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Sample records for corest modulate neuronal

  1. REST and CoREST modulate neuronal subtype specification, maturation and maintenance.

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    Joseph J Abrajano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF is a master regulator of neuronal gene expression. REST functions as a modular scaffold for dynamic recruitment of epigenetic regulatory factors including its primary cofactor, the corepressor for element-1-silencing transcription factor (CoREST, to genomic loci that contain the repressor element-1 (RE1 binding motif. While REST was initially believed to silence RE1 containing neuronal genes in neural stem cells (NSCs and non-neuronal cells, emerging evidence shows an increasingly complex cell type- and developmental stage-specific repertoire of REST target genes and functions that include regulation of neuronal lineage maturation and plasticity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we utilized chromatin immunoprecipitation on chip (ChIP-chip analysis to examine REST and CoREST functions during NSC-mediated specification of cholinergic neurons (CHOLNs, GABAergic neurons (GABANs, glutamatergic neurons (GLUTNs, and medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs. We identified largely distinct but overlapping profiles of REST and CoREST target genes during neuronal subtype specification including a disproportionately high percentage that are exclusive to each neuronal subtype. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that the differential deployment of REST and CoREST is an important regulatory mechanism that mediates neuronal subtype specification by modulating specific gene networks responsible for inducing and maintaining neuronal subtype identity. Our observations also implicate a broad array of factors in the generation of neuronal diversity including but not limited to those that mediate homeostasis, cell cycle dynamics, cell viability, stress responses and epigenetic regulation.

  2. Differential deployment of REST and CoREST promotes glial subtype specification and oligodendrocyte lineage maturation.

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    Joseph J Abrajano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The repressor element-1 (RE1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF is a master transcriptional regulator that binds to numerous genomic RE1 sites where it acts as a molecular scaffold for dynamic recruitment of modulatory and epigenetic cofactors, including corepressor for element-1-silencing transcription factor (CoREST. CoREST also acts as a hub for various cofactors that play important roles in epigenetic remodeling and transcriptional regulation. While REST can recruit CoREST to its macromolecular complex, CoREST complexes also function at genomic sites independently of REST. REST and CoREST perform a broad array of context-specific functions, which include repression of neuronal differentiation genes in neural stem cells (NSCs and other non-neuronal cells as well as promotion of neurogenesis. Despite their involvement in multiple aspects of neuronal development, REST and CoREST are not believed to have any direct modulatory roles in glial cell maturation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We challenged this view by performing the first study of REST and CoREST in NSC-mediated glial lineage specification and differentiation. Utilizing ChIP on chip (ChIP-chip assays, we identified distinct but overlapping developmental stage-specific profiles for REST and CoREST target genes during astrocyte (AS and oligodendrocyte (OL lineage specification and OL lineage maturation and myelination, including many genes not previously implicated in glial cell biology or linked to REST and CoREST regulation. Amongst these factors are those implicated in macroglial (AS and OL cell identity, maturation, and maintenance, such as members of key developmental signaling pathways and combinatorial transcription factor codes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results imply that REST and CoREST modulate not only neuronal but also glial lineage elaboration. These factors may therefore mediate critical developmental processes

  3. MicroRNA targeting of CoREST controls polarization of migrating cortical neurons.

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    Volvert, Marie-Laure; Prévot, Pierre-Paul; Close, Pierre; Laguesse, Sophie; Pirotte, Sophie; Hemphill, James; Rogister, Florence; Kruzy, Nathalie; Sacheli, Rosalie; Moonen, Gustave; Deiters, Alexander; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Chariot, Alain; Malgrange, Brigitte; Godin, Juliette D; Nguyen, Laurent

    2014-05-22

    The migration of cortical projection neurons is a multistep process characterized by dynamic cell shape remodeling. The molecular basis of these changes remains elusive, and the present work describes how microRNAs (miRNAs) control neuronal polarization during radial migration. We show that miR-22 and miR-124 are expressed in the cortical wall where they target components of the CoREST/REST transcriptional repressor complex, thereby regulating doublecortin transcription in migrating neurons. This molecular pathway underlies radial migration by promoting dynamic multipolar-bipolar cell conversion at early phases of migration, and later stabilization of cell polarity to support locomotion on radial glia fibers. Thus, our work emphasizes key roles of some miRNAs that control radial migration during cerebral corticogenesis.

  4. Comparison between Specific Lumber Mobilization and Core-Stability Exercises with Core-Stability Exercises Alone in Mechanical low back pain

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    Ahmed, Rafiq; Shakil-ur-Rehman, Syed; Sibtain, Fozia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To Compare the Specific Lumber Mobilization (SLM) techniques and Core-Stability (CS) Exercises with Core-Stability Exercises Alone in Mechanical low back pain (MLP) Methods: A 6 month pretest-posttest design, quasi experimental study was conducted at department of physiotherapy Khyber Teaching Hospital (KTH) Peshawar, Pakistan. We conveniently selected a sample 40 patients and placed into two groups. The SLM techniques with CS exercises was applied in group A and CS exercises alone...

  5. NAC1, a cocaine-regulated POZ/BTB protein interacts with CoREST.

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    Korutla, Laxminarayana; Degnan, Ryan; Wang, Peijie; Mackler, Scott A

    2007-05-01

    In this report, CoREST was identified as a protein that interacts with NAC1. NAC1 is a cocaine-regulated Pox virus and Zinc finger/Bric-a-brac Tramtrack Broad complex (POZ/BTB) repressor protein, which mediates interactions among several other transcriptional regulators. In the present study, an interaction between NAC1 and CoREST was detected in neuro-2A cells and HEK293T cells. We found that the POZ/BTB domain is necessary and sufficient for interaction with CoREST. Surprisingly, only one of five mutations in the POZ/BTB domain that disrupts homodimer assembly interfered with NAC1 and CoREST interactions. These results indicate that POZ/BTB homodimer formation is not required for NAC1-CoREST interaction. CoREST demonstrated protein-protein interactions with both isoforms of NAC1, sNAC1, and lNAC1. Coimmunoprecipitation studies show that NAC1 and CoREST are physically bound together. To further support the results, a direct interaction was demonstrated in glutathione-S-transferase pull down assays. siRNA directed against NAC1 mRNA significantly reduced NAC1 protein expression and resulted in reversal of CoREST-mediated repression in cells. This interaction between NAC1 and CoREST was not found for other POZ/BTB proteins tested. Endogenous interaction was demonstrated in lysates from rat brain samples. This is the first report to demonstrate that a POZ/BTB protein interacts with CoREST. Taken together, the results indicate that CoREST may be part of the NAC1 repressor mechanism.

  6. Development of a core-stability model: a delphi approach.

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    Majewski-Schrage, Tricia; Evans, Todd A; Ragan, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Despite widespread acceptance, there is currently no consensus on the definition, components, and the specific techniques most appropriate to measure and quantify core stability. To develop a comprehensive core-stability model addressing its definition, components, and assessment techniques. Delphi technique. University laboratory. 15 content experts from United States and Canada, representing a variety of disciplines. The authors distributed an open-ended questionnaire pertaining to a core-stability definition, components, and assessment techniques specific to each expert. They collected data over 2 rounds of telephone interviews. They concluded data collection once a consensus was achieved that equated with 51% agreement among respondents. The authors developed a working definition of core stability as the ability to achieve and sustain control of the trunk region at rest and during precise movement. Eighty-three percent of the experts considered the definition satisfactory. Therefore, the definition was accepted. Furthermore, the experts agreed that muscles (14/15 = 93.3%) and neuromuscular control (8/12 = 66.7%) were components of core stability. Assessment techniques were identified and inconsistencies were highlighted; however, no consensus was established. A consensus core-stability definition was created and 2 components were identified. However, of the initial definitions provided by the experts, no 2 were identical, which revealed the inconsistencies among experts and the importance of this study. Nonetheless, the goal of obtaining a consensus definition was obtained. Although a consensus for the assessment techniques of core stability could not be reached, it was a beneficial starting point to identify the inconsistencies that were discovered among the content experts.

  7. Salsolinol modulation of dopamine neurons

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    Guiqin eXie

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Salsolinol, a tetrahydroisoquinoline present in the human and rat brains, is the condensation product of dopamine and acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol. Previous evidence obtained in vivo links salsolinol with the mesolimbic dopaminergic system: salsolinol is self-administered into the posterior of the ventral tegmental area (pVTA of rats; intra-VTA administration of salsolinol induces a strong conditional place preference and increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. However, the underlying neuronal mechanisms are unclear. Here we present an overview of some of the recent research on this topic. Electrophysiological studies reveal that dopaminergic neurons in the posterior ventral tegmental area (pVTA are a target of salsolinol. In acute brain slices from rats, salsolinol increases the excitability and accelerates the ongoing firing of dopamine neurons in the pVTA. Intriguingly, this action of salsolinol involves multiple pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms, including: (a depolarizing the membrane potential of dopamine neurons; (b activating mu opioid receptors on the GABAergic inputs to dopamine neurons, which decreases GABAergic activity and dopamine neurons are disinhibited; and (c enhancing presynaptic glutamatergic transmission onto dopamine neurons via activation of dopamine type 1 receptors, probably situated on the glutamatergic terminals. These novel mechanisms may contribute to the rewarding/reinforcing properties of salsolinol observed in vivo.

  8. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

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    Pau eCelada

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT, acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by 1 modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and 2 varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3 and inhibitory (5-HT1A receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the

  9. Comparison between Specific Lumber Mobilization and Core-Stability Exercises with Core-Stability Exercises Alone in Mechanical low back pain.

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    Ahmed, Rafiq; Shakil-Ur-Rehman, Syed; Sibtain, Fozia

    2014-01-01

    To Compare the Specific Lumber Mobilization (SLM) techniques and Core-Stability (CS) Exercises with Core-Stability Exercises Alone in Mechanical low back pain (MLP) Methods: A 6 month pretest-posttest design, quasi experimental study was conducted at department of physiotherapy Khyber Teaching Hospital (KTH) Peshawar, Pakistan. We conveniently selected a sample 40 patients and placed into two groups. The SLM techniques with CS exercises was applied in group A and CS exercises alone in group B for 6 weeks. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Visual analog scale (VAS) for mechanical low back pain were assessment tools assessed for all patients before and after 6 weeks of physical therapy intervention. Data was analyzed by SPSS and statistical test were applied at 95% level of significance determine the efficacy of both the treatments regimes and compared with each other. After comparison between two groups, the group A treated with specific lumber mobilization techniques shows better results in improving pain (p=0.008) and reducing physical disability (p=0.004) as compared to the group B treated with specific lumber mobilization techniques alone (pain intensity: p= 0.172 and physical disability: p=0.201). It is concluded that patients with mechanical low back pain will show more improvement in pain and function while treated by specific lumber mobilization and core stability exercises as compared to those patients who will be treated by specific joint mobilization techniques.

  10. Behavioral plasticity through the modulation of switch neurons.

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    Vassiliades, Vassilis; Christodoulou, Chris

    2016-02-01

    A central question in artificial intelligence is how to design agents capable of switching between different behaviors in response to environmental changes. Taking inspiration from neuroscience, we address this problem by utilizing artificial neural networks (NNs) as agent controllers, and mechanisms such as neuromodulation and synaptic gating. The novel aspect of this work is the introduction of a type of artificial neuron we call "switch neuron". A switch neuron regulates the flow of information in NNs by selectively gating all but one of its incoming synaptic connections, effectively allowing only one signal to propagate forward. The allowed connection is determined by the switch neuron's level of modulatory activation which is affected by modulatory signals, such as signals that encode some information about the reward received by the agent. An important aspect of the switch neuron is that it can be used in appropriate "switch modules" in order to modulate other switch neurons. As we show, the introduction of the switch modules enables the creation of sequences of gating events. This is achieved through the design of a modulatory pathway capable of exploring in a principled manner all permutations of the connections arriving on the switch neurons. We test the model by presenting appropriate architectures in nonstationary binary association problems and T-maze tasks. The results show that for all tasks, the switch neuron architectures generate optimal adaptive behaviors, providing evidence that the switch neuron model could be a valuable tool in simulations where behavioral plasticity is required.

  11. Dynamic GABAergic afferent modulation of AgRP neurons

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    Garfield, Alastair S; Shah, Bhavik P; Burgess, Christian R; Li, Monica M; Li, Chia; Steger, Jennifer S; Madara, Joseph C; Campbell, John N; Kroeger, Daniel; Scammell, Thomas E; Tannous, Bakhos A; Myers, Martin G; Andermann, Mark L; Krashes, Michael J; Lowell, Bradford B

    2017-01-01

    Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) promote homeostatic feeding at times of caloric insufficiency, yet they are rapidly suppressed by food-related sensory cues prior to ingestion. Here we identify a highly selective inhibitory afferent to AgRP neurons that serves as a neural determinant of this rapid modulation. Specifically, GABAergic projections arising from the ventral compartment of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (vDMH) contribute to the pre-consummatory modulation of ARCAgRP neurons. In a manner reciprocal to ARCAgRP neurons, ARC-projecting leptin receptor (LepR)-expressing GABAergic DMH neurons exhibit rapid activation upon availability of food that additionally reflects the relative value of the food. Thus, DMHLepR neurons form part of the sensory network that relays real-time information about the nature and availability of food to dynamically modulate ARCAgRP neuron activity and feeding behavior. PMID:27643429

  12. Caenorhabditis elegans glia modulate neuronal activity and behavior

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    Randy F Stout; Alexei eVerkhratsky; Vladimir eParpura

    2014-01-01

    Glial cells of Caenorhabditis elegans can modulate neuronal activity and behavior, which is the focus of this review. Initially, we provide an overview of neuroglial evolution, making a comparison between C. elegans glia and their genealogical counterparts. What follows is a brief discussion on C. elegans glia characteristics in terms of their exact numbers, germ layers origin, their necessity for proper development of sensory organs, and lack of their need for neuronal survival. The more spe...

  13. Sexually dimorphic octopaminergic neurons modulate female postmating behaviors in Drosophila.

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    Rezával, Carolina; Nojima, Tetsuya; Neville, Megan C; Lin, Andrew C; Goodwin, Stephen F

    2014-03-31

    Mating elicits profound behavioral and physiological changes in many species that are crucial for reproductive success. After copulation, Drosophila melanogaster females reduce their sexual receptivity and increase egg laying [1, 2]. Transfer of male sex peptide (SP) during copulation mediates these postmating responses [1, 3-6] via SP sensory neurons in the uterus defined by coexpression of the proprioceptive neuronal marker pickpocket (ppk) and the sex-determination genes doublesex (dsx) and fruitless (fru) [7-9]. Although neurons expressing dsx downstream of SP signaling have been shown to regulate postmating behaviors [9], how the female nervous system coordinates the change from pre- to postcopulatory states is unknown. Here, we show a role of the neuromodulator octopamine (OA) in the female postmating response. Lack of OA disrupts postmating responses in mated females, while increase of OA induces postmating responses in virgin females. Using a novel dsx(FLP) allele, we uncovered dsx neuronal elements associated with OA signaling involved in modulation of postmating responses. We identified a small subset of sexually dimorphic OA/dsx(+) neurons (approximately nine cells in females) in the abdominal ganglion. Our results are consistent with a model whereby OA neuronal signaling increases after copulation, which in turn modulates changes in female behavior and physiology in response to reproductive state. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Astrocytic modulation of neuronal excitability through K(+) spatial buffering.

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    Bellot-Saez, Alba; Kékesi, Orsolya; Morley, John W; Buskila, Yossi

    2017-03-06

    The human brain contains two major cell populations, neurons and glia. While neurons are electrically excitable and capable of discharging short voltage pulses known as action potentials, glial cells are not. However, astrocytes, the prevailing subtype of glia in the cortex, are highly connected and can modulate the excitability of neurons by changing the concentration of potassium ions in the extracellular environment, a process called K(+) clearance. During the past decade, astrocytes have been the focus of much research, mainly due to their close association with synapses and their modulatory impact on neuronal activity. It has been shown that astrocytes play an essential role in normal brain function including: nitrosative regulation of synaptic release in the neocortex, synaptogenesis, synaptic transmission and plasticity. Here, we discuss the role of astrocytes in network modulation through their K(+) clearance capabilities, a theory that was first raised 50 years ago by Orkand and Kuffler. We will discuss the functional alterations in astrocytic activity that leads to aberrant modulation of network oscillations and synchronous activity.

  15. A noncanonical release of GABA and glutamate modulates neuronal migration.

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    Manent, Jean-Bernard; Demarque, Michaël; Jorquera, Isabel; Pellegrino, Christophe; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Aniksztejn, Laurent; Represa, Alfonso

    2005-05-11

    Immature neurons express GABA and glutamate receptors before synapse formation, and both transmitters are released at an early developmental stage. We have now tested the hypothesis that the ongoing release of GABA and glutamate modulates neuronal migration. Using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling and cocultures of hippocampal slices obtained from naive and green fluorescent protein-transgenic mice, we report that migration is severely affected by GABA(A) or NMDA receptor antagonist treatments. These effects were also present in munc18-1 knock-out slices in which soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-dependent vesicular secretion of transmitters has been deleted. GABA(A) antagonists were more efficient than NMDA antagonists to reduce cell migration, in keeping with the earlier maturation of GABAergic mechanisms. We conclude that GABA and, to a lesser degree, glutamate released in a SNARE-independent mechanism exert a paracrine action on neuronal migration.

  16. Social modulation during songbird courtship potentiates midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

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    Ya-Chun Huang

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission onto dopaminergic neurons of the mammalian ventral tegmental area (VTA can be potentiated by acute or chronic exposure to addictive drugs. Because rewarding behavior, such as social affiliation, can activate the same neural circuitry as addictive drugs, we tested whether the intense social interaction of songbird courtship may also potentiate VTA synaptic function. We recorded glutamatergic synaptic currents from VTA of male zebra finches who had experienced distinct social and behavioral conditions during the previous hour. The level of synaptic transmission to VTA neurons, as assayed by the ratio of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA glutamate receptor mediated synaptic currents, was increased after males sang to females, and also after they saw females without singing, but not after they sang while alone. Potentiation after female exposure alone did not appear to result from stress, as it was not blocked by inhibition of glucocorticoid receptors. This potentiation was restricted to synapses of dopaminergic projection neurons, and appeared to be expressed postsynaptically. This study supports a model in which VTA dopaminergic neurons are more strongly activated during singing used for courtship than during non-courtship singing, and thus can provide social context-dependent modulation to forebrain areas. More generally, these results demonstrate that an intense social encounter can trigger the same pathways of neuronal plasticity as addictive drugs.

  17. Serotonin modulates glutamatergic transmission to neurons in the lateral habenula.

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    Xie, Guiqin; Zuo, Wanhong; Wu, Liangzhi; Li, Wenting; Wu, Wei; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-04-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is bilaterally connected with serotoninergic raphe nuclei, and expresses high density of serotonin receptors. However, actions of serotonin on the excitatory synaptic transmission to LHb neurons have not been thoroughly investigated. The LHb contains two anatomically and functionally distinct regions: lateral (LHbl) and medial (LHbm) divisions. We compared serotonin's effects on glutamatergic transmission across the LHb in rat brains. Serotonin bi-directionally and differentially modulated glutamatergic transmission. Serotonin inhibited glutamatergic transmission in higher percentage of LHbl neurons but potentiated in higher percentage of LHbm neurons. Magnitude of potentiation was greater in LHbm than in LHbl. Type 2 and 3 serotonin receptor antagonists attenuated serotonin's potentiation. The serotonin reuptake blocker, and the type 2 and 3 receptor agonists facilitated glutamatergic transmission in both LHbl and LHbm neurons. Thus, serotonin via activating its type 2, 3 receptors, increased glutamate release at nerve terminals in some LHb neurons. Our data demonstrated that serotonin affects both LHbm and LHbl. Serotonin might play an important role in processing information between the LHb and its downstream-targeted structures during decision-making. It may also contribute to a homeostatic balance underlying the neural circuitry between the LHb and raphe nuclei.

  18. HIV-1 differentially modulates autophagy in neurons and astrocytes.

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    Mehla, Rajeev; Chauhan, Ashok

    2015-08-15

    Autophagy, a lysosomal degradative pathway that maintains cellular homeostasis, has emerged as an innate immune defense against pathogens. The role of autophagy in the deregulated HIV-infected central nervous system (CNS) is unclear. We have found that HIV-1-induced neuro-glial (neurons and astrocytes) damage involves modulation of the autophagy pathway. Neuro-glial stress induced by HIV-1 led to biochemical and morphological dysfunctions. X4 HIV-1 produced neuro-glial toxicity coupled with suppression of autophagy, while R5 HIV-1-induced toxicity was restricted to neurons. Rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor (autophagy inducer) relieved the blockage of the autophagy pathway caused by HIV-1 and resulted in neuro-glial protection. Further understanding of the regulation of autophagy by cytokines and chemokines or other signaling events may lead to recognition of therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Promoting Neuronal Tolerance of Diabetic Stress: Modulating Molecular Chaperones.

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    Emery, S M; Dobrowsky, R T

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) involves an interrelated series of metabolic and vascular insults that ultimately contribute to sensory neuron degeneration. In the quest to pharmacologically manage DPN, small-molecule inhibitors have targeted proteins and pathways regarded as "diabetes specific" as well as others whose activity are altered in numerous disease states. These efforts have not yielded any significant therapies, due in part to the complicating issue that the biochemical contribution of these targets/pathways to the progression of DPN does not occur with temporal and/or biochemical uniformity between individuals. In a complex, chronic neurodegenerative disease such as DPN, it is increasingly appreciated that effective disease management may not necessarily require targeting a pathway or protein considered to contribute to disease progression. Alternatively, it may prove sufficiently beneficial to pharmacologically enhance the activity of endogenous cytoprotective pathways to aid neuronal tolerance to and recovery from glucotoxic stress. In pursuing this paradigm shift, we have shown that modulating the activity and expression of molecular chaperones such as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) may provide translational potential for the effective medical management of insensate DPN. Considerable evidence supports that modulating Hsp70 has beneficial effects in improving inflammation, oxidative stress, and glucose sensitivity. Given the emerging potential of modulating Hsp70 to manage DPN, the current review discusses efforts to characterize the cytoprotective effects of this protein and the benefits and limitations that may arise in drug development efforts that exploit its cytoprotective activity.

  20. Adiponectin modulates excitability of rat paraventricular nucleus neurons by differential modulation of potassium currents.

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    Hoyda, Ted D; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2010-07-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone adiponectin acts at two seven-transmembrane domain receptors, adiponectin receptor 1 and adiponectin receptor 2, present in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus to regulate neuronal excitability and endocrine function. Adiponectin depolarizes rat parvocellular preautonomic neurons that secrete either thyrotropin releasing hormone or oxytocin and parvocellular neuroendocrine corticotropin releasing hormone neurons, leading to an increase in plasma adrenocorticotropin hormone concentrations while also hyperpolarizing a subgroup of neurons. In the present study, we investigate the ionic mechanisms responsible for these changes in excitability in parvocellular paraventricular nucleus neurons. Patch clamp recordings of currents elicited from slow voltage ramps and voltage steps indicate that adiponectin inhibits noninactivating delayed rectifier potassium current (I(K)) in a majority of neurons. This inhibition produced a broadening of the action potential in cells that depolarized in the presence of adiponectin. The depolarizing effects of adiponectin were abolished in cells pretreated with tetraethyl ammonium (0/15 cells depolarize). Slow voltage ramps performed during adiponectin-induced hyperpolarization indicate the activation of voltage-independent potassium current. These hyperpolarizing responses were abolished in the presence of glibenclamide [an ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel blocker] (0/12 cells hyperpolarize). The results presented in this study suggest that adiponectin controls neuronal excitability through the modulation of different potassium conductances, effects which contribute to changes in excitability and action potential profiles responsible for peptidergic release into the circulation.

  1. Microtubules Modulate F-actin Dynamics during Neuronal Polarization.

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    Zhao, Bing; Meka, Durga Praveen; Scharrenberg, Robin; König, Theresa; Schwanke, Birgit; Kobler, Oliver; Windhorst, Sabine; Kreutz, Michael R; Mikhaylova, Marina; Calderon de Anda, Froylan

    2017-08-29

    Neuronal polarization is reflected by different dynamics of microtubule and filamentous actin (F-actin). Axonal microtubules are more stable than those in the remaining neurites, while dynamics of F-actin in axonal growth cones clearly exceed those in their dendritic counterparts. However, whether a functional interplay exists between the microtubule network and F-actin dynamics in growing axons and whether this interplay is instrumental for breaking cellular symmetry is currently unknown. Here, we show that an increment on microtubule stability or number of microtubules is associated with increased F-actin dynamics. Moreover, we show that Drebrin E, an F-actin and microtubule plus-end binding protein, mediates this cross talk. Drebrin E segregates preferentially to growth cones with a higher F-actin treadmilling rate, where more microtubule plus-ends are found. Interruption of the interaction of Drebrin E with microtubules decreases F-actin dynamics and arrests neuronal polarization. Collectively the data show that microtubules modulate F-actin dynamics for initial axon extension during neuronal development.

  2. Arsenic Trioxide Modulates the Central Snail Neuron Action Potential

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    Guan-Ling Lu

    2009-09-01

    Conclusion: As2O3 at 10 mM elicits BoPs in central snail neurons and this effect may relate to the PLC activity of the neuron, rather than protein kinase A activity, or calcium influxes of the neuron. As2O3 at higher concentration irreversibly abolishes the spontaneous action potentials of the neuron.

  3. Galanin-Expressing GABA Neurons in the Lateral Hypothalamus Modulate Food Reward and Noncompulsive Locomotion.

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    Qualls-Creekmore, Emily; Yu, Sangho; Francois, Marie; Hoang, John; Huesing, Clara; Bruce-Keller, Annadora; Burk, David; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Morrison, Christopher D; Münzberg, Heike

    2017-06-21

    The lateral hypothalamus (LHA) integrates reward and appetitive behavior and is composed of many overlapping neuronal populations. Recent studies associated LHA GABAergic neurons (LHA (GABA) ), which densely innervate the ventral tegmental area (VTA), with modulation of food reward and consumption; yet, LHA (GABA) projections to the VTA exclusively modulated food consumption, not reward. We identified a subpopulation of LHA (GABA) neurons that coexpress the neuropeptide galanin (LHA (Gal) ). These LHA (Gal) neurons also modulate food reward, but lack direct VTA innervation. We hypothesized that LHA (Gal) neurons may represent a subpopulation of LHA (GABA) neurons that mediates food reward independent of direct VTA innervation. We used chemogenetic activation of LHA (Gal) or LHA (GABA) neurons in mice to compare their role in feeding behavior. We further analyzed locomotor behavior to understand how differential VTA connectivity and transmitter release in these LHA neurons influences this behavior. LHA (Gal) or LHA (GABA) neuronal activation both increased operant food-seeking behavior, but only activation of LHA (GABA) neurons increased overall chow consumption. Additionally, LHA (Gal) or LHA (GABA) neuronal activation similarly induced locomotor activity, but with striking differences in modality. Activation of LHA (GABA) neurons induced compulsive-like locomotor behavior; while LHA (Gal) neurons induced locomotor activity without compulsivity. Thus, LHA (Gal) neurons define a subpopulation of LHA (GABA) neurons without direct VTA innervation that mediate noncompulsive food-seeking behavior. We speculate that the striking difference in compulsive-like locomotor behavior is also based on differential VTA innervation. The downstream neural network responsible for this behavior and a potential role for galanin as neuromodulator remains to be identified.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The lateral hypothalamus (LHA) regulates motivated feeding behavior via GABAergic LHA neurons

  4. Modulation of orientation-selective neurons by motion: when additive, when multiplicative?

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    Torsten eLüdge

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The recurrent interaction among orientation-selective neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1 is suited to enhance contours in a noisy visual scene. Motion is known to have a strong pop-up effect in perceiving contours, but how motion-sensitive neurons in V1 support contour detection remains vastly elusive. Here we suggest how the various types of motion-sensitive neurons observed in V1 should be wired together in a micro-circuitry to optimally extract contours in the visual scene. Motion-sensitive neurons can be selective about the direction of motion occurring at some spot or respond equally to all directions (pandirectional. We show that, in the light of figure-ground segregation, direction-selective motion neurons should additively modulate the corresponding orientation-selective neurons with preferred orientation orthogonal to the motion direction. In turn, to maximally enhance contours, pandirectional motion neurons should multiplicatively modulate all orientation-selective neurons with co-localized receptive fields. This multiplicative modulation amplifies the local V1-circuitry among co-aligned orientation-selective neurons for detecting elongated contours. We suggest that the additive modulation by direction- specific motion neurons is achieved through synaptic projections to the somatic region, and the multiplicative modulation by pandirectional motion neurons through projections to the apical region of orientation-specific pyramidal neurons. For the purpose of contour detection, the V1- intrinsic integration of motion information is advantageous over a downstream integration as it exploits the recurrent V1-circuitry designed for that task.

  5. Transient brain ischemia: NMDA receptor modulation and delayed neuronal death

    OpenAIRE

    Benquet, Pascal; Gee, Christine E.; Gerber, Urs

    2008-01-01

    Transient global ischemia induces delayed neuronal death in certain cell types and brain regions while sparing cells in other areas. A key process through which oxygen-glucose deprivation triggers cell death is the excessive accumulation of the neurotransmitter glutamate leading to over excitation of neurons. In certain neurons this increase in glutamate will potentiate the NMDA type of glutamate receptor, which can then initiate cell death. This review provides an update of the neurophysiolo...

  6. Multiple sensory G proteins in the olfactory, gustatory and nociceptive neurons modulate longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lans (Hannes); G. Jansen (Gert)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe life span of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is under control of sensory signals detected by the amphid neurons. In these neurons, C. elegans expresses at least 13 Galpha subunits and a Ggamma subunit, which are involved in the transduction and modulation of sensory signals. Here

  7. Reciprocal cholinergic and GABAergic modulation of the small ventrolateral pacemaker neurons of Drosophila's circadian clock neuron network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelito, Katherine R; Shafer, Orie T

    2012-04-01

    The relatively simple clock neuron network of Drosophila is a valuable model system for the neuronal basis of circadian timekeeping. Unfortunately, many key neuronal classes of this network are inaccessible to electrophysiological analysis. We have therefore adopted the use of genetically encoded sensors to address the physiology of the fly's circadian clock network. Using genetically encoded Ca(2+) and cAMP sensors, we have investigated the physiological responses of two specific classes of clock neuron, the large and small ventrolateral neurons (l- and s-LN(v)s), to two neurotransmitters implicated in their modulation: acetylcholine (ACh) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Live imaging of l-LN(v) cAMP and Ca(2+) dynamics in response to cholinergic agonist and GABA application were well aligned with published electrophysiological data, indicating that our sensors were capable of faithfully reporting acute physiological responses to these transmitters within single adult clock neuron soma. We extended these live imaging methods to s-LN(v)s, critical neuronal pacemakers whose physiological properties in the adult brain are largely unknown. Our s-LN(v) experiments revealed the predicted excitatory responses to bath-applied cholinergic agonists and the predicted inhibitory effects of GABA and established that the antagonism of ACh and GABA extends to their effects on cAMP signaling. These data support recently published but physiologically untested models of s-LN(v) modulation and lead to the prediction that cholinergic and GABAergic inputs to s-LN(v)s will have opposing effects on the phase and/or period of the molecular clock within these critical pacemaker neurons.

  8. [Transient brain ischemia: NMDA receptor modulation and delayed neuronal death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benquet, Pascal; Gee, Christine E; Gerber, Urs

    2008-02-01

    Transient global ischemia induces delayed neuronal death in certain cell types and brain regions while sparing cells in other areas. A key process through which oxygen-glucose deprivation triggers cell death is the excessive accumulation of the neurotransmitter glutamate leading to over excitation of neurons. In certain neurons this increase in glutamate will potentiate the NMDA type of glutamate receptor, which can then initiate cell death. This review provides an update of the neurophysiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms inducing post-ischemic plasticity of NMDA receptors, focusing on the sensitive CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus as compared to the relatively resistant neighboring CA3 neurons. Both a change in the equilibrium between protein tyrosine kinases/phosphatases and an increased density of surface NMDA receptors in response to ischemia may explain the selective vulnerability of specific cell types. Implications for the treatment of stroke and reasons for the failures of human clinical trials utilizing NMDA receptor antagonists are also discussed.

  9. Divergent Modulation of Nociception by Glutamatergic and GABAergic Neuronal Subpopulations in the Periaqueductal Gray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajales-Reyes, Jose G.; Copits, Bryan A.; O’Brien, Daniel E.; Trigg, Sarah L.; Gomez, Adrian M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) constitutes a major descending pain modulatory system and is a crucial site for opioid-induced analgesia. A number of previous studies have demonstrated that glutamate and GABA play critical opposing roles in nociceptive processing in the vlPAG. It has been suggested that glutamatergic neurotransmission exerts antinociceptive effects, whereas GABAergic neurotransmission exert pronociceptive effects on pain transmission, through descending pathways. The inability to exclusively manipulate subpopulations of neurons in the PAG has prevented direct testing of this hypothesis. Here, we demonstrate the different contributions of genetically defined glutamatergic and GABAergic vlPAG neurons in nociceptive processing by employing cell type-specific chemogenetic approaches in mice. Global chemogenetic manipulation of vlPAG neuronal activity suggests that vlPAG neural circuits exert tonic suppression of nociception, consistent with previous pharmacological and electrophysiological studies. However, selective modulation of GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons demonstrates an inverse regulation of nociceptive behaviors by these cell populations. Selective chemogenetic activation of glutamatergic neurons, or inhibition of GABAergic neurons, in vlPAG suppresses nociception. In contrast, inhibition of glutamatergic neurons, or activation of GABAergic neurons, in vlPAG facilitates nociception. Our findings provide direct experimental support for a model in which excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the PAG bidirectionally modulate nociception. PMID:28374016

  10. Modulation of DNA base excision repair during neuronal differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykora, Peter; Yang, Jenq-Lin; Ferrarelli, Leslie K

    2013-01-01

    Neurons are terminally differentiated cells with a high rate of metabolism and multiple biological properties distinct from their undifferentiated precursors. Previous studies showed that nucleotide excision DNA repair is downregulated in postmitotic muscle cells and neurons. Here, we characterize...... DNA damage susceptibility and base excision DNA repair (BER) capacity in undifferentiated and differentiated human neural cells. The results show that undifferentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells are less sensitive to oxidative damage than their differentiated counterparts, in part because...

  11. Neuronal spike initiation modulated by extracellular electric fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Sheng Yi

    Full Text Available Based on a reduced two-compartment model, the dynamical and biophysical mechanism underlying the spike initiation of the neuron to extracellular electric fields is investigated in this paper. With stability and phase plane analysis, we first investigate in detail the dynamical properties of neuronal spike initiation induced by geometric parameter and internal coupling conductance. The geometric parameter is the ratio between soma area and total membrane area, which describes the proportion of area occupied by somatic chamber. It is found that varying it could qualitatively alter the bifurcation structures of equilibrium as well as neuronal phase portraits, which remain unchanged when varying internal coupling conductance. By analyzing the activating properties of somatic membrane currents at subthreshold potentials, we explore the relevant biophysical basis of spike initiation dynamics induced by these two parameters. It is observed that increasing geometric parameter could greatly decrease the intensity of the internal current flowing from soma to dendrite, which switches spike initiation dynamics from Hopf bifurcation to SNIC bifurcation; increasing internal coupling conductance could lead to the increase of this outward internal current, whereas the increasing range is so small that it could not qualitatively alter the spike initiation dynamics. These results highlight that neuronal geometric parameter is a crucial factor in determining the spike initiation dynamics to electric fields. The finding is useful to interpret the functional significance of neuronal biophysical properties in their encoding dynamics, which could contribute to uncovering how neuron encodes electric field signals.

  12. Effects of acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises in treating a patient with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation: a clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganiyu, Sokunbi Oluwaleke; Gujba, Kachalla Fatimah

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill 12-minute walking exercises in treating patients with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation. A 34-year-old woman with a history lumbar disc prolapse who had undergone lumbar disc surgery on two different occasions was treated using acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises three times per week for 12 weeks. The outcome measures used in this study were pain intensity, spinal range of movement, and general health. After 12 weeks of treatment, the patient had made improvement in terms of pain, which was reduced from 9/10 to 1/10. In a similar vein, the patient's general health showed improvement of >100% after 12 weeks of treatment. Pre-treatment scores of spinal flexion and left-side flexion, which measured 20 cm and 12 cm, respectively, increased to 25 cm and 16 cm after 12 weeks of treatment. This study showed that acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises were useful in relieving pain, increasing spinal range of movement, and improving the health of a patient with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Activity of Tachykinin1-Expressing Pet1 Raphe Neurons Modulates the Respiratory Chemoreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Morgan L; Corcoran, Andrea E; Brust, Rachael D; Chang, YoonJeung; Nattie, Eugene E; Dymecki, Susan M

    2017-02-15

    Homeostatic control of breathing, heart rate, and body temperature relies on circuits within the brainstem modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT). Mounting evidence points to specialized neuronal subtypes within the serotonergic neuronal system, borne out in functional studies, for the modulation of distinct facets of homeostasis. Such functional differences, read out at the organismal level, are likely subserved by differences among 5-HT neuron subtypes at the cellular and molecular levels, including differences in the capacity to coexpress other neurotransmitters such as glutamate, GABA, thyrotropin releasing hormone, and substance P encoded by the Tachykinin-1 (Tac1) gene. Here, we characterize in mice a 5-HT neuron subtype identified by expression of Tac1 and the serotonergic transcription factor gene Pet1, referred to as the Tac1-Pet1 neuron subtype. Transgenic cell labeling showed Tac1-Pet1 soma resident largely in the caudal medulla. Chemogenetic [clozapine-N-oxide (CNO)-hM4Di] perturbation of Tac1-Pet1 neuron activity blunted the ventilatory response of the respiratory CO2 chemoreflex, which normally augments ventilation in response to hypercapnic acidosis to restore normal pH and PCO2Tac1-Pet1 axonal boutons were found localized to brainstem areas implicated in respiratory modulation, with highest density in motor regions. These findings demonstrate that the activity of a Pet1 neuron subtype with the potential to release both 5-HT and substance P is necessary for normal respiratory dynamics, perhaps via motor outputs that engage muscles of respiration and maintain airway patency. These Tac1-Pet1 neurons may act downstream of Egr2-Pet1 serotonergic neurons, which were previously established in respiratory chemoreception, but do not innervate respiratory motor nuclei.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Serotonin (5-HT) neurons modulate physiological processes and behaviors as diverse as body temperature, respiration, aggression, and mood. Using genetic tools

  14. Pharmacogenetic modulation of orexin neurons alters sleep/wakefulness states in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Sasaki

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic neurons expressing neuropeptide orexins are critically involved in the control of sleep and wakefulness. Although the activity of orexin neurons is thought to be influenced by various neuronal input as well as humoral factors, the direct consequences of changes in the activity of these neurons in an intact animal are largely unknown. We therefore examined the effects of orexin neuron-specific pharmacogenetic modulation in vivo by a new method called the Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs approach (DREADD. Using this system, we successfully activated and suppressed orexin neurons as measured by Fos staining. EEG and EMG recordings suggested that excitation of orexin neurons significantly increased the amount of time spent in wakefulness and decreased both non-rapid eye movement (NREM and rapid eye movement (REM sleep times. Inhibition of orexin neurons decreased wakefulness time and increased NREM sleep time. These findings clearly show that changes in the activity of orexin neurons can alter the behavioral state of animals and also validate this novel approach for manipulating neuronal activity in awake, freely-moving animals.

  15. Spinal muscular atrophy: Factors that modulate motor neurone vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wen-Yo; Simpson, Julie E; Highley, J Robin; Heath, Paul R

    2017-02-02

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant death, is a neurodegenerative disease characterised by the selective loss of particular groups of motor neurones in the anterior horn of the spinal cord with concomitant muscle weakness. To date, no effective treatment is available, however, there are ongoing clinical trials are in place which promise much for the future. However, there remains an ongoing problem in trying to link a single gene loss to motor neurone degeneration. Fortunately, given successful disease models that have been established and intensive studies on SMN functions in the past ten years, we are fast approaching the stage of identifying the underlying mechanisms of SMA pathogenesis Here we discuss potential disease modifying factors on motor neurone vulnerability, in the belief that these factors give insight into the pathological mechanisms of SMA and therefore possible therapeutic targets.

  16. Matrix stiffness modulates formation and activity of neuronal networks of controlled architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantoine, Joséphine; Grevesse, Thomas; Villers, Agnès; Delhaye, Geoffrey; Mestdagh, Camille; Versaevel, Marie; Mohammed, Danahe; Bruyère, Céline; Alaimo, Laura; Lacour, Stéphanie P; Ris, Laurence; Gabriele, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    The ability to construct easily in vitro networks of primary neurons organized with imposed topologies is required for neural tissue engineering as well as for the development of neuronal interfaces with desirable characteristics. However, accumulating evidence suggests that the mechanical properties of the culture matrix can modulate important neuronal functions such as growth, extension, branching and activity. Here we designed robust and reproducible laminin-polylysine grid micropatterns on cell culture substrates that have similar biochemical properties but a 100-fold difference in Young's modulus to investigate the role of the matrix rigidity on the formation and activity of cortical neuronal networks. We found that cell bodies of primary cortical neurons gradually accumulate in circular islands, whereas axonal extensions spread on linear tracks to connect circular islands. Our findings indicate that migration of cortical neurons is enhanced on soft substrates, leading to a faster formation of neuronal networks. Furthermore, the pre-synaptic density was two times higher on stiff substrates and consistently the number of action potentials and miniature synaptic currents was enhanced on stiff substrates. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence to indicate that matrix stiffness is a key parameter to modulate the growth dynamics, synaptic density and electrophysiological activity of cortical neuronal networks, thus providing useful information on scaffold design for neural tissue engineering.

  17. Divergent modulation of neuronal differentiation by caspase-2 and -9.

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    Giuseppa Pistritto

    Full Text Available Human Ntera2/cl.D1 (NT2 cells treated with retinoic acid (RA differentiate towards a well characterized neuronal phenotype sharing many features with human fetal neurons. In view of the emerging role of caspases in murine stem cell/neural precursor differentiation, caspases activity was evaluated during RA differentiation. Caspase-2, -3 and -9 activity was transiently and selectively increased in differentiating and non-apoptotic NT2-cells. SiRNA-mediated selective silencing of either caspase-2 (si-Casp2 or -9 (si-Casp9 was implemented in order to dissect the role of distinct caspases. The RA-induced expression of neuronal markers, i.e. neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP2 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH mRNAs and proteins, was decreased in si-Casp9, but markedly increased in si-Casp2 cells. During RA-induced NT2 differentiation, the class III histone deacetylase Sirt1, a putative caspase substrate implicated in the regulation of the proneural bHLH MASH1 gene expression, was cleaved to a ∼100 kDa fragment. Sirt1 cleavage was markedly reduced in si-Casp9 cells, even though caspase-3 was normally activated, but was not affected (still cleaved in si-Casp2 cells, despite a marked reduction of caspase-3 activity. The expression of MASH1 mRNA was higher and occurred earlier in si-Casp2 cells, while was reduced at early time points during differentiation in si-Casp9 cells. Thus, caspase-2 and -9 may perform opposite functions during RA-induced NT2 neuronal differentiation. While caspase-9 activation is relevant for proper neuronal differentiation, likely through the fine tuning of Sirt1 function, caspase-2 activation appears to hinder the RA-induced neuronal differentiation of NT2 cells.

  18. REM sleep modulation by perifornical orexinergic inputs to the pedunculo-pontine tegmental neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanday, M A; Mallick, B N

    2015-11-12

    Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) is regulated by the interaction of the REM-ON and REM-OFF neurons located in the pedunculo-pontine-tegmentum (PPT) and the locus coeruleus (LC), respectively. Many other brain areas, particularly those controlling non-REMS (NREMS) and waking, modulate REMS by modulating these REMS-related neurons. Perifornical (PeF) orexin (Ox)-ergic neurons are reported to increase waking and reduce NREMS as well as REMS; dysfunction of the PeF neurons are related to REMS loss-associated disorders. Hence, we were interested in understanding the neural mechanism of PeF-induced REMS modulation. As a first step we have recently reported that PeF Ox-ergic neurons modulate REMS by influencing the LC neurons (site for REM-OFF neurons). Thereafter, in this in vivo study we have explored the role of PeF inputs on the PPT neurons (site for REM-ON neurons) for the regulation of REMS. Chronic male rats were surgically prepared with implanted bilateral cannulae in PeF and PPT and electrodes for recording sleep-waking patterns. After post-surgical recovery sleep-waking-REMS were recorded when bilateral PeF neurons were stimulated by glutamate and simultaneously bilateral PPT neurons were infused with either saline or orexin receptor1 (OX1R) antagonist. It was observed that PeF stimulation increased waking and decreased NREMS as well as REMS, which were prevented by OX1R antagonist into the PPT. We conclude that the PeF stimulation-induced reduction in REMS was likely to be due to inhibition of REM-ON neurons in the PPT. As waking and NREMS are inversely related, subject to confirmation, the reduction in NREMS could be due to increased waking or vice versa. Based on our findings from this and earlier studies we have proposed a model showing connections between PeF- and PPT-neurons for REMS regulation.

  19. Modulation of adult-born neurons in the inflamed hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim eBelarbi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life new neurons are continuously added to the hippocampal circuitry involved with spatial learning and memory. These new cells originate from neural precursors in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, migrate into the granule cell layer and integrate into neural networks encoding spatial and contextual information. This process can be influenced by several environmental and endogenous factors and is modified in different animal models of neurological disorders. Neuroinflammation, as defined by the presence of activated microglia, is a common key factor to the progression of neurological disorders. Analysis of the literature shows that microglial activation impacts not only the production, but also the migration and the recruitment of new neurons. The impact of microglia on adult-born neurons appears much more multifaceted than ever envisioned before, combining both supportive and detrimental effects that are dependent upon the activation phenotype and the factors being released. The development of strategies aimed to change microglia toward states that promote functional neurogenesis could therefore offer novel therapeutic opportunities against neurological disorders associated with cognitive deficits and neuroinflammation. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on how production, distribution and recruitment of new neurons into behaviorally relevant neural networks are modified in the inflamed hippocampus.

  20. Bacteria activate sensory neurons that modulate pain and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiu, Isaac M.; Heesters, Balthasar A.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Von Hehn, Christian A.; Zhao, Fan; Tran, Johnathan; Wainger, Brian; Strominger, Amanda; Muralidharan, Sriya; Horswill, Alexander R.; Wardenburg, Juliane Bubeck; Hwang, Sun Wook; Carroll, Michael C.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Nociceptor sensory neurons are specialized to detect potentially damaging stimuli, protecting the organism by initiating the sensation of pain and eliciting defensive behaviours. Bacterial infections produce pain by unknown molecular mechanisms, although they are presumed to be secondary to immune a

  1. Frontal Neurons Modulate Memory Retrieval across Widely Varying Temporal Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Hua; Williams, Ziv M.

    2015-01-01

    Once a memory has formed, it is thought to undergo a gradual transition within the brain from short- to long-term storage. This putative process, however, also poses a unique problem to the memory system in that the same learned items must also be retrieved across broadly varying time scales. Here, we find that neurons in the ventrolateral…

  2. Muscarinic modulation of sodium current by activation of protein kinase C in rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, A R; Ma, J Y; Scheuer, T; Catterall, W A

    1996-05-01

    Phosphorylation of brain Na+ channels by protein kinase C (PKC) decreases peak Na+ current and slows macroscopic inactivation, but receptor-activated modulation of Na+ currents via the PKC pathway has not been demonstrated. We have examined modulation of Na+ channels by activation of muscarinic receptors in acutely-isolated hippocampal neurons using whole-cell voltage-clamp recording. Application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol reduced peak Na+ current and slowed macroscopic inactivation at all potentials, without changing the voltage-dependent properties of the channel. These effects were mediated by PKC, since they were eliminated when the specific PKC inhibitor (PKCI19-36) was included in the pipette solution and mimicked by the extracellular application of the PKC activator, OAG. Thus, activation of endogenous muscarinic receptors on hippocampal neurons strongly modulates Na+ channel activity by activation of PKC. Cholinergic input from basal forebrain neurons may have this effect in the hippocampus in vivo.

  3. Optogenetic Modulation of Intracellular Signalling and Transcription: Focus on Neuronal Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, Cyril; Cesca, Fabrizia; Maragliano, Luca; Benfenati, Fabio; Maya-Vetencourt, Jose Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Several fields in neuroscience have been revolutionized by the advent of optogenetics, a technique that offers the possibility to modulate neuronal physiology in response to light stimulation. This innovative and far-reaching tool provided unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution to explore the activity of neural circuits underlying cognition and behaviour. With an exponential growth in the discovery and synthesis of new photosensitive actuators capable of modulating neuronal networks function, other fields in biology are experiencing a similar re-evolution. Here, we review the various optogenetic toolboxes developed to influence cellular physiology as well as the diverse ways in which these can be engineered to precisely modulate intracellular signalling and transcription. We also explore the processes required to successfully express and stimulate these photo-actuators in vivo before discussing how such tools can enlighten our understanding of neuronal plasticity at the systems level.

  4. Modulating motility of intracellular vesicles in cortical neurons with nanomagnetic forces on-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Anja; Murray, Coleman Tylor; Godzich, Chanya; Lin, Jonathan; Owsley, Keegan; Tay, Andy; Di Carlo, Dino

    2017-02-28

    Vesicle transport is a major underlying mechanism of cell communication. Inhibiting vesicle transport in brain cells results in blockage of neuronal signals, even in intact neuronal networks. Modulating intracellular vesicle transport can have a huge impact on the development of new neurotherapeutic concepts, but only if we can specifically interfere with intracellular transport patterns. Here, we propose to modulate motion of intracellular lipid vesicles in rat cortical neurons based on exogenously bioconjugated and cell internalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) within microengineered magnetic gradients on-chip. Upon application of 6-126 pN on intracellular vesicles in neuronal cells, we explored how the magnetic force stimulus impacts the motion pattern of vesicles at various intracellular locations without modulating the entire cell morphology. Altering vesicle dynamics was quantified using, mean square displacement, a caging diameter and the total traveled distance. We observed a de-acceleration of intercellular vesicle motility, while applying nanomagnetic forces to cultured neurons with SPIONs, which can be explained by a decrease in motility due to opposing magnetic force direction. Ultimately, using nanomagnetic forces inside neurons may permit us to stop the mis-sorting of intracellular organelles, proteins and cell signals, which have been associated with cellular dysfunction. Furthermore, nanomagnetic force applications will allow us to wirelessly guide axons and dendrites by exogenously using permanent magnetic field gradients.

  5. Nicotine modulates GABAergic transmission to dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng XIAO; Ke-chun YANG; Chun-yi ZHOU; Guo-zhang JIN; Jie WU; Jiang-hong YE

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) play important roles in motor control and drug addiction. As the major afferent, GABAergic innervation controls the activity of SNc dopaminergic neurons. Although it is clear that nicotine modulates SNc dopaminergic neurons by activating subtypes of somatodendritic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the detailed mechanisms of this activation remain to be addressed.Methods: In the current study, we recorded GABAA receptor-mediated spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIP-SCs) from dissociated SNc dopaminergic neurons that were obtained using an enzyme-free procedure. These neurons preserved some functional terminals after isolation, including those that release GABA.Results: We found that both extra- and intra-cellular calcium modulates sIPSCs in these neurons. Furthermore, both nicotine and endogenous acetylcholine enhance the frequency of sIPSCs. Moreover, endogenous acetylcholine tonically facilitates sIPSC frequency, primarily by activating the a4B2* nAChRs on the GABAergic terminals.Conclusion: Nicotine facilitates GABA release onto SNc dopaminergic neurons mainly via the activation of presynaptic a4B2* nAChRs.

  6. VTA GABA neurons modulate specific learning behaviours through the control of dopamine and cholinergic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meaghan C Creed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic reward system is primarily comprised of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc as well as their afferent and efferent connections. This circuitry is essential for learning about stimuli associated with motivationally-relevant outcomes. Moreover, addictive drugs affect and remodel this system, which may underlie their addictive properties. In addition to DA neurons, the VTA also contains approximately 30% ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons. The task of signalling both rewarding and aversive events from the VTA to the NAc has mostly been ascribed to DA neurons and the role of GABA neurons has been largely neglected until recently. GABA neurons provide local inhibition of DA neurons and also long-range inhibition of projection regions, including the NAc. Here we review studies using a combination of in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiology, pharmacogenetic and optogenetic manipulations that have characterized the functional neuroanatomy of inhibitory circuits in the mesolimbic system, and describe how GABA neurons of the VTA regulate reward and aversion-related learning. We also discuss pharmacogenetic manipulation of this system with benzodiazepines (BDZs, a class of addictive drugs, which act directly on GABAA receptors located on GABA neurons of the VTA. The results gathered with each of these approaches suggest that VTA GABA neurons bi-directionally modulate activity of local DA neurons, underlying reward or aversion at the behavioural level. Conversely, long-range GABA projections from the VTA to the NAc selectively target cholinergic interneurons (CINs to pause their firing and temporarily reduce cholinergic tone in the NAc, which modulates associative learning. Further characterization of inhibitory circuit function within and beyond the VTA is needed in order to fully understand the function of the mesolimbic system under normal and pathological conditions.

  7. Modulation of neuronal microcircuit activities within the medial prefrontal cortex by mGluR5 positive allosteric modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Marie; Bartolome, Jose Manuel; Conn, P Jeffrey; Steckler, Thomas; Shaban, Hamdy

    2014-10-01

    Suppressing anxiety and fear memory relies on bidirectional projections between the medial prefrontal cortex and the amygdala. Positive allosteric modulators of mGluR5 improve cognition in animal models of schizophrenia and retrieval of newly formed associations such as extinction of fear-conditioned behaviour. The increase in neuronal network activities of the medial prefrontal cortex is influenced by both mGluR1 and mGluR5; however, it is not well understood how they modulate network activities and downstream information processing. To map mGluR5-mediated network activity in relation to its emergence as a viable cognitive enhancer, we tested group I mGluR compounds on medial prefrontal cortex network activity via multi-electrode array neuronal spiking and whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Results indicate that mGluR5 activation promotes feed-forward inhibition that depends on recruitment of neuronal activity by carbachol-evoked up states. The rate of neuronal spiking activity under the influence of carbachol was reduced by the mGluR5 positive allosteric modulator, N-(1,3-Diphenyl-1H-pyrazolo-5-yl)-4-nitrobenzamide (VU-29), and enhanced by the mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator, 3-((2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MTEP). Spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents were increased upon application of carbachol and in combination with VU-29. These results emphasize a bias towards tonic mGluR5-mediated inhibition that might serve as a signal-to-noise enhancer of sensory inputs projected from associated limbic areas onto the medial prefrontal cortex neuronal microcircuit.

  8. Modulation of inositol polyphosphate levels regulates neuronal differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss, Omar; Wu, Chun Ting; Riccio, Antonella; Saiardi, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    The binding of neurotrophins to tropomyosin receptor kinase receptors initiates several signaling pathways, including the activation of phospholipase C-γ, which promotes the release of diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). In addition to recycling back to inositol, IP3 serves as a precursor for the synthesis of higher phosphorylated inositols, such as inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate (IP5) and inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6). Previous studies on the effect of neurotrophins on inositol signaling were limited to the analysis of IP3 and its dephosphorylation products. Here we demonstrate that nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates the levels of IP5 and IP6 during PC12 differentiation. Furthermore, both NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor alter IP5 and IP6 intracellular ratio in differentiated PC12 cells and primary neurons. Neurotrophins specifically regulate the expression of IP5-2 kinase (IP5-2K), which phosphorylates IP5 into IP6. IP5-2K is rapidly induced after NGF treatment, but its transcriptional levels sharply decrease in fully differentiated PC12 cells. Reduction of IP5-2K protein levels by small interfering RNA has an effect on the early stages of PC12 cell differentiation, whereas fully differentiated cells are not affected. Conversely, perturbation of IP5-2K levels by overexpression suggests that both differentiated PC12 cells and sympathetic neurons require low levels of the enzyme for survival. Therefore maintaining appropriate intracellular levels of inositol polyphosphates is necessary for neuronal survival and differentiation. PMID:23864704

  9. Inhibitory short-term plasticity modulates neuronal activity in the rat entopeduncular nucleus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavian, Hagar; Korngreen, Alon

    2016-04-01

    The entopeduncular nucleus (EP) is one of the basal ganglia output nuclei integrating synaptic information from several pathways within the basal ganglia. The firing of EP neurons is modulated by two streams of inhibitory synaptic transmission, the direct pathway from the striatum and the indirect pathway from the globus pallidus. These two inhibitory pathways continuously modulate the firing of EP neurons. However, the link between these synaptic inputs to neuronal firing in the EP is unclear. To investigate this input-output transformation we performed whole-cell and perforated-patch recordings from single neurons in the entopeduncular nucleus in rat brain slices during repetitive stimulation of the striatum and the globus pallidus at frequencies within the in vivo activity range of these neurons. These recordings, supplemented by compartmental modelling, showed that GABAergic synapses from the striatum, converging on EP dendrites, display short-term facilitation and that somatic or proximal GABAergic synapses from the globus pallidus show short-term depression. Activation of striatal synapses during low presynaptic activity decreased postsynaptic firing rate by continuously increasing the inter-spike interval. Conversely, activation of pallidal synapses significantly affected postsynaptic firing during high presynaptic activity. Our data thus suggest that low-frequency striatal output may be encoded as progressive phase shifts in downstream nuclei of the basal ganglia while high-frequency pallidal output may continuously modulate EP firing.

  10. Corticofugal modulation of frequency tuning of inferior collicular neurons in big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to explore the possible mechanism of corticofugal modulation of excitatory frequency tuning curves (EFTCs) of midbrain neurons, we examined the change of sharpness, frequency-intensity response area, minimum threshold of both EFTCs and inhibitory frequency tuning curves (IFTCs) of inferior collicular neurons during corticofugal modulation using two-tone inhibition paradigm and micro-electrical stimulation technique. Our data showed that corticofugal inhibition increased sharpness, minimum threshold, and decreased the frequency-intensity response area of EFTCs, at the same time it decreased the sharpness, minimum threshold but increased the frequency-intensity response area of IFTCs. The opposite results were observed for EFTCs and IFTCs of corticofugally facilitated inferior collicular neurons. During corticofugal inhibition, the per-cent change of frequency-intensity response area of EFTCs had significant correlation with the percent change of that of IFTCs. These data suggest that cortical neurons are likely to improve frequency information processing of inferior col-licular neurons by modulation of IFTCs.

  11. Zinc Modulates Nanosilver-Induced Toxicity in Primary Neuronal Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemińska, Elżbieta; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2016-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (NAg) have recently become one of the most commonly used nanomaterials. Since the ability of nanosilver to enter the brain has been confirmed, there has been a need to investigate mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. We previously showed that primary neuronal cultures treated with nanosilver undergo destabilization of calcium homeostasis via a mechanism involving glutamatergic NMDA receptors. Considering the fact that zinc interacts with these receptors, the aim of the present study was to examine the role of zinc in mechanisms of neuronal cell death in primary cultures. In cells treated with nanosilver, we noted an imbalance between extracellular and intracellular zinc levels. Thus, the influence of zinc deficiency and supplementation on nanosilver-evoked cytotoxicity was investigated by treatment with TPEN (a chelator of zinc ions), or ZnCl(2), respectively. Elimination of zinc leads to complete death of nanosilver-treated CGCs. In contrast, supplementation with ZnCl(2) increases viability of CGCs in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of zinc provided protection against the extra/intracellular calcium imbalance in a manner similar to MK-801, an antagonist of NMDA receptors. Zinc chelation by TPEN decreases the mitochondrial potential and dramatically increases the rate of production of reactive oxygen species. Our results indicate that zinc supplementation positively influences nanosilver-evoked changes in CGCs. This is presumed to be due to an inhibitory effect on NMDA-sensitive calcium channels.

  12. Memory Deficits Are Associated with Impaired Ability to Modulate Neuronal Excitability in Middle-Aged Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorowski, Catherine C.; Disterhoft, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Normal aging disrupts hippocampal neuroplasticity and learning and memory. Aging deficits were exposed in a subset (30%) of middle-aged mice that performed below criterion on a hippocampal-dependent contextual fear conditioning task. Basal neuronal excitability was comparable in middle-aged and young mice, but learning-related modulation of the…

  13. Positive modulation of delta-subunit containing GABAA receptors in mouse neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vardya, Irina; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Nieto-Gonzalez, Jose Luis;

    2012-01-01

    δ-subunit containing extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors are potential targets for modifying neuronal activity in a range of brain disorders. With the aim of gaining more insight in synaptic and extrasynaptic inhibition, we used a new positive modulator, AA29504, of δ-subunit containing GABA(A) recep...

  14. Modulation of Hippocampal Theta Oscillations and Spatial Memory by Relaxin-3 Neurons of the Nucleus Incertus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sherie; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E.; Hossain, M. Akhter; Lin, Feng; Kuei, Chester; Liu, Changlu; Wade, John D.; Sutton, Steven W.; Nunez, Angel; Gundlach, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01

    Hippocampal theta rhythm is thought to underlie learning and memory, and it is well established that "pacemaker" neurons in medial septum (MS) modulate theta activity. Recent studies in the rat demonstrated that brainstem-generated theta rhythm occurs through a multisynaptic pathway via the nucleus incertus (NI), which is the primary source of the…

  15. Identification of Intrinsic Axon Growth Modulators for Intact CNS Neurons after Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathren L. Fink

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Functional deficits persist after spinal cord injury (SCI because axons in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS fail to regenerate. However, modest levels of spontaneous functional recovery are typically observed after trauma and are thought to be mediated by the plasticity of intact circuitry. The mechanisms underlying intact circuit plasticity are not delineated. Here, we characterize the in vivo transcriptome of sprouting intact neurons from Ngr1 null mice after partial SCI. We identify the lysophosphatidic acid signaling modulators LPPR1 and LPAR1 as intrinsic axon growth modulators for intact corticospinal motor neurons after adjacent injury. Furthermore, in vivo LPAR1 inhibition or LPPR1 overexpression enhances sprouting of intact corticospinal tract axons and yields greater functional recovery after unilateral brainstem lesion in wild-type mice. Thus, the transcriptional profile of injury-induced sprouting of intact neurons reveals targets for therapeutic enhancement of axon growth initiation and new synapse formation.

  16. Bidirectional modulation of hyperalgesia via the specific control of excitatory and inhibitory neuronal activity in the ACC

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, SukJae Joshua; Kwak, Chuljung; Lee, Jaejyun; Sim, Su-Eon; Shim, Jaehoon; Choi, Taehyuk; Graham L. Collingridge; Zhou, Min; Kaang, B-K

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) are assumed to play important roles in the perception of nociceptive signals and the associated emotional responses. However, the neuronal types within the ACC that mediate these functions are poorly understood. In the present study, we used optogenetic techniques to selectively modulate excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the ACC and to assess their ability to modulate peripheral mechanical hypersensitivity in freely movi...

  17. Differential modulation of interleukin-6 expression by interleukin-1beta in neuronal and glial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Loreto, Silvia; Maccarone, Rita; Corvetti, Luigi; Sebastiani, Pierluigi; Piancatelli, Daniela; Adorno, Domenico

    2003-01-01

    We analysed the specific effects of IL-1beta immunoneutralization on the expression of IL-6 in different pure cultures of neurones and glia after both experimental subliminal hypoxia and recovery. Whereas the IL-1beta-deprivation signal induced a decrease in IL-6 expression and release of normoxic neurones, it provoked an increase in IL-6 protein in hypoxic neurones. Moreover, the direct correlation between IL-1beta and IL-6, observed in normal and recovering neuronal cultures, was reversed in hypoxic conditions. These reversals were not observed in glial cells, in which IL-1beta immunosuppression led to a decrease in IL-6 under all conditions considered. In conclusion, the IL-1beta modulates IL-6 in different ways according to the ambient physiological or pathological conditions, and also acts via different mechanisms, depending on the cellular phenotype.

  18. A mammalian nervous-system-specific plasma membrane proteasome complex that modulates neuronal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Kapil V; Margolis, Seth S

    2017-04-01

    In the nervous system, rapidly occurring processes such as neuronal transmission and calcium signaling are affected by short-term inhibition of proteasome function. It is unclear how proteasomes are able to acutely regulate such processes, as this action is inconsistent with their canonical role in proteostasis. Here we describe a mammalian nervous-system-specific membrane proteasome complex that directly and rapidly modulates neuronal function by degrading intracellular proteins into extracellular peptides that can stimulate neuronal signaling. This proteasome complex is closely associated with neuronal plasma membranes, exposed to the extracellular space, and catalytically active. Selective inhibition of the membrane proteasome complex by a cell-impermeable proteasome inhibitor blocked the production of extracellular peptides and attenuated neuronal-activity-induced calcium signaling. Moreover, we observed that membrane-proteasome-derived peptides were sufficient to induce neuronal calcium signaling. Our discoveries challenge the prevailing notion that proteasomes function primarily to maintain proteostasis, and highlight a form of neuronal communication that takes place through a membrane proteasome complex.

  19. Lipoprotein Lipase is an Important Modulator of Lipid Uptake and Storage in Hypothalamic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Andrew E.; Wang, Hong; Mittal, Richa; Sungelo, Mitchell; Potma, Eric; Eckel, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    LPL is the rate-limiting enzyme for uptake of TG-derived FFA in peripheral tissues, and the enzyme is expressed in the brain and CNS. We previously created a mouse which lacks neuronal LPL. This animal becomes obese on a standard chow, and we observed reduced lipid uptake in the hypothalamus at 3 months preceding obesity. In our present study, we replicated the animal phenotype in an immortalized mouse hypothalamic cell line (N41) to examine how LPL affects expression of AgRP as well as entry and storage of lipids into neurons. We show that LPL is able to modulate levels of the orexigenic peptide AgRP. LPL also exerts effects on lipid uptake into culture neurons, and that uptake of neutral lipid can be enhanced even by mutant LPL lacking catalytic activity. N41 cells also accumulate neutral lipid in droplets, and this is at least in part regulated by LPL. These data in addition to those published in mice with neuron-specific deletion of LPL suggest that neuronal LPL is an important regulator of lipid homeostasis in neurons and that alterations in LPL levels may have important effects on systemic metabolism and neuronal lipid biology. PMID:26265042

  20. Bioenergetic status modulates motor neuron vulnerability and pathogenesis in a zebrafish model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope J Boyd

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Degeneration and loss of lower motor neurons is the major pathological hallmark of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, resulting from low levels of ubiquitously-expressed survival motor neuron (SMN protein. One remarkable, yet unresolved, feature of SMA is that not all motor neurons are equally affected, with some populations displaying a robust resistance to the disease. Here, we demonstrate that selective vulnerability of distinct motor neuron pools arises from fundamental modifications to their basal molecular profiles. Comparative gene expression profiling of motor neurons innervating the extensor digitorum longus (disease-resistant, gastrocnemius (intermediate vulnerability, and tibialis anterior (vulnerable muscles in mice revealed that disease susceptibility correlates strongly with a modified bioenergetic profile. Targeting of identified bioenergetic pathways by enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis rescued motor axon defects in SMA zebrafish. Moreover, targeting of a single bioenergetic protein, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (Pgk1, was found to modulate motor neuron vulnerability in vivo. Knockdown of pgk1 alone was sufficient to partially mimic the SMA phenotype in wild-type zebrafish. Conversely, Pgk1 overexpression, or treatment with terazosin (an FDA-approved small molecule that binds and activates Pgk1, rescued motor axon phenotypes in SMA zebrafish. We conclude that global bioenergetics pathways can be therapeutically manipulated to ameliorate SMA motor neuron phenotypes in vivo.

  1. Ultrasound neuro-modulation chip: activation of sensory neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans by surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Kaiyue; Huang, Bin; Niu, Lili; Li, Fei; Cai, Feiyan; Chen, Yan; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Cheng, Hankui; Kang, Lijun; Meng, Long; Zheng, Hairong

    2017-05-16

    Ultrasound neuro-modulation has gained increasing attention as a non-invasive method. In this paper, we present an ultrasound neuro-modulation chip, capable of initiating reversal behaviour and activating neurons of C. elegans under the stimulation of a single-shot, short-pulsed ultrasound. About 85.29% ± 6.17% of worms respond to the ultrasound stimulation exhibiting reversal behaviour. Furthermore, the worms can adapt to the ultrasound stimulation with a lower acoustic pulse duration of stimulation. In vivo calcium imaging shows that the activity of ASH, a polymodal sensory neuron in C. elegans, can be directly evoked by the ultrasound stimulation. On the other hand, AFD, a thermal sensitive neuron, cannot be activated by the ultrasound stimulation using the same parameter and the temperature elevation during the stimulation process is relatively small. Consistent with the calcium imaging results, the tax-4 mutants, which are insensitive to temperature increase, do not show a significant difference in avoidance probability compared to the wild type. Therefore, the mechanical effects induced by ultrasound are the main reason for neural and behavioural modulation of C. elegans. With the advantages of confined acoustic energy on the surface, compatible with standard calcium imaging, this neuro-modulation chip could be a powerful tool for revealing the molecular mechanisms of ultrasound neuro-modulation.

