WorldWideScience

Sample records for corneum membrane domains

  1. Direct visualization of lipid domains in human skin stratum corneum's lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Norlen, Lars; Bagatolli, Luis

    2007-01-01

    ; and iii), whether pH has a direct effect on the lipid matrix phase behavior. In this work the lateral structure of membranes composed of lipids extracted from human skin stratum corneum was studied in a broad temperature range (10 degrees C-90 degrees C) using different techniques such as differential......The main function of skin is to serve as a physical barrier between the body and the environment. This barrier capacity is in turn a function of the physical state and structural organization of the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix. This lipid matrix is essentially composed of very long...... scanning calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and two-photon excitation and laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. Here we show that hydrated bilayers of human skin stratum corneum lipids express a giant sponge-like morphology with dimensions corresponding to the global three...

  2. Proposed human stratum corneum water domain in chemical absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hanjiang; Jung, Eui-Chang; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Compounds with varying physical and chemical properties may have different affinities to the stratum corneum (SC) and/or its intercellular lipids, keratin protein, and possible water domains. To better understand the mechanism of percutaneous absorption, we utilized 21 carbon-14 labeled chemicals, with wide hydrophilicity (log P = -0.05 to 6.17), and quantified their absorption/adsorption properties for a short incubation time (15 min) with regards to intact SC membrane, delipidized SC membrane and SC lipid. A facile method was developed for SC/lipid absorption, providing a more equivalent procedure and comparable data. SC lipid absorption of chemical solutes positively correlated with the octanol/water partition coefficient (log P). Differences between the percent dose of chemical absorption to intact SC and the total percent dose contributed by the protein and lipid domains suggest the possibility and significance of a water domain. Absorption rate experiments showed a longer lag time for intact SC than for delipidized SC or SC lipid, suggesting that the water domain may delay chemical binding to protein and lipid domains, and may be a factor in the resistance of many chemicals to current decontamination methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The physics of stratum corneum lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Chinmay; Olmsted, Peter D

    2016-07-28

    The stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of skin, comprises rigid corneocytes (keratin-filled dead cells) in a specialized lipid matrix. The continuous lipid matrix provides the main barrier against uncontrolled water loss and invasion of external pathogens. Unlike all other biological lipid membranes (such as intracellular organelles and plasma membranes), molecules in the SC lipid matrix show small hydrophilic groups and large variability in the length of the alkyl tails and in the numbers and positions of groups that are capable of forming hydrogen bonds. Molecular simulations provide a route for systematically probing the effects of each of these differences separately. In this article, we present the results from atomistic molecular dynamics of selected lipid bilayers and multi-layers to probe the effect of these polydispersities. We address the nature of the tail packing in the gel-like phase, the hydrogen bond network among head groups, the bending moduli expected for leaflets comprising SC lipids and the conformation of very long ceramide lipids in multi-bilayer lipid assemblies.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'.

  4. Chemical enhancer solubility in human stratum corneum lipids and enhancer mechanism of action on stratum corneum lipid domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sarah A; Li, S Kevin

    2010-01-04

    Previously, chemical enhancer-induced permeation enhancement on human stratum corneum (SC) lipoidal pathway at enhancer thermodynamic activities approaching unity in the absence of cosolvents (defined as Emax) was determined and hypothesized to be related to the enhancer solubilities in the SC lipid domain. The objectives of the present study were to (a) quantify enhancer uptake into SC lipid domain at saturation, (b) elucidate enhancer mechanism(s) of action, and (c) study the SC lipid phase behavior at Emax. It was concluded that direct quantification of enhancer uptake into SC lipid domain using intact SC was complicated. Therefore a liposomal model of extracted human SC lipids was used. In the liposome study, enhancer uptake into extracted human SC lipid liposomes (EHSCLL) was shown to correlate with Emax. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to evaluate lipid phase alterations in enhancer-treated intact SC. IR spectra demonstrated an increase in the lipid domain fluidity and DSC thermograms indicated a decrease in the phase transition temperature with increasing Emax. These results suggest that the enhancer mechanism of action is through enhancer intercalation into SC intercellular lipids and subsequent lipid lamellae fluidization related to enhancer lipid concentration.

  5. Delivery of Timolol through Artificial Membranes and Pig Stratum Corneum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Rolevink, Hendrikus H.M.; Koops, G.H.

    2003-01-01

    The in vitro passive and iontophoretic (applied current density: 0.5 mA/cm2) timolol (TM) permeability from a liquid solution through pig stratum corneum (SC) is found to be 0.9 ± 0.5 × 10-6 and 3.9 ± 0.9 × 10-6 cm/s, respectively. The in vitro iontophoretic TM delivery through the combination of

  6. Membrane binding domains

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, James H.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic signaling and trafficking proteins are rich in modular domains that bind cell membranes. These binding events are tightly regulated in space and time. The structural, biochemical, and biophysical mechanisms for targeting have been worked out for many families of membrane binding domains. This review takes a comparative view of seven major classes of membrane binding domains, the C1, C2, PH, FYVE, PX, ENTH, and BAR domains. These domains use a combination of specific headgroup inter...

  7. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies of lipid domain formation in normal and ceramide deficient stratum corneum lipid models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorcea, Mihaela; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Moore, David J; Lane, Majella E

    2012-10-01

    The current work describes thermotropic and kinetic Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of lipid dynamics and domain formation in normal and ceramide (CER) deficient lipid samples designed as simple models of the stratum corneum (SC). For the first time, this work focuses on the time dependence of lipid reorganization and domain formation in CER deficient models. By utilizing deuterated fatty acid (FA) and simultaneously monitoring the methylene vibrational modes of both CER and FA chains these experiments follow the time evolution of lipid organization in these SC lipid models following an external stress. Kinetic and thermotropic experiments demonstrate differences in both CER and FA chain fluidity and ordered domain formation with decreased levels of CER. In the CER deficient model, the formation of CER orthorhombic domains is retarded compared to the normal model. Furthermore, there is little evidence of hexongally packed (or mixed) FA domains in the CER deficient model compared to the models of normal SC. These data demonstrate that barrier lipid organization, in terms of ceramide domain formation, is altered in the ceramide deficient model. This work highlights the successful development of an experimental methodology to study time dependent changes in lipid biophysics in simple SC model membranes and suggests this approach will prove useful for understanding some of the biophysical changes that underlie impaired physiological barrier function in diseased skin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular dynamics and partitioning of di-tert-butyl nitroxide in stratum corneum membranes: effect of terpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargos, Heverton Silva; Silva, Adolfo Henrique Moraes; Anjos, Jorge Luiz Vieira; Alonso, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    In this work, we have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the small spin label di-tert-butyl nitroxide (DTBN), which partitions the aqueous and hydrocarbon phases, to study the interaction of the terpenes alpha-terpineol, 1,8-cineole, L(-)-carvone and (+)-limonene with the uppermost skin layer, the stratum corneum, and the membrane models of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC). The EPR spectra indicated that the terpenes increase both the partition coefficient and the rotational correlation time of the spin labels in the stratum corneum membranes, whereas similar effects were observed in the DMPC and DPPC bilayers only at temperatures below the liquid-crystalline phase. The EPR parameter associated to probe polarity inside the membranes showed thermotropically induced changes, suggesting relocations of spin probe, which were dependent on the membrane phases. While the DMPC and DPPC bilayers showed abrupt changes in the partitioning and rotational correlation time parameters in the phase transitions, the SC membranes were characterized by slight changes in the total range of measured temperatures, presenting the greatest changes or membranes reorganizations in the temperature range of approximately 50 to approximately 74 degrees C. The results suggest that terpenes act as spacers, weakening the hydrogen-bonded network at the polar interface and thus fluidizing the stratum corneum lipids.

  9. Comparison of lipid membrane-water partitioning with various organic solvent-water partitions of neutral species and ionic species: Uniqueness of cerasome as a model for the stratum corneum in partition processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keda; Fahr, Alfred; Abraham, Michael H; Acree, William E; Tobin, Desmond J; Liu, Xiangli

    2015-10-15

    Lipid membrane-water partitions (e.g., immobilized artificial membrane systems where the lipid membrane is a neutral phospholipid monolayer bound to gel beads) were compared to various organic solvent-water partitions using linear free energy relationships. To this end, we also measured the retention factors of 36 compounds (including neutral and ionic species) from water to liposomes made up of 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine and 3-sn-phosphatidyl-l-serine (80:20, mol/mol), employing liposome electrokinetic chromatography in this work. The results show that lipid membranes exhibit a considerably different chemical environment from those of organic solvents. For both neutral species and ionic species, partitions into the more polar hydroxylic solvents are chemically closer to partition into the lipid membrane as compared to partitions into the less polar hydroxylic solvents and into aprotic solvents. This means that solutes partition into the polar parts of lipid membranes, regardless of whether they are charged or not. In addition, cerasome (i.e., liposome composed mainly of stratum corneum lipids) was compared with regular phospholipid liposomes as a possible model for human stratum corneum in partitions. It was found that the cerasome-water partition exhibits a better chemical similarity to skin permeation. This is probably due to the unique structures of ceramides that occur in cerasome and in the stratum corneum lipid domain. We further show that membranes in membrane-water partitions exhibit very different properties.

  10. Effect of ceramide acyl chain length on skin permeability and thermotropic phase behavior of model stratum corneum lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janůšová, Barbora; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Lorenc, Petr; Vavrysová, Helena; Palát, Karel; Hrabálek, Alexandr; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2011-03-01

    Stratum corneum ceramides play an essential role in the barrier properties of skin. However, their structure-activity relationships are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of acyl chain length in the non-hydroxy acyl sphingosine type (NS) ceramides on the skin permeability and their thermotropic phase behavior. Neither the long- to medium-chain ceramides (8-24 C) nor free sphingosine produced any changes of the skin barrier function. In contrast, the short-chain ceramides decreased skin electrical impedance and increased skin permeability for two marker drugs, theophylline and indomethacin, with maxima in the 4-6C acyl ceramides. The thermotropic phase behavior of pure ceramides and model stratum corneum lipid membranes composed of ceramide/lignoceric acid/cholesterol/cholesterol sulfate was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy. Differences in thermotropic phase behavior of these lipids were found: those ceramides that had the greatest impact on the skin barrier properties displayed the lowest phase transitions and formed the least dense model stratum corneum lipid membranes at 32°C. In conclusion, the long hydrophobic chains in the NS-type ceramides are essential for maintaining the skin barrier function. However, this ability is not shared by their short-chain counterparts despite their having the same polar head structure and hydrogen bonding ability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Stratum corneum model membranes : molecular organization in relation to skin barrier function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Daniël

    2011-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC), the thin uppermost layer of the skin, consists of dead flattened skin cells (corneocytes) embedded in a lipid matrix. The lipid matrix is considered to play a crucial role in the skin barrier function. It consists of ceramides (CER), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids

  12. Effects of sphingomyelin/ceramide ratio on the permeability and microstructure of model stratum corneum lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullmannová, Petra; Staňková, Klára; Pospíšilová, Markéta; Skolová, Barbora; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2014-08-01

    The conversion of sphingomyelin (SM) to a ceramide (Cer) by acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) is an important event in skin barrier development. A deficiency in aSMase in diseases such as Niemann-Pick disease and atopic dermatitis coincides with impaired skin barrier recovery after disruption. We studied how an increased SM/Cer ratio influences the barrier function and microstructure of model stratum corneum (SC) lipid membranes. In the membranes composed of isolated human SC Cer (hCer)/cholesterol/free fatty acids/cholesteryl sulfate, partial or full replacement of hCer by SM increased water loss. Partial replacement of 25% and 50% of hCer by SM also increased the membrane permeability to theophylline and alternating electric current, while a higher SM content either did not alter or even decreased the membrane permeability. In contrast, in a simple membrane model with only one type of Cer (nonhydroxyacyl sphingosine, CerNS), an increased SM/Cer ratio provided a similar or better barrier against the permeation of various markers. X-ray powder diffraction revealed that the replacement of hCer by SM interferes with the formation of the long periodicity lamellar phase with a repeat distance of d=12.7nm. Our results suggest that SM-to-Cer processing in the human epidermis is essential for preventing excessive water loss, while the permeability barrier to exogenous compounds is less sensitive to the presence of sphingomyelin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Permeability and microstructure of model stratum corneum lipid membranes containing ceramides with long (C16) and very long (C24) acyl chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullmannová, Petra; Pavlíková, Ludmila; Kováčik, Andrej; Sochorová, Michaela; Školová, Barbora; Slepička, Petr; Maixner, Jaroslav; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2017-05-01

    The Stratum corneum (SC) prevents water loss from the body and absorption of chemicals. SC intercellular spaces contain ceramides (Cer), free fatty acids (FFA), cholesterol (Chol) and cholesteryl sulfate (CholS). Cer with "very long" acyl chains (for example, N-lignoceroyl-sphingosine, CerNS24) are important for skin barrier function, whereas increased levels of "long" acyl Cer (for example, N-palmitoyl-sphingosine, CerNS16) occur in patients suffering from atopic eczema or psoriasis. We studied the impact of the replacement of CerNS24 by CerNS16 on the barrier properties and microstructure of model SC lipid membranes composed of Cer/FFA/Chol/CholS. Membranes containing the long CerNS16 were significantly more permeable to water (by 38-53%), theophylline (by 50-55%) and indomethacin (by 83-120%) than those containing the very long CerNS24 (either with lignoceric acid or a mixture of long to very long chain FFA). Langmuir monolayers with CerNS24 were more condensed than with CerNS16 and atomic force microscopy showed differences in domain formation. X-ray powder diffraction revealed that CerNS24-based membranes formed one lamellar phase and separated Chol, whereas the CerNS16-based membranes formed up to three phases and Chol. These results suggest that replacement of CerNS24 by CerNS16 has a direct negative impact on membrane structure and permeability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Membrane domains and polarized trafficking of sphingolipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, O; Slimane, TA; Hoekstra, D

    The plasma membrane of polarized cells consists of distinct domains, the apical and basolateral membrane that are characterized by a distinct lipid and protein content. Apical protein transport is largely mediated by (glyco)sphingolipid-cholesterol enriched membrane microdomains, so called rafts. In

  15. Polyunsaturated Lipids Regulate Membrane Domain Stability by Tuning Membrane Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levental, Kandice R; Lorent, Joseph H; Lin, Xubo; Skinkle, Allison D; Surma, Michal A; Stockenbojer, Emily A; Gorfe, Alemayehu A; Levental, Ilya

    2016-04-26

    The plasma membrane (PM) serves as the functional interface between a cell and its environment, hosting extracellular signal transduction and nutrient transport among a variety of other processes. To support this extensive functionality, PMs are organized into lateral domains, including ordered, lipid-driven assemblies termed lipid rafts. Although the general requirements for ordered domain formation are well established, how these domains are regulated by cell-endogenous mechanisms or exogenous perturbations has not been widely addressed. In this context, an intriguing possibility is that dietary fats can incorporate into membrane lipids to regulate the properties and physiology of raft domains. Here, we investigate the effects of polyunsaturated fats on the organization of membrane domains across a spectrum of membrane models, including computer simulations, synthetic lipid membranes, and intact PMs isolated from mammalian cells. We observe that the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid is robustly incorporated into membrane lipids, and this incorporation leads to significant remodeling of the PM lipidome. Across model systems, docosahexaenoic acid-containing lipids enhance the stability of ordered raft domains by increasing the order difference between them and coexisting nonraft domains. The relationship between interdomain order disparity and the stability of phase separation holds for a spectrum of different perturbations, including manipulation of cholesterol levels and high concentrations of exogenous amphiphiles, suggesting it as a general feature of the organization of biological membranes. These results demonstrate that polyunsaturated fats affect the composition and organization of biological membranes, suggesting a potential mechanism for the extensive effects of dietary fat on health and disease.

  16. Stabilizing membrane domains antagonizes anesthesia

    CERN Document Server

    Machta, Benjamin B; Nouri, Mariam; McCarthy, Nicola L C; Gray, Erin M; Miller, Ann L; Brooks, Nicholas J; Veatch, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Diverse molecules induce general anesthesia with potency strongly correlated both with their hydrophobicity and their effects on certain ion channels. We recently observed that several anesthetics inhibit heterogeneity in plasma membrane derived vesicles by lowering the critical temperature ($T_c$) for phase separation. Here we exploit conditions that stabilize membrane heterogeneity to test the correlation between the anesthetic potency of n-alcohols and effects on $T_c$. First we show that hexadecanol acts oppositely to anesthetics on membrane mixing and antagonizes ethanol induced anesthesia in a tadpole behavioral assay. Second, we show that two previously described `intoxication reversers' raise $T_c$ in vesicles and counter ethanol's effects in vesicles, mimicking the findings of previous electrophysiological measurements. Third, we find that hydrostatic pressure, long known to reverse anesthesia, also raises $T_c$ in vesicles with a magnitude that counters the effect of an anesthetic at relevant concen...

  17. Effect of the ω-acylceramides on the lipid organization of stratum corneum model membranes evaluated by X-ray diffraction and FTIR studies (Part I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa Neto, Diogenes; Gooris, Gert; Bouwstra, Joke

    2011-03-01

    The lipid organization in the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, is important for the skin barrier function. The stratum corneum lipids are composed of ceramides (CER), free fatty acids (FFA) and cholesterol (CHOL). In the present study Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques were utilized to evaluate the effect of three C18 fatty acid esterified ω-acylceramides (CER EOS) on the lipid organization of stratum corneum model membranes. FTIR spectra (scissoring and rocking bands) showed as a function of temperature significant line-shape changes for both components assigned to the orthorhombic phase. Second-derivative analyzes revealed a significant decrease in the interchain coupling strength (Δν values) for the samples formed by CER EOS with the linoleate (CER EOS-L) and oleate (CER EOS-O) moiety around 28.5°C. However, only a gradual decrease in the Δν values was noticed for the mixture formed with CER EOS with the stearate moiety (CER EOS-S) over the whole temperature range. In the absence of CER EOS the decrease started already at 25.5°C, demonstrating that CER EOS stabilized the orthorhombic lattice. This stabilization was most pronounced for the CER EOS-S. Spectral fittings allowed to evaluate the orientation changes of the skeletal plane within the orthorhombic unit cell (θ values) for a given temperature range. From the best-fit parameters (peak area values), a decrease in the orthorhombic phase contribution to the scissoring band was also monitored as a function of the temperature. SAXS studies showed the coexistence of two lamellar phases with a periodicity of ∼5.5 nm (short periodicity phase, SPP) and ∼12 nm (LPP) in the presence of the CER EOS-L and CER EOS-O. However, no diffraction peaks associated to the LPP were detected for CER EOS-S. While CER EOS-S most efficiently stabilized the orthorhombic phase, CER EOS-L and CER EOS-O promoted the presence of the LPP. Therefore, the

  18. Nanoscale Membrane Domain Formation Driven by Cholesterol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javanainen, Matti; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2017-01-01

    Biological membranes generate specific functions through compartmentalized regions such as cholesterol-enriched membrane nanodomains that host selected proteins. Despite the biological significance of nanodomains, details on their structure remain elusive. They cannot be observed via microscopic...... dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol - the "minimal standard" for nanodomain formation. The simulations reveal how cholesterol drives the formation of fluid cholesterol-rich nanodomains hosting hexagonally packed cholesterol-poor lipid nanoclusters, both of which show registration between the membrane leaflets....... The complex nanodomain substructure forms when cholesterol positions itself in the domain boundary region. Here cholesterol can also readily flip-flop across the membrane. Most importantly, replacing cholesterol with a sterol characterized by a less asymmetric ring region impairs the emergence of nanodomains...

  19. Stochastic single-molecule dynamics of synaptic membrane protein domains

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by single-molecule experiments on synaptic membrane protein domains, we use a stochastic lattice model to study protein reaction and diffusion processes in crowded membranes. We find that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic proteins provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the single-molecule trajectories observed for synaptic proteins, and spatially inhomogeneous protein lifetimes at the cell membrane. Our results suggest that central aspects of the single-molecule and collective dynamics observed for membrane protein domains can be understood in terms of stochastic reaction-diffusion processes at the cell membrane.

  20. Structural alterations of fully hydrated human stratum corneum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charalambopoulou, G.Ch.; Steriotis, Th.A.; Hauss, Th.; Stubos, A.K.; Kanellopoulos, N.K

    2004-07-15

    The diffusional barrier function of skin is associated with the superficial epidermal layer, the stratum corneum, a highly complex biomembrane consisting of a staggered corneocyte arrangement in a lipid lamellar continuum. One of the key elements for stratum corneum barrier function is its hydration state. In the present work, the membrane neutron diffraction method is employed to reveal important stratum corneum structural changes that emanate upon water uptake. Increasing stratum corneum water content was observed to lead reversibly to the progressive disruption of the highly ordered lipid configuration and the distortion of the system's barrier functio000.

  1. Localization of methyl-branched ceramide [EOS] species within the long-periodicity phase in stratum corneum lipid model membranes: A neutron diffraction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Adina; Sonnenberger, Stefan; Dobner, Bodo; Hauß, Thomas; Schroeter, Annett; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2016-11-01

    The outermost layer of the mammalian skin, the stratum corneum (SC), is a very thin structure and realizes simultaneously the main barrier properties. The penetration barrier for xenobiotica is mostly represented by a complex lipid matrix. There is great interest in the subject of getting information about the arrangement of the lipids, which are mainly ceramides (CER), free fatty acids (FFA) and cholesterol (CHOL). SC lipid model membranes containing synthetically derived lipids in a non-physiological ratio were investigated. To compare the study to a former experiment, a methyl-branched ceramide [EOS] species in presence of the ultra-long chain CER[AP], CHOL and behenic acid (23/10/33/33, wt%) was applied. The membrane structure was studied using the very versatile technique of neutron diffraction. We were able to identify a long-periodicity phase (LPP) with a size of 114Å or 118Å with CER[EOS]-br in a ratio of >60wt% of the ceramides. Furthermore, we figured out two additional coexisting short-periodicity phases (SPP) with repeat distances of 48Å and 45Å, respectively. Partial deuterations of CER[EOS]-br and CER[AP] enabled the localization of the molecules within the multiphase system. CER[EOS]-d3 was present in the LPP, but absent in both SPP. CER[AP]-d3 was determined in both short phases but not localized within the LPP. Besides, we revealed influences of humidity and time with respect to the long-periodicity phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Focus on Membrane Differentiation and Membrane Domains in the Prokaryotic Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan; van Bezouwen, Laura S.; Bolhuis, Henk; Folea, I. Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    A summary is presented of membrane differentiation in the prokaryotic cell, with an emphasis on the organization of proteins in the plasma/cell membrane. Many species belonging to the Eubacteria and Archaea have special membrane domains and/or membrane proliferation, which are vital for different cellular processes. Typical membrane domains are found in bacteria where a specific membrane protein is abundantly expressed. Lipid rafts form another example. Despite the rareness of conventional or...

  3. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  4. Stratum Corneum Barrier Lipids in Cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, V; Halkier-Sørensen, L; Rasmussen, G

    2000-01-01

    emerged. When the corneocyte reaches the transitional stage to the stratum corneum, the Odland bodies accumulate near the cell membrane and discharge their contents of lipid and enzymes. The lipids are reorganized into multiple long sheets of lamellar structures that embrace the keratinized corneocytes...

  5. Transient domain formation in membrane-bound organelles undergoing maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Sens, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    The membrane components of cellular organelles have been shown to segregate into domains as the result of biochemical maturation. We propose that the dynamical competition between maturation and lateral segregation of membrane components regulates domain formation. We study a two-component fluid membrane in which enzymatic reaction irreversibly converts one component into another and phase separation triggers the formation of transient membrane domains. The maximum domain size is shown to depend on the maturation rate as a power law similar to the one observed for domain growth with time in the absence of maturation, despite this time dependence not being verified in the case of irreversible maturation. This control of domain size by enzymatic activity could play a critical role in regulating exchange between organelles or within compartmentalized organelles such as the Golgi apparatus.

  6. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  7. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lenoir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH and Tec homology (TH domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  8. Bilayer thickness mismatch controls domain size in biomimetic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Petruzielo, Robin S.; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kučerka, Norbert; Standaert, Robert F.; Feigenson, Gerald W.; Katsara, John

    2013-03-01

    In order to promote functionality, cells may alter the spatial organization of membrane lipids and proteins, including separation of liquid phases into distinct domains. In model membranes, domain size and morphology depend strongly on composition and temperature, but the physicochemical mechanisms controlling them are poorly understood. Theoretical work suggests a role for interfacial energy at domain boundaries, which may be driven in part by thickness mismatch between a domain and its surrounding bilayer. However, no direct evidence linking thickness mismatch to domain size in free-standing bilayers has been reported. We describe the use of Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) to detect domains in simplified lipid-only models that mimic the composition of plasma membrane. We find that domain size is controlled by the degree of acyl chain unsaturation of low-melting temperature lipids, and that this size transition is correlated to changes in the thickness mismatch between coexisting liquid phases.

  9. Focus on Membrane Differentiation and Membrane Domains in the Prokaryotic Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, E.J.; Scheffers, D.-J.; van Bezouwen, L.S.; Bolhuis, H.; Folea, I.M.

    2013-01-01

    A summary is presented of membrane differentiation in the prokaryotic cell, with an emphasis on the organization of proteins in the plasma/cell membrane. Many species belonging to the Eubacteria and Archaea have special membrane domains and/or membrane proliferation, which are vital for different

  10. Superdiffusive motion of membrane-targeting C2 domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Grace; Nepal, Kanti; Schroder, Bryce W.; Peersen, Olve B.; Krapf, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Membrane-targeting domains play crucial roles in the recruitment of signalling molecules to the plasma membrane. For most peripheral proteins, the protein-to-membrane interaction is transient. After proteins dissociate from the membrane they have been observed to rebind following brief excursions in the bulk solution. Such membrane hops can have broad implications for the efficiency of reactions on membranes. We study the diffusion of membrane-targeting C2 domains using single-molecule tracking in supported lipid bilayers. The ensemble-averaged mean square displacement (MSD) exhibits superdiffusive behaviour. However, traditional time-averaged MSD analysis of individual trajectories remains linear and does not reveal superdiffusion. Our observations are explained in terms of bulk excursions that introduce jumps with a heavy-tail distribution. These hopping events allow proteins to explore large areas in a short time. The experimental results are shown to be consistent with analytical models of bulk-mediated diffusion and numerical simulations.

  11. Membrane shape instabilities induced by BAR domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    Membrane curvature has developed into a forefront of membrane biophysics. Numerous proteins involved in membrane curvature sensing and membrane curvature generation have recently been discovered, including proteins containing the crescent-shaped BAR domain as membrane binding and shaping module. Accordingly, the structure determination of these proteins and their multimeric complexes is increasingly well-understood. Substantially less understood, however, are thermodynamic and kinetic aspects and the detailed mechanisms of how these proteins interact with membranes in a curvature-dependent manner. New experimental approaches need to be combined with established techniques to be able to fill in these missing details. Here we use model membrane systems in combination with a variety of biophysical techniques to characterize mechanistic aspects of BAR domain protein function. This includes a characterization of membrane curvature sensing and membrane generation. We also establish kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of BAR protein dimerization in solution, and investigate kinetic aspects of membrane binding. We present two new approaches to investigate membrane shape instabilities and demonstrate that membrane shape instabilities can be controlled by protein binding and lateral membrane tension. This work is supported through NIH grant GM-097552 and NSF grant CBET-1053857.

  12. Local Palmitoylation Cycles and Specialized Membrane Domain Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukata, Yuko; Murakami, Tatsuro; Yokoi, Norihiko

    2016-01-01

    Palmitoylation is an evolutionally conserved lipid modification of proteins. Dynamic and reversible palmitoylation controls a wide range of molecular and cellular properties of proteins including the protein trafficking, protein function, protein stability, and specialized membrane domain organiz...

  13. Nanoviscosity Measurements Revealing Domain Formation in Biomimetic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Imad Younus; Mechler, Adam

    2017-02-07

    Partitioning of lipid molecules in biomimetic membranes is a model system for the study of naturally occurring domains, such as rafts, in biological membranes. The existence of nanometer scale membrane domains in binary lipid mixtures has been shown with microscopy methods; however, the nature of these domains has not been established unequivocally. A common notion is to ascribe domain separation to thermodynamic phase equilibria. However, characterizing thermodynamic phases of single bilayer membranes has not been possible due to their extreme dimensions: the size of the domains falls to the order of tens to hundreds of nanometers whereas the membrane thickness is only a few nanometers. Here, we present direct measurements of phase transitions in single bilayers of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) phospholipid mixtures using quartz crystal microbalance-based nanoviscosity measurements. Coexisting thermodynamic phases have been successfully identified, and a phase diagram was constructed for the single bilayer binary lipid system. It was demonstrated that domain separation only takes place in planar membranes, and thus, it is absent in liposomes and not detectable in calorimetric measurements on liposome suspensions. On the basis of energetic analysis, the main transition was identified as the breaking of van der Waals interactions between the acyl chains.

  14. Macroscopic domain formation in the platelet plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bali, Rachna; Savino, Laura; Ramirez, Diego A.;

    2009-01-01

    There has been ample debate on whether cell membranes can present macroscopic lipid domains as predicted by three-component phase diagrams obtained by fluorescence microscopy. Several groups have argued that membrane proteins and interactions with the cytoskeleton inhibit the formation of large d...

  15. Hepatitis C virus NS4B carboxy terminal domain is a membrane binding domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaan Willy JM

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV induces membrane rearrangements during replication. All HCV proteins are associated to membranes, pointing out the importance of membranes for HCV. Non structural protein 4B (NS4B has been reported to induce cellular membrane alterations like the membranous web. Four transmembrane segments in the middle of the protein anchor NS4B to membranes. An amphipatic helix at the amino-terminus attaches to membranes as well. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD of NS4B is highly conserved in Hepaciviruses, though its function remains unknown. Results A cytosolic localization is predicted for the NS4B-CTD. However, using membrane floatation assays and immunofluorescence, we now show targeting of the NS4B-CTD to membranes. Furthermore, a profile-profile search, with an HCV NS4B-CTD multiple sequence alignment, indicates sequence similarity to the membrane binding domain of prokaryotic D-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH. The crystal structure of E. coli d-LDH suggests that the region similar to NS4B-CTD is located in the membrane binding domain (MBD of d-LDH, implying analogy in membrane association. Targeting of d-LDH to membranes occurs via electrostatic interactions of positive residues on the outside of the protein with negative head groups of lipids. To verify that anchorage of d-LDH MBD and NS4B-CTD is analogous, NS4B-CTD mutants were designed to disrupt these electrostatic interactions. Membrane association was confirmed by swopping the membrane contacting helix of d-LDH with the corresponding domain of the 4B-CTD. Furthermore, the functionality of these residues was tested in the HCV replicon system. Conclusion Together these data show that NS4B-CTD is associated to membranes, similar to the prokaryotic d-LDH MBD, and is important for replication.

  16. Hepatitis C virus NS4B carboxy terminal domain is a membrane binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liefhebber, Jolanda M P; Brandt, Bernd W; Broer, Rene; Spaan, Willy J M; van Leeuwen, Hans C

    2009-05-25

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces membrane rearrangements during replication. All HCV proteins are associated to membranes, pointing out the importance of membranes for HCV. Non structural protein 4B (NS4B) has been reported to induce cellular membrane alterations like the membranous web. Four transmembrane segments in the middle of the protein anchor NS4B to membranes. An amphipatic helix at the amino-terminus attaches to membranes as well. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of NS4B is highly conserved in Hepaciviruses, though its function remains unknown. A cytosolic localization is predicted for the NS4B-CTD. However, using membrane floatation assays and immunofluorescence, we now show targeting of the NS4B-CTD to membranes. Furthermore, a profile-profile search, with an HCV NS4B-CTD multiple sequence alignment, indicates sequence similarity to the membrane binding domain of prokaryotic D-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH). The crystal structure of E. coli d-LDH suggests that the region similar to NS4B-CTD is located in the membrane binding domain (MBD) of d-LDH, implying analogy in membrane association. Targeting of d-LDH to membranes occurs via electrostatic interactions of positive residues on the outside of the protein with negative head groups of lipids. To verify that anchorage of d-LDH MBD and NS4B-CTD is analogous, NS4B-CTD mutants were designed to disrupt these electrostatic interactions. Membrane association was confirmed by swopping the membrane contacting helix of d-LDH with the corresponding domain of the 4B-CTD. Furthermore, the functionality of these residues was tested in the HCV replicon system. Together these data show that NS4B-CTD is associated to membranes, similar to the prokaryotic d-LDH MBD, and is important for replication.

  17. Hydrophobic mismatch triggering texture defects in membrane gel domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, J.; Brewer, J.R.; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2013-01-01

    The orientational texture of gel-phase lipid bilayers is a phenomenon that can structure membrane domains. Using two-photon polarized fluorescence microscopy and image analysis, we map the lateral variation of the lipid orientation (the texture) in single domains. With this method, we uncover...

  18. The Observation of Highly Ordered Domains in Membranes with Cholesterol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Clare L [McMaster University; Marquardt, Drew [Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada; Dies, Hannah [McMaster University; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Yamani, Zahra [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, National Research Council, Chalk River Laboratorie; Harroun, Thad [Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Shi, A-C [McMaster University; Rheinstadter, Maikel C [McMaster University

    2013-01-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano- or mesoscopic structures in the exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane, and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes. Using neutron diffraction and computer modelling, we present evidence for the existence of highly ordered lipid domains in the cholesterol-rich (32.5 mol%) liquid-ordered (lo) phase of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes. The liquid ordered phase in one-component lipid membranes has previously been thought to be a homogeneous phase. The presence of highly ordered lipid domains embedded in a disordered lipid matrix implies non-uniform distribution of cholesterol between the two phases. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with recent computer simulations of DPPC/cholesterol complexes [Meinhardt, Vink and Schmid (2013). Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(12): 4476 4481], which reported the existence of nanometer size lo domains in a liquid disordered lipid environment.

  19. Focus on membrane differentiation and membrane domains in the prokaryotic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekema, Egbert J; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan; van Bezouwen, Laura S; Bolhuis, Henk; Folea, I Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    A summary is presented of membrane differentiation in the prokaryotic cell, with an emphasis on the organization of proteins in the plasma/cell membrane. Many species belonging to the Eubacteria and Archaea have special membrane domains and/or membrane proliferation, which are vital for different cellular processes. Typical membrane domains are found in bacteria where a specific membrane protein is abundantly expressed. Lipid rafts form another example. Despite the rareness of conventional organelles as found in eukaryotes, some bacteria are known to have an intricate internal cell membrane organization. Membrane proliferation can be divided into curvature and invaginations which can lead to internal compartmentalization. This study discusses some of the clearest examples of bacteria with such domains and internal membranes. The need for membrane specialization is highest among the heterogeneous group of bacteria which harvest light energy, such as photosynthetic bacteria and halophilic archaea. Most of the highly specialized membranes and domains, such as the purple membrane, chromatophore and chlorosome, are found in these autotrophic organisms. Otherwise the need for membrane differentiation is lower and variable, except for those structures involved in cell division. Microscopy techniques have given essential insight into bacterial membrane morphology. As microscopy will further contribute to the unraveling of membrane organization in the years to come, past and present technology in electron microscopy and light microscopy is discussed. Electron microscopy was the first to unravel bacterial morphology because it can directly visualize membranes with inserted proteins, which no other technique can do. Electron microscopy techniques developed in the 1950s and perfected in the following decades involve the thin sectioning and freeze fractioning of cells. Several studies from the golden age of these techniques show amazing examples of cell membrane morphology

  20. Partitioning of Lipids at Domain Boundaries in Model Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, Lars V.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2010-01-01

    Line-active molecules ("linactants") that bind to the boundary interface between different fluid lipid domains in membranes have a strong potential as regulators of the lateral heterogeneity that is important for many biological processes. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations in combination w

  1. Membrane Domains and Their Relevance to the Organization of Biological Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide a succinct update about research focused on membrane domains, particularly summarizing new information obtained using imaging techniques. This is presented and discussed in the context of the vast information previously reported using classical biophysical...... of lateral heterogeneity in lipid bilayers are discussed, including a synopsis of classical biophysical techniques used to study membrane lateral structure. Later in the chapter the focus shifts to giant vesicles and planar membranes recapitulating information on lipid domains obtained using imaging...

  2. Stratum corneum lipid organization as observed by atomic force, confocal and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlén, L; Plasencia, I; Bagatolli, L

    2008-12-01

    Skin moisturization is largely a function of stratum corneum barrier capacity, which in turn is a function of the physical state and structural organization of the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix [J. Invest. Dermatol.18, 433 (1952); AIChE J. 21, 985 (1975); Acta Derm. Venereol.74, 1 (1994); J. Invest. Dermatol.117, 830 (2001)]. Three unsolved key questions with respect to this lipid matrix' structural organization [Acta Derm. Venereol.74, 1 (1994); J. Invest. Dermatol.117, 830 (2001); J. Invest. Dermatol.118, 897 (2002); J. Invest. Dermatol.118, 899 (2002)] are: i) whether the lipid matrix is constituted by a single-gel phase or by co-existing solid (crystalline or gel) domains, ii) whether a separate fluid (liquid crystalline) phase is present and iii) whether the local pH has a direct effect on the lipid matrix' phase behaviour. Using an array of complementary visual-related biophysical techniques (e.g. atomic force microscopy and confocal/two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy), it was recently shown that reconstituted membranes composed of extracted decontaminated human stratum corneum lipids do not form a fluid phase, but exclusively a single-gel phase that segregates into co-existing microscopic domains below pH 6 [Biophys. J.93, 3142 (2007)]. It was further shown that the role of cholesterol is related to dispersion of ceramide-enriched domains. This effect is counteracted by the presence of free fatty acids, which mix with skin ceramides but not with cholesterol.

  3. Adaptive lipid packing and bioactivity in membrane domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdinc Sezgin

    Full Text Available Lateral compositional and physicochemical heterogeneity is a ubiquitous feature of cellular membranes on various length scales, from molecular assemblies to micrometric domains. Segregated lipid domains of increased local order, referred to as rafts, are believed to be prominent features in eukaryotic plasma membranes; however, their exact nature (i.e. size, lifetime, composition, homogeneity in live cells remains difficult to define. Here we present evidence that both synthetic and natural plasma membranes assume a wide range of lipid packing states with varying levels of molecular order. These states may be adapted and specifically tuned by cells during active cellular processes, as we show for stimulated insulin secretion. Most importantly, these states regulate both the partitioning of molecules between coexisting domains and the bioactivity of their constituent molecules, which we demonstrate for the ligand binding activity of the glycosphingolipid receptor GM1. These results confirm the complexity and flexibility of lipid-mediated membrane organization and reveal mechanisms by which this flexibility could be functionalized by cells.

  4. Designing lipids for selective partitioning into liquid ordered membrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, Noor; Lee, Stacey; Gadok, Avinash K; Busch, David J; Bachand, George D; Hayden, Carl C; Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2015-04-28

    Self-organization of lipid molecules into specific membrane phases is key to the development of hierarchical molecular assemblies that mimic cellular structures. While the packing interaction of the lipid tails should provide the major driving force to direct lipid partitioning to ordered or disordered membrane domains, numerous examples show that the headgroup and spacer play important but undefined roles. We report here the development of several new biotinylated lipids that examine the role of spacer chemistry and structure on membrane phase partitioning. The new lipids were prepared with varying lengths of low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (EGn) spacers to examine how spacer hydrophilicity and length influence their partitioning behavior following binding with FITC-labeled streptavidin in liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) phase coexisting membranes. Partitioning coefficients (Kp Lo/Ld) of the biotinylated lipids were determined using fluorescence measurements in studies with giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Compared against DPPE-biotin, DPPE-cap-biotin, and DSPE-PEG2000-biotin lipids, the new dipalmityl-EGn-biotin lipids exhibited markedly enhanced partitioning into liquid ordered domains, achieving Kp of up to 7.3 with a decaethylene glycol spacer (DP-EG10-biotin). We further demonstrated biological relevance of the lipids with selective partitioning to lipid raft-like domains observed in giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) derived from mammalian cells. Our results found that the spacer group not only plays a pivotal role for designing lipids with phase selectivity but may also influence the structural order of the domain assemblies.

  5. Organized living: formation mechanisms and functions of plasma membrane domains in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E; Christiano, Romain; Walther, Tobias C

    2012-03-01

    Plasma membrane proteins and lipids organize into lateral domains of specific composition. Domain formation is achieved by a combination of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions, membrane-binding protein scaffolds and protein fences. The resulting domains function in membrane protein turnover and homeostasis, as well as in cell signaling. We review the mechanisms generating plasma membrane domains and the functional consequences of this organization, focusing on recent findings from research on the yeast model system.

  6. Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Petruzielo, Robin S [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Drazba, Paul [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Feigenson, Gerald [Cornell University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  7. Deployment of membrane fusion protein domains during fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, J; Mittal, A

    2000-01-01

    It is clear that both viral and intracellular membrane fusion proteins contain a minimal set of domains which must be deployed at the appropriate time during the fusion process. An account of these domains and their functions is given here for the four best-described fusion systems: influenza HA, sendai virus F1, HIV gp120/41 and the neuronal SNARE core composed of synaptobrevin (syn), syntaxin (stx) and the N- and C-termini of SNAP25 (sn25), together with the Ca(2+)binding protein synaptotagmin (syt). Membrane fusion begins with the binding of the virion or vesicle to the target membrane via receptors. The committed step in influenza HA- mediated fusion begins with an aggregate of HAs (at least eight) with some of their HA2 N-termini, a.k.a. fusion peptides, embedded into the viral bilayer (Bentz, 2000 a). The hypothesis presented in Bentz (2000 b) is that the conformational change of HA to the extended coiled coil extracts the fusion peptides from the viral bilayer. When this extraction occurs from the center of the site of restricted lipid flow, it exposes acyl chains and parts of the HA transmembrane domains to the aqueous media, i.e. a hydrophobic defect is formed. This is the 'transition state' of the committed step of fusion. It is stabilized by a 'dam' of HAs, which are inhibited from diffusing away by the rest of the HAs in the aggregate and because that would initially expose more acyl chains to water. Recruitment of lipids from the apposed target membrane can heal this hydrophobic defect, initiating lipid mixing and fusion. The HA transmembrane domains are required to be part of the hydrophobic defect, because the HA aggregate must be closely packed enough to restrict lipid flow. This hypothesis provides a simple and direct coupling between the energy released by the formation of the coiled coil to the energy needed to create and stabilize the high energy intermediates of fusion. Several of these essential domains have been described for the viral fusion

  8. Nitrocellulose membrane sample holder using for terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaojing; Liu, Shangjian; Wang, Cuicui; Zuo, Jian; Zhang, Cunlin

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology has promising applications for the detection and identification of materials because it has a great advantage in measuring material fingerprint spectrum. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is a key technique that is applied to spectroscopic measurement of materials. However, it is difficult to press a pellet with small mass of sample and a bulking medium such as polyethylene (PE) powder usually need to be added. Characteristic absorption peaks of the solution in liquid cell is hard to be observed due to the interaction between materials and water molecules. Therefore, one method using the hydrophilic nitrocellulose (NC) membrane as a sample holder was applied to detect samples in an aqueous medium by THz-TDS. In this study, the α-lactose samples were mixed with 20 μl of deionized water and then applied directly onto the double-layered NC membrane sample holder. This mixture is located on the gap of two piece of NC membranes. Firstly the NC membranes with different pore sizes were tested in the experiment. And then the α-lactose solutions with different concentrations were measured on the NC with different pore sizes. Consequently, the small mass of samples can be detected and the characteristic absorption peaks become stronger with the increase of NC pore size. Moreover, compared to the traditional pellet-making and liquid cell detection, this membrane method is more convenient and easy to operate.

  9. Synaptobrevin transmembrane domain influences exocytosis by perturbing vesicle membrane curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2015-07-07

    Membrane fusion requires that nearly flat lipid bilayers deform into shapes with very high curvature. This makes membrane bending a critical force in determining fusion mechanisms. A lipid bilayer will bend spontaneously when material is distributed asymmetrically between its two monolayers, and its spontaneous curvature (C0) will influence the stability of curved fusion intermediates. Prior work on Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis revealed that fusion pore lifetime (τ) varies with vesicle content (Q), and showed that this relation reflects membrane bending energetics. Lipids that alter C0 change the dependence of τ on Q. These results suggested that the greater stability of an initial exocytotic fusion pore associated with larger vesicles reflects the need to bend more membrane during fusion pore dilation. In this study, we explored the possibility of manipulating C0 by mutating the transmembrane domain (TMD) of the vesicle membrane protein synaptobrevin 2 (syb2). Amperometric measurements of exocytosis in mouse chromaffin cells revealed that syb2 TMD mutations altered the relation between τ and Q. The effects of these mutations showed a striking periodicity, changing sign as the structural perturbation moved through the inner and outer leaflets. Some glycine and charge mutations also influenced the dependence of τ on Q in a manner consistent with expected changes in C0. These results suggest that side chains in the syb2 TMD influence the kinetics of exocytosis by perturbing the packing of the surrounding lipids. The present results support the view that membrane bending occurs during fusion pore expansion rather than during fusion pore formation. This supports the view of an initial fusion pore through two relatively flat membranes formed by protein. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization.

  11. Targeting proteins to liquid-ordered domains in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Hayden, Carl C; Sanchez, Mari Angelica A; Wang, Julia; Bunker, Bruce C; Voigt, James A; Sasaki, Darryl Y

    2011-02-15

    We demonstrate the construction of novel protein-lipid assemblies through the design of a lipid-like molecule, DPIDA, endowed with tail-driven affinity for specific lipid membrane phases and head-driven affinity for specific proteins. In studies performed on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) with varying mole fractions of dipalymitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol, and diphytanoylphosphatidyl choline (DPhPC), DPIDA selectively partitioned into the more ordered phases, either solid or liquid-ordered (L(o)) depending on membrane composition. Fluorescence imaging established the phase behavior of the resulting quaternary lipid system. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy confirmed the fluidity of the L(o) phase containing DPIDA. In the presence of CuCl(2), the iminodiacetic acid (IDA) headgroup of DPIDA forms the Cu(II)-IDA complex that exhibits a high affinity for histidine residues. His-tagged proteins were bound specifically to domains enriched in DPIDA, demonstrating the capacity to target protein binding selectively to both solid and L(o) phases. Steric pressure from the crowding of surface-bound proteins transformed the domains into tubules with persistence lengths that depended on the phase state of the lipid domains.

  12. Domain Formation in Membranes Near the Onset of Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Irene; Hayrapetyan, Gurgen; Leoni, Giovanni; Zwicknagl, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    The formation of microdomains, also called rafts, in biomembranes can be attributed to the surface tension of the membrane. In order to model this phenomenon, a model involving a coupling between the local composition and the local curvature was proposed by Seul and Andelman in 1995. In addition to the familiar Cahn-Hilliard/Modica-Mortola energy, there are additional `forces' that prevent large domains of homogeneous concentration. This is taken into account by the bending energy of the membrane, which is coupled to the value of the order parameter, and reflects the notion that surface tension associated with a slightly curved membrane influences the localization of phases as the geometry of the lipids has an effect on the preferred placement on the membrane. The main result of the paper is the study of the Γ -convergence of this family of energy functionals, involving nonlocal as well as negative terms. Since the minimizers of the limiting energy have minimal interfaces, the physical interpretation is that, within a sufficiently strong interspecies surface tension and a large enough sample size, raft microdomains are not formed.

  13. Plasma membrane domains enriched in cortical endoplasmic reticulum function as membrane protein trafficking hubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Philip D; Haberkorn, Christopher J; Weigel, Aubrey V; Higgins, Jenny L; Akin, Elizabeth J; Kennedy, Matthew J; Krapf, Diego; Tamkun, Michael M

    2013-09-01

    In mammalian cells, the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER) is a network of tubules and cisterns that lie in close apposition to the plasma membrane (PM). We provide evidence that PM domains enriched in underlying cER function as trafficking hubs for insertion and removal of PM proteins in HEK 293 cells. By simultaneously visualizing cER and various transmembrane protein cargoes with total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrate that the majority of exocytotic delivery events for a recycled membrane protein or for a membrane protein being delivered to the PM for the first time occur at regions enriched in cER. Likewise, we observed recurring clathrin clusters and functional endocytosis of PM proteins preferentially at the cER-enriched regions. Thus the cER network serves to organize the molecular machinery for both insertion and removal of cell surface proteins, highlighting a novel role for these unique cellular microdomains in membrane trafficking.

  14. Magnetic field alignable domains in phospholipid vesicle membranes containing lanthanides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Paul; Liebi, Marianne; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Ishikawa, Takashi; Rüegger, Heinz; Zepik, Helmut; Fischer, Peter; Walde, Peter; Windhab, Erich

    2010-01-14

    Magnetic fields were applied as a structuring force on phospholipid-based vesicular systems, using paramagnetic lanthanide ions as magnetic handles anchored to the vesicle membrane. Different vesicle formulations were investigated using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) in a magnetic field of up to 8 T, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), (31)P NMR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and permeability measurements with a fluorescent water-soluble marker (calcein). The investigated vesicle formulations consisted usually of 80 mol % of the phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 20 mol % of a chelator lipid (DMPE-DTPA; 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate) with complexed lanthanide ions (Tm(3+), Dy(3+), or La(3+)), and the total lipid concentration was 15 mM. Vesicles containing the paramagnetic lanthanide Tm(3+) or Dy(3+) exhibited a temperature-dependent response to magnetic fields, which can be explained by considering the formation of lipid domains, which upon reaching a critical size become alignable in a magnetic field. The features of this "magnetic field alignable domain model" are as follows: with decreasing temperature (from 30 to 2.5 degrees C) solid domains, consisting mainly of the higher melting phospholipid (DMPE-DTPA.lanthanide), begin to form and grow in size. The domains assemble the large magnetic moments conferred by the lanthanides and orient in magnetic fields. The direction of alignment depends on the type of lanthanide used. The domains orient with their normal parallel to the magnetic field with thulium (Tm(3+)) and perpendicular with dysprosium (Dy(3+)). No magnetic field alignable domains were observed if DMPE-DTPA is replaced either by POPE-DTPA (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetate) or by DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine).

  15. Continuous monitoring of membrane protein micro-domain association during cell signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Heng

    2011-01-01

    Central to understanding membrane bound cell signaling is to quantify how the membrane ultra-structure consisting of transient spatial domains modulates signaling and how the signaling influences this ultra-structure. Yet, measuring the association of membrane proteins with domains in living, intact cells poses considerable challenges. Here, we describe a non-destructive method to quantify protein-lipid domain and protein cytoskeleton interactions in single, intact cells enabling continuous monitoring of the protein domains interaction over time during signaling.

  16. Ethnicity and stratum corneum ceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J.M.; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The barrier function of the skin is dependent on an optimal composition of the stratum corneum lipids, exemplified by the altered lipid profile in patients with atopic eczema (AE). Differences in the global prevalence of AE point to the environment as an important factor in AE. Studies...... on filaggrin point to a genetic aspect in AE. The influence of environment and genes needs to be explored. OBJECTIVES: To investigate possible differences in stratum corneum lipids between different healthy ethnicities living in the same environment. METHODS: Healthy participants without any major skin...... diseases were enrolled in the study. Twenty-five participants of Asian origin (Asians), 18 of African origin (Africans) and 28 of Danish origin (white-skinned), all students at universities in the Copenhagen area of Denmark, had the ceramide profile of their stratum corneum examined using the cyanoacrylate...

  17. Lipid domain structure of the plasma membrane revealed by patching of membrane components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, T; Scheiffele, P; Verkade, P; Simons, K

    1998-05-18

    Lateral assemblies of glycolipids and cholesterol, "rafts," have been implicated to play a role in cellular processes like membrane sorting, signal transduction, and cell adhesion. We studied the structure of raft domains in the plasma membrane of non-polarized cells. Overexpressed plasma membrane markers were evenly distributed in the plasma membrane. We compared the patching behavior of pairs of raft markers (defined by insolubility in Triton X-100) with pairs of raft/non-raft markers. For this purpose we cross-linked glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), Thy-1, influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), and the raft lipid ganglioside GM1 using antibodies and/or cholera toxin. The patches of these raft markers overlapped extensively in BHK cells as well as in Jurkat T-lymphoma cells. Importantly, patches of GPI-anchored PLAP accumulated src-like protein tyrosine kinase fyn, which is thought to be anchored in the cytoplasmic leaflet of raft domains. In contrast patched raft components and patches of transferrin receptor as a non-raft marker were sharply separated. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that coalescence of cross-linked raft elements is mediated by their common lipid environments, whereas separation of raft and non-raft patches is caused by the immiscibility of different lipid phases. This view is supported by the finding that cholesterol depletion abrogated segregation. Our results are consistent with the view that raft domains in the plasma membrane of non-polarized cells are normally small and highly dispersed but that raft size can be modulated by oligomerization of raft components.

  18. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces membrane fluidity, inhibits cholesterol domain formation, and normalizes bilayer width in atherosclerotic-like model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol crystalline domains characterize atherosclerotic membranes, altering vascular signaling and function. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and subsequent cholesterol domain formation. We evaluated non-peroxidation-mediated effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), other TG-lowering agents, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and other long-chain fatty acids on membrane fluidity, bilayer width, and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes. In membranes prepared at 1.5:1 cholesterol-to-phospholipid (C/P) mole ratio (creating pre-existing domains), EPA, glycyrrhizin, arachidonic acid, and alpha linolenic acid promoted the greatest reductions in cholesterol domains (by 65.5%, 54.9%, 46.8%, and 45.2%, respectively) compared to controls; other treatments had modest effects. EPA effects on cholesterol domain formation were dose-dependent. In membranes with 1:1 C/P (predisposing domain formation), DHA, but not EPA, dose-dependently increased membrane fluidity. DHA also induced cholesterol domain formation without affecting temperature-induced changes in-bilayer unit cell periodicity relative to controls (d-space; 57Å-55Å over 15-30°C). Together, these data suggest simultaneous formation of distinct cholesterol-rich ordered domains and cholesterol-poor disordered domains in the presence of DHA. By contrast, EPA had no effect on cholesterol domain formation and produced larger d-space values relative to controls (60Å-57Å; pmembrane bilayer width, membrane fluidity, and cholesterol crystalline domain formation; suggesting omega-3 fatty acids with differing chain length or unsaturation may differentially influence membrane lipid dynamics and structural organization as a result of distinct phospholipid/sterol interactions.

  19. Membrane binding and self-association of the epsin N-terminal homology domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Jao, Christine C; Lyman, Edward; Gallop, Jennifer L; Peter, Brian J; McMahon, Harvey T; Langen, Ralf; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-11-09

    Epsin possesses a conserved epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain that acts as a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-lipid-targeting and membrane-curvature-generating element. Upon binding phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, the N-terminal helix (H(0)) of the ENTH domain becomes structured and aids in the aggregation of ENTH domains, which results in extensive membrane remodeling. In this article, atomistic and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate the structure and the stability of ENTH domain aggregates on lipid bilayers. EPR experiments are also reported for systems composed of different ENTH-bound membrane morphologies, including membrane vesicles as well as preformed membrane tubules. The EPR data are used to help develop a molecular model of ENTH domain aggregates on preformed lipid tubules that are then studied by CG MD simulation. The combined computational and experimental approach suggests that ENTH domains exist predominantly as monomers on vesiculated structures, while ENTH domains self-associate into dimeric structures and even higher-order oligomers on the membrane tubes. The results emphasize that the arrangement of ENTH domain aggregates depends strongly on whether the local membrane curvature is isotropic or anisotropic. The molecular mechanism of ENTH-domain-induced membrane vesiculation and tubulation and the implications of the epsin's role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis resulting from the interplay between ENTH domain membrane binding and ENTH domain self-association are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bile acids modulate signaling by functional perturbation of plasma membrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Maxwell, Kelsey N; Sezgin, Erdinc; Lu, Maryia; Liang, Hong; Hancock, John F; Dial, Elizabeth J; Lichtenberger, Lenard M; Levental, Ilya

    2013-12-13

    Eukaryotic cell membranes are organized into functional lipid and protein domains, the most widely studied being membrane rafts. Although rafts have been associated with numerous plasma membrane functions, the mechanisms by which these domains themselves are regulated remain undefined. Bile acids (BAs), whose primary function is the solubilization of dietary lipids for digestion and absorption, can affect cells by interacting directly with membranes. To investigate whether these interactions affected domain organization in biological membranes, we assayed the effects of BAs on biomimetic synthetic liposomes, isolated plasma membranes, and live cells. At cytotoxic concentrations, BAs dissolved synthetic and cell-derived membranes and disrupted live cell plasma membranes, implicating plasma membrane damage as the mechanism for BA cellular toxicity. At subtoxic concentrations, BAs dramatically stabilized domain separation in Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles without affecting protein partitioning between coexisting domains. Domain stabilization was the result of BA binding to and disordering the nonraft domain, thus promoting separation by enhancing domain immiscibility. Consistent with the physical changes observed in synthetic and isolated biological membranes, BAs reorganized intact cell membranes, as evaluated by the spatial distribution of membrane-anchored Ras isoforms. Nanoclustering of K-Ras, related to nonraft membrane domains, was enhanced in intact plasma membranes, whereas the organization of H-Ras was unaffected. BA-induced changes in Ras lateral segregation potentiated EGF-induced signaling through MAPK, confirming the ability of BAs to influence cell signal transduction by altering the physical properties of the plasma membrane. These observations suggest general, membrane-mediated mechanisms by which biological amphiphiles can produce their cellular effects.

  1. Ethnicity and stratum corneum ceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J M; Høgh, J K; Hellgren, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The barrier function of the skin is dependent on an optimal composition of the stratum corneum lipids, exemplified by the altered lipid profile in patients with atopic eczema (AE). Differences in the global prevalence of AE point to the environment as an important factor in AE. Studies on filaggrin...

  2. Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pykäläinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Peränen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka (Helsinki); (Penn)

    2013-05-29

    Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

  3. Hydrostatic Pressure Promotes Domain Formation in Model Lipid Raft Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, David L; Weinrich, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements demonstrate that hydrostatic pressure promotes liquid-ordered (Lo) domain formation in lipid membranes prepared as both oriented multilayers and unilamellar vesicles made of a canonical ternary lipid mixture for which demixing transitions have been extensively studied. The results demonstrate an unusually large dependence of the mixing transition on hydrostatic pressure. Additionally, data at 28 °C show that the magnitude of increase in Lo caused by 10 MPa pressure is much the same as the decrease in Lo produced by twice minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC) of general anesthetics such as halothane, nitrous oxide, and xenon. Therefore, the results may provide a plausible explanation for the reversal of general anesthesia by hydrostatic pressure.

  4. Stratum corneum barrier lipids in cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, V; Halkier-Sørensen, L; Rasmussen, G;

    2000-01-01

    Specimens from primary cholesteatomas were examined under the electron microscope using a lipid-retaining method that is best suited for intracellular lipids and a method that is best for intercellular lipids. In the stratum granulosum of the squamous epithelium, a large number of Odland bodies...... emerged. When the corneocyte reaches the transitional stage to the stratum corneum, the Odland bodies accumulate near the cell membrane and discharge their contents of lipid and enzymes. The lipids are reorganized into multiple long sheets of lamellar structures that embrace the keratinized corneocytes......, as seen in the formation and maintenance of the cutaneous permeability barrier. In this study we draw the attention to the facts that the cholesteatoma epithelium is capable of producing not only cholesterol, but also several lipids, and that the lipid molecules are organized in multilamellar structures...

  5. Stratum Corneum Barrier Lipids in Cholesteatoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, V; Halkier-Sørensen, L; Rasmussen, G

    2000-01-01

    emerged. When the corneocyte reaches the transitional stage to the stratum corneum, the Odland bodies accumulate near the cell membrane and discharge their contents of lipid and enzymes. The lipids are reorganized into multiple long sheets of lamellar structures that embrace the keratinized corneocytes......Specimens from primary cholesteatomas were examined under the electron microscope using a lipid-retaining method that is best suited for intracellular lipids and a method that is best for intercellular lipids. In the stratum granulosum of the squamous epithelium, a large number of Odland bodies......, as seen in the formation and maintenance of the cutaneous permeability barrier. In this study we draw the attention to the facts that the cholesteatoma epithelium is capable of producing not only cholesterol, but also several lipids, and that the lipid molecules are organized in multilamellar structures...

  6. Approche osmotique de l'hydratation du stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestier, J P

    1987-12-01

    Summary An osmotic approach to a study of hydration of the stratum corneum At first Middleton, in his classic studies, explains the water sorption of stratum corneum by osmotic processes. To follow Middleton, and in order to study water osmosis diffusion, we made an osmotic model of stratum corneum (OMSC). The OMSC was constituted by 0.8 g of sheep wool, which was closed in a dialysis bag. When the OMSC was placed in the water, its weight increased, due to water diffusing through the membrane to bind with the protein. The rate of sorption was slow, but the value was about the same as that which Scheuplein has observed for the stratum corneum. At saturation, the weight of 'bound water'was 13 times greater than the weight of keratine. The components of Natural Moisturizing Factor and glycerol enhance the sorption rate and the weight fraction 'bound water'at saturation. The best component is urea. This observation suggests that humectants increase the number of water-binding sites of keratin. The OMSC could allow preliminary tests of water-soluble skin moisturizers.

  7. Higher-order assemblies of BAR domain proteins for shaping membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Shiro

    2016-06-01

    Most cellular organelles contain lipid bilayer membranes. The earliest characterization of cellular organelles was performed by electron microscopy observation of such membranes. However, the precise mechanisms for shaping the membrane in particular subcellular organelles is poorly understood. Classically, the overall cellular shape, i.e. the shape of the plasma membrane, was thought to be governed by the reorganization of cytoskeletal components such as actin and microtubules. The plasma membrane contains various submicron structures such as clathrin-coated pits, caveolae, filopodia and lamellipodia. These subcellular structures are either invaginations or protrusions and are associated with the cytoskeleton. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that there are membrane-binding proteins that cooperates with cytoskeleton in shaping of plasma membrane organelles. Proteins with the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain connect a variety of membrane shapes to actin filaments. The BAR domains themselves bend the membranes by their rigidity and then mold the membranes into tubules through their assembly as spiral polymers, which are thought to be involved in the various submicron structures. Membrane tubulation by polymeric assembly of the BAR domains is supposed to be regulated by binding proteins, binding lipids and the mechanical properties of the membrane. This review gives an overview of BAR protein assembly, describes the significance of the assembly and discusses how to study the assembly in the context of membrane and cellular morphology. The technical problems encountered in microscopic observation of BAR domain assembly are also discussed.

  8. Amphipathic motifs in BAR domains are essential for membrane curvature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatia, Vikram K; Madsen, Kenneth L; Bolinger, Pierre-Yves;

    2009-01-01

    nanosized liposomes of different diameters and therefore membrane curvature. Characterization of members of the three BAR domain families showed surprisingly that the crescent-shaped BAR dimer with its positively charged concave face is not able to sense membrane curvature. Mutagenesis on BAR domains showed...... that membrane curvature sensing critically depends on the N-terminal AH and furthermore that BAR domains sense membrane curvature through hydrophobic insertion in lipid packing defects and not through electrostatics. Consequently, amphipathic motifs, such as AHs, that are often associated with BAR domains...... emerge as an important means for a protein to sense membrane curvature. Measurements on single liposomes allowed us to document heterogeneous binding behaviour within the ensemble and quantify the influence of liposome polydispersity on bulk membrane curvature sensing experiments. The latter results...

