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Sample records for corneum model lipid

  1. Investigation of the interaction between modified ISCOMs and stratum corneum lipid model systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henriette Baun; Arboe-Andersen, Helle M.; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2010-01-01

    of the stratum corneum, the interaction between the nanoparticles and lipid model systems in form of liposomes and/or supported lipid bilayer was studied. As a lipid model we used Stratum Corneum Lipid (SCL), a mixture similar in composition to the lipids of the intercorneocyte space. By Forster Resonance Energy...... Transfer (FRET), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) it was shown that application of nanoparticles to the SCL bilayers results in lipid disturbance. Investigation of this interaction by means of Isothermal...

  2. Development of a stratum corneum substitute for in vitro percutaneous penetration studies : a skin barrier model comprising synthetic stratum corneum lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Miranda Wilhelmina de

    2006-01-01

    The research outlined in this thesis was focused on the development of a skin barrier model, which can substitute for stratum corneum in diffusion studies. This so-called stratum corneum substitute (SCS) was prepared with reconstituted SC lipids (cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides) on a

  3. Effects of anionic surfactants on the water permeability of a model stratum corneum lipid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Wook; Tettey, Kwadwo E; Yarovoy, Yury; Lee, Daeyeon

    2014-01-14

    The stratum corneum (SC) is the ourtermost layer of the epidermis and has a brick-and-mortar-like structure, in which multilamellar lipid bilayers surround flattened dead cells known as corneocytes. The SC lipid membranes provide the main pathway for the transport of water and other substances through the SC. While the physicochemical properties of the SC can be affected by exogenous materials such as surfactants, little is known about how the water barrier function of the SC lipid membranes is compromised by common surfactants. Here, we study the effect of common anionic surfactants on the water permeability of a model SC lipid membrane using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Particularly, the effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) is compared. These two surfactants share commonality in their molecular structure: sulfate in the polar headgroup and the same apolar tail. The mass of the lipid membranes increases after the surfactant treatment at or above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the surfactants due to their absorption into the membranes. The incorporation of the surfactants into the lipid membranes is also accompanied by partial dissolution of the lipids from the model SC lipid membranes as confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Although the water sorption of pure SDS is much lower than that of pure SLES, the water sorption of SDS-treated membranes increases significantly similar to that of SLES-treated membranes. By combining QCM-D and FT-IR spectroscopy, we find that the chain conformational order and stiffness of the lipid membranes decrease after SDS treatment, resulting in the increased water sorption and diffusivity. In contrast, the conformational order and stiffness of the SLES-treated lipid membranes increase, suggesting that the increased water sorption capacity of SLES-treated lipid membranes is due to the hygroscopic nature of SLES.

  4. Further investigations on the role of ascorbic acid in stratum corneum lipid models after UV exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommer, Hagen; Böttcher, Rolf; Huschka, Christoph; Wohlrab, Wolfgang; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2005-08-01

    This study is the continuation of our research into vitamin C and its possible effects on human skin after topical administration. The effects of ascorbic acid, iron ions and UV irradiation on stratum corneum lipid models were investigated. The lipid models used were: a simple system (linolenic acid dispersion), a complex system (liposomes consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and linolenic acid) and complex systems with additionally incorporated ceramides (types III and IV). The lipid peroxidation was quantified by the thiobarbituric acid assay. A human adult low-calcium high-temperature (HaCaT) keratinocytes cell culture was used as a second in-vitro model. The amount of intracellular peroxides was determined by measuring the fluorescence intensity using the dihydrorhodamine 123 assay. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to study the influence of ascorbic acid and iron ions on the signal intensity of 5-doxylstearic acid during UV exposure. Ascorbic acid showed prooxidative properties in the thiobarbituric acid assay whereas cell protection was measured in the HaCaT keratinocytes experiments. Electron paramagnetic resonance investigations revealed different extents of free radical production generated by iron ions, ascorbic acid and UV irradiation. In evaluating the results from this study new aspects of the mechanism of lipid damage caused by these three factors were suggested, transcending the simple redox behaviour of ascorbic acid.

  5. Stratum Corneum Barrier Lipids in Cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, V; Halkier-Sørensen, L; Rasmussen, G

    2000-01-01

    Specimens from primary cholesteatomas were examined under the electron microscope using a lipid-retaining method that is best suited for intracellular lipids and a method that is best for intercellular lipids. In the stratum granulosum of the squamous epithelium, a large number of Odland bodies...... emerged. When the corneocyte reaches the transitional stage to the stratum corneum, the Odland bodies accumulate near the cell membrane and discharge their contents of lipid and enzymes. The lipids are reorganized into multiple long sheets of lamellar structures that embrace the keratinized corneocytes......, as seen in the formation and maintenance of the cutaneous permeability barrier. In this study we draw the attention to the facts that the cholesteatoma epithelium is capable of producing not only cholesterol, but also several lipids, and that the lipid molecules are organized in multilamellar structures...

  6. Direct visualization of lipid domains in human skin stratum corneum's lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Norlen, Lars; Bagatolli, Luis

    2007-01-01

    ; and iii), whether pH has a direct effect on the lipid matrix phase behavior. In this work the lateral structure of membranes composed of lipids extracted from human skin stratum corneum was studied in a broad temperature range (10 degrees C-90 degrees C) using different techniques such as differential...... resolution limit 300 nm) to a single gel phase at pH 7, coexistence of different gel phases between pH 5 and 6, and no fluid phase at any pH. This observation suggests that the local pH in the stratum corneum may control the physical properties of the extracellular lipid matrix by regulating membrane lateral......-dimensional morphology of the stratum corneum extracellular space. These structures can be directly visualized using the aforementioned fluorescence microscopy techniques. At skin physiological temperatures (28 degrees C-32 degrees C), the phase state of these hydrated bilayers correspond microscopically (radial...

  7. A breached barrier : analysis of stratum corneum lipids and their role in eczematous patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeden, Jeroen van

    2013-01-01

    The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of the skin, and acts as the primary barrier against penetration of pathogens, allergens and other exogenous substances into the lower layers of the skin. Crucial for a proper barrier function are the lipids in the stratum corneum, mainly consisting of

  8. Thermodynamic clarification of interaction between antiseptic compounds and lipids consisting of stratum corneum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aki, Hatsumi; Kawasaki, Yuhsuke

    2004-06-24

    The interactions of antiseptic compounds with quaternary ammonium, such as benzalkonium chloride (BC), benzethonium chloride (BZC), dodecyldiaminoethyl-glycine hydrochloride (AEG), and chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), with components of the stratum corneum were investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry at pH 7.5 and 25 deg. C. The different mechanisms for their permeation to stratum corneum were clarified. Cationic surfactants of BC and BZC bound to cholesterol and cholesterol sulfate with high affinity (10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} M{sup -1}) to extract endogenous cholesterol and its derivatives from the stratum corneum and penetrated via an intercellular route. CHG also bound to cholesterol and accumulated in the stratum corneum without removing endogenous cholesterol. On the other hand, an amphoteric surfactant of AEG seemed to be incorporated into the lipid bilayer and bound to ceramide with its polar end close to the lipid polar heads by hydrophobic interaction.

  9. Lipid composition of the stratum corneum and cutaneous water loss in birds along an aridity gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Champagne, Alex M.; Munoz-Garcia, Agusti; Shtayyeh, Tamer; Tieleman, B. Irene; Hegemann, Arne; Clement, Michelle E.; Williams, Joseph B.

    2012-01-01

    Intercellular and covalently bound lipids within the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the epidermis, are the primary barrier to cutaneous water loss (CWL) in birds. We compared CWL and intercellular SC lipid composition in 20 species of birds from desert and mesic environments.

  10. Stratum corneum lipids: specificity, role, deficiencies and modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castiel-Higounenc Isabelle

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Lipids are important constituents of the human epidermis. Either free and organized into broad lipid bilayers in the intercorneocytes spaces, or covalently bound to the corneocyte envelope, they play a crucial role in permeability barrier function. This article presents the structures of various human skin ceramides, their role in the maintenance of skin barrier function and homeostasis, and their qualitative and quantitative changes in some cases of dry skin or atopic xerosis. Moreover, we show that reconstructed human skin models could provide valuable tools to assess in vitro the biological interest of active compounds on epidermal lipogenesis. Based on such in vitro studies, we assume that the association of vitamin C and some exogenous sphingolipid could enhance the endogenous ceramide content deficient in some cases of atopic dry skin.

  11. Stratum corneum lipids in disorders of cornification: increased cholesterol sulfate content of stratum corneum in recessive x-linked ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M L; Elias, P M

    1981-01-01

    Activity of the microsomal enzyme, steroid sulfatase, is absent in keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and leukocytes of patients with recessive x-linked ichthyosis. This study was undertaken to determine if cholesterol sulfate, a substrate of this enzyme, accumulates in the pathological scale of these patients. Scales from 8 patients with recessive x-linked ichthyosis, 10 patients with other forms of ichthyosis, and normal human outer stratum corneum were extracted with chloroform/water (1:2:0.8 by vol) and lipids were fractionated by quantitative, sequential thin-layer chromatography. Cholesterol sulfate was identified by cochromatography in several solvent systems, by its staining characteristics, by biochemical analysis, and by mass spectrometry. The mean cholesterol sulfate content of recessive x-linked ichthyotic scale was 12.5 +/- 0.8% of the total lipid, a fivefold increase over normal (P less than 0.0025), whereas the cholesterol sulfate content of other ichthyotic scale was normal. This increase in cholesterol sulfate content was accompanied by a decrease in total neutral lipids (P less than 0.0025) and free sterols (P less than 0.025) but no change in sterol esters or total sterols. These results demonstrate that deficiency of steroid sulfatase in recessive x-linked ichthyosis results in excessive accumulation of a substrate, cholesterol sulfate, in the pathologic scale, which may underly the pathogenesis of the scaling in this disorder. Measurement of cholesterol sulfate content in scale provides an alternative method to enzymatic assay for the diagnosis of this form of ichthyosis. Images PMID:6947980

  12. Validation of Cyanoacrylate Method for Collection of Stratum Corneum in Human Skin for Lipid Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, JM; Hellgren, Lars; Drachmann, Tue

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective: Lipids in the stratum corneum (SC) are of major importance for the skin barrier function. Many different methods have been used for the collection of SC for the analysis of SC lipids. The objective of the present study was to validate the cyanoacrylate method for the col......Background and Objective: Lipids in the stratum corneum (SC) are of major importance for the skin barrier function. Many different methods have been used for the collection of SC for the analysis of SC lipids. The objective of the present study was to validate the cyanoacrylate method...... for the collection of SC in relation to lipid analysis. Methods: The results of the lipid analysis (ceramide/cholesterol and ceramide profile) of SC samples obtained by the cyanoacrylate method were compared to the results of the lipid analysis of mechanically removed SC samples. The intra- and interindividual...... indicate that the cyanoacrylate method used for obtaining SC for lipid analysis is a useful and valid method for the purpose....

  13. Lipid composition and molecular interactions change with depth in the avian stratum corneum to regulate cutaneous water loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Alex M; Allen, Heather C; Williams, Joseph B

    2015-10-01

    The outermost 10-20 µm of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), consists of flat, dead cells embedded in a matrix of intercellular lipids. These lipids regulate cutaneous water loss (CWL), which accounts for over half of total water loss in birds. However, the mechanisms by which lipids are able to regulate CWL and how these mechanisms change with depth in the SC are poorly understood. We used attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) to measure lipid-lipid and lipid-water interactions as a function of depth in the SC of house sparrows (Passer domesticus Linnaeus) in the winter and summer. We then compared these molecular interactions at each depth with lipid composition at the same depth. We found that in both groups, water content increased with depth in the SC, and likely contributed to greater numbers of gauche defects in lipids in deeper levels of the SC. In winter-caught birds, which had lower rates of CWL than summer-caught birds, water exhibited stronger hydrogen bonding in deeper layers of the SC, and these strong hydrogen bonds were associated with greater amounts of polar lipids such as ceramides and cerebrosides. Based on these data, we propose a model by which polar lipids in deep levels of the SC form strong hydrogen bonds with water molecules to increase the viscosity of water and slow the permeation of water through the SC. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Analytical data of synthesized deuterated isopropyl myristate and data about the influence of IPM/IPMdeut on the thermodynamics and morphology of 2D Stratum Corneum models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S.L. Oliveira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The data in this article shows the effect of isopropyl myristate (IPM on a 2D Stratum Corneum lipid model. In the first part, the analytical characterization of the synthesized deuterated isopropyl myristate is given. Then a BAM image of the pure Stratum Corneum model used is shown and a dataset of surface-pressure – area isotherms considering various ratios of deuterated and non-deuterated IPM and the Stratum Corneum model mixture is provided. Assuming that after the plateau in the isotherm the area per molecule corresponds only to the Stratum Corneum model (squeezing out of IPM, the value of the area will correspond to the percentage of these lipids in the mixture when considering the pure SC model. The comparison of the real and the calculated areas per molecule is also done.

  15. Molecular Interaction between Intercellular Lipids in the Stratum Corneum and l-Menthol, as Analyzed by Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoshida, Shinya; Obata, Yasuko; Onuki, Yoshinori; Utsumi, Shunichi; Ohta, Noboru; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Takayama, Kozo

    2017-01-01

    l-Menthol increases drug partitioning on the surface of skin, diffusion of drugs in the skin, and lipid fluidity in the stratum corneum and alters the rigidly arranged lipid structure of intercellular lipids...

  16. Comparative SAXS and DSC study on stratum corneum structural organization in an epidermal cell culture model (ROC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Herre, Angela; Fahr, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Cell cultured skin equivalents present an alternative for dermatological in vitro evaluations of drugs and excipients as they provide the advantage of availability, lower variability and higher assay robustness compared to native skin. For penetration/permeation studies, an adequate stratum corneum...... barrier similar to that of human stratum corneum is, however, a prerequisite. In this study, the stratum corneum lipid organization in an epidermal cell culture model based on rat epidermal keratinocytes (REK organotypic culture, ROC) was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in dependence.......g. slightly smaller than that determined for human SC in the present study (127Å). Moreover, SAXS results also indicate the presence of covalently bound ceramides, which are crucial for a proper SC barrier, although the corresponding thermal transitions were not clearly detectable by DSC. Due to the competent...

  17. Effect of borneol on the transdermal permeation of drugs with differing lipophilicity and molecular organization of stratum corneum lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Qi-Feng; Yan, Jin; Tang, Si-Yuan; Huang, Hui; Kang, Li-Yang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present paper was to investigate the promoting activity of borneol on the transdermal permeation of drugs with differing lipophilicity, and probe its alterations in molecular organization of stratum corneum (SC) lipids. The toxicity of borneol was evaluated in epidermal keratinocyte HaCaT and dermal fibroblast CCC-HSF-1 cell cultures and compared to known enhancers, and its irritant profile was also assessed by transepidermal water loss (TEWL) evaluation. The promoting effect of borneol on the transdermal permeation of five model drugs, namely 5-fluorouracil, antipyrine, aspirin, salicylic acid and ibuprofen, which were selected based on their lipophilicity denoted by logp value, were performed using in vitro skin permeation studies. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was employed to monitor the borneol-induced alteration in molecular organization of SC lipids. The enhancer borneol displayed lower cytotoxicity or irritation in comparison to the well-established and standard enhancer Azone. Borneol could effectively promote the transdermal permeation of five model drugs, and its enhancement ratios were found to be parabolic curve with the logp values of drugs, which exhibited the optimum permeation activity for relatively hydrophilic drugs (an estimated logp value of -0.5 ∼0.5). The molecular mechanism studies suggested that borneol could perturb the structure of SC lipid alkyl chains, and extract part of SC lipids, resulting in the alteration in the skin permeability barrier.

  18. Effect of chemical permeation enhancers on stratum corneum barrier lipid organizational structure and interferon alpha permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Shadi H; Saliaj, Evi; Wettig, Shawn D; Dong, Chilbert; Ivanova, Marina V; Huzil, J Torin; Foldvari, Marianna

    2013-06-03

    The outermost layer of the skin, known as the stratum corneum (SC), is composed of dead corneocytes embedded in an intercellular lipid matrix consisting of ceramides, free fatty acids, and cholesterol. The high level of organization within this matrix protects the body by limiting the permeation of most compounds through the skin. While essential for its protective functions, the SC poses a significant barrier for the delivery of topically applied pharmaceutical agents. Chemical permeation enhancers (CPEs) can increase delivery of small drug compounds into the skin by interacting with the intercellular lipids through physical processes including extraction, fluidization, increased disorder, and phase separation. However, it is not clear whether these same mechanisms are involved in delivery of biotherapeutic macromolecules, such as proteins. Here we describe the effect of three categories of CPEs {solvents [ethanol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (transcutol), oleic acid], terpenes [menthol, nerol, camphor, methyl salicylate], and surfactants [Tween 80, SDS, benzalkonium chloride, polyoxyl 40 hydrogenated castor oil (Cremophor RH40), didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), didecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB)]} on the lipid organizational structure of human SC as determined by X-ray scattering studies. Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering studies were conducted to correlate the degree of structural changes and hydrocarbon chain packing in SC lipids caused by these various classes of CPEs to the extent of permeation of interferon alpha-2b (IFNα), a 19 kDa protein drug, into human skin. With the exception of solvents, propylene glycol and ethanol, all classes of CPEs caused increased disordering of lamellar and lateral packing of lipids. We observed that the highest degree of SC lipid disordering was caused by surfactants (especially SDS, DDAB, and DTAB) followed by terpenes, such as nerol. Interestingly, in vitro skin permeation studies

  19. Stratum corneum lipid organization as observed by atomic force, confocal and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlén, Lars; Plasencia Gil, Maria Inés; Bagatolli, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Skin moisturization is largely a function of stratum corneum barrier capacity, which in turn is a function of the physical state and structural organization of the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix [ J. Invest. Dermatol.18, 433 (1952); AIChE J. 21, 985 (1975); Acta Derm. Venereol.74, 1...... into co-existing microscopic domains below pH 6 [ Biophys. J.93, 3142 (2007) ]. It was further shown that the role of cholesterol is related to dispersion of ceramide-enriched domains. This effect is counteracted by the presence of free fatty acids, which mix with skin ceramides but not with cholesterol...

  20. Interaction of menthol with mixed-lipid bilayer of stratum corneum: A coarse-grained simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Guang; Dai, Xingxing; Yin, Qianqian; Shi, Xinyuan; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2015-07-01

    Menthol is a widely used penetration enhancer in clinical medicine due to its high efficiency and relative safety. Although there are many studies focused on the penetration-enhancing activity of menthol, the details of molecular mechanism are rarely involved in the discussion. In this study, we present a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interaction of menthol with a mixed-lipid bilayer model consisting of ceramides, cholesterol and free fatty acids in a 2:2:1 molar ratio. Taking both the concentration of menthol and temperature into consideration, it was found that a rise in temperature and concentration within a specific range (1-20%) could improve the penetration-enhancing property of menthol and the floppiness of the bilayer. However, at high concentrations (30% and more), menthol completely mixed with the lipids and the membrane can no longer maintain a bilayer structure. Our results elucidates some of the molecular basis for menthol's penetration enhancing effects and may provide some assistance for the development and applications of menthol as a penetration enhancer. Furthermore, we establish a method to investigate the penetration enhancement mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine using the mixed-lipid bilayer model of stratum corneum by molecular dynamics simulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Conformational changes in stratum corneum lipids by effect of bicellar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Gelen; Barbosa-Barros, Lucyanna; Rubio, Laia; Cócera, Mercedes; Díez, Avencia; Estelrich, Joan; Pons, Ramon; Caelles, Jaume; De la Maza, Alfonso; López, Olga

    2009-09-15

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of the bicelles formed by dimyristoyl-glycero-phosphocholine (DMPC) and dihexanoyl-glycero-phosphocholine (DHPC) in porcine stratum corneum (SC) in vitro. A comparison of skin samples treated and untreated with bicelles at different temperatures was carried out. The analysis of variations after treatment in the position of the symmetric CH2 stretching, CH2 scissoring, and CH2 rocking vibrations reported important information about the effect of bicelles on the skin. Bicellar systems caused a phase transition from the gel or solid state to the liquid crystalline state in the lipid conformation of SC, reflecting the major order-disorder transition from hexagonally packed to disordered chains. Grazing incidence small and wide X-ray scattering (GISAXS and GIWAXS) techniques confirmed this effect of bicelles on the SC. These results are probably related to with the permeabilizing effect previously described for the DMPC/DHPC bicelles.

  2. Stratum Corneum Lipids: Their Role for the Skin Barrier Function in Healthy Subjects and Atopic Dermatitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2016-01-01

    Human skin acts as a primary barrier between the body and its environment. Crucial for this skin barrier function is the lipid matrix in the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC). Two of its functions are (1) to prevent excessive water loss through the epidermis and (2) to avoid that compounds from the environment permeate into the viable epidermal and dermal layers and thereby provoke an immune response. The composition of the SC lipid matrix is dominated by three lipid classes: cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides. These lipids adopt a highly ordered, 3-dimensional structure of stacked densely packed lipid layers (lipid lamellae): the lateral and lamellar lipid organization. The way in which these lipids are ordered depends on the composition of the lipids. One very common skin disease in which the SC lipid barrier is affected is atopic dermatitis (AD). This review addresses the SC lipid composition and organization in healthy skin, and elaborates on how these parameters are changed in lesional and nonlesional skin of AD patients. Concerning the lipid composition, the changes in the three main lipid classes and the importance of the carbon chain lengths of the lipids are discussed. In addition, this review addresses how these changes in lipid composition induce changes in lipid organization and subsequently correlate with an impaired skin barrier function in both lesional and nonlesional skin of these patients. Furthermore, the effect of filaggrin and mutations in the filaggrin gene on the SC lipid composition is critically discussed. Also, the breakdown products of filaggrin, the natural moisturizing factor molecules and its relation to SC-pH is described. Finally, the paper discusses some major changes in epidermal lipid biosynthesis in patients with AD and other related skin diseases, and how inflammation has a deteriorating effect on the SC lipids and SC biosynthesis. The review ends with perspectives on future studies in relation to

  3. Developmental plasticity of cutaneous water loss and lipid composition in stratum corneum of desert and mesic nestling house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Williams, Joseph B

    2008-10-07

    Intercellular lipids of the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis, form a barrier to water vapor diffusion through the skin. Previously, we measured cutaneous water loss (CWL) and lipid composition of the SC of adult house sparrows from two populations, one living in the deserts of Saudi Arabia and another living in mesic Ohio. Adult desert house sparrows had a lower CWL, a lower proportion of free fatty acids, and a higher proportion of ceramides and cerebrosides in the SC compared with mesic sparrows. In this study, we investigated developmental plasticity of CWL and lipid composition of the SC in desert and mesic nestling house sparrows reared in low and high humidity and compared our results with previous work on adults. We measured CWL of nestlings and analyzed the lipid composition of the SC using thin-layer chromatography. We showed that nestling house sparrows from both localities had higher CWL than adults in their natural environment, a result of major modifications of the lipid composition of the SC. The expression of plasticity in CWL seems to be a response to opposed selection pressures, thermoregulation and water conservation, at different life stages, on which regulation of CWL plays a crucial role. Desert nestlings showed a greater degree of plasticity in CWL and lipid composition of the SC than did mesic nestlings, a finding consistent with the idea that organisms exposed to more environmental stress ought to be more plastic than individuals living in more benign environments.

  4. Correlation between the properties of the lipid matrix and the degrees of integrity and cohesion in healthy human Stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthaud, Fabienne; Boncheva, Mila

    2011-03-01

    The correlation between the degrees of integrity and cohesion in healthy human Stratum corneum (SC) and the properties of the SC lipid matrix could be examined non-invasively in vivo using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and measurements of pH, conductance, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) taken in the course of tape-stripping. The change of TEWL following the removal of a SC layer with a predefined thickness served as a measure for the SC integrity, and the amount of protein removed by predefined number of tapes - as a measure for the SC cohesion. The extent of lipids organized in orthorhombic lattices and the pH in the inner SC emerged as the main factors that determine the degree of integrity. The amounts and molecular organization of the SC lipids did not correlate with the degree of cohesion, while the pH and the hydration of SC correlated well with the degree of cohesion in the superficial but not in the inner SC layers. This study evidenced the variability of SC integrity and cohesion existing in healthy human skin, demonstrated the importance of the lipid molecular organization for the SC integrity, and illustrated the limitations in the determination the degree of corneodesmolysis in SC based only on the protein content of tape-strips. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Skin barrier response to occlusion of healthy and irritated skin: Differences in trans-epidermal water loss, erythema and stratum corneum lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J.M.; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2010-01-01

    been damaged by either sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) or tape stripping, respectively, was determined and compared with that of to non-occluded pre-damaged skin. Skin barrier function was assessed by measurements of trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) and erythema. In study A, stratum corneum lipids were...

  6. Effect of menthone and related compounds on skin permeation of drugs with different lipophilicity and molecular organization of stratum corneum lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yi; Wang, Jingyan; Li, Hui; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Yanyan; Zhao, Bochen; Wu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article was to investigate the enhancing effect of menthone, menthol and pulegone on the transdermal absorption of drugs with different lipophilicity and probe their mechanisms of action at molecular level. Five model drugs, namely osthole, tetramethylpyrazine, ferulic acid, puerarin and geniposide, which were selected based on their lipophilicity denoted by logKo/w, were tested using in vitro permeation studies in which Franz diffusion cells and rat skin were employed. Infrared spectroscopy and molecular dynamic simulation were used to investigate the effect of these enhancers on the stratum corneum (SC) lipids, respectively. Three compounds could effectively promote the transdermal absorption of drugs with different lipophilicity, and the overall promoting capacities were in the following increasing order: pulegone drug lipophilicity after treatment with menthol or menthone, while the penetration enhancement effect of pulegone hardly changed with the alteration of the drug lipophilicity. The molecular mechanism studies suggested that menthone and menthol enhanced the skin permeability by disordering the ordered organization of SC lipids and extracted part of SC lipids, while pulegone appeared to promote drug transport across the skin only by extracting part of SC lipids.

  7. Interaction of fengycin with stratum corneum mimicking model membranes: a calorimetry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeman, Marc; Olofsson, Gerd; Sparr, Emma; Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Nylander, Tommy; Deleu, Magali

    2014-09-01

    Based on its outstanding antifungal properties, it is reasonable to believe that fengycin might be efficient to topically treat localized dermatomycoses. Since most of the fungi species involved in the formation of those mycotic skin diseases colonize primarily the stratum corneum (SC), studying the interaction between fengycin and SC-mimicking lipid membranes is a primary step to determine the potential of fengycin to overcome the physical barrier of the skin. In this respect, multilamellar lipid vesicles (MLVs), with a lipid composition mimicking that of the SC, were prepared and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of fengycin was also assessed under skin conditions and found to be 1.2±0.1μM. The molecular interactions of fengycin with SC-mimicking MLVs were investigated by both DSC and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Results showed that the interactions were considerably affected by changes in lipid phase behaviour. At 40°C and below, fengycin induced exothermic changes in the lipid structures suggesting that less-ordered lipid domains became more-ordered in presence of fengycin. At 60°C, clearly endothermic interaction enthalpies were observed, which could arise from the "melting" of remaining solid domains enriched in high melting lipids that without fengycin melt at higher temperatures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of a Novel Dimeric Ceramide Molecule on the Nanostructure and Thermotropic Phase Behavior of a Stratum Corneum Model Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlberg, Sören; Eichner, Adina; Sonnenberger, Stefan; Kováčik, Andrej; Lange, Stefan; Schmitt, Thomas; Demé, Bruno; Hauß, Thomas; Dobner, Bodo; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Huster, Daniel

    2017-09-12

    The stratum corneum (SC) is the outermost layer of the skin and is composed of a multilayered assembly of mostly ceramids (Cer), free fatty acids, cholesterol (Chol), and cholesterol sulfate (Chol-S). Because of the tight packing of these lipids, the SC features unique barrier properties defending the skin from environmental influences. Under pathological conditions, where the skin barrier function is compromised, topical application of molecules that rigidify the SC may lead to a restored barrier function. To this end, molecules are required that incorporate into the SC and bring back the original rigidity of the skin barrier. Here, we investigated the influence of a novel dimeric ceramide (dim-Cer) molecule designed to feature a long, rigid hydrocarbon chain ideally suited to forming an orthorhombic lipid phase. The influence of this molecules on the thermotropic phase behavior of a SC mixture consisting of Cer[AP18] (55 wt %), cholesterol (Chol, 25 wt %), steric acid (SA, 15 wt %), and cholesterol sulfate (Chol-S, 5 wt %) was studied using a combination of neutron diffraction and 2H NMR spectroscopy. These methods provide detailed insights into the packing properties of the lipids in the SC model mixture. Dim-Cer remains in an all-trans state of the membrane-spanning lipid chain at all investigated temperatures, but the influence on the phase behavior of the other lipids in the mixture is marginal. Biophysical experiments are complemented by permeability measurements in model membranes and human skin. The latter, however, indicates that dim-Cer only partially provides the desired effect on membrane permeability, necessitating further optimization of its structure for medical applications.

  9. Ethnicity and stratum corneum ceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J M; Høgh, J K; Hellgren, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The barrier function of the skin is dependent on an optimal composition of the stratum corneum lipids, exemplified by the altered lipid profile in patients with atopic eczema (AE). Differences in the global prevalence of AE point to the environment as an important factor in AE. Studies on filaggr...

  10. A depth-dependent profile of the lipid conformation and lateral packing order of the stratum corneum in vivo measured using Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, ChunSik; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2016-03-21

    The intercellular lipid structure of the stratum corneum (SC) plays a key role in skin barrier function. A depth profile of the intercellular lipid conformation and the lipid lateral packing order were measured in vivo in the human SC using confocal Raman microscopy. The depth profiles of the 2880 cm(-1)/2850 cm(-1) peak ratio intensity, which represent the C-H stretching and lateral packing order of lipids, and the 1080 cm(-1)/(1130 cm(-1) + 1060 cm(-1)) peak ratio, which represents the C-C skeleton vibration and trans-gauche conformation order of lipids, were investigated. The influence of keratin on the lipid peaks at 2850 cm(-1) and 2880 cm(-1) was excluded by the developed mathematical algorithm. The results show that the trans-conformation and lateral packing order of the intercellular lipids reach their maximum value in the SC at 20-40% of its depth and then decrease towards the stratum granulosum. These results show that at a depth of 20-40% (normally corresponding to a depth of 4-8 μm) the SC exhibits the most ordered lipids and therefore the highest skin barrier function. The lateral packing of lipids is more disordered on the surface and in the deeper parts of the SC, which may be associated with a reduced skin barrier function.

  11. Phenotypic flexibility in cutaneous water loss and lipids of the stratum corneum in house sparrows (Passer domesticus) following acclimation to high and low humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Garcia, Agusti; Cox, Robert M; Williams, Joseph B

    2008-01-01

    Resistance to water-vapor diffusion through the skin is thought to be conferred by lipids in the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis. We tested the effect of ambient humidity on cutaneous water loss (CWL) and lipid composition of the SC by acclimating house sparrows (Passer domesticus) to either a dry (6.5 g/m(3) absolute humidity) or a humid (31 g/m(3)) environment for 3 wk at a thermoneutral temperature (30 degrees C). Sparrows in the dry-acclimated group reduced CWL by 36% compared with those in the humid environment. Relative to initial values, both groups of sparrows decreased CWL, 45% in the dry-acclimated group and 23% in the humid group, suggesting that temperature is also an important stimulus for CWL apart from humidity. Both groups of acclimated sparrows decreased quantities of cholesterol, free fatty acids, and cerebrosides and increased the proportion of ceramides in their SC. Lipid amounts or proportions in the SC did not differ between dry- and humid-acclimated sparrows, but the free fatty acid : ceramide ratio was significantly lower in dry-acclimated birds. Also, lipid composition was only correlated with CWL in dry-acclimated sparrows, suggesting that structural changes to SC lipids are more tightly linked to CWL regulation in response to low humidity. Our results demonstrate phenotypic flexibility in CWL and lipid composition of the SC and provide support for a functional relationship between these traits.

  12. Nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy and imaging of structural lipids in human stratum corneum using an atomic force microscope to directly detect absorbed light from a tunable IR laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcott, Curtis; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Domanov, Yegor; Balooch, Guive; Luengo, Gustavo S

    2013-06-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) and a tunable infrared (IR) laser source have been combined in a single instrument (AFM-IR) capable of producing ~200-nm spatial resolution IR spectra and absorption images. This new capability enables IR spectroscopic characterization of human stratum corneum at unprecendented levels. Samples of normal and delipidized stratum corneum were embedded, cross-sectioned and mounted on ZnSe prisms. A pulsed tunable IR laser source produces thermomechanical expansion upon absorption, which is detected through excitation of contact resonance modes in the AFM cantilever. In addition to reducing the total lipid content, the delipidization process damages the stratum corneum morphological structure. The delipidized stratum corneum shows substantially less long-chain CH2 -stretching IR absorption band intensity than normal skin. AFM-IR images that compare absorbances at 2930/cm (lipid) and 3290/cm (keratin) suggest that regions of higher lipid concentration are located at the perimeter of corneocytes in the normal stratum corneum. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Cutaneous water loss and covalently bound lipids of the stratum corneum in nestling house sparrows (Passer domesticus L.) from desert and mesic habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Michelle E; Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Williams, Joseph B

    2012-04-01

    Lipids of the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis of birds and mammals, provide a barrier to water vapor diffusion through the skin. The SC of birds consists of flat dead cells, called corneocytes, and two lipid compartments: an intercellular matrix and a monolayer of covalently bound lipids (CBLs) attached to the outer surface of the corneocytes. We previously found two classes of sphingolipids, ceramides and cerebrosides, covalently bound to corneocytes in the SC of house sparrows (Passer domesticus L.); these lipids were associated with cutaneous water loss (CWL). In this study, we collected adult and nestling house sparrows from Ohio and nestlings from Saudi Arabia, acclimated them to either high or low humidity, and measured their rates of CWL. We also measured CWL for natural populations of nestlings from Ohio and Saudi Arabia, beginning when chicks were 2 days old until they fledged. We then evaluated the composition of the CBLs of the SC of sparrows using thin layer chromatography. We found that adult house sparrows had a greater diversity of CBLs in their SC than previously described. During ontogeny, nestling sparrows increased the amount of CBLs and developed their CBLs differently, depending on their habitat. Acclimating nestlings to different humidity regimes did not alter the ontogeny of the CBLs, suggesting that these lipids represent a fundamental component of SC organization that does not respond to short-term environmental change.

  14. In vivo confocal Raman microscopic determination of depth profiles of the stratum corneum lipid organization influenced by application of various oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, ChunSik; Schleusener, Johannes; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2017-08-01

    The intercellular lipids (ICL) of stratum corneum (SC) play an important role in maintaining the skin barrier function. The lateral and lamellar packing order of ICL in SC is not homogenous, but rather depth-dependent. This study aimed to analyze the influence of the topically applied mineral-derived (paraffin and petrolatum) and plant-derived (almond oil and jojoba oil) oils on the depth-dependent ICL profile ordering of the SC in vivo. Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), a unique tool to analyze the depth profile of the ICL structure non-invasively, is employed to investigate the interaction between oils and human SC in vivo. The results show that the response of SC to oils' permeation varies in the depths. All oils remain in the upper layers of the SC (0-20% of SC thickness) and show predominated differences of ICL ordering from intact skin. In these depths, skin treated with plant-derived oils shows more disordered lateral and lamellar packing order of ICL than intact skin (poils do not influence the lateral packing order of SC ICL (p>0.1), except plant-derived oils at the depth 30% of SC thickness. In the deeper layers of the SC (60-100% of SC thickness), no difference between ICL lateral packing order of the oil-treated and intact skin can be observed, except that at the depths of 70-90% of the SC thickness, where slight changes with more disorder states are measured for plant-derived oil treated skin (poil types remain in the superficial layers of the SC (0-20% of the SC thickness). Skin treated with mineral- and plant-derived oils shows significantly higher disordered lateral and lamellar packing order of ICL in these layers of the SC compared to intact skin. Plant-derived oils significantly changed the ICL ordering in the depths of 30% and 70-90% of the SC thickness, which is likely due to the penetration of free fatty acids in the deeper layers of the SC. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  15. Reduced barrier efficiency in axillary stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, A; Lee, R S; Moore, A E; Pudney, P D A; Paterson, S E; Rawlings, A V

    2002-06-01

    The skin of the axilla is cosmetically important with millions of consumers daily applying antiperspirant/deodorant products. Despite this, we know virtually nothing about axillary skin or how antiperspirant (AP) use impacts upon it. To characterize the axillary stratum corneum and determine whether this is a unique skin type, we have looked at stratum corneum composition and function, particularly its barrier properties, and compared it with other body sites. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and corneosurfametry (CSM) revealed a reduced barrier function in the axilla. HPTLC analysis of the stratum corneum lipids demonstrated statistically elevated levels of fatty acids, ceramides, and particularly cholesterol in the axilla. Both ceramide and cholesterol did not appear to change with depth, indicating that they were predominantly of stratum corneum origin. On the other hand, at least some of the fatty acid had a sebaceous origin. We hypothesized that the reduced barrier function might be owing to the changes in the crucial ceramide : cholesterol ratio. To address this, we used a combination of attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) with cyanoacrylate sampling. These results demonstrated more ordered lipid-lamellae phase behaviour in the axilla, suggesting that the elevated cholesterol might form crystal microdomains within the lipid lamellae, allowing an increase in water flux. Since an exaggerated application of antiperspirant had no effect upon the axilla barrier properties, it is concluded that this region of skin physiologically has a reduced barrier function.

  16. Stratum Corneum Keratin Structure, Function, and Formation: The Cubic Rod-Packing and Membrane Templating Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Norlén, Lars; Al-Amoudi, Ashraf

    2004-01-01

    ... capable of explaining keratin intermediate filament structure, function, and formation when newer findings regarding the native structural organization of fully hydrated epidermis (cf.) have been taken into account. Such a theoretical model may provide for a rational design of experimental studies on skin diseases, skin permeability, topical d...

  17. Vehicle effects on human stratum corneum absorption and skin penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Alissa; Jung, Eui-Chang; Zhu, Hanjiang; Zou, Ying; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of three vehicles-ethanol (EtOH), isopropyl alcohol (IPA), and isopropyl myristate (IPM)-on stratum corneum (SC) absorption and diffusion of the [(14)C]-model compounds benzoic acid and butenafine hydrochloride to better understand the transport pathways of chemicals passing through and resident in SC. Following application of topical formulations to human dermatomed skin for 30 min, penetration flux was observed for 24 h post dosing, using an in vitro flow-through skin diffusion system. Skin absorption and penetration was compared to the chemical-SC (intact, delipidized, or SC lipid film) binding levels. A significant vehicle effect was observed for chemical skin penetration and SC absorption. IPA resulted in the greatest levels of intact SC/SC lipid absorption, skin penetration, and total skin absorption/penetration of benzoic acid, followed by IPM and EtOH, respectively. For intact SC absorption and total skin absorption/penetration of butenafine, the vehicle that demonstrated the highest level of sorption/penetration was EtOH, followed by IPA and IPM, respectively. The percent doses of butenafine that were absorbed in SC lipid film and penetrated through skin in 24 h were greatest for IPA, followed by EtOH and IPM, respectively. The vehicle effect was consistent between intact SC absorption and total chemical skin absorption and penetration, as well as SC lipid absorption and chemical penetration through skin, suggesting intercellular transport as a main pathway of skin penetration for model chemicals. These results suggest the potential to predict vehicle effects on skin permeability with simple SC absorption assays. As decontamination was applied 30 min after chemical exposure, significant vehicle effects on chemical SC partitioning and percutaneous penetration also suggest that skin decontamination efficiency is vehicle dependent, and an effective decontamination method should act on chemical solutes in the lipid domain.

  18. Interaction of lipid nanoparticles with human epidermis and an organotypic cell culture model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Bunjes, Heike; Fahr, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    Various lipid nanoparticle formulations were investigated with respect to (trans)dermal drug delivery with special regard to the mechanism of their effects on human and an organotypic cell culture epidermis. Potential alterations of stratum corneum lipid domains were studied using fluorescence...... was visualized by fluorescence microscopy of cross sections of human epidermis after incubation with cubic and solid lipid nanoparticles. Corticosterone permeation was limited when applied in matrix-type lipid nanoparticles (fat emulsion, smectic and solid lipid nanoparticles). An adhesion of solid lipid...... nanoparticles was clearly observed in thermal analysis as reflected by additional phase transitions probably caused by the nanoparticle matrix lipid. However, as for the other matrix-type nanoparticles, no distinct alterations of the phase transitions of the stratum corneum lipids were observed. Cubic...

  19. Model Answers to Lipid Membrane Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, O. G.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since it was discovered that biological membranes have a core of a bimolecular sheet of lipid molecules, lipid bilayers have been a model laboratory for investigating physicochemical and functional properties of biological membranes. Experimental and theoretical models help the experimental ...... to pursue. Here we review some membrane models for lipid self-assembly, monolayers, bilayers, liposomes, and lipid-protein interactions and illustrate how such models can help answering questions in modern lipid cell biology....... scientist to plan experiments and interpret data. Theoretical models are the theoretical scientist's preferred toys to make contact between membrane theory and experiments. Most importantly, models serve to shape our intuition about which membrane questions are the more fundamental and relevant ones...

  20. Phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine ceramides in model skin lipid membranes: permeability and biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Školová, Barbora; Kováčik, Andrej; Tesař, Ondřej; Opálka, Lukáš; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2017-05-01

    Ceramides based on phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine are essential constituents of the skin lipid barrier that protects the body from excessive water loss. The roles of the individual ceramide subclasses in regulating skin permeability and the reasons for C4-hydroxylation of these sphingolipids are not completely understood. We investigated the chain length-dependent effects of dihydroceramides, sphingosine ceramides (with C4-unsaturation) and phytoceramides (with C4-hydroxyl) on the permeability, lipid organization and thermotropic behavior of model stratum corneum lipid membranes composed of ceramide/lignoceric acid/cholesterol/cholesteryl sulfate. Phytoceramides with very long C24 acyl chains increased the permeability of the model lipid membranes compared to dihydroceramides or sphingosine ceramides with the same chain lengths. Either unsaturation or C4-hydroxylation of dihydroceramides induced chain length-dependent increases in membrane permeability. Infrared spectroscopy showed that C4-hydroxylation of the sphingoid base decreased the relative ratio of orthorhombic chain packing in the membrane and lowered the miscibility of C24 phytoceramide with lignoceric acid. The phase separation in phytoceramide membranes was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. In contrast, phytoceramides formed strong hydrogen bonds and highly thermostable domains. Thus, the large heterogeneity in ceramide structures and in their aggregation mechanisms may confer resistance towards the heterogeneous external stressors that are constantly faced by the skin barrier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of Sunscreen at Preventing Solar UV-Induced Alterations of Human Stratum Corneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, O.; Dauskardt, R.; Biniek, K.; Novoa, F.

    2012-12-01

    The outermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum, protects the body from harmful environmental conditions by serving as a selective barrier. Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is one of the most common conditions the body encounters and is responsible for many negative skin responses, including compromised barrier function. UV exposure has dramatic effects on stratum corneum cell cohesion and mechanical integrity that are related to its effects on the stratum corneum's intercellular lipids. Hypothesis Sunscreen contains chemicals that absorb UV radiation to prevent the radiation from penetrating the skin. Thus, it is expected that the application of sunscreen on human stratum corneum will reduce UV-induced alterations of human stratum corneum. Procedures/Equipment Human tissue was processed in order to isolate the stratum corneum, the top layer of the epidermis. Double cantilever beam (DCB) testing was used to study the effect of UV radiation on human stratum corneum. Two different types of DCB samples were created: control DCB samples with the application of carrier and UV light to the stratum corneum and DCB samples with the application of sunscreen and UV light to the stratum corneum. For the control sample, one side of the stratum corneum was glued to a polycarbonate beam and carrier was applied. Then, the sample was placed 10 cm away from the UV lamp inside of the environmental chamber and were exposed to UV dosages of about 800 J/cm2. Once this step was complete, a second polycarbonate beam was glued to the other side of the stratum corneum. The steps were similar for the DCB sample that had sunscreen applied and that was exposed to UV light. After gluing one side of the stratum corneum to a polycarbonate beam, Octinoxate sunscreen was applied. The next steps were similar to those of the control sample. All DCB samples were then let out to dry for two hours in a dry box in order for the moisture from the lab to be extracted. Each DCB sample was tested

  2. Liquid immiscibility in model bilayer lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Sarah L.

    There is growing evidence that cell plasma membranes are laterally organized into "raft" regions in which particular lipids and proteins are concentrated. These domains have sub-micron dimensions and have been implicated in vital cell functions. Similar liquid domains are observed in model bilayer membrane mixtures that mimick cellular lipid compositions. In model membranes, domains can be large (microns) and can readily form in the absence of proteins. This thesis presents studies of liquid immiscibility in model membrane systems using two experimental methods. By fluorescence microscopy, this thesis documents that miscibility transitions occur in a wide variety of ternary lipid mixtures containing high melting temperature (saturated) lipids, low melting temperature (usually unsaturated) lipids, and cholesterol. I have constructed detailed miscibility phase diagrams for three separate ternary lipid mixtures (DOPC/DPPC/Chol, DOPC/PSM/Chol, and POPC/PSM/Chol). Phase separation is also observed in membranes of lipids extracted from human erythrocytes. NMR experiments probe lipid order and verify the coexistence of a saturated lipid and cholesterol rich liquid ordered (Lo) phase with a more disordered, unsaturated lipid rich liquid crystalline (Lalpha) phase at low temperatures. These experiments also find multiple thermodynamic transitions and lipid organization on different length-scales. This complexity is revealed because fluorescence microscopy and NMR probe lipid order at different length-scales (>1mum vs. ˜100nm). NMR detects small domains (˜80nm) at temperatures just below the miscibility transition, even though micron-scale domains are observed by fluorescent microscopy. NMR does detect large-scale ("100nm) demixing, but at a lower temperature. In addition, it has long been known that >10nm length-scale structure is present in many lipid mixtures containing cholesterol and at least one additional lipid species, though it is shown here that only a subset of

  3. Structure Enhancement Relationship of Chemical Penetration Enhancers in Drug Transport across the Stratum Corneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantasart, Doungdaw; Li, S. Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The stratum corneum is a major barrier of drug penetration across the skin in transdermal delivery. For effective transdermal drug delivery, skin penetration enhancers are used to overcome this barrier. In the past decades, a number of research studies were conducted to understand the mechanisms of skin penetration enhancers and to develop a structure enhancement relationship. Such understanding allows effective prediction of the effects of skin penetration enhancers, assists topical and transdermal formulation development, and avoids extensive enhancer screening in the transdermal delivery industry. In the past two decades, several hypotheses on chemical enhancer-induced penetration enhancement for transport across the skin lipoidal pathway have been examined based on a systematic approach. Particularly, a hypothesis that skin penetration enhancement is directly related to the concentration of the enhancers in the stratum corneum lipid domain was examined. A direct relationship between skin penetration enhancer potency (based on enhancer aqueous concentration in the diffusion cell chamber) and enhancer n-octanol-water partition coefficient was also established. The nature of the microenvironment of the enhancer site of action in the stratum corneum lipid domain was found to be mimicked by n-octanol. The present paper reviews the work related to these hypotheses and the relationships between skin penetration enhancement and enhancer concentration in the drug delivery media and stratum corneum lipids. PMID:24300181

  4. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine is upregulated in the stratum corneum of patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Reiko; Arikawa, Junko; Ishibashi, Mutsumi; Kawashima, Makoto; Takagi, Yutaka; Imokawa, Genji

    2003-01-01

    To clarify the functional relevance of sphingomyelin (SM) deacylase to the ceramide deficiency seen in atopic dermatitis (AD), we developed a new highly sensitive method and measured the metabolic intermediate sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) that accumulates in the stratum corneum. SPC in intercellular lipids extracted from stratum corneum was reacted with [(14)C]acetic anhydride to yield [(14)C-C(2)]SM, which was then analyzed by TLC. In both the lesional and non-lesional stratum corneum obtained from patients with AD, there was a significant increase in the content of SPC over that of healthy control subjects. There was a reciprocal relationship between increases in SPC and decreases in ceramide levels of stratum corneum obtained from healthy controls, and from lesional and non-lesional skin from patients with AD. Comparison with other sphingolipids present in the stratum corneum demonstrated that there is a significant positive correlation between SPC and glucosylsphingosine, another lysosphingolipid derived from glucosylceramide by another novel epidermal enzyme, termed glucosylceramide deacylase. In contrast, there was no correlation between SPC and sphingosine, a degradative product generated from ceramide by ceramidase. These findings strongly suggest the physiological relevance of SM deacylase function in vivo to the ceramide deficiency found in the skin of patients with AD.

  5. Coarse grained model for semiquantitative lipid simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, SJ; de Vries, AH; Mark, AE

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the parametrization of a new coarse grained (CG) model for lipid and surfactant systems. Reduction of the number of degrees of freedom together with the use of short range potentials makes it computationally very efficient. Compared to atomistic models a gain of 3-4 orders of

  6. Self-assembly models for lipid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Divya; Porcar, Lionel; Butler, Paul; Perez-Salas, Ursula

    2006-03-01

    Solutions of mixed long and short (detergent-like) phospholipids referred to as ``bicelle'' mixtures in the literature, are known to form a variety of different morphologies based on their total lipid composition and temperature in a complex phase diagram. Some of these morphologies have been found to orient in a magnetic field, and consequently bicelle mixtures are widely used to study the structure of soluble as well as membrane embedded proteins using NMR. In this work, we report on the low temperature phase of the DMPC and DHPC bicelle mixture, where there is agreement on the discoid structures but where molecular packing models are still being contested. The most widely accepted packing arrangement, first proposed by Vold and Prosser had the lipids completely segregated in the disk: DHPC in the rim and DMPC in the disk. Using data from small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments, we show how radius of the planar domain of the disks is governed by the effective molar ratio qeff of lipids in aggregate and not the molar ratio q (q = [DMPC]/[DHPC] ) as has been understood previously. We propose a new quantitative (packing) model and show that in this self assembly scheme, qeff is the real determinant of disk sizes. Based on qeff , a master equation can then scale the radii of disks from mixtures with varying q and total lipid concentration.

  7. Finite element modeling of lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Klug, William S.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented for the study of biological membranes composed of lipid bilayers based on the finite element method. The classic model for these membranes employs a two-dimensional-fluid-like elastic constitutive law which is sensitive to curvature, and subjects vesicles to physically imposed constraints on surface area and volume. This model is implemented numerically via the use of C1-conforming triangular Loop subdivision finite elements. The validity of the framework is tested by computing equilibrium shapes from previously-determined axisymmetric shape-phase diagram of lipid bilayer vesicles with homogeneous material properties. Some of the benefits and challenges of finite element modeling of lipid bilayer systems are discussed, and it is indicated how this framework is natural for future investigation of biologically realistic bilayer structures involving nonaxisymmetric geometries, binding and adhesive interactions, heterogeneous mechanical properties, cytoskeletal interactions, and complex loading arrangements. These biologically relevant features have important consequences for the shape mechanics of nonidealized vesicles and cells, and their study requires not simply advances in theory, but also advances in numerical simulation techniques, such as those presented here.

  8. In vitro model of infected stratum corneum for the efficacy evaluation of poloxamer 407-based formulations of ciclopirox olamine against Trichophyton rubrum as well as differential scanning calorimetry and stability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Täuber, Anja; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2015-10-15

    Superficial fungal skin infections are a common disease and concern 20-25% of the world's population with the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum being the main trigger. Due to autoinoculation, fungal skin infections of the feet (tinea pedis) often occur simultaneously with fungal nail infections (onychomycosis). Therefore, the overall objective was the development and characterisation of poloxamer 407-based formulations with the antimycotic active ingredient ciclopirox olamine (CPX) for simultaneous antifungal therapy. The formulations consisted of poloxamer 407, water, isopropyl alcohol, propylene glycol and medium chain triglycerides in given ratios. The in vitro antifungal efficacy against T. rubrum was tested in a novel in vitro model of infected stratum corneum in comparison to a marketed semi-solid formulation containing 1% (w/w) ciclopirox olamine and a marketed nail lacquer containing 8% ciclopirox. Several liquid poloxamer 407-based formulations with only 1% CPX completely inhibited fungal growth after 6 days of incubation, whereas the marketed semi-solid formulation did not inhibit fungal growth. Differential scanning calorimetry studies revealing the interaction between the formulations and the SC showed that increasing isopropyl alcohol/propylene glycol concentrations as well as increasing CPX concentrations caused increasing endothermic transition shifts. Moreover, stability studies at 30 °C exhibited only a slight decrease of the CPX amount after 12 months of storage. Each formulation contained >90% of the initial CPX concentration after termination of the stability studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Controlled penetration of ceramides into and across the stratum corneum using various types of microemulsions and formulation associated toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahle, Fitsum F; Wohlrab, Johannes; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2014-02-01

    Several skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis are associated with the depletion or disturbance of stratum corneum (SC) lipids such as ceramides (CERs), free fatty acids and cholesterol. Studies suggested that replenishment of these lipids might help to treat diseased, affected or aged skin. With this premises in mind, there are some formulations in the market that contain SC lipids and currently, to facilitate permeation of the lipids deep into the SC, various CERs, and other SC lipid microemulsions (MEs) were developed and characterised using lecithin or TEGO® CARE PL 4 (TCPL4) as base surfactants. However, to date, there are no reports that involve the permeability of SC lipids into and across the SC, and therefore, the penetration of CER [NP] as a model ceramide from various formulations was investigated ex vivo using Franz diffusion cell. Besides, the toxicity of the MEs was assessed using hen's egg test chorioallantoic membrane (HET-CAM). The results of the study showed that CER [NP] could not permeate into deeper layers of the SC from a conventional hydrophilic cream. Unlike the cream, CER [NP] permeated into the deeper layers of the SC from both type of MEs, where permeation of the CER was more and into deeper layers from droplet type and lecithin-based MEs than bicontinuous (BC) type and TCPL4 based MEs, respectively. The CER also permeated into deeper layers from ME gels which was, however, shallow and to a lesser extent when compared with the MEs. The results of HET-CAM showed that both MEs are safe to be used topically, with lecithin-based MEs exhibiting better safety profiles than TCPL4 based MEs. Concluding, the study showed that the MEs are safe to be used on the skin for the controlled penetration of CER [NP] deep into the SC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Penetration and growth of DPPC/DHPC bicelles inside the stratum corneum of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Barros, L; de la Maza, A; Estelrich, J; Linares, A M; Feliz, M; Walther, P; Pons, R; López, O

    2008-06-03

    The effect of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) bicelles on the microstructure of pig stratum corneum (SC) in vitro was evaluated. The physicochemical characterization of these nanoaggregates revealed small disks with diameters around 15 nm and a thickness of 5.4 nm. Upon dilution, the bicelles grow and transform into vesicles. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) images of the SC pieces treated with this system showed vesicles of about 200 nm and lamellar-like structures in the intercellular lipid areas. These vesicles probably resulted from the growth and molecular rearrangement of the DPPC/DHPC bicelles after penetrating the SC. The presence of lamellar-like structures is ascribed to the interaction of the lipids from bicelles with the SC lipids. The bicellar system used is suitable to penetrate the skin SC and to reinforce the intercellular lipid areas, constituting a promising tool for skin applications.

  11. A population-based study of the stratum corneum moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pires TF

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Thiago de Farias Pires,1 Ana Paula Azambuja,2 Andrea Roseli Vançan Russo Horimoto,1 Mary Sanae Nakamura,2 Rafael de Oliveira Alvim,1 José Eduardo Krieger,1 Alexandre Costa Pereira1 1Laboratory of Genetics and Molecular Cardiology, Heart Institute, University of São Paulo Medical School, 2Natura Innovation and Product Technology Ltd., Cajamar, SP, Brazil Background: The stratum corneum (SC has important functions as a bound-water modulator and a primary barrier of the human skin from the external environment. However, no large epidemiological study has quantified the relative importance of different exposures with regard to these functional properties. In this study, we have studied a large sample of individuals from the Brazilian population in order to understand the different relationships between the properties of SC and a number of demographic and self-perceived variables. Methods: One thousand three hundred and thirty-nine individuals from a rural Brazilian population, who were participants of a family-based study, were submitted to a cross-sectional examination of the SC moisture by capacitance using the Corneometer® CM820 and investigated regarding environmental exposures, cosmetic use, and other physiological and epidemiological measurements. Self-perception-scaled questions about skin conditions were also applied. Results: We found significant associations between SC moisture and sex, age, high sun exposure, and sunscreen use frequency (P<0.025. In specific studied sites, self-reported race and obesity were also found to show significant effects. Dry skin self-perception was also found to be highly correlated with the objective measurement of the skin. Other environmental effects on SC moisture are also reported. Keywords: investigative dermatology, stratum corneum moisture, Corneometer, sun exposure, familial data modeling

  12. Lipid Processing Technology: Building a Multilevel Modeling Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Díaz Tovar, Carlos Axel; Mustaffa, Azizul Azri; Mukkerikar, Amol

    2011-01-01

    in design and analysis of unit operations; iv) the information and models developed are used as building blocks in the development of methods and tools for computer-aided synthesis and design of process flowsheets (CAFD). The applicability of this methodology is highlighted in each level of modeling through......The aim of this work is to present the development of a computer aided multilevel modeling network for the systematic design and analysis of processes employing lipid technologies. This is achieved by decomposing the problem into four levels of modeling: i) pure component property modeling...... and a lipid-database of collected experimental data from industry and generated data from validated predictive property models, as well as modeling tools for fast adoption-analysis of property prediction models; ii) modeling of phase behavior of relevant lipid mixtures using the UNIFACCI model, development...

  13. Building a multilevel modeling network for lipid processing systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustaffa, Azizul Azri; Díaz Tovar, Carlos Axel; Hukkerikar, Amol

    2011-01-01

    data collected from existing process plants, and application of validated models in design and analysis of unit operations; iv) the information and models developed are used as building blocks in the development of methods and tools for computer-aided synthesis and design of process flowsheets (CAFD......The aim of this work is to present the development of a computer aided multilevel modeling network for the systematic design and analysis of processes employing lipid technologies. This is achieved by decomposing the problem into four levels of modeling: i) pure component property modeling...... and a lipid-database of collected experimental data from industry and generated data from validated predictive property models, as well as modeling tools for fast adoption-analysis of property prediction models; ii) modeling of phase behavior of relevant lipid mixtures using the UNIFAC-CI model, development...

  14. Modelling phagosomal lipid networks that regulate actin assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz Roland

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When purified phagosomes are incubated in the presence of actin under appropriate conditions, microfilaments start growing from the membrane in a process that is affected by ATP and the lipid composition of the membrane. Isolated phagosomes are metabolically active organelles that contain enzymes and metabolites necessary for lipid interconversion. Hence, addition of ATP, lipids, and actin to the system alter the steady-state composition of the phagosomal membrane at the same time that the actin nucleation is initiated. Our aim was to model all these processes in parallel. Results We compiled detailed experimental data on the effects of different lipids and ATP on actin nucleation and we investigated experimentally lipid interconversion and ATP metabolism in phagosomes by using suitable radioactive compounds. In a first step, a complex lipid network interconnected by chemical reactions catalyzed by known enzymes was modelled in COPASI (Complex Pathway Simulator. However, several lines of experimental evidence indicated that only the phosphatidylinositol branch of the network was active, an observation that dramatically reduced the number of parameters in the model. The results also indicated that a lipid network-independent ATP-consuming activity should be included in the model. When this activity was introduced, the set of differential equations satisfactorily reproduced the experimental data. On the other hand, a molecular mechanism connecting membrane lipids, ATP, and the actin nucleation process is still missing. We therefore adopted a phenomenological (black-box approach to represent the empirical observations. We proposed that lipids and ATP influence the dynamic interconversion between active and inactive actin nucleation sites. With this simple model, all the experimental data were satisfactorily fitted with a single positive parameter per lipid and ATP. Conclusion By establishing an active 'dialogue' between an

  15. Comparative thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of water interaction with human stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Santosh; Wickett, R Randall; Pinto, Neville G; Kasting, Gerald B; Thiel, Stephen W

    2009-05-01

    The water content of skin has a significant impact on skin properties; sufficient hydration is necessary to keep the skin supple, flexible, and smooth. To understand more completely the water retention properties of the human skin barrier, physical macroscopic properties must be related to the structural organization of the stratum corneum (SC). Water, lipids, and natural moisturizing factor (NMF) influence the molecular structures that affect the properties of SC, including water sorption and binding enthalpy. In the research reported here, isothermal microcalorimetry was used to study the interaction of water vapor with isolated human SC in intact, delipidized, and water-washed delipidized forms to identify the influences of the principal components of SC on water sorption. The calorimetric data are interpreted in conjunction with spectroscopic results to identify the conformational changes in keratins induced by lipid and NMF removal and to assess the influence of these changes on water binding in SC. Isothermal calorimetry was used to measure the integral heat of water vapor sorption on intact, delipidized, and water-washed delipidized human SC at 32 degrees C as a function of relative humidity using back and thigh skin from three donors. Calorimetric measurements were combined with water vapor sorption measurements to determine the differential thermodynamic properties of these systems. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate effects of extraction on protein secondary structure. The magnitudes of the differential enthalpy, entropy, and free energy were greatest for intact SC and least for water-washed delipidized SC. Water sorption followed a similar trend. Delipidization led to a significantly reduced binding enthalpy at low water content; water washing the delipidized SC had only a small additional effect on binding enthalpy. Delipidization converts a fraction of keratin alpha-helixes to turns and random

  16. Computer-Aided Modeling of Lipid Processing Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz Tovar, Carlos Axel

    2011-01-01

    Vegetable oils and fats have an important role in human nutrition and in the chemical industry since they are a source of energy, fat-soluble vitamins, and now also in the production of renewable sources of energy. Nowadays as the consumer preferences for natural products and healthier foods...... this is not the case for the edible oil and biodiesel industries. The oleochemical industry lags behind the chemical industry in terms of thermophysical property modeling and development of computational tools suitable for the design/analysis, and optimization of lipid-related processes. The aim of this work has been...... to develop systematic computer-aided methods (property models) and tools (database) related to the prediction of the necessary physical properties suitable for design and analysis of processes employing lipid technologies. The methods and tools include: the development of a lipid-database (CAPEC_Lipids...

  17. Selective Interaction of a Cationic Polyfluorene with Model Lipid Membranes: Anionic versus Zwitterionic Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Kahveci

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the interaction mechanism between the conjugated polyelectrolyte {[9,9-bis(6'-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumhexyl]fluorene-phenylene}bromide (HTMA-PFP and model lipid membranes. The study was carried out using different biophysical techniques, mainly fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. Results show that despite the preferential interaction of HTMA-PFP with anionic lipids, HTMA-PFP shows affinity for zwitterionic lipids; although the interaction mechanism is different as well as HTMA-PFP’s final membrane location. Whilst the polyelectrolyte is embedded within the lipid bilayer in the anionic membrane, it remains close to the surface, forming aggregates that are sensitive to the physical state of the lipid bilayer in the zwitterionic system. The different interaction mechanism is reflected in the polyelectrolyte fluorescence spectrum, since the maximum shifts to longer wavelengths in the zwitterionic system. The intrinsic fluorescence of HTMA-PFP was used to visualize the interaction between polymer and vesicles via fluorescence microscopy, thanks to its high quantum yield and photostability. This technique allows the selectivity of the polyelectrolyte and higher affinity for anionic membranes to be observed. The results confirmed the appropriateness of using HTMA-PFP as a membrane fluorescent marker and suggest that, given its different behaviour towards anionic and zwitterionic membranes, HTMA-PFP could be used for selective recognition and imaging of bacteria over mammalian cells.

  18. Gaussian graphical modeling reveals specific lipid correlations in glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nikola S.; Krumsiek, Jan; Theis, Fabian J.; Böhm, Christian; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2011-06-01

    Advances in high-throughput measurements of biological specimens necessitate the development of biologically driven computational techniques. To understand the molecular level of many human diseases, such as cancer, lipid quantifications have been shown to offer an excellent opportunity to reveal disease-specific regulations. The data analysis of the cell lipidome, however, remains a challenging task and cannot be accomplished solely based on intuitive reasoning. We have developed a method to identify a lipid correlation network which is entirely disease-specific. A powerful method to correlate experimentally measured lipid levels across the various samples is a Gaussian Graphical Model (GGM), which is based on partial correlation coefficients. In contrast to regular Pearson correlations, partial correlations aim to identify only direct correlations while eliminating indirect associations. Conventional GGM calculations on the entire dataset can, however, not provide information on whether a correlation is truly disease-specific with respect to the disease samples and not a correlation of control samples. Thus, we implemented a novel differential GGM approach unraveling only the disease-specific correlations, and applied it to the lipidome of immortal Glioblastoma tumor cells. A large set of lipid species were measured by mass spectrometry in order to evaluate lipid remodeling as a result to a combination of perturbation of cells inducing programmed cell death, while the other perturbations served solely as biological controls. With the differential GGM, we were able to reveal Glioblastoma-specific lipid correlations to advance biomedical research on novel gene therapies.

  19. Hand eczema and stratum corneum ceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J. M.; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hand eczema (HE) is a multifactorial disease, comprising different aetiological conditions and different morphologies. There are two aetiologically distinct groups of HE recognised: exogenous, such as contact dermatitis (allergic and/or irritant HE) and endogenous, such as the classic......: Using cyanoacrylate, SC samples were taken from 23 patients with allergic/irritant HE and 15 with hyperkeratotic HE for lipid analysis by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). Samples were also taken from adjacent, unaffected skin. Severity of HE was assessed by the Hand Eczema Severity...... found a significantly higher HECSI score for hyperkeratotic HE compared with irritant or allergic HE (P=0.02). Conclusions: There appears to be no difference in skin barrier between allergic/irritant HE (exogenous eczema) and hyperkeratotic HE (endogenous eczema) with regard to SC lipids...

  20. Interaction of hydrophobic polymers with model lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, D; Panizon, E; Monticelli, L; Rossi, G

    2017-07-25

    The interaction of nanoscale synthetic materials with cell membranes is one of the key steps determining nanomaterials' toxicity. Here we use molecular simulations, with atomistic and coarse-grained resolution, to investigate the interaction of three hydrophobic polymers with model lipid membranes. Polymer nanoparticles made of polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene with size up to 7 nm enter easily POPC lipid membranes, localizing to the membrane hydrophobic core. For all three materials, solid polymeric nanoparticles become essentially liquid within the membrane at room temperature. Still, their behavior in the membrane core is not the same: PP and PS disperse in the core of the bilayer, while PE shows a tendency to aggregate. We also examined the interaction of the polymers with heterogeneous membranes, consisting of a ternary lipid mixture exhibiting liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered phase separation. The behavior of the three polymers is markedly different: PP disfavors lipid phase separation, PS stabilizes it, and PE modifies the topology of the phase boundaries and causes cholesterol depletion from the liquid ordered phase. Our results show that different hydrophobic polymers have major effects on the properties of lipid membranes, calling for further investigations on model systems and cell membranes.