  2. Muscarinic M1 receptors regulate propofol modulation of GABAergic transmission in rat ventrolateral preoptic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Tian; Liu, Yang; Qian, Kun; Yu, Bu-Wei

    2015-04-01

    GABAergic neurons within the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) play an important role in sleep-wakefulness regulation. Propofol, a widely used systemic anesthetic, has lately been reported to excite noradrenaline (NA)-inhibited type of VLPO neurons. Present study tested if acetylcholine system takes part in the propofol modulation of GABAergic spontaneous miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in mechanically dissociated rat VLPO neurons using a conventional whole-cell patch clamp technique. Propofol reversibly decreased mIPSC frequency without affecting the current amplitude, indicating that propofol acts presynaptically to decrease the probability of spontaneous GABA release. The propofol action on GABAergic mIPSC frequency was completely blocked by atropine, a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor antagonist, and pirenzepine, a selective M1 receptor antagonist. These results suggest that propofol acts on M1 receptors on GABAergic nerve terminals projecting to VLPO neurons to inhibit spontaneous GABA release. The M1 receptor-mediated modulation of GABAergic transmission onto VLPO neurons may contribute to the regulation of loss of consciousness induced by propofol.

  3. Concentration-dependent activation of dopamine receptors differentially modulates GABA release onto orexin neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Victoria; Trask, Robert B.; Briggs, Chantalle; Rowe, Todd M.; Hirasawa, Michiru

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) and orexin neurons play important roles in reward and food intake. There are anatomical and functional connections between these two cell groups, where orexin peptides stimulate DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area and DA inhibits orexin neurons in the hypothalamus. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying DA action on orexin neurons remain incompletely understood. Therefore, the effect of DA on inhibitory transmission to orexin neurons was investigated in rat brain slices using whole cell patch clamp technique. We found that DA modulated the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) in a concentration dependent, bidirectional manner. Low (1 μM) and high concentrations (100 μM) of DA decreased and increased IPSC frequency, respectively. These effects did not accompany a change in mIPSC amplitude and persisted in the presence of G protein signaling inhibitor GDPβS in the pipette, suggesting that DA acts presynaptically. The decrease in mIPSC frequency was mediated by D2 receptors, whereas the increase required co-activation of D1 and D2 receptors and subsequent activation of phospholipase C. In summary, our results suggest that DA has complex effects on GABAergic transmission to orexin neurons, involving cooperation of multiple receptor subtypes. The direction of dopaminergic influence on orexin neurons is dependent on the level of DA in the hypothalamus. At low levels DA disinhibits orexin neurons whereas at high levels it facilitates GABA release, which may act as negative feedback to curb the excitatory orexinergic output to DA neurons. These mechanisms may have implications for consummatory and motivated behaviours. PMID:26036709

  4. Concentration-dependent activation of dopamine receptors differentially modulates GABA release onto orexin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Victoria; Trask, Robert B; Briggs, Chantalle; Rowe, Todd M; Hirasawa, Michiru

    2015-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) and orexin neurons play important roles in reward and food intake. There are anatomical and functional connections between these two cell groups: orexin peptides stimulate DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area and DA inhibits orexin neurons in the hypothalamus. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the action of DA on orexin neurons remain incompletely understood. Therefore, the effect of DA on inhibitory transmission to orexin neurons was investigated in rat brain slices using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that DA modulated the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) in a concentration-dependent bidirectional manner. Low (1 μM) and high (100 μM) concentrations of DA decreased and increased IPSC frequency, respectively. These effects did not accompany a change in mIPSC amplitude and persisted in the presence of G-protein signaling inhibitor GDPβS in the pipette, suggesting that DA acts presynaptically. The decrease in mIPSC frequency was mediated by D2 receptors whereas the increase required co-activation of D1 and D2 receptors and subsequent activation of phospholipase C. In summary, our results suggest that DA has complex effects on GABAergic transmission to orexin neurons, involving cooperation of multiple receptor subtypes. The direction of dopaminergic influence on orexin neurons is dependent on the level of DA in the hypothalamus. At low levels DA disinhibits orexin neurons whereas at high levels it facilitates GABA release, which may act as negative feedback to curb the excitatory orexinergic output to DA neurons. These mechanisms may have implications for consummatory and motivated behaviours.

  5. Physiological modulators of Kv3.1 channels adjust firing patterns of auditory brain stem neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Maile R; El-Hassar, Lynda; Zhang, Yalan; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Large, Charles H; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-07-01

    Many rapidly firing neurons, including those in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) in the auditory brain stem, express "high threshold" voltage-gated Kv3.1 potassium channels that activate only at positive potentials and are required for stimuli to generate rapid trains of actions potentials. We now describe the actions of two imidazolidinedione derivatives, AUT1 and AUT2, which modulate Kv3.1 channels. Using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing rat Kv3.1 channels, we found that lower concentrations of these compounds shift the voltage of activation of Kv3.1 currents toward negative potentials, increasing currents evoked by depolarization from typical neuronal resting potentials. Single-channel recordings also showed that AUT1 shifted the open probability of Kv3.1 to more negative potentials. Higher concentrations of AUT2 also shifted inactivation to negative potentials. The effects of lower and higher concentrations could be mimicked in numerical simulations by increasing rates of activation and inactivation respectively, with no change in intrinsic voltage dependence. In brain slice recordings of mouse MNTB neurons, both AUT1 and AUT2 modulated firing rate at high rates of stimulation, a result predicted by numerical simulations. Our results suggest that pharmaceutical modulation of Kv3.1 currents represents a novel avenue for manipulation of neuronal excitability and has the potential for therapeutic benefit in the treatment of hearing disorders.

  6. miR-29a modulates neuronal differentiation through targeting REST in mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Duan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the modulation of microRNAs (miRNAs upon the neuronal differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs through targeting RE-1 Silencing Factor (REST, a mature neuronal gene suppressor in neuronal and un-neuronal cells. METHODS: Rat bone marrow derived-MSCs were induced into neuron-like cells (MSC-NCs by DMSO and BHA in vitro. The expression of neuron specific enolase (NSE, microtubule-associated protein tau (Tau, REST and its target genes, including synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25 and L1 cell adhesion molecular (L1CAM, were detected in MSCs and MSC-NCs. miRNA array analysis was conducted to screen for the upregulated miRNAs after neuronal differentiation. TargetScan was used to predict the relationship between these miRNAs and REST gene, and dual luciferase reporter assay was applied to validate it. Gain and loss of function experiments were used to study the role of miR-29a upon neuronal differentiation of MSCs. The knockdown of REST was conducted to show that miR-29a affected this process through targeting REST. RESULTS: MSCs were induced into neuron-like cells which presented neuronal cell shape and expressed NSE and Tau. The expression of REST declined and the expression of SNAP25 and L1CAM increased upon the neuronal differentiation of MSCs. Among 14 upregulated miRNAs, miR-29a was validated to target REST gene. During the neuronal differentiation of MSCs, miR-29a inhibition blocked the downregulation of REST, as well as the upregulation of SNAP25, L1CAM, NSE and Tau. REST knockdown rescued the effect of miR-29a inhibition on the expression of NSE and Tau. Meanwhile, miR-29a knockin significantly decreased the expression of REST and increased the expression of SNAP25 and L1CMA in MSCs, but did not significantly affect the expression of NSE and Tau. CONCLUSION: miR-29a regulates neurogenic markers through targeting REST in mesenchymal stem cells, which provides advances in neuronal differentiation research

  7. Serotonin reciprocally regulates melanocortin neurons to modulate food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, Lora K; Jobst, Erin E; Sutton, Gregory M; Zhou, Ligang; Borok, Erzsebet; Thornton-Jones, Zoe; Liu, Hong Yan; Zigman, Jeffrey M; Balthasar, Nina; Kishi, Toshiro; Lee, Charlotte E; Aschkenasi, Carl J; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Yu, Jia; Boss, Olivier; Mountjoy, Kathleen G; Clifton, Peter G; Lowell, Bradford B; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Horvath, Tamas; Butler, Andrew A; Elmquist, Joel K; Cowley, Michael A

    2006-07-20

    The neural pathways through which central serotonergic systems regulate food intake and body weight remain to be fully elucidated. We report that serotonin, via action at serotonin1B receptors (5-HT1BRs), modulates the endogenous release of both agonists and antagonists of the melanocortin receptors, which are a core component of the central circuitry controlling body weight homeostasis. We also show that serotonin-induced hypophagia requires downstream activation of melanocortin 4, but not melanocortin 3, receptors. These results identify a primary mechanism underlying the serotonergic regulation of energy balance and provide an example of a centrally derived signal that reciprocally regulates melanocortin receptor agonists and antagonists in a similar manner to peripheral adiposity signals.

  8. Somatostatinergic modulation of firing pattern and calcium-activated potassium currents in medium spiny neostriatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarraga, E; Vilchis, C; Tkatch, T; Salgado, H; Tecuapetla, F; Perez-Rosello, T; Perez-Garci, E; Hernandez-Echeagaray, E; Surmeier, D J; Bargas, J

    2007-05-11

    Somatostatin is synthesized and released by aspiny GABAergic interneurons of the neostriatum, some of them identified as low threshold spike generating neurons (LTS-interneurons). These neurons make synaptic contacts with spiny neostriatal projection neurons. However, very few somatostatin actions on projection neurons have been described. The present work reports that somatostatin modulates the Ca(2+) activated K(+) currents (K(Ca) currents) expressed by projection cells. These actions contribute in designing the firing pattern of the spiny projection neuron; which is the output of the neostriatum. Small conductance (SK) and large conductance (BK) K(Ca) currents represent between 30% and 50% of the sustained outward current in spiny cells. Somatostatin reduces SK-type K(+) currents and at the same time enhances BK-type K(+) currents. This dual effect enhances the fast component of the after hyperpolarizing potential while reducing the slow component. Somatostatin then modifies the firing pattern of spiny neurons which changed from a tonic regular pattern to an interrupted "stuttering"-like pattern. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tissue expression analysis of dorsal striatal somatostatinergic receptors (SSTR) mRNA revealed that all five SSTR mRNAs are present. However, single cell RT-PCR profiling suggests that the most probable receptor in charge of this modulation is the SSTR2 receptor. Interestingly, aspiny interneurons may exhibit a "stuttering"-like firing pattern. Therefore, somatostatin actions appear to be the entrainment of projection neurons to the rhythms generated by some interneurons. Somatostatin is then capable of modifying the processing and output of the neostriatum.

  9. Modulation of neuronal sodium channels by the sea anemone peptide BDS-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pin; Jo, Sooyeon; Bean, Bruce P

    2012-06-01

    Blood-depressing substance I (BDS-I), a 43 amino-acid peptide from sea anemone venom, is used as a specific inhibitor of Kv3-family potassium channels. We found that BDS-I acts with even higher potency to modulate specific types of voltage-dependent sodium channels. In rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, 3 μM BDS-I strongly enhanced tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium current but weakly inhibited TTX-resistant sodium current. In rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons, which express only TTX-sensitive sodium current, BDS-I enhanced current elicited by small depolarizations and slowed decay of currents at all voltages (EC(50) ∼ 300 nM). BDS-I acted with exceptionally high potency and efficacy on cloned human Nav1.7 channels, slowing inactivation by 6-fold, with an EC(50) of approximately 3 nM. BDS-I also slowed inactivation of sodium currents in N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells (mainly from Nav1.3 channels), with an EC(50) ∼ 600 nM. In hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons (mouse) and cerebellar Purkinje neurons (mouse and rat), BDS-I had only small effects on current decay (slowing inactivation by 20-50%), suggesting relatively weak sensitivity of Nav1.1 and Nav1.6 channels. The biggest effect of BDS-I in central neurons was to enhance resurgent current in Purkinje neurons, an effect reflected in enhancement of sodium current during the repolarization phase of Purkinje neuron action potentials. Overall, these results show that BDS-I acts to modulate sodium channel gating in a manner similar to previously known neurotoxin receptor site 3 anemone toxins but with different isoform sensitivity. Most notably, BDS-I acts with very high potency on human Nav1.7 channels.

  10. Development of GPCR modulation of GABAergic transmission in chicken nucleus laminaris neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Quan Tang

    Full Text Available Neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL of birds act as coincidence detectors and encode interaural time difference to localize the sound source in the azimuth plane. GABAergic transmission in a number of CNS nuclei including the NL is subject to a dual modulation by presynaptic GABA(B receptors (GABA(BRs and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs. Here, using in vitro whole-cell patch clamp recordings from acute brain slices of the chick, we characterized the following important but unknown properties pertaining to such a dual modulation: (1 emergence of functional GABA synapses in NL neurons; (2 the temporal onset of neuromodulation mediated by GABA(BRs and mGluRs; and (3 the physiological conditions under which GABA(BRs and mGluRs are activated by endogenous transmitters. We found that (1 GABA(AR-mediated synaptic responses were observed in about half of the neurons at embryonic day 11 (E11; (2 GABA(BR-mediated modulation of the GABAergic transmission was detectable at E11, whereas the modulation by mGluRs did not emerge until E15; and (3 endogenous activity of GABA(BRs was induced by both low- (5 or 10 Hz and high-frequency (200 Hz stimulation of the GABAergic pathway, whereas endogenous activity of mGluRs was induced by high- (200 Hz but not low-frequency (5 or 10 Hz stimulation of the glutamatergic pathway. Furthermore, the endogenous activity of mGluRs was mediated by group II but not group III members. Therefore, autoreceptor-mediated modulation of GABAergic transmission emerges at the same time when the GABA synapses become functional. Heteroreceptor-mediated modulation appears at a later time and is receptor type dependent in vitro.

  11. Modulation of Neuronal Responses by Exogenous Attention in Macaque Primary Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Chen, Minggui; Yan, Yin; Zhaoping, Li; Li, Wu

    2015-09-30

    Visual perception is influenced by attention deployed voluntarily or triggered involuntarily by salient stimuli. Modulation of visual cortical processing by voluntary or endogenous attention has been extensively studied, but much less is known about how involuntary or exogenous attention affects responses of visual cortical neurons. Using implanted microelectrode arrays, we examined the effects of exogenous attention on neuronal responses in the primary visual cortex (V1) of awake monkeys. A bright annular cue was flashed either around the receptive fields of recorded neurons or in the opposite visual field to capture attention. A subsequent grating stimulus probed the cue-induced effects. In a fixation task, when the cue-to-probe stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) was visual fields weakened or diminished both the physiological and behavioral cueing effects. Our findings indicate that exogenous attention significantly modulates V1 responses and that the modulation strength depends on both novelty and task relevance of the stimulus. Significance statement: Visual attention can be involuntarily captured by a sudden appearance of a conspicuous object, allowing rapid reactions to unexpected events of significance. The current study discovered a correlate of this effect in monkey primary visual cortex. An abrupt, salient, flash enhanced neuronal responses, and shortened the animal's reaction time, to a subsequent visual probe stimulus at the same location. However, the enhancement of the neural responses diminished after repeated exposures to this flash if the animal was not required to react to the probe. Moreover, a second, simultaneous, flash at another location weakened the neuronal and behavioral effects of the first one. These findings revealed, beyond the observations reported so far, the effects of exogenous attention in the brain.

  12. Demodulation effect is observed in neurones by exposure to low frequency modulated microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bruzón, R. N.; Figols, T.; Azanza, M. J.; del Moral, A.

    2010-01-01

    Neurones exposure to a microwave (carrier fc=13.6 GHz; power P simeq 5 mW; Ho simeq 0.10 Am-1 = 1.25 mOe; E0 simeq 3.5 V/m; ΔT simeq 0.01°C SAR: 3.1×10-3 - 5.8×10-3 W/Kg) EMF amplitude modulated by ELF-AC field (frequency, fm= 0-100 Hz) shows no electrophysiological effect under the carrier MF alone, but "frequency resonances: at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 50, 100 Hz: demodulation effect. Resonances appear when applied ELF-MF is close to a dominant characteristic frequency of the neurone impulse Fourier spectrum. This is an interesting result considering that ELF-MF modulating RF or MW in the range of human EEG could induce frequency-resonant effects on exposed human brain.

  13. Extrasynaptic neurotransmission in the modulation of brain function. Focus on the striatal neuronal-glial networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell eFuxe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Extrasynaptic neurotransmission is an important short distance form of volume transmission (VT and describes the extracellular diffusion of transmitters and modulators after synaptic spillover or extrasynaptic release in the local circuit regions binding to and activating mainly extrasynaptic neuronal and glial receptors in the neuroglial networks of the brain. Receptor-receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR heteromers play a major role, on dendritic spines and nerve terminals including glutamate synapses, in the integrative processes of the extrasynaptic signaling. Heteromeric complexes between GPCR and ion-channel receptors play a special role in the integration of the synaptic and extrasynaptic signals. Changes in extracellular concentrations of the classical synaptic neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA found with microdialysis is likely an expression of the activity of the neuron-astrocyte unit of the brain and can be used as an index of VT-mediated actions of these two neurotransmitters in the brain. Thus, the activity of neurons may be functionally linked to the activity of astrocytes, which may release glutamate and GABA to the extracellular space where extrasynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors do exist. Wiring transmission (WT and VT are fundamental properties of all neurons of the CNS but the balance between WT and VT varies from one nerve cell population to the other. The focus is on the striatal cellular networks, and the WT and VT and their integration via receptor heteromers are described in the GABA projection neurons, the glutamate, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT and histamine striatal afferents, the cholinergic interneurons and different types of GABA interneurons. In addition, the role in these networks of VT signaling of the energy-dependent modulator adenosine and of endocannabinoids mainly formed in the striatal projection neurons will be underlined to understand the communication in the striatal

  14. Modulation of excitatory neurotransmission by neuronal/glial signalling molecules: interplay between purinergic and glutamatergic systems.

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    Köles, László; Kató, Erzsébet; Hanuska, Adrienn; Zádori, Zoltán S; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud; Zelles, Tibor; Rubini, Patrizia; Illes, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system (CNS), released both from neurons and glial cells. Acting via ionotropic (NMDA, AMPA, kainate) and metabotropic glutamate receptors, it is critically involved in essential regulatory functions. Disturbances of glutamatergic neurotransmission can be detected in cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders. This paper summarizes the present knowledge on the modulation of glutamate-mediated responses in the CNS. Emphasis will be put on NMDA receptor channels, which are essential executive and integrative elements of the glutamatergic system. This receptor is crucial for proper functioning of neuronal circuits; its hypofunction or overactivation can result in neuronal disturbances and neurotoxicity. Somewhat surprisingly, NMDA receptors are not widely targeted by pharmacotherapy in clinics; their robust activation or inhibition seems to be desirable only in exceptional cases. However, their fine-tuning might provide a promising manipulation to optimize the activity of the glutamatergic system and to restore proper CNS function. This orchestration utilizes several neuromodulators. Besides the classical ones such as dopamine, novel candidates emerged in the last two decades. The purinergic system is a promising possibility to optimize the activity of the glutamatergic system. It exerts not only direct and indirect influences on NMDA receptors but, by modulating glutamatergic transmission, also plays an important role in glia-neuron communication. These purinergic functions will be illustrated mostly by depicting the modulatory role of the purinergic system on glutamatergic transmission in the prefrontal cortex, a CNS area important for attention, memory and learning.

  15. CaMKII modulates sodium current in neurons from epileptic Scn2a mutant mice.

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    Thompson, Christopher H; Hawkins, Nicole A; Kearney, Jennifer A; George, Alfred L

    2017-02-14

    Monogenic epilepsies with wide-ranging clinical severity have been associated with mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel genes. In the Scn2a(Q54) mouse model of epilepsy, a focal epilepsy phenotype is caused by transgenic expression of an engineered NaV1.2 mutation displaying enhanced persistent sodium current. Seizure frequency and other phenotypic features in Scn2a(Q54) mice depend on genetic background. We investigated the neurophysiological and molecular correlates of strain-dependent epilepsy severity in this model. Scn2a(Q54) mice on the C57BL/6J background (B6.Q54) exhibit a mild disorder, whereas animals intercrossed with SJL/J mice (F1.Q54) have a severe phenotype. Whole-cell recording revealed that hippocampal pyramidal neurons from B6.Q54 and F1.Q54 animals exhibit spontaneous action potentials, but F1.Q54 neurons exhibited higher firing frequency and greater evoked activity compared with B6.Q54 neurons. These findings correlated with larger persistent sodium current and depolarized inactivation in neurons from F1.Q54 animals. Because calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II (CaMKII) is known to modify persistent current and channel inactivation in the heart, we investigated CaMKII as a plausible modulator of neuronal sodium channels. CaMKII activity in hippocampal protein lysates exhibited a strain-dependence in Scn2a(Q54) mice with higher activity in F1.Q54 animals. Heterologously expressed NaV1.2 channels exposed to activated CaMKII had enhanced persistent current and depolarized channel inactivation resembling the properties of F1.Q54 neuronal sodium channels. By contrast, inhibition of CaMKII attenuated persistent current, evoked a hyperpolarized channel inactivation, and suppressed neuronal excitability. We conclude that CaMKII-mediated modulation of neuronal sodium current impacts neuronal excitability in Scn2a(Q54) mice and may represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of epilepsy.

  16. Fast two-photon neuronal imaging and control using a spatial light modulator and ruthenium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Darcy S.; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Fino, Elodie; Araya, Roberto; Etchenique, Roberto; Yuste, Rafael

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a spatial light modulator (SLM) based microscope that uses diffraction to shape the incoming two-photon laser source to any arbitrary light pattern. This allows the simultaneous imaging or photostimulation of different regions of a sample with three-dimensional precision at high frame rates. Additionally, we have combined this microscope with a new class of two photon active neuromodulators with Ruthenium BiPyridine (RuBi) based cages that offer great flexibility for neuronal control.

  17. Dopaminergic regulation of neuronal excitability through modulation of Ih in layer V entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, J Amiel; Johnston, Daniel

    2006-03-22

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) is a significant component of the systems that underlie certain forms of memory formation and recall. Evidence has been emerging that the dopaminergic system in the EC facilitates these and other functions of the EC. The effects of dopamine (DA) on membrane properties and excitability of EC neurons, however, are not known. We used in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from layer V pyramidal neuronal somata and dendrites of the adult rat lateral EC to investigate the effects of DA on the excitability of these neurons. We found that brief application of DA caused a reduction in the excitability of layer V EC pyramidal neurons. This effect was attributable to voltage-dependent modification of membrane properties that can best be explained by an increase in a hyperpolarization-activated conductance. Furthermore, the effects of DA were blocked by pharmacological blockade of h-channels, but not by any of a number of other ion channels. These actions were produced by a D1 receptor-mediated increase of cAMP but were independent of protein kinase A. A portion of the actions of DA can be attributed to effects in the apical dendrites. The data suggest that DA can directly influence the membrane properties of layer V EC pyramidal neurons by modulation of h-channels. These actions may underlie some of the effects of DA on memory formation.

  18. Store-operated calcium entry modulates neuronal network activity in a model of chronic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Julius A; Henke, Nadine; Opatz, Jessica; Gruszczynska-Biegala, Joanna; Schneider, Lars; Theiss, Stephan; Hamacher, Nadine; Steinfarz, Barbara; Golz, Stefan; Brüstle, Oliver; Kuznicki, Jacek; Methner, Axel

    2011-12-01

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) over the plasma membrane is activated by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores and has only recently been shown to play a role in CNS processes like synaptic plasticity. However, the direct effect of SOCE on the excitability of neuronal networks in vitro and in vivo has never been determined. We confirmed the presence of SOCE and the expression of the calcium sensors STIM1 and STIM2, which convey information about the calcium load of the stores to channel proteins at the plasma membrane, in neurons and astrocytes. Inhibition of SOCE by pharmacological agents 2-APB and ML-9 reduced the steady-state neuronal Ca(2+) concentration, reduced network activity, and increased synchrony of primary neuronal cultures grown on multi-electrode arrays, which prompted us to elucidate the relative expression of STIM proteins in conditions of pathologic excitability. Both proteins were increased in brains of chronic epileptic rodents and strongly expressed in hippocampal specimens from medial temporal lobe epilepsy patients. Pharmacologic inhibition of SOCE in chronic epileptic hippocampal slices suppressed interictal spikes and rhythmized epileptic burst activity. Our results indicate that SOCE modulates the activity of neuronal networks in vitro and in vivo and delineates SOCE as a potential drug target. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dopamine neurons modulate neural encoding and expression of depression-related behaviour.

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    Tye, Kay M; Mirzabekov, Julie J; Warden, Melissa R; Ferenczi, Emily A; Tsai, Hsing-Chen; Finkelstein, Joel; Kim, Sung-Yon; Adhikari, Avishek; Thompson, Kimberly R; Andalman, Aaron S; Gunaydin, Lisa A; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl

    2013-01-24

    Major depression is characterized by diverse debilitating symptoms that include hopelessness and anhedonia. Dopamine neurons involved in reward and motivation are among many neural populations that have been hypothesized to be relevant, and certain antidepressant treatments, including medications and brain stimulation therapies, can influence the complex dopamine system. Until now it has not been possible to test this hypothesis directly, even in animal models, as existing therapeutic interventions are unable to specifically target dopamine neurons. Here we investigated directly the causal contributions of defined dopamine neurons to multidimensional depression-like phenotypes induced by chronic mild stress, by integrating behavioural, pharmacological, optogenetic and electrophysiological methods in freely moving rodents. We found that bidirectional control (inhibition or excitation) of specified midbrain dopamine neurons immediately and bidirectionally modulates (induces or relieves) multiple independent depression symptoms caused by chronic stress. By probing the circuit implementation of these effects, we observed that optogenetic recruitment of these dopamine neurons potently alters the neural encoding of depression-related behaviours in the downstream nucleus accumbens of freely moving rodents, suggesting that processes affecting depression symptoms may involve alterations in the neural encoding of action in limbic circuitry.

  20. Thalamic neuron models encode stimulus information by burst-size modulation

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    Daniel Henry Elijah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thalamic neurons have been long assumed to fire in tonic mode during perceptive states, and in burst mode during sleep and unconsciousness. However, recent evidence suggests that bursts may also be relevant in the encoding of sensory information. Here we explore the neural code of such thalamic bursts. In order to assess whether the burst code is generic or whether it depends on the detailed properties of each bursting neuron, we analyzed two neuron models incorporating different levels of biological detail. One of the models contained no information of the biophysical processes entailed in spike generation, and described neuron activity at a phenomenological level. The second model represented the evolution of the individual ionic conductances involved in spiking and bursting, and required a large number of parameters. We analyzed the models' input selectivity using reverse correlation methods and information theory. We found that n-spike bursts from both models transmit information by modulating their spike count in response to changes to instantaneous input features, such as slope, phase, amplitude, etc. The stimulus feature that is most efficiently encoded by bursts, however, need not coincide with one of such classical features. We therefore searched for the optimal feature among all those that could be expressed as a linear transformation of the time-dependent input current. We found that bursting neurons transmitted 6 times more information about such more general features. The relevant events in the stimulus were located in a time window spanning ~100 ms before and ~20 ms after burst onset. Most importantly, the neural code employed by the simple and the biologically realistic models was largely the same, implying that the simple thalamic neuron model contains the essential ingredients that account for the computational properties of the thalamic burst code. Thus, our results suggest the n-spike burst code is a general property of

  1. Thalamic neuron models encode stimulus information by burst-size modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elijah, Daniel H; Samengo, Inés; Montemurro, Marcelo A

    2015-01-01

    Thalamic neurons have been long assumed to fire in tonic mode during perceptive states, and in burst mode during sleep and unconsciousness. However, recent evidence suggests that bursts may also be relevant in the encoding of sensory information. Here, we explore the neural code of such thalamic bursts. In order to assess whether the burst code is generic or whether it depends on the detailed properties of each bursting neuron, we analyzed two neuron models incorporating different levels of biological detail. One of the models contained no information of the biophysical processes entailed in spike generation, and described neuron activity at a phenomenological level. The second model represented the evolution of the individual ionic conductances involved in spiking and bursting, and required a large number of parameters. We analyzed the models' input selectivity using reverse correlation methods and information theory. We found that n-spike bursts from both models transmit information by modulating their spike count in response to changes to instantaneous input features, such as slope, phase, amplitude, etc. The stimulus feature that is most efficiently encoded by bursts, however, need not coincide with one of such classical features. We therefore searched for the optimal feature among all those that could be expressed as a linear transformation of the time-dependent input current. We found that bursting neurons transmitted 6 times more information about such more general features. The relevant events in the stimulus were located in a time window spanning ~100 ms before and ~20 ms after burst onset. Most importantly, the neural code employed by the simple and the biologically realistic models was largely the same, implying that the simple thalamic neuron model contains the essential ingredients that account for the computational properties of the thalamic burst code. Thus, our results suggest the n-spike burst code is a general property of thalamic neurons.

  2. Cannabinoid Receptors Modulate Neuronal Morphology and AnkyrinG Density at the Axon Initial Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Mónica; Dominguez, Ana; Zhang, Wei; del Puerto, Ana; Ciorraga, María; Benitez, María José; Guaza, Carmen; Garrido, Juan José

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal polarization underlies the ability of neurons to integrate and transmit information. This process begins early in development with axon outgrowth, followed by dendritic growth and subsequent maturation. In between these two steps, the axon initial segment (AIS), a subcellular domain crucial for generating action potentials (APs) and maintaining the morphological and functional polarization, starts to develop. However, the cellular/molecular mechanisms and receptors involved in AIS initial development and maturation are mostly unknown. In this study, we have focused on the role of the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), a highly abundant G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) in the nervous system largely involved in different phases of neuronal development and differentiation. Although CB1R activity modulation has been related to changes in axons or dendrites, its possible role as a modulator of AIS development has not been yet explored. Here we analyzed the potential role of CB1R on neuronal morphology and AIS development using pharmacological and RNA interference approaches in cultured hippocampal neurons. CB1R inhibition, at a very early developmental stage, has no effect on axonal growth, yet CB1R activation can promote it. By contrast, subsequent dendritic growth is impaired by CB1R inhibition, which also reduces ankyrinG density at the AIS. Moreover, our data show a significant correlation between early dendritic growth and ankyrinG density. However, CB1R inhibition in later developmental stages after dendrites are formed only reduces ankyrinG accumulation at the AIS. In conclusion, our data suggest that neuronal CB1R basal activity plays a role in initial development of dendrites and indirectly in AIS proteins accumulation. Based on the lack of CB1R expression at the AIS, we hypothesize that CB1R mediated modulation of dendritic arbor size during early development indirectly determines the accumulation of ankyrinG and AIS development. Further studies

  3. Divisive Gain Modulation with Dynamic Stimuli in Integrate-and-Fire Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Cheng; Doiron, Brent

    2009-01-01

    The modulation of the sensitivity, or gain, of neural responses to input is an important component of neural computation. It has been shown that divisive gain modulation of neural responses can result from a stochastic shunting from balanced (mixed excitation and inhibition) background activity. This gain control scheme was developed and explored with static inputs, where the membrane and spike train statistics were stationary in time. However, input statistics, such as the firing rates of pre-synaptic neurons, are often dynamic, varying on timescales comparable to typical membrane time constants. Using a population density approach for integrate-and-fire neurons with dynamic and temporally rich inputs, we find that the same fluctuation-induced divisive gain modulation is operative for dynamic inputs driving nonequilibrium responses. Moreover, the degree of divisive scaling of the dynamic response is quantitatively the same as the steady-state responses—thus, gain modulation via balanced conductance fluctuations generalizes in a straight-forward way to a dynamic setting. PMID:19390603

  4. Divisive gain modulation with dynamic stimuli in integrate-and-fire neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Ly

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The modulation of the sensitivity, or gain, of neural responses to input is an important component of neural computation. It has been shown that divisive gain modulation of neural responses can result from a stochastic shunting from balanced (mixed excitation and inhibition background activity. This gain control scheme was developed and explored with static inputs, where the membrane and spike train statistics were stationary in time. However, input statistics, such as the firing rates of pre-synaptic neurons, are often dynamic, varying on timescales comparable to typical membrane time constants. Using a population density approach for integrate-and-fire neurons with dynamic and temporally rich inputs, we find that the same fluctuation-induced divisive gain modulation is operative for dynamic inputs driving nonequilibrium responses. Moreover, the degree of divisive scaling of the dynamic response is quantitatively the same as the steady-state responses--thus, gain modulation via balanced conductance fluctuations generalizes in a straight-forward way to a dynamic setting.

  5. Histamine Transmission Modulates the Phenotype of Murine Narcolepsy Caused by Orexin Neuron Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianini, Stefano; Silvani, Alessandro; Berteotti, Chiara; Lo Martire, Viviana; Cohen, Gary; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Zoccoli, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is associated with loss of orexin neurons, sleep-wake derangements, cataplexy, and a wide spectrum of alterations in other physiological functions, including energy balance, cardiovascular, and respiratory control. It is unclear which narcolepsy signs are directly related to the lack of orexin neurons or are instead modulated by dysfunction of other neurotransmitter systems physiologically controlled by orexin neurons, such as the histamine system. To address this question, we tested whether some of narcolepsy signs would be detected in mice lacking histamine signaling (HDC-KO). Moreover, we studied double-mutant mice lacking both histamine signaling and orexin neurons (DM) to evaluate whether the absence of histamine signaling would modulate narcolepsy symptoms produced by orexin deficiency. Mice were instrumented with electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram and a telemetric arterial pressure transducer. Sleep attacks fragmenting wakefulness, cataplexy, excess rapid-eye-movement sleep (R) during the activity period, and enhanced increase of arterial pressure during R, which are hallmarks of narcolepsy in mice, did not occur in HDC-KO, whereas they were observed in DM mice. Thus, these narcolepsy signs are neither caused nor abrogated by the absence of histamine. Conversely, the lack of histamine produced obesity in HDC-KO and to a greater extent also in DM. Moreover, the regularity of breath duration during R was significantly increased in either HDC-KO or DM relative to that in congenic wild-type mice. Defects of histamine transmission may thus modulate the metabolic and respiratory phenotype of murine narcolepsy.

  6. Histamine Transmission Modulates the Phenotype of Murine Narcolepsy Caused by Orexin Neuron Deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bastianini

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy type 1 is associated with loss of orexin neurons, sleep-wake derangements, cataplexy, and a wide spectrum of alterations in other physiological functions, including energy balance, cardiovascular, and respiratory control. It is unclear which narcolepsy signs are directly related to the lack of orexin neurons or are instead modulated by dysfunction of other neurotransmitter systems physiologically controlled by orexin neurons, such as the histamine system. To address this question, we tested whether some of narcolepsy signs would be detected in mice lacking histamine signaling (HDC-KO. Moreover, we studied double-mutant mice lacking both histamine signaling and orexin neurons (DM to evaluate whether the absence of histamine signaling would modulate narcolepsy symptoms produced by orexin deficiency. Mice were instrumented with electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram and a telemetric arterial pressure transducer. Sleep attacks fragmenting wakefulness, cataplexy, excess rapid-eye-movement sleep (R during the activity period, and enhanced increase of arterial pressure during R, which are hallmarks of narcolepsy in mice, did not occur in HDC-KO, whereas they were observed in DM mice. Thus, these narcolepsy signs are neither caused nor abrogated by the absence of histamine. Conversely, the lack of histamine produced obesity in HDC-KO and to a greater extent also in DM. Moreover, the regularity of breath duration during R was significantly increased in either HDC-KO or DM relative to that in congenic wild-type mice. Defects of histamine transmission may thus modulate the metabolic and respiratory phenotype of murine narcolepsy.

  7. VIP and PACAP 38 modulate ibotenate-induced neuronal heterotopias in the newborn hamster neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressens, P; Arquié, C; Hill, J M; Marret, S; Sahir, N; Robberecht, P; Evrard, P

    2000-12-01

    Intracerebral administration of ibotenate produces, through activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, neuronal heterotopias in the newborn hamster neocortex: high doses of ibotenate induce periventricular and subcortical neuronal heterotopias, while low doses of ibotenate produce intracortical heterotopias and molecular layer ectopias. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) are closely related peptides with neurotrophic properties. They share common VPAC1 and VPAC2 receptors, which use cAMP as a second messenger. Previous studies have shown that VIP prevents excitotoxic neuronal death and exacerbates glutamate-induced c-fos neuronal expression. In order to gain new insight into the molecular control of neuronal migration, the present study examined the effects of VIP and PACAP on ibotenate-induced heterotopias in the newborn hamster. Co-treatment with VIP and a high dose of ibotenate produced a pattern of neuronal heterotopias similar to the one observed in animals treated with low doses of ibotenate alone. Pups co-injected with a low dose of ibotenate and a VIP antagonist displayed cortical dysgeneses similar to those observed in animals treated with high doses of ibotenate alone. The modulating effects of VIP on excitotoxin-induced heterotopias were mimicked by forskolin, PACAP, and by a specific VPAC2 receptor agonist but not by a VPAC1 agonist, and were blocked by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Taken together, these data suggest that VIP and PACAP can attenuate ibotenate-induced heterotopias in newborn hamster and that this effect is mediated by the VPAC2 receptor utilizing the cAMP-PKA pathway.

  8. STAT3 modulation to enhance motor neuron differentiation in human neural stem cells.

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    Rajalaxmi Natarajan

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis damages spinal motor neurons and forms a glial scar, which prevents neural regeneration. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 plays a critical role in astrogliogenesis and scar formation, and thus a fine modulation of STAT3 signaling may help to control the excessive gliogenic environment and enhance neural repair. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of STAT3 inhibition on human neural stem cells (hNSCs. In vitro hNSCs primed with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 exhibited a lower level of phosphorylated STAT3 than cells primed by epidermal growth factor (EGF, which correlated with a higher number of motor neurons differentiated from FGF2-primed hNSCs. Treatment with STAT3 inhibitors, Stattic and Niclosamide, enhanced motor neuron differentiation only in FGF2-primed hNSCs, as shown by increased homeobox gene Hb9 mRNA levels as well as HB9+ and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2+ co-labeled cells. The increased motor neuron differentiation was accompanied by a decrease in the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP-positive astrocytes. Interestingly, Stattic and Niclosamide did not affect the level of STAT3 phosphorylation; rather, they perturbed the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated STAT3. In summary, we demonstrate that FGF2 is required for motor neuron differentiation from hNSCs and that inhibition of STAT3 further increases motor neuron differentiation at the expense of astrogliogenesis. Our study thus suggests a potential benefit of targeting the STAT3 pathway for neurotrauma or neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. A model for modulation of neuronal synchronization by D4 dopamine receptor-mediated phospholipid methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Anna Y; Deth, Richard C

    2008-06-01

    We describe a new molecular mechanism of dopamine-induced membrane protein modulation that can tune neuronal oscillation frequency to attention-related gamma rhythm. This mechanism is based on the unique ability of D4 dopamine receptors (D4R) to carry out phospholipid methylation (PLM) that may affect the kinetics of ion channels. We show that by deceasing the inertia of the delayed rectifier potassium channel, a transition to 40 Hz oscillations can be achieved. Decreased potassium channel inertia shortens spike duration and decreases the interspike interval via its influence on the calcium-dependent potassium current. This mechanism leads to a transition to attention-related gamma oscillations in a pyramidal cell-interneuron network. The higher frequency and better synchronization is observed with PLM affecting pyramidal neurons only, and recurrent excitation between pyramidal neurons is important for synchronization. Thus dopamine-stimulated methylation of membrane phospholipids may be an important mechanism for modulating firing activity, while impaired methylation can contribute to disorders of attention.

  10. Flufenamic acid decreases neuronal excitability through modulation of voltage-gated sodium channel gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Hau-Jie; Baranauskas, Gytis; Martina, Marco

    2010-10-15

    The electrophysiological phenotype of individual neurons critically depends on the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated channels they express. Differences in sodium channel gating are instrumental in determining the different firing phenotypes of pyramidal cells and interneurons; moreover, sodium channel modulation represents an important mechanism of action for many widely used CNS drugs. Flufenamic acid (FFA) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been long used as a blocker of calcium-dependent cationic conductances. Here we show that FFA inhibits voltage-gated sodium currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons; this effect is dose-dependent with IC(50) = 189 μm. We used whole-cell and nucleated patch recordings to investigate the mechanisms of FFA modulation of TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium current. Our data show that flufenamic acid slows down the inactivation process of the sodium current, while shifting the inactivation curve ~10 mV toward more hyperpolarized potentials. The recovery from inactivation is also affected in a voltage-dependent way, resulting in slower recovery at hyperpolarized potentials. Recordings from acute slices demonstrate that FFA reduces repetitive- and abolishes burst-firing in CA1 pyramidal neurons. A computational model based on our data was employed to better understand the mechanisms of FFA action. Simulation data support the idea that FFA acts via a novel mechanism by reducing the voltage dependence of the sodium channel fast inactivation rates. These effects of FFA suggest that it may be an effective anti-epileptic drug.

  11. Identification of Intrinsic Axon Growth Modulators for Intact CNS Neurons after Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Kathren L; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Kim, In-Jung; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Cafferty, William B J

    2017-03-14

    Functional deficits persist after spinal cord injury (SCI) because axons in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) fail to regenerate. However, modest levels of spontaneous functional recovery are typically observed after trauma and are thought to be mediated by the plasticity of intact circuitry. The mechanisms underlying intact circuit plasticity are not delineated. Here, we characterize the in vivo transcriptome of sprouting intact neurons from Ngr1 null mice after partial SCI. We identify the lysophosphatidic acid signaling modulators LPPR1 and LPAR1 as intrinsic axon growth modulators for intact corticospinal motor neurons after adjacent injury. Furthermore, in vivo LPAR1 inhibition or LPPR1 overexpression enhances sprouting of intact corticospinal tract axons and yields greater functional recovery after unilateral brainstem lesion in wild-type mice. Thus, the transcriptional profile of injury-induced sprouting of intact neurons reveals targets for therapeutic enhancement of axon growth initiation and new synapse formation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imène Achour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE, the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model.

  13. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Imène; Arel-Dubeau, Anne-Marie; Renaud, Justine; Legrand, Manon; Attard, Everaldo; Germain, Marc; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE), the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model. PMID:27517912

  14. Emotion processing fails to modulate putative mirror neuron response to trained visuomotor associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M; Kirkovski, Melissa; Fornito, Alex; Paton, Bryan; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Enticott, Peter G

    2016-04-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that activation of the putative human mirror neuron system (MNS) can be elicited via visuomotor training. This is generally interpreted as supporting an associative learning account of the mirror neuron system (MNS) that argues against the ontogeny of the MNS to be an evolutionary adaptation for social cognition. The current study assessed whether a central component of social cognition, emotion processing, would influence the MNS activity to trained visuomotor associations, which could support a broader role of the MNS in social cognition. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we assessed repetition suppression to the presentation of stimulus pairs involving a simple hand action and a geometric shape that was either congruent or incongruent with earlier association training. Each pair was preceded by an image of positive, negative, or neutral emotionality. In support of an associative learning account of the MNS, repetition suppression was greater for trained pairs compared with untrained pairs in several regions, primarily supplementary motor area (SMA) and right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG). This response, however, was not modulated by the valence of the emotional images. These findings argue against a fundamental role of emotion processing in the mirror neuron response, and are inconsistent with theoretical accounts linking mirror neurons to social cognition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Olfactory experience modulates immature neuron development in postnatal and adult guinea pig piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X; Zhang, X-M; Wu, J; Fu, J; Mou, L; Lu, D-H; Cai, Y; Luo, X-G; Pan, A; Yan, X-X

    2014-02-14

    Immature neurons expressing doublecortin (DCX+) are present around cortical layer II in various mammals including guinea pigs and humans, especially enriched in the paleocortex. However, little is known whether and how functional experience affects the development of this population of neurons. We attempted to explore a modulation by experience to layer II DCX+ cells in the primary olfactory cortex in postnatal and adult guinea pigs. Neonatal and 1-year-old guinea pigs were subjected to unilateral naris-occlusion, followed 1 and 2months later by morphometry of DCX+ cells in the piriform cortex. DCX+ somata and processes were reduced in the deprived relative to the non-deprived piriform cortex in both age groups at the two surviving time points. The number of DCX+ cells was decreased in the deprived side relative to internal control at 1 and 2months in the youths and at 2months in the adults post-occlusion. The mean somal area of DCX+ cells showed a trend of decrease in the deprived side relative to the internal control in the youths. In addition, DCX+ cells in the deprived side exhibited a lower frequency of colocalization with the neuron-specific nuclear antigen (NeuN) relative to counterparts. These results suggest that normal olfactory experience is required for the maintenance and development of DCX+ immature neurons in postnatal and adult guinea pig piriform cortex.

  16. Kv4.2 mediates histamine modulation of preoptic neuron activity and body temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Sethi

    Full Text Available Histamine regulates arousal, circadian rhythms, and thermoregulation. Activation of H3 histamine receptors expressed by preoptic GABAergic neurons results in a decrease of their firing rate and hyperthermia. Here we report that an increase in the A-type K⁺ current in preoptic GABAergic neurons in response to activation of H3 histamine receptors results in decreased firing rate and hyperthermia in mice. The Kv4.2 subunit is required for these actions in spite of the fact that Kv4.2⁻/⁻ preoptic GABAergic neurons display A-type currents and firing characteristics similar to those of wild-type neurons. This electrical remodeling is achieved by robust upregulation of the expression of the Kv4.1 subunit and of a delayed rectifier current. Dynamic clamp experiments indicate that enhancement of the A-type current by a similar amount to that induced by histamine is sufficient to mimic its robust effect on firing rates. These data indicate a central role played by the Kv4.2 subunit in histamine regulation of body temperature and its interaction with pERK1/2 downstream of the H3 receptor. We also reveal that this pathway provides a mechanism for selective modulation of body temperature at the beginning of the active phase of the circadian cycle.

  17. Development and modulation of intrinsic membrane properties control the temporal precision of auditory brain stem neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Delwen L; Gleiss, Sarah A; Berger, Christina; Kümpfbeck, Franziska S; Ammer, Julian J; Felmy, Felix

    2015-01-15

    Passive and active membrane properties determine the voltage responses of neurons. Within the auditory brain stem, refinements in these intrinsic properties during late postnatal development usually generate short integration times and precise action-potential generation. This developmentally acquired temporal precision is crucial for auditory signal processing. How the interactions of these intrinsic properties develop in concert to enable auditory neurons to transfer information with high temporal precision has not yet been elucidated in detail. Here, we show how the developmental interaction of intrinsic membrane parameters generates high firing precision. We performed in vitro recordings from neurons of postnatal days 9-28 in the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of Mongolian gerbils, an auditory brain stem structure that converts excitatory to inhibitory information with high temporal precision. During this developmental period, the input resistance and capacitance decrease, and action potentials acquire faster kinetics and enhanced precision. Depending on the stimulation time course, the input resistance and capacitance contribute differentially to action-potential thresholds. The decrease in input resistance, however, is sufficient to explain the enhanced action-potential precision. Alterations in passive membrane properties also interact with a developmental change in potassium currents to generate the emergence of the mature firing pattern, characteristic of coincidence-detector neurons. Cholinergic receptor-mediated depolarizations further modulate this intrinsic excitability profile by eliciting changes in the threshold and firing pattern, irrespective of the developmental stage. Thus our findings reveal how intrinsic membrane properties interact developmentally to promote temporally precise information processing.

  18. Modulation of firing and synaptic transmission of serotonergic neurons by intrinsic G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eMaejima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic neurons project to virtually all regions of the CNS and are consequently involved in many critical physiological functions such as mood, sexual behavior, feeding, sleep/wake cycle, memory, cognition, blood pressure regulation, breathing and reproductive success. Therefore serotonin release and serotonergic neuronal activity have to be precisely controlled and modulated by interacting brain circuits to adapt to specific emotional and environmental states. We will review the current knowledge about G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels involved in the regulation of serotonergic system, how their regulation is modulating the intrinsic activity of serotonergic neurons and its transmitter release and will discuss the latest methods for controlling the modulation of serotonin release and intracellular signaling in serotonergic neurons in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Loureirin B: An Effective Component in Dragon's Blood Modulating Sodium Currents in TG Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangming; Yin, Shijin; Chen, Su; Ma, Quanshun

    2005-01-01

    To test, analyze and express the relationship between the pharmacological effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) dragon's blood and that of its component loureirin B, specify an operational definition for effective component from raw drug of TCM. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, the effects of dragon's blood and its component loureirin B on tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium currents in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons were observed. The results show that both dragon's blood and loureirin B suppressed two types of peak sodium currents in a dose-dependent way. 0.1% dragon's blood and 0.2mmol/L loureirin B affected the activation and inactivation of sodium channels. The results further prove the analgetic mechanism of dragon's blood interfering with the nociceptive transmission. According to the above definition, loureirin B is the effective component in dragon's blood modulating sodium currents in TG neurons.

  20. On Neuron Membrane Potential Distributions for Voltage and Time Dependent Current Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salig, J. B.; Carpio-Bernido, M. V.; Bernido, C. C.; Bornales, J. B.

    Tracking variations of neuronal membrane potential in response to multiple synaptic inputs remains an important open field of investigation since information about neural network behavior and higher brain functions can be inferred from such studies. Much experimental work has been done, with recent advances in multi-electrode recordings and imaging technology giving exciting results. However, experiments have also raised questions of compatibility with available theoretical models. Here we show how methods of modern infinite dimensional analysis allow closed form expressions for important quantities rich in information such as the conditional probability density (cpd). In particular, we use a Feynman integral approach where fluctuations in the dynamical variable are parametrized with Hida white noise variables. The stochastic process described then gives variations in time of the relative membrane potential defined as the difference between the neuron membrane and firing threshold potentials. We obtain the cpd for several forms of current modulation coefficients reflecting the flow of synaptic currents, and which are analogous to drift coefficients in the configuration space Fokker-Planck equation. In particular, we consider cases of voltage and time dependence for current modulation for periodic and non-periodic oscillatory current modulation described by sinusoidal and Bessel functions.

  1. Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates neuronal activity and learning in pilot training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehoon eChoe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skill acquisition requires distributed learning both within (online and across (offline days to consolidate experiences into newly learned abilities. In particular, piloting an aircraft requires skills developed from extensive training and practice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS can modulate neuronal function to improve skill learning and performance during flight simulator training of aircraft landing procedures. Thirty-two right-handed participants consented to participate in four consecutive daily sessions of flight simulation training and received sham or anodal high-definition-tDCS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC or left motor cortex (M1 in a randomized, double-blind experiment. Continuous electroencephalography (EEG and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS were collected during flight simulation, n-back working memory, and resting-state assessments. tDCS of the right DLPFC increased midline-frontal theta-band activity in flight and n-back working memory training, confirming tDCS-related modulation of brain processes involved in executive function. This modulation corresponded to a significantly different online and offline learning rates for working memory accuracy and decreased inter-subject behavioral variability in flight and n-back tasks in the DLPFC stimulation group. Additionally, tDCS of left M1 increased parietal alpha power during flight tasks and tDCS to the right DLPFC increased midline frontal theta-band power during n-back and flight tasks. These results demonstrate a modulation of group variance in skill acquisition through an increasing in learned skill consistency in cognitive and real-world tasks with tDCS. Further, tDCS performance improvements corresponded to changes in electrophysiological and blood-oxygenation activity of the DLPFC and motor cortices, providing a stronger link between modulated neuronal function and behavior.

  2. Olfactory-learning abilities are correlated with the rate by which intrinsic neuronal excitability is modulated in the piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Matsliah, Sivan I; Rosenblum, Kobi; Barkai, Edi

    2009-10-01

    Long-lasting modulation of intrinsic neuronal excitability in cortical neurons underlies distinct stages of skill learning. However, whether individual differences in learning capabilities are dependent on the rate by which such learning-induced modifications occur has yet to be explored. Here we show that training rats in a simple olfactory-discrimination task results in the same enhanced excitability in piriform cortex neurons as previously shown after training in a much more complex olfactory-discrimination task. Based on their learning capabilities in the simple task, rats could be divided to two groups: fast performers and slow performers. The rate at which rats accomplished the skill to perform the simple task was correlated with the time course at which piriform cortex neurons increased their repetitive spike firing. Twelve hours after learning, neurons from fast performers had reduced spike frequency adaptation as compared with neurons from slow performers and controls. Three days after learning, spike frequency adaptation was reduced in neurons from SP, while neurons from fast performers increased their spike firing adaptation to the level of controls. Accordingly, the post-burst AHP was reduced in neurons from fast performers 12 h after learning and in neurons from slow performers 3 days after learning. Moreover, the differences in learning capabilities between fast performers and slow performers were maintained when examined in a different, complex olfactory-discrimination task. We suggest that the rate at which neuronal excitability is modified during learning may affect the behavioral flexibility of the animal.

  3. Octopaminergic modulation of a fly visual motion-sensitive neuron during stimulation with naturalistic optic flow

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    Diana eRien

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In a variety of species locomotor activity, like walking or flying, has been demonstrated to alter visual information processing. The neuromodulator octopamine was shown to change the response characteristics of optic-flow processing neurons in the fly’s visual system in a similar way as locomotor activity. This modulation resulted in enhanced neuronal responses, in particular during sustained stimulation with high temporal frequencies, and in shorter latencies of responses to abrupt onsets of pattern motion. These state-dependent changes were interpreted to adjust neuronal tuning to the range of high velocities encountered during locomotion. Here we assess the significance of these changes for the processing of optic flow as experienced during flight. Naturalistic image sequences were reconstructed based on measurements of the head position and gaze direction of Calliphora vicina flying in an arena. We recorded the responses of the V1 neuron during presentation of these image sequences on a panoramic stimulus device (FliMax. Consistent with previous accounts, we found that spontaneous as well as stimulus-induced spike rates were increased by an octopamine agonist and decreased by an antagonist. Moreover, a small but consistent decrease in response latency upon octopaminergic activation was present, which might support fast responses to optic flow cues and limit instabilities during closed-loop optomotor regulation. However, apart from these effects the similarities between the dynamic response properties in the different pharmacologically induced states were surprisingly high, indicating that the processing of naturalistic optic flow is not fundamentally altered by octopaminergic modulation.

  4. Acetylcholine modulates transient outward potassium channel in acutely isolated cerebral cortical neurons of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lanwei Cui; Tao Sun; Lihui Qu; Yurong Li; Haixia Wen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The neuronal transient outward potassium channel has been shown to be highly associated with acetylcholine.However,the influence of acetylcholine on the transient outward potassium current in cerebral cortical neurons remains poorly understood.OBJECTIVE:To investigate acetylcholine modulation on transient outward potassium current in rat parietal cortical neurons using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A neuroelectrophysiology study was performed at the Department of Physiology,Harbin Medical University between January 2005 and January 2006.MATERIALS:Wistar rats were provided by the Animal Research Center,the Second Hospital of Harbin Medical University;PC-IIC patch-clamp amplifier and IBBClamp data collection analysis system were provided by Huazhong University for Science and Technology,Wuhan,China;PP-83 microelectrode puller was purchased from Narrishage,Japan.METHODS:The parietal somatosensory cortical neurons were acutely dissociated,and the modulation of acetylcholine (0.1,1,10,100 μmol/L) on transient outward potassium channel was recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Influence of acetylcholine on transient outward potassium current,potassium channel activation,and inactivation.RESULTS:The inhibitory effect of acetylcholine on transient outward potassium current was dose- and voltage-dependent (P<0.01).Acetylcholine was found to significantly affect the activation process of transient outward potassium current,i.e.,the activation curve of transient outward potassium current was left-shifted,while the inactivation curve was shifted to hyperpolarization.Acetylcholine significantly prolonged the time constant of recovery from inactivation of transient outward potassium current (P<0.01).CONCLUSION:These results suggest that acetylcholine inhibits transient outward potassium current by regulating activation and inactivation processes of the transient outward potassium channel.

  5. Sexual modulation of sex-shared neurons and circuits in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portman, Douglas S

    2017-01-02

    Studies using the nematode C. elegans have provided unique insights into the development and function of sex differences in the nervous system. Enabled by the relative simplicity of this species, comprehensive studies have solved the complete cellular neuroanatomy of both sexes as well as the complete neural connectomes of the entire adult hermaphrodite and the adult male tail. This work, together with detailed behavioral studies, has revealed three aspects of sex differences in the nervous system: sex-specific neurons and circuits; circuits with sexually dimorphic synaptic connectivity; and sex differences in the physiology and functions of shared neurons and circuits. At all of these levels, biological sex influences neural development and function through the activity of a well-defined genetic hierarchy that acts throughout the body to translate chromosomal sex into the state of a master autosomal regulator of sexual differentiation, the transcription factor TRA-1A. This Review focuses on the role of genetic sex in implementing sex differences in shared neurons and circuits, with an emphasis on linking the sexual modulation of specific neural properties to the specification and optimization of sexually divergent and dimorphic behaviors. An important and unexpected finding from these studies is that chemosensory neurons are a primary focus of sexual modulation, with genetic sex adaptively shaping chemosensory repertoire to guide behavioral choice. Importantly, hormone-independent functions of genetic sex are the principal drivers of all of these sex differences, making nematodes an excellent model for understanding similar but poorly understood mechanisms that likely act throughout the animal kingdom. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Substance P Differentially Modulates Firing Rate of Solitary Complex (SC) Neurons from Control and Chronic Hypoxia-Adapted Adult Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Nicole L.; Powell, Frank L.; Dean, Jay B.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    NK1 receptors, which bind substance P, are present in the majority of brainstem regions that contain CO2/H+-sensitive neurons that play a role in central chemosensitivity. However, the effect of substance P on the chemosensitive response of neurons from these regions has not been studied. Hypoxia increases substance P release from peripheral afferents that terminate in the caudal nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). Here we studied the effect of substance P on the chemosensitive responses of solitary complex (SC: NTS and dorsal motor nucleus) neurons from control and chronic hypoxia-adapted (CHx) adult rats. We simultaneously measured intracellular pH and electrical responses to hypercapnic acidosis in SC neurons from control and CHx adult rats using the blind whole cell patch clamp technique and fluorescence imaging microscopy. Substance P significantly increased the basal firing rate in SC neurons from control and CHx rats, although the increase was smaller in CHx rats. However, substance P did not affect the chemosensitive response of SC neurons from either group of rats. In conclusion, we found that substance P plays a role in modulating the basal firing rate of SC neurons but the magnitude of the effect is smaller for SC neurons from CHx adult rats, implying that NK1 receptors may be down regulated in CHx adult rats. Substance P does not appear to play a role in modulating the firing rate response to hypercapnic acidosis of SC neurons from either control or CHx adult rats. PMID:24516602

  7. Substance P differentially modulates firing rate of solitary complex (SC neurons from control and chronic hypoxia-adapted adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Nichols

    Full Text Available NK1 receptors, which bind substance P, are present in the majority of brainstem regions that contain CO2/H(+-sensitive neurons that play a role in central chemosensitivity. However, the effect of substance P on the chemosensitive response of neurons from these regions has not been studied. Hypoxia increases substance P release from peripheral afferents that terminate in the caudal nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS. Here we studied the effect of substance P on the chemosensitive responses of solitary complex (SC: NTS and dorsal motor nucleus neurons from control and chronic hypoxia-adapted (CHx adult rats. We simultaneously measured intracellular pH and electrical responses to hypercapnic acidosis in SC neurons from control and CHx adult rats using the blind whole cell patch clamp technique and fluorescence imaging microscopy. Substance P significantly increased the basal firing rate in SC neurons from control and CHx rats, although the increase was smaller in CHx rats. However, substance P did not affect the chemosensitive response of SC neurons from either group of rats. In conclusion, we found that substance P plays a role in modulating the basal firing rate of SC neurons but the magnitude of the effect is smaller for SC neurons from CHx adult rats, implying that NK1 receptors may be down regulated in CHx adult rats. Substance P does not appear to play a role in modulating the firing rate response to hypercapnic acidosis of SC neurons from either control or CHx adult rats.

  8. Screening with an NMNAT2-MSD platform identifies small molecules that modulate NMNAT2 levels in cortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Yousuf O.; Bradley, Gillian; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2 (NMNAT2) is a key neuronal maintenance factor and provides potent neuroprotection in numerous preclinical models of neurological disorders. NMNAT2 is significantly reduced in Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, Parkinson’s diseases. Here we developed a Meso Scale Discovery (MSD)-based screening platform to quantify endogenous NMNAT2 in cortical neurons. The high sensitivity and large dynamic range of this NMNAT2-MSD platform allowed us to screen the Sigma LOPAC library consisting of 1280 compounds. This library had a 2.89% hit rate, with 24 NMNAT2 positive and 13 negative modulators identified. Western analysis was conducted to validate and determine the dose-dependency of identified modulators. Caffeine, one identified NMNAT2 positive-modulator, when systemically administered restored NMNAT2 expression in rTg4510 tauopathy mice to normal levels. We confirmed in a cell culture model that four selected positive-modulators exerted NMNAT2-specific neuroprotection against vincristine-induced cell death while four selected NMNAT2 negative modulators reduced neuronal viability in an NMNAT2-dependent manner. Many of the identified NMNAT2 positive modulators are predicted to increase cAMP concentration, suggesting that neuronal NMNAT2 levels are tightly regulated by cAMP signaling. Taken together, our findings indicate that the NMNAT2-MSD platform provides a sensitive phenotypic screen to detect NMNAT2 in neurons. PMID:28266613

  9. Mirror Neurons of Ventral Premotor Cortex Are Modulated by Social Cues Provided by Others' Gaze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudé, Gino; Festante, Fabrizia; Cilia, Adriana; Loiacono, Veronica; Bimbi, Marco; Fogassi, Leonardo; Ferrari, Pier Francesco

    2016-03-16

    Mirror neurons (MNs) in the inferior parietal lobule and ventral premotor cortex (PMv) can code the intentions of other individuals using contextual cues. Gaze direction is an important social cue that can be used for understanding the meaning of actions made by other individuals. Here we addressed the issue of whether PMv MNs are influenced by the gaze direction of another individual. We recorded single-unit activity in macaque PMv while the monkey was observing an experimenter performing a grasping action and orienting his gaze either toward (congruent gaze condition) or away (incongruent gaze condition) from a target object. The results showed that one-half of the recorded MNs were modulated by the gaze direction of the human agent. These gaze-modulated neurons were evenly distributed between those preferring a gaze direction congruent with the direction where the grasping action was performed and the others that preferred an incongruent gaze. Whereas the presence of congruent responses is in line with the usual coupling of hand and gaze in both executed and observed actions, the incongruent responses can be explained by the long exposure of the monkeys to this condition. Our results reveal that the representation of observed actions in PMv is influenced by contextual information not only extracted from physical cues, but also from cues endowed with biological or social value. In this study, we present the first evidence showing that social cues modulate MNs in the monkey ventral premotor cortex. These data suggest that there is an integrated representation of other's hand actions and gaze direction at the single neuron level in the ventral premotor cortex, and support the hypothesis of a functional role of MNs in decoding actions and understanding motor intentions. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/363145-12$15.00/0.

  10. Borna disease virus phosphoprotein modulates epigenetic signaling in neurons to control viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnaud, Emilie M; Szelechowski, Marion; Bétourné, Alexandre; Foret, Charlotte; Thouard, Anne; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel; Malnou, Cécile E

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the modalities of interaction of neurotropic viruses with their target cells represents a major challenge that may improve our knowledge of many human neurological disorders for which viral origin is suspected. Borna disease virus (BDV) represents an ideal model to analyze the molecular mechanisms of viral persistence in neurons and its consequences for neuronal homeostasis. It is now established that BDV ensures its long-term maintenance in infected cells through a stable interaction of viral components with the host cell chromatin, in particular, with core histones. This has led to our hypothesis that such an interaction may trigger epigenetic changes in the host cell. Here, we focused on histone acetylation, which plays key roles in epigenetic regulation of gene expression, notably for neurons. We performed a comparative analysis of histone acetylation patterns of neurons infected or not infected by BDV, which revealed that infection decreases histone acetylation on selected lysine residues. We showed that the BDV phosphoprotein (P) is responsible for these perturbations, even when it is expressed alone independently of the viral context, and that this action depends on its phosphorylation by protein kinase C. We also demonstrated that BDV P inhibits cellular histone acetyltransferase activities. Finally, by pharmacologically manipulating cellular acetylation levels, we observed that inhibiting cellular acetyl transferases reduces viral replication in cell culture. Our findings reveal that manipulation of cellular epigenetics by BDV could be a means to modulate viral replication and thus illustrate a fascinating example of virus-host cell interaction. Persistent DNA viruses often subvert the mechanisms that regulate cellular chromatin dynamics, thereby benefitting from the resulting epigenetic changes to create a favorable milieu for their latent and persistent states. Here, we reasoned that Borna disease virus (BDV), the only RNA virus known to

  11. Modulations in the oscillatory activity of the Globus Pallidus internus neurons during a behavioral task-A point process analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shreya; Gale, John T; Eskandar, Emad N; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2011-01-01

    The behavioral state of a subject is hypothesized to be reflected in the oscillatory modulations of the spiking activity of certain groups of neurons. In particular, the beta- and gamma-bands have been experimentally shown to be related to movement in the motor cortex and parts of the basal ganglia. Here, we analyze the relationship between directional tuning and oscillations in the beta- and gamma-bands of the neurons in the Globus Pallidus internus (GPi) of two healthy nonhuman primates during a radial center-out motor task. We find that, during the planning stages of the movement, the percentage of directionally tuned neurons displaying gamma oscillations increases when compared to the percentage of directionally tuned neurons displaying beta oscillations. A similar trend is not seen in non-directionally tuned neurons. This suggests that the GPi neurons involved in the planning of movement communicate information using an emergence of oscillations in the gamma-band.

  12. The epitranscriptome in modulating spatiotemporal RNA translation in neuronal post-synaptic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobbir eHussain

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of next-generation-sequencing based methods has recently allowed the sequence-specific occurrence of RNA modifications to be investigated in transcriptome-wide settings. This has led to the emergence of a new field of molecular genetics research termed ‘epitranscriptomics’. Investigations have shown that these modifications can exert control over protein synthesis via various mechanisms, and particularly when occurring on messenger RNAs, can be dynamically regulated. Here, we propose that RNA modifications may be a critical regulator over the spatiotemporal control of protein-synthesis in neurons, which is supported by our finding that the RNA methylase NSun2 colocalises with the translational-repressor FMRP at neuronal dendrites. We also observe that NSun2 commonly methylates mRNAs which encode components of the postsynaptic proteome, and further find that NSun2 and FMRP likely share a common subset of mRNA targets which include those that are known to be translated at dendrites in an activity-dependent manner. We consider potential roles for RNA modifications in space- time- and activity-dependent regulation of protein synthesis in neuronal physiology, with a particular focus on synaptic plasticity modulation.

  13. Disruption of Slc4a10 augments neuronal excitability and modulates synaptic short-term plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eSinning

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Slc4a10 is a Na+-coupled Cl--HCO3- exchanger, which is expressed in principal and inhibitory neurons as well as in choroid plexus epithelial cells of the brain. Slc4a10 knockout mice have collapsed brain ventricles and display an increased seizure threshold, while heterozygous deletions in man have been associated with idiopathic epilepsy and other neurological symptoms. To further characterize the role of Slc4a10 for network excitability, we compared input-output relations as well as short and long term changes of evoked field potentials in Slc4a10 knockout and wildtype mice. While responses of CA1 pyramidal neurons to stimulation of Schaffer collaterals were increased in Slc4a10 knockout mice, evoked field potentials did not differ between genotypes in the stratum radiatum or the neocortical areas analyzed. Paired pulse facilitation was diminished in the hippocampus upon disruption of Slc4a10 and paired pulse depression was increased in the neocortex. Though short term plasticity is modulated via Slc4a10, long term potentiation appears independent of Slc4a10. Our data support that Slc4a10 dampens neuronal excitability and thus sheds light on the pathophysiology of SLC4A10 associated pathologies.

  14. Deoxyschisandrin modulates synchronized Ca2+ oscillations and spontaneous synaptic transmission of cultured hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min FU; Zhao-hui SUN; Min ZONG; Xiang-ping HE; Huan-cong ZUO; Zuo-ping XIE

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Deoxyschisandrin is one of the most effective composites of Schisandra chinensis, a famous Chinese medicine widely used as an antistress, anti-aging, and neurological performance-improving herb. In this study, we examined its spe- cific mechanisms of action on cultured hippocampal neurons. Methods: Hippoc- ampal neurons, primarily cultured for 9-11 d in vitro, were used for this study. DS were dissolved in DMSO and applied to calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamp. Results: The application of 3 mg/L DS decreased the frequency of sponta- neous and synchronous oscillations of intracellular Ca2+ to 72%±2% (mean±SEM), and the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents to 60%±3% (mean±SEM). The inhibitory concentraton 50% (IC50) for the effect of DS on calcium oscillations was 3.8 mg/L. DS also depressed the high voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and the voltage-gated Na+ channel currents at the same time point. It had no effect, however, on voltage-gated K+ and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Conclusion: DS inhibited the spontaneous and synchronous oscillations of intra- cellular Ca2+ through the depression of influx of extracellular calcium and the initiation of action potential. By repressing the spontaneous neurotransmitter release, DS modulated the neuronal network activities.