  9. A unifying mechanism accounts for sensing of membrane curvature by BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller; Hatzakis, Nikos; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    unrelated motifs: BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins. We discuss the conclusion that the curvature of the BAR dimer is not responsible for sensing and that the sensing properties of all three motifs can be rationalized by the physicochemical properties of the curved membrane......The discovery of proteins that recognize membrane curvature created a paradigm shift by suggesting that membrane shape may act as a cue for protein localization that is independent of lipid or protein composition. Here we review recent data on membrane curvature sensing by three structurally...... itself. We thus anticipate that membrane curvature will promote the redistribution of proteins that are anchored in membranes through any type of hydrophobic moiety, a thesis that broadens tremendously the implications of membrane curvature for protein sorting, trafficking and signaling in cell biology....

  10. Accumulation of raft lipids in T-cell plasma membrane domains engaged in TCR signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zech, Tobias; Ejsing, Christer S.; Gaus, Katharina;

    2009-01-01

    domains were also enriched in plasmenyl phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. Modulating the T-cell lipidome with polyunsaturated fatty acids impaired the plasma membrane condensation at TCR signalling foci and resulted in a perturbed molecular lipid composition. These results correlate...... and saturated phosphatidylcholine species as compared with control plasma membrane fragments. This provides, for the first time, direct evidence that TCR activation domains comprise a distinct molecular lipid composition reminiscent of liquid-ordered raft phases in model membranes. Interestingly, TCR activation...

  11. Membrane Interaction of the Factor VIIIa Discoidin Domains in Atomistic Detail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jesper Jonasson; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Peters, Günther H.J.;

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed membrane-mimetic model was applied to study membrane interaction and binding of the two anchoring C2-like discoidin domains of human coagulation factor VIIIa (FVIIIa), the C1 and C2 domains. Both individual domains, FVIII C1 and FVIII C2, were observed to bind the phospholipi...... binding of FVIIIa, based on the prevalent nonspecificity of ionic interactions in the simulated membrane-bound states of FVIII C1 and FVIII C2.......A recently developed membrane-mimetic model was applied to study membrane interaction and binding of the two anchoring C2-like discoidin domains of human coagulation factor VIIIa (FVIIIa), the C1 and C2 domains. Both individual domains, FVIII C1 and FVIII C2, were observed to bind the phospholipid...... membrane by partial or full insertion of their extruding loops (the spikes). However, the two domains adopted different molecular orientations in their membrane-bound states; FVIII C2 roughly was positioned normal to the membrane plane, while FVIII C1 displayed a multitude of tilted orientations...

  12. Membrane heterogeneity : from lipid domains to curvature effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semrau, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Membrane heterogeneity on the micro- and nanometer scale plays an important role for a large number of biological processes. In parallel to the conception of refined membrane models, new experimental techniques to determine membrane microstructure were developed in recent years. Single molecule fluo

  13. Lateral diffusion of phospholipids in the plasma membrane of soybean protoplasts: Evidence for membrane lipid domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, T N; Wang, J L; Schindler, M

    1986-01-01

    Fluorescent lipid and phospholipid probes were incorporated at 4 degrees C into soybean protoplasts prepared from cultured soybean (SB-1) cells. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the plasma membrane as well as the nucleus were labeled. Fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis was performed on these cells at 18 degrees C to monitor the lateral mobility of the incorporated probes. After labeling at low concentrations (40 mug/ml) of phosphatidyl-N-(4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazolyl)ethanolamine (NBD-PtdEtn), a single mobile component was observed with a diffusion coefficient (D) of approximately 3 x 10(-9) cm(2)/sec. After labeling at higher probe concentrations (>/=100 mug/ml), two diffusing species were observed, with diffusion coefficients of approximately 3 x 10(-9) cm(2)/sec ("fast") and approximately 5 x 10(-10) cm(2)/sec ("slow"). Similar results were observed with fluorescent derivatives of phosphatidylcholine and fatty acids. In contrast to these results, parallel analysis of 3T3 fibroblasts, using the same probes and conditions, yielded only a single diffusion component. These results suggest that the soybean plasma membrane may contain two distinct lipid domains in terms of lipid mobility. Consistent with this idea, experiments with soybean protoplasts yielded a single diffusion component under the following conditions: (i) labeling with NBD-PtdEtn (100 mug/ml), FRAP analysis at 37 degrees C (D = 1.1 x 10(-8) cm(2)/sec); (ii) labeling with NBD-PtdEtn (100 mug/ml), FRAP analysis at 18 degrees C in the presence of 2 mM EGTA (D = 4.2 x 10(-9) cm(2)/sec); (iii) labeling with 5-(N-dodecanoyl)aminofluorescein (a short-chain lipid probe), FRAP analysis at 18 degrees C or 37 degrees C (D = 2.5 x 10(-8) cm(2)/sec). These results suggest that the plasma membrane of soybean cells may contain stable immiscible domains of fluid and gel-like lipids.

  14. Membrane raft domains and remodeling in aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Julie; Gregory-Pauron, Lynn; Lanhers, Marie-Claire; Claudepierre, Thomas; Corbier, Catherine; Yen, Frances T; Malaplate-Armand, Catherine; Oster, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Lipids are the fundamental structural components of biological membranes. For a long time considered as simple barriers segregating aqueous compartments, membranes are now viewed as dynamic interfaces providing a molecular environment favorable to the activity of membrane-associated proteins. Interestingly, variations in membrane lipid composition, whether quantitative or qualitative, play a crucial role in regulation of membrane protein functionalities. Indeed, a variety of alterations in brain lipid composition have been associated with the processes of normal and pathological aging. Although not establishing a direct cause-and-effect relationship between these complex modifications in cerebral membranes and the process of cognitive decline, evidence shows that alterations in membrane lipid composition affect important physicochemical properties notably impacting the lateral organization of membranes, and thus microdomains. It has been suggested that preservation of microdomain functionality may represent an effective strategy for preventing or decelerating neuronal dysfunction and cerebral vulnerability, processes that are both aggravated by aging. The working hypothesis developed in this review proposes that preservation of membrane organization, for example, through nutritional supplementation of docosahexaenoic acid, could prevent disturbances in and preserve effective cerebral function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  15. Study on the lipid organization of stratum corneum lipid models by (cryo-) electron diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilgram, GSK; Pelt, AMEV; Oostergetel, GT; Koerten, HK; Bouwstra, JA

    The barrier function of the skin resides in the stratum corneum (SC), This outermost layer consists of protein-rich corneocytes and lipid-rich intercellular domains. These domains form the rate-limiting step for transepidermal water loss and the penetration of substances from the environment. To

  16. ELASTIC MEMBRANE DEFORMATIONS GOVERN INTERLEAFLET COUPLING OF LIPID-ORDERED DOMAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimzyanov, Timur R.; Molotkovsky, Rodion J.; Bozdaganyan, Marine E.; Cohen, Fredric S.; Pohl, Peter; Akimov, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for domain registration in two membrane leaflets has thus far remained enigmatic. Using continuum elasticity theory, we show that minimum line tension is achieved along the rim between thicker (ordered) and thinner (disordered) domains by shifting the rims in opposing leaflets by a few nanometers relative to each other. Increasing surface tension yields an increase in line tension, resulting in larger domains. Because domain registration is driven by lipid deformation energy, it does not require special lipid components nor interactions at the membrane midplane. PMID:26340212

  17. Differences between the lateral organization of conventional and inositol phospholipid-anchored membrane proteins. A further definition of micrometer scale membrane domains

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Plasma membranes of many cells appear to be divided into domains, areas whose composition and function differ from the average for an entire membrane. We have previously used fluorescence photo-bleaching and recovery to demonstrate one type of membrane domain, with dimensions of micrometers (Yechiel, E., and M. Edidin. 1987, J. Cell Biol. 105: 755- 760). The presence of membrane domains is inferred from the dependence of the apparent mobile fraction of labeled molecules on the size of the mem...

  18. Imaging lipid domains in cell membranes: the advent of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan Myers Owen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The lipid bilayer of model membranes, liposomes reconstituted from cell lipids, and plasma membrane vesicles and spheres can separate into two distinct liquid phases to yield lipid domains with liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered properties. These observations are the basis of the lipid raft hypothesis that postulates the existence of cholesterol-enriched ordered-phase lipid domains in cell membranes that could regulate protein mobility, localization and interaction. Here we review the evidence that nano-scaled lipid complexes and meso-scaled lipid domains exist in cell membranes and how new fluorescence microscopy techniques that overcome the diffraction limit provide new insights into lipid organization in cell membranes.

  19. Recent progress on lipid lateral heterogeneity in plasma membranes: From rafts to submicrometric domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carquin, Mélanie; D'Auria, Ludovic; Pollet, Hélène; Bongarzone, Ernesto R; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2016-04-01

    The concept of transient nanometric domains known as lipid rafts has brought interest to reassess the validity of the Singer-Nicolson model of a fluid bilayer for cell membranes. However, this new view is still insufficient to explain the cellular control of surface lipid diversity or membrane deformability. During the past decades, the hypothesis that some lipids form large (submicrometric/mesoscale vs nanometric rafts) and stable (>min vs s) membrane domains has emerged, largely based on indirect methods. Morphological evidence for stable submicrometric lipid domains, well-accepted for artificial and highly specialized biological membranes, was further reported for a variety of living cells from prokaryot es to yeast and mammalian cells. However, results remained questioned based on limitations of available fluorescent tools, use of poor lipid fixatives, and imaging artifacts due to non-resolved membrane projections. In this review, we will discuss recent evidence generated using powerful and innovative approaches such as lipid-specific toxin fragments that support the existence of submicrometric domains. We will integrate documented mechanisms involved in the formation and maintenance of these domains, and provide a perspective on their relevance on membrane deformability and regulation of membrane protein distribution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Penetration of a Single Domain of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ie-Domain I to a Lipid Membrane In vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Shu-yuan; LI Jie; CHEN Zhen; HE Kang-lai

    2014-01-01

    Domain I of the activated Crystal protein from Bacillus thuringiensis has a sevenα-helix bundle structure, which is responsible for membrane channel formation in its insecticidal mechanism. Cry1Ie is toxic to Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée), and plays important roles in insect biological control. The domain I from Cry1Ie has been expressed and puriifed in its normal conformation, as embedded in the full length homologous toxin structure. The membrane insertion ability of this single domain was compared with the full length homologous toxin using a monolayer insertion experiment. The results indicated that the Cry1Ie-domain I had the ability to insert into the lipid monolayer, and this ability is greater than that of the IE648 toxin. However, the state of insertion is not stable and remains for only a short period of time. The Cry1Ie-domain I plays no role in receptor binding as it had a nonspeciifc binding with the brush border membrane vesicles of the Asian corn borer.

  1. Study of Raft Domains in Model Membrane of DPPC/PE/Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda

    2010-10-01

    Raft domains in bilayer membrane are thought to play an important role in many cell functions such as cell signaling or trans-membrane protein activation. Here we use a model membrane consisting of DPPC/PE/cholesterol to examine the structure of membrane rafts and phase interactions. In particular we are interested in lipids containing the highly polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA. We use both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy to obtain information on the structural properties of raft regions and track cholesterol. As expected, we find phase separation of raft regions between saturated and unsaturated lipids. Moreover, we find that the roughness of the domains change with varying cholesterol concentration possibly due to overpacking. This model study provides further understanding of the role of cholesterol in bilayer membrane leading towards a better knowledge of cell membranes.

  2. Membrane binding properties of EBV gp110 C-terminal domain; evidences for structural transition in the membrane environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Jean; Seo, Min-Duk; Lee, Suk Kyeong; Lee, Bong Jin

    2008-09-30

    Gp110 of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) mainly localizes on nuclear/ER membranes and plays a role in the assembly of EBV nucleocapsid. The C-terminal tail domain (gp110 CTD) is essential for the function of gp110 and the nuclear/ER membranes localization of gp110 is ruled by its C-terminal unique nuclear localization signal (NLS), consecutive four arginines. In the present study, the structural properties of gp110 CTD in membrane mimics were investigated using CD, size-exclusion chromatography, and NMR, to elucidate the effect of membrane environment on the structural transition and to compare the structural feature of the protein in the solution state with that of the membrane-bound form. CD and NMR analysis showed that gp110 CTD in a buffer solution appears to adopt a stable folding intermediate which lacks compactness, and a highly helical structure is formed only in membrane environments. The helical content of gp110 CTD was significantly affected by the negative charge as well as the size of membrane mimics. Based on the elution profiles of the size-exclusion chromatography, we found that gp110 CTD intrinsically forms a trimer, revealing that a trimerization region may exist in the C-terminal domain of gp110 like the ectodomain of gp110. The mutation of NLS (RRRR) to RTTR does not affect the overall structure of gp110 CTD in membrane mimics, while the helical propensity in a buffer solution was slightly different between the wild-type and the mutant proteins. This result suggests that not only the helicity induced in membrane environment but also the local structure around NLS may be related to trafficking to the nuclear membrane. More detailed structural difference between the wild-type and the mutant in membrane environment was examined using synthetic two peptides including the wild-type NLS and the mutant NLS.

  3. Why Do Some T Cell Receptor Cytoplasmic Domains Associate with the Plasma Membrane?

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Anton evan der Merwe; Hao eZhang; Shaun-Paul eCordoba

    2012-01-01

    Based on studies in model systems it has been proposed that the cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor signaling subunits that have polybasic motifs associate with the plasma membrane, and that this regulates their phosphorylation. Recent experiments in more physiological systems have confirmed membrane association but raised questions as to its function.

  4. Fluid domain patterns in free-standing membranes captured on a solid support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhartia, Tripta; Husen, Peter Rasmussen; Ipsen, John Hjort

    2014-01-01

    membrane, where lateral domain structures are kinetically trapped. High-resolution images of domain patterns in the liquid-ordered (lo) and liquid-disordered (ld) co-existence region in the phase-diagram of ternary lipid mixtures are revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) scans of the patches...

  5. Positioning lipid membrane domains in giant vesicles by micro-organization of aqueous cytoplasm mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cans, Ann-Sofie; Andes-Koback, Meghan; Keating, Christine D

    2008-06-11

    We report localization of lipid membrane microdomains to specific "poles" of asymmetric giant vesicles (GVs) in response to local internal composition. Interior aqueous microdomains were generated in a simple model cytoplasm composed of a poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG)/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) encapsulated in the vesicles. The GV membrane composition used here was a modification of a DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol mixture known to form micrometer-scale liquid ordered and liquid disordered domains; we added lipids with PEG 2000 Da-modified headgroups. Osmotically induced budding of the ATPS-containing GVs led to structures where the PEG-rich and dextran-rich interior aqueous phases were in contact with different regions of the vesicle membrane. Liquid ordered (L o) membrane domains rich in PEG-terminated lipids preferentially coated the PEG-rich aqueous phase vesicle "body", while coexisting liquid disordered (L d) membrane domains coated the dextran-rich aqueous phase "bud". Membrane domain positioning resulted from interactions between lipid headgroups and the interior aqueous polymer solutions, e.g., PEGylated headgroups with PEG and dextran polymers. Heating resulted first in patchy membranes where L o and L d domains no longer showed any preference for coating the PEG-rich vs dextran-rich interior aqueous volumes, and eventually complete lipid mixing. Upon cooling lipid domains again coated their preferred interior aqueous microvolume. This work shows that nonspecific interactions between interior aqueous contents and the membrane that encapsulates them can drive local chemical heterogeneity, and offers a primitive experimental model for membrane and cytoplasmic polarity in biological cells.

  6. Membrane Binding and Modulation of the PDZ Domain of PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlendsson, Simon; Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolding proteins serve to assemble protein complexes in dynamic processes by means of specific protein-protein and protein-lipid binding domains. Many of these domains bind either proteins or lipids exclusively; however, it has become increasingly evident that certain domains are capable of b...... lipids. Moreover, we review how these PDZ-membrane interactions are regulated in the case of the synaptic scaffolding protein PICK1 and how this might affect cellular localization and function....

  7. Membrane localization is critical for activation of the PICK1 BAR domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth L; Eriksen, Jacob; Milan-Lobo, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) domain protein, protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) contains a C-terminal Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain mediating recognition of curved membranes; however, the molecular mechanisms controlling the activity of this domain are poorly understood....... In agreement with negative regulation of the BAR domain by the N-terminal PDZ domain, PICK1 distributed evenly in the cytoplasm, whereas truncation of the PDZ domain caused BAR domain-dependent redistribution to clusters colocalizing with markers of recycling endosomal compartments. A similar clustering...... was observed both upon truncation of a short putative alpha-helical segment in the linker between the PDZ and the BAR domains and upon coexpression of PICK1 with a transmembrane PDZ ligand, including the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor GluR2 subunit, the GluR2 C...

  8. Yeast lipids can phase separate into micrometer-scale membrane domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Christian; Ejsing, Christer S; Garcia-Saez, Ana J;

    2010-01-01

    The lipid raft concept proposes that biological membranes have the potential to form functional domains based on a selective interaction between sphingolipids and sterols. These domains seem to be involved in signal transduction and vesicular sorting of proteins and lipids. Although...... there is biochemical evidence for lipid raft-dependent protein and lipid sorting in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, direct evidence for an interaction between yeast sphingolipids and the yeast sterol ergosterol, resulting in membrane domain formation, is lacking. Here we show that model membranes formed from yeast...... total lipid extracts possess an inherent self-organization potential resulting in Ld-Lo phase coexistence at physiologically relevant temperature. Analyses of lipid extracts from mutants defective in sphingolipid metabolism as well as reconstitution of purified yeast lipids in model membranes of defined...

  9. Bax transmembrane domain interacts with prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins in biological membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Fernández, Vicente; Sancho, Mónica; Genovés, Ainhoa; Lucendo, Estefanía; Todt, Franziska; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Funk, Kathrin; Jahreis, Günther; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Mingarro, Ismael; Edlich, Frank; Orzáez, Mar

    2017-01-10

    The Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) protein Bax (Bcl-2 associated X, apoptosis regulator) can commit cells to apoptosis via outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Bax activity is controlled in healthy cells by prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins. C-terminal Bax transmembrane domain interactions were implicated recently in Bax pore formation. Here, we show that the isolated transmembrane domains of Bax, Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large), and Bcl-2 can mediate interactions between Bax and prosurvival proteins inside the membrane in the absence of apoptotic stimuli. Bcl-2 protein transmembrane domains specifically homooligomerize and heterooligomerize in bacterial and mitochondrial membranes. Their interactions participate in the regulation of Bcl-2 proteins, thus modulating apoptotic activity. Our results suggest that interactions between the transmembrane domains of Bax and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins represent a previously unappreciated level of apoptosis regulation.

  10. Molecular assemblies and membrane domains in multivesicular endosome dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falguieres, Thomas; Luyet, Pierre-Philippe [Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, 30 quai Ernest Ansermet-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Gruenberg, Jean, E-mail: jean.gruenberg@biochem.unige.ch [Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, 30 quai Ernest Ansermet-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2009-05-15

    Along the degradation pathway, endosomes exhibit a characteristic multivesicular organization, resulting from the budding of vesicles into the endosomal lumen. After endocytosis and transport to early endosomes, activated signaling receptors are incorporated into these intralumenal vesicles through the action of the ESCRT machinery, a process that contributes to terminate signaling. Then, the vesicles and their protein cargo are further transported towards lysosomes for degradation. Evidence also shows that intralumenal vesicles can undergo 'back-fusion' with the late endosome limiting membrane, a route exploited by some pathogens and presumably followed by proteins and lipids that need to be recycled from within the endosomal lumen. This process depends on the late endosomal lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid and its putative effector Alix/AIP1, and is presumably coupled to the invagination of the endosomal limiting membrane at the molecular level via ESCRT proteins. In this review, we discuss the intra-endosomal transport routes in mammalian cells, and in particular the different mechanisms involved in membrane invagination, vesicle formation and fusion in a space inaccessible to proteins known to control intracellular membrane traffic.

  11. Epithelial cell-cell junctions and plasma membrane domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Epithelial cells form a barrier against the environment, but are also required for the regulated exchange of molecules between an organism and its surroundings. Epithelial cells are characterised by a remarkable polarization of their plasma membrane, evidenced by the appearance of structurally,

  12. Epithelial cell-cell junctions and plasma membrane domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cells form a barrier against the environment, but are also required for the regulated exchange of molecules between an organism and its surroundings. Epithelial cells are characterised by a remarkable polarization of their plasma membrane, evidenced by the appearance of structurally, comp

  13. Sizes of lipid domains: What do we know from artificial lipid membranes? What are the possible shared features with membrane rafts in cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosetti, Carla M; Mangiarotti, Agustín; Wilke, Natalia

    2017-01-28

    In model lipid membranes with phase coexistence, domain sizes distribute in a very wide range, from the nanometer (reported in vesicles and supported films) to the micrometer (observed in many model membranes). Domain growth by coalescence and Ostwald ripening is slow (minutes to hours), the domain size being correlated with the size of the capture region. Domain sizes thus strongly depend on the number of domains which, in the case of a nucleation process, depends on the oversaturation of the system, on line tension and on the perturbation rate in relation to the membrane dynamics. Here, an overview is given of the factors that affect nucleation or spinodal decomposition and domain growth, and their influence on the distribution of domain sizes in different model membranes is discussed. The parameters analyzed respond to very general physical rules, and we therefore propose a similar behavior for the rafts in the plasma membrane of cells, but with obstructed mobility and with a continuously changing environment.

  14. Membrane Restructuring by Phospholipase A2 Is Regulated by the Presence of Lipid Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, Chad; Ocampo, Jackson; Duelund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    . Differential scanning calorimetry results show that this preferential hydrolysis in the presence of lipid domains leads to a membrane system with a higher-temperature melting profile due to enrichment in DSPC. Together, these results show that the presence of lipid domains can induce specificity......Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) catalyzes the hydrolysis of glycerophospholipids. This enzyme is sensitive to membrane structure, and its activity has been shown to increase in the presence of liquid-crystalline/gel (Lα/Lβ) lipid domains. In this work, we explore whether lipid domains can also...... direct the activity of the enzyme by inducing hydrolysis of certain lipid components due to preferential activity of the enzyme toward lipid domains susceptible to sPLA(2). Specifically, we show that the presence of Lα/Lβ and Lα/Lβ, phase coexistence in a 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-PhosPhocholine (DMPC...

  15. Kinetics of endophilin N-BAR domain dimerization and membrane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capraro, Benjamin R; Shi, Zheng; Wu, Tingting; Chen, Zhiming; Dunn, Joanna M; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Baumgart, Tobias

    2013-05-01

    The recruitment to plasma membrane invaginations of the protein endophilin is a temporally regulated step in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Endophilin is believed to sense or stabilize membrane curvature, which in turn likely depends on the dimeric structure of the protein. The dynamic nature of the membrane association and dimerization of endophilin is thus functionally important and is illuminated herein. Using subunit exchange Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we determine dimer dissociation kinetics and find a dimerization equilibrium constant orders of magnitude lower than previously published values. We characterize N-BAR domain membrane association kinetics under conditions where the dimeric species predominates, by stopped flow, observing prominent electrostatic sensitivity of membrane interaction kinetics. Relative to membrane binding, we find that protein monomer/dimer species equilibrate with far slower kinetics. Complementary optical microscopy studies reveal strikingly slow membrane dissociation and an increase of dissociation rate constant for a construct lacking the amphipathic segment helix 0 (H0). We attribute the slow dissociation kinetics to higher-order protein oligomerization on the membrane. We incorporate our findings into a kinetic scheme for endophilin N-BAR membrane binding and find a significant separation of time scales for endophilin membrane binding and subsequent oligomerization. This separation may facilitate the regulation of membrane trafficking phenomena.

  16. Organization and Dynamics of Fas Transmembrane Domain in Raft Membranes and Modulation by Ceramide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Bruno M.; de Almeida, Rodrigo F.M.; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Fedorov, Aleksander; Prieto, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    To comprehend the molecular processes that lead to the Fas death receptor clustering in lipid rafts, a 21-mer peptide corresponding to its single transmembrane domain (TMD) was reconstituted into mammalian raft model membranes composed of an unsaturated glycerophospholipid, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol. The peptide membrane lateral organization and dynamics, and its influence on membrane properties, were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques and by attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Our results show that Fas TMD is preferentially localized in liquid-disordered membrane regions and undergoes a strong reorganization as the membrane composition is changed toward the liquid-ordered phase. This results from the strong hydrophobic mismatch between the length of the peptide hydrophobic stretch and the hydrophobic thickness of liquid-ordered membranes. The stability of nonclustered Fas TMD in liquid-disordered domains suggests that its sequence may have a protective function against nonligand-induced Fas clustering in lipid rafts. It has been reported that ceramide induces Fas oligomerization in lipid rafts. Here, it is shown that neither Fas TMD membrane organization nor its conformation is affected by ceramide. These results are discussed within the framework of Fas membrane signaling events. PMID:21961589

  17. The C2 domains of granuphilin are high-affinity sensors for plasma membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhova, Tatyana A; Knight, Jefferson D

    2014-09-01

    Membrane-targeting proteins are crucial components of many cell signaling pathways, including the secretion of insulin. Granuphilin, also known as synaptotagmin-like protein 4, functions in tethering secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane prior to exocytosis. Granuphilin docks to insulin secretory vesicles through interaction of its N-terminal domain with vesicular Rab proteins; however, the mechanisms of granuphilin plasma membrane targeting and release are less clear. Granuphilin contains two C2 domains, C2A and C2B, that interact with the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. The goal of this study was to determine membrane-binding mechanisms, affinities, and kinetics of both granuphilin C2 domains using fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Results indicate that both C2A and C2B bind anionic lipids in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. The C2A domain binds liposomes containing a physiological mixture of lipids including 2% PI(4,5)P2 or PI(3,4,5)P3 with high affinity (apparent K(d, PIPx) of 2-5 nM), and binds nonspecifically with moderate affinity to anionic liposomes lacking phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIPx) lipids. The C2B domain binds with sub-micromolar affinity to liposomes containing PI(4,5)P2 but does not have a measurable affinity for background anionic lipids. Both domains can be competed away from their target lipids by the soluble PIPx analog inositol-(1,2,3,4,5,6)-hexakisphosphate (IP6), which is a positive regulator of insulin secretion. Potential roles of these interactions in the docking and release of granuphilin from the plasma membrane are discussed.

  18. Regulation of plant plasma membrane H+- and Ca2+-ATPases by terminal domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lone; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years, major progress has been made to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of P-type plasma membrane H(+)-and Ca(2+)-ATPases. Even though a number of regulatory proteins have been identified, many pieces are still lacking in order to understand the complete regulator...... mechanisms of these pumps. In plant plasma membrane H(+)- and Ca(2+)-ATPases, autoinhibitory domains are situated in the C- and N-terminal domains, respectively. A model for a common mechanism of autoinhibition is discussed....

  19. Diffusion mediated coagulation and fragmentation based study of domain formation in lipid bilayer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Laxminarsimha V., E-mail: laxman@iitk.ac.in [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Roy, Subhradeep [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics (MC 0219), Virginia Tech, 495 Old Turner Street, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Das, Sovan Lal [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2017-01-15

    We estimate the equilibrium size distribution of cholesterol rich micro-domains on a lipid bilayer by solving Smoluchowski equation for coagulation and fragmentation. Towards this aim, we first derive the coagulation kernels based on the diffusion behaviour of domains moving in a two dimensional membrane sheet, as this represents the reality better. We incorporate three different diffusion scenarios of domain diffusion into our coagulation kernel. Subsequently, we investigate the influence of the parameters in our model on the coagulation and fragmentation behaviour. The observed behaviours of the coagulation and fragmentation kernels are also manifested in the equilibrium domain size distribution and its first moment. Finally, considering the liquid domains diffusing in a supported lipid bilayer, we fit the equilibrium domain size distribution to a benchmark solution.

  20. C2 domain of synaptotagminⅠassociates with lipid rafts of plasma membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) JiHua; HE Li; SUI SenFang

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report that the C2 domain of synaptotagmin I (syt I) could associate with lipid rafts of plasma membrane. We demonstrate that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) in the target membrane and Ca2+ are the key factors to enhance the raft association of the C2 domain. We also found that the raft association of the C2 domain could be fulfilled by either C2A or C2B alone, suggesting that their raft association might be complementary. Finally, we indicate that destroying lipid rafts or blocking syt I-raft association could significantly reduce the Ca2+-driven release of glutamates. Our data indicate that the raft association of the C2 domain might play an important role in the regulated exocytosis.

  1. A C-terminal membrane association domain of phototropin 2 is necessary for chloroplast movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Sam-Geun; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Nagatani, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2), plant-specific blue light receptor kinases, mediate a range of physiological responses in Arabidopsis, including phototropism, chloroplast photorelocation movement, stomatal opening and leaf flattening. Phototropins consist of two photoreceptive domains at their N-terminus, LOV1 (light, oxygen or voltage 1) and LOV2, and a serine/threonine kinase domain at their C-terminus. Here, we determined the molecular moiety for the membrane association of phototropins using the yeast CytoTrap and Arabidopsis protoplast systems. We then examined the physiological significance of the membrane association of phototropins. This detailed study with serial deletions narrowed down the association domain to a relatively small part of the C-terminal domain of phototropin. The functional analysis of phot2 deletion mutants in the phot2-deficient Adiantum and Arabidopsis mutants revealed that the ability to mediate the chloroplast avoidance response correlated well with phot2's membrane association, especially with the Golgi apparatus. Taken together, our data suggest that a small part of the C-terminal domain of phototropins is necessary not only for membrane association but also for the physiological activities that elicit phototropin-specific responses.

  2. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Tran

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC. Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1 colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells.

  3. Domains of increased thickness in microvillar membranes of the small intestinal enterocyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunding, Andreas H; Christensen, Sune M; Danielsen, E Michael;

    2010-01-01

    in orchestrating absorptive/digestive action of dietary nutrients at this important cellular interface. Increased membrane thickness is believed to be a morphological characteristic of rafts. Thus, we investigated whether the high contents of lipid rafts in the microvillar membrane is reflected in local variations...... was clearly monophasic. The encountered domains of increased thickness (DITs) occupied 48% of the microvillar membrane and from the data we estimated the area of a single DIT to have a lower limit of 600 nm(2). In other experiments we mapped the organization of biochemically defined lipid rafts by immunogold...

  4. Identification of routing determinants in the cytosolic domain of a secretory granule-associated integral membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, S L; Mains, R E; Eipper, B A

    1996-07-19

    We have investigated the trafficking of integral membrane peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) in the neuroendocrine AtT-20 cell line. This bifunctional enzyme has two domains which together catalyze the COOH-terminal alpha-amidation of peptidylglycine substrates yielding amidated products stored in secretory granules. As soluble proteins, both catalytic domains were independently targeted to secretory granules. In contrast, membrane PAM was largely localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Upon truncation of its cytoplasmic COOH-terminal domain, membrane PAM was less efficiently cleaved by secretory granule enzymes and accumulated on the plasma membrane. When transferred to the lumenal domain of the interleukin 2 receptor alpha-chain (Tac protein), the cytoplasmic domain of PAM caused rerouting of Tac from the surface to the TGN and supported internalization of Tac antibody from the plasma membrane. To define sequences in the cytoplasmic domain of integral membrane PAM involved in its trafficking, we expressed PAM proteins containing truncations, deletions, or point mutations in the COOH-terminal cytoplasmic domain. PAM proteins were not retained in the TGN when half of the cytoplasmic domain was deleted; such proteins accumulated on the plasma membrane, were not efficiently internalized, and were cleaved to generate a bifunctional PAM protein that was not stored in secretory granules. A tyrosine-based internalization motif was identified, which was not required for efficient cleavage of full-length integral membrane PAM by secretory granule enzymes. Deletion of an 18-amino acid domain surrounding this Tyr residue both diminished cleavage of membrane PAM by secretory granule enzymes and eliminated internalization of PAM from the plasma membrane. The cytoplasmic domain is responsible for retaining membrane PAM in the TGN and for retrieving membrane PAM from the cell surface, while the lumenal catalytic domains of PAM appear to be responsible for

  5. Tracking cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains with the ostreolysin A-mCherry protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Skočaj

    Full Text Available Ostreolysin A (OlyA is an ∼15-kDa protein that has been shown to bind selectively to membranes rich in cholesterol and sphingomyelin. In this study, we investigated whether OlyA fluorescently tagged at the C-terminal with mCherry (OlyA-mCherry labels cholesterol/sphingomyelin domains in artificial membrane systems and in membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK epithelial cells. OlyA-mCherry showed similar lipid binding characteristics to non-tagged OlyA. OlyA-mCherry also stained cholesterol/sphingomyelin domains in the plasma membranes of both fixed and living MDCK cells, and in the living cells, this staining was abolished by pretreatment with either methyl-β-cyclodextrin or sphingomyelinase. Double labelling of MDCK cells with OlyA-mCherry and the sphingomyelin-specific markers equinatoxin II-Alexa488 and GST-lysenin, the cholera toxin B subunit as a probe that binds to the ganglioside GM1, or the cholesterol-specific D4 domain of perfringolysin O fused with EGFP, showed different patterns of binding and distribution of OlyA-mCherry in comparison with these other proteins. Furthermore, we show that OlyA-mCherry is internalised in living MDCK cells, and within 90 min it reaches the juxtanuclear region via caveolin-1-positive structures. No binding to membranes could be seen when OlyA-mCherry was expressed in MDCK cells. Altogether, these data clearly indicate that OlyA-mCherry is a promising tool for labelling a distinct pool of cholesterol/sphingomyelin membrane domains in living and fixed cells, and for following these domains when they are apparently internalised by the cell.

  6. Building a patchwork - The yeast plasma membrane as model to study lateral domain formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuberth, Christian; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2015-04-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) has to fulfill a wide range of biological functions including selective uptake of substances, signal transduction and modulation of cell polarity and cell shape. To allow efficient regulation of these processes many resident proteins and lipids of the PM are laterally segregated into different functional domains. A particularly striking example of lateral segregation has been described for the budding yeast PM, where integral membrane proteins as well as lipids exhibit very slow translational mobility and form a patchwork of many overlapping micron-sized domains. Here we discuss the molecular and physical mechanisms contributing to the formation of a multi-domain membrane and review our current understanding of yeast PM organization. Many of the fundamental principles underlying membrane self-assembly and organization identified in yeast are expected to equally hold true in other organisms, even for the more transient and elusive organization of the PM in mammalian cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nanoscale membrane organisation and signalling.

  7. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to study diffusion in the presence of a hierarchy of membrane domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalay, Ziya

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a commonly used experimental technique to study molecular transport, especially in biological systems. FCS is particularly useful in two-dimensional systems such as the cell membrane, where molecules approximately move in a plane over several hundreds of nanometers, and the signal to noise ratio is high. Recent observations showed that proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane (the outermost membrane of a cell) can become temporarily confined in a hierarchy of membrane domains, induced by actin filaments and dynamic clusters formed by lipids and proteins (rafts). There has been considerable interest in measuring the characteristic size and lifetime of these domains via microscopy techniques, including FCS. Even though FCS is widely applicable, interpretation of the results is often indirect, as data has to be fit to model predictions in order to extract transport coefficients. In this talk, I will present our recent theoretical and computational findings on how FCS measurements would reflect diffusion in the simultaneous presence of cytoskeleton induced membrane compartments, and raft-like domains.

  8. Two-component membrane material properties and domain formation from dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illya, G; Lipowsky, R; Shillcock, J C

    2006-09-21

    The material parameters (area stretch modulus and bending rigidity) of two-component amphiphilic membranes are determined from dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The preferred area per molecule for each species is varied so as to produce homogeneous mixtures or nonhomogeneous mixtures that form domains. If the latter mixtures are composed of amphiphiles with the same tail length, but different preferred areas per molecule, their material parameters increase monotonically as a function of composition. By contrast, mixtures of amphiphiles that differ in both tail length and preferred area per molecule form both homogeneous and nonhomogeneous mixtures that both exhibit smaller values of their material properties compared to the corresponding pure systems. When the same nonhomogeneous mixtures of amphiphiles are assembled into planar membrane patches and vesicles, the resulting domain shapes are different when the bending rigidities of the domains are sufficiently different. Additionally, both bilayer and monolayer domains are observed in vesicles. We conclude that the evolution of the domain shapes is influenced by the high curvature of the vesicles in the simulation, a result that may be relevant for biological vesicle membranes.

  9. Complex roles of hybrid lipids in the composition, order, and size of lipid membrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Baykal-Caglar, Eda; Alwarawrah, Mohammad; Huang, Juyang

    2014-02-11

    Hybrid lipids (HL) are phospholipids with one saturated chain and one unsaturated chain. HL are hypothesized to act as linactants (i.e., 2D surfactants) in cell membranes, reducing line tension and creating nanoscopic lipid domains. Here we compare three hybrid lipids of different chain unsaturation (16:0-18:1PC (POPC), 16:0-18:2PC (PLPC), and 16:0-20:4PC (PAPC)) in their abilities to alter the composition, line tension, order, and compactness of lipid domains. We found that the liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) lipid domains in PAPC/di18:0PC(DSPC)/cholesterol and PLPC/DSPC/cholesterol mixtures are micrometer-sized, and only the POPC/DSPC/cholesterol system has nanoscopic domains. The results indicate that some HLs with polyunsaturated chains are not linactants, and the monounsaturated POPC displays both properties of weak linactants and "Ld-phase" lipids such as di18:1PC (DOPC). The obtained phase boundaries from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) show that both POPC and PLPC partition well in the Lo phases. Our MD simulations reveal that these hybrid lipids decrease the order and compactness of Lo domains. Thus, hybrid lipids distinguish themselves from other lipid groups in this combined "partitioning and loosening" ability, which could explain why the Lo domains of GUVs, which often do not contain HL, are more compact than the raft domains in cell membranes. Our line tension measurement and Monte Carlo simulation both show that even the monounsaturated POPC is a weak linactant with only modest ability to occupy domain boundaries and reduce line tension. A more important property of HLs is that they can reduce physical property differences of Lo and Ld bulk domains, which also reduces line tension at domain boundaries.

  10. Plasma membrane partitioning: from macro-domains to new views on plasmodesmata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutté, Yohann; Moreau, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular functions relies on partitioning of domains of diverse sizes within the plasma membrane (PM). Macro-domains measure several micrometers and contain specific proteins concentrated to specific sides (apical, basal, and lateral) of the PM conferring a polarity to the cell. Cell polarity is one of the driving forces in tissue and growth patterning. To maintain macro-domains within the PM, eukaryotic cells exert diverse mechanisms to counteract the free lateral diffusion of proteins. Protein activation/inactivation, endocytosis, PM recycling of transmembrane proteins and the role of diffusion barriers in macro-domains partitioning at PM will be discussed. Moreover, as plasmodesmata (PDs) are domains inserted within the PM which also mediate tissue and growth patterning, it is essential to understand how segregation of specific set of proteins is maintained at PDs while PDs domains are smaller in size compared to macro-domains. Here, we will present mechanisms allowing restriction of proteins at PM macro-domains, but for which molecular components have been found in PDs proteome. We will explore the hypothesis that partitioning of macro-domains and PDs may be ruled by similar mechanisms.

  11. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-04-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been the subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored-mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic-ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane.

  12. Chain ordering of hybrid lipids can stabilize domains in saturated/hybrid/cholesterol lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T.; Brewster, R.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-07-01

    We use a liquid-crystal model to predict that hybrid lipids (lipids that have one saturated and one unsaturated tail) can stabilize line interfaces between domains in mixed membranes of saturated lipids, hybrid lipids, and cholesterol (SHC membranes). The model predicts the phase separation of SHC membranes with both parabolic and loop binodals depending on the cholesterol concentration, modeled via an effective pressure. In some cases, the hybrid lipids can reduce the line tension to zero in SHC membranes at temperatures that approach the critical temperature as the pressure is increased. The differences in the hybrid saturated tail conformational order in bulk and at the interface are responsible for the reduction of the line tension.

  13. Reduced barrier efficiency in axillary stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, A; Lee, R S; Moore, A E; Pudney, P D A; Paterson, S E; Rawlings, A V

    2002-06-01

    The skin of the axilla is cosmetically important with millions of consumers daily applying antiperspirant/deodorant products. Despite this, we know virtually nothing about axillary skin or how antiperspirant (AP) use impacts upon it. To characterize the axillary stratum corneum and determine whether this is a unique skin type, we have looked at stratum corneum composition and function, particularly its barrier properties, and compared it with other body sites. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and corneosurfametry (CSM) revealed a reduced barrier function in the axilla. HPTLC analysis of the stratum corneum lipids demonstrated statistically elevated levels of fatty acids, ceramides, and particularly cholesterol in the axilla. Both ceramide and cholesterol did not appear to change with depth, indicating that they were predominantly of stratum corneum origin. On the other hand, at least some of the fatty acid had a sebaceous origin. We hypothesized that the reduced barrier function might be owing to the changes in the crucial ceramide : cholesterol ratio. To address this, we used a combination of attenuated total reflectance-Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) with cyanoacrylate sampling. These results demonstrated more ordered lipid-lamellae phase behaviour in the axilla, suggesting that the elevated cholesterol might form crystal microdomains within the lipid lamellae, allowing an increase in water flux. Since an exaggerated application of antiperspirant had no effect upon the axilla barrier properties, it is concluded that this region of skin physiologically has a reduced barrier function.

  14. Plasma membrane partitioning: from macro-domains to new views on plasmodesmata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohann eBoutté

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Compartmentalization of cellular functions relies on partitioning of domains of diverse sizes within the plasma membrane (PM. Macro-domains measure several micrometers and contain specific proteins concentrated to specific sides (apical, basal and lateral of the PM conferring a polarity to the cell. Cell polarity is one of the driving forces in tissue and growth patterning. To maintain macro-domains within the PM, eukaryotic cells exert diverse mechanisms to counteract the free lateral diffusion of proteins. Protein activation/inactivation, endocytosis, PM recycling of transmembrane proteins and the role of diffusion barriers in macro-domains partitioning at PM will be discussed. Moreover, as plasmodesmata (PDs are domains inserted within the PM which also mediate tissue and growth patterning, it is essential to understand how segregation of specific set of proteins is maintained at PDs while PDs domains are smaller in size compared to macro-domains. Here, we will present mechanisms allowing restriction of proteins at PM macrodomains, but for which molecular components have been found in PDs proteome. We will explore the hypothesis that partitioning of macro-domains and PDs may be ruled by similar mechanisms.

  15. DNA damage targets PKC{eta} to the nuclear membrane via its C1b domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamarkin, Ana; Zurgil, Udi; Braiman, Alex; Hai, Naama; Krasnitsky, Ella; Maissel, Adva; Ben-Ari, Assaf; Yankelovich, Liat; Livneh, Etta, E-mail: etta@bgumail.bgu.ac.il

    2011-06-10

    Translocation to cellular membranes is one of the hallmarks of PKC activation, occurring as a result of the generation of lipid secondary messengers in target membrane compartments. The activation-induced translocation of PKCs and binding to membranes is largely directed by their regulatory domains. We have previously reported that PKC{eta}, a member of the novel subfamily and an epithelial specific isoform, is localized at the cytoplasm and ER/Golgi and is translocated to the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope upon short-term activation by PMA. Here we show that PKC{eta} is shuttling between the cytoplasm and the nucleus and that upon etoposide induced DNA damage is tethered at the nuclear envelope. Although PKC{eta} expression and its phosphorylation on the hydrophobic motif (Ser675) are increased by etoposide, this phosphorylation is not required for its accumulation at the nuclear envelope. Moreover, we demonstrate that the C1b domain is sufficient for translocation to the nuclear envelope. We further show that, similar to full-length PKC{eta}, the C1b domain could also confer protection against etoposide-induced cell death. Our studies demonstrate translocation of PKC{eta} to the nuclear envelope, and suggest that its spatial regulation could be important for its cellular functions including effects on cell death.

  16. Independent regulation of reovirus membrane penetration and apoptosis by the mu1 phi domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Danthi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of reovirus encephalitis. Reovirus outer-capsid protein mu1, which functions to penetrate host cell membranes during viral entry, is the primary regulator of apoptosis following reovirus infection. Ectopic expression of full-length and truncated forms of mu1 indicates that the mu1 phi domain is sufficient to elicit a cell death response. To evaluate the contribution of the mu1 phi domain to the induction of apoptosis following reovirus infection, phi mutant viruses were generated by reverse genetics and analyzed for the capacity to penetrate cell membranes and elicit apoptosis. We found that mutations in phi diminish reovirus membrane penetration efficiency by preventing conformational changes that lead to generation of key reovirus entry intermediates. Independent of effects on membrane penetration, amino acid substitutions in phi affect the apoptotic potential of reovirus, suggesting that phi initiates apoptosis subsequent to cytosolic delivery. In comparison to wild-type virus, apoptosis-defective phi mutant viruses display diminished neurovirulence following intracranial inoculation of newborn mice. These results indicate that the phi domain of mu1 plays an important regulatory role in reovirus-induced apoptosis and disease.

  17. Protein sorting by lipid phase-like domains supports emergent signaling function in B lymphocyte plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Matthew B; Shelby, Sarah A; Núñez, Marcos F; Wisser, Kathleen; Veatch, Sarah L

    2017-02-01

    Diverse cellular signaling events, including B cell receptor (BCR) activation, are hypothesized to be facilitated by domains enriched in specific plasma membrane lipids and proteins that resemble liquid-ordered phase-separated domains in model membranes. This concept remains controversial and lacks direct experimental support in intact cells. Here, we visualize ordered and disordered domains in mouse B lymphoma cell membranes using super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy, demonstrate that clustered BCR resides within ordered phase-like domains capable of sorting key regulators of BCR activation, and present a minimal, predictive model where clustering receptors leads to their collective activation by stabilizing an extended ordered domain. These results provide evidence for the role of membrane domains in BCR signaling and a plausible mechanism of BCR activation via receptor clustering that could be generalized to other signaling pathways. Overall, these studies demonstrate that lipid mediated forces can bias biochemical networks in ways that broadly impact signal transduction.

  18. Structure and dynamics of nano-sized raft-like domains on the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Fernando E.; Pantano, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes are constitutively composed of thousands of different lipidic species, whose specific organization leads to functional heterogeneities. In particular, sphingolipids, cholesterol and some proteins associate among them to form stable nanoscale domains involved in recognition, signaling, membrane trafficking, etc. Atomic-detail information in the nanometer/second scale is still elusive to experimental techniques. In this context, molecular simulations on membrane systems have provided useful insights contributing to bridge this gap. Here we present the results of a series of simulations of biomembranes representing non-raft and raft-like nano-sized domains in order to analyze the particular structural and dynamical properties of these domains. Our results indicate that the smallest (5 nm) raft domains are able to preserve their distinctive structural and dynamical features, such as an increased thickness, higher ordering, lower lateral diffusion, and specific lipid-ion interactions. The insertion of a transmembrane protein helix into non-raft, extended raft-like, and raft-like nanodomain environments result in markedly different protein orientations, highlighting the interplay between the lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions.

  19. Structural determinants of protein partitioning into ordered membrane domains and lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorent, Joseph Helmuth; Levental, Ilya

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the existence of lateral nanoscopic lipid domains in plasma membranes, known as lipid rafts. These domains preferentially recruit membrane proteins and lipids to facilitate their interactions and thereby regulate transmembrane signaling and cellular homeostasis. The functionality of raft domains is intrinsically dependent on their selectivity for specific membrane components; however, while the physicochemical determinants of raft association for lipids are known, very few systematic studies have focused on the structural aspects that guide raft partitioning of proteins. In this review, we describe biophysical and thermodynamic aspects of raft-mimetic liquid ordered phases, focusing on those most relevant for protein partitioning. Further, we detail the variety of experimental models used to study protein-raft interactions. Finally, we review the existing literature on mechanisms for raft targeting, including lipid post-translational modifications, lipid binding, and transmembrane domain features. We conclude that while protein palmitoylation is a clear raft-targeting signal, few other general structural determinants for raft partitioning have been revealed, suggesting that many discoveries lie ahead in this burgeoning field.

  20. Membrane-Pore Forming Characteristics of the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattip Kurehong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Previously, the 126-kDa Bordetella pertussis CyaA pore-forming/hemolysin (CyaA-Hly domain was shown to retain its hemolytic activity causing lysis of susceptible erythrocytes. Here, we have succeeded in producing, at large quantity and high purity, the His-tagged CyaA-Hly domain over-expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble hemolytically-active form. Quantitative assays of hemolysis against sheep erythrocytes revealed that the purified CyaA-Hly domain could function cooperatively by forming an oligomeric pore in the target cell membrane with a Hill coefficient of ~3. When the CyaA-Hly toxin was incorporated into planar lipid bilayers (PLBs under symmetrical conditions at 1.0 M KCl, 10 mM HEPES buffer (pH 7.4, it produced a clearly resolved single channel with a maximum conductance of ~35 pS. PLB results also revealed that the CyaA-Hly induced channel was unidirectional and opened more frequently at higher negative membrane potentials. Altogether, our results first provide more insights into pore-forming characteristics of the CyaA-Hly domain as being the major pore-forming determinant of which the ability to induce such ion channels in receptor-free membranes could account for its cooperative hemolytic action on the target erythrocytes.

  1. Emerin suppresses Notch signaling by restricting the Notch intracellular domain to the nuclear membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byongsun; Lee, Tae-Hee; Shim, Jaekyung

    2017-02-01

    Emerin is an inner nuclear membrane protein that is involved in maintaining the mechanical integrity of the nuclear membrane. Increasing evidence supports the involvement of emerin in the regulation of gene expression; however, its precise function remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that emerin downregulated genes downstream of Notch signaling, which are activated exclusively by the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). Deletion mutant experiments revealed that the transmembrane domain of emerin is important for the inhibition of Notch signaling. Emerin interacted directly and colocalized with the NICD at the nuclear membrane. Emerin knockdown induced the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT, increased endogenous Notch signaling, and inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. Notably, the downregulation of barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) or lamin A/C increased Notch signaling by inducing the release of emerin into the cytosol, implying that nuclear membrane-bound emerin acts as an endogenous inhibitor of Notch signaling. Taken together, our results indicate that emerin negatively regulates Notch signaling by promoting the retention of the NICD at the nuclear membrane. This mechanism could constitute a new therapeutic target for the treatment of emerin-related diseases.

  2. Two photon fluorescence imaging of lipid membrane domains and potentials using advanced fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilin, Vasyl; Darwich, Zeinab; Richert, Ludovic; Didier, Pascal; Klymchenko, Andrey; Mély, Yves

    2013-02-01

    Biomembranes are ordered and dynamic nanoscale structures critical for cell functions. The biological functions of the membranes strongly depend on their physicochemical properties, such as electrostatics, phase state, viscosity, polarity and hydration. These properties are essential for the membrane structure and the proper folding and function of membrane proteins. To monitor these properties, fluorescence techniques and notably, two-photon microscopy appear highly suited due to their exquisite sensitivity and their capability to operate in complex biological systems, such as living cells and tissues. In this context, we have developed multiparametric environment-sensitive fluorescent probes tailored for precise location in the membrane bilayer. We notably developed probes of the 3-hydroxychromone family, characterized by an excited state intramolecular proton transfer reaction, which generates two tautomeric emissive species with well-separated emission bands. As a consequence, the response of these probes to changes in their environment could be monitored through changes in the ratios of the two bands, as well as through changes in the fluorescence lifetimes. Using two-photon ratiometric imaging and FLIM, these probes were used to monitor the surface membrane potential, and were applied to detect apoptotic cells and image membrane domains.

  3. Drag Coefficient of a Liquid Domain in a Fluid Membrane Surrounded by Confined Three-Dimensional Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujitani, Youhei

    2013-08-01

    It is thought that, in a biomembrane, some minor lipid constituents are concentrated in a domain called the lipid raft. Some raftlike domains in a lipid-bilayer membrane can be regarded as two-dimensional droplets. The membrane viscosities inside and outside the domain are generally different. The present author previously studied the drag coefficient of a circular liquid domain in a flat fluid membrane surrounded by three-dimensional fluids, which occupy the semi-infinite spaces on both sides of the membrane. Here we generalize this problem by assuming that the surrounding fluids are confined by container walls parallel to the membrane. Errors in the present author's previous studies are also corrected in this paper.

  4. The B-domain of factor VIII reduces cell membrane attachement to host cells in serum free conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Mille Petersen; Nørby, Peder Lisby; Flintegaard, Thomas Veje

    2010-01-01

    engineered extensively throughout the years to increase the low production yields that initially were obtained from mammalian cell cultures. The scope of this work was to investigate the interaction of rFVIII with the cell membrane surface of the producing cells in serum free medium. We wondered whether...... binding of rFVIII to the cell membrane could be a factor diminishing the production yield. We studied the contribution of the rFVIII B-domain to membrane attachment by transfecting several constructs containing increasing lengths of the B-domain into cells under serum free conditions. We found that 90......% of rFVIII is attached to the cell membrane of the producing cell when the rFVIII variant contains a short B-domain (21 aa). By increasing the length of the B-domain the membrane attached fraction can be reduced to 50% of the total expressed rFVIII. Further, our studies show that the N...

  5. Nano-domains of high viscosity and stiffness mapped in the cell membrane by thermal noise imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yunhsiang; Pralle, Arnd

    2012-02-01

    The cell membrane is thought to contain spatial domains, created by cholesterol-lipid clusters and by interactions with the membrane cytoskeleton. The influence of these domains on membrane protein mobility and cell signaling has clearly been demonstrate. Yet, due to their small size and transient nature, the cholesterol stabilized domains cannot be visualized directly. We show here that thermal noise imaging (TNI) which tracks the diffusion of a colloid labeled membrane protein with microsecond and nanometer precision, can visualize cholesterol stabilized domains, also know as lipid raft, in intact cells. Using TNI to confine a single membrane protein to diffuse for seconds in an area of 300nm x 300nm provides sufficient data for high resolutions maps of the local diffusion, local attraction potentials and membrane stiffness. Using a GPI-anchored GFP molecule to probe the membrane of PtK2 cells we detect domains of increased membrane stiffness, which also show increase viscosity and are the preferred location for the GPI-anchored protein. These domains are further stabilized by addition of ganglioside cross linking toxins and disappear after removal of the cholesterol.

  6. Understanding the role of amphipathic helices in N-BAR domain driven membrane remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haosheng; Mim, Carsten; Vázquez, Francisco X; Lyman, Edward; Unger, Vinzenz M; Voth, Gregory A

    2013-01-22

    Endophilin N-BAR (N-terminal helix and Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain tubulates and vesiculates lipid membranes in vitro via its crescent-shaped dimer and four amphipathic helices that penetrate into membranes as wedges. Like F-BAR domains, endophilin N-BAR also forms a scaffold on membrane tubes. Unlike F-BARs, endophilin N-BARs have N-terminal H0 amphipathic helices that are proposed to interact with other N-BARs in oligomer lattices. Recent cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions shed light on the organization of the N-BAR lattice coats on a nanometer scale. However, because of the resolution of the reconstructions, the precise positioning of the amphipathic helices is still ambiguous. In this work, we applied a coarse-grained model to study various membrane remodeling scenarios induced by endophilin N-BARs. We found that H0 helices of N-BARs prefer to align in an antiparallel manner at two ends of the protein to form a stable lattice. The deletion of H0 helices causes disruption of the lattice. In addition, we analyzed the persistence lengths of the protein-coated tubes and found that the stiffness of endophilin N-BAR-coated tubules qualitatively agrees with previous experimental work studying N-BAR-coated tubules. Large-scale simulations on membrane liposomes revealed a systematic relation between H0 helix density and local membrane curvature fluctuations. The data also suggest that the H0 helix is required for BARs to form organized structures on the liposome, further illustrating its important function.

  7. Autoantibodies from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis recognize a region within the nucleoplasmic domain of inner nuclear membrane protein LBR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, F; Noyer, C M; Ye, Q; Courvalin, J C; Worman, H J

    1996-01-01

    Autoantibodies from rare patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) recognize LBR, or lamin B receptor, an integral membrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane. Human LBR has a nucleoplasmic, amino-terminal domain of 208 amino acids followed by a carboxyl-terminal domain with eight putative transmembrane segments. Autoantibodies against LBR from four patients with PBC recognized the nucleoplasmic, amino-terminal domain but not the carboxyl-terminal domain. Immunoblotting of smaller fusion proteins demonstrated that these autoantibodies recognized a conformational epitope(s) contained within the stretch of amino acids from 1 to 60. These results, combined with those of previous studies, show that autoepitopes of nuclear membrane proteins are located within their nucleocytoplasmic domains and that autoantibodies from patients with PBC predominantly react with one domain of a protein antigen. This work also provides further characterization of anti-LBR antibodies that have found utility as reagents in cell biology research.

  8. Stratum corneum barrier integrity controls skin homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W

    1999-04-01

    The stratum corneum water barrier controls structural and functional properties of both the epidermis and the dermis. Treatments which chronically disrupt the stratum corneum water barrier can induce changes similar to those seen with 'anti-aging' treatments such as (-Hydroxy acids (AHAs) and Retin Atrade mark. Barrier disruption via daily tape stripping increases epidermal and dermal thickness, superficial and integral skin firmness, and improves skin surface texture. Modest or transitory disruption did not produce such effects. Similar results were observed with topical application of AHAs, retinoids or mild irritants after about 4-6 weeks provided such treatments resulted in prolonged elevation in TEWL (trans-epidermal water loss). Treatments that did not chronically elevate TEWL could also produce positive cosmetic effects, but such effects were in general restricted to the skin surface or epidermis. Irritation, which was observed with some treatments, was not solely responsible for the positive effects observed.

  9. Transposition of domains between the M2 and HN viral membrane proteins results in polypeptides which can adopt more than one membrane orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, G D; Hull, J D; Lamb, R A

    1989-11-01

    The influenza A virus M2 polypeptide is a small integral membrane protein that does not contain a cleaved signal sequence, but is unusual in that it assumes the membrane orientation of a class I integral membrane protein with an NH2-terminal ectodomain and a COOH-terminal cytoplasmic tail. To determine the domains of M2 involved in specifying membrane orientation, hybrid genes were constructed and expressed in which regions of the M2 protein were linked to portions of the paramyxovirus HN and SH proteins, two class II integral membrane proteins that adopt the opposite orientation in membranes from M2. A hybrid protein (MgMH) consisting of the M2 NH2-terminal and membrane-spanning domains linked precisely to the HN COOH-terminal ectodomain was found in cells in two forms: integrated into membranes in the M2 topology or completely translocated across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and ultimately secreted from the cell. The finding of a soluble form suggested that in this hybrid protein the anchor function of the M2 signal/anchor domain can be overridden. A second hybrid which contained the M2 NH2 terminus linked to the HN signal anchor and ectodomain (MgHH) was found in both the M2 and the HN orientation, suggesting that the M2 NH2 terminus was capable of reversing the topology of a class II membrane protein. The exchange of the M2 signal/anchor domain with that of SH resulted in a hybrid protein which assumed only the M2 topology. Thus, all these data suggest that the NH2-terminal 24 residues to M2 are important for directing the unusual membrane topology of the M2 protein. These data are discussed in relationship to the loop model for insertion of proteins into membranes and the role of charged residues as a factor in determining orientation.

  10. Simulation Studies of Stratum Corneum Lipid Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Das, C; Noro, MG; Olmsted, PD

    2009-01-01

    We present atomistic molecular dynamics results for fully hydrated bilayers composed of ceramide NS-24:0, free fatty acid 24:0 and cholesterol, to address the effect of the different components in the stratum corneum (the outermost layer of skin) lipid matrix on its structural properties. Bilayers containing ceramide molecules show higher in-plane density and hence lower rate of passive transport compared to phospholipid bilayers. At physiological temperatures, for all composition ratios expl...

  11. Structural plasticity in the topology of the membrane-interacting domain of HIV-1 gp41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Freites, J Alfredo; He, Jing; Tobias, Douglas J; Wimley, William C; Ladokhin, Alexey S

    2014-02-04

    We use a number of computational and experimental approaches to investigate the membrane topology of the membrane-interacting C-terminal domain of the HIV-1 gp41 fusion protein. Several putative transmembrane regions are identified using hydrophobicity analysis based on the Wimley-White scales, including the membrane-proximal external region (MPER). The MPER region is an important target for neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies and is believed to have an interfacial topology in the membrane. To assess the possibility of a transmembrane topology of MPER, we examined the membrane interactions of a peptide corresponding to a 22-residue stretch of the MPER sequence (residues 662-683) using fluorescence spectroscopy and oriented circular dichroism. In addition to the previously reported interfacial location, we identify a stable transmembrane conformation of the peptide in synthetic lipid bilayers. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the MPER-derived peptide in a lipid bilayer demonstrate a stable helical structure with an average tilt of 24 degrees, with the five tryptophan residues sampling different environments inside the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer, consistent with the observed spectral properties of intrinsic fluorescence. The degree of lipid bilayer penetration obtained by computer simulation was verified using depth-dependent fluorescence quenching of a selectively attached fluorescence probe. Overall, our data indicate that the MPER sequence can have at least two stable conformations in the lipid bilayer, interfacial and transmembrane, and suggest a possibility that external perturbations can switch the topology during physiological functioning.

  12. Oleic acid disorders stratum corneum lipids in Langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Guangru; VanWyck, Dina; Xiao, Xin; Mack Correa, M Catherine; Gunn, Euen; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Walters, Russel M

    2013-04-16

    Oleic acid (OA) is well-known to affect the function of the skin barrier. In this study, the molecular interactions between OA and model stratum corneum (SC) lipids consisting of ceramide, cholesterol, and palmitic acid (PA) were investigated with Langmuir monolayer and associated techniques. Mixtures with different OA/SC lipid compositions were spread at the air/water interface, and the phase behavior was tracked with surface pressure-molecular area (π-A) isotherms. With increasing OA levels in the monolayer, the films became more fluid and more compressible. The thermodynamic parameters derived from π-A isotherms indicated that there are preferential interactions between OA and SC lipids and that films of their mixtures were thermodynamically stable. The domain structure and lipid conformational order of the monolayers were studied through Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), respectively. Results indicate that lower concentrations of OA preferentially mix with and disorder the ceramide-enriched domains, followed by perturbation of the PA-enriched domains and disruption of SC lipid domain separation at higher OA levels.

