reactor a sharp attenuation of the corona has to be considered in practical design.

  9. Magnetic Jam in the Corona of the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, F; Bingert, S; Cheung, M C M

    2015-01-01

    The outer solar atmosphere, the corona, contains plasma at temperatures of more than a million K, more than 100 times hotter that solar surface. How this gas is heated is a fundamental question tightly interwoven with the structure of the magnetic field in the upper atmosphere. Conducting numerical experiments based on magnetohydrodynamics we account for both the evolving three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere and the complex interaction of magnetic field and plasma. Together this defines the formation and evolution of coronal loops, the basic building block prominently seen in X-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images. The structures seen as coronal loops in the EUV can evolve quite differently from the magnetic field. While the magnetic field continuously expands as new magnetic flux emerges through the solar surface, the plasma gets heated on successively emerging fieldlines creating an EUV loop that remains roughly at the same place. For each snapshot the EUV images outline the magnetic field, bu...

  10. 3d Numerical Models of the Chromosphere, Transition Region, and Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Hansteen, Viggo H; Gudiksen, Boris

    2007-01-01

    A major goal in solar physics has during the last five decades been to find how energy flux generated in the solar convection zone is transported and dissipated in the outer solar layers. Progress in this field has been slow and painstaking. However, advances in computer hardware and numerical methods, vastly increased observational capabilities and growing physical insight seem finally to be leading towards understanding. Here we present exploratory numerical MHD models that span the entire solar atmosphere from the upper convection zone to the lower corona. These models include non-grey, non-LTE radiative transport in the photosphere and chromosphere, optically thin radiative losses as well as magnetic field-aligned heat conduction in the transition region and corona.

  11. Hi-C Observations of an Active Region Corona, and Investigation of the Underlying Magnetic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. K.; Alexander, C. E.; Winebarger, A.; Moore, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The solar corona is much hotter (>=10(exp 6) K) than its surface (approx 6000 K), puzzling astrophysicists for several decades. Active region (AR) corona is again hotter than the quiet Sun (QS) corona by a factor of 4-10. The most widely accepted mechanism that could heat the active region corona is the energy release by current dissipation via reconnection of braided magnetic field structure, first proposed by E. N. Parker three decades ago. The first observational evidence for this mechanism has only recently been presented by Cirtain et al. by using High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) observations of an AR corona at a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec, which is required to resolve the coronal loops, and was not available before the rocket flight of Hi-C in July 2012. The Hi-C project is led by NASA/MSFC. In the case of the QS, work done by convection/granulation on the inter-granular feet of the coronal field lines translates into the heat observed in the corona. In the case of the AR, as here, there could be flux emergence, cancellation/submergence, or shear flows generating large stress and tension in coronal field loops which is released as heat in the corona. We are currently investigating the changes taking place in photospheric feet of the magnetic field involved with brightenings in the Hi-C AR corona. For this purpose, we are also using SDO/AIA data of +/- 2 hours around the 5 minutes Hi-C flight. In the present talk, I will first summarize some of the results of the Hi-C observations and then present some results from our recent analysis on what photospheric processes feed the magnetic energy that dissipates into heat in coronal loops.

  12. Outflow structure of the quiet sun corona probed by spacecraft radio scintillations in strong scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 484-8601 (Japan); Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471, Japan. (Japan); Miyamoto, Mayu [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Häusler, Bernd [Institut für Raumfahrttechnik, Universität der Bundeswehr München, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Pätzold, Martin [Rheinisches Institut für Umweltforschung, Department Planetenforschung, Universität zu Köln, Aachener Strasse 209, D-50931 Köln (Germany); Nabatov, Alexander [The Institute of Radio Astronomy, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Chervonoprapornaya, Strasse 4, Kharkov 61002 (Ukraine); Yaji, Kentaro [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yamada, Manabu, E-mail: imamura.takeshi@jaxa.jp [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1, Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan)

    2014-06-20

    Radio scintillation observations have been unable to probe flow speeds in the low corona where the scattering of radio waves is exceedingly strong. Here we estimate outflow speeds continuously from the vicinity of the Sun to the outer corona (heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 solar radii) by applying the strong scattering theory to radio scintillations for the first time, using the Akatsuki spacecraft as the radio source. Small, nonzero outflow speeds were observed over a wide latitudinal range in the quiet-Sun low corona, suggesting that the supply of plasma from closed loops to the solar wind occurs over an extended area. The existence of power-law density fluctuations down to the scale of 100 m was suggested, which is indicative of well-developed turbulence which can play a key role in heating the corona. At higher altitudes, a rapid acceleration typical of radial open fields is observed, and the temperatures derived from the speed profile show a distinct maximum in the outer corona. This study opened up a possibility of observing detailed flow structures near the Sun from a vast amount of existing interplanetary scintillation data.

  13. White dwarf mergers and the origin of R Coronae Borealis stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lorén-Aguilar, P; José, J; García-Berro, E; Althaus, L G; Isern, J

    2011-01-01

    We present a nucleosynthesis study of the merger of a 0.4 solar masses helium white dwarf with a 0.8 solar masses carbon-oxygen white dwarf, coupling the thermodynamic history of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics particles with a post-processing code. The resulting chemical abundance pattern, particularly for oxygen and fluorine, is in qualitative agreement with the observed abundances in R Coronae Borealis stars.

  14. Pre-Flare Flows in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, A. J.; Harra, L. K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Matthews, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Solar flares take place in regions of strong magnetic fields and are generally accepted to be the result of a resistive instability leading to magnetic reconnection. When new flux emerges into a pre-existing active region it can act as a flare and coronal mass ejection trigger. In this study we observed active region 10955 after the emergence of small-scale additional flux at the magnetic inversion line. We found that flaring began when additional positive flux levels exceeded 1.38×1020 Mx (maxwell), approximately 7 h after the initial flux emergence. We focussed on the pre-flare activity of one B-class flare that occurred on the following day. The earliest indication of activity was a rise in the non-thermal velocity one hour before the flare. 40 min before flaring began, brightenings and pre-flare flows were observed along two loop systems in the corona, involving the new flux and the pre-existing active region loops. We discuss the possibility that reconnection between the new flux and pre-existing loops before the flare drives the flows by either generating slow mode magnetoacoustic waves or a pressure gradient between the newly reconnected loops. The subsequent B-class flare originated from fast reconnection of the same loop systems as the pre-flare flows.

  15. Processing method of images obtained during the TESIS/CORONAS-PHOTON experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, S. V.; Shestov, S. V.; Bogachev, S. A.; Pertsov, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Reva, A. A.

    2011-04-01

    In January 2009, the CORONAS-PHOTON spacecraft was successfully launched. It includes a set of telescopes and spectroheliometers—TESIS—designed to image the solar corona in soft X-ray and EUV spectral ranges. Due to features of the reading system, to obtain physical information from these images, it is necessary to preprocess them, i.e., to remove the background, correct the white field, level, and clean. The paper discusses the algorithms and software developed and used for the preprocessing of images.

  16. CORONA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    今年的深圳服交会上,粉红嫩绿大肆张扬,在一片娇嫩中,冷色调的黑白配以热情的红反而特别耀眼却不失深刻,1号馆里,CORONA以“经典与激情的碰撞”为主题,在原有的黑白经典的基础上,加进了红色.

  17. Impact of Type II Spicules into the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo H.; Pereira, Tiago M. D.

    2017-08-01

    In the lower solar atmosphere, the chromosphere is permeated by jets, in which plasma is propelled at speeds of 50-150 km/s into the Sun’s atmosphere or corona. Although these spicules may play a role in heating the million-degree corona and are associated with Alfvén waves that help drive the solar wind, their generation remains mysterious. We implemented in the radiative MHD Bifrost code the effects of partial ionization using the generalized Ohm’s law. This code also solves the full MHD equations with non-grey and non-LTE radiative transfer and thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The ion-neutral collision frequency is computed using recent studies that improved the estimation of the cross sections under chromospheric conditions (Vranjes & Krstic 2013). Self-consistently driven jets (spicules type II) in magnetohydrodynamic simulations occur ubiquitously when magnetic tension is confined and transported upwards through interactions between ions and neutrals, and impulsively released to drive flows, heat plasma, generate Alfvén waves, and may play an important role in maintaining the substructure of loop fans. This mechanism explains how spicular plasma can be heated to millions of degrees and how Alfvén waves are generated in the chromosphere.

  18. Oscillations above sunspots from the temperature minimum to the corona

    CERN Document Server

    Kobanov, N I; Kolobov, D Y

    2013-01-01

    Context. An analysis of the oscillations above sunspots was carried out using simultaneous ground-based and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations (SiI 10827A, HeI 10830A, FeI 6173A, 1700A, HeII 304A, FeIX 171A). Aims. Investigation of the spatial distribution of oscillation power in the frequency range 1-8 mHz for the different height levels of the solar atmosphere. Measuring the time lags between the oscillations at the different layers. Methods. We used frequency filtration of the intensity and Doppler velocity variations with Morlet wavelet to trace the wave propagation from the photosphere to the chromosphere and the corona. Results. The 15 min oscillations are concentrated near the outer penumbra in the upper photosphere (1700 A), forming a ring, that expands in the transition zone. These oscillations propagate upward and reach the corona level, where their spatial distribution resembles a fan structure. The spatial distribution of the 5 min oscillation power looks like a circle-shape structure m...

  19. Characterization of the slow wind in the outer corona

    CERN Document Server

    Abbo, Lucia; Mikić, Zoran; Linker, Jon A; Riley, Pete; Lionello, Roberto; 10.1016/j.asr.2010.08.008

    2010-01-01

    The study concerns the streamer belt observed at high spectral resolution during the minimum of solar cycle 22 with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) onboard SOHO. On the basis of a spectroscopic analysis of the O VI doublet, the solar wind plasma parameters are inferred in the extended corona. The analysis accounts for the coronal magnetic topology, extrapolated through a 3D magneto-hydrodynamic model, in order to define the streamer boundary and to analyse the edges of coronal holes. The results of the analysis allow an accurate identification of the source regions of the slow coronal wind that are confirmed to be along the streamer boundary in the open magnetic field region.

  20. Structure and Dynamics of the 2009 July 22 Eclipse White-light Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Rušin, V.; Saniga, M.; Druckmüllerová, H.; Babcock, B. A.

    2011-11-01

    The white-light corona (WLC) during the total solar eclipse of 2009 July 22 was observed by several teams in the Moon's shadow stretching from India and China across the Pacific Ocean with its many isolated islands. We present a comparison of the WLC as observed by eclipse teams located in China (Shanghai region) and on the Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands, with observations taken 112 minutes apart, combined with near-simultaneous space observations. The eclipse was observed at the beginning of solar cycle 24, during a deep solar minimum (officially estimated as 2008 December according to the smoothed sunspot number, but very extended). The solar corona shows several different types of features (coronal holes, polar rays, helmet streamers, faint loops, voids, etc.), though it was extremely sparse in streamers as shown from Large-Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph data. No large-scale dynamical phenomena were seen when comparing the observations from the two sites, confirming that the corona was quiescent. We measure a Ludendorff flattening coefficient of 0.238, typical of solar minimum.

  1. The Role of Magnetic Helicity in the Structure and Heating of the Sun's Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Knizhnik, Kalman J

    2016-01-01

    Two of the most important features of the solar atmosphere are its hot, smooth coronal loops and the concentrations of magnetic shear, known as filament channels, that reside above photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs). The shear observed in filament channels represents magnetic helicity, while the smoothness of the coronal loops indicates an apparent lack of magnetic helicity in the rest of the corona. At the same time, models that attempt to explain the high temperatures observed in these coronal loops require magnetic energy, in the form of twist, to be injected at the photosphere. In addition to magnetic energy, this twist also represents magnetic helicity. Unlike magnetic energy, magnetic helicity is conserved under reconnection, and is consequently expected to accumulate and be observed in the corona. However, filament channels, rather than the coronal loops, are the locations in the corona where magnetic helicity is observed, and it manifests itself in the form of shear, rather than twist. This ...

  2. The protein corona of circulating PEGylated liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchetti, Sara; Colapicchioni, Valentina; Digiacomo, Luca; Caracciolo, Giulio; Pozzi, Daniela; Capriotti, Anna Laura; La Barbera, Giorgia; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-02-01

    Following systemic administration, liposomes are covered by a 'corona' of proteins, and preserving the surface functionality is challenging. Coating the liposome surface with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is the most widely used anti-opsonization strategy, but it cannot fully preclude protein adsorption. To date, protein binding has been studied following in vitro incubation to predict the fate of liposomes in vivo, while dynamic incubation mimicking in vivo conditions remains largely unexplored. The main aim of this investigation was to determine whether shear stress, produced by physiologically relevant dynamic flow, could influence the liposome-protein corona. The corona of circulating PEGylated liposome was thoroughly compared with that formed by incubation in vitro. Systematic comparison in terms of size, surface charge and quantitative composition was made by dynamic light scattering, microelectrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS). Size of coronas formed under static vs. dynamic incubation did not appreciably differ from each other. On the other side, the corona of circulating liposomes was more negatively charged than its static counterpart. Of note, the variety of protein species in the corona formed in a dynamic flow was significantly wider. Collectively, these results demonstrated that the corona of circulating PEGylated liposomes can be considerably different from that formed in a static fluid. This seems to be a key factor to predict the biological activity of a liposomal formulation in a physiological environment.

  3. Study of the dynamics of the corona using July 11, 2010 eclipse data recorded from Easter Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Tanmoy

    Spectroscopic observations of the solar corona were performed during the total solar eclipse of 11 July 2010 in the green line at 5303 Å [Fe XIV] and the red line at 6374 Å [Fe X] from Easter Island, Chile. The data is analyzed to study the periodic variations in the intensity, line width and doppler velocity using wavelet analysis at all pixels within our field of view. We have found that there are few locations where significant oscillations are present. These oscillations can be interpreted in terms of the presence of magnetoacoustic waves or Alfvén waves in the corona.

  4. Magnetohydrostatic modelling of stellar coronae

    CERN Document Server

    MacTaggart, David; Neukirch, Thomas; Donati, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    We introduce to the stellar physics community a method of modelling stellar coronae that can be considered to be an extension of the potential field. In this approach, the magnetic field is coupled to the background atmosphere. The model is magnetohydrostatic (MHS) and is a balance between the Lorentz force, the pressure gradient and gravity. Analytical solutions are possible and we consider a particular class of equilibria in this paper. The model contains two free parameters and the effects of these on both the geometry and topology of the coronal magnetic field are investigated. A demonstration of the approach is given using a magnetogram derived from Zeeman-Doppler imaging of the 0.75 M$_{\\odot}$ M-dwarf star GJ 182.

  5. Theoretical and observational problems related to solar eclipses. Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouradian, Z.; Stavinschi, M.

    The contributions to this book are based on the current knowledge of solar corona physics and on the prospects for future total eclipse observations, focusing on the eclipse of August 11, 1999, which forecasters believe will occur at precisely the maximum of solar activity. The results of past eclipse observations are reviewed, including coronal hot and cold structures, coronal heating, public education and instrumental problems. The relation of the corona to the Sun is discussed, viz., the energy and mass transfer between the chromosphere and the corona, including the formation of prominences by coronal condensation in coronal cavities and the supply of mass to the corona by spicules.

  6. Gamma-ray radiation of solar flares in October-November 2003 according to the data obtained with the AVS-F instrument onboard the CORONAS-F satellite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelsky, A. I.; Kotov, Yu. D.; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Glyanenko, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    Thirty active regions were observed on the Sun during the period from October 19 to November 20, 2003. Hard X-ray and gamma-ray radiation was detected from four active regions (10484, 10486, 10488, and 10490): 14 solar flares stronger than M5.0 according to the GOES classification were recorded duri

  7. Structure and Dynamics of the 13/14 November 2012 Eclipse White-Light Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Pasachoff, Jay M; Saniga, Metod; Babcock, Bryce A; Lu, Muzhou; Davis, Allen B; Dantowitz, Ronald F; Gaintatzis, Pavlos; Seiradakis, John H; Voulgaris, Aristeidis; Seaton, Daniel B; Shiota, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Continuing our series of observations of the motion and dynamics of the solar corona over the solar-activity cycle, we observed the corona from sites in Queensland, Australia, during the 13 (UT)/14 (local time) November 2012 total solar eclipse. The corona took the low-ellipticity shape typical of solar maximum (flattening index {\\epsilon} = 0.01), showing a change from the composite coronal images that we had observed and analyzed in this journal and elsewhere for the 2006, 2008, 2009, and 2010 eclipses. After crossing the northeast Australian coast, the rest of the path of totality was over the ocean, so further totality was seen only by shipborne observers. Our results include measurements of velocities of a coronal mass ejection; during the 36 minutes of passage from the Queensland coast to a ship north of New Zealand, we find a speed of 413 km/s, and we analyze its dynamics. We discuss the shapes and positions of several types of coronal features seen on our higher-resolution composite Queensland images ...