  1. Tape Stripping Technique for Stratum Corneum Protein Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Slotved, H.-C.; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the amount of protein in stratum corneum in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients and healthy controls, using tape stripping technique. Furthermore, to compare two different methods for protein assessment. Tape stripping was performed in AD patients and healthy ...

  2. Lipid domains in model membranes: a brief historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Ole G; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    All biological membranes consist of a complex composite of macromolecules and macromolecular assemblies, of which the fluid lipid-bilayer component is a core element with regard to cell encapsulation and barrier properties. The fluid lipid bilayer also supports the functional machinery of receptors, channels and pumps that are associated with the membrane. This bilayer is stabilized by weak physical and colloidal forces, and its nature is that of a self-assembled system of amphiphiles in water. Being only approximately 5 nm in thickness and still encapsulating a cell that is three orders of magnitude larger in diameter, the lipid bilayer as a material has very unusual physical properties, both in terms of structure and dynamics. Although the lipid bilayer is a fluid, it has a distinct and structured trans-bilayer profile, and in the plane of the bilayer the various molecular components, viz different lipid species and membrane proteins, have the capacity to organize laterally in terms of differentiated domains on different length and time scales. These elements of small-scale structure and order are crucial for the functioning of the membrane. It has turned out to be difficult to quantitatively study the small-scale structure of biological membranes. A major part of the insight into membrane micro- and nano-domains and the concepts used to describe them have hence come from studies of simple lipid bilayers as models of membranes, by use of a wide range of theoretical, experimental and simulational approaches. Many questions remain to be answered as to which extent the result from model studies can carry over to real biological membranes.

  3. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschi, Federico, E-mail: federico.boschi@univr.it [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro [Department of Medicine, Geriatric Section, University of Verona, Piazzale Stefani 1, 37126 Verona (Italy); Sbarbati, Andrea [Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    catabolism (fission and the decrease through neutral lipid exit from pre-existing droplets) to reproduce their size reduction observed in lipolytic conditions. The results suggest that each single process, considered alone, can not be considered the only responsible for the size variation observed, but more than one of them, playing together, can quite well reproduce the experimental data. - Highlights: The growth and fission of the lipid droplets (LDs) were computationally simulated. To write and test the growth and fission models more than 110,000 LDs were measured. The usual processes considered alone, are not able to justify the experimental data. Some processes, playing together, can explain the growth and fission.

  4. Effect of shaving on axillary stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, V P J; Lee, R S; Moore, A E; Paterson, S E; Watkinson, A; Rawlings, A V

    2003-08-01

    Removal of underarm hair is an intrinsic part of the care regimen for the majority of female consumers, with most using a wet shave with a disposable razor. However, little is known of the impact of shaving on axillary skin, and it is a particularly neglected area of research. To investigate this, we have studied the acute and chronic effects of shaving ultrastructurally, biochemically and functionally. A forearm patch test protocol was devised for antiperspirant (AP) product screening, which involved a pre-shave of the test site with a dry razor just prior to patching. Comparison of the irritation caused by a series of AP products confirmed that shaving leads to increased irritation consistent with enhanced sensitivity. The effect of regular shaving in the axilla was assessed in a 4-week in-use study with shaving either once a week or once a day, both combined with the application of an AP. Expert visual assessment of skin condition showed that more frequent shaving promoted a higher level of visible irritation. However, indirect measurement using corneosurfametry indicated no significant changes to the lipid barrier over the study period irrespective of shaving frequency. Nevertheless, digital images of the axillary skin after dry shaving show distinct opaque lines because of uplifting skin flakes with a corresponding increase in scaliness parameter. Moreover, histamine iontophoresis to assess skin sensitivity demonstrated a significant enhancement of histamine-induced itch and neurogenic flare.

  5. Effects of surfactin on membrane models displaying lipid phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleu, Magali; Lorent, Joseph; Lins, Laurence; Brasseur, Robert; Braun, Nathalie; El Kirat, Karim; Nylander, Tommy; Dufrêne, Yves F; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2013-02-01

    Surfactin, a bacterial amphiphilic lipopeptide is attracting more and more attention in view of its bioactive properties which are in relation with its ability to interact with lipids of biological membranes. In this work, we investigated the effect of surfactin on membrane structure using model of membranes, vesicles as well as supported bilayers, presenting coexistence of fluid-disordered (DOPC) and gel (DPPC) phases. A range of complementary methods was used including AFM, ellipsometry, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence measurements of Laurdan, DPH, calcein release, and octadecylrhodamine B dequenching. Our findings demonstrated that surfactin concentration is critical for its effect on the membrane. The results suggest that the presence of rigid domains can play an essential role in the first step of surfactin insertion and that surfactin interacts both with the membrane polar heads and the acyl chain region. A mechanism for the surfactin lipid membrane interaction, consisting of three sequential structural and morphological changes, is proposed. At concentrations below the CMC, surfactin inserted at the boundary between gel and fluid lipid domains, inhibited phase separation and stiffened the bilayer without global morphological change of liposomes. At concentrations close to CMC, surfactin solubilized the fluid phospholipid phase and increased order in the remainder of the lipid bilayer. At higher surfactin concentrations, both the fluid and the rigid bilayer structures were dissolved into mixed micelles and other structures presenting a wide size distribution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sensitive skin and stratum corneum reactivity to household cleaning products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, V; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    1996-02-01

    Products intended for individuals with sensitive skin are being increasingly developed by formulators of household cleaning products. However, there is currently no consensus about the definition and recognition of the biological basis of sensitive skin. We sought to determine the relation between the nature of environmental threat perceived as aggressive by panelists, and the stratum corneum reactivity to household cleaning products as measured by the corneosurfametry test. Results indicate substantial differences in irritancy potential between proprietary products. Corneosurfametry data show significant differences in stratum corneum reactivity between, on the one hand, individuals with either non-sensitive skin or skin sensitive to climate/fabrics, and, on the other hand, individuals with detergent-sensitive skin. It is concluded that sensitive skin is not one single condition. Sound information in rating detergent-sensitive skin may be gained by corneosurfametry.

  7. Lipid peroxidation modifies the picture of membranes from the "Fluid Mosaic Model" to the "Lipid Whisker Model".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalá, Angel

    2012-01-01

    The "Fluid Mosaic Model", described by Singer and Nicolson, explain both how a cell membrane preserves a critical barrier function while it concomitantly facilitates rapid lateral diffusion of proteins and lipids within the planar membrane surface. However, the lipid components of biological plasma membranes are not regularly distributed. They are thought to contain "rafts" - nano-domains enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol that are distinct from surrounding membranes of unsaturated phospholipids. Cholesterol and fatty acids adjust the transport and diffusion of molecular oxygen in membranes. The presence of cholesterol and saturated phospholipids decreases oxygen permeability across the membrane. Alpha-tocopherol, the main antioxidant in biological membranes, partition into domains that are enriched in polyunsaturated phospholipids increasing the concentration of the vitamin in the place where it is most required. On the basis of these observations, it is possible to assume that non-raft domains enriched in phospholipids containing PUFAs and vitamin E will be more accessible by molecular oxygen than lipid raft domains enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol. This situation will render some nano-domains more sensitive to lipid peroxidation than others. Phospholipid oxidation products are very likely to alter the properties of biological membranes, because their polarity and shape may differ considerably from the structures of their parent molecules. Addition of a polar oxygen atom to several peroxidized fatty acids reorients the acyl chain whereby it no longer remains buried within the membrane interior, but rather projects into the aqueous environment "Lipid Whisker Model". This exceptional conformational change facilitates direct physical access of the oxidized fatty acid moiety to cell surface scavenger receptors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Tethered bimolecular lipid membranes - A novel model membrane platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, Wolfgang; Koeper, Ingo; Naumann, Renate; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2008-10-01

    stabilization of lipid bilayers, i.e., the protein-tethered membrane. Our efforts in experimentally characterizing the resulting membrane functions and correlating the data with the structural details of the bilayer architectures are complemented by theoretical studies modeling the electrical and electrochemical response of functional tethered lipid bilayer membranes by extended SPICE simulations. (author)

  9. Investigation of heat induced reactions between lipid oxidation products and amino acids in lipid rich model systems and hazelnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademir, Yeşim; Göncüoğlu, Neslihan; Gökmen, Vural

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of lipid oxidation to non-enzymatic browning reactions in lipid rich model and actual food systems. Hazelnut oil and model reaction mixtures consisting of different amino acids were heated under certain conditions to determine possible lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reaction products. In model systems, the Schiff base of 2,4-decadienal, its decarboxylated form, and reaction products formed after hydrolytic cleavage of the Schiff base or decarboxylated form were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. No furosine was detected in hazelnuts after roasting at 160 °C while the concentration of free amino acids significantly decreased. 2,4-Decadienal reacted effectively with all amino acids studied through a Maillard type carbonyl-amine condensation pathway. (2E,4E)-Deca-2,4-dien-1-amine was identified as a typical reaction product in model systems and roasted hazelnuts. In lipid-rich foods like hazelnuts, lipid-derived carbonyls might be responsible for potential modifications of free and protein bound amino acids during heating.

  10. Cutaneous water loss and sphingolipids covalently bound to corneocytes in the stratum corneum of house sparrows Passer domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yu; Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Brown, Johnie C; Ro, Jennifer; Williams, Joseph B

    2008-05-01

    The barrier to water loss from the skin of birds and mammals is localized in the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis. The SC consists of corneocytes, each surrounded by a protein envelope, and a lipid compartment, formed by an extracellular matrix of lipids and by lipids covalently bound to the protein envelope. In mammals, covalently bound lipids in the SC consist of omega-hydroxyceramides attached to the outer surface of corneocytes. Evidence suggests that covalently bound lipids in the SC might be crucial for the establishment of a competent permeability barrier. In this study we assessed the composition of covalently bound lipids of the avian SC and their relationship to cutaneous water loss (CWL) in two populations of house sparrows, one living in the deserts of Saudi Arabia and the other in mesic Ohio. Previously, we showed that CWL of adult desert sparrows was 25% lower than that of mesic birds. In the present study we characterize covalently bound lipids of the SC using thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure Photospray ionization mass spectrometry. Our study is the first to demonstrate the existence of sphingolipids covalently bound to corneocytes in the SC of birds. Although omega-hydroxyceramides occurred in the lipid envelope surrounding corneocytes, the major constituent of the covalently bound lipid envelope in house sparrows was omega-hydroxycerebrosides, ceramides with a hexose molecule attached. Sparrows from Saudi Arabia had more covalently bound cerebrosides, fewer covalently bound ceramides and a lower ceramide to cerebroside ratio than sparrows living in Ohio; these differences were associated with CWL.

  11. Effect of ingested lipids on drug dissolution and release with concurrent digestion: a modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukozturk, Fulden; Di Maio, Selena; Budil, David E.; Carrier, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To mechanistically study and model the effect of lipids, either from food or self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS), on drug transport in the intestinal lumen. Methods Simultaneous lipid digestion, dissolution/release, and drug partitioning were experimentally studied and modeled for two dosing scenarios: solid drug with a food-associated lipid (soybean oil) and drug solubilized in a model SEDDS (soybean oil and Tween 80 at 1:1 ratio). Rate constants for digestion, permeability of emulsion droplets, and partition coefficients in micellar and oil phases were measured, and used to numerically solve the developed model. Results Strong influence of lipid digestion on drug release from SEDDS and solid drug dissolution into food-associated lipid emulsion were observed and predicted by the developed model. 90 minutes after introduction of SEDDS, there was 9% and 70% drug release in the absence and presence of digestion, respectively. However, overall drug dissolution in the presence of food-associated lipids occurred over a longer period than without digestion. Conclusion A systems-based mechanistic model incorporating simultaneous dynamic processes occurring upon dosing of drug with lipids enabled prediction of aqueous drug concentration profile. This model, once incorporated with a pharmacokinetic model considering processes of drug absorption and drug lymphatic transport in the presence of lipids, could be highly useful for quantitative prediction of impact of lipids on bioavailability of drugs. PMID:24234918

  12. Mathematical modeling of drug release from lipid dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, J; Siepmann, F

    2011-10-10

    Lipid dosage forms provide an interesting potential for controlled drug delivery. In contrast to frequently used poly(ester) based devices for parenteral administration, they do not lead to acidification upon degradation and potential drug inactivation, especially in the case of protein drugs and other acid-labile active agents. The aim of this article is to give an overview on the current state of the art of mathematical modeling of drug release from this type of advanced drug delivery systems. Empirical and semi-empirical models are described as well as mechanistic theories, considering diffusional mass transport, potentially limited drug solubility and the leaching of other, water-soluble excipients into the surrounding bulk fluid. Various practical examples are given, including lipid microparticles, beads and implants, which can successfully be used to control the release of an incorporated drug during periods ranging from a few hours up to several years. The great benefit of mechanistic mathematical theories is the possibility to quantitatively predict the effects of different formulation parameters and device dimensions on the resulting drug release kinetics. Thus, in silico simulations can significantly speed up product optimization. This is particularly useful if long release periods (e.g., several months) are targeted, since experimental trial-and-error studies are highly time-consuming in these cases. In the future it would be highly desirable to combine mechanistic theories with the quantitative description of the drug fate in vivo, ideally including the pharmacodynamic efficacy of the treatments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Interaction pathways between soft lipid nanodiscs and plasma membranes: A molecular modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shixin; Luo, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Ren, Hao; Deng, Li; Zhang, Xianren; Huang, Fang; Yue, Tongtao

    2017-10-01

    Lipid nanodisc, a model membrane platform originally synthesized for study of membrane proteins, has recently been used as the carrier to deliver amphiphilic drugs into target tumor cells. However, the central question of how cells interact with such emerging nanomaterials remains unclear and deserves our research for both improving the delivery efficiency and reducing the side effect. In this work, a binary lipid nanodisc is designed as the minimum model to investigate its interactions with plasma membranes by using the dissipative particle dynamics method. Three typical interaction pathways, including the membrane attachment with lipid domain exchange of nanodiscs, the partial membrane wrapping with nanodisc vesiculation, and the receptor-mediated endocytosis, are discovered. For the first pathway, the boundary normal lipids acting as ligands diffuse along the nanodisc rim to gather at the membrane interface, repelling the central bola lipids to reach a stable membrane attachment. If bola lipids are positioned at the periphery and act as ligands, they diffuse to form a large aggregate being wrapped by the membrane, leaving the normal lipids exposed on the membrane exterior by assembling into a vesicle. Finally, by setting both central normal lipids and boundary bola lipids as ligands, the receptor-mediated endocytosis occurs via both deformation and self-rotation of the nanodiscs. All above pathways for soft lipid nanodiscs are quite different from those for rigid nanoparticles, which may provide useful guidelines for design of soft lipid nanodiscs in widespread biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Two randomized, controlled, comparative studies of the stratum corneum integrity benefits of two cosmetic niacinamide/glycerin body moisturizers vs. conventional body moisturizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, Jeremy C; Fix, Deborah K; Lucus, Sawanna C; Watson, Debrah; Desmier, Emma; Wilkerson, Rolanda J Johnson; Fixler, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous body moisturizers being available, cosmetic xerosis continues to be a leading skin problem for consumers. We performed two 35-day studies to evaluate the ability of a variety of body moisturizers containing various levels of oils/lipids, humectants, as well as other ingredients (e.g., niacinamide) to improve stratum corneum integrity. 63 and 58 female subjects were enrolled and randomized in an incomplete block design to six of nine products (eight moisturizers or no treatment control) in studies 1 and 2, respectively. The primary endpoints included visual dryness by a qualified skin grader, skin hydration as measured by Corneometer, and barrier integrity as measured by transepidermal water loss (TEWL). The primary comparisons for the two niacinamide/glycerin moisturizers were to the other six moisturizers and to the no treatment control for each endpoint. The two niacinamide/glycerin moisturizers demonstrated an overall better solution towards rapid and prolonged improvement of cosmetic xerosis due to functional improvement of stratum corneum barrier function compared to no treatment and the other moisturizers tested. These studies establish the benefit of including niacinamide in a body moisturizer to improve the integrity of the stratum corneum and thus reduce cosmetic xerosis over time.

  15. Production of fungal lipids : kinetic modeling and process design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwse, P.

    2011-01-01

    Finding alternatives for fossil fuels is currently urgent. One of the new processes in this field is the production of biodiesel from lipids accumulated by microorganisms. Some yeasts and fungi accumulate lipids when a component needed for growth, usually the N-source, is limiting while the C-source

  16. LipidWrapper: an algorithm for generating large-scale membrane models of arbitrary geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, Jacob D; Amaro, Rommie E

    2014-07-01

    As ever larger and more complex biological systems are modeled in silico, approximating physiological lipid bilayers with simple planar models becomes increasingly unrealistic. In order to build accurate large-scale models of subcellular environments, models of lipid membranes with carefully considered, biologically relevant curvature will be essential. In the current work, we present a multi-scale utility called LipidWrapper capable of creating curved membrane models with geometries derived from various sources, both experimental and theoretical. To demonstrate its utility, we use LipidWrapper to examine an important mechanism of influenza virulence. A copy of the program can be downloaded free of charge under the terms of the open-source FreeBSD License from http://nbcr.ucsd.edu/lipidwrapper. LipidWrapper has been tested on all major computer operating systems.

  17. [Model systems based on the lipid-porphyrin assemblies and lipoproteins in biochemical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuz, S S; Sebiakin, Iu L

    1996-01-01

    Reviewed are the modern state and prospects of using lipid-porphyrin assemblies and lipoporphyrins to study fine functional mechanisms of complex biological systems and to solve applied problems in biochemistry and medicine. Data on the interaction of porphyrin derivatives with natural and artificial membranes are summarized. Models for electron transfer and oxygen transport via lipid-porphyrin assemblies are discussed.

  18. 2D lattice model of a lipid bilayer: Microscopic derivation and thermodynamic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Davit; Heuer, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Based on all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of a lipid bilayer we present a systematic mapping on a 2D lattice model. Keeping the lipid type and the chain order parameter as key variables we derive a free energy functional, containing the enthalpic interaction of adjacent lipids as well as the tail entropy. The functional form of both functions is explicitly determined for saturated and polyunsaturated lipids. By studying the lattice model via Monte Carlo simulations it is possible to reproduce the temperature dependence of the distribution of order parameters of the pure lipids, including the prediction of the gel transition. Furthermore, application to a mixture of saturated and polyunsaturated lipids yields the correct phase separation behavior at lower temperatures with a simulation time reduced by approximately 7 orders of magnitude as compared to the corresponding MD simulations. Even the time-dependence of the de-mixing is reproduced on a semi-quantitative level. Due to the generality of the approach we envisage a large number of further applications, ranging from modeling larger sets of lipids, sterols, and solvent proteins to predicting nucleation barriers for the melting of lipids. Particularly, from the properties of the 2D lattice model one can directly read off the enthalpy and entropy change of the 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine gel-to-liquid transition in excellent agreement with experimental and MD results.

  19. The spectral stability of several sunscreening agents on stratum corneum sheets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammeyer, A.; Westerhof, W.; Bolhuis, P. A.; Ris, A. J.; Hische, E. A.

    1987-01-01

    Synopsis Film layers of seventeen commercially available sunscreen products and sixteen active ingredients on stratum corneum sheets were spectrophotometrically monitored before and after simulated solar irradiation. Fixed irradiation doses were given within the daily terrestrial limits. From the

  20. Stratum corneum hydration : mode of action of moisturizers on a molecular level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caussin, Julia

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the mode of action of stratum corneum moisturizers is studied using a variety of techniques: cryo-scanning electron microscopy, freeze fracture transmission electron microscopy, small angle X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  1. Lipid Vesicles for the Skin Delivery of Diclofenac: Cerosomes vs. Other Lipid Suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Anahita Fathi-Azarbayjani; Kai Xin Ng; Yew Weng Chan; Sui Yung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Lipid suspensions as drug carriers, including conventional liposomes, ethosomes, transferosomes, proniosomes, niosomes, PEG-PPG-PEG niosomes and stratum corneum liposomes (cerosomes), were formulated and compared. Methods: Lipid vesicles were formulated and assessed with regards to enhancement of skin permeation of diclofenac and stability profiles of the formulations. Formulation-induced changes of the biophysical structure of excised human skin were monitored using the Fourier t...

  2. Simulations of simple linoleic acid-containing lipid membranes and models for the soybean plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaohong; Ou, Anna; Klauda, Jeffery B.

    2017-06-01

    The all-atom CHARMM36 lipid force field (C36FF) has been tested with saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated lipids; however, it has not been validated against the 18:2 linoleoyl lipids with an unsaturated sn-1 chain. The linoleoyl lipids are common in plants and the main component of the soybean membrane. The lipid composition of soybean plasma membranes has been thoroughly characterized with experimental studies. However, there is comparatively less work done with computational modeling. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results show that the pure linoleoyl lipids, 1-stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0/18:2) and 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (di-18:2), agree very well with the experiments, which demonstrates the accuracy of the C36FF for the computational study of soybean membranes. Based on the experimental composition, the soybean hypocotyl and root plasma membrane models are developed with each containing seven or eight types of linoleoyl phospholipids and two types of sterols (sitosterol and stigmasterol). MD simulations are performed to characterize soybean membranes, and the hydrogen bonds and clustering results demonstrate that the lipids prefer to interact with the lipids of the same/similar tail unsaturation. All the results suggest that these two soybean membrane models can be used as a basis for further research in soybean and higher plant membranes involving membrane-associated proteins.

  3. Effect of Amphotericin B antibiotic on the properties of model lipid membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiryakova, S.; Dencheva-Zarkova, M.; Genova, J.

    2014-12-01

    Model membranes formed from natural and synthetic lipids are an interesting object for scientific investigations due to their similarity to biological cell membrane and their simple structure with controlled composition and properties. Amphotericin B is an important polyene antifungal antibiotic, used for treatment of systemic fungal infections. It is known from the literature that the studied antibiotic has a substantial effect on the transmembrane ionic channel structures. When applied to the lipid membranes it has the tendency to create pores and in this way to affect the structure and the properties of the membrane lipid bilayer. In this work the thermally induced shape fluctuations of giant quasi-spherical liposomes have been used to study the influence of polyene antibiotic amphotericin B on the elastic properties of model lipid membranes. It have been shown experimentally that the presence of 3 mol % of AmB in the lipid membrane reduces the bending elasticity of the lipid membrane for both studied cases: pure SOPC membrane and mixed SOPC-Cholesterol membrane. Interaction of the amphotericin B with bilayer lipid membranes containing channels have been studied in this work. Model membranes were self-assembled using the patch-clamp and tip-dip patch clamp technique. We have found that amphotericin B is an ionophore and reduces the resistance of the lipid bilayer.

  4. Comprehensive quantification of ceramide species in human stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masukawa, Yoshinori; Narita, Hirofumi; Sato, Hirayuki; Naoe, Ayano; Kondo, Naoki; Sugai, Yoshiya; Oba, Tsuyoshi; Homma, Rika; Ishikawa, Junko; Takagi, Yutaka; Kitahara, Takashi

    2009-08-01

    One of the key challenges in lipidomics is to quantify lipidomes of interest, as it is practically impossible to collect all authentic materials covering the targeted lipidomes. For diverse ceramides (CER) in human stratum corneum (SC) that play important physicochemical roles in the skin, we developed a novel method for quantification of the overall CER species by improving our previously reported profiling technique using normal-phase liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (NPLC-ESI-MS). The use of simultaneous selected ion monitoring measurement of as many as 182 kinds of molecular-related ions enables the highly sensitive detection of the overall CER species, as they can be analyzed in only one SC-stripped tape as small as 5 mm x 10 mm. To comprehensively quantify CERs, including those not available as authentic species, we designed a procedure to estimate their levels using relative responses of representative authentic species covering the species targeted, considering the systematic error based on intra-/inter-day analyses. The CER levels obtained by this method were comparable to those determined by conventional thin-layer chromatography (TLC), which guarantees the validity of this method. This method opens lipidomics approaches for CERs in the SC.

  5. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Federico; Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2015-08-15

    Lipid droplets (LD) are spherical cellular inclusion devoted to lipids storage. It is well known that excessive accumulation of lipids leads to several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis. LDs' size range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes and is related to the lipid content, but their growth is still a puzzling question. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to the fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained by the merging of two smaller LDs, but these events seems to be rare and difficult to be observed. Many other processes are thought to be involved in the number and growth of LDs, like the de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets. Moreover the number and size of LDs are influenced by the catabolism and the absorption or interaction with other organelles. The comprehension of these processes could help in the confinement of the pathologies related to lipid accumulation. In this study the LDs' size distribution, number and the total volume of immature (n=12), mature (n=12, 10-days differentiated) and lipolytic (n=12) 3T3-L1 adipocytes were considered. More than 11,000 LDs were measured in the 36 cells after Oil Red O staining. In a previous work Monte Carlo simulations were used to mimic the fusion process alone between LDs. We found that, considering the fusion as the only process acting on the LDs, the size distribution in mature adipocytes can be obtained with numerical simulation starting from the size distribution in immature cells provided a very high rate of fusion events. In this paper Monte Carlo simulations were developed to mimic the interaction between LDs taking into account many other processes in addition to fusion (de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets) in order to reproduce the LDs growth and we also simulated the catabolism

  6. A mouse model of harlequin ichthyosis delineates a key role for Abca12 in lipid homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Smyth

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Harlequin Ichthyosis (HI is a severe and often lethal hyperkeratotic skin disease caused by mutations in the ABCA12 transport protein. In keratinocytes, ABCA12 is thought to regulate the transfer of lipids into small intracellular trafficking vesicles known as lamellar bodies. However, the nature and scope of this regulation remains unclear. As part of an original recessive mouse ENU mutagenesis screen, we have identified and characterised an animal model of HI and showed that it displays many of the hallmarks of the disease including hyperkeratosis, loss of barrier function, and defects in lipid homeostasis. We have used this model to follow disease progression in utero and present evidence that loss of Abca12 function leads to premature differentiation of basal keratinocytes. A comprehensive analysis of lipid levels in mutant epidermis demonstrated profound defects in lipid homeostasis, illustrating for the first time the extent to which Abca12 plays a pivotal role in maintaining lipid balance in the skin. To further investigate the scope of Abca12's activity, we have utilised cells from the mutant mouse to ascribe direct transport functions to the protein and, in doing so, we demonstrate activities independent of its role in lamellar body function. These cells have severely impaired lipid efflux leading to intracellular accumulation of neutral lipids. Furthermore, we identify Abca12 as a mediator of Abca1-regulated cellular cholesterol efflux, a finding that may have significant implications for other diseases of lipid metabolism and homeostasis, including atherosclerosis.

  7. Data, analysis and modeling of physical properties for process designof systems involving lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunico, Larissa; Ceriani, Roberta; Sarup, Bent

    2013-01-01

    have systematicallycollected data for vapor–liquid equilibrium (VLE), solid–liquid equilibrium (SLE) and related pure com-ponent properties involving lipid systems as a first step toward developing relevant property models.The established consistency tests to evaluate the VLE data of lipid systems...... as well as lipid properties arebriefly reviewed. For SLE systems, where consistency tests based on the Gibbs–Duhem equation cannotbe implemented, a consistency test has been developed. It involves limiting conditions and regressionof the parameters for a new thermodynamic model that combines solute...... activity coefficients in the liq-uid phase at infinite dilution and a theoretically based term to account for the non-ideality in dilutesolutions. This model gives noticeably better descriptions of experimental data in lipid systems than dotraditional models. Examination of various objective functions...

  8. Lipid metabolism, adipocyte depot physiology and utilization of meat animals as experimental models for metabolic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Michael V; Hausman, Gary J; Guan, Leluo; Du, Min; Rasmussen, Theodore P; Poulos, Sylvia P; Mir, Priya; Bergen, Werner G; Fernyhough, Melinda E; McFarland, Douglas C; Rhoads, Robert P; Soret, Beatrice; Reecy, James M; Velleman, Sandra G; Jiang, Zhihua

    2010-11-22

    Meat animals are unique as experimental models for both lipid metabolism and adipocyte studies because of their direct economic value for animal production. This paper discusses the principles that regulate adipogenesis in major meat animals (beef cattle, dairy cattle, and pigs), the definition of adipose depot-specific regulation of lipid metabolism or adipogenesis, and introduces the potential value of these animals as models for metabolic research including mammary biology and the ontogeny of fatty livers.

  9. Lipid metabolism, adipocyte depot physiology and utilization of meat animals as experimental models for metabolic research

    OpenAIRE

    Michael V. Dodson, Gary J. Hausman, LeLuo Guan, Min Du, Theodore P. Rasmussen, Sylvia P. Poulos, Priya Mir, Werner G. Bergen, Melinda E. Fernyhough, Douglas C. McFarland, Robert P. Rhoads, Beatrice Soret, James M. Reecy, Sandra G. Velleman, Zhihua Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Meat animals are unique as experimental models for both lipid metabolism and adipocyte studies because of their direct economic value for animal production. This paper discusses the principles that regulate adipogenesis in major meat animals (beef cattle, dairy cattle, and pigs), the definition of adipose depot-specific regulation of lipid metabolism or adipogenesis, and introduces the potential value of these animals as models for metabolic research including mammary biology and the ontogeny...

  10. Hypoxia and oxidation levels of DNA and lipids in humans and animal experimental models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Risom, Lotte; Lundby, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this review was to evaluate the association between hypoxia and oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. Evaluation criteria encompassed specificity and validation status of the biomarkers, study design, strength of the association, dose-response relationship, biological plausibility,...... in subjects at high altitude. Most of the animal experimental models should be interpreted with caution because the assays for assessment of lipid peroxidation products have suboptimal validity.......The objective of this review was to evaluate the association between hypoxia and oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. Evaluation criteria encompassed specificity and validation status of the biomarkers, study design, strength of the association, dose-response relationship, biological plausibility......, analogous exposures, and effect modification by intervention. The collective interpretation indicates persuasive evidence from the studies in humans for an association between hypoxia and elevated levels of oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. The levels of oxidatively generated DNA lesions and lipid...

  11. Kinetic modelling of starch and lipid formation during mixotrophic, nutrient-limited microalgal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Torres, Gonzalo M; Pittman, Jon K; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2017-10-01

    Microalgal starch and lipids, carbon-based storage molecules, are useful as potential biofuel feedstocks. In this work, cultivation strategies maximising starch and lipid formation were established by developing a multi-parameter kinetic model describing microalgal growth as well as starch and lipid formation, in conjunction with laboratory-scale experiments. Growth dynamics are driven by nitrogen-limited mixotrophic conditions, known to increase cellular starch and lipid contents whilst enhancing biomass growth. Model parameters were computed by fitting model outputs to a range of experimental datasets from batch cultures of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Predictive capabilities of the model were established against different experimental data. The model was subsequently used to compute optimal nutrient-based cultivation strategies in terms of initial nitrogen and carbon concentrations. Model-based optimal strategies yielded a significant increase of 261% for starch (0.065gCL-1) and 66% for lipid (0.08gCL-1) production compared to base-case conditions (0.018gCL-1 starch, 0.048gCL-1 lipids). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A model of lipid-free apolipoprotein A-I revealed by iterative molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhang

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I, the major protein component of high-density lipoprotein, has been proven inversely correlated to cardiovascular risk in past decades. The lipid-free state of apo A-I is the initial stage which binds to lipids forming high-density lipoprotein. Molecular models of lipid-free apo A-I have been reported by methods like X-ray crystallography and chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CCL/MS. Through structural analysis we found that those current models had limited consistency with other experimental results, such as those from hydrogen exchange with mass spectrometry. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we also found those models could not reach a stable equilibrium state. Therefore, by integrating various experimental results, we proposed a new structural model for lipid-free apo A-I, which contains a bundled four-helix N-terminal domain (1-192 that forms a variable hydrophobic groove and a mobile short hairpin C-terminal domain (193-243. This model exhibits an equilibrium state through molecular dynamics simulation and is consistent with most of the experimental results known from CCL/MS on lysine pairs, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and hydrogen exchange. This solution-state lipid-free apo A-I model may elucidate the possible conformational transitions of apo A-I binding with lipids in high-density lipoprotein formation.

  13. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M.

    2014-02-01

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus kc and bar{k} and the preferred monolayer curvature J_0^m, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of kc and the area compression modulus kA are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for bar{k} and J_0^m can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both bar{k} and J_0^m change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically bar{k}PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J_0^m ≫ 0, especially at low ionic strengths. We anticipate that these changes lead to unstable membranes as these become vulnerable to pore formation or disintegration into lipid disks.

  14. Structural characterization and lipid composition of acquired cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Svane-Knudsen, Viggo; Sørensen, Jens A

    2012-01-01

    , evaluation of Nile red and LAURDAN generalized polarization function images of the cholesteatoma show intercellular regions similar to normal skin stratum corneum in terms of lipid membrane packing and local water content. CONCLUSION: The investigations show the presence of an extremely thickened stratum...... is a suitable noninvasive tool for investigating the morphology and intrinsic physical properties of acquired cholesteatoma....

  15. Diphytanoyl lipids as model systems for studying membrane-active peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Sezgin; Afonin, Sergii; Babii, Oleg; Tkachenko, Anton N; Komarov, Igor V; Ulrich, Anne S

    2017-10-01

    The branched chains in diphytanoyl lipids provide membranes with unique properties, such as high chemical/physical stability, low water permeability, and no gel-to-fluid phase transition at ambient temperature. Synthetic diphytanoyl phospholipids are often used as model membranes for electrophysiological experiments. To evaluate whether these sturdy lipids are also suitable for solid-state NMR, we have examined their interactions with a typical amphiphilic peptide in comparison with straight-chain lipids. First, their phase properties were monitored using 31 P NMR, and the structural behaviour of the antimicrobial peptide PGLa was studied by 19 F NMR and circular dichroism in oriented membrane samples. Only lipids with choline headgroups (DPhPC) were found to form stable lipid bilayers in oriented samples, while DPhPG, DPhPE and DPhPS display non-lamellar structures. Hence, the experimental temperature and hydration are crucial factors when using supported diphytanoyl lipids, as both parameters must be maintained in an appropriate range to avoid the formation of non-bilayer structures. For the same reason, a high content of other diphytanoyl lipids besides DPhPC in mixed lipid systems is not favourable. Unlike the situation in straight-chain membranes, we found that the α-helical PGLa was not able to insert into the tightly packed fluid bilayer of DPhPC but remained in a surface-bound state even at very high peptide concentration. This behaviour can be explained by the high cohesivity and the negative spontaneous curvature of the diphytanoyl lipids. These characteristic features must therefore be taken into consideration, both, in electrophysiological studies, and when interpreting the structural behaviour of membrane-active peptides in such lipid environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of detergents on the physico-chemical properties of skin stratum corneum: A two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Pashkovski, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Understanding the structural and dynamical features of skin is critical for advancing innovation in personal care and drug discovery. Synthetic detergent mixtures used in commercially available body wash products are thought to be less aggressive towards the skin barrier when compared...... to conventional detergents. The aim of this work is to comparatively characterize the effect of a mild synthetic cleanser mixture (SCM) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) on the hydration state of the intercellular lipid matrix and on proton activity of excised skin stratum corneum (SC). METHOD: Experiments were...... performed using two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescent images of fluorescence reporters sensitive to proton activity and hydration of SC were obtained in excised skin and examined in presence and absence of SCM and SDS detergents. RESULTS: Hydration of the intercellular lipid matrix...

  17. Lipid emulsion improves survival in animal models of local anesthetic toxicity: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettiplace, Michael R; McCabe, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    The Lipid Emulsion Therapy workgroup, organized by the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology, recently conducted a systematic review, which subjectively evaluated lipid emulsion as a treatment for local anesthetic toxicity. We re-extracted data and conducted a meta-analysis of survival in animal models. We extracted survival data from 26 publications and conducted a random-effect meta-analysis based on odds ratio weighted by inverse variance. We assessed the benefit of lipid emulsion as an independent variable in resuscitative models (16 studies). We measured Cochran's Q for heterogeneity and I2 to determine variance contributed by heterogeneity. Finally, we conducted a funnel plot analysis and Egger's test to assess for publication bias in studies. Lipid emulsion reduced the odds of death in resuscitative models (OR =0.24; 95%CI: 0.1-0.56, p = .0012). Heterogeneity analysis indicated a homogenous distribution. Funnel plot analysis did not indicate publication bias in experimental models. Meta-analysis of animal data supports the use of lipid emulsion (in combination with other resuscitative measures) for the treatment of local anesthetic toxicity, specifically from bupivacaine. Our conclusion differed from the original review. Analysis of outliers reinforced the need for good life support measures (securement of airway and chest compressions) along with prompt treatment with lipid.

  18. Optimization of lipid production with a genome-scale model of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavšček, Martin; Bhutada, Govindprasad; Madl, Tobias; Natter, Klaus

    2015-10-26

    Yarrowia lipolytica is a non-conventional yeast that is extensively investigated for its ability to excrete citrate or to accumulate large amounts of storage lipids, which is of great significance for single cell oil production. Both traits are thus of interest for basic research as well as for biotechnological applications but they typically occur simultaneously thus lowering the respective yields. Therefore, engineering of strains with high lipid content relies on novel concepts such as computational simulation to better understand the two competing processes and to eliminate citrate excretion. Using a genome-scale model (GSM) of baker's yeast as a scaffold, we reconstructed the metabolic network of Y. lipolytica and optimized it for use in flux balance analysis (FBA), with the aim to simulate growth and lipid production phases of this yeast. We validated our model and found the predictions of the growth behavior of Y. lipolytica in excellent agreement with experimental data. Based on these data, we successfully designed a fed-batch strategy to avoid citrate excretion during the lipid production phase. Further analysis of the network suggested that the oxygen demand of Y. lipolytica is reduced upon induction of lipid synthesis. According to this finding we hypothesized that a reduced aeration rate might induce lipid accumulation. This prediction was indeed confirmed experimentally. In a fermentation combining these two strategies lipid content of the biomass was increased by 80%, and lipid yield was improved more than four-fold, compared to standard conditions. Genome scale network reconstructions provide a powerful tool to predict the effects of genetic modifications and the metabolic response to environmental conditions. The high accuracy and the predictive value of a newly reconstructed GSM of Y. lipolytica to optimize growth conditions for lipid accumulation are demonstrated. Based on these findings, further strategies for engineering Y. lipolytica towards

  19. Effect of organic solvents on normal human stratum corneum: evaluation by the corneoxenometry bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, V; Letawe, C; Piérard, G E

    1997-01-01

    Organic solvents alter the stratum corneum structure and barrier function. To measure the effect of various solvents upon human stratum corneum using the ex vivo corneoxenometry bioassay which is a variant of corneosurfametry. Corneoxenometry entails collection of human stratum corneum by cyanoacrylate. The material is immersed in organic solvents for periods ranging from 1 to 120 min. After staining the samples with a toluidine blue-basic fuchsin solution, the color is measured using reflectance colorimetry. Solvent aggressivity to the stratum corneum correlates with the color darkening of the samples. The least aggressive solvent was hexane, followed by ethanol, methanol, hexane-ethanol, chloroform, chloroform-methanol and hexane-methanol. The influence of contact time between solvents and the stratum corneum showed a logarithmic pattern which varied according to the solvent. Data are in line with previous experiments conducted in vivo and in vitro, thus indicating the predictive value of corneoxenometry. Such a bioassay may avoid hazards of some in vivo human testings.

  20. Transdermal delivery of molecules is limited by full epidermis, not just stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Samantha N; Jeong, Eunhye; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2013-04-01

    Most methods to increase transdermal drug delivery focus on increasing stratum corneum permeability, without addressing the need to increase permeability of viable epidermis. Here, we assess the hypothesis that viable epidermis offers a significant permeability barrier that becomes rate limiting upon sufficient permeabilization of stratum corneum. We tested this hypothesis by using calibrated microdermabrasion to selectively remove stratum corneum or full epidermis in pig and human skin, and then measuring skin permeability to a small molecule (sulforhodamine) and macromolecules (bovine serum albumin, insulin, inactivated influenza vaccine) in vitro. We found that removal of stratum corneum dramatically increased skin permeability to all compounds tested. However, removal of full epidermis increased skin permeability by another 1-2 orders of magnitude. We also studied the effects of removing skin tissue only from localized spots on the skin surface by covering skin with a mask containing 125-μm holes during tissue removal. Skin permeabilized in this less-invasive way showed similar results. This suggests that microdermabrasion of skin using a mask may provide an effective way to increase skin permeability. We conclude that viable epidermis offers a significant permeability barrier that becomes rate limiting upon removal of stratum corneum.

  1. Model studies of lipid flip-flop in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parisio, Giulia; Ferrarini, Alberta; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    Biomembranes, which are made of a lipid bilayer matrix where proteins are embedded or attached, constitute a physical barrier for cell and its internal organelles. With regard to the distribution of their molecular components, biomembranes are both laterally heterogeneous and transversally......, and growth heavily depend. Such transverse motion—commonly called flip-flop—has been studied both experimentally and computationally. Experimental investigations face difficulties related to time-scales and probe-induced membrane perturbation issues. Molecular dynamics simulations play an important role...

  2. Competitive Adsorption between B-Casein or B-Lactoglobulin and Model Milk Membrane Lipids at Oil-Water Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, R.; Walstra, P.; Bastiaans, J.; Nieuwenhuijse, H.; Nylander, T.; Paulsson, M.; Bergenstahl, B.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the competitive adsorption between milk proteins and model milk membrane lipids at the oil-water interface and its dependence on the state of the lipid dispersion and the formation of emulsions. Both protein and membrane lipid surface load were determined using a serum

  3. Stratum corneum lipids, skin barrier function and filaggrin mutations in patients with atopic eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars; Jungersted, JM

    2010-01-01

    Background: Prior to the discovery of filaggrin (FLG) mutations, evidence for an impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis (AD) has been documented, and changes in ceramide profile, altered skin pH and increased trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) in patients with AD have been reported. Until now,...

  4. Lecithin-based microemulsions for targeted delivery of ceramide AP into the stratum corneum: formulation, characterizations, and in vitro release and penetration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahle, Fitsum F; Metz, Hendrik; Wohlrab, Johannes; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2013-02-01

    To improve the solubility and penetration of Ceramide AP (CER [AP]) into the stratum corneum that potentially restores the barrier function of aged and affected skin. CER [AP] microemulsions (MEs) were formulated using lecithin, Miglyol® 812 (miglyol) and water-1,2 pentandiol (PeG) mixture as amphiphilic, oily and hydrophilic components, respectively. The nanostructure of the MEs was revealed using electrical conductivity, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. Photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) was used to measure the sizes and shape of ME droplets. The release and penetration of the CER into the stratum corneum was investigated in vitro using a multi-layer membrane model. The MEs exhibited excellent thermodynamic stability (>2 years) and loading capacity (0.5% CER [AP]). The pseudo-ternary phase diagrams of the MEs were obtained and PCS results showed that the droplets are spherical in shape and bigger in size. In vitro investigations showed that the MEs exhibited excellent rate and extent of release and penetration. Stable lecithin-based CER [AP] MEs that significantly enhance the solubility and penetration of CER [AP] into the stratum corneum were developed. The MEs also have better properties than the previously reported polyglycerol fatty acid surfactant-based CER [AP] MEs.

  5. Regional differences in stratum corneum reactivity to surfactants. Quantitative assessment using the corneosurfametry bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, F; Goffin, V; Maibach, H I; Piérard, G E

    1997-12-01

    The skin does not react similarly to the presence of xenobiotics over all anatomic sites. Distinct regional differences have been described for irritancy and percutaneous absorption. The present study assesses the regional variation of stratum corneum reactivity to surfactants using the corneosurfametry bioassay. Stratum corneum was harvested from 6 body sites in 20 young adults. Corneosurfametry was performed using water, 1% SLS and a 5% soap solution. Data show that the best variable to assess regional variability in irritancy is the overall difference in corneosurfametry (ODC), comparing the effect of a given surfactant with water. The dorsal hand and volar forearm were the least reactive, the neck, forehead, back and dorsal foot the most reactive, sites. It is concluded that the corneosurfametry bioassay, through the ODC variable, is a practically noninvasive tool for the evaluation of regional variation in irritancy at the level of the stratum corneum.

  6. Influence of lipid composition of model membranes on methacrylate antimicrobial polymer-membrane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baul, Upayan; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2017-10-25

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, the role of lipid composition in the interactions of multiple methacrylate antimicrobial polymer agents with model membranes, and the consequent response of the membranes is studied. In our earlier study, methacrylate polymers were observed to induce phase demixing and associated thickness mismatch in a POPE-POPG model microbial membrane. In this work, we probe (1) the role of varying the degree of saturation in lipid acyl chains in the membrane interactions of methacrylate polymers, and (2) whether electrostatics (addition of anionic lipids) can influence the interactions of the polymers with model mammalian membranes. Lipid composition is observed to significantly modify membrane-polymer interactions, leading to differences in both the mode of partitioning and the conformations adopted by the polymers, in addition to impacting membrane properties differently. The results strongly suggest that the oft-cited electrostatic interactions between the antimicrobial agents and the microbial membranes do not fully account for the recognition and subsequent partitioning of the antimicrobial agents. The ability of the methacrylate polymers to sense interfacial lipid packing defects, determined by the PE/PC head groups of lipids, is also found to be influential in their membrane partitioning. Deliberate inclusion of charged anionic lipids into a model mammalian membrane, leading to additional favorable electrostatics, does not reproduce a similar polymer partitioning mechanism to that in its microbial counterpart. The differences observed in the interactions of methacrylate polymers with the various model membranes can be instrumental in extending our understanding of underlying modes of membrane disruption by general antimicrobial agents as well.

  7. Xenon and other volatile anesthetics change domain structure in model lipid raft membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Michael; Worcester, David L

    2013-12-19

    Inhalation anesthetics have been in clinical use for over 160 years, but the molecular mechanisms of action continue to be investigated. Direct interactions with ion channels received much attention after it was found that anesthetics do not change the structure of homogeneous model membranes. However, it was recently found that halothane, a prototypical anesthetic, changes domain structure of a binary lipid membrane. The noble gas xenon is an excellent anesthetic and provides a pivotal test of the generality of this finding, extended to ternary lipid raft mixtures. We report that xenon and conventional anesthetics change the domain equilibrium in two canonical ternary lipid raft mixtures. These findings demonstrate a membrane-mediated mechanism whereby inhalation anesthetics can affect the lipid environment of transmembrane proteins.

  8. Xenon and Other Volatile Anesthetics Change Domain Structure in Model Lipid Raft Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Michael; Worcester, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics have been in clinical use for over 160 years, but the molecular mechanisms of action continue to be investigated. Direct interactions with ion channels received much attention after it was found that anesthetics do not change the structure of homogeneous model membranes. However, it was recently found that halothane, a prototypical anesthetic, changes domain structure of a binary lipid membrane. The noble gas xenon is an excellent anesthetic and provides a pivotal test of the generality of this finding, extended to ternary lipid raft mixtures. We report that xenon and conventional anesthetics change the domain equilibrium in two canonical ternary lipid raft mixtures. These findings demonstrate a membrane-mediated mechanism whereby inhalation anesthetics can affect the lipid environment of trans-membrane proteins. PMID:24299622

  9. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, H; Kleijn, J M; Leermakers, F A M

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus kc and k̄ and the preferred monolayer curvature J(0)(m), and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of kc and the area compression modulus kA are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k̄ and J(0)(m) can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k̄ and J(0)(m) change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k̄ 0, especially at low ionic strengths. We anticipate that these changes lead to unstable membranes as these become vulnerable to pore formation or disintegration into lipid disks.

  10. Topical retinol and the stratum corneum response to an environmental threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, V; Henry, F; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    1997-01-01

    The functional consequences of using topical retinol on skin have not been thoroughly studied so far. The aim of this open study was to compare two preparations containing either retinol or vitamin E, using biometric evaluations. Three methods, namely the sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) corneosurfametry bioassay, the ultraviolet (UV) squamometry test and optical profilometry of the UV-induced wrinkling process, were used to assess some properties of the stratum corneum. The retinol preparation achieved better scores than the vitamin-E cream in all three tests and appears to improve the resistance of the stratum corneum against some chemical (SLS) and physical (UV) threats. It also limits UV-induced shallow wrinkling.

  11. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M., E-mail: Frans.leermakers@wur.nl [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 6, 6307 HB Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k{sub c} and k{sup ¯} and the preferred monolayer curvature J{sub 0}{sup m}, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k{sub c} and the area compression modulus k{sub A} are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k{sup ¯}<0, membranes can form stable cubic phases when the Gaussian bending modulus becomes positive, which occurs with membranes composed of PC lipids with long tails. Similarly, negative monolayer curvatures appear when a small head group such as PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J{sub 0}{sup m}≫0, especially at low ionic

  12. Interaction of thermal responsive NIPAM nanogels with model lipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huihui; Resmini, Marina; Zarbakhsh, Ali

    2018-02-17

    Understanding the interaction of nanoparticles (NP) with ceramide lipids is important in developing strategies to overcome the formidable obstacle that is skin. This paper presents studies of interactions between N-isopropylacrylamide nanogels, crosslinked with 30% N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, and model ceramide lipid monolayers at the air-water interface as a function of temperature. In the case of the mixed ceramide/cholesterol/behenic acid monolayer, the interaction of nanogels with the ceramide was strongly mediated by the fatty acids. This interaction between nanogels and monolayer components is dominated by hydrophobic-hydrophobic binding. The data show the important intermediary role of the fatty acid in facilitating transmembrane transport. For a pure ceramide lipid monolayer, the neutron reflectivity (NR), Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and surface pressure results showed a lipid-nanogel complex formation and the subsequent depletion/solubilisation of the lipids from the interface when the area per molecule for the lipid was increased from 42 to 44 Å 2 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Protective efficacy of a lipid antigen vaccine in a guinea pig model of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Layre, Emilie; Clark, Simon; Prandi, Jacques; Rayner, Emma; Lepore, Marco; de Libero, Gennaro; Williams, Ann; Puzo, Germain; Gilleron, Martine

    2017-03-07

    The bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine, the only licensed vaccine against TB, displays partial and variable efficacy, thus making the exploitation of novel vaccination strategies a major priority. Most of the current vaccines in pre-clinical or clinical development are based on the induction of T cells recognizing protein antigens. However, a large number of T cells specific for mycobacterial lipids are induced during infection, suggesting that lipid-based vaccines might represent an important component of novel sub-unit vaccines. Here, we investigated whether immunization with defined mycobacterial lipid antigens induces protection in guinea pigs challenged with M. tuberculosis. Two purified mycobacterial lipid antigens, the diacylated sulfoglycolipids (Ac2SGL) and the phosphatidyl-myo-inositol dimannosides (PIM2) were formulated in biophysically characterized liposomes made of dimethyl-dioctadecyl-ammonium (DDA) and synthetic trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (TDB). In three protection trials, a reduction of bacterial load in the spleen of inoculated animals was consistently observed compared to the unvaccinated group. Moreover, a reduction in the number of lesions and severity of pathology was detected in the lungs and spleen of the lipid vaccine group compared to unvaccinated controls. As the degree of protection achieved is similar to that observed using protein antigens in the same guinea pig model, these promising results pave the way to future investigations of lipid antigens as subunit vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative investigations on the water content of the stratum corneum using different methods of measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triebskorn, A; Gloor, M; Greiner, F

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of the water content of the stratum corneum were made on the flexor side of the forearm in healthy male volunteers using direct current resistance and alternating current (1.5 and 15 kHz) electric impedance measurements, capacity measurements and measurements of transepidermal water loss. In addition, infrared-spectroscopic investigations were made using a Frustrated Multiple Internal Reflection device on unstripped skin, then on the same skin area after five and ten strippings with adhesive tape. The tests showed (except for the measurements of transepidermal water loss) all of the aforementioned test methods led to relevant measurement values. While the direct current electrical resistance measurement yielded data on the water content of the most superficial layer of the stratum corneum, it was found that the capacitor measurements gave results from the deep layers of the stratum corneum. With the alternating current impedance measurement method, both superficial and deep layers of the stratum corneum were taken into account. Comparative measurements of direct current resistance and infrared absorption after occlusion treatment revealed that under certain circumstances using both methods can lead to contradictory results.

  15. Modulation of human stratum corneum properties by salicylic acid and all-trans-retinoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Goffin, V; Piérard, G E

    1998-01-01

    Topical all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) has been reported to decrease the in vivo skin response to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). The converse was also shown with a synergistic effect of RA following prior applications of SLS. The reason for such effects is not clear. We employed measures of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), squamometry and sequential corneosurfametry to explore the protective activity of a 0.05% RA cream at the level of the stratum corneum. Nonionic oil-in-water emulsions with or without 5% salicylic acid (SA) served as test product references. Data indicated that the RA formulation was responsible for a stochastic impairment in the TEWL and for an increased intercorneocyte cohesion. SA and the unmedicated emulsion did not lead to similar TEWL changes. The squamometry test proved to be very sensitive to disclose the effects of SA and RA without, however, allowing to distinguish the difference in the physiological processes involved. The corneosurfametry bioassay did not show any protection or synergistic effect between RA or SA and SLS challenge on the stratum corneum. This is in contrast to a previous work showing a positive protective effect afforded by retinol against SLS. The combined effects of irritant compounds affecting the stratum corneum are complex. The precise reason for some of their biological consequences remains a conundrum. On balance, products such as SA and RA do not appear to afford protection or impairment to a surfactant challenge at the level of the stratum corneum.

  16. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Buttet

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome (MetS greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD. By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP and blood clearance (ApoC2. These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG, while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the

  17. Asymmetric Lipid Membranes: Towards More Realistic Model Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Drew; Geier, Barbara; Pabst, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of transbilayer asymmetry in natural cell membranes, the vast majority of existing research has utilized chemically well-defined symmetric liposomes, where the inner and outer bilayer leaflets have the same composition. Here, we review various aspects of asymmetry in nature and in model systems in anticipation for the next phase of model membrane studies. PMID:25955841

  18. Pathogenesis of permeability barrier abnormalities in the ichthyoses: inherited disorders of lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Peter M.; Williams, Mary L.; Holleran, Walter M.; Jiang, Yan J.; Schmuth, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Many of the ichthyoses are associated with inherited disorders of lipid metabolism. These disorders have provided unique models to dissect physiologic processes in normal epidermis and the pathophysiology of more common scaling conditions. In most of these disorders, a permeability barrier abnormality “drives” pathophysiology through stimulation of epidermal hyperplasia. Among primary abnormalities of nonpolar lipid metabolism, triglyceride accumulation in neutral lipid storage disease as a result of a lipase mutation provokes a barrier abnormality via lamellar/nonlamellar phase separation within the extracellular matrix of the stratum corneum (SC). Similar mechanisms account for the barrier abnormalities (and subsequent ichthyosis) in inherited disorders of polar lipid metabolism. For example, in recessive X-linked ichthyosis (RXLI), cholesterol sulfate (CSO4) accumulation also produces a permeability barrier defect through lamellar/nonlamellar phase separation. However, in RXLI, the desquamation abnormality is in part attributable to the plurifunctional roles of CSO4 as a regulator of both epidermal differentiation and corneodesmosome degradation. Phase separation also occurs in type II Gaucher disease (GD; from accumulation of glucosylceramides as a result of to β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency). Finally, failure to assemble both lipids and desquamatory enzymes into nascent epidermal lamellar bodies (LBs) accounts for both the permeability barrier and desquamation abnormalities in Harlequin ichthyosis (HI). The barrier abnormality provokes the clinical phenotype in these disorders not only by stimulating epidermal proliferation, but also by inducing inflammation. PMID:18245815

  19. Lipid Processing Technology: Building a Multilevel Modeling Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz Tovar, Carlos Axel; Mustaffa, Azizul Azri; Hukkerikar, Amol

    (connectivity index). A master parameter table is prepared for this purpose. In the third level, a detailed computer aided model analysis of unit operations encountered in oleo chemical industry (eg. Transesterification, Hydrogenation, Interesterification etc.), optimal design, operation and control...

  20. Quantitative profiling of brain lipid raft proteome in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Castillo, Catherine; Francesconi, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome, a leading cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism, arises from transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene encoding an RNA-binding protein, Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). FMRP can regulate the expression of approximately 4% of brain transcripts through its role in regulation of mRNA transport, stability and translation, thus providing a molecular rationale for its potential pleiotropic effects on neuronal and brain circuitry function. Several intracellular signaling pathways are dysregulated in the absence of FMRP suggesting that cellular deficits may be broad and could result in homeostatic changes. Lipid rafts are specialized regions of the plasma membrane, enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids, involved in regulation of intracellular signaling. Among transcripts targeted by FMRP, a subset encodes proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis and homeostasis, dysregulation of which could affect the integrity and function of lipid rafts. Using a quantitative mass spectrometry-based approach we analyzed the lipid raft proteome of Fmr1 knockout mice, an animal model of Fragile X syndrome, and identified candidate proteins that are differentially represented in Fmr1 knockout mice lipid rafts. Furthermore, network analysis of these candidate proteins reveals connectivity between them and predicts functional connectivity with genes encoding components of myelin sheath, axonal processes and growth cones. Our findings provide insight to aid identification of molecular and cellular dysfunctions arising from Fmr1 silencing and for uncovering shared pathologies between Fragile X syndrome and other autism spectrum disorders.

  1. Cardiorespiratory effects of venous lipid micro embolization in an experimental model of mediastinal shed blood reinfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dencker Magnus

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retransfusion of the patient's own blood during surgery is used to reduce the need for allogenic blood transfusion. It has however been found that this blood contains lipid particles, which form emboli in different organs if the blood is retransfused on the arterial side. In this study, we tested whether retransfusion of blood containing lipid micro-particles on the venous side in a porcine model will give hemodynamic effects. Methods Seven adult pigs were used. A shed blood surrogate containing 400 ml diluted blood and 5 ml radioactive triolein was produced to generate a lipid embolic load. The shed blood surrogate was rapidly ( Results A more than 30-fold increase in pulmonary vascular resistance was observed, with subsequent increase in pulmonary artery pressure, and decrease in cardiac output and arterial pressure. This response was transient, but was followed by a smaller, persistent increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Only a small portion of the infused triolein passed the lungs, and only a small fraction could be recirculated by increasing cardiac output and pulmonary pressure. Conclusion Infusion of blood containing lipid micro-emboli on the venous side leads to acute, severe hemodynamic responses that can be life threatening. Lipid particles will be trapped in the lungs, leading to persistent effects on the pulmonary vascular resistance.

  2. Quantitative profiling of brain lipid raft proteome in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Kalinowska

    Full Text Available Fragile X Syndrome, a leading cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism, arises from transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene encoding an RNA-binding protein, Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP. FMRP can regulate the expression of approximately 4% of brain transcripts through its role in regulation of mRNA transport, stability and translation, thus providing a molecular rationale for its potential pleiotropic effects on neuronal and brain circuitry function. Several intracellular signaling pathways are dysregulated in the absence of FMRP suggesting that cellular deficits may be broad and could result in homeostatic changes. Lipid rafts are specialized regions of the plasma membrane, enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids, involved in regulation of intracellular signaling. Among transcripts targeted by FMRP, a subset encodes proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis and homeostasis, dysregulation of which could affect the integrity and function of lipid rafts. Using a quantitative mass spectrometry-based approach we analyzed the lipid raft proteome of Fmr1 knockout mice, an animal model of Fragile X syndrome, and identified candidate proteins that are differentially represented in Fmr1 knockout mice lipid rafts. Furthermore, network analysis of these candidate proteins reveals connectivity between them and predicts functional connectivity with genes encoding components of myelin sheath, axonal processes and growth cones. Our findings provide insight to aid identification of molecular and cellular dysfunctions arising from Fmr1 silencing and for uncovering shared pathologies between Fragile X syndrome and other autism spectrum disorders.

  3. Cutaneous water loss and the development of the stratum corneum of nestling house sparrows (Passer domesticus) from desert and mesic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Williams, Joseph B

    2011-01-01

    Evaporation through the skin contributes to more than half of the total water loss in birds. Therefore, we expect the regulation of cutaneous water loss (CWL) to be crucial for birds, especially those that live in deserts, to maintain a normal state of hydration. Previous studies in adult birds showed that modifications of the lipid composition of the stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis, were associated with changes in rates of CWL. However, few studies have examined the ontogeny of CWL and the lipids of the SC in nestling birds. In this study, we measured CWL and the lipid composition of the SC during development of nestlings from two populations of house sparrows, one from the deserts of Saudi Arabia and the other from mesic Ohio. We found that desert and mesic nestlings followed different developmental trajectories for CWL. Desert nestlings seemed to make a more frugal use of water than did mesic nestlings. To regulate CWL, nestlings appeared to modify the lipid composition of the SC during ontogeny. Our results also suggest a tighter regulation of CWL in desert nestlings, presumably as a result of the stronger selection pressures to which nestlings are exposed in deserts.

  4. The protease inhibitors ritonavir and saquinavir influence lipid metabolism: a pig model for the rapid evaluation of new drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E.; Mu, Huiling; Porsgaard, Trine

    2010-01-01

    Background: Studies of the effects of antiretroviral drugs on lipid metabolism are limited by the availability of suitable models. We have thus developed an animal model utilising Gottingen mini-pigs. The normal lipid metabolism of mini-pigs closely reflects that of humans and they are expected t...

  5. Transport and uptake effects of marine complex lipid liposomes in small intestinal epithelial cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Yang, Yu-Hong; Xu, Jie; Wang, Yu-Ming; Xue, Chang-Hu; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, marine complex lipids, including starfish phospholipids (SFP) and cerebrosides (SFC) separated from Asterias amurensis as well as sea cucumber phospholipids (SCP) and cerebrosides (SCC) isolated from Cucumaria frondosa, have received much attention because of their potent biological activities. However, little information is known on the transport and uptake of these lipids in liposome forms in small intestinal cells. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of these complex lipid liposomes on transport and uptake in Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. The results revealed that SFP and SCP contained 42% and 47.9% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), respectively. The average particle sizes of liposomes prepared in this study were from 169 to 189 nm. We found that the transport of the liposomes across the M cell monolayer model was much higher than the Caco-2 cell monolayer model. The liposomes consisting of SFP or SCP showed significantly higher transport and uptake than soy phospholipid (soy-PL) liposomes in both Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. Our results also exhibited that treatment with 1 mM liposomes composed of SFP or SCP for 3 h tended to increase the EPA content in phospholipid fractions of both differentiated Caco-2 and M cells. Moreover, it was also found that the hybrid liposomes consisting of SFP/SFC/cholesterol (Chol) revealed higher transport and uptake across the M cell monolayer in comparison with other liposomes. Furthermore, treatment with SFP/SFC/Chol liposomes could notably decrease the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) values of Caco-2 and M cell monolayers. The present data also showed that the cell viability of differentiated Caco-2 and M cells was not affected after the treatment with marine complex lipids or soy-PL liposomes. Based on the data in this study, it was suggested that marine complex lipid liposomes exhibit prominent transport and uptake in small intestinal epithelial cell models.

  6. Lipid-assisted protein transport: A diffusion-reaction model supported by kinetic experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Carmelo; Scalisi, Silvia; Lolicato, Fabio; Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The protein transport inside a cell is a complex phenomenon that goes through several difficult steps. The facilitated transport requires sophisticated machineries involving protein assemblies. In this work, we developed a diffusion-reaction model to simulate co-transport kinetics of proteins and lipids. We assume the following: (a) there is always a small lipid concentration of order of the Critical Micellar Concentration (CMC) in equilibrium with the membrane; (b) the binding of lipids to proteins modulates the hydrophobicity of the complexes and, therefore, their ability to interact and merge with the bilayer; and (c) some lipids leave the bilayer to replenish those bound to proteins. The model leads to a pair of integral equations for the time-evolution of the adsorbed proteins in the lipid bilayer. Relationships between transport kinetics, CMC, and lipid-protein binding constants were found. Under particular conditions, a perturbation analysis suggests the onset of kinks in the protein adsorption kinetics. To validate our model, we performed leakage measurements of vesicles composed by either high or low CMC lipids interacting with Islet Amyloid PolyPeptide (IAPP) and Aβ (1-40) used as sample proteins. Since the lipid-protein complex stoichiometry is not easily accessible, molecular dynamics simulations were performed using monomeric IAPP interacting with an increasing number of phospholipids. Main results are the following: (a) 1:1 lipid-protein complexes generally show a faster insertion rate proportional to the complex hydrophobicity and inversely related to lipid CMC; (b) on increasing the number of bound lipids, the protein insertion rate decreases; and (c) at slow lipids desorption rate, the lipid-assisted proteins transport might exhibit a discontinuous behavior and does non-linearly depend on protein concentration.

  7. Noninvasive stratum corneum sampling and electron microscopical examination of skin barrier integrity: pilot study with a topical glycerin formulation for atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daehnhardt-Pfeiffer, S; Surber, C; Wilhelm, K-P; Daehnhardt, D; Springmann, G; Boettcher, M; Foelster-Holst, R

    2012-01-01

    Therapy of atopic dermatitis encloses use of medicated and nonmedicated preparations. Results of clinical and biophysical procedures indirectly describe the condition of the impaired skin barrier (SB). Direct evaluation of SB integrity is only possible by electron microscopical visualization, e.g. intercellular lipid lamellae (ICLL) organization of the stratum corneum. SB integrity was measured by morphometric analysis of ICLL in healthy and atopic skin and after a 15-day treatment (plus 7-day follow-up) of atopic skin with a glycerin preparation. Significant treatment effect was shown by the restoration of the ICLL. The study reveals that morphometric analysis of ICLL organization is suitable to differentiate between healthy and diseased skin and to semiquantitatively determine the effect of a nonmedicated glycerin formulation. Small treatment cohort. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. The ELBA force field for coarse-grain modeling of lipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Orsi

    Full Text Available A new coarse-grain model for molecular dynamics simulation of lipid membranes is presented. Following a simple and conventional approach, lipid molecules are modeled by spherical sites, each representing a group of several atoms. In contrast to common coarse-grain methods, two original (interdependent features are here adopted. First, the main electrostatics are modeled explicitly by charges and dipoles, which interact realistically through a relative dielectric constant of unity (ε(r = 1. Second, water molecules are represented individually through a new parametrization of the simple Stockmayer potential for polar fluids; each water molecule is therefore described by a single spherical site embedded with a point dipole. The force field is shown to accurately reproduce the main physical properties of single-species phospholipid bilayers comprising dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE in the liquid crystal phase, as well as distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC in the liquid crystal and gel phases. Insights are presented into fundamental properties and phenomena that can be difficult or impossible to study with alternative computational or experimental methods. For example, we investigate the internal pressure distribution, dipole potential, lipid diffusion, and spontaneous self-assembly. Simulations lasting up to 1.5 microseconds were conducted for systems of different sizes (128, 512 and 1058 lipids; this also allowed us to identify size-dependent artifacts that are expected to affect membrane simulations in general. Future extensions and applications are discussed, particularly in relation to the methodology's inherent multiscale capabilities.

  9. Building a Multilevel Modeling Network for Lipid Processing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz Tovar, Carlos Axel; Mustaffa, Azizul Azri; Hukkerikar, Amol

    The world’s fats and oils production has been growing rapidly over the past few decades, exceeding the need for human nutrition. This overproduction combined with the increasing interest among the consumers for healthier food products and bio-fuels, has led the oleo chemical industry to face...... for their physical properties and unit operation models for their processing have limited computer-aided methods and tools for process synthesis, modeling and simulation to be widely used for design, analysis, and optimization of these processes. The world’s fats and oils production has been growing rapidly over...... the past few decades, exceeding the need for human nutrition. This overproduction combined with the increasing interest among the consumers for healthier food products and bio-fuels, has led the oleo chemical industry to face in the upcoming years major challenges in terms of design and development...