  13. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong (Harvard-Med); (UAH); (Maastricht); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  14. Energy of the interaction between membrane lipid domains calculated from splay and tilt deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimzyanov, T. R.; Molotkovsky, R. J.; Kheyfets, B. B.; Akimov, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Specific domains, called rafts, are formed in cell membranes. Similar lipid domains can be formed in model membranes as a result of phase separation with raft size may remaining small (˜10-100 nm) for a long time. The characteristic lifetime of a nanoraft ensemble strongly depends on the nature of mutual raft interactions. The interaction energy between the boundaries of two rafts has been calculated under the assumption that the thickness of the raft bilayer is greater than that of the surrounding membrane, and elastic deformations appear in order to smooth the thickness mismatch at the boundary. When rafts approach each other, deformations from their boundaries overlap, making interaction energy profile sophisticated. It has been shown that raft merger occurs in two stages: rafts first merge in one monolayer of the lipid bilayer and then in another monolayer. Each merger stage requires overcoming of an energy barrier of about 0.08-0.12 k BT per 1 nm of boundary length. These results allow us to explain the stability of the ensemble of finite sized rafts.

  15. Co-existence of Gel and Fluid Lipid Domains in Single-component Phospholipid Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Clare L [McMaster University; Barrett, M [McMaster University; Toppozini, L [McMaster University; Yamani, Zahra [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, National Research Council, Chalk River Laboratorie; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Katsaras, John [ORNL; Fragneto, Giovanna [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Rheinstadter, Maikel C [McMaster University

    2012-01-01

    Lateral nanostructures in membranes, so-called rafts, are believed to strongly influence membrane properties and functions. The experimental observation of rafts has proven difficult as they are thought to be dynamic structures that likely fluctuate on nano- to microsecond time scales. Using neutron diffraction we present direct experimental evidence for the co-existence of gel and fluid lipid domains in a single-component phospholipid membrane made of DPPC as it undergoes its main phase transition. The coherence length of the neutron beam sets a lower limit for the size of structures that can be observed. Neutron coherence lengths between 30 and 242A used in this study were obtained by varying the incident neutron energy and the resolution of the neutron spectrometer. We observe Bragg peaks corresponding to co-existing nanometer sized structures, both in out-of-plane and in-plane scans, by tuning the neutron coherence length. During the main phase transition, instead of a continuous transition that shows a pseudo-critical behavior, we observe the co-existence of gel and fluid domains.

  16. Spatial control of plasma membrane domains: ROP GTPase-based symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenbiao; Lavagi, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Breaking of the cell membrane symmetry to form polarized or localized domains/regions of the plasma membrane (PM) is a fundamental cellular process that occurs in essentially all cellular organisms, and is required for a wide variety of cellular functions/behaviors including cell morphogenesis, cell division and cell differentiation. In plants, the development of localized or polarized PM domains has been linked to a vast array of cellular and developmental processes such as polar cell expansion, asymmetric cell division, cell morphogenesis, the polarization of auxin transporters (and thus auxin polar transport), secondary cell wall patterning, cell type specification, and tissue pattern formation. Rho GTPases from plants (ROPs) are known to be involved in many of these processes. Here, we review the current knowledge on ROP involvement in breaking symmetry and propose that ROP-based self-organizing signaling may provide a common mechanism for the spatial control of PM domains required in various cellular and developmental processes in plants. PMID:23177207

  17. Role of MINOS in Mitochondrial Membrane Architecture : Cristae Morphology and Outer Membrane Interactions Differentially Depend on Mitofilin Domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zerbes, Ralf M.; Bohnert, Maria; Stroud, David A.; von der Malsburg, Karina; Kram, Anita; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Warscheid, Bettina; Becker, Thomas; Wiedemann, Nils; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane contains a large protein complex crucial for membrane architecture, the mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS). MINOS is required for keeping cristae membranes attached to the inner boundary membrane via crista junctions and interacts with protein com

  18. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A. (UPENN-MED)

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  19. Single-molecule imaging of the H-ras membrane-anchor reveals domains in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the cell membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Lommerse, Piet H M; Cognet, Laurent; Harms, Gregory S; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; Spaink, Herman P; Schmidt, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    In the last decade evidence has accumulated that small domains of 50-700 nm in diameter are located in the exoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Most of these domains supposedly consist of specific sets of lipids and proteins, and are believed to coordinate signal transduction cascades. Whether similar domains are also present in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane is unclear so far. To investigate the presence of cytoplasmic leaflet domains, the H-Ras membrane-targeting sequence was fused to the C-terminus of the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein. Using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, trajectories of individual molecules diffusing in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane were recorded. From these trajectories, the diffusion of individual membrane-anchored enhanced yellow fluorescent protein molecules was studied in live cells on timescales from 5 to 200 ms. The results show that the diffusion of 30-40% of the molecules is constrained in domains with a typical size of 200 n...

  20. Polyethylcyanoacrylate nanoparticle transport through the stratum corneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Torres, Roberto; Jiménez Sandoval, Sergio J.; Ibañez-Orozco, Oscar; Rodríguez-Romo, Suemi

    2009-07-01

    The traceability of polyethylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles transported through human skin is studied in this paper. Photoluminescence is used to find the precise diffusion path of polyethylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles through the skin stratum corneum (SC). Reproducible data were obtained, and the nanoparticles' distribution in each layer of the SC is presented. We contribute to the basic knowledge of these phenomena as a stationary stochastic process using a one-dimensional linear chain model with the left end open and the right end closed. Possible applications are in the field of pharmaceutical technology, especially concerning drug transport through the skin by nanoparticle carriers.

  1. Fatty acyl chain-dependent but charge-independent association of the SH4 domain of Lck with lipid membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anoop Rawat; Avaronnan Harishchandran; Ramakrishnan Nagaraj

    2013-03-01

    The SH4 domain of Src family of nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases represents the extreme N-terminal 1–16 amino acid region which mediates membrane association of these proteins and facilitates their functions. The SH4 domains among Src members lack well-defined sequence consensus and vary in the net charge. However, they readily anchor to the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane upon fatty acid acylation. Here, we report the membrane association of differentially acylated SH4 domain of Lck kinase, which has net negative charge at physiological pH. Our results suggest that despite the net negative charge, the SH4 domain of Lck associates with membranes upon fatty acid acylation. While myristoylation at the N-terminus is sufficient for providing membrane anchorage, multiple acylation determines orientation of the peptide chain with respect to the lipid bilayer. Hence, fatty acylation serves more than just a lipid anchor. It has an important role in regulating the spatial orientation of the peptide domain with respect to the lipid bilayer, which could be important for the interaction of the other domains of these kinases with their partners.

  2. Two coiled-coil domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA affect membrane fusion events during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Ronzone

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. How IncA selectively inhibits or activates membrane fusion remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the spatial and molecular determinants of IncA's fusogenic and inhibitory functions. Using a cell-free membrane fusion assay, we found that inhibition of SNARE-mediated fusion requires IncA to be on the same membrane as the endocytic SNARE proteins. IncA displays two coiled-coil domains showing high homology with SNARE proteins. Domain swap and deletion experiments revealed that although both these domains are capable of independently inhibiting SNARE-mediated fusion, these two coiled-coil domains cooperate in mediating IncA multimerization and homotypic membrane interaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Chlamydia employs SNARE-like virulence factors that positively and negatively affect membrane fusion and promote infection.

  3. Two coiled-coil domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA affect membrane fusion events during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzone, Erik; Paumet, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A) appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. How IncA selectively inhibits or activates membrane fusion remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the spatial and molecular determinants of IncA's fusogenic and inhibitory functions. Using a cell-free membrane fusion assay, we found that inhibition of SNARE-mediated fusion requires IncA to be on the same membrane as the endocytic SNARE proteins. IncA displays two coiled-coil domains showing high homology with SNARE proteins. Domain swap and deletion experiments revealed that although both these domains are capable of independently inhibiting SNARE-mediated fusion, these two coiled-coil domains cooperate in mediating IncA multimerization and homotypic membrane interaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Chlamydia employs SNARE-like virulence factors that positively and negatively affect membrane fusion and promote infection.

  4. Characterization of a novel prokaryotic GDP dissociation inhibitor domain from the G protein coupled membrane protein FeoB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Edward T; Jalilian, Amir R; Spasov, Krasimir A; Unger, Vinzenz M

    2008-01-25

    The FeoB family of membrane embedded G proteins are involved with high affinity Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report that FeoB harbors a novel GDP dissociation inhibitor-like domain that specifically stabilizes GDP-binding through an interaction with the switch I region of the G protein. We show that the stabilization of GDP binding is conserved between species despite a high degree of sequence variability in their guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI)-like domains, and demonstrate that the presence of the membrane embedded domain increases GDP-binding affinity roughly 150-fold over the level accomplished by action of the GDI-like domain alone. To our knowledge, this is the first example for a prokaryotic GDI, targeting a bacterial G protein-coupled membrane process. Our findings suggest that Fe(II) uptake in bacteria involves a G protein regulatory pathway reminiscent of signaling mechanisms found in higher-order organisms.

  5. Membrane-spanning domain of bovine foamy virus transmembrane protein having cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yonggang; YU Hong; WANG Jinzhong; CHEN Qimin; GENG Yunqi

    2006-01-01

    Foamy viruses (FVs) have broad cellular tropism infecting vertebrates from fish to human being,which indicates that Env protein has a high capability for membrane fusion.Conservative features in all FV transmembrane (TM) proteins include a region of hydrophobic domain called membrane-spanning domain (MSD),which contains several stretches of hydrophobic amino acids.To investigate whether these features were associated with the cytotoxicity effect of TM on Escherichia coli,a series of mutants were constructed and expressed in the E.coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-32a (+) as expressing vector.The results showed that only TM3 without MSD was expressed in E.coli,whereas the other two containing full or part of the MSD (TM1 and TM2) could not be expressed.Furthermore,the bacterial amount and living bacteria analysis revealed that the cytotoxicity of TM was dependent on its MSD,especially on the stretches of hydrophobic amino acids.Western blotting analysis showed that TM3 protein was purified with affinity purification.

  6. The Membrane-anchoring Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands Dictates Their Ability to Operate in Juxtacrine Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Jianying; Opresko, Lee; Chrisler, William B.; Orr, Galya; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H S.

    2005-06-01

    All ligands of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are synthesized as membrane-anchored precursors. Previous work has suggested that some ligands, such as EGF, must be proteolytically released to be active, whereas others, such as heparin binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) can function while still anchored to the membrane (i.e., juxtacrine signaling). To explore the structural basis for these differences in ligand activity, we engineered a series of membrane-anchored ligands in which the core, receptor-binding domain of EGF was combined with different domains of both EGF and HB-EGF. We found that ligands having the N-terminal extension of EGF could not bind to the EGFR, even when released from the membrane. Ligands lacking an N-terminal extension, but possessing the membrane-anchoring domain of EGF still required proteolytic release for activity, whereas ligands with the membrane anchoring domain of HB-EGF could elicit full biological activity while still membrane anchored. Ligands containing the HB-EGF membrane anchor, but lacking an N-terminal extension, activated EGFR during their transit through the Golgi apparatus . However, cell-mixing experiments and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies showed that juxtacrine signaling typically occurred in trans at the cell surface, at points of cell-cell contact. Our data suggest that the membrane-anchoring domain of ligands selectively controls their ability to participate in juxtacrine signaling and thus, only a subclass of EGFR ligands can act in a juxtacrine mode.

  7. Lipid domains control myelin basic protein adsorption and membrane interactions between model myelin lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Kaufman, Yair; Boggs, Joan M; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2014-02-25

    The surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscope were used to study the effects of lipid composition and concentrations of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the structure of model lipid bilayers, as well as the interaction forces and adhesion between them. The lipid bilayers had a lipid composition characteristic of the cytoplasmic leaflets of myelin from "normal" (healthy) and "disease-like" [experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)] animals. They showed significant differences in the adsorption mechanism of MBP. MBP adsorbs on normal bilayers to form a compact film (3-4 nm) with strong intermembrane adhesion (∼0.36 mJ/m(2)), in contrast to its formation of thicker (7-8 nm) swelled films with weaker intermembrane adhesion (∼0.13 mJ/m(2)) on EAE bilayers. MBP preferentially adsorbs to liquid-disordered submicron domains within the lipid membranes, attributed to hydrophobic attractions. These results show a direct connection between the lipid composition of membranes and membrane-protein adsorption mechanisms that affects intermembrane spacing and adhesion and has direct implications for demyelinating diseases.

  8. Two forms of the membrane-bound state of the first C2 domain (C2A) of synaptotagminⅠand calcium-triggered membrane insertion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yuhong; LI Xianghui; WANG Fu; XUE Yi; SUI Senfang

    2003-01-01

    The synaptic vesicle protein synaptotagminⅠ (sytⅠ) is a vesicle trans membrane protein present in synaptic vesicles, which has been proposed as the Ca 2+ sensor that regulates secretion. The C2A domain is the membrane proximal part of its cytoplasmic domain. The interaction between C2A and lipid bilayer has be en considered to be essential for triggering neurotransmitter release. In the pr esent work, the measurements of membrane surface tension and surface concentrati on showed that the C2A domain of sytⅠexhibited two membrane-bound states: the s urface adsorption state and the membrane insertion state. The surface absorption state formed in a Ca2+-independent manner with lower affinity, while the membra ne insertion state formed with high affinity was only found in the presence of C a2+. Both the Ca2+-independent and Ca2+-dependent sytⅠ- membrane interactions r equired anionic phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine (PS). When expressed i nto rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells , as demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining and subcellular fractionation, most of the C2A was found at the plasma membrane, even when the cells were deple ted of Ca2+ by incubation with EGTA. These results suggested a new molecular mec hanism of sytⅠas a Ca2+ sensor in membrane fusion. Ca2+-independent surface ads orption might attach sytⅠto the release site during the docking or priming step . When intracellular Ca2+ increased, sytⅠtriggered the neurotransmitter release following the Ca2+-dependent penetration into the target membrane.

  9. The Dimer Interface of the Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Hemopexin Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochowicz, Anna; Goettig, Peter; Evans, Richard; Visse, Robert; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Palmisano, Ralf; Ito, Noriko; Richter, Klaus; Maskos, Klaus; Franke, Daniel; Svergun, Dmitri; Nagase, Hideaki; Bode, Wolfram; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2011-01-01

    Homodimerization is an essential step for membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) to activate proMMP-2 and to degrade collagen on the cell surface. To uncover the molecular basis of the hemopexin (Hpx) domain-driven dimerization of MT1-MMP, a crystal structure of the Hpx domain was solved at 1.7 Å resolution. Two interactions were identified as potential biological dimer interfaces in the crystal structure, and mutagenesis studies revealed that the biological dimer possesses a symmetrical interaction where blades II and III of molecule A interact with blades III and II of molecule B. The mutations of amino acids involved in the interaction weakened the dimer interaction of Hpx domains in solution, and incorporation of these mutations into the full-length enzyme significantly inhibited dimer-dependent functions on the cell surface, including proMMP-2 activation, collagen degradation, and invasion into the three-dimensional collagen matrix, whereas dimer-independent functions, including gelatin film degradation and two-dimensional cell migration, were not affected. These results shed light on the structural basis of MT1-MMP dimerization that is crucial to promote cellular invasion. PMID:21193411

  10. Lipid domains in intact fiber-cell plasma membranes isolated from cortical and nuclear regions of human eye lenses of donors from different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2015-03-01

    The results reported here clearly document changes in the properties and the organization of fiber-cell membrane lipids that occur with age, based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis of lens membranes of clear lenses from donors of age groups from 0 to 20, 21 to 40, and 61 to 80 years. The physical properties, including profiles of the alkyl chain order, fluidity, hydrophobicity, and oxygen transport parameter, were investigated using EPR spin-labeling methods, which also provide an opportunity to discriminate coexisting lipid domains and to evaluate the relative amounts of lipids in these domains. Fiber-cell membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments: bulk lipid domain, which appears minimally affected by membrane proteins, and two domains that appear due to the presence of membrane proteins, namely boundary and trapped lipid domains. In nuclear membranes the amount of boundary and trapped phospholipids as well as the amount of cholesterol in trapped lipid domains increased with the donors' age and was greater than that in cortical membranes. The difference between the amounts of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins in nuclear and cortical membranes increased with the donors' age. It was also shown that cholesterol was to a large degree excluded from trapped lipid domains in cortical membranes. It is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes was greater than that of cortical membranes for all age groups. The amount of lipids in domains of low oxygen permeability, mainly in trapped lipid domains, were greater in nuclear than cortical membranes and increased with the age of donors. These results indicate that the nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes were less permeable to oxygen than cortical membranes and become less permeable to oxygen with age. In clear lenses, age-related changes in the lens lipid and protein composition and organization appear to occur in ways that increase fiber

  11. Proving lipid rafts exist: membrane domains in the prokaryote Borrelia burgdorferi have the same properties as eukaryotic lipid rafts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J LaRocca

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts in eukaryotic cells are sphingolipid and cholesterol-rich, ordered membrane regions that have been postulated to play roles in many membrane functions, including infection. We previously demonstrated the existence of cholesterol-lipid-rich domains in membranes of the prokaryote, B. burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease [LaRocca et al. (2010 Cell Host & Microbe 8, 331-342]. Here, we show that these prokaryote membrane domains have the hallmarks of eukaryotic lipid rafts, despite lacking sphingolipids. Substitution experiments replacing cholesterol lipids with a set of sterols, ranging from strongly raft-promoting to raft-inhibiting when mixed with eukaryotic sphingolipids, showed that sterols that can support ordered domain formation are both necessary and sufficient for formation of B. burgdorferi membrane domains that can be detected by transmission electron microscopy or in living organisms by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET. Raft-supporting sterols were also necessary and sufficient for formation of high amounts of detergent resistant membranes from B. burgdorferi. Furthermore, having saturated acyl chains was required for a biotinylated lipid to associate with the cholesterol-lipid-rich domains in B. burgdorferi, another characteristic identical to that of eukaryotic lipid rafts. Sterols supporting ordered domain formation were also necessary and sufficient to maintain B. burgdorferi membrane integrity, and thus critical to the life of the organism. These findings provide compelling evidence for the existence of lipid rafts and show that the same principles of lipid raft formation apply to prokaryotes and eukaryotes despite marked differences in their lipid compositions.

  12. Amounts of phospholipids and cholesterol in lipid domains formed in intact lens membranes: Methodology development and its application to studies of porcine lens membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2015-11-01

    An electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling method has been developed that allows quantitative evaluation of the amounts of phospholipids and cholesterol in lipid domains of intact fiber-cell plasma membranes isolated from cortical and nuclear regions of eye lenses. The long term goal of this research is the assessment of organizational changes in human lens fiber cell membranes that occur with age and during cataract development. The measurements needed to be performed on lens membranes prepared from eyes of single donors and from single eyes. For these types of studies it is necessary to separate the age/cataract related changes from preparation/technique related changes. Human lenses differ not only because of age, but also because of the varying health histories of the donors. To solve these problems the sample-to-sample preparation/technique related changes were evaluated for cortical and nuclear lens membranes prepared from single porcine eyes. It was assumed that the differences due to the age (animals were two year old) and environmental conditions for raising these animals were minimal. Mean values and standard deviations from preparation/technique changes for measured amounts of lipids in membrane domains were calculated. Statistical analysis (Student's t-test) of the data also allowed determining the differences of mean values which were statistically significant with P ≤ 0.05. These differences defined for porcine lenses will be used for comparison of amounts of lipids in domains in human lens membranes prepared from eyes of single donors and from single eyes. Greater separations will indicate that differences were statistically significant with (P ≤ 0.05) and that they came from different than preparation/technique sources. Results confirmed that in nuclear porcine membranes the amounts of lipids in domains created due to the presence of membrane proteins were greater than those in cortical membranes and the differences were larger than

  13. Thrombospondin Type-1 Domain-Containing 7A in Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Seitz-Polski, Barbara; Ma, Hong; Zahner, Gunther; Dolla, Guillaume; Hoxha, Elion; Helmchen, Udo; Dabert-Gay, Anne-Sophie; Debayle, Delphine; Merchant, Michael; Klein, Jon; Salant, David J.; Stahl, Rolf A.K.; Lambeau, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Idiopathic membranous nephropathy is an autoimmune disease. In approximately 70% of patients, it is associated with autoantibodies against the phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R1). Antigenic targets in the remaining patients are unknown. METHODS Using Western blotting, we screened serum samples from patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy, patients with other glomerular diseases, and healthy controls for antibodies against human native glomerular proteins. We partially purified a putative new antigen, identified this protein by means of mass spectrometry of digested peptides, and validated the results by analysis of recombinant protein expression, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS Serum samples from 6 of 44 patients in a European cohort and 9 of 110 patients in a Boston cohort with anti-PLA2R1–negative idiopathic membranous nephropathy recognized a glomerular protein that was 250 kD in size. None of the serum samples from the 74 patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy who were sero-positive for anti-PLA2R1 antibodies, from the 76 patients with other glomerular diseases, and from the 44 healthy controls reacted against this antigen. Although this newly identified antigen is clearly different from PLA2R1, it shares some biochemical features, such as N-glycosylation, membranous location, and reactivity with serum only under nonreducing conditions. Mass spectrometry identified this antigen as thrombospondin type-1 domain-containing 7A (THSD7A). All reactive serum samples recognized recombinant THSD7A and immunoprecipitated THSD7A from glomerular lysates. Moreover, immunohistochemical analyses of biopsy samples from patients revealed localization of THSD7A to podocytes, and IgG eluted from one of these samples was specific for THSD7A. CONCLUSIONS In our cohort, 15 of 154 patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy had circulating autoantibodies to THSD7A but not to PLA2R1, a finding that suggests a distinct

  14. pH-Triggered Conformational Switching along the Membrane Insertion Pathway of the Diphtheria Toxin T-Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey S. Ladokhin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The translocation (T-domain plays a key role in the action of diphtheria toxin and is responsible for transferring the catalytic domain across the endosomal membrane into the cytosol in response to acidification. Deciphering the molecular mechanism of pH-dependent refolding and membrane insertion of the T-domain, which is considered to be a paradigm for cell entry of other bacterial toxins, reveals general physicochemical principles underlying membrane protein assembly and signaling on membrane interfaces. Structure-function studies along the T-domain insertion pathway have been affected by the presence of multiple conformations at the same time, which hinders the application of high-resolution structural techniques. Here, we review recent progress in structural, functional and thermodynamic studies of the T-domain archived using a combination of site-selective fluorescence labeling with an array of spectroscopic techniques and computer simulations. We also discuss the principles of conformational switching along the insertion pathway revealed by studies of a series of T-domain mutants with substitutions of histidine residues.

  15. The membrane-extrinsic domain of cytochrome b(558/566) from the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius performs pivoting movements with respect to the membrane surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepp-Cothenet, B; Schütz, M; Baymann, F; Brugna, M; Nitschke, W; Myllykallio, H; Schmidt, C

    2001-01-05

    The orientation of the membrane-attached cytochrome b(558/566)-haem with respect to the membrane was determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy on two-dimensionally ordered oxidised membrane fragments from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Unlike the other redox centres in the membrane, the cytochrome b(558/566)-haem was found to cover a range of orientations between 25 degrees and 90 degrees. The described results are reminiscent of those obtained on the Rieske cluster of bc complexes and indicate that the membrane-extrinsic domain of cytochrome b(558/566) can perform pivoting motion between two extreme positions. Such a conformational flexibility is likely to play a role in electron transfer with its redox partners.

  16. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Truschel; D Sengupta; A Foote; A Heroux; M Macbeth; A Linstedt

    2011-12-31

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  17. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truschel, S.T.; Heroux, A.; Sengupta, D.; Foote, A.; Macbeth, M. R.; Linstedt, A. D.

    2011-06-10

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  18. Optical Signatures of Quantum Delocalization over Extended Domains in Photosynthetic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Christopher A; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2015-08-27

    The prospect of coherent dynamics and excitonic delocalization across several light-harvesting structures in photosynthetic membranes is of considerable interest, but challenging to explore experimentally. Here we demonstrate theoretically that the excitonic delocalization across extended domains involving several light-harvesting complexes can lead to unambiguous signatures in the optical response, specifically, linear absorption spectra. We characterize, under experimentally established conditions of molecular assembly and protein-induced inhomogeneities, the optical absorption in these arrays from polarized and unpolarized excitation, and demonstrate that it can be used as a diagnostic tool to determine the resonance coupling between iso-energetic light-harvesting structures. The knowledge of these couplings would then provide further insight into the dynamical properties of transfer, such as facilitating the accurate determination of Förster rates.

  19. Optical signatures of quantum delocalization over extended domains in photosynthetic membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Christopher A; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of coherent dynamics and excitonic delocalization across several light-harvesting structures in photosynthetic membranes is of considerable interest, but challenging to explore experimentally. Here we demonstrate theoretically that the excitonic delocalization across extended domains involving several light-harvesting complexes can lead to unambiguous signatures in the optical response, specifically, linear absorption spectra. We characterize, under experimentally established conditions of molecular assembly and protein-induced inhomogeneities, the optical absorption in these arrays from polarized and unpolarized excitation, and demonstrate that it can be used as a diagnostic tool to determine the coherent coupling among iso-energetic light-harvesting structures. The knowledge of these couplings would then provide further insight into the dynamical properties of transfer, such as facilitating the accurate determination of F\\"orster rates.

  20. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC. PMID:27070312

  1. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araye, Anne; Goudet, Amélie; Barbier, Julien; Pichard, Sylvain; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pérez, Javier; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Chenal, Alexandre; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC), a translocation domain (HN) and a receptor-binding domain (HC). Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC.

  2. Gel Domains in the Plasma Membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: HIGHLY ORDERED, ERGOSTEROL-FREE, AND SPHINGOLIPID-ENRICHED LIPID RAFTS*

    OpenAIRE

    Aresta-Branco, Francisco; Cordeiro, André M.; Marinho, H. Susana; Cyrne, Luísa; Antunes, Fernando; de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied using the probes trans-parinaric acid and diphenylhexatriene. Diphenylhexatriene anisotropy is a good reporter of global membrane order. The fluorescence lifetimes of trans-parinaric acid are particularly sensitive to the presence and nature of ordered domains, but thus far they have not been measured in yeast cells. A long lifetime typical of the gel phase (>30 ns) was found in wild-type (WT) cells from two different genetic backgro...

  3. Intra-ER sorting of the peroxisomal membrane protein Pex3 relies on its luminal domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H. Fakieh

    2013-06-01

    Pex3 is an evolutionarily conserved type III peroxisomal membrane protein required for peroxisome formation. It is inserted into the ER membrane and sorted via an ER subdomain (the peroxisomal ER, or pER to peroxisomes. By constructing chimeras between Pex3 and the type III ER membrane protein Sec66, we have been able to separate the signals that mediate insertion of Pex3 into the ER from those that mediate sorting within the ER to the pER subdomain. The N-terminal 17-amino acid segment of Pex3 contains two signals that are each sufficient for sorting to the pER: a chimeric protein containing the N-terminal domain of Pex3 fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic segments of Sec66 sorts to the pER in wild type cells, and does not colocalise with peroxisomes. Subsequent transport to existing peroxisomes requires the Pex3 transmembrane segment. When expressed in Drosophila S2R+ cells, ScPex3 targeting to peroxisomes is dependent on the intra-ER sorting signals in the N-terminal segment. The N-terminal segments of both human and Drosophila Pex3 contain intra-ER sorting information and can replace that of ScPex3. Our analysis has uncovered the signals within Pex3 required for the various steps of its transport to peroxisomes. Our generation of versions of Pex3 that are blocked at each stage along its transport pathway provides a tool to dissect the mechanism, as well as the molecular machinery required at each step of the pathway.

  4. A novel form of the membrane protein CD147 that contains an extra Ig-like domain and interacts homophilically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Marion H

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD147 is a broadly distributed integral membrane glycoprotein with two Ig-like domains implicated in a wide range of functions. It is associated at the cell surface with the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and 4 but interactions of the extracellular region have not been characterised. Results We report the characterisation of a form of CD147 with an additional membrane-distal Ig-like domain. In contrast to the two domain form, this three domain form of CD147 interacts homophilically. Surface plasmon resonance analysis using recombinant proteins showed that the interaction was of low affinity (KD ~ 40 μM and this is typical of many interactions between membrane proteins. cDNA for the 3 domain form are rare but have been identified in human and mouse retina. Conclusion The finding that the three domain form of CD147 has an extracellular ligand, that is it interacts homophilically, suggests this interaction may be important in aligning lactate transporters in the retina where lactate is an important metabolite.

  5. Ceramide-Enriched Membrane Domains in Red Blood Cells and the Mechanism ofSphingomyelinase-Induced Hot-Cold Hemolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, Ruth; Lopez, David; Sot, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    ) but also in goat erythrocytes, which lack PC. However, in horse erythrocytes, with a large proportion of PC and almost no SM, hot-cold hemolysis induced by PlcHR2 is not observed. Fluorescence microscopy observations confirm the formation of ceramide-enriched domains as a result of PlcHR2 activity. After...... cooling down to 4 °C, the erythrocyte ghost membranes arising from hemolysis contain large, ceramide-rich domains. We suggest that formation of these rigid domains in the originally flexible cell makes it fragile, thus highly susceptible to hemolysis. We also interpret the slow hemolysis observed at 37 °C...

  6. A neutron-diffraction study of the effect of hydration on stratum corneum structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charalambopoulou, G.C.; Steriotis, T.A.; Stefanopoulos, K.L.; Stubos, A.K. [NCSR ' Demokritos' , 15310 Agia Paraskevi Attikis (Greece); Hauss, T. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The primary barrier to transdermal diffusion resides in the stratum corneum (SC), the thin outermost layer of the skin. The SC hydration state is one of the most important factors that determine the rate of percutaneous permeability. Despite its great importance, the actual mechanism of water-SC interaction is yet unresolved. In the present work we employ the membrane neutron diffraction method, aiming to reveal structural details of porcine SC and ultimately enable the localization of water molecules in the two phases of the tissue. (orig.)

  7. Different domains of Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxins can bind to insect midgut membrane proteins on ligand blots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maagd, de R.A.; Klei, van der H.; Bakker, P.L.; Stiekema, W.J.; Bosch, D.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the role of the constituent domains of the CryIA(b) and CryIA(c) δ-endotoxins in binding to midgut epithelial cell membrane proteins of Spodoptera exigua and Manduca sexta on ligand blots. A collection of wild- type and CryIC-CryIA hybrid toxins was used for this purpose. As demonstr

  8. A conserved aromatic residue in the autochaperone domain of the autotransporter Hbp is critical for initiation of outer membrane translocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soprova, Z.; Sauri, A.; van Ulsen, P.; Tame, J.R.H.; den Blaauwen, T.; Jong, W.S.P.; Luirink, J.

    2010-01-01

    Autotransporters are bacterial virulence factors that share a common mechanism by which they are transported to the cell surface. They consist of an N-terminal passenger domain and a C-terminal β-barrel, which has been implicated in translocation of the passenger across the outer membrane (OM). The

  9. Modular toxin from the lynx spider Oxyopes takobius: Structure of spiderine domains in solution and membrane-mimicking environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadezhdin, Kirill D; Romanovskaia, Daria D; Sachkova, Maria Y; Oparin, Peter B; Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Grishin, Eugene V; Arseniev, Alexander S; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2017-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a common phenomenon in evolution of spider venom composition is the emergence of so-called modular toxins consisting of two domains, each corresponding to a "usual" single-domain toxin. In this article, we describe the structure of two domains that build up a modular toxin named spiderine or OtTx1a from the venom of Oxyopes takobius. Both domains were investigated by solution NMR in water and detergent micelles used to mimic membrane environment. The N-terminal spiderine domain OtTx1a-AMP (41 amino acid residues) contains no cysteines. It is disordered in aqueous solution but in micelles, it assumes a stable amphiphilic structure consisting of two α-helices separated by a flexible linker. On the contrary, the C-terminal domain OtTx1a-ICK (59 residues) is a disulfide-rich polypeptide reticulated by five S-S bridges. It presents a stable structure in water and its core is the inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) or knottin motif that is common among single-domain neurotoxins. OtTx1a-ICK structure is the first knottin with five disulfide bridges and it represents a good reference for the whole oxytoxin family. The affinity of both domains to membranes was measured with NMR using titration by liposome suspensions. In agreement with biological tests, OtTx1a-AMP was found to show high membrane affinity explaining its potent antimicrobial properties. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  10. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qianlong [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Blissard, Gary W. [Boyce Thompson Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United State (United States); Liu, Tong-Xian [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Li, Zhaofei, E-mail: zhaofeili73@outlook.com [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. - Highlights: • The baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. • The detailed mechanism of conformational change of GP64 is unknown. • We analyzed 24 positions that might stabilize the post-fusion structure of GP64. • We identified 4 residues in domain V that were critical for membrane fusion. • Two residues are critical for formation of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64.

  11. BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins use the same mechanism to sense membrane curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard; Bhatia, V K; Gether, U;

    2010-01-01

    The internal membranes of eukaryotic cells are all twists and bends characterized by high curvature. During recent years it has become clear that specific proteins sustain these curvatures while others simply recognize membrane shape and use it as "molecular information" to organize cellular...... processes in space and time. Here we discuss this new important recognition process termed membrane curvature sensing (MCS). First, we review a new fluorescence-based experimental method that allows characterization of MCS using measurements on single vesicles and compare it to sensing assays that use bulk...... on curved membranes instead of higher affinity as assumed so far. Finally, we integrate these new insights into the debate about which motifs are involved in sensing versus induction of membrane curvature and what role MCS proteins may play in biology....

  12. How cholesterol interacts with membrane proteins: an exploration of cholesterol-binding sites including CRAC, CARC and tilted domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques eFantini

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells contains several types of lipids displaying high biochemical variability in both their apolar moiety (e.g. the acyl chain of glycerolipids and their polar head (e.g. the sugar structure of glycosphingolipids. Among these lipids, cholesterol is unique because its biochemical variability is almost exclusively restricted to the oxidation of its polar -OH group. Although generally considered the most rigid membrane lipid, cholesterol can adopt a broad range of conformations due to the flexibility of its isooctyl chain linked to the polycyclic sterane backbone. Moreover, cholesterol is an asymmetric molecule displaying a planar face and a rough  face. Overall, these structural features open up a number of possible interactions between cholesterol and membrane lipids and proteins, consistent with the prominent regulatory functions that this unique lipid exerts on membrane components. The aim of this review is to describe how cholesterol interacts with membrane lipids and proteins at the molecular/atomic scale, with special emphasis on transmembrane domains of proteins containing either the consensus cholesterol-binding motifs CRAC and CARC or a tilted peptide. Despite their broad structural diversity, all these domains bind cholesterol through common molecular mechanisms, leading to the identification of a subset of amino acid residues that are overrepresented in both linear and three-dimensional membrane cholesterol-binding sites.

  13. The C-terminal Domains of Apoptotic BH3-only Proteins Mediate Their Insertion into Distinct Biological Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Fernández, Vicente; García-Murria, María J; Bañó-Polo, Manuel; Martin, Juliette; Monticelli, Luca; Orzáez, Mar; Mingarro, Ismael

    2016-11-25

    Changes in the equilibrium of pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein family in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) induce structural changes that commit cells to apoptosis. Bcl-2 homology-3 (BH3)-only proteins participate in this process by either activating pro-apoptotic effectors or inhibiting anti-apoptotic components and by promoting MOM permeabilization. The association of BH3-only proteins with MOMs is necessary for the activation and amplification of death signals; however, the nature of this association remains controversial, as these proteins lack a canonical transmembrane sequence. Here we used an in vitro expression system to study the insertion capacity of hydrophobic C-terminal regions of the BH3-only proteins Bik, Bim, Noxa, Bmf, and Puma into microsomal membranes. An Escherichia coli complementation assay was used to validate the results in a cellular context, and peptide insertions were modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. We also found that some of the C-terminal domains were sufficient to direct green fluorescent protein fusion proteins to specific membranes in human cells, but the domains did not activate apoptosis. Thus, the hydrophobic regions in the C termini of BH3-only members associated in distinct ways with various biological membranes, suggesting that a detailed investigation of the entire process of apoptosis should include studying the membranes as a setting for protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Short transmembrane domains with high-volume exoplasmic halves determine retention of Type II membrane proteins in the Golgi complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Rodrigo; Trenchi, Alejandra; González Montoro, Ayelén; Valdez Taubas, Javier; Maccioni, Hugo J F

    2013-12-01

    It is still unclear why some proteins that travel along the secretory pathway are retained in the Golgi complex whereas others make their way to the plasma membrane. Recent bioinformatic analyses on a large number of single-spanning membrane proteins support the hypothesis that specific features of the transmembrane domain (TMD) are relevant to the sorting of these proteins to particular organelles. Here we experimentally test this hypothesis for Golgi and plasma membrane proteins. Using the Golgi SNARE protein Sft1 and the plasma membrane SNARE protein Sso1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model proteins, we modified the length of their TMDs and the volume of their exoplasmic hemi-TMD, and determined their subcellular localization both in yeast and mammalian cells. We found that short TMDs with high-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs confer Golgi membrane residence, whereas TMDs with low-volume exoplasmic hemi-TMDs, either short or long, confer plasma membrane residence to these proteins. Results indicate that the shape of the exoplasmic hemi-TMD, in addition to the length of the entire TMD, determine retention in the Golgi or exit to the plasma membrane of Type II membrane proteins.

  15. Stratum corneum lipid organization as observed by atomic force, confocal and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlén, Lars; Plasencia Gil, Maria Inés; Bagatolli, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Skin moisturization is largely a function of stratum corneum barrier capacity, which in turn is a function of the physical state and structural organization of the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix [ J. Invest. Dermatol.18, 433 (1952); AIChE J. 21, 985 (1975); Acta Derm. Venereol.74, 1...... into co-existing microscopic domains below pH 6 [ Biophys. J.93, 3142 (2007) ]. It was further shown that the role of cholesterol is related to dispersion of ceramide-enriched domains. This effect is counteracted by the presence of free fatty acids, which mix with skin ceramides but not with cholesterol...... (1994); J. Invest. Dermatol.117, 830 (2001) ]. Three unsolved key questions with respect to this lipid matrix' structural organization [ Acta Derm. Venereol.74, 1 (1994); J. Invest. Dermatol.117, 830 (2001); J. Invest. Dermatol.118, 897 (2002); J. Invest. Dermatol.118, 899 (2002) ] are: i) whether...

  16. Insight into the adsorption profiles of the Saprolegnia monoica chitin synthase MIT domain on POPA and POPC membranes by molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Guanglin; Liang, Lijun; Brown, Christian; Wang, Qi; Bulone, Vincent; Tu, Yaoquan

    2016-02-21

    The critical role of chitin synthases in oomycete hyphal tip growth has been established. A microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain was discovered in the chitin synthases of the oomycete model organism, Saprolegnia monoica. MIT domains have been identified in diverse proteins and may play a role in intracellular trafficking. The structure of the Saprolegnia monoica chitin synthase 1 (SmChs1) MIT domain has been recently determined by our group. However, although our in vitro assay identified increased strength in interactions between the MIT domain and phosphatidic acid (PA) relative to other phospholipids including phosphatidylcholine (PC), the mechanism used by the MIT domain remains unknown. In this work, the adsorption behavior of the SmChs1 MIT domain on POPA and POPC membranes was systematically investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that the MIT domain can adsorb onto the tested membranes in varying orientations. Interestingly, due to the specific interactions between MIT residues and lipid molecules, the binding affinity to the POPA membrane is much higher than that to the POPC membrane. A binding hotspot, which is critical for the adsorption of the MIT domain onto the POPA membrane, was also identified. The lower binding affinity to the POPC membrane can be attributed to the self-saturated membrane surface, which is unfavorable for hydrogen-bond and electrostatic interactions. The present study provides insight into the adsorption profile of SmChs1 and additionally has the potential to improve our understanding of other proteins containing MIT domains.

  17. Role of a Putative gp41 Dimerization Domain in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Membrane Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.; Deng, Y; Li, Q; Dey, A; Moore, J; Lu, M

    2010-01-01

    The entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into a target cell entails a series of conformational changes in the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates the fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. A trimer-of-hairpins structure formed by the association of two heptad repeat (HR) regions of the gp41 ectodomain has been implicated in a late step of the fusion pathway. Earlier native and intermediate states of the protein are postulated to mediate the antiviral activity of the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide and of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NAbs), but the details of these structures remain unknown. Here, we report the identification and crystal structure of a dimerization domain in the C-terminal ectodomain of gp41 (residues 630 to 683, or C54). Two C54 monomers associate to form an asymmetric, antiparallel coiled coil with two distinct C-terminal {alpha}-helical overhangs. This dimer structure is conferred largely by interactions within a central core that corresponds to the sequence of enfuvirtide. The mutagenic alteration of the dimer interface severely impairs the infectivity of Env-pseudotyped viruses. Moreover, the C54 structure binds tightly to both the 2F5 and 4E10 NAbs and likely represents a potential intermediate conformation of gp41. These results should enhance our understanding of the molecular basis of the gp41 fusogenic structural transitions and thereby guide rational, structure-based efforts to design new fusion inhibitors and vaccine candidates intended to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

  18. Formation of domain structure of erythrocyte membrane in Wistar rat fed with CeCl3 per os

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To explore the possibility of absorption of lanthanides via digestive duct and their effects on the membrane structure and permeability of erythrocytes,the fine structure of erythrocyte membrane from Wistar rats,fed for 70 days of daily administration per os with 20 mg CeCl3/kg weight,was imaged by means of atomic force microscopy and FT-IR deconvolution spectra.The results show that,although the erythrocytes maintain the intact shape,the change of secondary structure,aggregation and crosslinking of the protein particles of membrane surface and the enlarged lipid regions lead to the domain structure formation.This structure might be responsible for the increasing permeability of erythrocyte membrane.

  19. CX3CL1, a chemokine finely tuned to adhesion: critical roles of the stalk glycosylation and the membrane domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano A. Ostuni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The multi-domain CX3CL1 transmembrane chemokine triggers leukocyte adherence without rolling and migration by presenting its chemokine domain (CD to its receptor CX3CR1. Through the combination of functional adhesion assays with structural analysis using FRAP, we investigated the functional role of the other domains of CX3CL1, i.e., its mucin stalk, transmembrane domain, and cytosolic domain. Our results indicate that the CX3CL1 molecular structure is finely adapted to capture CX3CR1 in circulating cells and that each domain has a specific purpose: the mucin stalk is stiffened by its high glycosylation to present the CD away from the membrane, the transmembrane domain generates the permanent aggregation of an adequate amount of monomers to guarantee adhesion and prevent rolling, and the cytosolic domain ensures adhesive robustness by interacting with the cytoskeleton. We propose a model in which quasi-immobile CX3CL1 bundles are organized to quickly generate adhesive patches with sufficiently high strength to capture CX3CR1+ leukocytes but with sufficiently low strength to allow their patrolling behavior.

  20. Topical Delivery of Interferon Alpha by Biphasic Vesicles: Evidence for a Novel Nanopathway across the Stratum Corneum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foldvari, M.; Badea, B; Wettig, S; Baboolal, D; Kumar, P; Creagh, A; Haynes, C

    2010-01-01

    Noninvasive delivery of macromolecules across intact skin is challenging but would allow for needle-free administration of many pharmaceuticals. Biphasic vesicles, a novel lipid-based topical delivery system, have been shown to deliver macromolecules into the skin. Investigation of the delivery mechanism of interferon alpha (IFN {alpha}), as a model protein, by biphasic vesicles could improve understanding of molecular transport through the stratum corneum and allow for the design of more effective delivery systems. The interaction of biphasic vesicles with human skin and isolated stratum corneum membrane was investigated by confocal microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS). Confocal microscopy revealed that biphasic vesicles delivered IFN {alpha} intercellularly, to a depth of 70 {micro}m, well below the stratum corneum and into the viable epidermis. DSC and SAXS/WAXS data suggest that the interaction of biphasic vesicles with SC lipids resulted in the formation of a three-dimensional cubic Pn3m polymorphic phase by the molecular rearrangement of intercellular lipids. This cubic phase could be an intercellular permeation nanopathway that may explain the increased delivery of IFN {alpha} by biphasic vesicles. Liposomes and submicrometer emulsion (the individual building blocks of biphasic vesicles) separately and methylcellulose gel, an alternative topical vehicle, did not induce a cubic phase and delivered low amounts of IFN {alpha} below the stratum corneum. Molecular modeling of the cubic Pn3m phase and lamellar-to-cubic phase transitions provides a plausible mechanism for transport of IFN {alpha}. It is hypothesized that induction of a Pn3m cubic phase in stratum corneum lipids could make dermal and transdermal delivery of other macromolecules also possible.

  1. A frequent kinase domain mutation that changes the interaction between PI3K[alpha] and the membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelker, Diana; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Zhu, Jiuxiang; Cheong, Ian; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L. Mario; (JHU-MED); (HHMI)

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in oncogenes often promote tumorigenesis by changing the conformation of the encoded proteins, thereby altering enzymatic activity. The PIK3CA oncogene, which encodes p110{alpha}, the catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase alpha (PI3K{alpha}), is one of the two most frequently mutated oncogenes in human cancers. We report the structure of the most common mutant of p110{alpha} in complex with two interacting domains of its regulatory partner (p85{alpha}), both free and bound to an inhibitor (wortmannin). The N-terminal SH2 (nSH2) domain of p85{alpha} is shown to form a scaffold for the entire enzyme complex, strategically positioned to communicate extrinsic signals from phosphopeptides to three distinct regions of p110{alpha}. Moreover, we found that Arg-1047 points toward the cell membrane, perpendicular to the orientation of His-1047 in the WT enzyme. Surprisingly, two loops of the kinase domain that contact the cell membrane shift conformation in the oncogenic mutant. Biochemical assays revealed that the enzymatic activity of the p110{alpha} His1047Arg mutant is differentially regulated by lipid membrane composition. These structural and biochemical data suggest a previously undescribed mechanism for mutational activation of a kinase that involves perturbation of its interaction with the cellular membrane.

  2. Targeting Cell Membrane Lipid Rafts by Stoichiometric Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles With a Sphingolipid-Binding Domain Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramelle, David; Nieves, Daniel; Brun, Benjamin; Kraut, Rachel S; Fernig, David G

    2015-04-22

    A non-membrane protein-based nanoparticle agent for the tracking of lipid rafts on live cells is produced by stoichiometric functionalization of gold nanoparticles with a previously characterized sphingolipid- and cell membrane microdomain-binding domain peptide (SBD). The SBD peptide is inserted in a self-assembled monolayer of peptidol and alkane thiol ethylene glycol, on gold nanoparticles surface. The stoichiometric functionalization of nanoparticles with the SBD peptide, essential for single molecule tracking, is achieved by means of non-affinity nanoparticle purification. The SBD-nanoparticles have remarkable long-term resistance to electrolyte-induced aggregation and ligand-exchange and have no detectable non-specific binding to live cells. Binding and diffusion of SBD-nanoparticles bound to the membrane of live cells is measured by real-time photothermal microscopy and shows the dynamics of sphingolipid-enriched microdomains on cells membrane, with evidence for clustering, splitting, and diffusion over time of the SBD-nanoparticle labeled membrane domains. The monofunctionalized SBD-nanoparticle is a promising targeting agent for the tracking of lipid rafts independently of their protein composition and the labelling requires no prior modification of the cells. This approach has potential for further functionalization of the particles to manipulate the organization of, or targeting to microdomains that control signaling events and thereby lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutics.

  3. Deconvoluting the Effect of the Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Domains of an Amphiphilic Integral Membrane Protein in Lipid Bicontinuous Cubic Mesophases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Hag, Leonie; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lu, Jingxiong; Hawley, Adrian M; Gras, Sally L; Drummond, Calum J; Conn, Charlotte E

    2015-11-10

    Lipidic bicontinuous cubic mesophases with encapsulated amphiphilic proteins are widely used in a range of biological and biomedical applications, including in meso crystallization, as drug delivery vehicles for therapeutic proteins, and as biosensors and biofuel cells. However, the effect of amphiphilic protein encapsulation on the cubic phase nanostructure is not well-understood. In this study, we illustrate the effect of incorporating the bacterial amphiphilic membrane protein Ag43, and its individual hydrophobic β(43) and hydrophilic α(43) domains, in bicontinuous cubic mesophases. For the monoolein, monoalmitolein, and phytantriol cubic phases with and without 8% w/w cholesterol, the effect of the full length amphiphilic protein Ag43 on the cubic phase nanostructure was more significant than the sum of the individual hydrophobic β(43) and hydrophilic α(43) domains. Several factors were found to potentially influence the impact of the hydrophobic β(43) domain on the cubic phase internal nanostructure. These include the size of the hydrophobic β(43) domain relative to the thickness of the lipid bilayer, as well as its charge and diameter. The size of the hydrophilic α(43) domain relative to the water channel radius of the cubic mesophase was also found to be important. The secondary structure of the Ag43 proteins was affected by the hydrophobic thickness and physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer and the water channel diameter of the cubic phase. Such structural changes may be small but could potentially affect membrane protein function.

  4. Stratum corneum molecular mobility in the presence of natural moisturizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Sebastian; Andersson, Jenny Marie; Pham, Quoc Dat; Nowacka, Agnieszka; Topgaard, Daniel; Sparr, Emma

    2014-07-07

    The outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), is a lipid-protein membrane that experiences considerable osmotic stress from a dry and cold climate. The natural moisturizing factor (NMF) comprises small and polar substances, which like osmolytes can protect living systems from osmotic stress. NMF is commonly claimed to increase the water content in the SC and thereby protect the skin from dryness. In this work we challenge this proposed mechanism, and explore the influence of NMF on the lipid and protein components in the SC. We employ natural-abundance (13)C solid-state NMR methods to investigate how the SC molecular components are influenced by urea, glycerol, pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA), and urocanic acid (UCA), all of which are naturally present in the SC as NMF compounds. Experiments are performed with intact SC, isolated corneocytes and model lipids. The combination of NMR experiments provides molecularly resolved qualitative information on the dynamics of different SC lipid and protein components. We obtain completely novel molecular information on the interaction of these NMF compounds with the SC lipids and proteins. We show that urea and glycerol, which are also common ingredients in skin care products, increase the molecular mobility of both SC lipids and proteins at moderate relative humidity where the SC components are considerably more rigid in the absence of these compounds. This effect cannot be attributed to increased SC water content. PCA has no detectable effect on SC molecular mobility under the conditions investigated. It is finally shown that the more apolar compound, UCA, specifically influences the mobility of the SC lipid regions. The present results show that the NMF components act to retain the fluidity of the SC molecular components under dehydrating conditions in such a way that the SC properties remain largely unchanged as compared to more hydrated SC. These findings provide a new molecular insight into how small

  5. Water diffusion in fully hydrated porcine stratum corneum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, J.; Charalambopoulou, G.; Steriotis, Th.; Vasenkov, S.; Desmedt, A.; Lechner, R.E

    2003-08-01

    The microscopic mechanisms of water diffusion in fully hydrated porcine stratum corneum (SC) have been studied by a combination of incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and pulsed field gradient-nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) for two sample orientations. The presence of three types of water in fully hydrated SC is inferred on the basis of water sorption isotherm data, i.e., (a) bound and (b) weakly bound hydration water forming layers between adjacent lipid bilayers of SC, as well as (c) bulk water probably located in the corneocytes and in intercellular regions. Water self-diffusion coefficients for motions parallel and perpendicular to the membrane plane of D{sub parallel}=3.30x10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s and D{sub perpendicular}=1.56x10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, respectively, were determined by PFG-NMR and assigned to the translational diffusion of weakly bound water. QENS measurements have been carried out using different samples hydrated with H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O, respectively, in order to separate the contribution of SC from that of the water. The QENS data for both sample orientations and two different energy resolutions can be fitted by a model which accounts for the microscopic dynamics of all three aforementioned types of water. This analysis establishes rotational diffusion coefficients for bound and weakly bound hydration water of 0.025 and 0.030 meV, respectively. Furthermore, the QENS data prove the presence of bulk water in fully hydrated SC samples.

  6. Limited cross-reactivity among domains of the Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7 erythrocyte membrane protein 1 family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Louise; Turner, Louise; Magistrado, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    The var gene-encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family is responsible for antigenic variation and sequestration of infected erythrocytes during malaria. We have previously grouped the 60 PfEMP1 variants of P. falciparum clone 3D7 into groups A and B/A (category A...... from clone 3D7 by using a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a pool of plasma from 63 malaria-exposed Tanzanian individuals. We conclude that naturally acquired antibodies are largely directed toward epitopes varying between different domains with a few, mainly category A, domains...

  7. Co-autodisplay of Z-domains and bovine caseins on the outer membrane of E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Gu; Saenger, Thorsten; Bong, Ji-Hong; Jose, Joachim; Kang, Min-Jung; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2015-12-01

    In this work, two proteins, Z-domains and bovine casein, were auto-displayed on the outer membrane of the same Escherichia coli cells by co-transformation of two different auto-display vectors. On the basis of SDS-PAGE densitometry, Z-domains and bovine casein were expressed at 3.12 × 10⁵ and 1.55 × 10⁵ proteins/E. coli cell, respectively. The co-auto-displayed Z-domains had antibody-binding activity and the bovine casein had adhesive properties. E. coli with co-auto-displayed proteins were analyzed by fluorescence assisted cell sorting (FACS). E. coli with co-auto-displayed Z-domains and bovine casein aggregated due to hydrophobic interaction. For application to immunoassays, the Z-domain activity was estimated after (1) immobilizing the E. coli and (2) forming an OM layer. E. coli with co-auto-displayed two proteins that were immobilized on a polystyrene microplate had the same antibody-binding activity as did E. coli with auto-displayed Z-domains only. The OM layer from the co-transformed E. coli had Z-domains and bovine casein expressed at a 1:2 ratio from antibody-binding activity measurements.

  8. Autoantibodies against thrombospondin type 1 domain-containing 7A induce membranous nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Nicola M; Hoxha, Elion; Reinicke, Anna T; Fester, Lars; Helmchen, Udo; Gerth, Jens; Bachmann, Friederike; Budde, Klemens; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Zahner, Gunther; Rune, Gabriele; Lambeau, Gerard; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Stahl, Rolf A K

    2016-07-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is the most common cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults, and one-third of patients develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Circulating autoantibodies against the podocyte surface antigens phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R1) and the recently identified thrombospondin type 1 domain-containing 7A (THSD7A) are assumed to cause the disease in the majority of patients. The pathogenicity of these antibodies, however, has not been directly proven. Here, we have reported the analysis and characterization of a male patient with THSD7A-associated MN who progressed to ESRD and subsequently underwent renal transplantation. MN rapidly recurred after transplantation. Enhanced staining for THSD7A was observed in the kidney allograft, and detectable anti-THSD7A antibodies were present in the serum before and after transplantation, suggesting that these antibodies induced a recurrence of MN in the renal transplant. In contrast to PLA2R1, THSD7A was expressed on both human and murine podocytes, enabling the evaluation of whether anti-THSD7A antibodies cause MN in mice. We demonstrated that human anti-THSD7A antibodies specifically bind to murine THSD7A on podocyte foot processes, induce proteinuria, and initiate a histopathological pattern that is typical of MN. Furthermore, anti-THSD7A antibodies induced marked cytoskeletal rearrangement in primary murine glomerular epithelial cells as well as in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Our findings support a causative role of anti-THSD7A antibodies in the development of MN.

  9. Functional characterization of the trans-membrane domain interactions of the Sec61 protein translocation complex beta-subunit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xueqiang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic cells co- and post-translational protein translocation is mediated by the trimeric Sec61 complex. Currently, the role of the Sec61 complex β-subunit in protein translocation is poorly understood. We have shown previously that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae the trans-membrane domain alone is sufficient for the function of the β-subunit Sbh1p in co-translational protein translocation. In addition, Sbh1p co-purifies not only with the protein translocation channel subunits Sec61p and Sss1p, but also with the reticulon family protein Rtn1p. Results We used random mutagenesis to generate novel Sbh1p mutants in order to functionally map the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain. These mutants were analyzed for their interactions with Sec61p and how they support co-translational protein translocation. The distribution of mutations identifies one side of the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain α-helix that is involved in interactions with Sec61p and that is important for Sbh1p function in protein translocation. At the same time, these mutations do not affect Sbh1p interaction with Rtn1p. Furthermore we show that Sbh1p is found in protein complexes containing not only Rtn1p, but also the two other reticulon-like proteins Rtn2p and Yop1p. Conclusion Our results identify functionally important amino acids in the Sbh1p trans-membrane domain. In addition, our results provide additional support for the involvement of Sec61β in processes unlinked to protein translocation.

  10. Sequential, ordered acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cham, Gerald K K; Turner, Louise; Lusingu, John;

    2009-01-01

    The binding of erythrocytes infected with mature blood stage parasites to the vascular bed is key to the pathogenesis of malignant malaria. The binding is mediated by members of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family. PfEMP1s can be divided into groups, and it has pr....... The identification of PfEMP1 domains expressed by parasites causing disease in infants and young children is important for development of vaccines protecting against severe malaria....

  11. Crystal structure of the conserved domain of the DC lysosomal associated membrane protein: implications for the lysosomal glycocalyx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Sonja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP comprises the multifunctional, ubiquitous LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, and the cell type-specific proteins DC-LAMP (LAMP-3, BAD-LAMP (UNC-46, C20orf103 and macrosialin (CD68. LAMPs have been implicated in a multitude of cellular processes, including phagocytosis, autophagy, lipid transport and aging. LAMP-2 isoform A acts as a receptor in chaperone-mediated autophagy. LAMP-2 deficiency causes the fatal Danon disease. The abundant proteins LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 are major constituents of the glycoconjugate coat present on the inside of the lysosomal membrane, the 'lysosomal glycocalyx'. The LAMP family is characterized by a conserved domain of 150 to 200 amino acids with two disulfide bonds. Results The crystal structure of the conserved domain of human DC-LAMP was solved. It is the first high-resolution structure of a heavily glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein. The structure represents a novel β-prism fold formed by two β-sheets bent by β-bulges and connected by a disulfide bond. Flexible loops and a hydrophobic pocket represent possible sites of molecular interaction. Computational models of the glycosylated luminal regions of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 indicate that the proteins adopt a compact conformation in close proximity to the lysosomal membrane. The models correspond to the thickness of the lysosomal glycoprotein coat of only 5 to 12 nm, according to electron microscopy. Conclusion The conserved luminal domain of lysosome-associated membrane proteins forms a previously unknown β-prism fold. Insights into the structure of the lysosomal glycoprotein coat were obtained by computational models of the LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 luminal regions.

  12. Properties of ceramides and their impact on the stratum corneum structure. Part 2: stratum corneum lipid model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessner, D; Ruettinger, A; Kiselev, M A; Wartewig, S; Neubert, R H H

    2008-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) represents the outermost layer of the mammalian skin, exhibits the main skin barrier and plays an important role in the water penetration pathway through the SC. Knowing the structure and properties of the SC at the molecular level is essential for studying drug penetration through the SC and for the development of new dermal drug delivery systems. Therefore, research interest is focused on the SC lipid matrix and on water diffusion through it. Thus, the ultimate aim is to design a lipid mixture that mimics the barrier properties of the human SC to a high extent and that can substitute the SC in drug delivery systems. This review summarizes various studies performed on either isolated animal or human ceramide based SC model systems, coming to the result that using synthetic lipids with a well-defined architecture allows good extrapolation to the in vivo situation. This review is the continuation of part 1 that is focused on a detailed description of the thermotropic and/or lyotropic phase behaviour of single ceramide types obtained by various experimental techniques. The objective of part 2 is to reflect the numerous studies on SC lipid model systems, namely binary, ternary and multicomponent systems, during the last decade. In this context, neutron diffraction as a prospective tool for analyzing the internal membrane structure is addressed in particular. Based on these new insights, current SC models are presented, whose validations are still under discussion. A profound knowledge about SC lipid organization at the molecular level is still missing.

  13. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-02-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes.

  14. Topology of eukaryotic type II membrane proteins: importance of N-terminal positively charged residues flanking the hydrophobic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, G D; Lamb, R A

    1991-02-22

    We have tested the role of different charged residues flanking the sides of the signal/anchor (S/A) domain of a eukaryotic type II (N(cyt)C(exo)) integral membrane protein in determining its topology. The removal of positively charged residues on the N-terminal side of the S/A yields proteins with an inverted topology, while the addition of positively charged residues to only the C-terminal side has very little effect on orientation. Expression of chimeric proteins composed of domains from a type II protein (HN) and the oppositely oriented membrane protein M2 indicates that the HN N-terminal domain is sufficient to confer a type II topology and that the M2 N-terminal ectodomain can direct a type II topology when modified by adding positively charged residues. These data suggest that eukaryotic membrane protein topology is governed by the presence or absence of an N-terminal signal for retention in the cytoplasm that is composed in part of positive charges.

  15. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes.

  16. An investigation of the effect of membrane curvature on transmembrane-domain dependent protein sorting in lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Matteo; Goud, Bruno; Borgese, Nica; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Sorting of membrane proteins within the secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells is a complex process involving discrete sorting signals as well as physico-chemical properties of the transmembrane domain (TMD). Previous work demonstrated that tail-anchored (TA) protein sorting at the interface between the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and the Golgi complex is exquisitely dependent on the length and hydrophobicity of the transmembrane domain, and suggested that an imbalance between TMD length and bilayer thickness (hydrophobic mismatch) could drive long TMD-containing proteins into curved membrane domains, including ER exit sites, with consequent export of the mismatched protein out of the ER. Here, we tested a possible role of curvature in TMD-dependent sorting in a model system consisting of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) from which narrow membrane tubes were pulled by micromanipulation. Fluorescent TA proteins differing in TMD length were incorporated into GUVs of uniform lipid composition or made of total ER lipids, and TMD-dependent sorting and diffusion, as well as the bending rigidity of bilayers made of microsomal lipids, were investigated. Long and short TMD-containing constructs were inserted with similar orientation, diffused equally rapidly in GUVs and in tubes pulled from GUVs, and no difference in their final distribution between planar and curved regions was detected. These results indicate that curvature alone is not sufficient to drive TMD-dependent sorting at the ER-Golgi interface, and set the basis for the investigation of the additional factors that must be required. PMID:25210649

  17. Axonal Membranes and Their Domains: Assembly and Function of the Axon Initial Segment and Node of Ranvier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Nelson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are highly specialized cells of the nervous system that receive, process and transmit electrical signals critical for normal brain function. Here, we review the intricate organization of axonal membrane domains that facilitate rapid action potential conduction underlying communication between complex neuronal circuits. Two critical excitable domains of vertebrate axons are the axon initial segment (AIS and the nodes of Ranvier, which are characterized by the high concentrations of voltage-gated ion channels, cell adhesion molecules and specialized cytoskeletal networks. The AIS is located at the proximal region of the axon and serves as the site of action potential initiation, while nodes of Ranvier, gaps between adjacent myelin sheaths, allow rapid propagation of the action potential through saltatory conduction. The AIS and nodes of Ranvier are assembled by ankyrins, spectrins and their associated binding partners through the clustering of membrane proteins and connection to the underlying cytoskeleton network. Although the AIS and nodes of Ranvier share similar protein composition, their mechanisms of assembly are strikingly different. Here we will cover the mechanisms of formation and maintenance of these axonal excitable membrane domains, specifically highlighting the similarities and differences between them. We will also discuss recent advances in super resolution fluorescence imaging which have elucidated the arrangement of the submembranous axonal cytoskeleton revealing a surprising structural organization necessary to maintain axonal organization and function. Finally, human mutations in axonal domain components have been associated with a growing number of neurological disorders including severe cognitive dysfunction, epilepsy, autism, neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. Overall, this review highlights the assembly, maintenance and function of axonal excitable domains, particularly the AIS and nodes of

  18. The cation channel mucolipin-1 is a bifunctional protein that facilitates membrane remodeling via its serine lipase domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPlante, Janice M; Falardeau, John L; Brown, Edward M; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Vassilev, Peter M

    2011-04-01

    Phospholipase modulators have been shown to affect the topology of lipid bilayers and the formation of tubulo-vesicular structures, but the specific endogenous phospholipases involved have yet to be identified. Here we show that TRPML1 (MLN1), a Ca(2+)-permeable channel, contributes to membrane remodeling through a serine lipase consensus domain, and thus represents a novel type of bifunctional protein. Remarkably, this serine lipase active site determines the ability of MLN1 to generate tubulo-vesicular extensions in mucolipin-1-expressing oocytes, human fibroblasts and model membrane vesicles. Our demonstration that MLN1 is involved in membrane remodeling and the formation of extensions suggests that it may play a role in the formation of cellular processes linked to the late endosome/lysosome (LE/L) pathway. MLN1 is absent or mutated in patients with mucolipidosis IV (MLIV), a lysosomal disorder with devastating neurological and other consequences. This study provides potential insight into the pathophysiology of MLIV.