  8. HiRISE Mission to Address the Dynamical Chromosphere-Corona Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, Luc; Lamy, Philippe; von Fay-Siebenburgen (Erdélyi), Robert

    Several ground facilities and space missions are currently dedicated to the study of the Sun at high resolution and of the solar corona in particular. However, and despite significant progress with the advent of space missions and UV, EUV and XUV direct observations of the hot chro-mosphere and million degrees coronal plasma, much is yet to be achieved in the understanding of these high temperatures, fine dissipative structures and of the coronal heating in general. Recent missions have shown the definite role of waves and of the magnetic field deep in the inner corona, at the chromosphere-corona interface, where dramatic changes occur. The dynamics of the chromosphere and corona is controlled by the emerging magnetic field, guided by the coronal magnetic field. Accordingly, the direct measurement of the chromospheric and coronal magnetic fields is of prime importance. The solar corona consists of many thin loops or threads with the plasmas brightening and fading independently. The dynamics in each thread is believed to be related to the formation of filaments, each one being dynamic, in a non-equilibrium state. The mechanism sustaining that dynamics, oscillations or waves (Alfvén or MHD?), require both very high-cadence, multi-spectral observations, and high resolution. This is foreseen in the future Space Mission HiRISE, the ultimate new generation ultrahigh resolution, interferomet-ric and coronagraphic, Solar Physics Mission, proposed for ESA Cosmic Vision (pre-selected in 2007, and under preparation for 2012 second call). HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy Explorer), at the L1 Lagrangian point, provides meter class FUV imaging and spectro-imaging, EUV and XUV imaging and spectroscopy, and ultimate coronagraphy by a remote external occulter (satellites in formation flying 280 m apart) allowing to characterize temperature, densities and velocities in the solar upper chromosphere, transition zone and inner corona with, in particular, 2D very high

  9. Progress on Solar Physics in China During 2004 - 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yihua; AI Guoxiang

    2006-01-01

    The solar physics studies in China during 2004-2006 from solar interior to solar atmospheres and solar-interplanetary space are summarized. These researches are arranged under the topics of solar interior, photosphere, chromosphere and transition region, corona, flares and CMEs (and the associated radio bursts, X-ray/γ-ray bursts and particle acceleration), solar wind, solar cycle, and ground-based instrumentation.

  10. Complementary analysis of the hard and soft protein corona: sample preparation critically effects corona composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzen, S.; Schoettler, S.; Baier, G.; Rosenauer, C.; Mailaender, V.; Landfester, K.; Mohr, K.

    2015-02-01

    Here we demonstrate how a complementary analysis of nanocapsule-protein interactions with and without application media allows gaining insights into the so called hard and soft protein corona. We have investigated how both human plasma and individual proteins (human serum albumin (HSA), apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I)) adsorb and interact with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) nanocapsules possessing different functionalities. To analyse the hard protein corona we used sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and a protein quantitation assay. No significant differences were observed with regards to the hard protein corona. For analysis of the soft protein corona we characterized the nanocapsule-protein interaction with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). DLS and ITC measurements revealed that a high amount of plasma proteins were adsorbed onto the capsules' surface. Although HSA was not detected in the hard protein corona, ITC measurements indicated the adsorption of an HSA amount similar to plasma with a low binding affinity and reaction heat. In contrast, only small amounts of ApoA-I protein adsorb to the capsules with high binding affinities. Through a comparison of these methods we have identified ApoA-I to be a component of the hard protein corona and HSA as a component of the soft corona. We demonstrate a pronounced difference in the protein corona observed depending on the type of characterization technique applied. As the biological identity of a particle is given by the protein corona it is crucial to use complementary characterization techniques to analyse different aspects of the protein corona.Here we demonstrate how a complementary analysis of nanocapsule-protein interactions with and without application media allows gaining insights into the so called hard and soft protein corona. We have investigated how both human plasma and individual proteins (human serum albumin (HSA), apolipoprotein A

  11. Complementary analysis of the hard and soft protein corona: sample preparation critically effects corona composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzen, S; Schoettler, S; Baier, G; Rosenauer, C; Mailaender, V; Landfester, K; Mohr, K

    2015-02-21

    Here we demonstrate how a complementary analysis of nanocapsule-protein interactions with and without application media allows gaining insights into the so called hard and soft protein corona. We have investigated how both human plasma and individual proteins (human serum albumin (HSA), apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I)) adsorb and interact with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) nanocapsules possessing different functionalities. To analyse the hard protein corona we used sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and a protein quantitation assay. No significant differences were observed with regards to the hard protein corona. For analysis of the soft protein corona we characterized the nanocapsule-protein interaction with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). DLS and ITC measurements revealed that a high amount of plasma proteins were adsorbed onto the capsules' surface. Although HSA was not detected in the hard protein corona, ITC measurements indicated the adsorption of an HSA amount similar to plasma with a low binding affinity and reaction heat. In contrast, only small amounts of ApoA-I protein adsorb to the capsules with high binding affinities. Through a comparison of these methods we have identified ApoA-I to be a component of the hard protein corona and HSA as a component of the soft corona. We demonstrate a pronounced difference in the protein corona observed depending on the type of characterization technique applied. As the biological identity of a particle is given by the protein corona it is crucial to use complementary characterization techniques to analyse different aspects of the protein corona.

  12. Simulations of Solar Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Formation of a coronal jet from twisted field lines that have reconnected with the ambient field. The colors show the radial velocity of the plasma. [Adapted from Szente et al. 2017]How do jets emitted from the Suns surface contribute to its corona and to the solar wind? In a recent study, a team of scientists performed complex three-dimensional simulations of coronal jets to answer these questions.Small ExplosionsCoronal jets are relatively small eruptions from the Suns surface, with heights of roughly 100 to 10,000 km, speeds of 10 to 1,000 km/s, and lifetimes of a few minutes to around ten hours. These jets are constantly present theyre emitted even from the quiet Sun, when activity is otherwise low and weve observed them with a fleet of Sun-watching space telescopes spanning the visible, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and X-ray wavelength bands.A comparison of simulated observations based on the authors model (left panels) to actual EUV and X-ray observations of jets (right panels). [Szente et al. 2017]Due to their ubiquity, we speculate that these jets might contribute to heating the global solar corona (which is significantly hotter than the surface below it, a curiosity known as the coronal heating problem). We can also wonder what role these jets might play in driving the overall solar wind.Launching a JetLed by Judit Szente (University of Michigan), a team of scientists has explored the impact of coronal jets on the global corona and solar wind with a series of numerical simulations. Szente and collaborators used three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that provide realistic treatment of the solar atmosphere, the solar wind acceleration, and the complexities of heat transfer throughout the corona.In the authors simulations, a jet is initiated as a magnetic dipole rotates at the solar surface, winding up field lines. Magnetic reconnection between the twisted lines and the background field then launches the jet from the dense and hot solar

  13. Coronal structure and flattening during total solar eclipse 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Galal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of well resolved observations of the solar corona taken at Salloum N-W of Egypt during the total solar eclipse of 2006 “the descending phase of solar cycle 23”, some aspects of the physics of the corona have been studied up to several solar radii. The magnetic structures of the white light corona were studied. The flattening coefficient e characterizes the shape of the isophotes of the whit-light corona and computed as a function of the distance from the disk center. The flattening index e during solar total eclipse 2006 was found to be 0.158. This result is in a good agreement with previous published results.

  14. Improved Determination of the Location of the Temperature Maximum in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, J. F.; Stegen, K.

    2016-12-01

    The most used method to calculate the coronal electron temperature [Te (r)] from a coronal density distribution [ne (r)] is the scale-height method (SHM). We introduce a novel method that is a generalization of a method introduced by Alfvén ( Ark. Mat. Astron. Fys. 27, 1, 1941) to calculate Te(r) for a corona in hydrostatic equilibrium: the "HST" method. All of the methods discussed here require given electron-density distributions [ne (r)] which can be derived from white-light (WL) eclipse observations. The new "DYN" method determines the unique solution of Te(r) for which Te(r → ∞) → 0 when the solar corona expands radially as realized in hydrodynamical solar-wind models. The applications of the SHM method and DYN method give comparable distributions for Te(r). Both have a maximum [T_{max}] whose value ranges between 1 - 3 MK. However, the peak of temperature is located at a different altitude in both cases. Close to the Sun where the expansion velocity is subsonic (r < 1.3 R_{⊙}) the DYN method gives the same results as the HST method. The effects of the other free parameters on the DYN temperature distribution are presented in the last part of this study. Our DYN method is a new tool to evaluate the range of altitudes where the heating rate is maximum in the solar corona when the electron-density distribution is obtained from WL coronal observations.

  15. Recent perspectives in solar physics - Elemental composition, coronal structure and magnetic fields, solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Elemental abundances in the solar corona are studied. Abundances in the corona, solar wind and solar cosmic rays are compared to those in the photosphere. The variation in silicon and iron abundance in the solar wind as compared to helium is studied. The coronal small and large scale structure is investigated, emphasizing magnetic field activity and examining cosmic ray generation mechanisms. The corona is observed in the X-ray and EUV regions. The nature of coronal transients is discussed with emphasis on solar-wind modulation of galactic cosmic rays. A schematic plan view of the interplanetary magnetic field during sunspot minimum is given showing the presence of magnetic bubbles and their concentration in the region around 4-5 AU by a fast solar wind stream.

  16. White light coronal structures and flattening during six total solar eclipses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. Marzouk

    2016-12-01

    Flattening index is the first quantitative parameter introduced for analyses of the global structure of the solar corona. It varies with respect to the phase of the solar activity and sunspot number. In this paper we study the solar corona during the 1990, 1999, 2006, 2008, 2009 and 2012 total solar eclipses. We obtain flattening coefficients for all the six eclipses by using a new computer program. Our results are in a good agreement with published results.

  17. Direct observation of laser guided corona discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tie-Jun; Liu, Yaoxiang; Chen, Na; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Sun, Haiyi; Wang, Cheng; Lu, Haihe; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-01-01

    Laser based lightning control holds a promising way to solve the problem of the long standing disaster of lightning strikes. But it is a challenging project due to insufficient understanding of the interaction between laser plasma channel and high voltage electric filed. In this work, a direct observation of laser guided corona discharge is reported. The high voltage corona discharge can be guided along laser plasma filament, and enhanced through the interaction with laser filaments. The fluorescence lifetime of laser filament guided corona discharge was measured to be several microseconds, which is 3 orders of magnitude longer than the fluorescence lifetime of laser filaments. This could be advantageous towards laser assisted leader development in the atmosphere.

  18. Solar Eclipses Observed from Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Aspects of the solar corona are still best observed during totality of solar eclipses, and other high-resolution observations of coronal active regions can be observed with radio telescopes by differentiation of occultation observations, as we did with the Jansky Very Large Array for the annular solar eclipse of 2012 May 20 in the US. Totality crossing Antarctica included the eclipse of 2003 November 23, and will next occur on 2021 December 4; annularity crossing Antarctica included the eclip...

  19. TRIANGLE-SHAPED DC CORONA DISCHARGE DEVICE FOR MOLECULAR DECOMPOSITION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses the evaluation of electrostatic DC corona discharge devices for the application of molecular decomposition. A point-to-plane geometry corona device with a rectangular cross section demonstrated low decomposition efficiencies in earlier experimental work. The n...

  20. Energy Input Flux in the Global Quiet-Sun Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Cormack, Cecilia; Vásquez, Alberto M.; López Fuentes, Marcelo; Nuevo, Federico A.; Landi, Enrico; Frazin, Richard A.

    2017-07-01

    We present first results of a novel technique that provides, for the first time, constraints on the energy input flux at the coronal base (r ˜ 1.025 R ⊙) of the quiet Sun at a global scale. By combining differential emission measure tomography of EUV images, with global models of the coronal magnetic field, we estimate the energy input flux at the coronal base that is required to maintain thermodynamically stable structures. The technique is described in detail and first applied to data provided by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager instrument, on board the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory mission, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument, on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, for two solar rotations with different levels of activity. Our analysis indicates that the typical energy input flux at the coronal base of magnetic loops in the quiet Sun is in the range ˜0.5-2.0 × 105 (erg s-1 cm-2), depending on the structure size and level of activity. A large fraction of this energy input, or even its totality, could be accounted for by Alfvén waves, as shown by recent independent observational estimates derived from determinations of the non-thermal broadening of spectral lines in the coronal base of quiet-Sun regions. This new tomography product will be useful for the validation of coronal heating models in magnetohydrodinamic simulations of the global corona.

  1. Magnetic jam in the corona of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F.; Peter, H.; Bingert, S.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2015-06-01

    The outer solar atmosphere, the corona, contains plasma at temperatures of more than a million kelvin--more than 100 times hotter than the solar surface. How this gas is heated is a fundamental question tightly interwoven with the structure of the magnetic field. Together this governs the evolution of coronal loops, the basic building block prominently seen in X-rays and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images. Here we present numerical experiments accounting for both the evolving three-dimensional structure of the magnetic field and its complex interaction with the plasma. Although the magnetic field continuously expands as new magnetic flux emerges through the solar surface, plasma on successive field lines is heated in succession, giving the illusion that an EUV loop remains roughly at the same place. For each snapshot the EUV images outline the magnetic field. However, in contrast to the traditional view, the temporal evolution of the magnetic field and the EUV loops can be quite different. This indicates that the thermal and the magnetic evolution in the outer atmosphere of a cool star should be treated together, and should not be simply separated as predominantly done so far.

  2. Evolution of chromospheres and coronae in solar mass stars - A far-ultraviolet and soft X-ray comparison of Arcturus /K2 III/ and Alpha Centauri A /G2 V/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T. R.; Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    IUE far-UV and Einstein Observatory soft X-ray observations for the red giant Arcturus and the nearby yellow dwarf Alpha-Centauri A, which are archetypes of solar mass stars in different stages of evolution, are compared. Evidence is found for neither coronal soft X-ray emission from the red giant, at surface flux levels of only 0.0006 that detected previously for the yellow dwarf, nor C II and IV resonance line emission at surface flux levels of only 0.02 those of the yellow dwarf. The resonance line upper limits and previous detections of the C II intersystem UV multiplet 0.01 near 2325 A provide evidence for an Arcturus outer atmosphere that is geometrically extended, tenuous and cool. The red giant has, in addition, a prominent cool stellar wind. An extensive tabulation of line identifications, widths and fluxes for the IUE far-UV echelle spectra of the two stars is given, and two competing explanations for the Wilson-Bappu effect are discussed.

  3. Device for generation of pulsed corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsol, Alexander F [San Ramon, CA; Fridman, Alexander [Marlton, NJ; Blank, Kenneth [Philadelphia, PA; Korobtsev, Sergey [Moscow, RU; Shiryaevsky, Valery [Moscow, RU; Medvedev, Dmitry [Moscow, RU

    2012-05-08

    The invention is a method and system for the generation of high voltage, pulsed, periodic corona discharges capable of being used in the presence of conductive liquid droplets. The method and system can be used, for example, in different devices for cleaning of gaseous or liquid media using pulsed corona discharge. Specially designed electrodes and an inductor increase the efficiency of the system, permit the plasma chemical oxidation of detrimental impurities, and increase the range of stable discharge operations in the presence of droplets of water or other conductive liquids in the discharge chamber.

  4. Surface degradation of silicone rubber exposed to corona discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yong; Haji, Kenichi; Otsubo, Masahisa; Honda, Chikahisa

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the surface degradation of unfilled high-temperature vulcanized silicone rubber (HTV-SR)###resulting from creeping corona discharges under atmospheric pressure. In this paper, HTV-SR specimens were exposed to corona###stress generated by a parallel needle-plate electrode system; furthermore, physicochemical analyses were conducted on the surface layer of SR before and after corona discharge treatment. The results showed that the plasma impingement from the corona discharg...

  5. Nanoparticle-protein corona in invertebrate in vitro testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Miclaus, Teodora; Scavenius, Carsten;

    2013-01-01

    , and the primary cells were thus exposed to silver nanoparticles with pre-formed corona of serum albumin (a major serum protein). Here we have profiled proteins forming the hard corona around silver nanoparticles (OECD reference materials, 15 nm and 75 nm) using gel electrophoresis techniques to identify proteins...... for evaluation of the protein corona in invertebrate in vitro setting....

  6. A Connection Between Corona and Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    The structure immediately around a supermassive black hole at the heart of an active galaxy can tell us about how material flows in and out of these monsters but this region is hard to observe! A new study provides us with clues of what might be going on in these active and energetic cores of galaxies.In- and OutflowsIn active galactic nuclei (AGN), matter flows both in and out. As material flows toward the black hole via its surrounding accretion disk, much of this gas and dust can then be expelled from the vicinity via highly collimated jets.Top: The fraction of X-rays that is reflected decreases as jet power increases. Bottom: the distance between the corona and the reflecting part of the disk increases as jet power increases. [Adapted from King et al. 2017]To better understand this symbiosis between accretion and outflows, we examine whats known as the corona the hot, X-ray-emitting gas thats located in the closest regions around the black hole. But because the active centers of galaxies are generally obscured by surrounding gas and dust, its difficult for us to learn about the structure of these inner regions near the black hole.Where are the X-rays of the corona produced: in the inner accretion flow, or at the base of the jet? How far away is this corona from the disk? And how does the coronas behavior relate to that of the jet?Reflected ObservationsTo address some of these questions, a group of scientists led by Ashley King (Einstein Fellow at Stanford University) has analyzed X-ray observations from NuSTAR and XMM-Newton of over 40 AGN. The team examined the reflections of the X-rays off of the accretion disk and used two measurements to learn about the structure around the black hole:the fraction of the coronas X-rays that are reflected by the disk, andthe time lag between the original and reflected X-rays, which reveals the distance from the corona to the reflecting part of the disk.A visualization of the authors model for an AGN. The accretion disk is

  7. The CORONAS-Photon/TESIS experiment on EUV imaging spectroscopy of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, S.; Zhitnik, I.; Bogachev, S.; Bugaenko, O.; Ignat'ev, A.; Mitrofanov, A.; Perzov, A.; Shestov, S.; Slemzin, V.; Suhodrev, N.