  15. Sugar-dependent modulation of neuronal development, regeneration, and plasticity by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gregory M; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C

    2015-12-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) play important roles in the developing and mature nervous system, where they guide axons, maintain stable connections, restrict synaptic plasticity, and prevent axon regeneration following CNS injury. The chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (CS GAG) chains that decorate CSPGs are essential for their functions. Through these sugar chains, CSPGs are able to bind and regulate the activity of a diverse range of proteins. CSPGs have been found both to promote and inhibit neuronal growth. They can promote neurite outgrowth by binding to various growth factors such as midkine (MK), pleiotrophin (PTN), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other neurotrophin family members. CSPGs can also inhibit neuronal growth and limit plasticity by interacting with transmembrane receptors such as protein tyrosine phosphatase σ (PTPσ), leukocyte common antigen-related (LAR) receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, and the Nogo receptors 1 and 3 (NgR1 and NgR3). These CS-protein interactions depend on specific sulfation patterns within the CS GAG chains, and accordingly, particular CS sulfation motifs are upregulated during development, in the mature nervous system, and in response to CNS injury. Thus, spatiotemporal regulation of CS GAG biosynthesis may provide an important mechanism to control the functions of CSPGs and to modulate intracellular signaling pathways. Here, we will discuss these sulfation-dependent processes and highlight how the CS sugars on CSPGs contribute to neuronal growth, axon guidance, and plasticity in the nervous system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. MicroRNA-92a is a circadian modulator of neuronal excitability in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Rosbash, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Many biological and behavioural processes of animals are governed by an endogenous circadian clock, which is dependent on transcriptional regulation. Here we address post-transcriptional regulation and the role of miRNAs in Drosophila circadian rhythms. At least six miRNAs show cycling expression levels within the pigment dispersing factor (PDF) cell-pacemaker neurons; only mir-92a peaks during the night. In vivo calcium monitoring, dynamics of PDF projections, ArcLight, GCaMP6 imaging and sleep assays indicate that mir-92a suppresses neuronal excitability. In addition, mir-92a levels within PDF cells respond to light pulses and also affect the phase shift response. Translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP) and in vitro luciferase reporter assay indicate that mir-92a suppresses expression of sirt2, which is homologous to human sir2 and sirt3. sirt2 RNAi also phenocopies mir-92a overexpression. These experiments indicate that sirt2 is a functional mir-92a target and that mir-92a modulates PDF neuronal excitability via suppressing SIRT2 levels in a rhythmic manner. PMID:28276426

  17. Demodulation effect is observed in neurones by exposure to low frequency modulated microwaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Bruzon, R N; Figols, T; Azanza, M J [Laboratorio de Magnetobiologia, Departamento de Anatomia e Histologia Humanas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Moral, A del, E-mail: naogit@yahoo.co [Laboratorio de Magnetismo de Solidos, Departamento de Fisica de Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza and CSIC (Spain)

    2010-01-01

    Neurones exposure to a microwave (carrier f{sub c}=13.6 GHz; power P {approx_equal} 5 mW; H{sub o} {approx_equal} 0.10 Am{sup -1} = 1.25 mOe; E{sub 0} {approx_equal} 3.5 V/m; {Delta}T {approx_equal} 0.01{sup 0}C; SAR: 3.1x10{sup -3} - 5.8x10{sup -3} W/Kg) EMF amplitude modulated by ELF-AC field (frequency, f{sub m}= 0-100 Hz) shows no electrophysiological effect under the carrier MF alone, but {sup f}requency resonances: at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 50, 100 Hz: demodulation effect. Resonances appear when applied ELF-MF is close to a dominant characteristic frequency of the neurone impulse Fourier spectrum. This is an interesting result considering that ELF-MF modulating RF or MW in the range of human EEG could induce frequency-resonant effects on exposed human brain.

  18. Modulating Molecular Chaperones Improves Mitochondrial Bioenergetics and Decreases the Inflammatory Transcriptome in Diabetic Sensory Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiacheng; Pan, Pan; Anyika, Mercy; Blagg, Brian S J; Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2015-09-16

    We have previously demonstrated that modulating molecular chaperones with KU-32, a novobiocin derivative, ameliorates physiologic and bioenergetic deficits of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Replacing the coumarin core of KU-32 with a meta-fluorinated biphenyl ring system created KU-596, a novobiocin analogue (novologue) that showed neuroprotective activity in a cell-based assay. The current study sought to determine whether KU-596 offers similar therapeutic potential for treating DPN. Administration of 2-20 mg/kg of KU-596 improved diabetes induced hypoalgesia and sensory neuron bioenergetic deficits in a dose-dependent manner. However, the drug could not improve these neuropathic deficits in diabetic heat shock protein 70 knockout (Hsp70 KO) mice. To gain further insight into the mechanisms by which KU-596 improved DPN, we performed transcriptomic analysis of sensory neuron RNA obtained from diabetic wild-type and Hsp70 KO mice using RNA sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that diabetes strongly increased inflammatory pathways and that KU-596 therapy effectively reversed these increases independent of Hsp70. In contrast, the effects of KU-596 on decreasing the expression of genes regulating the production of reactive oxygen species were more Hsp70-dependent. These data indicate that modulation of molecular chaperones by novologue therapy offers an effective approach toward correcting nerve dysfunction in DPN but that normalization of inflammatory pathways alone by novologue therapy seems to be insufficient to reverse sensory deficits associated with insensate DPN.

  19. Cholinergic modulation of primary afferent glutamatergic transmission in rat medullary dorsal horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seok-Gwon; Choi, In-Sun; Cho, Jin-Hwa; Jang, Il-Sung

    2013-12-01

    Although muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptors are expressed in trigeminal ganglia, it is still unknown whether mACh receptors modulate glutamatergic transmission from primary afferents onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. In this study, we have addressed the cholinergic modulation of primary afferent glutamatergic transmission using a conventional whole cell patch clamp technique. Glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were evoked from primary afferents by electrical stimulation of trigeminal tract and monosynaptic EPSCs were recorded from medullary dorsal horn neurons of rat horizontal brain stem slices. Muscarine and ACh reversibly and concentration-dependently decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic EPSCs and increased the paired-pulse ratio. In addition, muscarine reduced the frequency of miniature EPSCs without affecting the current amplitude, suggesting that muscarine acts presynaptically to decrease the probability of glutamate release onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. The muscarine-induced decrease of glutamatergic EPSCs was significantly occluded by methoctramine or AF-DX116, M2 receptor antagonists, but not pirenzepine, J104129 and MT-3, selective M1, M3 and M4 receptor antagonists. The muscarine-induced decrease of glutamatergic EPSCs was highly dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration. Physostigmine and clinically available acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as rivastigmine and donepezil, significantly shifted the concentration-inhibition relationship of ACh for glutamatergic EPSCs. These results suggest that muscarine acts on presynaptic M2 receptors to inhibit glutamatergic transmission by reducing the Ca2+ influx into primary afferent terminals, and that M2 receptor agonists and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors could be, at least, potential targets to reduce nociceptive transmission from orofacial tissues.

  20. SGPL1 (sphingosine phosphate lyase 1) modulates neuronal autophagy via phosphatidylethanolamine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitroi, Daniel N; Karunakaran, Indulekha; Gräler, Markus; Saba, Julie D; Ehninger, Dan; Ledesma, María Dolores; van Echten-Deckert, Gerhild

    2017-05-04

    Macroautophagy/autophagy defects have been identified as critical factors underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. The roles of the bioactive signaling lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its catabolic enzyme SGPL1/SPL (sphingosine phosphate lyase 1) in autophagy are increasingly recognized. Here we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence for a previously unidentified route through which SGPL1 modulates autophagy in neurons. SGPL1 cleaves S1P into ethanolamine phosphate, which is directed toward the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) that anchors LC3-I to phagophore membranes in the form of LC3-II. In the brains of SGPL1(fl/fl/Nes) mice with developmental neural specific SGPL1 ablation, we observed significantly reduced PE levels. Accordingly, alterations in basal and stimulated autophagy involving decreased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and increased BECN1/Beclin-1 and SQSTM1/p62 levels were apparent. Alterations were also noticed in downstream events of the autophagic-lysosomal pathway such as increased levels of lysosomal markers and aggregate-prone proteins such as APP (amyloid β [A4] precursor protein) and SNCA/α-synuclein. In vivo profound deficits in cognitive skills were observed. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of SGPL1 in cultured neurons promoted these alterations, whereas addition of PE was sufficient to restore LC3-I to LC3-II conversion, and control levels of SQSTM1, APP and SNCA. Electron and immunofluorescence microscopy showed accumulation of unclosed phagophore-like structures, reduction of autolysosomes and altered distribution of LC3 in SGPL1(fl/fl/Nes) brains. Experiments using EGFP-mRFP-LC3 provided further support for blockage of the autophagic flux at initiation stages upon SGPL1 deficiency due to PE paucity. These results emphasize a formerly overlooked direct role of SGPL1 in neuronal autophagy and assume significance in the context that autophagy modulators hold an enormous therapeutic potential in the

  1. Fasting and 17β-estradiol differentially modulate the M-current in NPY neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepke, Troy A.; Qiu, Jian; Smith, Arik W.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple K+ conductances are targets for many peripheral and central signals involved in the control of energy homeostasis. Potential K+ channel targets are the KCNQ subunits that form the channels underlying the M-current, a sub-threshold, non-inactivating K+ current that is a common target for G-protein coupled receptors. Whole-cell recordings were made from GFP (Renilla)-tagged NPY neurons from the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus using protocols to isolate and characterize the M-current in these orexigenic neurons. We recorded robust K+ currents in the voltage range of the M-current, which were inhibited by the selective KCNQ channel blocker XE991 (40 µM), in both intact males and ovariectomized, 17β-estradiol (E2)-treated females. Since NPY neurons are orexigenic and are active during fasting, the M-current was measured in fed and fasted male mice. Fasting attenuated the XE991-sensitive current by 3-fold which correlated with decreased expression of the KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 subunits as measured with quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, E2 treatment augmented the XE991-sensitive M-current by 3-fold in ovariectomized (vs. oil-treated) female mice. E2-treatment increased the expression of the KCNQ5 subunit in females but not KCNQ2 or KCNQ3 subunits. Fasting in females abrogated the effects of E2 on M-current activity, at least in part, by decreasing KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 expression. In summary, these data suggest that the M-current plays a pivotal role in the modulation of NPY neuronal excitability and may be an important cellular target for neurotransmitter and hormonal signals in the control of energy homeostasis in both males and females. PMID:21849543

  2. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4-Induced Modulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels in Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhiwen; Jie, Pinghui; Tian, Yujing; Chen, Tingting; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to control the resting membrane potential and increase excitability in many types of cells. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play an important role in initiating action potentials in neurons. However, whether VGSCs can be modulated by the activation of TRPV4 in hippocampal pyramidal neurons remains unknown. In this study, we tested the effect of TRPV4 agonists (GSK1016790A and 4α-PDD) on voltage-gated sodium current (I Na) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and the protein levels of α/β-subunit of VGSCs in the hippocampus of mice subjected to intracerebroventricular (icv.) injection of GSK1016790A (GSK-injected mice). Herein, we report that I Na was inhibited by acute application of GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD. In the presence of TRPV4 agonists, the voltage-dependent inactivation curve shifted to the hyperpolarization, whereas the voltage-dependent activation curve remained unchanged. The TRPV4 agonist-induced inhibition of I Na was blocked by the TRPV4 antagonist or tetrodotoxin. Moreover, blocking protein kinase A (PKA) markedly attenuated the GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of I Na, whereas antagonism of protein kinase C or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase did not change GSK1016790A action. Finally, the protein levels of Nav1.1, Nav1.2, and Nav1.6 in the hippocampus increased in GSK-injected mice, whereas those of Nav1.3 and Navβ1 remained nearly unchanged. We conclude that I Na is inhibited by the acute activation of TRPV4 through PKA signaling pathway in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, but protein expression of α-subunit of VGSCs is increased by sustained TRPV4 activation, which may compensate for the acute inhibition of I Na and provide a possibility for hyper-excitability upon sustained TRPV4 activation.

  3. A new role for TIMP-1 in modulating neurite outgrowth and morphology of cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adlane Ould-yahoui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1 displays pleiotropic activities, both dependent and independent of its inhibitory activity on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. In the central nervous system (CNS, TIMP-1 is strongly upregulated in reactive astrocytes and cortical neurons following excitotoxic/inflammatory stimuli, but no information exists on its effects on growth and morphology of cortical neurons. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that 24 h incubation with recombinant TIMP-1 induced a 35% reduction in neurite length and significantly increased growth cones size and the number of F-actin rich microprocesses. TIMP-1 mediated reduction in neurite length affected both dendrites and axons after 48 h treatment. The effects on neurite length and morphology were not elicited by a mutated form of TIMP-1 inactive against MMP-1, -2 and -3, and still inhibitory for MMP-9, but were mimicked by a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor. MMP-9 was poorly expressed in developing cortical neurons, unlike MMP-2 which was present in growth cones and whose selective inhibition caused neurite length reductions similar to those induced by TIMP-1. Moreover, TIMP-1 mediated changes in cytoskeleton reorganisation were not accompanied by modifications in the expression levels of actin, betaIII-tubulin, or microtubule assembly regulatory protein MAP2c. Transfection-mediated overexpression of TIMP-1 dramatically reduced neuritic arbour extension in the absence of detectable levels of released extracellular TIMP-1. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, TIMP-1 emerges as a modulator of neuronal outgrowth and morphology in a paracrine and autrocrine manner through the inhibition, at least in part, of MMP-2 and not MMP-9. These findings may help us understand the role of the MMP/TIMP system in post-lesion pre-scarring conditions.

  4. Action potential modulation in CA1 pyramidal neuron axons facilitates OLM interneuron activation in recurrent inhibitory microcircuits of rat hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooyun Kim

    Full Text Available Oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM interneurons in the CA1 region of the hippocampus play a key role in feedback inhibition and in the control of network activity. However, how these cells are efficiently activated in the network remains unclear. To address this question, I performed recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons, the presynaptic fibers that provide feedback innervation of these interneurons. Two forms of axonal action potential (AP modulation were identified. First, repetitive stimulation resulted in activity-dependent AP broadening. Broadening showed fast onset, with marked changes in AP shape following a single AP. Second, tonic depolarization in CA1 pyramidal neuron somata induced AP broadening in the axon, and depolarization-induced broadening summated with activity-dependent broadening. Outside-out patch recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons revealed a high density of α-dendrotoxin (α-DTX-sensitive, inactivating K+ channels, suggesting that K+ channel inactivation mechanistically contributes to AP broadening. To examine the functional consequences of axonal AP modulation for synaptic transmission, I performed paired recordings between synaptically connected CA1 pyramidal neurons and O-LM interneurons. CA1 pyramidal neuron-O-LM interneuron excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs showed facilitation during both repetitive stimulation and tonic depolarization of the presynaptic neuron. Both effects were mimicked and occluded by α-DTX, suggesting that they were mediated by K+ channel inactivation. Therefore, axonal AP modulation can greatly facilitate the activation of O-LM interneurons. In conclusion, modulation of AP shape in CA1 pyramidal neuron axons substantially enhances the efficacy of principal neuron-interneuron synapses, promoting the activation of O-LM interneurons in recurrent inhibitory microcircuits.

  5. Action potential modulation in CA1 pyramidal neuron axons facilitates OLM interneuron activation in recurrent inhibitory microcircuits of rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooyun

    2014-01-01

    Oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons in the CA1 region of the hippocampus play a key role in feedback inhibition and in the control of network activity. However, how these cells are efficiently activated in the network remains unclear. To address this question, I performed recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons, the presynaptic fibers that provide feedback innervation of these interneurons. Two forms of axonal action potential (AP) modulation were identified. First, repetitive stimulation resulted in activity-dependent AP broadening. Broadening showed fast onset, with marked changes in AP shape following a single AP. Second, tonic depolarization in CA1 pyramidal neuron somata induced AP broadening in the axon, and depolarization-induced broadening summated with activity-dependent broadening. Outside-out patch recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons revealed a high density of α-dendrotoxin (α-DTX)-sensitive, inactivating K+ channels, suggesting that K+ channel inactivation mechanistically contributes to AP broadening. To examine the functional consequences of axonal AP modulation for synaptic transmission, I performed paired recordings between synaptically connected CA1 pyramidal neurons and O-LM interneurons. CA1 pyramidal neuron-O-LM interneuron excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) showed facilitation during both repetitive stimulation and tonic depolarization of the presynaptic neuron. Both effects were mimicked and occluded by α-DTX, suggesting that they were mediated by K+ channel inactivation. Therefore, axonal AP modulation can greatly facilitate the activation of O-LM interneurons. In conclusion, modulation of AP shape in CA1 pyramidal neuron axons substantially enhances the efficacy of principal neuron-interneuron synapses, promoting the activation of O-LM interneurons in recurrent inhibitory microcircuits.

  6. DREADD Modulation of Transplanted DA Neurons Reveals a Novel Parkinsonian Dyskinesia Mechanism Mediated by the Serotonin 5-HT6 Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Summary Transplantation of DA neurons is actively pursued as a restorative therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Pioneering clinical trials using transplants of fetal DA neuroblasts have given promising results, although a number of patients have developed graft-induced dyskinesias (GIDs), and the mechanism underlying this troublesome side effect is still unknown. Here we have used a new model where the activity of the transplanted DA neurons can be selectively modulated using a bimodal chemog...

  7. [Modulating effect of dopamine on amplitude of GABA-produced chemocontrolled currents in multipolar spinal cord neurons of ammocaete].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukinich, A A

    2010-01-01

    By using the patch-clamp method in the whole cell configuration, modulating effect of dopamine on GABA-activated currents has been studied on isolated multipolar spinal cord neurons of the ammocaete (larva of the lamprey Lampetra planeri). At application of dopamine (5 microM), there was observed in some cases a decrease of the GABA-activated current, on average, by 33.3 +/- 8.7 (n = 8, p multipolar neurons of the ammocaete spinal cord.

  8. Methamphetamine modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission in rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuzhuo; Jin, Yuelei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Lujia; Ge, Zhi juan; Wang, Hui; Li, Jin; Zheng, Jianquan

    2014-09-25

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant drug. Abuse of METH produces long-term behavioral changes including behavioral, sensitization, tolerance, and dependence. It induces neurotoxic effects in several areas of the brain via enhancing dopamine (DA) level abnormally, which may cause a secondary release of glutamate (GLU). However, repeated administration of METH still increases release of GLU even when dopamine content in tissue is significantly depleted. It implies that some other mechanisms are likely to involve in METH-induced GLU release. The goal of this study was to observe METH affected glutamatergic synaptic transmission in rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons and to explore the mechanism of METH modulated GLU release. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that METH (0.1-50.0μM) increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). However, METH decreased the frequency of sEPSCs and mEPSCs at high concentration of 100μM. The postsynaptic NMDA receptor currents and P/Q-type calcium channel were not affected by the use of METH (10,100μM). METH did not present visible effect on N-type Ca(2+) channel current at the concentration lower than 50.0μM, but it was inhibited by use of METH at a 100μM. The effect of METH on glutamatergic synaptic transmission was not revered by pretreated with DA receptor antagonist SCH23390. These results suggest that METH directly modulated presynaptic GLU release at a different concentration, while dopaminergic system was not involved in METH modulated release of GLU in rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

  9. Involvement of serotonin 2A receptor activation in modulating medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala neuronal activation during novelty-exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervig, Mona El-Sayed; Jensen, Nadja Cecilie Hvid; Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo

    2017-01-01

    -field arena affects medial PFC activation and basolateral amygdala (BLA) reactivity. We used c-Fos immunoreactivity (IR) as a marker of neuronal activation and stereological quantification for obtaining the total number of c-Fos-IR neurons as a measure of regional activation. We further examined the impact...... of 5-HT2AR blockade on the striatal-projecting BLA neurons. Systemic administration of ketanserin (0.5 mg/kg) prior to novel open-field exposure resulted in reduced total numbers of c-Fos-IR cells in dorsomedial PFC areas and the BLA. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the relative time......-treated animals, upholding its involvement in modulating averseness. Ketanserin did not affect the number of activated striatal-projecting BLA neurons (measured by number of Cholera Toxin b (CTb) retrograde labelled neurons also being c-Fos-IR) following CTb injection in the ventral striatum. These results...

  10. Pulse-Density Modulation with an Ensemble of Single-Electron Circuits Employing Neuronal Heterogeneity to Achieve High Temporal Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikombo, Andrew Kilinga; Asai, Tetsuya; Amemiya, Yoshihito

    We investigated the implications of static noises in a pulse-density modulator based on Vestibulo-ocular Reflex model. We constructed a simple neuromorphic circuit consisting of an ensemble of single-electron devices and confirmed that static noises (heterogeneity in circuit parameters) introduced into the network indeed played an important role in improving the fidelity with which neurons could encode signals whose input frequencies are higher than the intrinsic response frequencies of single neurons. Through Monte-Carlo based computer simulations, we demonstrated that the heterogeneous network could corectly encode signals with input frequencies as high as 1 GHz, twice the range for single (or a network of homogeneous) neurons.

  11. Identification of hypothalamic neuron-derived neurotrophic factor as a novel factor modulating appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerly, Mardi S; Swanson, Roy D; Semsarzadeh, Nina N; McCulloh, Patrick S; Kwon, Kiwook; Aja, Susan; Moran, Timothy H; Wong, G William; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-06-15

    Disruption of finely coordinated neuropeptide signals in the hypothalamus can result in altered food intake and body weight. We identified neuron-derived neurotrophic factor (NENF) as a novel secreted protein through a large-scale screen aimed at identifying novel secreted hypothalamic proteins that regulate food intake. We observed robust Nenf expression in hypothalamic nuclei known to regulate food intake, and its expression was altered under the diet-induced obese (DIO) condition relative to the fed state. Hypothalamic Nenf mRNA was regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, itself an important regulator of appetite. Delivery of purified recombinant BDNF into the lateral cerebral ventricle decreased hypothalamic Nenf expression, while pharmacological inhibition of trkB signaling increased Nenf mRNA expression. Furthermore, recombinant NENF administered via an intracerebroventricular cannula decreased food intake and body weight and increased hypothalamic Pomc and Mc4r mRNA expression. Importantly, the appetite-suppressing effect of NENF was abrogated in obese mice fed a high-fat diet, demonstrating a diet-dependent modulation of NENF function. We propose the existence of a regulatory circuit involving BDNF, NENF, and melanocortin signaling. Our study validates the power of using an integrated experimental and bioinformatic approach to identify novel CNS-derived proteins with appetite-modulating function and reveals NENF as an important central modulator of food intake.

  12. Pharmacological and kinetic characterization of two functional classes of serotonergic modulation in Aplysia sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, L L; Mercer, A R; Emptage, N J; Carew, T J

    1996-02-01

    1. Modulation of mechanoafferent sensory neurons (SNs) by the neutrotransmitter serotonin (5HT) plays a significant role in behavioral sensitization of several withdrawal reflexes in Aplysia. The modulatory effects of 5HT on these SNs include increased excitability, increased input resistance, action potential broadening, and increased synaptic transmission. Based on a previously described dissociation of some of these modulatory effects, revealed with the 5HT-receptor antagonist, cyproheptadine, we investigated whether a similar dissociation could be found by systematically varying the concentration of the endogenous agonist, 5HT. 2. We first applied a range of 5HT concentrations to isolated pleural/pedal ganglia (containing tail SNs and tail motor neurons, respectively), and measured the magnitude of 5HT-induced modulation of spike broadening and increased excitability. The resulting dose-response curve showed that both forms of modulation increase monotonically as a function of 5HT concentration, but that excitability has a lower threshold for modulation by 5HT than does spike duration. 3. We further characterized the modulatory effects of 5HT on Aplysia SNs by comparing the time course of onset of modulation by 5HT and the time course of recovery after washout. Independent of 5HT concentration, modulation of excitability increases rapidly in the presence of 5HT and recovers rapidly (broadening, which resembles the kinetics of increased excitability and increased input resistance. Higher concentrations of 5HT (2.5 and 5 microM) induce a more slowly developing and prolonged-recovery form of spike broadening (> 9 min). At these higher concentrations, the recovery profile for prolonged spike broadening is significantly different from those observed for both increased excitability and increased input resistance. 4. We next compared the relationship between spike broadening and short-term synaptic facilitation. We found that significant facilitation of synaptic

  13. The growth cones of Aplysia sensory neurons: Modulation by serotonin of action potential duration and single potassium channel currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardetti, F; Schacher, S; Kandel, E R; Siegelbaum, S A

    1986-09-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) closes a specific K channel ("S") in the cell body of Aplysia sensory neurons, resulting in a slow excitatory postsynaptic potential and spike broadening. To determine whether the S channel is present and can be modulated in processes of the neuron other than the cell body, we studied the effects of 5-HT on growth cones of sensory neurons in culture by using the patch-clamp technique. Simultaneous application of 5-HT to the cell body and to the growth cones of sensory neurons produced, in both, a slow depolarization of approximately 5 mV. Also, 5-HT produced a lengthening of the duration of action potential in the growth cone and cell body by 20-30%. Similar effects were observed in isolated growth cones that had been severed from the rest of the neuron, implying that the growth cones contain all the molecular components (i.e., receptors, channels, cAMP cascade) necessary for 5-HT action. Cell-attached patch-clamp recordings demonstrated the presence of S channels in sensory neuron growth cones. Application of serotonin to the bath produced long-lasting all-or-none closures of these channels in a manner identical to the previously characterized action of 5-HT in the cell body. Thus, channel modulation is not restricted to the cell body and probably occurs throughout the sensory neuron. This strengthens the view that S-channel modulation may also occur at the sensory neuron presynaptic terminal, where it could play a role in the presynaptic facilitation produced by 5-HT.

  14. Spine formation pattern of adult-born neurons is differentially modulated by the induction timing and location of hippocampal plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriaki Ohkawa

    Full Text Available In the adult hippocampus dentate gyrus (DG, newly born neurons are functionally integrated into existing circuits and play important roles in hippocampus-dependent memory. However, it remains unclear how neural plasticity regulates the integration pattern of new neurons into preexisting circuits. Because dendritic spines are major postsynaptic sites for excitatory inputs, spines of new neurons were visualized by retrovirus-mediated labeling to evaluate integration. Long-term potentiation (LTP was induced at 12, 16, or 21 days postinfection (dpi, at which time new neurons have no, few, or many spines, respectively. The spine expression patterns were investigated at one or two weeks after LTP induction. Induction at 12 dpi increased later spinogenesis, although the new neurons at 12 dpi didn't respond to the stimulus for LTP induction. Induction at 21 dpi transiently mediated spine enlargement. Surprisingly, LTP induction at 16 dpi reduced the spine density of new neurons. All LTP-mediated changes specifically appeared within the LTP-induced layer. Therefore, neural plasticity differentially regulates the integration of new neurons into the activated circuit, dependent on their developmental stage. Consequently, new neurons at different developmental stages may play distinct roles in processing the acquired information by modulating the connectivity of activated circuits via their integration.

  15. Golli Myelin Basic Proteins Modulate Voltage-Operated Ca(++) Influx and Development in Cortical and Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vt, Cheli; DA, Santiago González; V, Spreuer; V, Handley; At, Campagnoni; Pm, Paez

    2016-10-01

    The golli proteins, products of the myelin basic protein gene, are widely expressed in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and neurons during the postnatal development of the brain. While golli appears to be important for oligodendrocyte migration and differentiation, its function in neuronal development is completely unknown. We have found that golli proteins function as new and novel modulators of voltage-operated Ca(++) channels (VOCCs) in neurons. In vitro, golli knock-out (KO) neurons exhibit decreased Ca(++) influx after plasma membrane depolarization and a substantial maturational delay. Increased expression of golli proteins enhances L-type Ca(++) entry and processes outgrowth in cortical neurons, and pharmacological activation of L-type Ca(++) channels stimulates maturation and prevents cell death in golli-KO neurons. In situ, Ca(++) influx mediated by L-type VOCCs was significantly decreased in cortical and hippocampal neurons of the golli-KO brain. These Ca(++) alterations affect cortical and hippocampal development and the proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells during the postnatal development of the golli-KO brain. The CA1/3 sections and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus were reduced in the golli-KO mice as well as the density of dendrites in the somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, the golli-KO mice display abnormal behavior including deficits in episodic memory and reduced anxiety. Because of the expression of the golli proteins within neurons in learning and memory centers of the brain, this work has profound implication in neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders.

  16. Metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors modulate cellular excitability and glutamatergic transmission in chicken cochlear nucleus angularis neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Lu, Yong

    2017-03-01

    Neurons in the avian cochlear nucleus angularis (NA) receive glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve, and GABAergic input from the superior olivary nucleus. Physiologically heterogeneous, NA neurons perform multiple functions including encoding sound intensity information. Using in vitro whole-cell patch recordings from acute brain slices and immunohistochemistry staining, we investigated neuromodulation mediated by metabotropic glutamate and GABA receptors (mGluRs and GABABRs) in NA neurons. Based on their intrinsic firing patterns in response to somatic current injections, NA neurons were classified into onset, damped, and tonic cells. Pharmacological activation of group II mGluRs, group III mGluRs, and GABABRs, by their respective agonists, suppressed the cellular excitability of non-onset firing NA neurons. Each of these agonists inhibited the glutamatergic transmission in NA neurons, in a cell type-independent manner. The frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous release of glutamate was reduced by each of these agonists, suggesting that the modulation of the glutamatergic transmission was via presynaptic actions. Interestingly, activation of group I mGluRs increased cellular excitability and suppressed glutamatergic transmission in non-onset neurons. These results elaborate that auditory processing in NA neurons is subject to neuromodulation mediated by metabotropic receptors activated by native neurotransmitters released at NA.

  17. Modulation of Hyperpolarization-Activated Cation Currents (Ih) by Ethanol in Rat Hippocampal CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Licheri, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that ethanol (EtOH), through the interaction with several membrane proteins, as well as intracellular pathways, is capable to modulate many neuronal function. Recent reports show that EtOH increases the firing rate of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons through the positive modulation of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) cation channels. This effect might be consistent with the increase of GABA release from presynaptic terminals...

  18. The mechanism of noradrenergic alpha 1 excitatory modulation of pontine reticular formation neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, D R; McCarley, R W; Greene, R W

    1994-11-01

    The alpha 1 adrenergic receptor occurs in all major divisions of the CNS and is thought to play a role in all behaviors influenced by norepinephrine (NE). In the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF), the proposed site of adrenergic enhancement of startle responses (Davis, 1984), alpha 1 agonists excite most neurons (Gerber et al., 1990). We here report that alpha 1 excitation results from a reduction of a voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium current, not previously recognized as ligand-modulated. The calcium sensitivity is suggested by its antagonism with Mg2+, Cd2+, Ba2+, low concentrations of tetraethylammonium, and charybdotoxin. The voltage sensitivity of this conductance falls within the membrane potential range critical to action potential generation. Based on this voltage sensitivity, the change in repetitive firing characteristics may be predicted according to a mathematical model of the mPRF neuronal electrophysiology. The predicted response to a 50% decrease in the phenylephrine (PE)-sensitive conductance is similar to the observed responses, with respect to both the current response under voltage-clamp conditions and alterations of the AHP and frequency/current curve. In contrast, modeling a reduction of a voltage-insensitive leak current predicts none of these changes. Thus, the noradrenergic reduction of this current depolarizes the membrane, increases the likelihood of an initial response to depolarizing input, and increases firing rate during sustained depolarization in a manner consistent with an NE role as an excitatory neuromodulator of the mPRF.

  19. ZBTB20 regulates nociception and pain sensation by modulating TRP channel expression in nociceptive sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, An-Jing; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Anjun; Ma, Xianhua; Liang, Qing; Cao, Dongmei; Wood, John N; He, David Z; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Yuan, Wen-Jun; Xie, Zhifang; Zhang, Weiping J

    2014-11-05

    In mammals, pain sensation is initiated by the detection of noxious stimuli through specialized transduction ion channels and receptors in nociceptive sensory neurons. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are the key sensory transducers that confer nociceptors distinct sensory modalities. However, the regulatory mechanisms about their expression are poorly defined. Here we show that the zinc-finger protein ZBTB20 regulates TRP channels expression in nociceptors. ZBTB20 is highly expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia. Disruption of ZBTB20 in nociceptors led to a marked decrease in the expression levels of TRPV1, TRPA1 and TRPM8 and the response of calcium flux and whole-cell currents evoked by their respective specific agonists. Phenotypically, the mice lacking ZBTB20 specifically in nociceptors showed a defect in nociception and pain sensation in response to thermal, mechanical and inflammatory stimulation. Our findings point to ZBTB20 as a critical regulator of nociception and pain sensation by modulating TRP channels expression in nociceptors.

  20. Spatial Attention and Temporal Expectation Under Timed Uncertainty Predictably Modulate Neuronal Responses in Monkey V1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jitendra; Sugihara, Hiroki; Katz, Yarden; Schummers, James; Tenenbaum, Joshua; Sur, Mriganka

    2015-01-01

    The brain uses attention and expectation as flexible devices for optimizing behavioral responses associated with expected but unpredictably timed events. The neural bases of attention and expectation are thought to engage higher cognitive loci; however, their influence at the level of primary visual cortex (V1) remains unknown. Here, we asked whether single-neuron responses in monkey V1 were influenced by an attention task of unpredictable duration. Monkeys covertly attended to a spot that remained unchanged for a fixed period and then abruptly disappeared at variable times, prompting a lever release for reward. We show that monkeys responded progressively faster and performed better as the trial duration increased. Neural responses also followed monkey's task engagement—there was an early, but short duration, response facilitation, followed by a late but sustained increase during the time monkeys expected the attention spot to disappear. This late attentional modulation was significantly and negatively correlated with the reaction time and was well explained by a modified hazard function. Such bimodal, time-dependent changes were, however, absent in a task that did not require explicit attentional engagement. Thus, V1 neurons carry reliable signals of attention and temporal expectation that correlate with predictable influences on monkeys' behavioral responses. PMID:24836689

  1. S-Nitrosylation-Mediated Redox Transcriptional Switch Modulates Neurogenesis and Neuronal Cell Death

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    Shu-ichi Okamoto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Redox-mediated posttranslational modifications represent a molecular switch that controls major mechanisms of cell function. Nitric oxide (NO can mediate redox reactions via S-nitrosylation, representing transfer of an NO group to a critical protein thiol. NO is known to modulate neurogenesis and neuronal survival in various brain regions in disparate neurodegenerative conditions. However, a unifying molecular mechanism linking these phenomena remains unknown. Here, we report that S-nitrosylation of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 transcription factors acts as a redox switch to inhibit both neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Structure-based analysis reveals that MEF2 dimerization creates a pocket, facilitating S-nitrosylation at an evolutionally conserved cysteine residue in the DNA binding domain. S-Nitrosylation disrupts MEF2-DNA binding and transcriptional activity, leading to impaired neurogenesis and survival in vitro and in vivo. Our data define a molecular switch whereby redox-mediated posttranslational modification controls both neurogenesis and neurodegeneration via a single transcriptional signaling cascade.

  2. Cue combination encoding via contextual modulation of V1 and V2 neurons

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    Zarella MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mark D Zarella, Daniel Y Ts’o Department of Neurosurgery, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA Abstract: Neurons in early visual cortical areas encode the local properties of a stimulus in a number of different feature dimensions such as color, orientation, and motion. It has been shown, however, that stimuli presented well beyond the confines of the classical receptive field can augment these responses in a way that emphasizes these local attributes within the greater context of the visual scene. This mechanism imparts global information to cells that are otherwise considered local feature detectors and can potentially serve as an important foundation for surface segmentation, texture representation, and figure–ground segregation. The role of early visual cortex toward these functions remains somewhat of an enigma, as it is unclear how surface segmentation cues are integrated from multiple feature dimensions. We examined the impact of orientation- and motion-defined surface segmentation cues in V1 and V2 neurons using a stimulus in which the two features are completely separable. We find that, although some cells are modulated in a cue-invariant manner, many cells are influenced by only one cue or the other. Furthermore, cells that are modulated by both cues tend to be more strongly affected when both cues are presented together than when presented individually. These results demonstrate two mechanisms by which cue combinations can enhance salience. We find that feature-specific populations are more frequently encountered in V1, while cue additivity is more prominent in V2. These results highlight how two strongly interconnected areas at different stages in the cortical hierarchy can potentially contribute to scene segmentation. Keywords: striate, extrastriate, extraclassical, texture, segmentation

  3. Leptin modulates the intrinsic excitability of AgRP/NPY neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baver, Scott B; Hope, Kevin; Guyot, Shannon; Bjørbaek, Christian; Kaczorowski, Catherine; O'Connell, Kristen M S

    2014-04-16

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARH) is a brain region critical for regulation of food intake and a primary area for the action of leptin in the CNS. In lean mice, the adipokine leptin inhibits neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neuronal activity, resulting in decreased food intake. Here we show that diet-induced obesity in mice is associated with persistent activation of NPY neurons and a failure of leptin to reduce the firing rate or hyperpolarize the resting membrane potential. However, the molecular mechanism whereby diet uncouples leptin's effect on neuronal excitability remains to be fully elucidated. In NPY neurons from lean mice, the Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine inhibited leptin-induced changes in input resistance and spike rate. Consistent with this, we found that ARH NPY neurons have a large, leptin-sensitive delayed rectifier K(+) current and that leptin sensitivity of this current is blunted in neurons from diet-induced obese mice. This current is primarily carried by Kv2-containing channels, as the Kv2 channel inhibitor stromatoxin-1 significantly increased the spontaneous firing rate in NPY neurons from lean mice. In HEK cells, leptin induced a significant hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of Kv2.1 but had no effect on the function of the closely related channel Kv2.2 when these channels were coexpressed with the long isoform of the leptin receptor LepRb. Our results suggest that dynamic modulation of somatic Kv2.1 channels regulates the intrinsic excitability of NPY neurons to modulate the spontaneous activity and the integration of synaptic input onto these neurons in the ARH.

  4. SGPL1 (sphingosine phosphate lyase 1) modulates neuronal autophagy via phosphatidylethanolamine production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitroi, Daniel N.; Karunakaran, Indulekha; Gräler, Markus; Saba, Julie D.; Ehninger, Dan; Ledesma, María Dolores; van Echten-Deckert, Gerhild

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macroautophagy/autophagy defects have been identified as critical factors underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. The roles of the bioactive signaling lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its catabolic enzyme SGPL1/SPL (sphingosine phosphate lyase 1) in autophagy are increasingly recognized. Here we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence for a previously unidentified route through which SGPL1 modulates autophagy in neurons. SGPL1 cleaves S1P into ethanolamine phosphate, which is directed toward the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) that anchors LC3-I to phagophore membranes in the form of LC3-II. In the brains of SGPL1fl/fl/Nes mice with developmental neural specific SGPL1 ablation, we observed significantly reduced PE levels. Accordingly, alterations in basal and stimulated autophagy involving decreased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and increased BECN1/Beclin-1 and SQSTM1/p62 levels were apparent. Alterations were also noticed in downstream events of the autophagic-lysosomal pathway such as increased levels of lysosomal markers and aggregate-prone proteins such as APP (amyloid β [A4] precursor protein) and SNCA/α-synuclein. In vivo profound deficits in cognitive skills were observed. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of SGPL1 in cultured neurons promoted these alterations, whereas addition of PE was sufficient to restore LC3-I to LC3-II conversion, and control levels of SQSTM1, APP and SNCA. Electron and immunofluorescence microscopy showed accumulation of unclosed phagophore-like structures, reduction of autolysosomes and altered distribution of LC3 in SGPL1fl/fl/Nes brains. Experiments using EGFP-mRFP-LC3 provided further support for blockage of the autophagic flux at initiation stages upon SGPL1 deficiency due to PE paucity. These results emphasize a formerly overlooked direct role of SGPL1 in neuronal autophagy and assume significance in the context that autophagy modulators hold an enormous therapeutic potential

  5. Kinetic changes and modulation by carbamazepine on voltage-gated sodium channels in rat CA1 neurons after epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Sun; T.R. Werkman; W.J. Wadman

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the functional properties of sodium channels, and subsequently the channel modulation by carbamazepine (CBZ) in hippocampal CA1 neurons can be changed after epileptic seizures. METHODS: We used the acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from epilepsy model rats 3 w

  6. Rhythmic neuronal synchronization in visual cortex entails spatial phase relation diversity that is modulated by stimulation and attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maris, E.G.G.; Womelsdorf, T.; Desimone, R.; Fries, P.

    2013-01-01

    Groups of neurons tend to synchronize in distinct frequency bands. Within a given frequency band, synchronization is defined as the consistency of phase relations between site pairs, over time. This synchronization has been investigated in numerous studies and has been found to be modulated by senso

  7. Modulating nitric oxide levels in dorsal root ganglion neurons of rat with low-level laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-qin; Wang, Yu-hua; He, Yi-peng; Zhou, Jie; Yang, Hong-qin; Zhang, Yan-ding; Xie, Shu-sen

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) have an important role in pain signaling transmission in animal models. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is known to have an analgesic effect, but the mechanism is unclear. The aim of the study is to investigate the influence of LLLT on NO release and NOS synthesis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, in order to find whether LLLI can ameliorate pain through modulating NO production at the cellular level. The results show that in stress conditions, the laser irradiation at 658 nm can modulate NO production in DRG neurons with soma diameter of about 20 μm in a short time after illumination, and affect NOS synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. It is demonstrated that LLLT might treat pain by altering NO release directly and indirectly in DRG neurons.

  8. Modulation of neurite branching by protein phosphorylation in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Cabell, L; Kern, M

    1997-09-20

    The control of branching of axons and dendrites is poorly understood. It has been hypothesized that branching may be produced by changes in the cytoskeleton [F.J. Diez-Guerra, J. Avila, MAP2 phosphorylation parallels dendrite arborization in hippocampal neurones in culture, NeuroReport 4 (1993) 412-419; P. Friedrich, A. Aszodi, MAP2: a sensitive cross-linker and adjustable spacer in dendritic architecture, FEBS Lett. 295 (1991) 5-9]. The assembly and stability of microtubules, which are prominent cytoskeletal elements in both axons and dendrites, are regulated by microtubule-associated proteins, including tau (predominantly found in axons) and MAP2 (predominantly found in dendrites). The phosphorylation state of tau and MAP2 modulates their interactions with microtubules. In their low-phosphorylation states, tau and MAP2 bind to microtubules and increase microtubule assembly and/or stability. Increased phosphorylation decreases these effects. Diez-Guerra and Avila [F.J. Diez-Guerra, J. Avila, MAP2 phosphorylation parallels dendrite arborization in hippocampal neurones in culture, NeuroReport 4 (1993) 412-419] found that protein phosphorylation correlates with neurite branching in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, and hypothesized that increased protein phosphorylation stimulates neurite branching. To test this hypothesis, we cultured rat hippocampal neurons in the presence of specific modulators of serine-threonine protein kinases and phosphatases. Inhibitors of several protein kinases, which would be expected to decrease protein phosphorylation, reduced branching. KT5720, an inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and KN62, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, inhibited branching of both axons and dendrites. Calphostin C and chelerythrine, inhibitors of protein kinase C, inhibited branching of axons but not dendrites. Treatments that would be expected to increase protein phosphorylation, including inhibitors of protein

  9. Arterial CO2 Fluctuations Modulate Neuronal Rhythmicity: Implications for MEG and fMRI Studies of Resting-State Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Joseph R.; Bright, Molly G.; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.; Murphy, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    A fast emerging technique for studying human resting state networks (RSNs) is based on spontaneous temporal fluctuations in neuronal oscillatory power, as measured by magnetoencephalography. However, it has been demonstrated recently that this power is sensitive to modulations in arterial CO2 concentration. Arterial CO2 can be modulated by natural fluctuations in breathing pattern, as might typically occur during the acquisition of an RSN experiment. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the fine-scale dependence of neuronal oscillatory power on arterial CO2 concentration, showing that reductions in alpha, beta, and gamma power are observed with even very mild levels of hypercapnia (increased arterial CO2). We use a graded hypercapnia paradigm and participant feedback to rule out a sensory cause, suggesting a predominantly physiological origin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that natural fluctuations in arterial CO2, without administration of inspired CO2, are of a sufficient level to influence neuronal oscillatory power significantly in the delta-, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-frequency bands. A more thorough understanding of the relationship between physiological factors and cortical rhythmicity is required. In light of these findings, existing results, paradigms, and analysis techniques for the study of resting-state brain data should be revisited. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we show for the first time that neuronal oscillatory power is intimately linked to arterial CO2 concentration down to the fine-scale modulations that occur during spontaneous breathing. We extend these results to demonstrate a correlation between neuronal oscillatory power and spontaneous arterial CO2 fluctuations in awake humans at rest. This work identifies a need for studies investigating resting-state networks in the human brain to measure and account for the impact of spontaneous changes in arterial CO2 on the neuronal signals of interest. Changes in breathing pattern that are

  10. Modulation of specific sensory cortical areas by segregated basal forebrain cholinergic neurons demonstrated by neuronal tracing and optogenetic stimulation in mice

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    Irene eChaves-Coira

    2016-04-01

    pools of neurons that may modulate specific cortical areas.

  11. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    pools of neurons that may modulate specific cortical areas. PMID:27147975

  12. Activation of CRH receptor type 1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons increases excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by the modulation of voltage-gated ion channels

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    Stephan eKratzer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH plays an important role in a substantial number of patients with stress-related mental disorders, such as anxiety disorders and depression. CRH has been shown to increase neuronal excitability in the hippocampus, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The effects of CRH on neuronal excitability were investigated in acute hippocampal brain slices. Population spikes (PS and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP were evoked by stimulating Schaffer-collaterals and recorded simultaneously from the somatic and dendritic region of CA1 pyramidal neurons. CRH was found to increase PS amplitudes (mean  Standard error of the mean; 231.8  31.2% of control; n=10 while neither affecting fEPSPs (104.3 ± 4.2%; n=10 nor long-term potentiation (LTP. However, when Schaffer-collaterals were excited via action potentials (APs generated by stimulation of CA3 pyramidal neurons, CRH increased fEPSP amplitudes (119.8 ± 3.6%; n=8 and the magnitude of LTP in the CA1 region. Experiments in slices from transgenic mice revealed that the effect on PS amplitude is mediated exclusively by CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons. The effects of CRH on PS were dependent on phosphatase-2B, L- and T-type calcium channels and voltage-gated potassium channels but independent on intracellular Ca2+-elevation. In patch-clamp experiments, CRH increased the frequency and decay times of APs and decreased currents through A-type and delayed-rectifier potassium channels. These results suggest that CRH does not affect synaptic transmission per se, but modulates voltage-gated ion currents important for the generation of APs and hence elevates by this route overall neuronal activity.

  13. Membrane voltage modulates the GABA(A) receptor gating in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-02-01

    The kinetics of GABAergic currents in neurons is known to be modulated by the membrane voltage but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully explored. In particular, the impact of membrane potential on the GABA(A) receptor gating has not been elucidated. In the present study, the effect of membrane voltage on current responses elicited by ultrafast GABA applications was studied in cultured hippocampal neurons. The current to voltage relationship (I-V) for responses to saturating [GABA] (10 mM) showed an inward rectification (slope conductance at positive voltages was 0.62 +/- 0.05 of that at negative potentials). On the contrary, I-V for currents evoked by low [GABA] (1 microM) showed an outward rectification. The onset of currents elicited by saturating [GABA] was significantly accelerated at positive potentials. Analysis of currents evoked by prolonged applications of saturating [GABA] revealed that positive voltages significantly increased the rate and extent of desensitization. The onsets of current responses to non-saturating [GABA] were significantly accelerated at positive voltages indicating an enhancement of the binding rate. However, at low [GABA] at which the onset rate is expected to approach an asymptote set by opening/closing and unbinding rates, no significant modification of current onset by voltage was observed. Quantitative analysis based on model simulations indicated that the major effect of membrane depolarization was to increase the rates of binding, desensitization and of opening as well as to slightly reduce the rate of exit from desensitization. In conclusion, we provide evidence that membrane voltage affects the GABA(A) receptor microscopic gating.

  14. Network-state modulation of power-law frequency-scaling in visual cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Boustani, Sami; Marre, Olivier; Béhuret, Sébastien; Baudot, Pierre; Yger, Pierre; Bal, Thierry; Destexhe, Alain; Frégnac, Yves

    2009-09-01

    Various types of neural-based signals, such as EEG, local field potentials and intracellular synaptic potentials, integrate multiple sources of activity distributed across large assemblies. They have in common a power-law frequency-scaling structure at high frequencies, but it is still unclear whether this scaling property is dominated by intrinsic neuronal properties or by network activity. The latter case is particularly interesting because if frequency-scaling reflects the network state it could be used to characterize the functional impact of the connectivity. In intracellularly recorded neurons of cat primary visual cortex in vivo, the power spectral density of V(m) activity displays a power-law structure at high frequencies with a fractional scaling exponent. We show that this exponent is not constant, but depends on the visual statistics used to drive the network. To investigate the determinants of this frequency-scaling, we considered a generic recurrent model of cortex receiving a retinotopically organized external input. Similarly to the in vivo case, our in computo simulations show that the scaling exponent reflects the correlation level imposed in the input. This systematic dependence was also replicated at the single cell level, by controlling independently, in a parametric way, the strength and the temporal decay of the pairwise correlation between presynaptic inputs. This last model was implemented in vitro by imposing the correlation control in artificial presynaptic spike trains through dynamic-clamp techniques. These in vitro manipulations induced a modulation of the scaling exponent, similar to that observed in vivo and predicted in computo. We conclude that the frequency-scaling exponent of the V(m) reflects stimulus-driven correlations in the cortical network activity. Therefore, we propose that the scaling exponent could be used to read-out the "effective" connectivity responsible for the dynamical signature of the population signals measured

  15. Network-state modulation of power-law frequency-scaling in visual cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami El Boustani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Various types of neural-based signals, such as EEG, local field potentials and intracellular synaptic potentials, integrate multiple sources of activity distributed across large assemblies. They have in common a power-law frequency-scaling structure at high frequencies, but it is still unclear whether this scaling property is dominated by intrinsic neuronal properties or by network activity. The latter case is particularly interesting because if frequency-scaling reflects the network state it could be used to characterize the functional impact of the connectivity. In intracellularly recorded neurons of cat primary visual cortex in vivo, the power spectral density of V(m activity displays a power-law structure at high frequencies with a fractional scaling exponent. We show that this exponent is not constant, but depends on the visual statistics used to drive the network. To investigate the determinants of this frequency-scaling, we considered a generic recurrent model of cortex receiving a retinotopically organized external input. Similarly to the in vivo case, our in computo simulations show that the scaling exponent reflects the correlation level imposed in the input. This systematic dependence was also replicated at the single cell level, by controlling independently, in a parametric way, the strength and the temporal decay of the pairwise correlation between presynaptic inputs. This last model was implemented in vitro by imposing the correlation control in artificial presynaptic spike trains through dynamic-clamp techniques. These in vitro manipulations induced a modulation of the scaling exponent, similar to that observed in vivo and predicted in computo. We conclude that the frequency-scaling exponent of the V(m reflects stimulus-driven correlations in the cortical network activity. Therefore, we propose that the scaling exponent could be used to read-out the "effective" connectivity responsible for the dynamical signature of the population

  16. Rhythmic Components in Extracranial Brain Signals Reveal Multifaceted Task Modulation of Overlapping Neuronal Activity.

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    Roemer van der Meij

    Full Text Available Oscillatory neuronal activity is implicated in many cognitive functions, and its phase coupling between sensors may reflect networks of communicating neuronal populations. Oscillatory activity is often studied using extracranial recordings and compared between experimental conditions. This is challenging, because there is overlap between sensor-level activity generated by different sources, and this can obscure differential experimental modulations of these sources. Additionally, in extracranial data, sensor-level phase coupling not only reflects communicating populations, but can also be generated by a current dipole, whose sensor-level phase coupling does not reflect source-level interactions. We present a novel method, which is capable of separating and characterizing sources on the basis of their phase coupling patterns as a function of space, frequency and time (trials. Importantly, this method depends on a plausible model of a neurobiological rhythm. We present this model and an accompanying analysis pipeline. Next, we demonstrate our approach, using magnetoencephalographic (MEG recordings during a cued tactile detection task as a case study. We show that the extracted components have overlapping spatial maps and frequency content, which are difficult to resolve using conventional pairwise measures. Because our decomposition also provides trial loadings, components can be readily contrasted between experimental conditions. Strikingly, we observed heterogeneity in alpha and beta sources with respect to whether their activity was suppressed or enhanced as a function of attention and performance, and this happened both in task relevant and irrelevant regions. This heterogeneity contrasts with the common view that alpha and beta amplitude over sensory areas are always negatively related to attention and performance.

  17. Acute Modulation of Synaptic Plasticity of Pyramidal Neurons by Activin in Adult Hippocampus

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    Yoshitaka eHasegawa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Activin A is known as a neuroprotective factor produced upon acute excitotoxic injury of the hippocampus (in pathological states. We attempt to reveal the role of activin as a neuromodulator in the adult male hippocampus under physiological conditions (in healthy states, which remains largely unknown. We showed endogenous/basal expression of activin in the hippocampal neurons. Localization of activin receptors in dendritic spines (= postsynapses was demonstrated by immunoelectron microscopy. The incubation of hippocampal acute slices with activin A (10 ng/mL, 0.4 nM for 2 h altered the density and morphology of spines in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The total spine density increased by 1.2-fold upon activin treatments. Activin selectively increased the density of large-head spines, without affecting middle-head and small-head spines. Blocking of Erk/MAPK, PKA or PKC prevented the activin-induced spinogenesis by reducing the density of large-head spines, independent of Smad-induced gene transcription which usually takes more than several hours. Incubation of acute slices with activin for 2 h induced the moderate early long-term potentiation (moderate LTP upon weak theta burst stimuli. This moderate LTP induction was blocked by follistatin, MAPK inhibitor (PD98059 and inhibitor of NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors (Ro25-6981. It should be noted that the weak theta burst stimuli alone cannot induce moderate LTP. These results suggest that MAPK-induced phosphorylation of NMDA receptors (including NR2B may play an important role for activin-induced moderate LTP. Taken together, the current results reveal interesting physiological roles of endogenous activin as a synaptic modulator in the adult hippocampus.

  18. Fluorescent indication that nitric oxide formation in NTS neurons is modulated by glutamate and GABA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajolla, Gisela P; Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Rodrigues, Gerson J; Bendhack, Lusiane M; Machado, Benedito H; Lunardi, Claure N

    2009-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in NTS plays an important role in regulating autonomic function to the cardiovascular system. Using the fluorescent dye DAF-2 DA, we evaluated the NO concentration in NTS. Brainstem slices of rats were loaded with DAF-2 DA, washed, fixed in paraformaldehyde and examined under fluorescent light. In different experimental groups, NTS slices were pre-incubated with 1 mM l-NAME (a non-selective NOS inhibitor), 1 mM d-NAME (an inactive enantiomere of l-NAME), 1 mM kynurenic acid (a non-selective ionotropic receptors antagonist) or 20 microM bicuculline (a selective GABAA receptors antagonist) before and during DAF-2 DA loading. Images were acquired using a confocal microscope and the intensity of fluorescence was quantified in three antero-posterior NTS regions. In addition, slices previously loaded with DAF-2 DA were incubated with NeuN or GFAP antibody. A semi-quantitative analysis of the fluorescence intensity showed that the basal NO concentration was similar in all antero-posterior aspects of the NTS (rostral intermediate, 15.5 +/- 0.8 AU; caudal intermediate, 13.2 +/- 1.4 AU; caudal commissural, 13.8 +/- 1.4 AU, n = 10). In addition, the inhibition of NOS and the antagonism of glutamatergic receptors decreased the NO fluorescence in the NTS. On the other hand, d-NAME did not affect the NO fluorescence and the antagonism of GABAA receptors increased the NO fluorescence in the NTS. It is important to note that the fluorescence for NO was detected mainly in neurons. These data show that the fluorescence observed after NTS loading with DAF-2 DA is a result of NO present in the NTS and support the concept that NTS neurons have basal NO production which is modulated by l-glutamate and GABA.

  19. Neuron unit arrays and Nature/Nurture adaptation for photonic multichip modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Jaw-Chyng Lormen

    To implement a previously proposed 3-D hybrid electronic/photonic multichip module (PMCM) (mimicking a primate retina structure) capable of low-latency, high-throughput, parallel-processing computations, several critical hardware components are designed, fabricated, and tested. All components are made of MOSIS 1.5 mum n-well BiCMOS (bipolar complimentary metal oxide silicon) fabrication process. A 12-by-12 dual-input, dual-output silicon neuron unit array chip has been fabricated, and characterized. A desired sigmoid-shape optical output from a vertical surface emitting laser (VCSEL) driven by this chip (with a linear-optical-input) was obtained. A logarithmic amplifier circuitry has been fabricated, and characterized. The dynamic range of its sensed brightness is multiple decades wide. This bipolar-based circuit's high sensitivity at low input signal range can improve the overall optical responsivity of the PMCM if it is integrated. A floating gate design is verified to be a good candidate for the long-term analog weight storage. The floating gate controlled channel resistance can represent the lateral weighted interconnection in the PMCM. A preliminary active pixel sensor design is also characterized, and evaluated for weight storage. Physical constraints, trade-offs, and relationships among the components for optimizing the performance of the PMCM are discussed. Software-wise, an artificial neural learning algorithm (Nature/Nurture algorithm) is developed for modeling the PMCM. This algorithm describes the weight updating rules for both the vertical fixed (nature-like) and the lateral adaptive (nurture-like) weighted interconnections in the PMCM. The learning algorithm for the lateral weight adaptations is new, and derived based on the multi-layer error back-propagation (BP) supervised learning algorithm using gradient descent method. Results from a simple optical character recognition (OCR) simulation show: (1) A PMCM with only one hidden neuron layer is

  20. Mu Opioid Receptor Modulation of Dopamine Neurons in the Periaqueductal Gray/Dorsal Raphe: A Role in Regulation of Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chia; Sugam, Jonathan A; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; McElligott, Zoe A; McCall, Nora M; Lopez, Alberto J; McKlveen, Jessica M; Pleil, Kristen E; Kash, Thomas L

    2016-07-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is a brain region involved in nociception modulation, and an important relay center for the descending nociceptive pathway through the rostral ventral lateral medulla. Given the dense expression of mu opioid receptors and the role of dopamine in pain, the recently characterized dopamine neurons in the ventral PAG (vPAG)/dorsal raphe (DR) region are a potentially critical site for the antinociceptive actions of opioids. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate synaptic modulation of the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons by mu opioid receptors and to (2) dissect the anatomy and neurochemistry of these neurons, in order to assess the downstream loci and functions of their activation. Using a mouse line that expresses eGFP under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, we found that mu opioid receptor activation led to a decrease in inhibitory inputs onto the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons. Furthermore, combining immunohistochemistry, optogenetics, electrophysiology, and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a TH-cre mouse line, we demonstrated that these neurons also express the vesicular glutamate type 2 transporter and co-release dopamine and glutamate in a major downstream projection structure-the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Finally, activation of TH-positive neurons in the vPAG/DR using Gq designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs displayed a supraspinal, but not spinal, antinociceptive effect. These results indicate that vPAG/DR dopamine neurons likely play a key role in opiate antinociception, potentially via the activation of downstream structures through dopamine and glutamate release.

  1. Interaction between cyclodextrin and neuronal membrane results in modulation of GABA(A) receptor conformational transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-06-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are nanostructures widely applied in biotechnology and chemistry. Owing to partially hydrophobic character, CDs interact with biological membranes. While the mechanisms of CDs interactions with lipids were widely studied, their effects on proteins are less understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of beta cyclodextrin (betaCD) on GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) gating. To reliably resolve the kinetics of conformational transitions, currents were elicited by ultrafast gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) applications to outside-out patches from rat cultured hippocampal neurons. betaCD increased the amplitude of responses to saturating GABA concentration ([GABA]) in a dose-dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by profound alterations in the current kinetics. Current deactivation was slowed down by betaCD but this effect was biphasic with a maximum at around 0.5 mM betaCD. While the fast deactivation time constant was monotonically slowed down within considered betaCD concentration range, the slow component first increased and then, at millimolar betaCD concentration, decreased. The rate and extent of desensitization was decreased by betaCD in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of current responses to nonsaturating [GABA] indicated that betaCD affected the GABA(A)R agonist binding site by slowing down the unbinding rate. Modulation of GABA(A)R desensitization and binding showed different concentration-dependence suggesting different modualtory sites with higher affinity of the latter one. All the betaCD effects were fully reversible indicating that cholesterol uptake into betaCD was not the primary mechanism. We conclude that betaCD is a strong modulator of GABA(A)R conformational transitions.

  2. Interaction between cyclodextrin and neuronal membrane results in modulation of GABAA receptor conformational transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are nanostructures widely applied in biotechnology and chemistry. Owing to partially hydrophobic character, CDs interact with biological membranes. While the mechanisms of CDs interactions with lipids were widely studied, their effects on proteins are less understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of beta cyclodextrin (βCD) on GABAA receptor (GABAAR) gating. To reliably resolve the kinetics of conformational transitions, currents were elicited by ultrafast gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) applications to outside-out patches from rat cultured hippocampal neurons. βCD increased the amplitude of responses to saturating GABA concentration ([GABA]) in a dose-dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by profound alterations in the current kinetics. Current deactivation was slowed down by βCD but this effect was biphasic with a maximum at around 0.5 mM βCD. While the fast deactivation time constant was monotonically slowed down within considered βCD concentration range, the slow component first increased and then, at millimolar βCD concentration, decreased. The rate and extent of desensitization was decreased by βCD in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of current responses to nonsaturating [GABA] indicated that βCD affected the GABAAR agonist binding site by slowing down the unbinding rate. Modulation of GABAAR desensitization and binding showed different concentration-dependence suggesting different modualtory sites with higher affinity of the latter one. All the βCD effects were fully reversible indicating that cholesterol uptake into βCD was not the primary mechanism. We conclude that βCD is a strong modulator of GABAAR conformational transitions. PMID:16702996

  3. The amygdala modulates neuronal activation in the hippocampus in response to spatial novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Archana; Berretta, Sabina; Lange, Nicholas; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that the amygdala and the hippocampus play an important role in the pathophysiology of major psychotic disorders. Consistent with this evidence, and with data indicating amygdala modulation of hippocampal activity, animal model investigations have shown that a disruption of amygdala activity induces neurochemical changes in the hippocampus that are similar to those detected in subjects with schizophrenia. With the present study, we used induction of the immediate early gene Fos, to test the hypothesis that the amygdala may affect neuronal activation of the hippocampus in response to different spatial environments (familiar, modified, and novel). Exploratory and anxiety related behaviors were also assessed. In vehicle-treated rats, exposure to a modified version of the familiar environment was associated with an increase of numerical densities of Fos-immunoreactive nuclei in sectors CA1 and CA2, while exposure to a completely novel environment was associated with an increase in sectors CA1, CA4, and DG, compared with the familiar environment. Pharmacological disruption of amygdala activity resulted in a failure to increase Fos induction in the hippocampus in response to these environments. Exploratory behavior in response to the different environments was not altered by manipulation of amygdala activity. These findings support the idea that the amygdala modulates spatial information processing in the hippocampus and may affect encoding of specific environmental features, while complex behavioral responses to environment may be the result of broader neural circuits. These findings also raise the possibility that amygdala abnormalities may contribute to impairments in cognitive information processing in subjects with major psychoses.

  4. Orexin-A modulates excitatory synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability in the spinal cord substantia gelatinosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Younghoon; Park, Ki Bum; Pervin, Rokeya; Kim, Tae Wan; Youn, Dong-ho

    2015-09-14

    Although intrathecal orexin-A has been known to be antinociceptive in various pain models, the role of orexin-A in antinociception is not well characterized. In the present study, we examined whether orexin-A modulates primary afferent fiber-mediated or spontaneous excitatory synaptic transmission using transverse spinal cord slices with attached dorsal root. Bath-application of orexin-A (100nM) reduced the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by electrical stimulation of Aδ- or C-primary afferent fibers. The magnitude of reduction was much larger for EPSCs evoked by polysynaptic C-fibers than polysynaptic Aδ-fibers, whereas it was similar in EPSCs evoked by monosynaptic Aδ- or C-fibers. SB674042, an orexin-1 receptor antagonist, but not EMPA, an orexin-2 receptor antagonist, significantly inhibited the orexin-A-induced reduction in EPSC amplitude from mono- or polysynaptic Aδ-fibers, as well as from mono- or polysynaptic C-fibers. Furthermore, orexin-A significantly increased the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs but not the amplitude. This increase was almost completely blocked by both SB674042 and EMPA. On the other hand, orexin-A produced membrane oscillations and inward currents in the SG neurons that were partially or completely inhibited by SB674042 or EMPA, respectively. Thus, this study suggests that the spinal actions of orexin-A underlie orexin-A-induced antinociceptive effects via different subtypes of orexin receptors.

  5. Spiking irregularity and frequency modulate the behavioral report of single-neuron stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron, Guy; von Heimendahl, Moritz; Schlattmann, Peter; Houweling, Arthur R; Brecht, Michael

    2014-02-01

    The action potential activity of single cortical neurons can evoke measurable sensory effects, but it is not known how spiking parameters and neuronal subtypes affect the evoked sensations. Here, we examined the effects of spike train irregularity, spike frequency, and spike number on the detectability of single-neuron stimulation in rat somatosensory cortex. For regular-spiking, putative excitatory neurons, detectability increased with spike train irregularity and decreasing spike frequencies but was not affected by spike number. Stimulation of single, fast-spiking, putative inhibitory neurons led to a larger sensory effect compared to regular-spiking neurons, and the effect size depended only on spike irregularity. An ideal-observer analysis suggests that, under our experimental conditions, rats were using integration windows of a few hundred milliseconds or more. Our data imply that the behaving animal is sensitive to single neurons' spikes and even to their temporal patterning.

  6. 980-nm infrared laser modulation of sodium channel kinetics in a neuron cell linearly mediated by photothermal effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyu; Liu, Jia; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Changsen

    2014-10-01

    Photothermal effect (PE) plays a major role in the near-infrared laser interaction with biological tissue. But, quite few interactions can be quantitatively depicted. Here, a two-step model is proposed to describe a 980-nm infrared laser interaction with neuron cell in vitro. First, the laser-induced temperature rises in the cell surrounding area were measured by using an open pipette method and also calculated by solving the heat conduction equation. Second, we recorded the modifications on sodium (Na) channel current in neuron cells directly by using a patch clamp to synchronize the 980-nm laser irradiation and obtained how the electrophysiological function of neuron cells respond to the temperature rise. Then, the activation time constants, τm, were extracted by fitting the sodium currents with the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The infrared laser modulation effect on sodium currents kinetics was examined by taking a ratio between the time constants with and without the laser irradiations. The analysis revealed that the averaged ratio at a specific laser exposure could be well related to the temperature properties of the Na channel protein. These results proved that the modulation of sodium current kinetics of a neuron cell in vitro by 980-nm laser with different-irradiation levels was linearly mediated corresponding to the laser-induced PE.

  7. Action Potential Modulation in CA1 Pyramidal Neuron Axons Facilitates OLM Interneuron Activation in Recurrent Inhibitory Microcircuits of Rat Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Sooyun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons in the CA1 region of the hippocampus play a key role in feedback inhibition and in the control of network activity. However, how these cells are efficiently activated in the network remains unclear. To address this question, I performed recordings from CA1 pyramidal neuron axons, the presynaptic fibers that provide feedback innervation of these interneurons. Two forms of axonal action potential (AP) modulation were identified. First, repetitive ...

  8. The neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its metabolites alter 5-HT neuronal activity via modulation of GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartside, S E; Griffith, N C; Kaura, V; Ingram, C D

    2010-11-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its metabolites, DHEA-sulphate (DHEA-S) and androsterone, have neurosteroid activity. In this study, we examined whether DHEA, DHEA-S and androsterone, can influence serotonin (5-HT) neuronal firing activity via modulation of γ-aminobutryic acid (GABA(A)) receptors. The firing of presumed 5-HT neurones in a slice preparation containing rat dorsal raphe nucleus was inhibited by the GABA(A) receptor agonists 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridinyl-3-ol (THIP) (25 μM) and GABA (100 μM). DHEA (100 and 300 μM) and DHEA-S (1, 10 and 100 μM) caused a rapid and reversible attenuation of the response to THIP. DHEA (100 μM) and DHEA-S (100 μM) also attenuated the effect of GABA. Androsterone (10 and 30 μM) markedly enhanced the inhibitory response to THIP (25 μM). The effect was apparent during androsterone administration but persisted and even increased in magnitude after drug wash-out. The data indicate that GABA(A) receptor-mediated regulation of 5-HT neuronal firing is sensitive to negative modulation by DHEA and its metabolite DHEA-S is sensitive to positive modulation by the metabolite androsterone. The effects of these neurosteroids on GABA(A) receptor-mediated regulation of 5-HT firing may underlie some of the reported behavioural and psychological effects of endogenous and exogenous DHEA.

  9. Segregated cholinergic transmission modulates dopamine neurons integrated in distinct functional circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautan, Daniel; Souza, Albert S; Huerta-Ocampo, Icnelia; Valencia, Miguel; Assous, Maxime; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Tepper, James M; Bolam, J Paul; Gerdjikov, Todor V; Mena-Segovia, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) receive cholinergic innervation from brainstem structures that are associated with either movement or reward. Whereas cholinergic neurons of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) carry an associative/motor signal, those of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) convey limbic information. We used optogenetics and in vivo juxtacellular recording and labeling to examine the influence of brainstem cholinergic innervation of distinct neuronal subpopulations in the VTA. We found that LDT cholinergic axons selectively enhanced the bursting activity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons that were excited by aversive stimulation. In contrast, PPN cholinergic axons activated and changed the discharge properties of VTA neurons that were integrated in distinct functional circuits and were inhibited by aversive stimulation. Although both structures conveyed a reinforcing signal, they had opposite roles in locomotion. Our results demonstrate that two modes of cholinergic transmission operate in the VTA and segregate the neurons involved in different reward circuits.