  19. Influence of lysophospholipid hydrolysis by the catalytic domain of neuropathy target esterase on the fluidity of bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Aaron J; Richardson, Rudy J; Worden, R Mark; Ofoli, Robert Y

    2010-08-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) is an integral membrane protein localized in the endoplasmic reticulum in neurons. Irreversible inhibition of NTE by certain organophosphorus compounds produces a paralysis known as organophosphorus compound-induced delayed neuropathy. In vitro, NTE has phospholipase/lysophospholipase activity that hydrolyses exogenously added single-chain lysophospholipids in preference to dual-chain phospholipids, and NTE mutations have been associated with motor neuron disease. NTE's physiological role is not well understood, although recent studies suggest that it may control the cytotoxic accumulation of lysophospholipids in membranes. We used the NTE catalytic domain (NEST) to hydrolyze palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (p-lysoPC) to palmitic acid in bilayer membranes comprising 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and the fluorophore 1-oleoyl-2-[12-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]dodecanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (NBD-PC). Translational diffusion coefficients (D(L)) in supported bilayer membranes were measured by fluorescence recovery after pattern photobleaching (FRAPP). The average D(L) for DOPC/p-lysoPC membranes without NEST was 2.44 microm(2)s(-1)+/-0.09; the D(L) for DOPC/p-lysoPC membranes containing NEST and diisopropylphosphorofluoridate, an inhibitor, was nearly identical at 2.45+/-0.08. By contrast, the D(L) for membranes comprising NEST, DOPC, and p-lysoPC was 2.28+/-0.07, significantly different from the system with inhibited NEST, due to NEST hydrolysis. Likewise, a system without NEST containing the amount of palmitic acid that would have been produced by NEST hydrolysis of p-lysoPC was identical at 2.26+/-0.06. These results indicate that NTE's catalytic activity can alter membrane fluidity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Deletion analysis of AGD1 reveals domains crucial for plasma membrane recruitment and function in root hair polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Cheol-Min; Naramoto, Satoshi; Sparks, J Alan; Khan, Bibi Rafeiza; Nakashima, Jin; Fukuda, Hiroo; Blancaflor, Elison B

    2017-06-23

    AGD1, a plant ACAP-type ADP-ribosylation factor-GTPase activating protein (ARF-GAP), functions in specifying root hair polarity in Arabidopsis thaliana To better understand how AGD1 modulates root hair growth, we generated full-length and domain-deleted AGD1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) constructs, and followed their localization during root hair development. AGD1-GFP localized to the cytoplasm and was recruited to specific regions of the root hair plasma membrane (PM). Distinct PM AGD1-GFP signal was first detected along the site of root hair bulge formation. The construct continued to mark the PM at the root hair apical dome, but only during periods of reduced growth. During rapid tip growth, AGD1-GFP labeled the PM of the lateral flanks and dissipated from the apical-most PM. Deletion analysis and a single domain GFP fusion revealed that the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain is the minimal unit required for recruitment of AGD1 to the PM. Our results indicate that differential recruitment of AGD1 to specific PM domains is an essential component of the membrane trafficking machinery that facilitates root hair developmental phase transitions and responses to changes in the root microenvironment. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. The membrane localization domains of two distinct bacterial toxins form a 4-helix-bundle in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisao, Grant S; Brothers, Michael C; Ho, Mengfei; Wilson, Brenda A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2017-03-01

    Membrane localization domain (MLD) was first proposed for a 4-helix-bundle motif in the crystal structure of the C1 domain of Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT). This structure motif is also found in the crystal structures of several clostridial glycosylating toxins (TcdA, TcdB, TcsL, and TcnA). The Ras/Rap1-specific endopeptidase (RRSP) module of the multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxins (MARTX) toxin produced by Vibrio vulnificus has sequence homology to the C1-C2 domains of PMT, including a putative MLD. We have determined the solution structure for the MLDs in PMT and in RRSP using solution state NMR. We conclude that the MLDs in these two toxins assume a 4-helix-bundle structure in solution. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  2. Membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to a target lipid bilayer: an EPR site-directed spin-labeling and relaxation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available The second messenger lipid PIP(3 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate is generated by the lipid kinase PI3K (phosphoinositide-3-kinase in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, where it regulates a broad array of cell processes by recruiting multiple signaling proteins containing PIP(3-specific pleckstrin homology (PH domains to the membrane surface. Despite the broad importance of PIP(3-specific PH domains, the membrane docking geometry of a PH domain bound to its target PIP(3 lipid on a bilayer surface has not yet been experimentally determined. The present study employs EPR site-directed spin labeling and relaxation methods to elucidate the membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to bilayer-embedded PIP(3. The model target bilayer contains the neutral background lipid PC and both essential targeting lipids: (i PIP(3 target lipid that provides specificity and affinity, and (ii PS facilitator lipid that enhances the PIP(3 on-rate via an electrostatic search mechanism. The EPR approach measures membrane depth parameters for 18 function-retaining spin labels coupled to the PH domain, and for calibration spin labels coupled to phospholipids. The resulting depth parameters, together with the known high resolution structure of the co-complex between GRP1 PH domain and the PIP(3 headgroup, provide sufficient constraints to define an optimized, self-consistent membrane docking geometry. In this optimized geometry the PH domain engulfs the PIP(3 headgroup with minimal bilayer penetration, yielding the shallowest membrane position yet described for a lipid binding domain. This binding interaction displaces the PIP(3 headgroup from its lowest energy position and orientation in the bilayer, but the headgroup remains within its energetically accessible depth and angular ranges. Finally, the optimized docking geometry explains previous biophysical findings including mutations observed to disrupt membrane binding, and the rapid lateral

  3. Highly conserved residues in the helical domain of dengue virus type 1 precursor membrane protein are involved in assembly, precursor membrane (prM) protein cleavage, and entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Szu-Chia; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Zou, Gang; Nerurkar, Vivek R; Shi, Pei-Yong; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2014-11-28

    The envelope and precursor membrane (prM) proteins of dengue virus (DENV) are present on the surface of immature virions. During maturation, prM protein is cleaved by furin protease into pr peptide and membrane (M) protein. Although previous studies mainly focusing on the pr region have identified several residues important for DENV replication, the functional role of M protein, particularly the α-helical domain (MH), which is predicted to undergo a large conformational change during maturation, remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of nine highly conserved MH domain residues in the replication cycle of DENV by site-directed mutagenesis in a DENV1 prME expression construct and found that alanine substitutions introduced to four highly conserved residues at the C terminus and one at the N terminus of the MH domain greatly affect the production of both virus-like particles and replicon particles. Eight of the nine alanine mutants affected the entry of replicon particles, which correlated with the impairment in prM cleavage. Moreover, seven mutants were found to have reduced prM-E interaction at low pH, which may inhibit the formation of smooth immature particles and exposure of prM cleavage site during maturation, thus contributing to inefficient prM cleavage. Taken together, these results are the first report showing that highly conserved MH domain residues, located at 20-38 amino acids downstream from the prM cleavage site, can modulate the prM cleavage, maturation of particles, and virus entry. The highly conserved nature of these residues suggests potential targets of antiviral strategy.

  4. All-atom models of the membrane-spanning domain of HIV-1 gp41 from metadynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangupomu, Vamshi K; Abrams, Cameron F

    2010-11-17

    The 27-residue membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp41 bears conserved sequence elements crucial to the biological function of the virus, in particular a conserved GXXXG motif and a midspan arginine. However, structure-based explanations for the roles of these and other MSD features remain unclear. Using molecular dynamics and metadynamics calculations of an all-atom, explicit solvent, and membrane-anchored model, we study the conformational variability of the HIV-1 gp41 MSD. We find that the MSD peptide assumes a stable tilted α-helical conformation in the membrane. However, when the side chain of the midspan Arg (694) "snorkels" to the outer leaflet of the viral membrane, the MSD assumes a metastable conformation where the highly-conserved N-terminal core (between Lys(681) and Arg(694) and containing the GXXXG motif) unfolds. In contrast, when the Arg(694) side chain snorkels to the inner leaflet, the MSD peptide assumes a metastable conformation consistent with experimental observations where the peptide kinks at Phe(697) to facilitate Arg(694) snorkeling. Both of these models suggest specific ways that gp41 may destabilize viral membrane, priming the virus for fusion with a target cell.

  5. A novel membrane-dependent on/off switch mechanism of talin FERM domain at sites of cell adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianqiang Song; Jun Qin; Jun Yang; Jamila Hirbawi; Sheng Ye; H Dhanuja Perera; Esen Goksoy; Pallavi Dwivedi; Edward F Plow; Rongguang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The activation of heterodimeric (α/β) integrin transmembrane receptors by cytosolic protein talin is crucial for regulating diverse cell-adhesion-dependent processes,including blood coagulation,tissue remodeling,and cancer metastasis.This process is triggered by the coincident binding of N-terminal FERM (four-point-one-protein/ezrin/radixin/moesin) domain of talin (talin-FERM) to the inner membrane surface and integrin β cytoplasmic tail,but how these binding events are spatiotemporally regulated remains obscure.Here we report the crystal structure of a dormant talin,revealing how a C-terminal talin rod segment (talin-RS) self-masks a key integrin-binding site on talin-FERM via a large interface.Unexpectedly,the structure also reveals a distinct negatively charged surface on talin-RS that electrostatically hinders the talin-FERM binding to the membrane.Such a dual inhibitory topology for talin is consistent with the biochemical and functional data,but differs significantly from a previous model.We show that upon enrichment with phosphotidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) - a known talin activator,membrane strongly attracts a positively charged surface on talin-FERM and simultaneously repels the negatively charged surface on talin-RS.Such an electrostatic "pull-push" process promotes the relief of the dual inhibition of talin-FERM,which differs from the classic "steric clash" model for conventional PIP2-induced FERM domain activation.These data therefore unravel a new type of membrane-dependent FERM domain regulation and illustrate how it mediates the talin on/off switches to regulate integrin transmembrane signaling and cell adhesion.

  6. Single particle electron microscopy analysis of the bovine anion exchanger 1 reveals a flexible linker connecting the cytoplasmic and membrane domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiansen Jiang

    Full Text Available Anion exchanger 1 (AE1 is the major erythrocyte membrane protein that mediates chloride/bicarbonate exchange across the erythrocyte membrane facilitating CO₂ transport by the blood, and anchors the plasma membrane to the spectrin-based cytoskeleton. This multi-protein cytoskeletal complex plays an important role in erythrocyte elasticity and membrane stability. An in-frame AE1 deletion of nine amino acids in the cytoplasmic domain in a proximity to the membrane domain results in a marked increase in membrane rigidity and ovalocytic red cells in the disease Southeast Asian Ovalocytosis (SAO. We hypothesized that AE1 has a flexible region connecting the cytoplasmic and membrane domains, which is partially deleted in SAO, thus causing the loss of erythrocyte elasticity. To explore this hypothesis, we developed a new non-denaturing method of AE1 purification from bovine erythrocyte membranes. A three-dimensional (3D structure of bovine AE1 at 2.4 nm resolution was obtained by negative staining electron microscopy, orthogonal tilt reconstruction and single particle analysis. The cytoplasmic and membrane domains are connected by two parallel linkers. Image classification demonstrated substantial flexibility in the linker region. We propose a mechanism whereby flexibility of the linker region plays a critical role in regulating red cell elasticity.

  7. The Antitumor Effect of Single-domain Antibodies Directed Towards Membrane-associated Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg; Motz, Manfred

    2016-11-01

    Neutralizing single-domain antibodies directed towards catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) caused efficient reactivation of intercellular reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent apoptosis-inducing signaling specifically in human tumor cells. Single-domain antibodies targeted tumor cell-specific membrane-associated SOD and catalase, but not the corresponding intracellular enzymes. They were shown to be about 200-fold more effective than corresponding classical recombinant antigen-binding fragments and more than four log steps more efficient than monoclonal antibodies. Combined addition of single-domain antibodies against catalase and SOD caused a remarkable synergistic effect. Proof-of-concept experiments in immunocompromised mice using human tumor xenografts and single-domain antibodies directed towards SOD showed an inhibition of tumor growth. Neutralizing single-domain antibodies directed to catalase and SOD also caused a very strong synergistic effect with the established chemotherapeutic agent taxol, indicating an overlap of signaling pathways. This effect might also be useful in order to avoid unwanted side-effects and to drastically lower the costs for taxol-based therapy.

  8. Comparative sequence analysis of domain I of Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 from Saudi Arabia and worldwide isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A; Abdel-Muhsin, Abdel-Muhsin A; Bin Dajem, Saad M; AlSheikh, Adel Ali H; Bohol, Marie Fe F; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Putaporntip, Chaturong; Jongwutiwes, Somchai

    2016-04-01

    The apical membrane antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum (PfAMA1) plays a crucial role in erythrocyte invasion and is a target of protective antibodies. Although domain I of PfAMA1 has been considered a promising vaccine component, extensive sequence diversity in this domain could compromise an effective vaccine design. To explore the extent of sequence diversity in domain I of PfAMA1, P. falciparum-infected blood samples from Saudi Arabia collected between 2007 and 2009 were analyzed and compared with those from worldwide parasite populations. Forty-six haplotypes and a novel codon change (M190V) were found among Saudi Arabian isolates. The haplotype diversity (0.948±0.004) and nucleotide diversity (0.0191±0.0008) were comparable to those from African hyperendemic countries. Positive selection in domain I of PfAMA1 among Saudi Arabian parasite population was observed because nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions per nonsynonymous site (dN) significantly exceeded synonymous nucleotide substitutions per synonymous site (dS) and Tajima's D and its related statistics significantly deviated from neutrality in the positive direction. Despite a relatively low prevalence of malaria in Saudi Arabia, a minimum of 17 recombination events occurred in domain I. Genetic differentiation was significant between P. falciparum in Saudi Arabia and parasites from other geographic origins. Several shared or closely related haplotypes were found among parasites from different geographic areas, suggesting that vaccine derived from multiple shared epitopes could be effective across endemic countries.

  9. The cytoplasmic domain is essential for transport function of the integral membrane transport protein SLC4A11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Sampath K; Lukowski, Chris M; Casey, Joseph R

    2016-01-15

    Large cytoplasmic domains (CD) are a common feature among integral membrane proteins. In virtually all cases, these CD have a function (e.g., binding cytoskeleton or regulatory factors) separate from that of the membrane domain (MD). Strong associations between CD and MD are rare. Here we studied SLC4A11, a membrane transport protein of corneal endothelial cells, the mutations of which cause genetic corneal blindness. SLC4A11 has a 41-kDa CD and a 57-kDa integral MD. One disease-causing mutation in the CD, R125H, manifests a catalytic defect, suggesting a role of the CD in transport function. Expressed in HEK-293 cells without the CD, MD-SLC4A11 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating a folding defect. Replacement of CD-SLC4A11 with green fluorescent protein did not rescue MD-SLC4A11, suggesting some specific role of CD-SLC4A11. Homology modeling revealed that the structure of CD-SLC4A11 is similar to that of the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange protein AE1 (SLC4A1) CD. Fusion to CD-AE1 partially rescued MD-SLC4A11 to the cell surface, suggesting that the structure of CD-AE1 is similar to that of CD-SLC4A11. The CD-AE1-MD-SLC4a11 chimera, however, had no functional activity. We conclude that CD-SLC4A11 has an indispensable role in the transport function of SLC4A11. CD-SLC4A11 forms insoluble precipitates when expressed in bacteria, suggesting that the domain cannot fold properly when expressed alone. Consistent with a strong association between CD-SLC4A11 and MD-SLC4A11, these domains specifically associate when coexpressed in HEK-293 cells. We conclude that SLC4A11 is a rare integral membrane protein in which the CD has strong associations with the integral MD, which contributes to membrane transport function.

  10. Loss of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding by the C-terminal Tiam-1 pleckstrin homology domain prevents in vivo Rac1 activation without affecting membrane targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Mark A; Martinu, Lenka; Rossman, Kent L; Sondek, John; Lemmon, Mark A; Chou, Margaret M

    2003-03-28

    Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho family small GTPases invariably contain a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain that immediately follows their Dbl homology (DH) domain. Although the DH domain is responsible for GEF activity, the role of the PH domain is less clear. We previously reported that PH domains from several Dbl family members bind phosphoinositides with very low affinity (K(d) values in the 10 microM range). This suggests that, unlike several other PH domains, those from Dbl proteins will not function as independent membrane-targeting modules. To determine the functional relevance of low affinity phosphoinositide binding, we mutated the corresponding PH domain from Tiam-1 to abolish its weak, specific binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. We first confirmed in vitro that phosphoinositide binding by the isolated DH/PH domain was impaired by the mutations but that intrinsic GEF activity was unaffected. We then introduced the PH domain mutations into full-length Tiam-1 and found that its ability to activate Rac1 or serum response factor in vivo was abolished. Immunofluorescence studies showed that membrane targeting of Tiam-1 was essentially unaffected by mutations in the C-terminal PH domain. Our studies therefore indicate that low affinity phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding by the C-terminal PH domain may be critical for in vivo regulation and activity of Tiam-1 but that the PH domain exerts its regulatory effects without altering membrane targeting. We suggest instead that ligand binding to the PH domain induces conformational and/or orientational changes at the membrane surface that are required for maximum exchange activity of its adjacent DH domain.

  11. Gene transfer and expression in human neutrophils. The phox homology domain of p47phox translocates to the plasma membrane but not to the membrane of mature phagosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzezinska Agnieszka A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophils are non-dividing cells with poor survival after isolation. Consequently, exogenous gene expression in neutrophils is challenging. We report here the transfection of genes and expression of active proteins in human primary peripheral neutrophils using nucleofection. Results Exogenous gene expression in human neutrophils was achieved 2 h post-transfection. We show that neutrophils transfected by nucleofection are functional cells, able to respond to soluble and particulate stimuli. They conserved the ability to undergo physiological processes including phagocytosis. Using this technique, we were able to show that the phox homology (PX domain of p47phox localizes to the plasma membrane in human neutrophils. We also show that RhoB, but not the PX domain of p47phox, is translocated to the membrane of mature phagosomes. Conclusion We demonstrated that cDNA transfer and expression of exogenous protein in human neutrophils is compatible with cell viability and is no longer a limitation for the study of protein function in human neutrophils.

  12. Stratum corneum: a barrier of skin resistants light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Hu, Yating; Mao, Zongzhen; Zheng, Ying; Lu, Wei; Luo, Qingming

    2007-05-01

    Benzisothiazdone, a kind of safe and effective ketone containing heterocycle, was introduced as an enhancer to investigate the effect on optical clearing of the piglet skin with and without stratum corneum in vitro. The skin samples were treated with different agents, such as, pure polyethyleneglycol 400, mixed solution (benzisothiazdone combining with polyethyleneglycol 400) and isotonic saline. The total transmittance of samples was monitored by a single integrating sphere system. The results show that the saline does not affect the rate of optical clearing obviously. For the sample with stratum corneum, single optical clearing agent such as PEG400 penetrates slowly because of the barrier function of SC. The stratum corneum makes the effect of optical clearing on the sample inconspicuous. In contrast, the mixed solution can damage the barrier function of SC to some extent. For the sample without stratum corneum, an obvious increase in the rate of optical clearing is in the single PEG400 administration stage, this effect will be more remarkable if the Benzisothiazdone was used as an enhancer. We can conclude that SC can prevent skin from effecting of single OCA, but the barrier will become weaker if right immersion agent is adopted as the enhancer.

  13. Tape Stripping Technique for Stratum Corneum Protein Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja-Lisa; Slotved, H.-C.; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the amount of protein in stratum corneum in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients and healthy controls, using tape stripping technique. Furthermore, to compare two different methods for protein assessment. Tape stripping was performed in AD patients and healthy ...

  14. Visualization of sterol-rich membrane domains with fluorescently-labeled theonellamides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Nishimura

    Full Text Available Cholesterol plays important roles in biological membranes. The cellular location where cholesterol molecules work is prerequisite information for understanding their dynamic action. Bioimaging probes for cholesterol molecules would be the most powerful means for unraveling the complex nature of lipid membranes. However, only a limited number of chemical or protein probes have been developed so far for cytological analysis. Here we show that fluorescently-labeled derivatives of theonellamides act as new sterol probes in mammalian cultured cells. The fluorescent probes recognized cholesterol molecules and bound to liposomes in a cholesterol-concentration dependent manner. The probes showed patchy distribution in the plasma membrane, while they stained specific organelle in the cytoplasm. These data suggest that fTNMs will be valuable sterol probes for studies on the role of sterols in the biological membrane under a variety of experimental conditions.

  15. Recycling endosomes in apical plasma membrane domain formation and epithelial cell polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golachowska, Magdalena R.; Hoekstra, Dick; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2010-01-01

    Recycling endosomes have taken central stage in the intracellular sorting and polarized trafficking of apical and basolateral plasma membrane components. Molecular players in the underlying mechanisms are now emerging, including small GTPases, class V myosins and adaptor proteins. In particular,

  16. Prediction of β-barrel membrane proteins by searching for restricted domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schleiff Enrico

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of β-barrel membrane proteins out of a genomic/proteomic background is one of the rapidly developing fields in bioinformatics. Our main goal is the prediction of such proteins in genome/proteome wide analyses. Results For the prediction of β-barrel membrane proteins within prokaryotic proteomes a set of parameters was developed. We have focused on a procedure with a low false positive rate beside a procedure with lowest false prediction rate to obtain a high certainty for the predicted sequences. We demonstrate that the discrimination between β-barrel membrane proteins and other proteins is improved by analyzing a length limited region. The developed set of parameters is applied to the proteome of E. coli and the results are compared to four other described procedures. Conclusion Analyzing the β-barrel membrane proteins revealed the presence of a defined membrane inserted β-barrel region. This information can now be used to refine other prediction programs as well. So far, all tested programs fail to predict outer membrane proteins in the proteome of the prokaryote E. coli with high reliability. However, the reliability of the prediction is improved significantly by a combinatory approach of several programs. The consequences and usability of the developed scores are discussed.

  17. Confinement Effects on Watery Domains in Hydrated Block Copolymer Electrolyte Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moon Jeong; Kim, Sung Yeon; Yeo, Joomi

    2011-03-01

    The morphology of a series of diblock copolymers comprising randomly sulfonated polystyrene (PSS) and polymethylbutylene (PMB) blocks equilibrated with humid air was determined by in- situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS). In-situ SANS data were collected over a wide angular range permitting the determination of the superstructure of the hydrophilic PSS-rich and hydrophobic PMB-rich domains and the substructure within the hydrophilic PSS-rich domains. When the characteristic length of the superstructure is larger than 10 nm, the hydrophilic PSS domains are heterogeneous with periodically arranged watery domains. The scattering signature of the watery domains is very similar to the well-established ``ionomer peak.'' This peak vanishes when the neutron scattering length density of the water (H2O/D2O mixture) is matched to that of the PSS block. The spacing between watery domains depends only on sulfonation level of the PSS block. When the characteristic length of the superstructure is less than 10 nm, the watery substructure disappears and homogeneous hydrated PSS-rich domains are obtained.

  18. [Prokaryotic expression of S2 extracellular domain of SARS coronavirus spike protein and its fusion with Hela cell membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Ai-Hua; Deng, Peng; Wu, Xiang-Ling; Li, Tao; Liu, Ya-Wei; Xu, Jia; Jiang, Yong

    2009-03-01

    To construct the expression plasmid of S2 extracellular domain (S2ED) of SARS-coronavirus (SARS- Cov) spike protein (S protein) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to obtain the fusion protein expressed in prokaryotic cells. S2ED based on bioinformatics prediction and EGFP sequence were amplified by PCR and inserted into pET-14b plasmid. The recombinant protein His-S2ED-EGFP was expressed in E. coli by IPTG induction. After purification by Ni-NTA agarose beads, the soluble fractions of the fusion protein were collected and identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The fusion of S2ED with Hela cell membranes was observed with fluorescent microscope. The pET-14b-S2ED-EGFP plasmid was correctly constructed and highly expressed in BL21 (DE3). When incubated with Hela cells, the purified protein could not internalize through membrane fusion. The expression plasmid containing S2ED of SARS-Cov S protein and EGFP sequence is constructed successfully. Although the recombinant protein obtained has not shown the expected fusion effect with Hela cell membrane, this work may enrich the understanding of the process of membrane fusion mediated by S2 protein and lay the foundation for future study of targeting cell transport system based on cell-specific binding peptide.

  19. Plasmodium falciparum double C2 domain protein, PfDOC2, binds to calcium when associated with membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Sophonie; Zapata-Jenks, Mónica A; Farley, Julie M; Tracy, Erin; Mayer, D C Ghislaine

    2014-09-01

    The pathogenesis of malaria is strongly correlated with secretion of the micronemes, the apical organelles which contain the adhesins required for invasion of Plasmodium falciparum into human erythrocytes. A critical event in P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion is the production of calcium transients. After entering the cell, Ca(2+) binds to soluble Ca(2+)-binding proteins, such as the double C2 domains (DOC2). Recently, deletion of a P. falciparum DOC2 protein, PfDOC2, was shown to cause impairment in microneme secretion. However, PfDOC2 remains poorly characterized. Here, we report that PfDOC2 is expressed throughout the erythrocytic cycle and demonstrate that it is associated with membrane fractions and binds to calcium when it is part of these membranous structures. In summary, we show that PfDOC2 is a calcium lipid-binding protein of the protein kinase C type of DOC2 proteins.

  20. Coalescence of B cell receptor and invariant chain MHC II in a raft-like membrane domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Julian T; Lindner, Robert

    2014-11-01

    The BCR binds antigen for processing and subsequent presentation on MHC II molecules. Polyvalent antigen induces BCR clustering and targeting to endocytic processing compartments, which are also accessed by Ii-MHC II. Here, we report that clustered BCR is able to team up with Ii-MHC II already at the plasma membrane of mouse B-lymphocytes. Colocalization of BCR and Ii-MHC II on the cell surface required clustering of both types of molecules. The clustering of only one type did not trigger the recruitment of the other. Ii-bound MIF (a ligand of Ii) also colocalized with clustered BCR upon oligomerization of MIF on the surface of the B cell. Abundant surface molecules, such as B220 or TfnR, did not cocluster with the BCR. Some membrane raft-associated molecules, such as peptide-loaded MHC II, coclustered with the BCR, whereas others, such as GM1, did not. The formation of a BCR- and Ii-MHC II-containing membrane domain by antibody-mediated clustering was independent of F-actin and led to the coendocytosis of its constituents. With a rapid Brij 98 extraction method, it was possible to capture this membrane domain biochemically as a DRM. Ii and clustered BCR were present on the same DRM, as shown by immunoisolation. The coalescence of BCR and Ii-MHC II increased tyrosine phosphorylation, indicative of enhanced BCR signaling. Our work suggests a novel role for MIF and Ii-MHC II in BCR-mediated antigen processing.

  1. C-terminal, endoplasmic reticulum-lumenal domain of prosurfactant protein C - structural features and membrane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casals, Cristina; Johansson, Hanna; Saenz, Alejandra; Gustafsson, Magnus; Alfonso, Carlos; Nordling, Kerstin; Johansson, Jan

    2008-02-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) constitutes the transmembrane part of prosurfactant protein C (proSP-C) and is alpha-helical in its native state. The C-terminal part of proSP-C (CTC) is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and binds to misfolded (beta-strand) SP-C, thereby preventing its aggregation and amyloid fibril formation. In this study, we investigated the structure of recombinant human CTC and the effects of CTC-membrane interaction on protein structure. CTC forms noncovalent trimers and supratrimeric oligomers. It contains two intrachain disulfide bridges, and its secondary structure is significantly affected by urea or heat only after disulfide reduction. The postulated Brichos domain of CTC, with homologs found in proteins associated with amyloid and proliferative disease, is up to 1000-fold more protected from limited proteolysis than the rest of CTC. The protein exposes hydrophobic surfaces, as determined by CTC binding to the environment-sensitive fluorescent probe 1,1'-bis(4-anilino-5,5'-naphthalenesulfonate). Fluorescence energy transfer experiments further reveal close proximity between bound 1,1'-bis(4-anilino-5,5'-naphthalenesulfonate) and tyrosine residues in CTC, some of which are conserved in all Brichos domains. CTC binds to unilamellar phospholipid vesicles with low micromolar dissociation constants, and differential scanning calorimetry and CD analyses indicate that membrane-bound CTC is less structurally ordered than the unbound protein. The exposed hydrophobic surfaces and the structural disordering that result from interactions with phospholipid membranes suggest a mechanism whereby CTC binds to misfolded SP-C in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

  2. Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of two cytokine receptors mediate conserved interactions with membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxholm, Gitte Wolfsberg; Nikolajsen, Louise Fletcher; Olsen, Johan Gotthardt;

    2015-01-01

    Class 1 cytokine receptors regulate essential biological processes through complex intracellular signaling networks. However, the structural platform for understanding their functions is currently incomplete as structure-function studies of the intracellular domains (ICDs) are critically lacking...

  3. Genetic polymorphism in domain I of the apical membrane antigen-1 among Plasmodium knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun Yik; Wong, Shen Siang; Silva, Jeremy Ryan De; Lau, Yee Ling

    2015-12-01

    The simian malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is now recognized as a species that can cause human malaria. The first report of large scale human knowlesi malaria was in 2004 in Malaysia Borneo. Since then, hundreds of human knowlesi malaria cases have been reported in Southeast Asia. The present study investigates the genetic polymorphism of P. knowlesi DI domain of the apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1), a protein considered as a promising vaccine candidate for malaria. The DI domain of AMA-1 gene of P. knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia was amplified by PCR, cloned into Escherichia coli, then sequenced and analysed. Ninety-seven DI domain sequences were obtained. Comparison at the nucleotide level against P. knowlesi strain H as reference sequence showed 21 synonymous and 25 nonsynonymous mutations. Nonetheless, nucleotide sequence analysis revealed low genetic diversity of the DI domain, and it was under purifying (negative) selection. At the amino acid level, 26 different haplotypes were identified and 2 were predominant haplotypes (H1, H2) with high frequencies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the 26 haplotypes could be clustered into 2 distinct groups (I and II). Members of the groups were basically derived from haplotypes H1 and H2, respectively.

  4. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...... for the lateral organization of membranes as wells as for physical properties like bending, permeability and elasticity...

  5. Membraner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner......Notatet giver en kort introduktion til den statiske virkemåde af membraner og membrankonstruktioner...

  6. Membrane association of the Arabidopsis ARF exchange factor GNOM involves interaction of conserved domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anders, Nadine; Nielsen, Michael M.; Keicher, Jutta;

    2008-01-01

    The GNOM protein plays a fundamental role in Arabidopsis thaliana development by regulating endosome-to-plasma membrane trafficking required for polar localization of the auxin efflux carrier PIN1. GNOM is a family member of large ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factors (ARF-GEFs), which regulate...

  7. Conditions that Stabilize Membrane Domains Also Antagonize n-Alcohol Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machta, Benjamin B.; Gray, Ellyn; Nouri, Mariam; McCarthy, Nicola L. C.; Gray, Erin M.; Miller, Ann L.; Brooks, Nicholas J.; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2016-08-01

    Diverse molecules induce general anesthesia with potency strongly correlated both with their hydrophobicity and their effects on certain ion channels. We recently observed that several n-alcohol anesthetics inhibit heterogeneity in plasma membrane derived vesicles by lowering the critical temperature ($T_c$) for phase separation. Here we exploit conditions that stabilize membrane heterogeneity to further test the correlation between the anesthetic potency of n-alcohols and effects on $T_c$. First we show that hexadecanol acts oppositely to n-alcohol anesthetics on membrane mixing and antagonizes ethanol induced anesthesia in a tadpole behavioral assay. Second, we show that two previously described `intoxication reversers' raise $T_c$ and counter ethanol's effects in vesicles, mimicking the findings of previous electrophysiological and behavioral measurements. Third, we find that hydrostatic pressure, long known to reverse anesthesia, also raises $T_c$ in vesicles with a magnitude that counters the effect of butanol at relevant concentrations and pressures. Taken together, these results demonstrate that $\\Delta T_c$ predicts anesthetic potency for n-alcohols better than hydrophobicity in a range of contexts, supporting a mechanistic role for membrane heterogeneity in general anesthesia.

  8. Identification of a region that assists membrane insertion and translocation of the catalytic domain of Bordetella pertussis CyaA toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, Johanna C; Barker, Robert; Devi, Usha; Swann, Marcus J; Davi, Marilyne; Roser, Stephen J; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2012-03-16

    The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin, one of the virulence factors secreted by Bordetella pertussis, the pathogenic bacteria responsible for whooping cough, plays a critical role in the early stages of respiratory tract colonization by this bacterium. The CyaA toxin is able to invade eukaryotic cells by translocating its N-terminal catalytic domain directly across the plasma membrane of the target cells, where, activated by endogenous calmodulin, it produces supraphysiological levels of cAMP. How the catalytic domain is transferred from the hydrophilic extracellular medium into the hydrophobic environment of the membrane and then to the cell cytoplasm remains an unsolved question. In this report, we have characterized the membrane-interacting properties of the CyaA catalytic domain. We showed that a protein covering the catalytic domain (AC384, encompassing residues 1-384 of CyaA) displayed no membrane association propensity. However, a longer polypeptide (AC489), encompassing residues 1-489 of CyaA, exhibited the intrinsic property to bind to membranes and to induce lipid bilayer destabilization. We further showed that deletion of residues 375-485 within CyaA totally abrogated the toxin's ability to increase intracellular cAMP in target cells. These results indicate that, whereas the calmodulin dependent enzymatic domain is restricted to the amino-terminal residues 1-384 of CyaA, the membrane-interacting, translocation-competent domain extends up to residue 489. This thus suggests an important role of the region adjacent to the catalytic domain of CyaA in promoting its interaction with and its translocation across the plasma membrane of target cells.

  9. Stability and Membrane Orientation of the Fukutin Transmembrane Domain: A Combined Multiscale Molecular Dynamics and Circular Dichroism Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of fukutin-I has been implicated in the localization of the protein in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi Apparatus. It has been proposed to mediate this through its interaction with the thinner lipid bilayers found in these compartments. Here we have employed multiscale molecular dynamics simulations and circular dichroism spectroscopy to explore the structure, stability, and orientation of the short 36-residue N-terminus of fukutin-I (FK1TMD) in lipids with differing tail lengths. Our results show that FK1TMD adopts a stable helical conformation in phosphatidylcholine lipids when oriented with its principal axis perpendicular to the bilayer plane. The stability of the helix is largely insensitive to the lipid tail length, preventing hydrophobic mismatch by virtue of its mobility and ability to tilt within the lipid bilayers. This suggests that changes in FK1TMD tilt in response to bilayer properties may be implicated in the regulation of its trafficking. Coarse-grained simulations of the complex Golgi membrane suggest the N-terminal domain may induce the formation of microdomains in the surrounding membrane through its preferential interaction with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate lipids. PMID:21105749

  10. Ceramides with a pentadecasphingosine chain and short acyls have strong permeabilization effects on skin and model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Školová, Barbora; Janůšová, Barbora; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2016-02-01

    The composition and organization of stratum corneum lipids play an essential role in skin barrier function. Ceramides represent essential components of this lipid matrix; however, the importance of the individual structural features in ceramides is not fully understood. To probe the structure-permeability relationships in ceramides, we prepared analogs of N-lignoceroylsphingosine with shortened sphingosine (15 and 12 carbons) and acyl chains (2, 4 and 6 carbons) and studied their behavior in skin and in model lipid membranes. Ceramide analogs with pentadecasphingosine (15C) chains were more barrier-perturbing than 12C- and 18C-sphingosine ceramides; the greatest effects were found with 4 to 6C acyls (up to 15 times higher skin permeability compared to an untreated control and up to 79 times higher permeability of model stratum corneum lipid membranes compared to native very long-chain ceramides). Infrared spectroscopy using deuterated lipids and X-ray powder diffraction showed surprisingly similar behavior of the short ceramide membranes in terms of lipid chain order and packing, phase transitions and domain formation. The high- and low-permeability membranes differed in their amide I band shape and lamellar organization. These skin and membrane permeabilization properties of some short ceramides may be explored, for example, for the rational design of permeation enhancers for transdermal drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. VX-809 corrects folding defects in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein through action on membrane-spanning domain 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hong Yu; Grove, Diane E; De La Rosa, Oxana; Houck, Scott A; Sopha, Pattarawut; Van Goor, Fredrick; Hoffman, Beth J; Cyr, Douglas M

    2013-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a fatal genetic disorder associated with defective hydration of lung airways due to the loss of chloride transport through the CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). CFTR contains two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs), two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), and a regulatory domain, and its channel assembly requires multiple interdomain contacts. The most common CF-causing mutation, F508del, occurs in NBD1 and results in misfolding and premature degradation of F508del-CFTR. VX-809 is an investigational CFTR corrector that partially restores CFTR function in people who are homozygous for F508del-CFTR. To identify the folding defect(s) in F508del-CFTR that must be repaired to treat CF, we explored the mechanism of VX-809 action. VX-809 stabilized an N-terminal domain in CFTR that contains only MSD1 and efficaciously restored function to CFTR forms that have missense mutations in MSD1. The action of VX-809 on MSD1 appears to suppress folding defects in F508del-CFTR by enhancing interactions among the NBD1, MSD1, and MSD2 domains. The ability of VX-809 to correct F508del-CFTR is enhanced when combined with mutations that improve F508del-NBD1 interaction with MSD2. These data suggest that the use of VX-809 in combination with an additional CFTR corrector that suppresses folding defects downstream of MSD1 may further enhance CFTR function in people with F508del-CFTR.

  12. The membrane-spanning domain of gp41 plays a critical role in intracellular trafficking of the HIV envelope protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondo Naoyuki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequences of membrane-spanning domains (MSDs on the gp41 subunit are highly conserved among many isolates of HIV-1. The GXXXG motif, a potential helix-helix interaction motif, and an arginine residue (rare in hydrophobic MSDs are especially well conserved. These two conserved elements are expected to locate on the opposite sides of the MSD, if the MSD takes a α-helical secondary structure. A scanning alanine-insertion mutagenesis was performed to elucidate the structure-function relationship of gp41 MSD. Results A circular dichroism analysis of a synthetic gp41 MSD peptide determined that the secondary structure of the gp41 MSD was α-helical. We then performed a scanning alanine-insertion mutagenesis of the entire gp41 MSD, progressively shifting the relative positions of MSD segments around the helix axis. Altering the position of Gly694, the last residue of the GXXXG motif, relative to Arg696 (the number indicates the position of the amino acid residues in HXB2 Env around the axis resulted in defective fusion. These mutants showed impaired processing of the gp160 precursor into gp120 and gp41. Furthermore, these Env mutants manifested inefficient intracellular transport in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi regions. Indeed, a transplantation of the gp41 MSD portion into the transmembrane domain of another membrane protein, Tac, altered its intracellular distribution. Our data suggest that the intact MSD α-helix is critical in the intracellular trafficking of HIV-1 Env. Conclusions The relative position between the highly conserved GXXXG motif and an arginine residue around the gp41 MSD α-helix is critical for intracellular trafficking of HIV-1 Env. The gp41 MSD region not only modulates membrane fusion but also controls biosynthesis of HIV-1 Env.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Detergent Resistant Membrane Domains during Early Interaction of Macrophages with Rough and Smooth Brucella melitensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Sabine A.; Iyer, Srinivas; Sanchez, Timothy; Forst, Christian V.; Bowden, Brent; Carlson, Kay; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains discrete nanometer-sized domains that are resistant to non-ionic detergents, and which are called detergent resistant membrane domains (DRMDs) or lipid rafts. Exposure of host cells to pathogenic bacteria has been shown to induce the re-distribution of specific host proteins between DRMDs and detergent soluble membranes, which leads to the initiation of cell signaling that enable pathogens to access host cells. DRMDs have been shown to play a role in the invasion of Brucella into host macrophages and the formation of replicative phagosomes called Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs). In this study we sought to characterize changes to the protein expression profiles in DRMDs and to respective cellular pathways and networks of Mono Mac 6 cells in response to the adherence of rough VTRM1 and smooth 16 M B. melitensis strains. DRMDs were extracted from Mono Mac 6 cells exposed for 2 minutes at 4°C to Brucella (no infection occurs) and from unexposed control cells. Protein expression was determined using the non-gel based quantitative iTRAQ (Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation) mass spectrometry technique. Using the identified iTRAQ proteins we performed enrichment analyses and probed constructed human biochemical networks for interactions and metabolic reactions. We identified 149 proteins, which either became enriched, depleted or whose amounts did not change in DRMDs upon Brucella exposure. Several of these proteins were distinctly enriched or depleted in DRMDs upon exposure to rough and smooth B. melitensis strains which results in the differential engagement of cellular pathways and networks immediately upon Brucella encounter. For some of the proteins such as myosin 9, small G protein signaling modulator 3, lysine-specific demethylase 5D, erlin-2, and voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 2, we observed extreme differential depletion or enrichment in DRMDs. The identified proteins and pathways could provide

  14. Breakdown of interlocking domains may contribute to formation of membranous globules and lens opacity in ephrin-A5(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sondip; Son, Alexander; Yu, Qili; Zhou, Renping; Lo, Woo-Kuen

    2016-04-01

    Ephrin-A5, a ligand of the Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases, plays a key role in lens fiber cell packing and cell-cell adhesion, with approximately 87% of ephrin-A5(-/-) mice develop nuclear cataracts. Here, we investigated the extensive formation of light-scattering globules associated with breakdown of interlocking protrusions during lens opacification in ephrin-A5(-/-) mice. Lenses from wild-type (WT) and ephrin-A5(-/-) mice between 2 and 21 weeks old were studied with light and electron microscopy, immunofluorescence labeling, freeze-fracture TEM and filipin cytochemistry for membrane cholesterol detection. Lens opacities with various densities were first observed in ephrin-A5(-/-) mice at around 60 days old. Dense cataracts in the mutant lenses were seen primarily in the nuclear region surrounded by transparent cortices from all eyes examined. We confirmed that a majority of nuclear cataracts were dislocated posteriorly and ruptured the thinner posterior lens capsule. SEM analysis indicated that numerous interlocking protrusions and wavy ridge-and-valley membrane surfaces in deep cortical and nuclear fibers did not cause lens opacity in both transparent ephrin-A5(-/-) and WT mice. In contrast, abundant isolated membranous globules of approximately 1000 nm in size were distributed randomly along the intact fiber cells during early stage of all ephrin-A5(-/-) cataracts examined. A further examination using both SEM and TEM revealed that isolated globules were generated from the disintegrated interlocking protrusions originally located along the corners of hexagonal fiber cells. Freeze-fracture TEM further revealed the association of square-array aquaporin junctions with both isolated globules and interlocking membrane domains. This study reports for the first time that disrupted interlocking protrusions are the source of numerous large membranous globules that contribute to light scattering and nuclear cataracts in the ephrin-A5(-/-) mice. Our results

  15. Formation of cholesterol bilayer domains precedes formation of cholesterol crystals in cholesterol/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine membranes: EPR and DSC studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K

    2013-08-01

    Saturation-recovery EPR along with DSC were used to determine the cholesterol content at which pure cholesterol bilayer domains (CBDs) and cholesterol crystals begin to form in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes. To preserve compositional homogeneity throughout the membrane suspension, lipid multilamellar dispersions were prepared using a rapid solvent exchange method. The cholesterol content increased from 0 to 75 mol %. With spin-labeled cholesterol analogues, it was shown that the CBDs begin to form at ~50 mol % cholesterol. It was confirmed by DSC that the cholesterol solubility threshold for DMPC membranes is detected at ~66 mol % cholesterol. At levels above this cholesterol content, monohydrate cholesterol crystals start to form. The major finding is that the formation of CBDs precedes formation of cholesterol crystals. The region of the phase diagram for cholesterol contents between 50 and 66 mol % is described as a structured one-phase region in which CBDs have to be supported by the surrounding DMPC bilayer saturated with cholesterol. Thus, the phase boundary located at 66 mol % cholesterol separates the structured one-phase region (liquid-ordered phase of DMPC with CBDs) from the two-phase region where the structured liquid-ordered phase of DMPC coexists with cholesterol crystals. It is likely that CBDs are precursors of monohydrate cholesterol crystals.

  16. Development of a stratum corneum substitute for in vitro percutaneous penetration studies : a skin barrier model comprising synthetic stratum corneum lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Miranda Wilhelmina de

    2006-01-01

    The research outlined in this thesis was focused on the development of a skin barrier model, which can substitute for stratum corneum in diffusion studies. This so-called stratum corneum substitute (SCS) was prepared with reconstituted SC lipids (cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides) on a por

  17. Development of a stratum corneum substitute for in vitro percutaneous penetration studies : a skin barrier model comprising synthetic stratum corneum lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Miranda Wilhelmina de

    2006-01-01

    The research outlined in this thesis was focused on the development of a skin barrier model, which can substitute for stratum corneum in diffusion studies. This so-called stratum corneum substitute (SCS) was prepared with reconstituted SC lipids (cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides) on a

  18. Sensitive skin and stratum corneum reactivity to household cleaning products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, V; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    1996-02-01

    Products intended for individuals with sensitive skin are being increasingly developed by formulators of household cleaning products. However, there is currently no consensus about the definition and recognition of the biological basis of sensitive skin. We sought to determine the relation between the nature of environmental threat perceived as aggressive by panelists, and the stratum corneum reactivity to household cleaning products as measured by the corneosurfametry test. Results indicate substantial differences in irritancy potential between proprietary products. Corneosurfametry data show significant differences in stratum corneum reactivity between, on the one hand, individuals with either non-sensitive skin or skin sensitive to climate/fabrics, and, on the other hand, individuals with detergent-sensitive skin. It is concluded that sensitive skin is not one single condition. Sound information in rating detergent-sensitive skin may be gained by corneosurfametry.

  19. Conformation of ceramide 6 molecules and chain-flip transitions in the lipid matrix of the outermost layer of mammalian skin, the stratum corneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, M. A.

    2007-05-01

    Neutron diffraction from oriented multilamellar model stratum corneum (SC) membranes provides information on the internal nanostructure and hydration of the lipid bilayer. The main distinguishing feature of model SC membranes based on ceramide 6 is the extremely small intermembrane space (1 Å). The role of the fully extended (FE) conformation of ceramide 6 molecules in the organization of the nanostructure of the lipid matrix is discussed. The FE conformation gives rise to extremely strong intermembrane attractions (armature reinforcement), which tighten the adjacent bilayers to form steric contacts. Chain-flip transitions in the conformation of ceramide molecules account for structural alterations in native and model SC membranes upon their hydration.

  20. Near-membrane dynamics and capture of TRPM8 channels within transient confinement domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A Veliz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cold and menthol receptor, TRPM8, is a non-selective cation channel expressed in a subset of peripheral neurons that is responsible for neuronal detection of environmental cold stimuli. It was previously shown that members of the transient receptor potential (TRP family of ion channels are translocated toward the plasma membrane (PM in response to agonist stimulation. Because the spatial and temporal dynamics of cold receptor cell-surface residence may determine neuronal activity, we hypothesized that the movement of TRPM8 to and from the PM might be a regulated process. Single particle tracking (SPT is a useful tool for probing the organization and dynamics of protein constituents in the plasma membrane. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used SPT to study the receptor dynamics and describe membrane/near-membrane behavior of particles containing TRPM8-EGFP in transfected HEK-293T and F-11 cells. Cells were imaged using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy and the 2D and 3D trajectories of TRPM8 molecules were calculated by analyzing mean-square particle displacement against time. Four characteristic types of motion were observed: stationary mode, simple Brownian diffusion, directed motion, and confined diffusion. In the absence of cold or menthol to activate the channel, most TRPM8 particles move in network covering the PM, periodically lingering for 2-8 s in confined microdomains of about 800 nm radius. Removing cholesterol with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD stabilizes TRPM8 motion in the PM and is correlated with larger TRPM8 current amplitude that results from an increase in the number of available channels without a change in open probability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results reveal a novel mechanism for regulating TRPM8 channel activity, and suggest that PM dynamics may play an important role in controlling electrical activity in cold-sensitive neurons.

  1. The dimer interface of the membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase hemopexin domain: crystal structure and biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochowicz, Anna; Goettig, Peter; Evans, Richard; Visse, Robert; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Palmisano, Ralf; Ito, Noriko; Richter, Klaus; Maskos, Klaus; Franke, Daniel; Svergun, Dmitri; Nagase, Hideaki; Bode, Wolfram; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2011-03-04

    Homodimerization is an essential step for membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) to activate proMMP-2 and to degrade collagen on the cell surface. To uncover the molecular basis of the hemopexin (Hpx) domain-driven dimerization of MT1-MMP, a crystal structure of the Hpx domain was solved at 1.7 Å resolution. Two interactions were identified as potential biological dimer interfaces in the crystal structure, and mutagenesis studies revealed that the biological dimer possesses a symmetrical interaction where blades II and III of molecule A interact with blades III and II of molecule B. The mutations of amino acids involved in the interaction weakened the dimer interaction of Hpx domains in solution, and incorporation of these mutations into the full-length enzyme significantly inhibited dimer-dependent functions on the cell surface, including proMMP-2 activation, collagen degradation, and invasion into the three-dimensional collagen matrix, whereas dimer-independent functions, including gelatin film degradation and two-dimensional cell migration, were not affected. These results shed light on the structural basis of MT1-MMP dimerization that is crucial to promote cellular invasion.

  2. The physical chemistry of the stratum corneum lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncheva, M

    2014-12-01

    This article summarizes the current knowledge of the composition, self-assembly, and molecular organization of the stratum corneum (SC) lipids, reviews the evidence connecting these parameters and the barrier properties of human skin, and outlines the immediate issues in the field of SC lipid research. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  3. Structure of anti-FLAG M2 Fab domain and its use in the stabilization of engineered membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roosild, Tarmo P.; Castronovo, Samantha; Choe, Senyon, E-mail: choe@salk.edu [Structural Biology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037 (United States)

    2006-09-01

    The X-ray crystallographic analysis of anti-FLAG M2 Fab is reported and the implications of the structure on FLAG epitope binding are described as a first step in the development of a tool for the structural and biophysical study of membrane proteins. The inherent difficulties of stabilizing detergent-solubilized integral membrane proteins for biophysical or structural analysis demand the development of new methodologies to improve success rates. One proven strategy is the use of antibody fragments to increase the ‘soluble’ portion of any membrane protein, but this approach is limited by the difficulties and expense associated with producing monoclonal antibodies to an appropriate exposed epitope on the target protein. Here, the stabilization of a detergent-solubilized K{sup +} channel protein, KvPae, by engineering a FLAG-binding epitope into a known loop region of the protein and creating a complex with Fab fragments from commercially available anti-FLAG M2 monoclonal antibodies is reported. Although well diffracting crystals of the complex have not yet been obtained, during the course of crystallization trials the structure of the anti-FLAG M2 Fab domain was solved to 1.86 Å resolution. This structure, which should aid future structure-determination efforts using this approach by facilitating molecular-replacement phasing, reveals that the binding pocket appears to be specific only for the first four amino acids of the traditional FLAG epitope, namely DYKD. Thus, the use of antibody fragments for improving the stability of target proteins can be rapidly applied to the study of membrane-protein structure by placing the short DKYD motif within a predicted peripheral loop of that protein and utilizing commercially available anti-FLAG M2 antibody fragments.

  4. Flotillins interact with PSGL-1 in neutrophils and, upon stimulation, rapidly organize into membrane domains subsequently accumulating in the uropod.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Rossy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutrophils polarize and migrate in response to chemokines. Different types of membrane microdomains (rafts have been postulated to be present in rear and front of polarized leukocytes and disruption of rafts by cholesterol sequestration prevents leukocyte polarization. Reggie/flotillin-1 and -2 are two highly homologous proteins that are ubiquitously enriched in detergent resistant membranes and are thought to shape membrane microdomains by forming homo- and hetero-oligomers. It was the goal of this study to investigate dynamic membrane microdomain reorganization during neutrophil activation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show now, using immunofluorescence staining and co-immunoprecipitation, that endogenous flotillin-1 and -2 colocalize and associate in resting spherical and polarized primary neutrophils. Flotillins redistribute very early after chemoattractant stimulation, and form distinct caps in more than 90% of the neutrophils. At later time points flotillins accumulate in the uropod of polarized cells. Chemotactic peptide-induced redistribution and capping of flotillins requires integrity and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, but does not involve Rho-kinase dependent signaling related to formation of the uropod. Both flotillin isoforms are involved in the formation of this membrane domain, as uropod location of exogenously expressed flotillins is dramatically enhanced by co-overexpression of tagged flotillin-1 and -2 in differentiated HL-60 cells as compared to cells expressing only one tagged isoform. Flotillin-1 and -2 associate with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1 in resting and in stimulated neutrophils as shown by colocalization and co-immunoprecipitation. Neutrophils isolated from PSGL-1-deficient mice exhibit flotillin caps to the same extent as cells isolated from wild type animals, implying that PSGL-1 is not required for the formation of the flotillin caps. Finally we show that stimulus

  5. Structure and Membrane Binding Properties of the Endosomal Tetratricopeptide Repeat (TPR) Domain-containing Sorting Nexins SNX20 and SNX21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairfeuille, Thomas; Norwood, Suzanne J; Qi, Xiaying; Teasdale, Rohan D; Collins, Brett M

    2015-06-01

    Sorting nexins (SNX) orchestrate membrane trafficking and signaling events required for the proper distribution of proteins within the endosomal network. Their phox homology (PX) domain acts as a phosphoinositide (PI) recognition module that targets them to specific endocytic membrane domains. The modularity of SNX proteins confers a wide variety of functions from signaling to membrane deformation and cargo binding, and many SNXs are crucial modulators of endosome dynamics and are involved in a myriad of physiological and pathological processes such as neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and inflammation. Here, we have studied the poorly characterized SNX20 and its paralogue SNX21, which contain an N-terminal PX domain and a C-terminal PX-associated B (PXB) domain of unknown function. The two proteins share similar PI-binding properties and are recruited to early endosomal compartments by their PX domain. The crystal structure of the SNX21 PXB domain reveals a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-fold, a module that typically binds short peptide motifs, with three TPR α-helical repeats. However, the C-terminal capping helix adopts a highly unusual and potentially self-inhibitory topology. SAXS solution structures of SNX20 and SNX21 show that these proteins adopt a compact globular architecture, and membrane interaction analyses indicate the presence of overlapping PI-binding sites that may regulate their intracellular localization. This study provides the first structural analysis of this poorly characterized subfamily of SNX proteins, highlighting a likely role as endosome-associated scaffolds.

  6. A novel approach for application of nylon membranes in the biosensing domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahmand, Elham; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Hosseini, Samira [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Rothan, Hussin A.; Yusof, Rohana [Department of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Koole, Leo H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Djordjevic, Ivan, E-mail: ivandjordjevich@hotmail.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polymer coated nylon membranes as bioreceptor surfaces. • Carboxylated porous surface for protein immobilization. • High level of biosensing performance for dengue virus detection. - Abstract: In this paper we report the polymer-coated microporous nylon membranes and their application as platforms for protein immobilization and subsequent detection of the dengue virus (DV) in blood serum. Protein recognition experiments were performed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The polymers used for coatings were synthesized by free-radical polymerization reaction between methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAA) in different concentrations. The MAA monomer has carefully been chosen to generate polymers with pendant carboxyl (–COOH) groups, which also exist on polymer surfaces. A high degree of control over surface-exposed –COOH groups has been achieved through variation of monomers concentration in polymerization reaction. The general aspect of this work relies on the dengue antibody (Ab) immobilization on surface –COOH groups via physical attachment or covalent immobilization. Prior to Ab immobilization and ELISA experiment, polymer-coated nylon samples were analyzed in detail for their physical properties by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and water-in-air contact angle (WCA) measurements. Membranes were further analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in order to establish the relationship between wettability, porosity, and surface roughness with chemical composition and concentration of –COOH groups on the coating's surface. Optimized coatings have shown high sensitivity towards dengue Ab molecules, revealing fundamental aspect of polymer–protein interfaces as a function of surface –COOH groups’ concentration.

  7. Ultrastructural effects of acetone and benzalkonium chloride on the stratum corneum lipids in murine epidermis%丙酮和氯化苯甲烃铵对角质层脂质超微结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜少军; 周晓军

    2003-01-01

    本文用裸鼠作为实验动物对化学刺激性物质导致角质层脂态的变化进行超微结构的研究.裸鼠表皮经丙酮和氯化苯甲烃铵处理后,样品用四氧化钌固定.超微结构观察表明由于丙酮和氯化苯甲烃铵的刺激作用导致角质层脂质形态的变化、角质层脂质的抽提以及在角质细胞之间形成腔隙.结果表明四氧化钌对角质层脂质有良好的固定作用,并清晰地展示出丙酮和氯化苯甲烃铵对角质层脂质的影响.%To gain a better understanding of the interaction of chemically different irritants with the stratum corneum lipids, the morphological changes of the stratum corneum lipids resulting from the chemical irritants in murine epidermis were investigated. Node mice were treated topically with either acetone or 2% benzalkonium chloride, the visualization of the stratum corneum was carried out using a special fixation method utilizing 0.25% ruthenium tetroxide as the post-fixative. Ultrastructural observation demonstrated obvious distortions within the intercellular domains of the stratum corneum, including disorganization of lipid bilayers, lipid extraction, and lacunae formation. The results of this study indicated that ruthenium tetroxide is a preferable post-fixative for the study of the stratum corneum lipids, and provide evidence that different irritants induce distinct alterations within the stratum corneum to reflect the specific interaction with the stratum corneum lipids.

  8. Membranous Nephropathy with an Enhanced Granular Expression of Thrombospondin Type-1 Domain-containing 7A in a Pregnant Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakura, Takamasa; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Katahashi, Naoko; Sato, Taichi; Ishigaki, Sayaka; Tsuji, Naoko; Naito, Yoshitaka; Isobe, Shinsuke; Ono, Masashi; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Tsuji, Takayuki; Ohashi, Naro; Kato, Akihiko; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Yasuda, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman with proteinuria first noted at 26 weeks of gestation was admitted to undergo further evaluation. A renal biopsy revealed membranous nephropathy (MN). There was no evidence of any secondary MN. Prednisolone was initiated 6 months after delivery. Four months later, her urine protein became negative. Enhanced granular staining for thrombospondin type-1 domain-containing 7A (THSD7A) in the glomeruli was retrospectively detected in a biopsy specimen. A literature review revealed that 60% of cases of THSD7A-related MN occurred in women of childbearing age. Therefore, THSD7A-related MN should be considered in female patients presenting with idiopathic MN in childbearing age.

  9. Structural Changes in Ceramide Bilayers Rationalize Increased Permeation through Stratum Corneum Models with Shorter Acyl Tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloncýová, Markéta; Vávrová, Kateřina; Sovová, Žofie; DeVane, Russell; Otyepka, Michal; Berka, Karel

    2015-07-30

    Ceramides are indispensable constituents of the stratum corneum (SC), the uppermost impermeable layer of human skin. Ceramides with shorter (four- to eight-carbon acyl chains) fatty acid chains increase skin and model membrane permeability, while further shortening of the chain leads to increased resistance to penetration almost as good as that of ceramides from healthy skin (24 carbons long on average). Here we address the extent to which the atomistic CHARMM36 and coarse-grain MARTINI molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reflect the skin permeability data. As a result, we observed the same bell-shaped permeability trend for water that was observed in the skin and multilayer membrane experiments for model compounds. We showed that the enhanced permeability of the short ceramides is mainly caused by the disturbance of their headgroup conformation because of their inability to accommodate the shorter lipid acyl chain into a typical hairpin conformation, which further led to their destabilization and phase separation. As MD simulations described well delicate structural features of SC membranes, they seem to be suitable for further studies of the SC superstructure, including the development of skin penetration enhancers for transdermal drug delivery and skin toxicity risk assessment studies.

  10. Preferential Protection of Domains II and III of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa Toxin by Brush Border Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed-Rehan A. Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Título español: Protección preferencial de los dominios II y III de la toxina Cry1Aa de Bacillus thuringiensis en Vesículas de Membrana de Borde de Cepillo Abstract The surface exposed Leucine 371 on loop 2 of domain II, in Cry1Aa toxin, was mutated to Lysine to generate the trypsin-sensitive mutant, L371K. Upon trypsin digestion L371K is cleaved into approximately 37 and 26 kDa fragments. These are separable on SDS-PAGE, but remain as a single molecule of 65 kDa upon purification by liquid chromatography. The larger fragment is domain I and a portion of domain II (amino acid residues 1 to 371. The smaller 26-kDa polypeptide is the remainder of domain II and domain III (amino acids 372 to 609. When the mutant toxin was treated with high dose of M. sexta gut juice both fragments were degraded. However, when incubated with M. sexta BBMV, the 26 kDa fragment (domains II and III was preferentially protected from gut juice proteases. As previously reported, wild type Cry1Aa toxin was also protected against degradation by gut juice proteases when incubated with M. sexta BBMV. On the contrary, when mouse BBMV was added to the reaction mixture neither Cry1Aa nor L371K toxins showed resistance to M. sexta gut juice proteases and were degraded. Since the whole Cry1Aa toxin and most of the domain II and domain III of L371K are protected from proteases in the presence of BBMV of the target insect, we suggest that the insertion of the toxin into the membrane is complex and involves all three domains. Key words: Bacillus thuringiensis, site directed mutagenesis,  -endotoxin. Resumen La superficie de la toxina Cry1Aa, en el asa 2 del dominio II contiene expuesta la leucina 371, la cual fue modificada a lisina produciendo una mutante sensible a la tripsina, L371K. Esta mutante produce dos fragmentos de 37 y 26 kDa por acción de la tripsina que son separables por SDS-PAGE, pero que a la purificación por cromatografía líquida se mantienen como una sola

  11. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of the periplasmic signalling domain of HasR, a TonB-dependent outer membrane heme transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Idir; Cardoso de Amorim, Gisele; Simenel, Catherine; Prochnicka-Chalufour, Ada; Delepierre, Muriel; Izadi-Pruneyre, Nadia

    2013-04-01

    TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) are bacterial outer membrane proteins that internalize nutrients such as vitamin B12, metal complexes, heme, some carbohydrates, etc. In addition to their transport activity, several TBDTs are also involved in a signalling cascade from the cell surface into the cytoplasm, via their periplasmic signalling domain. Here we report the backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the signalling domain of HasR, a TonB-dependent outer membrane heme transporter from Serratia marcescens as a first step towards its structural study.