  10. Joint action of pharmaceuticals in model lipid membranes: calorimetric effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. В. Ващенко

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Joint action of a number of pharmaceuticals has been studied in multibilayer model membranes of L-α-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. Shift of the main phase transition temperature of the membrane under the pharmaceuticals introduction (∆Tm was determined by means of differential scanning calorimetry and used as a basic factor of their membranotropic action (MA. Pairs of pharmaceuticals were selected with various character of lipophylicity and MA; cholesterol was used as the membrane compound with the well-known MA. Revelation and identification of the effects of joint action was performed by comparison of ∆Tm values under separate and joint introduction of the pharmaceuticals. Effects of joint action appear similar for hydrophobic azithromycin and hydrophilic succinylcholine in their combinations both with povidone and with cholesterol. Examination of joint action of an active pharmaceutical intgredient (API and and an excipient allowed us to establish a certain advantage of the API’s MA in the pairs azithromycin-lactose and azithromycin-dimetylsulfoxide, and additivity of the MA in the pair amixin-hypromelose.

  11. Lipid Vesicles for the Skin Delivery of Diclofenac: Cerosomes vs. Other Lipid Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Fathi-Azarbayjani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Lipid suspensions as drug carriers, including conventional liposomes, ethosomes, transferosomes, proniosomes, niosomes, PEG-PPG-PEG niosomes and stratum corneum liposomes (cerosomes, were formulated and compared. Methods: Lipid vesicles were formulated and assessed with regards to enhancement of skin permeation of diclofenac and stability profiles of the formulations. Formulation-induced changes of the biophysical structure of excised human skin were monitored using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results: The stability profiles of these suspensions over 12 weeks did not show any significant drug leakage from the vesicles of interest (p > 0.05. FTIR observations indicated that the vesicles increased stratum corneum (SC lipid fluidization and altered protein conformation. Skin permeability experiments showed that the free unencapsulated drug in the cerosomal formulations caused significant increase in drug permeation across the skin (p < 0.01. Low skin permeability of drug from the other lipid suspensions could be due to the entrapment of diclofenac within these vesicles which decreased the solubility of the hydrophilic drug in the skin lipids and the partition coefficient of the drug from these vesicles into the SC. Conclusion: Optimal drug entrapment in vesicles or alteration of the skin structure may not necessarily enhance the permeation of hydrophilic drugs across the human skin. These lipid vesicles may be further developed into carriers of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for topical and transdermal delivery, respectively.

  12. Interplay of electrostatics and lipid packing determines the binding of charged polymer coated nanoparticles to model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Nupur; Bhattacharya, Rupak; Saha, Arindam; Jana, Nikhil R; Basu, Jaydeep K

    2015-10-07

    Understanding of nanoparticle-membrane interactions is useful for various applications of nanoparticles like drug delivery and imaging. Here we report on the studies of interaction between hydrophilic charged polymer coated semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles with model lipid membranes. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity measurements suggest that cationic nanoparticles bind and penetrate bilayers of zwitterionic lipids. Penetration and binding depend on the extent of lipid packing and result in the disruption of the lipid bilayer accompanied by enhanced lipid diffusion. On the other hand, anionic nanoparticles show minimal membrane binding although, curiously, their interaction leads to reduction in lipid diffusivity. It is suggested that the enhanced binding of cationic QDs at higher lipid packing can be understood in terms of the effective surface potential of the bilayers which is tunable through membrane lipid packing. Our results bring forth the subtle interplay of membrane lipid packing and electrostatics which determine nanoparticle binding and penetration of model membranes with further implications for real cell membranes.

  13. A metabolomic analysis of two intravenous lipid emulsions in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T Kalish

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition (PN, including intravenous lipid administration, is a life-saving therapy but can be complicated by cholestasis and liver disease. The administration of intravenous soy bean oil (SO has been associated with the development of liver disease, while the administration of intravenous fish oil (FO has been associated with the resolution of liver disease. The biochemical mechanism of this differential effect is unclear. This study compares SO and FO lipid emulsions in a murine model of hepatic steatosis, one of the first hits in PN-associated liver disease.We established a murine model of hepatic steatosis in which liver injury is induced by orally feeding mice a PN solution. C57BL/6J mice were randomized to receive PN alone (a high carbohydrate diet (HCD, PN plus intravenous FO (Omegaven®; Fresenius Kabi AG, Bad Homburg VDH, Germany, PN plus intravenous SO (Intralipid®; Fresenius Kabi AG, Bad Homburg v.d.H., Germany, for Baxter Healthcare, Deerfield, IL, or a chow diet. After 19 days, liver tissue was harvested from all animals and subjected to metabolomic profiling.The administration of an oral HCD without lipid induced profound hepatic steatosis. SO was associated with macro- and microvesicular hepatic steatosis, while FO largely prevented the development of steatosis. 321 detectable compounds were identified in the metabolomic analysis. HCD induced de novo fatty acid synthesis and oxidative stress. Both FO and SO relieved some of the metabolic shift towards de novo lipogenesis, but FO offered additional advantages in terms of lipid peroxidation and the generation of inflammatory precursors.Improved lipid metabolism combined with reduced oxidative stress may explain the protective effect offered by intravenous FO in vivo.

  14. Cholesterol as a factor regulating the influence of natural (PAF and lysoPAF) vs synthetic (ED) ether lipids on model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2013-11-01

    In this work we have performed a comparative study on the effect of antineoplastic ether lipid-edelfosine (ED), its natural analogs - Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) and its precursor (lyso-PAF), both lacking anticancer properties, on cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine (Chol/PC) monolayers, serving as model membranes. Since all the above ether lipids are membrane active, it can be expected that their effect on membranes may differentiate their biological activity. Our investigations were aimed at studying potential relationship of the effect of ED, PAF and lyso-PAF on model membranes, differing in condensation. We have modified molecular packing of Chol/PC model systems either by increasing the level of sterol in the system or changing the structure of PC, while keeping the same sterol content. Additionally, we have performed a detailed comparison of the miscibility of ED, PAF and lyso-PAF with various membrane lipids. The collected data evidenced that all the investigated ether lipids influence Chol/PC films in the same way; however, in a different magnitude. Moreover, the interactions of ED, PAF and lyso-PAF with model membranes were the strongest at the highest level of sterol in the system. A thorough analysis of the obtained results has proved that the effect of the investigated ether lipids on membranes is not dependent on the condensation of the system, but it is strongly determined by the concentration of cholesterol. Since ED was found to interact with model membranes stronger than PAF and lyso-PAF, we have suggested that this fact may contribute to differences in cytotoxicity of these compounds. © 2013.

  15. 1,2-naphthoquinone stimulates lipid peroxidation and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Robert F; Aleo, Michael D; Self-Medlin, Yehudi; Doshna, Colleen M; Mason, R Preston

    2013-11-01

    Naphthalene induces cataract formation through the accumulation of its reactive metabolite, 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ), in the ocular lens. 1,2-NQ increases lens protein oxidation and disrupts fiber cell membrane function; however, the association of these effects with changes in membrane structure is not understood. The goal of this study was to determine the direct effects of 1,2-NQ on membrane lipid oxidation and structural organization. Iodometric approaches were used to measure the effects of naphthalene and 1,2-NQ on lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) formation in model membranes composed of cholesterol and dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine. Membrane samples were prepared at various cholesterol-to-phospholipid mole ratios and subjected to autoxidation at 37°C for 48 hours in the absence or presence of either agent alone (0.1-5.0 μM) or in combination with vitamin E. Small-angle x-ray diffraction was used to measure the effects of naphthalene and 1,2-NQ on membrane structure before and after exposure to oxidative stress. 1,2-NQ increased LOOH formation by 250% (P lipid organization were observed with naphthalene under the same conditions. These data suggest a novel mechanism for naphthalene-induced cataract, facilitated by the direct effects of 1,2-NQ on lipid peroxidation and cholesterol domain formation.

  16. Investigating the Biosynthesis of Membrane-spanning Lipids Using Model Strains of Acidobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, A. S.; Chubiz, L. M.

    2016-12-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs), deriving from the membrane-spanning lipids of microbes, are detected in a wide range of environments including marine and lacustrine waters, sediments, and in terrestrial soils. In sediments and soils, ratios of various GDGT structures form the basis of the TEX86 proxy based on isoprenoidal GDGTs derived from archaea, and the MBT/CBT proxy based on bacterial-derived branched GDGTs (brGDGTs), which is influenced by both temperature and pH. While the relationships of the proxy values to environmental variables have been empirically calibrated, much uncertainty remains in understanding genetic and physiological factors that affect the production of these lipid structures by microbes. In this study we compare two model bacterial strains - Edaphobacter aggregans WGB-1 , which has been previously demonstrated to produce brGDGTs (Damsté et al 2011) and Edaphobacter modestus JBG-1 (a non-brGDGT producer) to gain traction into understanding brGDGT production. We have sequenced each genome, facilitating comparisons that can be used to computationally generate hypotheses for genes involved in brGDGT biosynthesis. We will also report the results of initial experiments conducted to understand how the lipid profiles of each strain vary as a function of growth phase. Through a combination of genetic approaches and physiolotical experiments, we aim to bring new understanding to brGDGTs and how proxies derived from these lipids relate to environmental variables. Damsté et al. 2011 AEM 77: 4147

  17. Soy Protein Isolate Suppresses Lipodystrophy-induced Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in Model Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Koji; Matsumoto, Akiko; Kai, Shunichi; Kayashima, Tomoko; Yanagita, Teruyoshi

    2017-02-01

    Lipodystrophies are acquired and genetic disorders characterized by the complete or partial absence of body fat with a line of metabolic disorders, including hepatic steatosis. Because soy protein isolate (SPI) has been reported to reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels in animals and humans, we explored the effect of SPI on the pathophysiology of hepatic lipid accumutaion in a diet-induced lipodystrophy model mice. Four weeks of the lipodystrophy model diet induced hepatic lipid accumulation concomitant with marked deficiencies of adipose tissue and serum adipocytokines in mice. However, supplementing the lipodystrophy model diet with SPI could alleviate the hepatic lipid acculation without affecting the lipoatrophic effect of the diet. Enhanced lipogenesis is the principal mechanism of hepatic steatosis in this model, but SPI supplementation significantly attenuated the increase in enzyme activity and/or mRNA expression. Additionally, SPI supplementation upregulated the hepatic mRNA expression of an enzyme involved in cholesterol catabolism. In conclusion, our results indicate the possibility of dietary SPI to attenuate lipodystorophy-induced hepatic steatosis through the direct reduction of hepatic lipogenesis without affecting adipocytokine production.

  18. Modelling of phase equilibria and related properties of mixtures involving lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunico, Larissa

    data and the fitted parameters contributed to the extension of the created dababase. The consistency of the available VLE data has been checked using a general and robust approach developed by the Thermodynamics Research Center (TRC) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). For SLE......Many challenges involving physical and thermodynamic properties in the production of edible oils and biodiesel are observed, such as availability of experimental data and realiable prediction. In the case of lipids, a lack of experimental data for pure components and also for their mixtures in open...... Calorimetry (DSC) technique. The relevance of enlarging experimental databank of lipids systems data in order to improve the performance of predictive thermodynamic models was confirmed in this work by analyzing the calculated values of original UNIFAC model and by proposing new interaction parameters...

  19. Xenon and Other Volatile Anesthetics Change Domain Structure in Model Lipid Raft Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Weinrich, Michael; Worcester, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics have been in clinical use for over 160 years, but the molecular mechanisms of action continue to be investigated. Direct interactions with ion channels received much attention after it was found that anesthetics do not change the structure of homogeneous model membranes. However, it was recently found that halothane, a prototypical anesthetic, changes domain structure of a binary lipid membrane. The noble gas xenon is an excellent anesthetic and provides a pivotal test ...

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of Permeation of Molecules through Skin Lipid Bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rakesh; Sridhar, D B; Rai, Beena

    2016-09-01

    Stratum Corneum (SC), the outermost layer of skin, is mainly responsible for skin's barrier function. The complex lipid matrix of SC determines these barrier properties. In this study, the lipid matrix is modeled as an equimolar mixture of ceramide (CER), cholesterol (CHOL), and free fatty acid (FFA). The permeation of water, oxygen, ethanol, acetic acid, urea, butanol, benzene, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), toluene, phenol, styrene, and ethylbenzene across this layer is studied using a constrained MD simulations technique. Several long constrained simulations are performed at a skin temperature of 310 K under NPT conditions. The free energy profiles and diffusion coefficients along the bilayer normal have been calculated for each molecule. Permeability coefficients are also calculated and compared with experimental data. The main resistance for the permeation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic permeants has been found to be in the interior of the lipid bilayer and near the lipid-water interface, respectively. The obtained permeability is found to be a few orders of magnitude higher than experimental values for hydrophilic molecules while for hydrophobic molecules more discrepancy was observed. Overall, the qualitative ranking is consistent with the experiments.

  1. Bayesian Analysis of a Lipid-Based Physiologically Based Toxicokinetic Model for a Mixture of PCBs in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan F. Sasso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A lipid-based physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK model has been developed for a mixture of six polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs in rats. The aim of this study was to apply population Bayesian analysis to a lipid PBTK model, while incorporating an internal exposure-response model linking enzyme induction and metabolic rate. Lipid-based physiologically based toxicokinetic models are a subset of PBTK models that can simulate concentrations of highly lipophilic compounds in tissue lipids, without the need for partition coefficients. A hierarchical treatment of population metabolic parameters and a CYP450 induction model were incorporated into the lipid-based PBTK framework, and Markov-Chain Monte Carlo was applied to in vivo data. A mass balance of CYP1A and CYP2B in the liver was necessary to model PCB metabolism at high doses. The linked PBTK/induction model remained on a lipid basis and was capable of modeling PCB concentrations in multiple tissues for all dose levels and dose profiles.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  3. Effect of neurosteroids on a model lipid bilayer including cholesterol: An Atomic Force Microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Mattia; Balleza, Daniel; Vena, Giulia; Puia, Giulia; Facci, Paolo; Alessandrini, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Amphiphilic molecules which have a biological effect on specific membrane proteins, could also affect lipid bilayer properties possibly resulting in a modulation of the overall membrane behavior. In light of this consideration, it is important to study the possible effects of amphiphilic molecule of pharmacological interest on model systems which recapitulate some of the main properties of the biological plasma membranes. In this work we studied the effect of a neurosteroid, Allopregnanolone (3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or Allo), on a model bilayer composed by the ternary lipid mixture DOPC/bSM/chol. We chose ternary mixtures which present, at room temperature, a phase coexistence of liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains and which reside near to a critical point. We found that Allo, which is able to strongly partition in the lipid bilayer, induces a marked increase in the bilayer area and modifies the relative proportion of the two phases favoring the Ld phase. We also found that the neurosteroid shifts the miscibility temperature to higher values in a way similarly to what happens when the cholesterol concentration is decreased. Interestingly, an isoform of Allo, isoAllopregnanolone (3β,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or isoAllo), known to inhibit the effects of Allo on GABAA receptors, has an opposite effect on the bilayer properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lipid Vesicles for the Skin Delivery of Diclofenac: Cerosomes vs. Other Lipid Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi-Azarbayjani, Anahita; Ng, Kai Xin; Chan, Yew Weng; Chan, Sui Yung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Lipid suspensions as drug carriers, including conventional liposomes, ethosomes, transferosomes, proniosomes, niosomes, PEG-PPG-PEG niosomes and stratum corneum liposomes (cerosomes), were formulated and compared. Methods: Lipid vesicles were formulated and assessed with regards to enhancement of skin permeation of diclofenac and stability profiles of the formulations. Formulation-induced changes of the biophysical structure of excised human skin were monitored using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results: The stability profiles of these suspensions over 12 weeks did not show any significant drug leakage from the vesicles of interest (p > 0.05). FTIR observations indicated that the vesicles increased stratum corneum (SC) lipid fluidization and altered protein conformation. Skin permeability experiments showed that the free unencapsulated drug in the cerosomal formulations caused significant increase in drug permeation across the skin (p hydrophilic drug in the skin lipids and the partition coefficient of the drug from these vesicles into the SC. Conclusion: Optimal drug entrapment in vesicles or alteration of the skin structure may not necessarily enhance the permeation of hydrophilic drugs across the human skin. These lipid vesicles may be further developed into carriers of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for topical and transdermal delivery, respectively. PMID:25789216

  5. The effects of exogenous lipid on THP-1 cells: an in vitro model of airway aspiration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette A. Hayman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory diseases of the airways are associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR and aspiration events. The observation of lipid-laden macrophages (LLMs within the airway may indicate aspiration secondary to GOR. The proposed mechanism, that lipid droplets from undigested or partially digested food are aspirated leading to accumulation in scavenging macrophages, led us to hypothesise that an activated population of LLMs could interact with other immune cells to induce bronchial inflammation. To test this, we generated an in vitro model using differentiated THP-1 cells, which were treated with a high-fat liquid feed. Here, we show that THP-1 cells can take up lipid from the high-fat feed independent of actin polymerisation or CD36-dependent phagocytosis. These cells did not exhibit M1 or M2 polarisation. Gene array analysis confirmed over 8000 genes were upregulated by at least twofold following high fat exposure, and IL-8 was the most upregulated gene. Pathway analysis revealed upregulation of genes known to be involved in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD pathophysiology. We suggest that aspiration and macrophage phagocytosis may be important mechanisms in the aetiology of diseases such as COPD and cystic fibrosis that are characterised by high levels of IL-8 within the airways.

  6. Mitochondrial modulators improve lipid composition and attenuate memory deficits in experimental model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Arpit; Sood, Abhilasha; Sandhir, Rajat

    2015-12-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) is an irreversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase and induces neuropathological changes similar to those observed in Huntington's disease (HD). The objective of the present study was to investigate neuroprotective effect of mitochondrial modulators; alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) and acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) on 3-NP-induced alterations in mitochondrial lipid composition, mitochondrial structure and memory functions. Experimental model of HD was developed by administering 3-NP at sub-chronic doses, twice daily for 17 days. The levels of conjugated dienes, cholesterol and glycolipids were significantly increased, whereas the levels of phospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine) including cardiolipin were significantly decreased in the mitochondria isolated from the striatum of 3-NP-treated animals. In addition, the difference in molecular composition of each phospholipid class was also evaluated using mass spectrometry. Mitochondria lipid from 3-NP-treated animals showed increased cholesterol to phospholipid ratio, suggesting decreased mitochondrial membrane fluidity. 3-NP administration also resulted in ultra-structural changes in mitochondria, accompanied by swelling as assessed by transmission electron microscopy. The 3-NP administered animals had impaired spatial memory evaluated using elevated plus maze test. However, combined supplementation with ALA + ALCAR for 21 days normalized mitochondrial lipid composition, improved mitochondrial structure and ameliorated memory impairments in 3-NP-treated animals, suggesting an imperative role of these two modulators in combination in the management of HD.

  7. A Linear Programming Approach for Modeling and Simulation of Growth and Lipid Accumulation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Posten

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular microalga Phaeodactylum tricornutum exhibits the ability to accumulate triacylglycerols to a high specific content when nutrients are limited in the culture medium. Therefore, the organism is a promising candidate for biodiesel production. Mathematical modeling can substantially contribute to process development and optimization of algae cultivation on different levels. In our work we describe a linear programming approach to model and simulate the growth and storage molecule accumulation of P. tricornutum. The model is based on mass and energy balances and shows that the organism realizes the inherent drive for maximization of energy to biomass conversion and growth. The model predicts that under nutrient limiting conditions both storage carbohydrates and lipids are synthesized simultaneously but at different rates. The model was validated with data gained from batch growth experiments.

  8. Fluorescence of nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-labeled lipids in model membranes is connected not to lipid mobility but to probe location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Mariana; Filipe, Hugo A L; Prates Ramalho, J P; Hof, Martin; Loura, Luís M S

    2016-03-14

    Nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-labeled lipids are popular fluorescent membrane probes. However, the understanding of important aspects of the photophysics of NBD remains incomplete, including the observed shift in the emission spectrum of NBD-lipids to longer wavelengths following excitation at the red edge of the absorption spectrum (red-edge excitation shift or REES). REES of NBD-lipids in membrane environments has been previously interpreted as reflecting restricted mobility of solvent surrounding the fluorophore. However, this requires a large change in the dipole moment (Δμ) of NBD upon excitation. Previous calculations of the value of Δμ of NBD in the literature have been carried out using outdated semi-empirical methods, leading to conflicting values. Using up-to-date density functional theory methods, we recalculated the value of Δμ and verified that it is rather small (∼2 D). Fluorescence measurements confirmed that the value of REES is ∼16 nm for 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine-N-(NBD) (NBD-PS) in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles. However, the observed shift is independent of both the temperature and the presence of cholesterol and is therefore insensitive to the mobility and hydration of the membrane. Moreover, red-edge excitation leads to an increased contribution of the decay component with a shorter lifetime, whereas time-resolved emission spectra of NBD-PS displayed an atypical blue shift following excitation. This excludes restrictions to solvent relaxation as the cause of the measured REES and TRES of NBD, pointing instead to the heterogeneous transverse location of probes as the origin of these effects. The latter hypothesis was confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, from which the calculated heterogeneity of the hydration and location of NBD correlated with the measured fluorescence lifetimes/REES. Globally, our combination of theoretical and experiment-based techniques has led to a considerably improved understanding of

  9. An Experimental Model to Study the Impact of Lipid Oxidation on Contact Lens Deposition In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuett, Burkhardt S; Millar, Thomas J

    2017-09-01

    This study was to establish a controlled in vitro test system to study the effect of lipid oxidation on lipid deposition on contact lenses. Fatty acids with varying degree of unsaturation were oxidized using the Fenton reaction. The degree of lipid oxidation and the lipid moieties formed during the oxidation were identified and estimated by various lipid staining techniques following separation with thin-layer chromatography, and by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances or peroxides in solution. Two different silicone hydrogel-based contact lenses (Balafilcon A and Senofilcon A) were incubated with fatty acids laced with radioactive tracer oxidized to varying degrees, and the amount of lipid deposition was measured using unoxidized lipid samples as controls. The Fenton reaction together with the analytical methods to analyze the lipid oxidation can be used to control oxidation of lipids to a desired amount. In general, saturated fatty acids are not oxidized, the monounsaturated oleic acid produced peroxides while poly-unsaturated lipids initially produced peroxides and then fragmented into reactive aldehydes. Incubation with mildly oxidized lipids (most likely lipid peroxides) resulted in increased lipid deposition on Balafilcon A lenses compared to unoxidized lipids, but this was not observed for Senofilcon A lenses. Further oxidation of the lipids (carbon chain breakup) on the other hand resulted in diminished lipid deposition for both contact lens types. This study provides a method for inducing and controlling lipid oxidation so that the effect of lipid oxidation on contact lens binding can be compared. It could be shown that the degree of lipid oxidation has different effects on the lipid deposition on different contact lens types.

  10. Modelling small-angle scattering data from complex protein-lipid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kynde, Søren Andreas Røssell

    as carriers of membrane proteins. Together they form monodisperse soluble aggregates of about 10 nm in size. Chapter 2 introduces the method of small-angle scattering. Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering are well suited for studying particles in solution on length scales from 1 to 100 nm. This makes...... the techniques very well suited for the study of the nanodisc system. Chapter 3 explains two different modelling approaches that can be used in the analysis of small-angle scattering data from lipid-protein complexes. These are the continuous approach where the system of interest is modelled as a few regular...... geometric objects and the discrete approach were models are build from a large number of points. It is the basic hypothesis of this thesis, that analysis of smallangle scattering data can be approached in a way that combines the continuous and the discrete modelling methods, and that such an approach can...

  11. A Microscopic Interaction Model of Maximum Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Juyang; Feigenson, Gerald.W.

    1999-01-01

    We recently reported the equilibrium maximum solubility of cholesterol in a lipid bilayer, chi*chol, to be 0.66 in four different phosphatidylcholines, and 0.51 in a phosphatidylethanolamine (Huang, J.,J.T. Buboltz, and G. W. Feigenson. 1999. Biochim. Biophys. Acta. in press). Here we present a model of cholesterol-phospholipid mixing that explains these observed values of chi*chol. Monte Carlo simulations show that pairwise-additivity of nearest-neighbor interactions is inadequate to describ...

  12. Understanding detergent effects on lipid membranes: a model study of lysolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Jonas R; Andresen, Thomas L; Feldborg, Lise N; Duelund, Lars; Ipsen, John H

    2010-05-19

    Lysolipids and fatty acids are the natural products formed by the hydrolysis of phospholipids. Lysolipids and fatty acids form micelles in solution and acts as detergents in the presence of lipid membranes. In this study, we investigate the detergent strength of a homologous series of lyso-phosphatidylcholine lipids (LPCs) on 1-palmitoyl-2-oleyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) lipid membranes by use of isothermal titration calorimetry and vesicle fluctuation analysis. The membrane partition coefficient (K) and critical micelle concentration (cmc) are determined by isothermal titration calorimetry and found to obey an inverse proportionality relation (cmc.K approximately 0.05-0.3). The partition coefficient and critical micelle concentration are used for the analysis of the effect of LPCs on the membrane bending rigidity. The dependency of the bending rigidity on LPC membrane coverage has been analyzed in terms of a phenomenological model based on continuum elastic theory, which yields information about the curvature-inducing properties of the LPC molecule. The results reveal: 1), an increase in the partition coefficient with increasing LPC acyl-chain length; and 2), that the degree of acyl-chain mismatch between LPC and POPC determines the magnitude of the membrane mechanical perturbation per LPC molecule in the membrane. Finally, the three-stage model describing detergent membrane interaction has been extended by a parameter D(MCI), which governs the membrane curvature stability in the detergent concentration range below the cmc-value of the LPC molecule. Copyright 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Peripheral nervous system manifestations in a Sandhoff disease mouse model: nerve conduction, myelin structure, lipid analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strichartz Gary R

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sandhoff disease is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by a mutation in the gene for the β-subunit (Hexb gene of β-hexosaminidase A (αβ and B (ββ. The β-subunit together with the GM2 activator protein catabolize ganglioside GM2. This enzyme deficiency results in GM2 accumulation primarily in the central nervous system. To investigate how abnormal GM2 catabolism affects the peripheral nervous system in a mouse model of Sandhoff disease (Hexb-/-, we examined the electrophysiology of dissected sciatic nerves, structure of central and peripheral myelin, and lipid composition of the peripheral nervous system. Results We detected no significant difference in signal impulse conduction velocity or any consistent change in the frequency-dependent conduction slowing and failure between freshly dissected sciatic nerves from the Hexb+/- and Hexb-/- mice. The low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns from freshly dissected sciatic and optic nerves of Hexb+/- and Hexb-/- mice showed normal myelin periods; however, Hexb-/- mice displayed a ~10% decrease in the relative amount of compact optic nerve myelin, which is consistent with the previously established reduction in myelin-enriched lipids (cerebrosides and sulfatides in brains of Hexb-/- mice. Finally, analysis of lipid composition revealed that GM2 content was present in the sciatic nerve of the Hexb-/- mice (undetectable in Hexb+/-. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate the absence of significant functional, structural, or compositional abnormalities in the peripheral nervous system of the murine model for Sandhoff disease, but do show the potential value of integrating multiple techniques to evaluate myelin structure and function in nervous system disorders.

  14. Acetic acid bacterial lipids improve cognitive function in dementia model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Hiroyuki; Tachimoto, Hideki; Kishi, Mikiya; Kaga, Takayuki; Tanaka, Yasukazu

    2010-04-14

    Acetic acid bacteria, fermentative microorganisms of traditional foods, have unique alkali-stable lipids (ASL), such as dihydroceramide which is a precursor of sphingolipids. Sphingolipids are important components of the brain tissue. We examined the effect of oral administration of ASL in a rat model of dementia (7-week-old, male) with a basal forebrain lesion. In a water maze test, the dementia model rats demonstrated poor spatial orientation. The administration of ASL (165 or 1650 mg/kg of body weight per day, for 14 days) produced a significant improvement in learning ability in the dementia model rats. In vitro experiments showed ASL had the ability to promote neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Among the ASL components, dihydroceramide has the most potent effect on the differentiation of PC12 cells. It is highly possible that oral administration of dihydroceramide-containing ASL reverses the decline in cognitive function in dementia.

  15. The use of D-optimal mixture design in optimising okara soap formulation for stratum corneum application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhan, Farrah Payyadhah; Abd Gani, Siti Salwa; Shamsuddin, Rosnah

    2014-01-01

    Okara, soybean waste from tofu and soymilk production, was utilised as a natural antioxidant in soap formulation for stratum corneum application. D-optimal mixture design was employed to investigate the influence of the main compositions of okara soap containing different fatty acid and oils (virgin coconut oil A (24-28% w/w), olive oil B (15-20% w/w), palm oil C (6-10% w/w), castor oil D (15-20% w/w), cocoa butter E (6-10% w/w), and okara F (2-7% w/w)) by saponification process on the response hardness of the soap. The experimental data were utilized to carry out analysis of variance (ANOVA) and to develop a polynomial regression model for okara soap hardness in terms of the six design factors considered in this study. Results revealed that the best mixture was the formulation that included 26.537% A, 19.999% B, 9.998% C, 16.241% D, 7.633% E, and 7.000% F. The results proved that the difference in the level of fatty acid and oils in the formulation significantly affects the hardness of soap. Depending on the desirable level of those six variables, creation of okara based soap with desirable properties better than those of commercial ones is possible.

  16. The Use of D-Optimal Mixture Design in Optimising Okara Soap Formulation for Stratum Corneum Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrah Payyadhah Borhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Okara, soybean waste from tofu and soymilk production, was utilised as a natural antioxidant in soap formulation for stratum corneum application. D-optimal mixture design was employed to investigate the influence of the main compositions of okara soap containing different fatty acid and oils (virgin coconut oil A (24–28% w/w, olive oil B (15–20% w/w, palm oil C (6–10% w/w, castor oil D (15–20% w/w, cocoa butter E (6–10% w/w, and okara F (2–7% w/w by saponification process on the response hardness of the soap. The experimental data were utilized to carry out analysis of variance (ANOVA and to develop a polynomial regression model for okara soap hardness in terms of the six design factors considered in this study. Results revealed that the best mixture was the formulation that included 26.537% A, 19.999% B, 9.998% C, 16.241% D, 7.633% E, and 7.000% F. The results proved that the difference in the level of fatty acid and oils in the formulation significantly affects the hardness of soap. Depending on the desirable level of those six variables, creation of okara based soap with desirable properties better than those of commercial ones is possible.

  17. Insulin versus Lipid Emulsion in a Rabbit Model of Severe Propranolol Toxicity: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective. Beta-blocker overdose may result in intractable cardiovascular collapse despite conventional antidotal treatments. High dose insulin/glucose (ING, and more recently intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE, have been proposed as potentially beneficial therapies in beta blocker intoxication. We compare efficacy of the novel antidotes ING, with ILE, in a rabbit model of combined enteric/intravenous propranolol toxicity. Methods. Sedated, mechanically ventilated and invasively monitored New Zealand White rabbits underwent mini-laparotomy and enterostomy formation with 40 mg/kg propranolol instilled into the proximal small bowel. At 30 minutes propranolol infusion was commenced at 4 mg/kg/hr and continued to a target mean arterial pressure (MAP of 50% baseline MAP. Animals were resuscitated with insulin at 3 U/kg plus 0.5 g/kg glucose (ING group, or 10 mL/kg 20% Intralipid (ILE group. Results. Rate pressure product (RPP; RPP = heart rate × mean arterial pressure was greatest in the ING group at 60 minutes (P<.05. A trend toward greater heart rate was observed in the ING group (P=.06. No difference was observed in survival between groups (4/5 ING versus 2/5 ILE; P=.524. Conclusions. High dose insulin resulted in greater rate pressure product compared with lipid emulsion in this rabbit model of severe enteric/intravenous propranolol toxicity.

  18. Epiphytic flora on Gelidium corneum (Rhodophyta: Gelidiales in relation to wave exposure and depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endika Quintano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The canopy-forming macroalga Gelidium corneum (Hudson J.V. Lamouroux plays a major role in the functioning of the subtidal ecosystem of the Cantabrian Sea (northern Spain. Despite its importance, little is known about the factors that may potentially affect the distribution pattern of its epiphytic flora. Here we examine two indirect factors: coastal orientation (N and NW and depth (3 and 7 m, as proxies for wave exposure and light availability, respectively. We test their effects on the total epiphytic load, alpha diversity (species richness, Shannon, Simpson and evenness measures and multivariate structure of the epiphytic flora growing on G. corneum in subtidal waters off the Basque coast. Plocamium cartilagineum, Dictyota dichotoma and Acrosorium ciliolatum were found to be the most common epiphytes. Significant interactive effect of coastal orientation and depth were observed for species composition and abundance of epiphytic flora. Increased wave exposure resulted in a lower epiphyte load and a less diverse community, suggesting that under high hydrodynamic conditions epiphytes were more likely to become dislodged from hosts. However, light availability only had a significant effect on the distribution of epiphytes below a certain threshold of wave action, with the epiphytic load being 30-40% greater on shallow bottoms.

  19. From observational to analytical morphology of the stratum corneum: progress avoiding hazardous animal and human testings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard, Gérald E; Courtois, Justine; Ritacco, Caroline; Humbert, Philippe; Fanian, Ferial; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine

    2015-01-01

    In cosmetic science, noninvasive sampling of the upper part of the stratum corneum is conveniently performed using strippings with adhesive-coated discs (SACD) and cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings (CSSSs). Under controlled conditions, it is possible to scrutinize SACD and CSSS with objectivity using appropriate methods of analytical morphology. These procedures apply to a series of clinical conditions including xerosis grading, comedometry, corneodynamics, corneomelametry, corneosurfametry, corneoxenometry, and dandruff assessment. With any of the analytical evaluations, SACD and CSSS provide specific salient information that is useful in the field of cosmetology. In particular, both methods appear valuable and complementary in assessing the human skin compatibility of personal skincare products. A set of quantitative analytical methods applicable to the minimally invasive and low-cost SACD and CSSS procedures allow for a sound assessment of cosmetic effects on the stratum corneum. Under regular conditions, both methods are painless and do not induce adverse events. Globally, CSSS appears more precise and informative than the regular SACD stripping.

  20. Comparison of gravimetric and spectroscopic approaches to quantify stratum corneum removed by tape-stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, D; Yang, Q; Guy, R H; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2012-09-01

    Skin surface tape-stripping is an extensively used technique to examine the distribution profile, penetration and safety of various active compounds. It is also a widely accepted method to probe skin barrier properties and more specifically, those of the stratum corneum (SC). The amount of SC removed by tape-stripping is generally determined either gravimetrically or by extraction and measurement of SC proteins. A novel infra-red densitometry (IRD) technique has recently been introduced to measure SC protein content. In the present study, IRD was investigated as an alternative method to measure the mass of SC removed by tape-stripping. Tape-stripping experiments were conducted on human volunteers. The weight of the stratum corneum removed was assessed by the gravimetric approach and by IRD. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was also measured before and after each tape-strip. A linear correlation coefficient was obtained for the data from the gravimetric and IRD measurements (r(2)=0.65; n=240). IRD is therefore proposed as a rapid, non-destructive alternative to the gravimetric approach to estimate the amount of SC removed by tape-stripping in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Implications of normal and disordered remodeling dynamics of corneodesmosomes in stratum corneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Kitajima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Desmosomes and corneodesmosomes are the most important adhering junctions, providing strength for the epidermal sheet structure made of living keratinocytes and enucleated stratum corneum corneocytes, respectively. These junctions are connected directly with transmembrane desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins (Dsgs, and desmocollins (Dscs; mainly Dsg1/Dsc1 and Dsg3/Dsc3 in desmosomes, and Dsg1/Dsc1 with corneodesmosin in corneodesmosomes. Dsgs and Dscs are associated with several proteins at their inner cytoplasmic domains to anchor keratin intermediate filaments. Desmosomes are not static, but dynamic units that undergo regular remodeling to allow for keratinocyte outward-migration in the epidermis. In corneodesmosomes, this dynamic nature of desmosomes is lost by fixing desmosomal cadherins with corneodesmosin at the intercellular domain of desmosomes and possibly with the formation of peptide bonds by activation of transglutaminase-1 at the intracellular face of desmosomes. Immediately after formation, corneodesmosomes normally commit to degradation, which is complicatedly regulated by proteolytic cleavage of their respective extracellular portions, via kallikrein-regulated peptidases and cathepsins. This proteolytic activity is in turn controlled by a variety of inhibitory agents, including protease inhibitors, cholesterol sulfate, and an acidic gradient. The impairment of protease control causes keratinization disorders. This review focuses on the regulation of corneodesmosome remodeling in relation to disorders of the stratum corneum.

  2. INFLUENCE OF ENALAPRIL, DIGOXIN, ATENOLOL AND DILTIAZEM ON LIPID PEROXIDATION IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF COMPLEX METABOLIC DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Usanova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study influence of enalapril, digoxin, atenolol and diltiazem on lipid peroxidation and antioxidative protection in experimental disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism.Material and methods. White nonlinear mice were used for modeling of the complex metabolic disorders by alloxan and cholesterol infusion. Evaluation of acute drug toxicity and indicators of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection was performed. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, malondialdehyde concentration were evaluated.Results. Toxicity of digoxin, diltiazem, atenolol in complex metabolic disorders was increased, and toxicity of enalapril was unchanged. Enalapril had antioxidant effect. Atenolol had prooxidative effect in myocardium and kidneys, and diltiazem - in kidneys.Conclusion. Enalapril showed antioxidant effect and decreased concentration of secondary products of lipid peroxidation in renal tissue. It may be considered as the first line drug in complex metabolic disorders.

  3. INFLUENCE OF ENALAPRIL, DIGOXIN, ATENOLOL AND DILTIAZEM ON LIPID PEROXIDATION IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF COMPLEX METABOLIC DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Usanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study influence of enalapril, digoxin, atenolol and diltiazem on lipid peroxidation and antioxidative protection in experimental disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism.Material and methods. White nonlinear mice were used for modeling of the complex metabolic disorders by alloxan and cholesterol infusion. Evaluation of acute drug toxicity and indicators of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant protection was performed. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, malondialdehyde concentration were evaluated.Results. Toxicity of digoxin, diltiazem, atenolol in complex metabolic disorders was increased, and toxicity of enalapril was unchanged. Enalapril had antioxidant effect. Atenolol had prooxidative effect in myocardium and kidneys, and diltiazem - in kidneys.Conclusion. Enalapril showed antioxidant effect and decreased concentration of secondary products of lipid peroxidation in renal tissue. It may be considered as the first line drug in complex metabolic disorders.

  4. Off-lattice model for the phase behavior of lipid-cholesterol bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Miao, Ling; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1999-01-01

    Lipid bilayers exhibit a phase behavior that involves two distinct, but coupled, order-disorder processes, one in terms of lipid-chain crystalline packing (translational degrees of freedom) and the other in terms of lipid-chain conformational ordering (internal degrees of freedom). Experiments an...

  5. Lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells: lessons from human inherited disorders and mouse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrast, R.; Saher, G.; Nave, K.A.; Verheijen, M.H.G.

    2011-01-01

    The integrity of central and peripheral nervous system myelin is affected in numerous lipid metabolism disorders. This vulnerability was so far mostly attributed to the extraordinarily high level of lipid synthesis that is required for the formation of myelin, and to the relative autonomy in lipid

  6. Understanding Detergent Effects on Lipid Membranes: A Model Study of Lysolipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Feldborg, Lise Nørkjær

    2010-01-01

    Lysolipids and fatty acids are the natural products formed by the hydrolysis of phospholipids. Lysolipids and fatty acids form micelles in solution and acts as detergents in the presence of lipid membranes. In this study, we investigate the detergent strength of a homologous series of lyso...... in terms of a phenomenological model based on continuum elastic theory, which yields information about the curvature-inducing properties of the LPC molecule. The results reveal: 1), an increase in the partition coefficient with increasing LPC acyl-chain length; and 2), that the degree of acyl......-chain mismatch between LPC and POPC determines the magnitude of the membrane mechanical perturbation per LPC molecule in the membrane. Finally, the three-stage model describing detergent membrane interaction has been extended by a parameter D-MCI, which governs the membrane curvature stability in the detergent...

  7. Infant digestion physiology and the relevance of in vitro biochemical models to test infant formula lipid digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poquet, Laure; Wooster, Tim J

    2016-08-01

    Lipids play an important role in the diet of preterm and term infants providing a key energy source and essential lipid components for development. While a lot is known about adult lipid digestion, our understanding of infant digestion physiology is still incomplete, the greatest gap being on the biochemistry of the small intestine, particularly the activity and relative importance of the various lipases active in the intestine. The literature has been reviewed to identify the characteristics of lipid digestion of preterm and term infants, but also to better understand the physiology of the infant gastrointestinal tract compared to adults that impacts the absorption of lipids. The main differences are a higher gastric pH, submicellar bile salt concentration, a far more important role of gastric lipases as well as differences at the level of the intestinal barrier. Importantly, the consequences of improper in vitro replication of gastric digestions conditions (pH and lipase specificity) are demonstrated using examples from the most recent of studies. It is true that some animal models could be adapted to study infant lipid digestion physiology, however the ethical relevance of such models is questionable, hence the development of accurate in vitro models is a must. In vitro models that combine up to date knowledge of digestion biochemistry with intestinal cells in culture are the best choice to replicate digestion and absorption in infant population, this would allow the adaptation of infant formula for a better digestion and absorption of dietary lipids by preterm and term infants. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Enhancing Alkane Production in Cyanobacterial Lipid Droplets: A Model Platform for Industrially Relevant Compound Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anantha Peramuna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial lipid droplets (LDs are packed with hydrophobic energy-dense compounds and have great potential for biotechnological expression and the compartmentalization of high value compounds. Nostoc punctiforme normally accumulates LDs containing neutral lipids, and small amounts of heptadecane, during the stationary phase of growth. In this study, we further enhanced heptadecane production in N. punctiforme by introducing extrachromosomal copies of aar/adc genes, and report the discovery of a putative novel lipase encoded by Npun_F5141, which further enhanced alkane production. Extra copies of all three genes in high light conditions resulted in a 16-fold higher accumulation of heptadecane compared to the wild type strain in the exponential phase. LD accumulation during exponential phase also increased massively to accommodate the heptadecane production. A large number of small, less fluorescent LDs were observed at the cell periphery in exponential growth phase, whereas fewer number of highly fluorescent, much larger LDs were localized towards the center of the cell in the stationary phase. These advances demonstrate that cyanobacterial LDs are an ideal model platform to make industrially relevant compounds, such as alkanes, during exponential growth, and provide insight into LD formation in cyanobacteria.

  9. Structural mass spectrometry analysis of lipid changes in a Drosophila epilepsy model brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliman, Michal; Vijayakrishnan, Niranjana; Wang, Lily; Tapp, John T; Broadie, Kendal; McLean, John A

    2010-06-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) is one of the most abundant phospholipids in many animal cell types. The Drosophila easily shocked (eas(2)) mutant, used as an epilepsy model, is null for the PtdEtn biosynthetic enzyme, ethanolamine kinase. This mutant displays bang sensitive paralysis, and was previously shown to have decreased levels of PtdEtn. We have developed a highly selective and sensitive measurement strategy using ion mobility-mass spectrometry for the relative quantitation of intact phospholipid species directly from isolated brain tissue of eas mutants. Over 1200 distinct lipid signals are observed and within this population 38, including PtdEtn, phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) species are identified to have changed significantly (p < 0.03) between mutant and control tissue. This method has revealed for the first time the structural complexity and biosynthetic interconnectedness of specific PtdEtn and PtdIns lipid species within tissue, and provides great molecular detail compared to traditionally used detection techniques.

  10. Modeling the effect of nano-sized polymer particles on the properties of lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giulia; Monticelli, Luca

    2014-12-17

    The interaction between polymers and biological membranes has recently gained significant interest in several research areas. On the biomedical side, dendrimers, linear polyelectrolytes, and neutral copolymers find application as drug and gene delivery agents, as biocidal agents, and as platforms for biological sensors. On the environmental side, plastic debris is often disposed of in the oceans and gets degraded into small particles; therefore concern is raising about the interaction of small plastic particles with living organisms. From both perspectives, it is crucial to understand the processes driving the interaction between polymers and cell membranes. In recent times progress in computer technology and simulation methods has allowed computational predictions on the molecular mechanism of interaction between polymeric materials and lipid membranes. Here we review the computational studies on the interaction between lipid membranes and different classes of polymers: dendrimers, linear charged polymers, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and its derivatives, polystyrene, and some generic models of polymer chains. We conclude by discussing some of the technical challenges in this area and future developments.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of acetylcholine receptor-lipid interactions: from model membranes to human biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenziger, John E; daCosta, Corrie J B

    2013-03-01

    Lipids are potent modulators of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Lipids influence nicotinic receptor function by allosteric mechanisms, stabilizing varying proportions of pre-existing resting, open, desensitized, and uncoupled conformations. Recent structures reveal that lipids could alter function by modulating transmembrane α-helix/α-helix packing, which in turn could alter the conformation of the allosteric interface that links the agonist-binding and transmembrane pore domains-this interface is essential in the coupling of agonist binding to channel gating. We discuss potential mechanisms by which lipids stabilize different conformational states in the context of the hypothesis that lipid-nicotinic receptor interactions modulate receptor function at biological synapses.

  12. Comparison of existing models to simulate anaerobic digestion of lipid-rich waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béline, F; Rodriguez-Mendez, R; Girault, R; Bihan, Y Le; Lessard, P

    2017-02-01

    Models for anaerobic digestion of lipid-rich waste taking inhibition into account were reviewed and, if necessary, adjusted to the ADM1 model framework in order to compare them. Experimental data from anaerobic digestion of slaughterhouse waste at an organic loading rate (OLR) ranging from 0.3 to 1.9kgVSm(-3)d(-1) were used to compare and evaluate models. Experimental data obtained at low OLRs were accurately modeled whatever the model thereby validating the stoichiometric parameters used and influent fractionation. However, at higher OLRs, although inhibition parameters were optimized to reduce differences between experimental and simulated data, no model was able to accurately simulate accumulation of substrates and intermediates, mainly due to the wrong simulation of pH. A simulation using pH based on experimental data showed that acetogenesis and methanogenesis were the most sensitive steps to LCFA inhibition and enabled identification of the inhibition parameters of both steps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mathematical Modeling: A Tool for Optimization of Lipid Nanoparticle-Mediated Delivery of siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Radu; Ruhela, Dipali; Keough, Edward; Cherkaev, Elena; Chang, Silvia; Galinski, Beverly; Bartz, René; Brown, Duncan; Howell, Bonnie; Cunningham, James J

    2017-06-16

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have been used to successfully deliver small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to target cells in both preclinical and clinical studies and currently are the leading systems for in vivo delivery. Here, we propose the use of an ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based model as a tool for optimizing LNP-mediated delivery of siRNAs. As a first step, we have used a combination of experimental and computational approaches to develop and validate a mathematical model that captures the critical features for efficient siRNA-LNP delivery in vitro. This model accurately predicts mRNA knockdown resulting from novel combinations of siRNAs and LNPs in vitro. As demonstrated, this model can be effectively used as a screening tool to select the most efficacious LNPs, which can then further be evaluated in vivo. The model serves as a starting point for the future development of next generation models capable of capturing the additional complexity of in vivo delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elena Cherkaev, Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ USA. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo bioluminescence imaging of nanostructured lipid carriers for targeting the brain: apomorphine as a model drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Wen, Chih-Jen; Al-Suwayeh, S. A.; Chang, Hui-Wen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Fang, Jia-You

    2010-10-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared to investigate whether the duration of brain targeting and accumulation of drugs in the brain can be improved by intravenous delivery. NLCs were developed using cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrix, squalene as the cationic surfactant, and Pluronic F68, polysorbate 80 and polyethylene glycol as the interfacial additives. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and lipid emulsions (LEs) were also prepared for comparison. An anti-Parkinson's drug, apomorphine, was used as the model drug. Nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry showed possible interactions between the solid and liquid lipids in the inner core. The lipid nanoparticles with different compositions were characterized by mean size, zeta potential, apomorphine encapsulation and in vitro drug release. NLCs were 370-430 nm in size, which was between the sizes of the SLNs and LEs. A cationic surfactant was used to produce a positive surface charge of 42-50 mV. The base form of apomorphine was successfully entrapped by NLCs with an entrapment percentage of > 60%. The loading of apomorphine in nanoparticles resulted in a slower release behavior compared to the aqueous solution, with LEs showing the lowest release. In vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging of the rat brain revealed that NLCs could be targeted, through certain vessels, to selected brain regions. This effect was further confirmed by imaging the entire brain and brain slices. The results indicated that NLCs with moderate additives are a promising controlled-release and drug-targeting system.

  15. Native and Heated Hydrolysates of Milk Proteins and Their Capacity to Inhibit Lipid Peroxidation in the Zebrafish Larvae Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Wilman; Guzmán, Xavier; Vilcacundo, Edgar

    2017-09-14

    Casein and whey proteins with and without heat treatment were obtained of whole milk and four commercial milks in Ecuador, and were hydrolyzed. Then, their capacity to inhibit the lipid peroxidation using the TBARS method was evaluated at concentrations of 0.02, 0.04, 0.2, and, 0.4 mg/mL. Native and heated hydrolysates of milk proteins present high inhibitions of lipid peroxidation with a dose dependent effect both in vivo and in vitro tests. Casein and whey proteins obtained from whole milk were the ones with the highest anti-oxidant activity in vitro and in vivo test. Native casein hydrolysate at 0.4 mg/mL present a value of 55.55% of inhibition of lipid peroxidation and heated casein hydrolysate at 0.4 mg/mL presents a value of 58.00% of inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Native whey protein at 0.4 mg/mL present a value of 34.84% of inhibition of lipid peroxidation, and heated whey protein at 0.4 mg/mL presents a value of 40.86% of inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Native and heated casein hydrolysates were more active than native and heated whey protein hydrolysates. Heat treatments have an effect of increasing the in vitro inhibition of lipid peroxidation of hydrolysates of milk protein. Casein and whey hydrolysates were able to inhibiting lipid peroxidation in the zebrafish larvae model. Native casein hydrolysate obtained of whole milk presents 48.35% of inhibition TBARS in vivo, this activity was higher in heated casein hydrolysate obtained of whole milk with a value of 56.28% of inhibition TBARS in vivo. Native whey protein hydrolysate obtained of whole milk presents 35.30% of inhibition TBARS, and heated whey protein hydrolysate obtained of whole milk was higher, with a value of 43.60% of inhibition TBARS in vivo.

  16. Lipid metabolic perturbation is an early-onset phenotype in adult spinster mutants: a Drosophila model for lysosomal storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbar, Sarita; Khandelwal, Avinash; Jayashree, R; Hindle, Samantha J; Chiang, Yin Ning; Yew, Joanne Y; Sweeney, Sean T; Schwudke, Dominik

    2017-12-15

    Intracellular accumulation of lipids and swollen dysfunctional lysosomes are linked to several neurodegenerative diseases, including lysosomal storage disorders (LSD). Detailed characterization of lipid metabolic changes in relation to the onset and progression of neurodegeneration is currently missing. We systematically analyzed lipid perturbations in spinster (spin) mutants, a Drosophila model of LSD-like neurodegeneration. Our results highlight an imbalance in brain ceramide and sphingosine in the early stages of neurodegeneration, preceding the accumulation of endomembranous structures, manifestation of altered behavior, and buildup of lipofuscin. Manipulating levels of ceramidase and altering these lipids in spin mutants allowed us to conclude that ceramide homeostasis is the driving force in disease progression and is integral to spin function in the adult nervous system. We identified 29 novel physical interaction partners of Spin and focused on the lipid carrier protein, Lipophorin (Lpp). A subset of Lpp and Spin colocalize in the brain and within organs specialized for lipid metabolism (fat bodies and oenocytes). Reduced Lpp protein was observed in spin mutant tissues. Finally, increased levels of lipid metabolites produced by oenocytes in spin mutants allude to a functional interaction between Spin and Lpp, underscoring the systemic nature of lipid perturbation in LSD. © 2017 Hebbar et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Les enzymes de l'espace extra-cellulaire du stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestier, J P

    1992-04-01

    Synopsis Bien que le stratum corneum soit composé de cellules 'mortes', il est le siège d'une activité métabolique très importante. Mais, contrairement à la plupart d'autres tissus, cette activité a la particularité d'étre extra-cellulaire. Elle est due à des enzymes excrétées par les Corps d'Odland avec les bicouches céramidiques. Ces enzymes sont des hydrolases, elles sont identiques ou très proches de celles des lysosomes. Les principales activités observées correspondent à une (ou des) glycosidase(s), une phospholipase, une sphingomyélinase, une phosphatase, une (ou des) estérase(s), des sulfatases, des protéases. Comme les hydrolases des lysosomes, elles semblent peu spécifiques. Ce pool enzymatique pourrait jouer plusieurs rôles fondamentaux, notamment: 1. La transformation des bicouches gluco-céramidiques en bicouches ceramidiques plus lipophiles; 2. L'élimination de la membrane plasmique, dont certains produits du catabolisme, comme les acides gras et les céramides, peuvent être intégrés aux bicouches céramidiques; 3. La diminution de la cohésion entre les cornéocytes; 4. La protection contre l'intrusion de corps étrangers. Comme tout système enzymatique, les hydrolases extra-cellulaires, sont certainement soumises à des régulations. Plusieurs de ces régulations sont envisagées. A partir de considérations d'enzymologie, le pH de la base du stratum corneum peut être estiméà environ 5. En cosmétologie, les enzymes du stratum corneum sont mises à contribution pour rendre actifs des précurseurs. L'étude des conséquences des modifications de l'activité enzymatique sur l'état de la peau pourrait constituer une future voie de recherche extrêmement prometteuse.

  18. A Mathematical Model of Neutral Lipid Content in terms of Initial Nitrogen Concentration and Validation in Coelastrum sp. HA-1 and Application in Chlorella sorokiniana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are considered to be a potential major biomass feedstock for biofuel due to their high lipid content. However, no correlation equations as a function of initial nitrogen concentration for lipid accumulation have been developed for simplicity to predict lipid production and optimize the lipid production process. In this study, a lipid accumulation model was developed with simple parameters based on the assumption protein synthesis shift to lipid synthesis by a linear function of nitrogen quota. The model predictions fitted well for the growth, lipid content, and nitrogen consumption of Coelastrum sp. HA-1 under various initial nitrogen concentrations. Then the model was applied successfully in Chlorella sorokiniana to predict the lipid content with different light intensities. The quantitative relationship between initial nitrogen concentrations and the final lipid content with sensitivity analysis of the model were also discussed. Based on the model results, the conversion efficiency from protein synthesis to lipid synthesis is higher and higher in microalgae metabolism process as nitrogen decreases; however, the carbohydrate composition content remains basically unchanged neither in HA-1 nor in C. sorokiniana.

  19. Comparative surfactant reactivity of canine and human stratum corneum: a plea for the use of the corneosurfametry bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, V; Fontaine, J; Piérard, G E

    1999-01-01

    Comparative dermatology has paid little attention to the physiopathology of the stratum corneum. In this study, we investigated the responses of human and canine horny layers to marketed animal wash products by using the corneosurfametry bioassay. Previous work has shown that, with increasing surfactant aggressiveness to the stratum corneum, the colorimetric index of mildness (CIM) decreases, while both the corneosurfametry index (CSMI) and the overall difference in corneosurfametry (ODC) increase. In the present study, stratum corneum reactivity to wash products and inter-individual variability were significantly higher in humans than in dogs. For the three corneosurfametry variables, linear correlations were found between data gathered in the two panel groups. In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that mean stratum corneum reactivity to surfactants is stronger in humans than in dogs. Inter-individual variation, indicative of sensitive skin, also appears to be broader in humans. As a consequence, data gathered from dogs by using the corneosurfametry bioassay cannot be extrapolated to humans. Such variation between species could be important in the assessment of product safety and in supporting claims for mildness. 1999 FRAME.

  20. Native and dry-heated lysozyme interactions with membrane lipid monolayers: Lipid packing modifications of a phospholipid mixture, model of the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derde, Melanie; Nau, Françoise; Guérin-Dubiard, Catherine; Lechevalier, Valérie; Paboeuf, Gilles; Jan, Sophie; Baron, Florence; Gautier, Michel; Vié, Véronique

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is currently an important public health issue. The need for innovative antimicrobials is therefore growing. The ideal antimicrobial compound should limit antimicrobial resistance. Antimicrobial peptides or proteins such as hen egg white lysozyme are promising molecules that act on bacterial membranes. Hen egg white lysozyme has recently been identified as active on Gram-negative bacteria due to disruption of the outer and cytoplasmic membrane integrity. Furthermore, dry-heating (7 days and 80 °C) improves the membrane activity of lysozyme, resulting in higher antimicrobial activity. These in vivo findings suggest interactions between lysozyme and membrane lipids. This is consistent with the findings of several other authors who have shown lysozyme interaction with bacterial phospholipids such as phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. However, until now, the interaction between lysozyme and bacterial cytoplasmic phospholipids has been in need of clarification. This study proposes the use of monolayer models with a realistic bacterial phospholipid composition in physiological conditions. The lysozyme/phospholipid interactions have been studied by surface pressure measurements, ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy. Native lysozyme has proved able to absorb and insert into a bacterial phospholipid monolayer, resulting in lipid packing reorganization, which in turn has lead to lateral cohesion modifications between phospholipids. Dry-heating of lysozyme has increased insertion capacity and ability to induce lipid packing modifications. These in vitro findings are then consistent with the increased membrane disruption potential of dry heated lysozyme in vivo compared to native lysozyme. Moreover, an eggPC monolayer study suggested that lysozyme/phospholipid interactions are specific to bacterial cytoplasmic membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Interaction of lysozyme with a tear film lipid layer model: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizert, Alicja; Iskander, D Robert; Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2017-12-01

    The tear film is a thin multilayered structure covering the cornea. Its outermost layer is a lipid film underneath of which resides on an aqueous layer. This tear film lipid layer (TFLL) is itself a complex structure, formed by both polar and nonpolar lipids. It was recently suggested that due to tear film dynamics, TFLL contains inhomogeneities in the form of polar lipid aggregates. The aqueous phase of tear film contains lachrymal-origin proteins, whereby lysozyme is the most abundant. These proteins can alter TFLL properties, mainly by reducing its surface tension. However, a detailed nature of protein-lipid interactions in tear film is not known. We investigate the interactions of lysozyme with TFLL in molecular details by employing coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We demonstrate that lysozyme, due to lateral restructuring of TFLL, is able to penetrate the tear lipid film embedded in inverse micellar aggregates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Akt2 is required for hepatic lipid accumulation in models of insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Leavens, Karla F.; Easton, Rachael M.; Shulman, Gerald I; Previs, Stephen F.; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin drives the global anabolic response to nutrient ingestion, regulating both carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Previous studies have demonstrated that Akt2/protein kinase B is critical to insulin’s control of glucose metabolism, but its role in lipid metabolism has remained controversial. Here we show that Akt2 is required for hepatic lipid accumulation in obese, insulin-resistant states induced by either leptin-deficiency or high fat diet feeding. Lepob/ob mice lacking hepatic Akt2 fa...

  3. From observational to analytical morphology of the stratum corneum: progress avoiding hazardous animal and human testings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piérard GE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gérald E Piérard,1,2 Justine Courtois,1 Caroline Ritacco,1 Philippe Humbert,2,3 Ferial Fanian,3 Claudine Piérard-Franchimont1,4,5 1Laboratory of Skin Bioengineering and Imaging (LABIC, Department of Clinical Sciences, Liège University, Liège, Belgium; 2University of Franche-Comté, Besançon, France; 3Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Saint-Jacques, Besançon, France; 4Department of Dermatopathology, Unilab Lg, University Hospital of Liège, Liège, Belgium; 5Department of Dermatology, Regional Hospital of Huy, Huy, Belgium Background: In cosmetic science, noninvasive sampling of the upper part of the stratum corneum is conveniently performed using strippings with adhesive-coated discs (SACD and cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings (CSSSs. Methods: Under controlled conditions, it is possible to scrutinize SACD and CSSS with objectivity using appropriate methods of analytical morphology. These procedures apply to a series of clinical conditions including xerosis grading, comedometry, corneodynamics, corneomelametry, corneosurfametry, corneoxenometry, and dandruff assessment. Results: With any of the analytical evaluations, SACD and CSSS provide specific salient information that is useful in the field of cosmetology. In particular, both methods appear valuable and complementary in assessing the human skin compatibility of personal skincare products. Conclusion: A set of quantitative analytical methods applicable to the minimally invasive and low-cost SACD and CSSS procedures allow for a sound assessment of cosmetic effects on the stratum corneum. Under regular conditions, both methods are painless and do not induce adverse events. Globally, CSSS appears more precise and informative than the regular SACD stripping. Keywords: irritation, morphometry, quantitative morphology, stripping

  4. Spontaneous adsorption of coiled-coil model peptides K and E to a mixed lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhackova, Kristyna; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; Kirsch, Sonja; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2015-03-26

    A molecular description of the lipid-protein interactions underlying the adsorption of proteins to membranes is crucial for understanding, for example, the specificity of adsorption or the binding strength of a protein to a bilayer, or for characterizing protein-induced changes of membrane properties. In this paper, we extend an automated in silico assay (DAFT) for binding studies and apply it to characterize the adsorption of the model fusion peptides E and K to a mixed phospholipid/cholesterol membrane using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. In addition, we couple the coarse-grained protocol to reverse transformation to atomistic resolution, thereby allowing to study molecular interactions with high detail. The experimentally observed differential binding of the peptides E and K to membranes, as well as the increased binding affinity of helical over unstructered peptides, could be well reproduced using the polarizable Martini coarse-grained (CG) force field. Binding to neutral membranes is shown to be dominated by initial binding of the positively charged N-terminus to the phospholipid headgroup region, followed by membrane surface-aligned insertion of the peptide at the interface between the hydrophobic core of the membrane and its polar headgroup region. Both coarse-grained and atomistic simulations confirm a before hypothesized snorkeling of lysine side chains for the membrane-bound state of the peptide K. Cholesterol was found to be enriched in peptide vicinity, which is probably of importance for the mechanism of membrane fusion. The applied sequential multiscale method, using coarse-grained simulations for the slow adsorption process of peptides to membranes followed by backward transformation to atomistic detail and subsequent atomistic simulations of the preformed peptide-lipid complexes, is shown to be a versatile approach to study the interactions of peptides or proteins with biomembranes.

  5. The interaction of eugenol with cell membrane models at the air-water interface is modulated by the lipid monolayer composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Giulia E G; de Souza, Fernanda S; Lago, João Henrique G; Caseli, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    Eugenol, a natural phenylpropanoid derivative with possible action in biological surfaces as microbicide, anesthetic and antioxidant, was incorporated in lipid monolayers of selected lipids at the air-water interface, representing cell membrane models. Interaction of eugenol with the lipids dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB), and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS) could be inferred by means of surface pressure-area isotherms and Polarization-Modulation Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy. The interaction showed different effects on the different lipids. A higher monolayer expansion was observed for DPPS and DODAB, while more significant effects on the polar groups of the lipids were observed for DPPS and DPPC. These results pointed to the fact that the interaction of eugenol with lipid monolayers at the air-water interface is modulated by the lipid composition, which may be important to comprehend at the molecular level the interaction of this drug with biological surfaces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Mourokh, Lev G [Department of Physics, Queens College, The City University of New York, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electron and proton creation/annihilation operators, taking into account the appropriate Coulomb terms, tunnel couplings, and the interaction with the environment. For the second model, these equations of motion are solved jointly with a Langevin-type equation for the shuttle position. We obtain expressions for the electron and proton currents and determine their dependence on the electron and proton voltage build-ups, on-site charging energies, reorganization energies, temperature, and other system parameters. We show that the quantum yield in our models can be up to 100% and the power-conversion efficiency can reach 35%.

  7. A mathematical model describing the kinetic of cationic liposome production from dried lipid films adsorbed in a multitubular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Torre

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Cationic liposomes are an alternative to DNA non-viral carrier in gene therapy, promoting higher efficiency for transport and delivery into the cells. Liposome production large scale is still a challenge. Among many processes, from dried film adsorbed inside multitubular system promising due its operational simplicity. this field, engineering contributions scarce no mathematical treatment literature describing type of process available. formulation proposed describe kinetic considering wetting disintegration lipid followed by lipids aggregation bilayers generating liposomes. model has fitted experimental data mass thickness, being useful predictions scaling up as well contributing development pharmaceutical products.

  8. Conformations of double-headed, triple-tailed phospholipid oxidation lipid products in model membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermetter, Albin; Kopec, Wojciech; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    Products of phospholipid oxidation can produce lipids with a carbonyl moiety at the end of a shortened lipid acyl tail, such as 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC). The carbonyl tail of POVPC can covalently bond to the free tertiary amine of a phosphatidylethanolamin...

  9. Lipid oxidation promotes acrylamide formation in fat-rich model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capuano, E.; Oliviero, T.; Açar, Ö.; Gökmen, V.; Fogliano, V.

    2010-01-01

    Lipid oxidation is one of the major chemical reactions occurring during food processing or storage and may have a strong impact on the final quality of foods. A significant role of carbonyl compounds derived from lipid oxidation in acrylamide formation has been recently proposed. In this work, the

  10. Testing Models of Fatty Acid Transfer and Lipid Synthesis in Spinach Leaf Using in Vivo Oxygen-18 Labeling1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Mike; Ohlrogge, John

    1999-01-01

    Oxygen-18 labeling has been applied to the study of plant lipid biosynthesis for the first time. [13C218O2]Acetate was incubated with spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves and the 18O content in fatty acid methyl esters isolated from different lipid classes measured by gas chromatography-mass spectometry. Fatty acids isolated from lipids synthesized within the plastid, such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, show an 18O content consistent with the exogenous acetate undergoing a single activation step and with the direct utilization of acyl-acyl carrier protein by the acyl transferases of the chloroplast. In contrast, fatty acids isolated from lipids assembled in the cytosol, such as phosphatidylcholine, show a 50% reduction in the 18O content. This is indicative of export of the fatty acyl groups from the plastid via a free carboxylate anion, and is consistent with the acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase:acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase mediated export mechanism. If this were not the case and the acyl group was transferred directly from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an acyl acceptor on the cytosolic side, there would be either complete retention of 18O or, less likely, complete loss of 18O, but not a 50% loss of 18O. Thus, existing models for fatty acid transfer from the plastid and for spatially separate synthesis of “prokaryotic” and “eukaryotic” lipids have both been confirmed. PMID:10594108

  11. Testing models of fatty acid transfer and lipid synthesis in spinach leaf using in vivo oxygen-18 labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, M.; Ohlrogge, J.

