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Sample records for cores ii solar

  1. THE MASS-SIZE RELATION FROM CLOUDS TO CORES. II. SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffmann, J.; Shetty, R.; Goodman, A. A.; Pillai, T.; Myers, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    We measure the mass and size of cloud fragments in several molecular clouds continuously over a wide range of spatial scales (0.05 ∼ 2 , is not well suited to describe the derived mass-size data. Solar neighborhood clouds not forming massive stars (∼ sun ; Pipe Nebula, Taurus, Perseus, and Ophiuchus) obey m(r) ≤ 870 M sun (r/pc) 1.33 . In contrast to this, clouds forming massive stars (Orion A, G10.15 - 0.34, G11.11 - 0.12) do exceed the aforementioned relation. Thus, this limiting mass-size relation may approximate a threshold for the formation of massive stars. Across all clouds, cluster-forming cloud fragments are found to be-at given radius-more massive than fragments devoid of clusters. The cluster-bearing fragments are found to roughly obey a mass-size law m ∝ r 1.27 (where the exponent is highly uncertain in any given cloud, but is certainly smaller than 1.5).

  2. Efficiency Enhanced Colloidal Mn-Doped Type II Core/Shell ZnSe/CdS Quantum Dot Sensitized Hybrid Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jamshidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal Mn-doped ZnSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs are synthesized for the first time and employed as a strategy to boost the power conversion efficiency of quantum dot sensitized solar cells. By using Mn-doping as a band gap engineering tool for core/shell QDs an effective improvement of absorption spectra could be obtained. The mid-states generated by a proper Mn content alleviate carrier separation and enhance the electron injection rate, thus facilitating electron transport to the TiO2 substrate. It is demonstrated that a device constructed with 0.25% Mn-doped ZnSe/CdS leads to an enhancement of the electron injection rate and power conversion efficiency by 4 times and 1.3, respectively.

  3. JOYO MK-II core characteristics database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Shiro; Aoyama, Takafumi; Nagasaki, Hideaki; Kato, Yuichi

    1998-12-01

    The experimental fast reactor JOYO served as the MK-II irradiation bed core for testing fuel and material for FBR development for 15 years from 1982 to 1997. During the MK-II operation, extensive data were accumulated from the core characteristics tests conducted in thirty-one duty operations and thirteen special test operations. These core management data and core characteristics data were compiled into a database. The code system MAGI has been developed and used for core management of JOYO MK-II, and the core characteristics and the irradiation test conditions were calculated using MAGI on the basis of three dimensional diffusion theory with seven neutron energy groups. The core management data include extensive data, which were recorded on CD-ROM for user convenience. The data are specifications and configurations of the core, and for about 300 driver fuel subassemblies and about 60 uninstrumented irradiation subassemblies are core composition before and after irradiation, neutron flux, neutron fluences, fuel and control rod burn-up, and temperature and power distributions. MK-II core characteristics and test conditions were stored in the database for post analysis. Core characteristics data include excess reactivities, control rod worths, and reactivity coefficients, e.g., temperature, power and burn-up. Test conditions include both measured and calculated data for irradiation conditions. (author)

  4. JOYO MK-II core characteristics database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawachi, Yasushi; Maeda, Shigetaka; Sekine, Takashi; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2003-04-01

    The 'JOYO' MK-II core characteristics database was compiled and published in 1998. Comments and requests from many users led to the creation of a revised edition. The revisions include changes to the MAGI calculation code system to use the 70 group JFS-3-J3.2 constant set processed from the JENDL-3.2 library. Total control rod worth, reactor kinetic parameters and the MK-II core performance test results were included per user's requests. The core characteristics obtained from the 32 nd to 35 th operational cycles, which were conducted in the MK-III transition core, were newly added in this revised version. The MK-II core management data and core characteristics data were recorded to CD-ROM for user convenience. The Configuration Data' include the core arrangement and refueling record for each operational cycle. The 'Subassembly Library Data' include the atomic number density, neutron fluence, burn-up, integral power of 362 driver fuel subassemblies and 69 irradiation test subassemblies. The 'Output Data' contain the calculated neutron flux, gamma flux, power density, linear heat rate, coolant and fuel temperature distribution of all the fuel subassemblies at the beginning and end of each operational cycle. The 'Core Characteristics Data' include the measured excess reactivity, control rod worth calibration curve, and reactivity coefficients of temperature, power and burn-up. (author)