    The new experiment TESIS is developent for russian CORONAS-Photon mission launch is planned on the end of 2007 The experiment is aimed on the study of activity of the Sun in the phases of minimum rise and maximum of 24 th cycle of Solar activity by the method of XUV imaging spectroscopy The method is based on the registration full-Sun monochromatic images with high spatial and temporal resolution The scientific tasks of the experiment are i Investigation dynamic processes in corona flares CME etc with high spatial up to 1 and temporal up to 1 second resolution ii determination of the main plasma parameters like plasma electron and ion density and temperature differential emission measure etc iii study of the processes of appearance and development large scale long-life magnetic structures in the solar corona study of the fluency of this structures on the global activity of the corona iv study of the mechanisms of energy accumulation and release in the solar flares and mechanisms of transformation of this energy into the heating of the plasma and kinematics energy To get the information for this studies the TESIS will register full-Sun images in narrow spectral intervals and the monochromatic lines of HeII SiXI FeXXI-FeXXIII MgXII ions The instrument includes 5 independent channels 2 telescopes for 304 and 132 A wide-field 2 5 degrees coronograph 280-330A and 8 42 A spectroheliographs The detailed description of the TESIS experiment and the instrument is presented

  8. Solar Wind Variation with the Cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I. S. Veselovsky; A. V. Dmitriev; A. V. Suvorova; M. V. Tarsina

    2000-09-01

    The cyclic evolution of the heliospheric plasma parameters is related to the time-dependent boundary conditions in the solar corona. "Minimal" coronal configurations correspond to the regular appearance of the tenuous, but hot and fast plasma streams from the large polar coronal holes. The denser, but cooler and slower solar wind is adjacent to coronal streamers. Irregular dynamic manifestations are present in the corona and the solar wind everywhere and always. They follow the solar activity cycle rather well. Because of this, the direct and indirect solar wind measurements demonstrate clear variations in space and time according to the minimal, intermediate and maximal conditions of the cycles. The average solar wind density, velocity and temperature measured at the Earth's orbit show specific decadal variations and trends, which are of the order of the first tens per cent during the last three solar cycles. Statistical, spectral and correlation characteristics of the solar wind are reviewed with the emphasis on the cycles.

  9. Coronas implantosoportadas: ¿individualizar o ferulizar?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Gómez Polo

    Full Text Available Existen diferentes formas de rehabilitación de coronas sobre implantes adyacentes en un tramo edéntulo. Las opciones que pueden encontrarse son la de restaurar con varias coronas unitarias, o bien unir esas coronas en una sola prótesis. Material y Método: Se llevó a cabo una búsqueda bibliográfica a través de bases de datos en revistas especializadas de Odontología. Resultados: En la bibliografía revisada se observa que existen defensores y detractores de cada una de las técnicas, basándose cada autor en distintos estudios y argumentos. Discusión: Se encontraron ventajas e inconvenientes en ambas opciones prostodóncicas, valorando en base a éstos cuándo utilizar cada una de las técnicas propuestas. Conclusiones: Cuando las condiciones son idóneas, se considera adecuada la restauración con coronas individuales; por otro lado cuando existan condiciones adversas (implantes cortos, hueso de mala calidad, carga inmediata o factores oclusales no adecuados, en las que el reparto de fuerzas pueda comprometer el pronóstico de la restauración, la ferulización será el tratamiento de elección.

  10. Positive and negative pulsed corona in argon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Rutgers, W.R.; Ebert, U.

    2002-01-01

    Photographs are obtained of corona discharges in argon at atmospheric pressure using a high resolution, intensified CCD camera. Positive and negative polarity is applied at the curved electrode in a point-plane gap and a plane-plane gap with a protruding point. Branching is observed in the positive

  11. Force-free field modeling of twist and braiding-induced magnetic energy in an active-region corona

    CERN Document Server

    Thalmann, J K; Wiegelmann, T

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical concept that braided magnetic field lines in the solar corona may dissipate a sufficient amount of energy to account for the brightening observed in the active-region corona, has been substantiated by high-resolution observations only recently. From the analysis of coronal images obtained with the High Resolution Coronal Imager, first observational evidence of the braiding of magnetic field lines was reported by Cirtain et al. 2013 (hereafter CG13). We present nonlinear force-free reconstructions of the associated coronal magnetic field based on vector SDO/HMI magnetograms. We deliver estimates of the free magnetic energy associated to a braided coronal structure. Our model results suggest (~100 times) more free energy at the braiding site than analytically estimated by CG13, strengthening the possibility of the active-region corona being heated by field line braiding. We were able to assess the coronal free energy appropriately by using vector field measurements and attribute the lower energy...

  12. Solar physics: When the tail wags the dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulanier, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    Solar eruptions are triggered by magnetic stress building up in the corona due to the motion of the Sun's dense surface. New observations reveal that these eruptions can, in turn, induce the rotational motion of sunspots.

  13. Effect of the planet shine on the corona: Application to the Martian hot oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaufray, J.-Y.; Deighan, J.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Schneider, N.; Clarke, J.; Leblanc, F.; Jakosky, B.

    2016-11-01

    Systematic observations of the Martian hot oxygen corona by Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph on Mars Atmosphere and Volatile and EvolutioN can be used to constrain estimates of the current neutral oxygen escape rate. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the photons emitted from the thermosphere and lower exosphere on the emissivity of the hot oxygen corona at 130.4 nm. We compare this source of illumination, generally neglected, to the direct solar illumination used to convert the O I 130.4 triplet brightness into line-of-sight column density. This study is performed using a radiative transfer model with two Maxwellian oxygen populations, assuming spherical symmetry for the cold and hot oxygen densities. Contribution to the corona from the illumination of the exosphere by the sunlit atmosphere depends on the amount of cold oxygen and varies with altitude and solar zenith angle. An analytic formulation to take into account variations of this effect with respect to the hot oxygen kinetic temperature is proposed. The effect of the atmosphere sunlit should be general and occur on other planets for other very optically thick resonance lines.

  14. Heating heavy ions in the polar corona by collisionless shocks: A one-dimensional simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, Giuseppe; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    Recently a new model for explaining the observations of preferential heating of heavy ions in the polar solar corona was proposed (Zimbardo, 2010, 2011). In that model the ion energization mechanism is the ion reflection off supercritical quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks in the corona and the subsequent acceleration by the motional electric field E = -V × B/c. The mechanism of heavy ion reflection is based on ion gyration in the magnetic overshoot of the shock. The acceleration due to the motional electric field is perpendicular to the magnetic field, giving rise to large temperature anisotropy with T⊥ ≫ T∥, in agreement with SoHO observations. Such a model is tested here by means of a one dimensional test particle simulation where ions are launched toward electric and magnetic profiles representing the shock transition. We study the dynamics of O5+, as representative of coronal heavy ions for Alfvénic Mach numbers of 2-4, as appropriate to solar corona. It is found that O5+ ions are easily reflected and gain more than mass proportional energy with respect to protons.

  15. Improved Determination of the Location of the Temperature Maximum in the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, J. F.; Stegen, K.

    2016-10-01

    The most used method to calculate the coronal electron temperature [ Te (r)] from a coronal density distribution [ ne (r)] is the scale-height method (SHM). We introduce a novel method that is a generalization of a method introduced by Alfvén (Ark. Mat. Astron. Fys. 27, 1, 1941) to calculate Te(r) for a corona in hydrostatic equilibrium: the "HST" method. All of the methods discussed here require given electron-density distributions [ ne (r)] which can be derived from white-light (WL) eclipse observations. The new "DYN" method determines the unique solution of Te(r) for which Te(r → ∞) → 0 when the solar corona expands radially as realized in hydrodynamical solar-wind models. The applications of the SHM method and DYN method give comparable distributions for Te(r). Both have a maximum [ T_{max}] whose value ranges between 1 - 3 MK. However, the peak of temperature is located at a different altitude in both cases. Close to the Sun where the expansion velocity is subsonic ( r corona when the electron-density distribution is obtained from WL coronal observations.

  16. SELF-HEATING OF CORONA BY ELECTROSTATIC FIELDS DRIVEN BY SHEARED FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, H.; Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics, Shahdra Valley Road, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Poedts, S. [K. U. Leuven, Centre for Plasma Astrophysics, and Leuven Mathematical Modeling and Computational Science Center (LMCC), Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-04-01

    A mechanism for self-heating of the solar corona is discussed. It is shown that the free energy available in the form of sheared flows gives rise to unstable electrostatic perturbations which accelerate and heat particles. The electrostatic perturbations can occur through two processes, viz., by a purely growing sheared flow-driven instability and/or by a sheared flow-driven drift wave. These processes can occur throughout the corona and, hence, this self-heating mechanism could be very important for coronal heating. These instabilities can give rise to local perturbed electrostatic potentials {psi}{sub 1} of up to 100 volts within 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} to a few seconds time, if the (dimensionless) initial perturbation is assumed to be about 1%, that is, e{psi}{sub 1}/T{sub e} {approx_equal} 10{sup -2}. The wavelengths in the direction perpendicular to the external magnetic field B{sub 0} vary from about 10 m to 1 m in our model. The purely growing instability creates electrostatic fields by sheared flows even if there is no density gradient, whereas a density gradient is crucial for the occurrence of the drift wave instability. The purely growing instability develops a small real frequency as well in the two-ion coronal plasma. In the solar corona, very low frequency (of the order of 1 Hz) drift dissipative waves can also occur due to electron-ion collisions.

  17. Solar coronal observations at high frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Katsiyannis, A. C.; Mathioudakis, M.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Williams, D. R.; F. P. Keenan

    2001-01-01

    The Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (SECIS) is a simple and extremely fast, high-resolution imaging instrument designed for studies of the solar corona. Light from the corona (during, for example, a total solar eclipse) is reflected off a heliostat and passes via a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and beam splitter to two CCD cameras capable of imaging at 60 frames a second. The cameras are attached via SCSI connections to a purpose-built PC that acts as the data acquisition and storage syst...

  18. Solar Cycle in the Heliosphere and Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-23

    On the other hand, solar energetic particles can serve as probes for explosive phenomena on the Sun and conditions in the corona and inner...hot parts of the corona even in the absence of active sunspot regions. The likelihood that the solar wind was slow during the Maunder Minimum was...minima” and that “diffusion contributed ≈50 % of the total cosmic proton intensities observed at Earth while particle drifts contributed the other 50

  19. IMAGING COMET ISON C/2012 S1 IN THE INNER CORONA AT PERIHELION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druckmüller, Miloslav [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Habbal, Shadia Rifai [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu 96822, Hawaii (United States); Aniol, Peter [ASTELCO Systems GmbH, D-82152 Martinsried (Germany); Ding, Adalbert [Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin, and Institute of Technical Physics, Berlin (Germany); Morgan, Huw [Institute of Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science, Aberystwyth University, Ceredigion, Cymru SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Much anticipation and speculation were building around comet ISON, or C/2012 S1, discovered on 2012 September 21 by the International Scientific Optical Network telescope in Russia, and bound for the Sun on 2013 November 28, with a closest heliocentric approach distance of 2.7 R {sub ☉}. Here we present the first white light image of the comet's trail through the inner corona. The image was taken with a wide field Lyot-type coronagraph from the Mees Observatory on Haleakala at 19:12 UT, past its perihelion passage at 18:45 UT. The perfect match between the comet's trail captured in the inner corona and the trail that had persisted across the field of view of 2-6 R {sub ☉} of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment/C2 coronagraph at 19:12 UT demonstrates that the comet survived its perihelion passage.

  20. Distribution of electric currents in sunspots from photosphere to corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosain, Sanjay [National Solar Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Démoulin, Pascal [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, UMR 8109 (CNRS), F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); López Fuentes, Marcelo [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, CC. 67, Suc. 28 Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

    2014-09-20

    We present a study of two regular sunspots that exhibit nearly uniform twist from the photosphere to the corona. We derive the twist parameter in the corona and in the chromosphere by minimizing the difference between the extrapolated linear force-free field model field lines and the observed intensity structures in the extreme-ultraviolet images of the Sun. The chromospheric structures appear more twisted than the coronal structures by a factor of two. Further, we derive the vertical component of electric current density, j{sub z} , using vector magnetograms from the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). The spatial distribution of j{sub z} has a zebra pattern of strong positive and negative values owing to the penumbral fibril structure resolved by Hinode/SOT. This zebra pattern is due to the derivative of the horizontal magnetic field across the thin fibrils; therefore, it is strong and masks weaker currents that might be present, for example, as a result of the twist of the sunspot. We decompose j{sub z} into the contribution due to the derivatives along and across the direction of the horizontal field, which follows the fibril orientation closely. The map of the tangential component has more distributed currents that are coherent with the chromospheric and coronal twisted structures. Moreover, it allows us to map and identify the direct and return currents in the sunspots. Finally, this decomposition of j{sub z} is general and can be applied to any vector magnetogram in order to better identify the weaker large-scale currents that are associated with coronal twisted/sheared structures.

  1. Emergence of magnetic flux from the convection zone into the corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archontis, V.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Galsgaard, K.; Hood, A.; O'Shea, E.

    2004-11-01

    Numerical experiments of the emergence of magnetic flux from the uppermost layers of the solar interior to the photosphere and its further eruption into the low atmosphere and corona are carried out. We use idealized models for the initial stratification and magnetic field distribution below the photosphere similar to those used for multidimensional flux emergence experiments in the literature. The energy equation is adiabatic except for the inclusion of ohmic and viscous dissipation terms, which, however, become important only at interfaces and reconnection sites. Three-dimensional experiments for the eruption of magnetic flux both into an unmagnetized corona and into a corona with a preexisting ambient horizontal field are presented. The shocks preceding the rising plasma present the classical structure of nonlinear Lamb waves. The expansion of the matter when rising into the atmosphere takes place preferentially in the horizontal directions: a flattened (or oval) low plasma-β ball ensues, in which the field lines describe loops in the corona with increasing inclination away from the vertical as one goes toward the sides of the structure. Magnetograms and velocity field distributions on horizontal planes are presented simultaneously for the solar interior and various levels in the atmosphere. Since the background pressure and density drop over many orders of magnitude with increasing height, the adiabatic expansion of the rising plasma yields very low temperatures. To avoid this, the entropy of the rising fluid elements should be increased to the high values of the original atmosphere via heating mechanisms not included in the present numerical experiments. The eruption of magnetic flux into a corona with a preexisting magnetic field pointing in the horizontal direction yields a clear case of essentially three-dimensional reconnection when the upcoming and ambient field systems come into contact. The coronal ambient field is chosen at time t=0 perpendicular to

  2. Prediction of solar energetic particle event histories using real-time particle and solar wind measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelof, E. C.; Gold, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The comparatively well-ordered magnetic structure in the solar corona during the decline of Solar Cycle 20 revealed a characteristic dependence of solar energetic particle injection upon heliographic longitude. When analyzed using solar wind mapping of the large scale interplanetary magnetic field line connection from the corona to the Earth, particle fluxes display an approximately exponential dependence on heliographic longitude. Since variations in the solar wind velocity (and hence the coronal connection longitude) can severely distort the simple coronal injection profile, the use of real-time solar wind velocity measurements can be of great aid in predicting the decay of solar particle events. Although such exponential injection profiles are commonplace during 1973-1975, they have also been identified earlier in Solar Cycle 20, and hence this structure may be present during the rise and maximum of the cycle, but somewhat obscured by greater temporal variations in particle injection.

  3. Helium corona-assisted air discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Nan; Gao Lei; Ji Ailing; Cao Zexian [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Operation of atmospheric discharge of electronegative gases including air at low voltages yet without consuming any inert gas will enormously promote the application of non-thermal plasmas. By taking advantage of the low onset voltage for helium corona, air discharge was successfully launched at much reduced voltages with a needle-plate system partly contained in a helium-filled glass bulb--for a needle-plate distance of 12 mm, 1.0 kV suffices. Ultraviolet emission from helium corona facilitates the discharging of air, and the discharge current manifests distinct features such as relatively broad Trichel pulses in both half periods. This design allows safe and economic implementation of atmospheric discharge of electronegative gases, which will find a broad palette of applications in surface modification, plasma medicine and gas treatment, etc.

  4. Duality, Tangential Interpolation, and Toeplitz Corona Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Raghupathi, Mrinal

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we extend a method of Arveson and McCullough to prove a tangential interpolation theorem for subalgebras of $H^\\infty$. This tangential interpolation result implies a Toelitz corona theorem. In particular, it is shown that the set of matrix positivity conditions is indexed by cyclic subspaces, which is analogous to the results obtained for the ball and the polydisk algebra by Trent-Wick and Douglas-Sarkar.

  5. Observational Signatures of Waves and Flows in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    De Moortel, Ineke; Van Doorsselaere, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Propagating perturbations have been observed in extended coronal loop structures for a number of years, but the interpretation in terms of slow (propagating) magneto-acoustic waves and/or as quasi-periodic upflows remains unresolved. We used forward-modelling to construct observational signatures associated with a simple slow magneto-acoustic wave or periodic flow model. Observational signatures were computed for the 171 {\\AA} Fe ix and the 193 {\\AA} Fe xii spectral lines. Although there are many differences between the flow and wave models, we did not find any clear, robust observational characteristics that can be used in isolation ( i.e. that do not rely on a comparison between the models). For the waves model, a relatively rapid change of the average line widths as a function of (shallow) line-of-sight angles was found, whereas the ratio of the line width amplitudes to the Doppler velocity amplitudes is relatively high for the flow model. The most robust observational signature found is that the ratio of ...

  6. Magneto-Fluid Coupling - Eruptive Events in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Ohsaki, S; Yoshida, Z; Mahajan, S M; Ohsaki, Shuichi; Shatashvili, Nana L.; Yoshida, Zensho; Mahajan, Swadesh M.

    2001-01-01

    By modelling the coronal structures by "slowly" evolving Double-Beltrami two-fluid equilibria (created by the interaction of the magnetic and velocity fields), the conditions for catastrophic transformations of the original state are derived. It is shown that, at the transition, much of the magnetic energy of the original state is converted to the the flow kinetic energy.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of electrical corona discharge in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settaouti, A.; Settaouti, L. [Electrotechnic Department, University of Sciences and Technology, P.O. Box 1505, El-M' naouar, Oran (Algeria)

    2011-01-15

    Electrical discharges play a key role in technologies; there are many industrial applications where the corona discharge is used. Air as insulator is probably the best compromise solution for many applications. All of this reflects on the great importance of the evaluation of the corona performance characteristics. Numerical simulation of the corona discharge helps to better understand the involved phenomena and optimize the corona devices. This paper is aimed at calculating the corona discharge in negative point-plane air gaps. To describe the non-equilibrium behavior of the electronic avalanches and to simulate the development of corona discharge the method of Monte Carlo has been used. This model provides the spatial-temporal local field and particles charged densities variations as well as the ionization front velocity. (author)

  8. Dynamic corona characteristics of water droplets on charged conductor surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Zezhong; Chen, Shuiming; He, Jinliang

    2017-03-01

    The formation of the Taylor cone of a water droplet on the surface of the conductor in a line-ground electrode system is captured using a high-speed camera, while the corona current is synchronously measured using a current measurement system. Repeated Taylor cone deformation is observed, yielding regular groupings of corona current pulses. The underlying mechanism of this deformation is studied and the correlation between corona discharge characteristics and cone deformation is investigated. Depending on the applied voltage and rate of water supply, the Taylor cone may be stable or unstable and has a significant influence on the characteristics of the corona currents. If the rate of water supply is large enough, the Taylor cone tends to be unstable and generates corona-current pulses of numerous induced current pulses with low amplitudes. In consequence, this difference suggests that large rainfall results in simultaneously lower radio interference and higher corona loss.