  10. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation modulates cortical neuronal activity in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eMarceglia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG showed that Alzheimer’s disease (AD is characterized by increased theta power, decreased alpha and beta power, and decreased coherence in the alpha and theta band in posterior regions. These abnormalities are thought to be associated with functional disconnections among cortical areas, death of cortical neurons, axonal pathology, and cholinergic deficits. Since transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS over the temporo-parietal area is thought to have beneficial effects in patients with AD, in this study we aimed to investigate whether tDCS benefits are related to tDCS-induced changes in cortical activity, as represented by qEEG.A weak anodal current (1.5 mA, 15 min was delivered bilaterally over the temporal-parietal lobe to 7 subjects with probable AD (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE score >20. EEG (21 electrodes, 10-20 international system was recorded for 5 minutes with eyes closed before (baseline, t0 and 30 minutes after anodal and cathodal tDCS ended (t1. At the same time points, patients performed a Word Recognition Task (WRT to assess working memory functions. The spectral power and the inter- and intra-hemispheric EEG coherence in different frequency bands (e.g., low frequencies, including delta and theta; high frequencies, including alpha and beta were calculated for each subject at t0 and t1. tDCS-induced changes in EEG neurophysiological markers were correlated with the performance of patients at the WRT.At baseline, qEEG features in AD patients confirmed that the decreased high frequency power was correlated with lower MMSE. After anodal tDCS, we observed an increase in the high-frequency power in the temporo-parietal area and an increase in the temporo-parieto-occipital coherence that correlated with the improvement at the WRT. In addition, cathodal tDCS produced a non-specific effect of decreased theta power all over the scalp that was not correlated with the clinical

  11. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Cortical Neuronal Activity in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceglia, Sara; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Rosa, Manuela; Ferrucci, Roberta; Mameli, Francesca; Vergari, Maurizio; Arlotti, Mattia; Ruggiero, Fabiana; Scarpini, Elio; Galimberti, Daniela; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) showed that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by increased theta power, decreased alpha and beta power, and decreased coherence in the alpha and theta band in posterior regions. These abnormalities are thought to be associated with functional disconnections among cortical areas, death of cortical neurons, axonal pathology, and cholinergic deficits. Since transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the temporo-parietal area is thought to have beneficial effects in patients with AD, in this study we aimed to investigate whether tDCS benefits are related to tDCS-induced changes in cortical activity, as represented by qEEG. A weak anodal current (1.5 mA, 15 min) was delivered bilaterally over the temporal-parietal lobe to seven subjects with probable AD (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE score >20). EEG (21 electrodes, 10-20 international system) was recorded for 5 min with eyes closed before (baseline, t0) and 30 min after anodal and cathodal tDCS ended (t1). At the same time points, patients performed a Word Recognition Task (WRT) to assess working memory functions. The spectral power and the inter- and intra-hemispheric EEG coherence in different frequency bands (e.g., low frequencies, including delta and theta; high frequencies, including alpha and beta) were calculated for each subject at t0 and t1. tDCS-induced changes in EEG neurophysiological markers were correlated with the performance of patients at the WRT. At baseline, qEEG features in AD patients confirmed that the decreased high frequency power was correlated with lower MMSE. After anodal tDCS, we observed an increase in the high-frequency power in the temporo-parietal area and an increase in the temporo-parieto-occipital coherence that correlated with the improvement at the WRT. In addition, cathodal tDCS produced a non-specific effect of decreased theta power all over the scalp that was not correlated with the clinical observation at the WRT

  12. Towards bridging the gap between acid-base transporters and neuronal excitability modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Li-Ming

    2014-01-01

    pH homeostasis is a fundamental regulator of the function of the central nervous system. Dysfunction of acid-base transporters often results in disturbance of neuronal excitability. In a latest issue of Journal of Neuroscience, Jones et al. report that increasing intracellular bicarbonate concentration substantially stimulates the excitability of pyramidal neurons from mouse hippocampus by inhibiting KCNQ potassium channel. The finding shed important new light in understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of neuronal excitability by acid-base transporters.

  13. Dioxin modulates expression of receptor for activated C kinase (RACK-1) in developing neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.H.; Kim, S.Y.; Lee, H.G.; Kim, M.Y.; Lee, J.H.; Chae, W.G. [Catholic Univ. of Daegu, Dept. of Pharmacology/Toxicology, Daegu (Korea)

    2004-09-15

    TCDD is sensitive to the central nerve system of the developing brain. The TCDD-induced neurodevelopmental deficits include the cognitive disability and motor dysfunction. While TCDD may lead to neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral deficit, it is not known which molecular substances are intracellular targets for TCDD. Since TCDD accumulates in brain and the brain contains the Ah receptor, it is possible that TCDD may act at the target site such as cerebellum, which is responsible for cognitive abilities and motor function. A recent in vitro studies using cerebellar granule cells demonstrated a translocation of PKC-{alpha} and {epsilon} following the TCDD or PCB exposure. One of the most pivotal second messenger molecules involved in neuronal function and development is protein kinase C (PKC). PKC signaling pathways have been implicated as an important factor in learning and memory processes. PKC signaling events are optimized by the adaptor proteins, which organize PKCs near their selective substrates and away from others. RACK-1(receptor for activated C-kinase) is one of adaptor proteins that anchor the activated PKC at the site of translocation 6. RACKs bind PKC only in the presence of PKC activators. RACKs are 30- and 36-kDa proteins located in cytoskeletal compartment and play a key role in PKC activation and in membrane amchoring. Since different PKC isoforms translocate to distinct subcellular sites on activation, it is suggested that isoform-specific RACK may be present. Activation of certain PKC isoforms (PKC-a and {beta}II) is preferentially associated with RACK-1. While TCDD modulates PKC signaling pathway, role of RACK-1 on TCDD-mediated signaling pathway is not known. To identify the intracellular target for TCDD and understand a mechanism of signaling pathway in the developing brain, the present study attempted to analyze effects of RACK-1 in the cerebellar granule cells following TCDD exposure.

  14. Hypothalamic neuronal histamine modulates febrile response but not anorexia induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Seiichi; Itateyama, Emi; Oka, Kyoko; Masaki, Takayuki; Sakata, Toshiie; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2005-05-01

    This study examined the contribution of hypothalamic neuronal histamine (HA) to the anorectic and febrile responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an exogenous pyrogen, and the endogenous pyrogens interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Intraperitoneal (ip) injection of LPS, IL-1beta, or TNF-alpha suppressed 24-hr cumulative food intake and increased rectal temperature in rats. To analyze the histaminergic contribution, rats were pretreated with intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of 2.44 mmol/kg or ip injection of 244 mmol/kg of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (FMH), a suicide inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), to deplete neural HA. The depletion of neural HA augmented the febrile response to ip injection of LPS and IL-1beta and alleviated the anorectic response to ip injection of IL-1beta. However, the depletion of neural HA did not modify the LPS-induced anorectic response or TNF-alpha-induced febrile and anorectic responses. Consistent with these results, the rate of hypothalamic HA turnover, assessed by the accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), was elevated with ip injections of LPS and IL-1beta, but unaffected by TNF-alpha at equivalent doses. This suggests that (i) LPS and IL-1beta activate hypothalamic neural HA turnover; (ii) hypothalamic neural HA suppresses the LPS- and IL-1beta-induced febrile responses and accelerates the IL-1beta-induced anorectic response; and (iii) TNF-alpha modulates the febrile and anorectic responses via a neural HA-independent pathway. Therefore, hypothalamic neural HA is involved in the IL-1beta-dominant pathway, rather than the TNF-alpha-dominant pathway, preceding the systemic inflammatory response induced by exogenous pyrogens, such as LPS. Further research on this is needed.

  15. The Timing for Neuronal Maturation in the Adult Hippocampus Is Modulated by Local Network Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatti, Verónica C.; Davies-Sala, M. Georgina; Espósito, M. Soledad; Mongiat, Lucas A.; Trinchero, Mariela F.; Schinder, Alejandro F.

    2013-01-01

    The adult hippocampus continuously generates new cohorts of immature neurons with increased excitability and plasticity. The window for the expression of those unique properties in each cohort is determined by the time required to acquire a mature neuronal phenotype. Here, we show that local network activity regulates the rate of maturation of adult-born neurons along the septotemporal axis of the hippocampus. Confocal microscopy and patch-clamp recordings were combined to assess marker expression, morphological development, and functional properties in retrovirally labeled neurons over time. The septal dentate gyrus displayed higher levels of basal network activity and faster rates of newborn neuron maturation than the temporal region. Voluntary exercise enhanced network activity only in the temporal region and, in turn, accelerated neuronal development. Finally, neurons developing within a highly active environment exhibited a delayed maturation when their intrinsic electrical activity was reduced by the cell-autonomous overexpression of Kir2.1, an inward-rectifying potassium channel. Our findings reveal a novel type of activity-dependent plasticity acting on the timing of neuronal maturation and functional integration of newly generated neurons along the longitudinal axis of the adult hippocampus. PMID:21613484

  16. Glial cells modulate the synaptic transmission of NTS neurons sending projections to ventral medulla of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Zoccal, Daniel B; Bonagamba, Leni G H; Machado, Benedito H

    2013-09-01

    There is evidence that sympathoexcitatory and respiratory responses to chemoreflex activation involve ventrolateral medulla-projecting nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons (NTS-VLM neurons) and also that ATP modulates this neurotransmission. Here, we evaluated whether or not astrocytes is the source of endogenous ATP modulating the synaptic transmission in NTS-VLM neurons. Synaptic activities of putative astrocytes or NTS-VLM neurons were recorded using whole cell patch clamp. Tractus solitarius (TS) stimulation induced TS-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (TS-eEPSCs) in NTS-VLM neurons as well in NTS putative astrocytes, which were also identified by previous labeling. Fluoracetate (FAC), an inhibitor of glial metabolism, reduced TS-eEPSCs amplitude (-85.6 ± 16 vs. -39 ± 7.1 pA, n = 12) and sEPSCs frequency (2.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.8 ± 0.46 Hz, n = 10) in recorded NTS-VLM neurons, indicating a gliomodulation of glutamatergic currents. To verify the involvement of endogenous ATP a purinergic antagonist was used, which reduced the TS-eEPSCs amplitude (-207 ± 50 vs. -149 ± 50 pA, n = 6), the sEPSCs frequency (1.19 ± 0.2 vs. 0.62 ± 0.11 Hz, n = 6), and increased the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) values (∼20%) in NTS-VLM neurons. Simultaneous perfusion of Pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',5'-disulfonic acid (iso-PPADS) and FAC produced reduction in TS-eEPSCs similar to that observed with iso-PPADS or FAC alone, indicating that glial cells are the source of ATP released after TS stimulation. Extracellular ATP measurement showed that FAC reduced evoked and spontaneous ATP release. All together these data show that putative astrocytes are the source of endogenous ATP, which via activation of presynaptic P2X receptors, facilitates the evoked glutamate release and increases the synaptic transmission efficacy in the NTS-VLM neurons probably involved with the peripheral chemoreflex pathways.

  17. GABAergic inhibition modulates intensity sensitivity of temporally patterned pulse trains in the inferior collicular neurons in big brown bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Rui-Hong; Wu, Fei-Jian; Jen, Philip H-S; Sun, Xin-De

    2007-12-25

    The echolocating big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) emit trains of frequency-modulated (FM) biosonar signals with duration, amplitude, repetition rate, and sweep structure changing systematically during interception of their prey. In the present study, the sound stimuli of temporally patterned pulse trains at three different pulse repetition rates (PRRs) were used to mimic the sounds received during search, approach, and terminal stages of echolocation. Electrophysiological method was adopted in recordings from the inferior colliculus (IC) of midbrain. By means of iontophoretic application of bicuculline, the effect of GABAergic inhibition on the intensity sensitivity of IC neurons responding to three different PRRs of 10, 30 and 90 pulses per second (pps) was examined. The rate-intensity functions (RIFs) were acquired. The dynamic range (DR) of RIFs was considered as a criterion of intensity sensitivity. Comparing the average DR of RIFs at different PRRs, we found that the intensity sensitivity of some neurons improved, but that of other neurons decayed when repetition rate of stimulus trains increased from 10 to 30 and 90 pps. During application of bicuculline, the number of impulses responding to the different pulse trains increased under all stimulating conditions, while the DR differences of RIFs at different PRRs were abolished. The results indicate that GABAergic inhibition was involved in modulating the intensity sensitivity of IC neurons responding to pulse trains at different PRRs. Before and during bicuculline application, the percentage of changes in responses was maximal in lower stimulus intensity near to the minimum threshold (MT), and decreased gradually with the increment of stimulus intensity. This observation suggests that GABAergic inhibition contributes more effectively to the intensity sensitivity of the IC neurons responding to pulse trains at lower sound level.

  18. KNDy Neurons Modulate the Magnitude of the Steroid-Induced Luteinizing Hormone Surges in Ovariectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helena, Cleyde V; Toporikova, Natalia; Kalil, Bruna; Stathopoulos, Andrea M; Pogrebna, Veronika V; Carolino, Ruither O; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Bertram, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Kisspeptin is the most potent stimulator of LH release. There are two kisspeptin neuronal populations in the rodent brain: in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and in the arcuate nucleus. The arcuate neurons coexpress kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin and are called KNDy neurons. Because estradiol increases kisspeptin expression in the AVPV whereas it inhibits KNDy neurons, AVPV and KNDy neurons have been postulated to mediate the positive and negative feedback effects of estradiol on LH secretion, respectively. Yet the role of KNDy neurons during the positive feedback is not clear. In this study, ovariectomized rats were microinjected bilaterally into the arcuate nucleus with a saporin-conjugated neurokinin B receptor agonist for targeted ablation of approximately 70% of KNDy neurons. In oil-treated animals, ablation of KNDy neurons impaired the rise in LH after ovariectomy and kisspeptin content in both populations. In estradiol-treated animals, KNDy ablation did not influence the negative feedback of steroids during the morning. Surprisingly, KNDy ablation increased the steroid-induced LH surges, accompanied by an increase of kisspeptin content in the AVPV. This increase seems to be due to lack of dynorphin input from KNDy neurons to the AVPV as the following: 1) microinjections of a dynorphin antagonist into the AVPV significantly increased the LH surge in estradiol-treated rats, similar to KNDy ablation, and 2) intra-AVPV microinjections of dynorphin in KNDy-ablated rats restored LH surge levels. Our results suggest that KNDy neurons provide inhibition to AVPV kisspeptin neurons through dynorphin and thus regulate the amplitude of the steroid-induced LH surges.

  19. Necdin regulates p53 acetylation via Sirtuin1 to modulate DNA damage response in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2008-08-27

    Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a mammalian homolog of yeast Sir2, deacetylates the tumor suppressor protein p53 and attenuates p53-mediated cell death. Necdin, a p53-interacting protein expressed predominantly in postmitotic neurons, is a melanoma antigen family protein that promotes neuronal differentiation and survival. In mammals, the necdin gene (Ndn) is maternally imprinted, and mutant mice carrying mutated paternal Ndn show abnormalities of neuronal development. Here we report that necdin regulates the acetylation status of p53 via Sirt1 to suppress p53-dependent apoptosis in postmitotic neurons. Double-immunostaining analysis demonstrated that necdin colocalizes with Sirt1 in postmitotic neurons of mouse embryonic forebrain in vivo. Coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro binding analyses revealed that necdin interacts with both p53 and Sirt1 to potentiate Sirt1-mediated p53 deacetylation by facilitating their association. Primary cortical neurons prepared from paternal Ndn-deficient mice have high p53 acetylation levels and are sensitive to the DNA-damaging compounds camptothecin and hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, DNA transfection per se increases p53 acetylation and apoptosis in paternal Ndn-deficient neurons, whereas small interfering RNA-mediated p53 knockdown completely blocks these changes. However, Sirt1 knockdown increases both acetylated p53 level and apoptosis in wild-type neurons but fails to affect them in paternal Ndn-deficient neurons. In organotypic forebrain slice cultures treated with hydrogen peroxide, p53 is accumulated and colocalized with necdin and Sirt1 in cortical neurons. These results suggest that necdin downregulates p53 acetylation levels by forming a stable complex with p53 and Sirt1 to protect neurons from DNA damage-induced apoptosis.

  20. Glutamate signalling and secretory phospholipase A2 modulate the release of arachidonic acid from neuronal membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez De Turco, Elena B; Jackson, Fannie R; DeCoster, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    and secretory PLA(2) (sPLA(2)) from bee venom (bv sPLA(2)) and Taipan snake venom (OS2) elicit synergy in inducing neuronal cell death. Low concentrations of sPLA(2) are selective ligands of cell-surface sPLA(2) receptors. We investigated which neuronal arachidonoyl phospholipids are targeted by glutamate...

  1. Trophic factors as modulators of motor neuron physiology and survival: implications for ALS therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis B Tovar-y-Romo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron physiology and development depend on a continuous and tightly regulated trophic support from a variety of cellular sources. Trophic factors guide the generation and positioning of motor neurons during every stage of the developmental process. As well, they are involved in axon guidance and synapse formation. Even in the adult spinal cord an uninterrupted trophic input is required to maintain neuronal functioning and protection from noxious stimuli. Among the trophic factors that have been demonstrated to participate in motor neuron physiology are vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1. Upon binding to membrane receptors expressed in motor neurons or neighboring glia, these trophic factors activate intracellular signaling pathways that promote cell survival and have protective action on motor neurons, in both in vivo and in vitro models of neuronal degeneration. For these reasons these factors have been considered a promising therapeutic method for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases, although their efficacy in human clinical trials have not yet shown the expected protection. In this review we summarize experimental data on the role of these trophic factors in motor neuron function and survival, as well as their mechanisms of action. We also briefly discuss the potential therapeutic use of the trophic factors and why these therapies may have not been yet successful in the clinical use.

  2. Thrombin modulates persistent sodium current in CA1 pyramidal neurons of young and adult rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunko, O O; Isaev, D S; Krishtal, O O; Isaeva, E V

    2015-01-01

    Serine protease thrombin, a key factor of blood coagulation, participates in many neuronal processes important for normal brain functioning and during pathological conditions involving abnormal neuronal synchronization, neurodegeneration and inflammation. Our previous study on CA3 pyramidal neurons showed that application ofthrombin through the activation of specific protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) produces a significant hyperpolarizing shift of the activation of the TTX-sensitive persistent voltage-gated Na+ current (I(Nap)) thereby affecting membrane potential and seizure threshold at the network level. It was shown that PAR1 is also expressed in CA1 area of hippocampus and can be implicated in neuronal damage in this area after status epilepticus. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of thrombin on I(NaP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons from adult and young rats. Using whole cell patch-clamp technique we demonstrate that thrombin application results in the hyperpolarization shift of I(NaP) activation as well as increase in the I(NaP) amplitude in both age groups. We have found that I(NaP) in pyramidal neurons of hippocampal CA 1 region is more vulnerable to the thrombin action than I(NaP) in pyramidal neurons of hippocampal CA3 region. We have also found that the immature hippocampus is more sensitive to thrombin action which emphasizes the contribution of thrombin-dependent pathway to the regulation of neuronal activity in immature brain.

  3. Stress and Sucrose Intake Modulate Neuronal Activity in the Anterior Hypothalamic Area in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Arojit; Guèvremont, Geneviève; Timofeeva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The anterior hypothalamic area (AHA) is an important integrative relay structure for a variety of autonomic, endocrine, and behavioral responses including feeding behavior and response to stress. However, changes in the activity of the AHA neurons during stress and feeding in freely moving rats are not clear. The present study investigated the firing rate and burst activity of neurons in the central nucleus of the AHA (cAHA) during sucrose intake in non-stressful conditions and after acute stress in freely behaving rats. Rats were implanted with micro-electrodes into the cAHA, and extracellular multi-unit activity was recorded during 1-h access to 10% sucrose in non-stressful conditions or after acute foot shock stress. Acute stress significantly reduced sucrose intake, total sucrose lick number, and lick frequency in licking clusters, and increased inter-lick intervals. At the cluster start (CS) of sucrose licking, the cAHA neurons increased (CS-excited, 20% of the recorded neurons), decreased (CS-inhibited, 42% of the neurons) or did not change (CS-nonresponsive, 38% of the neurons) their firing rate. Stress resulted in a significant increase in the firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons by decreasing inter-spike intervals within the burst firing of these neurons. This increase in the stress-induced firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons was accompanied by a disruption of the correlation between the firing rate of CS-inhibited and CS-nonresponsive neurons that was observed in non-stressful conditions. Stress did not affect the firing rate of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons. However, stress changed the pattern of burst firing of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons by decreasing and increasing the burst number in the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons, respectively. These results suggest that the cAHA neurons integrate the signals related to stress and intake of palatable food and play a role in the stress- and eating-related circuitry

  4. Spatial Frequency Components of Images Modulate Neuronal Activity in Monkey Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Lourido, Pilar; Bermudez, M A; Romero, M C; Vicente, A F; Gonzalez, F

    2016-04-01

    Processing the spatial frequency components of an image is a crucial feature for visual perception, especially in recognition of faces. Here, we study the correlation between spatial frequency components of images of faces and neuronal activity in monkey amygdala while performing a visual recognition task. The frequency components of the images were analyzed using a fast Fourier transform for 40 spatial frequency ranges. We recorded 65 neurons showing statistically significant responses to at least one of the images used as a stimulus. A total of 37 of these neurons (n = 37) showed significant responses to at least three images, and in eight of them (8/37, 22%), we found a statistically significant correlation between neuron response and the modulus amplitude of at least one frequency range present in the images. Our results indicate that high spatial frequency and low spatial frequency components of images influence the activity of amygdala neurons.

  5. Adenosine A₂A receptors in striatal glutamatergic terminals and GABAergic neurons oppositely modulate psychostimulant action and DARPP-32 phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Ying Shen

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR are located postsynaptically in striatopallidal GABAergic neurons, antagonizing dopamine D2 receptor functions, and are also located presynaptically at corticostriatal terminals, facilitating glutamate release. To address the hypothesis that these two A2AR populations differently control the action of psychostimulants, we characterized A2AR modulation of cocaine-induced effects at the level of DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75, c-Fos expression, and psychomotor activity using two lines of cell-type selective A2AR knockout (KO mice with selective A2AR deletion in GABAergic neurons (striatum-A2AR-KO mice, or with A2AR deletion in both striatal GABAergic neurons and projecting cortical glutamatergic neurons (forebrain-A2AR-KO mice. We demonstrated that striatum-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs exclusively in striatal GABAergic terminals whereas forebrain-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs in both striatal GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals leading to a blunted A2AR-mediated facilitation of synaptosomal glutamate release. The inactivation of A2ARs in GABAergic neurons reduced striatal DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and increased its phosphorylation at Thr-75. Conversely, the additional deletion of corticostriatal glutamatergic A2ARs produced opposite effects on DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75. This distinct modulation of DARPP-32 phosphorylation was associated with opposite responses to cocaine-induced striatal c-Fos expression and psychomotor activity in striatum-A2AR KO (enhanced and forebrain-A2AR KO mice (reduced. Thus, A2ARs in glutamatergic corticostriatal terminals and in GABAergic striatal neurons modulate the action of psychostimulants and DARPP-32 phosphorylation in opposite ways. We conclude that A2ARs in glutamatergic terminals prominently control the action of psychostimulants and define a novel mechanism by which A2ARs fine-tune striatal activity by integrating GABAergic, dopaminergic and

  6. TRESK channel contribution to nociceptive sensory neurons excitability: modulation by nerve injury

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    Serra Jordi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal hyperexcitability is a crucial phenomenon underlying spontaneous and evoked pain. In invertebrate nociceptors, the S-type leak K+ channel (analogous to TREK-1 in mammals plays a critical role of in determining neuronal excitability following nerve injury. Few data are available on the role of leak K2P channels after peripheral axotomy in mammals. Results Here we describe that rat sciatic nerve axotomy induces hyperexcitability of L4-L5 DRG sensory neurons and decreases TRESK (K2P18.1 expression, a channel with a major contribution to total leak current in DRGs. While the expression of other channels from the same family did not significantly change, injury markers ATF3 and Cacna2d1 were highly upregulated. Similarly, acute sensory neuron dissociation (in vitro axotomy produced marked hyperexcitability and similar total background currents compared with neurons injured in vivo. In addition, the sanshool derivative IBA, which blocked TRESK currents in transfected HEK293 cells and DRGs, increased intracellular calcium in 49% of DRG neurons in culture. Most IBA-responding neurons (71% also responded to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, indicating that they were nociceptors. Additional evidence of a biological role of TRESK channels was provided by behavioral evidence of pain (flinching and licking, in vivo electrophysiological evidence of C-nociceptor activation following IBA injection in the rat hindpaw, and increased sensitivity to painful pressure after TRESK knockdown in vivo. Conclusions In summary, our results clearly support an important role of TRESK channels in determining neuronal excitability in specific DRG neurons subpopulations, and show that axonal injury down-regulates TRESK channels, therefore contributing to neuronal hyperexcitability.

  7. Tianma modulates proteins with various neuro-regenerative modalities in differentiated human neuronal SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Umamaheswari; Manavalan, Arulmani; Sundaramurthi, Husvinee; Sze, Siu Kwan; Feng, Zhi Wei; Hu, Jiang-Miao; Heese, Klaus

    2012-06-01

    Tianma (Rhizoma gastrodiae) is the dried rhizome of the plant Gastrodia elata Blume (Orchidaceae family). As a medicinal herb in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) its functions are to control convulsions, pain, headache, dizziness, vertigo, seizure, epilepsy and others. In addition, tianma is frequently used for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders though the mechanism of action is widely unknown. Accordingly, this study was designed to examine the effects of tianma on the proteome metabolism in differentiated human neuronal SH-SY5Y cells to explore its specific effects on neuronal signaling pathways. Using an iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation)-based proteomics research approach, we identified 2390 modulated proteins, out of which 406 were found to be altered by tianma in differentiated human neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Based on the observed data, we hypothesize that tianma promotes neuro-regenerative signaling cascades by controlling chaperone/proteasomal degradation pathways (e.g. CALR, FKBP3/4, HSP70/90) and mobilizing neuro-protective genes (such as AIP5) as well as modulating other proteins (RTN1/4, NCAM, PACSIN2, and PDLIM1/5) with various regenerative modalities and capacities related to neuro-synaptic plasticity.

  8. Noninvasive Focused Ultrasound Stimulation Can Modulate Phase-Amplitude Coupling between Neuronal Oscillations in the Rat Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yi; Yan, Jiaqing; Ma, Zhitao; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive focused ultrasound stimulation (FUS) can be used to modulate neural activity with high spatial resolution. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) between neuronal oscillations is tightly associated with cognitive processes, including learning, attention, and memory. In this study, we investigated the effect of FUS on PAC between neuronal oscillations and established the relationship between the PAC index and ultrasonic intensity. The rat hippocampus was stimulated using focused ultrasound at different spatial-average pulse-average ultrasonic intensities (3.9, 9.6, and 19.2 W/cm2). The local field potentials (LFPs) in the rat hippocampus were recorded before and after FUS. Then, we analyzed PAC between neuronal oscillations using a PAC calculation algorithm. Our results showed that FUS significantly modulated PAC between the theta (4–8 Hz) and gamma (30–80 Hz) bands and between the alpha (9–13 Hz) and ripple (81–200 Hz) bands in the rat hippocampus, and PAC increased with incremental increases in ultrasonic intensity. PMID:27499733

  9. Noninvasive focused ultrasound stimulation can modulate phase-amplitude coupling between neuronal oscillations in the rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive focused ultrasound stimulation (FUS can be used to modulate neural activity with high spatial resolution. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC between neuronal oscillations is tightly associated with cognitive processes, including learning, attention and memory. In this study, we investigated the effect of FUS on PAC between neuronal oscillations and established the relationship between the PAC index and ultrasonic intensity. The rat hippocampus was stimulated using focused ultrasound at different spatial-average pulse-average ultrasonic intensities (3.9 W/cm2, 9.6 W/cm2, and 19.2 W/cm2. The local field potentials (LFPs in the rat hippocampus were recorded before and after FUS. Then, we analyzed PAC between neuronal oscillations using a PAC calculation algorithm. Our results showed that FUS significantly modulated PAC between the theta (4-8 Hz and gamma (30-80 Hz bands and between the alpha (9-13 Hz and ripple (81-200 Hz bands in the rat hippocampus, and PAC increased with incremental increases in ultrasonic intensity.

  10. Exploiting the gain-modulation mechanism in parieto-motor neurons: application to visuomotor transformations and embodied simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahé, Sylvain; Braud, Raphaël; Gaussier, Philippe; Quoy, Mathias; Pitti, Alexandre

    2015-02-01

    The so-called self-other correspondence problem in imitation demands to find the transformation that maps the motor dynamics of one partner to our own. This requires a general purpose sensorimotor mechanism that transforms an external fixation-point (partner's shoulder) reference frame to one's own body-centered reference frame. We propose that the mechanism of gain-modulation observed in parietal neurons may generally serve these types of transformations by binding the sensory signals across the modalities with radial basis functions (tensor products) on the one hand and by permitting the learning of contextual reference frames on the other hand. In a shoulder-elbow robotic experiment, gain-field neurons (GF) intertwine the visuo-motor variables so that their amplitude depends on them all. In situations of modification of the body-centered reference frame, the error detected in the visuo-motor mapping can serve then to learn the transformation between the robot's current sensorimotor space and the new one. These situations occur for instance when we turn the head on its axis (visual transformation), when we use a tool (body modification), or when we interact with a partner (embodied simulation). Our results defend the idea that the biologically-inspired mechanism of gain modulation found in parietal neurons can serve as a basic structure for achieving nonlinear mapping in spatial tasks as well as in cooperative and social functions.

  11. Inhibitory modulation of CART peptides in accumbal neuron through decreasing interaction of CaMKIIα with dopamine D3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhenyu; Zhang, Dalei; Ying, Ying; Yan, Min; Yang, Jianhua; Xu, Fangyun; Oh, Kiwan; Hu, Zhenzhen

    2014-04-04

    Previous studies in rats have shown that microinjections of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide into the nucleus accumbens (NAc; the area of the brain that mediates drug reward and reinforcement) attenuate the locomotor effects of psychostimulants. CART peptide has also been shown to induce decreased intracellular concentrations of calcium (Ca(2+)) in primary cultures of hippocampus neurons. The purpose of this study was to characterize the interaction of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMKIIα) with dopamine D3 (D3) receptors (R) in primary cultures of accumbal neurons. This interaction is involved in inhibitory modulation of CART peptides. In vitro, CART (55-102) peptide (0.1, 0.5 or 1μM) was found to dose-dependently inhibit K(+) depolarization-elicited Ca(2+) influx and CaMKIIα phosphorylation in accumbal neurons. Moreover, CART peptides were also found to block cocaine (1μM)-induced Ca(2+) influx, CaMKIIα phosphorylation, CaMKIIα-D3R interaction, and CREB phosphorylation. In vivo, repeated microinjections of CART (55-102) peptide (2μg/1μl/side) into the NAc over a 5-day period had no effect on behavioral activity but blocked cocaine-induced locomotor activity. These results indicate that D3R function in accumbal neurons is a target of CART (55-102) peptide and suggest that CART peptide by dephosphorylating limbic D3Rs may have potential as a treatment for cocaine abuse.

  12. Thioredoxin-2 Modulates Neuronal Programmed Cell Death in the Embryonic Chick Spinal Cord in Basal and Target-Deprived Conditions.

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    Marc Pirson

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin-2 (Trx2 is a mitochondrial protein using a dithiol active site to reduce protein disulfides. In addition to the cytoprotective function of this enzyme, several studies have highlighted the implication of Trx2 in cellular signaling events. In particular, growing evidence points to such roles of redox enzymes in developmental processes taking place in the central nervous system. Here, we investigate the potential implication of Trx2 in embryonic development of chick spinal cord. To this end, we first studied the distribution of the enzyme in this tissue and report strong expression of Trx2 in chick embryo post-mitotic neurons at E4.5 and in motor neurons at E6.5. Using in ovo electroporation, we go on to highlight a cytoprotective effect of Trx2 on the programmed cell death (PCD of neurons during spinal cord development and in a novel cultured spinal cord explant model. These findings suggest an implication of Trx2 in the modulation of developmental PCD of neurons during embryonic development of the spinal cord, possibly through redox regulation mechanisms.

  13. Electrophysiological effects of FLFQPQRF amide, an endogenous brain morphine modulating peptide, on cultured mouse spinal-cord neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, A; Legendre, P; Allard, M; Geoffre, S; Vincent, J D; Simonnet, G

    1989-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from dissociated fetal mouse spinal cord neurones in primary culture. Micropressure application of FLFQPQRFamide (10(-5) M in the delivery pipette), an endogenous mammalian brain morphine modulating peptide, onto the surface of spinal cord neurones induced, in a dose dependent manner, a transitory hyperpolarization followed by a long lasting depolarization of the membrane potential (n = 37). In contrast, no response was observed when the peptide was applied on dorsal root ganglia neurones (n = 30). The depolarizing phase of this response was underlied by an increase of the input resistance. Extrapolated reversal potential for the depolarizing phase was close to -80 mV while it was close to -40 mV for the hyperpolarizing phase. Increasing extracellular K+ concentration raised the reversal potential value of depolarizing phases to more positive values. The amplitude of the depolarizing phase was reduced by application of tetraethylammonium (50 mM) while it was enhanced by application of 4-aminopyridine (3 mM). CaCl2 application (3 mM) reversibly blocked the hyperpolarization and decreased the subsequent depolarization. In presence of Ba2+ the extrapollated reversal potential of the hyperpolarizing phase was dramatically shifted to a more positive value. Finally FLFQPQRFamide induced response can be partially mimicked by FMRFamide application. Our observations indicate that FLFQPQRFamide can have multiple effects on membrane conductance of mammalian spinal cord neurones by acting on a single class of receptor. These effects of FLFQPQRFamide were found to be mainly excitatory.

  14. Reversible Axonal Dystrophy by Calcium Modulation in Frataxin-Deficient Sensory Neurons of YG8R Mice

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    Belén Mollá

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA is a peripheral neuropathy involving a loss of proprioceptive sensory neurons. Studies of biopsies from patients suggest that axonal dysfunction precedes the death of proprioceptive neurons in a dying-back process. We observed that the deficiency of frataxin in sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia (DRG of the YG8R mouse model causes the formation of axonal spheroids which retain dysfunctional mitochondria, shows alterations in the cytoskeleton and it produces impairment of axonal transport and autophagic flux. The homogenous distribution of axonal spheroids along the neurites supports the existence of continues focal damages. This lead us to propose for FRDA a model of distal axonopathy based on axonal focal damages. In addition, we observed the involvement of oxidative stress and dyshomeostasis of calcium in axonal spheroid formation generating axonal injury as a primary cause of pathophysiology. Axonal spheroids may be a consequence of calcium imbalance, thus we propose the quenching or removal extracellular Ca2+ to prevent spheroids formation. In our neuronal model, treatments with BAPTA and o-phenanthroline reverted the axonal dystrophy and the mitochondrial dysmorphic parameters. These results support the hypothesis that axonal pathology is reversible in FRDA by pharmacological manipulation of intracellular Ca2+ with Ca2+ chelators or metalloprotease inhibitors, preventing Ca2+-mediated axonal injury. Thus, the modulation of Ca2+ levels may be a relevant therapeutic target to develop early axonal protection and prevent dying-back neurodegeneration.

  15. Gradients and modulation of K(+ channels optimize temporal accuracy in networks of auditory neurons.

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    Leonard K Kaczmarek

    Full Text Available Accurate timing of action potentials is required for neurons in auditory brainstem nuclei to encode the frequency and phase of incoming sound stimuli. Many such neurons express "high threshold" Kv3-family channels that are required for firing at high rates (> -200 Hz. Kv3 channels are expressed in gradients along the medial-lateral tonotopic axis of the nuclei. Numerical simulations of auditory brainstem neurons were used to calculate the input-output relations of ensembles of 1-50 neurons, stimulated at rates between 100-1500 Hz. Individual neurons with different levels of potassium currents differ in their ability to follow specific rates of stimulation but all perform poorly when the stimulus rate is greater than the maximal firing rate of the neurons. The temporal accuracy of the combined synaptic output of an ensemble is, however, enhanced by the presence of gradients in Kv3 channel levels over that measured when neurons express uniform levels of channels. Surprisingly, at high rates of stimulation, temporal accuracy is also enhanced by the occurrence of random spontaneous activity, such as is normally observed in the absence of sound stimulation. For any pattern of stimulation, however, greatest accuracy is observed when, in the presence of spontaneous activity, the levels of potassium conductance in all of the neurons is adjusted to that found in the subset of neurons that respond better than their neighbors. This optimization of response by adjusting the K(+ conductance occurs for stimulus patterns containing either single and or multiple frequencies in the phase-locking range. The findings suggest that gradients of channel expression are required for normal auditory processing and that changes in levels of potassium currents across the nuclei, by mechanisms such as protein phosphorylation and rapid changes in channel synthesis, adapt the nuclei to the ongoing auditory environment.

  16. Fibronectin type III (FN3) modules of the neuronal cell adhesion molecule L1 interact directly with the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Li, Shizhong; Hinsby, Anders Mørkeberg

    2008-01-01

    The neuronal cell adhesion molecule (CAM) L1 promotes axonal outgrowth, presumably through an interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). The present study demonstrates a direct interaction between L1 fibronectin type III (FN3) modules I-V and FGFR1 immunoglobulin (Ig) modules ...

  17. Baicalein reverts L-valine-induced persistent sodium current up-modulation in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caioli, Silvia; Candelotti, Elena; Pedersen, Jens Z; Saba, Luana; Antonini, Alessia; Incerpi, Sandra; Zona, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    L-valine is a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) largely used as dietary integrator by athletes and involved in some inherited rare diseases such as maple syrup urine disease. This pathology is caused by an altered BCAA metabolism with the accumulation of toxic keto acids in tissues and body fluids with consequent severe neurological symptoms. In animal models of BCAA accumulation, increased oxidative stress levels and lipid peroxidation have been reported. The aim of this study was to analyze both whether high BCAA concentrations in neurons induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and whether, by performing electrophysiological recordings, the neuronal functional properties are modified. Our results demonstrate that in primary cortical cultures, a high dose of valine increases ROS production and provokes neuronal hyperexcitability because the action potential frequencies and the persistent sodium current amplitudes increase significantly compared to non-treated neurons. Since Baicalein, a flavone obtained from the Scutellaria root, has been shown to act as a strong antioxidant with neuroprotective effects, we evaluated its possible antioxidant activity in primary cortical neurons chronically exposed to L-valine. The preincubation of cortical neurons with Baicalein prevents the ROS production and is able to revert both the neuronal hyperexcitability and the increase of the persistent sodium current, indicating a direct correlation between the ROS production and the altered physiological parameters. In conclusion, our data show that the electrophysiological alterations of cortical neurons elicited by high valine concentration are due to the increase in ROS production, suggesting much caution in the intake of BCAA dietary integrators.

  18. Towards bridging the gap between acid-base transporters and neuronal excitability modulation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    pH homeostasis is a fundamental regulator of the function of the central nervous system. Dysfunction of acid-base transporters often results in disturbance of neuronal excitability. In a latest issue of Journal of Neuroscience, Jones et al. report that increasing intracellular bicarbonate concentration substantially stimulates the excitability of pyramidal neurons from mouse hippocampus by inhibiting KCNQ potassium channel. The finding shed important new light in understanding the molecular m...

  19. Lactate modulates the activity of primary cortical neurons through a receptor-mediated pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Bozzo

    Full Text Available Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM. To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM. None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism.

  20. Lactate modulates the activity of primary cortical neurons through a receptor-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzo, Luigi; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Lactate is increasingly described as an energy substrate of the brain. Beside this still debated metabolic role, lactate may have other effects on brain cells. Here, we describe lactate as a neuromodulator, able to influence the activity of cortical neurons. Neuronal excitability of mouse primary neurons was monitored by calcium imaging. When applied in conjunction with glucose, lactate induced a decrease in the spontaneous calcium spiking frequency of neurons. The effect was reversible and concentration dependent (IC50 ∼4.2 mM). To test whether lactate effects are dependent on energy metabolism, we applied the closely related substrate pyruvate (5 mM) or switched to different glucose concentrations (0.5 or 10 mM). None of these conditions reproduced the effect of lactate. Recently, a Gi protein-coupled receptor for lactate called HCA1 has been introduced. To test if this receptor is implicated in the observed lactate sensitivity, we incubated cells with pertussis toxin (PTX) an inhibitor of Gi-protein. PTX prevented the decrease of neuronal activity by L-lactate. Moreover 3,5-dyhydroxybenzoic acid, a specific agonist of the HCA1 receptor, mimicked the action of lactate. This study indicates that lactate operates a negative feedback on neuronal activity by a receptor-mediated mechanism, independent from its intracellular metabolism.

  1. Prostaglandin D2 Modulates Neuronal Excitation of the Trigeminal Ganglion to Augment Allergic Rhinitis in Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagira, Yoji; Goto, Kumiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Miwa; Furue, Shingo; Inagaki, Naoki; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Shichijo, Michitaka

    2016-05-01

    Prostaglandin D2(PGD2) is involved in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis. However, the sensory nervous system-mediated contributions of PGD2to the symptoms of allergic rhinitis remain unclear. We investigated the involvement of PGD2in these symptoms and in neuronal excitation by in vivo and ex vivo experiments. In an ovalbumin-induced model of allergic rhinitis in guinea pigs, the number of sneezing, nasal rubbing, and nasal secretion events were assessed after the nasal cavity instillation of PGD2, histamine, or a combination of PGD2and histamine. In situ hybridization for PGD2receptor 1 (DP1) mRNA transcripts and immunohistochemical analysis of histamine H1receptor protein expression in guinea pig trigeminal ganglion (TRG) were performed. The effects of DP1receptor activation on the excitability of TRG neurons to electrical and histamine stimuli were assessed using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Histamine induced more sneezing, nasal rubbing, and nasal secretion events than PGD2 PGD2augmented histamine-induced responses, whereas pretreatment with a DP1receptor-selective antagonist completely suppressed PGD2-induced augmentation. DP1receptor mRNA transcripts and H1receptor protein expression could be detected in TRG neurons. Moreover, a DP1receptor agonist caused significant increases in the number of histamine-induced action potentials and depolarization, and reduced the current threshold in small-diameter neurons. Our findings show that PGD2-DP1receptor signaling augments the symptoms of allergic rhinitis via the sensory nervous system by modulating nasal neuronal activation to various stimuli, such as histamine. These findings suggest that DP1receptor antagonist has therapeutic potential for the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

  2. Acetic acid modulates spike rate and spike latency to salt in peripheral gustatory neurons of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breza, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Sour and salt taste interactions are not well understood in the peripheral gustatory system. Therefore, we investigated the interaction of acetic acid and NaCl on taste processing by rat chorda tympani neurons. We recorded multi-unit responses from the severed chorda tympani nerve (CT) and single-cell responses from intact narrowly tuned and broadly tuned salt-sensitive neurons in the geniculate ganglion simultaneously with stimulus-evoked summated potentials to signal when the stimulus contacted the lingual epithelium. Artificial saliva served as the rinse and solvent for all stimuli [0.3 M NH4Cl, 0.5 M sucrose, 0.1 M NaCl, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.02 M quinine hydrochloride (QHCl), 0.1 M KCl, 0.003–0.1 M acetic acid, and 0.003–0.1 M acetic acid mixed with 0.1 M NaCl]. We used benzamil to assess NaCl responses mediated by the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). The CT nerve responses to acetic acid/NaCl mixtures were less than those predicted by summing the component responses. Single-unit analyses revealed that acetic acid activated acid-generalist neurons exclusively in a concentration-dependent manner: increasing acid concentration increased response frequency and decreased response latency in a parallel fashion. Acetic acid suppressed NaCl responses in ENaC-dependent NaCl-specialist neurons, whereas acetic acid-NaCl mixtures were additive in acid-generalist neurons. These data suggest that acetic acid attenuates sodium responses in ENaC-expressing-taste cells in contact with NaCl-specialist neurons, whereas acetic acid-NaCl mixtures activate distinct receptor/cellular mechanisms on taste cells in contact with acid-generalist neurons. We speculate that NaCl-specialist neurons are in contact with type I cells, whereas acid-generalist neurons are in contact with type III cells in fungiform taste buds. PMID:22896718

  3. Modulation of in vivo neuronal sprouting by serotonin in the adult CNS of the snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, M W; Croll, R P

    1996-10-01

    1. During in situ recovery from a lesion to the cerebrobuccal connective (CBC) in the snail Achatina fulica, neurons of the buccal ganglia undergo extensive regeneration and sprouting as assessed by axonal dye-fillings of the CBC. 2. These changes are preceded by the distal degeneration of severed fibres from the serotonergic metacerebral giant neuron (MCG), which results in the depletion of serotonin (5-HT) in the ipsilateral buccal ganglion. We have investigated the potential role of this depletion in causing some of the ensuing neuroplastic events. 3. Pharmacological depletion of 5-HT using either 5,7-dihydroxtryptamine or p-chlorophenylalanine in normal, unlesioned animals was found to produce supernumerary neuronal labelling similar to that seen following a lesion. 4. Systemic daily injections of 5-HT were found to partly suppress the sprouting response following the CBC lesion. For example, the contralateral, uninjured MCG which is normally induced by the lesion to sprout novel projections into the denervated ganglion, is suppressed from doing so by the 5-HT treatment. 5. These growth inhibiting effects of 5-HT upon the contralateral MCG could be antagonized by the prior administration of the 5-HT receptor blocker cyproheptadine, suggesting a specific receptor mediated action. 6. We suggest that 5-HT may play a role in governing the state of neuronal outgrowth in vivo in the CNS of the adult snail, as has been suggested by early development and neuronal cultural studies.

  4. Transmitter modulation of spike-evoked calcium transients in arousal related neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne; Leonard, Christopher S

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-containing cholinergic neurons in the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) influence behavioral and motivational states through their projections to the thalamus, ventral tegmental area and a brainstem 'rapid eye movement (REM)-induction' site. Action potential-evoked intracel......Nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-containing cholinergic neurons in the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) influence behavioral and motivational states through their projections to the thalamus, ventral tegmental area and a brainstem 'rapid eye movement (REM)-induction' site. Action potential......-evoked intracellular calcium transients dampen excitability and stimulate NO production in these neurons. In this study, we investigated the action of several arousal-related neurotransmitters and the role of specific calcium channels in these LDT Ca(2+)-transients by simultaneous whole-cell recording and calcium...... of cholinergic LDT neurons and that inhibition of spike-evoked Ca(2+)-transients is a common action of neurotransmitters that also activate GIRK channels in these neurons. Because spike-evoked calcium influx dampens excitability, our findings suggest that these 'inhibitory' transmitters could boost firing rate...

  5. Intrinsic modulation of pulse-coupled integrate-and-fire neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, S.; Lord, G. J.

    1997-11-01

    Intrinsic neuromodulation is observed in sensory and neuromuscular circuits and in biological central pattern generators. We model a simple neuronal circuit with a system of two pulse-coupled integrate-and-fire neurons and explore the parameter regimes for periodic firing behavior. The inclusion of biologically realistic features shows that the speed and onset of neuronal response plays a crucial role in determining the firing phase for periodic rhythms. We explore the neurophysiological function of distributed delays arising from both the synaptic transmission process and dendritic structure as well as discrete delays associated with axonal communication delays. Bifurcation and stability diagrams are constructed with a mixture of simple analysis, numerical continuation and the Kuramoto phase-reduction technique. Moreover, we show that, for asynchronous behavior, the strength of electrical synapses can control the firing rate of the system.

  6. DP-b99 modulates matrix metalloproteinase activity and neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeghiazaryan, Marine; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Konopka, Anna; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M; Melikyan, Armenuhi; Korkotian, Eduard; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Figiel, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    DP-b99 is a membrane-activated chelator of zinc and calcium ions, recently proposed as a therapeutic agent. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent extracellularly operating proteases that might contribute to synaptic plasticity, learning and memory under physiological conditions. In excessive amounts these enzymes contribute to a number of neuronal pathologies ranging from the stroke to neurodegeneration and epileptogenesis. In the present study, we report that DP-b99 delays onset and severity of PTZ-induced seizures in mice, as well as displays neuroprotective effect on kainate excitotoxicity in hippocampal organotypic slices and furthermore blocks morphological reorganization of the dendritic spines evoked by a major neuronal MMP, MMP-9. Taken together, our findings suggest that DP-b99 may inhibit neuronal plasticity driven by MMPs, in particular MMP-9, and thus may be considered as a therapeutic agent under conditions of aberrant plasticity, such as those subserving epileptogenesis.

  7. [Local GABA-ergic modulation of serotonergic neuron activity in the nucleus raphe magnus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniushkin, A N; Merkulova, N A; Orlova, A O; Iniushkina, E M

    2009-07-01

    In voltage-clamp experimental on slices of the rat brainstem the effects of 5-HT and GABA on serotonergic neurons of nucleus raphe magnus were investigated. Local applications of 5-HT induced an increase in IPCSs frequency and amplitude in 45% of serotonergic cells. The effect suppressed by the blocker of fast sodium channels tetradotoxin. Antagonist of GABA receptor gabazine blocked IPSCs in neurons both sensitive and non-sensitive to 5-HT action. Applications of GABA induced a membrane current (I(GABA)), which was completely blocked by gabazine. The data suggest self-control of the activity of serotonergic neurons in nucleus raphe magnus by negative feedback loop via local GABAergic interneurons.

  8. Urotensin II modulates rapid eye movement sleep through activation of brainstem cholinergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Sánchez-Alavez, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a cyclic neuropeptide with strong vasoconstrictive activity in the peripheral vasculature. UII receptor mRNA is also expressed in the CNS, in particular in cholinergic neurons located in the mesopontine tegmental area, including the pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) and lateral...... dorsal tegmental nuclei. This distribution suggests that the UII system is involved in functions regulated by acetylcholine, such as the sleep-wake cycle. Here, we tested the hypothesis that UII influences cholinergic PPT neuron activity and alters rapid eye movement (REM) sleep patterns in rats. Local...... blood flow. Moreover, whole-cell recordings from rat-brain slices show that UII selectively excites cholinergic PPT neurons via an inward current and membrane depolarization that were accompanied by membrane conductance decreases. This effect does not depend on action potential generation or fast...

  9. Ionic modulation of QPX stability as a nano-switch regulating gene expression in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaee Ravari, Soodeh

    G-quadruplexes (G-QPX) have been the subject of intense research due to their unique structural configuration and potential applications, particularly their functionality in biological process as a novel type of nano--switch. They have been found in critical regions of the human genome such as telomeres, promoter regions, and untranslated regions of RNA. About 50% of human DNA in promoters has G-rich regions with the potential to form G-QPX structures. A G-QPX might act mechanistically as an ON/OFF switch, regulating gene expression, meaning that the formation of G-QPX in a single strand of DNA disrupts double stranded DNA, prevents the binding of transcription factors (TF) to their recognition sites, resulting in gene down-regulation. Although there are numerous studies on biological roles of G-QPXs in oncogenes, their potential formation in neuronal cells, in particular upstream of transcription start sites, is poorly investigated. The main focus of this research is to identify stable G-QPXs in the 97bp active promoter region of the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene, the terminal enzyme involved in synthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, and to clarify ionic modulation of G-QPX nanostructures through the mechanism of neural action potentials. Different bioinformatics analyses (in silico), including the QGRS, quadparser and G4-Calculator programs, have been used to predict stable G-QPX in the active promoter region of the human ChAT gene, located 1000bp upstream from the TATA box. The results of computational studies (using those three different algorithms) led to the identification of three consecutive intramolecular G-QPX structures in the negative strand (ChAT G17-2, ChAT G17, and ChAT G29) and one intramolecular G-QPX structure in the positive strand (ChAT G30). Also, the results suggest the possibility that nearby G-runs in opposed DNA strands with a short distance of each other may be able to form a stable intermolecular G-QPX involving two DNA

  10. How does a neuron know to modulate its epigenetic machinery in response to early-life environment/experience?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carley A Karsten

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Exciting information is emerging about epigenetic mechanisms and their role in long-lasting changes of neuronal gene expression. Whereas these mechanisms are active throughout life, recent findings point to a critical window of early postnatal development during which neuronal gene expression may be persistently re-programmed via epigenetic modifications. However, it remains unclear how the epigenetic machinery is modulated. Here we focus on an important example of early-life programming: the effect of sensory input from the mother on expression patterns of key stress-related genes in the developing brain. We focus on the lasting effects of this early life experience on corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH gene expression in the hypothalamus, and describe recent work that integrates organism-wide signals with cellular signals that in turn impact epigenetic regulation. We describe the operational brain networks that convey sensory input to CRH-expressing cells, and highlight the resulting re-wiring of synaptic connectivity to these neurons. We then move from intercellular to intracellular mechanisms, speculating about the induction and maintenance of lifelong CRH repression provoked by early-life experience. Elucidating such pathways is critical for understanding the enduring links between experience and gene expression. In the context of responses to stress, such mechanisms should contribute to vulnerability or resilience to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and other stress-related disorders.

  11. DREADD Modulation of Transplanted DA Neurons Reveals a Novel Parkinsonian Dyskinesia Mechanism Mediated by the Serotonin 5-HT6 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrin-Kirk, Patrick; Heuer, Andreas; Wang, Gang; Mattsson, Bengt; Lundblad, Martin; Parmar, Malin; Björklund, Tomas

    2016-06-01

    Transplantation of DA neurons is actively pursued as a restorative therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). Pioneering clinical trials using transplants of fetal DA neuroblasts have given promising results, although a number of patients have developed graft-induced dyskinesias (GIDs), and the mechanism underlying this troublesome side effect is still unknown. Here we have used a new model where the activity of the transplanted DA neurons can be selectively modulated using a bimodal chemogenetic (DREADD) approach, allowing either enhancement or reduction of the therapeutic effect. We show that exclusive activation of a cAMP-linked (Gs-coupled) DREADD or serotonin 5-HT6 receptor, located on the grafted DA neurons, is sufficient to induce GIDs. These findings establish a mechanistic link between the 5-HT6 receptor, intracellular cAMP, and GIDs in transplanted PD patients. This effect is thought to be mediated through counteraction of the D2 autoreceptor feedback inhibition, resulting in a dysplastic DA release from the transplant.

  12. Role of miRNAs and BDNF in the modulation of hippocampal neurons morphology by antidepressants

    OpenAIRE

    Jordão, Marta Costa

    2012-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Biologia Celular e Molecular, apresentada ao Departamento Ciências da Vida da Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra. A depressão é uma desordem psiquiátrica que representa uma das maiores causas de incapacidade em todo o Mundo, sendo que é caracterizada pelo enfraquecimento da plasticidade neuronal, anormal rede neuronal e, somente em alguns casos, perda celular. No entanto, o mecanismo pelo qual surgem estas alterações neuronais ...

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibition decreases cholesterol levels in neuronal cells by modulating key genes in cholesterol synthesis, uptake and efflux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João Nunes

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is an essential component of the central nervous system and increasing evidence suggests an association between brain cholesterol metabolism dysfunction and the onset of neurodegenerative disorders. Interestingly, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi such as trichostatin A (TSA are emerging as promising therapeutic approaches in neurodegenerative diseases, but their effect on brain cholesterol metabolism is poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that HDACi up-regulate CYP46A1 gene transcription, a key enzyme in neuronal cholesterol homeostasis. In this study, TSA was shown to modulate the transcription of other genes involved in cholesterol metabolism in human neuroblastoma cells, namely by up-regulating genes that control cholesterol efflux and down-regulating genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and uptake, thus leading to an overall decrease in total cholesterol content. Furthermore, co-treatment with the amphipathic drug U18666A that can mimic the intracellular cholesterol accumulation observed in cells of Niemman-Pick type C patients, revealed that TSA can ameliorate the phenotype induced by pathological cholesterol accumulation, by restoring the expression of key genes involved in cholesterol synthesis, uptake and efflux and promoting lysosomal cholesterol redistribution. These results clarify the role of TSA in the modulation of neuronal cholesterol metabolism at the transcriptional level, and emphasize the idea of HDAC inhibition as a promising therapeutic tool in neurodegenerative disorders with impaired cholesterol metabolism.

  14. Excitatory amino acid transporters tonically restrain nTS synaptic and neuronal activity to modulate cardiorespiratory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matott, Michael P; Ruyle, Brian C; Hasser, Eileen M; Kline, David D

    2016-03-01

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) is the initial central termination site for visceral afferents and is important for modulation and integration of multiple reflexes including cardiorespiratory reflexes. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the nTS and is removed from the extracellular milieu by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). The goal of this study was to elucidate the role of EAATs in the nTS on basal synaptic and neuronal function and cardiorespiratory regulation. The majority of glutamate clearance in the central nervous system is believed to be mediated by astrocytic EAAT 1 and 2. We confirmed the presence of EAAT 1 and 2 within the nTS and their colocalization with astrocytic markers. EAAT blockade withdl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) produced a concentration-related depolarization, increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) frequency, and enhanced action potential discharge in nTS neurons. Solitary tract-evoked EPSCs were significantly reduced by EAAT blockade. Microinjection of TBOA into the nTS of anesthetized rats induced apneic, sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic responses. These effects mimicked the response to microinjection of exogenous glutamate, and glutamate responses were enhanced by EAAT blockade. Together these data indicate that EAATs tonically restrain nTS excitability to modulate cardiorespiratory function.

  15. Intracellular calcium level is an important factor influencing ion channel modulations by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yuto; Echigo, Ryousuke; Kashima, Kousuke; Minami, Hanae; Watanabe, Megumi; Nishikawa, Yuiko; Muranishi, Miho; Yoneda, Mitsugu; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako

    2013-05-28

    Signaling pathways involving phospholipase C (PLC) are involved in various neural functions. Understanding how these pathways are regulated will lead to a better understanding of their roles in neural functions. Previous studies demonstrated that receptor-driven PLCβ activation depends on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), suggesting the possibility that PLCβ-dependent cellular responses are basically Ca(2+) dependent. To test this possibility, we examined whether modulations of ion channels driven by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors are sensitive to [Ca(2+)]i using cultured hippocampal neurons. Muscarinic activation triggered an inward current at -100 mV (the equilibrium potential for K(+)) in a subpopulation of neurons. This current response was suppressed by pirenzepine (an M1-preferring antagonist), PLC inhibitor, non-selective cation channel blocker, and lowering [Ca(2+)]i. Using the neurons showing no response at -100 mV, effects of muscarinic activation on K(+) channels were examined at -40 mV. Muscarinic activation induced a transient decrease of the holding outward current. This current response was mimicked and occluded by XE991, an M-current K(+) channel blocker, suppressed by pirenzepine, PLC inhibitor and lowering [Ca(2+)]i, and enhanced by elevating [Ca(2+)]i. Similar results were obtained when group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were activated instead of muscarinic receptors. These results clearly show that ion channel modulations driven by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors are dependent on [Ca(2+)]i, supporting the hypothesis that cellular responses induced by receptor-driven PLCβ activation are basically Ca(2+) dependent.

  16. Comparative Distribution of Neurons Containing FLFQPQRFamide-like (morphine-modulating) Peptide and Related Neuropeptides in the Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivipelto, Leena; Panula, Pertti

    1991-01-01

    FLFQPQRF-NH2 (F8Famide; morphine-modulating peptide), isolated from bovine brain, is an FMRFamide-like peptide with opioid analgesia modulating effects. In the rat brain, F8Famide is immunohistochemically localized in neurons of the medial hypothalamus and medulla oblongata. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is structurally related to F8Famide and the mammalian FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity (LI) was once thought to be due to an NPY-like peptide. We compared the anatomical distribution of F8Famide-LI with the localization of enkephalin- and NPY-LI-containing structures in the rat brain to find out if NPY or enkephalins coexist with F8Famide-LI. Cryostat sections of colchicine-treated Wistar rat brains were incubated with specific antisera against F8Famide, NPY, YGGFMRGL (Met-enkephalin-Arg-Gly-Leu), or YGGFMRF (Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe) raised in rabbits. The immunoreactivity was visualized by the peroxidase - antiperoxidase or immunofluorescence method. The light microscopic mirror method was applied to study the colocalization of F8Famide and NPY. The F8Famide-immunoreactivity was concentrated in smaller areas of medial hypothalamus and nucleus of the solitary tract than that of enkephalins and NPY. In all brain areas, the distributions of F8Famide-, enkephalin- and NPY-immunoreactive neurons were distinct. F8Famide-, NPY- and enkephalin-LI-containing nerve terminals were seen in the nucleus of the solitary tract and in the lateral parabrachial nucleus. These results show that the neuronal systems containing F8Famide-, enkephalin- or NPY-LI are anatomically separate in all brain regions. However, there are terminal areas in which more than one type of these immunoreactivities are detected. These results have anatomical correlation with pharmacological reports, suggesting modulatory functions for these peptides on regulation of blood pressure, feeding behaviour and endocrine functions.

  17. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppert, M.M.J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Viergever, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This scena

  18. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppert, M.M.J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Viergever, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This

  19. Direct action and modulating effect of (+)- and (-)-nicotine on ion channels expressed in trigeminal sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Benjamin S P; Lehmann, Ramona; Thiel, Ulrike; Ziemba, Paul M; Beltrán, Leopoldo R; Sherkheli, Muhammad A; Jeanbourquin, Philippe; Hugi, Alain; Werner, Markus; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2014-04-05

    Nicotine sensory perception is generally thought to be mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors. However, recent data strongly support the idea that other receptors (e.g., transient receptor potential A1 channel, TRPA1) and other pathways contribute to the detection mechanisms underlying the olfactory and trigeminal cell response to nicotine flavor. This is in accordance with the reported ability of humans to discriminate between (+)- and (-)- nicotine enantiomers. To get a more detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular basis underlying the sensory perception of nicotine, we studied the activity of (+)- and (-)-nicotine on cultured murine trigeminal sensory neurons and on a range of heterologously expressed receptors. The human TRPA1 channel is activated by (-)-nicotine. In this work, we show that (+)-nicotine is also an activator of this channel. Pharmacological experiments using nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and transient receptor potential blockers revealed that trigeminal neurons express one or more unidentified receptors that are sensitive to (+)- and/or (-)-nicotine. Results also indicate that the presence of extracellular calcium ions is required to elicit trigeminal neuron responses to (+)- and (-)-nicotine. Results also show that both (+)-nicotine and (-)-nicotine can block 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor-mediated responses in recombinant expression systems and in cultured trigeminal neurons expressing 5-HT3 receptors. Our investigations broaden the spectra of receptors that are targets for nicotine enantiomers and give new insights into the physiological role of nicotine.

  20. Highly Selective, Reversible Inhibitor Identified by Comparative Chemoproteomics Modulates Diacylglycerol Lipase Activity in Neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Baggelaar; P.J.P. Chameau; V. Kantae; J. Hummel; K.L. Hsu; F. Janssen; T. van der Wel; M. Soethoudt; H. Deng; H. den Dulk; M. Allarà; B.I. Florea; V. Di Marzo; W.J. Wadman; C.G. Kruse; H.S. Overkleeft; T. Hankemeier; T.R. Werkman; B.F. Cravatt; M. van der Stelt

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL)-alpha and -beta are enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Selective and reversible inhibitors are required to study the function of DAGLs in neuronal cells in an acute and temporal fashion, but they are currently l

  1. Focal adhesion kinase modulates radial glia-dependent neuronal migration through connexin-26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Manuel; Ciceri, Gabriele; Rico, Beatriz; Marín, Oscar

    2011-08-10

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase and scaffold protein that regulates migration in many different cellular contexts but whose function in neuronal migration remains controversial. Here, we have analyzed the function of FAK in two populations of neurons with very distinct migratory behaviors: cortical interneurons, which migrate tangentially and independently of radial glia; and pyramidal cells, which undergo glial-dependent migration. We found that FAK is dispensable for glial-independent migration but is cell-autonomously required for the normal interaction of pyramidal cells with radial glial fibers. Loss of FAK function disrupts the normal morphology of migrating pyramidal cells, delays migration, and increases the tangential dispersion of neurons arising from the same radial unit. FAK mediates this process by regulating the assembly of Connexin-26 contact points in the membrane of migrating pyramidal cells. These results indicate that FAK plays a fundamental role in the dynamic regulation of Gap-mediated adhesions during glial-guided neuronal migration in the mouse.

  2. CyPPA, a Positive SK3/SK2 Modulator, Reduces Activity of Dopaminergic Neurons, Inhibits Dopamine Release, and Counteracts Hyperdopaminergic Behaviors Induced by Methylphenidate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrik, Kjartan F; Redrobe, John P; Holst, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) containing midbrain neurons play critical roles in several psychiatric and neurological diseases, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and the substantia nigra pars compacta neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson's disease. Pharmacological...... modulation of DA receptors and transporters are well established approaches for treatment of DA-related disorders. Direct modulation of the DA system by influencing the discharge pattern of these autonomously firing neurons has yet to be exploited as a potential therapeutic strategy. Small conductance Ca(2...... mouse and rat midbrain slices. Using an immunocytochemically and pharmacologically validated DA release assay employing cultured DA neurons from rats, we show that CyPPA repressed DA release in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximal effect equal to the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole. In vivo...

  3. Arrays of microLEDs and astrocytes: biological amplifiers to optogenetically modulate neuronal networks reducing light requirement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Berlinguer-Palmini

    Full Text Available In the modern view of synaptic transmission, astrocytes are no longer confined to the role of merely supportive cells. Although they do not generate action potentials, they nonetheless exhibit electrical activity and can influence surrounding neurons through gliotransmitter release. In this work, we explored whether optogenetic activation of glial cells could act as an amplification mechanism to optical neural stimulation via gliotransmission to the neural network. We studied the modulation of gliotransmission by selective photo-activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 and by means of a matrix of individually addressable super-bright microLEDs (μLEDs with an excitation peak at 470 nm. We combined Ca2+ imaging techniques and concurrent patch-clamp electrophysiology to obtain subsequent glia/neural activity. First, we tested the μLEDs efficacy in stimulating ChR2-transfected astrocyte. ChR2-induced astrocytic current did not desensitize overtime, and was linearly increased and prolonged by increasing μLED irradiance in terms of intensity and surface illumination. Subsequently, ChR2 astrocytic stimulation by broad-field LED illumination with the same spectral profile, increased both glial cells and neuronal calcium transient frequency and sEPSCs suggesting that few ChR2-transfected astrocytes were able to excite surrounding not-ChR2-transfected astrocytes and neurons. Finally, by using the μLEDs array to selectively light stimulate ChR2 positive astrocytes we were able to increase the synaptic activity of single neurons surrounding it. In conclusion, ChR2-transfected astrocytes and μLEDs system were shown to be an amplifier of synaptic activity in mixed corticalneuronal and glial cells culture.

  4. L1 retrotransposition in neurons is modulated by MeCP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muotri, Alysson R; Marchetto, Maria C N; Coufal, Nicole G; Oefner, Ruth; Yeo, Gene; Nakashima, Kinichi; Gage, Fred H

    2010-11-18

    Long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (LINE-1 or L1s) are abundant retrotransposons that comprise approximately 20% of mammalian genomes. Active L1 retrotransposons can impact the genome in a variety of ways, creating insertions, deletions, new splice sites or gene expression fine-tuning. We have shown previously that L1 retrotransposons are capable of mobilization in neuronal progenitor cells from rodents and humans and evidence of massive L1 insertions was observed in adult brain tissues but not in other somatic tissues. In addition, L1 mobility in the adult hippocampus can be influenced by the environment. The neuronal specificity of somatic L1 retrotransposition in neural progenitors is partially due to the transition of a Sox2/HDAC1 repressor complex to a Wnt-mediated T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) transcriptional activator. The transcriptional switch accompanies chromatin remodelling during neuronal differentiation, allowing a transient stimulation of L1 transcription. The activity of L1 retrotransposons during brain development can have an impact on gene expression and neuronal function, thereby increasing brain-specific genetic mosaicism. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate L1 expression should provide new insights into the role of L1 retrotransposition during brain development. Here we show that L1 neuronal transcription and retrotransposition in rodents are increased in the absence of methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2), a protein involved in global DNA methylation and human neurodevelopmental diseases. Using neuronal progenitor cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells and human tissues, we revealed that patients with Rett syndrome (RTT), carrying MeCP2 mutations, have increased susceptibility for L1 retrotransposition. Our data demonstrate that L1 retrotransposition can be controlled in a tissue-specific manner and that disease-related genetic mutations can influence the frequency of neuronal L

  5. Stress Hormones Epinephrine and Corticosterone Selectively Modulate Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 Productive Infections in Adult Sympathetic, but Not Sensory, Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Angela M; Bertke, Andrea S

    2017-07-01

    Herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infect and establish latency in peripheral neurons, from which they can reactivate to cause recurrent disease throughout the life of the host. Stress is associated with the exacerbation of clinical symptoms and the induction of recurrences in humans and animal models. The viruses preferentially replicate and establish latency in different subtypes of sensory neurons, as well as in neurons of the autonomic nervous system that are highly responsive to stress hormones. To determine if stress-related hormones modulate productive HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections within sensory and autonomic neurons, we analyzed viral DNA and the production of viral progeny after treatment of primary adult murine neuronal cultures with the stress hormones epinephrine and corticosterone. Both sensory trigeminal ganglion (TG) and sympathetic superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons expressed adrenergic receptors (activated by epinephrine) and the glucocorticoid receptor (activated by corticosterone). Productive HSV infection colocalized with these receptors in SCG but not in TG neurons. In productively infected neuronal cultures, epinephrine treatment significantly increased the levels of HSV-1 DNA replication and production of viral progeny in SCG neurons, but no significant differences were found in TG neurons. In contrast, corticosterone significantly decreased the levels of HSV-2 DNA replication and production of viral progeny in SCG neurons but not in TG neurons. Thus, the stress-related hormones epinephrine and corticosterone selectively modulate acute HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in autonomic, but not sensory, neurons.IMPORTANCE Stress exacerbates acute disease symptoms resulting from HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections and is associated with the appearance of recurrent skin lesions in millions of people. Although stress hormones are thought to impact HSV-1 and HSV-2 through immune system suppression, sensory and autonomic neurons that become infected

  6. FXYD1, a modulator of Na+,K+-ATPase activity, facilitates female sexual development by maintaining GnRH neuronal excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rudaz, Cecilia; Deng, Vivianne; Matagne, Valerie; Ronnekleiv, Oline; Bosch, Martha; Han, Victor; Percy, Alan K.; Ojeda, Sergio R.