  5. Heysham II/Torness AGR core integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birch, A.L.; Hampson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The design and construction process for the Heysham II/Torness AGR core structures is presented. The design intent utilizing all past experience in designing and building AGR core structures is described. The major aspects of the design criteria and the design conditions are outlined to demonstrate how the integrity of the Heysham II/Torness core is assured. Since no recognized codes of practice for graphite core design exist, the National Nuclear Corporation (NNC) have conceived design criteria utilizing reserve factors based on their design experience. Target reserve factors are defined for particular loading conditions including the ultimate 'safe-shutdown earthquake'. The substantial programme of computer analysis and RandD work to substantiate the design, including seismic qualification, is described. In keeping with their responsibility for the detailed core structure design and the fuel path geometry (guide tube system), NNC attach great importance to design/manufacture/construction liaison, which is demonstrated in the quality assurance section. (author)

  6. New insights on the solar core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GarcIa, R A; Mathis, S; Sato, K; Turck-Chieze, S [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS, Universite Paris 7 Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Salabert, D; Eff-Darwich, A; Jimenez, A; Palle, P L; Regulo, C [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ballot, J [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique Toulouse-Tarbes - OMP, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Garrido, R; Suarez, J C [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Apartado 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Mathur, S [High Altitude Observatory, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO, 80302 (United States); Moya, A, E-mail: rgarcia@cea.fr [Centro de AstrobiologIa (INTA-CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    Since the detection of the asymptotic properties of the dipole gravity modes in the Sun, the quest to find individual gravity modes has continued. An extensive and deeper analysis of 14 years of continuous GOLF/SoHO observational data, unveils the presence of a pattern of peaks that could be interpreted as individual dipole gravity modes in the frequency range between 60 and 140 microHz, with amplitudes compatible with the latest theoretical predictions. By collapsing the power spectrum we have obtained a quite constant splitting for these patterns in comparison to regions where no g modes were expected. Moreover, the same technique applied to simultaneous VIRGO/SoHO data unveils some common signals between the power spectra of both instruments. Thus, we are able to identify and characterize individual g modes with their central frequencies, amplitudes and splittings allowing to do seismic inversions of the rotation profile inside the solar core. These results open a new light on the physics and dynamics of the solar deep core.

  7. Asymmetries of the solar Ca II lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heasley, J.N.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical study of the influence of propagating acoustic pulses in the solar chromosphere upon the line profiles of the Ca II resonance and infrared triplet lines has been made. The major objective has been to explain the observed asymmetries seen in the cores of the H and K lines and to predict the temporal behavior of the infrared lines caused by passing acoustic or shock pulses. The velocities in the pulses, calculated from weak shock theory, have been included consistently in the non-LTE calculations. The results of the calculations show that these lines are very sensitive to perturbations in the background atmosphere caused by the pulses. Only minor changes in the line shapes result from including the velocities consistently in the line source function calculations. The qualitative changes in the line profiles vary markedly with the strength of the shock pulses. The observed differences in the K line profiles seen on the quiet Sun can be explained in terms of a spectrum of pulses with different wavelengths and initial amplitudes in the photosphere. (Auth.)

  8. FINDING THE FIRST COSMIC EXPLOSIONS. II. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Joggerst, Candace C.; Fryer, Chris L.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Heger, Alexander; Holz, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the properties of Population III (Pop III) stars is prerequisite to elucidating the nature of primeval galaxies, the chemical enrichment and reionization of the early intergalactic medium, and the origin of supermassive black holes. While the primordial initial mass function (IMF) remains unknown, recent evidence from numerical simulations and stellar archaeology suggests that some Pop III stars may have had lower masses than previously thought, 15-50 M ☉ in addition to 50-500 M ☉ . The detection of Pop III supernovae (SNe) by JWST, WFIRST, or the TMT could directly probe the primordial IMF for the first time. We present numerical simulations of 15-40 M ☉ Pop III core-collapse SNe performed with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code RAGE. We find that they will be visible in the earliest galaxies out to z ∼ 10-15, tracing their star formation rates and in some cases revealing their positions on the sky. Since the central engines of Pop III and solar-metallicity core-collapse SNe are quite similar, future detection of any Type II SNe by next-generation NIR instruments will in general be limited to this epoch.

  9. The relationship between solar activity and the H and K line cores in integrated sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jebsen, D.E.; Mitchell, W.E. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper the authors present and analyze new data on the cores of the H and K lines of ionized calcium in the spectrum of integrated sunlight. The intensities of the components Hsub(2γ), H 3 , Hsub(2r), Ksub(2γ), K 3 , and Ksub(2r) in the line cores were measured in terms of the continuum intensity at 4000 A during a solar rotation in September 1969. Other data on these components, obtained at or close to the time of solar minimum (September 1964) and solar maximum (September 1968), were also included. The intensities of these features are compared with two indices of solar activity: the Ca II plage index and the 2800 MHZ signal. The average correlation coefficients between the intensities of the measured features and those indices were 0.69 and 0.64, respectively. The results are consistent with those of Bumba and Ruzickova-Topolova (1967) for a solar rotation period in 1965. The method and results should provide a detailed quantitative basis for the study of the activity cycles and rotation periods of solar-type stars. (Auth.)