  9. Design of the UHVDC Corona Cage in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jian; LU Jiayu; ZHANG Wenliang

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of testing and analysing the corona characteristics of UHVDC bundle conductors,UHVDC corona cage would be built in China.Corona cage is one of the indispensable equipments for conductor corona performance researches.Tests of conductor cotona characteristics in corona cages can overcome the shortages of those with test lines.The dimensions of several corona cages constructed overseas were introduced in this paper.Based on foreign experiences and the requirement of State Grid Corporation of China,the UHVDC corona cage was designed as double-cage,double-layer,three-seetions,and catenary shape with the size of 70 m×22 m× 13 m.The corona loss measurement system,radio interference measuring system,and the audible noise measuring system are also detailed,including the measurement theory,connection with the cage,the parameters and the designing basis.The UHVDC corona cage has been put into service.It now undergoes a large amount of audible noise and radio frequency interference tests.

  10. What Can Be Interesting in the Analysis of Crowded Solar Bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Koval, A. A.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Zarka, Ph.; Rucker, H. O.

    2015-03-01

    At decameter wavelengths the radio astronomy observations reveal a wide variety of solar bursts. They are associated with solar activity manifestations such as movements of electron beams and shock waves in solar corona, flare- related events, coronal mass ejections and others. The analysis of burst features allows one to use them as probing signals which comprise useful information about solar corona parameters and their changes over time. By frequency-time measurements of different types of solar bursts occurred about the same time one can provide a comparative study of their properties, complementing the missing pieces in the complex mosaic of solar events. In this purpose we discuss features of their signal processing by the gradient filtration, as applied to quasi-periodic bursts like a zebra pattern related to Bernstein modes. The measured frequency periodicity of the bursts gives a chance to determine the magnetic field strength in upper corona around the protracted solar minimum of solar activity.

  11. SIMULATIONS OF THE KELVIN–HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE TURBULENT CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, Daniel O.; DeLuca, Edward E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mininni, Pablo D. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and Instituto de Física de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-02-20

    Recent high-resolution Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory images show evidence of the development of the Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) instability, as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) expand in the ambient corona. A large-scale magnetic field mostly tangential to the interface is inferred, both on the CME and on the background sides. However, the magnetic field component along the shear flow is not strong enough to quench the instability. There is also observational evidence that the ambient corona is in a turbulent regime, and therefore the criteria for the development of the instability are a priori expected to differ from the laminar case. To study the evolution of the KH instability with a turbulent background, we perform three-dimensional simulations of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations. The instability is driven by a velocity profile tangential to the CME–corona interface, which we simulate through a hyperbolic tangent profile. The turbulent background is generated by the application of a stationary stirring force. We compute the instability growth rate for different values of the turbulence intensity, and find that the role of turbulence is to attenuate the growth. The fact that KH instability is observed sets an upper limit on the correlation length of the coronal background turbulence.

  12. Numerical experiments on the detailed energy conversion and spectrum studies in a corona current sheet

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Lei; Mei, Zhixing; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the energy conversion and spectra in a corona current sheet by 2.5-dimensional MHD numerical simulations. Numerical results show that many Petschek-like fine structures with slow-mode shocks mediated by plasmoid instabilities develop during the magnetic reconnection process. The termination shocks can also be formed above the primary magnetic island and at the head of secondary islands. These shocks play important roles in generating thermal energy in a corona current sheet. For a numerical simulation with initial conditions close to the solar corona environment, the ratio of the generated thermal energy to the total dissipated magnetic energy is around $1/5$ before secondary islands appear. After secondary islands appear, the generated thermal energy starts to increase sharply and this ratio can reach a value about $3/5$. In an environment with a relatively lower plasma density and plasma $\\beta$, the plasma can be heated to a much higher temperature. After secondary islands appear, t...

  13. An Investigation of the Physical Properties of Erupting Solar Prominences, Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-30

    12 6. Total intensity of calibration images...solar corona . Changing magnetic fields in the photosphere, coupled with photospheric convective motions, drive the dynamics and heating of the corona ...Figure 4 is produced from these measurements. The dashed line represents the principal optical ray. Total Internal Reflection occurs at the 1st and

  14. The observation of total solar eclipse in Indonesia on 11 June 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y.; Miyazaki, H.; Imai, H.; Hiei, E.

    The total solar eclipse on 11 June 1983 was observed at Cepu, Central Java. The planning, observing instruments, setting-up and the observing procedure are described. Electron number density in thread-like fine structures in an active region of the corona was derived to be about 5×109 from the corona taken at the eclipse.

  15. K-corona recording in the range < 1.4 Rsun

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, I S; Lisin, D V; Nasonova, L P

    2015-01-01

    Two approaches are suggested for recording the continuum corona in the range < 1.4 Rsun. They are different from the classical coronagraphic ones. Current state in the thin film technology allows discussing a new generation coronagraph with a variable transmission of an entrance aperture. The estimated coronagraphic factor is 2 orders of magnitude higher compared to a Lyot-type coronagraph. Another approach is based on the use of total solar eclipses at near-Mercury orbits. The instrumental background is decreased at least 3 orders of magnitude. That allows using a more simplified optical sketch.

  16. TESIS experiment on XUV imaging spectroscopy of the Sun onboard the CORONAS-PHOTON satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, S. V.; Zhitnik, I. A.; Bogachev, S. A.; Shestov, S. V.; Bugaenko, O. I.; Suhodrev, N. K.; Pertsov, A. A.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Ignat'ev, A. P.; Slemzin, V. A.

    We present a brief description of new complex of space telescopes and spectrographs, TESIS, which will be placed aboard the CORONAS-PHOTON satellite. The complex is intended for high-resolution imaging observation of full Sun in the coronal spectral lines and in the spectral lines of the solar transition region. TESIS will be launched at the end of 2007 - early of 2008. About 25 % of the daily TESIS images will be free for use and for downloading from the TESIS data center that is planned to open 2 months before the TESIS launching at http://www.tesis.lebedev.ru

  17. Plasma Heating of Titan's Exobase and Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karn, M.; Smith, H. T.; Tucker, O. J.; Johnson, R. E.; de La Haye, V.; Waite, J. H.; Young, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Cassini data have shown that the dominant heating process for Titan's atmospheric corona and exobase region is as yet uncertain (DeLaHaye et al. 2007). We have speculated that the incident plasma, both the slowed and deflected ambient ions and the pick-up ions, may be responsible for all or a significant fraction of the non-thermal component of Titan's corona (De La Haye et al. 2007). Our earlier models of the net incident plasma heating (Michael et al. 2004; 2005) fall short in describing the coronal structure seen by INMS on Ta, Tb and T5. Since heating of the corona and exobase affects atmospheric escape, it is critical for describing the evolution of Titan's atmosphere (Johnson 2004). Here we describe an empirical approach to this problem. INMS data and the preliminary CAPS flux data clearly indicate, not surprisingly, that the heating is spatially non-uniform and is variable, but there is as yet no correlation with the plasma flow models. Therefore, we haev analyzed INMS data for the atmospheric structure near the exobase for a large number of Cassini passes through the exobase region and we have analyzed certain CAPS data for the plasma flow near the exobase. The goal is to develop a model for the spatial variations in the plasma heating near the exobase with the goal of improving our knowledge of atmospheric escape. De La Haye, V.. et al., JGR 112, A07309, doi:10.1029/2006JA012222, 2007 Johnson, R.E. ApJ 609, L99, 2004 Michael, M., and R. E. Johnson. PSS 53, 1510, 2005. Michael, M., et al. Icarus, 175, 263, 2005.

  18. Hydrogen Production from Methanol Using Corona Discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen production at room temperature from liquid methanol has been conductedusing corona discharge. The content of water in methanol solution has a significant effect on thisproduction. When water concentration increases from 1.0 % to 16.7 %, the methanol conversionrate changes from 0.196 to 0.284 mol/h. An important finding in this investigation is theformation of ethylene glycol as a major by-product. The yield of ethylene glycol is ranged from0.0045 to 0.0075 mol/h based on the water content.

  19. Fluorine in R Coronae Borealis Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, Gajendra; Rao, N Kameswara

    2007-01-01

    Neutral fluorine (F I) lines are identified in the optical spectra of several R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) at maximum light. These lines provide the first measurement of the fluorine abundance in these stars. Fluorine is enriched in some RCBs by factors of 800 to 8000 relative to its likely initial abundance. The overabundances of fluorine are evidence for the synthesis of fluorine. These results are discussed in the light of the scenario that RCBs are formed by accretion of an He white dwarf by a C-O white dwarf. Sakurai's object (V4334 Sgr), a final He-shell flash product, shows no detectable F I lines.

  20. Mass-Loss Evolution in the EUV Low Corona from SDO/AIA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Fernando M.; Hebe Cremades, M.; Nuevo, Federico A.; Balmaceda, Laura A.; Vásquez, Alberto M.

    2017-01-01

    We carry out an analysis of the mass that is ejected from three coronal dimming regions observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The three events are unambiguously identified with white-light coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that are associated in turn with surface activity of diverse nature: an impulsive (M-class) flare, a weak (B-class) flare, and a filament eruption without a flare. The use of three AIA coronal passbands allows applying a differential emission measure technique to define the dimming regions and identify their ejected mass through the analysis of the electronic density depletion associated with the eruptions. The temporal evolution of the mass loss from the three dimmings can be approximated by an exponential equation followed by a linear fit. We determine the mass of the associated CMEs from COR2 data. The results show that the ejected masses from the low corona represent a considerable amount of the CME mass. We also find that plasma is still being ejected from the low corona at the time when the CMEs reach the COR2 field of view. The temporal evolution of the angular width of the CMEs, of the dimming regions in the low corona, and of the flux registered by GOES in soft X-rays are all in close relation with the behavior of mass ejection from the low corona. We discuss the implications of our findings toward a better understanding of the temporal evolution of several parameters associated with the analyzed dimmings and CMEs.

  1. The Origins of Magnetic Structure in the Corona and Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important and most puzzling features of the coronal magnetic field is that it appears to have smooth magnetic structure with little evidence for non-potentiality except at two special locations: photospheric polarity inversions lines. (non-potentiality observed as a filament channel) and coronal hole boundaries, (observed as the slow solar wind). This characteristic feature of the closed-field corona is highly unexpected given that its magnetic field is continuously tangled by photospheric motions. Although reconnection can eliminate some of the injected structure, it cannot destroy the helicity, which should build up to produce observable complexity. I propose that an inverse cascade process transports the injected helicity from the interior of closed flux regions to their boundaries inversion lines and coronal holes, creating both filament channels and the slow wind. We describe how the helicity is injected and transported and calculate the relevant rates. I argue that one process, helicity transport, can explain both the observed lack and presence of structure in the coronal magnetic field. This work has been supported by the NASA HTP, SR&T, and LWS programs.

  2. The Corona Limit of Penrose Tilings Is a Regular Decagon

    OpenAIRE

    Akiyama, Shigeki; Imai, Katsunobu

    2016-01-01

    Part 2: Regular Papers; International audience; We define and study the corona limit of a tiling, by investigating the signal propagations on cellular automata (CA) on tilings employing the simple growth CA. In particular, the corona limit of Penrose tilings is the regular decagon.

  3. The nanoparticle biomolecule corona: lessons learned - challenge accepted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docter, D; Westmeier, D; Markiewicz, M; Stolte, S; Knauer, S K; Stauber, R H

    2015-10-07

    Besides the wide use of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) in technical products, their applications are not only increasing in biotechnology and biomedicine, but also in the environmental field. While the physico-chemical properties and behaviour of NMs can be characterized accurately under idealized conditions, this is no longer the case in complex physiological or natural environments. Herein, proteins and other biomolecules rapidly bind to NMs, forming a protein/biomolecule corona that critically affects the NMs' (patho)biological and technical identities. As the corona impacts the in vitro and/or in vivo NM applications in humans and ecosystems, a mechanistic understanding of its relevance and of the biophysical forces regulating corona formation is mandatory. Based on recent insights, we here critically review and present an updated concept of corona formation and evolution. We comment on how corona signatures may be linked to effects at the nano-bio interface in physiological and environmental systems. In order to comprehensively analyse corona profiles and to mechanistically understand the coronas' biological/ecological impact, we present a tiered multidisciplinary approach. To stimulate progress in this field, we introduce the potential impact of the corona for NM-microbiome-(human)host interactions and the novel concept of 'nanologicals', i.e., the nanomaterial-specific targeting of molecular machines. We conclude by discussing the relevant challenges that still need to be resolved in this field.

  4. Protein corona – from molecular adsorption to physiological complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Treuel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In biological environments, nanoparticles are enshrouded by a layer of biomolecules, predominantly proteins, mediating its subsequent interactions with cells. Detecting this protein corona, understanding its formation with regards to nanoparticle (NP and protein properties, and elucidating its biological implications were central aims of bio-related nano-research throughout the past years. Here, we discuss the mechanistic parameters that are involved in the protein corona formation and the consequences of this corona formation for both, the particle, and the protein. We review consequences of corona formation for colloidal stability and discuss the role of functional groups and NP surface functionalities in shaping NP–protein interactions. We also elaborate the recent advances demonstrating the strong involvement of Coulomb-type interactions between NPs and charged patches on the protein surface. Moreover, we discuss novel aspects related to the complexity of the protein corona forming under physiological conditions in full serum. Specifically, we address the relation between particle size and corona composition and the latest findings that help to shed light on temporal evolution of the full serum corona for the first time. Finally, we discuss the most recent advances regarding the molecular-scale mechanistic role of the protein corona in cellular uptake of NPs.

  5. Personalized protein coronas : a "key" factor at the nanobiointerface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajipour, Mohammad J.; Laurent, Sophie; Aghaie, Afsaneh; Rezaee, Farhad; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    It is now well known that the primary interactions of biological entities (e. g., tissues and cells) with nano-particles (NPs) are strongly influenced by the protein composition of the "corona" (i. e., the NP surface attached proteins). The composition of the corona strongly depends on the protein s

  6. Protein corona - from molecular adsorption to physiological complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuel, Lennart; Docter, Dominic; Maskos, Michael; Stauber, Roland H

    2015-01-01

    In biological environments, nanoparticles are enshrouded by a layer of biomolecules, predominantly proteins, mediating its subsequent interactions with cells. Detecting this protein corona, understanding its formation with regards to nanoparticle (NP) and protein properties, and elucidating its biological implications were central aims of bio-related nano-research throughout the past years. Here, we discuss the mechanistic parameters that are involved in the protein corona formation and the consequences of this corona formation for both, the particle, and the protein. We review consequences of corona formation for colloidal stability and discuss the role of functional groups and NP surface functionalities in shaping NP-protein interactions. We also elaborate the recent advances demonstrating the strong involvement of Coulomb-type interactions between NPs and charged patches on the protein surface. Moreover, we discuss novel aspects related to the complexity of the protein corona forming under physiological conditions in full serum. Specifically, we address the relation between particle size and corona composition and the latest findings that help to shed light on temporal evolution of the full serum corona for the first time. Finally, we discuss the most recent advances regarding the molecular-scale mechanistic role of the protein corona in cellular uptake of NPs.

  7. Solar origins of solar wind properties during the cycle 23 solar minimum and rising phase of cycle 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Janet G; Petrie, Gordon; Riley, Pete

    2013-05-01

    The solar wind was originally envisioned using a simple dipolar corona/polar coronal hole sources picture, but modern observations and models, together with the recent unusual solar cycle minimum, have demonstrated the limitations of this picture. The solar surface fields in both polar and low-to-mid-latitude active region zones routinely produce coronal magnetic fields and related solar wind sources much more complex than a dipole. This makes low-to-mid latitude coronal holes and their associated streamer boundaries major contributors to what is observed in the ecliptic and affects the Earth. In this paper we use magnetogram-based coronal field models to describe the conditions that prevailed in the corona from the decline of cycle 23 into the rising phase of cycle 24. The results emphasize the need for adopting new views of what is 'typical' solar wind, even when the Sun is relatively inactive.

  8. Solar origins of solar wind properties during the cycle 23 solar minimum and rising phase of cycle 24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet G. Luhmann

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind was originally envisioned using a simple dipolar corona/polar coronal hole sources picture, but modern observations and models, together with the recent unusual solar cycle minimum, have demonstrated the limitations of this picture. The solar surface fields in both polar and low-to-mid-latitude active region zones routinely produce coronal magnetic fields and related solar wind sources much more complex than a dipole. This makes low-to-mid latitude coronal holes and their associated streamer boundaries major contributors to what is observed in the ecliptic and affects the Earth. In this paper we use magnetogram-based coronal field models to describe the conditions that prevailed in the corona from the decline of cycle 23 into the rising phase of cycle 24. The results emphasize the need for adopting new views of what is ‘typical’ solar wind, even when the Sun is relatively inactive.

  9. Constraints on Lithospheric Rheology from Observations of Coronae on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Joseph G.; Smrekar, Suzanne; Moresi, Louis N.