    2009-01-01

    The excitatory tone to GnRH neurones is a critical component underlying the pubertal increase in GnRH secretion. However, the homeostatic mechanisms modulating the response of GnRH neurones to excitatory inputs remain poorly understood. A basic mechanism of neuronal homeostasis is the Na+, K+-ATPase-dependent restoration of Na+ and K+ transmembrane gradients after neuronal excitation. This activity is reduced in a mouse model of Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder in which expression of FXYD1, a modulator of Na+, K+-ATPase activity, is increased. We now report that the initiation, but not the completion of puberty, is advanced in girls with RTT, and that in rodents FXYD1 may contribute to the neuroendocrine regulation of female puberty by modulating GnRH neuronal excitability. Fxyd1 mRNA abundance reaches maximal levels in the female rat hypothalamus by the fourth postnatal week of life, i.e., around the time when the mode of GnRH secretion acquires an adult pattern of release. Although Fxyd1 mRNA expression is low in the hypothalamus, about 50% of GnRH neurones contain Fxyd1 transcripts. Whole-cell patch recording of GnRH-EGFP neurones revealed that the neurones of Fxyd1-null female mice respond to somatic current injections with a lower number of action potentials than wild-type cells. Both the age at vaginal opening and at first oestrous were delayed in Fxyd1-/- mice, but adult reproductive capacity was normal. These results suggest that FXYD1 contributes to facilitating the advent of puberty by maintaining GnRH neuronal excitability to incoming transsynaptic stimulatory inputs. PMID:19187398

  7. MiR-21 is an Ngf-modulated microRNA that supports Ngf signaling and regulates neuronal degeneration in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalban, Enrica; Mattugini, Nicola; Ciarapica, Roberta; Provenzano, Claudia; Savino, Mauro; Scagnoli, Fiorella; Prosperini, Gianluca; Carissimi, Claudia; Fulci, Valerio; Matrone, Carmela; Calissano, Pietro; Nasi, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    The neurotrophins Ngf, Bdnf, NT-3, NT4-5 have key roles in development, survival, and plasticity of neuronal cells. Their action involves broad gene expression changes at the level of transcription and translation. MicroRNAs (miRs)-small RNA molecules that control gene expression post-transcriptionally-are increasingly implicated in regulating development and plasticity of neural cells. Using PC12 cells as a model system, we show that Ngf modulates changes in expression of a variety of microRNAs, including miRs known to be modulated by neurotrophins-such as the miR-212/132 cluster-and several others, such as miR-21, miR-29c, miR-30c, miR-93, miR-103, miR-207, miR-691, and miR-709. Pathway analysis indicates that Ngf-modulated miRs may regulate many protein components of signaling pathways involved in neuronal development and disease. In particular, we show that miR-21 enhances neurotrophin signaling and controls neuronal differentiation induced by Ngf. Notably, in a situation mimicking neurodegeneration-differentiated neurons deprived of Ngf-this microRNA is able to preserve the neurite network and to support viability of the neurons. These findings uncover a broad role of microRNAs in regulating neurotrophin signaling and suggest that aberrant expression of one or more Ngf-modulated miRs may be involved in neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Imagined gait modulates neuronal network dynamics in the human pedunculopontine nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Timothy L; Stratton, Peter G; Coyne, Terry J; Cook, Raymond; Silberstein, Paul; Silburn, Peter A; Windels, François; Sah, Pankaj

    2014-03-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a part of the mesencephalic locomotor region and is thought to be important for the initiation and maintenance of gait. Lesions of the PPN induce gait deficits, and the PPN has therefore emerged as a target for deep brain stimulation for the control of gait and postural disability. However, the role of the PPN in gait control is not understood. Using extracellular single-unit recordings in awake patients, we found that neurons in the PPN discharged as synchronous functional networks whose activity was phase locked to alpha oscillations. Neurons in the PPN responded to limb movement and imagined gait by dynamically changing network activity and decreasing alpha phase locking. Our results indicate that different synchronous networks are activated during initial motor planning and actual motion, and suggest that changes in gait initiation in Parkinson's disease may result from disrupted network activity in the PPN.

  9. Positive modulation of delta-subunit containing GABAA receptors in mouse neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vardya, Irina; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Nieto-Gonzalez, Jose Luis

    2012-01-01

    (A) receptors in mouse neurons in vitro and in vivo. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were carried out in the dentate gyrus in mouse brain slices. In granule cells, AA29504 (1 μM) caused a 4.2-fold potentiation of a tonic current induced by THIP (1 μM), while interneurons showed a potentiation of 2.6-fold......, and possibly recruits perisynaptic δ-containing receptors to participate in synaptic phasic inhibition in dentate gyrus....

  10. 2-Bromopalmitate modulates neuronal differentiation through the regulation of histone acetylation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xueran; Du, Zhaoxia; Shi, Wei; Wang, Chen; Yang YANG; Wang, Fen; Yao, Yao; He, Kun; Hao, Aijun

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the functional significance of palmitoylation during multi-potent neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, retinoic acid-induced P19 cells were used in this study as a model system. Cell behaviour was monitored in the presence of the protein palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate (2BP). Here, we observed a significant reduction in neuronal differentiation in the 2BP-treated cell model. We further explored the underlying mechanisms and found that 2...

  11. Modulation of neuronal serotonin uptake by a putative endogenous ligand of imipramine recognition sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Barbaccia, M. L.; Gandolfi, O; Chuang, D M; Costa, E

    1983-01-01

    Imipramine inhibits the serotonin uptake by binding with high affinity to regulatory sites of this uptake located on axons that release serotonin. The number of imipramine recognition sites located on crude synaptic membrane preparations is reduced by two daily injections of imipramine or desmethylimipramine for 3 weeks. When the binding sites for [3H]imipramine are down-regulated the Vmax of the neuronal uptake of serotonin is increased. Moreover, in minces prepared from the brain hippocampu...

  12. KSRP modulation of GAP-43 mRNA stability restricts axonal outgrowth in embryonic hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark W Bird

    Full Text Available The KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP promotes the decay of AU-rich element (ARE-containing mRNAs. Although KSRP is expressed in the nervous system, very little is known about its role in neurons. In this study, we examined whether KSRP regulates the stability of the ARE-containing GAP-43 mRNA. We found that KSRP destabilizes this mRNA by binding to its ARE, a process that requires the presence of its fourth KH domain (KH4. Furthermore, KSRP competed with the stabilizing factor HuD for binding to these sequences. We also examined the functional consequences of KSRP overexpression and knockdown on the differentiation of primary hippocampal neurons in culture. Overexpression of full length KSRP or KSRP without its nuclear localization signal hindered axonal outgrowth in these cultures, while overexpression of a mutant protein without the KH4 domain that has less affinity for binding to GAP-43's ARE had no effect. In contrast, depletion of KSRP led to a rise in GAP-43 mRNA levels and a dramatic increase in axonal length, both in KSRP shRNA transfected cells and neurons cultured from Ksrp(+/- and Ksrp(-/- embryos. Finally we found that overexpression of GAP-43 rescued the axonal outgrowth deficits seen with KSRP overexpression, but only when cells were transfected with GAP-43 constructs containing 3' UTR sequences targeting the transport of this mRNA to axons. Together, our results suggest that KSRP is an important regulator of mRNA stability and axonal length that works in direct opposition to HuD to regulate the levels of GAP-43 and other ARE-containing neuronal mRNAs.

  13. Taurine-induced modulation of voltage-sensitive Na+ channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shan-Shan; Yu, Kuai; Gu, Yan; Ruan, Di-Yun

    2005-08-15

    The physiological role of taurine, an abundant free amino acid in the neural system, is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate its effect on TTX-sensitive (TTX-S) and TTX-resistant (TTX-R) Na+ currents in enzymatically dissociated neurons from rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) with conventional whole-cell recording manner under voltage-clamp conditions. A TTX-S Na+ current was recorded preferentially from large DRG neurons and a TTX-R Na+ current preferentially from small ones. For TTX-S Na+ channel, taurine of the concentration > or = 10 mM shifted the activation curve in the depolarizing direction and the inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction. There was no change in the activation curve for TTX-R Na+ channel and the inactivation curve was shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction slightly in the presence of taurine > or = 20 mM. When the recovery kinetics was examined, the presence of taurine resulted in a slower recovery from inactivation of TTX-S currents and no change of TTX-R ones. All the effects of taurine were weakly concentration-dependent and partly recovered quite slowly after washout. Our data indicate that taurine alters the properties of Na+ currents in intact DRG neurons. These may contribute to the understanding of taurine as a natural neuroprotectant and the potential of taurine as a useful medicine for the treatment of sensory neuropathies.

  14. Neuronal energy-sensing pathway promotes energy balance by modulating disease tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Run; Wang, Biao; Giribaldi, Maria G; Ayres, Janelle; Thomas, John B; Montminy, Marc

    2016-06-01

    The starvation-inducible coactivator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-cAMP-regulated transcription coactivator (Crtc) has been shown to promote starvation resistance in Drosophila by up-regulating CREB target gene expression in neurons, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. We found that Crtc and its binding partner CREB enhance energy homeostasis by stimulating the expression of short neuropeptide F (sNPF), an ortholog of mammalian neuropeptide Y, which we show here is a direct target of CREB and Crtc. Neuronal sNPF was found to promote energy homeostasis via gut enterocyte sNPF receptors, which appear to maintain gut epithelial integrity. Loss of Crtc-sNPF signaling disrupted epithelial tight junctions, allowing resident gut flora to promote chronic increases in antimicrobial peptide (AMP) gene expression that compromised energy balance. Growth on germ-free food reduced AMP gene expression and rescued starvation sensitivity in Crtc mutant flies. Overexpression of Crtc or sNPF in neurons of wild-type flies dampens the gut immune response and enhances starvation resistance. Our results reveal a previously unidentified tolerance defense strategy involving a brain-gut pathway that maintains homeostasis through its effects on epithelial integrity.

  15. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munck, Estefanía; Palomo, Valle; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Perez, Daniel I; Gómez-Miguel, Begoña; Solas, M Teresa; Gil, Carmen; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS.

  16. FGF14 modulates resurgent sodium current in mouse cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Haidun; Pablo, Juan L; Wang, Chaojian; Pitt, Geoffrey S

    2014-09-30

    Rapid firing of cerebellar Purkinje neurons is facilitated in part by a voltage-gated Na(+) (NaV) 'resurgent' current, which allows renewed Na(+) influx during membrane repolarization. Resurgent current results from unbinding of a blocking particle that competes with normal channel inactivation. The underlying molecular components contributing to resurgent current have not been fully identified. In this study, we show that the NaV channel auxiliary subunit FGF14 'b' isoform, a locus for inherited spinocerebellar ataxias, controls resurgent current and repetitive firing in Purkinje neurons. FGF14 knockdown biased NaV channels towards the inactivated state by decreasing channel availability, diminishing the 'late' NaV current, and accelerating channel inactivation rate, thereby reducing resurgent current and repetitive spiking. Critical for these effects was both the alternatively spliced FGF14b N-terminus and direct interaction between FGF14b and the NaV C-terminus. Together, these data suggest that the FGF14b N-terminus is a potent regulator of resurgent NaV current in cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

  17. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munck, Estefanía; Palomo, Valle; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Perez, Daniel I.; Gómez-Miguel, Begoña; Solas, M. Teresa; Gil, Carmen; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS. PMID:27631495

  18. Selective androgen receptor modulator RAD140 is neuroprotective in cultured neurons and kainate-lesioned male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Anusha; Christensen, Amy; Moser, V Alexandra; Vest, Rebekah S; Miller, Chris P; Hattersley, Gary; Pike, Christian J

    2014-04-01

    The decline in testosterone levels in men during normal aging increases risks of dysfunction and disease in androgen-responsive tissues, including brain. The use of testosterone therapy has the potential to increase the risks for developing prostate cancer and or accelerating its progression. To overcome this limitation, novel compounds termed "selective androgen receptor modulators" (SARMs) have been developed that lack significant androgen action in prostate but exert agonist effects in select androgen-responsive tissues. The efficacy of SARMs in brain is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the SARM RAD140 in cultured rat neurons and male rat brain for its ability to provide neuroprotection, an important neural action of endogenous androgens that is relevant to neural health and resilience to neurodegenerative diseases. In cultured hippocampal neurons, RAD140 was as effective as testosterone in reducing cell death induced by apoptotic insults. Mechanistically, RAD140 neuroprotection was dependent upon MAPK signaling, as evidenced by elevation of ERK phosphorylation and inhibition of protection by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126. Importantly, RAD140 was also neuroprotective in vivo using the rat kainate lesion model. In experiments with gonadectomized, adult male rats, RAD140 was shown to exhibit peripheral tissue-specific androgen action that largely spared prostate, neural efficacy as demonstrated by activation of androgenic gene regulation effects, and neuroprotection of hippocampal neurons against cell death caused by systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainate. These novel findings demonstrate initial preclinical efficacy of a SARM in neuroprotective actions relevant to Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Modulation by extracellular pH of low- and high-voltage-activated calcium currents of rat thalamic relay neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M J; Meis, S; Munsch, T; Pape, H C

    2001-03-01

    The effects of changes in the extracellular pH (pH(o)) on low-voltage- (LVA) and high-voltage- (HVA) activated calcium currents of acutely isolated relay neurons of the ventrobasal thalamic complex (VB) were examined using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. Modest extracellular alkalinization (pH 7.3 to 7.7) reversibly enlarged LVA calcium currents by 18.6 +/- 3.2% (mean +/- SE, n = 6), whereas extracellular acidification (pH 7.3 to 6.9) decreased the current by 24.8 +/- 3.1% (n = 9). Normalized current amplitudes (I/I(7.3)) fitted as a function of pH(o) revealed an apparent pK(a) of 6.9. Both, half-maximal activation voltage and steady-state inactivation were significantly shifted to more negative voltages by 2-4 mV on extracellular alkalinization and to more positive voltages by 2-3 mV on extracellular acidification, respectively. Recovery from inactivation of LVA calcium currents was not significantly affected by changes in pH(o). In contrast, HVA calcium currents were less sensitive to changes in pH(o). Although extracellular alkalinization increased maximal HVA current by 6.0 +/- 2.0% (n = 7) and extracellular acidification decreased it by 11.9 +/- 0.02% (n = 11), both activation and steady-state inactivation were only marginally affected by the moderate changes in pH(o) used in the present study. The results show that calcium currents of thalamic relay neurons exhibit different pH(o) sensitivity. Therefore activity-related extracellular pH transients might selectively modulate certain aspects of the electrogenic behavior of thalamic relay neurons.

  20. Dopaminergic modulation of the voltage-gated sodium current in the cochlear afferent neurons of the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Valdés-Baizabal

    Full Text Available The cochlear inner hair cells synapse onto type I afferent terminal dendrites, constituting the main afferent pathway for auditory information flow. This pathway receives central control input from the lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons that release various neurotransmitters, among which dopamine (DA plays a salient role. DA receptors activation exert a protective role in the over activation of the afferent glutamatergic synapses, which occurs when an animal is exposed to intense sound stimuli or during hypoxic events. However, the mechanism of action of DA at the cellular level is still not completely understood. In this work, we studied the actions of DA and its receptor agonists and antagonists on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa in isolated cochlear afferent neurons of the rat to define the mechanisms of dopaminergic control of the afferent input in the cochlear pathway. Experiments were performed using the voltage and current clamp techniques in the whole-cell configuration in primary cultures of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs. Recordings of the INa showed that DA receptor activation induced a significant inhibition of the peak current amplitude, leading to a significant decrease in cell excitability. Inhibition of the INa was produced by a phosphorylation of the sodium channels as shown by the use of phosphatase inhibitor that produced an inhibition analogous to that caused by DA receptor activation. Use of specific agonists and antagonists showed that inhibitory action of DA was mediated both by activation of D1- and D2-like DA receptors. The action of the D1- and D2-like receptors was shown to be mediated by a Gαs/AC/cAMP/PKA and Gαq/PLC/PKC pathways respectively. These results showed that DA receptor activation constitutes a significant modulatory input to SGNs, effectively modulating their excitability and information flow in the auditory pathway.

  1. Dopaminergic modulation of the voltage-gated sodium current in the cochlear afferent neurons of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Baizabal, Catalina; Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    The cochlear inner hair cells synapse onto type I afferent terminal dendrites, constituting the main afferent pathway for auditory information flow. This pathway receives central control input from the lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons that release various neurotransmitters, among which dopamine (DA) plays a salient role. DA receptors activation exert a protective role in the over activation of the afferent glutamatergic synapses, which occurs when an animal is exposed to intense sound stimuli or during hypoxic events. However, the mechanism of action of DA at the cellular level is still not completely understood. In this work, we studied the actions of DA and its receptor agonists and antagonists on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa) in isolated cochlear afferent neurons of the rat to define the mechanisms of dopaminergic control of the afferent input in the cochlear pathway. Experiments were performed using the voltage and current clamp techniques in the whole-cell configuration in primary cultures of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Recordings of the INa showed that DA receptor activation induced a significant inhibition of the peak current amplitude, leading to a significant decrease in cell excitability. Inhibition of the INa was produced by a phosphorylation of the sodium channels as shown by the use of phosphatase inhibitor that produced an inhibition analogous to that caused by DA receptor activation. Use of specific agonists and antagonists showed that inhibitory action of DA was mediated both by activation of D1- and D2-like DA receptors. The action of the D1- and D2-like receptors was shown to be mediated by a Gαs/AC/cAMP/PKA and Gαq/PLC/PKC pathways respectively. These results showed that DA receptor activation constitutes a significant modulatory input to SGNs, effectively modulating their excitability and information flow in the auditory pathway.

  2. Modulation of action potential and calcium signaling by levetiracetam in rat sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mete; Ayar, Ahmet

    2012-06-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV), a new anticonvulsant agent primarily used to treat epilepsy, has been used in pain treatment but the cellular mechanism of this action remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate effects of LEV on the excitability and membrane depolarization-induced calcium signaling in isolated rat sensory neurons using the whole-cell patch clamp and fura 2-based ratiometric Ca(2+)-imaging techniques. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were excised from neonatal rats, and cultured following enzymatic and mechanical dissociation. Under current clamp conditions, acute application of LEV (30 µM, 100 µM and 300 µM) significantly increased input resistance and caused the membrane to hyperpolarize from resting membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Reversal potentials of action potential (AP) after hyperpolarising amplitudes were shifted to more negative, toward to potassium equilibrium potentials, after application of LEV. It also caused a decrease in number of APs in neurons fired multiple APs in response to prolonged depolarization. Fura-2 fluorescence Ca(2+) imaging protocols revealed that HiK(+) (30 mM)-induced intracellular free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) was inhibited to 97.8 ± 4.6% (n = 17), 92.6 ± 4.8% (n = 17, p < 0.01) and 89.1 ± 5.1% (n = 18, p < 0.01) after application of 30 µM, 100 µM and 300 µM LEV (respectively), without any significant effect on basal levels of [Ca(2+)](i). This is the first evidence for the effect of LEV on the excitability of rat sensory neurons through an effect which might involve activation of potassium channels and inhibition of entry of Ca(2+), providing new insights for cellular mechanism(s) of LEV in pain treatment modalities.

  3. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppert, M. M. J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F. H.; Viergever, M. A.

    2011-08-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This scenario predicts exponential distributions of the duration of the seizures and of the inter-ictal intervals. These predictions were validated in rat models of absence epilepsy, as well as in a few human cases. Nonetheless, deviations from the predictions with respect to seizure duration distributions remained unexplained. The objective of the present work is to implement a simple but realistic computational model of a neuronal network including synaptic plasticity and ionic current dynamics and to explore the dynamics of the model with special emphasis on the distributions of seizure and inter-ictal period durations. We use as a basis our lumped model of cortical neuronal circuits. Here we introduce 'activity dependent' parameters, namely post-synaptic voltage-dependent plasticity, as well as a voltage-dependent hyperpolarization-activated current driven by slow and fast activation conductances. We examine the distributions of the durations of the seizure-like model activity and the normal activity, described respectively by the limit cycle and the steady state in the dynamics. We use a parametric γ-distribution fit as a quantifier. Our results show that autonomous, activity-dependent membrane processes can account for experimentally obtained statistical distributions of seizure durations, which were not explainable using the previous model. The activity-dependent membrane processes that display the strongest effect in accounting for these distributions are the hyperpolarization-dependent cationic (Ih) current and the GABAa plastic dynamics. Plastic synapses (NMDA-type) in the interneuron population show only a minor effect. The inter-ictal statistics retain their

  4. Severity of dependence modulates smokers' neuronal cue reactivity and cigarette craving elicited by tobacco advertisement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine; Kobiella, Andrea; Bühler, Mira; Graf, Caroline; Fehr, Christoph; Mann, Karl; Smolka, Michael N

    2011-01-01

    Smoking-related cues elicit craving and mesocorticolimbic brain activation in smokers. Severity of nicotine dependence seems to moderate cue reactivity, but the direction and mechanisms of its influence remains unclear. Although tobacco control policies demand a ban on tobacco advertising, cue reactivity studies in smokers so far have not employed tobacco advertisement as experimental stimuli. We investigated whether tobacco advertisement elicits cue reactivity at a behavioral (subjective craving) and a neural level (using functional magnetic resonance imaging) in 22 smokers and 21 never-smokers. Moreover, we studied the influence of severity of dependence on cue reactivity. In smokers, tobacco advertisement elicited substantially more craving than control advertisement whereas never-smokers reported no cue induced craving. Surprisingly, neuronal cue reactivity did not differ between smokers and never-smokers. Moderately dependent smokers' craving increased over the course of the experiment, whereas highly dependent smokers' craving was unaffected. Moderately dependent smokers' brain activity elicited by tobacco advertisement was higher in the amygdala, hippocampus, putamen and thalamus compared with highly dependent smokers. Furthermore, limbic brain activation predicted picture recognition rates after the scanning session, even in never-smokers. Our findings show that tobacco advertisement elicits cigarette craving and neuronal cue reactivity primarily in moderately dependent smokers, indicating that they might be particularly responsive towards external smoking-related cues. On the other hand, neuronal cue reactivity and cigarette craving in highly dependent smokers is more likely triggered by internal cues such as withdrawal symptoms. Tobacco advertisement seems to likewise appeal to smokers and non-smokers, clarifying the potential danger especially for young non-smokers.

  5. Phorbol Ester Modulation of Ca2+ Channels Mediates Nociceptive Transmission in Dorsal Horn Neurones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary J. Stephens

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phorbol esters are analogues of diacylglycerol which activate C1 domain proteins, such as protein kinase C (PKC. Phorbol ester/PKC pathways have been proposed as potential therapeutic targets for chronic pain states, potentially by phosphorylating proteins involved in nociception, such as voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs. In this brief report, we investigate the potential involvement of CaV2 VDCC subtypes in functional effects of the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA on nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. Effects of PMA and of selective pharmacological blockers of CaV2 VDCC subtypes on nociceptive transmission at laminae II dorsal horn neurones were examined in mouse spinal cord slices. Experiments were extended to CaV2.3(−/− mice to complement pharmacological studies. PMA increased the mean frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs in dorsal horn neurones, without an effect on event amplitude or half-width. sPSC frequency was reduced by selective VDCC blockers, w-agatoxin-IVA (AgTX; CaV2.1, w-conotoxin-GVIA (CTX; CaV2.2 or SNX-482 (CaV2.3. PMA effects were attenuated in the presence of each VDCC blocker and, also, in CaV2.3(−/− mice. These initial data demonstrate that PMA increases nociceptive transmission at dorsal horn neurones via actions on different CaV2 subtypes suggesting potential anti-nociceptive targets in this system.

  6. HDAC3 Inhibitor RGFP966 Modulates Neuronal Memory for Vocal Communication Signals in a Songbird Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi L. Phan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms that modify chromatin conformation have recently been under investigation for their contributions to learning and the formation of memory. For example, the role of enzymes involved in histone acetylation are studied in the formation of long-lasting memories because memory consolidation requires gene expression events that are facilitated by an open state of chromatin. We recently proposed that epigenetic events may control the entry of specific sensory features into long-term memory by enabling transcription-mediated neuronal plasticity in sensory brain areas. Histone deacetylases, like HDAC3, may thereby regulate the specific sensory information that is captured for entry into long-term memory stores (Phan and Bieszczad, 2016. To test this hypothesis, we used an HDAC3-selective inhibitor (RGFP966 to determine whether its application after an experience with a sound stimulus with unique acoustic features could contribute to the formation of a memory that would assist in mediating its later recognition. We gave adult male zebra finches limited exposure to unique conspecific songs (20 repetitions each, well below the normal threshold to form long-term memory, followed by treatment with RGFP966 or vehicle. In different groups, we either made multi-electrode recordings in the higher auditory area NCM (caudal medial nidopallidum, or determined expression of an immediate early gene, zenk (also identified as zif268, egr-1, ngfi-a and krox24, known to participate in neuronal memory in this system. We found that birds treated with RGFP966 showed neuronal memory after only limited exposure, while birds treated with vehicle did not. Strikingly, evidence of neuronal memory in NCM induced by HDAC3-inhibition was lateralized to the left-hemisphere, consistent with our finding that RGFP966-treatment also elevated zenk expression only in the left hemisphere. The present findings show feasibility for epigenetic mechanisms to control neural

  7. Selective pharmacological modulation of pyramidal neurons and interneurons in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia eMartina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is a complex network tightly regulated by interactions between excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In neurodegenerative disorders where cognitive functions such as learning and memory are impaired this excitation-inhibition balance may be altered. Interestingly, the uncompetitive NMDAR antagonist memantine, currently in clinical use for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, may alter the excitation-inhibition balance in the hippocampus. However, the specific mechanism by which memantine exerts this action is not clear. To better elucidate the effect of memantine on hippocampal circuitry, we studied its pharmacology on NMDAR currents in both pyramidal cells (PCs and interneurons (Ints in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Applying whole-cell patch-clamp methodology to acute rat hippocampal slices, we report that memantine antagonism is more robust in PCs than in Ints. Using specific NMDAR subunit antagonists, we determined that this selective antagonism of memantine is attributable to specific differences in the molecular make up of the NMDARs in excitatory and inhibitory neurons. These findings offer new insight into the mechanism of action and therapeutic potential of NMDA receptor pharmacology in modulating hippocampal excitability.

  8. Kinetic changes and modulation by carbamazepine on voltage-gated sodium channels in rat CA1 neurons after epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-chun SUN; Taco WERKMAN; Wytse J WADMAN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study whether the functional properties of sodium channels, and subsequently the channel modulation by carbamazepine (CBZ) in hippocampal CA1 neurons can be changed after epileptic seizures. Methods: We used the acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from epilepsy model rats 3 weeks and 3 months respectively after kainate injection, and whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. Results: After long-term epileptic seizures, both sodium channel voltage-dependence of activation and steady-state inactivation shifted to more hyperpolarizing potentials, which resulted in the enlarged window current; the membrane density of sodium current decreased and the time constant of recovery from inactivation increased. CBZ displayed unchanged efficacy on sodium channels, with a similar binding rate to them, except that at higher concentrations, the voltage shift of inactivation was reduced. For the short-term kainate model rats, no differences were detected between the control and epilepsy groups. Conclusion: These results indicate that the properties of sodium channels in acutely dissociated hippocampal neurons could be changed following long-term epilepsy, but the alternation might not be enough to induce the channel resistance to CBZ.

  9. Hyperforin modulates dendritic spine morphology in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by activating Ca(2+) -permeable TRPC6 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuner, Kristina; Li, Wei; Amaral, Michelle D; Rudolph, Stephanie; Calfa, Gaston; Schuwald, Anita M; Harteneck, Christian; Inoue, Takafumi; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    The standardized extract of the St. John's wort plant (Hypericum perforatum) is commonly used to treat mild to moderate depression. Its active constituent is hyperforin, a phloroglucinol derivative that reduces the reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine by increasing intracellular Na(+) concentration through the activation of nonselective cationic TRPC6 channels. TRPC6 channels are also Ca(2+) -permeable, resulting in intracellular Ca(2+) elevations. Indeed, hyperforin activates TRPC6-mediated currents and Ca(2+) transients in rat PC12 cells, which induce their differentiation, mimicking the neurotrophic effect of nerve growth factor. Here, we show that hyperforin modulates dendritic spine morphology in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of hippocampal slice cultures through the activation of TRPC6 channels. Hyperforin also evoked intracellular Ca(2+) transients and depolarizing inward currents sensitive to the TRPC channel blocker La(3+) , thus resembling the actions of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. These results suggest that the antidepressant actions of St. John's wort are mediated by a mechanism similar to that engaged by BDNF.

  10. Investigating the molecular pathway through which L-Lactate interacts with synaptic NMDAR to modulate neuronal plasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Engy

    2016-12-01

    In the brain, glycogen, the storage form of glucose, is exclusively localized in astrocytes (Magistretti and Allaman, 2015). Glycogenolysis leads to the production of L-lactate, which is shuttled to neurons for ATP production. Interestingly, L-lactate was recently shown to be not only a source of energy, but also a signaling molecule to neurons. This was demonstrated through the inhibition of L-lactate production or transport in an inhibitory avoidance paradigm, where the rodents developed amnesia. This inhibition of memory consolidation was rescued by L-lactate and not by equicaloric glucose emphasizing that L-lactate acts as a signaling molecule as well (Suzuki et al., 2011). A recent study in our laboratory suggests that the action of L-lactate takes place through a cascade of molecular events via the modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity (Yang et al., 2014). Since NADH produced similar results to those seen with L-lactate, it was hypothesized that the action of the latter is based on altering the redox state of the cell, in particular in view of the fact that redox-sensitive sites are present on the NMDAR. However, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the apparent change in the NMDAR activity is not fully elucidated. The objective of this study is to explore those mechanisms.

  11. Acetylcholine plays an antinociceptive role by modulating pain-induced discharges of pain-related neurons in the caudate putamen of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Mei; Zhang, Da-Ming; Yang, Chun-Xiao; Ma, Xu; Gao, He-Ren; Zhang, Duo; Xu, Man-Ying

    2014-02-12

    The caudate putamen (CPu) has been suggested to be involved in nociceptive modulation. Some neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine (ACh), participate in pain modulation in the central nervous system. However, the active mechanism of ACh on the pain-related neurons in the CPu remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the cholinergic agonists ACh and pilocarpine and the muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist atropine on the pain-induced response of pain-related neurons in the CPu of Wistar rats. Trains of electrical impulses applied to the sciatic nerve of rat were used as the noxious stimulus. The electrical activities of pain-excited neurons (PENs) or pain-inhibited neurons (PINs) in the CPu were recorded by a glass microelectrode. Our results showed that an intra-CPu injection of 4 μg/2 μl ACh or pilocarpine decreased and increased the pain-induced discharge frequency in the PENs and PINs, respectively. Intra-CPu administration of 1 μg/2 μl atropine produced the opposite effect on these neurons. These findings indicate that ACh may play an analgesic role by affecting the electric activities of PENs and PINs, and the muscarinic pathway may be involved in the modulation of pain perception in the CPu.

  12. Modulation of neuronal signal transduction and memory formation by synaptic zinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eSindreu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The physiological role of synaptic zinc has remained largely enigmatic since its initial detection in hippocampal mossy fibers over fifty years ago. The past few years have witnessed a number of studies highlighting the ability of zinc ions to regulate ion channels and intracellular signaling pathways implicated in neuroplasticity, and others that shed some light on the elusive role of synaptic zinc in learning and memory. Recent behavioral studies using knock out mice for the synapse-specific zinc transporter ZnT-3 indicate that vesicular zinc is required for the formation of memories dependent on the hippocampus and the amygdala, two brain centers that are prominently innervated by zinc-rich fibers. A common theme emerging from this research is the activity-dependent regulation of the Erk1/2 mitogen-activated-protein kinase pathway by synaptic zinc through diverse mechanisms in neurons. Here we discuss current knowledge on how synaptic zinc may play a role in cognition through its impact on neuronal signaling.

  13. Eliminating microglia in Alzheimer's mice prevents neuronal loss without modulating amyloid-β pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Elizabeth E; Lee, Rafael J; Najafi, Allison R; Rice, Rachel A; Elmore, Monica R P; Blurton-Jones, Mathew; West, Brian L; Green, Kim N

    2016-04-01

    In addition to amyloid-β plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation is considered a key feature of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Inflammation in Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of reactive astrocytes and activated microglia surrounding amyloid plaques, implicating their role in disease pathogenesis. Microglia in the healthy adult mouse depend on colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) signalling for survival, and pharmacological inhibition of this receptor results in rapid elimination of nearly all of the microglia in the central nervous system. In this study, we set out to determine if chronically activated microglia in the Alzheimer's disease brain are also dependent on CSF1R signalling, and if so, how these cells contribute to disease pathogenesis. Ten-month-old 5xfAD mice were treated with a selective CSF1R inhibitor for 1 month, resulting in the elimination of ∼80% of microglia. Chronic microglial elimination does not alter amyloid-β levels or plaque load; however, it does rescue dendritic spine loss and prevent neuronal loss in 5xfAD mice, as well as reduce overall neuroinflammation. Importantly, behavioural testing revealed improvements in contextual memory. Collectively, these results demonstrate that microglia contribute to neuronal loss, as well as memory impairments in 5xfAD mice, but do not mediate or protect from amyloid pathology.

  14. Sodium metabisulfite modulation of potassium channels in pain-sensing dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Aifang; Wei, Cailing; Meng, Ziqiang

    2009-12-01

    The effects of sodium metabisulfite (SMB), a general food preservative, on potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. SMB increased the amplitudes of both transient outward potassium currents and delayed rectifier potassium current in concentration- and voltage-dependent manner. The transient outward potassium currents (TOCs) include a fast inactivating (A-current or IA) current and a slow inactivating (D-current or ID) current. SMB majorly increased IA, and ID was little affected. SMB did not affect the activation process of transient outward currents (TOCs), but the inactivation curve of TOCs was shifted to more positive potentials. The inactivation time constants of TOCs were also increased by SMB. For delayed rectifier potassium current (IK), SMB shifted the activation curve to hyperpolarizing direction. SMB differently affected TOCs and IK, its effects major on A-type K+ channels, which play a role in adjusting pain sensitivity in response to peripheral redox conditions. SMB did not increase TOCs and IK when adding DTT in pipette solution. These results suggested that SMB might oxidize potassium channels, which relate to adjusting pain sensitivity in pain-sensing DRG neurons.

  15. Modulation of neuronal signal transduction and memory formation by synaptic zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindreu, Carlos; Storm, Daniel R

    2011-01-01

    The physiological role of synaptic zinc has remained largely enigmatic since its initial detection in hippocampal mossy fibers over 50 years ago. The past few years have witnessed a number of studies highlighting the ability of zinc ions to regulate ion channels and intracellular signaling pathways implicated in neuroplasticity, and others that shed some light on the elusive role of synaptic zinc in learning and memory. Recent behavioral studies using knock-out mice for the synapse-specific zinc transporter ZnT-3 indicate that vesicular zinc is required for the formation of memories dependent on the hippocampus and the amygdala, two brain centers that are prominently innervated by zinc-rich fibers. A common theme emerging from this research is the activity-dependent regulation of the Erk1/2 mitogen-activated-protein kinase pathway by synaptic zinc through diverse mechanisms in neurons. Here we discuss current knowledge on how synaptic zinc may play a role in cognition through its impact on neuronal signaling.

  16. Eliminating microglia in Alzheimer’s mice prevents neuronal loss without modulating amyloid-β pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Elizabeth E.; Lee, Rafael J.; Najafi, Allison R.; Rice, Rachel A.; Elmore, Monica R. P.; Blurton-Jones, Mathew; West, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to amyloid-β plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation is considered a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease pathology. Inflammation in Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of reactive astrocytes and activated microglia surrounding amyloid plaques, implicating their role in disease pathogenesis. Microglia in the healthy adult mouse depend on colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) signalling for survival, and pharmacological inhibition of this receptor results in rapid elimination of nearly all of the microglia in the central nervous system. In this study, we set out to determine if chronically activated microglia in the Alzheimer's disease brain are also dependent on CSF1R signalling, and if so, how these cells contribute to disease pathogenesis. Ten-month-old 5xfAD mice were treated with a selective CSF1R inhibitor for 1 month, resulting in the elimination of ∼80% of microglia. Chronic microglial elimination does not alter amyloid-β levels or plaque load; however, it does rescue dendritic spine loss and prevent neuronal loss in 5xfAD mice, as well as reduce overall neuroinflammation. Importantly, behavioural testing revealed improvements in contextual memory. Collectively, these results demonstrate that microglia contribute to neuronal loss, as well as memory impairments in 5xfAD mice, but do not mediate or protect from amyloid pathology. PMID:26921617

  17. Oxidative modulation of transient potassium current by arachidonic acid in brain central neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Angelova, Plamena

    2007-01-01

    Der neuronale Zelluntergang bei einer Vielzahl von Krankheiten des ZNS, wie z.B. Morbus Alzheimer (AD) und Temporallappenepilepsie (TLE), wird mit oxidativem Stress sowie Fehlfunktionen von Kaliumkanälen in Verbindung gebracht. In dieser Studie soll die selektive neuronale Sensitivität auf oxidativen Stress durch die Messung der oxidativen Modulation von Kaliumströmen untersucht werden. Dabei werden sternförmige Neuronen der zweiten Schicht des entorhinalen Kortex (EC) (bei AD bereits früh ge...

  18. CyPPA, a positive SK3/SK2 modulator, reduces activity of dopaminergic neurons, inhibits dopamine release, and counteracts hyperdopaminergic behaviors induced by methylphenidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjartan F. Herrik

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA containing midbrain neurons play critical roles in several psychiatric and neurological diseases, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, and the substantia nigra pars compacta neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson’s disease. Pharmacological modulation of DA receptors and transporters are well established approaches for treatment of DA-related disorders. Direct modulation of the DA system by influencing the discharge pattern of these autonomously firing neurons has yet to be exploited as a potential therapeutic strategy. Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (SK channels, in particular the SK3 subtype, are important in the physiology of DA neurons, and agents modifying SK channel activity could potentially affect DA-signaling and DA-related behaviors. Here we show that CyPPA (cyclohexyl-[2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl-6-methyl-pyrimidin-4-yl]-amine, a subtype-selective positive modulator of SK channels (SK3 > SK2 >>> SK1, IK, decreased spontaneous firing rate, increased the duration of the apamin-sensitive, medium duration afterhyperpolarization (mAHP, and caused an activity-dependent inhibition of current-evoked action potentials in DA neurons from both mouse and rat midbrain slices. Using a immunohistochemically and pharmacologically validated DA release assay employing cultured DA neurons from rats, we show that CyPPA repressed DA release in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximal effect equal to the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole. In vivo studies revealed that systemic administration of CyPPA attenuated methylphenidate-induced hyperactivity and stereotypic behaviors in mice. Taken together, the data accentuate the important role played by SK3 channels in the physiology of DA neurons, and indicate that their facilitation by CyPPA profoundly influences physiological as well as pharmacologically induced hyperdopaminergic behavior.

  19. Modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels by G protein-coupled receptors in celiac-mesenteric ganglion neurons of septic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Farrag

    Full Text Available Septic shock, the most severe complication associated with sepsis, is manifested by tissue hypoperfusion due, in part, to cardiovascular and autonomic dysfunction. In many cases, the splanchnic circulation becomes vasoplegic. The celiac-superior mesenteric ganglion (CSMG sympathetic neurons provide the main autonomic input to these vessels. We used the cecal ligation puncture (CLP model, which closely mimics the hemodynamic and metabolic disturbances observed in septic patients, to examine the properties and modulation of Ca2+ channels by G protein-coupled receptors in acutely dissociated rat CSMG neurons. Voltage-clamp studies 48 hr post-sepsis revealed that the Ca2+ current density in CMSG neurons from septic rats was significantly lower than those isolated from sham control rats. This reduction coincided with a significant increase in membrane surface area and a negligible increase in Ca2+ current amplitude. Possible explanations for these findings include either cell swelling or neurite outgrowth enhancement of CSMG neurons from septic rats. Additionally, a significant rightward shift of the concentration-response relationship for the norepinephrine (NE-mediated Ca2+ current inhibition was observed in CSMG neurons from septic rats. Testing for the presence of opioid receptor subtypes in CSMG neurons, showed that mu opioid receptors were present in ~70% of CSMG, while NOP opioid receptors were found in all CSMG neurons tested. The pharmacological profile for both opioid receptor subtypes was not significantly affected by sepsis. Further, the Ca2+ current modulation by propionate, an agonist for the free fatty acid receptors GPR41 and GPR43, was not altered by sepsis. Overall, our findings suggest that CSMG function is affected by sepsis via changes in cell size and α2-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca2+ channel modulation.

  20. Differential Octopaminergic Modulation of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Responses to Sex Pheromones in Heliothis virescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, N Kirk; Kavanagh, Rhys M B

    2015-01-01

    Octopamine is an important neuromodulator of neural function in invertebrates. Octopamine increases male moth sensitivity to female sex pheromones, however, relatively little is known as to the role of octopamine in the female olfactory system, nor its possible effects on the reception of non-pheromone odorants. The purpose of this study was to determine relative effects of octopamine on the sensitivity of the peripheral olfactory system in male and female Heliothis virescens. Single sensillum recording was conducted in both sexes following injection with octopamine or Ringer solution, and during odorant stimulation with conspecific female sex pheromone or host plant volatiles. Results indicate that octopamine plays a significant modulatory role in female sex pheromone detection in female moths; and that male and female pheromone detection neurons share distinct pharmacological and physiological similarities in H. virescens despite sexual dimorphism at the antennal level.

  1. 2-Bromopalmitate modulates neuronal differentiation through the regulation of histone acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueran; Du, Zhaoxia; Shi, Wei; Wang, Chen; Yang, Yang; Wang, Fen; Yao, Yao; He, Kun; Hao, Aijun

    2014-03-01

    In order to evaluate the functional significance of palmitoylation during multi-potent neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, retinoic acid-induced P19 cells were used in this study as a model system. Cell behaviour was monitored in the presence of the protein palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate (2BP). Here, we observed a significant reduction in neuronal differentiation in the 2BP-treated cell model. We further explored the underlying mechanisms and found that 2BP resulted in the decreased acetylation of histones H3 and H4 and interfered with cell cycle withdrawal and neural stem/progenitor cells' renewal. Our results established a direct link between palmitoylation and the regulation of neural cell fate specification and revealed the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that are involved in the effects of palmitoylation during neural development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 2-Bromopalmitate modulates neuronal differentiation through the regulation of histone acetylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueran Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the functional significance of palmitoylation during multi-potent neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, retinoic acid-induced P19 cells were used in this study as a model system. Cell behaviour was monitored in the presence of the protein palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate (2BP. Here, we observed a significant reduction in neuronal differentiation in the 2BP-treated cell model. We further explored the underlying mechanisms and found that 2BP resulted in the decreased acetylation of histones H3 and H4 and interfered with cell cycle withdrawal and neural stem/progenitor cells' renewal. Our results established a direct link between palmitoylation and the regulation of neural cell fate specification and revealed the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that are involved in the effects of palmitoylation during neural development.

  3. Propofol Modulates Agonist-induced Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Subtype-1 Receptor Desensitization via a Protein Kinase Cε-dependent Pathway in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Sensory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickley, Peter J.; Yuge, Ryo; Russell, Mary S.; Zhang, Hongyu; Sulak, Michael A.; Damron, Derek S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The activity of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype-1 (TRPV1) receptors, key nociceptive transducers in dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, is enhanced by protein kinase C ε (PKCε) activation. The intravenous anesthetic propofol has been shown to activate PKCε. Our objectives were to examine whether propofol modulates TRPV1 function in dorsal root ganglion neurons via activation of PKCε. Methods Lumbar dorsal root ganglion neurons from wild-type and PKCε-null mice were isolated and cultured for 24 h. Intracellular free Ca2+ concentration was measured in neurons by using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. The duration of pain-associated behaviors was also assessed. Phosphorylation of PKCε and TRPV1 and the cellular translocation of PKCε from cytosol to membrane compartments were assessed by immunoblot analysis. Results In wild-type neurons, repeated stimulation with capsaicin (100 nM) progressively decreased the transient rise in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration. After desensitization, exposure to propofol rescued the Ca2+ response. The resensitizing effect of propofol was absent in neurons obtained from PKCε-null mice. Moreover, the capsaicin-induced desensitization of TRPV1 was markedly attenuated in the presence of propofol in neurons from wild-type mice but not in neurons from PKCε-null mice. Propofol also prolonged the duration of agonist-induced pain associated behaviors in wild-type mice. In addition, propofol increased phosphorylation of PKCε as well as TRPV1 and stimulated translocation of PKCε from cytosolic to membrane fraction. Discussion Our results indicate that propofol modulates TRPV1 sensitivity to capsaicin and that this most likely occurs through a PKCε-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1. PMID:20808213

  4. Modulation of oxidative stress and Ca(2+) mobilization through TRPM2 channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neuron by Hypericum perforatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazıroğlu, M; Çiğ, B; Özgül, C

    2014-03-28

    A main component of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum, HP) is hyperforin which has antioxidant properties in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, due to its ability to modulate NADPH oxidase and protein kinase C. Recent reports indicate that oxidative stress through NADPH oxidase activates TRPM2 channels. HP may be a useful treatment for Ca(2+) entry and oxidative stress through modulation of TRPM2 channels in the DRG. We aimed to investigate the protective role of HP on Ca(2+) entry and oxidative stress through TRPM2 channels in DRG neurons of rats. The native rat DRG neurons were used in whole-cell patch-clamp, Fura-2 and antioxidant experiments. Appropriate, nontoxic concentrations and incubation times for HP were determined in the DRG neurons by assessing cell viability. The H2O2-induced TRPM2 currents were inhibited by 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB) and N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid (ACA). TRPM2 current densities and cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration in the neurons were also reduced by HP (2 and 24h). In Fura-2 experiments, cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization was reduced by voltage-gated calcium channel blockers (verapamil+diltiazem, V+D) and HP. Glutathione peroxidase activity and GSH values in the DRG were high in HP, 2-APB and V+D groups although lipid peroxidation level was low in the groups. In conclusion, we observed a protective role for HP on Ca(2+) entry through a TRPM2 channel in the DRG neurons. Since over-production of oxidative stress and Ca(2+) entry are implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain and neuronal inflammation, our findings may be relevant to the etiology and treatment of neuropathology in DRG neurons.

  5. BDNF-modulated spatial organization of Cajal-Retzius and GABAergic neurons in the marginal zone plays a role in the development of cortical organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Soledad; Pozas, Esther; Ibañez, Carlos F; Soriano, Eduardo

    2006-04-01

    The present study utilizes nestin-BDNF transgenic mice, which offer a model for early increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling, to examine the role of BDNF in the development of cortical architecture. Our results demonstrate that the premature and homogeneous expression of BDNF, while preserving tangential migration from the ganglionic eminence to the cortex, impairs the final radial migration of GABAergic neurons, as well as their integration in the appropriate cortical layers. Moreover, Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells and GABAergic neurons segregate in the cortical marginal zone (MZ) in response to BDNF signalling, leading to an alternating pattern and a columnar cortical organization, within which the migration of different neuronal populations is specifically affected. These results suggest that both CR and GABAergic neurons play a role in directing the radial migration of late-generated cortical neurons, and that the spatial distribution of these cells in the MZ is critical for the development of correct cortical organization. In addition, reelin secreted by CR cells in the MZ is not sufficient to direct the migration of late-born neurons to the upper cortical layers, which most likely requires the presence of reelin-secreting interneurons in layers V-VI. We propose that in addition to modulating reelin expression, BDNF regulates the patched distribution of CR and GABAergic neurons in the MZ, and that this spatial distribution is involved in the formation of anatomical and/or functional columns and convoluted structures.

  6. Caldendrin, a neuron-specific modulator of Cav/1.2 (L-type) Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippens, Alyssa L; Lee, Amy

    2007-03-16

    EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins such as calmodulin and CaBP1 have emerged as important regulatory subunits of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Here, we show that caldendrin, a variant of CaBP1 enriched in the brain, interacts with and distinctly modulates Cav1.2 (L-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels relative to other Ca2+-binding proteins. Caldendrin binds to the C-terminal IQ-domain of the pore-forming alpha1-subunit of Cav1.2 (alpha(1)1.2) and competitively displaces calmodulin and CaBP1 from this site. Compared with CaBP1, caldendrin causes a more modest suppression of Ca2+-dependent inactivation of Cav1.2 through a different subset of molecular determinants. Caldendrin does not bind to the N-terminal domain of alpha11.2, a site that is critical for functional interactions of the channel with CaBP1. Deletion of the N-terminal domain inhibits CaBP1, but spares caldendrin modulation of Cav1.2 inactivation. In contrast, mutations of the IQ-domain abolish physical and functional interactions of caldendrin and Cav1.2, but do not prevent channel modulation by CaBP1. Using antibodies specific for caldendrin and Cav1.2, we show that caldendrin coimmunoprecipitates with Cav1.2 from the brain and colocalizes with Cav1.2 in somatodendritic puncta of cortical neurons in culture. Our findings reveal functional diversity within related Ca2+-binding proteins, which may enhance the specificity of Ca2+ signaling by Cav1.2 channels in different cellular contexts.

  7. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khursheed A Wani

    Full Text Available Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1 required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior.

  8. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Khursheed A; Catanese, Mary; Normantowicz, Robyn; Herd, Muriel; Maher, Kathryn N; Chase, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1) required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior.

  9. Vasopressin modulates the activity of catecholamine containing neurons in specific brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, D H; De Kloet, E R; Greidanus, T V; De Wied, D

    1979-01-01

    Following the i.c.v. administration of antivasopressin serum the alpha-MPT-induced disappearance of noradrenaline was decreased in the dorsal septal nucleus, parafascicular nucleus and the rostral part of the nucleus tractus solitarii, whereas that of dopamine was lowered in the caudate nucleus and in the A2 region of the medulla oblongata. In general the effects are opposite to those previously found following the i.c.v. administration of vasopressin. The results support the hypothesis that vasopressin modulates catecholamine neurotransmission in specific brain regions of the rat.

  10. Changes in the Excitability of Neocortical Neurons in a Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Are Not Specific to Corticospinal Neurons and Are Modulated by Advancing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhyun; Hughes, Ethan G; Shetty, Ashwin S; Arlotta, Paola; Goff, Loyal A; Bergles, Dwight E; Brown, Solange P

    2017-09-13

    Cell type-specific changes in neuronal excitability have been proposed to contribute to the selective degeneration of corticospinal neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to neocortical hyperexcitability, a prominent feature of both inherited and sporadic variants of the disease, but the mechanisms underlying selective loss of specific cell types in ALS are not known. We analyzed the physiological properties of distinct classes of cortical neurons in the motor cortex of hSOD1(G93A) mice of both sexes and found that they all exhibit increases in intrinsic excitability that depend on disease stage. Targeted recordings and in vivo calcium imaging further revealed that neurons adapt their functional properties to normalize cortical excitability as the disease progresses. Although different neuron classes all exhibited increases in intrinsic excitability, transcriptional profiling indicated that the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes are cell type specific. The increases in excitability in both excitatory and inhibitory cortical neurons show that selective dysfunction of neuronal cell types cannot account for the specific vulnerability of corticospinal motor neurons in ALS. Furthermore, the stage-dependent alterations in neuronal function highlight the ability of cortical circuits to adapt as disease progresses. These findings show that both disease stage and cell type must be considered when developing therapeutic strategies for treating ALS.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It is not known why certain classes of neurons preferentially die in different neurodegenerative diseases. It has been proposed that the enhanced excitability of affected neurons is a major contributor to their selective loss. We show using a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disease in which corticospinal neurons exhibit selective vulnerability, that changes in excitability are not restricted to this neuronal class and that excitability does not increase

  11. HIPP neurons in the dentate gyrus mediate the cholinergic modulation of background context memory salience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Syed Ahsan; Albrecht, Anne; Çalışkan, Gürsel; Müller, Bettina; Demiray, Yunus Emre; Ludewig, Susann; Meis, Susanne; Faber, Nicolai; Hartig, Roland; Schraven, Burkhart; Lessmann, Volkmar; Schwegler, Herbert; Stork, Oliver

    2017-08-04

    Cholinergic neuromodulation in the hippocampus controls the salience of background context memory acquired in the presence of elemental stimuli predicting an aversive reinforcement. With pharmacogenetic inhibition we here demonstrate that hilar perforant path-associated (HIPP) cells of the dentate gyrus mediate the devaluation of background context memory during Pavlovian fear conditioning. The salience adjustment is sensitive to reduction of hilar neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression via dominant negative CREB expression in HIPP cells and to acute blockage of NPY-Y1 receptors in the dentate gyrus during conditioning. We show that NPY transmission and HIPP cell activity contribute to inhibitory effects of acetylcholine in the dentate gyrus and that M1 muscarinic receptors mediate the cholinergic activation of HIPP cells as well as their control of background context salience. Our data provide evidence for a peptidergic local circuit in the dentate gyrus that mediates the cholinergic encoding of background context salience during fear memory acquisition.Intra-hippocampal circuits are essential for associating a background context with behaviorally salient stimuli and involve cholinergic modulation at SST(+) interneurons. Here the authors show that the salience of the background context memory is modulated through muscarinic activation of NPY(+) hilar perforant path associated interneurons and NPY signaling in the dentate gyrus.

  12. Medial parabrachial nucleus neurons modulate d-fenfluramine-induced anorexia through 5HT2C receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifunovic, Radmila; Reilly, Steve

    2006-01-05

    We previously reported that lesions of the medial parabrachial nucleus (PBN) enhanced d-fenfluramine (DFEN)-induced anorexia; a finding that suggests these lesions may potentiate the release of serotonin (5HT) or increase the postsynaptic action of 5HT. In the present study, we used SB 206553 (a 5HT2B/2C receptor antagonist) or m-CPP (a 5HT2C/1B receptor agonist) in a standard behavioral procedure (deprivation-induced feeding) to further explore the role of the medial PBN in drug-induced anorexia. In Experiment 1, DFEN (0 or 1.0 mg/kg) was given alone or in combination with SB 206553 (2.0 or 5.0 mg/kg). In Experiment 2, we investigated the food-suppressive effects of m-CPP (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg). The results of Experiment 1 show that SB 206553, while having no influence on the performance of control subjects, attenuated (2.0 mg/kg) or abolished (5 mg/kg) the potentiating effect of the lesions on DFEN-induced anorexia. In Experiment 2, m-CPP induced a suppression of food intake in nonlesioned animals that was significantly potentiated in rats with medial PBN lesions. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that medial PBN neurons mediate anorexia through 5HT2C receptors.

  13. Castration modulates singing patterns and electrophysiological properties of RA projection neurons in adult male zebra finches

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    Songhua Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Castration can change levels of plasma testosterone. Androgens such as testosterone play an important role in stabilizing birdsong. The robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA is an important premotor nucleus critical for singing. In this study, we investigated the effect of castration on singing patterns and electrophysiological properties of projection neurons (PNs in the RA of adult male zebra finches. Adult male zebra finches were castrated and the changes in bird song assessed. We also recorded the electrophysiological changes from RA PNs using patch clamp recording. We found that the plasma levels of testosterone were significantly decreased, song syllable’s entropy was increased and the similarity of motif was decreased after castration. Spontaneous and evoked firing rates, membrane time constants, and membrane capacitance of RA PNs in the castration group were lower than those of the control and the sham groups. Afterhyperpolarization AHP time to peak of spontaneous action potential (AP was prolonged after castration.These findings suggest that castration decreases song stereotypy and excitability of RA PNs in male zebra finches.

  14. Hypotonicity modulates tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current in trigeminal ganglion neurons

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    Chen Lei

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs play an important role in the control of membrane excitability. We previously reported that the excitability of nociceptor was increased by hypotonic stimulation. The present study tested the effect of hypotonicity on tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current (TTX-S current in cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG neurons. Our data show that after hypotonic treatment, TTX-S current was increased. In the presence of hypotonicity, voltage-dependent activation curve shifted to the hyperpolarizing direction, while the voltage-dependent inactivation curve was not affected. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 receptor (TRPV4 activator increased TTX-S current and hypotonicity-induced increase was markedly attenuated by TRPV4 receptor blockers. We also demonstrate that inhibition of PKC attenuated hypotonicity-induced inhibition, whereas PKA system was not involved in hypotonic-response. We conclude that hypotonic stimulation enhances TTX-S current, which contributes to hypotonicity-induced nociception. TRPV4 receptor and PKC intracellular pathway are involved in the increase of TTX-S current by hypotonicity.

  15. Extracellular calcium modulates persistent sodium current-dependent burst-firing in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H; Alroy, G; Kirson, E D; Yaari, Y

    2001-06-15

    The generation of high-frequency spike bursts ("complex spikes"), either spontaneously or in response to depolarizing stimuli applied to the soma, is a notable feature in intracellular recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells (PCs) in vivo. There is compelling evidence that the bursts are intrinsically generated by summation of large spike afterdepolarizations (ADPs). Using intracellular recordings in adult rat hippocampal slices, we show that intrinsic burst-firing in CA1 PCs is strongly dependent on the extracellular concentration of Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](o)). Thus, lowering [Ca(2+)](o) (by equimolar substitution with Mn(2+) or Mg(2+)) induced intrinsic bursting in nonbursters, whereas raising [Ca(2+)](o) suppressed intrinsic bursting in native bursters. The induction of intrinsic bursting by low [Ca(2+)](o) was associated with enlargement of the spike ADP. Low [Ca(2+)](o)-induced intrinsic bursts and their underlying ADPs were suppressed by drugs that reduce the persistent Na(+) current (I(NaP)), indicating that this current mediates the slow burst depolarization. Blocking Ca(2+)-activated K(+) currents with extracellular Ni(2+) or intracellular chelation of Ca(2+) did not induce intrinsic bursting. This and other evidence suggest that lowering [Ca(2+)](o) may induce intrinsic bursting by augmenting I(NaP). Because repetitive neuronal activity in the hippocampus is associated with marked decreases in [Ca(2+)](o), the regulation of intrinsic bursting by extracellular Ca(2+) may provide a mechanism for preferential recruitment of this firing mode during certain forms of hippocampal activation.

  16. KAYAK-α modulates circadian transcriptional feedback loops in Drosophila pacemaker neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jinli; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Emery, Patrick

    2012-11-21

    Circadian rhythms are generated by well-conserved interlocked transcriptional feedback loops in animals. In Drosophila, the dimeric transcription factor CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC) promotes period (per), timeless (tim), vrille (vri), and PAR-domain protein 1 (Pdp1) transcription. PER and TIM negatively feed back on CLK/CYC transcriptional activity, whereas VRI and PDP1 negatively and positively regulate Clk transcription, respectively. Here, we show that the α isoform of the Drosophila FOS homolog KAYAK (KAY) is required for normal circadian behavior. KAY-α downregulation in circadian pacemaker neurons increases period length by 1.5 h. This behavioral phenotype is correlated with decreased expression of several circadian proteins. The strongest effects are on CLK and the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR, which are both under VRI and PDP1 control. Consistently, KAY-α can bind to VRI and inhibit its interaction with the Clk promoter. Interestingly, KAY-α can also repress CLK activity. Hence, in flies with low KAY-α levels, CLK derepression would partially compensate for increased VRI repression, thus attenuating the consequences of KAY-α downregulation on CLK targets. We propose that the double role of KAY-α in the two transcriptional loops controlling Drosophila circadian behavior brings precision and stability to their oscillations.

  17. Intrinsic excitability state of local neuronal population modulates signal propagation in feed-forward neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ruixue; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xilei; Qin, Yingmei; Wang, Haixu

    2015-04-01

    Reliable signal propagation across distributed brain areas is an essential requirement for cognitive function, and it has been investigated extensively in computational studies where feed-forward network (FFN) is taken as a generic model. But it is still unclear how distinct local network states, which are intrinsically generated by synaptic interactions within each layer, would affect the ability of FFN to transmit information. Here we investigate the impact of such network states on propagating transient synchrony (synfire) and firing rate by a combination of numerical simulations and analytical approach. Specifically, local network dynamics is attributed to the competition between excitatory and inhibitory neurons within each layer. Our results show that concomitant with different local network states, the performance of signal propagation differs dramatically. For both synfire propagation and firing rate propagation, there exists an optimal local excitability state, respectively, that optimizes the performance of signal propagation. Furthermore, we find that long-range connections strongly change the dependence of spiking activity propagation on local network state and propose that these two factors work jointly to determine information transmission across distributed networks. Finally, a simple mean field approach that bridges response properties of long-range connectivity and local subnetworks is utilized to reveal the underlying mechanism.

  18. WIP1 modulates responsiveness to Sonic Hedgehog signaling in neuronal precursor cells and medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Lee, Juhyun; Malhotra, Anshu; Nahta, Rita; Arnold, Amanda R.; Buss, Meghan C.; Brown, Briana D.; Maier, Caroline; Kenney, Anna M.; Remke, Marc; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Taylor, Michael D.; Castellino, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    High-level amplification of the protein phosphatase PPM1D (WIP1) is present in a subset of medulloblastomas (MBs) that have an expression profile consistent with active Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling. We found that WIP1 overexpression increased expression of Shh target genes and cell proliferation in response to Shh stimulation in NIH3T3 and cerebellar granule neuron precursor (cGNP) cells in a p53-independent manner. Thus, we developed a mouse in which WIP1 is expressed in the developing brain under control of the Neurod2 promoter (ND2:WIP1). The external granule layer in early post-natal ND2:WIP1 mice exhibited increased proliferation and expression of Shh downstream targets. MB incidence increased and survival decreased when ND2:WIP1 mice were crossed with a Shh-activated MB mouse model. Conversely, Wip1 knock out significantly suppressed MB formation in two independent mouse models of Shh-activated MB. Furthermore, Wip1 knock-down or treatment with a WIP1 inhibitor suppressed the effects of Shh stimulation and potentiated the growth inhibitory effects of SHH pathway-inhibiting drugs in Shh-activated MB cells in vitro. This suggests an important cross-talk between SHH and WIP1 pathways that accelerates tumorigenesis and supports WIP1 inhibition as a potential treatment strategy for MB. PMID:27086929

  19. Neuron as an emotion-modulated combinatorial switch, and a model of human and animal learning behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Rvachev, Marat M

    2013-01-01

    This theoretical paper proposes a neuronal circuitry layout and synaptic plasticity principles that allow the (pyramidal) neuron to act as a combinatorial switch, whereby the neuron learns to be more prone to generate spikes given those combinations of firing input neurons for which a previous spiking of the neuron had been followed by positive emotional response; the emotional response, it is posited, is mediated by certain modulatory neurotransmitters or hormones. More generally, a trial-and-error learning paradigm is suggested in which the purpose of emotions is to trigger a mechanism of long-term enhancement or weakening of a neuron's spiking response to the preceding synaptic input firing pattern. Thus, emotions provide a feedback pathway that informs neurons whether their spiking was beneficial or detrimental given the combination of inputs. The neuron's ability to discern specific combinations of firing input neurons is achieved through random or predetermined spatial distribution of input synapses on ...

  20. Melatonin modulation of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors located on short noradrenergic neurons of the rat vas deferens: a pharmacological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, the pineal hormone produced during the dark phase of the light-dark cycle, modulates neuronal acetylcholine receptors located presynaptically on nerve terminals of the rat vas deferens. Recently we showed the presence of high affinity nicotine-binding sites during the light phase, and low and high affinity binding sites during the dark phase. The appearance of the low affinity binding sites was due to the nocturnal melatonin surge and could be mimicked by exposure to melatonin in vitro. The aim of the present research was to identify the receptor subtypes responsible for the functional response during the light and the dark phase. The rank order of potency of agonists was dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP = cytisine > nicotine > carbachol and DMPP = nicotine = cytisine > carbachol, during the light and dark phase, respectively, due to an increase in apparent affinity for nicotine. Mecamylamine similarly blocked the DMPP response during the light and the dark phase, while the response to nicotine was more efficiently blocked during the light phase. In contrast, methyllycaconitine inhibited the nicotine-induced response only at 21:00 h. Since a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs have low affinity for nicotine in binding assays, we suggest that a mixed population composed of a3ß4 - plus a7-bearing nAChR subtypes is present at night. This plasticity in receptor subtypes is probably driven by melatonin since nicotine-induced contraction in organs from animals sacrificed at 15:00 h and incubated with melatonin (100 pg/ml, 4 h is not totally blocked by mecamylamine. Thus melatonin, by acting directly on the short adrenergic neurons that innervate the rat vas deferens, induces the appearance of the low affinity binding site, probably an a7 nAChR subtype.

  1. Comparison of icilin- and cold-evoked responses of spinal neurones, and their modulation of mechanical activity, in a model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignell, Jennifer L; Chapman, Victoria; Kendall, David A

    2008-06-18

    Cold allodynia is a poorly understood symptom of neuropathic pain. Two members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of proteins, TRPM8 and TRPA1, may contribute to cold somatosensation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of icilin as a pharmacological tool to study primary afferent fibre responses to cold stimuli and to determine whether there are differences in the responses of spinal neurones to cooling of peripheral receptive fields in control versus neuropathic rats. The effects of icilin, a TRPM8 and TRPA1 agonist, on intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) responses of small diameter adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurones were determined. Icilin (10 nM-10 microM) produced a concentration-related increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in DRG neurones, which was attenuated by the non-selective TRP channel antagonist ruthenium red (10 microM). In vivo electrophysiology in naïve, sham-operated and SNL rats demonstrated that application of ice to receptive fields evoked firing of wide dynamic range (WDR) neurones, which was significantly greater in SNL rats than naïve and sham-operated rats. Intraplantar injection of icilin did not evoke firing of WDR neurones in naïve, sham-operated or SNL rats but inhibited mechanically-evoked responses of WDR neurones in naïve and sham-operated rats, whilst facilitating mechanically-evoked responses in SNL rats. Icilin increased both innocuous (sham-operated and SNL rats) and noxious (SNL rats) receptive field sizes of WDR neurones. Our data suggests that icilin modulates the mechanosensitivity of dorsal horn neurones. The differing effects of ice and icilin on dorsal horn neurones indicate different mechanisms of action.

  2. Octopamine increases the excitability of neurons in the snail feeding system by modulation of inward sodium current but not outward potassium currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabó Henriette

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although octopamine has long been known to have major roles as both transmitter and modulator in arthropods, it has only recently been shown to be functionally important in molluscs, playing a role as a neurotransmitter in the feeding network of the snail Lymnaea stagnalis. The synaptic potentials cannot explain all the effects of octopamine-containing neurons on the feeding network, and here we test the hypothesis that octopamine is also a neuromodulator. Results The excitability of the B1 and B4 motoneurons in the buccal ganglia to depolarising current clamp pulses is significantly (P IA current and a sustained IK delayed-rectifier current, but neither was modulated by octopamine in any of these three buccal neurons. The fast inward current was eliminated in sodium – free saline and so is likely to be carried by sodium ions. 10 μM octopamine enhanced this current by 33 and 45% in the B1 and B4 motoneurons respectively (P Conclusion We conclude that octopamine is also a neuromodulator in snails, changing the excitability of the buccal neurons. This is supported by the close relationship from the voltage clamp data, through the quantitative simulation, to the action potential threshold, changing the properties of neurons in a rhythmic network. The increase in inward sodium current provides an explanation for the polycyclic modulation of the feeding system by the octopamine-containing interneurons, making feeding easier to initiate and making the feeding bursts more intense.

  3. Semantic embodiment, disembodiment or misembodiment? In search of meaning in modules and neuron circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2013-10-01

    "Embodied" proposals claim that the meaning of at least some words, concepts and constructions is grounded in knowledge about actions and objects. An alternative "disembodied" position locates semantics in a symbolic system functionally detached from sensorimotor modules. This latter view is not tenable theoretically and has been empirically falsified by neuroscience research. A minimally-embodied approach now claims that action-perception systems may "color", but not represent, meaning; however, such minimal embodiment (misembodiment?) still fails to explain why action and perception systems exert causal effects on the processing of symbols from specific semantic classes. Action perception theory (APT) offers neurobiological mechanisms for "embodied" referential, affective and action semantics along with "disembodied" mechanisms of semantic abstraction, generalization and symbol combination, which draw upon multimodal brain systems. In this sense, APT suggests integrative-neuromechanistic explanations of why both sensorimotor and multimodal areas of the human brain differentially contribute to specific facets of meaning and concepts.