  10. SMART core preliminary nuclear design-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Chan; Ji, Seong Kyun; Chang, Moon Hee

    1997-06-01

    Three loading patterns for 330 MWth SMART core are constructed for 25, 33 and 29 CRDMs, and one loading pattern for larger 69-FA core with 45 CRDMs is also constructed for comparison purpose. In this study, the core consists of 57 reduced height Korean Optimized Fuel Assemblies (KOFAs) developed by KAERI. The enrichment of fuel is 4.95 w/o. As a main burnable poison, 35% B-10 enriched B{sub 4}C-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shim is used. To control stuck rod worth, some gadolinia bearing fuel rods are used. The U-235 enrichment of the gadolinia bearing fuel rods is 1.8 w/o as used in KOFA. All patterns return cycle length of about 3 years. Three loading patterns except 25-CRDM pattern satisfy cold shutdown condition of keff {<=} 0.99 without soluble boron. These three patterns also satisfy the refueling condition of keff {<=} 0.95. In addition to the construction of loading pattern, an editing module of MASTER PPI files for rod power history generation is developed and rod power histories are generated for 29-CRDM loading pattern. Preliminary Fq design limit is suggested as 3.71 based on KOFA design experience. (author). 9 tabs., 45 figs., 16 refs.

  11. Variations of the core luminosity and solar neutrino fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandpierre, Attila

    The aim of the present work is to analyze the geological and astrophysical data as well as presenting theoretical considerations indicating the presence of dynamic processes present in the solar core. The dynamic solar model (DSM) is suggested to take into account the presence of cyclic variations in the temperature of the solar core. Comparing the results of calculations of the CO2 content, albedo and solar evolutionary luminosity changes with the empirically determined global earthly temperatures, and taking into account climatic models, I determined the relation between the earthly temperature and solar luminosity. These results indicate to the observed maximum of 10o change on the global terrestrial surface temperature a related solar luminosity change around 4-5 % on a ten million years timescale, which is the timescale of heat diffusion from the solar core to the surface. The related solar core temperature changes are around 1 % only. At the same time, the cyclic luminosity changes of the solar core are shielded effectively by the outer zones since the radiation diffusion takes more than 105 years to reach the solar surface. The measurements of the solar neutrino fluxes with Kamiokande 1987-1995 showed variations higher than 40 % around the average, at the Super-Kamiokande the size of the apparent scatter decreased to 13 %. This latter scatter, if would be related completely to stochastic variations of the central temperature, would indicate a smaller than 1 % change. Fourier and wavelet analysis of the solar neutrino fluxes indicate only a marginally significant period around 200 days (Haubold, 1998). Helioseismic measurements are known to be very constraining. Actually, Castellani et al. (1999) remarked that the different solar models lead to slightly different sound speeds, and the different methods of regularization yield slightly different sound speeds, too. Therefore, they doubled the found parameter variations, and were really conservative assuming

  12. Comparison of facility characteristics between SCTF Core-I and Core-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Murao, Yoshio.

    1990-08-01

    The Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) was constructed to investigate two-dimensional thermal-hydraulics in the core and fluid behavior of carryover water out of the core including its feed-back effect to the core behavior mainly during the reflood phase of a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Since three simulated cores are used in the SCTF Test Program and the design of these three cores are slightly different one by one, repeatability test is required to justify a direct comparison of data obtained with different cores. In the present report, data of Test S2-13 (Run 618) obtained with SCTF Core-II were compared with those of Test S1-05 (Run 511) obtained with the Core-I, which were performed under the forced-flooding condition. Thermal-hydraulic behaviors in these two tests showed quite similar characteristics of both system behavior and two-dimensional core behaviors. Therefore, the test data obtained from the two cores can be compared directly with each other. After the turnaround of clad temperatures, however, some differences were found in upper plenum water accumulation and resultant two-dimensional core cooling behaviors such as quench front propagation from bottom to top of the core. (author)

  13. FAST INVERSION OF SOLAR Ca II SPECTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, C.; Choudhary, D. P.; Rezaei, R.; Louis, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast (<<1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log τ ∼ –3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log τ = –6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively

  14. Development of JOYO MK-II core characteristics database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Shiro; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2000-01-01

    The MK-II core of the experimental fast reactor JOYO served as the irradiation bed for testing fuels and materials for FBR development since 1982 for 15 years. During the MK-II operation, extensive data were accumulated from the core management calculations and characteristics tests conducted in thirty-one duty operations and thirteen special test operations. These core management data and core characteristics data were compiled into a database recorded on CD-ROM for user convenience. The calculated core management data are the text style data. The 'Configuration Data' include the history of the fuel exchange and core arrangement for each cycle. The Subassembly Library Data' include the atomic number density, neutron fluence, burn-up, integral power of about 300 fuel subassemblies, and 60 irradiation subassemblies. The 'Output Data' include the neutron fluxes, gamma fluxes, power density, linear heat rates, coolant and fuel temperature distributions of each core position at the beginning and end of each cycle. The measured core characteristics data, such as the excess reactivity, control rod worths, temperature coefficient, power coefficient, and burn-up coefficient are also included along with the measurement conditions. (J.P.N.)