    1999-12-01

    Oxygen-18 labeling has been applied to the study of plant lipid biosynthesis for the first time. [{sup 13}C{sub 2}{sup 18}O{sub 2}]Acetate was incubated with spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves and the {sup 18}O content in fatty acid methyl esters isolated from different lipid classes measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fatty acids isolated from lipids synthesized within the plastid, such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, show an {sup 18}O content consistent with the exogenous acetate undergoing a single activation step and with the direct utilization of acyl-acyl carrier protein by the acyl transferases of the chloroplast. In contrast, fatty acids isolated from lipids assembled in the cytosol, such as phosphatidylcholine, show a 50% reduction in the {sup 18}O content. This is indicative of export of the fatty acyl groups from the plastid via a free carboxylate anion, and is consistent with the acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase:acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase mediated export mechanism. If this were not the case and the acyl group was transferred directly from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an acyl acceptor on the cytosolic side, there would be either complete retention of {sup 18}O or, less likely, complete loss of {sup 18}O, but not a 50% loss of {sup 18}O. Thus, existing models for fatty acid transfer from the plastid and for spatially separate synthesis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic lipids have both been confirmed.

  12. Validation of the narcosis target lipid model for petroleum products: gasoline as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Joy A; Parkerton, Thomas F; Hellweger, Ferdi L; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2005-09-01

    The narcosis target lipid model (NTLM) was used to predict the toxicity of water-accommodated fractions (WAFs) of six gasoline blending streams to algae (Pseudokirchnereilla subcapitata, formerly Selenastrum capricornutum), juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and water flea (Daphnia magna). Gasolines are comprised of hydrocarbons that on dissolution into the aqueous phase are expected to act via narcosis. Aquatic toxicity data were obtained using a lethal-loading test in which WAFs were prepared using different gasoline loadings. The compositions of the gasolines were determined by analysis of C3 to C13 hydrocarbons grouped in classes of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, aromatics, cyclic alkanes, and olefins. A model was developed to compute the concentrations of hydrocarbon blocks in WAFs based on gasoline composition and loading. The model accounts for the volume change of the gasoline, which varies depending on loading and volatilization loss. The predicted aqueous composition of WAFs compared favorably to measurements, and the predicted aqueous concentrations of WAFs were used in the NTLM to predict the aquatic toxicity of the gasolines. For each gasoline loading and species, total toxic units (TUs) were computed with an assumption of additivity. The acute toxicity of gasolines was predicted to within a factor of two for algae and daphnids. Predicted TUs overestimated toxicity to trout because of experimental factors that were not considered in the model. This analysis demonstrates the importance of aliphatic hydrocarbon loss to headspace during WAF preparation and the contribution of both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons test to the toxicity of gasolines in closed systems and loss of aliphatics to headspace during WAF preparation. Model calculations indicate that satisfactory toxicity predictions can be achieved by describing gasoline composition using a limited number of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon blocks with different octanol-water partition

  13. Effect of Centella asiatica on oxidative stress and lipid metabolism in hyperlipidemic animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun; Shu, Ping; Zhang, Youzhi; Lin, Limin; Zhou, Haihong; Xu, Zhentian; Suo, Daqin; Xie, Anzhi; Jin, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia and many other metabolic diseases are related to oxidative stress. Centella asiatica is a traditional Chinese medicine whose antioxidant effect in vitro has been reported. We are interested in whether it possesses this effect in vivo and hence modulates lipid metabolism. Therefore, experiments were carried out on mice and golden hamsters regarding its antioxidant and hypolipidemic effect. We observed that a fraction (CAF3) of the ethanol extract (CAE) of Centella asiatica had a cholesterol decrease of 79% and a triglyceride decrease of 95% in acute mice model, so CAF3 was further investigated in high-fat-fed hamster model. It was shown that CAF3 increased SOD and GSH-Px activities and decreased MDA level, and it also improved TC, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, AST, and ALT levels. L-CAT and SR-BI gene expression in hamsters were increased. Taken together, our data suggest that the CAF3 fraction of Centella asiatica has antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties.

  14. Effect of Centella asiatica on Oxidative Stress and Lipid Metabolism in Hyperlipidemic Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia and many other metabolic diseases are related to oxidative stress. Centella asiatica is a traditional Chinese medicine whose antioxidant effect in vitro has been reported. We are interested in whether it possesses this effect in vivo and hence modulates lipid metabolism. Therefore, experiments were carried out on mice and golden hamsters regarding its antioxidant and hypolipidemic effect. We observed that a fraction (CAF3 of the ethanol extract (CAE of Centella asiatica had a cholesterol decrease of 79% and a triglyceride decrease of 95% in acute mice model, so CAF3 was further investigated in high-fat-fed hamster model. It was shown that CAF3 increased SOD and GSH-Px activities and decreased MDA level, and it also improved TC, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, AST, and ALT levels. L-CAT and SR-BI gene expression in hamsters were increased. Taken together, our data suggest that the CAF3 fraction of Centella asiatica has antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties.

  15. Lipids and skin barrier function - a clinical perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J.M.; Hellgren, Lars; Jemec, G.B.E.

    2008-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) protects us from dehydration and external dangers. Much is known about the morphology of the SC and penetration of drugs through it, but the data are mainly derived from in vitro and animal experiments. In contrast, only a few studies have the human SC lipids as their focus...... and in particular, the role of barrier function in the pathogenesis of skin disease and its subsequent treatment protocols. The 3 major lipids in the SC of importance are ceramides, free fatty acids, and cholesterol. Human studies comparing levels of the major SC lipids in patients with atopic dermatitis...... and healthy controls have suggested a possible role for ceramide 1 and to some extent ceramide 3 in the pathogenesis of the disease. Therapies used in diseases involving barrier disruption have been sparely investigated from a lipid perspective. It has been suggested that ultraviolet light as a treatment...

  16. Renewable Diesel from Algal Lipids: An Integrated Baseline for Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential from a Harmonized Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Fishman, D.; Frank, E. D.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Aden, A.; Coleman, A. M.; Pienkos, P. T.; Skaggs, R. J.; Venteris, E. R.; Wang, M. Q.

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Program has begun an initiative to obtain consistent quantitative metrics for algal biofuel production to establish an 'integrated baseline' by harmonizing and combining the Program's national resource assessment (RA), techno-economic analysis (TEA), and life-cycle analysis (LCA) models. The baseline attempts to represent a plausible near-term production scenario with freshwater microalgae growth, extraction of lipids, and conversion via hydroprocessing to produce a renewable diesel (RD) blendstock. Differences in the prior TEA and LCA models were reconciled (harmonized) and the RA model was used to prioritize and select the most favorable consortium of sites that supports production of 5 billion gallons per year of RD. Aligning the TEA and LCA models produced slightly higher costs and emissions compared to the pre-harmonized results. However, after then applying the productivities predicted by the RA model (13 g/m2/d on annual average vs. 25 g/m2/d in the original models), the integrated baseline resulted in markedly higher costs and emissions. The relationship between performance (cost and emissions) and either productivity or lipid fraction was found to be non-linear, and important implications on the TEA and LCA results were observed after introducing seasonal variability from the RA model. Increasing productivity and lipid fraction alone was insufficient to achieve cost and emission targets; however, combined with lower energy, less expensive alternative technology scenarios, emissions and costs were substantially reduced.

  17. Engineering and validation of a novel lipid thin film for biomembrane modeling in lipophilicity determination of drugs and xenobiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogbonna Udochi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determination of lipophilicity as a tool for predicting pharmacokinetic molecular behavior is limited by the predictive power of available experimental models of the biomembrane. There is current interest, therefore, in models that accurately simulate the biomembrane structure and function. A novel bio-device; a lipid thin film, was engineered as an alternative approach to the previous use of hydrocarbon thin films in biomembrane modeling. Results Retention behavior of four structurally diverse model compounds; 4-amino-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid (ADBA, naproxen (NPX, nabumetone (NBT and halofantrine (HF, representing 4 broad classes of varying molecular polarities and aqueous solubility behavior, was investigated on the lipid film, liquid paraffin, and octadecylsilane layers. Computational, thermodynamic and image analysis confirms the peculiar amphiphilic configuration of the lipid film. Effect of solute-type, layer-type and variables interactions on retention behavior was delineated by 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and quantitative structure property relationships (QSPR. Validation of the lipid film was implemented by statistical correlation of a unique chromatographic metric with Log P (octanol/water and several calculated molecular descriptors of bulk and solubility properties. Conclusion The lipid film signifies a biomimetic artificial biological interface capable of both hydrophobic and specific electrostatic interactions. It captures the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB in the determination of lipophilicity of molecules unlike the pure hydrocarbon film of the prior art. The potentials and performance of the bio-device gives the promise of its utility as a predictive analytic tool for early-stage drug discovery science.

  18. The moisturizing effects of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Sogabe, Atsushi; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants, such as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), are produced by different yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma and have been attracting much attention as new cosmetic ingredients owing to their unique liquid-crystal-forming and moisturizing properties. In this study, the effects of different MEL derivatives on the skin were evaluated in detail using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model and an in vivo human study. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were evaluated on the basis of cell viability. Most MEL derivatives efficiently recovered the viability of the cells and showed high recovery rates (over 80%) comparable with that of natural ceramide. It is interesting that the recovery rate with MEL-A prepared from olive oil was significantly higher than that of MEL-A prepared from soybean oil. The water retention properties of MEL-B were further investigated on human forearm skin in a preliminary study. Compared with the control, the aqueous solution of MEL-B (5 wt%) was estimated to considerably increase the stratum corneum water content in the skin. Moreover, perspiration on the skin surface was clearly suppressed by treatment with the MEL-B solution. These results suggest that MELs are likely to exhibit a high moisturizing action, by assisting the barrier function of the skin. Accordingly, the yeast glycolipids have a strong potential as a new ingredient for skin care products.

  19. Model lipid bilayers mimic non-specific interactions of gold nanoparticles with macrophage plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montis, Costanza; Generini, Viola; Boccalini, Giulia; Bergese, Paolo; Bani, Daniele; Berti, Debora

    2018-04-15

    Understanding the interaction between nanomaterials and biological interfaces is a key unmet goal that still hampers clinical translation of nanomedicine. Here we investigate and compare non-specific interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with synthetic lipid and wild type macrophage membranes. A comprehensive data set was generated by systematically varying the structural and physicochemical properties of the AuNPs (size, shape, charge, surface functionalization) and of the synthetic membranes (composition, fluidity, bending properties and surface charge), which allowed to unveil the matching conditions for the interaction of the AuNPs with macrophage plasma membranes in vitro. This effort directly proved for the first time that synthetic bilayers can be set to mimic and predict with high fidelity key aspects of nanoparticle interaction with macrophage eukaryotic plasma membranes. It then allowed to model the experimental observations according to classical interface thermodynamics and in turn determine the paramount role played by non-specific contributions, primarily electrostatic, Van der Waals and bending energy, in driving nanoparticle-plasma membrane interactions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mesoporous silica for drug delivery: Interactions with model fluorescent lipid vesicles and live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Munmun; Majumdar, Anupa; Jana, Sayantan; Ghosh, Tapas; Pal, Uttam; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Senapati, Dulal

    2018-01-01

    Formulated mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) systems offer the best possible drug delivery system through the release of drug molecules from the accessible pores. In the present investigation, steady state and time resolved fluorescence techniques along with the fluorescence imaging were applied to investigate the interactions of dye loaded MSN with fluorescent unilamellar vesicles and live cells. Here 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospocholine (DMPC) was used to prepare Small Unilamellar Vesicles (SUVs) as the model membrane with fluorescent 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) molecule incorporated inside the lipid bilayer. The interaction of DPH incorporated DMPC membrane with Fluorescein loaded MSN lead to the release of Fluorescein (Fl) dye from the interior pores of MSN systems. The extent of release of Fl and spatial distribution of the DPH molecule has been explored by monitoring steady-state fluorescence intensity and fluorescence lifetime at physiological condition. To investigate the fate of drug molecule released from MSN, fluorescence anisotropy has been used. The drug delivery efficiency of the MSN as a carrier for doxorubicin (DOX), a fluorescent chemotherapeutic drug, has also been investigated at physiological conditions. The study gives a definite confirmation for high uptake and steady release of DOX in primary oral mucosal non-keratinized squamous cells in comparison to naked DOX treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Reconstruction of the microalga Nannochloropsis salina genome-scale metabolic model with applications to lipid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loira, Nicolás; Mendoza, Sebastian; Paz Cortés, María; Rojas, Natalia; Travisany, Dante; Genova, Alex Di; Gajardo, Natalia; Ehrenfeld, Nicole; Maass, Alejandro

    2017-07-04

    Nannochloropsis salina (= Eustigmatophyceae) is a marine microalga which has become a biotechnological target because of its high capacity to produce polyunsaturated fatty acids and triacylglycerols. It has been used as a source of biofuel, pigments and food supplements, like Omega 3. Only some Nannochloropsis species have been sequenced, but none of them benefit from a genome-scale metabolic model (GSMM), able to predict its metabolic capabilities. We present iNS934, the first GSMM for N. salina, including 2345 reactions, 934 genes and an exhaustive description of lipid and nitrogen metabolism. iNS934 has a 90% of accuracy when making simple growth/no-growth predictions and has a 15% error rate in predicting growth rates in different experimental conditions. Moreover, iNS934 allowed us to propose 82 different knockout strategies for strain optimization of triacylglycerols. iNS934 provides a powerful tool for metabolic improvement, allowing predictions and simulations of N. salina metabolism under different media and genetic conditions. It also provides a systemic view of N. salina metabolism, potentially guiding research and providing context to -omics data.

  2. Choline Modulation of the Aβ P1-40 Channel Reconstituted into a Model Lipid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Meleleo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs, implicated in memory and learning, in subjects affected by Alzheimer's disease result altered. Stimulation of α7-nAChRs inhibits amyloid plaques and increases ACh release. β-amyloid peptide (AβP forms ion channels in the cell and model phospholipid membranes that are retained responsible in Alzheimer disease. We tested if choline, precursor of ACh, could affect the AβP1-40 channels in oxidized cholesterol (OxCh and in palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC:Ch lipid bilayers. Choline concentrations of 5 × 10−11 M–1.5 × 10−8 M added to the cis- or trans-side of membrane quickly increased AβP1-40 ion channel frequency (events/min and ion conductance in OxCh membranes, but not in POPC:Ch membranes. Circular Dichroism (CD spectroscopy shows that after 24 and 48 hours of incubation with AβP1-40, choline stabilizes the random coil conformation of the peptide, making it less prone to fibrillate. These actions seem to be specific in that ACh is ineffective either in solution or on AβP1-40 channel incorporated into PLMs.

  3. Growth Mechanism of Lipid-Based Nanodiscs -- a Model Membrane for Studying Kinetics of Particle Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, Mu-Ping; Dizon, Anthony; Li, Ming; Hu, Andrew; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2012-02-01

    Lipid-based nanodiscs composed of long- and short- chain lipids [namely, dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) and dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC)] constantly form at high lipid concentrations and at low temperatures (i.e., below the melting transition temperature of DMPC, TM). The initial size of these nanodiscs (at high total lipid concentration, CL> 20 wt.%) is relatively uniform and of similar dimension (according to dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering experiments), seemingly independent of thermal history. Upon dilution, the nanodiscs slowly coalesce and grow in size with time irreversibly. Our preliminary result shows that the growth rate strongly depends on several parameters such as charge density, CL and temperature. We have also found that the nanodisc coalescence is a reaction limit instead of diffusion limit process through a time-resolved study.

  4. Ionization properties of mixed lipid membranes: a Gouy-Chapman model of the electrostatic-hydrogen bond switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengistu, Demmelash H; Kooijman, Edgar E; May, Sylvio

    2011-08-01

    The dissociation state of phosphatidic acid (PA) in a lipid bilayer is governed by the competition of proton binding and formation of a hydrogen bond through a mechanism termed the electrostatic-hydrogen bond switch. This mechanism has been suggested to provide the basis for the specific recognition of PA by proteins. Even in bare lipid bilayers the electrostatic-hydrogen bond switch is present if the membrane contains lipids like phosphatidylethanolamine that act as hydrogen bond donors. In this case, the dissociation state (pK(a)) of PA depends strongly on membrane composition. In the present work we incorporate the electrostatic-hydrogen bond switch mechanism into the Gouy-Chapman model for a membrane that is composed of PA and a hydrogen bond-donating zwitterionic lipid. To this end, our model integrates into the Gouy-Chapman approach a recently suggested electrostatic model for zwitterionic lipids. Hydrogen bond formation is incorporated phenomenologically as an additional non-electrostatic interaction between the phosphomonoester headgroup of PA and the zwitterionic lipid headgroup. We express the energetics of the composite membrane in terms of a free energy functional whose minimization leads to a modified non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation that we have solved numerically. Our calculations focus on the influence of the membrane environment on the dissociation state of PA. This influence can be expressed as a shift of the second pK(a) of PA, which we calculate as function of membrane composition, following experimental observation. The shift is large and negative if PA is the minor component in the membrane, and it changes over four pH units as function of the mole fraction of PA in the membrane. In contrast, the shift of the second pK(a) of PA remains small and is always positive if the zwitterionic lipid is unable to act as hydrogen bond donor. Hence, we find that the electrostatic-hydrogen bond switch mechanism regulates the dissociation state of PA

  5. Role of Unsaturated Lipid and Ergosterol in Ethanol Tolerance of Model Yeast Biomembranes

    KAUST Repository

    Vanegas, Juan M.

    2012-02-07

    We present a combined atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy study of the behavior of a ternary supported lipid bilayer system containing a saturated lipid (DPPC), an unsaturated lipid (DOPC), and ergosterol in the presence of high ethanol (20 vol %). We find that the fluorescent probe Texas Red DHPE preferentially partitions into the ethanol-induced interdigitated phase, which allows the use of fluorescence imaging to investigate the phase behavior of the system. Atomic force microscopy and fluorescence images of samples with the same lipid mixture show good agreement in sample morphology and area fractions of the observed phases. Using area fractions obtained from fluorescence images over a broad range of compositions, we constructed a phase diagram of the DPPC/DOPC/ergosterol system at 20 vol % ethanol. The phase diagram clearly shows that increasing unsaturated lipid and/or ergosterol protects the membrane by preventing the formation of the interdigitated phase. This result supports the hypothesis that yeast cells increase ergosterol and unsaturated lipid content to prevent interdigitation and maintain an optimal membrane thickness as ethanol concentration increases during anaerobic fermentations. Changes in plasma membrane composition provide an important survival factor for yeast cells to deter ethanol toxicity.

  6. Interactions between HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies and Model Lipid Membranes imaged with AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauscher, Stefan; Hardy, Gregory; Alam, Munir; Shapter, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Lipid membrane interactions with rare, broadly neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), 2F5 and 4E10, play a critical role in HIV-1 neutralization. Our research is motivated by recent immunization studies that have shown that induction of antibodies that avidly bind the gp41-MPER antigen is not sufficient for neutralization. Rather, it is required that antigen designs induce polyreactive antibodies that recognize MPER antigens as well as the viral lipid membrane. However, the mechanistic details of how membrane properties influence NAb-lipid and NAb-antigen interactions remain unknown. Furthermore, it is well established that the native viral membrane is heterogeneous, representing a mosaic of lipid rafts and protein clustering. However, the size, physical properties, and dynamics of these regions are poorly characterized and their potential roles in HIV-1 neutralization are also unknown. To understand how membrane properties contribute to 2F5/4E10 membrane interactions, we have engineered biomimetic supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and use atomic force microscopy to visualize membrane domains, antigen clustering, and antibody-membrane interactions at sub-nanometer z-resolution. Our results show that localized binding of HIV-1 antigens and NAbs occur preferentially with the most fluid membrane domain. This supports the theory that NAbs may interact with regions of low lateral lipid forces that allow antibody insertion into the bilayer.

  7. Intravenous Lipid Emulsion Therapy for Severe Diphenhydramine Toxicity: A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Study in a Swine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Shawn M; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Boudreau, Susan M; Vargas, Toni E; Castaneda, Maria; Zarzabal, Lee A

    2016-02-01

    Diphenhydramine is a moderately lipophilic antihistamine with sodium channel blockade properties. It is consumed recreationally for mild hallucinogenic and hypnotic effects and causes dysrhythmias, seizures, and death with overdose. Intravenous lipid emulsion is a novel agent used to treat lipophilic drug overdose. Two case reports describe clinical improvement with intravenous lipid emulsion after diphenhydramine toxicity, but no prospective studies have been reported. Our objective is to determine whether intravenous lipid emulsion improved hypotension compared with sodium bicarbonate for severe diphenhydramine toxicity in a model of critically ill swine. Twenty-four swine weighing 45 to 55 kg were infused with diphenhydramine at 1 mg/kg per minute until the mean arterial pressure reached 60% of baseline. Subjects were randomized to receive intravenous lipid emulsion (bolus of 7 mL/kg and then 0.25 mL/kg per minute) or sodium bicarbonate (2 mEq/kg plus an equal volume of normal saline solution). We measured pulse rate, systolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, cardiac output, QRS interval, and serum diphenhydramine level. Twelve animals per group provided a power of 0.8 and α of .05 to detect a 50% difference in mean arterial pressure. We assessed differences between groups with a repeated-measures linear model (MIXED) and Kaplan-Meier estimation methods. We compared systolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and cardiac output with repeated measures ANOVA. Baseline weight, hemodynamic parameters, QRS interval, time to hypotension, and diphenhydramine dose required to achieve hypotension were similar between groups. After hypotension was reached, there was no overall difference between intravenous lipid emulsion and sodium bicarbonate groups for cardiac output or QRS intervals; however, there were transient differences in mean arterial pressure and systolic blood pressure, favoring intravenous lipid emulsion (difference: mean arterial pressure

  8. Corneosurfametry: a predictive assessment of the interaction of personal-care cleansing products with human stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard, G E; Goffin, V; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    1994-01-01

    Corneosurfametry is introduced as a noninvasive quantitative test rating the interaction between surfactants and human stratum corneum. It may be used as a predictive irritancy test. Surfactants present in personal-care products elicit multiple effects on the stratum corneum. With upcoming regulations avoiding animal experiments and ethical considerations for human testing, there is a need for new in vitro methods evaluating irritancy. Corneosurfametry entails collection of cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings and short contact time with surfactants followed by staining samples with toluidine blue and basic fuchsin dyes. Measurements are made by reading the color of samples using reflectance colorimetry. The intensity of color increases with irritancy potential of the surfactant. Results are reproducible, and great differences are noted among a series of diluted shampoos, shower gels and facial cleansing gels. Corneosurfametry is proposed as a rapid in vitro method allowing a predictive grading of surfactants related to irritancy.

  9. Interaction study between maltose-modified PPI dendrimers and lipidic model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Dominika; Appelhans, Dietmar; Signorelli, Marco; Wiesner, Brigitte; Fessas, Dimitrios; Scheler, Ulrich; Voit, Brigitte; Maly, Jan

    2015-07-01

    The influence of maltose-modified poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPC/DMPG) (3%) liposomes was studied. Fourth generation (G4) PPI dendrimers with primary amino surface groups were partially (open shell glycodendrimers - OS) or completely (dense shell glycodendrimers - DS) modified with maltose residues. As a model membrane, two types of 100nm diameter liposomes were used to observe differences in the interactions between neutral DMPC and negatively charged DMPC/DMPG bilayers. Interactions were studied using fluorescence spectroscopy to evaluate the membrane fluidity of both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the lipid bilayer and using differential scanning calorimetry to investigate thermodynamic parameter changes. Pulsed-filed gradient NMR experiments were carried out to evaluate common diffusion coefficient of DMPG and DS PPI in D2O when using below critical micelle concentration of DMPG. Both OS and DS PPI G4 dendrimers show interactions with liposomes. Neutral DS dendrimers exhibit stronger changes in membrane fluidity compared to OS dendrimers. The bilayer structure seems more rigid in the case of anionic DMPC/DMPG liposomes in comparison to pure and neutral DMPC liposomes. Generally, interactions of dendrimers with anionic DMPC/DMPG and neutral DMPC liposomes were at the same level. Higher concentrations of positively charged OS dendrimers induced the aggregation process with negatively charged liposomes. For all types of experiments, the presence of NaCl decreased the strength of the interactions between glycodendrimers and liposomes. Based on NMR diffusion experiments we suggest that apart from electrostatic interactions for OS PPI hydrogen bonds play a major role in maltose-modified PPI dendrimer interactions with anionic and neutral model membranes where a contact surface is needed for undergoing multiple H-bond interactions between

  10. Skin permeability enhancement by low frequency sonophoresis: lipid extraction and transport pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Román, R; Merino, G; Kalia, Y N; Naik, A; Guy, R H

    2003-06-01

    The objective of this study was to shed light on the mechanism(s) by which low-frequency ultrasound (20 KHz) enhances the permeability of the skin. The physical effects on the barrier and the transport pathway, in particular, were examined. The amount of lipid removed from the intercellular domains of the stratum corneum following sonophoresis was determined by infrared spectroscopy. Transport of the fluorescent probes nile red and calcein, under the influence of ultrasound, was evaluated by laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The results were compared with the appropriate passive control data and with data obtained from experiments in which the skin was exposed simply to the thermal effects induced by ultrasound treatment. A significant fraction ( approximately 30%) of the intercellular lipids of the stratum corneum, which are principally responsible for skin barrier function, were removed during the application of low-frequency sonophoresis. Although the confocal images from the nile red experiments were not particularly informative, ultrasound clearly and significantly (again, relative to the corresponding controls) facilitated transport of the hydrophilic calcein via discrete permeabilized regions, whereas other areas of the barrier were apparently unaffected. Lipid removal from the stratum corneum is implicated as a factor contributing the observed permeation enhancement effects of low-frequency ultrasound. However, microscopic observations imply that sonophoresis induces localized (aqueous?) permeation pathways at discrete sites. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Anti-Lipid IgG Antibodies Are Produced via Germinal Centers in a Murine Model Resembling Human Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Reséndiz-Mora, Albany; Donis-Maturano, Luis; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Zárate-Neira, Luz; Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Calderón-Amador, Juana; Medina, Yolanda; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are produced in some mycobacterial infections and in certain autoimmune diseases [such as anti-phospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)]. However, few studies have addressed the B cell responses underlying the production of these immunoglobulins. Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are consistently found in a murine model resembling human lupus induced by chlorpromazine-stabilized non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements (NPA). NPA are transitory lipid associations found in the membranes of most cells; when NPA are stabilized they can become immunogenic and induce specific IgG antibodies, which appear to be involved in the development of the mouse model of lupus. Of note, anti-NPA antibodies are also detected in patients with SLE and leprosy. We used this model of lupus to investigate in vivo the cellular mechanisms that lead to the production of anti-lipid, class-switched IgG antibodies. In this murine lupus model, we found plasma cells (Gr1−, CD19−, CD138+) producing NPA-specific IgGs in the draining lymph nodes, the spleen, and the bone marrow. We also found a significant number of germinal center B cells (IgD−, CD19+, PNA+) specific for NPA in the draining lymph nodes and the spleen, and we identified in situ the presence of NPA in these germinal centers. By contrast, very few NPA-specific, extrafollicular reaction B cells (B220+, Blimp1+) were found. Moreover, when assessing the anti-NPA IgG antibodies produced during the experimental protocol, we found that the affinity of these antibodies progressively increased over time. Altogether, our data indicate that, in this murine model resembling human lupus, B cells produce anti-NPA IgG antibodies mainly via germinal centers. PMID:27746783

  12. Protective Effect of a Lipid-Based Preparation from Mycobacterium smegmatis in a Murine Model of Progressive Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de los Angeles García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A more effective vaccine against tuberculosis (TB is urgently needed. Based on its high genetic homology with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the nonpathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium smegmatis (Ms, could be an attractive source of potential antigens to be included in such a vaccine. We evaluated the capability of lipid-based preparations obtained from Ms to provide a protective response in Balb/c mice after challenge with Mtb H37Rv strain. The intratracheal model of progressive pulmonary TB was used to assess the level of protection in terms of bacterial load as well as the pathological changes in the lungs of immunized Balb/c mice following challenge with Mtb. Mice immunized with the lipid-based preparation from Ms either adjuvanted with Alum (LMs-AL or nonadjuvanted (LMs showed significant reductions in bacterial load (P<0.01 compared to the negative control group (animals immunized with phosphate buffered saline (PBS. Both lipid formulations showed the same level of protection as Bacille Calmette and Guerin (BCG. Regarding the pathologic changes in the lungs, mice immunized with both lipid formulations showed less pneumonic area when compared with the PBS group (P<0.01 and showed similar results compared with the BCG group. These findings suggest the potential of LMs as a promising vaccine candidate against TB.

  13. Protective Effect of a Lipid-Based Preparation from Mycobacterium smegmatis in a Murine Model of Progressive Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Maria de los Angeles; Lanio, Maria E.; Tirado, Yanely; Alvarez, Nadine; Puig, Alina; Aguilar, Alicia; Canet, Liem; Mata Espinoza, Dulce; Barrios Payán, Jorge; Sarmiento, María Elena; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Norazmi, Mohd-Nor; Acosta, Armando

    2014-01-01

    A more effective vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) is urgently needed. Based on its high genetic homology with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the nonpathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium smegmatis (Ms), could be an attractive source of potential antigens to be included in such a vaccine. We evaluated the capability of lipid-based preparations obtained from Ms to provide a protective response in Balb/c mice after challenge with Mtb H37Rv strain. The intratracheal model of progressive pulmonary TB was used to assess the level of protection in terms of bacterial load as well as the pathological changes in the lungs of immunized Balb/c mice following challenge with Mtb. Mice immunized with the lipid-based preparation from Ms either adjuvanted with Alum (LMs-AL) or nonadjuvanted (LMs) showed significant reductions in bacterial load (P < 0.01) compared to the negative control group (animals immunized with phosphate buffered saline (PBS)). Both lipid formulations showed the same level of protection as Bacille Calmette and Guerin (BCG). Regarding the pathologic changes in the lungs, mice immunized with both lipid formulations showed less pneumonic area when compared with the PBS group (P < 0.01) and showed similar results compared with the BCG group. These findings suggest the potential of LMs as a promising vaccine candidate against TB. PMID:25548767

  14. Lipidomics revealed idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis-induced hepatic lipid disorders corrected with treatment of baicalin in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changfeng; Wang, Yiqi; Fan, Yongsheng; Li, Haichang; Wang, Chunyan; Zhang, Jida; Zhang, Shuijuan; Han, Xianlin; Wen, Chengping

    2015-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal lung disease. The current standard treatment with glucocorticoids (GCs) leads to many adverse effects, and its effectiveness is questionable. Thus, it is critical and urgent to find new drug(s) for treatment of IPF. Baicalin (BAI) is an attractive candidate for this purpose. Herein, utilizing shotgun lipidomics, we revealed that IPF could lead to a lipid disorder of the liver in an animal model induced by bleomycin and confirmed through histopathological studies of the lung. Lipidomics further demonstrated that this disorder could virtually be corrected after treatment with BAI, but not with dexamethasone (DEX) (a commonly used GC for treatment of IPF). In contrast, the treatment with DEX did not improve IPF but led to tremendous alterations in hepatic lipidomes and accumulation of fat in the liver, which was very different from the lipid disorder induced by IPF. The underpinning mechanisms of the IPF-resultant lipid disorder and DEX-induced lipotoxicity as revealed by shotgun lipidomics were extensively discussed. Taken together, the current study showed that IPF could lead to hepatic lipid disorder, which can be treated with BAI, and demonstrated that lipidomics could be a powerful tool for drug screening.

  15. Skin capacitance imaging and corneosurfametry. A comparative assessment of the impact of surfactants on stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhauflaire-Uhoda, Emmanuelle; Loussouarn, Geneviève; Haubrechts, Christelle; Léger, Didier Saint; Piérard, Gérald E

    2006-05-01

    Silicon image sensor (SIS) technology was recently introduced as an innovative tool (SkinChip, L'Oréal) providing sensitive imaging of the skin capacitance. This method can detect discrete focal variations in skin surface hydration, and thus early discrete manifestations of skin irritation induced by surfactants. In the present in vivo study, 2 neat and diluted shampoos, and 5% and 10% sodium laurylsulfate solutions were tested on human skin. Each surfactant solution was gently rubbed on the skin using wet hair wicks mimicking the casual use of a shampoo on the scalp. Clinical and SIS evaluations were carried out. In addition, the same products were tested using the ex vivo corneosurfametry bioassay performed on human stratum corneum (SC) harvested by cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings. The colourimetric index of mildness (CIM) was measured on these samples. The product reactivity with the SC was recognized by darker skin capacitance images, and by both lowered SkinChip-generated values and lowered CIM values. The extent in changes varied according to the nature of the test products and their concentrations. The SkinChip image changes likely corresponded to the acute surfactant-induced water swelling of the corneocytes. Skin capacitance imaging and corneosurfametry allow to disclose discrete surfactant-induced alterations of corneocytes.

  16. Lipidomics Revealed Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis-Induced Hepatic Lipid Disorders Corrected with Treatment of Baicalin in a Murine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Changfeng; Wang,Yiqi; Fan, Yongsheng; Li, Haichang; WANG, CHUNYAN; Zhang, Jida; Zhang, Shuijuan; Han, Xianlin; Wen, Chengping

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal lung disease. The current standard treatment with glucocorticoids (GCs) leads to many adverse effects, and its effectiveness is questionable. Thus, it is critical and urgent to find new drug(s) for treatment of IPF. Baicalin (BAI) is an attractive candidate for this purpose. Herein, utilizing shotgun lipidomics, we revealed that IPF could lead to a lipid disorder of the liver in an animal model induced by bleomycin and confirmed through histopath...

  17. Modelling of noble anaesthetic gases and high hydrostatic pressure effects in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovitz, Yevgeny; Yang, Hui

    2015-03-21

    Our objective was to study molecular processes that might be responsible for inert gas narcosis and high-pressure nervous syndrome. The classical molecular dynamics trajectories (200 ns) of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers simulated by the Berger force field were evaluated for water and the atomic distribution of noble gases around DOPC molecules in the pressure range of 1-1000 bar and at a temperature of 310 K. Xenon and argon have been tested as model gases for general anaesthetics, and neon has been investigated for distortions that are potentially responsible for neurological tremors in hyperbaric conditions. The analysis of stacked radial pair distribution functions of DOPC headgroup atoms revealed the explicit solvation potential of the gas molecules, which correlates with their dimensions. The orientational dynamics of water molecules at the biomolecular interface should be considered as an influential factor, while excessive solvation effects appearing in the lumen of membrane-embedded ion channels could be a possible cause of inert gas narcosis. All the noble gases tested exhibit similar order parameter patterns for both DOPC acyl chains, which are opposite of the patterns found for the order parameter curve at high hydrostatic pressures in intact bilayers. This finding supports the 'critical volume' hypothesis of anaesthesia pressure reversal. The irregular lipid headgroup-water boundary observed in DOPC bilayers saturated with neon in the pressure range of 1-100 bar could be associated with the possible manifestation of neurological tremors at the atomic scale. The non-immobiliser neon also demonstrated the highest momentum impact on the normal component of the DOPC diffusion coefficient representing the monolayer undulation rate, which indicates that enhanced diffusivity rather than atomic size is the key factor.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes. Copyright © 2013

  19. Effects of lipid chain length on the surface properties of alkylaminomethyl rutin and of its mixture with model lecithin membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fang; Lin, Yi; Li, Ruixia; Tang, Guoqing; Wu, Dacheng

    2011-10-01

    Three model flavonoid-based bioactive molecules with different lipid chain lengths (RuCn: n=8, 12, 18) were newly synthesized. The surface properties [surface pressure (π)-area (A), surface potential (ΔV)-surface pressure (π) and dipole moment (u(⊥))-surface pressure (π)] of pure RuCn and the lecithin membrane compounds had been investigated by using the Langmuir monolayer technology. The results suggested that the distinctive monolayer behavior of RuCn is strongly dependent on the lipid chain length. The great differences in the monolayer properties brought by the lipid chain length could be attributed to two major factors: (i) the ionization degree of the bulky hydrophilic head group (including hydroxyl and NH groups) alters its local field solely via the surface potential; (ii) tring molecular (or dipole) packing density within monolayers. The excess Gibbs energy (ΔG((ex))) calculated for the RuCn-lecithin mixed monolayers infers that higher stability of the mixed monolayer can be strengthened as the lipid chain length decreases. And the addition of RuCn into lecithin membrane may increase the total u(⊥) of the binary mixed monolayers, which could inhibit the hydration of the lecithin's hydrophilic head groups. The shorter the lipid chain length of RuCn (e.g., RuC8) is, the higher the surface activity can be. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the application of such class of biomolecules in the functional food, cosmetics and medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. RNA-Seq transcriptomic analysis with Bag2D software identifies key pathways enhancing lipid yield in a high lipid-producing mutant of the non-model green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lina; Tan, Tin Wee; Ng, Yi-Kai; Ban, Kenneth Hon Kim; Shen, Hui; Lin, Huixin; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2015-01-01

    For many years, increasing demands for fossil fuels have met with limited supply. As a potential substitute and renewable source of biofuel feedstock, microalgae have received significant attention. However, few of the current algal species produce high lipid yields to be commercially viable. To discover more high yielding strains, next-generation sequencing technology is used to elucidate lipid synthetic pathways and energy metabolism involved in lipid yield. When subjected to manipulation by genetic and metabolic engineering, enhancement of such pathways may further enhance lipid yield. In this study, transcriptome profiling of a random insertional mutant with enhanced lipid production generated from a non-model marine microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta is presented. D9 mutant has a lipid yield that is 2- to 4-fold higher than that of wild type. Using novel Bag2D-workflow scripts developed and reported here, the non-redundant transcripts from de novo assembly were annotated based on the best hits in five model microalgae, namely Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Coccomyxa subellipsoidea C-169, Ostreococcus lucimarinus, Volvox carteri, Chlorella variabilis NC64A and a high plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. The assembled contigs (~181 Mb) includes 481,381 contigs, covering 10,185 genes. Pathway analysis showed that a pathway from inositol phosphate metabolism to fatty acid biosynthesis is the most significantly correlated with higher lipid yield in this mutant. Herein, we described a pipeline to analyze RNA-Seq data without pre-existing transcriptomic information. The draft transcriptome of D. tertiolecta was constructed and annotated, which offered useful information for characterizing high lipid-producing mutants. D. tertiolecta mutant was generated with an enhanced photosynthetic efficiency and lipid production. RNA-Seq data of the mutant and wild type were compared, providing biological insights into the expression patterns of contigs associated with energy

  1. Enhancement of Lipid Productivity in Oleaginous Colletotrichum Fungus through Genetic Transformation Using the Yeast CtDGAT2b Gene under Model-Optimized Growth Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Prabuddha; Mall, Nikunj; Chattopadhyay, Atrayee; Chakraborty, Monami; Maiti, Mrinal K.

    2014-01-01

    Oleaginous fungi are of special interest among microorganisms for the production of lipid feedstocks as they can be cultured on a variety of substrates, particularly waste lingocellulosic materials, and few fungal strains are reported to accumulate inherently higher neutral lipid than bacteria or microalgae. Previously, we have characterized an endophytic filamentous fungus Colletotrichum sp. DM06 that can produce total lipid ranging from 34% to 49% of its dry cell weight (DCW) upon growing with various carbon sources and nutrient-stress conditions. In the present study, we report on the genetic transformation of this fungal strain with the CtDGAT2b gene, which encodes for a catalytically efficient isozyme of type-2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) from oleaginous yeast Candida troplicalis SY005. Besides the increase in size of lipid bodies, total lipid titer by the transformed Colletotrichum (lipid content ∼73% DCW) was found to be ∼1.7-fold more than the wild type (lipid content ∼38% DCW) due to functional activity of the CtDGAT2b transgene when grown under standard condition of growth without imposition of any nutrient-stress. Analysis of lipid fractionation revealed that the neutral lipid titer in transformants increased up to 1.8-, 1.6- and 1.5-fold compared to the wild type when grown under standard, nitrogen stress and phosphorus stress conditions, respectively. Lipid titer of transformed cells was further increased to 1.7-fold following model-based optimization of culture conditions. Taken together, ∼2.9-fold higher lipid titer was achieved in Colletotrichum fungus due to overexpression of a rate-limiting crucial enzyme of lipid biosynthesis coupled with prediction-based bioprocess optimization. PMID:25375973

  2. Influence of isoform-specific Ras lipidation motifs on protein partitioning and dynamics in model membrane systems of various complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Nelli; Patra, Satyajit; Dwivedi, Mridula; Weise, Katrin; Winter, Roland

    2017-05-01

    The partitioning of the lipidated signaling proteins N-Ras and K-Ras4B into various membrane systems, ranging from single-component fluid bilayers, binary fluid mixtures, heterogeneous raft model membranes up to complex native-like lipid mixtures (GPMVs) in the absence and presence of integral membrane proteins have been explored in the last decade in a combined chemical-biological and biophysical approach. These studies have revealed pronounced isoform-specific differences regarding the lateral distribution in membranes and formation of protein-rich membrane domains. In this context, we will also discuss the effects of lipid head group structure and charge density on the partitioning behavior of the lipoproteins. Moreover, the dynamic properties of N-Ras and K-Ras4B have been studied in different model membrane systems and native-like crowded milieus. Addition of crowding agents such as Ficoll and its monomeric unit, sucrose, gradually favors clustering of Ras proteins in forming small oligomers in the bulk; only at very high crowder concentrations association is disfavored.

  3. Towards better modelling of drug-loading in solid lipid nanoparticles: Molecular dynamics, docking experiments and Gaussian Processes machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathout, Rania M; Metwally, Abdelkader A

    2016-11-01

    This study represents one of the series applying computer-oriented processes and tools in digging for information, analysing data and finally extracting correlations and meaningful outcomes. In this context, binding energies could be used to model and predict the mass of loaded drugs in solid lipid nanoparticles after molecular docking of literature-gathered drugs using MOE® software package on molecularly simulated tripalmitin matrices using GROMACS®. Consequently, Gaussian processes as a supervised machine learning artificial intelligence technique were used to correlate the drugs' descriptors (e.g. M.W., xLogP, TPSA and fragment complexity) with their molecular docking binding energies. Lower percentage bias was obtained compared to previous studies which allows the accurate estimation of the loaded mass of any drug in the investigated solid lipid nanoparticles by just projecting its chemical structure to its main features (descriptors). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Atomistic simulations of anionic Au-144(SR)(60) nanoparticles interacting with asymmetric model lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    , it forms relatively weak contacts with the zwitterionic head groups (in particular choline) of the phosphatidylcholine lipids. Consequently, AuNP- does not immerse deeply in the leaflet, enabling, e.g., lateral diffusion of the nanoparticle along the surface. On the cytosolic side, AuNP- remains...

  5. Major Alterations of Phosphatidylcholine and Lysophosphotidylcholine Lipids in the Substantia Nigra Using an Early Stage Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Farmer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal pathway, where patients do not manifest motor symptoms until >50% of neurons are lost. Thus, it is of great importance to determine early neuronal changes that may contribute to disease progression. Recent attention has focused on lipids and their role in pro- and anti-apoptotic processes. However, information regarding the lipid alterations in animal models of PD is lacking. In this study, we utilized high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and novel HPLC solvent methodology to profile phosphatidylcholines and sphingolipids within the substantia nigra. The ipsilateral substantia nigra pars compacta was collected from rats 21 days after an infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, or vehicle into the anterior dorsal striatum. We identified 115 lipid species from their mass/charge ratio using the LMAPS Lipid MS Predict Database. Of these, 19 lipid species (from phosphatidylcholine and lysophosphotidylcholine lipid classes were significantly altered by 6-OHDA, with most being down-regulated. The two lipid species that were up-regulated were LPC (16:0 and LPC (18:1, which are important for neuroinflammatory signalling. These findings provide a first step in the characterization of lipid changes in early stages of PD-like pathology and could provide novel targets for early interventions in PD.

  6. Major Alterations of Phosphatidylcholine and Lysophosphotidylcholine Lipids in the Substantia Nigra Using an Early Stage Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kyle; Smith, Catherine A.; Hayley, Shawn; Smith, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal pathway, where patients do not manifest motor symptoms until >50% of neurons are lost. Thus, it is of great importance to determine early neuronal changes that may contribute to disease progression. Recent attention has focused on lipids and their role in pro- and anti-apoptotic processes. However, information regarding the lipid alterations in animal models of PD is lacking. In this study, we utilized high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) and novel HPLC solvent methodology to profile phosphatidylcholines and sphingolipids within the substantia nigra. The ipsilateral substantia nigra pars compacta was collected from rats 21 days after an infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), or vehicle into the anterior dorsal striatum. We identified 115 lipid species from their mass/charge ratio using the LMAPS Lipid MS Predict Database. Of these, 19 lipid species (from phosphatidylcholine and lysophosphotidylcholine lipid classes) were significantly altered by 6-OHDA, with most being down-regulated. The two lipid species that were up-regulated were LPC (16:0) and LPC (18:1), which are important for neuroinflammatory signalling. These findings provide a first step in the characterization of lipid changes in early stages of PD-like pathology and could provide novel targets for early interventions in PD. PMID:26274953

  7. Digestibility of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) Protein Concentrate and Its Potential to Inhibit Lipid Peroxidation in the Zebrafish Larvae Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilcacundo, R; Barrio, D; Carpio, C; García-Ruiz, A; Rúales, J; Hernández-Ledesma, B; Carrillo, W

    2017-09-01

    Quinoa protein concentrate (QPC) was extracted and digested under in vitro gastrointestinal conditions. The protein content of QPC was in the range between 52.40 and 65.01% depending on the assay used. Quinoa proteins were almost completely hydrolyzed by pepsin at pH of 1.2, 2.0, and 3.2. At high pH, only partial hydrolysis was observed. During the duodenal phase, no intact proteins were visible, indicating their susceptibility to the in vitro simulated digestive conditions. Zebrafish larvae model was used to evaluate the in vivo ability of gastrointestinal digests to inhibit lipid peroxidation. Gastric digestion at pH 1.2 showed the highest lipid peroxidation inhibition percentage (75.15%). The lipid peroxidation activity increased after the duodenal phase. The digest obtained at the end of the digestive process showed an inhibition percentage of 82.10%, comparable to that showed when using BHT as positive control (87.13%).

  8. 3,5-Diiodo-L-Thyronine Modifies the Lipid Droplet Composition in a Model of Hepatosteatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grasselli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fatty acids are the main energy stores and the major membrane components of the cells. In the hepatocyte, fatty acids are esterified to triacylglycerols (TAGs and stored in lipid droplets (LDs. The lipid lowering action of 3,5-diiodo-L-thyronine (T2 on an in vitro model of hepatosteatosis was investigated in terms of fatty acid and protein content of LDs, lipid oxidation and secretion. Methods: FaO cells were exposed to oleate/palmitate, then treated with T2. Results: T2 reduced number and size of LDs, and modified their acyl composition by decreasing the content of saturated (SFA vs monounsaturated (MUFA fatty acids thus reversing the SFA/MUFA ratio. The expression of the LD-associated proteins adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP, oxidative tissue-enriched PAT protein (OXPAT, and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL was increased in ‘steatotic' cells and further up-regulated by T2. Moreover, T2 stimulated the mitochondrial oxidation by up-regulating carnitine-palmitoyl-transferase (CPT1, uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 and very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (VLCAD. Conclusions: T2 leads to mobilization of TAGs from LDs and stimulates mitochondrial oxidative metabolism of fatty acids, in particular of SFAs, and thus enriches of MUFAs the LDs. This action may protect the hepatocyte from excess of SFAs that are more toxic than MUFAs.

  9. Isolation, characterization, molecular cloning and modeling of a new lipid transfer protein with antiviral and antiproliferative activities from Narcissus tazetta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Linda S M; Tian, Li; Su, Miaoxian; Ho, Wing-Shan; Sun, Samuel S M; Chung, Hau-Yin; Wong, Henry N C; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2008-12-01

    A fetuin-binding peptide with a molecular mass of about 9kDa (designated NTP) was isolated and purified from the bulbs of Chinese daffodil, Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis L., by gel filtration and high-performance liquid chromatography, after removing the mannose-binding proteins by mannose-agarose column. Molecular cloning revealed that NTP contained an open reading frame of 354bp encoding a polypeptide of 118 amino acids which included a 26-amino-acid signal peptide. An analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of NTP shows considerable sequence homology to the non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) of certain plants. Model of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of NTP exhibits an internal hydrophobic cavity which can bind lipid-like molecules and transfer a wide range of ligands. As a member of the putative non-specific lipid transfer protein of N. tazetta, NTP did not possess hemagglutinating activity toward rabbit erythrocytes. In a cell-free system, it could arrest the protein synthesis of rabbit reticulocytes. Using the in vitro antiviral assays, NTP could significantly inhibit the plaque formation by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and the cytopathic effect induced by influenza A (H1N1) virus, as well as the proliferation of human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60).

  10. Altered expression patterns of lipid metabolism genes in an animal model of HCV core-related, nonobese, modest hepatic steatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ming-Ling

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because the gene expression patterns of nonobese hepatic steatosis in affected patients remain unclear, we sought to explore these patterns using an animal model of nonobese hepatic steatosis. Methods We developed mice that conditionally express the hepatitis C virus (HCV core protein regulated by the tetracycline transactivator (tTA. Microarray analyses and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed using liver samples of both the double transgenic mice (DTM, which express both the HCV core and tTA, and single transgenic mice (STM, which express tTA alone, at 2 months of age. Functional categories of genes with altered expression were classified using gene ontology programs. Serum glucose, lipid levels, and systemic blood pressure were also measured. Results Approximately 20–30% of hepatocytes from the DTM were steatotic. No significant differences were observed in the serum glucose, lipid content, or blood pressure levels between the DTM and STM. Gene expression analyses revealed Sterol-regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP pathway activation and dysregulation of the following genes involved in lipid metabolism: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1, Apolipoprotein AII, Apolipoprotein CI, acyl-CoA thioesterase I, and fatty acid binding protein 1; in mitochondrial function: solute carrier family 25 member 25 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II; in immune reaction: complement component 3, lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus A, lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus C, lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus D, and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus E. Conclusion Some genes of lipid metabolism, mitochondrial function, and immune reaction and the SREBP pathway are involved in HCV core-related, nonobese, modest hepatic steatosis.

  11. Model steatogenic compounds (amiodarone, valproic acid, and tetracycline alter lipid metabolism by different mechanisms in mouse liver slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Szalowska

    Full Text Available Although drug induced steatosis represents a mild type of hepatotoxicity it can progress into more severe non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Current models used for safety assessment in drug development and chemical risk assessment do not accurately predict steatosis in humans. Therefore, new models need to be developed to screen compounds for steatogenic properties. We have studied the usefulness of mouse precision-cut liver slices (PCLS as an alternative to animal testing to gain more insight into the mechanisms involved in the steatogenesis. To this end, PCLS were incubated 24 h with the model steatogenic compounds: amiodarone (AMI, valproic acid (VA, and tetracycline (TET. Transcriptome analysis using DNA microarrays was used to identify genes and processes affected by these compounds. AMI and VA upregulated lipid metabolism, whereas processes associated with extracellular matrix remodelling and inflammation were downregulated. TET downregulated mitochondrial functions, lipid metabolism, and fibrosis. Furthermore, on the basis of the transcriptomics data it was hypothesized that all three compounds affect peroxisome proliferator activated-receptor (PPAR signaling. Application of PPAR reporter assays classified AMI and VA as PPARγ and triple PPARα/(β/δ/γ agonist, respectively, whereas TET had no effect on any of the PPARs. Some of the differentially expressed genes were considered as potential candidate biomarkers to identify PPAR agonists (i.e. AMI and VA or compounds impairing mitochondrial functions (i.e. TET. Finally, comparison of our findings with publicly available transcriptomics data showed that a number of processes altered in the mouse PCLS was also affected in mouse livers and human primary hepatocytes exposed to known PPAR agonists. Thus mouse PCLS are a valuable model to identify early mechanisms of action of compounds altering lipid metabolism.

  12. Diet and serum lipids in vegan vegetarians: a model for risk reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnicow, K; Barone, J; Engle, A; Miller, S; Haley, N J; Fleming, D; Wynder, E

    1991-04-01

    The lipid levels and dietary habits of 31 Seventh-Day Adventist vegan vegetarians (aged 5 to 46 years) who consume no animal products were assessed. Mean serum total cholesterol (3.4 mmol/L), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (1.8 mmol/L), and triglyceride (0.8 mmol/L) levels were lower than expected values derived from the Lipid Research Clinics Population Studies prevalence data. Mean high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (1.3 mmol/L) was comparable to expected values. Analysis of quantitative food frequency data showed that vegans had a significantly lower daily intake of total energy, percentage of energy from fat (31% vs 38%), total fat, saturated fat, monounsaturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and protein and a significantly higher intake of fiber than a sample of matched omnivore controls. Vegans' food intake was also compared with expected values, matched for sex and age, derived from the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals 24-hour recall data. The vegan diet was characterized by increased consumption of almonds, cashews, and their nut butters; dried fruits; citrus fruits; soy milk; and greens. We conclude from the present study that a strict vegan diet, which is typically very low in saturated fat and dietary cholesterol and high in fiber, can help children and adults maintain or achieve desirable blood lipid levels.

  13. Cutaneous water loss and sphingolipids in the stratum corneum of house sparrows, Passer domesticus L., from desert and mesic environments as determined by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure photospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Ro, Jennifer; Brown, Johnie C; Williams, Joseph B

    2008-02-01

    Because cutaneous water loss (CWL) represents half of total water loss in birds, selection to reduce CWL may be strong in desert birds. We previously found that CWL of house sparrows from a desert population was about 25% lower than that of individuals from a mesic environment. The stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis, serves as the primary barrier to water vapor diffusion through the skin. The avian SC is formed by layers of corneocytes embedded in a lipid matrix consisting of cholesterol, free fatty acids and two classes of sphingolipids, ceramides and cerebrosides. The SC of birds also serves a thermoregulatory function; high rates of CWL keep body temperatures under lethal limits in episodes of heat stress. In this study, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC/APPI-MS) to identify and quantify over 200 sphingolipids in the SC of house sparrows from desert and mesic populations. Principal components analysis (PCA) led to the hypotheses that sphingolipids in the SC of desert sparrows have longer carbon chains in the fatty acid moiety and are more polar than those found in mesic sparrows. We also tested the association between principal components and CWL in both populations. Our study suggested that a reduction in CWL found in desert sparrows was, in part, the result of modifications in chain length and polarity of the sphingolipids, changes that apparently determine the interactions of the lipid molecules within the SC.

  14. Leaching from the stratum corneum does not explain the previously reported elevated potassium ion concentration in sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Michael J; Stone, Michael; Cannon, Daniel T

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if K+ is leached from the stratum corneum when sweat is present on the skin's surface. The results will help address whether sweat [K+] previously reported in the literature are artifactually elevated as a result of K+ leaching. Twelve (six female, six male) healthy volunteers participated in this study. After thorough skin cleansing and preparation with isopropyl alcohol and high-performance liquid chromatography-grade distilled water, three sites were chosen and a 50 μL drop of artificial sweat was pipetted directly onto the skin. The artificial sweat had a [K+] of 4 mEq·L-1, an osmolality of 120 mosm·L-1, and a pH of 6.0. Immediately following, a clear plastic cover slip (~6 cm2) with a shallow 0.8 cm2 convex impression in the center was applied over each drop, preventing evaporation. Each sample was allowed to sit on the forearm, under the plastic cover slip, for 10 min. The mean (±SD) [K+] in 'artificial' sweat not exposed to the skin was measured to be 4.2±0.4 mEq·L-1. After 10 min of exposure to the stratum corneum of the forearm, the artificial sweat had a mean (±SD) [K+] of 3.9±0.3 mEq·L-1. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the [K+] between the control artificial sweat and the samples collected after 10 min of exposure to forearm skin. These results do not support the hypothesis that significant K+ leaching from the stratum corneum into standing sweat is the cause for the previously reported elevated sweat [K+].

  15. A new PAMPA model using an in-house brain lipid extract for screening the blood-brain barrier permeability of drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicker, Joana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Falcão, Amílcar

    2016-03-30

    The determination of the permeability of drug candidates across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a fundamental step during drug discovery programs. The parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) is a high throughput screening tool applied to evaluate the passive permeability and adapted to predict BBB penetration. Herein, a new PAMPA model was developed using an in-house brain lipid extract capable of discriminating BBB permeable from non-permeable compounds. The apparent permeability (Papp) of 18 reference molecules and 10 test compounds was assessed and compared with phosphatidylcholine and commercial porcine polar brain lipid (PBL). The physicochemical selectivity of the in-house brain lipid extract was demonstrated by correlating Papp values with physicochemical properties and its predictive capacity estimated by establishing in vitro-in vivo correlations. The strong correlations achieved between 2% (w/v) in-house lipid extract and PBL for reference (r(2)=0.77) and test compounds (r(2)=0.94) support an equivalent discriminatory capacity and validate the presented model. Moreover, PAMPA studies performed with PBL and in-house lipid extract exhibited a higher correlation with the in vivo parameter logBB (r(2)=0.76 and r(2)=0.72, respectively) than phosphatidylcholine (r(2)=0.51). Overall, the applied lipid extraction process was reproducible, economical and provided lipid extracts that can be used to reliably assess BBB permeation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Influence of niacinamide containing formulations on the molecular and biophysical properties of the stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, D; Crowther, J M; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2013-01-30

    Niacinamide-containing moisturisers are known be efficacious in alleviating dry skin conditions and improving stratum corneum (SC) barrier function. However, the mechanisms of action of niacinamide at the molecular level in the SC are still not well understood. Previously, we have reported the development of novel methods to probe SC barrier properties in vivo. The aim of the present study was to characterise changes in Trans Epidermal Water Loss (TEWL), corneocyte surface area and maturity, selected protease activities and SC thickness after repeated application of a simple vehicle containing niacinamide. A commercial formulation was also included as a reference. The left and right mid-volar forearms of 20 healthy volunteers were used as study sites, to which topical formulations were applied twice daily for 28 days. After successive tape-stripping, corneocyte maturity and surface area were assessed. In addition, activity of the desquamatory kallikrein (KLK) protease enzymes KLK5 and KLK7, and tryptase and plasmin (implicated in inflammatory process) were measured using a fluorogenic probe assay. The amount of protein removed and TEWL were also recorded. SC thickness before and after treatment was determined using Confocal Raman Spectroscopy (CRS). Overall (i) corneocyte maturity and surface area decreased with increasing number of tape strips, (ii) activity of both the desquamatory and inflammatory enzymes was highest in the outer layers of the SC and decreased with depth (iii) TEWL increased as more SC layers were removed. Furthermore, areas treated with formulations containing niacinamide were significantly different to pre-treatment baseline and untreated/vehicle-control treated sites, with larger and more mature corneocytes, decreased inflammatory activity, decreased TEWL and increased SC thickness. These data (a) confirm the utility of measures and metrics developed previously for the non-invasive assay of SC barrier function, (b) present an holistic picture

  17. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy of stratum corneum: a pre-clinical validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Polefka, T G

    2008-02-01

    Skin moisturization is not only important for maintaining skin functional properties but also has great impact on the skin's aesthetic properties. The top layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), plays a key role in protecting and preventing against external aggressions as well as in regulating water flux in and out. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy is the first commercially available technique that provides a non-invasive, in vivo method to determine depth profiles of water concentration in the skin, however, in this case it was applied in an in vitro setting. As the first phase of validating the usefulness of confocal Raman microspectroscopy, we used porcine skin as a surrogate for human skin. Water concentration profiles were obtained using confocal Raman microspectroscopy from isolated pigskin SC and compared with that using the Karl Fischer titration method. The two methods correlated very well with a regression coefficient of 1.07 as well as a correlation coefficient, R(2) = 0.989, which demonstrated the consistency and accuracy of confocal Raman microspectroscopy for water concentration determination. To evaluate the instrument's response to different skin care/cleansing products, a wide range of products were tested to compare their skin moisturization ability. Among those tested were a lotion, commercial soap bar, syndet bar, traditional non-emollient shower gel (water, Sodium Laureth Ether Sulfate (SLES), cocamidopropyl betaine system) and emollient containing shower gel (water, sunflower oil, SLES, cocamidopropyl betaine, glycerin, petrolatum). The results were consistent with what was expected. The water content on skin treated with (A) lotion was significantly higher than the non-treated control; (B) syndet bar-treated skin had a significantly higher water content than soap-based bar-treated sites; (C) non-emollient shower gel washed sites were more moisturized than soap-based bar-treated samples; and (D) emollient shower gel-treated skin was

  18. Influence of size, surface coating and fine chemical composition on the in vitro reactivity and in vivo biodistribution of lipid nanocapsules versus lipid nanoemulsions in cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsjärvi, Samuli; Dufort, Sandrine; Gravier, Julien; Texier, Isabelle; Yan, Qiao; Bibette, Jérome; Sancey, Lucie; Josserand, Véronique; Passirani, Catherine; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2013-04-01

    Lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) and lipid nanoemulsions (LNEs) are biomimetic synthetic nanocarriers. Their in vitro and in vivo performance was evaluated as a function of their size (25, 50 and 100 nm) and the surface PEG chain length. Analysis methods included complement activation test, particle uptake in macrophage and HEK293(β3) cells and biodistribution studies with tumor-grafted mice by fluorescence imaging. A particular attention was paid to keep the concentration of each nanocarrier and to the amount of fluorescent dye in comparable conditions between the in vitro and in vivo studies. Under these conditions, no significant differences were found among the three tested particle sizes and the two nanocarrier types. Longer PEG chains on the LNE surface provided better stealth properties, whereas PEG modification on the LNC formulations inhibited the production of stable nanocarriers. Passive accumulation of LNCs and LNEs in different tumor types depended on the degree of tumor vascularization. This study of lipid nanocapsules and lipid nanoemulsions compares their vitro and in vivo performance as a function of size and surface PEG chain length, demonstrating no significant difference among the tested particle sizes. Longer PEG chains on the LNE surface provided better stealth properties, whereas PEG modification on the LNC formulations inhibited the production of stable nanocarriers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dry skin in the winter is related to the ceramide profile in the stratum corneum and can be improved by treatment with a Eucalyptus extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Junko; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Ito, Shotaro; Naoe, Ayano; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kitahara, Takashi; Takema, Yoshinori; Zerweck, Charles; Grove, Gary Lee

    2013-03-01

    Dry skin in the winter has been reported to involve scaling, defects in water holding and barrier functions, and decreased ceramide (CER) levels in the stratum corneum (SC). We previously reported that a Eucalyptus extract promotes CER synthesis in cultured keratinocytes and accelerates the recovery of hydration in a barrier-disrupted model of human skin. One of the objectives was to examine the CER profile and its contribution to the relief of dry skin. The other objective was to assess the efficacy of a Eucalyptus extract to treat dry skin. Twenty subjects with dry skin on their legs were assessed and their CER profiles were analyzed using tape-stripping. A moisturizer with a Eucalyptus extract was assessed for its effects on dry skin using a leg regression methodology comprising 28 days of treatment and 14 days of regression. Indicators of dry skin conditions (conductance, dryness, roughness, and scaliness) strongly correlated with the level of CER, CER [NP], and CER[NH]. Treatment with the Eucalyptus extract significantly improved conductance (3 days after regression) and transepidermal water loss (14 days after regression) compared with the placebo. After 28 days of treatment with the Eucalyptus extract, the level of CER in the SC did not increase, but CER [NP] did increase. These results suggest that not only the level of CER, but also specific CER species strongly contribute to dry skin relief and products that increase those are useful to improve dry skin conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A Model for the Interfacial Kinetics of Phospholipase D Activity on Long-Chain Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    200 mLmin1 for 15 min; 3) removal of excess liposomes by flowing a solution of PLD buffer at 100 mL min1 for 20 min; 4), measuring the on rate of PLD...and 5), measuring the off rate of PLD from the lipid layer by introducing PLD buffer (without the enzyme) at 100 mL min1 for 30 min. Fig. S1in the... exocytosis , and migration (24–32). Only a limited number of studies have presented any analysis of the interfacial kinetics of PLD from mammalian (2,25,33

  1. Development of a high-throughput in vitro intestinal lipolysis model for rapid screening of lipid-based drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosgaard, Mette D; Sassene, Philip; Mu, Huiling

    2015-01-01

    (DIVL) model with regard to the extent of lipid digestion and drug distribution of two poorly soluble model drugs (cinnarizine and danazol), during digestion of three LbDDS (LbDDS I-III). RESULT: The HTP model was able to maintain pH around 6.5 during digestion, without the addition of NaOH...

  2. Prediction of the solubility in lipidic solvent mixture: Investigation of the modeling approach and thermodynamic analysis of solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shruti V; Patel, Sarsvatkumar

    2015-09-18

    Self-micro emulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) is one of the methods to improve solubility and bioavailability of poorly soluble drug(s). The knowledge of the solubility of pharmaceuticals in pure lipidic solvents and solvent mixtures is crucial for designing the SMEDDS of poorly soluble drug substances. Since, experiments are very time consuming, a model, which allows for solubility predictions in solvent mixtures based on less experimental data is desirable for efficiency. Solvents employed were Labrafil® M1944CS and Labrasol® as lipidic solvents; Capryol-90®, Capryol-PGMC® and Tween®-80 as surfactants; Transcutol® and PEG-400 as co-solvents. Solubilities of both drugs were determined in single solvent systems at temperature (T) range of 283-333K. In present study, we investigated the applicability of the thermodynamic model to understand the solubility behavior of drugs in the lipiodic solvents. By using the Van't Hoff and general solubility theory, the thermodynamic functions like Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of solution, mixing and solvation for drug in single and mixed solvents were understood. The thermodynamic parameters were understood in the framework of drug-solvent interaction based on their chemical similarity and dissimilarity. Clotrimazole and Fluconazole were used as active ingredients whose solubility was measured in single solvent as a function of temperature and the data obtained were used to derive mathematical models which can predict solubility in multi-component solvent mixtures. Model dependent parameters for each drug were calculated at each temperature. The experimental solubility data of solute in mixed solvent system were measured experimentally and further correlated with the calculates values obtained from exponent model and log-linear model of Yalkowsky. The good correlation was observed between experimental solubility and predicted solubility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Neutron diffraction studies of the interaction between amphotericin B and lipid-sterol model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Lawrence, M. Jayne; Demeė, Bruno; Fragneto, Giovanna; Barlow, David

    2012-10-01

    Over the last 50 years or so, amphotericin has been widely employed in treating life-threatening systemic fungal infections. Its usefulness in the clinic, however, has always been circumscribed by its dose-limiting side-effects, and it is also now compromised by an increasing incidence of pathogen resistance. Combating these problems through development of new anti-fungal agents requires detailed knowledge of the drug's molecular mechanism, but unfortunately this is far from clear. Neutron diffraction studies of the drug's incorporation within lipid-sterol membranes have here been performed to shed light on this problem. The drug is shown to disturb the structures of both fungal and mammalian membranes, and co-localises with the membrane sterols in a manner consistent with trans-membrane pore formation. The differences seen in the membrane lipid ordering and in the distributions of the drug-ergosterol and drug-cholesterol complexes within the membranes are consistent with the drug's selectivity for fungal vs. human cells.