  4. Modulating the Delicate Glial-Neuronal Interactions in Neuropathic Pain: Promises and Potential Caveats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vinod; Guan, Yun; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2014-01-01

    During neuropathic pain, glial cells (mainly astrocytes and microglia) become activated and initiate a series of signaling cascades that modulate pain processing at both spinal and supraspinal levels. It has been generally accepted that glial cell activation contributes to neuropathic pain because glia release proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and factors such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P, and glutamate, which are known to facilitate pain signaling. However, recent research has shown that activation of glia also leads to some beneficial outcomes. Glia release anti-inflammatory factors that protect against neurotoxicity and restore normal pain. Accordingly, use of glial inhibitors might compromise the protective functions of glia in addition to suppressing their detrimental effects. With a better understanding of how different conditions affect glial cell activation, we may be able to promote the protective function of glia and pave the way for future development of novel, safe, and effective treatments of neuropathic pain. PMID:24820245

  5. Encoding of the amplitude modulation of pulsatile electrical stimulation in the feline cochlear nucleus by neurons in the inferior colliculus; effects of stimulus pulse rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreery, Douglas; Han, Martin; Pikov, Victor; Yadav, Kamal; Pannu, Satinderpall

    2013-10-01

    Objectives. Persons without a functional auditory nerve cannot benefit from cochlear implants, but some hearing can be restored by an auditory brainstem implant (ABI) with stimulating electrodes implanted on the surface of the cochlear nucleus (CN). Most users benefit from their ABI, but speech recognition tends to be poorer than for users of cochlear implants. Psychophysical studies suggest that poor modulation detection may contribute to the limited performance of ABI users. In a cat model, we determined how the pulse rate of the electrical stimulus applied within or on the CN affects temporal and rate encoding of amplitude modulation (AM) by neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). Approach. Stimulating microelectrodes were implanted chronically in and on the cats' CN, and multi-site recording microelectrodes were implanted chronically into the ICC. Encoding of AM pulse trains by neurons in the ICC was characterized as vector strength (VS), the synchrony of neural activity with the AM, and as the mean rate of neuronal action potentials (neuronal spike rate (NSR)). Main results. For intranuclear microstimulation, encoding of AM as VS was up to 3 dB greater when stimulus pulse rate was increased from 250 to 500 pps, but only for neuronal units with low best acoustic frequencies, and when the electrical stimulation was modulated at low frequencies (10-20 Hz). For stimulation on the surface of the CN, VS was similar at 250 and 500 pps, and the dynamic range of the VS was reduced for pulse rates greater than 250 pps. Modulation depth was encoded strongly as VS when the maximum stimulus amplitude was held constant across a range of modulation depth. This ‘constant maximum’ protocol allows enhancement of modulation depth while preserving overall dynamic range. However, modulation depth was not encoded as strongly as NSR. Significance. The findings have implications for improved sound processors for present and future ABIs. The performance of

  6. Dopamine modulates two potassium currents and inhibits the intrinsic firing properties of an identified motor neuron in a central pattern generator network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppenburg, P; Levini, R M; Harris-Warrick, R M

    1999-01-01

    The two pyloric dilator (PD) neurons are components [along with the anterior burster (AB) neuron] of the pacemaker group of the pyloric network in the stomatogastric ganglion of the spiny lobster Panulirus interruptus. Dopamine (DA) modifies the motor pattern generated by the pyloric network, in part by exciting or inhibiting different neurons. DA inhibits the PD neuron by hyperpolarizing it and reducing its rate of firing action potentials, which leads to a phase delay of PD relative to the electrically coupled AB and a reduction in the pyloric cycle frequency. In synaptically isolated PD neurons, DA slows the rate of recovery to spike after hyperpolarization. The latency from a hyperpolarizing prestep to the first action potential is increased, and the action potential frequency as well as the total number of action potentials are decreased. When a brief (1 s) puff of DA is applied to a synaptically isolated, voltage-clamped PD neuron, a small voltage-dependent outward current is evoked, accompanied by an increase in membrane conductance. These responses are occluded by the combined presence of the potassium channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and tetraethylammonium. In voltage-clamped PD neurons, DA enhances the maximal conductance of a voltage-sensitive transient potassium current (IA) and shifts its Vact to more negative potentials without affecting its Vinact. This enlarges the "window current" between the voltage activation and inactivation curves, increasing the tonically active IA near the resting potential and causing the cell to hyperpolarize. Thus DA's effect is to enhance both the transient and resting K+ currents by modulating the same channels. In addition, DA enhances the amplitude of a calcium-dependent potassium current (IO(Ca)), but has no effect on a sustained potassium current (IK(V)). These results suggest that DA hyperpolarizes and phase delays the activity of the PD neurons at least in part by modulating their intrinsic postinhibitory recovery

  7. Membrane properties of striatal direct and indirect pathway neurons in mouse and rat slices and their modulation by dopamine.

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    Henrike Planert

    Full Text Available D1 and D2 receptor expressing striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs are ascribed to striatonigral ("direct" and striatopallidal ("indirect" pathways, respectively, that are believed to function antagonistically in motor control. Glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto the two types is differentially affected by Dopamine (DA, however, less is known about the effects on MSN intrinsic electrical properties. Using patch clamp recordings, we comprehensively characterized the two pathways in rats and mice, and investigated their DA modulation. We identified the direct pathway by retrograde labeling in rats, and in mice we used transgenic animals in which EGFP is expressed in D1 MSNs. MSNs were subjected to a series of current injections to pinpoint differences between the populations, and in mice also following bath application of DA. In both animal models, most electrical properties were similar, however, membrane excitability as measured by step and ramp current injections consistently differed, with direct pathway MSNs being less excitable than their counterparts. DA had opposite effects on excitability of D1 and D2 MSNs, counteracting the initial differences. Pronounced changes in AP shape were seen in D2 MSNs. In direct pathway MSNs, excitability increased across experimental conditions and parameters, and also when applying DA or the D1 agonist SKF-81297 in presence of blockers of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic receptors. Thus, DA induced changes in excitability were D1 R mediated and intrinsic to direct pathway MSNs, and not a secondary network effect of altered synaptic transmission. DAergic modulation of intrinsic properties therefore acts in a synergistic manner with previously reported effects of DA on afferent synaptic transmission and dendritic processing, supporting the antagonistic model for direct vs. indirect striatal pathway function.

  8. Recovering stimulus locations using populations of eye-position modulated neurons in dorsal and ventral visual streams of nonhuman primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne B Sereno

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We recorded visual responses while monkeys fixated the same target at different gaze angles, both dorsally (lateral intraparietal cortex, LIP and ventrally (anterior inferotemporal cortex, AIT. While eye-position modulations occurred in both areas, they were both more frequent and stronger in LIP neurons. We used an intrinsic population decoding technique, multidimensional scaling, to recover eye positions, equivalent to recovering fixated target locations. We report that eye-position based visual space in LIP was more accurate (i.e., metric. Nevertheless, the AIT spatial representation remained largely topologically correct, perhaps indicative of a categorical spatial representation (i.e., a qualitative description such as left of or above as opposed to a quantitative, metrically precise description. Additionally, we developed a simple neural model of eye position signals and illustrate that differences in single cell characteristics can influence the ability to recover target position in a population of cells. We demonstrate for the first time that the ventral stream contains sufficient information for constructing an eye-position based spatial representation. Furthermore we demonstrate, in dorsal and ventral streams as well as modeling, that target locations can be extracted directly from eye position signals in cortical visual responses without computing coordinate transforms of visual space.

  9. Thalamic activation modulates the responses of neurons in rat primary auditory cortex: an in vivo intracellular recording study.

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    Lei Han

    Full Text Available Auditory cortical plasticity can be induced through various approaches. The medial geniculate body (MGB of the auditory thalamus gates the ascending auditory inputs to the cortex. The thalamocortical system has been proposed to play a critical role in the responses of the auditory cortex (AC. In the present study, we investigated the cellular mechanism of the cortical activity, adopting an in vivo intracellular recording technique, recording from the primary auditory cortex (AI while presenting an acoustic stimulus to the rat and electrically stimulating its MGB. We found that low-frequency stimuli enhanced the amplitudes of sound-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs in AI neurons, whereas high-frequency stimuli depressed these auditory responses. The degree of this modulation depended on the intensities of the train stimuli as well as the intervals between the electrical stimulations and their paired sound stimulations. These findings may have implications regarding the basic mechanisms of MGB activation of auditory cortical plasticity and cortical signal processing.

  10. Modulation of glutamatergic transmission by presynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate mechanisms in second-order neurons of the rat nucleus tractus solitarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Yoshiaki; Kimura, Satoko; Haji, Akira

    2015-02-05

    The present study investigated the physiological function of presynaptic N-methyl-d aspartate (NMDA) mechanisms in glutamatergic transmission in the rat nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). Membrane currents were recorded from the NTS second-order neurons by using whole-cell patch pipettes including MK-801 to block postsynaptic NMDA receptors. All experiments were performed under blockade of inhibitory synaptic transmission. Co-application of NMDA and d-serine decreased the tractus solitarius (TS)-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) in 7/12 (58%) of neurons, and increased the paired pulse ratio. The remaining neurons were insensitive to NMDA and d-serine. Application of an NMDA antagonist D-AP5 had no effect on eEPSCs in all 8 neurons tested. Action potential-independent EPSCs (miniature EPSCs; mEPSCs) were recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Co-application of NMDA and d-serine increased the mEPSC frequency but had no significant effect on the amplitude in 5/28 (18%) of neurons. D-AP5 decreased the mEPSC frequency without effect on the amplitude in 6/18 (33%) of neurons. This study demonstrated that (1) NMDA receptors were presynaptically distributed in a subset of NTS second-order neurons and that (2) the presynaptic NMDA receptors played an inhibitory role in TS-mediated release of glutamate and a facilitatory role in spontaneous release of glutamate. The present results suggest that the activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors modulates glutamatergic transmissions in the rat NTS second-order neurons.

  11. Deactivation of the inferior colliculus by cooling demonstrates intercollicular modulation of neuronal activity

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    Llwyd David Orton

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The auditory pathways coursing through the brainstem are organised bilaterally in mirror image about the midline and at several levels the two sides are interconnected. One of the most prominent points of interconnection is the commissure of the inferior colliculus (CoIC. Anatomical studies have revealed that these fibres make reciprocal connections which follow the tonotopic organisation of the inferior colliculus (IC, and that the commissure contains both excitatory and, albeit fewer, inhibitory fibres. The role of these connections in sound processing is largely unknown. Here we describe a method to address this question in the anaesthetised guinea pig. We used a cryoloop placed on one IC to produce reversible deactivation while recording electrophysiological responses to sounds in both ICs. We recorded single units, multi-unit clusters and local field potentials (LFPs before, during and after cooling. The degree and spread of cooling was measured with a thermocouple placed in the IC and other auditory structures. Cooling sufficient to eliminate firing was restricted to the IC contacted by the cryoloop. The temperature of other auditory brainstem structures, including the contralateral IC and the cochlea were minimally affected. Cooling below 20 °C reduced or eliminated the firing of action potentials in frequency laminae at depths corresponding to characteristic frequencies up to ~8 kHz. Modulation of neural activity also occurred in the un-cooled IC with changes in single unit firing and LFPs. Components of LFPs signalling lemniscal afferent input to the IC showed little change in amplitude or latency with cooling, whereas the later components, which likely reflect inter- and intra-collicular processing, showed marked changes in form and amplitude. We conclude that the cryoloop is an effective method of selectively deactivating one IC in guinea pig, and demonstrate that auditory processing in the IC is strongly influenced by the other.

  12. Modulation of synaptic potentials and cell excitability by dendritic KIR and KAS channels in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons: A computational study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jessy John; Rohit Manchanda

    2011-06-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc), a critical structure of the brain reward circuit, is implicated in normal goal-directed behaviour and learning as well as pathological conditions like schizophrenia and addiction. Its major cellular substrates, the medium spiny (MS) neurons, possess a wide variety of dendritic active conductances that may modulate the excitatory post synaptic potentials (EPSPs) and cell excitability. We examine this issue using a biophysically detailed 189-compartment stylized model of the NAc MS neuron, incorporating all the known active conductances. We find that, of all the active channels, inward rectifying K+ (KIR) channels play the primary role in modulating the resting membrane potential (RMP) and EPSPs in the down-state of the neuron. Reduction in the conductance of KIR channels evokes facilitatory effects on EPSPs accompanied by rises in local input resistance and membrane time constant. At depolarized membrane potentials closer to up-state levels, the slowly inactivating A-type potassium channel (KAs) conductance also plays a strong role in determining synaptic potential parameters and cell excitability. We discuss the implications of our results for the regulation of accumbal MS neuron biophysics and synaptic integration by intrinsic factors and extrinsic agents such as dopamine.

  13. The irre cell recognition module (IRM) protein Kirre is required to form the reciprocal synaptic network of L4 neurons in the Drosophila lamina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüthy, Kevin; Ahrens, Birgit; Rawal, Shilpa; Lu, Zhiyuan; Tarnogorska, Dorota; Meinertzhagen, Ian A; Fischbach, Karl-Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Each neuropil module, or cartridge, in the fly's lamina has a fixed complement of cells. Of five types of monopolar cell interneurons, only L4 has collaterals that invade neighboring cartridges. In the proximal lamina, these collaterals form reciprocal synapses with both the L2 of their own cartridge and the L4 collateral branches from two other neighboring cartridges. During synaptogenesis, L4 collaterals strongly express the cell adhesion protein Kirre, a member of the irre cell recognition module (IRM) group of proteins ( Fischbach et al., 2009 , J Neurogenet, 23, 48-67). The authors show by mutant analysis and gene knockdown techniques that L4 neurons develop their lamina collaterals in the absence of this cell adhesion protein. Using electron microscopy (EM), the authors demonstrate, however, that without Kirre protein these L4 collaterals selectively form fewer synapses. The collaterals of L4 neurons of various genotypes reconstructed from serial-section EM revealed that the number of postsynaptic sites was dramatically reduced in the absence of Kirre, almost eliminating any synaptic input to L4 neurons. A significant reduction of presynaptic sites was also detected in kirre(0) mutants and gene knockdown flies using RNA interference. L4 neuron reciprocal synapses are thus almost eliminated. A presynaptic marker, Brp-short(GFP) confirmed these data using confocal microscopy. This study reveals that removing Kirre protein specifically disrupts the functional L4 synaptic network in the Drosophila lamina.

  14. Neurochemical pathways that converge on thalamic trigeminovascular neurons: potential substrate for modulation of migraine by sleep, food intake, stress and anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Noseda

    Full Text Available Dynamic thalamic regulation of sensory signals allows the cortex to adjust better to rapidly changing behavioral, physiological and environmental demands. To fulfill this role, thalamic neurons must themselves be subjected to constantly changing modulatory inputs that originate in multiple neurochemical pathways involved in autonomic, affective and cognitive functions. Our overall goal is to define an anatomical framework for conceptualizing how a 'decision' is made on whether a trigeminovascular thalamic neuron fires, for how long, and at what frequency. To begin answering this question, we determine which neuropeptides/neurotransmitters are in a position to modulate thalamic trigeminovascular neurons. Using a combination of in-vivo single-unit recording, juxtacellular labeling with tetramethylrhodamine dextran (TMR and in-vitro immunohistochemistry, we found that thalamic trigeminovascular neurons were surrounded by high density of axons containing biomarkers of glutamate, GABA, dopamine and serotonin; moderate density of axons containing noradrenaline and histamine; low density of axons containing orexin and melanin concentrating hormone (MCH; but not axons containing CGRP, serotonin 1D receptor, oxytocin or vasopressin. In the context of migraine, the findings suggest that the transmission of headache-related nociceptive signals from the thalamus to the cortex may be modulated by opposing forces (i.e., facilitatory, inhibitory that are governed by continuous adjustments needed to keep physiological, behavioral, cognitive and emotional homeostasis.

  15. Octopamine increases the excitability of neurons in the snail feeding system by modulation of inward sodium current but not outward potassium currents

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Although octopamine has long been known to have major roles as both transmitter and modulator in arthropods, it has only recently been shown to be functionally important in molluscs, playing a role as a neurotransmitter in the feeding network of the snail Lymnaea stagnalis. The synaptic potentials cannot explain all the effects of octopamine-containing neurons on the feeding network, and here we test the hypothesis that octopamine is also a neuromodulator. Results The exci...

  16. Motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neuronal circuitry may involve in modulation of nociception: a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study in spinally transected transgenic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Wei Ye

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that motor cortex stimulation provided pain relief by motor cortex plasticity and activating descending inhibitory pain control systems. Recent evidence indicated that the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R in the periaqueductal gray played an important role in neuropathic pain. This study was designed to assess whether MC4R signaling existed in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neuronal circuitry modulated the activity of sympathetic pathway by a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study. Pseudorabies virus (PRV-614 was injected into the left gastrocnemius muscle in adult male MC4R-green fluorescent protein (GFP transgenic mice (n = 15. After a survival time of 4-6 days, the mice (n = 5 were randomly assigned to humanely sacrifice, and spinal cords and brains were removed and sectioned, and processed for PRV-614 visualization. Neurons involved in the efferent control of the left gastrocnemius muscle were identified following visualization of PRV-614 retrograde tracing. The neurochemical phenotype of MC4R-GFP-positive neurons was identified using fluorescence immunocytochemical labeling. PRV-614/MC4R-GFP dual labeled neurons were detected in spinal IML, periaqueductal gray and motor cortex. Our findings support the hypothesis that MC4R signaling in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neural pathway may participate in the modulation of the melanocortin-sympathetic signaling and contribute to the descending modulation of nociceptive transmission, suggesting that MC4R signaling in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neural pathway may modulate the activity of sympathetic outflow sensitive to nociceptive signals.

  17. Modulation of dragon's blood on tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons and identification of its material basis for efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangming; Chen, Su; Zhang, Yuxia; Zhang, Fan

    2006-06-01

    To clarify the modulation of dragon's blood on the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium currents in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and explore its corresponding material basis for the efficacy, using whole-cell patch clamp technique, the effects of dragon's blood and the combined effects of three components (cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B, and loureirin B) extracted from dragon's blood on the TTX-R sodium currents in acute-isolated DRG neurons of rats were observed. According to the operational definition of material basis for the efficacy of TCM established, the material basis of the modulation on the TTX-R sodium currents in DRG neurons of dragon's blood was judged from the experimental results. The drug interaction equation of Greco et al. was used to assess the interaction of the three components extracted from dragon's blood. This investigation demonstrated that dragon's blood suppressed the peak TTX-R sodium currents in a dose-dependent way and affected the activations of TTX-R sodium currents. The effects of the combination of cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B, and loureirin B were in good agreement with those of dragon's blood. Although the three components used alone could modulate TTX-R sodium currents, the concentrations of the three components used alone were respectively higher than those used in combination when the inhibition rates on the TTX-R sodium currents of them used alone and in combination were the same. The combined effects of the three components were synergistic. These results suggested that the interference with pain messages caused by the modulation of dragon's blood on TTX-R sodium currents in DRG neurons may explain some of the analgesic effect of dragon's blood and the corresponding material basis for the efficacy is the combination of cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B, and loureirin B.

  18. Modulation of dragon's blood on tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons and identification of its material basis for efficacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Xiangming; CHEN; Su; ZHANG; Yuxia

    2006-01-01

    To clarify the modulation of dragon's blood on the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium currents in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and explore its corresponding material basis for the efficacy, using whole-cell patch clamp technique, the effects of dragon's blood and the combined effects of three components (cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B, and loureirin B) extracted from dragon's blood on the TTX-R sodium currents in acute-isolated DRG neurons of rats were observed. According to the operational definition of material basis for the efficacy of TCM established, the material basis of the modulation on the TTX-R sodium currents in DRG neurons of dragon's blood was judged from the experimental results. The drug interaction equation of Greco et al. was used to assess the interaction of the three components extracted from dragon's blood. This investigation demonstrated that dragon's blood suppressed the peak TTX-R sodium currents in a dose-dependent way and affected the activations of TTX-R sodium currents. The effects of the combination of cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B, and loureirin B were in good agreement with those of dragon's blood. Although the three components used alone could modulate TTX-R sodium currents, the concentrations of the three components used alone were respectively higher than those used in combination when the inhibition rates on the TTX-R sodium currents of them used alone and in combination were the same. The combined effects of the three components were synergistic. These results suggested that the interference with pain messages caused by the modulation of dragon's blood on TTX-R sodium currents in DRG neurons may explain some of the analgesic effect of dragon's blood and the corresponding material basis for the efficacy is the combination of cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B, and loureirin B.

  19. Active and passive sexual roles that arise in Drosophila male-male courtship are modulated by dopamine levels in PPL2ab neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiu-Ling; Chen, Yu-Hui; Wang, Chuan-Chan; Yu, Yhu-Wei; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Hsu, Hsiao-Wen; Wu, Chia-Lin; Wang, Pei-Yu; Chen, Lien-Cheng; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Fu, Tsai-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The neurology of male sexuality has been poorly studied owing to difficulties in studying brain circuitry in humans. Dopamine (DA) is essential for both physiological and behavioural responses, including the regulation of sexuality. Previous studies have revealed that alterations in DA synthesis in dopaminergic neurons can induce male-male courtship behaviour, while increasing DA levels in the protocerebral posteriolateral dopaminergic cluster neuron 2ab (PPL2ab) may enhance the intensity of male courtship sustainment in Drosophila. Here we report that changes in the ability of the PPL2ab in the central nervous system (CNS) to produce DA strongly impact male-male courtship in D. melanogaster. Intriguingly, the DA-synthesizing abilities of these neurons appear to affect both the courting activities displayed by male flies and the sex appeal of male flies for other male flies. Moreover, the observed male-male courtship is triggered primarily by target motion, yet chemical cues can replace visual input under dark conditions. This is interesting evidence that courtship responses in male individuals are controlled by PPL2ab neurons in the CNS. Our study provides insight for subsequent studies focusing on sexual circuit modulation by PPL2ab neurons. PMID:28294190

  20. Modulation of Extracellular ATP Content of Mast Cells and DRG Neurons by Irradiation: Studies on Underlying Mechanism of Low-Level-Laser Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level-laser therapy (LLLT is an effective complementary treatment, especially for anti-inflammation and wound healing in which dermis or mucus mast cells (MCs are involved. In periphery, MCs crosstalk with neurons via purinergic signals and participate in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Whether extracellular ATP, an important purine in purinergic signaling, of MCs and neurons could be modulated by irradiation remains unknown. In this study, effects of red-laser irradiation on extracellular ATP content of MCs and dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons were investigated and underlying mechanisms were explored in vitro. Our results show that irradiation led to elevation of extracellular ATP level in the human mast cell line HMC-1 in a dose-dependent manner, which was accompanied by elevation of intracellular ATP content, an indicator for ATP synthesis, together with [Ca2+]i elevation, a trigger signal for exocytotic ATP release. In contrast to MCs, irradiation attenuated the extracellular ATP content of neurons, which could be abolished by ARL 67156, a nonspecific ecto-ATPases inhibitor. Our results suggest that irradiation potentiates extracellular ATP of MCs by promoting ATP synthesis and release and attenuates extracellular ATP of neurons by upregulating ecto-ATPase activity. The opposite responses of these two cell types indicate complex mechanisms underlying LLLT.

  1. NDUFV2 regulates neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex through modulation of the multipolar-bipolar transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianda; Wu, Qinwei; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Dai

    2015-11-02

    Abnormalities during brain development are tightly linked several psychiatric disorders. Mutations in NADH dehydrogenase ubiquinone flavoprotein 2 (NDUFV2) are responsible for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Parkinson׳s disease. However, the function of NDUFV2 during brain development remains unclear. Here we reported that ndufv2 is expressed in the developing cerebral cortex. In utero suppression of ndufv2 arrested neuronal migration, leading to accumulation of ectopic neurons in the intermediate zone. ndufv2 inhibition did not affect radial glia scaffold, progenitor cells or neurons survival. However, the loss of ndufv2 impairs neuronal multipolar-bipolar transition in vivo and polarization in vitro. Moreover, ndufv2 affected actin cytoskeleton and tubulin stabilization in cortical neurons. Overall, our findings establish a new NDUFV2 dependent mechanism underlying neuronal migration and psychiatric disorders.

  2. The regulation of p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis by JNK/c-Jun pathway in β-amyloid-induced neuron death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Rumana; Sanphui, Priyankar; Das, Hrishita; Saha, Pampa; Biswas, Subhas Chandra

    2015-09-01

    Neuronal loss in selective areas of brain underlies the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidences place oligomeric β-amyloid (Aβ) central to the disease. However, mechanism of neuron death in response to Aβ remains elusive. Activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and induction of the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun are reported in AD. However, targets of JNK/c-Jun in Aβ-induced neuron death are mostly unknown. Our study shows that pro-apoptotic proteins, Bim (Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death) and Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis) are targets of c-Jun in Aβ-treated neurons. We demonstrate that the JNK/c-Jun pathway is activated, in cultures of cortical neurons following treatment with oligomeric Aβ and in AD transgenic mice, and that inhibition of this pathway by selective inhibitor blocks induction of Puma by Aβ. We also find that both JNK and p53 pathways co-operatively regulate Puma expression in Aβ-treated neurons. Moreover, we identified a novel AP1-binding site on rat puma gene which is necessary for direct binding of c-Jun with Puma promoter. Finally, we find that knocking down of c-Jun by siRNA provides significant protection from Aβ toxicity and that induction of Bim and Puma by Aβ in neurons requires c-Jun. Taken together, our results suggest that both Bim and Puma are target of c-Jun and elucidate the intricate regulation of Puma expression by JNK/c-Jun and p53 pathways in neurons upon Aβ toxicity. JNK/c-Jun pathway is shown to be activated in neurons of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain and plays a vital role in neuron death in AD models. However, downstream targets of c-Jun in this disease have not been thoroughly elucidated. Our study shows that two important pro-apoptotic proteins, Bim (Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death) and Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis) are targets of c-Jun in Aβ-treated neurons. We demonstrate that the JNK/c-jun pathway is activated, in cultures

  3. Acute p38-mediated modulation of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in mouse sensory neurons by tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaochun; Gereau, Robert W

    2006-01-04

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the development and maintenance of inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions. TNFalpha can have long-lasting effects by regulating the expression of a variety of inflammatory mediators, including other cytokines and TNFalpha itself. However, the speed with which TNFalpha induces tactile and thermal hypersensitivity suggests that transcriptional regulation cannot fully account for its sensitizing effects, and some recent findings suggest that TNFalpha may act directly on primary afferent neurons to induce pain hypersensitivity. In the present study, we show that peripheral administration of TNFalpha induces thermal hypersensitivity in wild-type mice but not in transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor TRPV1(-/-) mice. In contrast, TNFalpha produced equivalent mechanical hypersensitivity in TRPV1(-/-) mice and wild-type littermates, suggesting a role for TRPV1 in TNFalpha-induced thermal, but not mechanical, hypersensitivity. Because tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Na+ channels are a critical site of modulation underlying mechanical hypersensitivity in inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions, we tested the effects of TNFalpha on these channels in isolated mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We report that acute application of TNFalpha rapidly enhances TTX-resistant Na+ currents in isolated DRG neurons. This potentiation of TTX-resistant currents by TNFalpha is dramatically reduced in DRG neurons from TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) knock-out mice and is blocked by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB202190 [4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole]. Mechanical hypersensitivity induced by peripherally applied TNFalpha is also significantly reduced by SB202190. These results suggest that TNFalpha may induce acute peripheral mechanical sensitization by acting directly on TNFR1 in primary afferent neurons, resulting in p38-dependent modulation

  4. Indicaxanthin from Opuntia ficus-indica Crosses the Blood-Brain Barrier and Modulates Neuronal Bioelectric Activity in Rat Hippocampus at Dietary-Consistent Amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Mario; Carletti, Fabio; Gambino, Giuditta; Tutone, Marco; Attanzio, Alessandro; Tesoriere, Luisa; Ferraro, Giuseppe; Sardo, Pierangelo; Almerico, Anna Maria; Livrea, Maria Antonia

    2015-08-26

    Indicaxanthin is a bioactive and bioavailable betalain pigment from the Opuntia ficus-indica fruits. In this in vivo study, kinetic measurements showed that indicaxanthin is revealed in the rat brain within 1 h from oral administration of 2 μmol/kg, an amount compatible with a dietary consumption of cactus pear fruits in humans. A peak (20 ± 2.4 ng of indicaxanthin per whole brain) was measured after 2.5 h; thereafter the molecule disappeared with first order kinetics within 4 h. The potential of indicaxanthin to affect neural activities was in vivo investigated by a microiontophoretic approach. Indicaxanthin, administered in a range between 0.085 ng and 0.34 ng per neuron, dose-dependently modulated the rate of discharge of spontaneously active neurons of the hippocampus, with reduction of the discharge and related changes of latency and duration of the effect. Indicaxanthin (0.34 ng/neuron) showed inhibitory effects on glutamate-induced excitation, indicating activity at the level of glutamatergic synapses. A molecular target of indicaxanthin is suggested by in silico molecular modeling of indicaxanthin with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), the most represented of the glutamate receptor family in hippocampus. Therefore, at nutritionally compatible amounts indicaxanthin (i) crosses the rat BBB and accumulates in brain; (ii) can affect the bioelectric activity of hippocampal neurons locally treated with amounts comparable with those measured in the brain; and (iii) modulates glutamate-induced neuronal excitation. The potential of dietary indicaxanthin as a natural neuromodulatory agent deserves further mechanistic and neurophysiologic investigation.

  5. Interactions between Brainstem Noradrenergic Neurons and the Nucleus Accumbens Shell in Modulating Memory for Emotionally Arousing Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Erin C.; Williams, Cedric L.

    2011-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens shell (NAC) receives axons containing dopamine-[beta]-hydroxylase that originate from brainstem neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Recent findings show that memory enhancement produced by stimulating NTS neurons after learning may involve interactions with the NAC. However, it is unclear whether these…

  6. Interactions between Brainstem Noradrenergic Neurons and the Nucleus Accumbens Shell in Modulating Memory for Emotionally Arousing Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Erin C.; Williams, Cedric L.

    2011-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens shell (NAC) receives axons containing dopamine-[beta]-hydroxylase that originate from brainstem neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Recent findings show that memory enhancement produced by stimulating NTS neurons after learning may involve interactions with the NAC. However, it is unclear whether these…

  7. Comparison of P2X and TRPV1 receptors in ganglia or primary culture of trigeminal neurons and their modulation by NGF or serotonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giniatullin Rashid

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultured sensory neurons are a common experimental model to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of pain transduction typically involving activation of ATP-sensitive P2X or capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1 receptors. This applies also to trigeminal ganglion neurons that convey pain inputs from head tissues. Little is, however, known about the plasticity of these receptors on trigeminal neurons in culture, grown without adding the neurotrophin NGF which per se is a powerful algogen. The characteristics of such receptors after short-term culture were compared with those of ganglia. Furthermore, their modulation by chronically-applied serotonin or NGF was investigated. Results Rat or mouse neurons in culture mainly belonged to small and medium diameter neurons as observed in sections of trigeminal ganglia. Real time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry showed upregulation of P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors after 1–4 days in culture (together with their more frequent co-localization, while P2X2 ones were unchanged. TRPV1 immunoreactivity was, however, lower in mouse ganglia and cultures. Intracellular Ca2+ imaging and whole-cell patch clamping showed functional P2X and TRPV1 receptors. Neurons exhibited a range of responses to the P2X agonist α, β-methylene-adenosine-5'-triphosphate indicating the presence of homomeric P2X3 receptors (selectively antagonized by A-317491 and heteromeric P2X2/3 receptors. The latter were observed in 16 % mouse neurons only. Despite upregulation of receptors in culture, neurons retained the potential for further enhancement of P2X3 receptors by 24 h NGF treatment. At this time point TRPV1 receptors had lost the facilitation observed after acute NGF application. Conversely, chronically-applied serotonin selectively upregulated TRPV1 receptors rather than P2X3 receptors. Conclusion Comparing ganglia and cultures offered the advantage of understanding early adaptive changes of nociception

  8. Antihyperalgesic effect of CB1 receptor activation involves the modulation of P2X3 receptor in the primary afferent neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Fusaro, Maria Cláudia Gonçalves; Zanoni, Cristiane Isabel Silva; Dos Santos, Gilson Gonçalves; Manzo, Luis Paulo; Araldi, Dionéia; Bonet, Ivan José Magayewski; Tambeli, Cláudia Herrera; Dias, Elayne Vieira; Parada, Carlos Amilcar

    2017-03-05

    Cannabinoid system is a potential target for pain control. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) activation play a role in the analgesic effect of cannabinoids once it is expressed in primary afferent neurons. This study investigates whether the anti-hyperalgesic effect of CB1 receptor activation involves P2X3 receptor in primary afferent neurons. Mechanical hyperalgesia was evaluated by electronic von Frey test. Cannabinoid effect was evaluated using anandamide or ACEA, a non-selective or a selective CB1 receptor agonists, respectively; AM251, a CB1 receptor antagonist, and antisense ODN for CB1 receptor. Calcium imaging assay was performed to evaluated α,β-meATP-responsive cultured DRG neurons pretreated with ACEA. Anandamide or ACEA administered in peripheral tissue reduced the carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. The reduction in the carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia induced by ACEA was completely reversed by administration of AM251 as well as by the intrathecal treatment with antisense ODN for CB1 receptor. Also, ACEA reduced the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by bradykinin and by α,β-meATP, a P2X3 receptor non-selective agonist, but not by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and chemokine-induced chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1). Finally, CB1 receptors are co-localized with P2X3 receptors in DRG small-diameter neurons and the treatment with ACEA reduced the number of α,β-meATP-responsive cultured DRG neurons. Our data suggest that the analgesic effect of CB1 receptor activation is mediated by a negative modulation of the P2X3 receptor in the primary afferent neurons.

  9. Statins reduce amyloid β-peptide production by modulating amyloid precursor protein maturation and phosphorylation through a cholesterol-independent mechanism in cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Ai; Araki, Wataru; Oda, Akiko; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Tamaoka, Akira

    2013-03-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been reported to attenuate amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) production in various cellular models. However, the mechanisms by which statins affect neuronal Aβ production have not yet been clarified. Here, we investigated this issue in rat primary cortical neurons using two statins, pitavastatin (PV) and atorvastatin (AV). Treatment of neurons with 0.2-2.5 μM PV or AV for 4 days induced a concentration- and time-dependent reduction in the secretion of both Aβ40 and Aβ42. Moreover, Western blot analyses of cell lysates showed that treatment with PV or AV significantly reduced expression levels of the mature form of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Thr668-phosphorylated APP (P-APP), but not immature form of APP; the decreases in P-APP levels were more notable than those of mature APP levels. The statin treatment did not alter expression of BACE1 (β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1) or γ-secretase complex proteins (presenilin 1, nicastrin, APH-1, and PEN-2). In neurons overexpressing APP via recombinant adenoviruses, PV or AV similarly reduced Aβ secretion and the levels of mature APP and P-APP. Statins also markedly reduced cellular cholesterol content in neurons in a concentration-dependent manner. Co-treatment with mevalonate reversed the statin-induced decreases in Aβ secretion and mature APP and P-APP levels, whereas co-treatment with cholesterol did not, despite recovery of cellular cholesterol levels. Finally, cell-surface biotinylation experiments revealed that both statins significantly reduced the levels of cell-surface P-APP without changing those of cell surface mature APP. These results suggest that statins reduce Aβ production by selectively modulating APP maturation and phosphorylation through a mechanism independent of cholesterol reduction in cultured neurons.

  10. A gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like molecule modulates the activity of diverse central neurons in a gastropod mollusk, Aplysia californica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao eSun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH is a crucial decapeptide that activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis to ensure successful reproduction. Recently, a GnRH-like molecule has been isolated from a gastropod mollusk, Aplysia californica. This GnRH (ap-GnRH is deduced to be an undecapeptide, and its function remains to be explored. Our previous study demonstrated that ap-GnRH did not stimulate a range of reproductive parameters. Instead, it affected acute behavioral and locomotive changes unrelated to reproduction. In this study, we used electrophysiology and retrograde tracing to further explore the central role of ap-GnRH. Sharp electrode intracellular recordings revealed that ap-GnRH had diverse effects on central neurons that ranged from excitatory, inhibitory, to the alteration of membrane potential. Unexpectedly, extracellular recordings revealed that ap-GnRH suppressed the onset of electrical afterdischarge (AD in bag cell neurons, suggesting an inhibitory effect on female reproduction. Lastly, using immunocytochemistry (ICC coupled with nickel-backfill, we demonstrated that some ap-GnRH neurons projected to efferent nerves known to innervate the foot and parapodia, suggesting ap-GnRH may directly modulate the motor output of these peripheral tissues. Overall, our results suggested that in A. californica, ap-GnRH more likely functioned as a central modulator of complex behavior and motor regulation rather than as a conventional reproductive stimulator.

  11. IMPACT is a developmentally regulated protein in neurons that opposes the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase GCN2 in the modulation of neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffé, Martín; Hajj, Glaucia N M; Azevedo, Hátylas F; Alves, Viviane S; Castilho, Beatriz A

    2013-04-12

    The product of the mouse Imprinted and Ancient gene, IMPACT, is preferentially expressed in neurons. We have previously shown that IMPACT overexpression inhibits the activation of the protein kinase GCN2, which signals amino acid starvation. GCN2 phosphorylates the α-subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), resulting in inhibition of general protein synthesis but increased translation of specific messages, such as ATF4. GCN2 is also involved in the regulation of neuronal functions, controlling synaptic plasticity, memory, and feeding behavior. We show here that IMPACT abundance increases during differentiation of neurons and neuron-like N2a cells, whereas GCN2 displays lowered activation levels. Upon differentiation, IMPACT associates with translating ribosomes, enhances translation initiation, and down-regulates the expression of ATF4. We further show that endogenous IMPACT promotes neurite outgrowth whereas GCN2 is a strong inhibitor of spontaneous neuritogenesis. Together, these results uncover the participation of the GCN2-IMPACT module of translational regulation in a highly controlled step in the development of the nervous system.

  12. Genistein inhibition of OGD-induced brain neuron death correlates with its modulation of apoptosis, voltage-gated potassium and sodium currents and glutamate signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xue-Ling; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Yu-Xiang; He, Cong-Cong; Tian, Kun; Wang, Hong-Gang; An, Di; Heng, Bin; Liu, Yan-Qiang

    2016-07-25

    In the present study, we established an in vitro model of hypoxic-ischemia via exposing primary neurons of newborn rats to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and observing the effects of genistein, a soybean isoflavone, on hypoxic-ischemic neuron viability, apoptosis, voltage-activated potassium (Kv) and sodium (Nav) currents, and glutamate receptor subunits. The results indicated that OGD exposure reduced the viability and increased the apoptosis of brain neurons. Meanwhile, OGD exposure caused changes in the current-voltage curves and current amplitude values of voltage-activated potassium and sodium currents; OGD exposure also decreased GluR2 expression and increased NR2 expression. However, genistein at least partially reversed the effects caused by OGD. The results suggest that hypoxic-ischemia-caused neuronal apoptosis/death is related to an increase in K(+) efflux, a decrease in Na(+) influx, a down-regulation of GluR2, and an up-regulation of NR2. Genistein may exert some neuroprotective effects via the modulation of Kv and Nav currents and the glutamate signal pathway, mediated by GluR2 and NR2.

  13. Synchrony between orientation-selective neurons is modulated during adaptation-induced plasticity in cat visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumikhina Svetlana

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visual neurons respond essentially to luminance variations occurring within their receptive fields. In primary visual cortex, each neuron is a filter for stimulus features such as orientation, motion direction and velocity, with the appropriate combination of features eliciting maximal firing rate. Temporal correlation of spike trains was proposed as a potential code for linking the neuronal responses evoked by various features of a same object. In the present study, synchrony strength was measured between cells following an adaptation protocol (prolonged exposure to a non-preferred stimulus which induce plasticity of neurons' orientation preference. Results Multi-unit activity from area 17 of anesthetized adult cats was recorded. Single cells were sorted out and (1 orientation tuning curves were measured before and following 12 min adaptation and 60 min after adaptation (2 pairwise synchrony was measured by an index that was normalized in relation to the cells' firing rate. We first observed that the prolonged presentation of a non-preferred stimulus produces attractive (58% and repulsive (42% shifts of cell's tuning curves. It follows that the adaptation-induced plasticity leads to changes in preferred orientation difference, i.e. increase or decrease in tuning properties between neurons. We report here that, after adaptation, the neuron pairs that shared closer tuning properties display a significant increase of synchronization. Recovery from adaptation was accompanied by a return to the initial synchrony level. Conclusion We conclude that synchrony reflects the similarity in neurons' response properties, and varies accordingly when these properties change.

  14. Enhanced Firing in NTS Induced by Short-Term Sustained Hypoxia Is Modulated by Glia-Neuron Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi-Mendonça, Daniela; Almado, Carlos E L; Bonagamba, Leni G H; Castania, Jaci A; Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H

    2015-04-29

    Humans ascending to high altitudes are submitted to sustained hypoxia (SH), activating peripheral chemoreflex with several autonomic and respiratory responses. Here we analyzed the effect of short-term SH (24 h, FIO210%) on the processing of cardiovascular and respiratory reflexes using an in situ preparation of rats. SH increased both the sympatho-inhibitory and bradycardiac components of baroreflex and the sympathetic and respiratory responses of peripheral chemoreflex. Electrophysiological properties and synaptic transmission in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons, the first synaptic station of afferents of baroreflexes and chemoreflexes, were evaluated using brainstem slices and whole-cell patch-clamp. The second-order NTS neurons were identified by previous application of fluorescent tracer onto carotid body for chemoreceptor afferents or onto aortic depressor nerve for baroreceptor afferents. SH increased the intrinsic excitability of NTS neurons. Delayed excitation, caused by A-type potassium current (IKA), was observed in most of NTS neurons from control rats. The IKA amplitude was higher in identified second-order NTS neurons from control than in SH rats. SH also blunted the astrocytic inhibition of IKA in NTS neurons and increased the synaptic transmission in response to afferent fibers stimulation. The frequency of spontaneous excitatory currents was also increased in neurons from SH rats, indicating that SH increased the neurotransmission by presynaptic mechanisms. Therefore, short-term SH changed the glia-neuron interaction, increasing the excitability and excitatory transmission of NTS neurons, which may contribute to the observed increase in the reflex sensitivity of baroreflex and chemoreflex in in situ preparation.

  15. MicroRNA132 Modulates Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity but Not Basal Release Probability in Hippocampal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Talley J.; Storm, Daniel R.; Sullivan, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important regulatory roles in a broad range of cellular processes including neuronal morphology and long-term synaptic plasticity. MicroRNA-132 (miR132) is a CREB-regulated miRNA that is induced by neuronal activity and neurotrophins, and plays a role in regulating neuronal morphology and cellular excitability. Little is known about the effects of miR132 expression on synaptic function. Here we show that overexpression of miR132 increases the paired-pulse ratio and decreases sy...

  16. Modulation of the activity of vasopressinergic neurons by estrogen in rats refed with normal or sodium-free food after fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio-Oliveira, F; Traslaviña, G A A; Borges, B D B; Franci, C R

    2015-01-22

    Feeding increases plasma osmolality and ovarian steroids may influence the balance of fluids. Vasopressin (AVP) neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and supraoptic nucleus (SON) express estrogen receptor type β (ERβ), but not estrogen receptor type α (ERα). The circumventricular organs express ERα and project efferent fibers to the PVN and SON. Our aim was to assess whether interactions exist between food state-related osmolality changes and the action of estrogen on AVP neuron activity and estrogen receptor expression. We assessed plasma osmolality and AVP levels; fos-coded protein (FOS)- and AVP-immunoreactivity (-IR) and FOS-IR and ERα-IR in the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) and organ vasculosum lamina terminalis (OVLT) in estrogen-primed and unprimed ovariectomized rats under the provision of ad libitum food, 48h of fasting, and subsequent refeeding with standard chow or sodium-free food. Refeeding with standard chow increased plasma osmolality and AVP as well as the co-expression of FOS-IR/AVP-IR in the PVN and SON. These responses were not altered by estrogen, with the exception of the decreases in FOS-IR/AVP-IR in the lateral PVN. During refeeding, estrogen modulates only a subpopulation of AVP neurons in the lateral PVN. FOS-ERα co-expression in the ventral median preoptic nucleus (vMnPO) was reduced by estrogen and increased after refeeding with standard chow following fasting. It appears that estrogen may indirectly modulate the activity of AVP neurons, which are involved in the mechanism affected by hyperosmolality-induced refeeding after fasting. This indirect action of estrogen can be at least in part via ERα in the vMnPO.

  17. Processing temporal modulations in binaural and monaural auditory stimuli by neurons in the inferior colliculus and auditory cortex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fitzpatrick, Douglas C; Roberts, Jason M; Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Kim, Duck O; Filipovic, Blagoje

    2009-01-01

    .... To examine the limits of binaural temporal processing at these brain levels, we used the binaural beat stimulus, which causes a fluctuating interaural phase difference, while recording from neurons...

  18. Genetic control of adult neurogenesis: interplay of differentiation, proliferation and survival modulates new neurons function and memory circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felice eTirone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the hippocampal circuitry, the basic function of the dentate gyrus is to transform the memory input coming from the enthorinal cortex into sparse and categorized outputs to CA3, in this way separating related memory information. New neurons generated in the dentate gyrus during adulthood appear to facilitate this process, allowing a better separation between closely spaced memories (pattern separation.The evidence underlying this model has been gathered essentially by ablating the newly adult-generated neurons. This approach, however, does not allow monitoring of the integration of new neurons into memory circuits and is likely to set in motion compensatory circuits, possibly leading to an underestimation of the role of new neurons. Here we review the background of the basic function of the hippocampus and of the known properties of new adult-generated neurons. In this context, we analyze the cognitive performance in mouse models generated by us and others, with modified expression of the genes Btg2-1, Pten, BMP4, etc., where new neurons underwent a change in their differentiation rate or a partial decrease of their proliferation or survival rate rather than ablation. The effects of these modifications are equal or greater than full ablation, suggesting that the architecture of circuits, as it unfolds from the interaction between existing and new neurons, can have a greater functional impact than the sheer number of new neurons. A model attempting to measure and correlate the extent of the total alterations in the process of neurogenesis with the impairment of memory is provided.

  19. Role of melatonin, serotonin 2B, and serotonin 2C receptors in modulating the firing activity of rat dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenu, Franck; Shim, Stacey; El Mansari, Mostafa; Blier, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    Melatonin has been widely used for the management of insomnia, but is devoid of antidepressant effect in the clinic. In contrast, agomelatine which is a potent melatonin receptor agonist is an effective antidepressant. It is, however, a potent serotonin 2B (5-HT(2B)) and serotonin 2C (5-HT(2C)) receptor antagonist as well. The present study was aimed at investigating the in vivo effects of repeated administration of melatonin (40 mg/kg/day), the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084 (0.5 mg/kg/day), the selective 5-HT(2B) receptor antagonist LY 266097 (0.6 mg/kg/day) and their combination on ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA), locus coeruleus (LC) norepinephrine (NE), and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) firing activity. Administration of melatonin twice daily increased the number of spontaneously active DA neurons but left the firing of NE neurons unaltered. Long-term administration of melatonin and SB 242084, by themselves, had no effect on the firing rate and burst parameters of 5-HT and DA neurons. Their combination, however, enhanced only the number of spontaneously active DA neurons, while leaving the firing of 5-HT neurons unchanged. The addition of LY 266097, which by itself is devoid of effect, to the previous regimen increased for DA neurons the number of bursts per minute and the percentage of spikes occurring in bursts. In conclusion, the combination of melatonin receptor activation as well as 5-HT(2C) receptor blockade resulted in a disinhibition of DA neurons. When 5-HT(2B) receptors were also blocked, the firing and the bursting activity of DA neurons were both enhanced, thus reproducing the effect of agomelatine.

  20. Modulators of cytoskeletal reorganization in CA1 hippocampal neurons show increased expression in patients at mid-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia F Kao

    Full Text Available During the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD, hippocampal neurons undergo cytoskeletal reorganization, resulting in degenerative as well as regenerative changes. As neurofibrillary tangles form and dystrophic neurites appear, sprouting neuronal processes with growth cones emerge. Actin and tubulin are indispensable for normal neurite development and regenerative responses to injury and neurodegenerative stimuli. We have previously shown that actin capping protein beta2 subunit, Capzb2, binds tubulin and, in the presence of tau, affects microtubule polymerization necessary for neurite outgrowth and normal growth cone morphology. Accordingly, Capzb2 silencing in hippocampal neurons resulted in short, dystrophic neurites, seen in neurodegenerative diseases including AD. Here we demonstrate the statistically significant increase in the Capzb2 expression in the postmortem hippocampi in persons at mid-stage, Braak and Braak stage (BB III-IV, non-familial AD in comparison to controls. The dynamics of Capzb2 expression in progressive AD stages cannot be attributed to reactive astrocytosis. Moreover, the increased expression of Capzb2 mRNA in CA1 pyramidal neurons in AD BB III-IV is accompanied by an increased mRNA expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB, mediator of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. Thus, the up-regulation of Capzb2 and TrkB may reflect cytoskeletal reorganization and/or regenerative response occurring in hippocampal CA1 neurons at a specific stage of AD progression.

  1. Cooperative roles of BDNF expression in neurons and Schwann cells are modulated by exercise to facilitate nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Jennifer C; Xu, Mei; Cucoranu, Delia; Chmielewski, Sarah; Holmes, Tiffany; Lau, Kelly Shukkwan; Bassell, Gary J; English, Arthur W

    2012-04-04

    After peripheral nerve injury, neurotrophins play a key role in the regeneration of damaged axons that can be augmented by exercise, although the distinct roles played by neurons and Schwann cells are unclear. In this study, we evaluated the requirement for the neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in neurons and Schwann cells for the regeneration of peripheral axons after injury. Common fibular or tibial nerves in thy-1-YFP-H mice were cut bilaterally and repaired using a graft of the same nerve from transgenic mice lacking BDNF in Schwann cells (BDNF(-/-)) or wild-type mice (WT). Two weeks postrepair, axonal regeneration into BDNF(-/-) grafts was markedly less than WT grafts, emphasizing the importance of Schwann cell BDNF. Nerve regeneration was enhanced by treadmill training posttransection, regardless of the BDNF content of the nerve graft. We further tested the hypothesis that training-induced increases in BDNF in neurons allow regenerating axons to overcome a lack of BDNF expression in cells in the pathway through which they regenerate. Nerves in mice lacking BDNF in YFP(+) neurons (SLICK) were cut and repaired with BDNF(-/-) and WT nerves. SLICK axons lacking BDNF did not regenerate into grafts lacking Schwann cell BDNF. Treadmill training could not rescue the regeneration into BDNF(-/-) grafts if the neurons also lacked BDNF. Both Schwann cell- and neuron-derived BDNF are thus important for axon regeneration in cut peripheral nerves.

  2. Modulation of Kv3.4 channel N-type inactivation by protein kinase C shapes the action potential in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, David M; Ho, Cojen; O'Leary, Michael E; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Fast inactivation of heterologously expressed Kv3.4 channels is dramatically slowed upon phosphorylation of the channel's N-terminal (N-type) inactivation gate by protein kinase C (PKC). However, the presence and physiological importance of this exquisite modulation in excitable tissues were unknown. Here, we employed minimally invasive cell-attached patch-clamping, single-cell qPCR and specific siRNAs to unambiguously demonstrate that fast-inactivating Kv3.4 channels underlie a robust high voltage-activated A-type K(+) current (I(AHV)) in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons from 7-day-old rats. We also show that PKC activation with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) causes a 4-fold slowing of Kv3.4 channel inactivation and, consequently, accelerates the repolarization of the action potential (AP) by 22%, which shortens the AP duration by 14%. G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists eliminate I(AHV) fast inactivation in a membrane-delimited manner, suggesting a Kv3.4 channel signalling complex. Preincubation of the neurons with the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide II inhibits the effect of GPCR agonists and PDBu. Furthermore, activation of PKC via GPCR agonists recapitulates the effects of PDBu on the AP. Finally, transfection of the neurons with Kv3.4 siRNA prolongs the AP by 25% and abolishes the GPCR agonist-induced acceleration of the AP repolarization. These results show that Kv3.4 channels help shape the repolarization of the nociceptor AP, and that modulation of Kv3.4 channel N-type inactivation by PKC regulates AP repolarization and duration. We propose that the dramatic modulation of I(AHV) fast inactivation by PKC represents a novel mechanism of neural plasticity with potentially significant implications in the transition from acute to chronic pain.

  3. Tfap2a promotes specification and maturation of neurons in the inner ear through modulation of Bmp, Fgf and notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Husniye; Edlund, Renee K; Groves, Andrew K; Riley, Bruce B

    2015-03-01

    Neurons of the statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) transmit auditory and vestibular information from the inner ear to the hindbrain. SAG neuroblasts originate in the floor of the otic vesicle. New neuroblasts soon delaminate and migrate towards the hindbrain while continuing to proliferate, a phase known as transit amplification. SAG cells eventually come to rest between the ear and hindbrain before terminally differentiating. Regulation of these events is only partially understood. Fgf initiates neuroblast specification within the ear. Subsequently, Fgf secreted by mature SAG neurons exceeds a maximum threshold, serving to terminate specification and delay maturation of transit-amplifying cells. Notch signaling also limits SAG development, but how it is coordinated with Fgf is unknown. Here we show that transcription factor Tfap2a coordinates multiple signaling pathways to promote neurogenesis in the zebrafish inner ear. In both zebrafish and chick, Tfap2a is expressed in a ventrolateral domain of the otic vesicle that includes neurogenic precursors. Functional studies were conducted in zebrafish. Loss of Tfap2a elevated Fgf and Notch signaling, thereby inhibiting SAG specification and slowing maturation of transit-amplifying cells. Conversely, overexpression of Tfap2a inhibited Fgf and Notch signaling, leading to excess and accelerated SAG production. However, most SAG neurons produced by Tfap2a overexpression died soon after maturation. Directly blocking either Fgf or Notch caused less dramatic acceleration of SAG development without neuronal death, whereas blocking both pathways mimicked all observed effects of Tfap2a overexpression, including apoptosis of mature neurons. Analysis of genetic mosaics showed that Tfap2a acts non-autonomously to inhibit Fgf. This led to the discovery that Tfap2a activates expression of Bmp7a, which in turn inhibits both Fgf and Notch signaling. Blocking Bmp signaling reversed the effects of overexpressing Tfap2a. Together, these data

  4. Shank3 is localized in axons and presynaptic specializations of developing hippocampal neurons and involved in the modulation of NMDA receptor levels at axon terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbedl, Sonja; Schoen, Michael; Feiler, Marisa S; Boeckers, Tobias M; Schmeisser, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Autism-related Shank1, Shank2, and Shank3 are major postsynaptic scaffold proteins of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. A few studies, however, have already indicated that within a neuron, the presence of Shank family members is not limited to the postsynaptic density. By separating axons from dendrites of developing hippocampal neurons in microfluidic chambers, we show that RNA of all three Shank family members is present within axons. Immunostaining confirms these findings as all three Shanks are indeed found within separated axons and further co-localize with well-known proteins of the presynaptic specialization in axon terminals. Therefore, Shank proteins might not only serve as postsynaptic scaffold proteins, but also play a crucial role during axonal outgrowth and presynaptic development and function. This is supported by our findings that shRNA-mediated knockdown of Shank3 results in up-regulation of the NMDA receptor subunit GluN1 in axon terminals. Taken together, our findings will have major implications for the future analysis of neuronal Shank biology in both health and disease. Shank1, Shank2, and Shank3 are major postsynaptic scaffold proteins of excitatory glutamatergic synapses strongly related to several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, a few studies have already implicated a functional role of the Shanks beyond the postsynaptic density (PSD). We here show that all three Shanks are localized in both axons and pre-synaptic specializiations of developing hippocampal neurons in culture. We further provide evidence that Shank3 is involved in the modulation of NMDA receptor levels at axon terminals. Taken together, our study will open up novel avenues for the future analysis of neuronal Shank biology in both health and disease.

  5. DAMGO modulates two-pore domain K(+) channels in the substantia gelatinosa neurons of rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Pyung Sun; Lee, Han Kyu; Lee, Sang Hoon; Im, Jay Zoon; Jung, Sung Jun

    2016-09-01

    The analgesic mechanism of opioids is known to decrease the excitability of substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons receiving the synaptic inputs from primary nociceptive afferent fiber by increasing inwardly rectifying K(+) current. In this study, we examined whether a µ-opioid agonist, [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO), affects the two-pore domain K(+) channel (K2P) current in rat SG neurons using a slice whole-cell patch clamp technique. Also we confirmed which subtypes of K2P channels were associated with DAMGO-induced currents, measuring the expression of K2P channel in whole spinal cord and SG region. DAMGO caused a robust hyperpolarization and outward current in the SG neurons, which developed almost instantaneously and did not show any time-dependent inactivation. Half of the SG neurons exhibited a linear I~V relationship of the DAMGO-induced current, whereas rest of the neurons displayed inward rectification. In SG neurons with a linear I~V relationship of DAMGO-induced current, the reversal potential was close to the K(+) equilibrium potentials. The mRNA expression of TWIK (tandem of pore domains in a weak inwardly rectifying K(+) channel) related acid-sensitive K(+) channel (TASK) 1 and 3 was found in the SG region and a low pH (6.4) significantly blocked the DAMGO-induced K(+) current. Taken together, the DAMGO-induced hyperpolarization at resting membrane potential and subsequent decrease in excitability of SG neurons can be carried by the two-pore domain K(+) channel (TASK1 and 3) in addition to inwardly rectifying K(+) channel.

  6. Trypanosomiasis-induced megacolon illustrates how myenteric neurons modulate the risk for colon cancer in rats and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Kannen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomiasis induces a remarkable myenteric neuronal degeneration leading to megacolon. Very little is known about the risk for colon cancer in chagasic megacolon patients. To clarify whether chagasic megacolon impacts on colon carcinogenesis, we investigated the risk for colon cancer in Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi infected patients and rats.Colon samples from T. cruzi-infected and uninfected patients and rats were histopathologically investigated with colon cancer biomarkers. An experimental model for chemical myenteric denervation was also performed to verify the myenteric neuronal effects on colon carcinogenesis. All experiments complied the guidelines and approval of ethical institutional review boards.No colon tumors were found in chagasic megacolon samples. A significant myenteric neuronal denervation was observed. Epithelial cell proliferation and hyperplasia were found increased in chagasic megacolon. Analyzing the argyrophilic nucleolar organiser regions within the cryptal bottom revealed reduced risk for colon cancer in Chagas' megacolon patients. T. cruzi-infected rats showed a significant myenteric neuronal denervation and decreased numbers of colon preneoplastic lesions. In chemical myenteric denervated rats preneoplastic lesions were reduced from the 2nd wk onward, which ensued having the colon myenteric denervation significantly induced.Our data suggest that the trypanosomiasis-related myenteric neuronal degeneration protects the colon tissue from carcinogenic events. Current findings highlight potential mechanisms in tropical diseases and cancer research.

  7. Reverse engineering a mouse embryonic stem cell-specific transcriptional network reveals a new modulator of neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cegli, Rossella; Iacobacci, Simona; Flore, Gemma; Gambardella, Gennaro; Mao, Lei; Cutillo, Luisa; Lauria, Mario; Klose, Joachim; Illingworth, Elizabeth; Banfi, Sandro; di Bernardo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiles can be used to infer previously unknown transcriptional regulatory interaction among thousands of genes, via systems biology 'reverse engineering' approaches. We 'reverse engineered' an embryonic stem (ES)-specific transcriptional network from 171 gene expression profiles, measured in ES cells, to identify master regulators of gene expression ('hubs'). We discovered that E130012A19Rik (E13), highly expressed in mouse ES cells as compared with differentiated cells, was a central 'hub' of the network. We demonstrated that E13 is a protein-coding gene implicated in regulating the commitment towards the different neuronal subtypes and glia cells. The overexpression and knock-down of E13 in ES cell lines, undergoing differentiation into neurons and glia cells, caused a strong up-regulation of the glutamatergic neurons marker Vglut2 and a strong down-regulation of the GABAergic neurons marker GAD65 and of the radial glia marker Blbp. We confirmed E13 expression in the cerebral cortex of adult mice and during development. By immuno-based affinity purification, we characterized protein partners of E13, involved in the Polycomb complex. Our results suggest a role of E13 in regulating the division between glutamatergic projection neurons and GABAergic interneurons and glia cells possibly by epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  8. Cell-attached single-channel recordings in intact prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons reveal compartmentalized D1/D5 receptor modulation of the persistent sodium current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia eGorelova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The persistent Na current (INap is believed to be an important target of dopamine modulation in prefrontal cortex (PFC neurons. While past studies have tested the effects of dopamine on INap, the results have been contradictory largely because of difficulties in measuring INap using somatic whole-cell recordings. To circumvent these confounds we used the cell-attached patch-clamp technique to record single Na channels from the soma, proximal dendrite or proximal axon of intact prefrontal layer V pyramidal neurons. Under baseline conditions, numerous well resolved Na channel openings were recorded that exhibited an extrapolated reversal potential of 73 mV, a slope conductance of 14-19pS and were blocked by TTX. While similar in most respects, the propensity to exhibit prolonged bursts lasting >40ms was many fold greater in the axon than the soma or dendrite. Bath application of the D1 agonist SKF81297 shifted the ensemble current activation curve leftward and increased the number of late events recorded from the proximal dendrite but not the soma or axon. However, the greatest effect was on prolonged bursting where the D1 agonist increased their occurrence 3 fold in the proximal dendrite and nearly 7 fold in the soma, but not at all in the axon. As a result, D1 activation equalized the probability of prolonged burst occurrence across the proximal axosomatodendritic region. Therefore, D1 modulation appears to be targeted mainly to Na channels in the proximal dendrite/soma and not the proximal axon. By circumventing the pitfalls of previous attempts to study the D1R modulation of INap, we demonstrate conclusively that D1R can increase the INap generated proximally, however questions still remain as to how D1R modulates Na currents in the more distal initial segment where most of the INap is normally generated.

  9. Modulation of synaptic transmission from segmental afferents by spontaneous activity of dorsal horn spinal neurones in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjarrez, E; Rojas-Piloni, J G; Jimenez, I; Rudomin, P

    2000-12-01

    We examined, in the anaesthetised cat, the influence of the neuronal ensembles producing spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) on segmental pathways mediating primary afferent depolarisation (PAD) of cutaneous and group I muscle afferents and on Ia monosynaptic activation of spinal motoneurones. The intraspinal distribution of the field potentials associated with the spontaneous nCDPs indicated that the neuronal ensembles involved in the generation of these potentials were located in the dorsal horn of lumbar segments, in the same region of termination of low-threshold cutaneous afferents. During the occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs, transmission from low-threshold cutaneous afferents to second order neurones in laminae III-VI, as well as transmission along pathways mediating PAD of cutaneous and Ib afferents, was facilitated. PAD of Ia afferents was instead inhibited. Monosynaptic reflexes of flexors and extensors were facilitated during the spontaneous nCDPs. The magnitude of the facilitation was proportional to the amplitude of the 'conditioning' spontaneous nCDPs. This led to a high positive correlation between amplitude fluctuations of spontaneous nCDPs and fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. Stimulation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents transiently reduced the probability of occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs as well as the fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. It is concluded that the spontaneous nCDPs were produced by the activation of a population of dorsal horn neurones that shared the same functional pathways and involved the same set of neurones as those responding monosynaptically to stimulation of large cutaneous afferents. The spontaneous activity of these neurones was probably the main cause of the fluctuations of the monosynaptic reflexes observed under anaesthesia and could provide a dynamic linkage between segmental sensory and motor pathways.

  10. Extracerebellar role for Cerebellin1: modulation of dendritic spine density and synapses in striatal medium spiny neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnoor, S V; Parris, J; Muly, E C; Morgan, J I; Deutch, A Y

    2010-07-01

    Cerebellin1 (Cbln1) is a secreted glycoprotein that was originally isolated from the cerebellum and subsequently found to regulate synaptic development and stability. Cbln1 has a heterogeneous distribution in brain, but the only site in which it has been shown to have central effects is the cerebellar cortex, where loss of Cbln1 causes a reduction in granule cell-Purkinje cell synapses. Neurons of the thalamic parafascicular nucleus (PF), which provide glutamatergic projections to the striatum, also express high levels of Cbln1. We first examined Cbln1 in thalamostriatal neurons and then determined if cbln1 knockout mice exhibit structural deficits in striatal neurons. Virtually all PF neurons express Cbln1-immunoreactivity (-ir). In contrast, only rare Cbln1-ir neurons are present in the central medial complex, the other thalamic region that projects heavily to the dorsal striatum. In the striatum Cbln1-ir processes are apposed to medium spiny neuron (MSN) dendrites; ultrastructural studies revealed that Cbln1-ir axon terminals form axodendritic synapses with MSNs. Tract-tracing studies found that all PF cells retrogradely labeled from the striatum express Cbln1-ir. We then examined the dendritic structure of Golgi-impregnated MSNs in adult cbln1 knockout mice. MSN dendritic spine density was markedly increased in cbln1(-/-) mice relative to wildtype littermates, but total dendritic length was unchanged. Ultrastructural examination revealed an increase in the density of MSN axospinous synapses in cbln1(-/-) mice, with no change in postsynaptic density length. Thus, Cbln1 determines the dendritic structure of striatal MSNs, with effects distinct from those seen in the cerebellum.

  11. Cannabidiol attenuates OGD/R-induced damage by enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics and modulating glucose metabolism via pentose-phosphate pathway in hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Sun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Deficient bioenergetics and diminished redox conservation have been implicated in the development of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this study, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of cannabidiol (CBD, a nonpsychotropic compound derived from Cannabis sativa with FDA-approved antiepilepsy properties, were studied in vitro using an oxygen–glucose-deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R model in a mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line. CBD supplementation during reperfusion rescued OGD/R-induced cell death, attenuated intracellular ROS generation and lipid peroxidation, and simultaneously reversed the abnormal changes in antioxidant biomarkers. Using the Seahorse XFe24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we found that CBD significantly improved basal respiration, ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate, and the spare respiratory capacity, and augmented glucose consumption in OGD/R-injured neurons. The activation of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the preservation of the NADPH/NADP+ ratio implies that the pentose-phosphate pathway is stimulated by CBD, thus protecting hippocampal neurons from OGD/R injury. This study is the first to document the neuroprotective effects of CBD against OGD/R insult, which depend in part on attenuating oxidative stress, enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics, and modulating glucose metabolism via the pentose-phosphate pathway, thus preserving both energy and the redox balance.

  12. Neuronal Structural plasticity of the rodent telencephalon: Role of PSA-NCAM and modulation by the antidepressant Fluoxetine

    OpenAIRE

    Guirado Guillén, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Recientes hipótesis sugieren que alteraciones en la plasticidad estructural neuronal están implicadas en ciertos desórdenes psiquiátricos como la esquizofrenia y la depresión. En este sentido, se ha demostrado la presencia de remodelado dendrítico y de espinas en modelos animales de ansiedad y depresión, asi como en pacientes humanos de estos desórdenes. Este remodelado neuronal en el adulto puede estar mediado por cambios en la expresion de moléculas relacionadas con la di...

  13. Characterization of l-Theanine Excitatory Actions on Hippocampal Neurons: Toward the Generation of Novel N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Modulators Based on Its Backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebih, Fatiha; Rousset, Matthieu; Bellahouel, Salima; Rolland, Marc; de Jesus Ferreira, Marie Celeste; Guiramand, Janique; Cohen-Solal, Catherine; Barbanel, Gérard; Cens, Thierry; Abouazza, Mohammed; Tassou, Adrien; Gratuze, Maud; Meusnier, Céline; Charnet, Pierre; Vignes, Michel; Rolland, Valérie

    2017-08-16

    l-Theanine (or l-γ-N-ethyl-glutamine) is the major amino acid found in Camellia sinensis. It has received much attention because of its pleiotropic physiological and pharmacological activities leading to health benefits in humans, especially. We describe here a new, easy, efficient, and environmentally friendly chemical synthesis of l-theanine and l-γ-N-propyl-Gln and their corresponding d-isomers. l-Theanine, and its derivatives obtained so far, exhibited partial coagonistic action at N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, with no detectable agonist effect at other glutamate receptors, on cultured hippocampal neurons. This activity was retained on NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In addition, both GluN2A and GluN2B containing NMDA receptors were equally modulated by l-theanine. The stereochemical change from l-theanine to d-theanine along with the substitution of the ethyl for a propyl moiety in the γ-N position of l- and d-theanine significantly enhanced the biological efficacy, as measured on cultured hippocampal neurons. l-Theanine structure thus represents an interesting backbone to develop novel NMDA receptor modulators.

  14. Dopaminergic modulation of sodium current in hippocampal neurons via cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of specific sites in the sodium channel alpha subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, A R; Smith, R D; Goldin, A L; Scheuer, T; Catterall, W A

    1997-10-01

    Phosphorylation of brain Na+ channel alpha subunits by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) decreases peak Na+ current in cultured brain neurons and in mammalian cells and Xenopus oocytes expressing cloned brain Na+ channels. We have studied PKA regulation of Na+ channel function by activation of D1-like dopamine receptors in acutely isolated hippocampal neurons using whole-cell voltage-clamp recording techniques. The D1 agonist SKF 81297 reversibly reduced peak Na+ current in a concentration-dependent manner. No changes in the voltage dependence or kinetics of activation or inactivation were observed. This effect was mediated by PKA, as it was mimicked by application of the PKA activator Sp-5, 6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole-3', 5'-monophosphorothioate(cBIMPS) and was inhibited by the specific PKA inhibitor peptide PKAI5-24. cBIMPS had similar effects on type IIA brain Na+ channel alpha subunits expressed in tsA-201 cells, but no effect was observed on a mutant Na+ channel alpha subunit in which serine residues in five PKA phosphorylation sites in the intracellular loop connecting domains I and II (LI-II) had been replaced by alanine. A single mutation, S573A, similarly eliminated cBIMPS modulation. Thus, activation of D1-like dopamine receptors results in PKA-dependent phosphorylation of specific sites in LI-II of the Na+ channel alpha subunit, causing a reduction in Na+ current. Such modulation is expected to exert a profound influence on overall neuronal excitability. Dopaminergic input to the hippocampus from the mesocorticolimbic system may exert this influence in vivo.

  15. Modulation of respiratory frequency by peptidergic input to rhythmogenic neurons in the preBötzinger complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gray, P A; Rekling, J C; Bocchiaro, C M;

    1999-01-01

    Neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) and mu-opioid receptor (muOR) agonists affected respiratory rhythm when injected directly into the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC), the hypothesized site for respiratory rhythmogenesis in mammals. These effects were mediated by actions on preBötC rhythmogenic neurons...