    2016-10-01

    Coronae are enigmatic, quasi-circular features found in myriad geological environments. They are primarily distinguished as rings of concentric fractures superimposed on various topographic profiles with at least small-scale volcanism. Mantle plumes may produce coronae with interior rises, whereas coronae with central depressions are often attributed to downwellings like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. For almost three decades, modelers have attempted to reproduce the topographic and gravity profiles measured at coronae. Until recently, few studies also considered tectonic deformation and melt production. In particular, "Type 2" coronae have complete topographic rims but arcs of fractures extending less than 180°, signifying both brittle and ductile deformation. Only a narrow range of rheological parameters like temperature and volatile content may be compatible with these observations. Ultimately, identifying how lithospheric properties differ between Earth and Venus is critical to understanding what factors permit plate tectonics on rocky, Earth-sized planets.Here we present a hierarchical approach to study the formation of coronae. First, we discuss an observational survey enabled by a new digital elevation model derived from stereo topography for ~20% of the surface of Venus, which offers an order-of-magnitude improvement over the horizontal resolution (10 to 20 kilometers) of altimetry data from NASA's Magellan mission. Next, we search this new dataset for signs of lithospheric flexure around small coronae. Simple, thin-elastic plate models were fit to topographic profiles of larger coronae in previous studies, but data resolution impeded efforts to apply this method to the entire coronae population. Finally, we show simulations of the formation of coronae using Underworld II, an open-source code adaptable to a variety of geodynamical problems. We benchmark our code using models of pure Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and then investigate the influence of

  10. Coronal structure and brightness profile of the total solar eclipse on August 1,2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO HaiBin; LIN QiSheng; CHEN YiPing; JIN Sheng; GUAN ZhenBiao; HU Zhongwei

    2009-01-01

    Solar corona is the outermost part of the solar atmosphere.Coronal activities influence space environment between the Sun and the Earth,space weather and the Earth itself.The total solar eclipse (TSE) is the best opportunity to observe the solar corona on ground.During the TSE 2008,a series of images of the corona and partial eclipse of solar disk were obtained using telescope and CCD camera.After image processing,preliminary results of coronal structure are given,and radial brightness profiles of the corona in directions of pole and equator of the Sun are measured.Though in solar activity minimum,the shape and structure of the corona are not symmetry.The equatorial regions are more extent than the polar one,and there are also larger differences between the east and west equatorial regions and between the south and north polar regions.Coronal streamers on east side of the equator,particularly the largest one in east-south direction,are very obvious.The coronal plume in south polar region consists of more polar rays than that in north polar region.These structures are also shown in other observations and data of SOHO.The radial brightness profiles in directions of pole and equator are similar to those of the Van de Hulst model in solar minimum,but there are a few differences due to coronal activity,which is shown in the isophote map of the corona.

  11. Solar Chameleons

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the creation of chameleons deep inside the sun and their subsequent conversion to photons near the magnetised surface of the sun. We find that the spectrum of the regenerated photons lies in the soft X-ray region, hence addressing the solar corona problem. Moreover, these back-converted photons originating from chameleons have an intrinsic difference with regenerated photons from axions: their relative polarisations are mutually orthogonal before Compton interacting with the surrounding plasma. Depending on the photon-chameleon coupling and working in the strong coupling regime of the chameleons to matter, we find that the induced photon flux, when regenerated resonantly with the surrounding plasma, coincides with the solar flux within the soft X-ray energy range. Moreover, using the soft X-ray solar flux as a prior, we find that with a strong enough photon-chameleon coupling the chameleons emitted by the sun could lead to a regenerated photon flux in the CAST pipes, which could be within the reach...

  12. An Estimate of Solar Wind Velocity Profiles in a Coronal Hole and Coronal Streamer Area (6-40R)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzold, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Using the total electron content data obtained by the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment during the first solar conjunction in summer 1991 (Bird et al., 1994), an estimate is presented of solar wind velocity profiles in a coronal hole and a coronal streamer area in the range between 6 and 40 solar radii.

  13. R Coronae Australis: A Cosmic Watercolour

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This magnificent view of the region around the star R Coronae Australis was created from images taken with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. R Coronae Australis lies at the heart of a nearby star-forming region and is surrounded by a delicate bluish reflection nebula embedded in a huge dust cloud. The image reveals surprising new details in this dramatic area of sky. The star R Coronae Australis lies in one of the nearest and most spectacular star-forming regions. This portrait was taken by the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. The image is a combination of twelve separate pictures taken through red, green and blue filters. This image shows a section of sky that spans roughly the width of the full Moon. This is equivalent to about four light-years at the distance of the nebula, which is located some 420 light-years away in the small constellation of Corona Australis (the Southern Crown). The complex is named after the star R Coronae Australis, which lies at the centre of the image. It is one of several stars in this region that belong to the class of very young stars that vary in brightness and are still surrounded by the clouds of gas and dust from which they formed. The intense radiation given off by these hot young stars interacts with the gas surrounding them and is either reflected or re-emitted at a different wavelength. These complex processes, determined by the physics of the interstellar medium and the properties of the stars, are responsible for the magnificent colours of nebulae. The light blue nebulosity seen in this picture is mostly due to the reflection of starlight off small dust particles. The young stars in the R Coronae Australis complex are similar in mass to the Sun and do not emit enough ultraviolet light to ionise a substantial fraction of the surrounding hydrogen. This means that the cloud does not glow with the characteristic red colour seen in

  14. Hybrid modeling of the lower corona using Faraday rotation observations and a MHD thermodynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, David B.; Hollweg, Joseph V.; Jensen, Elizabeth; Lionello, Roberto; Macneice, Peter J.; Coster, Anthea J.

    2017-08-01

    Study of coronal MHD wave energetics relies upon accurate representation of plasma particle number densities (ne) and magnetic field strengths. In the lower corona, these parameters are obtained indirectly, and typically presented as empirical equations as a function of heliocentric radial distance (solar offset, SO). The development of coronal global models using synoptic solar surface magnetogram inputs has provided refined characterization of the coronal plasma organization and magnetic field. We present a cross-analysis between a MHD thermodynamic simulation and Faraday rotation (FR) observations over SO 1.63-1.89 solar radii (Rs) near solar minimum. MESSENGER spacecraft radio signals with a line of sight (LOS) passing through the lower corona were recorded in dual polarization using the Green Bank Telescope in November 2009. Polarization position angle changes were obtained from Stokes parameters. The magnetic field vector (B) and ne along the LOS were obtained from a MHD thermodynamic simulation provided by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. The modeled FR was computed as the integrated product of ne and LOS-aligned B component. The observations over the given SO range yielded an FR change of 7 radians. The simulation reproduced this change when the modeled ne was scaled up by 2.8x, close to values obtained using the Allen-Baumbach equation. No scaling of B from the model was necessary. A refined fit to the observations was obtained when the observationally based total electron content (TEC) curves were introduced. Changes in LOS TEC were determined from radio frequency shifts as the signal passed to successively lower electron concentrations during egress. A good fit to the observations was achieved with an offset of 7e21 m-2 added. Back-calculating ne along the LOS from the TEC curves, we found that the equivalent ne scaling compared to the model output was higher by a factor of 3. The combination of solar surface magnetogram-based MHD coronal

  15. He-like ions as practical astrophysical plasma diagnostics: From stellar coronae to active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Porquet, Delphine; Grosso, Nicolas; 10.1007/s11214-010-9731-2

    2011-01-01

    We review X-ray plasma diagnostics based on the line ratios of He-like ions. Triplet/singlet line intensities can be used to determine electronic temperature and density, and were first developed for the study of the solar corona. Since the launches of the X-ray satellites Chandra and XMM-Newton, these diagnostics have been extended and used (from CV to Si XIII) for a wide variety of astrophysical plasmas such as stellar coronae, supernova remnants, solar system objects, active galactic nuclei, and X-ray binaries. Moreover, the intensities of He-like ions can be used to determine the ionization process(es) at work, as well as the distance between the X-ray plasma and the UV emission source for example in hot stars. In the near future thanks to the next generation of X-ray satellites (e.g., Astro-H and IXO), higher-Z He-like lines (e.g., iron) will be resolved, allowing plasmas with higher temperatures and densities to be probed. Moreover, the so-called satellite lines that are formed closed to parent He-like ...

  16. Detection of high frequency oscillations and damping from multi-slit spectroscopic observations of the corona

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, T; Sindhuja, G; Banerjee, D

    2015-01-01

    During the total solar eclipse of 11 July 2010, multi-slit spectroscopic observations of the solar corona were performed from Easter Island, Chile. To search for high-frequency waves, observations were taken at a high cadence in the green line at 5303 A due to [Fe xiv] and the red line at 6374 A due to [Fe x]. The data are analyzed to study the periodic variations in the intensity, Doppler velocity and line width using wavelet analysis. The data with high spectral and temporal resolution enabled us to study the rapid dynamical changes within coronal structures. We find that at certain locations each parameter shows significant oscillation with periods ranging from 6 - 25 s. For the first time, we could detect damping of high-frequency oscillations with periods of the order of 10 s. If the observed damped oscillations are due to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves then they can contribute significantly in the heating of the corona. From a statistical study we try to characterize the nature of the observed oscillat...

  17. Evidence of mass outflow in the low corona over a large sunspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupert, W. M.; Brosius, J. W.; Thomas, R. J.; Thompson, W. T.

    1994-04-01

    An extreme ultraviolet imaging spectrograph designed for sounding rocket flight has been used to search for velocity fields in the low solar corona. During a flight in May, 1989, the authors obtained emission line profile measurements along a chord through an active region on the Sun. Relative Doppler velocities were measured in emission lines of Mg IX, Fe XV, and Fe XVI with a sensitivity of 2 - 3 km s-1 at 350 A. The only Doppler shift appreciably greater than this level was observed in the line of Mg IX at 368.1 A over the umbra of the large sunspot. The maximum shift measured at that location corresponded to a velocity toward the observer of 14±3 km s-1 relative to the mean of measurements in that emission line made elsewhere over the active region. The magnetic field in the low corona was aligned to within 10° of the line of sight at the location of maximum Doppler shift. Depending on the magnetic field geometry, this mass outflow could either re-appear as a downflow of material in distant footpoints of closed coronal loops or, if along open field lines, could contribute to the solar wind.

  18. Fine-Scale Fluctuations in the Corona Observed with Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy; Schuler, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The High Resolution Coronal Imager(HiC) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket on 2012 July11 and captured roughly 345 s of high spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in a narrowband 193 Angstrom channel. We have analyzed the fluctuations in intensity of Active Region11520.We selected events based on a lifetime greater than 11s (twoHiC frames)and intensities greater than a threshold determined from the average background intensity in a pixel and the photon and electronic noise. We find fluctuations occurring down to the smallest timescale(11s).Typical intensity fluctuations are 20% background intensity, while some events peaka t100%the background intensity.Generally the fluctuations are clustered in solar structures, particularly the moss.We interpret the fluctuations in the moss as indicative of heating events. We use the observed events to model the active region core.

  19. Geometry of solar coronal rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B. P.; Martsenyuk, O. V.; Platov, Yu. V.; Den, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal helmet streamers are the most prominent large-scale elements of the solar corona observed in white light during total solar eclipses. The base of the streamer is an arcade of loops located above a global polarity inversion line. At an altitude of 1-2 solar radii above the limb, the apices of the arches sharpen, forming cusp structures, above which narrow coronal rays are observed. Lyot coronagraphs, especially those on-board spacecrafts flying beyond the Earth's atmosphere, enable us to observe the corona continuously and at large distances. At distances of several solar radii, the streamers take the form of fairly narrow spokes that diverge radially from the Sun. This radial direction displays a continuous expansion of the corona into the surrounding space, and the formation of the solar wind. However, the solar magnetic field and solar rotation complicate the situation. The rotation curves radial streams into spiral ones, similar to water streams flowing from rotating tubes. The influence of the magnetic field is more complex and multifarious. A thorough study of coronal ray geometries shows that rays are frequently not radial and not straight. Coronal streamers frequently display a curvature whose direction in the meridional plane depends on the phase of the solar cycle. It is evident that this curvature is related to the geometry of the global solar magnetic field, which depends on the cycle phase. Equatorward deviations of coronal streamers at solar minima and poleward deviations at solar maxima can be interpreted as the effects of changes in the general topology of the global solar magnetic field. There are sporadic temporal changes in the coronal rays shape caused by remote coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagating through the corona. This is also a manifestation of the influence of the magnetic field on plasma flows. The motion of a large-scale flux rope associated with a CME away from the Sun creates changes in the structure of surrounding field

  20. MHD wave propagation from the sub-photosphere to the corona in an arcade-shaped magnetic field with a null point

    CERN Document Server

    Santamaria, Irantzu C; Collados, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the energy transport by means of MHD waves propagating in quiet Sun magnetic topology from layers below the surface to the corona. Upward propagating waves find obstacles, such as the equipartition layer with plasma b=1 and the transition region, and get converted, reflected and refracted. Understanding the mechanisms by which MHD waves can reach the corona can give us information about the solar atmosphere and the magnetic structures. We carry out two-dimensional numerical simulations of wave propagation in a magnetic field structure that consists of two vertical flux tubes separated by an arcade shaped magnetic field. This configuration contains a null point in the corona, that significantly modifies the behaviour of the waves. We describe in detail the wave propagation through the atmosphere under different driving conditions. We also present the spatial distribution of the mean acoustic and magnetic energy fluxes and the spatial distribution of the dominant frequencies in ...

  1. Charging of moving surfaces by corona discharges sustained in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun-Chieh, E-mail: junchwan@umich.edu; Kushner, Mark J., E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States); Zhang, Daihua, E-mail: dhzhang@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Leoni, Napoleon, E-mail: napoleon.j.leoni@hp.com; Birecki, Henryk, E-mail: henryk.birecki@hp.com; Gila, Omer, E-mail: omer-gila@hp.com [Hewlett-Packard Research Labs, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    Atmospheric pressure corona discharges are used in electrophotographic (EP) printing technologies for charging imaging surfaces such as photoconductors. A typical corona discharge consists of a wire (or wire array) biased with a few hundred volts of dc plus a few kV of ac voltage. An electric discharge is produced around the corona wire from which electrons drift towards and charge the underlying dielectric surface. The surface charging reduces the voltage drop across the gap between the corona wire and the dielectric surface, which then terminates the discharge, as in a dielectric barrier discharge. In printing applications, this underlying surface is continuously moving throughout the charging process. For example, previously charged surfaces, which had reduced the local electric field and terminated the local discharge, are translated out of the field of view and are replaced with uncharged surface. The uncharged surface produces a rebound in the electric field in the vicinity of the corona wire which in turn results in re-ignition of the discharge. The discharge, so reignited, is then asymmetric. We found that in the idealized corona charging system we investigated, a negatively dc biased corona blade with a dielectric covered ground electrode, the discharge is initially sustained by electron impact ionization from the bulk plasma and then dominated by ionization from sheath accelerated secondary electrons. Depending on the speed of the underlying surface, the periodic re-ignition of the discharge can produce an oscillatory charging pattern on the moving surface.

  2. Charging of moving surfaces by corona discharges sustained in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Chieh; Zhang, Daihua; Leoni, Napoleon; Birecki, Henryk; Gila, Omer; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure corona discharges are used in electrophotographic (EP) printing technologies for charging imaging surfaces such as photoconductors. A typical corona discharge consists of a wire (or wire array) biased with a few hundred volts of dc plus a few kV of ac voltage. An electric discharge is produced around the corona wire from which electrons drift towards and charge the underlying dielectric surface. The surface charging reduces the voltage drop across the gap between the corona wire and the dielectric surface, which then terminates the discharge, as in a dielectric barrier discharge. In printing applications, this underlying surface is continuously moving throughout the charging process. For example, previously charged surfaces, which had reduced the local electric field and terminated the local discharge, are translated out of the field of view and are replaced with uncharged surface. The uncharged surface produces a rebound in the electric field in the vicinity of the corona wire which in turn results in re-ignition of the discharge. The discharge, so reignited, is then asymmetric. We found that in the idealized corona charging system we investigated, a negatively dc biased corona blade with a dielectric covered ground electrode, the discharge is initially sustained by electron impact ionization from the bulk plasma and then dominated by ionization from sheath accelerated secondary electrons. Depending on the speed of the underlying surface, the periodic re-ignition of the discharge can produce an oscillatory charging pattern on the moving surface.

  3. Space matters: meristem expansion triggers corona formation in Passiflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claßen-Bockhoff, Regine; Meyer, Charlotte

    2016-02-01

    Flower meristems differ from vegetative meristems in various aspects. One characteristic is the capacity for ongoing meristem expansion providing space for new structures. Here, corona formation in four species of Passiflora is investigated to understand the spatio-temporal conditions of its formation and to clarify homology of the corona elements. One bird-pollinated species with a single-rowed tubular corona (Passiflora tulae) and three insect-pollinated species with three (P. standleyi Killip), four (P. foetida L. 'Sanctae Martae') and six (P. foetida L. var. hispida) ray-shaped corona rows are chosen as representative examples for the study. Flower development is documented by scanning electron microscopy. Meristem expansion is reconstructed by morphometric data and correlated with the sequential corona element formation. In all species, corona formation starts late in ontogeny after all floral organs have been initiated. It is closely correlated with meristem expansion. The rows appear with increasing space in centripetal or convergent sequence. Based on the concept of fractionation, space induces primordia formation which is a self-regulating process filling the space completely. Correspondingly, the corona is interpreted as a structure of its own, originating from the receptacle. Considering the principle capacity of flower meristems to generate novel structures widens the view and allows new interpretations in combination with molecular, phylogenetic and morphogenetic data. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Understanding the Kinetics of Protein-Nanoparticle Corona Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Oriol; Mittag, Judith J; Kelly, Philip M; Milani, Silvia; Dawson, Kenneth A; Rädler, Joachim O; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2016-12-27

    When a pristine nanoparticle (NP) encounters a biological fluid, biomolecules spontaneously form adsorption layers around the NP, called "protein corona". The corona composition depends on the time-dependent environmental conditions and determines the NP's fate within living organisms. Understanding how the corona evolves is fundamental in nanotoxicology as well as medical applications. However, the process of corona formation is challenging due to the large number of molecules involved and to the large span of relevant time scales ranging from 100 μs, hard to probe in experiments, to hours, out of reach of all-atoms simulations. Here we combine experiments, simulations, and theory to study (i) the corona kinetics (over 10(-3)-10(3) s) and (ii) its final composition for silica NPs in a model plasma made of three blood proteins (human serum albumin, transferrin, and fibrinogen). When computer simulations are calibrated by experimental protein-NP binding affinities measured in single-protein solutions, the theoretical model correctly reproduces competitive protein replacement as proven by independent experiments. When we change the order of administration of the three proteins, we observe a memory effect in the final corona composition that we can explain within our model. Our combined experimental and computational approach is a step toward the development of systematic prediction and control of protein-NP corona composition based on a hierarchy of equilibrium protein binding constants.