  4. Association of blood glucose and lipid levels with complete blood count indices to establish a regression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guangshu; Wang, Dan; Sun, Yanni; Yu, Jiong; Lin, Feiyan; Cao, Hongcui

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, which are usually diagnosed by analysis of blood glucose (GLU) and lipid levels, are two of the most common diseases in modern society. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the potential association between blood GLU and lipid levels with complete blood count (CBC) indices in overweight and healthy individuals and establish a regression model. There were 456 healthy and 421 overweight participants in the study. Data were collected on triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (CHO), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), blood GLU and CBC. The distribution characteristics and differences between healthy and overweight subjects were analyzed. Subsequently, the associations between TG, CHO, HDL, LDL and GLU with CBC were analyzed using correlation analysis and multiple linear regression (MLR). Significant differences were identified between the healthy and overweight individuals in TG, CHO, HDL, LDL, GLU and in the majority of the CBC indices. The correlation analysis indicated that there were strong correlations between TG, LDL, HDL, CHO and GLU with CBC indices in the healthy and overweight subjects. The MLR demonstrated that the regression models of TG, LDL, HDL and CHO, but no GLU, were statistically significant in the two groups (PCBC indices, with HDL being the most relevant to the CBC indices. The CBC demonstrated statistical significance in the diagnosis of hyperlipidemia. PMID:28451397

  5. Alterations in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism induced by a diet rich in coconut oil and cholesterol in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulet, M A; Barber, A; Garcin, H; Higueret, P; Martínez, J A

    1999-02-01

    The type of dietary fat as well as the amount of cholesterol occurring in the diet have been associated with several metabolic disorders. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of a hypercholesterolemic diet enriched with coconut oil and cholesterol on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in a rat model. Twenty male Wistar rats weighing about 190 g were assigned to two dietary groups. One group received a semipurified control diet and the other was given a diet enriched in coconut oil (25% by weight) and cholesterol (1% by weight) for 26 days. Our results indicated a significant increase in serum total cholesterol (+285%; pcholesterol (+1509%; pcholesterol acyltransferase activity (-66%; p<0.001) was found. The situation of hypoglycemia (-18%; p<0.05) was accompanied by lower levels of serum insulin (-45%; p<0.01) and liver glycogen (-30%; p<0.05) in the hypercholesterolemic rats. Furthermore, glucose utilization was altered since lower glucose-6-Pase (-33%; p<0.05) and increased glucokinase (+212%; p<0.001) activities in the liver were found in the rat model of hypercholesterolemia. These results provide new evidence that a diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rats is associated with several adaptative changes in carbohydrate metabolism. These findings may be of importance not only considering the role of western diets on cholesterogenesis, but also in other metabolic disturbances involving lipid and carbohydrate metabolism.

  6. Study of the Combined Effect of Ibuprofen and Cholesterol on the Microviscosity and Ordering of Model Lipid Membranes by Timeresolved Measurement of Fluorescence Anisotropy Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefimova, S. L.; Tkacheva, T. N.; Kasian, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The timeresolved fluorescence anisotropy decay of perylene incorporated into the lipid Ladipalmitoylphosphatidylch oline (DPPC) membrane has been studied to evaluate the membranotropic action of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, ibuprofen, and the combined effect of ibuprofen and cholesterol. The rotation correlation times (φ) and limiting anisotropy (r∞ ) permit an independent estimation of the effects of these additives on the microviscosity and ordering of model lipid membranes in different phase states. Ibuprofen was shown to cause a significant decrease in the DPPC membrane microviscosity in the gel phase with hardly any effect on the liquidcrystal phase. However, in both phases, ibuprofen diminishes the ordering of the lipid hydrophobic chains. A marked additive effect is noted when ibuprofen is embedded in the liquid membrane enriched with cholesterol, which manifests itself in substantial fluidization and disordering or the liquid membrane by the action of the components on the lipid membrane. Ibuprofen in the liquidcrystal phase causes leveling of the fluidizing and ordering effects of cholesterol.

  7. Cellular interactions of a lipid-based nanocarrier model with human keratinocytes: Unravelling transport mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Elisabete; Barreiros, Luísa; Segundo, Marcela A; Costa Lima, Sofia A; Reis, Salette

    2017-04-15

    Knowledge of delivery system transport through epidermal cell monolayer is vital to improve skin permeation and bioavailability. Recently, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) have gained great attention for transdermal delivery due to their biocompatibility, high drug payload, occlusive properties and skin hydration effect. However, the nanocarriers transport related mechanisms in epidermal epithelial cells are not yet understood. In this research, the internalization and transport pathways of the NLCs across the epidermal epithelial cell monolayer (HaCaT cells) were investigated. The 250nm sized witepsol/miglyol NLCs, prepared by hot homogenization had reduced cytotoxicity and no effect on the integrity of cell membrane in human HaCaT keratinocytes. The internalization was time-, concentration- and energy-dependent, and the uptake of NLCs was a vesicle-mediated process by macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated pathways. 3% of NLCs were found at the apical membrane side of the HaCaT monolayer through exocytosis mechanism. Additionally, the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and microtubules played crucial roles in the transport of NLCs out of HaCaT cells. NLCs were transported intact across the human keratinocytes monolayer, without disturbing the tight junction's structure. From the transcytosis data only approximately 12% of the internalized NLCs were passed from the apical to the basolateral side. The transcytosis of NLCs throughout the HaCaT cell monolayer towards the basolateral membrane side requires the involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and microtubules. Our findings may contribute to a systematic understanding of NLCs transport across epidermal epithelial cell monolayers and their optimization for clinical transdermal application. Transdermal drug delivery is a challenging and growing area of clinical application. Lipid nanoparticles such as nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) have gained wide interest for transdermal drug

  8. Trait-based modelling of bioaccumulation by freshwater benthic invertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sidney, L.A.; Diepens, N.J.; Guo, X.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role of species traits in chemical exposure is crucial for bioaccumulation and toxicity assessment of chemicals. We measured and modelled bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus and Sphaerium corneum. We

  9. Differential effect of corn oil-based low trans structured fat on the plasma and hepatic lipid profile in an atherogenic mouse model: comparison to hydrogenated trans fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yun-Young; Kwon, Eun-Young; Kim, Hye-Jin; Jeon, Seon-Min; Lee, Ki-Teak; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2011-01-20

    Trans fat are not desirable in many aspects on health maintenance. Low trans structured fats have been reported to be relatively more safe than trans fats. We examined the effects of low trans structured fat from corn oil (LC), compared with high trans fat shortening, on cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in apo E deficient mice which is an atherogenic animal model. The animals were fed a high trans fat (10% fat: commercial shortening (CS)) or a low trans fat (LC) diet for 12 weeks. LC decreased apo B and hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride concentration compared to the CS group but significantly increased plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride concentration and fecal lipids with a simultaneous increase in HDL-cholesterol level, apo A-I, and the ratio of HDL-cholesterol to total cholesterol (HTR). Reduction of hepatic lipid levels by inclusion of LC intake was observed alongside modulation of hepatic enzyme activities related to cholesterol esterification, fatty acid metabolism and fecal lipids level compared to the CS group. The differential effects of LC intake on the plasma and hepatic lipid profile seemed to be partly due to the fatty acid composition of LC which contains higher MUFA, PUFA and SFA content as well as lower content of trans fatty acids compared to CS. We suggest that LC may exert a dual effect on plasma and hepatic lipid metabolism in an atherogenic animal model. Accordingly, LC, supplemented at 10% in diet, had an anti-atherogenic effect on these apo E-/- mice, and increased fecal lipids, decreased hepatic steatosis, but elevated plasma lipids. Further studies are needed to verify the exact mode of action regarding the complex physiological changes and alteration in lipid metabolism caused by LC.

  10. Field trial and modeling of uptake rates of in situ lipid-free polyethylene membrane passive sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K A; Sethajintanin, D; Sower, G; Quarles, L

    2008-06-15

    Lipid-free polyethylene membrane tubing (LFT) has been further developed in response to a growing need for an inexpensive and simple time-integrative sampling device for dissolved hydrophobic contaminants in water. The LFT sampler is based on the diffusion of dissolved hydrophobic target compounds through the aqueous boundary layer and into the polyethylene membrane, mimicking uptake by organisms. We demonstrate through laboratory and field validation studies that LFT provided the same benefits as many other passive sampling devices, withoutthe potential of analytical interference from lipid impurities. A total of 370 LFTs and semipermeable membrane devices were deployed for 21 days in paired studies at highly urbanized, undeveloped, and two Superfund sites, representing several river conditions. A simple internal surrogate spiking method served as an in situ calibration indicator of the effects of environmental conditions on the uptake rates. A modified extraction method for the LFT increased recoveries while decreasing solvent use and labor compared to other organic extraction procedures. LFT sampling rates were estimated using ratios, in situ calibration and modeling for over 45 target analytes, including PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides.

  11. Pretreatment with Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion Modulates Muscle Leukocyte Chemotaxis in Murine Model of Sublethal Lower Limb Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Ming Shih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of a fish oil- (FO- based lipid emulsion on muscle leukocyte chemotaxis and inflammatory responses in a murine model of limb ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury. Mice were assigned randomly to 1 sham (sham group, 2 ischemic groups, and 2 IR groups. The sham group did not undergo the ischemic procedure. The mice assigned to the ischemic or IR groups were pretreated intraperitoneally with either saline or FO-based lipid emulsion for 3 consecutive days. The IR procedure was induced by applying a 4.5 oz orthodontic rubber band to the left thigh above the greater trochanter for 120 min and then cutting the band to allow reperfusion. The ischemic groups were sacrificed immediately while the IR groups were sacrificed 24 h after reperfusion. Blood, IR-injured gastrocnemius, and lung tissues were collected for analysis. The results showed that FO pretreatment suppressed the local and systemic expression of several IR-induced proinflammatory mediators. Also, the FO-pretreated group had lower blood Ly6ChiCCR2hi monocyte percentage and muscle M1/M2 ratio than the saline group at 24 h after reperfusion. These findings suggest that FO pretreatment may have a protective role in limb IR injury by modulating the expression of proinflammatory mediators and regulating the polarization of macrophage.

  12. Modelling of microalgal growth and lipid production in Dunaliella tertiolecta using nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium fertilizer medium in sintered disk chromatographic glass bubble column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anup; Guria, Chandan; Chitres, G; Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Pathak, A K

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model involving NPK-10:26:26 fertilizer, NaCl, NaHCO3, light and temperature operating variables for Dunaliella tertiolecta cultivation is formulated to predict microalgae-biomass and lipid productivity. Proposed model includes Monod/Andrews kinetics for the absorption of essential nutrients into algae-biomass and Droop model involving internal nutrient cell quota for microalgae growth, assuming algae-biomass is composed of sugar, functional-pool and neutral-lipid. Biokinetic model parameters are determined by minimizing the residual-sum-of-square-errors between experimental and computed microalgae-biomass and lipid productivity using genetic algorithm. Developed model is validated with the experiments of Dunaliella tertiolecta cultivation using air-agitated sintered-disk chromatographic glass-bubble column and the effects of operating variables on microalgae-biomass and lipid productivity is investigated. Finally, parametric sensitivity analysis is carried out to know the sensitivity of model parameters on the obtained results in the input parameter space. Proposed model may be helpful in scale-up studies and implementation of model-based control strategy in large-scale algal cultivation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Repressive effects of oat extracts on intracellular lipid-droplet formation in adipocytes and a three-dimensional subcutaneous adipose tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinya; Kato, Yuko; Shibata, Hiroki; Saitoh, Yasukazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2015-04-01

    We assessed the repression of lipid-droplet formation in mouse mesenchymal stromal preadipocytes OP9 by specified oat extracts (Hatomugi, Coix lacryma-jobi var. ma-yuen) named "SPH" which were proteolytically and glucosyl-transferredly prepared from finely-milled oat whole-grain. Stimulation of OP9 preadipocytes with insulin-containing serum-replacement promoted differentiation to adipocytes, concurrently with an increase in the intracellular lipid droplets by 51.5%, which were repressed by SPH-bulk or SPH-water-extract at 840ppm, to 33.5% or 46.9%, respectively, but not by SPH-ethanol-extract at the same dose, showing the hydrophilic property of the anti-adipogenetic ingredients. The intracellular lipid droplets were scanty for intact preadipocytes, small-sized but abundant for the SPH-unadministered adipocytes, and large-sized but few for SPH-bulk-administered adipocytes being coexistent with many lipid-droplet-lacking viable cells, suggesting "the all-or-none rule" for lipid-droplet generation in cell-to-cell. Hydrogen-peroxide-induced cell death in human epidermal keratinocytes HaCaT was prevented by SPH-bulk at 100 or 150ppm by 5.6-8.1%, being consistent with higher viabilities of SPH-bulk-administered OP9 cells, together with repressions of both cell shrinkage and cell detachment from the culture substratum. In three-dimensional subcutaneous adipose tissue models reconstructed with HaCaT-keratinocytes and OP9-preadipocytes, lipid droplets were accumulated in dermal OP9-cell-parts, and repressed to 43.5% by SPH-bulk at 840ppm concurrently with marked diminishment of huge aggregates of lipid droplets. Thus SPH-bulk suppresses adipogenesis-associated lipid-droplet accumulation during differentiation of OP9 preadipocytes together with lowered cytotoxicity to either HaCaT keratinocytes or the preadipocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Statistical evaluation and modeling of cheap substrate-based cultivation medium of Chlorella vulgaris to enhance microalgae lipid as new potential feedstock for biolubricant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Mirzaie, M A; Kalbasi, M; Mousavi, S M; Ghobadian, B

    2016-05-18

    Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) microalga was investigated as a new potential feedstock for the production of biodegradable lubricant. In order to enhance microalgae lipid for biolubricant production, mixotrophic growth of C. vulgaris was optimized using statistical analysis of Plackett-Burman (P-B) and response surface methodology (RSM). A cheap substrate-based medium of molasses and corn steep liquor (CSL) was used instead of expensive mineral salts to reduce the total cost of microalgae production. The effects of molasses and CSL concentration (cheap substrates) and light intensity on the growth of microalgae and their lipid content were analyzed and modeled. Designed models by RSM showed good compatibility with a 95% confidence level when compared to the cultivation system. According to the models, optimal cultivation conditions were obtained with biomass productivity of 0.123 g L(-1) day(-1) and lipid dry weight of 0.64 g L(-1) as 35% of dry weight of C. vulgaris. The extracted microalgae lipid presented useful fatty acid for biolubricant production with viscosities of 42.00 cSt at 40°C and 8.500 cSt at 100°C, viscosity index of 185, flash point of 185°C, and pour point of -6°C. These properties showed that microalgae lipid could be used as potential feedstock for biolubricant production.

  15. Lipid somersaults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipids diffuse rapidly in the plane of the membrane but their ability to flip spontaneously across a membrane bilayer is hampered by a significant energy barrier. Thus spontaneous flip-flop of polar lipids across membranes is very slow, even though it must occur rapidly to support diverse...... aspects of cellular life. Here we discuss the mechanisms by which rapid flip-flop occurs, and what role lipid flipping plays in membrane homeostasis and cell growth. We focus on conceptual aspects, highlighting mechanistic insights from biochemical and in silico experiments, and the recent, ground...

  16. The Scalp Has a Lower Stratum Corneum Function with a Lower Sensory Input than Other Areas of the Skin Evaluated by the Electrical Current Perception Threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Takagi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Many people feel frequent prickling or itching sensations on their scalp. The scalp is an atypical area of the skin since it is normally covered with thick hair and has many sebaceous glands and sweat glands. The scalp often has skin problems that can affect its sensitivity and functions. However, not much is known about stratum corneum function and the neural sensitivity of the scalp. Here we evaluated stratum corneum function and the neural sensitivity of the scalp of 47 normal male individuals in various skin conditions and compared the results to that to the forehead. The neural sensitivity was evaluated by measuring the electrical current perception threshold (CPT. The cutaneous barrier function and stratum corneum moisture-retention ability (MRA of the scalp were significantly lower than on the forehead, even if there were some scalp problems. Depending on the increase in severity of scalp skin problems, both these skin functional properties and the CPT decreased significantly. However, regardless of its lower functional properties, scalp skin was not significantly lower than that of the forehead. Although the scalp has a low stratum corneum function compared with the forehead and has easily induced skin problems, the scalp skin has less sensitive sensory nerves, resulting in experiencing a worsening of scalp symptoms more easily.

  17. Data on the effects of low iron diet on serum lipid profile in HCV transgenic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Conigliaro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Here, we presented new original data on the effects of iron depletion on the circulating lipid profile in B6HCV mice, a murine model of HCV-related dyslipidemia. Male adult B6HCV mice were subjected to non-invasive iron depletion by low iron diet. Serum iron concentration was assessed for evaluating the effects of the dietary iron depletion. Concentrations of circulating triglycerides, total cholesterol, Low Density Lipoproteins (LDLs, High Density Lipoproteins (HDLs were analyzed and reported by using stacked line charts. The present data indicated that low serum iron concentration is associated to i lower serum triglycerides concentrations and ii increased circulating LDLs. The presented original data have not been published elsewhere.

  18. Calculating the free energy of transfer of small solutes into a model lipid membrane: Comparison between metadynamics and umbrella sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, Davide; Panizon, Emanuele; Ferrando, Riccardo; Monticelli, Luca; Rossi, Giulia

    2015-10-01

    We compare the performance of two well-established computational algorithms for the calculation of free-energy landscapes of biomolecular systems, umbrella sampling and metadynamics. We look at benchmark systems composed of polyethylene and polypropylene oligomers interacting with lipid (phosphatidylcholine) membranes, aiming at the calculation of the oligomer water-membrane free energy of transfer. We model our test systems at two different levels of description, united-atom and coarse-grained. We provide optimized parameters for the two methods at both resolutions. We devote special attention to the analysis of statistical errors in the two different methods and propose a general procedure for the error estimation in metadynamics simulations. Metadynamics and umbrella sampling yield the same estimates for the water-membrane free energy profile, but metadynamics can be more efficient, providing lower statistical uncertainties within the same simulation time.

  19. Calculating the free energy of transfer of small solutes into a model lipid membrane: Comparison between metadynamics and umbrella sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochicchio, Davide; Panizon, Emanuele; Ferrando, Riccardo; Rossi, Giulia, E-mail: giulia.rossi@gmail.com [Physics Department, University of Genoa and CNR-IMEM, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa (Italy); Monticelli, Luca [Bases Moléculaires et Structurales des Systèmes Infectieux (BMSSI), CNRS UMR 5086, 7 Passage du Vercors, 69007 Lyon (France)

    2015-10-14

    We compare the performance of two well-established computational algorithms for the calculation of free-energy landscapes of biomolecular systems, umbrella sampling and metadynamics. We look at benchmark systems composed of polyethylene and polypropylene oligomers interacting with lipid (phosphatidylcholine) membranes, aiming at the calculation of the oligomer water-membrane free energy of transfer. We model our test systems at two different levels of description, united-atom and coarse-grained. We provide optimized parameters for the two methods at both resolutions. We devote special attention to the analysis of statistical errors in the two different methods and propose a general procedure for the error estimation in metadynamics simulations. Metadynamics and umbrella sampling yield the same estimates for the water-membrane free energy profile, but metadynamics can be more efficient, providing lower statistical uncertainties within the same simulation time.

  20. Lipid domains in bicelles containing unsaturated lipids and cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyo Soon; Dominick, Johnna L; Spence, Megan M

    2010-07-22

    We have created a stable bicelle system capable of forming micrometer-scale lipid domains that orient in a magnetic field, suitable for structural biology determination in solid-state NMR. The bicelles consisted of a mixture of cholesterol, saturated lipid (DMPC), and unsaturated lipid (POPC), a mixture commonly used to create domains in model membranes, along with a short chain lipid (DHPC) that allows formation of the bicelle phase. While maintaining a constant molar ratio of long to short chain lipids, q = ([POPC]+[DMPC])/[DHPC] = 3, we varied the concentrations of the unsaturated lipid, POPC, and cholesterol to observe the effects of the components on bicelle stability. Using (31)P solid-state NMR, we observed that unsaturated lipids (POPC) greatly destabilized the alignment of the membranes in the magnetic field, while cholesterol stabilized their alignment. By combining cholesterol and unsaturated lipids in the bicelles, we created membranes aligning uniformly in the magnetic field, despite very high concentrations of unsaturated lipids. These bicelles, with high concentrations of both cholesterol and unsaturated lipid, showed similar phase behavior to bicelles commonly used in structural biology, but aligned over a wider temperature range (291-314 K). Domains were observed by measuring time-dependent diffusion constants reflecting restricted diffusion of the lipids within micrometer-scale regions of the bicelles. Micron-scale domains have never been observed in POPC/DMPC/cholesterol vesicles, implying that bilayers in bicelles show different phase behavior than their counterparts in vesicles, and that bilayers in bicelles favor domain formation.

  1. Sucrose esters as biocompatible surfactants for penetration enhancement: An insight into the mechanism of penetration enhancement studied using stratumcorneum model lipids and Langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todosijević, Marija N; Brezesinski, Gerald; Savić, Snežana D; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2017-03-01

    Up to now, the molecular mechanism of the penetration enhancing effect of sucrose esters (SEs) on stratumcorneum (SC) has not been explained in details. In this study, variety of surface sensitive techniques, including surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms, infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), have been used to investigate interactions between SEs and SC intercellular lipids. A monolayer of the mixture of ceramide AS C18:18, stearic acid and cholesterol in the molar ratio of 1:1:0.7 on an aqueous subphase is a good model to mimic a single layer of intercellular SC lipids. The π-A isotherms of mixed monolayers and parameters derived from the curves demonstrated the interaction between nonionic surfactants such as SEs and SC lipids. With increasing SE concentration, the resultant monolayer films became more fluid and better compressible. IRRAS measurements showed that SEs disordered the acyl chains of SC lipids, and the BAM images demonstrated the modification of the domain structures in SC monolayers. Longer chain-SE has a stronger disordering effect and is better miscible with ceramides in comparison to SE with a shorter hydrophobic part. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the disordering effect of SEs on the biomimetic SC model, pointing out that small changes in the structure of surfactant may have a strong influence on a penetration enhancement of lipophilic drugs through intercellular lipids of skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiscale modelling to understand the self-assembly mechanism of human β2-adrenergic receptor in lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anirban; Sonavane, Uddhavesh; Joshi, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    The long perceived notion that G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) function in monomeric form has recently been changed by the description of a number of GPCRs that are found in oligomeric states. The mechanism of GPCR oligomerization, and its effect on receptor function, is not well understood. In the present study, coarse grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) approach was adopted for studying the self-assembly process of the human GPCR, β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR), for which several experimental evidences of the dimerization process and its effect on cellular functions are available. Since the crystal structure of β2-AR lacks the third intracellular loop, initially it was modelled and simulated using restrained MD in order to get a stable starting conformation. This structure was then converted to CG representation and 16 copies of it, inserted into a hydrated lipid bilayer, were simulated for 10 μs using the MARTINI force field. At the end of 10μs, oligomers of β2-AR were found to be formed through the self-assembly mechanism which were further validated through various analyses of the receptors. The lipid bilayer analysis also helped to quantify this assembly mechanism. In order to identify the domains which are responsible for this oligomerization, a reverse transformation of the CG system back to all-atom structure and simulated annealing run were carried out at the end of 10 μs CGMD run. Analysis of the all-atom dimers thus obtained, revealed that TM1/TM1, H8/H8, TM1/TM5 and TM6/TM6 regions formed most of the dimerization surfaces, which is in accordance with some of the experimental observations and recent simulation results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative damage of DNA and 2'-deoxyguanosine by model compounds of lipid hydroperoxides: involvement of peroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, W; Kurz, A; Saha-Möller, C R

    2000-12-01

    The peroxidase-catalyzed decomposition of 3-hydroperoxy-1-butene (1), 2,3-dimethyl-3-hydroperoxy-1-butene (2), tert-butyl hydroperoxide (3), ethyl oleate hydroperoxide 4, and linoleic acid hydroperoxide 5 was applied as a chemical model system to assess whether lipid hydroperoxides may cause DNA damage under peroxidase catalysis. For this purpose, the Coprinus peroxidase (CIP), horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and the physiologically important lactoperoxidase (LP) were tested. Indeed, hydroperoxides 1-5 induce strand breaks in pBR 322 DNA upon peroxidase catalysis. For the nucleoside dG, the enzymatic decomposition of hydroperoxides 1-4 led to significant amounts of 4, 8-dihydro-4-hydroxy-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (4-HO-8-oxo-dG) and guanidine-releasing products (GRP), whereas 7, 8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) was not obtained. In isolated calf thymus DNA, the efficient conversion of the guanine base (Gua) was observed. Peroxyl radicals, which are generated in situ from the hydroperoxides by one-electron oxidation with the peroxidases, are proposed as the active oxidants on the basis of the following experimental facts. (i) Radical scavengers strongly inhibit the guanine oxidation in dG and DNA and strand-break formation in the latter. (ii) EPR spectral studies with 5, 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap confirmed the formation of peroxyl radicals. (iii) The release of molecular oxygen was demonstrated, produced through the disproportionation of peroxyl radicals. The biological relevance of these findings should be seen in the potential role of the combined action of lipid hydroperoxides and peroxidases in damaging cellular DNA through peroxyl radicals.

  4. Novel therapeutic mechanisms determine the effectiveness of lipid-core nanocapsules on melanoma models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Carine C; Fiel, Luana A; Bexiga, Celina G; Asbahr, Ana Carolina C; Uchiyama, Mayara K; Cogliati, Bruno; Araki, Koiti; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Farsky, Sandra P

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a severe metastatic skin cancer with poor prognosis and no effective treatment. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches using nanotechnology have been proposed to improve therapeutic effectiveness. Lipid-core nanocapsules (LNCs), prepared with poly(ε-caprolactone), capric/caprylic triglyceride, and sorbitan monostearate and stabilized by polysorbate 80, are efficient as drug delivery systems. Here, we investigated the effects of acetyleugenol-loaded LNC (AcE-LNC) on human SK-Mel-28 melanoma cells and its therapeutic efficacies on melanoma induced by B16F10 in C57B6 mice. LNC and AcE-LNC had z-average diameters and zeta potential close to 210 nm and -10.0 mV, respectively. CytoViva(®) microscopy images showed that LNC and AcE-LNC penetrated into SK-Mel-28 cells, and remained in the cytoplasm. AcE-LNC in vitro treatment (18-90×10(9) particles/mL; 1 hour) induced late apoptosis and necrosis; LNC and AcE-LNC (3-18×10(9) particles/mL; 48 hours) treatments reduced cell proliferation and delayed the cell cycle. Elevated levels of nitric oxide were found in supernatant of LNC and AcE-LNC, which were not dependent on nitric oxide synthase expressions. Daily intraperitoneal or oral treatment (days 3-10 after tumor injection) with LNC or AcE-LNC (1×10(12) particles/day), but not with AcE (50 mg/kg/day, same dose as AcE-LNC), reduced the volume of the tumor; nevertheless, intraperitoneal treatment caused toxicity. Oral LNC treatment was more efficient than AcE-LNC treatment. Moreover, oral treatment with nonencapsulated capric/caprylic triglyceride did not inhibit tumor development, implying that nanocapsule supramolecular structure is important to the therapeutic effects. Together, data herein presented highlight the relevance of the supramolecular structure of LNCs to toxicity on SK-Mel-28 cells and to the therapeutic efficacy on melanoma development in mice, conferring novel therapeutic mechanisms to LNC further than a drug delivery system.

  5. Cytotoxicity assessment of lipid-based self-emulsifying drug delivery system with Caco-2 cell model: Cremophor EL as the surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Pengli; Narayanan, Silpa; Dalrymple, Damon; Cheng, Xingguo; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2016-08-25

    Caco-2 cells are used extensively for in vitro prediction of intestinal drug absorption. However, toxicity of excipients and formulations used can artificially increase drug permeation by damaging cell monolayers, thus providing misleading results. The present study aimed to investigate cytotoxicity of common lipid-based excipients and formulations on Caco-2 cells. Medium-chain monoglycerides alone or in mixture with the surfactant Cremophor EL, with and without a medium-chain triglyceride, were prepared and incubated with Caco-2 cells from a series of culture stages with varying maturity. Cell viability was evaluated and cell membrane integrity assessed. Cytotoxicity of lipid-based formulations was influenced by the maturity of Caco-2 cells and formulation composition. One-day culture was most sensitive to lipids. When cultured for 5days, viability of Caco-2 cells was significantly improved. The 21-day Caco-2 monolayers maintained the highest survival rate. Microemulsion formulations exhibited significantly less cytotoxicity than neat lipids or surfactant at all stages of cell maturity, and microemulsions containing 1:1 mixtures of monoglyceride and triglyceride appeared to be best tolerated among all the formulations tested. Mechanistically, the observed cytotoxicity was partially due to lipid-induced rupture of cell membrane. Microemulsions of lipid-surfactant mixtures have less cytotoxicity than lipid alone. Maturity of Caco-2 cells renders significant resistance to cytotoxicity, and monolayers with 21-day maturity are more relevant to in vivo conditions and appear to be a more accurate in vitro model for cytotoxicity assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The temperature-dependent physical state of polar lipids and their miscibility impact the topography and mechanical properties of bilayer models of the milk fat globule membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Appala Venkata Ramana; Guyomarc'h, Fanny; Lopez, Christelle

    2016-09-01

    The polar lipid assembly and biophysical properties of the biological membrane enveloping the milk fat globules (the MFGM) are yet poorly known, especially in connection with the temperature history that milk can experience after its secretion. However, bioactive mechanisms depend on biological structure, which itself highly depend on temperature. The objectives of this study were to investigate polar lipid packing in hydrated bilayers, models of the MFGM, and to follow at intermolecular level temperature-induced changes in the range 60-6°C, using the combination of differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy. MFGM polar lipids, especially sphingomyelin, contain long chain saturated fatty acids with high phase transition temperatures. On cooling, the liquid disordered ld to solid ordered so (gel) phase transition of MFGM polar lipids started at about 40°C, leading to phase separation and formation of so phase domains protruding by about 1nm from the ld phase. Indentation measurements using AFM revealed that the resistance of the so phase domains to rupture was significantly higher than that of the ld phase and that it increased for both the domain and fluid phases with decreasing temperature. However, packing and stability of the bilayers were adversely affected by fast cooling to 6°C or by cooling-rewarming cycle. This study showed that MFGM polar lipid bilayers are dynamic systems. Heterogeneity in the structure and mechanical properties of the membrane was induced by temperature-dependent so/ld phase immiscibility of the lipid components. This could have consequences on the MFGM technological and biological functions (e.g. immunity and milk lipid digestion). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of processing and mastication on almond lipid bioaccessibility using novel methods of in vitro digestion modelling and micro-structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalari, Giuseppina; Grundy, Myriam M-L; Grassby, Terri; Parker, Mary L; Cross, Kathryn L; Chessa, Simona; Bisignano, Carlo; Barreca, Davide; Bellocco, Ersilia; Laganà, Giuseppina; Butterworth, Peter J; Faulks, Richard M; Wilde, Peter J; Ellis, Peter R; Waldron, Keith W

    2014-11-14

    A number of studies have demonstrated that consuming almonds increases satiety but does not result in weight gain, despite their high energy and lipid content. To understand the mechanism of almond digestion, in the present study, we investigated the bioaccessibility of lipids from masticated almonds during in vitro simulated human digestion, and determined the associated changes in cell-wall composition and cellular microstructure. The influence of processing on lipid release was assessed by using natural raw almonds (NA) and roasted almonds (RA). Masticated samples from four healthy adults (two females, two males) were exposed to a dynamic gastric model of digestion followed by simulated duodenal digestion. Between 7·8 and 11·1 % of the total lipid was released as a result of mastication, with no significant differences between the NA and RA samples. Significant digestion occurred during the in vitro gastric phase (16·4 and 15·9 %) and the in vitro duodenal phase (32·2 and 32·7 %) for the NA and RA samples, respectively. Roasting produced a smaller average particle size distribution post-mastication; however, this was not significant in terms of lipid release. Light microscopy showed major changes that occurred in the distribution of lipid in all cells after the roasting process. Further changes were observed in the surface cells of almond fragments and in fractured cells after exposure to the duodenal environment. Almond cell walls prevented lipid release from intact cells, providing a mechanism for incomplete nutrient absorption in the gut. The composition of almond cell walls was not affected by processing or simulated digestion.

  8. Predictors of incident heart failure in patients after an acute coronary syndrome: The LIPID heart failure risk-prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Andrea; Barnes, Elizabeth H; Blankenberg, Stefan; Colquhoun, David M; Hunt, David; Nestel, Paul J; Stewart, Ralph A; West, Malcolm J; White, Harvey D; Simes, John; Tonkin, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    Coronary heart disease is a major cause of heart failure. Availability of risk-prediction models that include both clinical parameters and biomarkers is limited. We aimed to develop such a model for prediction of incident heart failure. A multivariable risk-factor model was developed for prediction of first occurrence of heart failure death or hospitalization. A simplified risk score was derived that enabled subjects to be grouped into categories of 5-year risk varying from 20%. Among 7101 patients from the LIPID study (84% male), with median age 61years (interquartile range 55-67years), 558 (8%) died or were hospitalized because of heart failure. Older age, history of claudication or diabetes mellitus, body mass index>30kg/m(2), LDL-cholesterol >2.5mmol/L, heart rate>70 beats/min, white blood cell count, and the nature of the qualifying acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction or unstable angina) were associated with an increase in heart failure events. Coronary revascularization was associated with a lower event rate. Incident heart failure increased with higher concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide >50ng/L, cystatin C>0.93nmol/L, D-dimer >273nmol/L, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein >4.8nmol/L, and sensitive troponin I>0.018μg/L. Addition of biomarkers to the clinical risk model improved the model's C statistic from 0.73 to 0.77. The net reclassification improvement incorporating biomarkers into the clinical model using categories of 5-year risk was 23%. Adding a multibiomarker panel to conventional parameters markedly improved discrimination and risk classification for future heart failure events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Self-consistent field modeling of hydrated unsaturated lipid bilayers in the liquid-crystal phase and comparison to molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leermakers, F.A.M.; Rabinovich, A.L.; Balabaev, N.K.

    2003-01-01

    A molecular-level self-consistent-field (SCF) theory is applied to model the lipid bilayer structures composed of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (18:0/18:1omega9cis PC) and 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (18:0/22:6omega3cis PC). As compared to

  10. Function of plastochromanol and other biological prenyllipids in the inhibition of lipid peroxidation-A comparative study in model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Beatrycze; Gruszka, Jolanta; Kruk, Jerzy

    2013-02-01

    Lipid peroxidation is an oxidation reaction leading to the generation of lipid hydroperoxides. Here we present comparative data on the inhibition of lipid peroxidation by a variety of biological prenyllipids in liposomes prepared from natural lipid membranes. Lipid peroxidation was initiated by hydrophilic and hydrophobic azo initiators, as well as by singlet oxygen generated via photosensitized reaction of hydrophobic zinc tetraphenylporphine. When lipid peroxidation was initiated in the water phase, tocopherols and plastochromanol-8 were more effective than prenylquinols, such as plastoquinol-9, ubiquinol-10 or α-tocopherolquinol. However, if the peroxidation was initiated within the hydrophobic interior of liposome membranes, long-chain prenyllipids, such as plastoquinol-9 and plastochromanol-8, were considerably more active than tocopherols in the inhibition of the reaction. In the latter system, tocopherols showed even prooxidant activity. The prooxidant activity of α-tocopherol was prevented by plastoquinol, suggesting the reduction of α-tocopheroxyl radical by the quinol. All the investigated prenyllipids were able to inhibit singlet oxygen-mediated lipid peroxidation but the most active were prenylquinols in this respect. Among all the prenyllipids investigated, plastochromanol-8 was the most versatile antioxidant in the inhibition of lipid peroxidation initiated by the three different methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy of oral lipid-based formulations of apomorphine and its diester in a Parkinson's disease rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkar, Nrupa; Andersson, Daniel R.; Yang, Mingshi

    2017-01-01

    in self-emulsifying drug delivery systems compared to s.c. apomorphine (1 h). This suggests that the lipid-based formulations provide a sustained drug release allowing for a steady exposure to the brain. Conclusions Oral lipid-based apomorphine delivery has a potential in achieving a steady response...

  12. Triglyceride Blisters in Lipid Bilayers: Implications for Lipid Droplet Biogenesis and the Mobile Lipid Signal in Cancer Cell Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Duelund, Lars; Pakkanen, Kirsi Inkeri

    2010-01-01

    Triglycerides have a limited solubility, around 3%, in phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. Using millisecond-scale course grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the model lipid bilayer can accommodate a higher concentration of triolein (TO) than earlier anticipated, by sequestering ...

  13. Influence of lipids with hydroxyl-containing head groups on Fe2+ (Cu2+)/H2O2-mediated transformation of phospholipids in model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshyk, Viktoriya N; Melsitova, Inna V; Yurkova, Irina L

    2014-01-01

    Under condition of ROS formation in lipid membranes, free radical reactions can proceed in both hydrophobic (peroxidation of lipids, POL) and polar (free radical fragmentation) parts of the bilayer. Free-radical fragmentation is typical for the lipids containing a hydroxyl group in β-position with respect to an ester or amide bond. The present study has been undertaken to investigate free-radical transformations of phospholipids in model membranes containing lipids able to undergo fragmentation in their polar part. Liposomes from egg yolk lecithin containing saturated or monounsaturated glycero- and sphingolipids were subjected to the action of an HO* - generating system - Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc, and the POL products were investigated. In parallel with this, the effects of monoacylglycerols and scavengers of reactive species on Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc - mediated free-radical fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerols were studied. Hydroxyl-containing sphingolipids and glycerolipids, which undergo free-radical fragmentation under such conditions, manifested antioxidant properties in the model membranes. In the absence of HO groups in the lipid structure, the effect was either pro-oxidant or neutral. Monoacylglycerols slowed down the rate of both peroxidation in the hydrophobic part and free-radical fragmentation in the hydrophilic part of phospholipid membrane. Scavengers of reactive species inhibited the fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerol substantially. Thus, the ability of hydroxyl-containing lipids to undergo free-radical fragmentation in polar part apparently makes a substantial contribution to the mechanism of their protector action. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Study of curcumin behavior in two different lipid bilayer models of liposomal curcumin using molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili, Seifollah; Saeedi, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Liposomal formulation of curcumin is an important therapeutic agent for the treatment of various cancers. Despite extensive studies on the biological effects of this formulation in cancer treatment, much remains unknown about curcumin-liposome interactions. Understanding how different lipid bilayers respond to curcumin molecule may help us to design more effective liposomal curcumin. Here, we used molecular dynamics simulation method to investigate the behavior of curcumin in two lipid bilayers commonly used in preparation of liposomal curcumin, namely dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG). First, the free energy barriers for translocation of one curcumin molecule from water to the lipid bilayer were determined by using the potential of mean force (PMF). The computed free energy profile exhibits a global minimum at the solvent-headgroup interface (LH region) for both lipid membranes. We also evaluated the free energy difference between the equilibrium position of curcumin in the lipid bilayer and bulk water as the excess chemical potential. Our results show that curcumin has the higher affinity in DMPG compared to DPPC lipid bilayer (-8.39 vs. -1.69 kBT) and this is related to more hydrogen bond possibility for curcumin in DMPG lipid membrane. Next, using an unconstrained molecular dynamic simulation with curcumin initially positioned at the center of lipid bilayer, we studied various properties of each lipid bilayer system in the presence of curcumin molecule that was in full agreement with PMF and experimental data. The results of these simulation studies suggest that membrane composition could have a large effect on interaction of curcumin-lipid bilayer.

  15. Validation of the target lipid model for toxicity assessment of residual petroleum constituents: monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Joy A; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2009-06-01

    A method is presented for developing scientifically defensible, numeric guidelines for residual petroleum-related constituents, specifically monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in the water column. The guidelines are equivalent to a HC5 (i.e., hazard concentration to 5% of the tested species, or the concentration that protects 95% of the tested species). The model of toxicity used in this evaluation is the target lipid model (TLM) that was developed for assessing the toxicity of type I narcotic chemicals. An acute to chronic ratio is used for chronic expression and sublethal effects. The TLM is evaluated by comparing predicted and observed toxicity of these petroleum components. The methodology is capable of predicting both the acute and chronic toxicity of MAHs and PAHs in single exposures and in mixtures. For acute exposures, the TLM was able to predict the toxicity to within a factor of three to five. The use of toxic units was an effective metric for expressing the toxicity of mixtures. Within the uncertainty bounds, the TLM correctly predicted where sublethal effects of edemas, hemorrhaging, and other abnormalities were observed to occur in early life-stage exposure to PAHs. The computed HC5s were lower than no-observed-effect concentrations based on growth, reproduction, and mortality endpoints and sublethal effects. The methodology presented can be used by the oil spill community to compare residual concentrations of PAHs against defensible, numeric guidelines to assess potential ecological impacts.

  16. A genome-scale metabolic model of the lipid-accumulating yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loira Nicolas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous yeast which has emerged as an important microorganism for several biotechnological processes, such as the production of organic acids, lipases and proteases. It is also considered a good candidate for single-cell oil production. Although some of its metabolic pathways are well studied, its metabolic engineering is hindered by the lack of a genome-scale model that integrates the current knowledge about its metabolism. Results Combining in silico tools and expert manual curation, we have produced an accurate genome-scale metabolic model for Y. lipolytica. Using a scaffold derived from a functional metabolic model of the well-studied but phylogenetically distant yeast S. cerevisiae, we mapped conserved reactions, rewrote gene associations, added species-specific reactions and inserted specialized copies of scaffold reactions to account for species-specific expansion of protein families. We used physiological measures obtained under lab conditions to validate our predictions. Conclusions Y. lipolytica iNL895 represents the first well-annotated metabolic model of an oleaginous yeast, providing a base for future metabolic improvement, and a starting point for the metabolic reconstruction of other species in the Yarrowia clade and other oleaginous yeasts.

  17. INTERACTION OF LIPIDS AND PROTEINS OF NEURONAL MEMBRANES VIA A MATHEMATICAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehanshu Saha

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems are inherently complex. This paper tries to find a model that simulates various actions and reactions resulting from the permeability of the neural cell membrane by ions through channel proteins. The problem here focuses on multiple channel protein concentration and cell dynamics inside and outside of the membrane. For simplicity we assume only two channel proteins; sodium and potassium and study the interaction effects due to them. Cell dynamics emphasizes on finding how ions actually move across the membranes of excitable cells. A mathematical model measuring the boundary voltage due to the rapid movement of ions inside and outside (the action potential is discussed. We attempt to solve a partial differential equation derived and then investigate the convergence of its solution.

  18. 5-Cholesten-3β,25-Diol 3-Sulfate Decreases Lipid Accumulation in Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Leyuan; Kim, Jin Koung; Bai, Qianming; Zhang, Xin; Kakiyama, Genta; Min, Hae-ki; Sanyal, Arun J.; Pandak, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) increases lipogenesis at the transcriptional level, and its expression is upregulated by liver X receptor α (LXRα). The LXRα/SREBP-1c signaling may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We previously reported that a cholesterol metabolite, 5-cholesten-3β,25-diol 3-sulfate (25HC3S), inhibits the LXRα signaling and reduces lipogenesis by decreasing SREBP-1c expression in primary hepatocytes. The present study aims to investigate the effects of 25HC3S on lipid homeostasis in diet-induced NAFLD mouse models. NAFLD was induced by feeding a high-fat diet (HFD) in C57BL/6J mice. The effects of 25HC3S on lipid homeostasis, inflammatory responses, and insulin sensitivity were evaluated after acute treatments or long-term treatments. Acute treatments with 25HC3S decreased serum lipid levels, and long-term treatments decreased hepatic lipid accumulation in the NAFLD mice. Gene expression analysis showed that 25HC3S significantly suppressed the SREBP-1c signaling pathway that was associated with the suppression of the key enzymes involved in lipogenesis: fatty acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1, and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. In addition, 25HC3S significantly reduced HFD-induced hepatic inflammation as evidenced by decreasing tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 α/β mRNA levels. A glucose tolerance test and insulin tolerance test showed that 25HC3S administration improved HFD-induced insulin resistance. The present results indicate that 25HC3S as a potent endogenous regulator decreases lipogenesis, and oxysterol sulfation can be a key protective regulatory pathway against lipid accumulation and lipid-induced inflammation in vivo. PMID:23258548

  19. The hydroxylated form of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA-H) modifies the brain lipid composition in a model of Alzheimer's disease, improving behavioral motor function and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaibes, Raheem J; Fiol-deRoque, María A; Torres, Manuel; Ordinas, Margarita; López, David J; Castro, José A; Escribá, Pablo V; Busquets, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    We have compared the effect of the commonly used ω-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid ethyl ester (DHA-EE), and of its 2-hydroxylated DHA form (DHA-H), on brain lipid composition, behavior and lifespan in a new human transgenic Drosophila melanogaster model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The transgenic flies expressed human Aβ42 and tau, and the overexpression of these human transgenes in the CNS of these flies produced progressive defects in motor function (antigeotaxic behavior) while reducing the animal's lifespan. Here, we demonstrate that both DHA-EE and DHA-H increase the longer chain fatty acids (≥18C) species in the heads of the flies, although only DHA-H produced an unknown chromatographic peak that corresponded to a non-hydroxylated lipid. In addition, only treatment with DHA-H prevented the abnormal climbing behavior and enhanced the lifespan of these transgenic flies. These benefits of DHA-H were confirmed in the well characterized transgenic PS1/APP mouse model of familial AD (5xFAD mice), mice that develop defects in spatial learning and in memory, as well as behavioral deficits. Hence, it appears that the modulation of brain lipid composition by DHA-H could have remedial effects on AD associated neurodegeneration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Effect of intracellular lipid accumulation in a new model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Rosso, Natalia; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In vitro exposure of liver cells to high concentrations of free fatty acids (FFA) results in fat overload which promotes inflammatory and fibrogenic response similar to those observed in patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH). Since the mechanisms of this event have not been fully characterized, we aimed to analyze the fibrogenic stimuli in a new in vitro model of NASH. Methods HuH7 cells were cultured for 24 h in a...

  1. [Effect of cysteine lithium salt on lipid peroxidation in the model of dopaminergic system disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsepian, L M; Kazarian, G V; Zakharian, A V; Zakarian, G V; L'vov, M V

    2010-07-01

    The antioxidant activity of a newly synthesized compound, cysteine lithium salt, was discovered using methyl oleate oxidation model of dopaminergic system disorder. Experimental data show that injection of the synthesized compound in animals with experimentally induced L-DOPA brings to normalization effect conditioned by inhibiting free radical reactions in the nuclear and mitochondrial fractions of brain cells. Antioxidant effect of the synthesized compound is related to its chemical structure that contains cysteine--an agent involved in the biosynthesis of glutathione, which is a component of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase enzymes participating in the antiradical protection system.

  2. Profile and quantification of human stratum corneum ceramides by normal-phase liquid chromatography coupled with dynamic multiple reaction monitoring of mass spectrometry: development of targeted lipidomic method and application to human stratum corneum of different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Jin-Lan; Shen, Chun-Ping; Ma, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Skin, the largest organ of the human body, serves as the primary barrier to the external environment. Ceramides are one of the main constituents of stratum corneum (SC), playing an important role in skin barrier function. Therefore, comprehensive profiling and quantification of SC ceramide is important. Herein, a new targeted lipidomic method for human SC ceramide profiling and quantification is presented and tested. Normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with dynamic multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (NP-HPLC-dMRM-MS) was used to separate ceramides into subclasses and then characterize different ceramides within each subclass on the basis of their characteristics. In total, 483 ceramides were quantified in a single run within 20 min, covering 12 subclasses as well as some glycosylated ceramides not previously reported. Each subclass had typical standard substances (if available) that served to establish representative standard curves and were used for related substances with no standards. Linearity range, limit of quantification (LOQ), limit of detection (LOD), precision, accuracy, stability, and matrix effects were validated. dMRM increased sensitivity and accuracy greatly compared with common MRM (cMRM). This method was successfully applied to the study of human SC from different age groups. A total of 193 potential biomarkers were found to indicate age differences between children and adults. This method is an innovative approach for high-throughput quantification of SC ceramide. Graphical Abstract Method establishment (MRM spectra by the established method) and method application (score scatter plots of authentic samples).

  3. Inhibition kinetics of lipid oxidation of model foods by using antioxidant extract of fermented soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardhani, Dyah H; Fuciños, Pablo; Vázquez, José A; Pandiella, Severino S

    2013-08-15

    Fermentation by using Aspergillus oryzae has been reported to increase antioxidant activity of soybeans significantly. The effectiveness of the extract from fermented soybeans was studied in 3 model foods with different complexities, i.e., linoleic acid emulsion, sunflower oil emulsions and bulk sunflower oil. For the emulsion systems, oxidation at two different pH values (4.5 and 7) was also compared. A reparameterised logistic equation was used to describe and to predict the experimental data. In general, a good agreement between experimental trends and simulated data from the model was found. A crude antioxidant extract (5 mg/g) showed a comparable antioxidant activity to 0.26 mg/g of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in the linoleic acid emulsions. The extract exhibited a better capability to retard primary products in the linoleic acid systems than the secondary products. The opposite effect was observed in the bulk sunflower oil and its emulsion systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. β-Estradiol-3-benzoate confers neuroprotection in Parkinson MPP(+) rat model through inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Vidal, Yoshajandith; Monroy-Noyola, Antonio; Anaya-Ramos, Laura; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela; Mendez-Armenta, Marisela; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Díaz-Zaragoza, Mariana; Morales-Montor, Jorge; Ríos, Camilo; Montes, Sergio

    2017-10-01

    Estradiol (E2), in addition to its known hormone function, is a neuroactive steroid that has shown neuroprotective profile in several models of neurological diseases. The present study explores the antioxidant effect of β-estradiol-3-benzoate (EB) on the neurotoxicity elicited by MPP(+) in rat striatum. Male Wistar rats, that were gonadectomized 30days prior to EB, were given 100µgEB per rat every 48h for 11days and animals were infused with MPP(+) via intrastriatal at day six after beginning EB treatment. EB treatment completely prevented the fall in dopamine caused by MPP(+), such result was related with decreased lipid peroxidation, a marker of oxidative stress; diminished number of ipsilateral-to-lesion turns and increased signal of the dopamine-synthesizing enzyme Tyrosin Hydroxylase in substantia nigra. The protection elicited by EB was not related to Mn or Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase enzymatic activities or glutathione modulation since none of these parameters were influenced by EB at the times assayed. Whereas, increased expression of PON2 as a result of EB treatment was observed, this phenomenon could be one of the mechanism by which the steroid conferred protection to dopaminergic cells against MPP(+) injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Urtica dioica attenuates ovalbumin-induced inflammation and lipid peroxidation of lung tissues in rat asthma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemmouri, Hanene; Sekiou, Omar; Ammar, Sonda; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Messarah, Mahfoud; Boumendjel, Amel

    2017-12-01

    To find bioactive medicinal herbs exerting anti-asthmatic activity, we investigated the effect of an aqueous extract of Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) leaves (UD), the closest extract to the Algerian traditional use. In this study, we investigated the in vivo anti-asthmatic and antioxidant activities of nettle extract. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Group I: negative control; group II: Ovalbumin sensitized/challenged rats (positive control); group III: received UD extract (1.5 g/kg/day) orally along the experimental protocol; group IV: received UD extract (1.5 g/kg/day) orally along the experimental protocol and sensitized/challenged with ovalbumin. After 25 days, blood and tissue samples were collected for haematological and histopathological analysis, respectively. The oxidative stress parameters were evaluated in the lungs, liver and erythrocytes. Then, correlations between markers of airway inflammation and markers of oxidative stress were explored. UD extract significantly (p effectively suppressed inflammatory cells recruitment in the asthmatic rat model. Besides, the lipid peroxidation generated by allergen administration was significantly (p effects of this extract against airway inflammation.

  6. Testing Models of Fatty Acid Transfer and Lipid Synthesis in Spinach Leaf Using in vivo Oxygen-18 Labeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mike Pollard; John Ohlrogge

    1999-01-01

    .... [ ]Acetate was incubated with spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves and the O content in fatty acid methyl esters isolated from different lipid classes measured by gas chromatography-mass spectometry...

  7. Effects of dietary omega-3 and omega-6 lipids and vitamin E on serum cytokines, lipid mediators and anti-DNA antibodies in a mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, J T; Chu, W C

    1999-12-01

    Omega-3 (omega-3) fatty acid rich-fish oil (FO) and vitamin E (vit-E) may delay the progress of certain autoimmune diseases. The present study examined the mechanism of action of omega-3 and omega-6 lipids and vit-E on the serum cytokines and lipid mediators in autoimmune-prone MRL/lpr mice (a model for rheumatoid arthritis, RA). The lpr (lymphoproliferative) gene is overexpressed in these mice causing extensive lymphoproliferation, lupus-like symptoms and accelerated aging. Weanling female MRL/lpr and congenic control MRL/++ mice were fed 10% corn oil (CO, omega6) or FO-based semipurified diets containing two levels of vitamin E (vit-E-75, I.U. and vit-E-500 I.U./Kg diet) for four months. At the end of the experiment, serum anti-DNA antibodies, cytokines and lipid mediators levels were determined. The appearance of enlarged lymph nodes was delayed in the mice fed FO, and the FO-500 IU vit-E diet offered further protection against enlargement of lymph nodes. The MRL/lpr mice exhibited significantly higher levels of serum anti-dsDNA antibodies. The FO-fed mice had significantly lower serum IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-alpha, PGE2, TXB2 and LTB4 levels compared with CO-fed mice. In mice fed 500 IU vit-E diets, the serum IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-alpha levels were significantly lower and serum IL-1beta was significantly higher compared to 75 IU-vit-E-fed mice in CO/FO or both. The levels of anti-DNA antibodies, IL-4, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-10 and IL-12 were higher in the sera of MRL/lpr mice. The FO diet lowered the levels of these cytokines (except IL-4) and lipid mediators. Adding 500 IU of vit-E to the FO diet further lowered the levels of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-alpha. It is clear from our observations that the beneficial effects of FO can be enhanced by the addition of 500 IU of vit-E in the diet. The FO diet containing 500 IU of vit-E may specifically modulate the levels of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-alpha and thereby may delay the onset of autoimmunity in the MRL

  8. CT/FMT dual-model imaging of breast cancer based on peptide-lipid nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Lin, Qiaoya; Lian, Lichao; Qian, Yuan; Lu, Lisen; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most harmful cancers in human. Its early diagnosis is expected to improve the patients' survival rate. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in tumor detection for obtaining three-dimentional information. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) imaging combined with near-infrared fluorescent dyes provides a powerful tool for the acquisition of molecular biodistribution information in deep tissues. Thus, the combination of CT and FMT imaging modalities allows us to better differentiate diseased tissues from normal tissues. Here we developed a tumor-targeting nanoparticle for dual-modality imaging based on a biocompatible HDL-mimicking peptide-phospholipid scaffold (HPPS) nanocarrier. By incorporation of CT contrast agents (iodinated oil) and far-infrared fluorescent dyes (DiR-BOA) into the hydrophobic core of HPPS, we obtained the FMT and CT signals simultaneously. Increased accumulation of the nanoparticles in the tumor lesions was achieved through the effect of the tumor-targeting peptide on the surface of nanoparticle. It resulted in excellent contrast between lesions and normal tissues. Together, the abilities to sensitively separate the lesions from adjacent normal tissues with the aid of a FMT/CT dual-model imaging approach make the targeting nanoparticles a useful tool for the diagnostics of breast cancer.

  9. EFFECT OF APPLE CIDER VINEGAR ON PLASMA LIPIDS (MODEL EXPERIMENT IN MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Bender

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false HU X-NONE X-NONE Model experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of apple cider vinegar (ACV on the blood and liver cholesterol (Ch, triglycerides (TG and one of a marker of antioxidant status of blood (FRAP in laboratory mice. Animals consumed a basal mice diet (Control served as the control group. The same diet was supplemented either 1% cholesterol (Ch or 1% edible sunflower oil (SFO. All groups were duplicated and their animals were supplied drinking water containing ACV (50 mg l-1(groups: Control+ACV, Chol+ACV, SFO+ACV.The feeding and drinking was ad libitum for 21 days. At the end of experiment the animals were exterminated. Blood and liver samples were analyzed for total cholesterol (tCh, triglycerides (TG and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP. The results show that the Ch supplemented group stored higher concentration of tCh in the liver (Pdoi:10.5219/156  

  10. Comparison of stratum corneum thickness between two proposed methods of calculation using Raman spectroscopic depth profiling of skin water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M; Won, K; Kim, E J; Hwang, J S; Lee, H K

    2018-02-20

    The stratum corneum (SC) is the most important layer for the barrier function of skin, so investigation of the SC is very important in cosmetic and medical research. Here, we calculated the SC thickness using the depth profile of the skin's water concentration based on previously described methods, and then compared the results. Seven Korean women in their 30s participated in this study. Raman spectroscopy was used to measure the in vivo depth profile of skin water concentration. A total of 21 areas were measured at forearm. Microsoft Excel 2007 was used to calculate SC thickness based on the slope and intersection methods. The slope method and the intersection method gave a forearm SC thickness calculated at 21.3 ± 2.6 μm and 17.6 ± 2.8 μm, respectively. There was a significant difference between the two calculation methods but the two methods showed strong correlation of SC thickness results (r = .899). Although there was a difference in calculated SC thickness of about 20% between the two methods, these results reveal that the two SC thickness calculation methods using Raman spectroscopy were suitable for measuring SC thickness, a finding consistent with other published results. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Long-term feeding of red algae (Gelidium amansii ameliorates glucose and lipid metabolism in a high fructose diet-impaired glucose tolerance rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hshuan-Chen Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the effect of Gelidium amansii (GA on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rats with high fructose (HF diet (57.1% w/w. Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a HF diet to induce glucose intolerance and hyperlipidemia. The experiment was divided into three groups: (1 control diet group (Con; (2 HF diet group (HF; and (3 HF with GA diet group (HF + 5% GA. The rats were fed the experimental diets and drinking water ad libitum for 23 weeks. The results showed that GA significantly decreased retroperitoneal fat mass weight of HF diet-fed rats. Supplementation of GA caused a decrease in plasma glucose, insulin, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leptin. HF diet increased hepatic lipid content. However, intake of GA reduced the accumulation of hepatic lipids including total cholesterol (TC and triglyceride contents. GA elevated the excretion of fecal lipids and bile acid in HF diet-fed rats. Furthermore, GA significantly decreased plasma TC, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein plus very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and TC/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio in HF diet-fed rats. HF diet induced an in plasma glucose and an impaired glucose tolerance, but GA supplementation decreased homeostasis model assessment equation-insulin resistance and improved impairment of glucose tolerance. Taken together, these results indicate that supplementation of GA can improve the impairment of glucose and lipid metabolism in an HF diet-fed rat model.

  12. Long-term feeding of red algae (Gelidium amansii) ameliorates glucose and lipid metabolism in a high fructose diet-impaired glucose tolerance rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hshuan-Chen; Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Tsung-Han; Chiang, Meng-Tsan

    2017-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of Gelidium amansii (GA) on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rats with high fructose (HF) diet (57.1% w/w). Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a HF diet to induce glucose intolerance and hyperlipidemia. The experiment was divided into three groups: (1) control diet group (Con); (2) HF diet group (HF); and (3) HF with GA diet group (HF + 5% GA). The rats were fed the experimental diets and drinking water ad libitum for 23 weeks. The results showed that GA significantly decreased retroperitoneal fat mass weight of HF diet-fed rats. Supplementation of GA caused a decrease in plasma glucose, insulin, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leptin. HF diet increased hepatic lipid content. However, intake of GA reduced the accumulation of hepatic lipids including total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride contents. GA elevated the excretion of fecal lipids and bile acid in HF diet-fed rats. Furthermore, GA significantly decreased plasma TC, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein plus very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and TC/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio in HF diet-fed rats. HF diet induced an in plasma glucose and an impaired glucose tolerance, but GA supplementation decreased homeostasis model assessment equation-insulin resistance and improved impairment of glucose tolerance. Taken together, these results indicate that supplementation of GA can improve the impairment of glucose and lipid metabolism in an HF diet-fed rat model. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. The salt and lipid composition of model cheeses modifies in-mouth flavour release and perception related to the free sodium ion content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisard, Lauriane; Andriot, Isabelle; Martin, Christophe; Septier, Chantal; Boissard, Vanessa; Salles, Christian; Guichard, Elisabeth

    2014-02-15

    Reducing salt and lipid levels in foodstuffs without any effect on acceptability is a major challenge, particularly because of their interactions with other ingredients. This study used a multimodal approach to understand the effects of changes to the composition of model cheeses (20/28, 24/24, 28/20 lipid/protein ratios, 0% and 1% added NaCl) on sodium ion mobility ((23)Na NMR), in-mouth sodium release and flavour perception. An increase in the salt content decreased cheese firmness and perceived hardness, and increased sodium ion mobility, in vivo sodium release and both saltiness and aroma perception. With the same amount of salt, a lower lipid/protein ratio increased the firmness of the cheeses, perceived hardness, and decreased sodium ion mobility, in vivo sodium release, saltiness and aroma perception. These findings suggest on one hand that it could be possible to increase saltiness perception by varying cheese composition, thus inducing differences in sodium ion mobility and in free sodium ion concentration, leading to differences in in-mouth sodium release and saltiness perception, and on the other hand that the reformulation of foods in line with health guidelines needs to take account of both salt content and the lipid/protein ratio. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of Western, Vegetarian, and Japanese dietary fat model diets with or without green tea extract on the plasma lipids and glucose, and liver lipids in mice. A long-term feeding experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Nobuya; Suzuki, Hiramitsu

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of three model diets containing different fats, with or without a small amount of green tea extract (GTE), on plasma lipids and glucose, and liver lipids in mice. Male mice (2 months old) fed 10% fat diets with Western (W), Vegetarian (V), and Japanese (J) fat compositions with or without 0.03% GTE for 7 months. The concentrations of plasma and liver total cholesterol in animals fed the W diet were not significantly different from those fed the J diet. Plasma triacylglycerol (TG) concentrations were significantly different from one another in the following order: V > J > W diet groups. GTE supplementation significantly reduced plasma and liver TG content only in V diet group. Plasma glucose (Glu) concentrations were in the following order: W > V > J diet groups, and the GTE supplementation reduced the concentration of Glu in each diet group. The ratios of plasma n-6 to n-3 fatty acids were in the following order: V > W > J diet groups, regardless of GTE supplementation. These findings show the possibility that Japanese eating habits combined with drinking green tea might be a factor in preventing the onset of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Myoglobin-induced lipid oxidation : A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline; Andersen, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of myoglobin-initiated lipid oxidation in simple model systems, muscle, and muscle-based foods is presented. The potential role of myoglobin spin and redox states in initiating lipid oxidation is reviewed. Proposed mechanisms for myoglobin- initiated lipid oxidation in muscle tissue (p...

  16. Protective Effects of Curcumin on Renal Oxidative Stress and Lipid Metabolism in a Rat Model of Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Hwan; Lee, Eun Soo; Choi, Ran; Nawaboot, Jarinyaporn; Lee, Mi Young; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Hyeon Soo; Chung, Choon Hee

    2016-05-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a serious complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and delaying the development of diabetic nephropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus is very important. In this study, we investigated inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipid metabolism to assess whether curcumin ameliorates diabetic nephropathy. Animals were divided into three groups: Long-Evans-Tokushima-Otsuka rats for normal controls, Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats for the diabetic group, and curcumin-treated (100 mg/kg/day) OLETF rats. We measured body and epididymal fat weights, and examined plasma glucose, adiponectin, and lipid profiles at 45 weeks. To confirm renal damage, we measured albumin-creatinine ratio, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in urine samples. Glomerular basement membrane thickness and slit pore density were evaluated in the renal cortex tissue of rats. Furthermore, we conducted adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and oxidative stress-related nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) signaling to investigate mechanisms of lipotoxicity in kidneys. Curcumin ameliorated albuminuria, pathophysiologic changes on the glomerulus, urinary MDA, and urinary SOD related with elevated Nrf2 signaling, as well as serum lipid-related index and ectopic lipid accumulation through activation of AMPK signaling. Collectively, these findings indicate that curcumin exerts renoprotective effects by inhibiting renal lipid accumulation and oxidative stress through AMPK and Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  17. Lipid mobility in supported lipid bilayers by single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohram, Maryam; Shi, Xiaojun; Smith, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Phospholipid bilayers are the main component of cell membranes and their interaction with biomolecules in their immediate environment is critical for cellular functions. These interactions include the binding of polycationic polymers to lipid bilayers which affects many cell membrane events. As an alternative method of studying live cell membranes, we assemble a supported lipid bilayer and investigate its binding with polycationic polymers in vitro by fluorescently labeling the molecules of the supported lipid bilayer and tracking their mobility. In this work, we use single molecule tracking total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) to study phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids with and without an adsorbed polycationic polymer, quaternized polyvinylpyridine (QPVP). Individual molecular trajectories are obtained from the experiment, and a Brownian diffusion model is used to determine diffusion coefficients through mean square displacements. Our results indicate a smaller diffusion coefficient for the supported lipid bilayers in the presence of QPVP in comparison to its absence, revealing that their binding causes a decrease in lateral mobility.

  18. Porphyrin lipid nanoparticles for enhanced photothermal therapy in a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.; Ding, Lili; Jin, Cheng; Cao, Pingjiang; Siddiqui, Iram; Hwang, David M.; Chen, Juan; Wilson, Brian C.; Zheng, Gang; Hedley, David W.

    2016-03-01

    Local disease control is a major problem in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, because curative-intent surgery is only possible in a minority of patients, and radiotherapy cannot be delivered in curative doses. Despite the promise of photothermal therapy (PTT) for ablation of pancreatic tumors, this approach remains under investigated. Using photothermal sensitizers in combination with laser light for PTT can result in more efficient conversion of light energy to heat, and confinement of thermal destruction to the tumor, thus sparing adjacent organs and vasculature. Porphyrins have been previously employed as photosensitizers for PDT and PTT, however their incorporation in to "porphysomes", lipid-based nanoparticles each containing ~80,000 porphyrins through conjugation of pyropheophorbide to phospholipids, carries two distinct advantages: 1) high-density porphyrin packing imparts the nanoparticles with enhanced photonic properties for imaging and phototherapy; 2) the enhanced permeability and retention effect may be exploited for optimal delivery of porphysomes to the tumor region thus high payload porphyrin delivery. The feasibility of porphysome-enhanced PTT for pancreatic cancer treatment was investigated using a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft tumor model. Uptake of porphysomes at the orthotopic tumor site was validated using ex vivo fluorescence imaging of intact organs of interest. The accumulation of porphysomes in orthotopic tumor microstructure was also confirmed by fluorescence imaging of excised tissue slices. PTT progress was monitored as changes in tumor surface temperature using IR optical imaging. Histological analyses were conducted to examine microstructure changes in tissue morphology, and the viability of remaining tumor tissues following exposure to heat. These studies may also provide insight as to the contribution of heat sink in application of thermal therapies to highly vascularized pancreatic tumors.