  12. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of calmodulin in complex with the regulatory domain of the plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPase ACA8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidow, Henning; Hein, Kim Langmach; Bækgaard, Lone

    2010-01-01

    -bound calmodulin (Ca(2+)-CaM) to this tail and a conformational change that displaces the autoinhibitory tail from the catalytic domain. The complex between calmodulin and the regulatory domain of the plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase ACA8 from Arabidopsis thaliana has been crystallized. The crystals belonged to space......Plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPases (PMCAs) are calcium pumps that expel Ca(2+) from eukaryotic cells to maintain overall Ca(2+) homoeostasis and to provide local control of intracellular Ca(2+) signalling. They are of major physiological importance, with different isoforms being essential, for example...

  13. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of calmodulin in complex with the regulatory domain of the plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPase ACA8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidow, Henning; Hein, Kim Langmach; Palmgren, Michael Broberg

    2010-01-01

    -bound calmodulin (Ca2+-CaM) to this tail and a conformational change that displaces the autoinhibitory tail from the catalytic domain. The complex between calmodulin and the regulatory domain of the plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPase ACA8 from Arabidopsis thaliana has been crystallized. The crystals belonged to space......Plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPases (PMCAs) are calcium pumps that expel Ca2+ from eukaryotic cells to maintain overall Ca2+ homoeostasis and to provide local control of intracellular Ca2+ signalling. They are of major physiological importance, with different isoforms being essential, for example...

  14. The membrane-binding domain of an amphitropic enzyme suppresses catalysis by contact with an amphipathic helix flanking its active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Harris K-H; Taneva, Svetla G; Lee, Jaeyong; Silva, Leslie P; Schriemer, David C; Cornell, Rosemary B

    2013-05-13

    CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT), the regulatory enzyme in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, is activated by binding membranes using a lipid-induced amphipathic helix (domain M). Domain M functions to silence catalysis when CCT is not membrane engaged. The silencing mechanism is unknown. We used photo-cross-linking and mass spectrometry to identify contacts between domain M and other CCT domains in its soluble form. Each of four sites in domain M forged cross-links to the same set of peptides that flank the active site and overlap at helix αE at the base of the active site. These cross-links were broken in the presence of activating lipid vesicles. Mutagenesis of domain M revealed that multiple hydrophobic residues within a putative auto-inhibitory (AI) motif contribute to the contact with helix αE and silencing. Helix αE was confirmed as the docking site for domain M by deuterium exchange analysis. We compared the dynamics and fold stability of CCT domains by site-directed fluorescence anisotropy and urea denaturation. The results suggest a bipartite structure for domain M: a disordered N-terminal portion and an ordered C-terminal AI motif with an unfolding transition identical with that of helix αE. Reduction in hydrophobicity of the AI motif decreased its order and fold stability, as did deletion of the catalytic domain. These results support a model in which catalytic silencing is mediated by the docking of an amphipathic AI motif onto the amphipathic helices αE. An unstructured leash linking αE with the AI motif may facilitate both the silencing contact and its membrane-triggered disruption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Solution structure and membrane-binding property of the N-terminal tail domain of human annexin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, M K; Park, S H; Won, H S; Na, D S; Lee, B J

    2000-11-10

    The conformational preferences of AnxI(N26), a peptide corresponding to residues 2-26 of human annexin I, were investigated using CD and NMR spectroscopy. CD results showed that AnxI(N26) adopts a mainly alpha-helical conformation in membrane-mimetic environments, TFE/water and SDS micelles, while a predominantly random structure with slight helical propensity in aqueous buffer. The helical region of AnxI(N26) showed a nearly identical conformation between in TFE/water and in SDS micelles, except for the orientation of the Trp-12 side-chain, which was quite different between the two. The N-terminal region of the AnxI(N26) helix showed a typical amphipathic nature, which could be stabilized by the neighboring hydrophobic cluster. The helical stability of the peptide in SDS micelles was increased by addition of calcium ions. These results suggest that the N-terminal tail domain of human annexin I interacts with biological membranes in a partially calcium-dependent manner.

  16. Involvement of the heterodimeric interface region of the nucleotide binding domain-2 (NBD2) in the CFTR quaternary structure and membrane stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoud, Julien; Chauvet, Sylvain; Scheckenbach, Klaus Ernst Ludwig; Alfaidy, Nadia; Chanson, Marc; Benharouga, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the only member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily that functions as a chloride channel. The predicted structure of CFTR protein contains two membrane-spanning domains (MSDs), each followed by a nucleotide binding domain (NBD1 and NBD2). The opening of the Cl- channel is directly linked to ATP-driven tight dimerization of CFTR's NBD1 and NBD2 domains. The presence of a heterodimeric interfaces (HI) region in NBD1 and NBD2 generated a head to tail orientation necessary for channel activity. This process was also suggested to promote important conformational changes in the associated transmembrane domains of CFTR, which may impact the CFTR plasma membrane stability. To better understand the role of the individual HI region in this process, we generated recombinant CFTR protein with suppressed HI-NBD1 and HI-NBD2. Our results indicate that HI-NBD2 deletion leads to the loss of the dimerization profile of CFTR that affect its plasma membrane stability. We conclude that, in addition to its role in Cl- transport, HI-NBD2 domain confers membrane stability of CFTR by consolidating its quaternary structure through interactions with HI-NBD1 region.

  17. Comment on "Elastic Membrane Deformations Govern Interleaflet Coupling of Lipid-Ordered Domains"

    CERN Document Server

    Williamson, John J

    2016-01-01

    In lieu of abstract, first paragraph reads: Galimzyanov et al. [1] find that line tension between thick liquid-ordered ($L_{o}$) and thinner liquid-disordered ($L_{d}$) registered lipid bilayer phases is minimised by an asymmetric "slip region", length $L\\!\\sim\\!5\\,\\textrm{nm}$ (Fig. 1). They claim that line tensions alone explain domain registration, without "direct" (area-dependent) inter-leaflet interaction [2,3]. We show this is unfounded, without direct interaction their results would predict \\textit{antiregistration}, dependent on composition. To find equilibrium from line energies, line \\textit{tensions} must be combined with interfacial lengths for given states at given composition. This was not done in [1].

  18. BH3 domains of BH3-only proteins differentially regulate Bax-mediated mitochondrial membrane permeabilization both directly and indirectly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwana, Tomomi; Bouchier-Hayes, Lisa; Chipuk, Jerry E; Bonzon, Christine; Sullivan, Barbara A; Green, Douglas R; Newmeyer, Donald D

    2005-02-18

    Using a Bax-dependent membrane-permeabilization assay, we show that peptides corresponding to the BH3 domains of Bcl-2 family "BH3-only" proteins have dual functions. Several BH3 peptides relieved the inhibition of Bax caused by the antiapoptotic Bcl-x(L) and/or Mcl-1 proteins, some displaying a specificity for either Bcl-x(L) or Mcl-1. Besides having this derepression function, the Bid and Bim peptides activated Bax directly and were the only BH3 peptides tested that could potently induce cytochrome c release from mitochondria in cultured cells. Furthermore, Bax activator molecules (cleaved Bid protein and the Bim BH3 peptide) synergistically induced cytochrome c release when introduced into cells along with derepressor BH3 peptides. These observations support a unified model of BH3 domain function, encompassing both positive and negative regulation of other Bcl-2 family members. In this model, the simple inhibition of antiapoptotic functions is insufficient to induce apoptosis unless a direct activator of Bax or Bak is present.

  19. Quantification of interaction strengths between chaperones and tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Regina; Soll, Jürgen; Jung, Kirsten; Heermann, Ralf; Schwenkert, Serena

    2013-10-18

    The three tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing docking proteins Toc64, OM64, and AtTPR7 reside in the chloroplast, mitochondrion, and endoplasmic reticulum of Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. They are suggested to act during post-translational protein import by association with chaperone-bound preprotein complexes. Here, we performed a detailed biochemical, biophysical, and computational analysis of the interaction between Toc64, OM64, and AtTPR7 and the five cytosolic chaperones HSP70.1, HSP90.1, HSP90.2, HSP90.3, and HSP90.4. We used surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy in combination with Interaction Map® analysis to distinguish between chaperone oligomerization and docking protein-chaperone interactions and to calculate binding affinities for all tested interactions. Complementary to this, we applied pulldown assays as well as microscale thermophoresis as surface immobilization independent techniques. The data revealed that OM64 prefers HSP70 over HSP90, whereas Toc64 binds all chaperones with comparable affinities. We could further show that AtTPR7 is able to bind HSP90 in addition to HSP70. Moreover, differences between the HSP90 isoforms were detected and revealed a weaker binding for HSP90.1 to AtTPR7 and OM64, showing that slight differences in the amino acid composition or structure of the chaperones influence binding to the tetratricopeptide repeat domain. The combinatory approach of several methods provided a powerful toolkit to determine binding affinities of similar interaction partners in a highly quantitative manner.

  20. The Presence of Sterols Favors Sticholysin I-Membrane Association and Pore Formation Regardless of Their Ability to Form Laterally Segregated Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrera, Lohans; Gomide, Andreza B; Sánchez, Rafael E; Ros, Uris; Wilke, Natalia; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, María E; Itri, Rosangela; Fanani, María Laura; Alvarez, Carlos

    2015-09-15

    Sticholysin I (St I) is a pore-forming toxin (PFT) produced by the Caribbean Sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus belonging to the actinoporin protein family, a unique class of eukaryotic PFT. As for actinoporins, it has been proposed that the presence of cholesterol (Chol) and the coexistence of lipid phases increase binding to the target membrane and pore-forming ability. However, little is known about the role of membrane structure and dynamics (phase state, fluidity, and the presence of lipid domains) on the activity of actinoporins or which regions of the membrane are the most favorable for protein insertion, oligomerization, and eventually pore formation. To gain insight into the role of membrane properties on the functional activity of St I, we studied its binding to monolayers and vesicles of phosphatidylcholine (PC), sphingomyelin (SM), and sterols inducing (ergosterol -Erg and cholesterol -Chol) or not (cholestenone - Cln) membrane phase segregation in liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains. This study revealed that St I binds and permeabilizes with higher efficiency sterol-containing membranes independently of their ability to form domains. We discuss the results in terms of the relevance of different membrane properties for the actinoporins mechanism of action, namely, molecular heterogeneity, specially potentiated in membranes with sterols inducers of phase separation (Chol or Erg) or Cln, a sterol noninducer of phase separation but with a high propensity to induce nonlamellar phase. The role of the Ld phase is pointed out as the most suitable platform for pore formation. In this regard, such regions in Chol-containing membranes seem to be the most favored due to its increased fluidity; this property promotes toxin insertion, diffusion, and oligomerization leading to pore formation.

  1. Cysteine 70 of ankyrin-G is S-palmitoylated and is required for function of ankyrin-G in membrane domain assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meng; Jenkins, Paul; Bennett, Vann

    2012-12-21

    Ankyrin-G (AnkG) coordinates protein composition of diverse membrane domains, including epithelial lateral membranes and neuronal axon initial segments. However, how AnkG itself localizes to these membrane domains is not understood. We report that AnkG remains on the plasma membrane in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells grown in low calcium, although these cells lack apical-basal polarity and exhibit loss of plasma membrane association of AnkG partners, E-cadherin and β(2)-spectrin. We subsequently demonstrate using mutagenesis and mass spectrometry that AnkG is S-palmitoylated exclusively at Cys-70, which is located in a loop of the first ankyrin repeat and is conserved in the vertebrate ankyrin family. Moreover, C70A mutation abolishes membrane association of 190-kDa AnkG in MDCK cells grown in low calcium. C70A 190-kDa AnkG fails to restore biogenesis of epithelial lateral membranes in MDCK cells depleted of endogenous AnkG. In addition, C70A 270-kDa AnkG fails to cluster at the axon initial segment of AnkG-depleted cultured hippocampal neurons and fails to recruit neurofascin as well as voltage-gated sodium channels. These effects of C70A mutation combined with evidence for its S-palmitoylation are consistent with a requirement of palmitoylation for targeting and function of AnkG in membrane domain biogenesis at epithelial lateral membranes and neuronal axon initial segments.

  2. A Structural Model for the Membrane-Bound Form of the Juxtamembrane Domain of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Carlin, Cathleen R.; Sonnichsen, Frank D.

    2005-06-24

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Its juxtamembrane domain (JX), the region located between the transmembrane and kinase domains, plays important roles in receptor trafficking. Two sorting signals, a PXXP motif and a 658LL659 motif, are responsible for basolateral sorting in polarized epithelial cells, and a 679LL680 motif targets the ligand-activated receptor for lysosomal degradation. To understand the regulation of these signals, we characterized the structural properties of recombinant JX domain in aqueous solution and in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) detergent. JX is inherently unstructured in aqueous solution, albeit a nascent helix encompasses the lysosomal sorting signal. In DPC micelles, structures derived from NMR data showed three amphipathic, helical segments. A large, internally inconsistent group of long range nuclear Overhauser effects suggest a close proximity of the helices, and the presence of significant conformational averaging. Models were determined for the average JX conformation using restraints representing the translational restriction due to micelle-surface adsorption, and the helix orientations were determined from residual dipolar couplings. Two equivalent average structural models were obtained that differ only in the relative orientation between first and second helices. In these models, the 658LL659 and 679LL680 motifs are located in the first and second helices and face the micelle surface, whereas the PXXP motif is located in a flexible helix-connecting region. The data suggest that the activity of these signals may be regulated by their membrane association and restricted accessibility in the intact receptor.

  3. Localization of the disulfide bonds in the NH2-terminal domain of the cellular receptor for human urokinase-type plasminogen activator. A domain structure belonging to a novel superfamily of glycolipid-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, M; Kjalke, M.; Rønne, E

    1993-01-01

    : Cys3-Cys24, Cys6-Cys12, Cys17-Cys45, and Cys71-Cys76. Similar cysteine pairing is likely to be found within other members of this protein superfamily, i.e. the membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis, Ly-6, and the remaining two domains of uPAR. However, an additional pair of cysteines present within...

  4. The structure of the RLIP76 RhoGAP-Ral binding domain dyad: fixed position of the domains leads to dual engagement of small G proteins at the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekar, Karthik V; Campbell, Louise J; Nietlispach, Daniel; Owen, Darerca; Mott, Helen R

    2013-12-03

    RLIP76 is an effector for Ral small GTPases, which in turn lie downstream of the master regulator Ras. Evidence is growing that Ral and RLIP76 play a role in tumorigenesis, invasion, and metastasis. RLIP76 contains both a RhoGAP domain and a Ral binding domain (GBD) and is, therefore, a node between Ras and Rho family signaling. The structure of the RhoGAP-GBD dyad reveals that the RLIP76 RhoGAP domain adopts a canonical RhoGAP domain structure and that the linker between the two RLIP76 domains is structured, fixing the orientation of the two domains and allowing RLIP76 to interact with Rho-family GTPases and Ral simultaneously. However, the juxtaposed domains do not influence each other functionally, suggesting that the RLIP76-Ral interaction controls cellular localization and that the fixed orientation of the two domains orientates the RhoGAP domain with respect to the membrane, allowing it to be perfectly poised to engage its target G proteins.

  5. Deacylation of the transmembrane domains of Sindbis virus envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 does not affect low-pH-induced viral membrane fusion activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, JM; Bittman, R; Wilschut, J

    2001-01-01

    The envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 of Sindbis virus are palmitoylated at cysteine residues within their transmembrane domains (E1 at position 430, and E2 at positions 388 and 390), Here, we investigated the in vitro membrane fusion activity of Sindbis virus variants (derived from the Tote 1101 inf

  6. A breached barrier : analysis of stratum corneum lipids and their role in eczematous patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeden, Jeroen van

    2013-01-01

    The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of the skin, and acts as the primary barrier against penetration of pathogens, allergens and other exogenous substances into the lower layers of the skin. Crucial for a proper barrier function are the lipids in the stratum corneum, mainly consisting of

  7. Water distribution and related morphology in human stratum corneum at different hydration levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwstra, J.A.; Graaff, de A.; Gooris, G.S.; Nijsse, J.; Wiechers, J.W.; Aelst, van A.C.

    2003-01-01

    This study focused on the water distribution in human stratum corneum and on the swelling of the corneocytes. For this purpose stratum corneum was hydrated to various levels and used either for Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy or for cryo-scanning electron microscopy. The images were analyzed

  8. Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 Mediates Collagen-Induced Activation of Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase in Human Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkowska, Iwona; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Ito, Noriko; Gray, Nathanael S; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2017-03-07

    Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-bound MMP that is highly expressed in cells with invading capacity including fibroblasts and invasive cancer cell. A potential physiological stimulus for MT1-MMP expression is fibrillar collagen, and it has been shown that it upregulates both MT1-MMP gene and functions in various cell types. However, the mechanisms of collagen-mediated MT1-MMP activation is not clearly understood. In this study we identified discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) as a crucial receptor that mediates this process in human fibroblasts. Knocking down DDR2, but not β1 integrin subunit, a common subunit for all collagen-binding integrins, inhibited collagen-induced activation of proMMP-2 and upregulation of MT1-MMP at the gene and protein level. Interestingly DDR2 knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of DDR2 also inhibited MT1-MMP-dependent cellular degradation of collagen film, suggesting that cell surface collagen degradation by MT1-MMP involves DDR2-mediated collagen signalling. This DDR2-mediated mechanism is only present in non-transformed mesenchymal cells, as collagen-induced MT1-MMP activation in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and MT1-MMP function in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells were not affected by DDR kinase inhibition. DDR2 activation was found to be noticeably more effective when cells were stimulated by collagen without non-helical telopeptides region compared to intact collagen fibrils. Those data suggest that DDR2 is a microenvironmental sensor that regulates fibroblasts migration in collagen-rich environment.

  9. The Plant Membrane-Associated REMORIN1.3 Accumulates in Discrete Perihaustorial Domains and Enhances Susceptibility to Phytophthora infestans1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Richardson, Annis; Dagdas, Yasin F.; Mongrand, Sébastien; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous pathogens such as the oomycete Phytophthora infestans infect plants by developing specialized structures termed haustoria inside the host cells. Haustoria are thought to enable the secretion of effector proteins into the plant cells. Haustorium biogenesis, therefore, is critical for pathogen accommodation in the host tissue. Haustoria are enveloped by a specialized host-derived membrane, the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM), which is distinct from the plant plasma membrane. The mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of the EHM are unknown. Remarkably, several plasma membrane-localized proteins are excluded from the EHM, but the remorin REM1.3 accumulates around P. infestans haustoria. Here, we used overexpression, colocalization with reporter proteins, and superresolution microscopy in cells infected by P. infestans to reveal discrete EHM domains labeled by REM1.3 and the P. infestans effector AVRblb2. Moreover, SYNAPTOTAGMIN1, another previously identified perihaustorial protein, localized to subdomains that are mainly not labeled by REM1.3 and AVRblb2. Functional characterization of REM1.3 revealed that it is a susceptibility factor that promotes infection by P. infestans. This activity, and REM1.3 recruitment to the EHM, require the REM1.3 membrane-binding domain. Our results implicate REM1.3 membrane microdomains in plant susceptibility to an oomycete pathogen. PMID:24808104

  10. Molecular mechanisms of protein-cholesterol interactions in plasma membranes: Functional distinction between topological (tilted) and consensus (CARC/CRAC) domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Jacques; Di Scala, Coralie; Baier, Carlos J; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2016-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms that control the multiple possible modes of protein association with membrane cholesterol are remarkably convergent. These mechanisms, which include hydrogen bonding, CH-π stacking and dispersion forces, are used by a wide variety of extracellular proteins (e.g. microbial or amyloid) and membrane receptors. Virus fusion peptides penetrate the membrane of host cells with a tilted orientation that is compatible with a transient interaction with cholesterol; this tilted orientation is also characteristic of the process of insertion of amyloid proteins that subsequently form oligomeric pores in the plasma membrane of brain cells. Membrane receptors that are associated with cholesterol generally display linear consensus binding motifs (CARC and CRAC) characterized by a triad of basic (Lys/Arg), aromatic (Tyr/phe) and aliphatic (Leu/Val) amino acid residues. In some cases, the presence of both CARC and CRAC within the same membrane-spanning domain allows the simultaneous binding of two cholesterol molecules, one in each membrane leaflet. In this review the molecular basis and the functional significance of the different modes of protein-cholesterol interactions in plasma membranes are discussed.

  11. Lipid-protein nanodiscs promote in vitro folding of transmembrane domains of multi-helical and multimeric membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Butenko, Ivan O; Petrovskaya, Lada E; Paramonov, Alexander S; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Nekrasova, Oksana V; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2013-02-01

    Production of helical integral membrane proteins (IMPs) in a folded state is a necessary prerequisite for their functional and structural studies. In many cases large-scale expression of IMPs in cell-based and cell-free systems results in misfolded proteins, which should be refolded in vitro. Here using examples of the bacteriorhodopsin ESR from Exiguobacterium sibiricum and full-length homotetrameric K(+) channel KcsA from Streptomyces lividans we found that the efficient in vitro folding of the transmembrane domains of the polytopic and multimeric IMPs could be achieved during the protein encapsulation into the reconstructed high-density lipoprotein particles, also known as lipid-protein nanodiscs. In this case the self-assembly of the IMP/nanodisc complexes from a mixture containing apolipoprotein, lipids and the partially denatured protein solubilized in a harsh detergent induces the folding of the transmembrane domains. The obtained folding yields showed significant dependence on the properties of lipids used for nanodisc formation. The largest recovery of the spectroscopically active ESR (~60%) from the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was achieved in the nanodiscs containing anionic saturated lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPG) and was approximately twice lower in the zwitterionic DMPC lipid. The reassembly of tetrameric KcsA from the acid-dissociated monomer solubilized in SDS was the most efficient (~80%) in the nanodiscs containing zwitterionic unsaturated lipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). The charged and saturated lipids provided lower tetramer quantities, and the lowest yield (<20%) was observed in DMPC. The overall yield of the ESR and KcsA folding was mainly restricted by the efficiency of the protein encapsulation into the nanodiscs.

  12. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the YxxPhi domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1(NL4.3) compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and increase of

  13. Association of Arabidopsis type-II ROPs with the plasma membrane requires a conserved C-terminal sequence motif and a proximal polybasic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavy, Meirav; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2006-06-01

    Plant ROPs (or RACs) are soluble Ras-related small GTPases that are attached to cell membranes by virtue of the post-translational lipid modifications of prenylation and S-acylation. ROPs (RACs) are subdivided into two major subgroups called type-I and type-II. Whereas type-I ROPs terminate with a conserved CaaL box and undergo prenylation, type-II ROPs undergo S-acylation on two or three C-terminal cysteines. In the present work we determined the sequence requirement for association of Arabidopsis type-II ROPs with the plasma membrane. We identified a conserved sequence motif, designated the GC-CG box, in which the modified cysteines are flanked by glycines. The GC-CG box cysteines are separated by five to six mostly non-polar residues. Deletion of this sequence or the introduction of mutations that change its nature disrupted the association of ROPs with the membrane. Mutations that changed the GC-CG box glycines to alanines also interfered with membrane association. Deletion of a polybasic domain proximal to the GC-CG box disrupted the plasma membrane association of AtROP10. A green fluorescent protein fusion protein containing the C-terminal 25 residues of AtROP10, including its polybasic domain and GC-CG box, was primarily associated with the plasma membrane but a similar fusion protein lacking the polybasic domain was exclusively localized in the soluble fraction. These data provide evidence for the minimal sequence required for plasma membrane association of type-II ROPs in Arabidopsis and other plant species.

  14. FCS diffusion laws in two-phase lipid membranes: determination of domain mean size by experiments and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favard, Cyril; Wenger, Jérôme; Lenne, Pierre-François; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-03-02

    Many efforts have been undertaken over the last few decades to characterize the diffusion process in model and cellular lipid membranes. One of the techniques developed for this purpose, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), has proved to be a very efficient approach, especially if the analysis is extended to measurements on different spatial scales (referred to as FCS diffusion laws). In this work, we examine the relevance of FCS diffusion laws for probing the behavior of a pure lipid and a lipid mixture at temperatures below, within and above the phase transitions, both experimentally and numerically. The accuracy of the microscopic description of the lipid mixtures found here extends previous work to a more complex model in which the geometry is unknown and the molecular motion is driven only by the thermodynamic parameters of the system itself. For multilamellar vesicles of both pure lipid and lipid mixtures, the FCS diffusion laws recorded at different temperatures exhibit large deviations from pure Brownian motion and reveal the existence of nanodomains. The variation of the mean size of these domains with temperature is in perfect correlation with the enthalpy fluctuation. This study highlights the advantages of using FCS diffusion laws in complex lipid systems to describe their temporal and spatial structure.

  15. SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY-BASED MICROSTRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF RETINAL ARCHITECTURE POST INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING FOR SURGERY OF IDIOPATHIC MACULAR HOLE REPAIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Aditya; Giridhar, Anantharaman; Gopalakrishnan, Mahesh

    2017-02-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography-based analysis of retinal architecture after internal limiting membrane peeling for macular hole surgery. Prospective, interventional study. Fifty eyes underwent the surgical procedure with minimum internal limiting membrane peel of 3 mm diameter. Automatic segmentation software was used to assess individual layers preoperatively and postoperatively, 1.5 millimeters medial and lateral to fovea at 3 months postoperative visit. Main outcome measures were final central macular thickness and variation in individual retinal layer thickness. Mean central macular thickness postoperatively was 201 microns. Retinal thickening was observed, 1.5 mm medial to fovea (P Internal limiting membrane peel is associated with significant alteration in inner retinal architecture, especially in ganglion cell layer, which can adversely influence functional outcome of the surgery and makes it imperative to avoid peeling internal limiting membrane over a larger surface area.

  16. APPL proteins FRET at the BAR: direct observation of APPL1 and APPL2 BAR domain-mediated interactions on cell membranes using FRET microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi J Chial

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human APPL1 and APPL2 are homologous RAB5 effectors whose binding partners include a diverse set of transmembrane receptors, signaling proteins, and phosphoinositides. APPL proteins associate dynamically with endosomal membranes and are proposed to function in endosome-mediated signaling pathways linking the cell surface to the cell nucleus. APPL proteins contain an N-terminal Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR domain, a central pleckstrin homology (PH domain, and a C-terminal phosphotyrosine binding (PTB domain. Previous structural and biochemical studies have shown that the APPL BAR domains mediate homotypic and heterotypic APPL-APPL interactions and that the APPL1 BAR domain forms crescent-shaped dimers. Although previous studies have shown that APPL minimal BAR domains associate with curved cell membranes, direct interaction between APPL BAR domains on cell membranes in vivo has not been reported. METHODOLOGY: Herein, we used a laser-scanning confocal microscope equipped with a spectral detector to carry out fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments with cyan fluorescent protein/yellow fluorescent protein (CFP/YFP FRET donor/acceptor pairs to examine interactions between APPL minimal BAR domains at the subcellular level. This comprehensive approach enabled us to evaluate FRET levels in a single cell using three methods: sensitized emission, standard acceptor photobleaching, and sequential acceptor photobleaching. We also analyzed emission spectra to address an outstanding controversy regarding the use of CFP donor/YFP acceptor pairs in FRET acceptor photobleaching experiments, based on reports that photobleaching of YFP converts it into a CFP-like species. CONCLUSIONS: All three methods consistently showed significant FRET between APPL minimal BAR domain FRET pairs, indicating that they interact directly in a homotypic (i.e., APPL1-APPL1 and APPL2-APPL2 and heterotypic (i.e., APPL1-APPL2 manner on curved cell membranes

  17. Activation of the plasma membrane Na/H antiporter salt-overly-sensitive 1 (SOS1) by phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory C-terminal domain

    KAUST Repository

    Quintero, Francisco J.

    2011-01-24

    The plasma membrane sodium/proton exchanger Salt-Overly-Sensitive 1 (SOS1) is a critical salt tolerance determinant in plants. The SOS2-SOS3 calcium-dependent protein kinase complex upregulates SOS1 activity, but the mechanistic details of this crucial event remain unresolved. Here we show that SOS1 is maintained in a resting state by a C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain that is the target of SOS2-SOS3. The auto-inhibitory domain interacts intramolecularly with an adjacent domain of SOS1 that is essential for activity. SOS1 is relieved from auto-inhibition upon phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory domain by SOS2-SOS3. Mutation of the SOS2 phosphorylation and recognition site impeded the activation of SOS1 in vivo and in vitro. Additional amino acid residues critically important for SOS1 activity and regulation were identified in a genetic screen for hypermorphic alleles.

  18. The microstructure of the stratum corneum lipid barrier: mid-infrared spectroscopic studies of hydrated ceramide:palmitic acid:cholesterol model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garidel, Patrick; Fölting, Bettina; Schaller, Ingrid; Kerth, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    The current mid-infrared spectroscopic study is a systematic investigation of hydrated stratum corneum lipid barrier model systems composed of an equimolar mixture of a ceramide, free palmitic acid and cholesterol. Four different ceramide molecules (CER NS, CER NP, CER NP-18:1, CER AS) were investigated with regard to their microstructure arrangement in a stratum corneum lipid barrier model system. Ceramide molecules were chosen from the sphingosine and phytosphingosine groups. The main differences in the used ceramide molecules result from their polar head group architecture as well as hydrocarbon chain properties. The mixing properties with cholesterol and palmitic acid are considered. This is feasible by using perdeuterated palmitic acid and proteated ceramides. Both molecules can be monitored separately, within the same experiment, using mid-infrared spectroscopy; no external label is necessary. At physiological relevant temperatures, between 30 and 35 degrees C, orthorhombic as well as hexagonal chain packing of the ceramide molecules is observed. The formation of these chain packings are extremely dependent on lipid hydration, with a decrease in ceramide hydration favouring the formation of orthorhombic hydrocarbon chain packing, as well as temperature. The presented data suggest in specific cases phase segregation in ceramide and palmitic acid rich phases. However, other ceramides like CER NP-18:1 show a rather high miscibility with palmitic acid and cholesterol. For all investigated ternary systems, more or less mixing of palmitic acid with cholesterol is observed. The investigated stratum corneum mixtures exhibit a rich polymorphism from crystalline domains with heterogeneous lipid composition to a "fluid" homogeneous phase. Thus, a single gel phase is not evident for the presented stratum corneum model systems. The study shows, that under skin physiological conditions (pH 5.5, hydrated, 30-35 degrees C) ternary systems composed of an equimolar ratio of

  19. Structure of the cytoplasmic domain of TcpE, the inner membrane core protein required for assembly of the Vibrio cholerae toxin-coregulated pilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Craig, Lisa

    2013-04-01

    Type IV pili are long thin surface-displayed polymers of the pilin subunit that are present in a diverse group of bacteria. These multifunctional filaments are critical to virulence for pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, which use them to form microcolonies and to secrete the colonization factor TcpF. The type IV pili are assembled from pilin subunits by a complex inner membrane machinery. The core component of the type IV pilus-assembly platform is an integral inner membrane protein belonging to the GspF superfamily of secretion proteins. These proteins somehow convert chemical energy from ATP hydrolysis by an assembly ATPase on the cytoplasmic side of the inner membrane to mechanical energy for extrusion of the growing pilus filament out of the inner membrane. Most GspF-family inner membrane core proteins are predicted to have N-terminal and central cytoplasmic domains, cyto1 and cyto2, and three transmembrane segments, TM1, TM2 and TM3. Cyto2 and TM3 represent an internal repeat of cyto1 and TM1. Here, the 1.88 Å resolution crystal structure of the cyto1 domain of V. cholerae TcpE, which is required for assembly of the toxin-coregulated pilus, is reported. This domain folds as a monomeric six-helix bundle with a positively charged membrane-interaction face at one end and a hydrophobic groove at the other end that may serve as a binding site for partner proteins in the pilus-assembly complex.

  20. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL β-BARREL DOMAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-08

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP.

  1. Modeling transmembrane domain dimers/trimers of plexin receptors: implications for mechanisms of signal transmission across the membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun Zhang

    Full Text Available Single-pass transmembrane (TM receptors transmit signals across lipid bilayers by helix association or by configurational changes within preformed dimers. The structure determination for such TM regions is challenging and has mostly been accomplished by NMR spectroscopy. Recently, the computational prediction of TM dimer structures is becoming recognized for providing models, including alternate conformational states, which are important for receptor regulation. Here we pursued a strategy to predict helix oligomers that is based on packing considerations (using the PREDDIMER webserver and is followed by a refinement of structures, utilizing microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We applied this method to plexin TM receptors, a family of 9 human proteins, involved in the regulation of cell guidance and motility. The predicted models show that, overall, the preferences identified by PREDDIMER are preserved in the unrestrained simulations and that TM structures are likely to be diverse across the plexin family. Plexin-B1 and -B3 TM helices are regular and tend to associate, whereas plexin-A1, -A2, -A3, -A4, -C1 and -D1 contain sequence elements, such as poly-Glycine or aromatic residues that distort helix conformation and association. Plexin-B2 does not form stable dimers due to the presence of TM prolines. No experimental structural information on the TM region is available for these proteins, except for plexin-C1 dimeric and plexin-B1 - trimeric structures inferred from X-ray crystal structures of the intracellular regions. Plexin-B1 TM trimers utilize Ser and Thr sidechains for interhelical contacts. We also modeled the juxta-membrane (JM region of plexin-C1 and plexin-B1 and show that it synergizes with the TM structures. The structure and dynamics of the JM region and TM-JM junction provide determinants for the distance and distribution of the intracellular domains, and for their binding partners relative to the membrane. The

  2. Evolutionarily evolved discriminators in the 3-TPR domain of the Toc64 family involved in protein translocation at the outer membrane of chloroplasts and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Oliver; Bionda, Tihana; von Haeseler, Arndt; Schleiff, Enrico

    2009-08-01

    Transport of polypeptides across membranes is a general and essential cellular process utilised by molecular machines. At least one component of these complexes contains a domain composed of three tetratricopeptide repeat (3-TPR) motifs. We have focussed on the receptor Toc64 to elucidate the evolved functional specifications of its 3-TPR domain. Toc64 is a component of the Toc core complex and functionally replaces Tom70 at the outer membrane of mitochondria in plants. Its 3-TPR domain recognises the conserved C-terminus of precursor-bound chaperones. We built homology models of the 3-TPR domain of chloroplastic Toc64 from different species and of the mitochondrial isoform from Arabidopsis. Guided by modelling, we identified residues essential for functional discrimination of the differently located isoforms to be located almost exclusively on the convex surface of the 3-TPR domain. The only exception is at568Ser/ps557Met, which is positioned in the ligand-binding groove. The functional implications of the homology models are discussed.

  3. Molecular view on protein sorting into liquid-ordered membrane domains mediated by gangliosides and lipid anchors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Djurre H.; Lopez, Cesar A.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from coarse grain molecular dynamics simulations of mixed model membranes consisting of saturated and unsaturated lipids together with cholesterol, in which lipid-anchored membrane proteins are embedded. The membrane proteins studied are the peripherally bound H-Ras, N-Ras, and He

  4. A population-based study of the stratum corneum moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pires TF

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Thiago de Farias Pires,1 Ana Paula Azambuja,2 Andrea Roseli Vançan Russo Horimoto,1 Mary Sanae Nakamura,2 Rafael de Oliveira Alvim,1 José Eduardo Krieger,1 Alexandre Costa Pereira1 1Laboratory of Genetics and Molecular Cardiology, Heart Institute, University of São Paulo Medical School, 2Natura Innovation and Product Technology Ltd., Cajamar, SP, Brazil Background: The stratum corneum (SC has important functions as a bound-water modulator and a primary barrier of the human skin from the external environment. However, no large epidemiological study has quantified the relative importance of different exposures with regard to these functional properties. In this study, we have studied a large sample of individuals from the Brazilian population in order to understand the different relationships between the properties of SC and a number of demographic and self-perceived variables. Methods: One thousand three hundred and thirty-nine individuals from a rural Brazilian population, who were participants of a family-based study, were submitted to a cross-sectional examination of the SC moisture by capacitance using the Corneometer® CM820 and investigated regarding environmental exposures, cosmetic use, and other physiological and epidemiological measurements. Self-perception-scaled questions about skin conditions were also applied. Results: We found significant associations between SC moisture and sex, age, high sun exposure, and sunscreen use frequency (P<0.025. In specific studied sites, self-reported race and obesity were also found to show significant effects. Dry skin self-perception was also found to be highly correlated with the objective measurement of the skin. Other environmental effects on SC moisture are also reported. Keywords: investigative dermatology, stratum corneum moisture, Corneometer, sun exposure, familial data modeling

  5. The structure of a LysM domain from E. coli membrane-bound lytic murein transglycosylase D (MltD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, A; Bycroft, M

    2000-06-16

    The LysM domain is a widespread protein module. It was originally identified in enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls but is also present in many other bacterial proteins. Several proteins that contain the domain, such as Staphylococcal IgG binding proteins and Escherichia coli intimin, are involved in bacterial pathogenesis. LysM domains are also found in some eukaryotic proteins, apparently as a result of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria. The available evidence suggests that the LysM domain is a general peptidoglycan-binding module. We have determined the structure of this domain from E. coli membrane-bound lytic murein transglycosylase D. The LysM domain has a betaalphaalphabeta secondary structure with the two helices packing onto the same side of an anti- parallel beta sheet. The structure shows no similarity to other bacterial cell surface domains. A potential binding site in a shallow groove on surface of the protein has been identified. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. Natural selection and population genetic structure of domain-I of Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen-1 in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Madhumita; Maji, Ardhendu Kumar; Mitra, Mitashree; Sengupta, Sanghamitra

    2013-08-01

    Development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum infection is an urgent priority particularly because of widespread resistance to most traditionally used drugs. Multiple evidences point to apical membrane antigen-1(AMA-1) as a prime vaccine candidate directed against P. falciparum asexual blood-stages. To gain understanding of the genetic and demographic forces shaping the parasite sequence diversity in Kolkata, a part of Pfama-1 gene covering domain-I was sequenced from 100 blood samples of malaria patients. Statistical and phylogenetic analyses of the sequences were performed using DnaSP and MEGA. Very high haplotype diversity was detected both at nucleotide (0.998±0.002) and amino-acid (0.996±0.001) levels. An abundance of low frequency polymorphisms (Tajima's D=-1.190, Fu & Li's D(∗) and F(∗)=-3.068 and -2.722), unimodal mismatch distribution and a star-like median-joining network of ama-1 haplotypes indicated a recent population expansion among Kolkata parasites. The high minimum number of recombination events (Rm=26) and a significantly high dN/dS of 3.705 (PIgNAR. Alterations in the desolvation and global energies of PfAMA-1-PfRON2 interaction complexes at the hotspot contact residues were observed together with redistribution of surface electrostatic potentials at the variant alleles with respect to referent Pf3D7 sequence. Finally, a comparison of P. falciparum subpopulations in five Indian regional isolates retrieved from GenBank revealed a significant level of genetic differentiation (FST=0.084-0.129) with respect to Kolkata sequences. Collectively, our results indicated a very high allelic and haplotype diversity, a high recombination rate and a signature of natural selection favoring accumulation of non-synonymous substitutions that facilitated PfAMA-1-PfRON2 interaction and hence parasite growth in Kolkata clinical isolates.

  7. On the Variation of Water Diffusion Coefficient in Stratum Corneum With Water Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Johnson, Robert; Kasting, Gerald B

    2016-03-01

    Water permeability and transient water sorption data in human and porcine stratum corneum (SC) are analyzed in conjunction with equilibrium water sorption data and a dynamic skin swelling model to develop a quantitative model for water diffusivity in the SC as a function of its water content. The recommended function (model 1) is phenomenological and treats the SC as a uniform, swellable slab. This approach yields satisfactory agreement with experimental data over a wide range of RH and associated equilibrium SC water content, Cw. It is supported by two alternative approaches. Model 2 considers the SC to be a multilaminate membrane consisting of alternating lipid and protein layers. Diffusivity in the protein phase is estimated from water diffusivity in other keratinized tissues, whereas diffusivity in the lipid phase is assumed to be linearly related to the swelling strain on intercellular lipids. Model 3 uses an analysis previously suggested by Stockdale to rationalize transepidermal water loss data in humans over a wide range of relative humidity. All models yield similar results for 0.20 ≤ Cw ≤ 0.78 g/cm(3), the usual range of SC water content in vivo. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Visualization of lipid domains of lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles using an environment-sensitive membrane probe based on 3-hydroxyflavone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klymchenko, Andrey; Oncul, Sule; Didier, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    of the photoselection with the Ld phase indicated no predominant orientation of the probe in the Ld phase. Comparison of the present results with those reported previously for F2N12S in living cells suggests a high content of the Lo phase in the outer leaflet of the cell plasma membranes. Taking into account the high......We characterized the recently introduced environment-sensitive fluorescent membrane probe based on 3-hydroxyflavone, F2N12S, in model lipid membranes displaying liquid disordered (Ld) phase, liquid ordered (Lo) phase, or their coexistence. Steady-state fluorescence studies in large unilamellar...... vesicles show that the probe dual emission drastically changes with the lipid bilayer phase, which can be correlated with the difference in their hydration. Using two-photon excitation microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles, the F2N12S probe was found to bind both Ld and Lo phases, allowing visualization...

  9. cDNA cloning of the basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein, bamacan: a five domain structure including coiled-coil motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, R R; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    Basement membranes contain several proteoglycans, and those bearing heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans such as perlecan and agrin usually predominate. Most mammalian basement membranes also contain chondroitin sulfate, and a core protein, bamacan, has been partially characterized. We have now...... obtained cDNA clones encoding the entire bamacan core protein of Mr = 138 kD, which reveal a five domain, head-rod-tail configuration. The head and tail are potentially globular, while the central large rod probably forms coiled-coil structures, with one large central and several very short interruptions....... This molecular architecture is novel for an extracellular matrix molecule, but it resembles that of a group of intracellular proteins, including some proposed to stabilize the mitotic chromosome scaffold. We have previously proposed a similar stabilizing role for bamacan in the basement membrane matrix...

  10. Raf activation by Ras and promotion of cellular metastasis require phosphorylation of prohibitin in the raft domain of the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, C-F; Ho, M-Y; Peng, J-M; Hung, S-W; Lee, W-H; Liang, C-M; Liang, S-M

    2013-02-01

    Prohibitin (PHB) is indispensable for Ras-induced Raf-1 activation, cell migration and growth; however, the exact role of PHB in the molecular pathogenesis of cancer metastasis remains largely unexamined. Here, we found a positive correlation between plasma membrane-associated PHB and the clinical stages of cancer. The level of PHB phosphorylated at threonine 258 (T258) and tyrosine 259 (Y259) in human cancer-cell membranes correlated with the invasiveness of cancer cells. Overexpression of phosphorylated PHB (phospho-PHB) in the lipid-raft domain of the cell membrane enhanced cell migration/invasion through PI3K/Akt and Raf-1/ERK activation. It also enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and invasiveness of cancer cells in vitro. Immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that phospho-PHB associated with Raf-1, Akt and Ras in the membrane and was essential for the activation of Raf-1 signaling by Ras. Mice implanted with cancer cells stably overexpressing PHB in the plasma membrane showed enlarged cervical tumors, enhanced metastasis and shorter survival time compared with mice implanted with cancer cells without PHB overexpression. Dephosphorylation of PHB at T258 by site-directed mutagenesis diminished the in vitro and in vivo effects of PHB. These results suggest that increase in phospho-PHB T258 in the raft domain of the plasma membrane has a role in the Ras-driven activation of PI3K/Akt and Raf-1/ERK-signaling cascades and results in the promotion of cancer metastasis.

  11. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael;

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries and...

  12. Combinatorial mutagenesis of the voltage-sensing domain enables the optical resolution of action potentials firing at 60 Hz by a genetically encoded fluorescent sensor of membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Hong Hua; Rajakumar, Dhanarajan; Kang, Bok Eum; Kim, Eun Ha; Baker, Bradley J

    2015-01-07

    ArcLight is a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage sensor using the voltage-sensing domain of the voltage-sensing phosphatase from Ciona intestinalis that gives a large but slow-responding optical signal in response to changes in membrane potential (Jin et al., 2012). Fluorescent voltage sensors using the voltage-sensing domain from other species give faster yet weaker optical signals (Baker et al., 2012; Han et al., 2013). Sequence alignment of voltage-sensing phosphatases from different species revealed conserved polar and charged residues at 7 aa intervals in the S1-S3 transmembrane segments of the voltage-sensing domain, suggesting potential coil-coil interactions. The contribution of these residues to the voltage-induced optical signal was tested using a cassette mutagenesis screen by flanking each transmembrane segment with unique restriction sites to allow for the testing of individual mutations in each transmembrane segment, as well as combinations in all four transmembrane segments. Addition of a counter charge in S2 improved the kinetics of the optical response. A double mutation in the S4 domain dramatically reduced the slow component of the optical signal seen in ArcLight. Combining that double S4 mutant with the mutation in the S2 domain yielded a probe with kinetics voltage-sensing domain could potentially lead to fluorescent sensors capable of optically resolving neuronal inhibition and subthreshold synaptic activity.

  13. Osmotic shock-dependent redistribution of diacylglycerol kinase η1 to non-ionic detergent-resistant membrane via pleckstrin homology and C1 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutomo, Daisuke; Isozaki, Takeshi; Sakai, Hiromichi; Sakane, Fumio

    2013-02-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) participates in regulating the intracellular concentrations of two bioactive lipids, diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. DGKη1 is a type II isozyme that contains a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and a pair of C1 domains at the N-terminus and separated catalytic domains (catalytic subdomain-a and b). We previously reported that DGKη1 expressed in COS-7 cells is translocated from the cytoplasm to punctate granules that partially include endosomes in response to stress stimuli such as osmotic shock. However, the biochemical properties of the stress-dependent behaviour of DGKη1 remain unknown. Here, we have found that DGKη1 is redistributed from the cytosol to the non-ionic detergent (Nonidet P-40)-resistant membrane (DRM) in response to osmotic shock. Our results strongly suggested that the Nonidet P-40 insolubility of DGKη1 is due to neither cytoskeleton localization nor lipid raft association, implying that DGKη1 is distributed to detergent-resistant membrane microdomains that have a low lipid-to-protein ratio. We revealed, using a series of DGKη1 deletion mutants, that the PH and C1 domains play a pivotal role in osmotic shock-dependent DRM redistribution, whereas catalytic subdomain-a negatively regulates the event.

  14. Characteristics of the Epidermis and Stratum Corneum of Hairless Mice with Experimentally Induced Diabetes Mellitus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sakai, Shingo; Endo, Yoko; Ozawa, Naoko; Sugawara, Tomoko; Kusaka, Ayumi; Sayo, Tetsuya; Tagami, Hachiro; Inoue, Shintaro

    2003-01-01

    ... (streptozotocin, 3.2-fold; alloxan, 3.7-fold). The stratum corneum water content was significantly reduced in both types of diabetic mice, whereas the transepidermal water loss remained unchanged...

  15. Stratum corneum hydration : mode of action of moisturizers on a molecular level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caussin, Julia

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the mode of action of stratum corneum moisturizers is studied using a variety of techniques: cryo-scanning electron microscopy, freeze fracture transmission electron microscopy, small angle X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  16. Stratum corneum lipids, skin barrier function and filaggrin mutations in patients with atopic eczema

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jungersted, J. M; Scheer, H; Mempel, M; Baurecht, H; Cifuentes, L; Hogh, J. K; Hellgren, L. I; Jemec, G. B. E; Agner, T; Weidinger, S

    2010-01-01

    ..., Høgh JK, Hellgren LI, Jemec GBE, Agner T, Weidinger S. Stratum corneum lipids, skin barrier function and filaggrin mutations in patients with atopic eczema. Allergy 2010; 65: 911-918. Background...

  17. Stratum corneum hydration : mode of action of moisturizers on a molecular level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caussin, Julia

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the mode of action of stratum corneum moisturizers is studied using a variety of techniques: cryo-scanning electron microscopy, freeze fracture transmission electron microscopy, small angle X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  18. Thermodynamic clarification of interaction between antiseptic compounds and lipids consisting of stratum corneum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aki, Hatsumi; Kawasaki, Yuhsuke

    2004-06-24

    The interactions of antiseptic compounds with quaternary ammonium, such as benzalkonium chloride (BC), benzethonium chloride (BZC), dodecyldiaminoethyl-glycine hydrochloride (AEG), and chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), with components of the stratum corneum were investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry at pH 7.5 and 25 deg. C. The different mechanisms for their permeation to stratum corneum were clarified. Cationic surfactants of BC and BZC bound to cholesterol and cholesterol sulfate with high affinity (10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} M{sup -1}) to extract endogenous cholesterol and its derivatives from the stratum corneum and penetrated via an intercellular route. CHG also bound to cholesterol and accumulated in the stratum corneum without removing endogenous cholesterol. On the other hand, an amphoteric surfactant of AEG seemed to be incorporated into the lipid bilayer and bound to ceramide with its polar end close to the lipid polar heads by hydrophobic interaction.

  19. Promiscuous and specific phospholipid binding by domains in ZAC, a membrane-associated Arabidopsis protein with an ARF GAP zinc finger and a C2 domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, R B; Lykke-Andersen, K; Frandsen, G I

    2000-01-01

    containing the ZAC-C2 domain bind anionic phospholipids non-specifically, with some variance in Ca2+ and salt dependence. Similar assays demonstrated specific affinity of the ZAC N-terminal region (residues 1-174) for phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate (PI-3-P). Binding was dependent in part on an intact...... zinc finger motif, but proteins containing only the zinc finger domain (residues 1-105) did not bind PI-3-P. Recombinant ZAC possessed GTPase-activating activity on Arabidopsis ARF proteins. These data identify a novel PI-3-P-binding protein region and thereby provide evidence...

  20. Importance of the N-Terminal Domain of the Qb-SNARE Vti1p for Different Membrane Transport Steps in the Yeast Endosomal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossing, Michael; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi; Fischer von Mollard, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) on transport vesicles and target membranes are crucial for vesicle targeting and fusion. They form SNARE complexes, which contain four α-helical SNARE motifs contributed by three or four different SNAREs. Most SNAREs function only in a single transport step. The yeast SNARE Vti1p participates in four distinct SNARE complexes in transport from the trans Golgi network to late endosomes, in transport to the vacuole, in retrograde transport from endosomes to the trans Golgi network and in retrograde transport within the Golgi. So far, all vti1 mutants investigated had mutations within the SNARE motif. Little is known about the function of the N-terminal domain of Vti1p, which forms a three helix bundle called Habc domain. Here we generated a temperature-sensitive mutant of this domain to study the effects on different transport steps. The secondary structure of wild type and vti1-3 Habc domain was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The amino acid exchanges identified in the temperature-sensitive vti1-3 mutant caused unfolding of the Habc domain. Transport pathways were investigated by immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized proteins after pulse-chase labeling and by fluorescence microscopy of a GFP-tagged protein cycling between plasma membrane, early endosomes and Golgi. In vti1-3 cells transport to the late endosome and assembly of the late endosomal SNARE complex was blocked at 37°C. Retrograde transport to the trans Golgi network was affected while fusion with the vacuole was possible but slower. Steady state levels of SNARE complexes mediating these steps were less affected than that of the late endosomal SNARE complex. As different transport steps were affected our data demonstrate the importance of a folded Vti1p Habc domain for transport. PMID:23776654

  1. Importance of the N-terminal domain of the Qb-SNARE Vti1p for different membrane transport steps in the yeast endosomal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossing, Michael; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi; Fischer von Mollard, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) on transport vesicles and target membranes are crucial for vesicle targeting and fusion. They form SNARE complexes, which contain four α-helical SNARE motifs contributed by three or four different SNAREs. Most SNAREs function only in a single transport step. The yeast SNARE Vti1p participates in four distinct SNARE complexes in transport from the trans Golgi network to late endosomes, in transport to the vacuole, in retrograde transport from endosomes to the trans Golgi network and in retrograde transport within the Golgi. So far, all vti1 mutants investigated had mutations within the SNARE motif. Little is known about the function of the N-terminal domain of Vti1p, which forms a three helix bundle called H(abc) domain. Here we generated a temperature-sensitive mutant of this domain to study the effects on different transport steps. The secondary structure of wild type and vti1-3 H(abc) domain was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The amino acid exchanges identified in the temperature-sensitive vti1-3 mutant caused unfolding of the H(abc) domain. Transport pathways were investigated by immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized proteins after pulse-chase labeling and by fluorescence microscopy of a GFP-tagged protein cycling between plasma membrane, early endosomes and Golgi. In vti1-3 cells transport to the late endosome and assembly of the late endosomal SNARE complex was blocked at 37°C. Retrograde transport to the trans Golgi network was affected while fusion with the vacuole was possible but slower. Steady state levels of SNARE complexes mediating these steps were less affected than that of the late endosomal SNARE complex. As different transport steps were affected our data demonstrate the importance of a folded Vti1p H(abc) domain for transport.

  2. Importance of the N-terminal domain of the Qb-SNARE Vti1p for different membrane transport steps in the yeast endosomal system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gossing

    Full Text Available SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor on transport vesicles and target membranes are crucial for vesicle targeting and fusion. They form SNARE complexes, which contain four α-helical SNARE motifs contributed by three or four different SNAREs. Most SNAREs function only in a single transport step. The yeast SNARE Vti1p participates in four distinct SNARE complexes in transport from the trans Golgi network to late endosomes, in transport to the vacuole, in retrograde transport from endosomes to the trans Golgi network and in retrograde transport within the Golgi. So far, all vti1 mutants investigated had mutations within the SNARE motif. Little is known about the function of the N-terminal domain of Vti1p, which forms a three helix bundle called H(abc domain. Here we generated a temperature-sensitive mutant of this domain to study the effects on different transport steps. The secondary structure of wild type and vti1-3 H(abc domain was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The amino acid exchanges identified in the temperature-sensitive vti1-3 mutant caused unfolding of the H(abc domain. Transport pathways were investigated by immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized proteins after pulse-chase labeling and by fluorescence microscopy of a GFP-tagged protein cycling between plasma membrane, early endosomes and Golgi. In vti1-3 cells transport to the late endosome and assembly of the late endosomal SNARE complex was blocked at 37°C. Retrograde transport to the trans Golgi network was affected while fusion with the vacuole was possible but slower. Steady state levels of SNARE complexes mediating these steps were less affected than that of the late endosomal SNARE complex. As different transport steps were affected our data demonstrate the importance of a folded Vti1p H(abc domain for transport.

  3. Quantitative study of stratum corneum ceramides contents in patients with sensitive skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hee Jin; Chung, Bo Young; Lee, Hee Bong; Kim, Hye One; Park, Chun Wook; Lee, Cheol Heon

    2012-03-01

    People with sensitive skin (SS) are those who state their skin is more sensitive than that of average persons. The stratum corneum is responsible for maintaining skin barrier function. Ceramides, major constituents of stratum corneum lipids, have been shown to predominantly contribute to the role. It has been suggested that barrier function in SS is decreased. However, we could find very few reports about stratum corneum ceramides in SS. This study was done to find out differences in stratum corneum ceramides between SS and non-SS groups. Fifty individuals (20 with SS and 30 with non-SS) were recruited. Lactic acid sting test (LAST) was performed on the left cheek. On six sites including the right cheek, arm, thigh, leg, back and palm, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and erythema index (EI) were measured. On the above six sites, stratum corneum sheets were obtained by stripping with cyanoacrylate resin and stratum corneum lipids were extracted, then, analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. LAST scores were higher in the SS group, but not statistically significant. There were no differences in TEWL and EI values between the two groups. The mean value of the quantity of stratum corneum ceramides on the face was significantly lower in the SS group. On other sites, mean values were also lower in the SS group, but not statistically significant. The quantity of ceramides was significantly decreased in the face of the SS group compared to that of the non-SS group. These results suggest that the decrease in stratum corneum ceramides on facial skin could be related to SS development. © 2011 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  4. Ultrastructure of skin from Refsum disease with emphasis on epidermal lamellar bodies and stratum corneum barrier lipid organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, G K; Orsó, E; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Crumrine, D; Schmitz, G; Elias, Peter M

    2014-10-01

    Classic Refsum disease (RD) is a rare, autosomal recessively-inherited disorder of peroxisome metabolism due to a defect in the initial step in the alpha oxidation of phytanic acid (PA), a C16 saturated fatty acid with four methyl side groups, which accumulates in plasma and lipid enriched tissues (please see van den Brink and Wanders, Cell Mol Life Sci 63:1752-1765, 2006). It has been proposed that the disease complex in RD is in part due to the high affinity of phytanic acid for retinoid X receptors and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Structurally, epidermal hyperplasia, increased numbers of cornified cell layers, presence of cells with lipid droplets in stratum basale and reduction of granular layer to a single layer have been reported by Blanchet-Bardon et al. (The ichthyoses, SP Medical & Scientific Books, New York, pp 65-69, 1978). However, lamellar body (LB) density and secretion were reportedly normal. We recently examined biopsies from four unrelated patients, using both OsO4 and RuO4 post-fixation to evaluate the barrier lipid structural organization. Although lamellar body density appeared normal, individual organelles often had distorted shape, or had non-lamellar domains interspersed with lamellar structures. Some of the organelles seemed to lack lamellar contents altogether, showing instead uniformly electron-dense contents. In addition, we also observed mitochondrial abnormalities in the nucleated epidermis. Stratum granulosum-stratum corneum junctions also showed co-existence of non-lamellar and lamellar domains, indicative of lipid phase separation. Also, partial detachment or complete absence of corneocyte lipid envelopes (CLE) was seen in the stratum corneum of all RD patients. In conclusion, abnormal LB contents, resulting in defective lamellar bilayers, as well as reduced CLEs, likely lead to impaired barrier function in RD.

  5. Membrane domain specificity in the spatial distribution of aquaporins 5, 7, 9, and 11 in efferent ducts and epididymis of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermo, Louis; Schellenberg, Morgan; Liu, Lauren Ye; Dayanandan, Bama; Zhang, Tong; Mandato, Craig A; Smith, Charles E

    2008-12-01

    Water content within the epididymis of the male reproductive system is stringently regulated to promote sperm maturation. Several members of the aquaporin (AQP) family of water channel-forming integral membrane proteins have been identified in epididymal cells, but expression profiling for this epithelium is presently incomplete, and no AQP isoform has yet been identified on basolateral plasma membranes of these cells. In this study, we explored AQP expression by RT-PCR and light microscopy immunolocalizations using peroxidase and wide-field fluorescence techniques. The results indicate that several AQPs are coexpressed in the epididymis including AQP 5, 7, 9, and 11. Immunolocalizations suggested complex patterns in the spatial distribution of these AQPs. In principal cells, AQP 9 and 11 were present mainly on microvilli, whereas AQP 7 was localized primarily to lateral and then to basal plasma membranes in a region-specific manner. AQP 5 was also expressed regionally but was associated with membranes of endosomes. Additionally, AQPs were expressed by some but not all basal (AQP 7 and 11), clear (AQP 7 and 9), and halo (AQP 7 and 11) cells. These findings indicate unique associations of AQPs with specific membrane domains in a cell type- and region-specific manner within the epididymis of adult animals.

  6. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct...... stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia....

  7. The role of the trans double bond in skin barrier sphingolipids: permeability and infrared spectroscopic study of model ceramide and dihydroceramide membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolová, Barbora; Jandovská, Kateřina; Pullmannová, Petra; Tesař, Ondřej; Roh, Jaroslav; Hrabálek, Alexandr; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2014-05-20

    Dihydroceramides (dCer) are members of the sphingolipid family that lack the C4 trans double bond in their sphingoid backbone. In addition to being precursors of ceramides (Cer) and phytoceramides, dCer have also been found in the extracellular lipid membranes of the epidermal barrier, the stratum corneum. However, their role in barrier homeostasis is not known. We studied how the lack of the trans double bond in dCer compared to Cer influences the permeability, lipid chain order, and packing of multilamellar membranes composed of the major skin barrier lipids: (d)Cer, fatty acids, cholesterol, and cholesteryl sulfate. The permeability of the membranes with long-chain dCer was measured using various markers and was either comparable to or only slightly greater than (by up to 35%, not significant) that of the Cer membranes. The dCer were less sensitive to acyl chain shortening than Cer (the short dCer membranes were up to 6-fold less permeable that the corresponding short Cer membranes). Infrared spectroscopy showed that long dCer mixed less with fatty acids but formed more thermally stable ordered domains than Cer. The key parameter explaining the differences in permeability in the short dCer and Cer was the proportion of the orthorhombic phase. Our results suggest that the presence of the trans double bond in Cer is not crucial for the permeability of skin lipid membranes and that dCer may be underappreciated members of the stratum corneum lipid barrier that increase its heterogeneity.

  8. Stratum corneum dynamic function measurements after moisturizer or irritant application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treffel, P; Gabard, B

    1995-01-01

    Two simple tests were conducted which allowed the quantification of parameters that characterize the stratum corneum (SC) dynamic functions in vivo under physiological conditions after moisturizer applications for 1 h and after irritation with different concentrations of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS; 0.5-4%) applied under occlusion for 15 min or 24 h. Both tests, the sorption-desorption test (SDT) and the moisture accumulation test (MAT), were performed with a Nova Dermal Phase Meter 9003. The following parameters were quantified: prehydration state (SDT, MAT), hygroscopicity, water-holding capacity (SDT), water accumulation velocity and water accumulation (MAT). These procedures allowed the demonstration of the water-holding effect of urea contained in moisturizers. Differences between the long and the short application time of SLS were characterized by differences in SC dynamic functions while the hydration state was not changed. An effect on transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was noted only after the long application time, although the MAT clearly showed dynamic parameters to be changed after 15 min of treatment. These tests were simple in practice and allowed the demonstration of functional modifications of the SC while other parameters remained unchanged. They gave insight into possible action mechanisms of urea and SLS in the SC.