  5. Kinetics of the formation of a protein corona around nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-12-01

    Interaction of metal or oxide nanoparticles (NPs) with biological soft matter is one of the central phenomena in basic and applied biology-oriented nanoscience. Often, this interaction includes adsorption of suspended proteins on the NP surface, resulting in the formation of the protein corona around NPs. Structurally, the corona contains a "hard" monolayer shell directly contacting a NP and a more distant weakly associated "soft" shell. Chemically, the corona is typically composed of a mixture of distinct proteins. The corresponding experimental and theoretical studies have already clarified many aspects of the corona formation. The process is, however, complex, and its understanding is still incomplete. Herein, we present a kinetic mean-field model of the formation of the "hard" corona with emphasis on the role of (i) protein-diffusion limitations and (ii) interplay between competitive adsorption of distinct proteins and irreversible reconfiguration of their native structure. The former factor is demonstrated to be significant only in the very beginning of the corona formation. The latter factor is predicted to be more important. It may determine the composition of the corona on the time scales comparable or longer than a few hours.

  6. A global view of velocity fluctuations in the corona below 1.3 $R_\\odot$ with CoMP

    CERN Document Server

    Morton, R J; Pinto, R F

    2016-01-01

    The Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) has previously demonstrated the presence of Doppler velocity fluctuations in the solar corona. The observed fluctuations are thought to be transverse waves, i.e. highly incompressible motions whose restoring force is dominated by the magnetic tension, some of which demonstrate clear periodicity. We aim to exploit CoMP's ability to provide high cadence observations of the off-limb corona to investigate the properties of velocity fluctuations in a range of coronal features, providing insight into how(if) the properties of the waves are influenced by the varying magnetic topology in active regions, quiet Sun and open fields regions. An analysis of Doppler velocity time-series of the solar corona from the $10,747$~{\\AA} Iron XIII line is performed, determining the velocity power spectra and using it as a tool to probe wave behaviour. Further, the average phase speed and density for each region are estimated and used to compute the spectra for energy density and energy ...

  7. Laboratory studies of corona emissions from air terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, F.; Berger, G.

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents some of the results obtained from a systematic series of laboratory investigations into the corona emission characteristics of air terminals. Two particular aspects are considered, namely the effect on corona emission of changing the distance between the tip of the air terminal and the overhead energized electrode, and the relationship between the two fundamental corona parameters (`amplitude coefficient' and onset electric field) and the height of the air terminal above a ground plane. The implications of the results for lightning protection designs are discussed.

  8. Transition region lineshifts and nanoflare heating of the corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansteen, V. H.

    After briefly reviewing previous data and new observations taken by the SUMER instrument aboard the SOHO spacecraft the author pursues the interpretation that the observed pervasive transition region line shifts are caused by MHD waves propagating along the magnetic field lines down from the corona towards the chromosphere. He argues that a likely source of such coronally generated MHD waves are the episodic magnetic reconection events that are believed to heat the corona. He also presents an alternate method of observation based on densitive sensitive line pairs that may give further evidence of the processes heating the corona.

  9. The effect of atmospheric corona treatment on AA1050 aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, Manthana; Møller, Per; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of atmospheric corona discharge on AM 050 aluminium surface was investigated using electrochemical polarization, SEM-EDX, FIB-SEM. and XPS. The corona treatment was performed with varying time (1, 5, and 15 min) in atmospheric air. A 200 nm oxide layer was generated on AA1050 after...... the 15 min air corona treatment. A significant reduction in anodic and cathodic reactivities was observed starting from 1 min exposure, which further decreased with prolonged exposure (15 min) and after delayed testing (after 30 days). The reduction in surface reactivity is due to the formation...

  10. Studying the corona product of graphs under some graph invariants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tavakoli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The corona product $Gcirc H$ of two graphs $G$ and $H$ is obtained by taking one copy of $G$ and $|V(G|$ copies of $H$; and by joining each vertex of the $i$-th copy of $H$ to the $i$-th vertex of $G$, where $1 leq i leq |V(G|$. In this paper, exact formulas for the eccentric distance sum and the edge revised Szeged indices of the corona product of graphs are presented. We also study the conditions under which the corona product of graphs produces a median graph.

  11. Heliophysics at total solar eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2017-08-01

    Observations during total solar eclipses have revealed many secrets about the solar corona, from its discovery in the 17th century to the measurement of its million-kelvin temperature in the 19th and 20th centuries, to details about its dynamics and its role in the solar-activity cycle in the 21st century. Today's heliophysicists benefit from continued instrumental and theoretical advances, but a solar eclipse still provides a unique occasion to study coronal science. In fact, the region of the corona best observed from the ground at total solar eclipses is not available for view from any space coronagraphs. In addition, eclipse views boast of much higher quality than those obtained with ground-based coronagraphs. On 21 August 2017, the first total solar eclipse visible solely from what is now United States territory since long before George Washington's presidency will occur. This event, which will cross coast-to-coast for the first time in 99 years, will provide an opportunity not only for massive expeditions with state-of-the-art ground-based equipment, but also for observations from aloft in aeroplanes and balloons. This set of eclipse observations will again complement space observations, this time near the minimum of the solar activity cycle. This review explores the past decade of solar eclipse studies, including advances in our understanding of the corona and its coronal mass ejections as well as terrestrial effects. We also discuss some additional bonus effects of eclipse observations, such as recreating the original verification of the general theory of relativity.

  12. Coronal Heating Driven by Magnetic-gradient Pumping Mechanism in Solar Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Baolin

    2014-01-01

    The solar coronal heating is a longstanding mystery in astrophysics. Considering that the solar magnetic field is spatially inhomogeneous with considerable magnetic gradient from solar surface to the corona, this work proposes a magnetic gradient pumping (MGP) mechanism and try to explain the formation of hot plasma upflows, such as the hot type II spicules and hot plasma ejections, etc. In MGP mechanism, the magnetic gradients drive the energetic particles to move upwards from the underlying solar atmosphere and form hot upflows. These upflow energetic particles deposit in corona and make it becoming very hot. Roughly estimations indicate that the solar corona can be heated to above 1 million degrees, and the upflow velocity is about 40 km/s in chromosphere and about 130 km/s in the corona. The solar magnetic flux tubes act as pumpers to extract energetic particles from the underlying thermal photosphere, convey them and deposit in the corona. The deposition of energetic particles will make the corona become...

  13. The detection of upwardly propagating waves channelling energy from the chromosphere to the low corona

    CERN Document Server

    Freij, N; Nelson, C J; Mumford, S; Wedemeyer, S; Erdélyi, R

    2014-01-01

    There have been ubiquitous observations of wave-like motions in the solar atmosphere for decades. Recent improvements to space- and ground-based observatories have allowed the focus to shift to smaller magnetic structures on the solar surface. In this paper, high-resolution ground-based data taken using the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope is combined with co-spatial and co-temporal data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite to analyze running penumbral waves (RPWs). RPWs have always been thought to be radial wave propagation that occurs within sunspots. Recent research has suggested that they are in fact upwardly propagating field-aligned waves (UPWs). Here, RPWs within a solar pore are observed for the first time and are interpreted as UPWs due to the lack of a penumbra that is required to support RPWs. These UPWs are also observed co-spatially and co-temporally within several SDO/AIA elemental lines that sample the transition region and low corona. T...

  14. Statistical characteristic in time-domain of direct current corona-generated audible noise from conductor in corona cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuebao; Cui, Xiang; Lu, Tiebing; Ma, Wenzuo; Bian, Xingming; Wang, Donglai; Hiziroglu, Huseyin

    2016-03-01

    The corona-generated audible noise (AN) has become one of decisive factors in the design of high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission lines. The AN from transmission lines can be attributed to sound pressure pulses which are generated by the multiple corona sources formed on the conductor, i.e., transmission lines. In this paper, a detailed time-domain characteristics of the sound pressure pulses, which are generated by the DC corona discharges formed over the surfaces of a stranded conductors, are investigated systematically in a laboratory settings using a corona cage structure. The amplitude of sound pressure pulse and its time intervals are extracted by observing a direct correlation between corona current pulses and corona-generated sound pressure pulses. Based on the statistical characteristics, a stochastic model is presented for simulating the sound pressure pulses due to DC corona discharges occurring on conductors. The proposed stochastic model is validated by comparing the calculated and measured A-weighted sound pressure level (SPL). The proposed model is then used to analyze the influence of the pulse amplitudes and pulse rate on the SPL. Furthermore, a mathematical relationship is found between the SPL and conductor diameter, electric field, and radial distance.

  15. Statistical characteristic in time-domain of direct current corona-generated audible noise from conductor in corona cage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xuebao, E-mail: lxb08357x@ncepu.edu.cn; Cui, Xiang, E-mail: x.cui@ncepu.edu.cn; Ma, Wenzuo; Bian, Xingming; Wang, Donglai [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Lu, Tiebing, E-mail: tiebinglu@ncepu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of High Voltage and EMC, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Hiziroglu, Huseyin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Kettering University, Flint, Michigan 48504 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The corona-generated audible noise (AN) has become one of decisive factors in the design of high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission lines. The AN from transmission lines can be attributed to sound pressure pulses which are generated by the multiple corona sources formed on the conductor, i.e., transmission lines. In this paper, a detailed time-domain characteristics of the sound pressure pulses, which are generated by the DC corona discharges formed over the surfaces of a stranded conductors, are investigated systematically in a laboratory settings using a corona cage structure. The amplitude of sound pressure pulse and its time intervals are extracted by observing a direct correlation between corona current pulses and corona-generated sound pressure pulses. Based on the statistical characteristics, a stochastic model is presented for simulating the sound pressure pulses due to DC corona discharges occurring on conductors. The proposed stochastic model is validated by comparing the calculated and measured A-weighted sound pressure level (SPL). The proposed model is then used to analyze the influence of the pulse amplitudes and pulse rate on the SPL. Furthermore, a mathematical relationship is found between the SPL and conductor diameter, electric field, and radial distance.

  16. The Origin and Dynamics of Solar Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, M. J; Culhane, J. L; Nordlund, Å; Solanki, S. K; Zahn, J.-P

    2009-01-01

    The articles collected in this volume present all aspects of solar magnetism: from its origin in the solar dynamo to its evolution and dynamics that create the variability of solar phenomena, its well-known 11-year activity cycle that leads to the ever-changing pattern of sunspots and active regions on the Sun. Several contributions deal with the solar dynamo, the driver of many solar phenomena. Other contributions treat the transport and emergence of the magnetic flux through the outer layers of the Sun. The coupling of magnetic fields from the surface to the solar corona and beyond is also described, together with current studies on the predictability of solar activity. This book is aimed at researchers and graduate students working in solar physics and space science. It provides a full review of our current understanding of solar magnetism by the foremost experts in the field.

  17. Magnetic Helicity and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to open a new window into the solar dynamo, convection, and magnetic reconnection through measurement of the helicity density of magnetic fields in the photosphere and tracing of large-scale patterns of magnetic helicity in the corona.

  18. Laboratory studies in ultraviolet solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Kohl, J. L.; Gardner, L. D.; Raymond, J. C.; Smith, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    The research activity comprised the measurement of basic atomic processes and parameters which relate directly to the interpretation of solar ultraviolet observations and to the development of comprehensive models of the component structures of the solar atmosphere. The research was specifically directed towards providing the relevant atomic data needed to perform and to improve solar diagnostic techniques which probe active and quiet portions of the solar chromosphere, the transition zone, the inner corona, and the solar wind acceleration regions of the extended corona. The accuracy with which the physical conditions in these structures can be determined depends directly on the accuracy and completeness of the atomic and molecular data. These laboratory data are used to support the analysis programs of past and current solar observations (e.g., the Orbiting solar Observatories, the Solar Maximum Mission, the Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount, and the Naval Research Laboratory's rocket-borne High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph). In addition, we attempted to anticipate the needs of future space-borne solar studies such as from the joint ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. Our laboratory activities stressed two categories of study: (1) the measurement of absolute rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination and electron impact excitation; and (2) the measurement of atomic transition probabilities for solar density diagnostics. A brief summary of the research activity is provided.

  19. A Global View of Velocity Fluctuations in the Corona below 1.3 R ⊙ with CoMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, R. J.; Tomczyk, S.; Pinto, R. F.

    2016-09-01

    The Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) has previously demonstrated the presence of Doppler velocity fluctuations in the solar corona. The observed fluctuations are thought to be transverse waves, i.e., highly incompressible motions whose restoring force is dominated by the magnetic tension, some of which demonstrate clear periodicity. We aim to exploit CoMP’s ability to provide high cadence observations of the off-limb corona to investigate the properties of velocity fluctuations in a range of coronal features, providing insight into how (whether) the properties of the waves are influenced by the varying magnetic topology in active regions, quiet Sun and open field regions. An analysis of Doppler velocity time-series of the solar corona from the 10747 Å Iron xiii line is performed, determining the velocity power spectrum and using it as a tool to probe wave behavior. Further, the average phase speed and density for each region are estimated and used to compute the spectra for energy density and energy flux. In addition, we assess the noise levels associated with the CoMP data, deriving analytic formulae for the uncertainty on Doppler velocity measurements and providing a comparison by estimating the noise from the data. It is found that the entire corona is replete with transverse wave behavior. The corresponding power spectra indicate that the observed velocity fluctuations are predominately generated by stochastic processes, with the spectral slope of the power varying between the different magnetic regions. Most strikingly, all power spectra reveal the presence of enhanced power occurring at ∼3 mHz, potentially implying that the excitation of coronal transverse waves by p-modes is a global phenomenon.

  20. The EUV-observatory TESIS on board Coronas-Photon: scientific goals and initial plan of observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev, Sergey

    The TESIS a EUV-observatory for solar research from space will be launched in 2008 September on board the satellite Coronas-Photon from cosmodrome Plesetsk. TESIS is a project of Lebedev Physical Institute of Russian Academy of Science with contribution from Space Research Center of Polish Academy of Science (the spectrometer SphinX). The experiment will focus on quasi-monochromatic imaging of the Sun and XUV spectroscopy of solar plasma. The scientific payload of TESIS contains five instruments: (1) Bragg crystal spectroheliometer for Sun monochromatic imaging in the line MgXII 8.42 A, (2) the normal-incidence Herschelian EUV telescopes with a resolution of 1.7 arc sec operated in lines FeXXII 133 A, FeIX 171 A and HeII 304 A, (3) the EUV imaging spectrometer, (4) the wide-field Ritchey-Chretien coronograph and (5) the X-ray spectrometer SphinX. The TESIS will focus on coordinated study of solar activity from the transition region to the outer corona up to 4 solar radii in wide temperature range from 5*104 to 2*107 K. We describe the scientific goals of the TESIS and its initial plan of observations.

  1. Direct observation of silver nanoparticle-ubiquitin corona formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Feng; Choudhary, Poonam; Chen, Ran; Brown, Jared M; Ke, Pu Chun

    2012-01-01

    Upon entering physiological environments, nanoparticles readily assume the form of a nanoparticle-protein corona that dictates their biological identity. Understanding the structure and dynamics of nanoparticle-protein corona is essential for predicting the fate, transport, and toxicity of nanomaterials in living systems and for enabling the vast applications of nanomedicine. We combined multiscale molecular dynamics simulations and complementary experiments to characterize the silver nanoparticle-ubiquitin corona formation. Specifically, ubiquitins competed with citrates for the nanoparticle surface and bound to the particle in a specific manner. Under a high protein/nanoparticle stoichiometry, ubiquitions formed a multi-layer corona on the particle surface. The binding exhibited an unusual stretched-exponential behavior, suggesting a rich kinetics originated from protein-protein, protein-citrate, and protein-nanoparticle interactions. Furthermore, the binding destabilized the {\\alpha}-helices while increasi...

  2. Cyclical Variation of the Quiet Corona and Coronal Holes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Takashi Sakurai

    2000-09-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the quiet corona and coronal holes are reviewed. The review is based on long-term accumulation of data from eclipse observations, coronagraph observations, helium 10830 Å spectroheliograms, and X-ray observations.

  3. Degree distance and Gutman index of corona product of graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sheeba Agnes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the degree distance and the Gutman index of the corona product of two graphs are determined. Using the results obtained, the exact degree distance and Gutman index of certain classes of graphs are computed.

  4. Decomposition characteristics of toluene by a corona radical shower system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zu-liang; GAO Xiang; LUO Zhong-yang; NI Ming-jiang; CEN Ke-fa

    2004-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma technologies offer an innovative approach to decomposing various volatile organic compounds(VOCs). The decomposition of toluene from simulated flue gas was investigated using a pipe electrode with nozzles for the generation of free radicals. Corona characteristics and decomposition of toluene were investigated experimentally. In addition, the decomposition mechanism of toluene was explored in view of reaction rate. The experimental results showed that the humidity of additional gas has an important effect on corona characteristics and modes and stable streamer corona can be generated through optimizing flow rate and humidity of additional gas. Applied voltage, concentration of toluene, humidity of toluene and resident time are some important factors affecting decomposition efficiency. Under optimizing conditions, the decomposition efficiency of toluene can reach 80%. These results can give a conclusion that the corona radical shower technology is feasible and effective on the removal of toluene in the flue gas.