  16. Stimulation of the midbrain periaqueductal gray modulates preinspiratory neurons in the ventrolateral medulla in the rat in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, Hari H.; Holstege, Gert

    2013-01-01

    The midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) is involved in many basic survival behaviors that affect respiration. We hypothesized that the PAG promotes these behaviors by changing the firing of preinspiratory (pre-I) neurons in the pre-Botzinger complex, a cell group thought to be important in generating

  17. The dopamine and cannabinoid interaction in the modulation of emotions and cognition: Assessing the role of cannabinoid CB1 receptor in neurons expressing dopamine D1 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luisa eTerzian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Although cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs are densely expressed in neurons expressing dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs, it is not fully understood to what extent they modulate emotional behaviors. We used conditional CB1R knock-out animals lacking CB1Rs in neurons expressing D1R (D1-CB1-/- in order to answer this question. To elucidate the behavioral effects of CB1R deficiency in this specific neuronal subpopulation, we subjected D1-CB1-/- mice to a battery of behavioral tests which included exploration-based tests, depressive-like behavioral tests, social behavior and fear-related memory paradigms. D1-CB1-/- did not show any difference in the exploration-based paradigms such as open field, elevated plus maze or novel object investigation test, except for an increase in novelty-induced grooming. By contrast, they showed a mild anhedonia-like state as described by the slightly decreased preference for sweet solution, as compared to wild-type control (WT group. This decrease, however, could be observed only during the first day of exposure, thus suggesting increased neophobia as an alternative explanation. Accordingly, mutant mice performed normally in the forced swim test, a procedure widely used for evaluating behavioral despair in rodents. However, weak- to moderate anxiety-like phenotypes were evident when D1-CB1-/- mice were tested for social behavior. Most strikingly, D1-CB1-/- mice exhibited significantly increased contextual and auditory-cued fear, with attenuated within session extinction, suggesting that a specific reduction of endocannabinoid signaling in neurons expressing dopamine D1Rs is able to affect acute fear adaptation. These results provided first direct evidence for a cross-talk between dopaminergic D1Rs and endocannabinoid system in terms of controlling negative affect.

  18. Modulation of major voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels in cultured neurons of the rat inferior colliculus by lidocaine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu YU; Lin CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the present study was to explore how lidocaine as a thera-peutic drug for tinnitus targets voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels and changes the excitability of central auditory neurons. Methods: Membrane cur-rents mediated by major voltage- and ligand-gated channels were recorded from primary cultured neurons of the inferior colliculus (IC) in rats with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in the presence and absence of lidocaine. The effects of lidocaine on the current-evoked firing of action potentials were also exam-ined. Results: Lidocaine at 100 μmol/L significantly suppressed voltage-gated sodium currents, transient outward potassium currents, and the glycine-induced chloride currents to 87.66%±2.12%, 96.33%±0.35%, and 91.46%±2.69% of that of the control level, respectively. At 1 mmol/L, lidocaine further suppressed the 3 currents to 70.26%±4.69%, 62.80% ±2.61%, and 89.11%±3.17% of that of the control level, respectively, However, lidocaine at concentrations lower than 1 mmol/L did not significantly affect GABA- or aspartate-induced currents. At a higher concentration (3 retool/L), lidocaine slightly depressed the GABA-in-duced current to 87.70%±1.87% of that of the control level. Finally, lidocaine at 100 μmol/L was shown to significantly suppress the current-evoked firing of IC neurons to 58.62%±11.22% of that of the control level, indicating that lidocaine decreases neuronal excitability. Conclusion: Although the action of lidocaine on the ion channels and receptors is complex and non-specific, it has an overall inhibitory effect on IC neurons at a clinically-relevant concentration, suggesting a central mechanism for lidocaine to suppress tinnitus.

  19. TPEN, a Specific Zn(2+) Chelator, Inhibits Sodium Dithionite and Glucose Deprivation (SDGD)-Induced Neuronal Death by Modulating Apoptosis, Glutamate Signaling, and Voltage-Gated K(+) and Na(+) Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Ma, Xue-Ling; Wang, Yu-Xiang; He, Cong-Cong; Tian, Kun; Wang, Hong-Gang; An, Di; Heng, Bin; Xie, Lai-Hua; Liu, Yan-Qiang

    2017-03-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia-induced neuronal death is an important pathophysiological process that accompanies ischemic stroke and represents a major challenge in preventing ischemic stroke. To elucidate factors related to and a potential preventative mechanism of hypoxia-ischemia-induced neuronal death, primary neurons were exposed to sodium dithionite and glucose deprivation (SDGD) to mimic hypoxic-ischemic conditions. The effects of N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), a specific Zn(2+)-chelating agent, on SDGD-induced neuronal death, glutamate signaling (including the free glutamate concentration and expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor (GluR2) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits (NR2B), and voltage-dependent K(+) and Na(+) channel currents were also investigated. Our results demonstrated that TPEN significantly suppressed increases in cell death, apoptosis, neuronal glutamate release into the culture medium, NR2B protein expression, and I K as well as decreased GluR2 protein expression and Na(+) channel activity in primary cultured neurons exposed to SDGD. These results suggest that TPEN could inhibit SDGD-induced neuronal death by modulating apoptosis, glutamate signaling (via ligand-gated channels such as AMPA and NMDA receptors), and voltage-gated K(+) and Na(+) channels in neurons. Hence, Zn(2+) chelation might be a promising approach for counteracting the neuronal loss caused by transient global ischemia. Moreover, TPEN could represent a potential cell-targeted therapy.

  20. Krebs Cycle Intermediates Protective against Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neuronal HT22 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Kenta; Uematsu, Takumi; Korenaga, Yusuke; Hirasawa, Ryuya; Kikuchi, Masatoshi; Murata, Kyohei; Zhang, Jian; Gai, Xiaoqing; Sakamoto, Kazuichi; Koyama, Tomoyuki; Satoh, Takumi

    2017-03-16

    Krebs cycle intermediates (KCIs) are reported to function as energy substrates in mitochondria and to exert antioxidants effects on the brain. The present study was designed to identify which KCIs are effective neuroprotective compounds against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Here we found that pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and α-ketoglutarate, but not lactate, citrate, iso-citrate, succinate, fumarate, or malate, protected HT22 cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. These three intermediates reduced the production of hydrogen peroxide-activated reactive oxygen species, measured in terms of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence. In contrast, none of the KCIs-used at 1 mM-protected against cell death induced by high concentrations of glutamate-another type of oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. Because these protective KCIs did not have any toxic effects (at least up to 10 mM), they have potential use for therapeutic intervention against chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Krebs Cycle Intermediates Protective against Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Neuronal HT22 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Sawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Krebs cycle intermediates (KCIs are reported to function as energy substrates in mitochondria and to exert antioxidants effects on the brain. The present study was designed to identify which KCIs are effective neuroprotective compounds against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. Here we found that pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and α-ketoglutarate, but not lactate, citrate, iso-citrate, succinate, fumarate, or malate, protected HT22 cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. These three intermediates reduced the production of hydrogen peroxide-activated reactive oxygen species, measured in terms of 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence. In contrast, none of the KCIs—used at 1 mM—protected against cell death induced by high concentrations of glutamate—another type of oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. Because these protective KCIs did not have any toxic effects (at least up to 10 mM, they have potential use for therapeutic intervention against chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Pertussis toxin modulation of sodium channels in the central neurons of cyhalothrin-resistant and cyhalothrin-susceptible cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANG ZHAO; DE-LING KONG; BING-JUN HE; YAN-QIANG LIU; XIAN-LIN FAN; AN-XI LIU

    2007-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTX) inhibits the activation of the α-subunit of the inhibitory heterotrimeric G-proteins (Gαi/o) and modulates voltage-gated sodium channels, which may be one of the primary targets of pyrethroids. To investigate the potential mechanisms of agricultural pests resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, we examined the modulations by PTX on sodium channels in the central neurons of the 3rd-4th instar larvae of cyhalothrin-resistant (Cy-R) and cyhalothrin-susceptible (Cy-S) Helicoverpa armigera by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique.The isolated neurons were cultured for 12-16 h in an improved L15 insect culture medium with or without PTX (400 ng/mL). The results showed that both the Cy-R and Cy-S sodium channels exhibited fast kinetics and tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitivity. The Cy-R sodium channels exhibited not only altered gating properties, including a 8.88-mV right shift in voltage-dependent activation (V0.5act) and a 6.54-mV right shift in voltage-dependent inactivation (V0.5inact), but also a reduced peak in sodium channel density (Idensity) (55.2% of that in Cy-S neurons). Cy-R sodium channels also showed low excitability, as evidenced by right shift of activation potential (Vacti) by 5-10 mV and peak potential (Vpeak) by 20 mV. PTX exerted significant effects on Cy-S sodium channels,reducing sodium channel density by 70.04%, right shifting V0.5act by 14.41 mV and V0.5inact by 9.38 mV. It did not cause any significant changes of the parameters mentioned above in the Cy-R sodium channels. The activation time (Tpeak) from latency to peak at peak voltage and the fast inactivation time constant (τinact) in both Cy-S and Cy-R neurons were not affected. The results suggest that cotton bollworm resistant to pyrethroid insecticides involves not only mutations and allosteric alterations of voltage-gated sodium channels, but also might implicate perturbation of PTX-sensitive Gαi/o-coupled signaling transduction pathways.

  3. The Role of the Electrogenic Sodium Pump in Modulation of Pacemaker Discharge of ’Aplysia’ Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    functionally change the intracellular ionic 12 concentrations. Gorman and Marmor , in a closely related preparation, have shown that membrane...Gorman, A. L. F. and Marmor , M. F. Contributions of the sodium pump and ionic gradients to the membrane potential of a molluscan neurone. J...Physiol. 210:897-917, 1970. 18 13. Gorman, A. L. F. and Marmor , M. F. Temperature dependence of the sodium- potassium permeability ratio of a

  4. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 modulates retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells.

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    Cathrin Schulz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dominant mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are the most prevalent cause of Parkinson's disease, however, little is known about the biological function of LRRK2 protein. LRRK2 is expressed in neural precursor cells suggesting a role in neurodevelopment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, differential gene expression profiling revealed a faster silencing of pluripotency-associated genes, like Nanog, Oct4, and Lin28, during retinoic acid-induced neuronal differentiation of LRRK2-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells compared to wildtype cultures. By contrast, expression of neurotransmitter receptors and neurotransmitter release was increased in LRRK2+/- cultures indicating that LRRK2 promotes neuronal differentiation. Consistently, the number of neural progenitor cells was higher in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult LRRK2-deficient mice. Alterations in phosphorylation of the putative LRRK2 substrates, translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 and moesin, do not appear to be involved in altered differentiation, rather there is indirect evidence that a regulatory signaling network comprising retinoic acid receptors, let-7 miRNA and downstream target genes/mRNAs may be affected in LRRK2-deficient stem cells in culture. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Parkinson's disease-linked LRRK2 mutations that associated with enhanced kinase activity may affect retinoic acid receptor signaling during neurodevelopment and/or neuronal maintenance as has been shown in other mouse models of chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Autoreceptor Modulation of Peptide/Neurotransmitter Co-release from PDF Neurons Determines Allocation of Circadian Activity in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Charles; Cao, Guan; Tanenhaus, Anne K.; McCarthy, Ellena v.; Jung, Misun; Schleyer, William; Shang, Yuhua; Rosbash, Michael; Yin, Jerry C.P.; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster flies concentrate behavioral activity around dawn and dusk. This organization of daily activity is controlled by central circadian clock neurons, including the lateral ventral pacemaker neurons (LNvs) that secrete the neuropeptide PDF (Pigment Dispersing Factor). Previous studies have demonstrated the requirement for PDF signaling to PDF receptor (PDFR)-expressing dorsal clock neurons in organizing circadian activity. While LNvs also express functional PDFR, the role of these autoreceptors has remained enigmatic. Here we show that (1) PDFR activation in LNvs shifts the balance of circadian activity from evening to morning, similar to behavioral responses to summer-like environmental conditions and (2) this shift is mediated by stimulation of the Ga,s-cAMP pathway and a consequent change in PDF/neurotransmitter co-release from the LNvs. These results suggest a novel mechanism for environmental control of the allocation of circadian activity and provide new general insight into the role of neuropeptide autoreceptors in behavioral control circuits. PMID:22938867

  6. Integrin-linked kinase modulates longevity and thermotolerance in C. elegans through neuronal control of HSF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumsta, Caroline; Ching, Tsui-Ting; Nishimura, Mayuko; Davis, Andrew E; Gelino, Sara; Catan, Hannah H; Yu, Xiaokun; Chu, Chu-Chiao; Ong, Binnan; Panowski, Siler H; Baird, Nathan; Bodmer, Rolf; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Hansen, Malene

    2014-06-01

    Integrin-signaling complexes play important roles in cytoskeletal organization and cell adhesion in many species. Components of the integrin-signaling complex have been linked to aging in both Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, but the mechanism underlying this function is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a key component of the integrin-signaling complex, in lifespan determination. We report that genetic reduction of ILK in both C. elegans and Drosophila increased resistance to heat stress, and led to lifespan extension in C. elegans without majorly affecting cytoskeletal integrity. In C. elegans, longevity and thermotolerance induced by ILK depletion was mediated by heat-shock factor-1 (HSF-1), a major transcriptional regulator of the heat-shock response (HSR). Reduction in ILK levels increased hsf-1 transcription and activation, and led to enhanced expression of a subset of genes with roles in the HSR. Moreover, induction of HSR-related genes, longevity and thermotolerance caused by ILK reduction required the thermosensory neurons AFD and interneurons AIY, which are known to play a critical role in the canonical HSR. Notably, ILK was expressed in neighboring neurons, but not in AFD or AIY, implying that ILK reduction initiates cell nonautonomous signaling through thermosensory neurons to elicit a noncanonical HSR. Our results thus identify HSF-1 as a novel effector of the organismal response to reduced ILK levels and show that ILK inhibition regulates HSF-1 in a cell nonautonomous fashion to enhance stress resistance and lifespan in C. elegans.

  7. Modulation of the delayed rectifier K+ current in neurons by an angiotensin II type 2 receptor fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J; Richards, E M; Posner, P; Sumners, C

    1995-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) stimulates the delayed rectifier K+ current (IK) in neurons cultured from rat hypothalamus and brain stem via AT2 receptors, and this effect involves activation of a Gi protein and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). However, there was no evidence that the AT2 receptor involved in this response was the same as the recently cloned AT2 receptor. In the present study, intracellular injection of a 22-amino acid peptide (PEP-22) corresponding to the putative third intracellular loop of the cloned AT2 receptor elicited an increase in IK in cultured neurons that was similar to the effect produced by ANG II. Furthermore, this effect of PEP-22 was abolished by pertussis toxin (200 ng/ml, 24 h) pretreatment and also by superfusion of the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid (10 nM), suggesting the involvement of Gi protein and PP2A, respectively. Intracellular injection of a random peptide or normal pipette solution did not affect neuronal IK. This is direct evidence to link the cloned AT2 receptor to a defined response elicited by ANG II.

  8. Dual modulation of inward rectifier potassium currents in olfactory neuronal cells by promiscuous G protein coupling of the oxytocin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravati, Marta; Busnelli, Marta; Bulgheroni, Elisabetta; Reversi, Alessandra; Spaiardi, Paolo; Parenti, Marco; Toselli, Mauro; Chini, Bice

    2010-09-01

    Oxytocin receptor is a seven transmembrane receptor widely expressed in the CNS that triggers G(i) or G(q) protein-mediated signaling cascades leading to the regulation of a variety of neuroendocrine and cognitive functions. We decided to investigate whether and how the promiscuous receptor/G protein coupling affects neuronal excitability. As an experimental model, we used the immortalized gonadotropin-releasing hormone-positive GN11 cell line displaying the features of immature, migrating olfactory neurons. Using RT-PCR analysis, we detected the presence of oxytocin receptors whose stimulation by oxytocin led to the accumulation of inositol phosphates and to the inhibition of cell proliferation, and the expression of several inward rectifier (IR) K+ channel subtypes. Moreover, electrophysiological and pharmacological inspections using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings evidenced that in GN11 cells, IR channel subtypes are responsive to oxytocin. In particular, we found that: (i) peptide activation of receptor either inhibited or stimulated IR conductances, and (ii) IR current inhibition was mediated by a pertussis toxin-resistant G protein presumably of the G(q/11) subtype, and by phospholipase C, whereas IR current activation was achieved via receptor coupling to a pertussis toxin-sensitive G(i/o) protein. The findings suggest that neuronal excitability might be tuned by a single peptide receptor that mediates opposing effects on distinct K+ channels through the promiscuous coupling to different G proteins.

  9. Neuron-Glia Crosstalk and Neuropathic Pain: Involvement in the Modulation of Motor Activity in the Orofacial Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Zakir; Unno, Shumpei; Ando, Hiroshi; Masuda, Yuji; Kitagawa, Junichi

    2017-09-26

    Neuropathic orofacial pain (NOP) is a debilitating condition. Although the pathophysiology remains unclear, accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of multiple mechanisms in the development of neuropathic pain. Recently, glial cells have been shown to play a key pathogenetic role. Nerve injury leads to an immune response near the site of injury. Satellite glial cells are activated in the peripheral ganglia. Various neural and immune mediators, released at the central terminals of primary afferents, lead to the sensitization of postsynaptic neurons and the activation of glia. The activated glia, in turn, release pro-inflammatory factors, further sensitizing the neurons, and resulting in central sensitization. Recently, we observed the involvement of glia in the alteration of orofacial motor activity in NOP. Microglia and astroglia were activated in the trigeminal sensory and motor nuclei, in parallel with altered motor functions and a decreased pain threshold. A microglial blocker attenuated the reduction in pain threshold, reduced the number of activated microglia, and restored motor activity. We also found an involvement of the astroglial glutamate-glutamine shuttle in the trigeminal motor nucleus in the alteration of the jaw reflex. Neuron-glia crosstalk thus plays an important role in the development of pain and altered motor activity in NOP.

  10. Genome-wide microRNA profiling of rat hippocampus after status epilepticus induced by amygdala stimulation identifies modulators of neuronal apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Sun

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small and endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate the expression of protein-coding genes at the translational level. Emerging evidence suggests that miRNAs play critical roles in central nervous system under physiological and pathological conditions. However, their expression and functions in status epilepticus (SE have not been well characterized thus far. Here, by using high-throughput sequencing, we characterized miRNA expression profile in rat hippocampus at 24 hours following SE induced by amygdala stimulation. After confirmation by qRT-PCR, six miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in brain after SE. Subsequent Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis indicated that most of the predicted target genes for these six miRNAs were related to neuronal apoptosis. We then investigated the dynamic changes of these six miRNAs at different time-point (4 hours, 24 hours, 1 week and 3 weeks after SE. Meanwhile, neuronal survival and apoptosis in the hippocampus after SE were evaluated by Nissl staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP end-labeling assay. We found that the expression of miR-874-3p, miR-20a-5p, miR-345-3p, miR-365-5p, and miR-764-3p were significantly increased from 24 hours to 1 week, whereas miR-99b-3p level was markedly decreased from 24 hours to 3 weeks after SE. Further analysis revealed that the levels of miR-365-5p and miR-99b-3p were significantly correlated with neuronal apoptosis after SE. Taken together, our data suggest that miRNAs are important modulators of SE-induced neuronal apoptosis. These findings also open new avenues for future studies aimed at developing strategies against neuronal apoptosis after SE.

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Modulation of Microglia via CD163-Targeted Glucocorticoids Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in the 6-OHDA Parkinson's Disease Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tentillier, Noemie; Etzerodt, Anders; Olesen, Mads N;

    2016-01-01

    intravenous CD163-targeted liposomes with Dexa for 3 weeks exhibited better motor performance than the control groups and had minimal glucocorticoid-driven side effects. Furthermore, these animals showed better survival of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra and an increased number of microglia......UNLABELLED: Increasing evidence supports a decisive role for inflammation in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease (PD). The immune response in PD seems to involve, not only microglia, but also other immune cells infiltrated into the brain. Indeed, we observed here the infiltration...... for the modulation of brain neurodegeneration and specifically highlight the potential of CD163-targeted liposomes as a therapeutic tool in PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: The immune response now evident in the progression of Parkinson's disease comprises both local microglia and other immune cells. We provide evidence...

  12. Functional differences in epigenetic modulators-superiority of mercaptoacetamide-based histone deacetylase inhibitors relative to hydroxamates in cortical neuron neuroprotection studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozikowski, Alan P; Chen, Yufeng; Gaysin, Arsen; Chen, Bin; D'Annibale, Melissa A; Suto, Carla M; Langley, Brett C

    2007-06-28

    We compare the ability of two structurally different classes of epigenetic modulators, namely, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors containing either a hydroxamate or a mercaptoacetamide as the zinc binding group, to protect cortical neurons in culture from oxidative stress-induced death. This study reveals that some of the mercaptoacetamide-based HDAC inhibitors are fully protective, whereas the hydroxamates show toxicity at higher concentrations. Our present results appear to be consistent with the possibility that the mercaptoacetamide-based HDAC inhibitors interact with a different subset of the HDAC isozymes [less activity at HDAC1 and 2 correlates with less inhibitor toxicity], or alternatively, are interacting selectively with only the cytoplasmic HDACs that are crucial for protection from oxidative stress.

  13. Modulation of glutamatergic transmission by metabotropic glutamate receptor activation in second-order neurons of the guinea pig nucleus tractus solitarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Yoshiaki; Kimura, Satoko; Haji, Akira

    2014-09-18

    Activity of second-order relay neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is regulated by peripheral and intrinsic synaptic inputs, and modulation of those inputs by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) has been proposed. This study investigated effects of mGluR activation on glutamatergic transmission in the NTS second-order neurons of guinea pigs. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from the brainstem slices revealed that activation of mGluRs exerted its effects on the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) but not on the amplitude. The sEPSC frequency was increased by an agonist of group I mGluRs, and it was decreased by an mGluR1 antagonist but not by an mGluR5 antagonist. The agonists of group II and III mGluRs decreased the sEPSC frequency, while their antagonists alone had no effect. Perfusion of cystine or TBOA, either of which elevates extracellular glutamate concentration, resulted in an increase in the sEPSC frequency, leaving the amplitude unchanged. The increased frequency of sEPSCs was returned to control by an mGluR1 antagonist. The tractus solitarius-evoked EPSCs were not altered by an agonist of group I mGluRs, whereas they were decreased along with an increase in paired-pulse ratio by agonists of group II and III mGluRs. These results suggest that mGluRs are present at the presynaptic sites in the NTS second-order neurons in guinea pigs. The mGluR1s function to facilitate the release of glutamate from axon terminals of intrinsic interneurons and the group II and III mGluRs play an inhibitory role in glutamatergic transmission.

  14. The aminoglycosides modulate the acid-sensing ionic channel currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons from the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Aníbal; López-Ramírez, Omar; Vega, Rosario; Soto, Enrique

    2010-02-01

    Acid-sensing ionic channels (ASICs) have been shown to have a significant role in a growing number of physiological and pathological processes, such as nociception, synaptic transmission and plasticity, mechanosensation, and acidosis-induced neuronal injury. The discovery of pharmacological agents targeting ASICs has significant therapeutic potential and use as a research tool. In our work, we studied the action of transient perfusion (5-15 s) of aminoglycosides (AGs) (streptomycin and neomycin) on the proton-gated ionic currents in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of the rat and in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells. In DRG neurons, streptomycin and neomycin (30 microM) produced a significant, concentration-dependent, and reversible reduction in the amplitude of the proton-gated current, and a slowing of the desensitization rate of the ASIC current. Gentamycin (30 microM) also showed a significant reversible action on the ASIC currents. The curves of the pH effect for streptomycin and neomycin indicated that their effect was not significantly affected by pH. In HEK-293 cells, streptomycin (30 microM) produced a significant reduction in the amplitude of the proton-gated current. Neomycin and gentamycin had no significant action. Reduction of extracellular Ca(2+) concentration produced a significant increase in the action of streptomycin and neomycin on the desensitization time course of ASIC currents. These results indicate that ASICs are molecular targets for AGs, which may contribute to the understanding of their actions on excitable cells. Moreover, AGs may constitute a source to develop novel molecules with a greater affinity, specificity, and selectivity for the different ASIC subunits.

  15. c-Jun N-terminal kinase regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics by modulating pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiongqiong; Lam, Philip Y; Han, Derick; Cadenas, Enrique

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the role of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in mitochondrial signaling and bioenergetics in primary cortical neurons and isolated rat brain mitochondria. Exposure of neurons to either anisomycin (an activator of JNK/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases) or H2O2 resulted in activation (phosphorylation) of JNK (mostly p46(JNK1)) and its translocation to mitochondria. Experiments with mitochondria isolated from either rat brain or primary cortical neurons and incubated with proteinase K revealed that phosphorylated JNK was associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane; this association resulted in the phosphorylation of the E(1alpha) subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and that links two major metabolic pathways: glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. JNK-mediated phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase was not observed in experiments carried out with mitoplasts, thus suggesting the requirement of intact, functional mitochondria for this effect. JNK-mediated phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase was associated with a decline in its activity and, consequently, a shift to anaerobic pyruvate metabolism: the latter was confirmed by increased accumulation of lactic acid and decreased overall energy production (ATP levels). Pyruvate dehydrogenase appears to be a specific phosphorylation target for JNK, for other kinases, such as protein kinase A and protein kinase C did not elicit pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphorylation and did not decrease the activity of the complex. These results suggest that JNK mediates a signaling pathway that regulates metabolic functions in mitochondria as part of a network that coordinates cytosolic and mitochondrial processes relevant for cell function.

  16. Neuronal correlates to consciousness. The "Hall of Mirrors" metaphor describing consciousness as an epiphenomenon of multiple dynamic mosaics of cortical functional modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnati, Luigi Francesco; Guidolin, Diego; Cortelli, Pietro; Genedani, Susanna; Cela-Conde, Camilo; Fuxe, Kjell

    2012-10-02

    Humans share the common intuition of a self that has access to an inner 'theater of mind' (Baars, 2003). The problem is how this internal theater is formed. Moving from Cook's view (Cook, 2008), we propose that the 'sentience' present in single excitable cells is integrated into units of neurons and glial cells transiently assembled into "functional modules" (FMs) organized as systems of encased networks (from cell networks to molecular networks). In line with Hebb's proposal of 'cell assemblies', FMs can be linked to form higher-order mosaics by means of reverberating circuits. Brain-level subjective awareness results from the binding phenomenon that coordinates several FM mosaics. Thus, consciousness may be thought as the global result of integrative processes taking place at different levels of miniaturization in plastic mosaics. On the basis of these neurobiological data and speculations and of the evidence of 'mirror neurons' the 'Hall of Mirrors' is proposed as a significant metaphor of consciousness. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Brain Integration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Lateral/Basolateral Amygdala Serotonin Type-2 Receptors Modulate Operant Self-administration of a Sweetened Ethanol Solution via Inhibition of Principal Neuron Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian eMccool

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lateral/basolateral amygdala (BLA forms an integral part of the neural circuitry controlling innate anxiety and learned fear. More recently, BLA dependent modulation of self-administration behaviors suggests a much broader role in the regulation of reward evaluation. To test this, we employed a self-administration paradigm that procedurally segregates ‘seeking’ (exemplified as lever-press behaviors from consumption (drinking directed at a sweetened ethanol solution. Microinjection of the nonselective serotonin type-2 receptor agonist, alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (-m5HT into the BLA reduced lever pressing behaviors in a dose-dependent fashion. This was associated with a significant reduction in the number of response-bouts expressed during non-reinforced sessions without altering the size of a bout or the rate of responding. Conversely, intra-BLA -m5HT only modestly effected consumption-related behaviors; the highest dose reduced the total time spent consuming a sweetened ethanol solution but did not inhibit the total number of licks, number of lick bouts, or amount of solution consumed during a session. In vitro neurophysiological characterization of BLA synaptic responses showed that -m5HT significantly reduced extracellular field potentials. This was blocked by the 5-HT2A/C antagonist ketanserin suggesting that 5-HT2-like receptors mediate the behavioral effect of -m5HT. During whole-cell patch current-clamp recordings, we subsequently found that -m5HT increased action potential threshold and hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential of BLA pyramidal neurons. Together, our findings show that the activation of BLA 5-HT2A/C receptors inhibits behaviors related to reward-seeking by suppressing BLA principal neuron activity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the BLA modulates reward-related behaviors and provides specific insight into BLA contributions during operant self-administration of a

  18. D-Aspartate Modulates Nociceptive-Specific Neuron Activity and Pain Threshold in Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Condition in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Boccella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available D-Aspartate (D-Asp is a free D-amino acid found in the mammalian brain with a temporal-dependent concentration based on the postnatal expression of its metabolizing enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO. D-Asp acts as an agonist on NMDA receptors (NMDARs. Accordingly, high levels of D-Asp in knockout mice for Ddo gene (Ddo−/− or in mice treated with D-Asp increase NMDAR-dependent processes. We have here evaluated in Ddo−/− mice the effect of high levels of free D-Asp on the long-term plastic changes along the nociceptive pathway occurring in chronic and acute pain condition. We found that Ddo−/− mice show an increased evoked activity of the nociceptive specific (NS neurons of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (L4–L6 and a significant decrease of mechanical and thermal thresholds, as compared to control mice. Moreover, Ddo gene deletion exacerbated the nocifensive responses in the formalin test and slightly reduced pain thresholds in neuropathic mice up to 7 days after chronic constriction injury. These findings suggest that the NMDAR agonist, D-Asp, may play a role in the regulation of NS neuron electrophysiological activity and behavioral responses in physiological and pathological pain conditions.

  19. D-Aspartate Modulates Nociceptive-Specific Neuron Activity and Pain Threshold in Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Condition in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccella, Serena; Vacca, Valentina; Errico, Francesco; Marinelli, Sara; Squillace, Marta; Di Maio, Anna; Vitucci, Daniela; Palazzo, Enza; De Novellis, Vito; Maione, Sabatino; Pavone, Flaminia; Usiello, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    D-Aspartate (D-Asp) is a free D-amino acid found in the mammalian brain with a temporal-dependent concentration based on the postnatal expression of its metabolizing enzyme D-aspartate oxidase (DDO). D-Asp acts as an agonist on NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Accordingly, high levels of D-Asp in knockout mice for Ddo gene (Ddo−/−) or in mice treated with D-Asp increase NMDAR-dependent processes. We have here evaluated in Ddo−/− mice the effect of high levels of free D-Asp on the long-term plastic changes along the nociceptive pathway occurring in chronic and acute pain condition. We found that Ddo−/− mice show an increased evoked activity of the nociceptive specific (NS) neurons of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (L4–L6) and a significant decrease of mechanical and thermal thresholds, as compared to control mice. Moreover, Ddo gene deletion exacerbated the nocifensive responses in the formalin test and slightly reduced pain thresholds in neuropathic mice up to 7 days after chronic constriction injury. These findings suggest that the NMDAR agonist, D-Asp, may play a role in the regulation of NS neuron electrophysiological activity and behavioral responses in physiological and pathological pain conditions. PMID:25629055

  20. Clinacanthus nutans Extracts Modulate Epigenetic Link to Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Expression in SH-SY5Y Cells and Primary Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Charlene Siew-Hon; Ho, Christabel Fung-Yih; Heng, Swan-Ser; Wu, Jui-Sheng; Tan, Benny Kwong-Huat; Ng, Yee-Kong; Sun, Grace Y; Lin, Teng-Nan; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2016-09-01

    Clinacanthus nutans Lindau (C. nutans), commonly known as Sabah Snake Grass in southeast Asia, is widely used in folk medicine due to its analgesic, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties. Our recent study provided evidence for the regulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) mRNA expression by epigenetic factors (Tan et al. in Mol Neurobiol. doi: 10.1007/s12035-015-9314-z , 2015). This enzyme catalyzes the release of arachidonic acid from glycerophospholipids, and formation of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids or toxic lipid peroxidation products such as 4-hydroxynonenal. In this study, we examined the effects of C. nutans ethanol leaf extracts on epigenetic regulation of cPLA2 mRNA expression in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and mouse primary cortical neurons. C. nutans modulated induction of cPLA2 expression in SH-SY5Y cells by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, MS-275, MC-1568, and TSA. C. nutans extracts also inhibited histone acetylase (HAT) activity. Levels of cPLA2 mRNA expression were increased in primary cortical neurons subjected to 0.5-h oxygen-glucose deprivation injury (OGD). This increase was significantly inhibited by C. nutans treatment. Treatment of primary neurons with the HDAC inhibitor MS-275 augmented OGD-induced cPLA2 mRNA expression, and this increase was modulated by C. nutans extracts. OGD-stimulated increase in cPLA2 mRNA expression was also reduced by a Tip60 HAT inhibitor, NU9056. In view of a key role of cPLA2 in the production of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and free radical damage, and the fact that epigenetic effects on genes are often long-lasting, results suggest a role for C. nutans and phytochemicals to inhibit the production of arachidonic acid-derived pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and chronic inflammation, through epigenetic regulation of cPLA2 expression.

  1. Exercise dependent increase in axon regeneration into peripheral nerve grafts by propriospinal but not sensory neurons after spinal cord injury is associated with modulation of regeneration-associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Rahul; Theisen, Catherine C; Ninan, Vinu; Twiss, Jeffery L; Houlé, John D

    2016-02-01

    Insufficient regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) axons contributes to persisting neurological dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI). Peripheral nerve grafts (PNGs) support regeneration by thousands of injured intraspinal axons and help them bypass some of the extracellular barriers that form after SCI. However this number represents but a small portion of the total number of axons that are injured. Here we tested if rhythmic sensory stimulation during cycling exercise would boost the intrinsic regenerative state of neurons to enhance axon regeneration into PNGs after a lower thoracic (T12) spinal transection of adult rats. Using True Blue retrograde tracing, we show that 4 weeks of cycling improves regeneration into a PNG from lumbar interneurons but not by primary sensory neurons. The majority of neurons that regenerate their axon are within 5 mm of the lesion and their number increased 70% with exercise. Importantly propriospinal neurons in more distant regions (5-20 mm from the lesion) that routinely exhibit very limited regeneration responded to exercise by increasing the number of regenerating neurons by 900%. There was no exercise-associated increase in regeneration from sensory neurons. Analyses using fluorescent in situ hybridization showed that this increase in regenerative response is associated with changes in levels of mRNAs encoding the regeneration associated genes (RAGs) GAP43, β-actin and Neuritin. While propriospinal neurons showed increased mRNA levels in response to SCI alone and then to grafting and exercise, sensory neurons did not respond to SCI, but there was a response to the presence of a PNG. Thus, exercise is a non-invasive approach to modulate gene expression in injured neurons leading to an increase in regeneration. This sets the stage for future studies to test whether exercise will promote axon outgrowth beyond the PNG and reconnection with spinal cord neurons, thereby demonstrating a potential clinical application of

  2. G(o) transduces GABAB-receptor modulation of N-type calcium channels in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon-Johansson, A S; Berrow, N; Dolphin, A C

    1993-11-01

    High-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channel currents (IBa) were recorded from acutely replated cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. IBa was irreversibly inhibited by 56.9 +/- 2.7% by 1 microM omega-conotoxin-GVIA (omega-CTx-GVIA), whereas the 1,4-dihydropyridine antagonist nicardipine was ineffective. The selective gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) agonist, (-)-baclofen (50 microM), inhibited the HVA IBa by 30.7 +/- 5.4%. Prior application of omega-CTx-GVIA completely occluded inhibition of the HVA IBa by (-)-baclofen, indicating that in this preparation (-)-baclofen inhibits N-type current. To investigate which G protein subtype was involved, cells were replated in the presence of anti-G protein antisera. Under these conditions the antibodies were shown to enter the cells through transient pores created during the replating procedure. Replating DRGs in the presence of anti-G(o) antiserum, raised against the C-terminal decapeptide of the G alpha o subunit, reduced (-)-baclofen inhibition of the HVA IBa, whereas replating DRGs in the presence of the anti-Gi antiserum did not. Using anti-G alpha o antisera (1:2000) and confocal laser microscopy, G alpha o localisation was investigated in both unreplated and replated neurons. G alpha o immunoreactivity was observed at the plasma membrane, neurites, attachment plaques and perinuclear region, and was particularly pronounced at points of cell-to-cell contact. The plasma membrane G alpha o immunoreactivity was completely blocked by preincubation with the immunising G alpha o undecapeptide (1 microgram.ml-1) for 1 h at 37 degrees C. A similar treatment also blocked recognition of G alpha o in brain membranes on immunoblots.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Rapamycin protects against neuronal death and improves neurological function with modulation of microglia after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D; Liu, F; Yang, T; Jin, T; Zhang, H; Luo, X; Wang, M

    2016-09-30

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) results in a devastating brain disorder with high mortality and poor prognosis and effective therapeutic intervention for the disease remains a challenge at present. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of rapamycin on ICH-induced brain damage and the possible involvement of activated microglia. ICH was induced in rats by injection of type IV collagenase into striatum. Different dose of rapamycin was systemically administrated by intraperitoneal injection beginning at 1 h after ICH induction. Western blot analysis showed that ICH led to a long-lasting increase of phosphorylated mTOR and this hyperactivation of mTOR was reduced by systemic administration of rapamycin. Rapamycin treatment significantly improved the sensorimotor deficits induced by ICH, and attenuated ICH-induced brain edema formation as well as lesion volume. Nissl and Fluoro-Jade C staining demonstrated that administration with rapamycin remarkably decreased neuronal death surrounding the hematoma at 7 d after ICH insult. ELISA and real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that rapamycin inhibited ICH-induced excessive expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in ipsilateral hemisphere. Furthermore, activation of microglia induced by ICH was significantly suppressed by rapamycin administration. These data indicated that treatment of rapamycin following ICH decreased the brain injuries and neuronal death at the peri-hematoma striatum, and increased neurological function, which associated with reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and activated microglia. The results provide novel insight into the neuroprotective therapeutic strategy of rapamycin for ICH insult, which possibly involving the regulation of microglial activation.

  4. Glutamate-induced depression of EPSP-spike coupling in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons and modulation by adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Alexandra L; Stone, Trevor W

    2010-04-01

    The presence of high concentrations of glutamate in the extracellular fluid following brain trauma or ischaemia may contribute substantially to subsequent impairments of neuronal function. In this study, glutamate was applied to hippocampal slices for several minutes, producing over-depolarization, which was reflected in an initial loss of evoked population potential size in the CA1 region. Orthodromic population spikes recovered only partially over the following 60 min, whereas antidromic spikes and excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) showed greater recovery, implying a change in EPSP-spike coupling (E-S coupling), which was confirmed by intracellular recording from CA1 pyramidal cells. The recovery of EPSPs was enhanced further by dizocilpine, suggesting that the long-lasting glutamate-induced change in E-S coupling involves NMDA receptors. This was supported by experiments showing that when isolated NMDA-receptor-mediated EPSPs were studied in isolation, there was only partial recovery following glutamate, unlike the composite EPSPs. The recovery of orthodromic population spikes and NMDA-receptor-mediated EPSPs following glutamate was enhanced by the adenosine A1 receptor blocker DPCPX, the A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 or adenosine deaminase, associated with a loss of restoration to normal of the glutamate-induced E-S depression. The results indicate that the long-lasting depression of neuronal excitability following recovery from glutamate is associated with a depression of E-S coupling. This effect is partly dependent on activation of NMDA receptors, which modify adenosine release or the sensitivity of adenosine receptors. The results may have implications for the use of A1 and A2A receptor ligands as cognitive enhancers or neuroprotectants.

  5. Modulation of valosin-containing protein by Kyoto University Substances (KUS as a novel therapeutic strategy for ischemic neuronal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Hata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ischemia causes several vision-threatening diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion, and retinal vein occlusion. Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP depletion and subsequent induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress are proposed to be the underlying mechanisms of ischemic retinal cell death. Recently, we found that a naphthalene derivative can inhibit ATPase activity of valosin-containing protein, universally expressed within various types of cells, including retinal neural cells, with strong cytoprotective activity. Based on the chemical structure, we developed novel valosin-containing protein modulators, Kyoto University Substances (KUSs, that not only inhibit intracellular ATP depletion, but also ameliorate ER stress. Suppressing ER stress by KUSs is associated with neural cell survival in animal models of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as glaucoma and retinal degeneration. Given that a major pathology of ischemic retinal diseases, other than intracellular ATP depletion, is ER stress-induced cell death, KUSs may provide a novel strategy for cell protection in ischemic conditions. Hence, we investigated the efficacy of KUS121 in a rat model of retinal ischemic injury. Intravitreal injections of KUS121, which is clinically preferable route of drug administration in retinal diseases, significantly suppressed inner retinal thinning and retinal cell death, and maintained visual functions. Valosin-containing protein modulation by KUS is a promising novel therapeutic strategy for ischemic retinal diseases.

  6. Aversive Behavior in the Nematode C. elegans Is Modulated by cGMP and a Neuronal Gap Junction Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowski, Michelle C.; Wood, Jordan F.; Brueggemann, Chantal; Bowitch, Alexander; Bethke, Mary; L’Etoile, Noelle D.; Ferkey, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    All animals rely on their ability to sense and respond to their environment to survive. However, the suitability of a behavioral response is context-dependent, and must reflect both an animal’s life history and its present internal state. Based on the integration of these variables, an animal’s needs can be prioritized to optimize survival strategies. Nociceptive sensory systems detect harmful stimuli and allow for the initiation of protective behavioral responses. The polymodal ASH sensory neurons are the primary nociceptors in C. elegans. We show here that the guanylyl cyclase ODR-1 functions non-cell-autonomously to downregulate ASH-mediated aversive behaviors and that ectopic cGMP generation in ASH is sufficient to dampen ASH sensitivity. We define a gap junction neural network that regulates nociception and propose that decentralized regulation of ASH signaling can allow for rapid correlation between an animal’s internal state and its behavioral output, lending modulatory flexibility to this hard-wired nociceptive neural circuit. PMID:27459302

  7. Chemical activation of C(1)-C(2) spinal neurons modulates activity of thoracic respiratory interneurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C; Farber, J P; Chandler, M J; Foreman, R D

    2002-10-01

    Discharge patterns of thoracic dorsal horn neurons are influenced by chemical activation of cell bodies in cervical spinal segments C(1)-C(2). The present aim was to examine whether such activation would specifically affect thoracic respiratory interneurons (TRINs) of the deep dorsal horn and intermediate zone in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized, paralyzed, artificially ventilated rats. We also characterized discharge patterns and pathways of TRIN activation in rats. A total of 77 cells were classified as TRINs by location, continued burst activity related to phrenic discharge when the respirator was stopped, and lack of antidromic response from selected pathways. A variety of respiration-phased discharge patterns was documented whose pathways were interrupted by ipsilateral C(1) transection. Glutamate pledgets (1 M, 1 min) on the dorsal surface of the spinal cord inhibited 22/49, excited 15/49, or excited/inhibited 3/49 tested cells. Incidence of responses did not depend on whether the phase of TRIN discharge was inspiratory, expiratory, or biphasic. Phrenic nerve activity was unaffected by chemical activation of C(1)-C(2) in this preparation. Besides supraspinal input, TRIN activity may be influenced by upper cervical modulatory pathways.

  8. Heparin/heparan sulfates bind to and modulate neuronal L-type (Cav1.2) voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garau, Gianpiero; Magotti, Paola; Heine, Martin; Korotchenko, Svetlana; Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Berezin, Vladimir; Dityatev, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies revealed that L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (Cav1.2 L-VDCCs) are modulated by the neural extracellular matrix backbone, polyanionic glycan hyaluronic acid. Here we used isothermal titration calorimetry and screened a set of peptides derived from the extracellular domains of Cav1.2α1 to identify putative binding sites between the channel and hyaluronic acid or another class of polyanionic glycans, such as heparin/heparan sulfates. None of the tested peptides showed detectable interaction with hyaluronic acid, but two peptides derived from the first pore-forming domain of Cav1.2α1 subunit bound to heparin. At 25 °C the binding of the peptide P7 (MGKMHKTCYN) was at ~50 μM, and that of the peptide P8 (GHGRQCQNGTVCKPGWDGPKHG) was at ~21 μM. The Cav1.2α1 first pore forming segment that contained both peptides maintained a high affinity for heparin (~23 μM), integrating their enthalpic and entropic binding contributions. Interaction between heparin and recombinant as well as native full-length neuronal Cav1.2α1 channels was confirmed using the heparin-agarose pull down assay. Whole cell patch clamp recordings in HEK293 cells transfected with neuronal Cav1.2 channels revealed that enzymatic digestion of highly sulfated heparan sulfates with heparinase 1 affects neither voltage-dependence of channel activation nor the level of steady state inactivation, but did speed up channel inactivation. Treatment of hippocampal cultures with heparinase 1 reduced the firing rate and led to appearance of long-lasting bursts in the same manner as treatment with the inhibitor of L-VDCC diltiazem. Thus, heparan sulfate proteoglycans may bind to and regulate L-VDCC inactivation and network activity.

  9. The lateral paragigantocellular nucleus modulates parasympathetic cardiac neurons: a mechanism for rapid eye movement sleep-dependent changes in heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergacheva, Olga; Wang, Xin; Lovett-Barr, Mary R; Jameson, Heather; Mendelowitz, David

    2010-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is generally associated with a withdrawal of parasympathetic activity and heart rate increases; however, episodic vagally mediated heart rate decelerations also occur during REM sleep. This alternating pattern of autonomic activation provides a physiological basis for REM sleep-induced cardiac arrhythmias. Medullary neurons within the lateral paragigantocellular nucleus (LPGi) are thought to be active after REM sleep recovery and play a role in REM sleep control. In proximity to the LPGi are parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) within the nucleus ambiguus (NA), which are critical for controlling heart rate. This study examined brain stem pathways that may mediate REM sleep-related reductions in parasympathetic cardiac activity. Electrical stimulation of the LPGi evoked inhibitory GABAergic postsynaptic currents in CVNs in an in vitro brain stem slice preparation in rats. Because brain stem cholinergic mechanisms are involved in REM sleep regulation, we also studied the role of nicotinic neurotransmission in modulation of GABAergic pathway from the LGPi to CVNs. Application of nicotine diminished the GABAergic responses evoked by electrical stimulation. This inhibitory effect of nicotine was prevented by the alpha7 nicotinic receptor antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin. Moreover, hypoxia/hypercapnia (H/H) diminished LPGi-evoked GABAergic current in CVNs, and this inhibitory effect was also prevented by alpha-bungarotoxin. In conclusion, stimulation of the LPGi evokes an inhibitory pathway to CVNs, which may constitute a mechanism for the reduced parasympathetic cardiac activity and increase in heart rate during REM sleep. Inhibition of this pathway by nicotinic receptor activation and H/H may play a role in REM sleep-related and apnea-associated bradyarrhythmias.

  10. Sprouty4 is an endogenous negative modulator of TrkA signaling and neuronal differentiation induced by NGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando C Alsina

    Full Text Available The Sprouty (Spry family of proteins represents endogenous regulators of downstream signaling pathways induced by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. Using real time PCR, we detect a significant increase in the expression of Spry4 mRNA in response to NGF, indicating that Spry4 could modulate intracellular signaling pathways and biological processes induced by NGF and its receptor TrkA. In this work, we demonstrate that overexpression of wild-type Spry4 causes a significant reduction in MAPK and Rac1 activation and neurite outgrowth induced by NGF. At molecular level, our findings indicate that ectopic expression of a mutated form of Spry4 (Y53A, in which a conserved tyrosine residue was replaced, fail to block both TrkA-mediated Erk/MAPK activation and neurite outgrowth induced by NGF, suggesting that an intact tyrosine 53 site is required for the inhibitory effect of Spry4 on NGF signaling. Downregulation of Spry4 using small interference RNA knockdown experiments potentiates PC12 cell differentiation and MAPK activation in response to NGF. Together, these findings establish a new physiological mechanism through which Spry4 regulates neurite outgrowth reducing not only the MAPK pathway but also restricting Rac1 activation in response to NGF.

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Modulation of Microglia via CD163-Targeted Glucocorticoids Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in the 6-OHDA Parkinson's Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentillier, Noemie; Etzerodt, Anders; Olesen, Mads N; Rizalar, F Sila; Jacobsen, Jan; Bender, Dirk; Moestrup, Søren K; Romero-Ramos, Marina

    2016-09-07

    Increasing evidence supports a decisive role for inflammation in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease (PD). The immune response in PD seems to involve, not only microglia, but also other immune cells infiltrated into the brain. Indeed, we observed here the infiltration of macrophages, specifically CD163+ macrophages, into the area of neurodegeneration in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) PD model. Therefore, we investigated the therapeutic potential of the infiltrated CD163+ macrophages to modulate local microglia in the brain to achieve neuroprotection. To do so, we designed liposomes targeted for the CD163 receptor to deliver dexamethasone (Dexa) into the CD163+ macrophages in the 6-OHDA PD model. Our data show that a fraction of the CD163-targeted liposomes were carried into the brain after peripheral intravenous injection. The 6-OHDA-lesioned rats that received repeated intravenous CD163-targeted liposomes with Dexa for 3 weeks exhibited better motor performance than the control groups and had minimal glucocorticoid-driven side effects. Furthermore, these animals showed better survival of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra and an increased number of microglia expressing major histocompatibility complex II. Therefore, rats receiving CD163-targeted liposomes with Dexa were partially protected against 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration, which correlated with a distinctive microglia response. Altogether, our data support the use of macrophages for the modulation of brain neurodegeneration and specifically highlight the potential of CD163-targeted liposomes as a therapeutic tool in PD. The immune response now evident in the progression of Parkinson's disease comprises both local microglia and other immune cells. We provide evidence that CD163+ macrophages can be a target to modulate brain immune response to achieve neuroprotection in the 6-hydroxydopamine model. To do so, we targeted the CD163+ population, which to a low but significant

  12. NEURON and Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hines

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including GUI tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the XML module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  13. NEURON and Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  14. Action-potential duration and the modulation of transmitter release from the sensory neurons of Aplysia in presynaptic facilitation and behavioral sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Hochner, Binyamin; Klein, Marc; Schacher, Samuel; Kandel, Eric R.

    1986-01-01

    Presynaptic facilitation of transmitter release from Aplysia sensory neurons is an important contributor to behavioral sensitization of the gill and siphon withdrawal reflex. The enhanced release is accompanied by reduction of the serotonin-sensitive S current in the sensory neurons and a consequent increase in duration of the presynaptic action potential (ranging from 10% to 30%). We find that changes of similar magnitude in the duration of depolarizing voltage-clamp steps in sensory neurons...

  15. Analgesic Effect of Photobiomodulation on Bothrops Moojeni Venom-Induced Hyperalgesia: A Mechanism Dependent on Neuronal Inhibition, Cytokines and Kinin Receptors Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Victoria Regina da Silva; Toniolo, Elaine Flamia; Feliciano, Regiane dos Santos; da Silva Jr., José Antonio; Zamuner, Stella Regina

    2016-01-01

    Background Envenoming induced by Bothrops snakebites is characterized by drastic local tissue damage that involves an intense inflammatory reaction and local hyperalgesia which are not neutralized by conventional antivenom treatment. Herein, the effectiveness of photobiomodulation to reduce inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by Bothrops moojeni venom (Bmv), as well as the mechanisms involved was investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Bmv (1 μg) was injected through the intraplantar route in the right hind paw of mice. Mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia were evaluated by von Frey filaments at different time points after venom injection. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) was applied at the site of Bmv injection at wavelength of red 685 nm with energy density of 2.2 J/cm2 at 30 min and 3 h after venom inoculation. Neuronal activation in the dorsal horn spinal cord was determined by immunohistochemistry of Fos protein and the mRNA expression of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, B1 and B2 kinin receptors were evaluated by Real time-PCR 6 h after venom injection. Photobiomodulation reversed Bmv-induced mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia and decreased Fos expression, induced by Bmv as well as the mRNA levels of IL-6, TNF-α and B1 and B2 kinin receptors. Finally, an increase on IL-10, was observed following LLLT. Conclusion/Significance These data demonstrate that LLLT interferes with mechanisms involved in nociception and hyperalgesia and modulates Bmv-induced nociceptive signal. The use of photobiomodulation in reducing local pain induced by Bothropic venoms should be considered as a novel therapeutic tool for the treatment of local symptoms induced after bothropic snakebites. PMID:27749899

  16. Neurotrophic Factors NGF, GDNF and NTN Selectively Modulate HSV1 and HSV2 Lytic Infection and Reactivation in Primary Adult Sensory and Autonomic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy A. Yanez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex viruses (HSV1 and HSV2 establish latency in peripheral ganglia after ocular or genital infection, and can reactivate to produce different patterns and frequencies of recurrent disease. Previous studies showed that nerve growth factor (NGF maintains HSV1 latency in embryonic sympathetic and sensory neurons. However, adult sensory neurons are no longer dependent on NGF for survival, some populations cease expression of NGF receptors postnatally, and the viruses preferentially establish latency in different populations of sensory neurons responsive to other neurotrophic factors (NTFs. Thus, NGF may not maintain latency in adult sensory neurons. To identify NTFs important for maintaining HSV1 and HSV2 latency in adult neurons, we investigated acute and latently-infected primary adult sensory trigeminal (TG and sympathetic superior cervical ganglia (SCG after NTF removal. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF deprivation induced HSV1 reactivation in adult sympathetic neurons. In adult sensory neurons, however, neurturin (NTN and GDNF deprivation induced HSV1 and HSV2 reactivation, respectively, while NGF deprivation had no effects. Furthermore, HSV1 and HSV2 preferentially reactivated from neurons expressing GFRα2 and GFRα1, the high affinity receptors for NTN and GDNF, respectively. Thus, NTN and GDNF play a critical role in selective maintenance of HSV1 and HSV2 latency in primary adult sensory neurons.

  17. 5-HT1A receptors are involved in the modulation of discharge activities of biphasic expiratory neurons and inspiratory neurons%5-HT1A受体对双相呼气和吸气神经元电活动的调制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦峥; 王晓锋; 郭谦; 吴中海

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨5-HT1A受体对延髓脑片双相呼气神经元和吸气神经元电活动的影响.方法 在新生大鼠延髓脑片上同步记录舌下神经根和双相呼气神经元/吸气神经元单位的放电活动,并在灌流的改良Kreb'S液中先后加以5-HT1A受体的特异性激动剂(+/-)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-N-propylamino)tetralin hydrobromide(8-OH-DPAT)和特异性拮抗剂多次甲基多苯基多异氰酸酯[4-iodo-N-[2-[4-(methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridynyl-benzamide hydrochloride](PMPPI)观察对神经元单位放电的影响.结果 给予5-HT1A受体激动剂8-OH-DPAT后,双相呼气神经元/吸气神经元的呼吸周期和呼气时程明显延长,积分幅度降低,单位放电峰频率显著性降低;给予特异性拮抗剂PMPPI后,对呼吸周期,呼气时程的作用相反,而积分幅度和单位放电峰频率无明显变化.结论 5-HT1A受体可能通过影响双相呼气神经元的电活动参与了呼吸时相的转换,同时也可能介导了吸气神经元的抑制性突触输入.%Objective To determine whether 5-HT1A receptors could modulate the discharge activities of biphasic expiratory neurons(BE-neurons)and inspiratory neurons (I-neurons).Methods Brainstem slices from newborn SD rats(0~3d)were made according to the method of Suzue,et al.These preparations included the medial region of the nucleus retrofacialis (mNRF)with the hypoglossal nerve rootlets retained.Respiratory rhythmical discharge activities (RRDA)of BE-neurons/I-neurons in mNRF and activities of the hypoglossal nerve(Ⅻ nerve)were simultaneously recorded by using extracellular microelectrodes and suction electrode,respectively.The effects of 5-HT1A receptors on the respiratory rhythm were investigated by application of 5-HT1A receptor specific agonist 8-OH-DPAT and its specific antagonist PMPPI in the perfusion solution.Results 8-OHDPAT induced a significant increase in the respiratory cycles(RC)and the expiratory time (TE) as well as a decrease

  18. Modulation of light-driven arousal by LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Apterous in large PDF-positive lateral neurons of the Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Naoto; Inami, Show; Sato, Shoma; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Sakai, Takaomi

    2016-11-17

    Apterous (Ap), the best studied LIM-homeodomain transcription factor in Drosophila, cooperates with the cofactor Chip (Chi) to regulate transcription of specific target genes. Although Ap regulates various developmental processes, its function in the adult brain remains unclear. Here, we report that Ap and Chi in the neurons expressing PDF, a neuropeptide, play important roles in proper sleep/wake regulation in adult flies. PDF-expressing neurons consist of two neuronal clusters: small ventral-lateral neurons (s-LNvs) acting as the circadian pacemaker and large ventral-lateral neurons (l-LNvs) regulating light-driven arousal. We identified that Ap localizes to the nuclei of s-LNvs and l-LNvs. In light-dark (LD) cycles, RNAi knockdown or the targeted expression of dominant-negative forms of Ap or Chi in PDF-expressing neurons or l-LNvs promoted arousal. In contrast, in constant darkness, knockdown of Ap in PDF-expressing neurons did not promote arousal, indicating that a reduced Ap function in PDF-expressing neurons promotes light-driven arousal. Furthermore, Ap expression in l-LNvs showed daily rhythms (peaking at midnight), which are generated by a direct light-dependent mechanism rather than by the endogenous clock. These results raise the possibility that the daily oscillation of Ap expression in l-LNvs may contribute to the buffering of light-driven arousal in wild-type flies.

  19. Elevated neuronal excitability due to modulation of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.6 by Aβ1-42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant increases in neuronal network excitability may contribute to the cognitive deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, the mechanisms underlying hyperexcitability are not fully understood. Such overexcitation of neuronal networks has been detected in the brains of APP/PS1 mice. In the present study, using current-clamp recording techniques, we observed that 12 days in vitro (DIV primary cultured pyramidal neurons from P0 APP/PS1 mice exhibited a more prominent action potential burst and a lower threshold than WT littermates. Moreover, after treatment with Aβ1-42 peptide, 12 DIV primary cultured neurons showed similar changes, to a greater degree than in controls. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed that the voltage-dependent sodium current density of neurons incubated with Aβ1-42 was significantly increased, without change in the voltage-dependent sodium channel kinetic characteristics. Immunohistochemistry and western blot results showed that, after treatment with Aβ1-42, expressions of Nav and Nav1.6 subtype increased in cultured neurons or APP/PS1 brains compared to control groups. The intrinsic neuronal hyperexcitability of APP/PS1 mice might thus be due to an increased expression of voltage-dependent sodium channels induced by Aβ1-42. These results may illuminate the mechanism of aberrant neuronal networks in AD.

  20. Salsolinol modulation of dopamine neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Guiqin eXie; Kresimir eKrnjevic; Jiang Hong Ye

    2013-01-01

    Salsolinol, a tetrahydroisoquinoline present in the human and rat brains, is the condensation product of dopamine and acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol. Previous evidence obtained in vivo links salsolinol with the mesolimbic dopaminergic system: salsolinol is self-administered into the posterior of the ventral tegmental area (pVTA) of rats; intra-VTA administration of salsolinol induces a strong conditional place preference and increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. ...

  1. Salsolinol modulation of dopamine neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Guiqin; Krnjević, Krešimir; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Salsolinol, a tetrahydroisoquinoline present in the human and rat brains, is the condensation product of dopamine and acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol. Previous evidence obtained in vivo links salsolinol with the mesolimbic dopaminergic (DA) system: salsolinol is self-administered into the posterior of the ventral tegmental area (pVTA) of rats; intra-VTA administration of salsolinol induces a strong conditional place preference and increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumb...

  2. The essential role of p53-up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma) and its regulation by FoxO3a transcription factor in β-amyloid-induced neuron death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Rumana; Sanphui, Priyankar; Biswas, Subhas Chandra

    2014-04-11

    Neurodegeneration underlies the pathology of Alzheimer disease (AD). The molecules responsible for such neurodegeneration in AD brain are mostly unknown. Recent findings indicate that the BH3-only proteins of the Bcl-2 family play an essential role in various cell death paradigms, including neurodegeneration. Here we report that Puma (p53-up-regulated modulator of apoptosis), an important member of the BH3-only protein family, is up-regulated in neurons upon toxic β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ(1-42)) exposure both in vitro and in vivo. Down-regulation of Puma by specific siRNA provides significant protection against neuron death induced by Aβ(1-42). We further demonstrate that the activation of p53 and inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathways induce Puma. The transcription factor FoxO3a, which is activated when PI3K/Akt signaling is inhibited, directly binds with the Puma gene and induces its expression upon exposure of neurons to oligomeric Aβ(1-42). Moreover, Puma cooperates with another BH3-only protein, Bim, which is already implicated in AD. Our results thus suggest that Puma is activated by both p53 and PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a pathways and cooperates with Bim to induce neuron death in response to Aβ(1-42).

  3. SK channels modulate the excitability and firing precision of projection neurons in the robust nucleus of the arcopallium in adult male zebra finches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Qiang Hou; Xuan Pan; Cong-Shu Liao; Song-Hua Wang; Dong-Feng Li

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] Motor control is encoded by neuronal activity.Small conductance Ca2+-activated Kˉ channels (SK channels) maintain the regularity and precision of firing by contributing to the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) of the action potential in mammals.However,it is not clear how SK channels regulate the output of the vocal motor system in songbirds.The premotor robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) in the zebra finch is responsible for the output of song information.The temporal pattern of spike bursts in RA projection neurons is associated with the timing of the acoustic features of birdsong.[Methods] The firing properties of RA projection neurons were analyzed using patch clamp wholecell and cell-attached recording techniques.[Results] SK channel blockade by apamin decreased the AHP amplitude and increased the evoked firing rate in RA projection neurons.It also caused reductions in the regularity and precision of firing.RA projection neurons displayed regular spontaneous action potentials,while apamin caused irregular spontaneous firing but had no effect on the firing rate.In the absence of synaptic inputs,RA projection neurons still had spontaneous firing,and apamin had an evident effect on the firing rate,but caused no significant change in the firing regularity,compared with apamin application in the presence of synaptic inputs.[Conclusion]SK channels contribute to the maintenance of firing regularity in RA projection neurons whichrequires synaptic activity,and consequently ensures the precision of song encoding.

  4. Orexins/hypocretins modulate the activity of NPY-positive and -negative neurons in the rat intergeniculate leaflet via OX1 and OX2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palus, K; Chrobok, L; Lewandowski, M H

    2015-08-06

    Orexins/hypocretins (OXA and OXB) are two hypothalamic peptides involved in the regulation of many physiological processes including the sleep-wake cycle, food intake and arousal. The orexinergic system of the lateral hypothalamus is considered a non-specific peptidergic system, and its nerve fibers innervate numerous brain areas. Among many targets of orexinergic neurons is the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) of the thalamus - a small but important structure of the mammalian biological clock. In rats, the IGL consists of GABAergic cells which also synthesize different neuropeptides. One group of neurons produces neuropeptide Y (NPY) and sends its axons to the master biological clock known as the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Another neuronal group produces enkephalin and is known to connect contralateral IGLs. This study evaluated the effects of orexins on identified IGL neurons revealing that 58% of the recorded neurons were sensitive to OXA (200nM) and OXB (200nM) administration. Both NPY-positive and -negative neurons were depolarized by these neuropeptides. Experiments using selective orexin receptor antagonists (SB-334867, 10μM and TCS-OX2-29, 10μM) suggested that both orexin receptors participate in the recorded OXA effects. In addition, IGL neurons were either directly depolarized by OXA or their activity was altered by changes in presynaptic inputs. We observed an increase of GABA release onto the investigated IGL neuron after OXA application, consistent with a presynaptic localization of the orexin receptors. An increase in miniature excitatory postsynaptic current frequency was not observed within the IGL. Our findings reinforce the connection between circadian clock physiology and the orexinergic system.

  5. Neuronal networks: enhanced feedback feeds forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Ronald L

    2012-09-25

    Modulatory projection neurons gate neuronal networks, such as those comprising motor central pattern generators; in turn, they receive feedback from the networks they gate. A recent study has shown that, in the crab stomatogastric ganglion, this feedback is also subject to modulation: the enhanced feedback feeds forward through the projection neurons to modify circuit output.

  6. Kisspeptins modulate the biology of multiple populations of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons during embryogenesis and adulthood in zebrafish (Danio rerio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Zhao

    Full Text Available Kisspeptin1 (product of the Kiss1 gene is the key neuropeptide that gates puberty and maintains fertility by regulating the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neuronal system in mammals. Inactivating mutations in Kiss1 and the kisspeptin receptor (GPR54/Kiss1r are associated with pubertal failure and infertility. Kiss2, a paralogous gene for kiss1, has been recently identified in several vertebrates including zebrafish. Using our transgenic zebrafish model system in which the GnRH3 promoter drives expression of emerald green fluorescent protein, we investigated the effects of kisspeptins on development of the GnRH neuronal system during embryogenesis and on electrical activity during adulthood. Quantitative PCR showed detectable levels of kiss1 and kiss2 mRNA by 1 day post fertilization, increasing throughout embryonic and larval development. Early treatment with Kiss1 or Kiss2 showed that both kisspeptins stimulated proliferation of trigeminal GnRH3 neurons located in the peripheral nervous system. However, only Kiss1, but not Kiss2, stimulated proliferation of terminal nerve and hypothalamic populations of GnRH3 neurons in the central nervous system. Immunohistochemical analysis of synaptic vesicle protein 2 suggested that Kiss1, but not Kiss2, increased synaptic contacts on the cell body and along the terminal nerve-GnRH3 neuronal processes during embryogenesis. In intact brain of adult zebrafish, whole-cell patch clamp recordings of GnRH3 neurons from the preoptic area and hypothalamus revealed opposite effects of Kiss1 and Kiss2 on spontaneous action potential firing frequency and membrane potential. Kiss1 increased spike frequency and depolarized membrane potential, whereas Kiss2 suppressed spike frequency and hyperpolarized membrane potential. We conclude that in zebrafish, Kiss1 is the primary stimulator of GnRH3 neuronal development in the embryo and an activator of stimulating hypophysiotropic neuron activities in the adult, while

  7. Modulation of Kv3.1b potassium channel phosphorylation in auditory neurons by conventional and novel protein kinase C isozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ping; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2006-06-02

    In fast-spiking neurons such as those in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) in the auditory brainstem, Kv3.1 potassium channels are required for high frequency firing. The Kv3.1b splice variant of this channel predominates in the mature nervous system and is a substrate for phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) at Ser-503. In resting neurons, basal phosphorylation at this site decreases Kv3.1 current, reducing neuronal ability to follow high frequency stimulation. We used a phospho-specific antibody to determine which PKC isozymes control serine 503 phosphorylation in Kv3.1b-tranfected cells and in auditory neurons in brainstem slices. By using isozyme-specific inhibitors, we found that the novel PKC-delta isozyme, together with the novel PKC-epsilon and conventional PKCs, contributed to the basal phosphorylation of Kv3.1b in MNTB neurons. In contrast, only PKC-epsilon and conventional PKCs mediate increases in phosphorylation produced by pharmacological activation of PKC in MNTB neurons or by metabotropic glutamate receptor activation in Kv3.1/mGluR1-cotransfected cells. We also measured the time course of dephosphorylation and recovery of basal phosphorylation of Kv3.1b following brief high frequency electrical stimulation of the trapezoid body, and we determined that the recovery process is mediated by both novel PKC-delta and PKC-epsilon isozymes and by conventional PKCs. The association between Kv3.1b and PKC isozymes was confirmed by reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation of Kv3.1b with multiple PKC isozymes. Our results suggest that the Kv3.1b channel is regulated by both conventional and novel PKC isozymes and that novel PKC-delta contributes specifically to the maintenance of basal phosphorylation in auditory neurons.

  8. Cholinergic Neurons Excite Cortically Projecting Basal Forebrain GABAergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; McKenna, James T.; Zant, Janneke C.; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in the control of cortical activation and attention. Understanding the modulation of BF neuronal activity is a prerequisite to treat disorders of cortical activation involving BF dysfunction, such as Alzheimer's disease. Here we reveal the interaction between cholinergic neurons and cortically projecting BF GABAergic neurons using immunohistochemistry and whole-cell recordings in vitro. In GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, BF cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase-positive) neurons were intermingled with GABAergic (GFP+) neurons. Immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter showed that cholinergic fibers apposed putative cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing parvalbumin (PV). In coronal BF slices from GAD67-GFP knock-in or PV-tdTomato mice, pharmacological activation of cholinergic receptors with bath application of carbachol increased the firing rate of large (>20 μm diameter) BF GFP+ and PV (tdTomato+) neurons, which exhibited the intrinsic membrane properties of cortically projecting neurons. The excitatory effect of carbachol was blocked by antagonists of M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors in two subpopulations of BF GABAergic neurons [large hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and small Ih, respectively]. Ion substitution experiments and reversal potential measurements suggested that the carbachol-induced inward current was mediated mainly by sodium-permeable cation channels. Carbachol also increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic neurons/fibers caused a mecamylamine- and atropine-sensitive inward current in putative GABAergic neurons. Thus, cortically projecting, BF GABAergic/PV neurons are excited by neighboring BF and/or brainstem cholinergic neurons. Loss of cholinergic neurons in Alzheimer's disease may impair cortical activation, in part, through disfacilitation of BF cortically

  9. The inverse F-BAR domain protein srGAP2 acts through srGAP3 to modulate neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth of mouse neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Ma

    Full Text Available The inverse F-BAR (IF-BAR domain proteins srGAP1, srGAP2 and srGAP3 are implicated in neuronal development and may be linked to mental retardation, schizophrenia and seizure. A partially overlapping expression pattern and highly similar protein structures indicate a functional redundancy of srGAPs in neuronal development. Our previous study suggests that srGAP3 negatively regulates neuronal differentiation in a Rac1-dependent manner in mouse Neuro2a cells. Here we show that exogenously expressed srGAP1 and srGAP2 are sufficient to inhibit valporic acid (VPA-induced neurite initiation and growth in the mouse Neuro2a cells. While ectopic- or over-expression of RhoGAP-defective mutants, srGAP1(R542A and srGAP2(R527A exert a visible inhibitory effect on neuronal differentiation. Unexpectedly, knockdown of endogenous srGAP2 fails to facilitate the neuronal differentiation induced by VPA, but promotes neurite outgrowth of differentiated cells. All three IF-BAR domains from srGAP1-3 can induce filopodia formation in Neuro2a, but the isolated IF-BAR domain from srGAP2, not from srGAP1 and srGAP3, can promote VPA-induced neurite initiation and neuronal differentiation. We identify biochemical and functional interactions of the three srGAPs family members. We propose that srGAP3-Rac1 signaling may be required for the effect of srGAP1 and srGAP2 on attenuating neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, inhibition of Slit-Robo interaction can phenocopy a loss-of-function of srGAP3, indicating that srGAP3 may be dedicated to the Slit-Robo pathway. Our results demonstrate the interplay between srGAP1, srGAP2 and srGAP3 regulates neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth. These findings may provide us new insights into the possible roles of srGAPs in neuronal development and a potential mechanism for neurodevelopmental diseases.