  9. The self-organization of lipids and proteins of myelin at the membrane interface. Molecular factors underlying the microheterogeneity of domain segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosetti, Carla M; Maggio, Bruno; Oliveira, Rafael G

    2008-01-01

    The advances over the last 10 years on the understanding of myelin heterogeneity are reviewed. The main focus is on the applicability of Langmuir monolayers, Langmuir-Blodgett films and some associated techniques to unravelling the behaviour of interfaces formed with all the components of a natural membrane. Lipid-protein lateral segregation appears as a major driving force to determine surface patterns that can change under compression from circular domains to two-dimensional fractal structures. The major proteins of the myelin membrane induce lateral segregation in an otherwise homogeneous surface formed by the mixture of total myelin lipids. The lipid and protein components appear to distribute in the surface domains according to their charge, compressibility and relative molecular weight: myelin proteins, ganglioside GM1 and fluorescent lipid probes partition into liquid-expanded phase domains; other components such as phosphatidylserine and galactocerebroside partition into another liquid phase enriched in cholesterol. Simplified protein-lipid mixtures allow assessment of the participation of the major proteins in the two dimensional pattern development. One of the major myelin proteins, the Folch-Lees proteolipid, self-segregates into, and determines formation of, fractal-like patterns. The presence of the second major protein, myelin basic protein, leads to round liquid-expanded domains in the absence of Folch-Lees proteolipid and softens the boundaries of the fractal structures in its presence. The location of myelin basic protein in the interface is surface pressure sensitive, being slightly squeezed out at high surface pressure, allowing the fractal domains enriched in Folch-Lees proteolipid to evolve.

  10. A plasma membrane-targeted cytosolic domain of STIM1 selectively activates ARC channels, an arachidonate-regulated store-independent Orai channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jill L; Shuttleworth, Trevor J

    2012-01-01

    The Orai family of calcium channels includes the store-operated CRAC channels and store-independent, arachidonic acid (AA)-regulated ARC channels. Both depend on STIM1 for their activation but, whereas CRAC channel activation involves sensing the depletion of intracellular calcium stores via a luminal N terminal EF-hand of STIM1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, ARC channels are exclusively activated by the pool of STIM1 that constitutively resides in the plasma membrane (PM). Here, the EF-hand is extracellular and unlikely to ever lose its bound calcium, suggesting that STIM1-dependent activation of ARC channels is very different from that of CRAC channels. We now show that attachment of the cytosolic portion of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM via an N terminal Lck-domain sequence is sufficient to enable normal AA-dependent activation of ARC channels, while failing to allow activation of store-operated CRAC channels. Introduction of a point mutation within the Lck-domain resulted in the loss of both PM localization and ARC channel activation. Reversing the orientation of the PM-anchored STIM1 C terminus via a C-terminal CAAX-box fails to support either CRAC or ARC channel activation. Finally, the Lck-anchored STIM1 C-terminal domain also enabled the exclusive activation of the ARC channels following physiological agonist addition. These data demonstrate that simple tethering of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM is sufficient to allow the full, normal and exclusive activation of ARC channels, and that the N-terminal regions of STIM1 (including the EF-hand domain) play no significant role in this activation.

  11. SARS-coronavirus spike S2 domain flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833 is important for activation of membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Ikenna G; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R

    2009-10-25

    The S2 domain of the coronavirus spike (S) protein is known to be responsible for mediating membrane fusion. In addition to a well-recognized cleavage site at the S1-S2 boundary, a second proteolytic cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). C-terminal to this S2 cleavage site is a conserved region flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833. Here, we investigated the importance of this well conserved region for SARS-CoV S-mediated fusion activation. We show that the residues between C822-C833 are well conserved across all coronaviruses. Mutagenic analysis of SARS-CoV S, combined with cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for the core-conserved residues C822, D830, L831, and C833. Based on available predictive models, we propose that the conserved domain flanked by cysteines 822 and 833 forms a loop structure that interacts with components of the SARS-CoV S trimer to control the activation of membrane fusion.

  12. Domain III of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ie Toxin Plays an Important Role in Binding to Peritrophic Membrane of Asian Corn Borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dongmei; Chen, Zhen; Wang, Zhiwen; Zhang, Chunlu; He, Kanglai; Guo, Shuyuan

    2015-01-01

    The insecticidal IE648 toxin is a truncated Cry1Ie protein with increased toxicity against Asian corn borer (ACB). Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins that disrupt insect midgut cells to kill the larvae. However, the peritrophic membrane (PM) is an important barrier that Cry toxins must cross before binding to midgut cells. Previously, it was shown that Cry toxins are able to bind and accumulate in the PM of several lepidopteran insects. Binding of IE648 toxin to PM of ACB was previously reported and the goal of the current work was the identification of the binding region between Cry1Ie and the PM of ACB. Homologous competition binding assays showed that this interaction was specific. Heterologous competition binding assays performed with different fragments corresponding to domain I, domain II and domain III allowed us to identify that domain III participates in the interaction of IE648 with the PM. Specifically, peptide D3-L8 (corresponding to Cry1Ie toxin residues 607 to 616), located in an exposed loop region of domain III is probably involved in this interaction. Ligand blot assays show that IE648 interact with chitin and PM proteins with sizes of 30, 32 and 80 kDa. The fact that domain III interacts with proteins of similar molecular masses supports that this region of the toxin might be involved in PM interaction. These data provide for the first time the identification of domain III as a putative binding region between PM and 3D-Cry toxin. PMID:26295704

  13. Domain III of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ie Toxin Plays an Important Role in Binding to Peritrophic Membrane of Asian Corn Borer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Feng

    Full Text Available The insecticidal IE648 toxin is a truncated Cry1Ie protein with increased toxicity against Asian corn borer (ACB. Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins that disrupt insect midgut cells to kill the larvae. However, the peritrophic membrane (PM is an important barrier that Cry toxins must cross before binding to midgut cells. Previously, it was shown that Cry toxins are able to bind and accumulate in the PM of several lepidopteran insects. Binding of IE648 toxin to PM of ACB was previously reported and the goal of the current work was the identification of the binding region between Cry1Ie and the PM of ACB. Homologous competition binding assays showed that this interaction was specific. Heterologous competition binding assays performed with different fragments corresponding to domain I, domain II and domain III allowed us to identify that domain III participates in the interaction of IE648 with the PM. Specifically, peptide D3-L8 (corresponding to Cry1Ie toxin residues 607 to 616, located in an exposed loop region of domain III is probably involved in this interaction. Ligand blot assays show that IE648 interact with chitin and PM proteins with sizes of 30, 32 and 80 kDa. The fact that domain III interacts with proteins of similar molecular masses supports that this region of the toxin might be involved in PM interaction. These data provide for the first time the identification of domain III as a putative binding region between PM and 3D-Cry toxin.

  14. Domain organization of photosystem II in membranes of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 investigated by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, I. Mihaela; Zhang, Pengpeng; Aro, Eva-Mari; Boekema, Egbert J.

    2008-01-01

    The supramolecular organization of photosystem II (PSII) complexes in the photosynthetic membrane of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803 was studied by electron microscopy. After mild detergent solubilization, crystalline PSII arrays were extracted in which dimeric PSII particles associate in mult

  15. p42/p44 MAP kinase activation is localized to caveolae-free membrane domains in airway smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, Reinoud; Dueck, Gordon; Gerthoffer, William T; Unruh, Helmut; Zaagsma, Johan; Meurs, Herman; Halayko, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    Caveolae are abundant plasma membrane invaginations in airway smooth muscle that may function as preorganized signalosomes by sequestering and regulating proteins that control cell proliferation, including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and their signaling effectors. We previously demonstrated, ho

  16. Evaluation of topical bioavailability in human stratum corneum in vivo by tape stripping using a direct sprectroscopic method

    OpenAIRE

    Fässler Tassopoulos, Tatiana

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to develop a spectrophotometric methodology for simultaneous determination of a sunscreening agent and relative stratum corneum tissue density in skin tape strips. This methodology was then employed to investigate the effect of different vehicles and their application time on the penetration of the sunscreening agent into the stratum corneum (SC) and the ability of these vehicles to create a reservoir. Tape stripping of the stratum corneum from ...

  17. Changes in skin barrier during treatment with systemic alitretinoin: focus on skin susceptibility and stratum corneum ceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J.M.; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2010-01-01

    the effect of systemic alitretinoin on skin barrier function and response to irritants, a secondary objective was to determine if changes occur in the lipid profile of stratum corneum after treatment with systemic alitretinoin. We conducted an open clinical intervention study on eight people ascribed....... No significant changes in stratum corneum lipids were found after 2 months of treatment. In conclusion, systemic alitretinoin does not influence skin susceptibility to irritants or the ceramide profile of stratum corneum....

  18. Visualization of lipid domains in giant unilamellar vesicles using an environment-sensitive membrane probe based on 3-hydroxyflavone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchenko, Andrey S; Oncul, Sule; Didier, Pascal; Schaub, Emmanuel; Bagatolli, Luis; Duportail, Guy; Mély, Yves

    2009-02-01

    We characterized the recently introduced environment-sensitive fluorescent membrane probe based on 3-hydroxyflavone, F2N12S, in model lipid membranes displaying liquid disordered (Ld) phase, liquid ordered (Lo) phase, or their coexistence. Steady-state fluorescence studies in large unilamellar vesicles show that the probe dual emission drastically changes with the lipid bilayer phase, which can be correlated with the difference in their hydration. Using two-photon excitation microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles, the F2N12S probe was found to bind both Ld and Lo phases, allowing visualization of the individual phases from the fluorescence intensity ratio of its two emission bands. By using a linearly polarized excitation light, a strong photoselection was observed for F2N12S in the Lo phase, indicating that its fluorophore is nearly parallel to the lipid chains of the bilayer. In contrast, the absence of the photoselection with the Ld phase indicated no predominant orientation of the probe in the Ld phase. Comparison of the present results with those reported previously for F2N12S in living cells suggests a high content of the Lo phase in the outer leaflet of the cell plasma membranes. Taking into account the high selectivity of F2N12S for the cell plasma membranes and its suitability for both single- and two-photon excitation, applications of this probe to study membrane lateral heterogeneity in biological membranes are foreseen.

  19. Arrangement of ceramide [EOS] in a stratum corneum lipid model matrix: new aspects revealed by neutron diffraction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessner, Doreen; Kiselev, Mikhail; Dante, Silvia; Hauss, Thomas; Lersch, Peter; Wartewig, Siegfried; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2008-07-01

    The lipid matrix in stratum corneum (SC) plays a key role in the barrier function of the mammalian skin. The major lipids are ceramides (CER), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFA). Especially the unique-structured omega-acylceramide CER[EOS] is regarded to be essential for skin barrier properties by inducing the formation of a long-periodicity phase of 130 angstroms (LPP). In the present study, the arrangement of CER[EOS], either mixed with CER[AP] and CHOL or with CER[AP], CHOL and palmitic acid (PA), inside a SC lipid model membrane has been studied for the first time by neutron diffraction. For a mixed CER[EOS]/CER[AP]/CHOL membrane in a partly dehydrated state, the internal membrane nanostructure, i.e. the neutron scattering length density profile in the direction normal to the surface, was obtained by Fourier synthesis from the experimental diffraction patterns. The membrane repeat distance is equal to that of the formerly used SC lipid model system composed of CER[AP]/CHOL/PA/ChS. By comparing both the neutron scattering length density profiles, a possible arrangement of synthetic long-chain CER[EOS] molecules inside a SC lipid model matrix is suggested. The analysis of the internal membrane nanostructure implies that one CER[EOS] molecule penetrates from one membrane layer into an adjacent layer. A 130 angstroms periodicity phase could not be observed under experimental conditions, either in CER/CHOL mixtures or in CER/CHOL/FFA mixture. CER[EOS] can be arranged inside a phase with a repeat unit of 45.2 angstroms which is predominately formed by short-chain CER[AP] with distinct polarity.

  20. Truncation of the membrane-spanning domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein defines elements required for fusion, incorporation, and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ling; Shang, Liang; Hunter, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein from human (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency viruses plays a key role in anchoring the Env complex into the viral membrane but also contributes to its biological function in fusion and virus entry. In HIV type 1 (HIV-1), it has been predicted to span 27 amino acids, from lysine residue 681 to arginine 707, and encompasses an internal arginine at residue 694. By examining a series of C-terminal-truncation mutants of the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein that substituted termination codons for amino acids 682 to 708, we show that this entire region is required for efficient viral infection of target cells. Truncation to the arginine at residue 694 resulted in an Env complex that was secreted from the cells. In contrast, a region from residues 681 to 698, which contains highly conserved hydrophobic residues and glycine motifs and extends 4 amino acids beyond 694R, can effectively anchor the protein in the membrane, allow efficient transport to the plasma membrane, and mediate wild-type levels of cell-cell fusion. However, these fusogenic truncated Env mutants are inefficiently incorporated into budding virions. Based on the analysis of these mutants, a "snorkeling" model, in which the flanking charged amino acid residues at 681 and 694 are buried in the lipid while their side chains interact with polar head groups, is proposed for the HIV-1 MSD.

  1. The regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) regulates plasma membrane localization and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Shen, Ke; Fischer, Christopher C; Wedegaertner, Philip B

    2014-07-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated GPCRs at the plasma membrane (PM). Here GRK5/GRK4 chimeras and point mutations in GRK5 identify a short sequence within the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain in GRK5 that is critical for GRK5 PM localization. This region of the RGS domain of GRK5 coincides with a region of GRK6 and GRK1 shown to form a hydrophobic dimeric interface (HDI) in crystal structures. Coimmunoprecipitation (coIP) and acceptor photobleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays show that expressed GRK5 self-associates in cells, whereas GRK5-M165E/F166E (GRK5-EE), containing hydrophilic mutations in the HDI region of the RGS domain, displays greatly decreased coIP interactions. Both forcing dimerization of GRK5-EE, via fusion to leucine zipper motifs, and appending an extra C-terminal membrane-binding region to GRK5-EE (GRK5-EE-CT) recover PM localization. In addition, GRK5-EE displays a decreased ability to inhibit PAR1-induced calcium release compared with GRK5 wild type (wt). In contrast, PM-localized GRK5-EE-CaaX (appending a C-terminal prenylation and polybasic motif from K-ras) or GRK5-EE-CT shows comparable ability to GRK5 wt to inhibit PAR1-induced calcium release. The results suggest a novel model in which GRK5 dimerization is important for its plasma membrane localization and function. © 2014 Xu, Jiang, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding the porcine type XVII collagen noncollagenous 16 A domain and localization of the domain to the upper part of porcine skin basement membrane zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Luting; Olivry, Thierry; Chan, Lawrence S

    2004-06-01

    Bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune blistering human skin disease mediated by immunoglobulin (Ig)G autoantibodies targeting skin basement membrane component type XVII collagen, a transmembrane protein. Also designated BP180 and BPAG2, type XVII collagen is an extracellular matrix element essential for the connection between the epidermis and the underlying dermis. In addition to being a target antigen in the human disease bullous pemphigoid, type XVII collagen is also targeted by autoantibodies of canine, feline, equine and porcine patients suffering from a similar blistering skin disease. Previously, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analyses have shown that autoantibodies from pigs affected with bullous pemphigoid recognize the human NC16A domain of type XVII collagen. To facilitate the development of porcine model of bullous pemphigoid, we isolated cDNA encoding the porcine type XVII collagen NC16A domain using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique. The amino acids deduced from the NC16A cDNA showed 61% identity with the sequence of human NC16A. An antibody generated against a 20-amino acid peptide within the porcine NC16A localized the NC16A epitope to the upper part of porcine skin basement membrane zone. Our data provide further information of the porcine bullous pemphigoid target antigen and may help investigators for their further studies of this disease.

  3. Membrane-perturbing properties of two Arg-rich paddle domains from voltage-gated sensors in the KvAP and HsapBK K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Madani, Fatemeh; Gräslund, Astrid; Mäler, Lena

    2012-05-15

    Voltage-gated K(+) channels are gated by displacement of basic residues located in the S4 helix that together with a part of the S3 helix, S3b, forms a "paddle" domain, whose position is altered by changes in the membrane potential modulating the open probability of the channel. Here, interactions between two paddle domains, KvAPp from the K(v) channel from Aeropyrum pernix and HsapBKp from the BK channel from Homo sapiens, and membrane models have been studied by spectroscopy. We show that both paddle domains induce calcein leakage in large unilamellar vesicles, and we suggest that this leakage represents a general thinning of the bilayer, making movement of the whole paddle domain plausible. The fact that HsapBKp induces more leakage than KvAPp may be explained by the presence of a Trp residue in HsapBKp. Trp residues generally promote localization to the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interface and disturb tight packing. In magnetically aligned bicelles, KvAPp increases the level of order along the whole acyl chain, while HsapBKp affects the morphology, also indicating that KvAPp adapts more to the lipid environment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements for HsapBKp show that overall the sequence has anisotropic motions. The S4 helix is well-structured with restricted local motion, while the turn between S4 and S3b is more flexible and undergoes slow local motion. Our results indicate that the calcein leakage is related to the flexibility in this turn region. A possibility by which HsapBKp can undergo structural transitions is also shown by relaxation NMR, which may be important for the gating mechanism.

  4. The outer-membrane export signal of Porphyromonas gingivalis type IX secretion system (T9SS) is a conserved C-terminal β-sandwich domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Iñaki; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Mizgalska, Danuta; Koneru, Lahari; Golik, Przemyslaw; Szmigielski, Borys; Nowak, Magdalena; Nowakowska, Zuzanna; Potempa, Barbara; Houston, John A; Enghild, Jan J; Thøgersen, Ida B; Gao, Jinlong; Kwan, Ann H; Trewhella, Jill; Dubin, Grzegorz; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Potempa, Jan

    2016-03-23

    In the recently characterized Type IX Secretion System (T9SS), the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) in secreted proteins functions as an outer membrane translocation signal for export of virulence factors to the cell surface in the Gram-negative Bacteroidetes phylum. In the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, the CTD is cleaved off by PorU sortase in a sequence-independent manner, and anionic lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS) is attached to many translocated proteins, thus anchoring them to the bacterial surface. Here, we solved the atomic structure of the CTD of gingipain B (RgpB) from P. gingivalis, alone and together with a preceding immunoglobulin-superfamily domain (IgSF). The CTD was found to possess a typical Ig-like fold encompassing seven antiparallel β-strands organized in two β-sheets, packed into a β-sandwich structure that can spontaneously dimerise through C-terminal strand swapping. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) revealed no fixed orientation of the CTD with respect to the IgSF. By introducing insertion or substitution of residues within the inter-domain linker in the native protein, we were able to show that despite the region being unstructured, it nevertheless is resistant to general proteolysis. These data suggest structural motifs located in the two adjacent Ig-like domains dictate the processing of CTDs by the T9SS secretion pathway.

  5. A Coarse-grained Model of Stratum Corneum Lipids: Free Fatty Acids and Ceramide NS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Timothy C.; Iacovella, Christopher R.; Hartkamp, Remco; Bunge, Annette L.; McCabe, Clare

    2017-01-01

    Ceramide (CER)-based biological membranes are used both experimentally and in simulations as simplified model systems of the skin barrier. Molecular dynamics studies have generally focused on simulating preassembled structures using atomistically detailed models of CERs, which limit the system sizes and timescales that can practically be probed, rendering them ineffective for studying particular phenomena, including self-assembly into bilayer and lamellar superstructures. Here, we report on the development of a coarse-grained (CG) model for CER NS, the most abundant CER in human stratum corneum. Multistate iterative Boltzmann inversion is used to derive the intermolecular pair potentials, resulting in a force field that is applicable over a range of state points and suitable for studying ceramide self-assembly. The chosen CG mapping, which includes explicit interaction sites for hydroxyl groups, captures the directional nature of hydrogen bonding and allows for accurate predictions of several key structural properties of CER NS bilayers. Simulated wetting experiments allow the hydrophobicity of CG beads to be accurately tuned to match atomistic wetting behavior, which affects the whole system since inaccurate hydrophobic character is found to unphysically alter the lipid packing in hydrated lamellar states. We find that CER NS can self-assemble into multilamellar structures, enabling the study of lipid systems more representative of the multilamellar lipid structures present in the skin barrier. The coarse-grained force field derived herein represents an important step in using molecular dynamics to study the human skin barrier, which gives a resolution not available through experiment alone. PMID:27564869

  6. Depth-dependent stratum corneum permeability in human skin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavona, John Jay P; Zhu, Hanjiang; Hui, Xiaoying; Jung, Eui-Chang; Maibach, Howard I

    2016-09-01

    The stratum corneum (SC), a permeable membrane, limits percutaneous penetration. As SC chemical and structural properties responsible for skin barrier function appear depth-related, we conducted an in vitro dermatopharmacokinetic study on intact and adhesive tape-stripped skin samples to clarify whether SC is a homogeneous barrier for chemical transport. SC concentration-thickness profiles were determined for four C-14 labeled model chemicals, panthenol, benzoic acid, paraoxon and butenafine, using the tape-stripping approach. Data analysis with the unsteady-state diffusion equation of Fick's second law permitted a chemical diffusion coefficient in SC. To evaluate the consistency of SC permeability from its surface to lower levels, the skin was tape-stripped five to 10 times to remove the upper cell layers before chemical application, such that diffusion coefficients could be determined from three SC depth levels (0, 5 and 10 tape strips). Results suggested the depth-dependency of SC permeability to panthenol, benzoic acid and butenafine; the diffusion coefficient of panthenol decreased significantly after the first five tape strips and subsequently remained consistent. A progressive increase in diffusion coefficients of benzoic acid and butenafine was observed as tape-stripping levels increased. The removal of superficial SC did not result in a significant difference in the paraoxon diffusion coefficient. For individual chemicals, a variation in the diffusion coefficient from SC surface to deeper layers agreed with the change of the diffusion coefficient over time in intact skin. Characterization of the SC properties contributing to the depth-dependent SC permeability will hopefully provide further insight to skin penetration/decontamination. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Environmental effects on the functions of the stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, H; Kobayashi, H; Zhen, X S; Kikuchi, K

    2001-11-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) is such an efficient barrier that only 2-5 g per h per cm2 of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) occurs in normal skin. The SC also plays another important role at the skin surface in keeping our skin smooth and flexible by binding water. We exposed a simulation model of in vivo SC to various, excessive physical insults in vitro, such as irradiation with 1 J per cm2 of UVB, 50 J per cm2 of UVA, or 3000 rad of X-ray, heating at 90 degrees C for 3 min, freezing at -196 degrees C for 60 s or repeated placement in an extremely dry or humid condition. None of them could cause any permanent change in the SC functions. Only the application of chemical agents such as lipid solvents or a detergent or the affliction of trauma resulted in a functional derangement of the SC. Because the viable skin tissues are more vulnerable to the effects of the environment than the SC, most of the abnormalities of the SC functions developing after environmental insults are secondarily caused by enhanced epidermal proliferation induced under the influence of underlying inflammation. These functional abnormalities were found to be demonstrable with biophysical measurements long after the disappearance of skin redness, the clinically observable sign of inflammation. The SC abnormalities in inflamed skin are also detectable as a change in the content of chemical mediators. For example, the ratio between proinflammatory IL-1 and its receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) whose production by epidermal keratinocytes is markedly enhanced by various proinflammatory stimuli, showed a deviation towards an excess of the latter in inflammatory skin. Facial skin that is always exposed to the environment is unique in that its SC shows such a deviation in the IL-1/IL-1ra ratio suggestive for the presence of mild inflammation even in normal individuals.

  8. Differences in the stratum corneum of Indonesian infants and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Fujimura

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Although understanding the stratum corneum (SC of infant skin is important to avoid skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, there has been no such investigation in Indonesian infants to date. Objective  To obtain a basic knowledge of SC characteristics in Indonesian infants in order to develop methods for infant-specific skin care and to prevent dermatitis and infection. Methods Seventy-two healthy, full term infants aged 1 to 24 months who were native Indonesians residing in Jakarta were enrolled in this study. Some of the mothers were also enrolled in the study as adults (n=30. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL and hydration of the SC (capacitance on the thigh, buttock, and upper arm were measured after sufficient acclimation in an air-conditioned room, in both infants and mothers. Results The SC hydration was significantly higher in infants than adults at all sites measured, including the buttocks, which is a diaper area. Infant TEWL values were also significantly higher than in adults at all sites. Hydration of the SC and TEWL values showed no significant correlation with age of infant for any site. The SC hydration and TEWL values of Indonesian infants did not decrease to adult values within 24 months, which indicates that the SC characteristics in infants continue to develop after 24 months of age. Conclusion  Indonesian infants aged 0-24 months have significantly higher SC hydration and TEWL values than Indonesian mothers. However, infant age has no correlation to SC hydration or to TEWL values.

  9. Iontophoretic delivery of 5-fluorouracil through excised human stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B N; Jayaswal, S B

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of ionization, current density and penetration enhancers on the iontophoretic delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) through excised human stratum corneum (HSC). The iontophoretic (cathodal) transport of 5-FU was assessed in vitro at three physiologically relevant pH values of 5.0, 7.4 and 8.0, at various levels of current density ranging between 0.15 to 0.98 mA/cm2, and in the presence of suitable penetration enhancers, namely Azone(®) (AZ), lauryl alcohol (LA), and isopropyl myristate (IPM). The steady-state flux at constant current density (0.47 mA/cm(2)) was increased by approximately 19, 10 and 27 fold at pH 5, 7.4 and 8.0, respectively. The effect of current density at pH 7.4 exhibited a linear correlation between current density and steady-state flux (r = 0.98, p = 0.002), which indicates the potential of iontophoresis for controlled transdermal delivery of 5-FU. The combination of cathodal iontophoresis with IPM produced an additive enhancement which may be attributed to aggravated skin perturbation effect and increased skin conductivity. Other enhancers such as AZ and LA produced negative or no further enhancement respectively, when used in conjunction with cathodal iontophoresis. It may be therefore concluded that pH and current density play critical role during iontophoretic delivery of 5-FU, and combination of a chemical penetration enhancer and iontophoresis can not be always viewed as a synergistic strategy which should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis for each drug candidate/enhancer combination.

  10. Novel preparation of intercellular lipid models of the stratum corneum containing stereoactive ceramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Obata, Yasuko; Onuki, Yoshinori; Ishida, Kenya; Takayama, Kozo

    2010-03-01

    The microstructure formed by intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum is important for the barrier function of the skin. However, the correlation between lipid composition and microstructure has not yet been clarified. To elucidate the microstructure of intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum, an intercellular lipid model was prepared from ceramide 5 (CER5), cholesterol (CHOL), and palmitic acid (PA), considering the nonuniformity of the lipid components of the stratum corneum. A response surface method incorporating thin-plate spline interpolation (RSM-S) was employed to prepare the CER5/CHOL/PA lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy of the CER5/CHOL/PA bilayers showed four distinct clusters based on Kohonen's self-organizing maps (SOM). At the centroid formulation of those clusters, the microstructures of CER5/CHOL/PA bilayers were determined using synchrotron X-ray scattering. Three kinds of lamellar structures and two kinds of lateral packing-namely, hexagonal and orthorhombic-were formed. The microstructure of the CER5/CHOL/PA bilayers was likely to be intrinsic to the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum. In conclusion, the CER5/CHOL/PA bilayers prepared based on RSM-S and SOM were useful as models of the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum.

  11. Effect of organic solvents on normal human stratum corneum: evaluation by the corneoxenometry bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, V; Letawe, C; Piérard, G E

    1997-01-01

    Organic solvents alter the stratum corneum structure and barrier function. To measure the effect of various solvents upon human stratum corneum using the ex vivo corneoxenometry bioassay which is a variant of corneosurfametry. Corneoxenometry entails collection of human stratum corneum by cyanoacrylate. The material is immersed in organic solvents for periods ranging from 1 to 120 min. After staining the samples with a toluidine blue-basic fuchsin solution, the color is measured using reflectance colorimetry. Solvent aggressivity to the stratum corneum correlates with the color darkening of the samples. The least aggressive solvent was hexane, followed by ethanol, methanol, hexane-ethanol, chloroform, chloroform-methanol and hexane-methanol. The influence of contact time between solvents and the stratum corneum showed a logarithmic pattern which varied according to the solvent. Data are in line with previous experiments conducted in vivo and in vitro, thus indicating the predictive value of corneoxenometry. Such a bioassay may avoid hazards of some in vivo human testings.

  12. Lipid domain formation and ligand-receptor distribution in lipid bilayer membranes investigated by atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Mouritsen, O.G.; Jørgensen, K.

    2002-01-01

    A novel experimental technique, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), is proposed to visualize the lateral organization of membrane systems in the nanometer range. The technique involves the use of a ligand-receptor pair, biotin-avidin, which introduces a height variation on a solid-supported l......A novel experimental technique, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), is proposed to visualize the lateral organization of membrane systems in the nanometer range. The technique involves the use of a ligand-receptor pair, biotin-avidin, which introduces a height variation on a solid...

  13. The Structure and Organization within the Membrane of the Helices Composing the Pore-Forming Domain of Bacillus thuringiensis δ -Endotoxin are Consistent with an ``Umbrella-Like'' Structure of the Pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazit, Ehud; La Rocca, Paolo; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Shai, Yechiel

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of membrane insertion and the structural organization of pores formed by Bacillus thuringiensis δ -endotoxin. We determined the relative affinities for membranes of peptides corresponding to the seven helices that compose the toxin pore-forming domain, their modes of membrane interaction, their structures within membranes, and their orientations relative to the membrane normal. In addition, we used resonance energy transfer measurements of all possible combinatorial pairs of membrane-bound helices to map the network of interactions between helices in their membrane-bound state. The interaction of the helices with the bilayer membrane was also probed by a Monte Carlo simulation protocol to determine lowest-energy orientations. Our results are consistent with a situation in which helices α 4 and α 5 insert into the membrane as a helical hairpin in an antiparallel manner, while the other helices lie on the membrane surface like the ribs of an umbrella (the ``umbrella model''). Our results also support the suggestion that α 7 may serve as a binding sensor to initiate the structural rearrangement of the pore-forming domain.

  14. Organization of the Escherichia coli aerobic enzyme complexes of oxidative phosphorylation in dynamic domains within the cytoplasmic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Heiko; Dempwolff, Felix; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Riehle, Marc; Schäfer, Caspar; Pohl, Thomas; Graumann, Peter; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2014-06-01

    The Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane contains the enzyme complexes of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Not much is known about their supramolecular organization and their dynamics within the membrane in this model organism. In mitochondria and other bacteria, it was demonstrated by nondenaturing electrophoretic methods and electron microscopy that the OXPHOS complexes are organized in so-called supercomplexes, stable assemblies with a defined number of the individual enzyme complexes. To investigate the organization of the E. coli enzyme complexes of aerobic OXPHOS in vivo, we established fluorescent protein fusions of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the cytochrome bd-I, and the cytochrome bo3 terminal oxidases, and the FoF1 ATP-synthase. The fusions were integrated in the chromosome to prevent artifacts caused by protein overproduction. Biochemical analysis revealed that all modified complexes were fully assembled, active, and stable. The distribution of the OXPHOS complexes in living cells was determined using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The dynamics within the membrane were detected by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. All aerobic OXPHOS complexes showed an uneven distribution in large mobile patches within the E. coli cytoplasmic membrane. It is discussed whether the individual OXPHOS complexes are organized as clustered individual complexes, here called "segrazones."

  15. Hierarchical, domain type-specific acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 in Tanzanian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cham, Gerald K K; Turner, Louise; Kurtis, Jonathan D

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a variant antigen expressed on the surface of malaria-infected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 attaches to the vascular lining and allows infected erythrocytes to avoid filtration through the spleen. Each parasite genome encodes about 60...

  16. Expression of the domain cassette 8 Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 is associated with cerebral malaria in Benin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertin, Gwladys I; Lavstsen, Thomas; Guillonneau, François

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein-1 (PfEMP-1) is a highly polymorphic adherence receptor expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Based on sequence homology PfEMP-1 variants have been grouped into three major groups A-C, the highly conserved VAR2CSA variants, and semi-c...

  17. Phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine ceramides in model skin lipid membranes: permeability and biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Školová, Barbora; Kováčik, Andrej; Tesař, Ondřej; Opálka, Lukáš; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2017-05-01

    Ceramides based on phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine are essential constituents of the skin lipid barrier that protects the body from excessive water loss. The roles of the individual ceramide subclasses in regulating skin permeability and the reasons for C4-hydroxylation of these sphingolipids are not completely understood. We investigated the chain length-dependent effects of dihydroceramides, sphingosine ceramides (with C4-unsaturation) and phytoceramides (with C4-hydroxyl) on the permeability, lipid organization and thermotropic behavior of model stratum corneum lipid membranes composed of ceramide/lignoceric acid/cholesterol/cholesteryl sulfate. Phytoceramides with very long C24 acyl chains increased the permeability of the model lipid membranes compared to dihydroceramides or sphingosine ceramides with the same chain lengths. Either unsaturation or C4-hydroxylation of dihydroceramides induced chain length-dependent increases in membrane permeability. Infrared spectroscopy showed that C4-hydroxylation of the sphingoid base decreased the relative ratio of orthorhombic chain packing in the membrane and lowered the miscibility of C24 phytoceramide with lignoceric acid. The phase separation in phytoceramide membranes was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. In contrast, phytoceramides formed strong hydrogen bonds and highly thermostable domains. Thus, the large heterogeneity in ceramide structures and in their aggregation mechanisms may confer resistance towards the heterogeneous external stressors that are constantly faced by the skin barrier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dimerization Domain of Retinal Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase 1 (RetGC1) Is an Essential Part of Guanylyl Cyclase-activating Protein (GCAP) Binding Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshenko, Igor V; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2015-08-01

    The photoreceptor-specific proteins guanylyl cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) bind and regulate retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase 1 (RetGC1) but not natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA). Study of RetGC1 regulation in vitro and its association with fluorescently tagged GCAP in transfected cells showed that R822P substitution in the cyclase dimerization domain causing congenital early onset blindness disrupted RetGC1 ability to bind GCAP but did not eliminate its affinity for another photoreceptor-specific protein, retinal degeneration 3 (RD3). Likewise, the presence of the NPRA dimerization domain in RetGC1/NPRA chimera specifically disabled binding of GCAPs but not of RD3. In subsequent mapping using hybrid dimerization domains in RetGC1/NPRA chimera, multiple RetGC1-specific residues contributed to GCAP binding by the cyclase, but the region around Met(823) was the most crucial. Either positively or negatively charged residues in that position completely blocked GCAP1 and GCAP2 but not RD3 binding similarly to the disease-causing mutation in the neighboring Arg(822). The specificity of GCAP binding imparted by RetGC1 dimerization domain was not directly related to promoting dimerization of the cyclase. The probability of coiled coil dimer formation computed for RetGC1/NPRA chimeras, even those incapable of binding GCAP, remained high, and functional complementation tests showed that the RetGC1 active site, which requires dimerization of the cyclase, was formed even when Met(823) or Arg(822) was mutated. These results directly demonstrate that the interface for GCAP binding on RetGC1 requires not only the kinase homology region but also directly involves the dimerization domain and especially its portion containing Arg(822) and Met(823).

  19. FINITE ELEMENT METHOD ON NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF STRATUM CORNEUM'S PENETRATION PROPERTY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    How the outer substance could penetrate through the skin lies in the stratum corneum, because it is the main barrier in the multi-layers of the skin. Supposing the keratin cell with a special geometry as tetrakaidecahedron, the penetration property of stratum corneum was the key problem which was numerically simulated with finite element method. At first the discretization of the stratum corneum region was given in two steps: first, the discretization of the keratin cell; second, the discretization of fattiness that surrounds the keratin. Then there was the work of numerical simulation. In this procedure, the finite element method and the multi-grid method were used. The former was to obtain the discretization of basic elements; the latter was to decrease the high frequency error. At last the visualization of the numerical simulation was shown.

  20. Regional differences in stratum corneum reactivity to surfactants. Quantitative assessment using the corneosurfametry bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, F; Goffin, V; Maibach, H I; Piérard, G E

    1997-12-01

    The skin does not react similarly to the presence of xenobiotics over all anatomic sites. Distinct regional differences have been described for irritancy and percutaneous absorption. The present study assesses the regional variation of stratum corneum reactivity to surfactants using the corneosurfametry bioassay. Stratum corneum was harvested from 6 body sites in 20 young adults. Corneosurfametry was performed using water, 1% SLS and a 5% soap solution. Data show that the best variable to assess regional variability in irritancy is the overall difference in corneosurfametry (ODC), comparing the effect of a given surfactant with water. The dorsal hand and volar forearm were the least reactive, the neck, forehead, back and dorsal foot the most reactive, sites. It is concluded that the corneosurfametry bioassay, through the ODC variable, is a practically noninvasive tool for the evaluation of regional variation in irritancy at the level of the stratum corneum.

  1. Biophysical Characterization of a Vaccine Candidate against HIV-1: The Transmembrane and Membrane Proximal Domains of HIV-1 gp41 as a Maltose Binding Protein Fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Gong

    Full Text Available The membrane proximal region (MPR, residues 649-683 and transmembrane domain (TMD, residues 684-705 of the gp41 subunit of HIV-1's envelope protein are highly conserved and are important in viral mucosal transmission, virus attachment and membrane fusion with target cells. Several structures of the trimeric membrane proximal external region (residues 662-683 of MPR have been reported at the atomic level; however, the atomic structure of the TMD still remains unknown. To elucidate the structure of both MPR and TMD, we expressed the region spanning both domains, MPR-TM (residues 649-705, in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP. MPR-TM was initially fused to the C-terminus of MBP via a 42 aa-long linker containing a TEV protease recognition site (MBP-linker-MPR-TM. Biophysical characterization indicated that the purified MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein was a monodisperse and stable candidate for crystallization. However, crystals of the MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein could not be obtained in extensive crystallization screens. It is possible that the 42 residue-long linker between MBP and MPR-TM was interfering with crystal formation. To test this hypothesis, the 42 residue-long linker was replaced with three alanine residues. The fusion protein, MBP-AAA-MPR-TM, was similarly purified and characterized. Significantly, both the MBP-linker-MPR-TM and MBP-AAA-MPR-TM proteins strongly interacted with broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. With epitopes accessible to the broadly neutralizing antibodies, these MBP/MPR-TM recombinant proteins may be in immunologically relevant conformations that mimic a pre-hairpin intermediate of gp41.

  2. Crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of the botulinum C-D mosaic neurotoxin reveals potential roles of lysines 1118 and 1136 in membrane interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Ling; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2011-01-07

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C (~two-thirds) and BoNT/D (~one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 Å resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal β-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR

  3. Crystal Structure of the Receptor Binding Domain of the botulinum C-D Mosiac Neurotoxin Reveals Potential Roles of Lysines 1118 and 1136 in Membrane Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C ({approx}two-third) and BoNT/D ({approx}one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 {angstrom} resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR.

  4. The Atomic Structure of the HIV-1 gp41 Transmembrane Domain and Its Connection to the Immunogenic Membrane-proximal External Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Rujas, Edurne; Serrano, Soraya; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Jiménez, M Ángeles; Nieva, José L

    2015-05-22

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) C-terminal segment and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41 are involved in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion and modulation of immune responses during viral infection. However, the atomic structure of this functional region remains unsolved. Here, based on the high resolution NMR data obtained for peptides spanning the C-terminal segment of MPER and the TMD, we report two main findings: (i) the conformational variability of the TMD helix at a membrane-buried position; and (ii) the existence of an uninterrupted α-helix spanning MPER and the N-terminal region of the TMD. Thus, our structural data provide evidence for the bipartite organization of TMD predicted by previous molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies, but they do not support the breaking of the helix at Lys-683, as was suggested by some models to mark the initiation of the TMD anchor. Antibody binding energetics examined with isothermal titration calorimetry and humoral responses elicited in rabbits by peptide-based vaccines further support the relevance of a continuous MPER-TMD helix for immune recognition. We conclude that the transmembrane anchor of HIV-1 envelope is composed of two distinct subdomains: 1) an immunogenic helix at the N terminus also involved in promoting membrane fusion; and 2) an immunosuppressive helix at the C terminus, which might also contribute to the late stages of the fusion process. The unprecedented high resolution structural data reported here may guide future vaccine and inhibitor developments.

  5. The catalytic activity of the CD45 membrane-proximal phosphatase domain is required for TCR signaling and regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desai, D M; Sap, J; Silvennoinen, O;

    1994-01-01

    Cell surface expression of CD45, a receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), is required for T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-mediated signal transduction. Like the majority of transmembrane PTPases, CD45 contains two cytoplasmic phosphatase domains, whose relative in vivo function is not...

  6. The effects of barrier disruption and moisturization on the dynamic drying mechanics of human stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; German, G K

    2015-09-01

    We study the dynamic drying mechanics of human stratum corneum, the most superficial layer of skin and essential physical and chemical barrier to the external environment. Barrier disruption caused by a depletion of lipids ordinarily found in healthy stratum corneum can occur with ageing, aggressive cleansing or with dry skin disorders and diseases such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. We establish the effects of severe barrier disruption on the dynamic drying mechanics of human stratum corneum by measuring variations in thickness and spatially resolved in-plane displacements in healthy and lipid depleted tissue samples drying in controlled environmental conditions. In-plane displacements recorded at regular intervals during drying are azimuthally averaged and fitted with a profile based on a linear elastic model. The measured thickness of the tissue sample is accounted for in each model fit. Dynamic variations in the drying stress and elastic modulus of the tissue are then established from the model fits. We find that barrier disruption causes dramatic reductions in drying timescales, increases in the elastic modulus of the tissue and larger drying stresses. We expect these changes to increase the propensity for cracking and chapping in skin. The maximum elastic modulus and drying stress of barrier disrupted stratum corneum (ESC=85.4±6.8 MPa, PSC=10.9±0.9 MPa) is reduced to levels comparable with stratum corneum containing lipids (ESC=26.1±3.2 MPa, PSC=2.58±0.45 MPa) after treatment with a 5% aqueous solution of glycerol. Neither 2% nor 5% glycerol solutions slow the accelerated drying timescales in barrier disrupted stratum corneum.

  7. Peptide from the C-terminal domain of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) inhibits membrane activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoping; Mikhailova, Margarita; Chen, Zhihua; Pal, Sanjay; Robichaud, Trista K; Lafer, Eileen M; Baber, Sam; Steffensen, Bjorn

    2011-09-01

    Cellular activation of latent matrix metalloproteinase-2 (proMMP-2) requires formation of a cell membrane-associated activation complex that involves specific binding between the hemopexin domain of proMMP-2 (PEX) and the C-terminal domain of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (C-TIMP-2). In this study, we tested the feasibility of inhibiting activation of proMMP-2 by exogenous inhibitors, which block the binding between PEX and TIMP-2. The recombinant C-TIMP-2 and synthetic peptides from C-TIMP-2 were used as inhibitors for proMMP-2 activation. Recombinant C-TIMP-2 bound specifically to both the catalytically inactive MMP-2(E404A) and the C-terminal domain of MMP-2 (PEX) in a concentration dependent manner with apparent K(d) of 3.9×10(-7)M and 1.7×10(-7)M, respectively. Moreover, C-TIMP-2 competed the binding between MMP-2(E404A) and full-length TIMP-2. Finally, activity assays showed that addition of C-TIMP-2 to HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells inhibited proMMP-2 activation in a concentration-dependent manner. We then designed a synthetic peptide, P175L, consisting of 20 residues from the PEX-binding tail region of C-TIMP-2. P175L bound PEX and inhibited cell membrane-mediated activation of proMMP-2 in a concentration dependent manner. Deletion of the last 9 tail residues of C-TIMP-2 in P175L abrogated the inhibitory activities of the peptide showing that these residues were essential for function. Overall, these experiments have demonstrated that proMMP-2 activation can be inhibited by exogenous inhibitors which points to a potential strategy for MMP-2 specific inhibition.

  8. Distribution of salicylic acid in human stratum corneum following topical application in vivo: a comparison of six different formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, J; Chuang, S; Hsu, M; Sheu, H

    1999-10-25

    Distribution of salicylic acid in human stratum corneum from treatment of six different formulations was assessed by quantitation of drug content in sequentially tape-stripped stratum corneum after a single 2-h dose was applied unoccluded to skin on the ventral forearm of four female subjects. The profile and total amounts of stratum corneum removed in 20 tape-strips varied among different types of formulations. With or without normalization by the total stratum corneum weights removed, the extent of drug delivery to the stratum corneum decreased in the following order: SA (5%) > > SAC (10%), Duofilm (16.7%) > TSSS (2%) > SAO (10%), Salic (2.5%), the percentage in parentheses indicating the salicylic acid concentration in each formulation. The greatest topical bioavailability was observed for the alcoholic solution containing glycerol (SA). The 10% collodion formulation (SAC) was found to deliver an amount of salicylic acid into the stratum corneum 2-fold greater than 10% ointment formulation (SAO). Use of absorption ointment (TSSS) also increased the uptake of salicylic acid into the stratum corneum in comparison with formulations based on simple ointment (SAO) and oil in water (o/w) cream (Salic). The partitioning of salicylic acid from collodion formulations (SAC and Duofilm) appeared to be concentration-independent. The results of this study indicate that topical bioavailability of salicylic acid in the stratum corneum varies substantially among different formulations.

  9. Sialidase NEU3 dynamically associates to different membrane domains specifically modifying their ganglioside pattern and triggering Akt phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Bonardi

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are known to regulate several membrane functions such as signaling, trafficking and cellular adhesion. The local enrichment in sphingolipids and cholesterol together with the low protein content allows their separation by density gradient flotation after extraction with non-ionic detergent at low temperature. These structures are also referred to as detergent resistant membranes (DRM. Among sphingolipids, gangliosides play important roles in different biological events, including signal transduction and tumorigenesis. Sialidase NEU3 shows high enzymatic specificity toward gangliosides. Moreover, the enzyme is present both at the cell surface and in endosomal structures and cofractionates with caveolin. Although changes in the expression level of NEU3 have been correlated to different tumors, little is known about the precise distribution of the protein and its ability in modifying the ganglioside composition of DRM and non-DRM, thus regulating intracellular events. By means of inducible expression cell system we found that i newly synthesized NEU3 is initially associated to non-DRM; ii at steady state the protein is equally distributed between the two membrane subcompartments, i.e., DRM and non-DRM; iii NEU3 is degraded via the proteasomal pathway; iv the enzyme specifically modifies the ganglioside composition of the membrane areas where it resides; and v NEU3 triggers phosphorylation of Akt, even in absence of exogenously administered EGF. Taken together our data demonstrate that NEU3 regulates the DRM ganglioside content and it can be considered as a modulator of Akt phosphorylation, further supporting the role of this enzyme in cancer and tumorigenesis.

  10. Topical retinol and the stratum corneum response to an environmental threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, V; Henry, F; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    1997-01-01

    The functional consequences of using topical retinol on skin have not been thoroughly studied so far. The aim of this open study was to compare two preparations containing either retinol or vitamin E, using biometric evaluations. Three methods, namely the sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) corneosurfametry bioassay, the ultraviolet (UV) squamometry test and optical profilometry of the UV-induced wrinkling process, were used to assess some properties of the stratum corneum. The retinol preparation achieved better scores than the vitamin-E cream in all three tests and appears to improve the resistance of the stratum corneum against some chemical (SLS) and physical (UV) threats. It also limits UV-induced shallow wrinkling.

  11. Structural and metal binding characterization of the C-terminal metallochaperone domain of membrane fusion protein SilB from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersch, Beate; Derfoufi, Kheiro-Mouna; De Angelis, Fabien; Auquier, Vanessa; Ekendé, Elisabeth Ngonlong; Mergeay, Max; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Vandenbussche, Guy

    2011-03-29

    Detoxification of heavy metal ions in Proteobacteria is tightly controlled by various systems regulating their sequestration and transport. In Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34, a model organism for heavy metal resistance studies, the sil determinant is potentially involved in the efflux of silver and copper ions. Proteins SilA, SilB, and SilC form a resistance nodulation cell division (RND)-based transport system in which SilB is the periplasmic adaptor protein belonging to the membrane fusion protein (MFP) family. In addition to the four domains typical of known MFPs, SilB has a fifth additional C-terminal domain, called SilB(440-521), which is characterized here. Structure and backbone dynamics of SilB(440-521) have been investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance, and the residues of the metal site were identified from (15)N- and (13)C-edited HSQC spectra. The solution structure and additional metal binding experiments demonstrated that this C-terminal domain folds independently of the rest of the protein and has a conformation and a Ag(+) and Cu(+) binding specificity similar to those determined for CusF from Escherichia coli. The small protein CusF plays a role in metal trafficking in the periplasm. The similarity with CusF suggests a potential metallochaperone role for SilB(440-521) that is discussed in the context of simultaneous expression of different determinants involved in copper resistance in C. metallidurans CH34.

  12. The polybasic lysine-rich domain of plasma membrane-resident STIM1 is essential for the modulation of store-operated divalent cation entry by extracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Isaac; Dionisio, Natalia; Frischauf, Irene; Berna-Erro, Alejandro; Woodard, Geoffrey E; López, José J; Salido, Ginés M; Rosado, Juan A

    2013-05-01

    STIM1 acts as an endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) sensor that communicates the filling state of the intracellular stores to the store-operated channels. In addition, STIM1 is expressed in the plasma membrane, with the Ca(2+) binding EF-hand motif facing the extracellular medium; however, its role sensing extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), as well as the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that divalent cation entry stimulated by thapsigargin (TG) is attenuated by extracellular Ca(2+) in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of the Ca(2+)-binding defective STIM1(D76A) mutant did not alter the surface expression of STIM1 but abolishes the regulation of divalent cation entry by extracellular Ca(2+). Orai1 and TRPC1 have been shown to play a major role in SOCE. Expression of the STIM1(D76A) mutant did not alter Orai1 phosphoserine content. TRPC1 silencing significantly attenuated TG-induced Mn(2+) entry. Expression of the STIM1(K684,685E) mutant impaired the association of plasma membrane STIM1 with TRPC1, as well as the regulation of TG-induced divalent cation entry by extracellular Ca(2+), which suggests that TRPC1 might be involved in the regulation of divalent cation entry by extracellular Ca(2+) mediated by plasma membrane-resident STIM1. Expression of the STIM1(D76A) or STIM1(K684,685E) mutants reduced store-operated divalent cation entry and resulted in loss of dependence on the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration, providing evidence for a functional role of plasma membrane-resident STIM1 in the regulation of store-operated divalent cation entry, which at least involves the EF-hand motif and the C-terminal polybasic lysine-rich domain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic polymorphism and effect of natural selection at domain I of apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) in Plasmodium vivax isolates from Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung-Ung; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Kang, Jung-Mi; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Park, Yun-Kyu; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Lin, Khin; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2010-05-01

    Malaria is endemic or hypoendemic in Myanmar and the country still contributes to the high level of malaria deaths in South-East Asia. Although information on the nature and extent of population diversity within malaria parasites in the country is essential not only for understanding the epidemic situation but also to establish a proper control strategy, very little data is currently available on the extent of genetic polymorphisms of the malaria parasites in Myanmar. In this study, we analyzed the genetic polymorphism and natural selection at domain I of the apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) among Plasmodium vivax Myanmar isolates. A total of 34 distinguishable haplotypes were identified among the 76 isolates sequenced. Comparison with the previously available PvAMA-1 sequences in the GenBank database revealed that 21 of them were new haplotypes that have never been reported till date. The difference between the rate of nonsynonymous (dN) and synonymous (dS) mutations was positive (dN-dS, 0.013+/-0.005), suggesting the domain I is under positive natural selection. The Tajima's D statistics was found to be -0.74652, suggesting that the gene has evolved under population size expansion and/or positive selection. The minimum recombination events were also high, indicating that recombination may occur within the domain I resulting in allelic diversity of PvAMA-1. Our results collectively suggest that PvAMA-1 displays high genetic polymorphism among Myanmar P. vivax isolates with highly diversifying selection at domain I. These results have significant implications in understanding the nature of P. vivax population circulating in Myanmar as well as providing useful information for malaria vaccine development based on this antigen.

  14. Crystal structure of the conserved domain of the DC lysosomal associated membrane protein: implications for the lysosomal glycocalyx

    OpenAIRE

    Wilke Sonja; Krausze Joern; Büssow Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The family of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP) comprises the multifunctional, ubiquitous LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, and the cell type-specific proteins DC-LAMP (LAMP-3), BAD-LAMP (UNC-46, C20orf103) and macrosialin (CD68). LAMPs have been implicated in a multitude of cellular processes, including phagocytosis, autophagy, lipid transport and aging. LAMP-2 isoform A acts as a receptor in chaperone-mediated autophagy. LAMP-2 deficiency causes the fatal Danon disease. The ...

  15. Transforming p21 ras protein: flexibility in the major variable region linking the catalytic and membrane-anchoring domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Papageorge, A G; Hubbert, N

    1985-01-01

    that is required for post-translational processing, membrane localization and transforming activity of the proteins. We have now used the viral oncogene (v-rasH) of Harvey sarcoma virus to study the major variable region by deleting or duplicating parts of the gene. Reducing this region to five amino acids...... or increasing it to 50 amino acids has relatively little effect on the capacity of the gene to induce morphological transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. Assays of GTP binding, GTPase and autophosphorylating activities of such mutant v-rasH-encoded proteins synthesized in bacteria indicated that the sequences...

  16. PRR repeats in the intracellular domain of KISS1R are important for its export to cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrier, Lucie; de Brevern, Alexandre; Hernandez, Eva; Leprince, Jérome; Vaudry, Hubert; Guedj, Anne Marie; de Roux, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    Inactivating mutations of KISS-1 receptor (KISS1R) have been recently described as a rare cause of isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism transmitted as a recessive trait. Few mutations have been described, and the structure-function relationship of KISS1R remains poorly understood. Here, we have taken advantage of the discovery of a novel mutation of KISS1R to characterize the structure and function of an uncommon protein motif composed of 3 proline-arginine-arginine (PRR) repeats located within the intracellular domain. A heterozygous insertion of 1 PRR repeat in-frame with 3 PRR repeats leading to synthesis of a receptor bearing 4 PRR repeats (PRR-KISS1R) was found in the index case. Functional analysis of PRR-KISS1R showed a decrease of the maximal response to kisspeptin stimulation, associated to a lower cell surface expression without modification of total expression. PRR-KISS1R exerts a dominant negative effect on the synthesis of the wild-type (WT)-KISS1R. This effect was due to the nature of inserted residues but also to the difference of the length of the intracellular domain between PRR-KISS1R and WT-KISS1R. A molecular dynamic analysis showed that the additional PRR constrained this arginine-rich region into a polyproline type II helix. Altogether, this study shows that a heterozygous insertion in KISS1R may lead to hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by a dominant negative effect on the WT receptor. An additional PRR repeat into a proline-arginine-rich motif can dramatically changed the conformation of the intracellular domain of KISS1R and its probable interaction with partner proteins.

  17. Repositioning antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a disruptor of the lateral interactions of transmembrane domain 5 of EBV latent membrane protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Fiorini, Zeno; Smith, Christina; Zhang, Yingning; Li, Jing; Watkins, Linda R; Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    The lateral transmembrane protein-protein interactions (PPI) have been regarded as "undruggable" despite their importance in many essential biological processes. The homo-trimerization of transmembrane domain 5 (TMD-5) of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) is critical for the constitutive oncogenic activation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Herein we repurpose the antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a regulator of LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. The results of ToxR assay, tryptophan fluorescence assay, courmarin fluorescence dequenching assay, and Bis-Tris sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) consistently show pentamidine disrupts LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. Furthermore, pentamidine inhibits LMP-1 signaling, inducing cellular apoptosis and suppressing cell proliferation in the EBV infected B cells. In contrast, EBV negative cells are less susceptible to pentamidine. This study provides a novel non-peptide small molecule agent for regulating LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions.

  18. Repositioning antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a disruptor of the lateral interactions of transmembrane domain 5 of EBV latent membrane protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Wang

    Full Text Available The lateral transmembrane protein-protein interactions (PPI have been regarded as "undruggable" despite their importance in many essential biological processes. The homo-trimerization of transmembrane domain 5 (TMD-5 of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1 is critical for the constitutive oncogenic activation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Herein we repurpose the antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a regulator of LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. The results of ToxR assay, tryptophan fluorescence assay, courmarin fluorescence dequenching assay, and Bis-Tris sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE consistently show pentamidine disrupts LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. Furthermore, pentamidine inhibits LMP-1 signaling, inducing cellular apoptosis and suppressing cell proliferation in the EBV infected B cells. In contrast, EBV negative cells are less susceptible to pentamidine. This study provides a novel non-peptide small molecule agent for regulating LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions.

  19. Atopic eczema : the role of stratum corneum lipids in the skin barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The skin barrier function strongly relies on the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), which consists of dead corneocytes embedded in a highly organized extracellular lipid matrix. The lipids are thought to play a crucial role in the skin barrier function. This lipid matrix consists

  20. Atopic eczema : the role of stratum corneum lipids in the skin barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The skin barrier function strongly relies on the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), which consists of dead corneocytes embedded in a highly organized extracellular lipid matrix. The lipids are thought to play a crucial role in the skin barrier function. This lipid matrix consists

  1. Lipid composition of the stratum corneum and cutaneous water loss in birds along an aridity gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Champagne, Alex M.; Munoz-Garcia, Agusti; Shtayyeh, Tamer; Tieleman, B. Irene; Hegemann, Arne; Clement, Michelle E.; Williams, Joseph B.

    2012-01-01

    Intercellular and covalently bound lipids within the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the epidermis, are the primary barrier to cutaneous water loss (CWL) in birds. We compared CWL and intercellular SC lipid composition in 20 species of birds from desert and mesic environments.

  2. Electron diffraction study of lipids in non-lesional stratum corneum of atopic eczema patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, M.; Mulder, A.A.W.; Smeden, J. van; Pilgram, G.S.; Wolterbeek, R..; Lavrijsen, A.P.M.; Koning, R.I.; Koster, A.J.; Bouwstra, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Skin barrier impairment is thought to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of atopic eczema (AE). The skin barrier is located in the stratum corneum (SC), consisting of corneocytes embedded in lipids. Ceramides, cholesterol and free fatty acids are the major lipid classes and are crucial for

  3. An In vitro Model for Bacterial Growth on Human Stratum Corneum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieken, D.A. van der; Ederveen, T.H.A.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Jansen, P.A.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Schalkwijk, J.; Zeeuwen, P.L.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The diversity and dynamics of the skin microbiome in health and disease have been studied recently, but adequate model systems to study skin microbiotas in vitro are largely lacking. We developed an in vitro system that mimics human stratum corneum, using human callus as substrate and nutrient

  4. Modulation of human stratum corneum properties by salicylic acid and all-trans-retinoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Goffin, V; Piérard, G E

    1998-01-01

    Topical all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) has been reported to decrease the in vivo skin response to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). The converse was also shown with a synergistic effect of RA following prior applications of SLS. The reason for such effects is not clear. We employed measures of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), squamometry and sequential corneosurfametry to explore the protective activity of a 0.05% RA cream at the level of the stratum corneum. Nonionic oil-in-water emulsions with or without 5% salicylic acid (SA) served as test product references. Data indicated that the RA formulation was responsible for a stochastic impairment in the TEWL and for an increased intercorneocyte cohesion. SA and the unmedicated emulsion did not lead to similar TEWL changes. The squamometry test proved to be very sensitive to disclose the effects of SA and RA without, however, allowing to distinguish the difference in the physiological processes involved. The corneosurfametry bioassay did not show any protection or synergistic effect between RA or SA and SLS challenge on the stratum corneum. This is in contrast to a previous work showing a positive protective effect afforded by retinol against SLS. The combined effects of irritant compounds affecting the stratum corneum are complex. The precise reason for some of their biological consequences remains a conundrum. On balance, products such as SA and RA do not appear to afford protection or impairment to a surfactant challenge at the level of the stratum corneum.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the catalytic domain of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hideaki; Decaneto, Elena; Grossman, Moran; Havenith, Martina; Sagi, Irit; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Knipp, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) belongs to the large family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases termed MMPs that are located in the extracellular matrix. MT1-MMP was crystallized at 277 K using the vapour-diffusion method with PEG as a precipitating agent. Data sets for MT1-MMP were collected to 2.24 Å resolution at 100 K. The crystals belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.99, c = 122.60 Å. The crystal contained one molecule per asymmetric unit, with a Matthews coefficient (V M) of 2.90 Å3 Da−1; the solvent content is estimated to be 57.6%. PMID:24637763

  6. Structure of transmembrane domain of lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A) reveals key features for substrate specificity in chaperone-mediated autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Ashok K; Strub, Marie-Paule; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Tjandra, Nico

    2014-12-19

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a highly regulated cellular process that mediates the degradation of a selective subset of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. Increasing CMA activity is one way for a cell to respond to stress, and it leads to enhanced turnover of non-critical cytosolic proteins into sources of energy or clearance of unwanted or damaged proteins from the cytosol. The lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A) together with a complex of chaperones and co-chaperones are key regulators of CMA. LAMP-2A is a transmembrane protein component for protein translocation to the lysosome. Here we present a study of the structure and dynamics of the transmembrane domain of human LAMP-2A in n-dodecylphosphocholine micelles by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We showed that LAMP-2A exists as a homotrimer in which the membrane-spanning helices wrap around each other to form a parallel coiled coil conformation, whereas its cytosolic tail is flexible and exposed to the cytosol. This cytosolic tail of LAMP-2A interacts with chaperone Hsc70 and a CMA substrate RNase A with comparable affinity but not with Hsp40 and RNase S peptide. Because the substrates and the chaperone complex can bind at the same time, thus creating a bimodal interaction, we propose that substrate recognition by chaperones and targeting to the lysosomal membrane by LAMP-2A are coupled. This can increase substrate affinity and specificity as well as prevent substrate aggregation, assist in the unfolding of the substrate, and promote the formation of the higher order complex of LAMP-2A required for translocation.

  7. Membrane Attack Complex/Perforin domain-containing proteins in a dual-species transcriptome of caenogastropoda Littorina littorea and its trematode parasite Himasthla elongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbushin, Alexander M

    2016-07-01

    The MACPF domain-containing proteins potentially able to build a transmembrane pore structure are found in the transcriptome of a common periwinkle kidney loaded with trematode rediae. Two homologs of mammalian Macrophage expressed gene 1 (Mpeg1), LlMpeg1-1 and LIMpeg1-2, share similar domain structure with the only difference such as LIMpeg1-2 transcript lacks of a C-terminal transmembrane helix. Expression of membrane-anchored protein LlMpeg1-1 is similar in kidneys of naturally infected with trematode Himasthla elongata and uninfected snails. The expression of the second soluble LIMpeg1-2 protein is 4-fold upregulated under infection. The third MACPF protein found in Littorina littorea kidney is homologous with Perivitellin - 2 67 kDa subunit named LlPV2-67 and the expression of the transcript is 3-fold upregulated in the kidney of infected snails. The last two molecules are candidate effectors that may participate in the immune response of common periwinkles to trematode infestation. A single parasite-expressed MACPF-like protein was recorded from the transcriptome of Himasthla elongata.