  5. Protein bio-corona: critical issue in immune nanotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagu, Monica; Piperigkou, Zoi; Karamanou, Konstantina; Engin, Ayse Basak; Docea, Anca Oana; Constantin, Carolina; Negrei, Carolina; Nikitovic, Dragana; Tsatsakis, Aristidis

    2017-03-01

    With the expansion of the nanomedicine field, the knowledge focusing on the behavior of nanoparticles in the biological milieu has rapidly escalated. Upon introduction to a complex biological system, nanomaterials dynamically interact with all the encountered biomolecules and form the protein "bio-corona." The decoration with these surface biomolecules endows nanoparticles with new properties. The present review will address updates of the protein bio-corona characteristics as influenced by nanoparticle's physicochemical properties and by the particularities of the encountered biological milieu. Undeniably, bio-corona generation influences the efficacy of the nanodrug and guides the actions of innate and adaptive immunity. Exploiting the dynamic process of protein bio-corona development in combination with the new engineered horizons of drugs linked to nanoparticles could lead to innovative functional nanotherapies. Therefore, bio-medical nanotechnologies should focus on the interactions of nanoparticles with the immune system for both safety and efficacy reasons.

  6. Miniature Dual-Corona Ionizer for Bipolar Charging of Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chaolong; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2013-01-01

    A corona-based bipolar charger has been developed for use in compact, field-portable mobility size spectrometers. The charger employs an aerosol flow cavity exposed to two corona ionizers producing ions of opposite polarity. Each corona ionizer houses two electrodes in parallel needle-mesh configuration and is operated at the same magnitude of corona current. Experimental measurement of detailed charge distribution of near-monodisperse particles of different diameter in the submicrometer size range showed that the charger is capable of producing well-defined, consistent bipolar charge distributions for flow rates up to 1.5 L/min and aerosol concentration up to 10(7) per cm(3). For particles with preexisting charge of +1, 0, and -1, the measured charge distributions agreed well with the theoretical distributions within the range of experimental and theoretical uncertainties. The transmission efficiency of the charger was measured to be 80% for 10 nm particles (at 0.3 L/min and 5 μA corona current) and increased with increasing diameter beyond this size. Measurement of uncharged fractions at various combinations of positive and negative corona currents showed the charger performance to be insensitive to fluctuations in corona current. Ion concentrations under positive and negative unipolar operation were estimated to be 8.2 × 10(7) and 3.37 × 10(8) cm(-3) for positive and negative ions; the n·t product value under positive corona operation was independently estimated to be 8.5 × 10(5) s/cm(3). The ion concentration estimates indicate the charger to be capable of "neutralizing" typical atmospheric and industrial aerosols in most measurement applications. The miniature size, simple and robust operation makes the charger suitable for portable mobility spectrometers.

  7. Corona development and floral nectaries of Asclepiadeae (Asclepiadoideae, Apocynaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Maciel Monteiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Flowers of Asclepiadoideae are notable for possessing numerous nectaries and elaborate coronas, where nectar can accumulate but is not necessarily produced. Given the complexity and importance of these structures for reproduction, this study aimed to analyze the ontogeny of the corona, the structure and position of nectaries and the histochemistry of the nectar of species of Asclepiadeae. Two types of coronas were observed: androecial [C(is] and corolline (Ca. The development of the C(is-type of corona initiates opposite the stamens in all species examined with the exception of Matelea in which it begins to develop as a ring around the filament tube. Despite their morphological variation, coronas typically originate from the androecium. A notable difference among the studied species was the location of the nectaries. Primarily, they are located in the stigmatic chamber, where nectar composed of carbohydrates and lipids is produced. A secondary location of nectaries found in species of Peplonia and Matelea is within the corona, where nectar is produced and stored, composed of carbohydrates and lipids in Peplonia and only carbohydrates in Matelea. The functional role of nectar is related to the location of its production since it is a resource for pollinators and inducers of pollen germination.

  8. Personalized protein corona on nanoparticles and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, Claudia; Molinaro, Roberto; Tabatabaei, Mateen; Farokhzad, Omid C; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2017-02-28

    It is now well understood that once in contact with biological fluids, nanoscale objects lose their original identity and acquire a new biological character, referred to as a protein corona. The protein corona changes many of the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, including size, surface charge, and aggregation state. These changes, in turn, affect the biological fate of nanoparticles, including their pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and therapeutic efficacy. It is progressively being accepted that even slight variations in the composition of a protein source (e.g., plasma and serum) can substantially change the composition of the corona formed on the surface of the exact same nanoparticles. Recently it has been shown that the protein corona is strongly affected by the patient's specific disease. Therefore, the same nanomaterial incubated with plasma proteins of patients with different pathologies adsorb protein coronas with different compositions, giving rise to the concept of personalized protein corona. Herein, we review this concept along with recent advances on the topic, with a particular focus on clinical relevance.

  9. Nanoparticle-protein complexes mimicking corona formation in ocular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Son, Jin Gyeong; Dan, Ki Soon; Song, Sang Hoon; Lee, Tae Geol; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2016-12-01

    Nanoparticles adsorb biomolecules to form corona upon entering the biological environment. In this study, tissue-specific corona formation is provided as a way of controlling protein interaction with nanoparticles in vivo. In the vitreous, the composition of the corona was determined by the electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the associated proteins, regardless of the material (gold and silica) or size (20- and 100-nm diameter) of the nanoparticles. To control protein adsorption, we pre-incubate 20-nm gold nanoparticles with 5 selectively enriched proteins from the corona, formed in the vitreous, to produce nanoparticle-protein complexes. Compared to bare nanoparticles, nanoparticle-protein complexes demonstrate improved binding to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the vitreous. Furthermore, nanoparticle-protein complexes retain in vitro anti-angiogenic properties of bare nanoparticles. In particular, priming the nanoparticles (gold and silica) with tissue-specific corona proteins allows nanoparticle-protein complexes to exert better in vivo therapeutic effects by higher binding to VEGF than bare nanoparticles. These results suggest that controlled corona formation that mimics in vivo processes may be useful in the therapeutic use of nanomaterials in local environment.

  10. Solar cosmic ray measurements at high heliocentric latitudes. [proposed space missions of solar probes to study solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review is presented of what might result from a program of solar cosmic ray observations on 'out-of-the-ecliptic' spacecraft. The following topics are discussed: (1) The magnetic fields of the sun at high latitudes, (2) propagation of fast charged particles in the solar corona and in interplanetary space at high latitudes, (3) origin of interplanetary particle populations and the solar wind, (4) other particle phenomena in interplanetary space (e.g., acceleration of shock waves), and (5) effect of spacecraft mission characteristics on solar cosmic ray studies at high latitudes. Maps of polar coronal magnetic fields are shown.

  11. Envelope Soliton in Solar Radio Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-Yu; Wangde; G. P. Chernov

    2000-01-01

    Several envelope soliton fine structures have been observed in solar radio metric-wave emission. We present amodel of 1ongitudinal modulational instability to explain these fine structures. It is found that this instability canonly occur in the condition of sound velocity being larger than Alfven velocity in corona. Therefore, the envelopesoliton fine structures should display in the coronal region with high temperature and low magnetic field, whichcorresponds to the solar radio emission in the region of meter and decameter wavelength.

  12. FORMATION AND PLASMA CIRCULATION OF SOLAR PROMINENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Chun; Keppens, Rony

    2016-01-01

    Solar prominences are long-lived cool and dense plasma curtains in the hot and rarefied outer solar atmosphere or corona. The physical mechanism responsible for their formation and especially for their internal plasma circulation has been uncertain for decades. The observed ubiquitous down flows in quiescent prominences are difficult to interpret as plasma with high conductivity seems to move across horizontal magnetic field lines. Here we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of pr...

  13. The role of turbulence in coronal heating and solar wind expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R; Asgari-Targhi, Mahboubeh; Miralles, Mari Paz; Raymond, John C; Strachan, Leonard; Tian, Hui; Woolsey, Lauren N

    2015-05-13

    Plasma in the Sun's hot corona expands into the heliosphere as a supersonic and highly magnetized solar wind. This paper provides an overview of our current understanding of how the corona is heated and how the solar wind is accelerated. Recent models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence have progressed to the point of successfully predicting many observed properties of this complex, multi-scale system. However, it is not clear whether the heating in open-field regions comes mainly from the dissipation of turbulent fluctuations that are launched from the solar surface, or whether the chaotic 'magnetic carpet' in the low corona energizes the system via magnetic reconnection. To help pin down the physics, we also review some key observational results from ultraviolet spectroscopy of the collisionless outer corona.

  14. A model for the formation of the active region corona driven by magnetic flux emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F.; Peter, H.; Bingert, S.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: We present the first model that couples the formation of the corona of a solar active region to a model of the emergence of a sunspot pair. This allows us to study when, where, and why active region loops form, and how they evolve. Methods: We use a 3D radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of the emergence of an active region through the upper convection zone and the photosphere as a lower boundary for a 3D MHD coronal model. The coronal model accounts for the braiding of the magnetic fieldlines, which induces currents in the corona to heat up the plasma. We synthesize the coronal emission for a direct comparison to observations. Starting with a basically field-free atmosphere we follow the filling of the corona with magnetic field and plasma. Results: Numerous individually identifiable hot coronal loops form, and reach temperatures well above 1 MK with densities comparable to observations. The footpoints of these loops are found where small patches of magnetic flux concentrations move into the sunspots. The loop formation is triggered by an increase in upward-directed Poynting flux at their footpoints in the photosphere. In the synthesized extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission these loops develop within a few minutes. The first EUV loop appears as a thin tube, then rises and expands significantly in the horizontal direction. Later, the spatially inhomogeneous heat input leads to a fragmented system of multiple loops or strands in a growing envelope. Animation associated with Fig. 2 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF THE 2012 NOVEMBER 13/14 ECLIPSE WHITE-LIGHT CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasachoff, J. M. [Williams College—Hopkins Observatory, Williamstown, MA 01267-2565 (United States); Rušin, V.; Saniga, M. [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 05960 Tatranská Lomnica (Slovakia); Babcock, B. A.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B., E-mail: eclipse@williams.edu, E-mail: vrusin@ta3.sk, E-mail: metod.saniga@tuwien.ac.at [Astronomy Department, Williams College, Williamstown, MA 01267-2565 (United States); and others

    2015-02-20

    Continuing our series of observations of coronal motion and dynamics over the solar-activity cycle, we observed from sites in Queensland, Australia, during the 2012 November 13 (UT)/14 (local time) total solar eclipse. The corona took the low-ellipticity shape typical of solar maximum (flattening index ε = 0.01), a change from the composite coronal images we observed and analyzed in this journal and elsewhere for the 2006 and 2008-2010 eclipses. After crossing the northeast Australian coast, the path of totality was over the ocean, so further totality was seen only by shipborne observers. Our results include velocities of a coronal mass ejection (CME; during the 36 minutes of passage from the Queensland coast to a ship north of New Zealand, we measured 413 km s{sup –1}) and we analyze its dynamics. We discuss the shapes and positions of several types of coronal features seen on our higher-resolution composite Queensland coronal images, including many helmet streamers, very faint bright and dark loops at the bases of helmet streamers, voids, and radially oriented thin streamers. We compare our eclipse observations with models of the magnetic field, confirming the validity of the predictions, and relate the eclipse phenomenology seen with the near-simultaneous images from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA), NASA's Extreme Ultraviolet Imager on Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, ESA/Royal Observatory of Belgium's Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) on PROBA2, and Naval Research Laboratory's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment on ESA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. For example, the southeastern CME is related to the solar flare whose origin we trace with a SWAP series of images.

  16. Titan's corona: The contribution of exothermic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Haye, V.; Waite, J. H.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Johnson, R. E.; Lebonnois, S.; Robertson, I. P.

    2007-11-01

    The contribution of exothermic ion and neutral chemistry to Titan's corona is studied. The production rates for fast neutrals N 2, CH 4, H, H 2, 3CH 2, CH 3, C 2H 4, C 2H 5, C 2H 6, N( 4S), NH, and HCN are determined using a coupled ion and neutral model of Titan's upper atmosphere. After production, the formation of the suprathermal particles is modeled using a two-stream simulation, as they travel simultaneously through a thermal mixture of N 2, CH 4, and H 2. The resulting suprathermal fluxes, hot density profiles, and energy distributions are compared to the N 2 and CH 4 INMS exospheric data presented in [De La Haye, V., Waite Jr., J.H., Johnson, R.E., Yelle, R.V., Cravens, T.E., Luhmann, J.G., Kasprzak, W.T., Gell, D.A., Magee, B., Leblanc, F., Michael, M., Jurac, S., Robertson, I.P., 2007. J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2006JA012222, in press], and are found insufficient for producing the suprathermal populations measured. Global losses of nitrogen atoms and carbon atoms in all forms due to exothermic chemistry are estimated to be 8.3×10 Ns and 7.2×10 Cs.

  17. The Soft X-ray Spectrophotometer SphinX for the CORONAS-Photon Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Szymon, Gburek; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Kuzin, Sergey; Kotov, Yury; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio

    The purpose, construction details and calibration results of the new design, Polish-led solar X-ray spectrophotometer SphinX will be presented. The instrument constitutes a part of the Russian TESIS X-ray and EUV complex aboard the forthcoming CORONAS-Photon solar mission to be launched later in 2008. SphinX uses Si-PIN detectors for high time resolution (down to 0.01 s) measurements of solar spectra in the energy range between 0.5 keV and 15 keV. The spectral resolution allows separating 256 individual energy channels in this range with particular groups of lines clearly distinguishable. Unprecedented accuracy of the instrument calibration at the XACT (Palermo) and BESSY (Berlin) synchrotron will allow for establishing the solar soft X-ray photometric reference system. The cross-comparison between SphinX and the other instruments presently in orbit like XRT on Hinode, RHESSI and GOES X-ray monitor, will allow for a precise determination of the coronal emission measure and temperature during both very low and very high activity periods. Examples of the detectors' ground calibration results as well as the calculated synthetic spectra will be presented. The operation of the instrument while in orbit will be discussed allowing for suggestions from other groups to be still included in mission planning.

  18. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boris Filippov; Olesya Martsenyuk; Abhishek K. Srivastava; Wahab Uddin

    2015-03-01

    In the early 1990s, it was found that the strongest disturbances of the space–weather were associated with huge ejections of plasma from the solar corona, which took the form of magnetic clouds when moved from the Sun. It is the collisions of the magnetic clouds with the Earth's magnetosphere that lead to strong, sometimes catastrophic changes in space–weather. The onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is sudden and no reliable forerunners of CMEs have been found till date. The CME prediction methodologies are less developed compared to the methods developed for the prediction of solar flares. The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they lose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading, etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field, which is estimated as decay index (). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are, therefore, good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by a comparison of observed filament heights with calculated decay index distributions. The present paper reviews the formation of magnetic flux ropes, their stable and unstable phases, eruption conditions, and also discusses their physical implications in the solar corona.

  19. Development of Efficient Models of Corona Discharges Around Tall Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, J.; Pasko, V. P.

    2012-12-01

    This work concerns with numerical modeling of glow corona and sreamer corona discharges that occur near tall ground structures under thunderstorm conditions. Glow corona can occur when ambient electric field reaches modest values on the order of 0.2 kV/cm and when the electric field near sharp points of ground structure rises above a geometry dependent critical field required for ionization of air. Air is continuously ionized in a small region close to the surface of the structure and ions diffuse out into the surrounding air forming a corona. A downward leader approaching from a thundercloud causes a further increase in the electric field at the ground level. If the electric field rises to the point where it can support formation of streamers in air surrounding the tall structure, a streamer corona flash, or series of streamer corona flashes can be formed significantly affecting the space charge configuration formed by the preceding glow corona. The streamer corona can heat the surrounding air enough to form a self-propagating thermalized leader that is launched upward from the tall structure. This leader travels upward towards the thundercloud and connects with the downward approaching leader thus causing a lightning flash. Accurate time-dependent modeling of charge configuration created by the glow and streamer corona discharges around tall structure is an important component for understanding of the sequence of events leading to lightning attachment to the tall structure. The present work builds on principal modeling ideas developed previously in [Aleksandrov et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., 38, 1225, 2005; Bazelyan et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol., 17, 024015, 2008; Kowalski, E. J., Honors Thesis, Penn State Univ., University Park, PA, May 2008; Tucker and Pasko, NSF EE REU Penn State Annual Res. J., 10, 13, 2012]. The non-stationary glow and streamer coronas are modeled in spherical geometry up to the point of initiation of the upward leader. The model

  20. Solar Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király, Péter

    Energetic particles recorded in the Earth environment and in interplanetary space have a multitude of origins, i.e. acceleration and propagation histories. At early days practically all sufficiently energetic particles were considered to have come either from solar flares or from interstellar space. Later on, co-rotating interplanetary shocks, the termination shock of the supersonic solar wind, planetary bow shocks and magnetospheres, and also coronal mass ejections (CME) were recognized as energetic particle sources. It was also recognized that less energetic (suprathermal) particles of solar origin and pick-up ions have also a vital role in giving rise to energetic particles in interplanetary disturbances. The meaning of the term "solar energetic particles" (SEP) is now somewhat vague, but essentially it refers to particles produced in disturbances fairly directly related to solar processes. Variation of intensity fluctuations with energy and with the phase of the solar cycle will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to extremes of time variation, i.e. to very quiet periods and to large events. While quiet-time fluxes are expected to shed light on some basic coronal processes, large events dominate the fluctuation characteristics of cumulated fluence, and the change of that fluctuation with energy and with the phase of the solar cycle may also provide important clues. Mainly ISEE-3 and long-term IMP-8 data will be invoked. Energetic and suprathermal particles that may never escape into interplanetary space may play an important part in heating the corona of the sun.