  19. Ameliorating effects of D-47, a newly developed compound, on lipid metabolism in an animal model of familial hypercholesterolemia (WHHLMI rabbits).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Shohei; Koike, Yui; Takeda, Hiroaki; Koike, Tomonari; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Nagasaka, Ryosuke; Tsunoda, Tetsuto; Tori, Motoo; Ogawa, Kazuo; Bamba, Takeshi; Shiomi, Masashi

    2018-03-05

    Improvements induced in lipid metabolism in the liver by D-47, a newly developed compound, were examined herein. WHHLMI rabbits, an animal model of hypercholesterolemia and coronary atherosclerosis, was fed D-47-supplemented chow for 5 weeks at a dose of 30mg/kg. Lipid concentration were assayed using enzymatic methods. Plasma lipoproteins were fractionated with an ultracentrifuge. mRNA expression was analyzed with real-time PCR. Lipidome analyses of lipoproteins were performed using supercritical fluid chromatography mass spectrometry. In the D-47-treated group, serum lipid levels decreased by 23% for total cholesterol and by 40% for triglycerides. These reductions were mainly attributed to decreases in the VLDL fraction. Compared with the control, in the D-47 group, lipid contents in the liver were decreased by 22% in cholesterol and by 69% in triglycerides, and fat accumulation was decreased by 57% in pericardial fat and by 17% in mesenteric fat. In lipidome analyses of VLDL fraction, lysophosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogen, sphingomyelin, and ceramide were decreased by the D-47 treatment. mRNA expression in the liver was 51% lower for FAS and 24% lower for MTP, but 5.9- and 5.1-fold higher for CYP7A1 and CPT-1, respectively, in the D-47 group than in the control. mRNA expression was 72%, 64%, and 36% higher for LPL, CTP-1, and PPARγ, respectively, in mesenteric fat in the D-47 group. D-47 is a potent lipid-lowering compound that uses a different mechanism of action from that of statins. It has potential as a compound in the treatment of steatohepatitis and metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Levosimendan combined with epinephrine improves rescue outcomes in a rat model of lipid-based resuscitation from bupivacaine-induced cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Fubei; Cai, Xixi; Ye, Yingchao; Xu, Xuzhong; Li, Zhengqian; Li, Min; Chen, Limei

    2017-09-15

    The effectiveness of a combination of a lipid emulsion with epinephrine in reversing local anesthetic-induced cardiac arrest has been confirmed. The combination of a lipid emulsion with levosimendan, was shown to be superior to administration of a lipid emulsion alone with regard to successful resuscitation. In this study, we compared the reversal effects of levosimendan, epinephrine, and a combination of the two agents in lipid-based resuscitation in a rat model of bupivacaine-induced cardiac arrest. Fifty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to bupivacaine (15 mg·kg(-1)) -induced asystole and were then randomly divided into 3 groups. A lipid emulsion was used as the basic treatment, and administration of drug combinations varied in each group as follows: (1) levosimendan combined with epinephrine (LiEL); (2) epinephrine (LiE); and (3) levosimendan (LiL). The resuscitation outcomes were recorded and included the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival at 40 min, time to first heartbeat, time to ROSC, and cumulative dose of epinephrine. We calculated the wet-to-dry ratio of the lung, blood gas values at 40 min and bupivacaine concentration of cardiac tissue and plasma. The rates of ROSC in LiEL and LiE groups were higher than LiL group (P rate in LiEL group was higher than LiE group (P = 0.003; LiEL vs LiE, P = 0.008; LiEL vs LiL, P = 0.001). The time to first heart beat in LiEL group was shorter than LiE, LiL groups. (P weight ratio, and ratio of damaged alveoli among groups. The LiEL group had the best result for all parameters (P rate as well as decreased epinephrine consumption and lung damage.

  1. Skin barrier response to occlusion of healthy and irritated skin: differences in trans-epidermal water loss, erythema and stratum corneum lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Occlusion of the skin is a risk factor for development of irritant contact dermatitis. Occlusion may, however, have a positive effect on skin healing. No consensus on the effect of occlusion has been reached....

  2. Near infra-red spectroscopy quantitative modelling of bivalve protein, lipid and glycogen composition using single-species versus multi-species calibration and validation sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jill K.; Maher, William A.; Purss, Matthew B. J.

    2018-03-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) quantitative modelling was used to measure the protein, lipid and glycogen composition of five marine bivalve species (Saccostrea glomerata, Ostrea angasi, Crassostrea gigas, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anadara trapezia) from multiple locations and seasons. Predictive models were produced for each component using individual species and aggregated sample populations for the three oyster species (S. glomerata, O. angasi and C. gigas) and for all five bivalve species. Whole animal tissues were freeze dried, ground to > 20 μm and scanned by NIRS. Protein, lipid and glycogen composition were determined by traditional chemical analyses and calibration models developed to allow rapid NIRS-measurement of these components in the five bivalve species. Calibration modelling was performed using wavelet selection, genetic algorithms and partial least squares analysis. Model quality was assessed using RPIQ and RMESP. For protein composition, single species model results had RPIQ values between 2.4 and 3.5 and RMSEP between 8.6 and 18%, the three oyster model had an RPIQ of 2.6 and an RMSEP of 10.8% and the five bivalve species had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 8.7% respectively. For lipid composition, single species models achieved RPIQ values between 2.9 and 5.3 with RMSEP between 9.1 and 11.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 6.8 and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 5.2 and RMSEP of 6.8% respectively. For glycogen composition, the single species models had RPIQs between 3.8 and 18.9 with RMSEP between 3.5 and 9.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 5.5 and RMSEP of 7.1% and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 4 and RMSEP of 7.6% respectively. Comparison between individual species models and aggregated models for three oyster species and five bivalve species for each component indicate that aggregating data from like species produces high quality models with robust and reliable quantitative application. The benefit of

  3. Stratum corneum damage and ex vivo porcine skin water absorption - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch Lynggaard, C; Bang Knudsen, D; Jemec, G B E

    2009-01-01

    A simple ex vivo screening technique would be of interest for mass screening of substances for potential barrier disruptive qualities. Ex vivo water absorption as a marker of skin barrier integrity was studied on pig ear skin. Skin water absorption was quantified by weighing and weight changes were...... found to reflect prehydration barrier damage. It is suggested that this simple model may be elaborated to provide a rapid, economical screening tool for potential skin irritants....

  4. Model-based approaches for the determination of lipid bilayer structure from small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Frederick A; Pan, Jianjun; Standaert, Robert F; Drazba, Paul; Kučerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John

    2012-10-01

    Some of our recent work has resulted in the detailed structures of fully hydrated, fluid phase phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) bilayers. These structures were obtained from the joint refinement of small-angle neutron and X-ray data using the scattering density profile (SDP) models developed by Kučerka et al. (Biophys J 95:2356-2367, 2008; J Phys Chem B 116:232-239, 2012). In this review, we first discuss models for the standalone analysis of neutron or X-ray scattering data from bilayers, and assess the strengths and weaknesses inherent to these models. In particular, it is recognized that standalone data do not contain enough information to fully resolve the structure of naturally disordered fluid bilayers, and therefore may not provide a robust determination of bilayer structure parameters, including the much-sought-after area per lipid. We then discuss the development of matter density-based models (including the SDP model) that allow for the joint refinement of different contrast neutron and X-ray data, as well as the implementation of local volume conservation within the unit cell (i.e., ideal packing). Such models provide natural definitions of bilayer thicknesses (most importantly the hydrophobic and Luzzati thicknesses) in terms of Gibbs dividing surfaces, and thus allow for the robust determination of lipid areas through equivalent slab relationships between bilayer thickness and lipid volume. In the final section of this review, we discuss some of the significant findings/features pertaining to structures of PC and PG bilayers as determined from SDP model analyses.

  5. Model-based Approaches for the Determination of Lipid Bilayer Structure from Small-Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Standaert, Robert F [ORNL; Drazba, Paul [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Some of our recent work has resulted in the detailed structures of fully hydrated, fluid phase phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) bilayers. These structures were obtained from the joint refinement of small-angle neutron and X-ray data using the scattering density profile (SDP) models developed by Ku erka et al. (Ku erka et al. 2012; Ku erka et al. 2008). In this review, we first discuss models for the standalone analysis of neutron or X-ray scattering data from bilayers, and assess the strengths and weaknesses inherent in these models. In particular, it is recognized that standalone data do not contain enough information to fully resolve the structure of inherently disordered fluid bilayers, and therefore may not provide a robust determination of bilayer structural parameters, including the much sought after area per lipid. We then discuss the development of matter density-based models (including the SDP model) that allow for the joint refinement of different contrast neutron and X-ray data sets, as well as the implementation of local volume conservation in the unit cell (i.e., ideal packing). Such models provide natural definitions of bilayer thicknesses (most importantly the hydrophobic and Luzzati thicknesses) in terms of Gibbs dividing surfaces, and thus allow for the robust determination of lipid areas through equivalent slab relationships between bilayer thickness and lipid volume. In the final section of this review, we discuss some of the significant findings/features pertaining to structures of PC and PG bilayers as determined from SDP model analyses.

  6. Hypochlorous acid-mediated oxidation of lipid components and antioxidants present in low-density lipoproteins: absolute rate constants, product analysis, and computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, David I; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J

    2003-04-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) is believed to contribute to the increased uptake of LDL by macrophages, which is an early event in atherosclerosis. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) has been implicated as one of the major oxidants involved in these processes. In a previous study, the rates of reaction of HOCl with the reactive sites in proteins were investigated (Pattison, D. I., and Davies, M. J. (2001) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 14, 1453-1464). The work presented here expands on those studies to determine absolute second-order rate constants for the reactions of HOCl with various lipid components and antioxidants in aqueous solution (pH 7.4). The reactions of HOCl with phosphoryl-serine and phosphoryl-ethanolamine are rapid (k approximately 10(5) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)) and of comparable reactivity to many of the protein sites. The major products formed in these reactions are chloramines, which decay to give both nitrogen- and carbon-centered radicals. Subsequent reactions of these species may induce oxidation of the LDL lipid component. In contrast, phosphoryl-choline reacted much more slowly (k < 10(-)(2) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)). Reaction of HOCl with 3-pentenoic acid was used as a model of lipid double bonds and yielded k = 9 M(-)(1) s(-)(1). The reactions of the lipid-soluble antioxidants, alpha-tocopherol and ubiquinol-10, with HOCl were investigated with model compounds. For the reactions of HOCl with both Trolox and ubiquinol-0, k = 1.3 x 10(3) M(-)(1) s(-)(1); thus, these lipid soluble antioxidants are relatively ineffective as direct scavengers for HOCl as compared to water soluble antioxidants (e.g., ascorbate, k ca. 10(6) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)). The reaction of HOCl with hydroquinone (a simple model for ubiquinol-10) was also investigated both in aqueous solution (k = 45 M(-)(1) s(-)(1)) and in a less polar environment (k approximately 0.5 M(-)(1) s(-)(1) in THF). A computational model was developed using these kinetic parameters to predict which LDL targets are oxidized

  7. An unsupervised machine learning method for delineating stratum corneum in reflectance confocal microscopy stacks of human skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Alican; Kose, Kivanc; Fox, Christi A.; Dy, Jennifer; Brooks, Dana H.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Study of the stratum corneum (SC) in human skin is important for research in barrier structure and function, drug delivery, and water permeability of skin. The optical sectioning and high resolution of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows visual examination of SC non-invasively. Here, we present an unsupervised segmentation algorithm that can automatically delineate thickness of the SC in RCM images of human skin in-vivo. We mimic clinicians visual process by applying complex wavelet transform over non-overlapping local regions of size 16 x 16 μm called tiles, and analyze the textural changes in between consecutive tiles in axial (depth) direction. We use dual-tree complex wavelet transform to represent textural structures in each tile. This transform is almost shift-invariant, and directionally selective, which makes it highly efficient in texture representation. Using DT-CWT, we decompose each tile into 6 directional sub-bands with orientations in +/-15, 45, and 75 degrees and a low-pass band, which is the decimated version of the input. We apply 3 scales of decomposition by recursively transforming the low-pass bands and obtain 18 bands of different directionality at different scales. We then calculate mean and variance of each band resulting in a feature vector of 36 entries. Feature vectors obtained for each stack of tiles in axial direction are then clustered using spectral clustering in order to detect the textural changes in depth direction. Testing on a set of 15 RCM stacks produced a mean error of 5.45+/-1.32 μm, compared to the "ground truth" segmentation provided by a clinical expert reader.

  8. Interactions between the stratum corneum and topically applied products: regulatory, instrumental and formulation issues with focus on moisturizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodén, M

    2014-09-01

    Virtually everyone in Europe will use at least one cosmetic product every day. The extensive use of cosmetics and results from measurements of quality of life in patients with skin diseases demonstrate the importance of a healthy skin. The skin is not only a barrier against desiccation and intrusion of harmful materials, but also an organ of social communication, where dry, scaly, rough stratum corneum is unappealing to touch, inducing anxiety and depression. Knowledge about the skin biochemistry and the use of noninvasive instruments facilitate the development of topical products and quantification of their effects. The presentation of the products and mode of action determine the regulatory demands and the approval process, as they can fall into different regulatory entities, such as cosmetics, medicinal products, medical devices and as other chemical products. The majority of the topical products on the market are regulated as cosmetics. For example, facial skin care and daily moisturizing routines are frequently used. However, despite visible relief of dryness symptoms, some products are reported to result in deterioration of the skin barrier function. New clinical outcomes show important clinical differences between formulations and the relapse of eczema. In a worst case scenario, treatment with a moisturizing cream may increase the risks of eczema and asthma. In the present overview, product presentations and mode of actions are reflected against the regulatory demands in Europe. The regulations are continuously revisited and new guidelines are being implemented, such as the new cosmetic regulation with advice on testing and responsible marketing. © 2014 The Author BJD © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. Effect of different alcohols on stratum corneum kallikrein 5 and phospholipase A2together with epidermal keratinocytes and skin irritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartner, T; Brand, N; Tian, K; Saud, A; Carr, T; Stapleton, P; Lane, M E; Rawlings, A V

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the effect of ethanol, isopropanol and n-propanol on stratum corneum (SC) enzymes and keratinocytes in vitro together with their effects on skin condition and function. Activities of kallikrein 5 (KLK5) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) as well as keratinocyte metabolic activity, interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured in vitro in the presence and absence of the different alcohols. We also measured transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin capacitance, visual dryness and visual redness on the volar forearms of 25 Caucasian women following application of the alcohols 20 and 100 times per day over a period of 14 days in a clinical study. Reduced activities of KLK5 and PLA2 were observed in the presence of the alcohols. The greatest denaturing effect was always observed for n-propanol (P effect of isopropanol was greater than ethanol (P effects on keratinocyte metabolic activity and cytokine secretion (P effects were on the induction of skin irritation (increased dropout rates) and ranked the intolerance of the different alcohols as follows: n-propanol > isopropanol > ethanol. At the high application frequencies, the effect of the different alcohols on transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin capacitance was similar, but at the low application frequencies, n-propanol had a significant effect on TEWL and capacitance values (P alcohols and should be the active ingredient of choice. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Cosmetic Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Cosmetic Scientists and Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  10. Sun-Induced Changes in Stratum Corneum Function Are Gender and Dose Dependent in a Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Fluhr, J.W.; Song, S.P.; Sun, Z.; Wang, H.; Shi, Y.J.; Elias, P.M.; Man, M.-Q.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that UVB radiation changes the epidermal permeability barrier and stratum corneum (SC) hydration. It is well known that sun exposure causes erythema, sunburn and melanoma. However, whether daily sun exposure alters SC integrity and epidermal permeability barrier function is largely unknown, especially in Chinese subjects. In the present study, we assess the SC integrity, SC hydration and epidermal permeability barrier function following various doses of sun exposure. A total of 258 subjects (124 males and 134 females) aged 18–50 years were enrolled. A multifunctional skin physiology monitor (Courage & Khazaka MPA5) was used to measure SC hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) on the forearms. In males, basal TEWL was higher with higher doses of sun exposure than with lower doses and control, whereas in females, basal TEWL was higher with lower doses of sun exposure than with higher doses and control. In the group with higher doses of sun exposure, TEWL in females was significantly lower than that in males. The barrier recovery was faster in females than in males in both control and lower-dose groups. In both males and females, barrier recovery was delayed with higher doses of sun exposure. In males, sun exposure did not alter SC hydration, while in females SC hydration was lower with lower doses of sun exposure as compared with control and higher doses of sun exposure. These results demonstrated that sun-induced changes in SC function and SC hydration vary with gender and the extent of sun exposure. PMID:20571289

  11. Sun-induced changes in stratum corneum function are gender and dose dependent in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Fluhr, J W; Song, S P; Sun, Z; Wang, H; Shi, Y J; Elias, P M; Man, M-Q

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that UVB radiation changes the epidermal permeability barrier and stratum corneum (SC) hydration. It is well known that sun exposure causes erythema, sunburn and melanoma. However, whether daily sun exposure alters SC integrity and epidermal permeability barrier function is largely unknown, especially in Chinese subjects. In the present study, we assess the SC integrity, SC hydration and epidermal permeability barrier function following various doses of sun exposure. A total of 258 subjects (124 males and 134 females) aged 18-50 years were enrolled. A multifunctional skin physiology monitor (Courage & Khazaka MPA5) was used to measure SC hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) on the forearms. In males, basal TEWL was higher with higher doses of sun exposure than with lower doses and control, whereas in females, basal TEWL was higher with lower doses of sun exposure than with higher doses and control. In the group with higher doses of sun exposure, TEWL in females was significantly lower than that in males. The barrier recovery was faster in females than in males in both control and lower-dose groups. In both males and females, barrier recovery was delayed with higher doses of sun exposure. In males, sun exposure did not alter SC hydration, while in females SC hydration was lower with lower doses of sun exposure as compared with control and higher doses of sun exposure. These results demonstrated that sun-induced changes in SC function and SC hydration vary with gender and the extent of sun exposure. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Documentation of normal stratum corneum scaling in an average population: features of differences among age, ethnicity and body site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, M; Kollias, N

    2011-03-01

    Scaling skin involves an imbalance between cell proliferation and desquamation, resulting in partially detached corneocytes at the stratum corneum (SC) surface that become visible as they scatter light. The purpose of this study was to document scaling skin with no associated pathology, to estimate the range of normal corneocyte detachment in the average population, and to determine if age, pigmentation and/or body sites of different exposures contribute to differences observed in the SC. Healthy African-American and Caucasian female subjects (n = 151) from a typical central New Jersey population, aged between 14 and 75 years, were evaluated on the dorsal forearm and upper inner arm. Dermatoscopy and adhesive tape were used to evaluate the appearance and adhesion of surface corneocytes. Transepidermal water loss and conductivity were measured to assess water-handling properties of the SC. Measurements were conducted during the winter. Corneocyte detachment observed with dermatoscopy became more prevalent with age and was more severe on the dorsal forearm and in Caucasian subjects. The distribution of the amount of corneocyte removal with adhesive tape increased with age. The range of values was larger in the dorsal forearm than the upper inner arm and was greater in Caucasian subjects than African-American subjects. Minimal changes were observed for water-handling properties. The architecture of the outer SC appears different between ages, body sites of different exposures, and individuals of different pigmentation groups, but minimal differences in water-handling properties are observed. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. Chemical ultraviolet absorbers topically applied in a skin barrier mimetic formulation remain in the outer stratum corneum of porcine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, T; Crowther, J M; Lane, M E; Moore, D J

    2016-08-20

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the fate of three chemical sunscreens, isoamyl p-methoxycinnamate (IPMC), diethylamino hydroxybenzoyl hexyl benzoate (DHHB), and bis-ethylhexylphenol methoxyphenyl triazine (BEMT), topically applied to mammalian skin from a skin barrier mimetic oil-in-water formulation. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) methods were developed for the analysis of each molecule and validated. Franz cell permeation studies were conducted following application of finite doses of the formulations to excised porcine skin. A vehicle formulation containing no sunscreens was evaluated as a control. Permeation studies were conducted for 12h after which full mass balance studies were carried out. Analysis of individual UV sunscreens was achieved with HPLC following application of the formulation to the skin with no interference from the vehicle components. No skin permeation of any of the chemical sunscreens was evident after 12h. While sunscreens were detected in up to 12 tape strips taken from the SC, 87% or more of the applied doses recovered in the first 5 tape strips. When corrected for the amount of protein removed per tape strip this corresponded to a penetration depth in porcine stratum corneum of ∼1.7μm. Mass balance studies indicated total recovery values were within accepted guidelines for cosmetic formulations. Overall, only superficial penetration into the SC was observed for each compound. These findings are consistent with the physicochemical properties of the selected UV absorbing molecules and their formulation into an ordered biomimetic barrier formulation thus support their intended use in topical consumer formulations designed to protect from UV exposure. To our knowledge this is the first report of depth profiling of chemical sunscreens in the SC that combines tape stripping and protein determination following in vitro Franz cell studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In vivo studies of aquaporins 3 and 10 in human stratum corneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Bomholt, Julie; Bajraktari, Niada

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) constitute one family of transmembrane proteins facilitating transport of water across cell membranes. Due to their specificity, AQPs have a broad spectrum of physiological functions, and for keratinocytes there are indications that these channel proteins are involved in cell...... by AQP3 and AQP10 antibodies. In conclusion, identification of AQP3 and AQP10 protein in SC in an in vivo model is new. Together with the new “minimal-invasive” method for SC collection presented, this opens for new possibilities to study the role of AQPs in relation to function of the skin barrier....

  15. Lipid-Based Formulations Can Enable the Model Poorly Water-Soluble Weakly Basic Drug Cinnarizine to Precipitate in an Amorphous-Salt Form during in Vitro Digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Jamal; Rades, Thomas; Boyd, Ben J

    2016-01-01

    The tendency for poorly water-soluble weakly basic drugs to precipitate in a noncrystalline form during the in vitro digestion of lipid-based formulations (LBFs) was linked to an ionic interaction between drug and fatty acid molecules produced upon lipid digestion. Cinnarizine was chosen as a model...... from the starting free base crystalline material to the hydrochloride salt, thus supporting the case that ionic interactions between weak bases and fatty acid molecules during digestion are responsible for producing amorphous-salts upon precipitation. The conclusion has wide implications...... weakly basic drug and was dissolved in a medium-chain (MC) LBF, which was subject to in vitro lipolysis experiments at various pH levels above and below the reported pKa value of cinnarizine (7.47). The solid-state form of the precipitated drug was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier...

  16. Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Ceylon cinnamon) on blood glucose and lipids in a diabetic and healthy rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Priyanga; Perera, Sanja; Gunatilake, Mangala; Abeywardene, Eranga; Gunapala, Nuwan; Premakumara, Sirimal; Perera, Kamal; Lokuhetty, Dilani; Katulanda, Prasad

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate short- and long-term effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum on food consumption, body weight, glycemic control, and lipids in healthy and diabetes-induced rats. The study was conducted in two phases (Phase I and Phase II), using Sprague-Dawley rats in four groups. Phase I evaluated acute effects on fasting blood glucose (FBG) (Groups 1 and 2) and on post-oral glucose (Groups 3 and 4) blood glucose. Groups 1 and 3 received distilled-water and Groups 2 and 4 received cinnamon-extracts. Phase II evaluated effects on food consumption, body weight, blood glucose, and lipids over 1 month. Group A (n = 8, distilled-water) and Group B (n = 8, cinnamon-extracts) were healthy rats, while Group C (n = 5, distilled-water) and Group D (n = 5, cinnamon-extracts) were diabetes-induced rats. Serum lipid profile and HbA1c were measured on D-0 and D-30. FBG, 2-h post-prandial blood glucose, body weight, and food consumption were measured on every fifth day. There was no significant difference in serial blood glucose values in cinnamon-treated group from time 0 (P > 0.05). Following oral glucose, the cinnamon group demonstrated a faster decline in blood glucose compared to controls (P zeylanicum lowered blood glucose, reduced food intake, and improved lipid parameters in diabetes-induced rats.

  17. Insulin induces a shift in lipid and primary carbon metabolites in a model of fasting-induced insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral insulin resistance shifts metabolic fuel use away from carbohydrates, and towards lipids, and is most commonly associated with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, regulated insulin resistance is an evolved mechanism to preserve glucose for the brain in conditions of high demand or carbohy...

  18. Electrophysiological, haemodynamic, and mitochondrial alterations induced by levobupivacaine during myocardial ischemia in a pig model: protection by lipid emulsions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamou, Zahida; Descotes, Jacques; Chevalier, Philippe; Bui-Xuan, Bernard; Romestaing, Caroline; Timour, Quadiri

    2015-10-01

    Accidental intravascular or high-dose injection of local anesthetics (LA) can result in serious, potentially life-threatening complications. Indeed, adequate supportive measures and the administration of lipid emulsions are required in such complications. The study's objectives were threefold: (i) evaluate the myocardial toxicity of levobupivacaine when administered intravenously; (ii) investigate levobupivacaine toxicity on cardiomyocytes mitochondrial functions and cellular structure; (iii) assess the protective effects of a lipid emulsion in the presence or absence of myocardial ischemia. Domestic pigs randomized into two groups of 24 animals each, with either preserved coronary circulation or experimental myocardial ischemia. Six animals from each group received either: (i) single IV injection of saline, (ii) lipid emulsion (Intralipid(®) ), (iii) levobupivacaine, (iv) combination levobupivacaine-Intralipid(®) . Serially measured endpoints included: heart rate, duration of the monophasic action potentials (dMAP), mean arterial pressure, and peak of the time derivative of left ventricular pressure (LV dP/dtmax ). In addition, the following cardiomyocytes mitochondrial functions were measured: reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, oxidative phosphorylation, and calcium retention capacity (CRC) as well as the consequences of ROS production on lipids, proteins, and DNA. IV injection of levobupivacaine induced sinus bradycardia and reduced dMAP and LV dP/dtmax . At the mitochondrial level, oxygen consumption and CRC were decreased. In contrast, ROS production was increased leading to enhanced lipid peroxidation and structural alterations of proteins and DNA. Myocardial ischemia was associated with global worsening of all changes. Intralipid(®) quickly improved haemodynamics. However, beneficial effects of Intralipid(®) were less clear after myocardial ischemia. © 2015 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  19. Electroacupuncture at Acupoints Reverses Plasma Glutamate, Lipid, and LDL/VLDL in an Acute Migraine Rat Model: A1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zishan Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this study was to identify potential biomarkers of electroacupuncture (EA on relieving acute migraine through metabolomic study. Methods. EA treatments were performed on both acupoints and nonacupoints on the nitroglycerin (NTG-induced migraine rat model. NMR experiments and multivariate analysis were used for metabolomic analysis. Results. The number of head-scratching, the main ethology index of migraine rat model, was significantly increased P<0.01 after NTG injection. The plasma metabolic profile of model group was distinct from that of the control group. Glutamate was significantly increased P<0.01, whereas lipids were significantly decreased P<0.01 in model rats. After EA at acupoints, the metabolic profile of model rats was normalized, with decreased glutamate P<0.05 and increased lipids P<0.01. In contrast, EA at nonacupoints did not restore the metabolic profile, but with six metabolites significantly different from acupoints group. Interestingly, the number of head-scratching and glutamate level were significantly decreased P<0.05 after receiving EA at both acupoints and nonacupoints. Conclusions. EA at acupoints may relieve acute migraine by restoring the plasma metabolic profile and plasma glutamate, while EA at nonacupoints may modestly relieve acute migraine by decreasing plasma glutamate.

  20. Lipid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Lipid metabolism disorders, such as Gaucher disease and Tay-Sachs disease, involve lipids. Lipids are fats or fat-like substances. They ...

  1. Survey Study of Lipid Effect on Nisin Nanoliposome Formation and Application in Pasteurized Milk as a Food Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Say-yed Hesameddin Tafreshi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of bacteriocins, mainly nisin, is one of the most significant preservation technologies in food industries. Nisin encapsulation can improve stability and homogenous distribution in food matrices. In this study, liposomes of four various lipids (lipoid S 100, lipoid S PC-3, lipoid S PC and lipoid PC (DPPC were prepared by dehydration-rehydration method, compared for entrapment efficiency and lipid with the highest entrapment efficiency (DPPC was characterized. Inhibitory effects of encapsulated (DPPC nanoliposomes and free nisin on spoilage of pasteurized milk were also studied. Entrapment efficiency ranged from 14% (lipoid S 100 to 49% (DPPC. DPPC nanoliposomes were large unilamellar vesicles (LUV and had an asymmetric oval shape (elliptical with a mean diameter of 136 nm. Our study revealed that pasteurized milk spoilage was delayed by both of free and encapsulated nisin, but free nisin (with 38 days was significantly more efficient in comparison with encapsulated nisin (14 days.

  2. New insights into the effects of onion consumption on lipid mediators using a diet-induced model of hypercholesterolemia

    OpenAIRE

    González-Peña, Diana; Checa, Antonio; Ancos, Begoña de; Wheelock, Craig E.; Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción

    2016-01-01

    The levels and roles of lipid mediators can be modified in response to nutritional stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate shifts in oxylipin and sphingolipid profiles stimulated by a hypercholesterolemic (HC) diet along with the modulating effects of onion introduced as an antioxidant functional ingredient characterized in the diet (HCO). Oxylipin and sphingolipid profiles were determined in plasma and tissues from Wistar rats using LC-MS/MS. Plasma ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA-derived oxylipi...

  3. Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Ceylon cinnamon) on blood glucose and lipids in a diabetic and healthy rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Priyanga; Perera, Sanja; Gunatilake, Mangala; Abeywardene, Eranga; Gunapala, Nuwan; Premakumara, Sirimal; Perera, Kamal; Lokuhetty, Dilani; Katulanda, Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate short- and long-term effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum on food consumption, body weight, glycemic control, and lipids in healthy and diabetes-induced rats. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two phases (Phase I and Phase II), using Sprague-Dawley rats in four groups. Phase I evaluated acute effects on fasting blood glucose (FBG) (Groups 1 and 2) and on post-oral glucose (Groups 3 and 4) blood glucose. Groups 1 and 3 received distilled-water and Groups 2 and 4 received cinnamon-extracts. Phase II evaluated effects on food consumption, body weight, blood glucose, and lipids over 1 month. Group A (n = 8, distilled-water) and Group B (n = 8, cinnamon-extracts) were healthy rats, while Group C (n = 5, distilled-water) and Group D (n = 5, cinnamon-extracts) were diabetes-induced rats. Serum lipid profile and HbA1c were measured on D-0 and D-30. FBG, 2-h post-prandial blood glucose, body weight, and food consumption were measured on every fifth day. Results: Phase I: There was no significant difference in serial blood glucose values in cinnamon-treated group from time 0 (P > 0.05). Following oral glucose, the cinnamon group demonstrated a faster decline in blood glucose compared to controls (P cinnamon-extracts in FBG and 2-h post-prandial blood glucose from D0 to D30 was shown only in diabetes-induced rats. In cinnamon-extracts administered groups, total and LDL cholesterol levels were lower on D30 in both healthy and diabetes-induced animals (P < 0.001). Conclusions: C. zeylanicum lowered blood glucose, reduced food intake, and improved lipid parameters in diabetes-induced rats. PMID:22518078

  4. New insights into the effects of onion consumption on lipid mediators using a diet-induced model of hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana González-Peña

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The levels and roles of lipid mediators can be modified in response to nutritional stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate shifts in oxylipin and sphingolipid profiles stimulated by a hypercholesterolemic (HC diet along with the modulating effects of onion introduced as an antioxidant functional ingredient characterized in the diet (HCO. Oxylipin and sphingolipid profiles were determined in plasma and tissues from Wistar rats using LC-MS/MS. Plasma ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA-derived oxylipins decreased in rats after 7 weeks of HC feeding, but did not evidence a further shift with HCO diet. Onion ingredient supplementation modulated the hepatic concentrations of prostaglandins and enhanced ω-3 oxylipins in the liver of HCO-fed rats relative to the HC group. The HC diet induced shifts in plasma sphingolipids, increasing sphingoid bases, dihydroceramides and ceramides, whilst the sphingomyelin, hexosylceramide and lactosylceramide families decreased. The HCO diet modified some HC diet-induced changes in sphingolipids in liver and spleen tissue. Onion supplementation effected changes in lipid mediator levels in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic Wistar rats. The potential of onion as regulator of pro-inflammatory mediators, and possible enhancer of pro-resolution pathways, warrants further study of the interaction of functional ingredients with bioactive lipid mediators and their potential impact on inflammation, oxidative stress and organ dysfunction.

  5. Effects of high-fat diets from different sources on serum and thymus lipid profile: study in an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carolina; Perris, Paula D; Fernandez, Ines; Godoy, Maria F; Mambrin, Cecilia; Slobodianik, Nora H; Feliu, Maria S

    2014-01-01

    A balanced diet is important to maintain an optimal health status and to prevent noncommunicable chronic diseases. The principal objective of this study was to analyze the effect of diets containing high fat levels from different sources, on serum and thymus lipid profile, in adult rats. Experimental diets contained 50% kcal of fat, provided by butter (B) or sunflower oil (S); control diet (C) was isocaloric, with 15 kcal of fat per 100 total kcal, provided by soy oil. Diets were otherwise complete in all nutrients and were administered for 40 days. Group B had higher levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides than C; S serum lipid profile did not differ from C, despite the higher fat content. Regarding serum and thymus FA profile, B showed an increase of saturated fatty acids and lower levels of ω6 and ω3 FA, and S had lower levels of ω3 fatty acids. The administration of high-fat diets, during 40 days to adult rats, provoked specific variations on serum and thymus fatty acids, as a consequence of differences in FA profile of their lipid sources. These results reflect the impact that eating habits have on health status. It is important to put emphasis not only on the reduction of total fat intake, but also on choosing healthy sources of fat, replacing saturated fatty acids by polyunsaturated and including oils with higher content of ω3 to keep a balanced ω6/ω3 ratio.

  6. Effect of calcium on the kinetics of free fatty acid release during in vitro lipid digestion in model emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Aiqian; Cui, Jian; Zhu, Xiangqian; Singh, Harjinder

    2013-08-15

    The effects of different calcium salts on in vitro lipid digestion were examined by determining the free fatty acids released from various oil-in-water emulsions. The kinetics of the total and individual free fatty acids released by lipolysis were monitored by the pH-stat method and gas chromatography, respectively. The rate and the extent of free fatty acid release increased with an increase in the added calcium concentration, but the increase was dependent on the emulsifying agent. The effect of calcium was diminished when the emulsion contained phosphate. Soluble calcium salts, such as calcium gluconate, calcium acetate and CaCl2, had greater effects on the rate and extent of free fatty acid release than did insoluble salts, such as CaO and CaSO4, suggesting that the ionic state of calcium plays a critical role in lipid digestion in emulsions. The addition of calcium did not alter the profiles of the individual free fatty acids released. This study provides useful information for food formulation with respect to lipid digestion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. New insights into the effects of onion consumption on lipid mediators using a diet-induced model of hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Peña, Diana; Checa, Antonio; de Ancos, Begoña; Wheelock, Craig E; Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción

    2017-04-01

    The levels and roles of lipid mediators can be modified in response to nutritional stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate shifts in oxylipin and sphingolipid profiles stimulated by a hypercholesterolemic (HC) diet along with the modulating effects of onion introduced as an antioxidant functional ingredient characterized in the diet (HCO). Oxylipin and sphingolipid profiles were determined in plasma and tissues from Wistar rats using LC-MS/MS. Plasma ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA-derived oxylipins decreased in rats after 7 weeks of HC feeding, but did not evidence a further shift with HCO diet. Onion ingredient supplementation modulated the hepatic concentrations of prostaglandins and enhanced ω-3 oxylipins in the liver of HCO-fed rats relative to the HC group. The HC diet induced shifts in plasma sphingolipids, increasing sphingoid bases, dihydroceramides and ceramides, whilst the sphingomyelin, hexosylceramide and lactosylceramide families decreased. The HCO diet modified some HC diet-induced changes in sphingolipids in liver and spleen tissue. Onion supplementation effected changes in lipid mediator levels in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic Wistar rats. The potential of onion as regulator of pro-inflammatory mediators, and possible enhancer of pro-resolution pathways, warrants further study of the interaction of functional ingredients with bioactive lipid mediators and their potential impact on inflammation, oxidative stress and organ dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Low-cost lipid production by an oleaginous yeast cultured in non-sterile conditions using model waste resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamauro, Fabio; Whiffin, Fraeya M; Scott, Rod J; Chuck, Christopher J

    2014-03-04

    The yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima, previously utilised as a biological control agent, was evaluated for its potential to produce lipids for biofuel production. Cultivation in low cost non-sterile conditions was achieved by exploiting its ability to grow at low temperature and pH and to produce natural antimicrobial compounds. Although not previously classified as oleaginous, a combination of low temperature and restricted nutrient availability triggered high levels of oil production in M. pulcherrima cultures. This regime was designed to trigger the sporulation process but prevent its completion to allow the accumulation of a subset of a normally transitional, but oil-rich, 'pulcherrima' cell type. This approach resulted in yields of up to 40% lipid, which compares favourably with other oleaginous microbes. We also demonstrate that M. pulcherrima metabolises glycerol and a diverse range of other sugars, suggesting that heterogeneous biomass could provide a suitable carbon source. M. pulcherrima also grows well in a minimal media containing no yeast extract. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of the yeast to produce lipids inexpensively on an industrial scale by culturing the yeast in a 500 L, open air, tank reactor without any significant contamination. The production of antimicrobial compounds coupled to efficient growth at low temperature and pH enables culture of this oleaginous yeast in inexpensive, non-sterile conditions providing a potential route to economic biofuel production.

  9. LIPID MAPS online tools for lipid research

    OpenAIRE

    Fahy, Eoin; Sud, Manish; Cotter, Dawn; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2007-01-01

    The LIPID MAPS consortium has developed a number of online tools for performing tasks such as drawing lipid structures and predicting possible structures from mass spectrometry (MS) data. A simple online interface has been developed to enable an end-user to rapidly generate a variety of lipid chemical structures, along with corresponding systematic names and ontological information. The structure-drawing tools are available for six categories of lipids: (i) fatty acyls, (ii) glycerolipids, (i...

  10. Spectral imaging toolbox: segmentation, hyperstack reconstruction, and batch processing of spectral images for the determination of cell and model membrane lipid order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Miles; Browning, Richard; Carugo, Dario; Sezgin, Erdinc; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Eggeling, Christian; Stride, Eleanor

    2017-05-12

    Spectral imaging with polarity-sensitive fluorescent probes enables the quantification of cell and model membrane physical properties, including local hydration, fluidity, and lateral lipid packing, usually characterized by the generalized polarization (GP) parameter. With the development of commercial microscopes equipped with spectral detectors, spectral imaging has become a convenient and powerful technique for measuring GP and other membrane properties. The existing tools for spectral image processing, however, are insufficient for processing the large data sets afforded by this technological advancement, and are unsuitable for processing images acquired with rapidly internalized fluorescent probes. Here we present a MATLAB spectral imaging toolbox with the aim of overcoming these limitations. In addition to common operations, such as the calculation of distributions of GP values, generation of pseudo-colored GP maps, and spectral analysis, a key highlight of this tool is reliable membrane segmentation for probes that are rapidly internalized. Furthermore, handling for hyperstacks, 3D reconstruction and batch processing facilitates analysis of data sets generated by time series, z-stack, and area scan microscope operations. Finally, the object size distribution is determined, which can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying changes in membrane properties and is desirable for e.g. studies involving model membranes and surfactant coated particles. Analysis is demonstrated for cell membranes, cell-derived vesicles, model membranes, and microbubbles with environmentally-sensitive probes Laurdan, carboxyl-modified Laurdan (C-Laurdan), Di-4-ANEPPDHQ, and Di-4-AN(F)EPPTEA (FE), for quantification of the local lateral density of lipids or lipid packing. The Spectral Imaging Toolbox is a powerful tool for the segmentation and processing of large spectral imaging datasets with a reliable method for membrane segmentation and no ability in programming required. The

  11. Computational modeling of the skin barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naegel, Arne; Heisig, Michael; Wittum, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    A simulation environment for the numerical calculation of permeation processes through human skin has been developed. In geometry models that represent the actual cell morphology of stratum corneum (SC) and deeper skin layers, the diffusive transport is simulated by a finite volume method. As reference elements for the corneocyte cells and lipid matrix, both three-dimensional tetrakaidecahedra and cuboids as well as two-dimensional brick-and-mortar models have been investigated. The central finding is that permeability and lag time of the different membranes can be represented in a closed form depending on model parameters and geometry. This allows a comparison of the models in terms of their barrier effectiveness at comparable cell sizes. The influence of the cell shape on the barrier properties has been numerically demonstrated and quantified. It is shown that tetrakaidecahedra in addition to an almost optimal surface-to-volume ratio also has a very favorable barrier-to-volume ratio. A simulation experiment was successfully validated with two representative test substances, the hydrophilic caffeine and the lipophilic flufenamic acid, which were applied in an aqueous vehicle with a constant dose. The input parameters for the simulation were determined in a companion study by experimental collaborators.

  12. Membrane lipid segregation in endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Sarah A.; Chou, Tom

    2008-08-01

    We explore the equilibrium mechanics of a binary lipid membrane that wraps around a spherical or cylindrical particle. One of the lipid membrane components induces a positive spontaneous curvature, while the other induces a negative local curvature. Using a Hamiltonian approach, we derive the equations governing the membrane shape and lipid concentrations near the wrapped object. Asymptotic expressions and numerical solutions for membrane shapes are presented. We determine the regimes of bending rigidity, surface tension, intrinsic lipid curvature, and effective receptor binding energies that lead to efficient wrapping and endocytosis. Our model is directly applicable to the study of invagination of clathrin-coated pits and receptor-induced wrapping of colloids such as spherical virus particles.

  13. Abca12-mediated lipid transport and Snap29-dependent trafficking of lamellar granules are crucial for epidermal morphogenesis in a zebrafish model of ichthyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Li

    2011-11-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio can serve as a model system to study heritable skin diseases. The skin is rapidly developed during the first 5–6 days of embryonic growth, accompanied by expression of skin-specific genes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM of wild-type zebrafish at day 5 reveals a two-cell-layer epidermis separated from the underlying collagenous stroma by a basement membrane with fully developed hemidesmosomes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM reveals an ordered surface contour of keratinocytes with discrete microridges. To gain insight into epidermal morphogenesis, we have employed morpholino-mediated knockdown of the abca12 and snap29 genes, which are crucial for secretion of lipids and intracellular trafficking of lamellar granules, respectively. Morpholinos, when placed on exon-intron junctions, were >90% effective in preventing the corresponding gene expression when injected into one- to four-cell-stage embryos. By day 3, TEM of abca12 morphants showed accumulation of lipid-containing electron-dense lamellar granules, whereas snap29 morphants showed the presence of apparently empty vesicles in the epidermis. Evaluation of epidermal morphogenesis by SEM revealed similar perturbations in both cases in the microridge architecture and the development of spicule-like protrusions on the surface of keratinocytes. These morphological findings are akin to epidermal changes in harlequin ichthyosis and CEDNIK syndrome, autosomal recessive keratinization disorders due to mutations in the ABCA12 and SNAP29 genes, respectively. The results indicate that interference of independent pathways involving lipid transport in the epidermis can result in phenotypically similar perturbations in epidermal morphogenesis, and that these fish mutants can serve as a model to study the pathomechanisms of these keratinization disorders.

  14. Development of a fish cell culture model to investigate the impact of fish oil replacement on lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Melissa K; King, Hamish W; Bain, Peter A; Gibson, Robert A; Tocher, Douglas R; Schuller, Kathryn A

    2011-08-01

    Fish oils are rich in omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA), predominantly 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3, whereas vegetable oils contain abundant C(18)-PUFA, predominantly 18:3n-3 or 18:2n-6. We hypothesized that replacement of fish oils with vegetable oils would increase the oxidative stability of fish lipids. Here we have used the long established and easily cultivated FHM cell line derived from the freshwater fish species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to test this hypothesis. The FHM cells were readily able to synthesize 20:5n-3 and 24:6n-3 from 18:3n-3 but 22:6n-3 synthesis was negligible. Also, they were readily able to synthesize 20:3n-6 from 18:2n-6 but 20:4n-6 synthesis was negligible. Mitochondrial β-oxidation was greatest for 18:3n-3 and 20:5n-3 and the rates for 16:0, 18:2n-6, 22:6n-3 and 18:1n-9 were significantly lower. Fatty acid incorporation was predominantly into phospholipids (79-97%) with very little incorporation into neutral lipids. Increasing the fatty acid concentration in the growth medium substantially increased the concentrations of 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6 in the cell phospholipids but this was not the case for 20:5n-3 or 22:6n-3. When they were subjected to oxidative stress, the FHM cells supplemented with either 20:5n-3 or 22:6n-3 (as compared with 18:3n-3 or saturated fatty acids) exhibited significantly higher levels of thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) indicating higher levels of lipid peroxidation. The results are discussed in relation to the effects of fatty acid unsaturation on the oxidative stability of cellular lipids and the implications for sustainable aquaculture.

  15. Modeling the self-assembly of lipids and nanotubes in solution: forming vesicles and bicelles with transmembrane nanotube channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Nayhouse, Michael J; Little, Steven R; Balazs, Anna C

    2011-06-28

    Via dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate the self-assembly of end-functionalized, amphiphilic nanotubes and lipids in a hydrophilic solvent. Each nanotube encompasses a hydrophobic stalk and two hydrophilic ends, which are functionalized with end-tethered chains. With a relatively low number of the nanotubes in solution, the components self-assemble into stable lipid-nanotube vesicles. As the number of nanotubes is increased, the system exhibits a vesicle-to-bicelle transition, resulting in stable hybrid bicelle. Moreover, our results reveal that the nanotubes cluster into distinct tripod-like structures within the vesicles and aggregate into a ring-like assembly within the bicelles. For both the vesicles and bicelles, the nanotubes assume trans-membrane orientations, with the tethered hairs extending into the surrounding solution or the encapsulated fluid. Thus, the hairs provide a means of regulating the transport of species through the self-assembled structures. Our findings provide guidelines for creating nanotube clusters with distinctive morphologies that might be difficult to achieve through more conventional means. The results also yield design rules for creating synthetic cell-like objects or microreactors that can exhibit biomimetic functionality.

  16. Effect of Quercus infectoria and Rosa damascena on lipid profile and atherosclerotic plaque formation in rabbit model of hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamhoseinian, A; Shahouzehi, B; Joukar, S; Iranpoor, M

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is the cause of many complications in the human societies. In this study, the effect of methanol extracts of Quercus infectoria (QI) galls and Rosa damascena (RD) Mill flower were studied on lipid profile and atherosclerotic plaques formation in hyperlipidemic rabbits. Thirty-six New Zeland white rabbits randomly divided into 6 groups as control (I), hyperlipidemic (II), hyperlipidemic+QI (III), hyperlipidemic+RD (IV), +Atorvastolin (V) and hyperlipidemic+Orlistat (VI) and were fed with high fat diet (0.5% cholesterol and 16% hydrogenated vegetable oil) for 45 days. At the end of the study period, lipid profile and plaque formation were assessed. Total Cholesterol (TC), Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) and Triglyceride (TG) levels were significantly increased in hyperlipidemic group compared with control group (p < 0.001). Methanol extract consumption of Quercus infectoria significantly decreased plasma levels of TC, TG and LDL (p < 0.001). It also decreased plaques formation in semi lunar valve and thoracic aorta. Rosa damascena mill flower methanol extract moderately decreased the levels of TC, TG, LDL and plaques formation but it was not significant. HDL levels and weight of animals did not show significant difference among groups. Based on the doses used in this study, our finding indicated that QI but no RD methanol extract has anti atherogenic and hypolipidemic activities.

  17. Vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce epitope-specific T cell responses but confers non-specific protective immunity in a malaria model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon H Apte

    Full Text Available Vaccines against many pathogens for which conventional approaches have failed remain an unmet public health priority. Synthetic peptide-based vaccines offer an attractive alternative to whole protein and whole organism vaccines, particularly for complex pathogens that cause chronic infection. Previously, we have reported a promising lipid core peptide (LCP vaccine delivery system that incorporates the antigen, carrier, and adjuvant in a single molecular entity. LCP vaccines have been used to deliver several peptide subunit-based vaccine candidates and induced high titre functional antibodies and protected against Group A streptococcus in mice. Herein, we have evaluated whether LCP constructs incorporating defined CD4(+ and/or CD8(+ T cell epitopes could induce epitope-specific T cell responses and protect against pathogen challenge in a rodent malaria model. We show that LCP vaccines failed to induce an expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells following primary immunization or by boosting. We further demonstrated that the LCP vaccines induced a non-specific type 2 polarized cytokine response, rather than an epitope-specific canonical CD8(+ T cell type 1 response. Cytotoxic responses of unknown specificity were also induced. These non-specific responses were able to protect against parasite challenge. These data demonstrate that vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce canonical epitope-specific T cell responses, at least in our rodent model, but can nonetheless confer non-specific protective immunity against Plasmodium parasite challenge.

  18. Effects of glucose and disorders in lipid metabolism on cytokine levels and cognitive impairment in the olanzapine-induced obesity rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X J; Maimaitirexiati, T X; Zhang, R; Hu, G; Luo, X

    2015-09-25

    The aim of the study was to explore the effects of increased levels of blood sugar and cytokines on impaired cognitive function in the olanzapine-induced obesity rat model. A total of 40 rats were randomly divided into 2 groups; the control and olanzapine groups (N = 20 per group). The control rats were fed regular food, while the olanzapine rats received olanzapine-enriched (1.2 mg/kg) food by gavage for 4 weeks to establish the olanzapine-induced obese rat model. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to measure the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP). Serum glucose content was measured by biochemical colorimetry. Learning and memory capacity was measured using a Y-maze, and the time before escape from a Morris water maze was recorded. Body weight and levels of blood glucose, lipids, TNF-α, IL-6, and CRP increased in the olanzapine group. In addition, the number of shocks received before reaching the learning and memory standard and the time before escape from the Morris water maze were higher in the olanzapine group than in the control group. Olanzapine causes disorders in glucose and lipid metabolism. Increase in blood glucose promotes the toxicity of cytokines and leads to cognitive dysfunction in rats.

  19. Lipid Signaling in Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Renyan; Huang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are important cellular building blocks and components of signaling cascades. Deregulation of lipid metabolism or signaling is frequently linked to a variety of human diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. It is widely believed that lipid molecules or their metabolic products are involved in tumorigenic inflammation and thus, lipids are implicated as significant contributors or even primary triggers of tumorigenesis. Lipids are believed to directly or indirectly...

  20. Specificity of Intramembrane Protein–Lipid Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Francesc-Xabier; Ernst, Andreas Max; Wieland, Felix; Brügger, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Our concept of biological membranes has markedly changed, from the fluid mosaic model to the current model that lipids and proteins have the ability to separate into microdomains, differing in their protein and lipid compositions. Since the breakthrough in crystallizing membrane proteins, the most powerful method to define lipid-binding sites on proteins has been X-ray and electron crystallography. More recently, chemical biology approaches have been developed to analyze protein–lipid interactions. Such methods have the advantage of providing highly specific cellular probes. With the advent of novel tools to study functions of individual lipid species in membranes together with structural analysis and simulations at the atomistic resolution, a growing number of specific protein–lipid complexes are defined and their functions explored. In the present article, we discuss the various modes of intramembrane protein–lipid interactions in cellular membranes, including examples for both annular and nonannular bound lipids. Furthermore, we will discuss possible functional roles of such specific protein–lipid interactions as well as roles of lipids as chaperones in protein folding and transport. PMID:21536707

  1. A lipid-based liquid crystalline matrix that provides sustained release and enhanced oral bioavailability for a model poorly water soluble drug in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Ben J; Khoo, Shui-Mei; Whittaker, Darryl V; Davey, Greg; Porter, Christopher J H

    2007-08-01

    Liquid crystalline phases that are stable in excess water, formed using lipids such as glyceryl monooleate (GMO) and oleyl glycerate (OG), are known to provide a sustained release matrix for poorly water soluble drugs in vitro, yet there has been no report of the use of these materials to impart oral sustained release behaviour in vivo. In the first part of this study, in vitro lipolysis experiments were used to compare the digestibility of GMO with a second structurally related lipid, oleyl glycerate, which was found to be less susceptible to hydrolysis by pancreatic lipase than GMO. Subsequent oral bioavailability studies were conducted in rats, in which a model poorly water soluble drug, cinnarizine (CIN), was administered orally as an aqueous suspension, or as a solution in GMO or OG. In the first bioavailability study, plasma samples were taken over a 30 h period and CIN concentrations determined by HPLC. Plasma CIN concentrations after administration in the GMO formulation were only sustained for a few hours after administration while for the OG formulation, the plasma concentration of cinnarizine was at its highest level 30 h after dosing, and appeared to be increasing. A second study in which CIN was again administered in OG, and plasma samples taken for 120 h, revealed a Tmax for CIN in rats of 36 h and a relative oral bioavailability of 344% when compared to the GMO formulation (117%) and the aqueous suspension formulation (assigned a nominal bioavailability of 100%). The results indicate that lipids that form liquid crystalline structures in excess water, may have application as an oral sustained release delivery system, providing they are not digested rapidly on administration.

  2. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of topical formulations containing physiological lipid mixture for replacement of skin barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, C; Parra, J L; Coderch, L; Semenzato, A

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to describe a new in vivo and in vitro approach of the efficacy evaluation of cosmetic emollients to better understand the link between the formulation and the activity of cosmetic products. Two long term in vivo studies were carried out on nine healthy Caucasian volunteers mean age 40±12 years to evaluate the protecting and repairing effects of the two different barrier repair cosmetic formulations. The application of the formulations was repeated once a day during 7 days and biophysical parameters (TEWL and Skin Hydration) were measured before and after Sodium laureth sulphate exposure The in vitro study was carried out by freeze substitution transmission electron microscopy (FSTEM) on stratum corneum samples obtained by sections of fresh skin from young pigs, depleted with a solvent mixture and treated with the two products The in vivo results demonstrated that daily product application provided a reinforcement of the skin barrier with protecting and repairing effects from chemical injuries the extent of which was dependent on the formulation features (product A>product B) The role of the technical form on the lipid availability was confirmed by the in vitro evaluation tests. The results point out that a daily application of physiological lipid mixture containing emulsion can protect healthy skin and promote the reparing effect on unpaired barrier skin, reducing TEWL and maintaining hydration of the stratum corneum. The efficacy degree is higher when the cosmetic form promotes the availability of active ingredients increasing the product performance.

  3. Comparison of the interactions of daunorubicin in a free form and attached to single-walled carbon nanotubes with model lipid membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Matyszewska

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work the interactions of an anticancer drug daunorubicin (DNR with model thiolipid layers composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothioethanol (DPPTE were investigated using Langmuir technique. The results obtained for a free drug were compared with the results recorded for DNR attached to SWCNTs as potential drug carrier. Langmuir studies of mixed DPPTE–SWCNTs-DNR monolayers showed that even at the highest investigated content of the nanotubes in the monolayer, the changes in the properties of DPPTE model membranes were not as significant as in case of the incorporation of a free drug, which resulted in a significant increase in the area per molecule and fluidization of the thiolipid layer. The presence of SWCNTs-DNR in the DPPTE monolayer at the air–water interface did not change the organization of the lipid molecules to such extent as the free drug, which may be explained by different types of interactions playing crucial role in these two types of systems. In the case of the interactions of free DNR the electrostatic attraction between positively charged drug and negatively charged DPPTE monolayer play the most important role, while in the case of SWCNTs-DNR adducts the hydrophobic interactions between nanotubes and acyl chains of the lipid seem to be prevailing. Electrochemical studies performed for supported model membranes containing the drug delivered in the two investigated forms revealed that the surface concentration of the drug-nanotube adduct in supported monolayers is comparable to the reported surface concentration of the free DNR incorporated into DPPTE monolayers on gold electrodes. Therefore, it may be concluded that the application of carbon nanotubes as potential DNR carrier allows for the incorporation of comparable amount of the drug into model membranes with simultaneous decrease in the negative changes in the membrane structure and organization, which is an important aspect in terms of side effects of

  4. Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucoidan and High Stability Fucoxanthin on Glucose Homeostasis, Lipid Metabolism, and Liver Function in a Mouse Model of Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ting Victor Lin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of low-molecular-weight fucoidan (LMF and fucoxanthin (Fx in terms of antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and hepatoprotective activities were investigated in a mouse model of type II diabetes. The intake of LMF, Fx, and LMF + Fx lowered the blood sugar and fasting blood sugar levels, and increased serum adiponectin levels. The significant decrease in urinary sugar was only observed in LMF + Fx supplementation. LMF and Fx had ameliorating effects on the hepatic tissue of db/db mice by increasing hepatic glycogen and antioxidative enzymes, and LMF was more effective than Fx at improving hepatic glucose metabolism. As for glucose and lipid metabolism in the adipose tissue, the expression of insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1, glucose transporter (GLUT, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, and uncoupling protein (UCP-1 mRNAs in the adipose tissue of diabetic mice was significantly upregulated by Fx and LMF + Fx, and levels of inflammatory adipocytokines, such as adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-6 (IL-6, were significantly modulated only by LMF + Fx supplementation. The efficacy of LMF + Fx supplementation on the decrease in urinary sugar and on glucose and lipid metabolism in the white adipose tissue of db/db mice was better than that of Fx or LMF alone, indicating the occurrence of a synergistic effect of LMF and Fx.

  5. Antimicrobial efficacy of external fixator pins coated with a lipid stabilized hydroxyapatite/chlorhexidine complex to prevent pin tract infection in a goat model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dejong, E. Schuyler; Deberardino, T. M.; Brooks, D. E.; Nelson, B. J.; Campbell, Allison A.; Bottoni, Craig R.; Pusateri, A. E.; Walton, R. S.; Guymon, C. H.; Mcmanus, Albert T.

    2001-06-01

    Background: Pin tract infection is a common complication of external fixation. An antiinfective external fixator pin might help to reduce the incidence of pin tract infection and improve pin fixation. Methods: Stainless steel and titanium external fixator pins, with and without a lipid stabilized hydroxyapatite/chlorhexidine coating, were evaluated in a goat model. Two pins contaminated with an identifiable Staphylococcus aureus strain were inserted into each tibia of 12 goats. The pin sites were examined daily. On day 14, the animals were killed, and the pin tips cultured. Insertion and extraction torques were measured. Results: Infection developed in 100% of uncoated pins, whereas coated pins demonstrated 4.2% infected, 12.5% colonized, and the remainder, 83.3%, had no growth (p < 0.01). Pin coating decreased the percent loss of fixation torque over uncoated pins (p = 0.04). Conclusion: These results demonstrate that the lipid stabilized hydroxyapatite/chlorhexidine coating was successful in decreasing infection and improving fixation of external fixator pins.

  6. A mathematical model for the study of lipid accumulation in oleaginous microorganisms. II. Study of cellular lipids of Mucor circinelloides during growth on a vegetable oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggelis, G.

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial oil production from fatty materials of animal or plant origin has been an object of research and industrial interest for many years. During the process of microbial growth/accumulation of fat reserves, the dominating phenomena that define the composition of endocellular fat are, first, the specific process of incorporation of substrate fatty acids into the microbial cell and, second, the endocellular changes of fatty acids defined by the enzymic capabilities of the microorganism. The fatty acids will either be degraded for growth needs or act as substrate of endocellular biotransformation processes, leading to concentration changes and production of "new" fatty acids which did not previously exist in the substrate.
    The purpose of the present work is to study the endocellular lipids of Mucor circinelloidesCBS 172-27 grown on sunflower oil. The mathematical model, described in part I, was applied in order to investigate the following:
    a. Microorganism specificity in the incorporation of substrate fatty acids.
    b. Microorganism specificity in the degradation of fatty acids present in the reserve fat.
    c. Possibilities of endocellular biotransformations during the microbial growth.
    In conclusion, this work is aimed at developing a quantitative expression of parameters defining the lipid composition of fat reserves. The proposed mathematical model can be used not only for selection of microbial strains having specific enzymic potential but also for substrate selection.

    La producción de aceites microbianos a partir de materiales grasos de origen animal o vegetal ha sido objeto de investigación e interés industrial durante muchos años. En el proceso de crecimiento microbiano/acumulación de reservas grasas, los fenómenos dominantes que definen la composición de grasa endocelular son, primero, el proceso específico de incorporación de ácidos grasos como sustratos en la célula microbiana

  7. A 3D-psoriatic skin model for dermatological testing: The impact of culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque-Fernandez, Alexandra; Gauthier, Lydia; Simard, Mélissa; Jean, Jessica; Gendreau, Isabelle; Morin, Alexandre; Soucy, Jacques; Auger, Michèle; Pouliot, Roxane

    2016-12-01

    Inadequate representation of the human tissue environment during a preclinical screen can result in inaccurate predictions of compound effects. Consequently, pharmaceutical investigators are searching for preclinical models that closely resemble original tissue for predicting clinical outcomes. The current research aims to compare the impact of using serum-free medium instead of complete culture medium during the last step of psoriatic skin substitute reconstruction. Skin substitutes were produced according to the self-assembly approach. Serum-free conditions have no negative impact on the reconstruction of healthy or psoriatic skin substitutes presented in this study regarding their macroscopic or histological appearances. ATR-FTIR results showed no significant differences in the CH2 bands between psoriatic substitutes cultured with or without serum, thus suggesting that serum deprivation did not have a negative impact on the lipid organization of their stratum corneum. Serum deprivation could even lead to a better organization of healthy skin substitute lipids. Percutaneous analyses demonstrated that psoriatic substitutes cultured in serum-free conditions showed a higher permeability to hydrocortisone compared to controls, while no significant differences in benzoic acid and caffeine penetration profiles were observed. Results obtained with this 3D-psoriatic skin substitute demonstrate the potential and versatility of the model. It could offer good prediction of drug related toxicities at preclinical stages performed in order to avoid unexpected and costly findings in the clinic. Together, these findings offer a new approach for one of the most important challenges of the 21st century, namely, prediction of drug toxicity.

  8. Final Report: 17th international Symposium on Plant Lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christoph Benning

    2007-03-07

    This meeting covered several emerging areas in the plant lipid field such as the biosynthesis of cuticle components, interorganelle lipid trafficking, the regulation of lipid homeostasis, and the utilization of algal models. Stimulating new insights were provided not only based on research reports based on plant models, but also due to several excellent talks by experts from the yeast field.

  9. A mathematical model for the study of lipid accumulation in oleaginous microorganisms. I. Lipid accumulation during growth of Mucor circinelloides CBS 172-27 on a vegetable oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggelis, G.

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available    The accumulation of lipids In microorganisms cultivated In growth media having as sole carbon and energy source vegetable or animal fat has been an object of research and industrial interest for many years. Interestingly, the accumulated fat often has a composition and structure much different from that of the fat present In the substrate.
       The present work describes a mathematical approach to the accumulation of fat by oleaginous microorganisms growing on medium containing vegetable oil as carbon source. A mathematical model, correlating the accumulation of reserve fat with the growth of microbial population and the available quantity of exocellular fat, is proposed. This model is verified by experimental data taken by cultivation of Mucor circinelloides CBS 172-27 on sunflower oil.
       The proposed model is described by the equation: XL = XLo + Lo(1-e-k2.t– (lnx-lnxo/k1    where XL(mg/l the concentration of reserve lipids at time t(h, XLo(mg/l the concentration of lipid reserves at time t=o, Lo(mg/l the initial concentration of exocellular fat (a t=o, X(mg/l the concentration of fat-free biomass at a given time t and Xo the concentration of fat-free biomass at time t=o; k1 and k2 constants.

       Durante muchos años la acumulación de lípidos en microorganismos desarrollados en medio de cultivo, tomando como única fuente de carbono y energía grasas vegetales o animales, ha sido objeto de investigación e Interés industrial.    Interesadamente, la grasa acumulada tiene a menudo una composición y estructura muy diferente de la que tiene la grasa presente en el sustrato.    El presente trabajo describe una aproximación matemática a la acumulaci

  10. Efficient molecular mechanics simulations of the folding, orientation, and assembly of peptides in lipid bilayers using an implicit atomic solvation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordner, Andrew J.; Zorman, Barry; Abagyan, Ruben

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins comprise a significant fraction of the proteomes of sequenced organisms and are the targets of approximately half of marketed drugs. However, in spite of their prevalence and biomedical importance, relatively few experimental structures are available due to technical challenges. Computational simulations can potentially address this deficit by providing structural models of membrane proteins. Solvation within the spatially heterogeneous membrane/solvent environment provides a major component of the energetics driving protein folding and association within the membrane. We have developed an implicit solvation model for membranes that is both computationally efficient and accurate enough to enable molecular mechanics predictions for the folding and association of peptides within the membrane. We derived the new atomic solvation model parameters using an unbiased fitting procedure to experimental data and have applied it to diverse problems in order to test its accuracy and to gain insight into membrane protein folding. First, we predicted the positions and orientations of peptides and complexes within the lipid bilayer and compared the simulation results with solid-state NMR structures. Additionally, we performed folding simulations for a series of host-guest peptides with varying propensities to form alpha helices in a hydrophobic environment and compared the structures with experimental measurements. We were also able to successfully predict the structures of amphipathic peptides as well as the structures for dimeric complexes of short hexapeptides that have experimentally characterized propensities to form beta sheets within the membrane. Finally, we compared calculated relative transfer energies with data from experiments measuring the effects of mutations on the free energies of translocon-mediated insertion of proteins into lipid bilayers and of combined folding and membrane insertion of a beta barrel protein.

  11. Systematic Review of Validity Assessments of Framingham Risk Score Results in Health Economic Modelling of Lipid-Modifying Therapies in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansson, Jonas; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-10-27

    The Framingham Risk Score is used both in the clinical setting and in health economic analyses to predict the risk for future coronary heart disease events. Based on an American population, the Framingham Risk Score has been criticised for potential overestimation of risk in European populations. We investigated whether the use of the Framingham Risk Score actually was validated in health economic studies that modelled the effects of lipid-lowering treatment with statins on coronary heart disease events in European populations. In this systematic literature review of all relevant published studies in English (literature searched September 2016 in PubMed, EMBASE and SCOPUS), 99 studies were identified and 22 were screened in full text, 18 of which were included. Key data were extracted and synthesised narratively. The only type of validation identified was a comparison against coronary heart disease risk data from one primary preventive and one secondary preventive clinical investigation, and from observational population data in one study. Taken together, those three studies reported an overall satisfactory accuracy in the results obtained by Framingham Risk Score predictions, but the Framingham Risk Score tended to underestimate non-fatal myocardial infarctions. In five studies, potential issues in applying the Framingham Risk Score on a European population were not addressed. Further studies are needed to ascertain that the Framingham Risk Score can accurately predict cardiovascular outcome in health economic modelling studies on lipid-lowering therapy in European populations. Future modelling studies using the Framingham Risk Score would benefit from validating the results against other data.