  8. Structural refinement of the hERG1 pore and voltage-sensing domains with ROSETTA-membrane and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotina, Julia; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Lees-Miller, James; Durdagi, Serdar; Guo, Jiqing; Duff, Henry J; Noskov, Sergei Yu

    2010-11-01

    The hERG1 gene (Kv11.1) encodes a voltage-gated potassium channel. Mutations in this gene lead to one form of the Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) in humans. Promiscuous binding of drugs to hERG1 is known to alter the structure/function of the channel leading to an acquired form of the LQTS. Expectably, creation and validation of reliable 3D model of the channel have been a key target in molecular cardiology and pharmacology for the last decade. Although many models were built, they all were limited to pore domain. In this work, a full model of the hERG1 channel is developed which includes all transmembrane segments. We tested a template-driven de-novo design with ROSETTA-membrane modeling using side-chain placements optimized by subsequent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Although backbone templates for the homology modeled parts of the pore and voltage sensors were based on the available structures of KvAP, Kv1.2 and Kv1.2-Kv2.1 chimera channels, the missing parts are modeled de-novo. The impact of several alignments on the structure of the S4 helix in the voltage-sensing domain was also tested. Herein, final models are evaluated for consistency to the reported structural elements discovered mainly on the basis of mutagenesis and electrophysiology. These structural elements include salt bridges and close contacts in the voltage-sensor domain; and the topology of the extracellular S5-pore linker compared with that established by toxin foot-printing and nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Implications of the refined hERG1 model to binding of blockers and channels activators (potent new ligands for channel activations) are discussed.

  9. TransportDB 2.0: a database for exploring membrane transporters in sequenced genomes from all domains of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbourne, Liam D H; Tetu, Sasha G; Hassan, Karl A; Paulsen, Ian T

    2017-01-04

    All cellular life contains an extensive array of membrane transport proteins. The vast majority of these transporters have not been experimentally characterized. We have developed a bioinformatic pipeline to identify and annotate complete sets of transporters in any sequenced genome. This pipeline is now fully automated enabling it to better keep pace with the accelerating rate of genome sequencing. This manuscript describes TransportDB 2.0 (http://www.membranetransport.org/transportDB2/), a completely updated version of TransportDB, which provides access to the large volumes of data generated by our automated transporter annotation pipeline. The TransportDB 2.0 web portal has been rebuilt to utilize contemporary JavaScript libraries, providing a highly interactive interface to the annotation information, and incorporates analysis tools that enable users to query the database on a number of levels. For example, TransportDB 2.0 includes tools that allow users to select annotated genomes of interest from the thousands of species held in the database and compare their complete transporter complements.

  10. TransportDB 2.0: a database for exploring membrane transporters in sequenced genomes from all domains of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Hassan, Karl A.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2017-01-01

    All cellular life contains an extensive array of membrane transport proteins. The vast majority of these transporters have not been experimentally characterized. We have developed a bioinformatic pipeline to identify and annotate complete sets of transporters in any sequenced genome. This pipeline is now fully automated enabling it to better keep pace with the accelerating rate of genome sequencing. This manuscript describes TransportDB 2.0 (http://www.membranetransport.org/transportDB2/), a completely updated version of TransportDB, which provides access to the large volumes of data generated by our automated transporter annotation pipeline. The TransportDB 2.0 web portal has been rebuilt to utilize contemporary JavaScript libraries, providing a highly interactive interface to the annotation information, and incorporates analysis tools that enable users to query the database on a number of levels. For example, TransportDB 2.0 includes tools that allow users to select annotated genomes of interest from the thousands of species held in the database and compare their complete transporter complements. PMID:27899676

  11. Interaction of menthol with mixed-lipid bilayer of stratum corneum: A coarse-grained simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Guang; Dai, Xingxing; Yin, Qianqian; Shi, Xinyuan; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2015-07-01

    Menthol is a widely used penetration enhancer in clinical medicine due to its high efficiency and relative safety. Although there are many studies focused on the penetration-enhancing activity of menthol, the details of molecular mechanism are rarely involved in the discussion. In this study, we present a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interaction of menthol with a mixed-lipid bilayer model consisting of ceramides, cholesterol and free fatty acids in a 2:2:1 molar ratio. Taking both the concentration of menthol and temperature into consideration, it was found that a rise in temperature and concentration within a specific range (1-20%) could improve the penetration-enhancing property of menthol and the floppiness of the bilayer. However, at high concentrations (30% and more), menthol completely mixed with the lipids and the membrane can no longer maintain a bilayer structure. Our results elucidates some of the molecular basis for menthol's penetration enhancing effects and may provide some assistance for the development and applications of menthol as a penetration enhancer. Furthermore, we establish a method to investigate the penetration enhancement mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine using the mixed-lipid bilayer model of stratum corneum by molecular dynamics simulations.

  12. Basal lamina strengthens cell membrane integrity via the laminin G domain-binding motif of α-dystroglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Renzhi; Kanagawa, Motoi; Yoshida-Moriguchi, Takako; Rader, Erik P.; Ng, Rainer A.; Michele, Daniel E.; Muirhead, David E.; Kunz, Stefan; Moore, Steven A.; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.; Mayer, Ulrike; Oldstone, Michael B. A.; Faulkner, John A.; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle basal lamina is linked to the sarcolemma through transmembrane receptors, including integrins and dystroglycan. The function of dystroglycan relies critically on posttranslational glycosylation, a common target shared by a genetically heterogeneous group of muscular dystrophies characterized by α-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation. Here we show that both dystroglycan and integrin α7 contribute to force-production of muscles, but that only disruption of dystroglycan causes detachment of the basal lamina from the sarcolemma and renders muscle prone to contraction-induced injury. These phenotypes of dystroglycan-null muscles are recapitulated by Largemyd muscles, which have an intact dystrophin–glycoprotein complex and lack only the laminin globular domain-binding motif on α-dystroglycan. Compromised sarcolemmal integrity is directly shown in Largemyd muscles and similarly in normal muscles when arenaviruses compete with matrix proteins for binding α-dystroglycan. These data provide direct mechanistic insight into how the dystroglycan-linked basal lamina contributes to the maintenance of sarcolemmal integrity and protects muscles from damage. PMID:19633189

  13. In situ permeation study of drug through the stratum corneum using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andanson, Jean-Michel; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Kazarian, Sergei G.

    2009-05-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is one of the most chemically specific analytical methods that gives information about composition, structure, and interactions in a material. IR spectroscopy has been successfully applied to study the permeation of xenobiotics through the skin. Combining IR spectroscopy with an IR array detector led to the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging, which generates chemical information from different areas of a sample at the microscopic level. This is particularly important for heterogeneous samples, such as skin. Attenuated total reflection (ATR)-FTIR imaging has been applied to measure, in situ, the diffusion of benzyl nicotinate (BN) through the outer layer of human skin [stratum corneum (SC)]. In vitro experiments have demonstrated the heterogeneous distribution of SC surface lipids before the penetration of a saturated solution of BN. Image analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between the distribution of lipids and drugs, while ethanol appeared to be homogenously distributed in the SC. These results show the ability of ATR-FTIR imaging to measure simultaneously the affinities of drug and solvent to the lipid-rich and lipid-poor skin domains, respectively, during permeation. This information may be useful in better understanding drug-diffusion pathways through the SC.

  14. An immunogenic, surface-exposed domain of Haemophilus ducreyi outer membrane protein HgbA is involved in hemoglobin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepluev, Igor; Afonina, Galyna; Fusco, William G; Leduc, Isabelle; Olsen, Bonnie; Temple, Brenda; Elkins, Christopher

    2009-07-01

    HgbA is the sole TonB-dependent receptor for hemoglobin (Hb) acquisition of Haemophilus ducreyi. Binding of Hb to HgbA is the initial step in heme acquisition from Hb. To better understand this step, we mutagenized hgbA by deletion of each of the 11 putative surface-exposed loops and expressed each of the mutant proteins in trans in host strain H. ducreyi FX547 hgbA. All mutant proteins were expressed, exported, and detected on the surface by anti-HgbA immunoglobulin G (IgG). Deletion of sequences in loops 5 and 7 of HgbA abolished Hb binding in two different formats. In contrast, HgbA proteins containing deletions in the other nine loops retained the ability to bind Hb. None of the clones expressing mutant proteins were able to grow on plates containing low concentrations of Hb. Previously we demonstrated in a swine model of chancroid infection that an HgbA vaccine conferred complete protection from a challenge infection. Using anti-HgbA IgG from this study and the above deletion mutants, we show that loops 4, 5, and 7 of HgbA were immunogenic and surface exposed and that IgG directed against loops 4 and 5 blocked Hb binding. Furthermore, loop 6 was cleaved by protease on intact H. ducreyi, suggesting surface exposure. These data implicate a central domain of HgbA (in respect to the primary amino acid sequence) as important in Hb binding and suggest that this region of the molecule might have potential as a subunit vaccine.

  15. Assessing the Relationship between Vitamin D 3 and Stratum Corneum Hydration for the Treatment of Xerotic Skin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meghan Russell

    2012-01-01

    .... We investigated the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and stratum corneum conductance as well as the effect of topical application of cholecalciferol (vitamin D 3 ) on dry skin...

  16. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain regulates the energy requirement for EBV-induced membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Zhang, Xianming; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Longnecker, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is preceded by membrane fusion, which in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is thought to be mediated by the refolding of glycoprotein B (gB) from a prefusion to a postfusion state. In our current studies, we characterized a gB C-terminal tail domain (CTD) mutant truncated at amino acid 843 (gB843). This truncation mutant is hyperfusogenic as monitored by syncytium formation and in a quantitative fusion assay and is dependent on gH/gL for fusion activity. gB843 can rescue the fusion function of other glycoprotein mutants that have null or decreased fusion activity in epithelial and B cells. In addition, gB843 requires less gp42 and gH/gL for fusion, and can function in fusion at a lower temperature than wild-type gB, indicating a lower energy requirement for fusion activation. Since a key step in fusion is the conversion of gB from a prefusion to an active postfusion state by gH/gL, gB843 may access this activated gB state more readily. Our studies indicate that the gB CTD may participate in the fusion function by maintaining gB in an inactive prefusion form prior to activation by receptor binding. Importance: Diseases resulting from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in humans range from the fairly benign disease infectious mononucleosis to life-threatening cancer. As an enveloped virus, EBV must fuse with a host cell membrane for entry and infection by using glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42. Among these glycoproteins, gB is thought to be the protein that executes fusion. To further characterize the function of the EBV gB cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain (CTD) in fusion, we used a previously constructed CTD truncation mutant and studied its fusion activity in the context of other EBV glycoprotein mutants. From these studies, we find that the gB CTD regulates fusion by altering the energy requirements for the triggering of fusion mediated by gH/gL or gp42. Overall, our studies may lead to a better understanding of EBV fusion

  17. Distinct epitopes for anti-glomerular basement membrane alport alloantibodies and goodpasture autoantibodies within the noncollagenous domain of alpha3(IV) collagen: a janus-faced antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-Ping; Fogo, Agnes B; Colon, Selene; Giannico, Giovanna; Abul-Ezz, Sameh R; Miner, Jeffrey H; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2005-12-01

    Alport posttransplantation anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis is mediated by alloantibodies against the noncollagenous (NC1) domains of the alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen network, which is present in the GBM of the allograft but absent from Alport kidneys. The specificity of kidney-bound anti-GBM alloantibodies from a patient who had autosomal recessive Alport syndrome (ARAS) and developed posttransplantation nephritis was compared with that of Goodpasture autoantibodies from patients with autoimmune anti-GBM disease. Allograft-eluted alloantibodies reacted specifically with alpha3alpha4alpha5 NC1 hexamers, targeting their alpha3NC1 and alpha4NC1 subunits, and recognized a noncontiguous alloepitope formed jointly by the E(A) and E(B) regions of alpha3NC1 domain. In contrast, human Goodpasture autoantibodies recognized the separate E(A) and E(B) autoepitopes of alpha3NC1 but not the composite alloepitope. Molecular modeling of alpha3NC1 revealed that the alloepitope is more accessible within the NC1 hexamers than the partially sequestered Goodpasture autoepitopes. Overall, the specificity of alloantibodies indicated a selective lack of immune tolerance toward the alpha3 and alpha4(IV) collagen chains not expressed in patients with ARAS. Using COL4A3 knockout mice, a model of ARAS, it was shown further that acid-dissociated rather than native alpha3alpha4alpha5 NC1 hexamers elicited murine anti-GBM antibodies most closely resembling human ARAS alloantibodies. In contrast, alpha3NC1 monomers elicited Goodpasture-like murine antibodies, targeting the E(A) and E(B) autoepitopes. Thus, the identity of alpha3NC1 epitopes targeted by anti-GBM antibodies is strongly influenced by the molecular organization of the immunogen. These findings suggest that different isoforms of alpha3(IV) collagen may be implicated in the pathogenesis of ARAS posttransplantation anti-GBM nephritis and Goodpasture disease.

  18. Water content and thickness of the stratum corneum contribute to skin surface morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, J; Yanai, M; Hirao, T; Denda, M

    2000-08-01

    Skin surface morphology has long been recognized as reflecting skin pathology. In the present study, we evaluated skin surface morphology using hairless mice under contrasting conditions of humidity. The skin surface microrelief was recorded with opaque quick-drying silicone rubber, and examined under a microscope. A binary image was produced by density slicing. Within 3 days of exposure to dry conditions, skin roughness was significantly increased. The skin roughness was partially mitigated by topical application of an aqueous solution of glycerol or hydration by immersion in water. A significant correlation between skin roughness and stratum corneum thickness was also observed. These results suggest that skin surface morphology is associated with both water content and thickness of the stratum corneum.

  19. Levels of retinyl palmitate and retinol in stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis of SKH-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian; Xia, Qingsu; Webb, Peggy; Warbritton, Alan R; Wamer, Wayne G; Howard, Paul C; Boudreau, Mary; Fu, Peter P

    2006-04-01

    Vitamin A (retinol) regulates many biological functions, including epidermal cell growth. Retinyl palmitate (RP) is the major esterified form of retinol and the predominant component of retinoids in the skin; however, how endogenous levels of RP and retinol in the skin are affected by the age of the animal remains unknown. Furthermore, the levels of retinol and RP in the various skin layers - the stratum corneum, epidermis and dermis of skin - have not been reported. In this paper, we report the development of a convenient method for separation of the skin from SKH-1 female mice into the stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis and the determination of the levels of RP and retinol in the three fractions by HPLC analysis. The total quantities of RP and retinol from the stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis are comparable to those extracted from the same amount of intact skin from the same mouse. There was an age-related effect on the levels of RP and retinol in the skin and liver of female mice. An age-related effect was also observed in the stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis. The levels of RP and retinol were highest in the epidermis of 20-week-old mice, and decreased when the age increased to 60- and 68-weeks. The total amount of RP at 20 weeks of age was found to be 1.52 ng/mg skin, and decreased about 4-fold at 60- and 68-weeks of age. A similar trend was found for the effects of age on the levels of retinol.

  20. Stratum corneum lipids, skin barrier function and filaggrin mutations in patients with atopic eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J M; Scheer, H; Mempel, M

    2010-01-01

    Prior to the discovery of filaggrin (FLG) mutations, evidence for an impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis (AD) has been documented, and changes in ceramide profile, altered skin pH and increased trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) in patients with AD have been reported. Until now, no studies...... have analysed stratum corneum (SC) lipids combined with skin barrier parameters in subjects of known FLG genotype....

  1. Resistance to Water Diffusion in the Stratum Corneum Is Depth-Dependent

    OpenAIRE

    van Logtestijn, Mark D. A.; Elisa Domínguez-Hüttinger; Georgios N. Stamatas; Reiko J Tanaka

    2015-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) provides a permeability barrier that limits the inflow and outflow of water. The permeability barrier is continuously and dynamically formed, maintained, and degraded along the depth, from the bottom to the top, of the SC. Naturally, its functioning and structure also change dynamically in a depth-dependent manner. While transepidermal water loss is typically used to assess the function of the SC barrier, it fails to provide any information about the dynamic mechanism...

  2. Modeling of diffusion with partitioning in stratum corneum using a finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero, Ana M; Frasch, H F

    2005-09-01

    Partitioning and diffusion of chemicals in skin is of interest to researchers in areas such as transdermal penetration and drug disposition, either for risk assessment or transdermal delivery. In this study a finite element method is used to model diffusion in the skin's outermost layer, the stratum corneum (SC). The SC is considered to be a finite two-dimensional composite having different diffusivity values in each medium as well as a partition coefficient at the interfaces between media. A commercial finite element package with thermal analysis capabilities is selected due to the flexibility of this software to handle irregular geometries. Partitioning is accommodated through a change of variables technique. This technique is validated by comparison of model results with analytical solutions of steady-state flux, transient concentration profiles, and time lag for diffusion in laminates. Two applications are presented. Diffusion is solved in a two-dimensional "brick and mortar" geometry that is a simplification of human stratum corneum, with a partition coefficient between corneocyte and lipid. Results are compared to the diffusion in multiple laminates to examine effects of the partition coefficient. The second application is the modeling of diffusion with partitioning through an irregular geometry which is obtained from a micrograph of hairless mouse stratum corneum.

  3. Prevalence of Enhanced Granular Expression of Thrombospondin Type-1 Domain-Containing 7A in the Glomeruli of Japanese Patients with Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakura, Takamasa; Ohashi, Naro; Kato, Akihiko; Baba, Satoshi; Yasuda, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is a leading cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults. Autoantibodies against M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) and thrombospondin type-1 domain-containing 7A (THSD7A), which mainly belong to the IgG4 subclass, were reported as associated antibodies for the development of MN. Although PLA2R is a major target antigen for idiopathic MN, the prevalence of MN patients seropositive for PLA2R in Japan is lower than that in other countries. In this study, we conducted immunohistochemical analysis of the presence of THSD7A and PLA2R in renal specimens of MN patients to estimate the prevalence of THSD7A/PLA2R-related idiopathic MN in Japan. Enhanced granular expression of THSD7A and PLA2R was detected in 9.1% and 52.7%, respectively, of the patients with idiopathic MN. Although none of patients with secondary MN displayed enhanced granular expression of THSD7A, 5.4% of them had enhanced granular expression of PLA2R. In conclusion, the prevalence of enhanced granular expression of THSD7A in the glomeruli of Japanese patients with idiopathic MN was higher than the prevalence of MN patients seropositive for THSD7A in USA and Europe.

  4. Prevalence of Enhanced Granular Expression of Thrombospondin Type-1 Domain-Containing 7A in the Glomeruli of Japanese Patients with Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Iwakura

    Full Text Available Membranous nephropathy (MN is a leading cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults. Autoantibodies against M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R and thrombospondin type-1 domain-containing 7A (THSD7A, which mainly belong to the IgG4 subclass, were reported as associated antibodies for the development of MN. Although PLA2R is a major target antigen for idiopathic MN, the prevalence of MN patients seropositive for PLA2R in Japan is lower than that in other countries. In this study, we conducted immunohistochemical analysis of the presence of THSD7A and PLA2R in renal specimens of MN patients to estimate the prevalence of THSD7A/PLA2R-related idiopathic MN in Japan. Enhanced granular expression of THSD7A and PLA2R was detected in 9.1% and 52.7%, respectively, of the patients with idiopathic MN. Although none of patients with secondary MN displayed enhanced granular expression of THSD7A, 5.4% of them had enhanced granular expression of PLA2R. In conclusion, the prevalence of enhanced granular expression of THSD7A in the glomeruli of Japanese patients with idiopathic MN was higher than the prevalence of MN patients seropositive for THSD7A in USA and Europe.

  5. An anti-phospholipase A2 receptor quantitative immunoassay and epitope analysis in membranous nephropathy reveals different antigenic domains of the receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnert, Astrid; Fritzler, Marvin J; Teng, Beina; Zhang, Meifeng; Bollig, Frank; Haller, Hermann; Skoberne, Andrej; Mahler, Michael; Schiffer, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) was recently discovered as a target autoantigen in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN). Published evidence suggests that the autoantibodies directed towards a conformation dependent epitope are currently effectively detected by a cell based assay (CBA) utilizing indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on tissue culture cells transfected with the PLA2R cDNA. Limitations of such IIF-CBA assays include observer dependent subjective evaluation of semi-quantitative test results and the protocols are not amenable to high throughput diagnostic testing. We developed a quantitative, observer independent, high throughput capture immunoassay for detecting PLA2R autoantibodies on an addressable laser bead immunoassay (ALBIA) platform. Since reactive domains of PLA2R (i.e. epitopes) could be used to improve diagnostic tests by using small peptides in various high throughput diagnostic platforms, we identified PLA2R epitopes that bound autoantibodies of IMN patients. These studies confirmed that inter-molecular epitope spreading occurs in IMN but use of the cognate synthetic peptides in immunoassays was unable to conclusively distinguish between IMN patients and normal controls. However, combinations of these peptides were able to effectively absorb anti-PLA2R reactivity in IIF-CBA and an immunoassay that employed a lysate derived from HEK cells tranfected with and overexpressing PLA2R. While we provide evidence of intermolecular epitope spreading, our data indicates that in addition to conformational epitopes, human anti-PLA2R reactivity in a commercially available CBA and an addressable laser bead immunoassay is significantly absorbed by peptides representing epitopes of PLA2R.

  6. An anti-phospholipase A2 receptor quantitative immunoassay and epitope analysis in membranous nephropathy reveals different antigenic domains of the receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Behnert

    Full Text Available The phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R was recently discovered as a target autoantigen in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN. Published evidence suggests that the autoantibodies directed towards a conformation dependent epitope are currently effectively detected by a cell based assay (CBA utilizing indirect immunofluorescence (IIF on tissue culture cells transfected with the PLA2R cDNA. Limitations of such IIF-CBA assays include observer dependent subjective evaluation of semi-quantitative test results and the protocols are not amenable to high throughput diagnostic testing. We developed a quantitative, observer independent, high throughput capture immunoassay for detecting PLA2R autoantibodies on an addressable laser bead immunoassay (ALBIA platform. Since reactive domains of PLA2R (i.e. epitopes could be used to improve diagnostic tests by using small peptides in various high throughput diagnostic platforms, we identified PLA2R epitopes that bound autoantibodies of IMN patients. These studies confirmed that inter-molecular epitope spreading occurs in IMN but use of the cognate synthetic peptides in immunoassays was unable to conclusively distinguish between IMN patients and normal controls. However, combinations of these peptides were able to effectively absorb anti-PLA2R reactivity in IIF-CBA and an immunoassay that employed a lysate derived from HEK cells tranfected with and overexpressing PLA2R. While we provide evidence of intermolecular epitope spreading, our data indicates that in addition to conformational epitopes, human anti-PLA2R reactivity in a commercially available CBA and an addressable laser bead immunoassay is significantly absorbed by peptides representing epitopes of PLA2R.

  7. TprC/D (Tp0117/131), a trimeric, pore-forming rare outer membrane protein of Treponema pallidum, has a bipartite domain structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star; Caimano, Melissa J; Karanian, Carson; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cruz, Adriana R; Salazar, Juan C; Radolf, Justin D

    2012-05-01

    Identification of Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been a longstanding objective of syphilis researchers. We recently developed a consensus computational framework that employs a battery of cellular localization and topological prediction tools to generate ranked clusters of candidate rare OMPs (D. L. Cox et al., Infect. Immun. 78:5178-5194, 2010). TP0117/TP0131 (TprC/D), a member of the T. pallidum repeat (Tpr) family, was a highly ranked candidate. Circular dichroism, heat modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning, and liposome incorporation confirmed that full-length, recombinant TprC (TprC(Fl)) forms a β-barrel capable of integrating into lipid bilayers. Moreover, TprC(Fl) increased efflux of terbium-dipicolinic acid complex from large unilamellar vesicles and migrated as a trimer by blue-native PAGE. We found that in T. pallidum, TprC is heat modifiable, trimeric, expressed in low abundance, and, based on proteinase K accessibility and opsonophagocytosis assays, surface exposed. From these collective data, we conclude that TprC is a bona fide rare OMP as well as a functional ortholog of Escherichia coli OmpF. We also discovered that TprC has a bipartite architecture consisting of a soluble N-terminal portion (TprC(N)), presumably periplasmic and bound directly or indirectly to peptidoglycan, and a C-terminal β-barrel (TprC(C)). Syphilitic rabbits generate antibodies exclusively against TprC(C), while secondary syphilis patients fail to mount a detectable antibody response against either domain. The syphilis spirochete appears to have resolved a fundamental dilemma arising from its extracellular lifestyle, namely, how to enhance OM permeability without increasing its vulnerability to the antibody-mediated defenses of its natural human host.

  8. Controlled penetration of ceramides into and across the stratum corneum using various types of microemulsions and formulation associated toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahle, Fitsum F; Wohlrab, Johannes; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2014-02-01

    Several skin diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis are associated with the depletion or disturbance of stratum corneum (SC) lipids such as ceramides (CERs), free fatty acids and cholesterol. Studies suggested that replenishment of these lipids might help to treat diseased, affected or aged skin. With this premises in mind, there are some formulations in the market that contain SC lipids and currently, to facilitate permeation of the lipids deep into the SC, various CERs, and other SC lipid microemulsions (MEs) were developed and characterised using lecithin or TEGO® CARE PL 4 (TCPL4) as base surfactants. However, to date, there are no reports that involve the permeability of SC lipids into and across the SC, and therefore, the penetration of CER [NP] as a model ceramide from various formulations was investigated ex vivo using Franz diffusion cell. Besides, the toxicity of the MEs was assessed using hen's egg test chorioallantoic membrane (HET-CAM). The results of the study showed that CER [NP] could not permeate into deeper layers of the SC from a conventional hydrophilic cream. Unlike the cream, CER [NP] permeated into the deeper layers of the SC from both type of MEs, where permeation of the CER was more and into deeper layers from droplet type and lecithin-based MEs than bicontinuous (BC) type and TCPL4 based MEs, respectively. The CER also permeated into deeper layers from ME gels which was, however, shallow and to a lesser extent when compared with the MEs. The results of HET-CAM showed that both MEs are safe to be used topically, with lecithin-based MEs exhibiting better safety profiles than TCPL4 based MEs. Concluding, the study showed that the MEs are safe to be used on the skin for the controlled penetration of CER [NP] deep into the SC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Different Modes of the Effect of 1,2-Propanediol and Azone on Stratum Corneum Lipids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红武; 李菲; 公衍道; 董敏; 张秀芳; 赵南明

    2001-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) controls the diffusion and penetration of drugs into and through the skin. In this investigation, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to study the effect of two enhancers, 1,2-propanediol and azone, on lipids extracted from SC (SC lipids). The two enhancers affected the SC lipids. However, their function modes were different. The penetration enhancing mechanisms of the two enhancers are discussed based on their effects on SC lipids and on their efficiencies in arbutin permeation enhancement.

  10. The impact of ultraviolet therapy on stratum corneum ceramides and barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The ceramide profile as well as the barrier function is known to be deteriorated in atopic eczema and psoriasis, and ultraviolet (UV) light is known to improve the barrier function. The impact of UV light on ceramides, however, is not clarified.The aim of this study was to examine the effect of U...... therapy in dermatological patients on ceramides and skin barrier function.We found that UV light treatment does not change the ratio of important stratum corneum lipids, but we confirm earlier findings of decreased susceptibility to irritants after UV- therapy....

  11. Chondroitin sulphate A (CSA)-binding of single recombinant Duffy-binding-like domains is not restricted to Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 expressed by CSA-binding parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resende, Mafalda; Ditlev, Sisse B; Nielsen, Morten A

    2009-01-01

    and offspring morbidity, such as severe maternal anaemia and low birth-weight, and is characterised by selective accumulation of parasite-infected erythrocytes (IE) in the placenta. A P. falciparum protein named VAR2CSA, which belongs to the large P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) family......, enables the IE to bind chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) in the placenta. Knock-out studies have demonstrated the exclusive capacity of VAR2CSA to mediate IE binding to CSA, and it has been shown that four of the six Duffy-binding-like (DBL) domains of VAR2CSA have the ability to bind CSA in vitro....... In this study, we confirm the CSA-binding of these DBL domains, however, the analysis of a number of DBL domains of a non-VAR2CSA origin shows that CSA-binding is not exclusively restricted to VAR2CSA DBL domains. Furthermore, we show that the VAR2CSA DBL domains as well as other DBL domains also bind heparan...

  12. Comparative SAXS and DSC study on stratum corneum structural organization in an epidermal cell culture model (ROC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Herre, Angela; Fahr, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Cell cultured skin equivalents present an alternative for dermatological in vitro evaluations of drugs and excipients as they provide the advantage of availability, lower variability and higher assay robustness compared to native skin. For penetration/permeation studies, an adequate stratum corneum...... barrier similar to that of human stratum corneum is, however, a prerequisite. In this study, the stratum corneum lipid organization in an epidermal cell culture model based on rat epidermal keratinocytes (REK organotypic culture, ROC) was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in dependence...... of ROC SC obtained at different cultivation times (7, 14 and 21days at the air-liquid interface) was connected with an increase in structural order of the SC lipids in SAXS measurements: Already cultivation for 14days at the air-liquid interface resulted overall in a competent SC permeability barrier...

  13. Impact on floating membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Duchemin, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    When impacted by a rigid object, a thin elastic membrane with negligible bending rigidity floating on a liquid pool deforms. Two axisymmetric waves radiating from the impact point propagate. In the first place, a longitudinal wave front -- associated with in-plane deformation of the membrane and traveling at constant speed -- separates an outward stress free domain with a stretched but flat domain. Then, in the stretched domain a dispersive transverse wave travels at a wave speed that depends...

  14. Drug testing with alternative matrices I. Pharmacological effects and disposition of cocaine and codeine in plasma, sebum, and stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, R E; Oyler, J M; Wstadik, A T; Ohuoha, C; Cone, E J

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the disposition of cocaine, codeine, and metabolites in stratum corneum, sebum, and plasma collected from five African-American males after administrations of cocaine and codeine during a 10-week inpatient clinical study. The subjects were experienced, healthy drug users with a recent history of cocaine and heroin abuse. The first drug administration was delayed by three weeks to allow for the elimination of previously administered drugs from the body. Subjects received three 75 mg cocaine hydrochloride/70 kg doses by the subcutaneous route and three 60 mg codeine sulfate/70 kg doses by the oral route on alternating days beginning in week 4. The same dosing sequence was repeated in week 8 with doubled (x 2) doses. Pharmacological measures (heart rate, pupil diameter, subject "High" and "Liking") were obtained simultaneously with blood. Stratum corneum was collected by scraping regions of the back once each week. Sebum was collected periodically from the forehead by applying Sebutape patches for 1-2-h intervals. Plasma, stratum corneum, and sebum were analyzed for cocaine, codeine, and metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Peak plasma cocaine concentrations occurred within the 30 min following dosing and followed peak pharmacological effects. Peak plasma codeine concentrations occurred within 1-2 h of dosing and before peak pharmacological effects. Cocaine and codeine were the primary analytes in sebum and stratum corneum. After dosing, these drugs appeared in sebum within 1-2 h and were detected for 1-2 days. Peak-drug concentrations in stratum corneum occurred one day after completion of dosing; elimination of the drugs continued over the next 1-2 weeks after dosing. Overall, no definitive relationship was observed between drug concentrations in sebum and stratum corneum compared with dose. Interpretation of drug distribution and elimination in sebum and stratum corneum was complicated by possible contamination of specimens with

  15. Natural moisturizing factors (NMF) in the stratum corneum (SC). I. Effects of lipid extraction and soaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marisa; Visscher, Marty; Laruffa, Angela; Wickett, Randy

    2010-01-01

    Natural moisturizing factor (NMF) is essential for appropriate stratum corneum hydration, barrier homeostasis, desquamation, and plasticity. It is formed from filaggrin proteolysis to small, hygroscopic molecules including amino acids. We hypothesized that common lipid extraction and soaking in water would alter the level of NMF in the upper SC and its biophysical properties. A novel method of measuring and quantifying the amino acid components of NMF is presented. Adhesive tapes were used to collect samples of the stratum corneum (SC) and were extracted with 6mM perchloric acid for analysis by reverse-phase HPLC. HPLC results were standardized to the amount of protein removed by the tapes. An increase in NMF was found with increased SC depth. Also, the combination of extraction and soaking was found to increase NMF loss relative to control or to extraction or soaking alone. Our results indicate that common skin care practices significantly influence the water binding materials in the upper SC. The findings have implications for the evaluation and formulation of skin care products.

  16. Comparison of gravimetric and spectroscopic approaches to quantify stratum corneum removed by tape-stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, D; Yang, Q; Guy, R H; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2012-09-01

    Skin surface tape-stripping is an extensively used technique to examine the distribution profile, penetration and safety of various active compounds. It is also a widely accepted method to probe skin barrier properties and more specifically, those of the stratum corneum (SC). The amount of SC removed by tape-stripping is generally determined either gravimetrically or by extraction and measurement of SC proteins. A novel infra-red densitometry (IRD) technique has recently been introduced to measure SC protein content. In the present study, IRD was investigated as an alternative method to measure the mass of SC removed by tape-stripping. Tape-stripping experiments were conducted on human volunteers. The weight of the stratum corneum removed was assessed by the gravimetric approach and by IRD. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was also measured before and after each tape-strip. A linear correlation coefficient was obtained for the data from the gravimetric and IRD measurements (r(2)=0.65; n=240). IRD is therefore proposed as a rapid, non-destructive alternative to the gravimetric approach to estimate the amount of SC removed by tape-stripping in vivo.

  17. Influence of cleansing on stratum corneum tryptic enzyme in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepky, A G; Holtzmann, U; Siegner, R; Zirpins, S; Schmucker, R; Wenck, H; Wittern, K P; Biel, S S

    2004-10-01

    Desquamation in human skin is a well-balanced process of de novo production of corneocytes and their shedding from the skin surface. The proteolysis of corneodesmosomes is an important step in the final desquamation process. In the degradation of these adhesion molecules, the stratum corneum tryptic enzyme (SCTE) plays a key role. In initial studies with extracts of porcine epidermis, SCTE was shown to be inactivated by low concentrations of sodium lauryl ether sulphate (SLES). These in vitro findings were supported by in situ results obtained by measuring the release of fluorescent dyes coupled to trypsin-specific substrates incubated on human skin cross-sections. Moreover, in further studies, it could be demonstrated that the SCTE activity in the human horny layer decreases after in vivo application of cleansing products containing SLES. After repeated washing of human volunteers with tap water, a standard market cleansing product (SLES/betaine system) or a new improved cleansing product (SLES/betaine/disodium cocoyl glutamate system), the specific SCTE activity was determined in extracts from the uppermost layers of the stratum corneum. It could be shown that after application of the new formula the remaining SCTE activity was significantly higher than after use of the standard market formula. This ex vivo approach has proven to be very helpful for measuring surfactant effects on human skin enzymes. Using this assay, we developed an improved shower gel formula, which leads to a significantly higher skin enzyme activity after application, compared to a standard market formula.

  18. From observational to analytical morphology of the stratum corneum: progress avoiding hazardous animal and human testings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard, Gérald E; Courtois, Justine; Ritacco, Caroline; Humbert, Philippe; Fanian, Ferial; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine

    2015-01-01

    In cosmetic science, noninvasive sampling of the upper part of the stratum corneum is conveniently performed using strippings with adhesive-coated discs (SACD) and cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings (CSSSs). Under controlled conditions, it is possible to scrutinize SACD and CSSS with objectivity using appropriate methods of analytical morphology. These procedures apply to a series of clinical conditions including xerosis grading, comedometry, corneodynamics, corneomelametry, corneosurfametry, corneoxenometry, and dandruff assessment. With any of the analytical evaluations, SACD and CSSS provide specific salient information that is useful in the field of cosmetology. In particular, both methods appear valuable and complementary in assessing the human skin compatibility of personal skincare products. A set of quantitative analytical methods applicable to the minimally invasive and low-cost SACD and CSSS procedures allow for a sound assessment of cosmetic effects on the stratum corneum. Under regular conditions, both methods are painless and do not induce adverse events. Globally, CSSS appears more precise and informative than the regular SACD stripping.

  19. Investigation of the cosmetic ingredient distribution in the stratum corneum using NanoSIMS imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanji, N. [Kao Corporation, 1334 Minato, Wakayama-shi, Wakayama, 640-8580 (Japan)], E-mail: tanji.noriyuki@kao.co.jp; Okamoto, M. [Kao Corporation, 1334 Minato, Wakayama-shi, Wakayama, 640-8580 (Japan); Katayama, Y.; Hosokawa, M. [Kao Corporation, 2-1-3 Bunka, Sumida-ku, Tokyo, 131-8501 (Japan); Takahata, N.; Sano, Y. [Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-15-1 Minamidai, Nakano-ku, Tokyo 164-8639 (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    In order to understand the mechanisms of action of cosmetic ingredients, it is important to establish the distribution of the component agents within the epidermis of the skin. To date, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has been used to detect cosmetic ingredients in the skin. However, it is technically difficult to investigate the distribution of the agents in the stratum corneum using TOF-SIMS. Therefore, an analytical method with higher spatial resolution is required. In this study, we investigated an imaging analysis technique based on NanoSIMS to detect cosmetic ingredients in the skin. Pig skin was used as a model for human skin. The sample was treated with a cosmetic formulation containing {sup 15}N-labelled pseudo-ceramide (SLE). The sample was frozen with liquid nitrogen and cross-sections were cut using a cryomicrotome. As a result, the fine layer structure of the corneocytes was clearly observed by using NanoSIMS. Our studies indicate that SLE penetrates into the stratum corneum via an intercellular route. We conclude that application of NanoSIMS analysis can contribute to a better understanding of the function of cosmetic ingredients in the skin.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter BtuB in complex with the carboxy-terminal domain of TonB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shultis, David D.; Purdy, Michael D. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Banchs, Christian N. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Wiener, Michael C., E-mail: mwiener@virginia.edu [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals of a complex of the E. coli proteins BtuB (outer membrane cobalamin transporter) and TonB (carboxy-terminal domain) diffracting to 2.1 Å resolution have been obtained. The energy-dependent uptake of organometallic compounds and other micronutrients across the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria is carried out by outer membrane active-transport proteins that utilize the proton-motive force of the inner membrane via coupling to the TonB protein. The Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter BtuB and a carboxy-terminal domain of the TonB protein, residues 147–239 of the wild-type protein, were expressed and purified individually. A complex of BtuB and TonB{sup 147–239} was formed in the presence of the substrate cyanocobalamin (CN-Cbl; vitamin B{sub 12}) and calcium and was crystallized. BtuB was purified in the detergent LDAO (n-dodecyl-N,N-dimethylamine-N-oxide) and the complex was formed in a detergent mixture of LDAO and C{sub 8}E{sub 4} (tetraethylene glycol monooctylether). Crystals were obtained by sitting-drop vapor diffusion, with the reservoir containing 30%(v/v) polyethylene glycol (PEG 300) and 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.2. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 74.3, b = 82.4, c = 122.6 Å). The asymmetric unit consists of a single BtuB–TonB complex. Data sets have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution at a synchrotron beamline (APS SER-CAT 22-ID)

  1. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    The domain concept, originally suggested by Schmidt-Rohr in the 1930’s (as credited in Fishman’s writings in the 1970s), was an attempt to sort out different areas of language use in multilingual societies, which are relevant for language choice. In Fishman’s version, domains were considered...... not described in terms of domains, and recent research e.g. about the multilingual communities in the Danish-German border area seems to confirm this....

  2. Serine 77 in the PDZ domain of PICK1 is a protein kinase Cα phosphorylation site regulated by lipid membrane binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Thorsen, Thor Seneca; Gether, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains an N-terminal protein binding PDZ domain and a C-terminal lipid binding BAR domain. PICK1 plays a key role in several physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms governing...... the activity of PICK1 itself. Here we show that PICK1 is a substrate in vitro both for PKCα (protein kinase Cα), as previously shown, and for CaMKIIα (Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα). By mutation of predicted phosphorylation sites, we identify Ser77 in the PDZ domain as a major phosphorylation...... for optimal phosphorylation. Binding of PKCα to the PICK1 PDZ domain was not required for phosphorylation, but a PDZ domain peptide ligand reduced the overall level of phosphorylation ~30%. The phosphomimic S77D reduced the extent of cytosolic clustering of eYFP-PICK1 in COS7 cells and thereby conceivably its...

  3. A literature review of the mechanical behavior of the stratum corneum, the living epidermis and the subcutaneous fat tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerligs, M.

    2006-01-01

    After a description of the structure and function of human skin, including the underlying fat layer, both in vitro and in vivo studies on the mechanical properties of separate skin layers are discussed: e.g. those of stratum corneum, living epidermis and the subcutaneous fat layer. Since the propert

  4. Lipids of the stratum corneum vary with cutaneous water loss among larks along a temperature-moisture gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haugen, M; Williams, JB; Wertz, P; Tieleman, BI

    2003-01-01

    We explored the relationship between lipids of the stratum corneum (SC), the barrier to water-vapor diffusion of the skin, and cutaneous water loss (CWL) of species of free-living larks along a temperature-moisture gradient. Our results showed that free fatty acids, cholesterol, and ceramides were t

  5. Lipids of the stratum corneum vary with cutaneous water loss among larks along a temperature-moisture gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haugen, M; Williams, JB; Wertz, P; Tieleman, BI

    2003-01-01

    We explored the relationship between lipids of the stratum corneum (SC), the barrier to water-vapor diffusion of the skin, and cutaneous water loss (CWL) of species of free-living larks along a temperature-moisture gradient. Our results showed that free fatty acids, cholesterol, and ceramides were

  6. A literature review of the mechanical behavior of the stratum corneum, the living epidermis and the subcutaneous fat tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerligs, M.

    2006-01-01

    After a description of the structure and function of human skin, including the underlying fat layer, both in vitro and in vivo studies on the mechanical properties of separate skin layers are discussed: e.g. those of stratum corneum, living epidermis and the subcutaneous fat layer. Since the

  7. Comparative surfactant reactivity of canine and human stratum corneum: a plea for the use of the corneosurfametry bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, V; Fontaine, J; Piérard, G E

    1999-01-01

    Comparative dermatology has paid little attention to the physiopathology of the stratum corneum. In this study, we investigated the responses of human and canine horny layers to marketed animal wash products by using the corneosurfametry bioassay. Previous work has shown that, with increasing surfactant aggressiveness to the stratum corneum, the colorimetric index of mildness (CIM) decreases, while both the corneosurfametry index (CSMI) and the overall difference in corneosurfametry (ODC) increase. In the present study, stratum corneum reactivity to wash products and inter-individual variability were significantly higher in humans than in dogs. For the three corneosurfametry variables, linear correlations were found between data gathered in the two panel groups. In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that mean stratum corneum reactivity to surfactants is stronger in humans than in dogs. Inter-individual variation, indicative of sensitive skin, also appears to be broader in humans. As a consequence, data gathered from dogs by using the corneosurfametry bioassay cannot be extrapolated to humans. Such variation between species could be important in the assessment of product safety and in supporting claims for mildness.

  8. Membrane biology: fission behind BARs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haucke, Volker

    2012-06-05

    Membrane bending is accomplished in part by amphipathic helix insertion into the bilayer and the assembly of BAR domain scaffolds preparing the membrane for fission. Two recent studies highlight the roles of amphipathic helices and BAR scaffolds in membrane fission and establish the structural basis of membrane bending by the N-BAR protein endophilin.

  9. The Mycoplasma hominis P120 membrane protein contains a 216 amino acid hypervariable domain that is recognized by the human humoral immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg; Birkelund, Svend; Christiansen, Gunna

    1997-01-01

    domain. Based on restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of the hypervariable domain the 18 isolates could be divided into four cases. Reactivity with both mAb 26.7D and pAb 121 confirmed these classes. The hypervariable, but not the constant, part of P120 was recognized by the human humoral immune...... and found to have a sequence identity of 91% with the gene of strain 7488. One hypervariable and two semivariable regions were detected. The epitope for mAb 26.7D was mapped to the hypervariable domain by expression of various parts of this domain in Escherichia coli using expression vector systems....... A polyclonal antiserum (pAb 121) generated against the hypervariable region of P120 from PG21 identified the P120 homologue in M. hominis PG21. Fusion proteins of the hypervariable and constant parts of the proteins were constructed and tested for reactivity with 21 human sera. Twelve sera reacted...

  10. Validation of Cyanoacrylate Method for Collection of Stratum Corneum in Human Skin for Lipid Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, JM; Hellgren, Lars; Drachmann, Tue

    2010-01-01

    for the collection of SC in relation to lipid analysis. Methods: The results of the lipid analysis (ceramide/cholesterol and ceramide profile) of SC samples obtained by the cyanoacrylate method were compared to the results of the lipid analysis of mechanically removed SC samples. The intra- and interindividual...... removed total thickness of the SC and cyanoacrylate samples. With respect to the cyanoacrylate samples, the intraindividual variation was significantly smaller than the interindividual variation, and the results did not indicate a change in lipid profile related to the depth of SC. The results clearly......Background and Objective: Lipids in the stratum corneum (SC) are of major importance for the skin barrier function. Many different methods have been used for the collection of SC for the analysis of SC lipids. The objective of the present study was to validate the cyanoacrylate method...

  11. Stratum corneum lipids, skin barrier function and filaggrin mutations in patients with atopic eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars; Jungersted, JM

    2010-01-01

    Background: Prior to the discovery of filaggrin (FLG) mutations, evidence for an impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis (AD) has been documented, and changes in ceramide profile, altered skin pH and increased trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) in patients with AD have been reported. Until now......, no studies have analysed stratum corneum (SC) lipids combined with skin barrier parameters in subjects of known FLG genotype. Methods: A cohort of 49 German individuals genotyped for the most common FLG mutations (R501X, 2282del4) had SC samples taken for lipid analysis by high-performance thin layer...... differences were observed for ceramide 2, 3, 5 and 6. FLGmut individuals had significantly higher skin pH values than individuals not carrying FLG mutations. Patients with AD with FLG mutations had significantly higher erythema compared to patients with AD without FLG mutations. Conclusion: Our results...

  12. The impact of ultraviolet therapy on stratum corneum ceramides and barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The ceramide profile as well as the barrier function is known to be deteriorated in atopic eczema and psoriasis, and ultraviolet (UV) light is known to improve the barrier function. The impact of UV light on ceramides, however, is not clarified.The aim of this study was to examine the effect of U...... therapy in dermatological patients on ceramides and skin barrier function.We found that UV light treatment does not change the ratio of important stratum corneum lipids, but we confirm earlier findings of decreased susceptibility to irritants after UV- therapy.......The ceramide profile as well as the barrier function is known to be deteriorated in atopic eczema and psoriasis, and ultraviolet (UV) light is known to improve the barrier function. The impact of UV light on ceramides, however, is not clarified.The aim of this study was to examine the effect of UV...

  13. The impact of ultraviolet therapy on stratum corneum ceramides and barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The ceramide profile as well as the barrier function is known to be deteriorated in atopic eczema and psoriasis, and ultraviolet (UV) light is known to improve the barrier function. The impact of UV light on ceramides, however, is not clarified. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ...... therapy in dermatological patients on ceramides and skin barrier function. We found that UV light treatment does not change the ratio of important stratum corneum lipids, but we confirm earlier findings of decreased susceptibility to irritants after UV- therapy.......The ceramide profile as well as the barrier function is known to be deteriorated in atopic eczema and psoriasis, and ultraviolet (UV) light is known to improve the barrier function. The impact of UV light on ceramides, however, is not clarified. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of UV...

  14. Penetration and growth of DPPC/DHPC bicelles inside the stratum corneum of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Barros, L; de la Maza, A; Estelrich, J; Linares, A M; Feliz, M; Walther, P; Pons, R; López, O

    2008-06-03

    The effect of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) bicelles on the microstructure of pig stratum corneum (SC) in vitro was evaluated. The physicochemical characterization of these nanoaggregates revealed small disks with diameters around 15 nm and a thickness of 5.4 nm. Upon dilution, the bicelles grow and transform into vesicles. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) images of the SC pieces treated with this system showed vesicles of about 200 nm and lamellar-like structures in the intercellular lipid areas. These vesicles probably resulted from the growth and molecular rearrangement of the DPPC/DHPC bicelles after penetrating the SC. The presence of lamellar-like structures is ascribed to the interaction of the lipids from bicelles with the SC lipids. The bicellar system used is suitable to penetrate the skin SC and to reinforce the intercellular lipid areas, constituting a promising tool for skin applications.

  15. Dermic diffusion and stratum corneum: a state of the art review of mathematical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Cordeiro, M Natália S; Reis, Sara S; Ribeiro, Rogério T; Pessoa, Ana M

    2014-03-10

    Transdermal biotechnologies are an ever increasing field of interest, due to the medical and pharmaceutical applications that they underlie. There are several mathematical models at use that permit a more inclusive vision of pure experimental data and even allow practical extrapolation for new dermal diffusion methodologies. However, they grasp a complex variety of theories and assumptions that allocate their use for specific situations. Models based on Fick's First Law found better use in contexts where scaled particle theory Models would be extensive in time-span but the reciprocal is also true, as context of transdermal diffusion of particular active compounds changes. This article reviews extensively the various theoretical methodologies for studying dermic diffusion in the rate limiting dermic barrier, the stratum corneum, and systematizes its characteristics, their proper context of application, advantages and limitations, as well as future perspectives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stratum corneum lipid removal by surfactants: relation to in vivo irritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froebe, C L; Simion, F A; Rhein, L D; Cagan, R H; Kligman, A

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the in vivo irritation potential of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) and the ability of these two surfactants to remove lipid from the stratum corneum (SC) in vitro were investigated. Either surfactant removes detectable levels of lipids only above its critical micelle concentration (CMC). At high concentrations the surfactants removed only very small amounts of cholesterol, free fatty acid, the esters of those materials, and possibly squalene. SLS and LAS have been shown, below the CMC, to bind to and irritate the SC. Thus, clinical irritation provoked by SLS or LAS is unlikely to be directly linked with extraction of SC lipid. The milder forms of irritation--dryness, tightness, roughness--may involve both surfactant binding to and denaturation of keratin as well as disruption of lipid. Our findings challenge earlier assumptions that surfactants' degreasing of the SC is involved in the induction of erythema.

  17. 2D-ELDOR study of heterogeneity and domain structure changes in plasma membrane vesicles upon cross-linking of receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yun-Wei; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Baird, Barbara; Freed, Jack H

    2011-09-08

    2D electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) with the "full Sc-" method of analysis is applied to the study of plasma membrane vesicles. Membrane structural changes upon antigen cross-linking of IgE receptors (IgE-FcεRI) in plasma membrane vesicles (PMVs) isolated from RBL-2H3 mast cells are investigated, for the first time, by means of these 2D-ELDOR techniques. Spectra of 1-palmitoyl-2-(16-doxyl stearoyl) phosphatidylcholine (16-PC) from PMVs before and after this stimulation at several temperatures are reported. The results demonstrate a coexistence of liquid-ordered (L(o)) and liquid-disordered (L(d)) components. We find that upon cross-linking, the membrane environment is remodeled to become more disordered, as shown by a moderate increase in the population of the L(d) component. This change in the relative amount of the L(o) versus L(d) components upon cross-linking is consistent with a model wherein the IgE receptors, which when clustered by antigen to cause cell stimulation, lead to more disordered lipids, and their dynamic and structural properties are slightly altered. This study demonstrates that 2D-ELDOR, analyzed by the full Sc- method, is a powerful approach for capturing the molecular dynamics in biological membranes. This is a particular case showing how 2D-ELDOR can be applied to study physical processes in complex systems that yield subtle changes.

  18. From observational to analytical morphology of the stratum corneum: progress avoiding hazardous animal and human testings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piérard GE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gérald E Piérard,1,2 Justine Courtois,1 Caroline Ritacco,1 Philippe Humbert,2,3 Ferial Fanian,3 Claudine Piérard-Franchimont1,4,5 1Laboratory of Skin Bioengineering and Imaging (LABIC, Department of Clinical Sciences, Liège University, Liège, Belgium; 2University of Franche-Comté, Besançon, France; 3Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Saint-Jacques, Besançon, France; 4Department of Dermatopathology, Unilab Lg, University Hospital of Liège, Liège, Belgium; 5Department of Dermatology, Regional Hospital of Huy, Huy, Belgium Background: In cosmetic science, noninvasive sampling of the upper part of the stratum corneum is conveniently performed using strippings with adhesive-coated discs (SACD and cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings (CSSSs. Methods: Under controlled conditions, it is possible to scrutinize SACD and CSSS with objectivity using appropriate methods of analytical morphology. These procedures apply to a series of clinical conditions including xerosis grading, comedometry, corneodynamics, corneomelametry, corneosurfametry, corneoxenometry, and dandruff assessment. Results: With any of the analytical evaluations, SACD and CSSS provide specific salient information that is useful in the field of cosmetology. In particular, both methods appear valuable and complementary in assessing the human skin compatibility of personal skincare products. Conclusion: A set of quantitative analytical methods applicable to the minimally invasive and low-cost SACD and CSSS procedures allow for a sound assessment of cosmetic effects on the stratum corneum. Under regular conditions, both methods are painless and do not induce adverse events. Globally, CSSS appears more precise and informative than the regular SACD stripping. Keywords: irritation, morphometry, quantitative morphology, stripping

  19. Age-Related Changes to Human Stratum Corneum Lipids Detected Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Following in Vivo Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Nichola J; Johnson, Daniel J; Wibawa, Judata; Marlow, Ian; Bell, Mike; Barrett, David A; Scurr, David J

    2016-04-19

    This work demonstrates the ability to detect changes in both quantity and spatial distribution of human stratum corneum (SC) lipids from samples collected in vivo. The SC functions as the predominant barrier to the body, protecting against the penetration of xenobiotic substances. Changes to the SC lipid composition have been associated with barrier impairment and consequent skin disorders, and it is therefore important to monitor and quantify changes to this structure. This work demonstrates the first reported use of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to assess physiological changes to human SC as a function of depth. This technique provides exceptional sensitivity and chemical specificity, allowing analysis of single tape stripped samples taken from volunteers. Using this methodology we were able to successfully identify chemical differences in human SC resulting from both intrinsic and extrinsic (photo) aging. Samples were collected from women of two age groups (under 27 and postmenopausal) and from two body sites with varying UV exposure (inner forearm and dorsal hand), and differences were identified using multivariate data analysis. The key finding was the significant aged-related increase and change in spatial distribution of the sterol cholesterol sulfate, a membrane stabilizing lipid. Significant changes in the prevalence of both lignoceric acid (C24:0) and hexacosanoic acid (C26:0) were also observed. This work describes previously unreported age-related chemical changes to human SC, providing an insight into aging mechanisms which may improve the design of both pharmaceutical and cosmetic topical products.

  20. Electroformation of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles from Native Membranes and Organic Lipid Mixtures for the Study of Lipid Domains under Physiological Ionic-Strength Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, Ruth; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Ibarguren, Maitane

    2010-01-01

    for the preparation of GUVs work only at very low salt concentrations, thus precluding experimentation under physiological conditions. In addition, the GUVs thus obtained lack membrane compositional asymmetry. Here we show how to prepare GUVs using a new protocol based on the electroformation method either from...

  1. Electroformation of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles from Native Membranes and Organic Lipid Mixtures for the Study of Lipid Domains under Physiological Ionic-Strength Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, Ruth; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Ibarguren, Maitane

    2010-01-01

    for the preparation of GUVs work only at very low salt concentrations, thus precluding experimentation under physiological conditions. In addition, the GUVs thus obtained lack membrane compositional asymmetry. Here we show how to prepare GUVs using a new protocol based on the electroformation method either from...

  2. Budded membrane microdomains as regulators for cellular tension

    OpenAIRE

    Sens, Pierre; Turner, Matthew S.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for mechanical regulation at the membrane of living cells, based on the exchange of membrane area between the cell membrane and a membrane reservoir. The reservoir is composed of invaginated membrane microdomains which are liable to flatten upon increase of membrane strain, effectively controlling membrane tension. We show that the domain shape transition is first order, allowing for coexistence between flat and invaginated domains. During coexistence, the membrane tens...

  3. Profile structures of the voltage-sensor domain and the voltage-gated K+-channel vectorially oriented in a single phospholipid bilayer membrane at the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces determined by x-ray interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Liu, J.; Strzalka, J.; Blasie, J. K.

    2011-09-01

    One subunit of the prokaryotic voltage-gated potassium ion channel from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) is comprised of six transmembrane α helices, of which S1-S4 form the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) and S5 and S6 contribute to the pore domain (PD) of the functional homotetramer. However, the mechanism of electromechanical coupling interconverting the closed-to-open (i.e., nonconducting-to-K+-conducting) states remains undetermined. Here, we have vectorially oriented the detergent (OG)-solubilized VSD in single monolayers by two independent approaches, namely “directed-assembly” and “self-assembly,” to achieve a high in-plane density. Both utilize Ni coordination chemistry to tether the protein to an alkylated inorganic surface via its C-terminal His6 tag. Subsequently, the detergent is replaced by phospholipid (POPC) via exchange, intended to reconstitute a phospholipid bilayer environment for the protein. X-ray interferometry, in which interference with a multilayer reference structure is used to both enhance and phase the specular x-ray reflectivity from the tethered single membrane, was used to determine directly the electron density profile structures of the VSD protein solvated by detergent versus phospholipid, and with either a moist He (moderate hydration) or bulk aqueous buffer (high hydration) environment to preserve a native structure conformation. Difference electron density profiles, with respect to the multilayer substrate itself, for the VSD-OG monolayer and VSD-POPC membranes at both the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces, reveal the profile structures of the VSD protein dominating these profiles and further indicate a successful reconstitution of a lipid bilayer environment. The self-assembly approach was similarly extended to the intact full-length KvAP channel for comparison. The spatial extent and asymmetry in the profile structures of both proteins confirm their unidirectional vectorial orientation within the reconstituted membrane and

  4. The angiopoietin-like protein ANGPTL4 catalyzes unfolding of the hydrolase domain in lipoprotein lipase and the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 counteracts this unfolding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) undergoes spontaneous inactivation via global unfolding and this unfolding is prevented by GPIHBP1 (Mysling et al., 2016). We now show: (1) that ANGPTL4 inactivates LPL by catalyzing the unfolding of its hydrolase domain; (2) that binding to GPIHBP1 renders LPL largely...

  5. Variation of Skin Surface pH, Sebum Content and Stratum Corneum Hydration with Age and Gender in a Large Chinese Population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Man, M.Q; Xin, S.J; Song, S.P; Cho, S.Y; Zhang, X.J; Tu, C.X; Feingold, K.R; Elias, P.M

    2009-01-01

    .... The results to date of studies on skin surface pH, stratum corneum (SC) hydration and sebum content in both genders and at various ages have been inconclusive, which was in part due to small sample size...

  6. Infrared Densitometry: A Fast and Non-Destructive Method for Exact Stratum Corneum Depth Calculation for in vitro Tape-Stripping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hahn, T; Hansen, S; Neumann, D; Kostka, K.H; Lehr, C.M; Muys, L; Schaefer, U.F

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of drug penetration into the stratum corneum (SC) by tape-stripping requires an accurate measure of the amount of SC on each tape-strip in order to determine the depth inside the SC...

  7. Analytical data of synthesized deuterated isopropyl myristate and data about the influence of IPM/IPMdeut on the thermodynamics and morphology of 2D Stratum Corneum models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S.L. Oliveira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The data in this article shows the effect of isopropyl myristate (IPM on a 2D Stratum Corneum lipid model. In the first part, the analytical characterization of the synthesized deuterated isopropyl myristate is given. Then a BAM image of the pure Stratum Corneum model used is shown and a dataset of surface-pressure – area isotherms considering various ratios of deuterated and non-deuterated IPM and the Stratum Corneum model mixture is provided. Assuming that after the plateau in the isotherm the area per molecule corresponds only to the Stratum Corneum model (squeezing out of IPM, the value of the area will correspond to the percentage of these lipids in the mixture when considering the pure SC model. The comparison of the real and the calculated areas per molecule is also done.

  8. A 30-residue-long "export initiation domain" adjacent to the signal sequence is critical for protein translocation across the inner membrane of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, H; von Heijne, G

    1991-01-01

    Signal sequences serve to target proteins to the secretory pathway in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. However, although necessary, the presence of a signal sequence is not always sufficient to ensure efficient membrane translocation. One feature of the nascent chain that adversely affects secretion, at least in Escherichia coli, is the presence of positively charged amino acids immediately downstream of the signal sequence. We have exploited this sensitivity to positively charged resid...

  9. The cytoplasmic domain of the gamete membrane fusion protein HAP2 targets the protein to the fusion site in Chlamydomonas and regulates the fusion reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanjie; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick; Snell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-cell fusion between gametes is a defining step during development of eukaryotes, yet we know little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the gamete membrane fusion reaction. HAP2 is the sole gamete-specific protein in any system that is broadly conserved and shown by gene disruption to be essential for gamete fusion. The wide evolutionary distribution of HAP2 (also known as GCS1) indicates it was present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and, therefore, dissecting its molecular properties should provide new insights into fundamental features of fertilization. HAP2 acts at a step after membrane adhesion, presumably directly in the merger of the lipid bilayers. Here, we use the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas to characterize contributions of key regions of HAP2 to protein location and function. We report that mutation of three strongly conserved residues in the ectodomain has no effect on targeting or fusion, although short deletions that include those residues block surface expression and fusion. Furthermore, HAP2 lacking a 237-residue segment of the cytoplasmic region is expressed at the cell surface, but fails to localize at the apical membrane patch specialized for fusion and fails to rescue fusion. Finally, we provide evidence that the ancient HAP2 contained a juxta-membrane, multi-cysteine motif in its cytoplasmic region, and that mutation of a cysteine dyad in this motif preserves protein localization, but substantially impairs HAP2 fusion activity. Thus, the ectodomain of HAP2 is essential for its surface expression, and the cytoplasmic region targets HAP2 to the site of fusion and regulates the fusion reaction. PMID:25655701

  10. Thermodynamic Insights and Conceptual Design of Skin-Sensitive Chitosan Coated Ceramide/PLGA Nanodrug for Regeneration of Stratum Corneum on Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sang-Myung Jung; Gwang Heum Yoon; Hoo Chul Lee; Moon Hee Jung; Sun Il Yu; Seung Ju Yeon; Seul Ki Min; Yeo Seon Kwon; Jin Ha Hwang; Hwa Sung Shin

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex skin disease primarily characterized by psoriasis of the stratum corneum. AD drugs have usually been used in acidic and hydrophilic solvents to supply moisture and prevent lipid defects. Ceramide is a typical treatment agent to regenerate the stratum corneum and relieve symptoms of AD. However, ceramide has limitation on direct use for skin because of its low dispersion properties in hydrophilic phase and side effects at excessive treatment. In this study, ...

  11. Thermodynamic Insights and Conceptual Design of Skin-Sensitive Chitosan Coated Ceramide/PLGA Nanodrug for Regeneration of Stratum Corneum on Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sang-Myung Jung; Gwang Heum Yoon; Hoo Chul Lee; Moon Hee Jung; Sun Il Yu; Seung Ju Yeon; Seul Ki Min; Yeo Seon Kwon; Jin Ha Hwang; Hwa Sung Shin

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex skin disease primarily characterized by psoriasis of the stratum corneum. AD drugs have usually been used in acidic and hydrophilic solvents to supply moisture and prevent lipid defects. Ceramide is a typical treatment agent to regenerate the stratum corneum and relieve symptoms of AD. However, ceramide has limitation on direct use for skin because of its low dispersion properties in hydrophilic phase and side effects at excessive treatment. In this study, ...