  1. Magnetic Field Confinement in the Corona: The Role of Magnetic Helicity Accumulation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, M; Zhang, Mei; Low, Natasha Flyer & Boon Chye

    2006-01-01

    A loss of magnetic field confinement is believed to be the cause of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), a major form of solar activity in the corona. The mechanisms for magnetic energy storage are crucial in understanding how a field may possess enough free energy to overcome the Aly limit and open up. Previously, we have pointed out that the accumulation of magnetic helicity in the corona plays a significant role in storing magnetic energy. In this paper, we investigate another hydromagnetic consequence of magnetic-helicity accumulation. We propose a conjecture that there is an upper bound on the total magnetic helicity that a force-free field can contain. This is directly related to the hydromagnetic property that force-free fields in unbounded space have to be self-confining. Although a mathematical proof of this conjecture for any field configuration is formidable, its plausibility can be demonstrated with the properties of several families of power-law, axisymmetric force-free fields. We put forth mathematica...

  2. Sub-photosphere to Solar Atmosphere Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komm, Rudolf; De Moortel, Ineke; Fan, Yuhong; Ilonidis, Stathis; Steiner, Oskar

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic fields extend from the solar interior through the atmosphere. The formation and evolution of active regions can be studied by measuring subsurface flows with local helioseismology. The emergence of magnetic flux from the solar convection zone is associated with acoustic perturbation signatures. In near-surface layers, the average dynamics can be determined for emerging regions. MHD simulations of the emergence of a twisted flux tube show how magnetic twist and free energy are transported from the interior into the corona and the dynamic signatures associated with such transport in the photospheric and sub-photospheric layers. The subsurface twisted flux tube does not emerge into the corona as a whole in emerging active regions. Shear flows at the polarity inversion line and coherent vortical motions in the subsurface flux tubes are the major means by which twist is transported into the corona, leading to the formation of sigmoid-shaped coronal magnetic fields capable of driving solar eruptions. The transport of twist can be followed from the interior by using the kinetic helicity of subsurface flows as a proxy of magnetic helicity; this quantity holds great promise for improving the understanding of eruptive phenomena. Waves are not only vital for studying the link between the solar interior and the surface but for linking the photosphere with the corona as well. Acoustic waves that propagate from the surface into the magnetically structured, dynamic atmosphere undergo mode conversion and refraction. These effects enable atmospheric seismology to determine the topography of magnetic canopies in the solar atmosphere. Inclined magnetic fields lower the cut-off frequency so that low frequency waves can leak into the outer atmosphere. Recent high resolution, high cadence observations of waves and oscillations in the solar atmosphere, have lead to a renewed interest in the potential role of waves as a heating mechanism. In light of their potential contribution

  3. Solar coronal and magnetic field observations near the time of the 1988 March 18 solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, D. G.; Fisher, R. R.; Mickey, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Observations made during the interval March 1-31, 1988, are presented which were designed to provide a synoptic context in which data from the March 18, 1988, total solar eclipse can be interpreted. Daily observations made with the Mark III K-coronameter and the H-alpha prominence monitor at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, along with photographic records of the Sun in H-alpha from the flare patrol at Mees Solar Observatory on Haleakala, Maui, are included. Observations of the longitudinal component of the photospheric magnetic field made at Mees Solar Observatory were also gathered around the period of the eclipse. Together with the white-light image of the corona at the eclipse, these coronal and magnetic field observations assembled into synoptic maps for this epoch, are presented. On the basis of these observations, an interpretation of the global density distribution of the corona at the time of the eclipse is constructed.

  4. Spatial Mapping and Quantification of Soft and Hard Protein Coronas at Silver Nanocubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miclaus, Teodora; Bochenkov, Vladimir; Ogaki, Ryosuke;

    2014-01-01

    Protein coronas around silver nanocubes were quantified in serum-containing media using localized surface plasmon resonances. Both soft and hard coronas showed exposure-time and concentration-dependent changes in protein surface density with time-dependent hardening. We observed spatially dependent...... kinetics of the corona-formation at cube edges/corners versus facets at short incubation times, where the polymer stabilization agent delayed corona hardening. The soft corona contained more protein than the hard corona at all time-points (8-fold difference with 10% serum conditions)....

  5. EUV and X-Ray Observations of Comet Lovejoy (C/2011 W3) in the Lower Corona

    CERN Document Server

    McCauley, Patrick I; Raymond, John C; Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of EUV and soft X-ray emission detected toward Comet Lovejoy (C/2011 W3) during its post-perihelion traverse of the solar corona on December 16, 2011. Observations were recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) aboard Hinode. A single set of contemporaneous images is explored in detail, along with prefatory consideration for time evolution using only the 171 A data. For each of the eight passbands, we characterize the emission and derive outgassing rates where applicable. As material sublimates from the nucleus and is immersed in coronal plasma, it rapidly ionizes through charge states seldom seen in this environment. The AIA data show four stages of oxygen ionization (O III - O VI) along with C IV, while XRT likely captured emission from O VII, a line typical of the corona. With a nucleus of at least several hundred meters upon approach to a perihelion that brought the comet to within 0.2 solar radii of the ph...

  6. THE STORAGE AND DISSIPATION OF MAGNETIC ENERGY IN THE QUIET SUN CORONA DETERMINED FROM SDO/HMI MAGNETOGRAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, K. A.; Sabol, J.; Mackay, D. H. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Van Ballegooijen, A. A., E-mail: karen@mcs.st-and.ac.uk [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    In recent years, higher cadence, higher resolution observations have revealed the quiet-Sun photosphere to be complex and rapidly evolving. Since magnetic fields anchored in the photosphere extend up into the solar corona, it is expected that the small-scale coronal magnetic field exhibits similar complexity. For the first time, the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field is continuously evolved through a series of non-potential, quasi-static equilibria, deduced from magnetograms observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, where the photospheric boundary condition which drives the coronal evolution exactly reproduces the observed magnetograms. The build-up, storage, and dissipation of magnetic energy within the simulations is studied. We find that the free magnetic energy built up and stored within the field is sufficient to explain small-scale, impulsive events such as nanoflares. On comparing with coronal images of the same region, the energy storage and dissipation visually reproduces many of the observed features. The results indicate that the complex small-scale magnetic evolution of a large number of magnetic features is a key element in explaining the nature of the solar corona.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic wave propagation from the subphotosphere to the corona in an arcade-shaped magnetic field with a null point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, I. C.; Khomenko, E.; Collados, M.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to study the energy transport by means of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves propagating in quiet-Sun magnetic topology from layers below the surface to the corona. Upwardly propagating waves find obstacles, such as the equipartition layer with plasma β = 1, the transition region, and null points, and they get transmitted, converted, reflected, and refracted. Understanding the mechanisms by which MHD waves can reach the corona can give us information about the solar atmosphere and the magnetic structures. Methods: We carried out two-dimensional numerical simulations of wave propagation in a magnetic field structure that consists of two vertical flux tubes with the same polarity separated by an arcade-shaped magnetic field. This configuration contains a null point in the corona, which significantly modifies the behavior of the waves as they pass near it. Results: We describe in detail the wave propagation through the atmosphere under different driving conditions. We also present the spatial distribution of the mean acoustic and magnetic energy fluxes for the cases where these calculations are possible, as well as the spatial distribution of the dominant frequencies in the whole domain. Conclusions: We conclude that the energy reaches the corona preferably along almost vertical magnetic fields, that is, inside the vertical flux tubes. This energy is acoustic in nature. Most of the magnetic energy stays concentrated below the transition region owing to the refraction of the magnetic waves and the continuous conversion of acoustic-like waves into fast magnetic waves in the equipartition layer located in the photosphere where plasma β = 1. However, part of the magnetic energy reaches the low corona when propagating in the region where the arcades are located, but waves are sent back downward into the lower atmosphere at the null-point surroundings. This phenomenon, together with the reflection and refraction of waves in the TR and the lower

  8. CORONA DISCHARGE IGNITION FOR ADVANCED STATIONARY NATURAL GAS ENGINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Paul D. Ronney

    2003-09-12

    An ignition source was constructed that is capable of producing a pulsed corona discharge for the purpose of igniting mixtures in a test chamber. This corona generator is adaptable for use as the ignition source for one cylinder on a test engine. The first tests were performed in a cylindrical shaped chamber to study the characteristics of the corona and analyze various electrode geometries. Next a test chamber was constructed that closely represented the dimensions of the combustion chamber of the test engine at USC. Combustion tests were performed in this chamber and various electrode diameters and geometries were tested. The data acquisition and control system hardware for the USC engine lab was updated with new equipment. New software was also developed to perform the engine control and data acquisition functions. Work is underway to design a corona electrode that will fit in the new test engine and be capable igniting the mixture in one cylinder at first and eventually in all four cylinders. A test engine was purchased for the project that has two spark plug ports per cylinder. With this configuration it will be possible to switch between corona ignition and conventional spark plug ignition without making any mechanical modifications.

  9. On the transition rates of the Fe X and Fe XIV corona lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabert, E

    2003-11-20

    Despite a considerable scatter of the theoretical predictions of the M1/E2 transition rate of the ''red iron line'' (FeX) in the solar corona, there is disagreement of all the results with the single measurement that used an electrostatic ion trap. Employing a heavy-ion storage ring for measuring the same transition in isoelectronic ions of Co, Ni, and Cu, the situation has been clarified, and a new data point for FeX can be determined by extrapolation. This result agrees with the basic atomic structure prediction for the line strength in combination with the experimental transition energy. For the ''green iron line'' (FeXIV), a recent measurement with an electron beam ion trap has resolved similar discrepancies.

  10. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts Powered by Hot Neutrino-Cooled Coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Socrates, Aristotle

    2005-01-01

    Cosmological explosions such as core-collapse supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to be powered by the rapid conversion of roughly a solar mass' worth of gravitational binding energy into a comparatively small amount of outgoing observable kinetic energy. A fractional absorption of the emitted neutrinos, the particles which carry away the binding energy, by the expelled matter is a widely discussed mechanism for powering such explosions. Previous work addressing neutrino emission from core-collapse like environments assumes that the outgoing neutrino spectrum closely resembles a black body whose effective temperature is determined by both the rate of energy release and the surface area of the entire body. Unfortunately, this assumption minimizes the net efficiency for both neutrino-driven explosion mechanisms. Motivated by this fact, we qualitatively outline a scenario where a hot corona deforms the neutrino spectrum away from that of a cool thermal emitter. Our primary result is that in ...

  11. Propagation of energetic electrons from the corona into interplanetary space and type III radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Breitling, F; Vocks, C

    2015-01-01

    During solar flares a large amount of electrons with energies greater than 20 keV is generated with a production rate of typically $10^{36}$ s$^{-1}$. A part of them is able to propagate along open magnetic field lines through the corona into interplanetary space. During their travel they emit radio radiation which is observed as type III radio bursts in the frequency range from 100 MHz down to 10 kHz by the WAVES radio spectrometer aboard the spacecraft WIND, for instance. From the drift rates of these bursts in dynamic radio spectra the radial propagation velocity $V_r$ of the type III burst exciting electrons is derived by employing a newly developed density model of the heliosphere. Calculations show that the radio radiation is emitted by electrons with different $V_r$ and therefore by different electrons of the initially produced electron distribution.

  12. High-frequency waves in the corona due to null points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, I. C.; Khomenko, E.; Collados, M.; de Vicente, A.

    2017-06-01

    This work aims to understand the behavior of non-linear waves in the vicinity of a coronal null point. In previous works we have shown that high-frequency waves are generated in such a magnetic configuration. This paper studies those waves in detail in order to provide a plausible explanation of their generation. We demonstrate that slow magneto-acoustic shock waves generated in the chromosphere propagate through the null point and produce a train of secondary shocks that escape along the field lines. A particular combination of the shock wave speeds generates waves at a frequency of 80 mHz. We speculate that this frequency may be sensitive to the atmospheric parameters in the corona and therefore can be used to probe the structure of this solar layer. Movies attached to Figs 2 and 4 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Solar coronal observations at high frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Katsiyannis, A C; Phillips, K J H; Williams, D R; Keenan, F P

    2001-01-01

    The Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (SECIS) is a simple and extremely fast, high-resolution imaging instrument designed for studies of the solar corona. Light from the corona (during, for example, a total solar eclipse) is reflected off a heliostat and passes via a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and beam splitter to two CCD cameras capable of imaging at 60 frames a second. The cameras are attached via SCSI connections to a purpose-built PC that acts as the data acquisition and storage system. Each optical channel has a different filter allowing observations of the same events in both white light and in the green line (Fe XIV at 5303 A). Wavelet analysis of the stabilized images has revealed high frequency oscillations which may make a significant contribution on the coronal heating process. In this presentation we give an outline of the instrument and its future development.

  14. Magnetoacoustic Waves in the Solar Stratified Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑惠南; 王水; 吴式灿; 李波

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of magnetoacoustic waves in the solar atmosphere consisting of the photosphere, chromosphere and corona has been studied numerically by time-dependent multi-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation. Pressure disturbances are introduced at the bottom of the chromosphere and at the bottom of the corona, respectively. The computational results show that incurred fast and slow MHD waves propagate away from the source of the disturbances. The fast MHD wave propagates as an expansive wave in the radial direction, while the slow one steepens and it may evolve into a slow shock. We suggest that the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope wave observed by the SOHO and Moreton wave are a fast MHD wave propagating in the corona and in the chromosphere, respectively.

  15. MAGRITTE: an instrument suite for the solar atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Rochus, Pierre; Defise, Jean-Marc; Halain, Jean-Philippe; Jamar, Claude; Mazy, Emmanuel; Rossi, Laurence; Thibert, Tanguy; Clette, Frederic; Cugnon, Pierre; Berghmans, David; Hochedez, Jean-Francois E; Delaboudiniere, Jean-Pierre; Auchere, Frederic; Mercier, Raymond; Ravet, Marie-Francoise

    2004-01-01

    The Solar Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory will characterize the dynamical evolution of the solar plasma from the chromosphere to the corona, and will follow the connection of plasma dynamics with magnetic activity throughout the solar atmosphere. The AIA consists of 7 high-resolution imaging telescopes in the following spectral bandpasses: 1215Å. Ly-a, 304 Å He II, 629 Å OV, 465 Å Ne VII, 195 Å Fe XII (includes Fe XXIV), 284 Å Fe XV, and 335 Å Fe XVI. ...

  16. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Raouafi, N E; Pariat, E; Young, P R; Sterling, A C; Savcheva, A; Shimojo, M; Moreno-Insertis, F; DeVore, C R; Archontis, V; Török, T; Mason, H; Curdt, W; Meyer, K; Dalmasse, K; Matsui, Y

    2016-01-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  17. Triggering Excimer Lasers by Photoionization from Corona Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhongmin; Duffey, Thomas; Brown, Daniel; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    High repetition rate ArF (192 nm) excimer lasers are used for photolithography sources in microelectronics fabrication. In highly attaching gas mixtures, preionization is critical to obtaining stable, reproducible glow discharges. Photoionization from a separate corona discharge is one technique for preionization which triggers the subsequent electron avalanche between the main electrodes. Photoionization triggering of an ArF excimer laser sustained in multi-atmosphere Ne/Ar/F2/Xe gas mixtures has been investigated using a 2-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model including radiation transport. Continuity equations for charged and neutral species, and Poisson's equation are solved coincident with the electron temperature with transport coefficients obtained from solutions of Boltzmann's equation. Photoionizing radiation is produced by a surface discharge which propagates along a corona-bar located adjacent to the discharge electrodes. The consequences of pulse power waveform, corona bar location, capacitance and gas mixture on uniformity, symmetry and gain of the avalanche discharge will be discussed.

  18. Influence of corona charging in cellular polyethylene film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega Brana, Gustavo; Magraner, Francisco; Quijano, Alfredo [Instituto Tecnologico de la Energia (ITE), Av. Juan de la Cierva 24, Parque Tecnologico de Valencia, 46980 Paterna-Valencia (Spain); Llovera Segovia, Pedro, E-mail: gustavo.ortega@ite.es [Instituto de TecnologIa Electrica - Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n 46022-Valencia (Spain)

    2011-06-23

    Cellular polymers have recently attracted attention for their property of exhibiting a piezoelectric constant when they are electrically charged. The electrostatic charge generated in the voids by the internal discharges creates and internal macrodipole which is responsible for the piezoelectric effect. Charging by corona discharge is the most used method for cellular polymers. Many works has been published on polypropylene and polyethylene films mainly focused on the required expansion process or on the results obtained for raw cellular materials electrically activated. Our work is based on commercial polyethylene cellular films which have been physically characterized and electrically activated. The effect of thermal treatment, physical uniaxial or biaxial stretching and corona charging was investigated. The new method of corona charging improved the piezoelectric constant under other activation conditions.

  19. Simulation of low temperature atmospheric pressure corona discharge in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekasov, Vladimir; Kirsanov, Gennady; Eliseev, Stepan; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Sisoev, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to construct a numerical model of corona discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The calculation was based on the two-dimensional hybrid model. Two different plasma-chemical models were considered. Models were built for RF corona and negative DC corona discharge. The system of equations is solved by the finite element method in the COMSOL Multiphysics. Main parameters of the discharge (the density of charged and excited particles, the electron temperature) and their dependence on the input parameters of the model (geometry, electrode voltage, power) were calculated. The calculations showed that the shape of the electron distribution near the electrode depends on the discharge power. The neutral gas heating data obtained will allow predicting the temperature of the gases at the designing of atmospheric pressure helium plasma sources.

  20. INDUCED SCATTERING LIMITS ON FAST RADIO BURSTS FROM STELLAR CORONAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubarsky, Yuri [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, P.O.B. 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Ostrovska, Sofiya [Department of Mathematics, Atilim University, Incek 06836, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-02-10

    The origin of fast radio bursts remains a puzzle. Suggestions have been made that they are produced within the Earth’s atmosphere, in stellar coronae, in other galaxies, or at cosmological distances. If they are extraterrestrial, the implied brightness temperature is very high, and therefore the induced scattering places constraints on possible models. In this paper, constraints are obtained on flares from coronae of nearby stars. It is shown that the radio pulses with the observed power could not be generated if the plasma density within and in the nearest vicinity of the source is as high as is necessary to provide the observed dispersion measure. However, one cannot exclude the possibility that the pulses are generated within a bubble with a very low density and pass through the dense plasma only in the outer corona.