  12. SU-F-I-63: Relaxation Times of Lipid Resonances in NAFLD Animal Model Using Enhanced Curve Fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, K-H; Yoo, C-H; Lim, S-I; Choe, B-Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to evaluate the relaxation time of methylene resonance in comparison with other lipid resonances. Methods: The examinations were performed on a 3.0T MRI scanner using a four-channel animal coil. Eight more Sprague-Dawley rats in the same baseline weight range were housed with ad libitum access to water and a high-fat (HF) diet (60% fat, 20% protein, and 20% carbohydrate). In order to avoid large blood vessels, a voxel (0.8×0.8×0.8 cm{sup 3}) was placed in a homogeneous area of the liver parenchyma during free breathing. Lipid relaxations in NC and HF diet rats were estimated at a fixed repetition time (TR) of 6000 msec, and multi echo time (TEs) of 40–220 msec. All spectra for data measurement were processed using the Advanced Method for Accurate, Robust, and Efficient Spectral (AMARES) fitting algorithm of the Java-based Magnetic Resonance User Interface (jMRUI) package. Results: The mean T2 relaxation time of the methylene resonance in normal-chow diet was 37.1 msec (M{sub 0}, 2.9±0.5), with a standard deviation of 4.3 msec. The mean T2 relaxation time of the methylene resonance was 31.4 msec (M{sub 0}, 3.7±0.3), with a standard deviation of 1.8 msec. The T2 relaxation times of methylene protons were higher in normal-chow diet rats than in HF rats (p<0.05), and the extrapolated M{sub 0} values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p<0.005). The excellent linear fit with R{sup 2}>0.9971 and R{sup 2}>0.9987 indicates T2 relaxation decay curves with mono-exponential function. Conclusion: In in vivo, a sufficient spectral resolution and a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be achieved, so that the data measured over short TE values can be extrapolated back to TE = 0 to produce better estimates of the relative weights of the spectral components. In the short term, treating the effective decay rate as exponential is an adequate approximation.

  13. Using fluorescent lipids in live zebrafish larvae: From imaging whole animal physiology to subcellular lipid trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J L; Carten, J D; Farber, S A

    2016-01-01

    Lipids serve essential functions in cells as signaling molecules, membrane components, and sources of energy. Defects in lipid metabolism are implicated in a number of pandemic human diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and hypercholesterolemia. Many aspects of how fatty acids and cholesterol are absorbed and processed by intestinal cells remain unclear and present a hurdle to developing approaches for disease prevention and treatment. Numerous studies have shown that the zebrafish is an excellent model for vertebrate lipid metabolism. In this chapter, we review commercially available fluorescent lipids that can be deployed in live zebrafish to better understand lipid signaling and metabolism. In this chapter, we present criteria one should consider when selecting specific fluorescent lipids for the study of digestive physiology or lipid metabolism in larval zebrafish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The impact of lipid composition on the stability of the tear fluid lipid layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulovesi, P.; Telenius, J.; Koivuniemi, A.

    2012-01-01

    selected a number of model systems comprised of phospholipids, cholesteryl oleates, triglycerides, and free fatty acids to study how the organization, stability, and dynamics of the lipid layer depend on its composition. In particular our aim is to unravel how excess neutral lipids affect the stability...... of the tear fluid and probably prevent evaporation. We have studied the impact of lipid composition on the structural and dynamical properties of the tear lipid film using Langmuir films, X-ray diffraction, and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Based on recently published lipidomic data, we have...... range of surface pressures. Decreasing the phospholipid-neutral lipid ratio, however, decreases the stability of the lipid film. This turns out to stem from the changed organization of the lipid film that varies from a layered structure to an oil droplet-like structure with decreasing phospholipid...

  15. Transglycosylated Starch Improves Insulin Response and Alters Lipid and Amino Acid Metabolome in a Growing Pig Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica A. Newman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the functional properties and physiological effects often associated with chemically modified starches, significant interest lies in their development for incorporation in processed foods. This study investigated the effect of transglycosylated cornstarch (TGS on blood glucose, insulin, and serum metabolome in the pre- and postprandial phase in growing pigs. Eight jugular vein-catheterized barrows were fed two diets containing 72% purified starch (waxy cornstarch (CON or TGS. A meal tolerance test (MTT was performed with serial blood sampling for glucose, insulin, lipids, and metabolome profiling. TGS-fed pigs had reduced postprandial insulin (p < 0.05 and glucose (p < 0.10 peaks compared to CON-fed pigs. The MTT showed increased (p < 0.05 serum urea with TGS-fed pigs compared to CON, indicative of increased protein catabolism. Metabolome profiling showed reduced (p < 0.05 amino acids such as alanine and glutamine with TGS, suggesting increased gluconeogenesis compared to CON, probably due to a reduction in available glucose. Of all metabolites affected by dietary treatment, alkyl-acyl-phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins were generally increased (p < 0.05 preprandially, whereas diacyl-phosphatidylcholines and lysophosphatidylcholines were decreased (p < 0.05 postprandially in TGS-fed pigs compared to CON. In conclusion, TGS led to changes in postprandial insulin and glucose metabolism, which may have caused the alterations in serum amino acid and phospholipid metabolome profiles.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins involved in cell wall lipid biosynthesis improve BCG vaccine efficacy in a murine TB model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Martin; Cadieux, Nathalie; Fitzpatrick, Megan; Reed, Steven; Arsenian, Sergei; Valentini, Davide; Parida, Shreemanta; Dodoo, Ernest; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2017-03-01

    Advances in tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development are urgently required to enhance global disease management. We evaluated the potential of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb)-derived protein antigens Rv0447c, Rv2957 and Rv2958c to boost BCG vaccine efficacy in the presence or absence of glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant formulated in a stable emulsion (GLA-SE) adjuvant. Mice received the BCG vaccine, followed by Rv0447c, Rv2957 and Rv2958c protein boosting with or without GLA-SE adjuvant 3 and 6 weeks later. Immune responses were examined at given time points. 9 weeks post vaccination, mice were aerosol-challenged with M. tb, and sacrificed at 6 and 12 weeks to assess bacterial burden. Vaccination of mice with BCG and M. tb proteins in the presence of GLA-SE adjuvant triggered strong IFN-γ and IL-2 production by splenocytes; more TNF-α was produced without GLA-SE addition. Antibody responses to all three antigens did not differ, with or without GLA-SE adjuvant. Protein boosting without GLA-SE adjuvant resulted in vaccinated animals having better control of pulmonary M. tb load at 6 and 12 weeks post aerosol infection, while animals receiving the protein boost with GLA-SE adjuvant exhibited more bacteria in the lungs. Our data provides evidence for developing Rv2958c, Rv2957 and Rv0447c in a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy with BCG. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Effects of Oriented Surface Dipole on Photoconversion Efficiency in an Alkane/Lipid-Hybrid-Bilayer-Based Photovoltaic Model System

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lixia

    2013-06-21

    When a phospholipid monolayer containing a zinc-coordinated porphyrin species formed atop a self-assembled monolayer of heptadecafluoro-1-decanethiol (CF3(CF2)7(CH2)2SH) is subjected to photoelectrochemical current generation, a significant modulation effect is observed. Compared with devices that contain similar photoactive lipid monolayers but formed on 1-dodecanethiol SAMs, these fluorinated hybrid bilayers produce a >60 % increase in cathodic currents and a similar decrease in anodic currents. Photovoltages recorded from these hybrid bilayers are found to vary in the same fashion. The modulation of photovoltaic responses in these hybrid-bilayer-based devices is explained by the opposite surface dipoles associated with the thiols employed in this study, which in one case (fluorothiol) increase and in another (alkanethiol) decrease the work function of the underlying gold substrates. A similar trend of photovoltage/photocurrent modulation is also observed if fullerene is used as the photoagent in these devices. Our results reveal the intricacy of orientated surface dipole in influencing the photovoltaic processes, and its subtle interplay with other factors related to the photoagents, such as their location and orientation within the organic matrix. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Lipids, lysosomes, and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishy, Bharat; Abel, E Dale

    2016-09-01

    Lipids are essential components of a cell providing energy substrates for cellular processes, signaling intermediates, and building blocks for biological membranes. Lipids are constantly recycled and redistributed within a cell. Lysosomes play an important role in this recycling process that involves the recruitment of lipids to lysosomes via autophagy or endocytosis for their degradation by lysosomal hydrolases. The catabolites produced are redistributed to various cellular compartments to support basic cellular function. Several studies demonstrated a bidirectional relationship between lipids and lysosomes that regulate autophagy. While lysosomal degradation pathways regulate cellular lipid metabolism, lipids also regulate lysosome function and autophagy. In this review, we focus on this bidirectional relationship in the context of dietary lipids and provide an overview of recent evidence of how lipid-overload lipotoxicity, as observed in obesity and metabolic syndrome, impairs lysosomal function and autophagy that may eventually lead to cellular dysfunction or cell death. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Parenteral Nutrition and Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Maitreyi; Almutairdi, Abdulelah; Mulesa, Leanne; Alberda, Cathy; Beattie, Colleen; Gramlich, Leah

    2017-04-14

    Lipids have multiple physiological roles that are biologically vital. Soybean oil lipid emulsions have been the mainstay of parenteral nutrition lipid formulations for decades in North America. Utilizing intravenous lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition has minimized the dependence on dextrose as a major source of nonprotein calories and prevents the clinical consequences of essential fatty acid deficiency. Emerging literature has indicated that there are benefits to utilizing alternative lipids such as olive/soy-based formulations, and combination lipids such as soy/MCT/olive/fish oil, compared with soybean based lipids, as they have less inflammatory properties, are immune modulating, have higher antioxidant content, decrease risk of cholestasis, and improve clinical outcomes in certain subgroups of patients. The objective of this article is to review the history of IVLE, their composition, the different generations of widely available IVLE, the variables to consider when selecting lipids, and the complications of IVLE and how to minimize them.

  20. A Hamster Model of Diet-Induced Obesity for Preclinical Evaluation of Anti-Obesity, Anti-Diabetic and Lipid Modulating Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbøge, Louise S; Pedersen, Philip J; Hansen, Gitte; Fabricius, Katrine; Hansen, Henrik B; Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Unlike rats and mice, hamsters develop hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia when fed a cholesterol-rich diet. Because hyperlipidemia is a hallmark of human obesity, we aimed to develop and characterize a novel diet-induced obesity (DIO) and hypercholesterolemia Golden Syrian hamster model. Hamsters fed a highly palatable fat- and sugar-rich diet (HPFS) for 12 weeks showed significant body weight gain, body fat accumulation and impaired glucose tolerance. Cholesterol supplementation to the diet evoked additional hypercholesterolemia. Chronic treatment with the GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide (0.2 mg/kg, SC, BID, 27 days), normalized body weight and glucose tolerance, and lowered blood lipids in the DIO-hamster. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, linagliptin (3.0 mg/kg, PO, QD) also improved glucose tolerance. Treatment with peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36, 1.0 mg/kg/day) or neuromedin U (NMU, 1.5 mg/kg/day), continuously infused via a subcutaneous osmotic minipump for 14 days, reduced body weight and energy intake and changed food preference from HPFS diet towards chow. Co-treatment with liraglutide and PYY3-36 evoked a pronounced synergistic decrease in body weight and food intake with no lower plateau established. Treatment with the cholesterol uptake inhibitor ezetimibe (10 mg/kg, PO, QD) for 14 days lowered plasma total cholesterol with a more marked reduction of LDL levels, as compared to HDL, indicating additional sensitivity to cholesterol modulating drugs in the hyperlipidemic DIO-hamster. In conclusion, the features of combined obesity, impaired glucose tolerance and hypercholesterolemia in the DIO-hamster make this animal model useful for preclinical evaluation of novel anti-obesity, anti-diabetic and lipid modulating agents.

  1. A Hamster Model of Diet-Induced Obesity for Preclinical Evaluation of Anti-Obesity, Anti-Diabetic and Lipid Modulating Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise S Dalbøge

    Full Text Available Unlike rats and mice, hamsters develop hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia when fed a cholesterol-rich diet. Because hyperlipidemia is a hallmark of human obesity, we aimed to develop and characterize a novel diet-induced obesity (DIO and hypercholesterolemia Golden Syrian hamster model.Hamsters fed a highly palatable fat- and sugar-rich diet (HPFS for 12 weeks showed significant body weight gain, body fat accumulation and impaired glucose tolerance. Cholesterol supplementation to the diet evoked additional hypercholesterolemia. Chronic treatment with the GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide (0.2 mg/kg, SC, BID, 27 days, normalized body weight and glucose tolerance, and lowered blood lipids in the DIO-hamster. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitor, linagliptin (3.0 mg/kg, PO, QD also improved glucose tolerance. Treatment with peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36, 1.0 mg/kg/day or neuromedin U (NMU, 1.5 mg/kg/day, continuously infused via a subcutaneous osmotic minipump for 14 days, reduced body weight and energy intake and changed food preference from HPFS diet towards chow. Co-treatment with liraglutide and PYY3-36 evoked a pronounced synergistic decrease in body weight and food intake with no lower plateau established. Treatment with the cholesterol uptake inhibitor ezetimibe (10 mg/kg, PO, QD for 14 days lowered plasma total cholesterol with a more marked reduction of LDL levels, as compared to HDL, indicating additional sensitivity to cholesterol modulating drugs in the hyperlipidemic DIO-hamster. In conclusion, the features of combined obesity, impaired glucose tolerance and hypercholesterolemia in the DIO-hamster make this animal model useful for preclinical evaluation of novel anti-obesity, anti-diabetic and lipid modulating agents.

  2. Deposits from Creams Containing 20% (w/w) Urea and Suppression of Crystallization (Part 2): Novel Analytical Methods of Urea Accumulated in the Stratum Corneum by Tape stripping and Colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Norio; Morita, Yutaka; Terada, Katsuhide

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of urea from a urea formulation to the stratum corneum varies with the formulation base and form, and impacts the formulation's therapeutic effect. Consequently, determining the amount of urea transferred is essential for developing efficient formulations. This study assessed a simple method for measuring the amount of urea accumulated in the stratum corneum. Conventional methods rely on labeling urea used in the formulation with radiocarbon ((14)C) or other radioactive isotopes (RIs), retrieving the transferred urea from the stratum corneum by tape stripping, then quantitating the urea. The handling and use of RIs, however, is subject to legal regulation and can only be performed in sanctioned facilities, so methods employing RIs are neither simple nor convenient. We therefore developed a non-radiolabel method "tape stripping-colorimetry (T-C)" that combines tape stripping with colorimetry (urease-glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH)) for the quantitative measurement of urea. Urea in the stratum corneum is collected by tape stripping and measured using urease-GLDH, which is commonly used to measure urea nitrogen in blood tests. The results indicate that accurate urea measurement by the T-C method requires the application of 1400 mg (on hairless rats) of a 20% urea solution on a 50 cm(2) (5×10 cm) area. Further, we determined the amount of urea accumulated in the stratum corneum using formulations with different urea concentrations, and the time course of urea accumulation from formulations differing in the rate of urea crystallization. We demonstrate that the T-C method is simple and convenient, with no need for (14)C or other RIs.

  3. Methotrexate associated to lipid core nanoparticles improves cardiac allograft vasculopathy and the inflammatory profile in a rabbit heart graft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Fiorelli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Coronary allograft vasculopathy is an inflammatory-proliferative process that compromises the long-term success of heart transplantation and has no effective treatment. A lipid nanoemulsion (LDE can carry chemotherapeutic agents in the circulation and concentrates them in the heart graft. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of methotrexate (MTX associated to LDE. Rabbits fed a 0.5% cholesterol diet and submitted to heterotopic heart transplantation were treated with cyclosporine A (10 mg·kg–1·day–1 orally and allocated to treatment with intravenous LDE-MTX (4 mg/kg, weekly, n=10 or with weekly intravenous saline solution (control group, n=10, beginning on the day of surgery. Animals were euthanized 6 weeks later. Compared to controls, grafts of LDE-MTX treated rabbits showed 20% reduction of coronary stenosis, with a four-fold increase in vessel lumen and 80% reduction of macrophage staining in grafts. Necrosis was attenuated by LDE-MTX. Native hearts of both LDE-MTX and Control groups were apparently normal. Gene expression of lipoprotein receptors was significantly greater in grafts compared to native hearts. In LDE-MTX group, gene expression of the pro-inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-18, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and matrix metalloproteinase-12 was strongly diminished whereas expression of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 increased. LDE-MTX promoted improvement of the cardiac allograft vasculopathy and diminished inflammation in heart grafts.

  4. Alcohol Interactions with Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Kondela

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the structural changes to lipid membrane that ensue from the addition of aliphatic alcohols with various alkyl tail lengths. Small angle neutron diffraction from flat lipid bilayers that are hydrated through water vapor has been employed to eliminate possible artefacts of the membrane curvature and the alcohol’s membrane-water partitioning. We have observed clear changes to membrane structure in both transversal and lateral directions. Most importantly, our results suggest the alteration of the membrane-water interface. The water encroachment has shifted in the way that alcohol loaded bilayers absorbed more water molecules when compared to the neat lipid bilayers. The experimental results have been corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations to reveal further details. Namely, the order parameter profiles have been fruitful in correlating the mechanical model of structural changes to the effect of anesthesia.

  5. Neurobehavioral Deficits in a Rat Model of Recurrent Neonatal Seizures Are Prevented by a Ketogenic Diet and Correlate with Hippocampal Zinc/Lipid Transporter Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Ni, Hong; Sun, Bao-liang

    2015-10-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) has been shown to be effective as an antiepileptic therapy in adults, but it has not been extensively tested for its efficacy in neonatal seizure-induced brain damage. We have previously shown altered expression of zinc/lipid metabolism-related genes in hippocampus following penicillin-induced developmental model of epilepsy. In this study, we further investigated the effect of KD on the neurobehavioral and cognitive deficits, as well as if KD has any influence in the activity of zinc/lipid transporters such as zinc transporter 3 (ZnT-3), MT-3, ApoE, ApoJ (clusterin), and ACAT-1 activities in neonatal rats submitted to flurothyl-induced recurrent seizures. Postnatal day 9 (P9), 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups: flurothyl-induced recurrent seizure group (EXP) and control group (CONT). On P28, they were further randomly divided into the seizure group without ketogenic diet (EXP1), seizure plus ketogenic diet (EXP2), the control group without ketogenic diet (CONT1), and the control plus ketogenic diet (CONT2). Neurological behavioral parameters of brain damage (plane righting reflex, cliff avoidance reflex, and open field test) were observed from P35 to P49. Morris water maze test was performed during P51-P57. Then hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting and the protein levels of ZnT3, MT3, ApoE, CLU, and ACAT-1 were detected by Timm staining and Western blot analysis, respectively. Flurothyl-induced neurobehavioral toxicology and aberrant mossy fiber sprouting were blocked by KD. In parallel with these behavioral changes, rats treated with KD (EXP2) showed a significant down-regulated expression of ZnT-3, MT-3, ApoE, clusterin, and ACAT-1 in hippocampus when compared with the non-KD-treated EXP1 group. Our findings provide support for zinc/lipid transporter signals being potential targets for the treatment of neonatal seizure-induced brain damage by KD.

  6. The Transcription Profile Unveils the Cardioprotective Effect of Aspalathin against Lipid Toxicity in an In Vitro H9c2 Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspalathin, a C-glucosyl dihydrochalcone, has previously been shown to protect cardiomyocytes against hyperglycemia-induced shifts in substrate preference and subsequent apoptosis. However, the precise gene regulatory network remains to be elucidated. To unravel the mechanism and provide insight into this supposition, the direct effect of aspalathin in an isolated cell-based system, without the influence of any variables, was tested using an H9c2 cardiomyocyte model. Cardiomyocytes were exposed to high glucose (33 mM for 48 h before post-treatment with or without aspalathin. Thereafter, RNA was extracted and RT2 PCR Profiler Arrays were used to profile the expression of 336 genes. Results showed that, 57 genes were differentially regulated in the high glucose or high glucose and aspalathin treated groups. Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins (STRING analysis revealed lipid metabolism and molecular transport as the biological processes altered after high glucose treatment, followed by inflammation and apoptosis. Aspalathin was able to modulate key regulators associated with lipid metabolism (Adipoq, Apob, CD36, Cpt1, Pparγ, Srebf1/2, Scd1 and Vldlr, insulin resistance (Igf1, Akt1, Pde3 and Map2k1, inflammation (Il3, Il6, Jak2, Lepr, Socs3, and Tnf13 and apoptosis (Bcl2 and Chuk. Collectively, our results suggest that aspalathin could reverse metabolic abnormalities by activating Adipoq while modulating the expression of Pparγ and Srebf1/2, decreasing inflammation via Il6/Jak2 pathway, which together with an observed increased expression of Bcl2 prevents myocardium apoptosis.

  7. Differential effects of natural palm oil, chemically- and enzymatically-modified palm oil on weight gain, blood lipid metabolites and fat deposition in a pediatric pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnampalam, Eric N; Lewandowski, Paul; Nesaratnam, Kalanithi; Dunshea, Frank R; Gill, Harsharn

    2011-05-18

    Increasing prevalence of obesity and overweight in the Western world, continue to be a major health threat and is responsible for increased health care costs. Dietary intervention studies show a strong positive association between saturated fat intake and the development of obesity and cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effect of positional distribution of palmitic acid (Sn-1, 2 & 3) of palm oil on cardiovascular health and development of obesity, using weaner pigs as a model for young children. Male and female weaner piglets were randomly allocated to 4 dietary treatment groups: 1) pork lard (LRD); 2) natural palm olein (NPO); 3) chemically inter-esterified PO (CPO) and 4) enzymatically inter-esterified PO (EnPO) as the fat source. Diets were formulated with 11% lard or with palm olein in order to provide 31% of digestible energy from fat in the diet and were balanced for cholesterol, protein and energy across treatments. From 8 weeks onwards, pigs on EnPO diet gained (Pweight than all other groups. Feed conversion efficiency (feed to gain) over the 12 week experimental period did not vary between treatment groups. Plasma LDL-C content and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio in pigs fed natural PO tended to be lower compared to all other diets. The natural PO lowered (Passociated with lower (Pweight gain or blood lipid parameters was observed between sexes. The observations on plasma TG, muscle and adipose tissue saturated fatty acid contents and back fat (subcutaneous) thickness suggest that natural palm oil may reduce deposition of body fat. In addition, dietary supplementation with natural palm oil containing palmitic acid at different positions in meat producing animals may lead to the production of meat and meat products with lower saturated fats. An increase in fat content and a decrease in lean content in female pigs resulted in an increased body fat:lean ratio but gender had no effect on blood lipid parameters or insulin concentrations.

  8. Lipid exchange by ultracentrifugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drachmann, Nikolaj Düring; Olesen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Lipids play an important role in maintaining P-type ATPase structure and function, and often they are crucial for ATPase activity. When the P-type ATPases are in the membrane, they are surrounded by a mix of different lipids species with varying aliphatic chain lengths and saturation......, and the complex interplay between the lipids and the P-type ATPases are still not well understood. We here describe a robust method to exchange the majority of the lipids surrounding the ATPase after solubilisation and/or purification with a target lipid of interest. The method is based on an ultracentrifugation...... step, where the protein sample is spun through a dense buffer containing large excess of the target lipid, which results in an approximately 80-85 % lipid exchange. The method is a very gently technique that maintains protein folding during the process, hence allowing further characterization...

  9. Nutrients and neurodevelopment: lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Horacio F; Visentin, Silvana

    2016-10-01

    Nutrients, lipids in particular, make up the central nervous system structure and play major functional roles: they stimulate development, migration, and nerve cell differentiation. They are part of gray matter, white matter, nerve nuclei, and synaptogenesis. Breast milk contains lipids which are crucial for infant brain development. The lipid profile of breast milk was used as a guideline for the development of breast milk substitutes. However, to date, no substitute has matched it. Complementary feeding should include docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, other polyunsaturated fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, and complex lipids found in milk fat. The lipid composition of breast milk depends on maternal intake and nutritional status during pregnancy and breast-feeding. It has a great impact on development. Our goal is to review scientific literature regarding the role of lipids on infant brain development and the importance of breast milk lipid composition, maternal diet, and complementary feeding. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  10. The human hepatocyte cell lines IHH and HepaRG : models to study glucose, lipid and lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samanez, Carolina Huaman; Caron, Sandrine; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Helene; Duplan, Isabelle; Kuipers, Folkert; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Clavey, Veronique; Staels, Bart

    Metabolic diseases reach epidemic proportions. A better knowledge of the associated alterations in the metabolic pathways in the liver is necessary. These studies need in vitro human cell models. Several human hepatoma models are used, but the response of many metabolic pathways to physiological

  11. Modeling the sensory impact of defined combinations of volatile lipid oxidation products on fishy and metallic off-flavors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkateshwarlu Venkat, Guidipati; Bruni Let, Mette; Meyer, Anne S.

    2004-01-01

    volatiles were subjected to sensory descriptive analysis for fishy and metallic off-flavors. The data were analyzed using partial least-squares regression and multiple linear regression to develop mathematical models. The models revealed significant main effects of (EZ)-2,6-nonadienal and 1-penten-3-one...

  12. Lipid Oxidation Promotes Acrylamide Formation in Fat-Rich Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capuano, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from model systems suggests that lipid oxidation can contribute to acrylamide (AA) formation through the generation of secondary lipid oxidation carbonyl products, mainly aldehydes, which are able to degrade asparagine to AA. In this respect, factors affecting the extent of lipid

  13. RPLC-lon-trap-FTMS method for lipid profiling of plasma: Method validation And application to p53 mutant mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, C.; Dommelen, J. van; Heijden, R. van der; Spijksma, G.; Reijmers, T.H.; Wang, M.; Slee, E.; Lu, X.; Xu, G.; Greef, J. van der; Hankemeier, T.

    2008-01-01

    A reversed-phase liquid chromatography-linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry method was developed for the profiling of lipids in human and mouse plasma. With the use of a fused-core C8 column and a binary gradient, more than 160 lipids belonging to

  14. Lipid Regulation of Acrosome Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Roy; Mukai, Chinatsu; Travis, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are critical regulators of mammalian sperm function, first helping prevent premature acrosome exocytosis, then enabling sperm to become competent to fertilize at the right place/time through the process of capacitation, and ultimately triggering acrosome exocytosis. Yet because they do not fit neatly into the "DNA--RNA-protein" synthetic pathway, they are understudied and poorly understood. Here, we focus on three lipids or lipid classes-cholesterol, phospholipids, and the ganglioside G(M1)--in context of the modern paradigm of acrosome exocytosis. We describe how these various- species are precisely segregated into membrane macrodomains and microdomains, simultaneously preventing premature exocytosis while acting as foci for organizing regulatory and effector molecules that will enable exocytosis. Although the mechanisms responsible for these domains are poorly defined, there is substantial evidence for their composition and functions. We present diverse ways that lipids and lipid modifications regulate capacitation and acrosome exocytosis, describing in more detail how removal of cholesterol plays a master regulatory role in enabling exocytosis through at least two complementary pathways. First, cholesterol efflux leads to proteolytic activation of phospholipase B, which cleaves both phospholipid tails. The resultant changes in membrane curvature provide a mechanism for the point fusions now known to occur far before a sperm physically interacts with the zona pellucida. Cholesterol efflux also enables G(M1) to regulate the voltage-dependent cation channel, Ca(V)2.3, triggering focal calcium transients required for acrosome exocytosis in response to subsequent whole-cell calcium rises. We close with a model integrating functions for lipids in regulating acrosome exocytosis.

  15. Oxygen as a paramagnetic probe for nuclear magnetic resonance: structure and paramagnetic profile of a lipid bilayer/membrane model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Abdul Wahid, M.S

    2005-07-01

    Paramagnetic contact shifts and relaxation rate enhancements from molecular oxygen dissolved in a model membrane, were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The model membrane system was an isotropic bicelle formed using 1-myristelaidoyl-2-myristoyl-d27-sn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (MLMPC), a custom phospholipid, and 1-2-dihexanoyl-d22-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC). The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H spectra of MLMPC were assigned. Molecular oxygen was delivered at external pressures of 20 and 50 atm. Paramagnetic contact shifts were found to scale with the oxygen solubility gradient in the lipid bilayer, were found to be invariant to temperature changes in the region studied (288K to 331K), and scaled linearly with changes in oxygen pressure. Relaxation rate enhancements from oxygen were low in the headgroup region and increased to a roughly constant rate in the acyl chain region. Rates were comparable to values predicted by simple thermodynamic theories which take into account the observed gradients in diffusion rates and solubility of oxygen in bilayers. (author)

  16. In vitro steatosis hepatic cell model to compare the lipid-lowering effects of pomegranate peel polyphenols with several other plant polyphenols as well as its related cholesterol efflux mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to compare the relative activities of the purified pomegranate peels polyphenols (PPPs with some other plant polyphenols including punicalagin, ellagic acid, gallic acid, phlorizin, and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG on the lipid metabolism regulation, and the cholesterol efflux mechanisms of PPPs and punicalagin were also investigated. In this paper, a convenient and accurate in vitro HL7702 steatosis hepatic cell model was applied to evaluate the lipid-lowering effects of the tested polyphenols. The results showed that PPPs possessed the strongest lipid-lowering effects. Prevention group (treated with polyphenols when establishing of steatosis model was more effective than treatment group (treated with polyphenols after establishment of steatosis model. Punicalagin displayed the strongest lipid-lowering effects among all the tested components of pomegranate peel polyphenols. Moreover, PPPs and punicalagin (10, 20, 40 μg/mL significantly increased the mRNA expression of LXRα (Liver X receptor alpha and its target genes-ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in a dose-dependent manner in HL7702 steatosis hepatic cells. The high mRNA expression of LXRα and ABCA1, next to lovastatin, was observed in cells treated with 40 μg/mL of PPPs. These in vitro findings suggested that PPPs might have great potential in the clinic treatment of hyperlipemia.

  17. An overview of molecular dynamics simulations of oxidized lipid systems, with a comparison of ELBA and MARTINI force fields for coarse grained lipid simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siani, Pablo; de Souza, R M; Dias, L G

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes and model lipid systems containing high amounts of unsaturated lipids and sterols are subject to chemical and/or photo-induced lipid oxidation, which leads to the creation of exotic oxidized lipid products (OxPLs). OxPLs are known to have significant physiological impact...... in cellular systems and also affect physical properties of both biological and model lipid bilayers. In this paper we (i) provide a perspective on the existing literature on simulations of lipid bilayer systems containing oxidized lipid species as well as the main related experimental results, (ii) describe...

  18. Exploring the dynamics and interaction of a full ErbB2 receptor and Trastuzumab-Fab antibody in a lipid bilayer model using Martini coarse-grained force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Gonzalez, Juan Felipe; Ramos, Javier; Cruz, Victor L.; Martinez-Salazar, Javier

    2014-11-01

    Coarse grained (CG) modeling has been applied to study the influence of the Trastuzumab monoclonal antibody on the structure and dynamics of the full ErbB2 receptor dimer, including the lipid bilayer. The usage of CG models to study such complexes is almost mandatory, at present, due to the large size of the whole system. We will show that the Martini model performs satisfactorily well, giving results well-matched with those obtained by atomistic models as well as with the experimental information existing on homolog receptors. For example, the extra and intracellular domains approach the bilayer surface in both the monomer and dimer cases. The Trastuzumab-Fab hinders the interaction of the receptors with the lipid bilayer. Another interesting effect of the antibody is the disruption of the antiparallel arrangement of the juxtamembrane segments in the dimer case. These findings might help to understand the effect of the antibody on the receptor bioactivity.

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans as an alternative in vivo model to determine oral uptake, nanotoxicity, and efficacy of melatonin-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules on paraquat damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charão, Mariele Feiffer; Souto, Caroline; Brucker, Natália; Barth, Anelise; Jornada, Denise S; Fagundez, Daiandra; Ávila, Daiana Silva; Eifler-Lima, Vera L; Guterres, Silvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Garcia, Solange Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an alternative in vivo model that is being successfully used to assess the pharmacological and toxic effects of drugs. The exponential growth of nanotechnology requires the use of alternative in vivo models to assess the toxic effects of theses nanomaterials. The use of polymeric nanocapsules has shown promising results for drug delivery. Moreover, these formulations have not been used in cases of intoxication, such as in treatment of paraquat (PQ) poisoning. Thus, the use of drugs with properties improved by nanotechnology is a promising approach to overcome the toxic effects of PQ. This research aimed to evaluate the absorption of rhodamine B-labeled melatonin (Mel)-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC) by C. elegans, the application of this model in nanotoxicology, and the protection of Mel-LNC against PQ damage. The formulations were prepared by self-assembly and characterized by particle sizing, zeta potential, drug content, and encapsulation efficiency. The results demonstrated that the formulations had narrow size distributions. Rhodamine B-labeled Mel-LNC were orally absorbed and distributed in the worms. The toxicity assessment of LNC showed a lethal dose 50% near the highest dose tested, indicating low toxicity of the nanocapsules. Moreover, pretreatment with Mel-LNC significantly increased the survival rate, reduced the reactive oxygen species, and maintained the development in C. elegans exposed to PQ compared to those worms that were either untreated or pretreated with free Mel. These results demonstrated for the first time the uptake and distribution of Mel-LNC by a nematode, and indicate that while LNC is not toxic, Mel-LNC prevents the effects of PQ poisoning. Thus, C. elegans may be an interesting alternative model to test the nanocapsules toxicity and efficacy. PMID:26300641

  20. Quantification of plaque lipids in the aortic root of ApoE-deficient mice by 3D DIXON magnetic resonance imaging in an ex vivo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietel, Barbara; Kuehn, Constanze; Achenbach, Stephan [University Hospital of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Erlangen (Germany); Budinsky, Lubos [Campus Science Support Facilities (CSF), Vienna Biocenter (VBC), Vienna (Austria); Uder, Michael [University Hospital of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Hess, Andreas [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-10-31

    To establish a dedicated protocol for the three-dimensional (3D) quantification of plaque lipids in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE{sup -/-}) mice using ex vivo MRI. ApoE{sup -/-} mice were fed a high-fat diet (n = 10) or normal food (n = 10) for 3 months. Subsequently, a 3D FLASH MRI sequence was used to view the anatomy of the aortic root in the isolated hearts, where a 3D double-echo two-excitation pulse sequence (DIXON sequence) was used to selectively image plaque lipids. The vessel wall, lumen and plaque lipid volumes were quantified by MRI and histology for correlation analysis. DIXON MRI allowed visualisation and accurate quantification of plaque lipids. When comparing the vessel wall, lumen and plaque lipid sizes in the aortic root, Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis revealed a close correlation between MRI results and the histological data both on a slice-by-slice basis and of the volumetric measurements (vessel wall: r{sup 2} = 0.775, p < 0.001; vessel lumen: r{sup 2} = 0.875; p = 0.002; plaque lipid: r{sup 2} = 0.819, p = 0.003). The combination of 3D FLASH and DIXON-sequence MRI permits an accurate ex vivo assessment of the investigated plaque parameters in the aortic root of mice, particularly the lipid content. (orig.)

  1. Modeling of the Kinetics of Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Lipids from Microalgae with Emphasis on Extract Desorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Sovová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae contain valuable biologically active lipophilic substances such as omega-3 fatty acids and carotenoids. In contrast to the recovery of vegetable oils from seeds, where the extraction with supercritical CO2 is used as a mild and selective method, economically viable application of this method on similarly soluble oils from microalgae requires, in most cases, much higher pressure. This paper presents and verifies hypothesis that this difference is caused by high adsorption capacity of microalgae. Under the pressures usually applied in supercritical fluid extraction from plants, microalgae bind a large fraction of the extracted oil, while under extremely high CO2 pressures their adsorption capacity diminishes and the extraction rate depends on oil solubility in supercritical CO2. A mathematical model for the extraction from microalgae was derived and applied to literature data on the extraction kinetics in order to determine model parameters.

  2. Evaluation of skin surface hydration state and barrier function of stratum corneum of dorsa of hands and heels treated with PROTECT X2 skin protective cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takahiro

    2012-06-01

    Skin roughness is a term commonly used in Japan to describe a poor skin condition related to a rough and dry skin surface that develops as a result of various damaging effects from the environment or skin inflammation. Recovery from skin roughness requires skin care for a long period, thus it is important to prevent development of such skin changes. PROTECT X2 contains agents used for a protective covering of the skin from frequent hand washing or use of alcohol-based disinfectants. These unique components are also thought to be effective to treat skin roughness of the dorsa of the hands and heels. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of PROTECT X2 to increase skin surface hydration state, as well as enhance the barrier function of the stratum corneum of the dorsa of the hands and heels in elderly individuals. A total of 8 elderly subjects and their caretakers without any skin diseases participated in the study. They applied PROTECT X2 by themselves to the dorsum area of 1 hand and heel 3 to 5 times daily for 1 month, while the opposite sides were left untreated. We measured stratum corneum (SC) hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) before beginning treatment, then 1 week and 1 month after the start of treatment to compare between the treated and untreated skin. SC hydration state after applications of PROTECT X2 was 1.5- to 3.0-fold higher than that of the untreated skin in the dorsa of both hands and heels, indicating that the moisturizing ingredients accompanied by water were replenished in those areas where the cream was applied. Also, TEWL in the dorsum of the hands was 17.0-27.9% lower on the treated side, indicating improvement in SC barrier function. On the basis of these findings, we concluded that PROTECT X2 enhances water-holding in the SC and aids the barrier function of the skin in the dorsum of the hands. In addition, we consider that this formulation is useful for not only protecting the hands from the effects of such agents

  3. Anisotropic solvent model of the lipid bilayer. 1. Parameterization of long-range electrostatics and first solvation shell effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomize, Andrei L.; Pogozheva, Irina; Mosberg, Henry I

    2011-01-01

    A new implicit solvation model was developed for calculating free energies of transfer of molecules from water to any solvent with defined bulk properties. The transfer energy was calculated as a sum of the first solvation shell energy and the long-range electrostatic contribution. The first term was proportional to solvent accessible surface area and solvation parameters (σi) for different atom types. The electrostatic term was computed as a product of group dipole moments and dipolar solvation parameter (η) for neutral molecules, or using a modified Born equation for ions. The regression coefficients in linear dependencies of solvation parameters σi and η on dielectric constant, solvatochromic polarizability parameter π*, and hydrogen-bonding donor and acceptor capacities of solvents were optimized using 1269 experimental transfer energies from 19 organic solvents to water. The root-mean-square errors for neutral compounds and ions were 0.82 and 1.61 kcal/mol, respectively. Quantification of energy components demonstrates the dominant roles of hydrophobic effect for non-polar atoms and of hydrogen-bonding for polar atoms. The estimated first solvation shell energy outweighs the long-range electrostatics for most compounds including ions. The simplicity and computational efficiency of the model allows its application for modeling of macromolecules in anisotropic environments, such as biological membranes. PMID:21438609

  4. Assessment of cell viability and permeation enhancement in presence of lipid-based self-emulsifying drug delivery systems using Caco-2 cell model: Polysorbate 80 as the surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Pengli; Ji, Yue; Narayanan, Silpa; Dalrymple, Damon; Cheng, Xingguo; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2017-03-01

    Lipid-based self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) are commonly used for solubilizing and enhancing oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. However, their effects on viability of intestine epithelial cells and influence on membrane permeation are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken for safety assessment of lipid-based formulations containing medium-chain fatty acid esters as lipids and polysorbate 80 as the surfactant using the Caco-2 in vitro model. Any possible paracellular permeation enhancement through Caco-2 monolayers by the nontoxic formulations was also investigated. Mixtures of monoglyceride (Capmul MCM EP or 708G) or propylene glycol monoester (Capmul PG-8 NF) of medium chain fatty acids with polysorbate 80, with and without the incorporation of a medium-chain triglyceride (Captex 355), were prepared. After suitable dilution with aqueous culture medium, the formulations were incubated with a series of Caco-2 cultures of different maturity. Cell viability and membrane integrity were assessed. Any effects of nontoxic formulations on the transport of the fluorescent dye, Lucifer yellow, through Caco-2 monolayers were also determined. Formulations containing 1:1 ratios of monoglyceride or propylene glycol monoester to triglyceride (30% polysorbate 80, 35% monoglyceride or monoester and 35% triglyceride) were best tolerated by Caco-2 cells. Increased maturity obtained through longer culture durations rendered Caco-2 cells greater tolerance towards lipid-based formulations, and maximum tolerance to lipid-based formulations was observed with Caco-2 monolayers after being cultured for 21-23days. Furthermore, extent of cell membrane rupture caused by lipid-surfactant mixtures correlated positively with levels of cytotoxicity, suggesting a potential underlying mechanism. Permeation studies using Caco-2 monolayer model revealed that certain formulations significantly enhanced paracellular transport activities. Lipid-based SEDDS

  5. A 3D-psoriatic skin model for dermatological testing: The impact of culture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Duque-Fernandez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate representation of the human tissue environment during a preclinical screen can result in inaccurate predictions of compound effects. Consequently, pharmaceutical investigators are searching for preclinical models that closely resemble original tissue for predicting clinical outcomes.The current research aims to compare the impact of using serum-free medium instead of complete culture medium during the last step of psoriatic skin substitute reconstruction. Skin substitutes were produced according to the self-assembly approach.Serum-free conditions have no negative impact on the reconstruction of healthy or psoriatic skin substitutes presented in this study regarding their macroscopic or histological appearances. ATR-FTIR results showed no significant differences in the CH2 bands between psoriatic substitutes cultured with or without serum, thus suggesting that serum deprivation did not have a negative impact on the lipid organization of their stratum corneum. Serum deprivation could even lead to a better organization of healthy skin substitute lipids. Percutaneous analyses demonstrated that psoriatic substitutes cultured in serum-free conditions showed a higher permeability to hydrocortisone compared to controls, while no significant differences in benzoic acid and caffeine penetration profiles were observed.Results obtained with this 3D-psoriatic skin substitute demonstrate the potential and versatility of the model. It could offer good prediction of drug related toxicities at preclinical stages performed in order to avoid unexpected and costly findings in the clinic.Together, these findings offer a new approach for one of the most important challenges of the 21st century, namely, prediction of drug toxicity.•Impact of serum-free conditions during psoriatic skin substitutes reconstruction.•Lipids disorganization of healthy and psoriatic skin substitutes.•Permeation profiles of healthy skin substitutes.•Permeation profiles of

  6. Analyzing and Understanding Lipids of Yeast: A Challenging Endeavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlwein, Sepp D

    2017-05-01

    Lipids are essential biomolecules with diverse biological functions, ranging from building blocks for all biological membranes to energy substrates, signaling molecules, and protein modifiers. Despite advances in lipid analytics by mass spectrometry, the extraction and quantitative analysis of the diverse classes of lipids are still an experimental challenge. Yeast is a model organism that provides several advantages for studying lipid metabolism, because most biosynthetic pathways are well described and a great deal of information is available on the regulatory mechanisms that control lipid homeostasis. In addition, the composition of yeast lipids is much less complex than that of mammalian lipids, making yeast an excellent reference system for studying lipid-associated cell functions. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Effect of leptin infusion on insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism in diet-induced lipodystrophy model mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Koji; Inoue, Nao; Ujino, Yoko; Higa, Kouki; Shirouchi, Bungo; Wang, Yu-Ming; Yanagita, Teruyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Background Lipodystrophies are rare acquired and genetic disorders characterized by the complete or partial absence of body fat with a line of metabolic disorders. Previous studies demonstrated that dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) induces hepatic steatosis and hyperinsulinemia through the drastic reduction of adipocytokine levels due to a paucity of adipose tissue in mice and the pathogenesis of these metabolic abnormalities in CLA-fed mice is similar to that in human lipodystrophy. The present study explores the effect of leptin infusion on the pathogenesis of diet-induced lipodystrophy in mice. C57BL/6N mice were assigned to three groups: (1) mice were fed a semisynthetic diet supplemented with 6% corn oil and infused PBS intraperitoneally (normal group), (2) mice were fed a semisynthetic diet supplemented with 4% corn oil plus 2% CLA and infused PBS intraperitoneally (lipodystrophy-control group), and (3) mice were fed a semisynthetic diet supplemented with 4% corn oil plus 2% CLA and infused recombinant murine leptin intraperitoneally (lipodystrophy-leptin group). All mice were fed normal or lipodystrophy model diets for 4 weeks and were infused intrapeneally 0 or 5 μg of leptin per day from third week of the feeding period for 1 week. Results The results indicate that leptin infusion can attenuate hepatic steatosis and hyperinsulinemia through the reduction of hepatic triglyceride synthesis and the improvement of insulin sensitivity in diet-induced lipodystrophy model mice. Conclusion We expect the use of this model for clarifying the pathophysiology of lipodystrophy-induced metabolic abnormalities and evaluating the efficacy and safety of drug and dietary treatment. PMID:18348717

  8. The application of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis to study drug crystallisation in the stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Choon Fu; Craig, Duncan Q M; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2017-02-01

    Drug permeation through the intercellular lipids, which pack around and between corneocytes, may be enhanced by increasing the thermodynamic activity of the active in a formulation. However, this may also result in unwanted drug crystallisation on and in the skin. In this work, we explore the combination of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis to study drug crystallisation in the skin. Ex vivo permeation studies of saturated solutions of diclofenac sodium (DF Na) in two vehicles, propylene glycol (PG) and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), were carried out in porcine ear skin. Tape stripping and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy were conducted simultaneously to collect spectral data as a function of skin depth. Multivariate data analysis was applied to visualise and categorise the spectral data in the region of interest (1700-1500cm-1) containing the carboxylate (COO-) asymmetric stretching vibrations of DF Na. Spectral data showed the redshifts of the COO- asymmetric stretching vibrations for DF Na in the solution compared with solid drug. Similar shifts were evident following application of saturated solutions of DF Na to porcine skin samples. Multivariate data analysis categorised the spectral data based on the spectral differences and drug crystallisation was found to be confined to the upper layers of the skin. This proof-of-concept study highlights the utility of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analysis as a simple and rapid approach in the investigation of drug deposition in the skin. The approach described here will be extended to the study of other actives for topical application to the skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy of an oral and tropically stable lipid-based formulation of Amphotericin B (iCo-010) in an experimental mouse model of systemic candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Fady; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Ellen K; Bartlett, Karen; Wasan, Kishor M

    2013-10-29

    An oral lipid based formulation that exhibits tropical stability (iCo-010) was developed to enhance the absorption of orally administered amphotericin B (AmB). iCo-010 has previously shown high efficacy in an acute model of systemic candidiasis in rats, directing the focus of this study to be its efficacy in a chronic model of systemic candidiasis in mice. Mice were infected with 0.6 to 1×108 CFUs of Candida albicans ATCC 18804 strain by tail vein injection and were left for three days to develop the infection after which time treatment was initiated. The infected animals were assigned to the following treatment groups: no treatment (control) or iCo-010 at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg administered by oral gavage once daily (QD) for 5 consecutive days. The animals were sacrificed 7 days after the last dose and the concentration of AmB and the fungal burden were assessed within the liver, kidneys, heart, lungs, spleen and brain. Although the infection was relatively low (~ 60-100 CFUs/ 1 ml tissue homogenate) in the liver, lungs and heart, the infection level was very high (70 000 CFUs / 1 ml tissue homogenate) in the kidney tissues for the control group. The highest concentrations of AmB were recovered in the kidneys and the spleen. The fungal burden in the tissues was lowered by 69-96% in the treatment groups when compared to the control group. Oral iCo-010 is an effective treatment of systemic candidiasis in the mouse model.

  10. Differential effects of natural palm oil, chemically- and enzymatically-modified palm oil on weight gain, blood lipid metabolites and fat deposition in a pediatric pig model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Increasing prevalence of obesity and overweight in the Western world, continue to be a major health threat and is responsible for increased health care costs. Dietary intervention studies show a strong positive association between saturated fat intake and the development of obesity and cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effect of positional distribution of palmitic acid (Sn-1, 2 & 3) of palm oil on cardiovascular health and development of obesity, using weaner pigs as a model for young children. Methods Male and female weaner piglets were randomly allocated to 4 dietary treatment groups: 1) pork lard (LRD); 2) natural palm olein (NPO); 3) chemically inter-esterified PO (CPO) and 4) enzymatically inter-esterified PO (EnPO) as the fat source. Diets were formulated with 11% lard or with palm olein in order to provide 31% of digestible energy from fat in the diet and were balanced for cholesterol, protein and energy across treatments. Results From 8 weeks onwards, pigs on EnPO diet gained (P palm oil may reduce deposition of body fat. In addition, dietary supplementation with natural palm oil containing palmitic acid at different positions in meat producing animals may lead to the production of meat and meat products with lower saturated fats. An increase in fat content and a decrease in lean content in female pigs resulted in an increased body fat:lean ratio but gender had no effect on blood lipid parameters or insulin concentrations. PMID:21586170

  11. Antidepressant effects of curcumin and HU-211 coencapsulated solid lipid nanoparticles against corticosterone-induced cellular and animal models of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaolie; Zhu, Yanjing; Wang, Mei; Jing, Guoxin; Zhu, Rongrong; Wang, Shilong

    Major depression is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with few treatment approaches. The use of nontargeted antidepressants induced many side effects with their low efficacy. A more precise targeting strategy is to develop nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems; hence, we employed solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to encapsulate HU-211 and curcumin (Cur). The antidepressant effects of the dual-drug nanoparticles (Cur/SLNs-HU-211) for major depression treatment were investigated in corticosterone-induced cellular and animal models of major depression. Cur/SLNs-HU-211 can effectively protect PC12 cells from corticosterone-induced apoptosis and can release more dopamine, which may be associated with the higher uptake of Cur/SLNs-HU-211 shown by cellular uptake behavior analysis. Additionally, Cur/SLNs-HU-211 significantly reduced the immobility time in forced swim test, enhanced fall latency in rotarod test, and improved the level of dopamine in mice blood. Cur/SLNs-HU-211 can deliver more Cur to the brain and thus produce a significant increase in neurotransmitters level in brain tissue, especially in the hippocampus and striatum. The results of Western blot and immunofluorescence revealed that Cur/SLNs-HU-211 can significantly enhance the expression of CB1, p-MEK1, and p-ERK1/2. Our study suggests that Cur/SLNs-HU-211 may have great potential for major depression treatment.

  12. Evaluating the effect of α-pinene on motor activity, avoidance memory and lipid peroxidation in animal model of Parkinson disease in adult male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Goudarzi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Parkinson's disease (PD is a common neuropathologic disorder that is caused by degeneration of dopaminergic neurons of dense part of nigra. Oxidative stress has been found in the pathophysiology of PD. Since α-pinene has strong anti-oxidant effects, the purpose of this research was to study its effects on movement disorders and memory and lipid peroxidation in PD. Methods: Thirty five male rats were divided in 5 groups: control, vehicle, PD (received injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA and Parkinson's groups receiving doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg via gavage for two weeks. Generating animal models for Parkinson was done by intracerebral injection of 6-OHDA in the left side of the brain in medial forebrain bundle (MFB. After the injection, the movement balance of the rats was measured by Rotarod. Memory test was done by shuttle box; their brain was extracted to analyze malondialdehyde (MDA in striatum, hippocampus and blood. Results: The  results showed that Parkinson caused, movement disorder (p

  13. MR-Visible Lipids and the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delikatny, E. James; Chawla, Sanjeev; Leung, Daniel-Joseph; Poptani, Harish

    2013-01-01

    MR-visible lipids or mobile lipids are defined as lipids that are observable using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in cells and in tissues. These MR-visible lipids are composed of triglycerides and cholesterol esters that accumulate in intracellular neutral lipid droplets, where their MR visibility is conferred as a result of the increased molecular motion available in this unique physical environment. This review will discuss factors that lead to the biogenesis of MR-visible lipids in cancer cells and in other cell types such as immune cells and fibroblasts. We focus on the accumulations of mobile lipids that are inducible in cultured cells by a number of stresses, including culture conditions and in response to activating stimuli or apoptotic cell death induced by anticancer drugs. This is compared with animal tumor models, where increases in mobile lipids are observed in response to chemo and radiotherapy, and to human tumors where mobile lipids are observed predominantly in high-grade brain tumors and in regions of necrosis. Conducive conditions for mobile lipid formation in the tumor microenvironment will be discussed including low pH, oxygen availability and the presence of inflammatory cells. It is concluded that MR-visible lipids appear in cancer cells and human tumors as a stress response. Mobile lipids stored as neutral lipid droplets may play a role in detoxification of the cell or act as an alternate energy source, especially in cancer cells, which often grow in ischemic/hypoxic environments. The role of MR-visible lipids in cancer diagnosis and assessment of treatment response both in animal models of cancer as well as human brain tumors will also be discussed. Although technical limitations exist in the accurate detection of intratumoral mobile lipids, early increases in mobile lipids after therapeutic interventions may be used as a potential biomarker for assessing treatment response in cancer. PMID:21538631

  14. Effect of lipid/polysaccharide ratio on surface activity of model root mucilage in its solid and liquid states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fengxian; Arye, Gilboa

    2016-04-01

    The rhizosphere can be defined as the volume of soil around living roots, which is influenced by root activity. The biological, chemical and physical conditions that prevail in the rhizosphere are significantly different from those of the bulk soil. Plant roots can release diverse organic materials in the rhizosphere which may have different effects on its bio-chemo-physical activity. Among these exudates is the root mucilage which can play a role on the maintenance of root-soil contact, lubrication of the root tip, protection of roots from desiccation and disease, stabilization of soil micro-aggregates and the selective absorption and storage of ions. The surface activity of the root mucilage at the liquid-air interface deduced from its surface tension depression relative to water, implying on its amphiphilic nature. Consequently as the rhizosphere dry out, hydrophobic functional groups may exhibit orientation at the solid-air interface and thus, the wettability of the rhizosphere may temporarily decrease. The major fraction of the root mucilage comprise of polysaccharides and to a much lesser extent, amino acids, organic acids, and phospholipids. The most frequent polysaccharide and phospholipids detected in root mucilage are polygalacturonic acid (PGA) and Phosphatidylcholine (PC), respectively. The latter, is thought to be main cause for the surface active nature of root mucilage. Nevertheless, the role and function of root mucilage in the rhizosphere is commonly studied based on model root mucilage that comprise of only one component, where the most frequent ones are PGA or PC (or lecithin). The main objective of this study was to quantify the effect of concentration and PGA/PC ratios on the wettability of a model rhizosphere soil and the surface tension of the model root mucilage at the liquid-air interface. The PGA/PC mixtures were measured for their equilibrium and dynamic surface tension using the Wilhelmy-Plate method. Quartz sand or glass slides were

  15. Markers of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and lipid accumulation are moderately associated with the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance in obese men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz A Samjoo

    Full Text Available Lower skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS and intramyocellular lipid (IMCL accumulation have been implicated in the etiology of insulin resistance (IR in obesity. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of endurance exercise on biochemical and morphological measures of IMCL and mitochondrial content, and their relationship to IR in obese individuals. We examined mitochondrial content (subunit protein abundance and maximal activity of electron transport chain enzymes, IMCL/mitochondrial morphology in both subsarcolemmal (SS and intermyofibrillar (IMF regions by transmission electron microscopy, and intracellular lipid metabolites (diacylglycerol and ceramide in vastus lateralis biopsies, as well as, the homeostasis model assessment index of IR (HOMA-IR prior to and following twelve weeks of an endurance exercise regimen in healthy age- and physical activity-matched lean and obese men. Obese men did not show evidence of mitochondrial OXPHOS dysfunction, disproportionate IMCL content in sub-cellular regions, or diacylglycerol/ceramide accretion despite marked IR vs. lean controls. Endurance exercise increased OXPHOS and mitochondrial size and density, but not number of individual mitochondrial fragments, with moderate improvements in HOMA-IR. Exercise reduced SS IMCL content (size, number and density, increased IMF IMCL content, while increasing IMCL/mitochondrial juxtaposition in both regions. HOMA-IR was inversely associated with SS (r = -0.34; P = 0.051 and IMF mitochondrial density (r = -0.29; P = 0.096, IMF IMCL/mitochondrial juxtaposition (r = -0.30; P = 0.086, and COXII (r = -0.32; P = 0.095 and COXIV protein abundance (r = -0.35; P = 0.052; while positively associated with SS IMCL size (r = 0.28; P = 0.119 and SS IMCL density (r = 0.25; P = 0.152. Our findings suggest that once physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness have been

  16. Experimental study and thermodynamic modeling for determining the effect of non-polar solvent (hexane)/polar solvent (methanol) ratio and moisture content on the lipid extraction efficiency from Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekzadeh, Mohammad; Abedini Najafabadi, Hamed; Hakim, Maziar; Feilizadeh, Mehrzad; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Rashtchian, Davood

    2016-02-01

    In this research, organic solvent composed of hexane and methanol was used for lipid extraction from dry and wet biomass of Chlorella vulgaris. The results indicated that lipid and fatty acid extraction yield was decreased by increasing the moisture content of biomass. However, the maximum extraction efficiency was attained by applying equivolume mixture of hexane and methanol for both dry and wet biomass. Thermodynamic modeling was employed to estimate the effect of hexane/methanol ratio and moisture content on fatty acid extraction yield. Hansen solubility parameter was used in adjusting the interaction parameters of the model, which led to decrease the number of tuning parameters from 6 to 2. The results indicated that the model can accurately estimate the fatty acid recovery with average absolute deviation percentage (AAD%) of 13.90% and 15.00% for the two cases of using 6 and 2 adjustable parameters, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ATR-IR study of skin components: Lipids, proteins and water. Part I: Temperature effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsztyńska-Janus, S.; Pietruszka, A.; Kiełbowicz, Z.; Czarnecki, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this work we report the studies of the effect of temperature on skin components, such as lipids, proteins and water. Modifications of lipids structure induced by increasing temperature (from 20 to 90 °C) have been studied using ATR-IR (Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared) spectroscopy, which is a powerful tool for characterization of the molecular structure and properties of tissues, such as skin. Due to the small depth of penetration (0.6-5.6 μm), ATR-IR spectroscopy probes only the outermost layer of the skin, i.e. the stratum corneum (SC). The assignment of main spectral features of skin components allows for the determination of phase transitions from the temperature dependencies of band intensities [e.g. νas(CH2) and νs(CH2)]. The phase transitions were determined by using two methods: the first one was based on the first derivative of the Boltzmann function and the second one employed tangent lines of sigmoidal, aforementioned dependencies. The phase transitions in lipids were correlated with modifications of the structure of water and proteins.

  18. In vitro skin penetration of clobetasol from lipid nanoparticles: drug extraction and quantitation in different skin layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Antônio Dantas Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Clobetasol propionate (CP is a potent topical corticosteroid that causes several cutaneous and systemic side effects. In the present work, CP was encapsulated in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs to increase drug retention in the outer skin layers and improve the safety of topical therapy. NLCs were prepared using a microemulsion technique with a mixture of lecithin, taurodeoxycholate, stearic acid, and oleic acid. In vitro penetration studies were performed in a modified Franz-type diffusion cell, and porcine ears were used as a model of human skin. A simple and sensitive liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for clobetasol determination in different skin layers. NLCs presented uniform size distribution, high zeta potentialand entrapment efficiency values (> 98%. The analytical procedure was validated according to FDA guidelines. Clobetasol recoveries from skin samples were higher than 85%, with no interference of skin components and NLC ingredients. In experiments, after 6 h, a higher drug accumulation in the stratum corneum arising from NLCs compared to aqueous CP solution was observed. Thus, the NLCs demonstrated high potential for targeting CP to the skin and ensuring drug accumulation in the stratum corneum.Proprionato de clobetasol (CP é um potente corticóide tópico, que apresenta vários efeitos adversos cutâneos e sistêmicos. No presente trabalho, CP foi encapsulado em carreadores lipídicos nanoestruturados (NLCs visando aumentar a retenção do fármaco nas camadas superficiais da pele e a segurança da terapia tópica. NLCs foram preparados usando a técnica de diluição de microemulsão com mistura de lecitina, taurodesoxicolato, ácido esteárico e ácido oléico. Estudos de penetração in vitro foram realizados em células de difusão de Franz modificadas usando pele de orelha de porco como modelo de pele humana. Um método simples e sensível de cromatografia líquida foi desenvolvido e validado para

  19. Bioactive lipids in osteoarthritis: risk or benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea; Kloppenburg, Margreet

    2018-01-01

    Lipids are bioactive molecules that can affect several biological functions. Technological developments allowing identification of novel lipid species and the study of their function have led to a significant advance in our understanding of lipid biology and their involvement in various diseases. This is particularly relevant for diseases associated with obesity in which lipid accumulation could be involved in pathogenesis. Here, we focus on osteoarthritis, a chronic joint disease aggravated by obesity, and will present the latest findings regarding the involvement of lipids in disease development and progression. Recent studies indicate a possible involvement of n-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acid and their anti-inflammatory and proresolving derivatives in osteoarthritis. These lipids were identified in the osteoarthritis joint, were found to have beneficial effects on cartilage in vitro and reduced pain in humans and animal models. Moreover, increased levels of cholesterol transport molecules, such as LDL particles, were recently associated with a higher risk of developing hand osteoarthritis in women and with more severe inflammation and osteophyte formation in osteoarthritis animal models. Together, these findings indicate that lipids are a promising target for future therapeutic intervention in osteoarthritis and open exciting possibilities for future research.

  20. Polyene-lipids: a new tool to image lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuerschner, Lars; Ejsing, Christer S.; Ekroos, Kim

    2005-01-01

    Microscopy of lipids in living cells is currently hampered by a lack of adequate fluorescent tags. The most frequently used tags, NBD and BODIPY, strongly influence the properties of lipids, yielding analogs with quite different characteristics. Here, we introduce polyene-lipids containing five...... conjugated double bonds as a new type of lipid tag. Polyene-lipids exhibit a unique structural similarity to natural lipids, which results in minimal effects on the lipid properties. Analyzing membrane phase partitioning, an important biophysical and biological property of lipids, we demonstrated...... the superiority of polyene-lipids to both NBD- and BODIPY-tagged lipids. Cells readily take up various polyene-lipid precursors and generate the expected end products with no apparent disturbance by the tag. Applying two-photon excitation microscopy, we imaged the distribution of polyene-lipids in living...

  1. Changes in hydration of the stratum corneum are the most suitable indicator to evaluate the irritation of surfactants on the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, T; Shimotoyodome, Y; Nishijima, T; Sugata, K; Taguchi, H; Moriwaki, S

    2017-02-01

    Irritancy levels of surfactants on human skin have not been clarified completely. The relationships between skin damage and changes of skin properties caused by various surfactants were investigated using non-invasive measurements. Aqueous solutions of seven kinds of anionic, non-ionic, and amphoteric surfactants were exposed to the inside of forearm skin of 20 human subjects in two separate studies using the cup method. Hydration of the stratum corneum (SC), transepidermal water loss (TEWL), pH, skin surface roughness, and contents of the SC were measured before and after one exposure and after five and nine consecutive exposures to various surfactants. The discontinuation ratio of subjects for testing in each surfactant was determined by skin irritation symptoms and was defined as the degree of skin damage. Significant changes were observed only in hydration, TEWL, and natural moisturizing factors (NMF) content in the SC following surfactant exposure. A significant correlation was observed between the discontinuation ratio of each surfactant and the changes of hydration, TEWL, and NMF. Especially, the change of SC hydration showed an excellent correlation with the discontinuation ratio both for single (r = 0.942, P surfactants, and therefore is the most suitable indicator to evaluate the irritation of surfactants on the skin. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Polyethylene glycol-stabilized lipid disks as model membranes in interaction studies based on electrokinetic capillary chromatography and quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainikka, Kati; Reijmar, Karin; Yohannes, Gebrenegus; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Edwards, Katarina; Jussila, Matti; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2011-07-01

    Distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC)/cholesterol/distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE)-polyethylene glycol 5000 [PEG(5000)] lipid disks, mimicking biological membranes, were used as pseudostationary phase in partial filling electrokinetic capillary chromatography (EKC) to study interactions between pharmaceuticals and lipid disks. Capillaries were coated either noncovalently with a poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone)-based copolymer or covalently with polyacrylamide to mask the negative charges of the fused-silica capillary wall and to minimize interactions between positively charged pharmaceuticals and capillary wall. Although the noncovalent copolymer coating method was faster, better stability of the covalent polyacrylamide coating at physiological pH 7.4 made it more reliable in partial filling EKC studies. Migration times of pharmaceuticals were proportional to the amount of lipids in the pseudostationary phase, and partition coefficients were successfully determined. Because the capillary coatings almost totally suppressed the electroosmotic flow, it was not practical to use the EKC-based method for partition studies involving large molecules with low mobilities. Hence, the applicability of the biomembrane mimicking lipid disks for interactions studies with large molecules was verified by the quartz crystal microbalance technique. Biotinylated lipid disks were then immobilized on streptavidin-coated sensor chip surface, and interactions with a high-molecular-mass molecule, lysozyme, were studied. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation were used to clarify the sizes of lipid disks used. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid bilayers and interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    In biological systems lipid bilayers are subject to many different interactions with other entities. These can range from proteins that are attached to the hydrophilic region of the bilayer or transmembrane proteins that interact with the hydrophobic region of the lipid bilayer. Interaction between

  4. The evolution of lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Y. H.; Sugai, A.; Uda, I.; Itoh, T.

    2001-01-01

    Living organisms on the Earth which are divided into three major domains - Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya, probably came from a common ancestral cell. Because there are many thermophilic microorganisms near the root of the universal phylogenetic tree, the common ancestral cell should be considered to be a thermophilic microorganism. The existence of a cell is necessary for the living organisms; the cell membrane is the essential structural component of a cell, so its amphiphilic property is vital for the molecule of lipids for cell membranes. Tetraether type glycerophospholipids with C 40 isoprenoid chains are major membrane lipids widely distributed in archaeal cells. Cyclization number of C 40 isoprenoid chains in thermophilic archaea influences the fluidity of lipids whereas the number of carbons and degree of unsaturation in fatty acids do so in bacteria and eucarya. In addition to the cyclization of the tetraether lipids, covalent bonding of two C 40 isoprenoid chains was found in hyperthermophiles. These characteristic structures of the lipids seem to contribute to their fundamental physiological roles in hyperthermophiles. Stereochemical differences between G-1-P archaeal lipids and G-3-P bacterial and eucaryal lipids might have occured by the function of some proteins long after the first cell was developed by the reactions of small organic molecules. We propose that the structure of lipids of the common ancestral cell may have been similar to those of hyperthermophilic archaea.