  12. Penetration route of functional molecules in stratum corneum studied by time-resolved small- and wide-angle x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatta, Ichiro; Ohta, Noboru; Yagi, Naoto [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8 (Japan); Nakazawa, Hiromitsu [Department of Physics, Kwansei Gakuin University (Japan); Obata, Yasuko [Department of Pharmaceutics, Hoshi University (Japan); Inoue, Katsuaki, E-mail: hatta@spring8.or.jp [Diamond Light Source (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-01

    We studied effects of functional molecules on corneocytes in stratum corneum using time-resolved small- and wide-angle x-ray diffraction after applying a functional molecule. From these results it was revealed that in the stratum corneum a typical hydrophilic molecule, ethanol, penetrates via the transcellular route and on the other hand a typical hydrophobic molecule, d-limonene, penetrates via the intercellular route.

  13. Corneosurfametry: a predictive assessment of the interaction of personal-care cleansing products with human stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard, G E; Goffin, V; Piérard-Franchimont, C

    1994-01-01

    Corneosurfametry is introduced as a noninvasive quantitative test rating the interaction between surfactants and human stratum corneum. It may be used as a predictive irritancy test. Surfactants present in personal-care products elicit multiple effects on the stratum corneum. With upcoming regulations avoiding animal experiments and ethical considerations for human testing, there is a need for new in vitro methods evaluating irritancy. Corneosurfametry entails collection of cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings and short contact time with surfactants followed by staining samples with toluidine blue and basic fuchsin dyes. Measurements are made by reading the color of samples using reflectance colorimetry. The intensity of color increases with irritancy potential of the surfactant. Results are reproducible, and great differences are noted among a series of diluted shampoos, shower gels and facial cleansing gels. Corneosurfametry is proposed as a rapid in vitro method allowing a predictive grading of surfactants related to irritancy.

  14. Dynamics of multicomponent lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camley, Brian Andrew

    We present theoretical and computational descriptions of the dynamics of multicomponent lipid bilayer membranes. These systems are both model systems for "lipid rafts" in cell membranes and interesting physical examples of quasi-two-dimensional fluids. Our chief tool is a continuum simulation that uses a phase field to track the composition of the membrane, and solves the hydrodynamic equations exactly using the appropriate Green's function (Oseen tensor) for the membrane. We apply this simulation to describe the diffusion of domains in phase-separated membranes, the dynamics of domain flickering, and the process of phase separation in lipid membranes. We then derive an analytical theory to describe domain flickering that is consistent with our simulation results, and use this to analyze experimental measurements of membrane domains. Through this method, we measure the membrane viscosity solely from fluorescence microscopy measurements. We study phase separation in quasi-two-dimensional membranes in depth with both simulations and scaling theory, and classify the different scaling regimes and morphologies, which differ from pure two-dimensional fluids. Our results may explain previous inconsistent measurements of the dynamical scaling exponent for phase separation in membranes. We also extend our theory beyond the simplest model, including the possibility that the membrane will be viscoelastic, as well as considering the inertia of the membrane and the fluid surrounding the membrane.

  15. Molecular Interaction between Intercellular Lipids in the Stratum Corneum and l-Menthol, as Analyzed by Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shinya; Obata, Yasuko; Onuki, Yoshinori; Utsumi, Shunichi; Ohta, Noboru; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Takayama, Kozo

    2017-01-01

    l-Menthol increases drug partitioning on the surface of skin, diffusion of drugs in the skin, and lipid fluidity in the stratum corneum and alters the rigidly arranged lipid structure of intercellular lipids. However, l-menthol is a solid at room temperature, and it is difficult to determine the effects of l-menthol alone. In this study, we vaporized l-menthol in order to avoid the effects of solvents. The vaporized l-menthol was applied to the stratum corneum or lipid models comprising composed of ceramides (CER) [EOS], the longest lipid acyl chain of the ceramides in the stratum corneum lipids that is associated with the barrier function of the skin; CER [NS], the shorter lipid acyl chain of the ceramides, and the most components in the stratum corneum of the intercellular lipids that is associated with water retention in the intercellular lipid structure of the stratum corneum; cholesterol; and palmitic acid. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses revealed that the lipid models were composed of hexagonal packing and orthorhombic packing structures of different lamellar periods. Taken together, our results revealed that l-menthol strongly affected the lipid model composed of CER [EOS]. Therefore, l-menthol facilitated the permeation of drugs through the skin by liquid crystallization of the longer lamellar structure. Importantly, these simple lipid models are useful for investigating microstructure of the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum.

  16. A literature review of the mechanical behavior of the stratum corneum, the living epidermis and the subcutaneous fat tissue

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    After a description of the structure and function of human skin, including the underlying fat layer, both in vitro and in vivo studies on the mechanical properties of separate skin layers are discussed: e.g. those of stratum corneum, living epidermis and the subcutaneous fat layer. Since the properties of the dermis are already widely known, this skin layer is left out of consideration. In addition, models on the mechanical behavior of human skin are considered.

  17. Effects of nonionic surfactant lauryl alcohol ethoxylated on stratum corneum alternative model biomembranes evaluated by biophysical techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Baby, André R.; Lacerda, Áurea C. L.; Prestes, Paula S.; Velasco, María Valéria R.; Kawano, Yoshio; Kaneko,Telma Mary

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the nonionic surfactant lauryl alcohol ethoxylate with 12 moles ethylene oxide (LAE-12OE) was evaluated on the Stratum corneum model biomembrane (SCMM) of shed snake skin (Bothrops jararaca and Spilotes pullatus) through the biophysical techniques Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) and Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS-FTIR). The surfactant was used in aqueous solutions above and below the critical micelle concentration (cmc), 50.0 and 0....

  18. Lipid mixtures prepared with well-defined synthetic ceramides closely mimic the unique stratum corneum lipid phase behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Miranda W; Gooris, Gert S; Ponec, Maria; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2005-12-01

    Lipid lamellae present in the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, form the main barrier for the diffusion of molecules through the skin. The presence of a unique 13 nm lamellar phase and its high crystallinity are characteristic for the stratum corneum lipid phase behavior. In the present study, small-angle and wide-angle X-ray diffraction were used to examine the organization in lipid mixtures prepared with a unique set of well-defined synthetic ceramides, varying from each other in head group architecture and acyl chain length. The results show that equimolar mixtures of cholesterol, free fatty acids, and synthetic ceramides (resembling the composition of pig ceramides) closely resemble the lamellar and lateral stratum corneum lipid organization, both at room and higher temperatures. Exclusion of several ceramide classes from the mixture does not affect the lipid organization. However, complete substitution of ceramide 1 (acylceramide with a sphingosine base) with ceramide 9 (acylceramide with a phytosphingosine base) reduces the formation of the long periodicity lamellar phase. This indicates that the head group architecture of acylceramides affects the lipid organization. In conclusion, lipid mixtures prepared with well-defined synthetic ceramides offer an attractive tool with which to unravel the importance of the molecular structure of individual ceramides for proper lipid organization.

  19. Non-invasive depth profile imaging of the stratum corneum using confocal Raman microscopy: first insights into the method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtikar, Mukul; Matthäus, Christian; Schmitt, Michael; Krafft, Christoph; Fahr, Alfred; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-12-18

    The stratum corneum is a strong barrier that must be overcome to achieve successful transdermal delivery of a pharmaceutical agent. Many strategies have been developed to enhance the permeation through this barrier. Traditionally, drug penetration through the stratum corneum is evaluated by employing tape-stripping protocols and measuring the content of the analyte. Although effective, this method cannot provide a detailed information regarding the penetration pathways. To address this issue various microscopic techniques have been employed. Raman microscopy offers the advantage of label free imaging and provides spectral information regarding the chemical integrity of the drug as well as the tissue. In this paper we present a relatively simple method to obtain XZ-Raman profiles of human stratum corneum using confocal Raman microscopy on intact full thickness skin biopsies. The spectral datasets were analysed using a spectral unmixing algorithm. The spectral information obtained, highlights the different components of the tissue and the presence of drug. We present Raman images of untreated skin and diffusion patterns for deuterated water and beta-carotene after Franz-cell diffusion experiment.

  20. Changes in skin barrier during treatment with systemic alitretinoin: focus on skin susceptibility and stratum corneum ceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Hellgren, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Alitretinoin is a new drug for systemic treatment of chronic hand eczema. Previous functional tests of skin topically treated with retinoids have indicated impaired skin barrier function, but no data are available on barrier parameters after systemic alitretinoin treatment. To investigate the eff....... No significant changes in stratum corneum lipids were found after 2 months of treatment. In conclusion, systemic alitretinoin does not influence skin susceptibility to irritants or the ceramide profile of stratum corneum....... the effect of systemic alitretinoin on skin barrier function and response to irritants, a secondary objective was to determine if changes occur in the lipid profile of stratum corneum after treatment with systemic alitretinoin. We conducted an open clinical intervention study on eight people ascribed......) was performed on the volar forearm and evaluated by trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema, and a cyanoacrylate skin sample was obtained for lipid analysis. We found no significant changes in response to SLS irritation as evaluated by TEWL and erythema, after treatment with alitretinoin for 2 months...

  1. Changes in skin barrier during treatment with systemic alitretinoin: focus on skin susceptibility and stratum corneum ceramides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie K; Hellgren, Lars I; Jemec, Gregor B E; Agner, Tove

    2010-11-01

    Alitretinoin is a new drug for systemic treatment of chronic hand eczema. Previous functional tests of skin topically treated with retinoids have indicated impaired skin barrier function, but no data are available on barrier parameters after systemic alitretinoin treatment. To investigate the effect of systemic alitretinoin on skin barrier function and response to irritants, a secondary objective was to determine if changes occur in the lipid profile of stratum corneum after treatment with systemic alitretinoin. We conducted an open clinical intervention study on eight people ascribed to systemic alitretinoin treatment. The criteria for being ascribed to alitretinoin were chronic hand eczema and insufficient therapeutic response to potent topical corticosteroids. Before initiation and after 2 months of systemic treatment with 30 mg alitretinoin, a challenge with sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) was performed on the volar forearm and evaluated by trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema, and a cyanoacrylate skin sample was obtained for lipid analysis. We found no significant changes in response to SLS irritation as evaluated by TEWL and erythema, after treatment with alitretinoin for 2 months. No significant changes in stratum corneum lipids were found after 2 months of treatment. In conclusion, systemic alitretinoin does not influence skin susceptibility to irritants or the ceramide profile of stratum corneum.

  2. Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Localization at the Apical Plasma Membrane Domain of Fisher Rat Thyroid Epithelial Cells Is Confined to Cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumska, Joanna; Qatato, Maria; Rehders, Maren; Führer, Dagmar; Biebermann, Heike; Grandy, David K.; Köhrle, Josef; Brix, Klaudia

    2015-01-01

    Background The trace amine-associated receptor 1 (Taar1) is one member of the Taar family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) accepting various biogenic amines as ligands. It has been proposed that Taar1 mediates rapid, membrane-initiated effects of thyronamines, the endogenous decarboxylated and deiodinated relatives of the classical thyroid hormones T4 and T3. Objectives Although the physiological actions of thyronamines in general and 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) in particular are incompletely understood, studies published to date suggest that synthetic T1AM-activated Taar1 signaling antagonizes thyromimetic effects exerted by T3. However, the location of Taar1 is currently unknown. Methods To fill this gap in our knowledge we employed immunofluorescence microscopy and a polyclonal antibody to detect Taar1 protein expression in thyroid tissue from Fisher rats, wild-type and taar1-deficient mice, and in the polarized FRT cells. Results With this approach we found that Taar1 is expressed in the membranes of subcellular compartments of the secretory pathway and on the apical plasma membrane of FRT cells. Three-dimensional analyses further revealed Taar1 immunoreactivity in cilial extensions of postconfluent FRT cell cultures that had formed follicle-like structures. Conclusions The results suggest Taar1 transport along the secretory pathway and its accumulation in the primary cilium of thyrocytes. These findings are of significance considering the increasing interest in the role of cilia in harboring functional GPCR. We hypothesize that thyronamines can reach and activate Taar1 in thyroid follicular epithelia by acting from within the thyroid follicle lumen, their potential site of synthesis, as part of a nonclassical mechanism of thyroid autoregulation. PMID:26601071

  3. Texture of lipid bilayer domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Uffe Bernchou; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Midtiby, Henrik Skov

    2009-01-01

    chains. By imaging the intensity variations as a function of the polarization angle, we map the lateral variations of the lipid tilt within domains. Results reveal that gel domains are composed of subdomains with different lipid tilt directions. We have applied a Fourier decomposition method......We investigate the texture of gel (g) domains in binary lipid membranes composed of the phospholipids DPPC and DOPC. Lateral organization of lipid bilayer membranes is a topic of fundamental and biological importance. Whereas questions related to size and composition of fluid membrane domain...... are well studied, the possibility of texture in gel domains has so far not been examined. When using polarized light for two-photon excitation of the fluorescent lipid probe Laurdan, the emission intensity is highly sensitive to the angle between the polarization and the tilt orientation of lipid acyl...

  4. Presence of a polyadenylated RNA fragment encoding the membrane domain for immunoglobulin alpha chain indicates that mRNAs for both secreted and membrane-bound alpha chains can be produced from the same RNA transcript.

    OpenAIRE

    Stavnezer, J.

    1986-01-01

    RNA blotting was employed to examine polyadenylated immunoglobulin alpha chain RNAs in a B lymphoma synthesizing membrane-bound and secretory IgA and in a hybridoma which synthesizes predominantly secretory IgA. Both cell lines were derived from the I.29 lymphoma and expressed the identical heavy chain variable region gene. In addition to the predicted mRNA precursors, four novel species of polyadenylated alpha RNAs were detected. The presence of a RNA species which was too large to have the ...

  5. Lateral diffusion of peripheral membrane proteins on supported lipid bilayers is controlled by the additive frictional drags of (1) bound lipids and (2) protein domains penetrating into the bilayer hydrocarbon core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P; Falke, Joseph J

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins bound to lipids on bilayer surfaces play central roles in a wide array of cellular processes, including many signaling pathways. These proteins diffuse in the plane of the bilayer and often undergo complex reactions involving the binding of regulatory and substrate lipids and proteins they encounter during their 2D diffusion. Some peripheral proteins, for example pleckstrin homology (PH) domains, dock to the bilayer in a relatively shallow position with little penetration into the bilayer. Other peripheral proteins exhibit more complex bilayer contacts, for example classical protein kinase C isoforms (PKCs) bind as many as six lipids in stepwise fashion, resulting in the penetration of three PKC domains (C1A, C1B, C2) into the bilayer headgroup and hydrocarbon regions. A molecular understanding of the molecular features that control the diffusion speeds of proteins bound to supported bilayers would enable key molecular information to be extracted from experimental diffusion constants, revealing protein-lipid and protein-bilayer interactions difficult to study by other methods. The present study investigates a range of 11 different peripheral protein constructs comprised by 1-3 distinct domains (PH, C1A, C1B, C2, anti-lipid antibody). By combining these constructs with various combinations of target lipids, the study measures 2D diffusion constants on supported bilayers for 17 different protein-lipid complexes. The resulting experimental diffusion constants, together with the known membrane interaction parameters of each complex, are used to analyze the molecular features correlated with diffusional slowing and bilayer friction. The findings show that both (1) individual bound lipids and (2) individual protein domains that penetrate into the hydrocarbon core make additive contributions to the friction against the bilayer, thereby defining the 2D diffusion constant. An empirical formula is developed that accurately estimates the diffusion

  6. Screening and identification of T helper 1 and linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitopes in spike 1 domain and membrane protein of feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomomi; Morioka, Hiroyuki; Gomi, Kohji; Tomizawa, Keisuke; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2014-04-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIP virus: FIPV) causes a fatal disease in wild and domestic cats. The development of an FIP-preventive vaccine requires an antigen that does not induce antibody-dependent enhancement, and T helper (Th)1 activity plays an important role in protect against FIPV infection. In the present study, we identified synthetic peptides including Th1 and a linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitope in the S1 domain and M protein of FIPV. We also identified peptides that strongly induce Th1 activity from those derived from the structural proteins (S, M, and N proteins) of FIPV based on this and previous studies (Satoh et al. [19]). No Th1 epitope-containing peptide was identified in the peptides derived from the S1 domain of type I FIPV. In contrast, 7 Th1 epitope-containing peptides were identified in the S1 domain of type II FIPV, and no linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitope was contained in any of these peptides. Eleven Th1 epitope-containing peptides common to each serotype were identified in the M protein-derived peptides, and 2 peptides (M-11 and M-12) contained the linear immunodominant antibody-binding epitope. Of the peptides derived from the S, M, and N proteins of FIPV, those that induced significantly stronger Th1 activity than that of the FIPV antigen were rescreened, and 4 peptides were identified. When 3 of these peptides (M-9, I-S2-15, and II-S1-24) were selected and administered with CpG-ODNs to SPF cats, M-9 and II-S1-24 induced Th1 activity. Our results may provide important information for the development of a peptide-based vaccine against FIPV infection.

  7. Increased presence of monounsaturated fatty acids in the stratum corneum of human skin equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakoersing, Varsha S; van Smeden, Jeroen; Mulder, Aat A; Vreeken, Rob J; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2013-01-01

    Previous results showed that our in-house human skin equivalents (HSEs) differ in their stratum corneum (SC) lipid organization compared with human SC. To elucidate the cause of the altered SC lipid organization in the HSEs, a recently developed liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method was used to study the free fatty acid (FFA) and ceramide composition in detail. In addition, the SC lipid composition of the HSEs and human skin was examined quantitatively with high-performance thin-layer chromatography. Our results reveal that all our HSEs have an increased presence of monounsaturated FFAs compared with human SC. Moreover, the HSEs display the presence of ceramide species with a monounsaturated acyl chain, which are not detected in human SC. All HSEs also exhibit an altered expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase, the enzyme that converts saturated FFAs to monounsaturated FFAs. Furthermore, the HSEs show the presence of 12 ceramide subclasses, similar to native human SC. However, the HSEs have increased levels of ceramides EOS and EOH and ceramide species with short total carbon chains and a reduced FFA level compared with human SC. The presence of unsaturated lipid chains in HSE offers new opportunities to mimic the lipid properties of human SC more closely.

  8. LC/MS analysis of stratum corneum lipids: ceramide profiling and discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Hoppel, Louise; van der Heijden, Rob; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vreeken, Rob J; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2011-06-01

    Ceramides (CERs) in the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), play a key role in the skin barrier function. In human SC, the literature currently reports 11 CER subclasses that have been identified. In this paper, a novel quick and robust LC/MS method is presented that allows the separation and analysis of all known human SC CER subclasses using only limited sample preparation. Besides all 11 known and identified subclasses, a 3D multi-mass chromatogram shows the presence of other lipid subclasses. Using LC/MS/MS with an ion trap (IT) system, a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance system, and a triple quadrupole system, we were able to identify one of these lipid subclasses as a new CER subclass: the ester-linked ω-hydroxy fatty acid with a dihydrosphingosine base (CER [EOdS]). Besides the identification of a new CER subclass, this paper also describes the applicability and robustness of the developed LC/MS method by analyzing three (biological) SC samples: SC from human dermatomed skin, human SC obtained by tape stripping, and SC from full-thickness skin explants. All three biological samples showed all known CER subclasses and slight differences were observed in CER profile.

  9. LC/MS analysis of stratum corneum lipids: ceramide profiling and discovery[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Hoppel, Louise; van der Heijden, Rob; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vreeken, Rob J.; Bouwstra, Joke A.

    2011-01-01

    Ceramides (CERs) in the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), play a key role in the skin barrier function. In human SC, the literature currently reports 11 CER subclasses that have been identified. In this paper, a novel quick and robust LC/MS method is presented that allows the separation and analysis of all known human SC CER subclasses using only limited sample preparation. Besides all 11 known and identified subclasses, a 3D multi-mass chromatogram shows the presence of other lipid subclasses. Using LC/MS/MS with an ion trap (IT) system, a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance system, and a triple quadrupole system, we were able to identify one of these lipid subclasses as a new CER subclass: the ester-linked ω-hydroxy fatty acid with a dihydrosphingosine base (CER [EOdS]). Besides the identification of a new CER subclass, this paper also describes the applicability and robustness of the developed LC/MS method by analyzing three (biological) SC samples: SC from human dermatomed skin, human SC obtained by tape stripping, and SC from full-thickness skin explants. All three biological samples showed all known CER subclasses and slight differences were observed in CER profile. PMID:21444759

  10. Bilayer Structure and Lipid Dynamics in a Model Stratum Corneum with Oleic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopes, Matthew I.; Noro, Massimo G.; Longo, Marjorie L.; Faller, Roland

    2011-03-31

    The stratum corneum is the uppermost layer of the skin and acts as a barrier to keep out contaminants and retain moisture. Understanding the molecular structure and behavior of this layer will provide guidance for optimizing its biological function. In this study we use a model mixture comprised of equimolar portions of ceramide NS (24:0), lignoceric acid, and cholesterol to model the effect of the addition of small amounts of oleic acid to the bilayer at 300 and 340 K. Five systems at each temperature have been simulated with concentrations between 0 and 0.1 mol % oleic acid. Our major finding is that subdiffusive behavior over the 200 ns time scale is evident in systems at 340 K, with cholesterol diffusion being enhanced with increased oleic acid. Importantly, cholesterol and other species diffuse faster when radial densities indicate nearest neighbors include more cholesterol. We also find that, with the addition of oleic acid, the bilayer midplane and interfacial densities are reduced and there is a 3% decrease in total thickness occurring mostly near the hydrophilic interface at 300 K with reduced overall density at 340 K. Increased interdigitation occurs independent of oleic acid with a temperature increase. Slight ordering of the long non-hydroxy fatty acid of the ceramide occurs near the hydrophilic interface as a function of the oleic acid concentration, but no significant impact on hydrogen bonding is seen in the chosen oleic acid concentrations.

  11. Conformational changes in stratum corneum lipids by effect of bicellar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Gelen; Barbosa-Barros, Lucyanna; Rubio, Laia; Cócera, Mercedes; Díez, Avencia; Estelrich, Joan; Pons, Ramon; Caelles, Jaume; De la Maza, Alfonso; López, Olga

    2009-09-15

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of the bicelles formed by dimyristoyl-glycero-phosphocholine (DMPC) and dihexanoyl-glycero-phosphocholine (DHPC) in porcine stratum corneum (SC) in vitro. A comparison of skin samples treated and untreated with bicelles at different temperatures was carried out. The analysis of variations after treatment in the position of the symmetric CH2 stretching, CH2 scissoring, and CH2 rocking vibrations reported important information about the effect of bicelles on the skin. Bicellar systems caused a phase transition from the gel or solid state to the liquid crystalline state in the lipid conformation of SC, reflecting the major order-disorder transition from hexagonally packed to disordered chains. Grazing incidence small and wide X-ray scattering (GISAXS and GIWAXS) techniques confirmed this effect of bicelles on the SC. These results are probably related to with the permeabilizing effect previously described for the DMPC/DHPC bicelles.

  12. In vivo studies of aquaporins 3 and 10 in human stratum corneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Bomholt, Julie; Bajraktari, Niada;

    2013-01-01

    migration and proliferation with consequences for the antimicrobial defense of the skin. AQP3 and AQP10 are aqua-glyceroporins, known to transport glycerol as well as water. AQP3 is the predominant AQP in human skin and has previously been demonstrated in the basal layer of epidermis in normal human skin......, but not in stratum corneum (SC). AQP10 has not previously been identified in human skin. Previous studies have demonstrated the presence of AQP3 and AQP10 mRNA in keratinocytes. In this study, our aim was to investigate if these aquaporin proteins were actually present in human SC cells. This can be seen as a first...... step toward elucidating the possible functional role of AQP3 and AQP10 in SC hydration. Specifically we investigate the presence of AQP3 and AQP10 in vivo in human SC using “minimal-invasive” technique for obtaining SC samples. SC samples were obtained from six healthy volunteers. Western blotting...

  13. The important role of stratum corneum lipids for the cutaneous barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, J; Janssens, M; Gooris, G S; Bouwstra, J A

    2014-03-01

    The skin protects the body from unwanted influences from the environment as well as excessive water loss. The barrier function of the skin is located in the stratum corneum (SC). The SC consists of corneocytes embedded in a lipid matrix. This lipid matrix is crucial for the lipid skin barrier function. This paper provides an overview of the reported SC lipid composition and organization mainly focusing on healthy and diseased human skin. In addition, an overview is provided on the data describing the relation between lipid modulations and the impaired skin barrier function. Finally, the use of in vitro lipid models for a better understanding of the relation between the lipid composition, lipid organization and skin lipid barrier is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. Guest Editors: Kenneth R. Feingold and Peter Elias.

  14. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy: measuring the effects of topical moisturizers on stratum corneum water gradient in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Anke; Crowther, Jonathan; Blenkiron, Peter; Marcott, Curtis; Matts, Paul J.

    2006-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) water concentration gradient is fundamental to skin's role as a barrier, regulating its physical and biochemical properties. Standard instruments utilizing changes in SC electrical properties to estimate SC water concentration provide simple, rapid measurements but cannot provide true interval data as a function of depth. Confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS) of human subjects provides non-invasive, real-time, in vivo measures of molecular concentration profiles. A state-of-the-art confocal Raman microspectrometer equipped with a fiber-coupled laser source operating at a wavelength of 671 nm was used to obtain measurements in the high wavenumber region (~2400-4000 cm -1). An aircooled, high-sensitivity back-illuminated, deep-depletion CCD camera captured radiation scattered inelastically from focal planes within the skin in vivo (a high-precision, computer-controlled piezo-electric stage and objective allowing depth resolutions of niacinamide on SC water concentration gradient, as measured by CRS, in vivo. The approach to compare SC water gradient effects will be discussed and the utility of this exciting new method will be compared and contrasted to existing methodology.

  15. The effect of urea and taurine as hydrophilic penetration enhancers on stratum corneum lipid models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, J; Oliveira, J S L; Barker, R; Trapp, M; Schroeter, A; Brezesinski, G; Neubert, R H H

    2016-09-01

    To optimize transdermal application of drugs, the barrier function of the skin, especially the stratum corneum (SC), needs to be reduced reversibly. For this purpose, penetration enhancers like urea or taurine are applied. Until now, it is unclear if this penetration enhancement is caused by an interaction with the SC lipid matrix or related to effects within the corneocytes. Therefore, the effects of both hydrophilic enhancers on SC models with different dimensionality, ranging from monolayers to multilayers, have been investigated in this study. Many sophisticated methods were applied to ascertain the mode of action of both substances on a molecular scale. The experiments reveal that there is no specific interaction when 10% urea or 5% taurine solutions are added to the SC model systems. No additional water uptake in the head group region and no decrease of the lipid chain packing density have been observed. Consequently, we suppose that the penetration enhancing effect of both substances might be based on the introduction of large amounts of water into the corneocytes, caused by the enormous water binding capacity of urea and a resulting osmotic pressure in case of taurine.

  16. Stratum corneum removal facilitates experimental sensitization to mite allergens in atopic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivry, Thierry; Wofford, Jessica; Paps, Judy S; Dunston, Stanley M

    2011-04-01

    In humans with atopic dermatitis and in mouse models of IgE-mediated allergic diseases, evidence is mounting that the stratum corneum (SC) provides an important barrier against environmental allergens. At this time, it is not known whether the SC has a similar role in dogs, especially in those with atopic dermatitis. The objectives of this pilot study were to determine whether SC removal led to earlier and stronger sensitization of atopic dogs to Dermatophagoides farinae (Df) house dust mites. Five Maltese-beagle atopic (MBA) dogs were sensitized epicutaneously after the SC was removed with ten tape strips (TS group), while sensitization was done without tape strips in five other MBA dogs (nontape stripping; NTS group). During this 16 week study, sensitization was assessed with allergen-specific IgE serology, intradermal testing with Df allergens and determination of stimulation indices of blood mononuclear cells cultured with Df and stained for CD4 and the activation markers CD25 or CD30. Compared with dogs from the NTS group, those of the TS group exhibited earlier rises in Df-specific IgE serum levels, usually had higher allergen-specific IgE titres, showed higher intradermal test reactivity and had earlier increases and higher percentages of CD25- or CD30-positive activated allergen-specific peripheral CD4-positive T lymphocytes. These observations implicate a role of the SC as a barrier limiting sensitization to exogenous allergens in this experimental atopic dog model.

  17. Relative uptake of minoxidil into appendages and stratum corneum and permeation through human skin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grice, Jeffrey E; Ciotti, Susan; Weiner, Norman; Lockwood, Peter; Cross, Sheree E; Roberts, Michael S

    2010-02-01

    We examined uptake of the model therapeutic agent, minoxidil, into appendages, stratum corneum (SC), and through human skin, under the influence of different vehicles. Quantitative estimation of therapeutic drug deposition into all three areas has not previously been reported. Finite doses of minoxidil (2%, w/v) in formulations containing varying amounts of ethanol, propylene glycol (PG), and water (60:20:20, 80:20:0, and 0:80:20 by volume, respectively) were used. Minoxidil in SC (by tape stripping), appendages (by cyanoacrylate casting), and receptor fluid was determined by liquid scintillation counting. At early times (30 min, 2 h), ethanol-containing formulations (60:20:20 and 80:20:0) caused significantly greater minoxidil retention in SC and appendages, compared to the formulation lacking ethanol (0:80:20). A significant increase in minoxidil receptor penetration occurred with the PG-rich 0:80:20 formulation after 12 h. We showed that deposition of minoxidil into appendages, SC, and skin penetration into receptor fluid were similar in magnitude. Transport by the appendageal route is likely to be a key determinant of hair growth promotion by minoxidil. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  18. Skin capacitance imaging and corneosurfametry. A comparative assessment of the impact of surfactants on stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhauflaire-Uhoda, Emmanuelle; Loussouarn, Geneviève; Haubrechts, Christelle; Léger, Didier Saint; Piérard, Gérald E

    2006-05-01

    Silicon image sensor (SIS) technology was recently introduced as an innovative tool (SkinChip, L'Oréal) providing sensitive imaging of the skin capacitance. This method can detect discrete focal variations in skin surface hydration, and thus early discrete manifestations of skin irritation induced by surfactants. In the present in vivo study, 2 neat and diluted shampoos, and 5% and 10% sodium laurylsulfate solutions were tested on human skin. Each surfactant solution was gently rubbed on the skin using wet hair wicks mimicking the casual use of a shampoo on the scalp. Clinical and SIS evaluations were carried out. In addition, the same products were tested using the ex vivo corneosurfametry bioassay performed on human stratum corneum (SC) harvested by cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings. The colourimetric index of mildness (CIM) was measured on these samples. The product reactivity with the SC was recognized by darker skin capacitance images, and by both lowered SkinChip-generated values and lowered CIM values. The extent in changes varied according to the nature of the test products and their concentrations. The SkinChip image changes likely corresponded to the acute surfactant-induced water swelling of the corneocytes. Skin capacitance imaging and corneosurfametry allow to disclose discrete surfactant-induced alterations of corneocytes.

  19. Extraction, characterization and antioxidant activities of polysaccharides from E. corneum gigeriae galli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qingping; Li, Xia; Zhou, Ruizhen; Hao, Hairong; Li, Songlin; Jing, Yi; Zhu, Chun; Zhang, Qinghua; Shi, Yingying

    2014-08-08

    In the present study, optimization of enzyme-assisted extraction, characterization and antioxidant activities in vitro of polysaccharides from Endothelium corneum gigeriae galli (PEGG) were investigated. It was found that the optimum extraction conditions were determined as follows: extraction temperature 87.0°C, extraction time 177.0 min, enzyme concentration 1.65%, enzymatic hydrolysis time 141.0 min, liquid-to-solid ratio 20, enzymatic hydrolysis temperature 55°C and enzymatic hydrolysis pH 3.6. Under these conditions, the experimental yield of polysaccharides was 5.08%. In addition, PEGG had a relatively high sulfate radical content. PEGG was composed of rhamnose, fucose, mannose, glucose and galactose, with molar percentages of 13.1, 4.5, 72.8 and 9.6%, respectively. The average molecular weight was 83 kDa. And there were infrared characteristic absorption peaks of polysaccharides in the FT-IR spectroscopy of PEGG. For antioxidant activities in vitro, PEGG showed possessed strong hydroxyl radical scavenging, Fe(2+) chelating and lipid peroxidation inhibitory activities.

  20. Bound simian virus 40 translocates to caveolin-enriched membrane domains, and its entry is inhibited by drugs that selectively disrupt caveolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H A; Chen, Y; Norkin, L C

    1996-11-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) entry leading to infection occurred only after the virus was at the cell surface for 1.5 to 2 h. SV40 infectious entry was not sensitive to cytosol acidification, a treatment that blocks endocytosis via clathrin-coated vesicles. Instead, SV40 infectious entry was blocked by treating cells with the phorbol ester PMA or nystatin, which selectively disrupts caveolae. In control experiments, transferrin internalization was sensitive to cytosol acidification but was not sensitive to PMA or nystatin. Also, absorbed transferrin entered cells within minutes. Finally, bound SV40 translocated to caveolin-enriched membrane complexes isolated by a Triton X-100 insolubility protocol. Treatment with nystatin did not impair SV40 binding but did block the partitioning of virus into the caveolin-enriched complexes.

  1. Giant plasma membrane vesicles: models for understanding membrane organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic membranes into functional domains continues to fascinate and puzzle cell biologists and biophysicists. The lipid raft hypothesis proposes that collective lipid interactions compartmentalize the membrane into coexisting liquid domains that are central to membrane physiology. This hypothesis has proven controversial because such structures cannot be directly visualized in live cells by light microscopy. The recent observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in biological membranes are an important validation of the raft hypothesis and enable application of the experimental toolbox of membrane physics to a biologically complex phase-separated membrane. This review addresses the role of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) in refining the raft hypothesis and expands on the application of GPMVs as an experimental model to answer some of key outstanding problems in membrane biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Domain analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2017-01-01

    The domain-analytic approach to knowledge organization (KO) (and to the broader field of library and information science, LIS) is outlined. The article reviews the discussions and proposals on the definition of domains, and provides an example of a domain-analytic study in the field of art studie....... Varieties of domain analysis as well as criticism and controversies are presented and discussed....

  3. Stratum corneum lipids, skin barrier function and filaggrin mutations in patients with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungersted, J M; Scheer, H; Mempel, M; Baurecht, H; Cifuentes, L; Høgh, J K; Hellgren, L I; Jemec, G B E; Agner, T; Weidinger, S

    2010-07-01

    Prior to the discovery of filaggrin (FLG) mutations, evidence for an impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis (AD) has been documented, and changes in ceramide profile, altered skin pH and increased trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) in patients with AD have been reported. Until now, no studies have analysed stratum corneum (SC) lipids combined with skin barrier parameters in subjects of known FLG genotype. A cohort of 49 German individuals genotyped for the most common FLG mutations (R501X, 2282del4) had SC samples taken for lipid analysis by high-performance thin layer chromatography. In addition, TEWL, erythema, skin hydration and pH were measured. In 27 of the 49 individuals, a 24-h irritation patch test with sodium lauryl sulphate was performed. For the analysis, both the AD group and the control group were stratified by FLG mutation status (FLGmut/FLGwt). In the FLGmut AD group, significantly lower levels of ceramide 4 and significantly higher levels of ceramide 7 were observed when compared to both healthy control groups. However, ceramide 7 levels also significantly differed between FLGwt AD and FLGwt controls, as did ceramide 1 levels. No significant differences were observed for ceramide 2, 3, 5 and 6. FLGmut individuals had significantly higher skin pH values than individuals not carrying FLG mutations. Patients with AD with FLG mutations had significantly higher erythema compared to patients with AD without FLG mutations. Our results confirm previous observations of altered ceramide levels in AD, which however appear to show no clear relationship with FLG mutations.

  4. Resistance to water diffusion in the stratum corneum is depth-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D A van Logtestijn

    Full Text Available The stratum corneum (SC provides a permeability barrier that limits the inflow and outflow of water. The permeability barrier is continuously and dynamically formed, maintained, and degraded along the depth, from the bottom to the top, of the SC. Naturally, its functioning and structure also change dynamically in a depth-dependent manner. While transepidermal water loss is typically used to assess the function of the SC barrier, it fails to provide any information about the dynamic mechanisms that are responsible for the depth-dependent characteristics of the permeability barrier. This paper aims to quantitatively characterize the depth-dependency of the permeability barrier using in vivo non-invasive measurement data for understanding the underlying mechanisms for barrier formation, maintenance, and degradation. As a framework to combine existing experimental data, we propose a mathematical model of the SC, consisting of multiple compartments, to explicitly address and investigate the depth-dependency of the SC permeability barrier. Using this mathematical model, we derive a measure of the water permeability barrier, i.e. resistance to water diffusion in the SC, from the measurement data on transepidermal water loss and water concentration profiles measured non-invasively by Raman spectroscopy. The derived resistance profiles effectively characterize the depth-dependency of the permeability barrier, with three distinct regions corresponding to formation, maintenance, and degradation of the barrier. Quantitative characterization of the obtained resistance profiles allows us to compare and evaluate the permeability barrier of skin with different morphology and physiology (infants vs adults, different skin sites, before and after application of oils and elucidates differences in underlying mechanisms of processing barriers. The resistance profiles were further used to predict the spatial-temporal effects of skin treatments by in silico experiments

  5. Emollient molecule effects on the drying stresses in human stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, K; Kwan, A; Rhines, A S; Gorcea, M; Moore, D J; Dauskardt, R H

    2010-10-01

    Emollient molecules are widely used in skin care formulations to improve skin sensory properties and to alleviate dry skin but little is understood regarding their effects on skin biomechanical properties. To investigate the effects of emollient molecules on drying stresses in human stratum corneum (SC) and how these stresses are related to SC components and moisture content. The substrate curvature method was used to measure the drying stresses in isolated SC following exposure to selected emollient molecules. While SC stresses measured using this method have the same biaxial in vivo stress state and moisture exchange with the environment, a limitation of the method is that moisture cannot be replenished by the underlying skin layers. This provides an opportunity to study the direct effects of emollient treatments on the moisture content and the components of the SC. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the effects of emollient molecules on SC lipid extraction and conformation. Results Emollient molecules resulted in a complex SC drying stress profile where stresses increased rapidly to peak values and then gradually decreased to significantly lower values compared with the control. The partially occlusive treatments also penetrated into the SC where they caused extraction and changes in lipid conformation. These effects together with their effects on SC moisture content are used to rationalize the drying stress profiles. Emollient molecules have dramatic effects on SC drying stresses that are related to their effects on intercellular lipids and SC moisture content. © 2010 The Authors. BJD © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. Phenotypic flexibility in cutaneous water loss and lipids of the stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Michael J; Tieleman, B Irene; Williams, Joseph B

    2003-10-01

    When vertebrates invaded land during the Carboniferous period, they were exposed not only to new ecological opportunities but also to a desiccating environment. To maintain cellular water homeostasis, natural selection modified the integument of pioneering terrestrial animals, enabling them to reduce water loss through the skin. In desert environments, where ambient temperatures (T(a)) can reach 50 degrees C, relative humidities are low and drinking water is scarce, integumentary modifications that reduce cutaneous water loss (CWL) could be fundamental to survival. Previous research has shown that hoopoe larks (Alaemon alaudipes) from the Arabian desert reduced CWL when acclimated to 35 degrees C compared with individuals at 15 degrees C, but skylarks (Alauda arvensis) and woodlarks (Lullula arborea), from The Netherlands, and Dunn's larks (Eremalauda dunni), also from the Arabian desert, did not. Here, we test the idea that hoopoe larks acclimated to 35 degrees C would alter the lipid composition of their stratum corneum (SC), resulting in a decrease in CWL, but that skylarks, woodlarks and Dunn's larks would not. Specifically, we hypothesized that hoopoe larks, acclimated to 35 degrees C, would increase the proportions of polar ceramide content and decrease the proportions of free fatty acids in their SC compared with individuals acclimated to 15 degrees C. Results showed that hoopoe larks at 35 degrees C had lower CWL and higher proportions of total ceramides but lower proportions of free fatty acids and sterols in their SC. We demonstrate that adjustments in ratios of lipid classes in the SC are associated with changes in CWL in hoopoe larks.

  7. Local and transient structural changes in stratum corneum at high electric fields: contribution of Joule heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliquett, U; Gallo, S; Hui, S W; Gusbeth, Ch; Neumann, E

    2005-09-01

    Electroporation of skin is accompanied by local heating, such that thermally induced structural changes of the stratum corneum (SC) accompany the field effect. Comparing on the time scale, the local changes in structure, temperature and conductance of the SC, during and after the pulse, it is seen that Joule heating also facilitates the subsequent molecular transport. It is found that the transport of medium-sized, ionic molecules occurs through localized transport regions (LTR). The size of a LTR increases with the pulse length, whereas the density of the LTRs increases with increasing voltage, for instance at U(SC=)80 V, the LTR cover approximately 0.02--1% of the surface area. The state of low resistance within the LTR is long-lived. During high voltage application, the center of the LTR is heated above the phase transition temperature of the SC lipids (70 degrees C) and the heat front propagates outwards. Inside the SC, the pulse causes aggregates of small-sized vesicles. At a higher temperature, the aggregate formation and their disappearance are delayed. Multiple pulses with the applied voltage of U(appl)=80 V induce the formation of long-lasting vesicle aggregates with a diameter of slashed circle=1--30 microm, covering 0.05--0.5% of the total sample area. The electric energy dissipated within the LTR during high voltage application is apparently sufficient to raise the temperature well above the phase transition temperature of the lipids of the SC, accounting for the conformational changes from the multi-lamella to the vesicular structures.

  8. Effect of Aqueous Cream BP on human stratum corneum in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, M; Guy, R H

    2010-11-01

    Aqueous Cream BP is widely prescribed to patients with eczema to relieve skin dryness. The formulation contains sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), a chemical that is a known skin irritant and a commonly used excipient in personal care and household products. The chronic effects of Aqueous Cream BP application on skin barrier function have not been determined. To characterize and assess skin barrier function of healthy skin after application of Aqueous Cream BP and to study the physical effects of the formulation on the stratum corneum (SC). The left and right volar forearms of six human volunteers were each separated into treated and control sides. The treated sides of each forearm were subjected to twice daily applications of Aqueous Cream BP for 4 weeks at the end of which concomitant tape stripping and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were made. The untreated sides of the forearms were not exposed to any products containing SLS during the study period. Changes in SC thickness, baseline TEWL and rate of increase in TEWL during tape stripping were observed in skin treated with Aqueous Cream BP. The mean decrease in SC thickness was 1·1 μm (12%) (P = 0·0015) and the mean increase in baseline TEWL was 2·5 g m⁻² h⁻¹ (20%) (P Cream BP, containing ∼1% SLS, reduced the SC thickness of healthy skin and increased its permeability to water loss. These observations call into question the continued use of this emollient on the already compromised barrier of eczematous skin. © 2010 The Authors. BJD © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. Resistance to Water Diffusion in the Stratum Corneum Is Depth-Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Logtestijn, Mark D. A.; Domínguez-Hüttinger, Elisa; Stamatas, Georgios N.; Tanaka, Reiko J.

    2015-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) provides a permeability barrier that limits the inflow and outflow of water. The permeability barrier is continuously and dynamically formed, maintained, and degraded along the depth, from the bottom to the top, of the SC. Naturally, its functioning and structure also change dynamically in a depth-dependent manner. While transepidermal water loss is typically used to assess the function of the SC barrier, it fails to provide any information about the dynamic mechanisms that are responsible for the depth-dependent characteristics of the permeability barrier. This paper aims to quantitatively characterize the depth-dependency of the permeability barrier using in vivo non-invasive measurement data for understanding the underlying mechanisms for barrier formation, maintenance, and degradation. As a framework to combine existing experimental data, we propose a mathematical model of the SC, consisting of multiple compartments, to explicitly address and investigate the depth-dependency of the SC permeability barrier. Using this mathematical model, we derive a measure of the water permeability barrier, i.e. resistance to water diffusion in the SC, from the measurement data on transepidermal water loss and water concentration profiles measured non-invasively by Raman spectroscopy. The derived resistance profiles effectively characterize the depth-dependency of the permeability barrier, with three distinct regions corresponding to formation, maintenance, and degradation of the barrier. Quantitative characterization of the obtained resistance profiles allows us to compare and evaluate the permeability barrier of skin with different morphology and physiology (infants vs adults, different skin sites, before and after application of oils) and elucidates differences in underlying mechanisms of processing barriers. The resistance profiles were further used to predict the spatial-temporal effects of skin treatments by in silico experiments, in terms of

  10. Toughening of a Carbon-Fibre Composite Using Electrospun Poly(Hydroxyether of Bisphenol A Nanofibrous Membranes Through Inverse Phase Separation and Inter-Domain Etherification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Fox

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The interlaminar toughening of a carbon fibre reinforced composite by interleaving a thin layer (~20 microns of poly(hydroxyether of bisphenol A (phenoxy nanofibres was explored in this work. Nanofibres, free of defect and averaging several hundred nanometres, were produced by electrospinning directly onto a pre-impregnated carbon fibre material (Toray G83C at various concentrations between 0.5 wt % and 2 wt %. During curing at 150 °C, phenoxy diffuses through the epoxy resin to form a semi interpenetrating network with an inverse phase type of morphology where the epoxy became the co-continuous phase with a nodular morphology. This type of morphology improved the fracture toughness in mode I (opening failure and mode II (in-plane shear failure by up to 150% and 30%, respectively. Interlaminar shear stress test results showed that the interleaving did not negatively affect the effective in-plane strength of the composites. Furthermore, there was some evidence from DMTA and FT-IR analysis to suggest that inter-domain etherification between the residual epoxide groups with the pendant hydroxyl groups of the phenoxy occurred, also leading to an increase in glass transition temperature (~7.5 °C.

  11. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehrig, John T., E-mail: jtr1@cdc.gov [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Bennett, Susan L. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Blair, Carol D. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Huang, Claire Y.-H. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants.

  12. PDZ-domain containing-2 (PDZD2) drives the maturity of human fetal pancreatic progenitor-derived islet-like cell clusters with functional responsiveness against membrane depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kwan Keung; Suen, Po Man; Lau, Tse Kin; Ko, Wing Hung; Yao, Kwok Ming; Leung, Po Sing

    2009-09-01

    We recently reported the isolation and characterization of a population of pancreatic progenitor cells (PPCs) from early trimester human fetal pancreata. The PPCs, being the forerunners of adult pancreatic cell lineages, were amenable to growth and differentiation into insulin-secreting islet-like cell clusters (ICCs) upon stimulation by adequate morphogens. Of note, a novel morphogenic factor, PDZ-domain containing-2 (PDZD2) and its secreted form (sPDZD2) were ubiquitously expressed in the PPCs. Our goals for this study were to evaluate the potential role of sPDZD2 in stimulating PPC differentiation and to establish the optimal concentration for such stimulation. We found that 10(-9)M sPDZD2 promoted PPC differentiation, as evidenced by the upregulation of the pancreatic endocrine markers (PDX-1, NGN3, NEURO-D, ISL-1, NKX 2.2, NKX 6.1) and INSULIN mRNA. Inhibited endogenous production of sPDZD2 suppressed expression of these factors. Secreted PDZD2 treatment significantly elevated the C-peptide content of the ICCs and increased the basal rate of insulin secretion. However, they remained unresponsive to glucose stimulation, reflected by a minimal increase in GLUT-2 and GLUCOKINASE mRNA expression. Interestingly, sPDZD2 treatment induced increased expression of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca(v)1.2) in the ICCs, triggering calcium ion influx under KCl stimulation and conferring an ability to secrete insulin in response to KCl. Pancreatic progenitor cells from 10- and 13-week fetal pancreata showed peak expression of endogenous sPDZD2, implying that sPDZD2 has a specific role in islet development during the first trimester. In conclusion, our data suggest that sPDZD2 promotes functional maturation of human fetal PPC-derived ICCs, thus enhancing its transplanting potentials.

  13. Impact of wet work on epidermal barrier (TEWL and stratum corneum hydration and skin viscoelasticity in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kieć-Świerczyńska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are prone to develop hand eczema due to occupational exposure to irritants, including wet work. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of wet work on selected skin properties, reflecting epidermal barrier function – transepidermal water loss (TEWL and stratum corneum hydration – and additionally skin viscoelasticity, in nurses. Material and Methods: Study subjects included 90 nurses employed in hospital wards. Measurements were carried out within the dorsal aspect of the dominant hand, using a Cutometer MPA 580 equipped with Tewameter TM 300 and Corneometer CM 825 (Courage&Khazaka, Germany probes. Examinations took place on hospital premises. Similar measurements were performed in the control group of females non-exposed to irritants. Results: In the examined group of nurses, mean TEWL was 15.5 g/h/m2 and was higher than in the control group (12.99 g/h/m2. After rejecting the extreme results, the difference between the groups proved to be statistically significant (p < 0.05. The mean value of stratum corneum hydration was lower in the examined group (37.915 compared with the control group (40.05, but the difference was not statistically significant. Also results of viscoelasticity assessment showed no significant differences between studied groups. Conclusions: The results of the assessment of skin biophysical properties show that wet work exerts a moderately adverse impact on skin condition. A higher TEWL value and a lower stratum corneum hydration in workers exposed to irritants reflect an adverse impact of these factors on the epidermal barrier function. Med Pr 2014;65(5:609–619

  14. Modelling Formation of a Drug Reservoir in the Stratum Corneum and Its Impact on Drug Monitoring Using Reverse Iontophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Paulley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse iontophoresis is a relatively new technique for non-invasive drug monitoring in the body. It involves a small electrical current being passed through the skin to facilitate the movement of small charged ions and polar molecules on the skin's surface where the amount of drug can then be measured and hence an accurate estimate of the blood concentration can be made. In vivo studies for several molecules show that initially large amounts of drug are extracted from the body, which are unrelated to the magnitude of the blood concentration; over time the fluxes of extraction decrease to a level proportional to the steady state blood concentration. This suggests that, at first, the drug is being extracted from some source other than the blood; one such candidate for this source is the dead cells which form the stratum corneum. In this paper, we construct two related mathematical models; the first describes the formation of the drug reservoir in the stratum corneum as a consequence of repeated drug intake and natural death of skin cells in the body. The output from this model provides initial conditions for the model of reverse iontophoresis in which charged ions from both the blood and the stratum corneum reservoir compete for the electric current. Model parameters are estimated from data collected for lithium monitoring. Our models will improve interpretation of reverse iontophoretic data by discriminating the subdermal from the skin contribution to the fluxes of extraction. They also suggest that analysis of the skin reservoir might be a valuable tool to investigate patients' exposure to chemicals including therapeutic drugs.

  15. Impact on floating membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Vandenberghe, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    When impacted by a rigid object, a thin elastic membrane with negligible bending rigidity floating on a liquid pool deforms. Two axisymmetric waves radiating from the impact point propagate. In the first place, a longitudinal wave front -- associated with in-plane deformation of the membrane and traveling at constant speed -- separates an outward stress free domain with a stretched but flat domain. Then, in the stretched domain a dispersive transverse wave travels at a wave speed that depends on the local stretching rate. We study the dynamics of this fluid-body system and we show that the wave dynamics is similar to the capillary waves that propagate at a liquid-gas interface but with a surface tension coefficient that depends on impact speed. We emphasize the role of the stretching in the membrane in the wave dynamics but also in the development of a buckling instability that give rise to radial wrinkles.

  16. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics of stratum corneum of dandruff scalp reveals new insights into its aetiology and similarities with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavusoglu, Nükhet; Delattre, Caroline; Donovan, Mark; Bourassa, Sylvie; Droit, Arnaud; El Rawadi, Charles; Jourdain, Roland; Bernard, Dominique

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed at detecting differentially expressed proteins in the stratum corneum of dandruff versus non-dandruff scalps to better understand dandruff aetiology. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis revealed a total of 68 differentially expressed biomarkers. A detailed analysis of their known physiological functions provided new insights into the affected metabolic pathways of a dandruff scalp. Dandruff scalp showed (1) profound changes in the expression and maturation of structural and epidermal differentiation related proteins, that are responsible for the integrity of the skin, (2) altered relevant factors that regulate skin hydration, and (3) an imbalanced physiological protease-protease inhibitor ratio. Stratum corneum proteins with antimicrobial activity, mainly those derived from sweat and sebaceous glands were also found modified. Comparing our data with those reported for atopic dermatitis revealed that about 50 % of the differentially expressed proteins in the superficial layers of the stratum corneum from dandruff and atopic dermatitis are identical.

  17. Regulation of HIV-Gag expression and targeting to the endolysosomal/secretory pathway by the luminal domain of lysosomal-associated membrane protein (LAMP-1 enhance Gag-specific immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Maciel da Costa Godinho

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that a DNA vaccine encoding HIV-p55gag in association with the lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1 elicited a greater Gag-specific immune response, in comparison to a DNA encoding the native gag. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that LAMP/Gag was highly expressed and was present in MHCII containing compartments in transfected cells. In this study, the mechanisms involved in these processes and the relative contributions of the increased expression and altered traffic for the enhanced immune response were addressed. Cells transfected with plasmid DNA constructs containing p55gag attached to truncated sequences of LAMP-1 showed that the increased expression of gag mRNA required p55gag in frame with at least 741 bp of the LAMP-1 luminal domain. LAMP luminal domain also showed to be essential for Gag traffic through lysosomes and, in this case, the whole sequence was required. Further analysis of the trafficking pathway of the intact LAMP/Gag chimera demonstrated that it was secreted, at least in part, associated with exosome-like vesicles. Immunization of mice with LAMP/gag chimeric plasmids demonstrated that high expression level alone can induce a substantial transient antibody response, but targeting of the antigen to the endolysosomal/secretory pathways was required for establishment of cellular and memory response. The intact LAMP/gag construct induced polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response, which presence at the time of immunization was required for CD8+ T cell priming. LAMP-mediated targeting to endolysosomal/secretory pathway is an important new mechanistic element in LAMP-mediated enhanced immunity with applications to the development of novel anti-HIV vaccines and to general vaccinology field.

  18. Regulation of HIV-Gag expression and targeting to the endolysosomal/secretory pathway by the luminal domain of lysosomal-associated membrane protein (LAMP-1) enhance Gag-specific immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Rodrigo Maciel da Costa; Matassoli, Flavio Lemos; Lucas, Carolina Gonçalves de Oliveira; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Gonçalves, Jorge Luiz Santos; Sato, Maria Notomi; Maciel, Milton; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; August, J Thomas; Marques, Ernesto Torres de Azevedo; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a DNA vaccine encoding HIV-p55gag in association with the lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) elicited a greater Gag-specific immune response, in comparison to a DNA encoding the native gag. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that LAMP/Gag was highly expressed and was present in MHCII containing compartments in transfected cells. In this study, the mechanisms involved in these processes and the relative contributions of the increased expression and altered traffic for the enhanced immune response were addressed. Cells transfected with plasmid DNA constructs containing p55gag attached to truncated sequences of LAMP-1 showed that the increased expression of gag mRNA required p55gag in frame with at least 741 bp of the LAMP-1 luminal domain. LAMP luminal domain also showed to be essential for Gag traffic through lysosomes and, in this case, the whole sequence was required. Further analysis of the trafficking pathway of the intact LAMP/Gag chimera demonstrated that it was secreted, at least in part, associated with exosome-like vesicles. Immunization of mice with LAMP/gag chimeric plasmids demonstrated that high expression level alone can induce a substantial transient antibody response, but targeting of the antigen to the endolysosomal/secretory pathways was required for establishment of cellular and memory response. The intact LAMP/gag construct induced polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response, which presence at the time of immunization was required for CD8+ T cell priming. LAMP-mediated targeting to endolysosomal/secretory pathway is an important new mechanistic element in LAMP-mediated enhanced immunity with applications to the development of novel anti-HIV vaccines and to general vaccinology field.

  19. Regulation of HIV-Gag Expression and Targeting to the Endolysosomal/Secretory Pathway by the Luminal Domain of Lysosomal-Associated Membrane Protein (LAMP-1) Enhance Gag-Specific Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Carolina Gonçalves de Oliveira; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Gonçalves, Jorge Luiz Santos; Sato, Maria Notomi; Maciel, Milton; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; August, J. Thomas; de Azevedo Marques, Ernesto Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a DNA vaccine encoding HIV-p55gag in association with the lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) elicited a greater Gag-specific immune response, in comparison to a DNA encoding the native gag. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that LAMP/Gag was highly expressed and was present in MHCII containing compartments in transfected cells. In this study, the mechanisms involved in these processes and the relative contributions of the increased expression and altered traffic for the enhanced immune response were addressed. Cells transfected with plasmid DNA constructs containing p55gag attached to truncated sequences of LAMP-1 showed that the increased expression of gag mRNA required p55gag in frame with at least 741 bp of the LAMP-1 luminal domain. LAMP luminal domain also showed to be essential for Gag traffic through lysosomes and, in this case, the whole sequence was required. Further analysis of the trafficking pathway of the intact LAMP/Gag chimera demonstrated that it was secreted, at least in part, associated with exosome-like vesicles. Immunization of mice with LAMP/gag chimeric plasmids demonstrated that high expression level alone can induce a substantial transient antibody response, but targeting of the antigen to the endolysosomal/secretory pathways was required for establishment of cellular and memory response. The intact LAMP/gag construct induced polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response, which presence at the time of immunization was required for CD8+ T cell priming. LAMP-mediated targeting to endolysosomal/secretory pathway is an important new mechanistic element in LAMP-mediated enhanced immunity with applications to the development of novel anti-HIV vaccines and to general vaccinology field. PMID:24932692

  20. The roughness of lip skin is related to the ceramide profile in the stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, E; Ishikawa, J; Naoe, A; Yamamoto, T

    2016-12-01

    The structure of skin on the lips is different from skin at other areas of the body; the water content of the stratum corneum (SC) and the barrier function there is low. Therefore, the lips can easily become dry and rough. The SC plays an important role in the barrier and water-holding functions of the skin. Above all, ceramides (CERs) are important SC lipids which maintain SC functions. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between the degree of lip roughness and the CER profile. Forty-one Japanese female subjects with normal skin (age range 22-52 years; mean 34.1) were enrolled in this study. The degree of lip roughness was scored, the values of capacitance and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were measured and CER profiles of the SC were analysed using tape-stripping. The degree of lip roughness was related to the capacitance values but not the TEWL values. The roughness level correlated with the levels of CER[NH], CER[NP], CER[AH], CER[EOS] and CER[EOH] and the average carbon numbers of CER[NDS], CER[NH] and CER[NP] but not with the level of total CERs. The capacitance values of the lips were related not only with the levels of total CERs but also with the levels of CER[NH], CER[NP], CER[AH], CER[AP], CER[EOS], CER[EOH] and CER[EOP] and with the average carbon numbers of CER[NDS], CER[NS], CER[NH] and CER[NP]. The TEWL values of the lips were related not only with the levels of total CERs but also with the levels of CER[NH], CER[AH], CER[AP], CER[EOS] and CER[EOH]. The relationship between lip roughness and the CER profile was clarified for the first time. The results suggest that not only the level of total CERs but also the specific CER species and their carbon numbers affect the maintenance of SC function. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  1. Influence of niacinamide containing formulations on the molecular and biophysical properties of the stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, D; Crowther, J M; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2013-01-30

    Niacinamide-containing moisturisers are known be efficacious in alleviating dry skin conditions and improving stratum corneum (SC) barrier function. However, the mechanisms of action of niacinamide at the molecular level in the SC are still not well understood. Previously, we have reported the development of novel methods to probe SC barrier properties in vivo. The aim of the present study was to characterise changes in Trans Epidermal Water Loss (TEWL), corneocyte surface area and maturity, selected protease activities and SC thickness after repeated application of a simple vehicle containing niacinamide. A commercial formulation was also included as a reference. The left and right mid-volar forearms of 20 healthy volunteers were used as study sites, to which topical formulations were applied twice daily for 28 days. After successive tape-stripping, corneocyte maturity and surface area were assessed. In addition, activity of the desquamatory kallikrein (KLK) protease enzymes KLK5 and KLK7, and tryptase and plasmin (implicated in inflammatory process) were measured using a fluorogenic probe assay. The amount of protein removed and TEWL were also recorded. SC thickness before and after treatment was determined using Confocal Raman Spectroscopy (CRS). Overall (i) corneocyte maturity and surface area decreased with increasing number of tape strips, (ii) activity of both the desquamatory and inflammatory enzymes was highest in the outer layers of the SC and decreased with depth (iii) TEWL increased as more SC layers were removed. Furthermore, areas treated with formulations containing niacinamide were significantly different to pre-treatment baseline and untreated/vehicle-control treated sites, with larger and more mature corneocytes, decreased inflammatory activity, decreased TEWL and increased SC thickness. These data (a) confirm the utility of measures and metrics developed previously for the non-invasive assay of SC barrier function, (b) present an holistic picture

  2. Variation in stratum corneum protein content as a function of anatomical site and ethnic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, N; Voegeli, R; Rawlings, A V; Gibbons, S; Munday, M R; Summers, B; Lane, M E

    2016-06-01

    Quantification of stratum corneum (SC) protein levels from tape strippings is frequently used to investigate skin conditions, to correct for amounts of SC protein removed in SC biomarker studies and to determine distribution of topically applied ingredients. In recent years, a rapid and convenient method for SC protein quantification from tape strippings has become available using infrared densitometry (IRD). However, standard curves have only been generated for Caucasian forearm and shoulder SC and have been assumed to be correct not only for facial SC but also for SC samples of other ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of IRD for SC protein measurement is valid for other body sites such as the cheek and for measuring SC protein content of darkly pigmented skin types. Ten Caucasian and ten Black African female subjects with self-assessed normal skin participated in the study. Tape strippings were collected from two different body sites (forearm and cheek). First from the tape strippings, the SC optical absorption was determined densitometrically. This obtained absorption (%) was compared with absolute SC protein extracted from the same tapes using a colorimetric microbicinchoninic acid (μBCA) assay. Higher amounts of SC protein were removed from the forearm compared with the cheek (P 0.05). The overall coefficient of determination (R(2) ) shows a good fit to the regression line between the two methods in both sites (forearm = 0.82, cheek = 0.77). Also, both ethnicities showed good correlation (R(2) ≥ 0.69, P = 0.01). Facial SC is morphologically distinct from the forearm, as demonstrated by the differences in amounts of SC removed. Although the data distribution in different subject groups varied, the regression was always quite similar between the two body sites and both ethnic groups. Also, the correlations were similar to previously published data on other body sites. The resultant calibration curves can be used as a rapid

  3. Fast Nondestructive Identification of Endothelium Corneum Gigeriae Galli Using Visible/Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小燕; 孟耀勇; 张浩; 欧文娟; 刘颂豪

    2011-01-01

    Vis/NIR, spcctroscopy, in combination with partial least square (PLS) analysis and a back-propagation neural network, is investigated to identify cndothcliutn corncum gigeriae galli (EC'GG). The spectra] features of ECGGs and their counterfeits are reasonably differentiated in vis/NfR region, whicli provides enough qualitative information to establish the r