  10. COMMUNICATION: Folate and S-adenosylmethionine modulate synaptic activity in cultured cortical neurons: acute differential impact on normal and apolipoprotein-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Michael; Chan, Amy; Dubey, Maya; Gilman, Vladimir; Shea, Thomas B.

    2008-12-01

    Folate deficiency is accompanied by a decline in the cognitive neurotransmitter acetylcholine and a decline in cognitive performance in mice lacking apolipoprotein E (ApoE-/- mice), a low-density lipoprotein that regulates aspects of lipid metabolism. One direct consequence of folate deficiency is a decline in S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Since dietary SAM supplementation maintains acetylcholine levels and cognitive performance in the absence of folate, we examined herein the impact of folate and SAM on neuronal synaptic activity. Embryonic cortical neurons from mice expressing or lacking ApoE (ApoE+/+ or -/-, respectively) were cultured for 1 month on multi-electrode arrays, and signaling was recorded. ApoE+/+ cultures displayed significantly more frequent spontaneous signals than ApoE-/- cultures. Supplementation with 166 µm SAM (not normally present in culture medium) increased signal frequency and decreased signal amplitude in ApoE+/+ cultures. SAM also increased the frequency of tightly clustered signal bursts. Folate deprivation reversibly reduced signal frequency in ApoE+/+ cultures; SAM supplementation maintained signal frequency despite folate deprivation. These findings support the importance of dietary supplementation with folate and SAM on neuronal health. Supplementation with 166 µm SAM did not alter signaling in ApoE-/- cultures, which may be a reflection of the reduced SAM levels in ApoE-/- mice. The differential impact of SAM on ApoE+/+ and -/- neurons underscores the combined impact of nutritional and genetic deficiencies on neuronal homeostasis.

  11. Heparin/heparan sulfates bind to and modulate neuronal L-type (Cav1.2) voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garau, Gianpiero; Magotti, Paola; Heine, Martin

    2015-01-01

    M), integrating their enthalpic and entropic binding contributions. Interaction between heparin and recombinant as well as native full-length neuronal Cav1.2α1 channels was confirmed using the heparin–agarose pull down assay. Whole cell patch clamp recordings in HEK293 cells transfected with neuronal Cav1...... rate and led to appearance of long-lasting bursts in the same manner as treatment with the inhibitor of L-VDCC diltiazem. Thus, heparan sulfate proteoglycans may bind to and regulate L-VDCC inactivation and network activity....

  12. Function and modulation of premotor brainstem parasympathetic cardiac neurons that control heart rate by hypoxia-, sleep-, and sleep-related diseases including obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergacheva, Olga; Weigand, Letitia A; Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Mares, Jacquelyn; Wang, Xin; Mendelowitz, David

    2014-01-01

    Parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the brainstem dominate the control of heart rate. Previous work has determined that these neurons are inherently silent, and their activity is largely determined by synaptic inputs to CVNs that include four major types of synapses that release glutamate, GABA, glycine, or serotonin. Whereas prior reviews have focused on glutamatergic, GABAergic and glycinergic pathways, and the receptors in CVNs activated by these neurotransmitters, this review focuses on the alterations in CVN activity with hypoxia-, sleep-, and sleep-related cardiovascular diseases including obstructive sleep apnea.

  13. Action-potential duration and the modulation of transmitter release from the sensory neurons of Aplysia in presynaptic facilitation and behavioral sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochner, B; Klein, M; Schacher, S; Kandel, E R

    1986-11-01

    Presynaptic facilitation of transmitter release from Aplysia sensory neurons is an important contributor to behavioral sensitization of the gill and siphon withdrawal reflex. The enhanced release is accompanied by reduction of the serotonin-sensitive S current in the sensory neurons and a consequent increase in duration of the presynaptic action potential (ranging from 10% to 30%). We find that changes of similar magnitude in the duration of depolarizing voltage-clamp steps in sensory neurons in intact abdominal ganglia yield increases in synaptic potentials of 45-120%. In dissociated cell culture, these changes lead to increases of 25-60% in the synaptic potential. Prolongation of presynaptic depolarization using voltage clamp or prolongation of the duration of the action potential by K(+)-channel blockers leads to prolongation of the time-to-peak of the synaptic potentials; similar changes in time-to-peak occur during presynaptic facilitation. The time-to-peak is not changed by homosynaptic depression or by changing the Ca(2+) concentration, procedures that alter release without changing the duration of the action potential. Preventing the spike from broadening by voltage clamping the presynaptic neuron substantially reduces or blocks the facilitation. These results suggest that broadening of the action potential during facilitation is a causal factor in the enhancement of transmitter release.

  14. c-fos modulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in mouse hippocampal CA3 and dentate gyrus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Mei; Wu, Yongfei; Fan, Yunxia; Xu, Ming; Zhang, Jianhua

    2006-05-29

    Excess neuronal excitation by glutamate induces neuron cell death, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of acute brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. Our previous studies using a mouse with hippocampal c-fos gene deletion showed that c-fos regulates neuronal excitability and excitotoxicity. Moreover, a delayed induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein expression in response to kainic acid (KA) treatment was found in c-fos mutant mice compared to wildtype controls, suggesting that c-fos is important in the temporal control of BDNF induction. To further investigate mechanisms of in vivo regulation of c-fos on BDNF expression, we studied the expression of BDNF mRNA and its colocalization with c-Fos protein in the hippocampal formation in the presence and absence of KA. By in situ hybridization, we observed that the c-fos mutant and wildtype mice exhibited similar basal expression of BDNF in the absence of KA. In contrast, the KA-induced BDNF mRNA levels were significantly different in wildtype and c-fos mutant mice in CA3 and dentate gyrus regions. Our findings indicate that c-fos regulates expression of BDNF in distinct neuron populations of the hippocampal formation in vivo.

  15. NMDA currents modulate the synaptic input-output functions of neurons in the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus in Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porres, Christian P; Meyer, Elisabeth M M; Grothe, Benedikt; Felmy, Felix

    2011-03-23

    Neurons in the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL) receive excitatory and inhibitory inputs from the superior olivary complex (SOC) and convey GABAergic inhibition to the contralateral DNLL and the inferior colliculi. Unlike the fast glycinergic inhibition in the SOC, this GABAergic inhibition outlasts auditory stimulation by tens of milliseconds. Two mechanisms have been postulated to explain this persistent inhibition. One, an "integration-based" mechanism, suggests that postsynaptic excitatory integration in DNLL neurons generates prolonged activity, and the other favors the synaptic time course of the DNLL output itself. The feasibility of the integration-based mechanism was tested in vitro in DNLL neurons of Mongolian gerbils by quantifying the cellular excitability and synaptic input-output functions (IO-Fs). All neurons were sustained firing and generated a near monotonic IO-F on current injections. From synaptic stimulations, we estimate that activation of approximately five fibers, each on average liberating ∼18 vesicles, is sufficient to trigger a single postsynaptic action potential. A strong single pulse of afferent fiber stimulation triggered multiple postsynaptic action potentials. The steepness of the synaptic IO-F was dependent on the synaptic NMDA component. The synaptic NMDA receptor current defines the slope of the synaptic IO-F by enhancing the temporal and spatial EPSP summation. Blocking this NMDA-dependent amplification during postsynaptic integration of train stimulations resulted into a ∼20% reduction of the decay time course of the GABAergic inhibition. Thus, our data show that the NMDA-dependent amplification of the postsynaptic activity contributes to the GABAergic persistent inhibition generated by DNLL neurons.

  16. Transduction of brain dopamine neurons by adenoviral vectors is modulated by CAR expression: rationale for tropism modified vectors in PD gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis B Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene-based therapy is a new paradigm for the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD and offers considerable promise for precise targeting and flexibility to impact multiple pathobiological processes for which small molecule agents are not available. Some success has been achieved utilizing adeno-associated virus for this approach, but it is likely that the characteristics of this vector system will ultimately create barriers to progress in clinical therapy. Adenovirus (Ad vector overcomes limitations in payload size and targeting. The cellular tropism of Ad serotype 5 (Ad5-based vectors is regulated by the Ad attachment protein binding to its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR. Many clinically relevant tissues are refractory to Ad5 infection due to negligible CAR levels but can be targeted by tropism-modified, CAR-independent forms of Ad. Our objective was to evaluate the role of CAR protein in transduction of dopamine (DA neurons in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ad5 was delivered to the substantia nigra (SN in wild type (wt and CAR transgenic animals. Cellular tropism was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC in the SN and striatal terminals. CAR expression was assessed by western blot and IHC. We found in wt animals, Ad5 results in robust transgene expression in astrocytes and other non-neuronal cells but poor infection of DA neurons. In contrast, in transgenic animals, Ad5 infects SNc neurons resulting in expression of transduced protein in their striatal terminals. Western blot showed low CAR expression in the ventral midbrain of wt animals compared to transgenic animals. Interestingly, hCAR protein localizes with markers of post-synaptic structures, suggesting synapses are the point of entry into dopaminergic neurons in transgenic animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate that CAR deficiency limits infection of wild type DA neurons by Ad5 and provide a rationale for the

  17. Rescue of an in vitro neuron phenotype identified in Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons by modulating the WNT pathway and calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthymiou, Anastasia G; Steiner, Joe; Pavan, William J; Wincovitch, Stephen; Larson, Denise M; Porter, Forbes D; Rao, Mahendra S; Malik, Nasir

    2015-03-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is a familial disorder that has devastating consequences on postnatal development with multisystem effects, including neurodegeneration. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment option for NPC1; however, several potentially therapeutic compounds have been identified in assays using yeast, rodent models, and NPC1 human fibroblasts. Although these discoveries were made in fibroblasts from NPC1 subjects and were in some instances validated in animal models of the disease, testing these drugs on a cell type more relevant for NPC1 neurological disease would greatly facilitate both study of the disease and identification of more relevant therapeutic compounds. Toward this goal, we have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell line from a subject homozygous for the most frequent NPC1 mutation (p.I1061T) and subsequently created a stable line of neural stem cells (NSCs). These NSCs were then used to create neurons as an appropriate disease model. NPC1 neurons display a premature cell death phenotype, and gene expression analysis of these cells suggests dysfunction of important signaling pathways, including calcium and WNT. The clear readout from these cells makes them ideal candidates for high-throughput screening and will be a valuable tool to better understand the development of NPC1 in neural cells, as well as to develop better therapeutic options for NPC1.

  18. PGE2 released by primary sensory neurons modulates Toll-like receptor 4 activities through an EP4 receptor-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Kai-Hei; Chow, Kevin B S; Wise, Helen

    2016-04-15

    Exogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) displays mixed regulatory properties with regard to inflammatory gene expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells. We show here that endogenously-produced nanomolar concentrations of PGE2, such as that generated in response to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) stimulation, inhibits both cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) mRNA expression in DRG cells in an EP4 receptor-dependent manner. DRG neurons appear to be the major source of PGE2 in the DRG and likely serve as both an autocrine and paracrine system for limiting over-activation of both DRG neurons and glial cells in response to TLR4 stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsiang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR, which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA- induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus

  20. Folate deprivation modulates the expression of autophagy- and circadian-related genes in HT-22 hippocampal neuron cells through GR-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinwei; Yang, Yang; Li, Xi; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Zhang, Nana; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-08-01

    Folic acid (FA) is an extremely important nutrient for brain formation and development. FA deficiency is highly linked to brain degeneration and age-related diseases, which are also associated with autophagic activities and circadian rhythm in hippocampal neurons. However, little is known how autophagy- and circadian-related genes in hippocampal neurons are regulated under FA deficiency. Here, hippocampal neuroncells (HT-22) were employed to determine the effect of FA deprivation (FD) on the expression of relevant genes and to reveal the potential role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR). FD increased autophagic activities in HT-22 cells, associated with significantly (PGR activation indicated by higher ratio of GR phosphorylation. Out of 17 autophagy-related genes determined, 8 was significantly (PGR binding to the promoter sequence of ATG3 and Per2. Moreover, MeDIP analysis demonstrated significant (PGR-mediated pathway. Our results provide a basis for future investigations into the intracellular regulatory network in response to folate deficiency.

  1. Modulation of N-type Ca²⁺ currents by moxonidine via imidazoline I₁ receptor activation in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hwan; Nam, Taick-Sang; Ahn, Duck-Sun; Chung, Seungsoo

    2011-06-17

    Moxonidine, an imidazoline deriviatives, suppress the vasopressor sympathetic outflow to produce hypotension. This effect has been known to be mediated in part by suppressing sympathetic outflow via acting imidazoline I(1) receptors (IR(1)) at postganglionic sympathetic neurons. But, the cellular mechanism of IR(1)-induced inhibition of noradrenaline (NA) release is still unknown. We therefore, investigated the effect of IR(1) activation on voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels which is known to play an pivotal role in regulating NA in rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons, using the conventional whole-cell patch-clamp method. In the presence of rauwolscine (3 μΜ), which blocks α(2)-adrenoceptor (R(α2)), moxonidine inhibited voltage-dependent Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) by about 30%. This moxonidine-induced inhibition was almost completely prevented by efaroxan (10 μΜ) which blocks IR(1) as well as R(α2). In addition, ω-conotoxin (CgTx) GVIA (1 μΜ) occluded moxonidine-induced inhibition of I(Ca), but, moxonidine-induced I(Ca) inhibition was not affected by pertussis toxin (PTX) nor shows any characteristics of voltage-dependent inhibition. These data suggest that moxonidine inhibit voltage-dependent N-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca-N)) via activating IR(1). Finally, moxonidine significantly decreased the frequency of AP firing in a partially reversible manner. This inhibition of AP firing was almost completely occluded in the presence of ω-CgTx. Taken together, our results suggest that activation of IR(1) in SCG neurons reduced I(Ca-N) in a PTX-and voltage-insensitive pathway, and this inhibition attenuated repetitive AP firing in SCG neurons.

  2. Synaptic function is modulated by LRRK2 and glutamate release is increased in cortical neurons of G2019S LRRK2 knock-in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayne A Beccano-Kelly

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase-2 (LRRK2 result in familial Parkinson’s disease and the G2019S mutation alone accounts for up to 30% in some ethnicities. Despite this, the function of LRRK2 is largely undetermined although evidence suggests roles in phosphorylation, protein interactions, autophagy and endocytosis. Emerging reports link loss of LRRK2 to altered synaptic transmission, but the effects of the G2019S mutation upon synaptic release in mammalian neurons are unknown. To assess wild type and mutant LRRK2 in established neuronal networks, we conducted immunocytochemical, electrophysiological and biochemical characterisation of >3 week old cortical cultures of LRRK2 knock-out, wild-type overexpressing and G2019S knock-in mice. Synaptic release and synapse numbers were grossly normal in LRRK2 knock-out cells, but discretely reduced glutamatergic activity and reduced synaptic protein levels were observed. Conversely, synapse density was modestly but significantly increased in wild-type LRRK2 overexpressing cultures although event frequency was not. In knock-in cultures, glutamate release was markedly elevated, in the absence of any change to synapse density; indicating that physiological levels of G2019S LRRK2 elevate probability of release. Several presynaptic regulatory proteins shown by others to interact with LRRK2 were expressed at normal levels in knock-in cultures; however, synapsin 1 phosphorylation was significantly reduced. Thus, perturbations to the presynaptic release machinery and elevated synaptic transmission are early neuronal effects of LRRK2 G2019S. Furthermore, the comparison of knock-in and overexpressing cultures suggests that one copy of the G2019S mutation has a more pronounced effect than an ~3-fold increase in LRRK2 protein. Mutant-induced increases in transmission may convey additional stressors to neuronal physiology that may eventually contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease.

  3. Aluminum modulates effects of beta amyloid(1-42) on neuronal calcium homeostasis and mitochondria functioning and is altered in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Denise; Cavaliere, Alessandra; Mascetra, Nicola; Ciavardelli, Domenico; di Ilio, Carmine; Zatta, Paolo; Sensi, Stefano L

    2008-10-01

    Recent findings suggest that beta-amyloid (A beta) is more neurotoxic when present in its oligomeric configuration rather than as monomers or fibrils. Previous work from our laboratories has shown that A beta aggregation is strongly influenced by the conjugation of the peptide with metal ions (aluminum A, copper [Cu], zinc [Zn], and iron [Fe]) that are found in high concentrations in the core of senile plaques. Disruption of Ca++ signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction are potent triggers of neuronal death and have been implicated in the neuronal loss that is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we explored whether A beta-metal complexes can have detrimental effects on intraneuronal Ca++ ([Ca++]i) homeostasis and mitochondrial function in vitro. Results from our experiments indicate that, when conjugated with Al, A beta perturbs neuronal [Ca++]i homeostasis and inhibits mitochondrial respiration. Finally, we analyzed the content of the four metals in the brain of a triple transgenic animal model of AD and found that Al is the only one to be increased in the cortex of these mice.

  4. The role of neuronal synchronization in selective attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Womelsdorf, T.; Fries, P.

    2007-01-01

    Attention selectively enhances the influence of neuronal responses conveying information about relevant sensory attributes. Accumulating evidence suggests that this selective neuronal modulation relies on rhythmic synchronization at local and long-range spatial scales: attention selectively

  5. Schwann Cell Expressed Nogo-B Modulates Axonal Branching of Adult Sensory Neurons Through the Nogo-B Receptor NgBR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckharter, Christoph; Junker, Nina; Winter, Lilli; Fischer, Irmgard; Fogli, Barbara; Kistner, Steffen; Pfaller, Kristian; Zheng, Binhai; Wiche, Gerhard; Klimaschewski, Lars; Schweigreiter, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the central nervous system (CNS) nerve fibers do regenerate in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) although in a clinically unsatisfying manner. A major problem is excessive sprouting of regenerating axons which results in aberrant reinnervation of target tissue and impaired functional recovery. In the CNS, the reticulon protein Nogo-A has been identified as a prominent oligodendrocyte expressed inhibitor of long-distance growth of regenerating axons. We show here that the related isoform Nogo-B is abundantly expressed in Schwann cells in the PNS. Other than Nogo-A in oligodendrocytes, Nogo-B does not localize to the myelin sheath but is detected in the ER and the plasma membrane of Schwann cells. Adult sensory neurons that are cultured on nogo-a/b deficient Schwann cells form significantly fewer axonal branches vs. those on wildtype Schwann cells, while their maximal axonal extension is unaffected. We demonstrate that this effect of Nogo-B on neuronal morphology is restricted to undifferentiated Schwann cells and is mediated by direct physical contact between these two cell types. Moreover, we show that blocking the Nogo-B specific receptor NgBR, which we find expressed on sensory neurons and to interact with Schwann cell expressed Nogo-B, produces the same branching phenotype as observed after deletion of Nogo-B. These data provide evidence for a novel function of the nogo gene that is implemented by the Nogo-B isoform. The remarkably specific effects of Nogo-B/NgBR on axonal branching, while leaving axonal extension unaffected, are of potential clinical relevance in the context of excessive axonal sprouting after peripheral nerve injury. Nogo-B is prominently expressed in Schwann cells and localizes to the ER and plasma membrane. It distributes to the external cytoplasmic compartment of Schwann cells in vivo, but is absent from the myelin sheath.Genetic deletion of Nogo-B in Schwann cells reduces axonal branching, but not long-distance growth, of

  6. Non ionising radiation as a non chemical strategy in regenerative medicine: Ca(2+)-ICR "In Vitro" effect on neuronal differentiation and tumorigenicity modulation in NT2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledda, Mario; Megiorni, Francesca; Pozzi, Deleana; Giuliani, Livio; D'Emilia, Enrico; Piccirillo, Sara; Mattei, Cristiana; Grimaldi, Settimio; Lisi, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In regenerative medicine finding a new method for cell differentiation without pharmacological treatment or gene modification and minimal cell manipulation is a challenging goal. In this work we reported a neuronal induced differentiation and consequent reduction of tumorigenicity in NT2 human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells exposed to an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF), matching the cyclotron frequency corresponding to the charge/mass ratio of calcium ion (Ca(2+)-ICR). These cells, capable of differentiating into post-mitotic neurons following treatment with Retinoic Acid (RA), were placed in a solenoid and exposed for 5 weeks to Ca(2+)-ICR. The solenoid was installed in a μ-metal shielded room to avoid the effect of the geomagnetic field and obtained totally controlled and reproducible conditions. Contrast microscopy analysis reveled, in the NT2 exposed cells, an important change in shape and morphology with the outgrowth of neuritic-like structures together with a lower proliferation rate and metabolic activity alike those found in the RA treated cells. A significant up-regulation of early and late neuronal differentiation markers and a significant down-regulation of the transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) and the fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4) were also observed in the exposed cells. The decreased protein expression of the transforming gene Cripto-1 and the reduced capability of the exposed NT2 cells to form colonies in soft agar supported these last results. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the Ca(2+)-ICR frequency is able to induce differentiation and reduction of tumorigenicity in NT2 exposed cells suggesting a new potential therapeutic use in regenerative medicine.

  7. Long-term omega-3 supplementation modulates behavior, hippocampal fatty acid concentration, neuronal progenitor proliferation and central TNF-α expression in 7 month old unchallenged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Trent; Toben, Catherine; Jaehne, Emily J; Corrigan, Frances; Baune, Bernhard T

    2014-01-01

    Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) manipulation is being investigated as a potential therapeutic supplement to reduce the risk of developing age-related cognitive decline (ARCD). Animal studies suggest that high omega (Ω)-3 and low Ω-6 dietary content reduces cognitive decline by decreasing central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and modifying neuroimmune activity. However, no previous studies have investigated the long term effects of Ω-3 and Ω-6 dietary levels in healthy aging mice leaving the important question about the preventive effects of Ω-3 and Ω-6 on behavior and underlying molecular pathways unaddressed. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of long-term Ω-3 and Ω-6 PUFA dietary supplementation in mature adult C57BL/6 mice. We measured the effect of low, medium, and high Ω-3:Ω-6 dietary ratio, given from the age of 3-7 months, on anxiety and cognition-like behavior, hippocampal tissue expression of TNF-α, markers of neuronal progenitor proliferation and gliogenesis and serum cytokine concentration. Our results show that a higher Ω-3:Ω-6 PUFA diet ratio increased hippocampal PUFA, increased anxiety, improved hippocampal dependent spatial memory and reduced hippocampal TNF-α levels compared to a low Ω-3:Ω-6 diet. Furthermore, serum TNF-α concentration was reduced in the higher Ω-3:Ω-6 PUFA ratio supplementation group while expression of the neuronal progenitor proliferation markers KI67 and doublecortin (DCX) was increased in the dentate gyrus as opposed to the low Ω-3:Ω-6 group. Conversely, Ω-3:Ω-6 dietary PUFA ratio had no significant effect on astrocyte or microglia number or cell death in the dentate gyrus. These results suggest that supplementation of PUFAs may delay aging effects on cognitive function in unchallenged mature adult C57BL/6 mice. This effect is possibly induced by increasing neuronal progenitor proliferation and reducing TNF-α.

  8. Long-term omega-3 supplementation modulates behavior, hippocampal fatty acid concentration, neuronal progenitor proliferation and central TNF-α expression in 7 month old unchallenged mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trent eGrundy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA manipulation is being investigated as a potential therapeutic supplement to reduce the risk of developing age-related cognitive decline (ARCD. Animal studies suggest that high omega (Ω-3 and low Ω-6 dietary content reduces cognitive decline by decreasing central nervous system (CNS inflammation and modifying neuroimmune activity. However, no previous studies have investigated the long term effects of Ω-3 and Ω-6 dietary levels in healthy aging mice leaving the important question about the preventive effects of Ω-3 and Ω-6 on behavior and underlying molecular pathways unaddressed. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of long-term Ω-3 and Ω-6 PUFA dietary supplementation in mature adult C57BL/6 mice. We measured the effect of low, medium and high Ω-3:Ω-6 dietary ratio, given from the age of 3 to 7 months, on anxiety and cognition-like behavior, hippocampal tissue expression of TNF-α, markers of neuronal progenitor proliferation and gliogenesis and serum cytokine concentration. Our results show that a higher Ω-3:Ω-6 PUFA diet ratio increased hippocampal PUFA, increased anxiety, improved hippocampal dependent spatial memory and reduced hippocampal TNF-α levels compared to a low Ω-3:Ω-6 diet. Furthermore, serum TNF-α concentration was reduced in the higher Ω-3:Ω-6 PUFA ratio supplementation group while expression of the neuronal progenitor proliferation markers KI67 and doublecortin (DCX was increased in the dentate gyrus as opposed to the low Ω-3:Ω-6 group. Conversely, Ω-3:Ω-6 dietary PUFA ratio had no significant effect on astrocyte or microglia number or cell death in the dentate gyrus. These results suggest that supplementation of PUFAs may delay ageing effects on cognitive function in unchallenged mature adult C57BL/6 mice. This effect is possibly induced by increasing neuronal progenitor proliferation and reducing TNF-α.

  9. Non ionising radiation as a non chemical strategy in regenerative medicine: Ca(2+-ICR "In Vitro" effect on neuronal differentiation and tumorigenicity modulation in NT2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ledda

    Full Text Available In regenerative medicine finding a new method for cell differentiation without pharmacological treatment or gene modification and minimal cell manipulation is a challenging goal. In this work we reported a neuronal induced differentiation and consequent reduction of tumorigenicity in NT2 human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells exposed to an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF, matching the cyclotron frequency corresponding to the charge/mass ratio of calcium ion (Ca(2+-ICR. These cells, capable of differentiating into post-mitotic neurons following treatment with Retinoic Acid (RA, were placed in a solenoid and exposed for 5 weeks to Ca(2+-ICR. The solenoid was installed in a μ-metal shielded room to avoid the effect of the geomagnetic field and obtained totally controlled and reproducible conditions. Contrast microscopy analysis reveled, in the NT2 exposed cells, an important change in shape and morphology with the outgrowth of neuritic-like structures together with a lower proliferation rate and metabolic activity alike those found in the RA treated cells. A significant up-regulation of early and late neuronal differentiation markers and a significant down-regulation of the transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α and the fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4 were also observed in the exposed cells. The decreased protein expression of the transforming gene Cripto-1 and the reduced capability of the exposed NT2 cells to form colonies in soft agar supported these last results. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the Ca(2+-ICR frequency is able to induce differentiation and reduction of tumorigenicity in NT2 exposed cells suggesting a new potential therapeutic use in regenerative medicine.

  10. Schwann cell expressed Nogo-B modulates axonal branching of adult sensory neurons through the Nogo-B receptor NgBR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eEckharter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the central nervous system (CNS nerve fibers do regenerate in the peripheral nervous system (PNS although in a clinically unsatisfying manner. A major problem is excessive sprouting of regenerating axons which results in aberrant reinnervation of target tissue and impaired functional recovery. In the CNS, the reticulon protein Nogo-A has been identified as a prominent oligodendrocyte expressed inhibitor of long-distance growth of regenerating axons. We show here that the related isoform Nogo-B is abundantly expressed in Schwann cells in the PNS. Other than Nogo-A in oligodendrocytes, Nogo-B does not localize to the myelin sheath but is detected in the ER and the plasma membrane of Schwann cells. Adult sensory neurons that are cultured on nogo-a/b deficient Schwann cells form significantly fewer axonal branches versus those on wildtype Schwann cells, while their maximal axonal extension is unaffected. We demonstrate that this effect of Nogo-B on neuronal morphology is restricted to undifferentiated Schwann cells and is mediated by direct physical contact between these two cell types. Moreover, we show that blocking the Nogo-B specific receptor NgBR, which we find expressed on sensory neurons and to interact with Schwann cell expressed Nogo-B, produces the same branching phenotype as observed after deletion of Nogo-B. These data provide evidence for a novel function of the nogo gene that is implemented by the Nogo-B isoform. The remarkably specific effects of Nogo-B/ NgBR on axonal branching, while leaving axonal extension unaffected, are of potential clinical relevance in the context of excessive axonal sprouting after peripheral nerve injury.

  11. Phenotypic checkpoints regulate neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2010-11-01

    Nervous system development proceeds by sequential gene expression mediated by cascades of transcription factors in parallel with sequences of patterned network activity driven by receptors and ion channels. These sequences are cell type- and developmental stage-dependent and modulated by paracrine actions of substances released by neurons and glia. How and to what extent these sequences interact to enable neuronal network development is not understood. Recent evidence demonstrates that CNS development requires intermediate stages of differentiation providing functional feedback that influences gene expression. We suggest that embryonic neuronal functions constitute a series of phenotypic checkpoint signatures; neurons failing to express these functions are delayed or developmentally arrested. Such checkpoints are likely to be a general feature of neuronal development and constitute presymptomatic signatures of neurological disorders when they go awry.

  12. Modulation of Mu Suppression in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Response to Familiar or Unfamiliar Stimuli: The Mirror Neuron Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberman, Lindsay M.; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S.; Pineda, Jaime A.

    2008-01-01

    In an early description of the mu rhythm, Gastaut and Bert [Gastaut, H. J., & Bert, J. (1954). EEG changes during cinematographic presentation. "Clinical Neurophysiology", 6, 433-444] noted that it was blocked when an individual identified himself with an active person on the screen, suggesting that it may be modulated by the degree to which the…

  13. Modulation of Mu Suppression in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Response to Familiar or Unfamiliar Stimuli: The Mirror Neuron Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberman, Lindsay M.; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S.; Pineda, Jaime A.

    2008-01-01

    In an early description of the mu rhythm, Gastaut and Bert [Gastaut, H. J., & Bert, J. (1954). EEG changes during cinematographic presentation. "Clinical Neurophysiology", 6, 433-444] noted that it was blocked when an individual identified himself with an active person on the screen, suggesting that it may be modulated by the degree to which the…

  14. Topiramate reduces excitability in the basolateral amygdala by selectively inhibiting GluK1 (GluR5) kainate receptors on interneurons and positively modulating GABAA receptors on principal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Maria F M; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Li, He; Rogawski, Michael A

    2009-08-01

    Topiramate [2,3:4,5-bis-O-(1-methylethylidene)-beta-D-fructopyranose sulfamate] is a structurally novel antiepileptic drug that has broad efficacy in epilepsy, but the mechanisms underlying its therapeutic activity are not fully understood. We have found that topiramate selectively inhibits GluK1 (GluR5) kainate receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic responses in rat basolateral amygdala (BLA) principal neurons and protects against seizures induced by the GluK1 kainate receptor agonist (R,S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (ATPA). Here, we demonstrate that topiramate also modulates inhibitory function in the BLA. Using whole-cell recordings in rat amygdala slices, we found that 0.3 to 10 microM topiramate 1) inhibited ATPA-evoked postsynaptic currents recorded from BLA interneurons; 2) suppressed ATPA-induced enhancement of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) recorded from BLA pyramidal cells; and 3) blocked ATPA-induced suppression of evoked IPSCs, which is mediated by presynaptic GluK1 kainate receptors present on BLA interneurons. Topiramate (10 microM) had no effect on the AMPA [(R,S)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid]-induced enhancement of spontaneous activity of BLA neurons. Thus, although topiramate inhibits GluK1 kainate receptor-mediated enhancement of interneuron firing, it promotes evoked GABA release, leading to a net inhibition of circuit excitability. In addition, we found that topiramate (0.3-10 microM) increased the amplitude of evoked, spontaneous, and miniature IPSCs in BLA pyramidal neurons, indicating an enhancement of postsynaptic GABA(A) receptor responses. Taken together with our previous findings, we conclude that topiramate protects against hyperexcitability in the BLA by suppressing the GluK1 kainate receptor-mediated excitation of principal neurons by glutamatergic afferents, blocking the suppression of GABA release from interneurons mediated by presynaptic GluK1

  15. Repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuronal restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF can regulate HSV-1 immediate-early transcription via histone modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill James M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During primary infection of its human host, Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 (HSV-1 establishes latency in neurons where the viral genome is maintained in a circular form associated with nucleosomes in a chromatin configration. During latency, most viral genes are silenced, although the molecular mechanisms responsible for this are unclear. We hypothesized that neuronal factors repress HSV-1 gene expression during latency. A search of the HSV-1 DNA sequence for potential regulatory elements identified a Repressor Element-1/Neuronal Restrictive Silencer Element (RE-1/NRSE located between HSV-1 genes ICP22 and ICP4. We predicted that the Repressor Element Silencing Transcription Factor/Neuronal Restrictive Silencer Factor (REST/NRSF regulates expression of ICP22 and ICP4. Results Transient cotransfection indicated that REST/NRSF inhibited the activity of both promoters. In contrast, cotransfection of a mutant form of REST/NRSF encoding only the DNA-binding domain of the protein resulted in less inhibition. Stably transformed cell lines containing episomal reporter plasmids with a chromatin structure showed that REST/NRSF specifically inhibited the ICP4 promoter, but not the ICP22 promoter. REST/NRSF inhibition of the ICP4 promoter was reversed by histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA. Additionally, chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP assays indicated that the corepressor CoREST was recruited to the proximity of ICP4 promoter and that acetylation of histone H4 was reduced in the presence of REST/NRSF. Conclusion Since the ICP4 protein is a key transactivator of HSV-1 lytic cycle genes, these results suggest that REST/NRSF may have an important role in the establishment and/or maintenance of HSV-1 gene silencing during latency by targeting ICP4 expression.

  16. Stiff substrates enhance cultured neuronal network activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan-You; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Xie, Jing; Li, Chen-Xu; Chen, Wei-Yi; Liu, Bai-Lin; Wu, Xiao-an; Li, Shu-Na; Huo, Bo; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Hu-Cheng

    2014-08-28

    The mechanical property of extracellular matrix and cell-supporting substrates is known to modulate neuronal growth, differentiation, extension and branching. Here we show that substrate stiffness is an important microenvironmental cue, to which mouse hippocampal neurons respond and integrate into synapse formation and transmission in cultured neuronal network. Hippocampal neurons were cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates fabricated to have similar surface properties but a 10-fold difference in Young's modulus. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel currents determined by patch-clamp recording were greater in neurons on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Ca(2+) oscillations in cultured neuronal network monitored using time-lapse single cell imaging increased in both amplitude and frequency among neurons on stiff substrates. Consistently, synaptic connectivity recorded by paired recording was enhanced between neurons on stiff substrates. Furthermore, spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic activity became greater and more frequent in neurons on stiff substrates. Evoked excitatory transmitter release and excitatory postsynaptic currents also were heightened at synapses between neurons on stiff substrates. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence to show that substrate stiffness is an important biophysical factor modulating synapse connectivity and transmission in cultured hippocampal neuronal network. Such information is useful in designing instructive scaffolds or supporting substrates for neural tissue engineering.

  17. Neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) represses cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) transcription and antagonizes cAMP-response element-binding protein signaling through a dual NRSE mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Sihan; Yuan, Lin; Yang, Yinxiang; Zhang, Bowen; Liu, Qingbin; Chen, Lin; Yue, Wen; Li, Yanhua; Pei, Xuetao

    2012-12-14

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide plays a pivotal role in neuroprotection against stroke-related brain injury. However, the regulatory mechanism on CART transcription, especially the repression mechanism, is not fully understood. Here, we show that the transcriptional repressor neuron-restrictive silencer elements (NRSF, also known as REST) represses CART expression through direct binding to two NRSF-binding elements (NRSEs) in the CART promoter and intron 1 (named pNRSE and iNRSE, respectively). EMSA show that NRSF binds to pNRSE and iNRSE directly in vitro. ChIP assays show that NRSF recruits differential co-repressor complexes including CoREST and HDAC1 to these NRSEs. The presence of both NRSEs is required for efficient repression of CART transcription as indicated by reporter gene assays. NRSF overexpression antagonizes forskolin-mediated up-regulation of CART mRNA and protein. Ischemia insult triggered by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) enhances NRSF mRNA levels and then NRSF antagonizes the CREB signaling on CART activation, leading to augmented cell death. Depletion of NRSF in combination with forskolin treatment increases neuronal survival after ischemic insult. These findings reveal a novel dual NRSE mechanism by which NRSF represses CART expression and suggest that NRSF may serve as a therapeutic target for stroke treatment.

  18. PSD95 Gene Specific siRNAs Attenuate Neuropathic Pain through Modulating Neuron Sensibility and Postsynaptic CaMKⅡα Phosphorylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Le Shen; Xu Li; Nen Chen; Li Xu; Wei Liu; Xue-rong Yu; Yu-guang Huang

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of PSD95 gene specific siRNAs on neuropathic pain relief,neuron viability,and postsynaptic calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ⅱα (CaMKⅡα) phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo.Methods Gene-specific siRNAs of rat PSD95 were synthesized chemically for transfection.Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 3 groups:naive group (n=6),sham group (n=6),and sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) group (n=24).The CCI group was further divided into 4 groups (n=6 in each group),which were pretreated with normal saline,transfection vehicle,negative control siRNAs,and PSD95 gene specific siRNAs respectively.All the subgroups received corresponding agents intrathecally for 3 days,started one day before the CCI of sciatic nerve.Both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured on post-operative day 3 and 7.PSD95 gene silenced NG108-15 cells were further stimulated by glutamate,with the cell viability and the expression/phosphorylation of CaMKⅡα measured by MTT cell proliferation assay andWestern blot,respectively.Results The siRNAs decreased PSD95 mRNA level significantly both in vivo and in vitro.Neuropathic pain rats pretreated with PSD95 gene specific siRNAs exhibited significant elevation in the mechanical withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency,without affecting the baseline nociception.PSD95 gene silencing enhanced neuronal tolerance against the glutamate excitotoxicity,meanwhile the phosphorylation of CaMKⅡαThr286 was attenuated.Conclusion Pre-emptive administration of PSD95 gene specific siRNAs may attenuate the central sensitization CaMKⅡα-related signaling cascades,leading to the relief of neuropathic pain.

  19. The Abused Inhalant Toluene Differentially Modulates Excitatory and Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in Deep-Layer Neurons of the Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, Jacob T; Woodward, John J

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic solvents such as toluene are voluntarily inhaled for their intoxicating effects. Solvent use is especially prevalent among adolescents, and is associated with deficits in a wide range of cognitive tasks including attention, behavioral control, and risk assessment. Despite these findings, little is known about the effects of toluene on brain areas mediating these behaviors. In this study, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were used to determine the effect toluene on neurons within the medial PFC, a region critically involved in cognitive function. Toluene had no effect on measures of intrinsic excitability, but enhanced stimulus-evoked γ-amino butyric acid A-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). In the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) to block action potentials, toluene increased the frequency and amplitude of miniature IPSCs. In contrast, toluene induced a delayed but persistent decrease in evoked or spontaneous AMPA-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). This effect was prevented by an intracellular calcium chelator or by the ryanodine receptor and SERCA inhibitors, dantrolene or thapsigargin, respectively, suggesting that toluene may mobilize intracellular calcium pools. The toluene-induced reduction in AMPA EPSCs was also prevented by a cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) antagonist, and was occluded by the CB1 agonist WIN 55,212-2 that itself induced a profound decrease in AMPA-mediated EPSCs. Toluene had no effect on the frequency or amplitude of miniature EPSCs recorded in the presence of TTX. Finally, toluene dose-dependently inhibited N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA)-mediated EPSCs and the magnitude and reversibility of this effect was CB1R sensitive indicating both direct and indirect actions of toluene on NMDA-mediated responses. Together, these results suggest that the effect of toluene on cognitive behaviors may result from its action on inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission of PFC neurons. PMID:21430649

  20. Abbreviated exposure to hypoxia is sufficient to induce CNS dysmyelination, modulate spinal motor neuron composition, and impair motor development in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watzlawik, Jens O; Kahoud, Robert J; O'Toole, Ryan J; White, Katherine A M; Ogden, Alyssa R; Painter, Meghan M; Wootla, Bharath; Papke, Louisa M; Denic, Aleksandar; Weimer, Jill M; Carey, William A; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal white matter injury (nWMI) is an increasingly common cause of cerebral palsy that results predominantly from hypoxic injury to progenitor cells including those of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Existing mouse models of nWMI utilize prolonged periods of hypoxia during the neonatal period, require complex cross-fostering and exhibit poor growth and high mortality rates. Abnormal CNS myelin composition serves as the major explanation for persistent neuro-motor deficits. Here we developed a simplified model of nWMI with low mortality rates and improved growth without cross-fostering. Neonatal mice are exposed to low oxygen from postnatal day (P) 3 to P7, which roughly corresponds to the period of human brain development between gestational weeks 32 and 36. CNS hypomyelination is detectable for 2-3 weeks post injury and strongly correlates with levels of body and brain weight loss. Immediately following hypoxia treatment, cell death was evident in multiple brain regions, most notably in superficial and deep cortical layers as well as the subventricular zone progenitor compartment. PDGFαR, Nkx2.2, and Olig2 positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cell were significantly reduced until postnatal day 27. In addition to CNS dysmyelination we identified a novel pathological marker for adult hypoxic animals that strongly correlates with life-long neuro-motor deficits. Mice reared under hypoxia reveal an abnormal spinal neuron composition with increased small and medium diameter axons and decreased large diameter axons in thoracic lateral and anterior funiculi. Differences were particularly pronounced in white matter motor tracts left and right of the anterior median fissure. Our findings suggest that 4 days of exposure to hypoxia are sufficient to induce experimental nWMI in CD1 mice, thus providing a model to test new therapeutics. Pathological hallmarks of this model include early cell death, decreased OPCs and hypomyelination in early postnatal life, followed by

  1. Mirror neurons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal...

  2. Periodically-modulated inhibition of living pacemaker neurons--III. The heterogeneity of the postsynaptic spike trains, and how control parameters affect it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segundo, J P; Vibert, J F; Stiber, M

    1998-11-01

    Codings involving spike trains at synapses with inhibitory postsynaptic potentials on pacemakers were examined in crayfish stretch receptor organs by modulating presynaptic instantaneous rates periodically (triangles or sines; frequencies, slopes and depths under, respectively, 5.0 Hz, 40.0/s/s and 25.0/s). Timings were described by interspike and cross-intervals ("phases"); patterns (dispersions, sequences) and forms (timing classes) were identified using pooled graphs (instant along the cycle when a spike occurs vs preceding interval) and return maps (plots of successive intervals). A remarkable heterogeneity of postsynaptic intervals and phases characterizes each modulation. All cycles separate into the same portions: each contains a particular form and switches abruptly to the next. Forms differ in irregularity and predictability: they are (see text) "p:q alternations", "intermittent", "phase walk-throughs", "messy erratic" and "messy stammering". Postsynaptic cycles are asymmetric (hysteresis). This contrasts with the presynaptic homogeneity, smoothness and symmetry. All control parameters are, individually and jointly, strongly influential. Presynaptic slopes, say, act through a postsynaptic sensitivity to their magnitude and sign; when increasing, hysteresis augments and forms change or disappear. Appropriate noise attenuates between-train contrasts, providing modulations are under 0.5 Hz. Postsynaptic natural intervals impose critical time bases, separating presynaptic intervals (around, above or below them) with dissimilar consequences. Coding rules are numerous and have restricted domains; generalizations are misleading. Modulation-driven forms are trendy pacemaker-driven forms. However, dissimilarities, slight when patterns are almost pacemaker, increase as inhibition departs from pacemaker and incorporate unpredictable features. Physiological significance-(1) Pacemaker-driven forms, simple and ubiquitous, appear to be elementary building blocks of

  3. Unconventional ligands and modulators of nicotinic receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pereira, Edna F.R; Hilmas, Corey; Santos, Mariton D; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Maelicke, Alfred; Albuquerque, Edson X

    2002-01-01

    .... In the mammalian brain, neuronal nAChRs, in addition to mediating fast synaptic transmission, modulate fast synaptic transmission mediated by the major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters...

  4. A Quantitative Analysis of Modulation of the Fast Excitatory Postsynaptic Potential of Neurons in Rat Sympathetic Ganglia by a Low-Intensity Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Hua; YANG Li-Jian; JIA Ya

    2005-01-01

    @@ We propose a mathematical model which can quantitatively describe the kinetics of postsynaptic membrane potential modulated by a low intensity laser. By virtue of the numerical computation, it is found that the height of peak of fast excitatory postsynaptic potential (f-EPSP) for intermediate laser power density (around 2mW/cm2) is higher than that for both small and large laser power densities, that is, of the f-EPSP peak height changes with the increasing laser power density (up to 5mW/cm2) in non-monotonic behaviour. The theoretical results are qualitatively consistent with the previous experimental data.

  5. NPY Y1 receptors differentially modulate GABAA and NMDA receptors via divergent signal-transduction pathways to reduce excitability of amygdala neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molosh, Andrei I; Sajdyk, Tammy J; Truitt, William A; Zhu, Weiguo; Oxford, Gerry S; Shekhar, Anantha

    2013-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) administration into the basolateral amygdala (BLA) decreases anxiety-like behavior, mediated in part through the Y1 receptor (Y1R) isoform. Activation of Y1Rs results in G-protein-mediated reduction of cAMP levels, which results in reduced excitability of amygdala projection neurons. Understanding the mechanisms linking decreased cAMP levels to reduced excitability in amygdala neurons is important for identifying novel anxiolytic targets. We studied the intracellular mechanisms of activation of Y1Rs on synaptic transmission in the BLA. Activating Y1Rs by [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-NPY (L-P NPY) reduced the amplitude of evoked NMDA-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs), without affecting AMPA-mediated eEPSCs, but conversely increased the amplitude of GABAA-mediated evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs). Both effects were abolished by the Y1R antagonist, PD160170. Intracellular GDP-β-S, or pre-treatment with either forskolin or 8Br-cAMP, eliminated the effects of L-P NPY on both NMDA- and GABAA-mediated currents. Thus, both the NMDA and GABAA effects of Y1R activation in the BLA are G-protein-mediated and cAMP-dependent. Pipette inclusion of protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit blocked the effect of L-P NPY on GABAA-mediated eIPSCs, but not on NMDA-mediated eEPSCs. Conversely, activating the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) with 8CPT-2Me-cAMP blocked the effect of L-P NPY on NMDA-mediated eEPSCs, but not on GABAA-mediated eIPSCs. Thus, NPY regulates amygdala excitability via two signal-transduction events, with reduced PKA activity enhancing GABAA-mediated eIPSCs and Epac deactivation reducing NMDA-mediated eEPSCs. This multipathway regulation of NMDA- and GABAA-mediated currents may be important for NPY plasticity and stress resilience in the amygdala.

  6. The Neuronal-Specific SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2 Kinase as a Transcriptional Modulator of BAG4, Brox, and PPP1CB Genes Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca González-Fernández

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Serum- and Glucocorticoid-induced Kinase 1, SGK1, exhibits a broad range of cellular functions that include regulation of the number of ion channels in plasma membrane and modulation of signaling pathways of cell survival. This diversity of functions is made possible by various regulatory processes acting upon the SGK1 gene, giving rise to various isoforms: SGK1_v1–5, each with distinct properties and distinct aminotermini that serve to target proteins to different subcellular compartments. Among cellular effects of SGK1 expression is to indirectly modulate gene transcription by phosphorylating transcriptional factors of the FOXO family. Here we examined if SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2; NM_001143676, which associates primarily to the plasma membrane, is also able to regulate gene expression. Using a differential gene expression approach we identified six genes upregulated by SGK1.1 in HeLa cells. Further analysis of transcript and protein levels validated two genes: BCL2-associated athanogene 4 (BAG-4 and Brox. The results indicate that SGK1.1 regulates gene transcription upon a different set of genes some of which participate in cell survival pathways (BAG-4 and others in intracellular vesicular traffic (Brox.

  7. The Neuronal-Specific SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2) Kinase as a Transcriptional Modulator of BAG4, Brox, and PPP1CB Genes Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Rebeca; Ávila, Julio; Arteaga, María F.; Canessa, Cecilia M.; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The Serum- and Glucocorticoid-induced Kinase 1, SGK1, exhibits a broad range of cellular functions that include regulation of the number of ion channels in plasma membrane and modulation of signaling pathways of cell survival. This diversity of functions is made possible by various regulatory processes acting upon the SGK1 gene, giving rise to various isoforms: SGK1_v1–5, each with distinct properties and distinct aminotermini that serve to target proteins to different subcellular compartments. Among cellular effects of SGK1 expression is to indirectly modulate gene transcription by phosphorylating transcriptional factors of the FOXO family. Here we examined if SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2; NM_001143676), which associates primarily to the plasma membrane, is also able to regulate gene expression. Using a differential gene expression approach we identified six genes upregulated by SGK1.1 in HeLa cells. Further analysis of transcript and protein levels validated two genes: BCL2-associated athanogene 4 (BAG-4) and Brox. The results indicate that SGK1.1 regulates gene transcription upon a different set of genes some of which participate in cell survival pathways (BAG-4) and others in intracellular vesicular traffic (Brox). PMID:25849655

  8. PDFR and CRY signaling converge in a subset of clock neurons to modulate the amplitude and phase of circadian behavior in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seol Hee Im

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To synchronize their molecular rhythms, circadian pacemaker neurons must input both external and internal timing cues and, therefore, signal integration between sensory information and internal clock status is fundamental to normal circadian physiology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate the specific convergence of clock-derived neuropeptide signaling with that of a deep brain photoreceptor. We report that the neuropeptide PDF receptor and the circadian photoreceptor CRYPTOCROME (CRY are precisely co-expressed in a subset of pacemakers, and that these pathways together provide a requisite drive for circadian control of daily locomotor rhythms. These convergent signaling pathways influence the phase of rhythm generation, but also its amplitude. In the absence of both pathways, PER rhythms were greatly reduced in only those specific pacemakers that receive convergent inputs and PER levels remained high in the nucleus throughout the day. This suggested a large-scale dis-regulation of the pacemaking machinery. Behavioral rhythms were likewise disrupted: in light:dark conditions they were aberrant, and under constant dark conditions, they were lost. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We speculate that the convergence of environmental and clock-derived signals may produce a coincident detection of light, synergistic responses to it, and thus more accurate and more efficient re-setting properties.

  9. A New Population of Parvocellular Oxytocin Neurons Controlling Magnocellular Neuron Activity and Inflammatory Pain Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliava, Marina; Melchior, Meggane; Knobloch-Bollmann, H Sophie; Wahis, Jérôme; da Silva Gouveia, Miriam; Tang, Yan; Ciobanu, Alexandru Cristian; Triana del Rio, Rodrigo; Roth, Lena C; Althammer, Ferdinand; Chavant, Virginie; Goumon, Yannick; Gruber, Tim; Petit-Demoulière, Nathalie; Busnelli, Marta; Chini, Bice; Tan, Linette L; Mitre, Mariela; Froemke, Robert C; Chao, Moses V; Giese, Günter; Sprengel, Rolf; Kuner, Rohini; Poisbeau, Pierrick; Seeburg, Peter H; Stoop, Ron; Charlet, Alexandre; Grinevich, Valery

    2016-03-16

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide elaborated by the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei. Magnocellular OT neurons of these nuclei innervate numerous forebrain regions and release OT into the blood from the posterior pituitary. The PVN also harbors parvocellular OT cells that project to the brainstem and spinal cord, but their function has not been directly assessed. Here, we identified a subset of approximately 30 parvocellular OT neurons, with collateral projections onto magnocellular OT neurons and neurons of deep layers of the spinal cord. Evoked OT release from these OT neurons suppresses nociception and promotes analgesia in an animal model of inflammatory pain. Our findings identify a new population of OT neurons that modulates nociception in a two tier process: (1) directly by release of OT from axons onto sensory spinal cord neurons and inhibiting their activity and (2) indirectly by stimulating OT release from SON neurons into the periphery.

  10. The Histamine H3 Receptor Differentially Modulates Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) and Akt Signaling in Striatonigral and Striatopallidal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Frick, Luciana R; Horn, Kyla D; Schwarcz, Rivka C; Pogorelov, Vladimir; Nairn, Angus C; Pittenger, Christopher

    2016-09-30

    The basal ganglia have a central role in motor patterning, habits, motivated behaviors, and cognition as well as in numerous neuropsychiatric disorders. Receptors for histamine, especially the H3 receptor (H3R), are highly expressed in the striatum, the primary input nucleus of the basal ganglia, but their effects on this circuitry have been little explored. H3R interacts with dopamine (DA) receptors ex vivo; the nature and functional importance of these interactions in vivo remain obscure. We found H3R activation with the agonist R-(-)-α-methylhistamine to produce a unique time- and cell type-dependent profile of molecular signaling events in the striatum. H3 agonist treatment did not detectably alter extracellular DA levels or signaling through the cAMP/DARPP-32 signaling pathway in either D1- or D2-expressing striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). In D1-MSNs, H3 agonist treatment transiently activated MAPK signaling and phosphorylation of rpS6 and led to phosphorylation of GSK3β-Ser(9), a novel effect. Consequences of H3 activation in D2-MSNs were completely different. MAPK signaling was unchanged, and GSK3β-Ser(9) phosphorylation was reduced. At the behavioral level, two H3 agonists had no significant effect on locomotion or stereotypy, but they dramatically attenuated the locomotor activation produced by the D1 agonist SKF82958. H3 agonist co-administration blocked the activation of MAPK signaling and the phosphorylation of rpS6 produced by D1 activation in D1-MSNs, paralleling behavioral effects. In contrast, GSK3β-Ser(9) phosphorylation was seen only after H3 agonist treatment, with no interactive effects. H3R signaling has been neglected in models of basal ganglia function and has implications for a range of pathophysiologies.

  11. Morphine, but not sodium cromoglycate, modulates the release of substance P from capsaicin-sensitive neurones in the rat trachea in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, N. J.; Jones, A. J.; Keen, P.

    1991-01-01

    1. Opioids have been shown to inhibit substance P (SP) release from primary afferent neurones (PAN). In addition, opioid receptors have been identified on PAN of the vagus nerves. Sodium cromoglycate (SCG) decreases the excitability of C-fibres in the lung of the dog in vivo. We have utilised a multi-superfusion system to investigate the effect of opioids and SCG on the release of SP from the rat trachea in vitro. 2. Pretreatment of newborn rats with capsaicin (50 mg kg-1 s.c. at day 1 and 2 of life) resulted in a 93.2 +/- 6.3% reduction in tracheal substance P-like immunoreactivity (SP-LI) content when determined by radioimmunoassay in the adult. 3. Exposure to isotonically elevated potassium concentrations (37-90 mM), capsaicin (100 nM-10 microM), and bradykinin (BK; 10nm-1 microM) but not des-Arg9-BK (1 microM) stimulated SP-LI release by a calcium-dependent mechanism. 4. SCG (1 microM and 100 microM) did not affect spontaneous, potassium (60 mM)- or BK (1 microM)-stimulated SP-LI release. 5. Morphine (0.1-100 microM) caused dose-related inhibition of potassium (60 mM)-stimulated SP-LI release with the greatest inhibition of 60.4 +/- 13.7% at 100 microM. The effect of morphine was not mimicked by the kappa-opioid receptor agonist, U50,488H (10 microM) or the delta-opioid receptor agonist, Tyr-(D-Pen)-Gly-Phe-(D-Pen) (DPDPE). 6. The effect of morphine was totally abolished by prior and concomitant exposure to naloxone (100 nM) which had no effect on control release values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1713104

  12. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  13. The origin and function of mirror neurons: the missing link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingnau, Angelika; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2014-04-01

    We argue, by analogy to the neural organization of the object recognition system, that demonstration of modulation of mirror neurons by associative learning does not imply absence of genetic adaptation. Innate connectivity defines the types of processes mirror neurons can participate in while allowing for extensive local plasticity. However, the proper function of these neurons remains to be worked out.

  14. Regulation of Irregular Neuronal Firing by Autaptic Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Daqing; Wu, Shengdun; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-05-01

    The importance of self-feedback autaptic transmission in modulating spike-time irregularity is still poorly understood. By using a biophysical model that incorporates autaptic coupling, we here show that self-innervation of neurons participates in the modulation of irregular neuronal firing, primarily by regulating the occurrence frequency of burst firing. In particular, we find that both excitatory and electrical autapses increase the occurrence of burst firing, thus reducing neuronal firing regularity. In contrast, inhibitory autapses suppress burst firing and therefore tend to improve the regularity of neuronal firing. Importantly, we show that these findings are independent of the firing properties of individual neurons, and as such can be observed for neurons operating in different modes. Our results provide an insightful mechanistic understanding of how different types of autapses shape irregular firing at the single-neuron level, and they highlight the functional importance of autaptic self-innervation in taming and modulating neurodynamics.

  15. 5-HT7 receptors as modulators of neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission and plasticity: physiological role and possible implications in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciranna, Lucia; Catania, Maria Vincenza

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin type 7 receptors (5-HT7) are expressed in several brain areas, regulate brain development, synaptic transmission and plasticity, and therefore are involved in various brain functions such as learning and memory. A number of studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptors could be potential pharmacotherapeutic target for cognitive disorders. Several abnormalities of serotonergic system have been described in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including abnormal activity of 5-HT transporter, altered blood and brain 5-HT levels, reduced 5-HT synthesis and altered expression of 5-HT receptors in the brain. A specific role for 5-HT7 receptors in ASD has not yet been demonstrated but some evidence implicates their possible involvement. We have recently shown that 5-HT7 receptor activation rescues hippocampal synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome, a monogenic cause of autism. Several other studies have shown that 5-HT7 receptors modulate behavioral flexibility, exploratory behavior, mood disorders and epilepsy, which include core and co-morbid symptoms of ASD. These findings further suggest an involvement of 5-HT7 receptors in ASD. Here, we review the physiological roles of 5-HT7 receptors and their implications in Fragile X Syndrome and other ASD.

  16. 5-HT7 receptors as modulators of neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission and plasticity: physiological role and possible implications in autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia eCiranna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin type 7 receptors (5-HT7 are expressed in several brain areas, regulate brain development, synaptic transmission and plasticity, and therefore are involved in various brain functions such as learning and memory. A number of studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptors could be potential pharmacotherapeutic target for cognitive disorders. Several abnormalities of serotonergic system have been described in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, including abnormal activity of 5-HT transporter, altered blood and brain 5-HT levels, reduced 5-HT synthesis and altered expression of 5-HT receptors in the brain. A specific role for 5-HT7 receptors in ASD has not yet been demonstrated but some evidence implicates their possible involvement. We have recently shown that 5-HT7 receptor activation rescues hippocampal synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome, a monogenic cause of autism. Several other studies have shown that 5-HT7 receptors modulate behavioral flexibility, exploratory behavior, mood disorders and epilepsy, which include core and co-morbid symptoms of ASD. These findings further suggest an involvement of 5-HT7 receptors in ASD. Here, we review the physiological roles of 5-HT7 receptors and their implications in Fragile X Syndrome and other ASD.

  17. Laser-Neuron Interaction with Femtosecond Beat-Modulated 800-1200 nm Photon Beams, as the Treatment of Brain Cancer Tissue. Laser Neurophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-03-01

    I propose a novel mechanism for the brain cancer tissue treatment: nonlinear interaction of ultrashort pulses of beat-photon, (ω1 -- ω2) , or double-photon, (ω1 +ω2) , beams with the cancer tissue. The multiphoton scattering is described via photon diffusion equation. The open-scull cerebral tissue can be irradiated with the beat-modulated photon pulses with the laser irradiances in the range of a few mW/cm2 , and repetition rate of a few 100s Hz generated in the beat-wave driven free electron laser. V. Stefan, B. I. Cohen, and C. Joshi, Nonlinear Mixing of Electromagnetic Waves in PlasmasScience 27 January 1989: V. Alexander Stefan, Genomic Medical Physics: A New Physics in the Making, (S-U-Press, 2008).} This highly accurate cancer tissue ablation removal may prove to be an efficient method for the treatment of brain cancer. Work supported in part by Nikola Tesla Laboratories (Stefan University), La Jolla, CA.

  18. Differential modulation of alpha 3 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 4 neuronal nicotinic receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes by flufenamic acid and niflumic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, R; Oortgiesen, M; Vijverberg, H P

    1995-03-01

    Effects of flufenamic acid (FFA) and niflumic acid (NFA), which are often used to block Ca(2+)-activated Cl- current, have been investigated in voltage-clamped Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha 3 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 4 nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs). NFA and FFA inhibit alpha 3 beta 2 nAChR-mediated inward currents and potentiate alpha 3 beta 4 nAChR-mediated inward currents in normal, Cl(-)-free and Ca(2+)-free solutions to a similar extent. The concentration-dependence of the inhibition of alpha 3 beta 2 nAChR-mediated ion current yields IC50 values of 90 microM for FFA and of 260 microM for NFA. The potentiation of alpha 3 beta 4 nAChR-mediated ion current by NFA yields an EC50 value of 30 microM, whereas the effect of FFA does not saturate for concentrations of up to 1 mM. At 100 microM, FFA reduces the maximum of the concentration-effect curve of ACh for alpha 3 beta 2 nAChRs, but leaves the EC50 of ACh unaffected. The same concentration of FFA potentiates alpha 3 beta 4 nAChR-mediated ion currents for all ACh concentrations and causes a small shift of the concentration-effect curve of ACh to lower agonist concentrations. The potentiation, like the inhibition, is most likely due to a noncompetitive effect of FFA. Increasing ACh-induced inward current either by raising the agonist concentration from 10 microM to 200 microM or by coapplication of 10 microM ACh and 200 microM FFA causes a similar enhancement of block of the alpha 3 beta 4 nAChR-mediated ion current by Mg2+. This suggests that the effects of FFA and of an increased agonist concentration result in a similar functional modification of the alpha 3 beta 4 nAChR-operated ion channel. It is concluded that alpha 3 beta 4 and alpha 3 beta 2 nAChRs are oppositely modulated by FFA and NFA through a direct beta-subunit-dependent effect.

  19. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...... properties of this facility in the path from synaptic sites to the motor axon is reviewed with emphasis on voltage sensitive ion channels and regulatory metabotropic transmitter pathways. The catalog of the intrinsic response properties, their underlying mechanisms, and regulation obtained from motoneurons...... in in vitro preparations is far from complete. Nevertheless, a foundation has been provided for pursuing functional significance of intrinsic response properties in motoneurons in vivo during motor behavior at levels from molecules to systems....

  20. The Neuroprotective Effect of Lithium in cannabinoid Dependence is Mediated through Modulation of Cyclic AMP, ERK1/2 and GSK-3β Phosphorylation in Cerebellar Granular Neurons of Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Ejtemaei-Mehr, Shahram; Razmi, Ali; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Lithium (Li), a glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor, has used to attenuate the cannabinoid-induced dependence/withdrawal signs, but molecular mechanisms related to this are unclear. Recent studies indicate the involvement of upstream extracellular signal kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and downstream GSK-3β pathways in the development of cannabinoid-induced dependence. This is mediated through cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) enriched in cerebellar granular neurons (CGNs). Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of modulatory/neuroprotective effects of Li on a cannabinoid agonist (WIN 55,212-2 (WIN))-induced dependence, through quantitative analysis of some involved proteins such as ERK1/2, GSK-3β and related signaling pathways including their phosphorylated forms; and cAMP level as the other molecular mechanisms leading to dependence, in CGNs model. The CGNs were prepared from 7-day-old Wistar rat pup in a 12-well plate, pretreated with Li (1mM) and an ERK1/2 inhibitor SL327 (SL, 10 µM). The WIN (1 µM) was added 30 minutes prior to treatment and AM251 (AM, 1 µM), as a cannabinoid antagonist was co-treated with WIN. The cAMP level, as an indicator of cannabinoid-induced dependence, was measured by ELISA following forskolin (FSK) stimulation. Western blot analyses determined the phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2), GSK-3β (p-GSK-3β) as well as their total expressions in various treatment times and doses in CGNs. WIN alone could down regulate the cAMP/p-ERK1/2 cascade compared to AM treatment. However, P-GSK-3β was up-regulated with Li and WIN or with SL and Li pretreatment to AM-induced cellular response, which was the highest 60 minutes after CGNs exposure. Results further suggested the potential role of Li pretreatment to diminish the development of cannabinoid-induced dependence/neuronal injury through possible mechanisms of modulating the cAMP/p-ERK1/2 cascade independent of p-GSK-3β signaling pathway in-vitro. PMID:26664379

  1. Presynaptic alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modulate excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal neurons%突触前α7烟碱受体对海马神经元兴奋性突触传递的调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘振伟; 杨胜; 张永祥; 刘传缋

    2003-01-01

    The effects of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) on excitatory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal neurons of the rat hippocampus were examined by blind whole-cell patch clamp recording from hippocampal slice preparations. Local application of the nAChRs agonist dimethylphenyl-piperazinium iodide (DMPP) did not induce a postsynaptic current response in CA1 pyramidal cells. However, DMPP enhanced the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in these cells in a dose-dependent manner. This enhancement was blocked by the selective nicotinic α-7 receptor antagonist α-bungarotoxin, but not by the antagonist mecamylamine, hexamethonium or dihyhro3-erythroidine. The frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) in CA1 pyramidal neurons was also increased by application of DMPP, indicating a presynaptic site of action of the agonist. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of presynaptic nAChRs in CA1 pyramidal neurons, which contain α-7 subunits, potentiates presynaptic glutamate release and consequently modulate excitatory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus.%采用盲法膜片钳技术观察突触前烟碱受体(nicotinic acetylcholine receptors,nAChRs)对海马脑片CA1区锥体神经元兴奋性突触传递的调控作用.结果显示,nAChRs激动剂碘化二甲基苯基哌嗪(dimethylphenyl-piperazinium iodide,DMPP)不能在CA1区锥体神经元上诱发出烟碱电流.DMPP对CA1区锥体神经元自发兴奋性突触后电流(spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current,sEPSC)具有明显的增频和增幅作用,并呈现明显的浓度依赖关系.DMPP对微小兴奋性突触后电流(miniature excitatory postsynaptic current,mEPSC)具有增频作用,但不具有增幅作用.上述DMPP增强突触传递的作用不能被nAChRs拮抗剂美加明、六烃季铵和双氢-β-刺桐丁所阻断,但可被α-银环蛇毒素阻断.上述结果提示,海马脑片CA1

  2. Unidirectional synchronization of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo-Perez, Octavio [Division de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Computacionales, IPICYT, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: octavio@ipicyt.edu.mx; Femat, Ricardo [Division de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Computacionales, IPICYT, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: rfemat@ipicyt.edu.mx

    2005-07-01

    Synchronization dynamics of two noiseless Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons under the action of feedback control is studied. The spiking patterns of the action potentials evoked by periodic external modulations attain synchronization states under the feedback action. Numerical simulations for the synchronization dynamics of regular-irregular desynchronized spiking sequences are displayed. The results are discussed in context of generalized synchronization. It is also shown that the HH neurons can be synchronized in face of unmeasured states.

  3. Brain state-dependent neuronal computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale eQuilichini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal firing pattern, which includes both the frequency and the timing of action potentials, is a key component of information processing in the brain. Although the relationship between neuronal output (the firing pattern and function (during a task/behavior is not fully understood, there is now considerable evidence that a given neuron can show very different firing patterns according to brain state. Thus, such neurons assembled into neuronal networks generate different rhythms (e.g. theta, gamma, sharp wave ripples, which sign specific brain states (e.g. learning, sleep. This implies that a given neuronal network, defined by its hard-wired physical connectivity, can support different brain state-dependent activities through the modulation of its functional connectivity. Here, we review data demonstrating that not only the firing pattern, but also the functional connections between neurons, can change dynamically. We then explore the possible mechanisms of such versatility, focusing on the intrinsic properties of neurons and the properties of the synapses they establish, and how they can be modified by neuromodulators, i.e. the different ways that neurons can use to switch from one mode of communication to the other.

  4. Performance limitations of relay neurons.

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    Rahul Agarwal

    Full Text Available Relay cells are prevalent throughout sensory systems and receive two types of inputs: driving and modulating. The driving input contains receptive field properties that must be transmitted while the modulating input alters the specifics of transmission. For example, the visual thalamus contains relay neurons that receive driving inputs from the retina that encode a visual image, and modulating inputs from reticular activating system and layer 6 of visual cortex that control what aspects of the image will be relayed back to visual cortex for perception. What gets relayed depends on several factors such as attentional demands and a subject's goals. In this paper, we analyze a biophysical based model of a relay cell and use systems theoretic tools to construct analytic bounds on how well the cell transmits a driving input as a function of the neuron's electrophysiological properties, the m