  5. Lipids in critical care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Juliane; Hiesgen, Christopher; Mayer, Konstantin

    2011-11-01

    While enteral nutrition is the basis for the critically ill, parenteral nutrition is often used when a sufficient enteral nutrition is not or not fully achievable. Lipids are a mainstay of caloric supply in both cases as they combine the provision of building blocks for the membranes and are precursors for function molecules including lipid mediators bearing the ability to influence immunity. Pro-inflammatory lipid mediators as prostaglandins and leukotrienes are generated from arachidonic acid (AA), a key member of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). In contrast, lipid mediators derived from the n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may exhibit less inflammatory properties compared to their AA-derived counterparts. Furthermore, intercellular mediators as resolvins and protectins are generated from n-3 fatty acids. They induce the resolution of inflammation, hence the name resolution phase interaction product-resolvin. Modulating the amount of PUFA and the n-6/n-3 ratio were investigated as means to change the inflammatory response and improve the outcome of patients. Experimental data showed that n-3 fatty acids may improve acute lung injury and sepsis in animal models. Studies in patients undergoing major surgery with application of n-3 fatty acids demonstrated beneficial effects in terms of reduction of length of stay and infectious complications. Clinical data hints that this concept may also improve outcome in critically ill patients. Additionally, experimental and clinical data suggest that a reduction in n-6 PUFA may change the immune response. In conclusion, modulating the amount of PUFA, the n-6/n-3 ratio and the composition of lipid emulsions may prove to be a useful means to improve the outcome of critically ill patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Outer membrane vesicles harboring modified lipid A moiety augment the efficacy of an influenza vaccine exhibiting reduced endotoxicity in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Young; Kim, Chang-Ung; Bae, Eun-Hye; Seo, Sang-Hwan; Jeong, Dae Gwin; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Young Sang; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Doo-Jin

    2017-01-23

    Influenza is an acute respiratory disease and a major health problem worldwide. Since mucosal immunity plays a critical role in protection against influenza virus infection, mucosal immunization is considered a promising vaccination route. However, except for live-attenuated vaccines, there are no effective killed or recombinant mucosal influenza vaccines to date. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are nano-sized vesicles produced by gram-negative bacteria, and contain various bacterial components capable of stimulating the immune system of the host. We generated an OMV with low endotoxicity (fmOMV) by modifying the structure of the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide and investigated its effect as an intranasal vaccine adjuvant in an influenza vaccine model. In this model, fmOMV exhibited reduced toll-like receptor 4-stimulating activity and attenuated endotoxicity compared to that of native OMV. Intranasal injection of the vaccine antigen with fmOMV significantly increased systemic antibody and T cell responses, mucosal IgA levels, and the frequency of lung-resident influenza-specific T cells. In addition, the number of antigen-bearing CD103+ dendritic cells in the mediastinal lymph nodes was significantly increased after fmOMV co-administration. Notably, the mice co-immunized with fmOMV showed a significantly higher protection rate against challenge with a lethal dose of homologous or heterologous influenza viruses without adverse effects. These results show the potential of fmOMV as an effective mucosal adjuvant for intranasal vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel lipid-lowering properties of Vaccinium myrtillus L. leaves, a traditional antidiabetic treatment, in several models of rat dyslipidaemia: a comparison with ciprofibrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cignarella, A; Nastasi, M; Cavalli, E; Puglisi, L

    1996-12-01

    Vaccinium myrtillus L. (blueberry) leaf infusions are traditionally used as a folk medicine treatment of diabetes. To further define this therapeutical action, a dried hydroalcoholic extract of the leaf was administered orally to streptozotocin-diabetic rats for 4 days. Plasma glucose levels were consistently found to drop by about 26% at two different stages of diabetes. Unexpectedly, plasma triglyceride (TG) were also decreased by 39% following treatment. Subsequent to the latter observation, possible lipid-lowering properties of the extract were investigated on other models of hyperlipidaemia and ciprofibrate, a well-established hypolipidaemic drug, was used as a reference compound. Both drug reduced TG levels of rats on hyperlipidaemic diet in a dose-dependent fashion. When administered at single doses over the same experimental period, blueberry and ciprofibrate were effective in lowering TG concentrations in ethanol-treated normolipidaemic animals and in genetically hyperlipidaemic Yoshida rats. Unlike ciprofibrate, however, blueberry failed to prevent the rise in plasma TG elicited by fructose and did not affect free fatty acid levels in any of the above experimental conditions. In rats treated with Triton WR-1339, blueberry feeding induced an hypolipidaemic activity one hour after injection but proved to be ineffective at later time points, thus suggesting that its hypolipidaemic action may reflect improved TG-rich lipoprotein catabolism. In addition, ciprofibrate and the extract were tested for antithrombotic activity using a collagen-triggered model of venous thrombosis in diabetic and Yoshida rats. Only ciprofibrate, however, significantly reduced thrombus formation in diabetics, possibly because of its effects on free fatty acid metabolism, whereas no effect was observed in Yoshida rats. In conclusion, the present findings indicate that active consituent(s) of Vaccinium myrtillus L. leaves may prove potentially useful for treatment of dyslipidaemiae

  8. Lipid Structure in Triolein Lipid Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2014-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are primary repositories of esterified fatty acids and sterols in animal cells. These organelles originate on the lumenal or cytoplasmic side of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and are released to the cytosol. In contrast to other intracellular organelles, LDs are compose...

  9. Lipid nanoscaffolds in carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukner, Catharina; Koziol, Krzysztof K. K.; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V.

    2013-09-01

    We present the fabrication of lipid nanoscaffolds inside carbon nanotube arrays by employing the nanostructural self-assembly of lipid molecules. The nanoscaffolds are finely tunable into model biomembrane-like architectures (planar), soft nanochannels (cylindrical) or 3-dimensionally ordered continuous bilayer structures (cubic). Carbon nanotube arrays hosting the above nanoscaffolds are formed by packing of highly oriented multiwalled carbon nanotubes which facilitate the alignment of lipid nanostructures without requiring an external force. Furthermore, the lipid nanoscaffolds can be created under both dry and hydrated conditions. We show their direct application in reconstitution of egg proteins. Such nanoscaffolds find enormous potential in bio- and nano-technological fields.We present the fabrication of lipid nanoscaffolds inside carbon nanotube arrays by employing the nanostructural self-assembly of lipid molecules. The nanoscaffolds are finely tunable into model biomembrane-like architectures (planar), soft nanochannels (cylindrical) or 3-dimensionally ordered continuous bilayer structures (cubic). Carbon nanotube arrays hosting the above nanoscaffolds are formed by packing of highly oriented multiwalled carbon nanotubes which facilitate the alignment of lipid nanostructures without requiring an external force. Furthermore, the lipid nanoscaffolds can be created under both dry and hydrated conditions. We show their direct application in reconstitution of egg proteins. Such nanoscaffolds find enormous potential in bio- and nano-technological fields. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) data on the alignment of lipid nanostructures, control and time resolved 2-d images of egg ovalbumin encapsulation and a summary picture of the present work. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02068a

  10. Lipid Bilayers: Clusters, Domains and Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerman, David G.; Feigenson, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss the complex mixing behavior of plasma membrane lipids. To do so, we first introduce the plasma membrane and membrane mixtures often used to model its complexity. We then discuss the nature of lipid phase behavior in bilayers and the distinction between these phases and other manifestations of nonrandom mixing found in one-phase mixtures, such as clusters, micelles, and microemulsions. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of Gibbs phase diagrams to the study of ...

  11. Model for calcium-mediated reduction of structural fluctuations in epidermis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yasuaki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2015-08-01

    We propose a reaction-advection-diffusion model of epidermis consisting of two variables, the degree of differentiation and the calcium ion concentration, where calcium ions enhance differentiation. By analytically and numerically investigating this system, we show that a calcium localization layer formed beneath the stratum corneum helps reduce spatiotemporal fluctuations of the structure of the stratum corneum. In particular, spatially or temporally small-scale fluctuations in the lower structure are suppressed and do not affect the upper structure, due to acceleration of differentiation by calcium ions. Analytical expressions for the reduction rate of fluctuation amplitudes are shown.

  12. Depth resolved detection of lipid using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Christine P.; Eckert, Jocelyn; Halpern, Elkan F.; Joseph A Gardecki; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) can identify key components related to plaque vulnerability but can suffer from artifacts that could prevent accurate identification of lipid rich regions. In this paper, we present a model of depth resolved spectral analysis of OFDI data for improved detection of lipid. A quadratic Discriminant analysis model was developed based on phantom compositions known chemical mixtures and applied to a tissue phantom of a lipid-rich plaque. We demonstrate that a...

  13. Lipid Production from Nannochloropsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Nian; Chen, Tian-Peng; Yang, Bo; Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-03-25

    Microalgae are sunlight-driven green cell factories for the production of potential bioactive products and biofuels. Nannochloropsis represents a genus of marine microalgae with high photosynthetic efficiency and can convert carbon dioxide to storage lipids mainly in the form of triacylglycerols and to the ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Recently, Nannochloropsis has received ever-increasing interests of both research and public communities. This review aims to provide an overview of biology and biotechnological potential of Nannochloropsis, with the emphasis on lipid production. The path forward for the further exploration of Nannochloropsis for lipid production with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed.

  14. Lake Superior lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish chemistry data (d13C, d15N, C:N, lipid content) published in Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2015, 29, 2069??2077 DOI: 10.1002/rcm.7367This dataset is associated with the following publication:Hoffman , J., M. Sierszen , and A. Cotter. Fish tissue lipid-C:N relationships for correcting ä13C values and estimating lipid content in aquatic food web studies. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry. Wiley InterScience, Silver Spring, MD, USA, 29(21): 2069–2077, (2015).

  15. Differential effects of natural palm oil, chemically- and enzymatically-modified palm oil on weight gain, blood lipid metabolites and fat deposition in a pediatric pig model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunshea Frank R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing prevalence of obesity and overweight in the Western world, continue to be a major health threat and is responsible for increased health care costs. Dietary intervention studies show a strong positive association between saturated fat intake and the development of obesity and cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effect of positional distribution of palmitic acid (Sn-1, 2 & 3 of palm oil on cardiovascular health and development of obesity, using weaner pigs as a model for young children. Methods Male and female weaner piglets were randomly allocated to 4 dietary treatment groups: 1 pork lard (LRD; 2 natural palm olein (NPO; 3 chemically inter-esterified PO (CPO and 4 enzymatically inter-esterified PO (EnPO as the fat source. Diets were formulated with 11% lard or with palm olein in order to provide 31% of digestible energy from fat in the diet and were balanced for cholesterol, protein and energy across treatments. Results From 8 weeks onwards, pigs on EnPO diet gained (P Conclusions The observations on plasma TG, muscle and adipose tissue saturated fatty acid contents and back fat (subcutaneous thickness suggest that natural palm oil may reduce deposition of body fat. In addition, dietary supplementation with natural palm oil containing palmitic acid at different positions in meat producing animals may lead to the production of meat and meat products with lower saturated fats. An increase in fat content and a decrease in lean content in female pigs resulted in an increased body fat:lean ratio but gender had no effect on blood lipid parameters or insulin concentrations.

  16. Allergenic lipid transfer proteins from plant-derived foods do not immunologically and clinically behave homogeneously: the kiwifruit LTP as a model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Livia Bernardi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Food allergy is increasingly common worldwide. Tools for allergy diagnosis measuring IgE improved much since allergenic molecules and microarrays started to be used. IgE response toward allergens belonging to the same group of molecules has not been comprehensively explored using such approach yet. OBJECTIVE: Using the model of lipid transfer proteins (LTPs from plants as allergens, including two new structures, we sought to define how heterogeneous is the behavior of homologous proteins. METHODS: Two new allergenic LTPs, Act d 10 and Act c 10, have been identified in green (Actinidia deliciosa and gold (Actinidia chinensis kiwifruit (KF, respectively, using clinically characterized allergic patients, and their biochemical features comparatively evaluated by means of amino acid sequence alignments. Along with other five LTPs from peach, mulberry, hazelnut, peanut, mugwort, KF LTPs, preliminary tested positive for IgE, have been immobilized on a microarray, used for IgE testing 1,003 allergic subjects. Comparative analysis has been carried out. RESULTS: Alignment of Act d 10 primary structure with the other allergenic LTPs shows amino acid identities to be in a narrow range between 40 and 55%, with a number of substitutions making the sequences quite different from each other. Although peach LTP dominates the IgE immune response in terms of prevalence, epitope recognition driven by sequence heterogeneity has been recorded to be distributed in a wide range of behaviors. KF LTPs IgE positive results were obtained in a patient subset IgE positive for the peach LTP. Anyhow, the negative results on homologous molecules allowed us to reintroduce KF in patients' diet. CONCLUSION: The biochemical nature of allergenic molecule belonging to a group of homologous ones should not be taken as proof of immunological recognition as well. The availability of panels of homologous molecules to be tested using microarrays is valuable to address the

  17. Lipid profiles of adipose and muscle tissues in mouse models of juvenile onset of obesity without high fat diet induction: a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ilke; Bozkurt, Ozlem; Aras, Ebru; Heise, Sebastian; Brockmann, Gudrun Anni; Severcan, Feride

    2015-06-01

    The current study aims to determine lipid profiles in terms of the content and structure of skeletal muscle and adipose tissues to better understand the characteristics of juvenile-onset spontaneous obesity without high fat diet induction. For the purposes of this study, muscle (longissimus, quadriceps) and adipose (inguinal, gonadal) tissues of 10-week-old male DBA/2J and Berlin fat mouse inbred (BFMI) lines (BFMI856, BFMI860, BFMI861) fed with a standard breeding diet were used. Biomolecular structure and composition was determined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy, and muscle triglyceride content was further quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD). The results revealed a loss of unsaturation in BFMI860 and BFMI861 lines in both muscles and inguinal adipose tissue, together with a decrease in the hydrocarbon chain length of lipids, especially in the BFMI860 line in muscles, suggesting an increased lipid peroxidation. There was an increase in saturated lipid and triglyceride content in all tissues of BFMI lines, more profoundly in longissimus muscle, where the increased triglyceride content was quantitatively confirmed by HPLC-ELSD. Moreover, an increase in the metabolic turnover of carbohydrates in muscles of the BFMI860 line was observed. The results demonstrated that subcutaneous (inguinal) fat also displayed considerable obesity-induced alterations. Taken together, the results revealed differences in lipid structure and content of BFMI lines, which may originate from different insulin sensitivity levels of the lines, making them promising animal models for spontaneous obesity. The results will contribute to the understanding of the generation of insulin resistance in obesity without high fat diet induction.

  18. Perspectives on marine zooplankton lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kattner, G.; Hagen, W.; Lee, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    We developed new perspectives to identify important questions and to propose approaches for future research on marine food web lipids. They were related to (i) structure and function of lipids, (ii) lipid changes during critical life phases, (iii) trophic marker lipids, and (iv) potential impact...... of climate change. The first addresses the role of lipids in membranes, storage lipids, and buoyancy with the following key question: How are the properties of membranes and deposits affected by the various types of lipids? The second deals with the importance of various types of lipids during reproduction......, development, and resting phases and addresses the role of the different storage lipids during growth and dormancy. The third relates to trophic marker lipids, which are an important tool to follow lipid and energy transfer through the food web. The central question is how can fatty acids be used to identify...

  19. Bioactivities of Milk Polar Lipids in Influencing Intestinal Barrier Integrity, Systemic Inflammation, and Lipid Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Albert Lihong

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of lactation is for nutrient provision and also importantly for protection from various environmental stressors. Milk polar lipids reduce cholesterol, protect against bacterial infection, reduce inflammation and help maintain gut integrity. Dynamic interactions within dietary fat, lipid metabolism, gut permeability and inflammatory cytokines remain unclear in the context of obesity and systemic inflammation. A rat model and three mouse models were developed to test the hypotheses ...

  20. Studies of Lipid Monolayers Prepared from Native and Model Plant Membranes in Their Interaction with Zearalenone and Its Mixture with Selenium Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gzyl-Malcher, Barbara; Filek, Maria; Rudolphi-Skórska, Elżbieta; Sieprawska, Apolonia

    2017-06-01

    The impact of zearalenone and selenate ions on the monolayers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DPTAP), and the lipid mixtures (phospholipids and galactolipids) extracted from wheat plasmalemma has been studied using Langmuir trough technique and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). The zearalenone is a mycotoxin that exerts toxic effects on the cells of plants and animals. Monolayers' properties were characterized by surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) isotherms. It was found that zearalenone interacts with lipid monolayers causing their expansion. The selenate ions, added to the subphase together with zearalenone, reduce the effect of this mycotoxin on the surface properties of lipid films.

  1. Oxidative Stress and Lipid Peroxidation in the Ischemic Small Intestine: Pathological and Biochemical Evaluation in a Rat model of Superior Mesenteric Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumlu, Ersin G; Bozkurt, Birkan; Tokaç, Mehmet; Kiyak, Gulten; Özkardeş, Alper B; Ergin, Merve; Yazgan, Aylin; Kılıç, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in acute mesenteric ischemia. Thirty male Wistar albino rats weighing 240-260 g were randomized into control (no operation), sham (operation without ischemia), and ischemia groups. To induce ischemia, the superior mesenteric artery was sutured. Total antioxidant and oxidant capacity and lipid peroxidase activity were measured in blood samples collected at 0 min, 60 min, and 240 min, and the pathology of ileum segments resected at 240 min was evaluated. Total oxidant status did not differ among the groups. Total antioxidant status increased significantly with time in the ischemia group compared to the control and sham groups (P ischemia group than controls (P ischemia values were similar among the groups. Similarly, basal and stimulated paraoxonase activity in blood samples did not differ among the groups. In conclusion, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation have no significant role in the pathophysiology of acute mesenteric ischemia.

  2. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Lipid Carriers: Structure, Preparation and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Neda; Valizadeh, Hadi; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have attracted special interest during last few decades. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are two major types of Lipid-based nanoparticles. SLNs were developed to overcome the limitations of other colloidal carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles because they have advantages like good release profile and targeted drug delivery with excellent physical stability. In the next generation of the lipid nanoparticle, NLCs are modified SLNs which improve the stability and capacity loading. Three structural models of NLCs have been proposed. These LNPs have potential applications in drug delivery field, research, cosmetics, clinical medicine, etc. This article focuses on features, structure and innovation of LNPs and presents a wide discussion about preparation methods, advantages, disadvantages and applications of LNPs by focusing on SLNs and NLCs. PMID:26504751

  3. Metabolism. Part III: Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the metabolic processes of complex lipids, including saponification, activation and transport, and the beta-oxidation spiral. Discusses fatty acid degradation in regard to biochemical energy and ketone bodies. (TW)

  4. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lipid complex is also in combination with another chemotherapy drug to treat multiple myeloma (a type of cancer of the bone marrow) that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other ...

  5. Design of lipid matrix particles for fenofibrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Dengning; Cui, Fude; Gan, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The effect of polymorphism of glycerol monostearate (GMS) on drug incorporation and release from lipid matrix particles (LMPs) was investigated using fenofibrate as a model drug. X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry were used to study the polymorphism change of GMS...... and the drug incorporation in GMS matrix. When medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) was absent, melted GMS was frozen to α-form of GMS with drug molecularly dispersed, whereas β-form of GMS was formed with part of drug crystallized out when the ratio of GMS/MCT in the lipid matrix was 2:1 (w/w). For LMP composed......, the polymorphism of GMS is an important factor determining particle stability, drug incorporation, and the release of the drug from LMP. Critical attention should be paid on the investigation as well as control of the lipid polymorphism when formulating lipid-based matrix particles. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc...

  6. Coalescence Kinetics of Lipid Based Bicelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Andrew; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Katsaras, John; Xia, Yan; Li, Ming; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2014-03-01

    Uniform nanodisc can be self-assembled from lipid mixtures of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), and dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC). This study focuses on the theoretical and experimental growth kinetics of phospholipid based nanodiscs. Motivation for this project comes from the nanodisc's small size and their potential use as a carrier for drug delivery. It was observed that at high total lipid concentration the nanodiscs are stable at approximately 10 nm. However, growth of these nanodiscs is observed at relatively low total lipid concentrations. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is used to monitor the size and growth rate of these nanodiscs at different solution conditions. The growth at low concentrations is caused by to the transfer of charged lipid (DMPG) from the discs to the solution, reducing the Columbic interaction. The growth of nanodisc as a function of size and surface potential is modeled using the Smoluchowski transport equation with transport-limited boundary conditions.

  7. Artificial Lipid Membranes: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siontorou, Christina G; Nikoleli, Georgia-Paraskevi; Nikolelis, Dimitrios P; Karapetis, Stefanos K

    2017-07-26

    The multifaceted role of biological membranes prompted early the development of artificial lipid-based models with a primary view of reconstituting the natural functions in vitro so as to study and exploit chemoreception for sensor engineering. Over the years, a fair amount of knowledge on the artificial lipid membranes, as both, suspended or supported lipid films and liposomes, has been disseminated and has helped to diversify and expand initial scopes. Artificial lipid membranes can be constructed by several methods, stabilized by various means, functionalized in a variety of ways, experimented upon intensively, and broadly utilized in sensor development, drug testing, drug discovery or as molecular tools and research probes for elucidating the mechanics and the mechanisms of biological membranes. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art, discusses the diversity of applications, and presents future perspectives. The newly-introduced field of artificial cells further broadens the applicability of artificial membranes in studying the evolution of life.

  8. Serum Lipid Profiles, Lipid Ratios and Chronic Kidney Disease in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To examine the association of serum lipids, lipid ratios with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD in a Chinese population. Methods: Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey in China. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73m2 or albuminuria-to-creatinine ratio (ACR > 30 mg/g. Multivariable logistic regressions and multivariate regression models were used. Serum lipids and lipid ratios included total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, TG/HDL-C ratio, TC/HDL-C ratio and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio. Results: In men, only logarithm-transformed (log TG was associated with CKD. The odds ratio (every SD increment was 1.39 (95% CI 1.03–1.87, P = 0.03. In women, none of the serum lipids and lipid ratios was associated with CKD. Using multivariate regression models, it was shown that log TG and log TG/HDL-C were negatively correlated with eGFR (P < 0.05 in men and LDL-C and log LDL-C/HDL-C ratio were correlated with ACR in men. In female subjects, serum TC, log TG, log TG/HDL-C and log TC/HDL-C were negatively correlated with eGFR (P < 0.05. All of serum lipid profiles and lipid related ratio were not correlated with ACR in women. Conclusion: Serum TG is the only suitable predictor for CKD in men. However, in women, none of serum lipids and lipid ratio can be used as a predictor for CKD. Log TG and log TG/HDL-C are negatively correlated with eGFR in both genders.

  9. Lipid domains in the ram sperm plasma membrane demonstrated by differential scanning calorimetry.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, D. E.; Maynard, V M; McKinnon, C A; Melchior, D L

    1990-01-01

    Mammalian sperm plasma membranes, in contrast to those of mammalian somatic cells, exhibit a significant fraction of lipid that does not diffuse laterally in the plane of the membrane. This nondiffusing fraction results from lipid-lipid interactions. Similar nondiffusing fractions are found in mixed-lipid model systems that contain coexistent gel and fluid domains. These results suggest that the sperm plasma membrane may also exhibit lateral phase segregations of lipids and may contain signif...

  10. Phase diagrams and lipid domains in multicomponent lipid bilayer mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenson, Gerald W

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the phase behavior of biological membranes is helped by the study of more simple systems. Model membranes that have as few as 3 components exhibit complex phase behavior that can be well described, providing insight for biological membranes. A number of different studies are in agreement on general findings for some compositional phase diagrams, in particular, those that model the outer leaflet of animal cell plasma membranes. These model mixtures include cholesterol, together with one high-melting lipid and one low-melting lipid. An interesting finding is of two categories of such 3-component mixtures, leading to what we term Type I and Type II compositional phase diagrams. The latter have phase regions of macroscopic coexisting domains of [Lalpha+Lbeta+Lo] and of [Lalpha+Lo], with domains resolved under the light microscope. Type I mixtures have the same phase coexistence regions, but the domains seem to be nanoscopic. Type I mixtures are likely to be better models for biological membranes.

  11. Development of an in vivo animal model for skin penetration in hairless rats assessed by mass balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Lene; Petersen, Mads B; Benfeldt, Eva

    2002-01-01

    acid and (14)C-butyl salicylate were topically applied. Rapid and differentiated percutaneous absorption of both compounds were shown by urinary excretion data. For (14)C-salicylic acid the amount on the skin surface, in the stratum corneum and in the viable skin was determined. Total mass balance...... rat and free mobility throughout the test period. By consecutive tape stripping, monitored by measurements of transepidermal water loss and confirmed by histological examination of skin biopsies, 10 tape strippings were found to remove the stratum corneum completely. For assessment of the model, (14)C-salicylic...

  12. Iron dextran increases hepatic oxidative stress and alters expression of genes related to lipid metabolism contributing to hyperlipidaemia in murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maísa; da Costa Guerra, Joyce Ferreira; Sampaio, Ana Flávia Santos; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of iron dextran on lipid metabolism and to determine the involvement of oxidative stress. Fischer rats were divided into two groups: the standard group (S), which was fed the AIN-93M diet, and the standard plus iron group (SI), which was fed the same diet but also received iron dextran injections. Serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were higher in the SI group than in the S group. Iron dextran was associated with decreased mRNA levels of pparα, and its downstream gene cpt1a, which is involved in lipid oxidation. Iron dextran also increased mRNA levels of apoB-100, MTP, and L-FABP indicating alterations in lipid secretion. Carbonyl protein and TBARS were consistently higher in the liver of the iron-treated rats. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between oxidative stress products, lfabp expression, and iron stores. In addition, a negative correlation was found between pparα expression, TBARS, carbonyl protein, and iron stores. In conclusion, our results suggest that the increase observed in the transport of lipids in the bloodstream and the decreased fatty acid oxidation in rats, which was promoted by iron dextran, might be attributed to increased oxidative stress.

  13. Orally Administered Baker's Yeast β-Glucan Promotes Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis in the Livers of Obesity and Diabetes Model Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan; Sun, Ying; Zou, Siwei; Li, Mengxia; Xu, Xiaojuan

    2017-11-08

    Baker's yeast glucan (BYG) has been reported to be an anti-diabetic agent. In the work described herein, further study on the effect of orally administered BYG on glucose and lipid homeostasis in the livers of ob/ob mice was performed. It was found that BYG decreased the blood glucose and the hepatic glucose and lipid disorders. Western blotting analysis revealed that BYG up-regulated p-AKT and p-AMPK, and down-regulated p-Acc in the liver. Furthermore, RNA-Seq analysis indicated that BYG down-regulated genes responsible for gluconeogenesis (G6pase and Got1), fatty acid biosynthesis (Acly, Acc, Fas, etc.), glycerolipid synthesis (Gpam and Lipin1/2), and cholesterol synthesis (Hmgcr, Fdps, etc.). Additionally, BYG decreased glucose transporters SGLT1 and GLUT2, fat emulsification, and adipogenic genes/proteins in the intestine to decrease glucose and lipid absorption. All these findings demonstrated that BYG is beneficial for regulating glucose and lipid homeostasis in diabetic mice, and thus has potential applications in anti-diabetic foods or drugs.

  14. JTT-130, a novel intestine-specific inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, ameliorates lipid metabolism and attenuates atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Mera

    2015-11-01

    From these results, JTT-130 ameliorates lipid metabolism accompanied with the enhancement of the anti-atherosclerotic function of HDL, and attenuates the progression of atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic animals. These findings indicate that intestinal MTP inhibition may be atherogenic in vivo and that JTT-130 may be a useful compound for the treatment of dyslipidemia and a potential anti-atherogenic drug.

  15. Iron Dextran Increases Hepatic Oxidative Stress and Alters Expression of Genes Related to Lipid Metabolism Contributing to Hyperlipidaemia in Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maísa Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of iron dextran on lipid metabolism and to determine the involvement of oxidative stress. Fischer rats were divided into two groups: the standard group (S, which was fed the AIN-93M diet, and the standard plus iron group (SI, which was fed the same diet but also received iron dextran injections. Serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were higher in the SI group than in the S group. Iron dextran was associated with decreased mRNA levels of pparα, and its downstream gene cpt1a, which is involved in lipid oxidation. Iron dextran also increased mRNA levels of apoB-100, MTP, and L-FABP indicating alterations in lipid secretion. Carbonyl protein and TBARS were consistently higher in the liver of the iron-treated rats. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between oxidative stress products, lfabp expression, and iron stores. In addition, a negative correlation was found between pparα expression, TBARS, carbonyl protein, and iron stores. In conclusion, our results suggest that the increase observed in the transport of lipids in the bloodstream and the decreased fatty acid oxidation in rats, which was promoted by iron dextran, might be attributed to increased oxidative stress.

  16. Anesthetics interacting with lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeiras, Cátia; Serro, Ana Paula; Luzyanin, Konstantin; Fernandes, Anabela; Saramago, Benilde

    2013-01-23

    The exact mechanism by which anesthetics induce cell membrane-mediated modifications is still an open question. Although the fluidization effect of the anesthetic molecules on the cellular membrane is widely recognized, it is not known if anesthetics show any preference for specific membrane domains, namely the lipid rafts. The importance of these membrane micro-domains derives from the fact that they have been associated with cell signaling pathways, as well as with specific drug interactions. The objective of this work is to contribute for the elucidation of this question through the comparison of the anesthetic interactions with membranes of various lipid compositions. Liposomes prepared with an equimolar mixture of POPC, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, were chosen as models for lipid rafts. The interactions of these liposomes with two local anesthetics, tetracaine and lidocaine, and one general anesthetic, propofol, were studied. The effect of cholesterol was investigated by comparing anesthetic interactions with POPC/SM liposomes and POPC/SM/CHOL liposomes. The following experimental techniques were used: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, differential scanning calorimetry and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance. Although the liposomes investigated by the different techniques are not in the same conditions, it is possible to assemble the information obtained from all experimental techniques employed to reach a general conclusion. Tetracaine interacts more with raftlike domains, lidocaine induces stronger modifications on POPC/SM liposomes and the results for propofol are not fully conclusive but it seems to be the least prone to lipid interactions. The results were compared with those obtained with DMPC-containing liposomes, reported in a previous work. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Topical Delivery of Withania somnifera Crude Extracts in Niosomes and Solid Lipid Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinembiri, Tawona N; Gerber, Minja; du Plessis, Lissinda H; du Preez, Jan L; Hamman, Josias H; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2017-10-01

    Withania somnifera is a medicinal plant native to India and is known to have anticancer properties. It has been investigated for its anti-melanoma properties, and since melanoma presents on the skin, it is prudent to probe the use of W. somnifera in topical formulations. To enhance topical drug delivery and to allow for controlled release, the use of niosomes and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) as delivery vesicles were explored. The objective of this study is to determine the stability and topical delivery of W. somnifera crude extracts encapsulated in niosomes and SLNs. Water, ethanol, and 50% ethanol crude extracts of W. somnifera were prepared using 24 h soxhlet extraction which were each encapsulated in niosomes and SLNs. Franz cell diffusion studies were conducted with the encapsulated extracts to determine the release and skin penetration of the phytomolecules, withaferin A, and withanolide A. The niosome and SLN formulations had average sizes ranging from 165.9 ± 9.4 to 304.6 ± 52.4 nm with the 50% ethanol extract formulations having the largest size. A small particle size seemed to have correlated with a low encapsulation efficiency (EE) of withaferin A, but a high EE of withanolide A. There was a significant difference (P < 0.05) between the amount of withaferin A and withanolide A that were released from each of the formulations, but only the SLN formulations managed to deliver withaferin A to the stratum corneum-epidermis and epidermis-dermis layers of the skin. SLNs and niosomes were able to encapsulate crude extracts of W. somnifera and release the marker compounds, withaferin A, and withanolide A, for delivery to certain layers in the skin. Withania somnifera crude extracts were prepared using ethanol, water, and 50% ethanol as solvents. These three extracts were then incorporated into niosomes and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) for use in skin diffusion studies, thus resulting in six formulations (ethanol niosome, water niosome, 50% ethanol

  18. Lipid-rich enteral nutrition controls intestinal inflammation, improves intestinal motility and mucosal barrier damage in a rat model of intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhi-Liang; Tan, Shan-Jun; Cheng, Min-Hua; Zhao, Chen-Yan; Yu, Wen-Kui; He, Yu-Long; Li, Jieshou; Li, Ning

    2017-06-01

    It has been reported that lipid-rich enteral nutrition (EN) could ameliorate inflammation in various diseases. In this study, we investigated whether lipid-rich EN could control intestinal inflammation, improve intestinal motility and mucosal barrier injury after intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Male adult rats received saline, conventional EN, or lipid-rich EN via gavage before and after intestinal I/R injury. The superior mesenteric artery was occluded for 60 min. The sham group underwent laparotomy without superior mesenteric artery occlusion and was administrated saline. Intestinal motility was measured 4 h after intestinal I/R injury by fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran transit assay; the intestinal and systemic inflammation were assessed by analyzing intestinal and serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)- 6, and IL-10, separately. The intestinal mucosal barrier injury was assessed by analyzing the serum levels of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) and intestinal mucosal tight junction (TJ) proteins. The intestinal I/R injury decreased intestinal motility and intestinal mucosal TJs expression significantly when compared with the sham group (P < 0.05). The intestinal and systemic inflammatory parameters and the serum I-FABP were also significantly higher in the I/R groups than those in the sham group (P < 0.05). Both conventional and lipid-rich EN increased the intestinal motility and the intestinal mucosal TJs expression and decreased the intestinal and systemic inflammatory parameter and serum I-FABP levels to different degrees when compared with the I/R group (P < 0.05). However, lipid-rich EN significantly improved the negative alterations in these biochemical parameters when compared with the conventional EN (P < 0.05). These results suggest that lipid-rich EN might be able to control intestinal inflammation, improve intestinal motility and mucosal barrier injury after intestinal I/R injury

  19. Imaging MALDI mass spectrometry using an oscillating capillary nebulizer matrix coating system and its application to analysis of lipids in brain from a mouse model of Tay-Sachs/Sandhoff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanfeng; Allegood, Jeremy; Liu, Ying; Wang, Elaine; Cachón-Gonzalez, Begoña; Cox, Timothy M; Merrill, Alfred H; Sullards, M Cameron

    2008-04-15

    The quality of tissue imaging by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) depends on the effectiveness of the matrix deposition, especially for lipids that may dissolve in the solvent used for the matrix application. This article describes the use of an oscillating capillary nebulizer (OCN) to spray small droplets of matrix aerosol onto the sample surface for improved matrix homogeneity, reduced crystal size, and controlled solvent effects. This system was then applied to the analysis of histological slices of brains from mice with homozygous disruption of the hexb gene (hexb-/-), a model of Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff disease, versus the functionally normal heterozygote (hexb+/-) by imaging MALDI-MS. This allowed profiling and localization of many different lipid species, and of particular interest, ganglioside GM2, asialo-GM2 (GA2), and sulfatides (ST). The presence of these compounds was confirmed by analysis of brain extracts using electrospray ionization in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The major fatty acid of the ceramide backbone of both GM2 and GA2 was identified as stearic acid (18:0) versus nervonic acid (24:1) for ST by both tissue-imaging MS and ESI-MS/MS. GM2 and GA2 were highly elevated in hexb-/- and were both localized in the granular cell region of the cerebellum. ST, however, was localized mainly in myelinated fiber (white matter) region of the cerebellum as well as in the brain stem with a relatively uniform distribution and had similar relative signal intensity for both hexb+/- and hexb-/- brain. It was also observed that there were distinct localizations for numerous other lipid subclasses; hence, imaging MALDI-MS could be used for "lipidomic" studies. These results illustrate the usefulness of tissue-imaging MALDI-MS with matrix deposition by OCN for histologic comparison of lipids in tissues such as brains from this mouse model of Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff disease.

  20. Function and regulation of lipid biology in Caenorhabditis elegans aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Shangming Hou

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly expanding aging populations and a concomitant increase in the prevalence of age-related diseases are global health problems today. Over the past three decades, a large body of work has led to the identification of genes and regulatory networks that affect longevity and health span, often benefitting from the tremendous power of genetics in vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms. Interestingly, many of these factors appear linked to lipids, important molecules that participate in cellular signaling, energy metabolism, and structural compartmentalization. Despite the putative link between lipids and longevity, the role of lipids in aging remains poorly understood. Emerging data from the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that lipid composition may change during aging, as several pathways that influence aging also regulate lipid metabolism enzymes; moreover, some of these enzymes apparently play key roles in the pathways that affect the rate of aging. By understanding how lipid biology is regulated during C. elegans aging, and how it impacts molecular, cellular and organismal function, we may gain insight into novel ways to delay aging using genetic or pharmacological interventions. In the present review we discuss recent insights into the roles of lipids in C. elegans aging, including regulatory roles played by lipids themselves, the regulation of lipid metabolic enzymes, and the roles of lipid metabolism genes in the pathways that affect aging.

  1. Caloric restriction shortens lifespan through an increase in lipid peroxidation, inflammation and apoptosis in the G93A mouse, an animal model of ALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barkha P Patel

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction (CR extends lifespan through a reduction in oxidative stress, delays the onset of morbidity and prolongs lifespan. We previously reported that long-term CR hastened clinical onset, disease progression and shortened lifespan, while transiently improving motor performance in G93A mice, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS that shows increased free radical production. To investigate the long-term CR-induced pathology in G93A mice, we assessed the mitochondrial bioenergetic efficiency and oxidative capacity (CS--citrate synthase content and activity, cytochrome c oxidase--COX activity and protein content of COX subunit-I and IV and UCP3-uncoupling protein 3, oxidative damage (MDA--malondialdehyde and PC--protein carbonyls, antioxidant enzyme capacity (Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD and catalase, inflammation (TNF-alpha, stress response (Hsp70 and markers of apoptosis (Bax, Bcl-2, caspase 9, cleaved caspase 9 in their skeletal muscle. At age 40 days, G93A mice were divided into two groups: Ad libitum (AL; n = 14; 7 females or CR (n = 13; 6 females, with a diet equal to 60% of AL. COX/CS enzyme activity was lower in CR vs. AL male quadriceps (35%, despite a 2.3-fold higher COX-IV/CS protein content. UCP3 was higher in CR vs. AL females only. MnSOD and Cu/Zn-SOD were higher in CR vs. AL mice and CR vs. AL females. MDA was higher (83% in CR vs. AL red gastrocnemius. Conversely, PC was lower in CR vs. AL red (62% and white (30% gastrocnemius. TNF-alpha was higher (52% in CR vs. AL mice and Hsp70 was lower (62% in CR vs. AL quadriceps. Bax was higher in CR vs. AL mice (41% and CR vs. AL females (52%. Catalase, Bcl-2 and caspases did not differ. We conclude that CR increases lipid peroxidation, inflammation and apoptosis, while decreasing mitochondrial bioenergetic efficiency, protein oxidation and stress response in G93A mice.

  2. Fish tissue lipid-C:N relationships for correcting δ(13) C values and estimating lipid content in aquatic food-web studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Joel C; Sierszen, Michael E; Cotter, Anne M

    2015-11-15

    Normalizing δ(13) C values of animal tissue for lipid content is necessary to accurately interpret food-web relationships from stable isotope analysis. To reduce the effort and expense associated with chemical extraction of lipids, various studies have tested arithmetic mass balance to mathematically normalize δ(13) C values for lipid content; however, the approach assumes that lipid content is related to the tissue C:N ratio. We evaluated two commonly used models for estimating tissue lipid content based on C:N ratio (a mass balance model and a stoichiometric model) by comparing model predictions to measure the lipid content of white muscle tissue. We then determined the effect of lipid model choice on δ(13) C values normalized using arithmetic mass balance. To do so, we used a collection of fish from Lake Superior spanning a wide range in lipid content (5% to 73% lipid). We found that the lipid content was positively related to the bulk muscle tissue C:N ratio. The two different lipid models produced similar estimates of lipid content based on tissue C:N, within 6% for tissue C:N values 1.0‰. Published in 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  3. Lipid Microarray Biosensor for Biotoxin Detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Anup K.; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Moran-Mirabal, Jose C.; Edel, Joshua B.; Meyer, Grant D.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2006-05-01

    We present the use of micron-sized lipid domains, patterned onto planar substrates and within microfluidic channels, to assay the binding of bacterial toxins via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The lipid domains were patterned using a polymer lift-off technique and consisted of ganglioside-populated DSPC:cholesterol supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). Lipid patterns were formed on the substrates by vesicle fusion followed by polymer lift-off, which revealed micron-sized SLBs containing either ganglioside GT1b or GM1. The ganglioside-populated SLB arrays were then exposed to either Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) or Tetanus toxin fragment C (TTC). Binding was assayed on planar substrates by TIRFM down to 1 nM concentration for CTB and 100 nM for TTC. Apparent binding constants extracted from three different models applied to the binding curves suggest that binding of a protein to a lipid-based receptor is strongly affected by the lipid composition of the SLB and by the substrate on which the bilayer is formed. Patterning of SLBs inside microfluidic channels also allowed the preparation of lipid domains with different compositions on a single device. Arrays within microfluidic channels were used to achieve segregation and selective binding from a binary mixture of the toxin fragments in one device. The binding and segregation within the microfluidic channels was assayed with epifluorescence as proof of concept. We propose that the method used for patterning the lipid microarrays on planar substrates and within microfluidic channels can be easily adapted to proteins or nucleic acids and can be used for biosensor applications and cell stimulation assays under different flow conditions. KEYWORDS. Microarray, ganglioside, polymer lift-off, cholera toxin, tetanus toxin, TIRFM, binding constant.4

  4. 10-Hydroxy-2-Decenoic Acid in Royal Jelly Extract Induced Both Filaggrin and Amino Acid in a Cultured Human Three-Dimensional Epidermis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihao Gu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Royal jelly (RJ is a natural product which the honeybee secretes as a special diet for a queen bee. It is one of the natural products in which various functionalities, such as antibacterial effects, immunomodulating properties, and estrogen-like action, were reported. We investigated the effect of the RJ extract on the moisturizing effect by topical application in humans. The stratum corneum moisture was increased significantly after four weeks by using the RJ extract lotion compared to placebo lotion. RJ extract contained a characteristic ingredient, 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10H2DA and 10-hydroxydecanoic acid (10HDAA, etc. However, the mechanism of stratum corneum moisture and its contributing ingredient have not yet been elucidated. We have investigated the effects of 10H2DA and 10HDAA on the free amino acids content in the stratum corneum using a cultured human three-dimensional epidermis model. Additionally, the effect of 10H2DA and 10HDAA on the amounts of filaggrin (FLG and aquaporin 3 (AQP3 were investigated at the mRNA level and by immunohistochemistry using a cultured human epidermis model. It was determined that 10H2DA increases the free amino acids in the stratum corneum of the cultured human epidermis model, and that it increased FLG on both the mRNA and protein levels. On the other hand, these actions are not observed by treatment of 10HDAA. The mRNA and protein level of AQP3 did not increase with 10H2DA or 10HDAA use. It was thought that the increase in the amount of FLG and the increase in the free amino acids of the epidermis and the stratum corneum, respectively, by 10H2DA were participating in the moisturizing function of the stratum corneum by the continuous use of RJ extract lotion.

  5. Thyroid and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, E; Chiovato, L; Pinchera, A

    2000-06-01

    Thyroid hormones influence all major metabolic pathways. Their most obvious and well-known action is an increase in basal energy expenditure obtained acting on protein, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. With specific regard to lipid metabolism, thyroid hormones affect synthesis, mobilization and degradation of lipids, although degradation is influenced more than synthesis. The main and best-known effects on lipid metabolism include: (a) enhanced utilization of lipid substrates; (b) increase in the synthesis and mobilization of triglycerides stored in adipose tissue; (c) increase in the concentration of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA); and (d) increase of lipoprotein-lipase activity. While severe hypothyroidism is usually associated with an increased serum concentration of total cholesterol and atherogenic lipoproteins, the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in hypothyroid patients is not frequent. However, hypothyroid patients appear to have an increased incidence of residual myocardial ischemia following AMI. Even in subclinical hypothyroidism, which is characterized by raised serum TSH levels with normal serum thyroid hormone concentrations, mild hyperlipidemia is present and may contribute to an increased risk of atherogenesis. Prudent substitution therapy with L-thyroxine is indicated in patients with both overt and subclinical hypothyroidism, with or without angina, to counteract the cardiovascular risk resulting from hyper-dyslipidemia.

  6. Lipid bilayers: clusters, domains and phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David G; Feigenson, Gerald W

    2015-01-01

    In the present chapter we discuss the complex mixing behaviour of plasma membrane lipids. To do so, we first introduce the plasma membrane and membrane mixtures often used to model its complexity. We then discuss the nature of lipid phase behaviour in bilayers and the distinction between these phases and other manifestations of non-random mixing found in one-phase mixtures, such as clusters, micelles and microemulsions. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of Gibbs phase diagrams to the study of increasingly complex model membrane systems, with a focus on phase coexistence, morphology and their implications for the cell plasma membrane.

  7. In Vivo Inhibition of Lipid Accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulistiyani; Purwakusumah, E. P.; Andrianto, D.

    2017-03-01

    This is a preliminary research report on the use of Caenorhabditis elegans as a model to establish anti-obesity screening assay of the natural plant resources. Nematode C. elegans has been used as experimental animal model for understanding lipid accumulation. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of selected plant extracts on lipid accumulation in C. elegans. Currently no report could be found regarding lipid accumulation in C.elegans treated with ethanolic leaf extracts of jabon merah (Anthocephalus macrophyllus), jati belanda (Guazuma ulmifolia), and Mindi (Melia Azedarach) plants. Lipid accumulation was determined qualitatively using lipid staining method and quantitatively by colorimetry using sulpho-phospho-vanillin reagent. Data showed that lipid accumulation was inhibited up to 72% by extract of M. azedarach, about 35% by both of A. macrophyllus and G. ulmifolia extracts, and up to 25% by orlistat (a synthetic slimming drug). Ethanolic extract of A. macrophyllus, G. ulmifolia, and M. azedarach leaves were shown to inhibit lipid accumulation in C. elegans and M. azedarach leaves extracts was the most effective inhibitor. C.elegans were shown to be an effective model for in vivo lipid accumulation mechanism and potential to be used as a rapid screening assay for bioactive compounds with lipid accumulation inhibitory activity.

  8. Lipid Ion Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Heimburg, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The interpretation electrical phenomena in biomembranes is usually based on the assumption that the experimentally found discrete ion conduction events are due to a particular class of proteins called ion channels while the lipid membrane is considered being an inert electrical insulator. The particular protein structure is thought to be related to ion specificity, specific recognition of drugs by receptors and to macroscopic phenomena as nerve pulse propagation. However, lipid membranes in their chain melting regime are known to be highly permeable to ions, water and small molecules, and are therefore not always inert. In voltage-clamp experiments one finds quantized conduction events through protein-free membranes in their melting regime similar to or even undistinguishable from those attributed to proteins. This constitutes a conceptual problem for the interpretation of electrophysiological data obtained from biological membrane preparations. Here, we review the experimental evidence for lipid ion channels...

  9. Heart, lipids and hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wolf

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in general population. Besides well-known risk factors such as hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia, growing evidence suggests that hormonal changes in various endocrine diseases also impact the cardiac morphology and function. Recent studies highlight the importance of ectopic intracellular myocardial and pericardial lipid deposition, since even slight changes of these fat depots are associated with alterations in cardiac performance. In this review, we overview the effects of hormones, including insulin, thyroid hormones, growth hormone and cortisol, on heart function, focusing on their impact on myocardial lipid metabolism, cardiac substrate utilization and ectopic lipid deposition, in order to highlight the important role of even subtle hormonal changes for heart function in various endocrine and metabolic diseases.

  10. Triglyceride blisters in lipid bilayers: implications for lipid droplet biogenesis and the mobile lipid signal in cancer cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Khandelia

    Full Text Available Triglycerides have a limited solubility, around 3%, in phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. Using millisecond-scale course grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the model lipid bilayer can accommodate a higher concentration of triolein (TO than earlier anticipated, by sequestering triolein molecules to the bilayer center in the form of a disordered, isotropic, mobile neutral lipid aggregate, at least 17 nm in diameter, which forms spontaneously, and remains stable on at least the microsecond time scale. The results give credence to the hotly debated existence of mobile neutral lipid aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model, and possibly living membranes. The blisters will result in anomalous membrane probe partitioning, which should be accounted for in the interpretation of probe-related measurements.

  11. Prenatal stress programs lipid metabolism enhancing cardiovascular risk in the female F1, F2, and F3 generation in the primate model common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Ulrike; Teupser, Daniel; Kuehnel, Friederike; Grohmann, Jana; Schmieder, Nancy; Beindorff, Nicola; Schlumbohm, Christina; Fuhrmann, Herbert; Einspanier, Almuth

    2012-08-01

    Many human diseases are modulated by intrauterine environment, which is called prenatal programming. This study investigated effects of prenatal glucocorticoids on the lipid metabolism of three filial generations of common marmosets. Pregnant primates were treated with dexamethasone during pregnancy. Body weight and blood lipid parameters of adult female offspring (F1: n = 5, F2: n = 6, F3: n = 3) were compared with age-related female controls (n = 12). F1, F2, and F3 offspring showed significantly lower percentage of plasma n3 fatty acids than controls. F2 and F3 presented higher cholesterol levels, with significantly more LDL cholesterol, significantly less HDL triglycerides and an enhanced cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio. Body weight was not significantly affected. Prenatal dexamethasone led to higher amounts of cardiovascular risk factors and less protective parameters in female F1-F3 offspring. The intergenerational consequences suggest prenatal programming through epigenetic effects. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Lipid intolerance in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, M; Eliasson, B; Joheim, E; Lenner, R A; Taskinen, M R; Smith, U

    1995-05-01

    Smokers have recently been shown to be insulin resistant and to exhibit several characteristics of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS). In this study, we assessed fasting and postprandial lipid levels in healthy, normolipidaemic, chronic smokers and a matched group of non-smoking individuals. A standardized mixed meal (containing 3.78 MJ and 51 g of fat) was given in the morning after an overnight fast. The smokers were either abstinent from tobacco for 48 h or were allowed to smoke freely, including being allowed to smoke six cigarettes during the study. Twenty-two middle-aged, healthy male subjects, nine habitual smokers and 13 non-smoking control subjects, were recruited to the study. The smokers had all been smoking at least 10 cigarettes per day for at least 10 years. The smokers exhibited a lipid intolerance in that their postprandial increase in triglyceride levels was more than 50% higher than in the non-smokers' group. This lipid intolerance could not be discerned in the postabsorptive state because the fasting triglyceride levels were the same in both groups, while the smokers had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The peak postprandial triglyceride level correlated closely and negatively with fasting HDL cholesterol, indicating an impaired lipolytic removal capacity in smokers. Healthy, normotriglyceridaemic smokers exhibit an abnormal postprandial lipid metabolism consistent with lipid intolerance. It is suggested that postprandial hyperlipidaemia is a characteristic trait of the insulin resistance syndrome and that the defect in lipid removal is related to the low HDL cholesterol in this syndrome. The insulin resistance syndrome is likely to be an important reason for the increased propensity for cardiovascular disease in smokers.

  13. Bioorthogonal chemical reporters for analyzing protein lipidation and lipid trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Howard C; Wilson, John P; Charron, Guillaume

    2011-09-20

    Protein lipidation and lipid trafficking control many key biological functions in all kingdoms of life. The discovery of diverse lipid species and their covalent attachment to many proteins has revealed a complex and regulated network of membranes and lipidated proteins that are central to fundamental aspects of physiology and human disease. Given the complexity of lipid trafficking and the protein targeting mechanisms involved with membrane lipids, precise and sensitive methods are needed to monitor and identify these hydrophobic molecules in bacteria, yeast, and higher eukaryotes. Although many analytical methods have been developed for characterizing membrane lipids and covalently modified proteins, traditional reagents and approaches have limited sensitivity, do not faithfully report on the lipids of interest, or are not readily accessible. The invention of bioorthogonal ligation reactions, such as the Staudinger ligation and azide-alkyne cycloadditions, has provided new tools to address these limitations, and their use has begun to yield fresh insight into the biology of protein lipidation and lipid trafficking. In this Account, we discuss how these new bioorthogonal ligation reactions and lipid chemical reporters afford new opportunities for exploring the biology of lipid-modified proteins and lipid trafficking. Lipid chemical reporters from our laboratory and several other research groups have enabled improved detection and large-scale proteomic analysis of fatty-acylated and prenylated proteins. For example, fatty acid and isoprenoid chemical reporters in conjunction with bioorthogonal ligation methods have circumvented the limited sensitivity and hazards of radioactive analogues, allowing rapid and robust fluorescent detection of lipidated proteins in all organisms tested. These chemical tools have revealed alterations in protein lipidation in different cellular states and are beginning to provide unique insights in mechanisms of regulation. Notably, the

  14. Study of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer to Lipid Domain Markers Ascertains Partitioning of Semisynthetic Lipidated N-Ras in Lipid Raft Nanodomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishina, Anna K; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A; Galiakhmetov, Azamat R; Rathore, Rajendra; Kovrigin, Evgenii L

    2018-01-10

    Cellular membranes are heterogeneous planar lipid bilayers displaying lateral phase separation with the nanometer-scale liquid-ordered phase (also known as "lipid rafts") surrounded by the liquid-disordered phase. Many membrane-associated proteins were found to permanently integrate into the lipid rafts, which is critical for their biological function. Isoforms H and N of Ras GTPase possess a unique ability to switch their lipid domain preference depending on the type of bound guanine nucleotide (GDP or GTP). This behavior, however, has never been demonstrated in vitro in model bilayers with recombinant proteins and therefore has been attributed to the action of binding of Ras to other proteins at the membrane surface. In this paper, we report the observation of the nucleotide-dependent switch of lipid domain preferences of the semisynthetic lipidated N-Ras in lipid raft vesicles in the absence of additional proteins. To detect segregation of Ras molecules in raft and disordered lipid domains, we measured Förster resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore, mant, attached to the protein-bound guanine nucleotides, and the acceptor, rhodamine-conjugated lipid, localized into the liquid-disordered domains. Herein, we established that N-Ras preferentially populated raft domains when bound to mant-GDP, while losing its preference for rafts when it was associated with a GTP mimic, mant-GppNHp. At the same time, the isolated lipidated C-terminal peptide of N-Ras was found to be localized outside of the liquid-ordered rafts, most likely in the bulk-disordered lipid. Substitution of the N-terminal G domain of N-Ras with a homologous G domain of H-Ras disrupted the nucleotide-dependent lipid domain switch.

  15. Ethnicity and stratum corneum ceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J.M.; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2010-01-01

    -skinned individuals having intermediate values, and Africans having the lowest values. No statistically significant differences were found between any of the ceramide subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: We found different ceramide/cholesterol ratios in comparable groups of different ethnicity, pointing to unknown genetic...... method and analysed using high-performance thin layer chromatography. RESULTS: For the ceramide/cholesterol ratio we found statistically significant differences between groups, with Asians having the highest ratio (P

  16. How proteins move lipids and lipids move proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/222364815; van der Sluijs, P.; van Meer, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068570368

    2001-01-01

    Cells determine the bilayer characteristics of different membranes by tightly controlling their lipid composition. Local changes in the physical properties of bilayers, in turn, allow membrane deformation, and facilitate vesicle budding and fusion. Moreover, specific lipids at specific locations

  17. Derivation of original RESP atomic partial charges for MD simulations of the LDAO surfactant with AMBER: applications to a model of micelle and a fragment of the lipid kinase PI4KA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Esra; Taveneau, Cyntia; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Marchi, Massimo; Robert, Bruno; Abel, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the derivation and the validation of original RESP atomic partial charges for the N, N-dimethyl-dodecylamine oxide (LDAO) surfactant. These charges, designed to be fully compatible with all the AMBER force fields, are at first tested against molecular dynamics simulations of pure LDAO micelles and with a fragment of the lipid kinase PIK4A (DI) modeled with the QUARK molecular modeling server. To model the micelle, we used two distinct AMBER force fields (i.e. Amber99SB and Lipid14) and a variety of starting conditions. We find that the micelle structural properties (such as the shape, size, the LDAO headgroup hydration, and alkyl chain conformation) slightly depend on the force field but not on the starting conditions and more importantly are in good agreement with experiments and previous simulations. We also show that the Lipid14 force field should be used instead of the Amber99SB one to better reproduce the C(sp3)C(sp3)C(sp3)C(sp3) conformation in the surfactant alkyl chain. Concerning the simulations with LDAO-DI protein, we carried out different runs at two NaCl concentrations (i.e. 0 and 300 mM) to mimic, in the latter case, the experimental conditions. We notice a small dependence of the simulation results with the LDAO parameters and the salt concentration. However, we find that in the simulations, three out of four tryptophans of the DI protein are not accessible to water in agreement with our fluorescence spectroscopy experiments reported in the paper.

  18. Lipids in Cryptomonas CR-1. I. Occurrence of Betaine Lipids

    OpenAIRE

    Naoki, Sato; Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo

    1991-01-01

    Polar lipids of the cryptophyte Cryptomonas CR-1 were analyzed in detail. In addition to glycolipids and phospholipids, three Dragendorff-positive lipids were found. Two of these lipids were identified as diacylglyceryltrimethylhomoserine (DGTS) and diacylglycerylhydroxymethyltrimethyl-β-alanine (DGTA), a recently discovered isomer of DGTS, while the least abundant lipid remains to be identified. The presence of both DGTS and DGTA, which have been widely found in green algae and brown algae, ...

  19. Solid lipid particles for oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs I - Elucidating the release mechanism of lysozyme during lipolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten B; Zhang, L.; Yang, M

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of protein release from solid lipid particles was investigated by a new lipolysis model in a biorelevant medium containing both bile salts and phospholipids. Lysozyme, a model protein, was formulated into solid lipid particles using four different types of lipids, two triglycerides ...... the drug release mechanism from solid lipid particles and can potentially be used in rational selection of lipid excipients for oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs....

  20. Lipids in cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipids are present in cheese at levels above 20 percent and are analyzed by several techniques. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy are used to examine the microstructure, gas chromatography is employed to look at fatty acid composition, and differential scanning cal...

  1. Salivary lipids: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matczuk, Jan; Żendzian-Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Maciejczyk, Mateusz; Kurek, Krzysztof

    2017-09-01

    Saliva is produced by both large and small salivary glands and may be considered one of the most important factors influencing the behavior of oral cavity homeostasis. Secretion of saliva plays an important role in numerous significant biological processes. Saliva facilitates chewing and bolus formation as well as performs protective functions and determines the buffering and antibacterial prosperities of the oral environment. Salivary lipids appear to be a very important component of saliva, as their qualitative and quantitative composition can be changed in various pathological states and human diseases. It has been shown that disturbances in salivary lipid homeostasis are involved in periodontal diseases as well as various systemic disorders (e.g. cystic fibrosis, diabetes and Sjögren's syndrome). However, little is known about the role and composition of salivary lipids and their interaction with other important ingredients of human saliva, including proteins, glycoproteins and salivary mucins. The purpose of this review paper is to present the latest knowledge on salivary lipids in healthy conditions and in oral and systemic diseases.

  2. Lateral pressure profile in lipid membranes with curvature: Analytical calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdova, A. A.; Mukhin, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    An analytical expression is obtained for the lateral pressure profile in the hydrophobic part of a lipid bilayer of finite curvature. Calculations are carried out within a microscopic model of a lipid bilayer, according to which the energy of a lipid chain represents the energy of a flexible string of finite thickness and the interaction between lipid chains is considered as a steric (entropic) repulsion. This microscopic model allows one to obtain an expression for the distribution of lateral pressure in membranes with given curvature if one considers the bending of a membrane as a small deviation from a flat conformation and applies perturbation theory in the small parameter L 0 J, where L 0 is the hydrophobic thickness of a monolayer and J is the mean curvature of the lipid bilayer. The resulting pressure profile depends on the microscopic parameters of the lipid chain: the bending modulus of the lipid chain, incompressible area per lipid chain, and the thickness of a flat monolayer. The coefficient of entropic repulsion between lipids is calculated self-consistently. The analytical results obtained for the lateral pressure distribution are in qualitative agreement with molecular dynamic simulations.

  3. Cell-based lipid flippase assay employing fluorescent lipid derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Stumph; Costa, Sara; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    , studies of individual P4-ATPase family members from fungi, plants, and animals show that P4-ATPases differ in their substrate specificities and mediate transport of a broader range of lipid substrates. Here, we describe an assay based on fluorescent lipid derivatives to monitor and characterize lipid...

  4. Evidence for condensed complexes of cholesterol in lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Maria K.

    Although cholesterol is a predominant lipid in the eukaryotic plasma membrane, its interactions with other lipids are still not well understood. Insights into the nature of lipid assembly can be gained from examining lipid-cholesterol interaction using model systems. A key observation was the discovery of liquid-liquid phase diagrams with two critical points in the binary mixtures of cholesterol and lipids. The shape of the phase diagrams can be explained by a thermodynamic model of "condensed complexes". In our quest to characterize cholesterol-lipid interactions, we determined phase diagrams of cholesterol and phospholipids that point to the existence of condensed complexes. This complex formation hypothesis was further supported by experiments involving cholesterol removal by cyclodextrin, grazing x-ray diffraction and x-ray reflectivity studies and isothermal calorimetry. Our study aimed at establishing a correlation (or the lack of) between domain formation and complex formation, as well as determining the mode of cholesterol association with different lipids based on their structural and physical properties. We established a displacement assay by which we were able to probe cholesterol-lipid interactions by perturbing them in the presence of an intercalator that competes with cholesterol for association with lipids. Our data support the condensed complex model between cholesterol and lipids, and cholesterol when complexed with lipids shows low activity whereas free, uncomplexed cholesterol exhibits high activity. We were successful in modulating cholesterol activity by varying the level of intercalator while keeping the cholesterol content fixed. In this thesis, not only have we shown that cholesterol can be displaced by intercalators in model systems, we have further established that such displacement can take place in membranes of live cell.

  5. Lipid radicals cause light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, Masataka; Shinto, Saki; Matsuoka, Yuta; Otsuka, Ayasa; Kaidzu, Sachiko; Tanito, Masaki; Shibata, Takahiro; Uchida, Koji; Ohira, Akihiro; Yamato, Mayumi; Yamada, Ken-Ichi

    2017-10-03

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. Although the cause of AMD remains unknown, lipid peroxidation (LPO) end-products are critical molecules for its development. Herein, we report the imaging of lipid radicals, which are key factors in the LPO reaction, and therapeutic information using animal models.

  6. Lipid peroxidation and water penetration in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conte, Elena; Megli, Francesco Maria; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2012-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays a key role in the alteration of cell membrane's properties. Here we used as model systems multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) made of the first two products in the oxidative cascade of linoleoyl lecithin, namely 1-palmitoyl-2-(13-hydroperoxy-9,11-octadecanedienoyl)-lecithin (Hp......(zz) parameters revealed that OHPLPC, but mostly HpPLPC, induced a measurable increase in polarity and H-bonding propensity in the central region of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics simulation performed on 16-DSA in the PLPC-HpPLPC bilayer revealed that water molecules are statistically favored with respect...... to the hydroperoxide groups to interact with the nitroxide at the methyl-terminal, confirming that the H-bonds experimentally observed are due to increased water penetration in the bilayer. The EPR and MD data on model membranes demonstrate that cell membrane damage by oxidative stress cause alteration of water...

  7. Genetic architecture of circulating lipid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkan, Ayşe; Amin, Najaf; Isaacs, Aaron; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Whitfield, John B; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Kyvik, Kirsten O H M; Rudan, Igor; Gieger, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Johansson, Åsa; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Smith, Johannes J; Wild, Sarah H; Pedersen, Nancy L; Willemsen, Gonneke; Mangino, Massimo; Hayward, Caroline; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline; Montgomery, Grant W; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Döring, Angela; Pramstaller, Peter P; Gyllensten, Ulf; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Wilson, James F; Rivadeneria, Fernando; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Spector, Tim; Campbell, Harry; Hoehne, Birgit; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; McCarthy, Mark; Peltonen-Palotie, Leena; Aulchenko, Yurii; Visscher, Peter M; Ripatti, Samuli; Janssens, A Cecile J W; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2011-07-01

    Serum concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TGs) and total cholesterol (TC) are important heritable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of circulating lipid levels have identified numerous loci, a substantial portion of the heritability of these traits remains unexplained. Evidence of unexplained genetic variance can be detected by combining multiple independent markers into additive genetic risk scores. Such polygenic scores, constructed using results from the ENGAGE Consortium GWAS on serum lipids, were applied to predict lipid levels in an independent population-based study, the Rotterdam Study-II (RS-II). We additionally tested for evidence of a shared genetic basis for different lipid phenotypes. Finally, the polygenic score approach was used to identify an alternative genome-wide significance threshold before pathway analysis and those results were compared with those based on the classical genome-wide significance threshold. Our study provides evidence suggesting that many loci influencing circulating lipid levels remain undiscovered. Cross-prediction models suggested a small overlap between the polygenic backgrounds involved in determining LDL-C, HDL-C and TG levels. Pathway analysis utilizing the best polygenic score for TC uncovered extra information compared with using only genome-wide significant loci. These results suggest that the genetic architecture of circulating lipids involves a number of undiscovered variants with very small effects, and that increasing GWAS sample sizes will enable the identification of novel variants that regulate lipid levels.

  8. In vivo intrabursal administration of bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate enhances vascular integrity in a rat model of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Mariana; Pascuali, Natalia; Scotti, Leopoldina; Irusta, Griselda; Bas, Diana; May, María; Tesone, Marta; Abramovich, Dalhia; Parborell, Fernanda

    2017-06-01

    Can the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) act as an endothelial barrier-enhancing molecule and, in turn, restore the vascular integrity and homoeostasis in a rat model of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). In vivo administration of S1P may prevent the early onset of OHSS and decrease its severity. Although advances in the prediction and treatment of OHSS have been made, complete prevention has not been possible yet. S1P in follicular fluid from women at risk of developing OHSS are lower in comparison from women who are not at such risk and administration of S1P in an OHSS rat model decreases ovarian capillary permeability. We used an animal model that develops OHSS in immature Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: the control group, which was injected with 10 IU of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG), and 10 IU of hCG 48 h later; the OHSS group, which was injected with excessive doses of PMSG (50 IU/day) for four consecutive days, followed by hCG; and the OHSS + S1P group, which was injected with the same doses of PMSG and hCG as the OHSS group and then treated with 5 μl S1P (1 mM) under the bursa of both ovaries, whereas the other groups of animals received the S1P vehicle. Rats were killed by decapitation 48 h after the hCG injection for ovary, endometrium and blood collection. The ovaries were weighed and then used for subsequent assays, while the serum was used for hormone assays. One of the ovaries from each rat (n = 6) was used for Western immunoblot and the other for immunohistochemical analysis. Statistical comparisons between groups were carried out. S1P administration reduced the ovarian weight (P < 0.05), and decreased the concentration of serum progesterone in the OHSS group compared to the OHSS group without treatment (P < 0.001). The percentage of antral follicles in the OHSS group was lower than that in the control group. S1P increased the percentage of antral follicles (P < 0.05) and

  9. Effects of chlorpromazine hydrochloride on bile salt synthesis, bile formation and biliary lipid secretion in the rhesus monkey: a model for chlorpromazine-induced cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, E; Small, D M; Carey, M C

    1979-02-01

    We studied the acute effects of intravenous infusions of chlorpromazine hydrochloride on bile salt synthesis, bile formation and biliary lipid secretion in the alert female Rhesus monkey prepared with a total biliary fistula and in a steady bile salt secretory state. In twelve studies (three animals), five doses of radiolabelled chlorpromazine hydrochloride (1-10 mg identical to 2.8-28 mumol/kg) were infused intravenously for 1 h in random order. Cholestasis was induced within minutes in all experiments. The radiolabel appeared rapidly in bile, with similar recoveries in bile and urine and a 90% total cumulative output in 4 days. Both bile flow, bile salt and other biliary lipid outputs were inhibited in a dose related and reversible manner. The apparent bile salt independent bile flow was consistently abolished, and a prompt return to basal values occurred when biliary concentration of the drug and metabolities fell below 1-2 mM. When chlorpromazine hydrochloride was infused at three doses (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg identical to 7-28 mumol/kg) during constant intravenous infusion of 14C sodium taurocholate (300 mumol/h), bile flow, total bile salt output and 14C taurocholate output decreased within minutes. This was accompanied by a progressive rise in the serum 14C taurocholate concentration. After 90 min the taurocholate specific activity in bile increased significantly indicating that bile salt synthesis was inhibited. Secretion of retained bile salts and reversal of inhibition of bile salt synthesis occurred with time: the course of both events was correlated with the dose of the drug. Thus, in monkeys, chlorpromazine hydrochloride induces reversible, dose related cholestasis suppression of the bile salt dependent and independent flow, inhibition of bile salt synthesis