  15. Improvement of SSR core design for ABWR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaki, Masanao; Aoyama, Motoo; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Hideya; Sakurada, Koichi; Tanabe, Akira

    2003-01-01

    In order to enhance the spectral shift effect in the ABWR-II reactor, a novel core design to bring out better performance of spectral shift rods (SSRs) is studied. The SSR is a new type of water rod, in which the water level develops naturally during operation and changes according to the coolant flow rate through the channel. By using the SSR, the average moderator density, which is directly related to core reactivity, can be controlled over a wide range by the core flow rate. In the new SSR core design, two types of SSR bundles, in which settings for the SSR water levels are different, are utilized and loaded according to flow distribution in the core. This two-region SSR core design allows wide variation in the average SSR water level, thus improving fuel economy. Enhancement of SSR function in the two-region SSR core increases the uranium saving factor by about 25%, from the 6% of the conventional uniform SSR core to about 8%. (author)

  16. Irradiation of microphones in the EBR-II core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, A.P.; Anderson, T.T.; Bobis, J.P.

    1976-06-01

    Six ANL developed high temperature microphone (acoustic detectors) have been exposed in flowing sodium in the In-Core Instrument Test Facility (INCOT) in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) for seven months without any indications of serious degradation of signal output due to the exposure. The YY05 experiment (EBR-II INCOT experiment designation) was performed to obtain data which would be useful in evaluating the ability of the microphones whose active elements are lithium niobate to serve as sensors for acoustic surveillance of fast breeder reactors. The reactor was at full power for 136 days of the experiment exposure period. The microphone temperatures varied from 371 0 C (700 0 F) to 621 0 C (1150 0 F). Neutron exposure varied from 2.64 x 10 22 nvt for the microphone at the elevation of the bottom of the EBR-II core to 0.24 x 10 22 nvt for the microphone at the elevation of the top of an EBR-II fuel assembly. The maximum gamma dose was 5 x 10 12 rads

  17. Variable solar control using thermotropic core/shell particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehling, Olaf; Seeboth, Arno; Ruhmann, Ralf; Potechius, Elvira; Vetter, Renate [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research (IAP), Department of Chromogenic Polymers, Volmerstr. 7B, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Haeusler, Tobias [Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU Cottbus), Chair of Applied Physics/Thermophysics, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Subject of our recent investigations is the utilization of a reversible thermotropic material for a self-regulating sun protection glazing that controls the solar energy input in order to avoid overheating. Based on the well-established UV curing technology for laminated glass a superior thermotropic material with tunable switching characteristics and of low material costs was developed. The polymer layer contains core/shell particles homogeneously dispersed in a UV-cured resin. The particle core in turn consists of an n-alkane mixture that is responsible for the temperature-induced clear/opaque switching. To obtain particles of well-defined size and with a narrow size distribution, the miniemulsion polymerization technique was used. The visible and solar optical properties (normal-normal, normal-hemispherical, and normal-diffuse transmittance) in the off (clear) and in the on state (opaque) were determined by UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopy. Samples containing particles of high median diameter (>800 nm) primarily scatter in the forward direction. However, with smaller particles (300-600 nm) a higher backscattering (reflection) efficiency was achieved. The largest difference in the normal-hemispherical transmittance could be found with a particle amount of 6% and a median scattering domain diameter of {proportional_to}380 nm. (author)

  18. Monte Carlo analysis of Musashi TRIGA mark II reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuo

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of the TRIGA-II core at the Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (Musashi reactor, 100 kW) was performed by the three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code (MCNP4A). Effective multiplication factors (k eff ) for the several fuel-loading patterns including the initial core criticality experiment, the fuel element and control rod reactivity worth as well as the neutron flux measurements were used in the validation process of the physical model and neutron cross section data from the ENDF/B-V evaluation. The calculated k eff overestimated the experimental data by about 1.0%Δk/k for both the initial core and the several fuel-loading arrangements. The calculated reactivity worths of control rod and fuel element agree well the measured ones within the uncertainties. The comparison of neutron flux distribution was consistent with the experimental ones which were measured by activation methods at the sample irradiation tubes. All in all, the agreement between the MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values is good, which indicated that the Monte Carlo model is enough to simulate the Musashi TRIGA-II reactor core. (author)

  19. Experience with lifetime limits for EBR-II core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.D.B.; Smith, R.N.; Golden, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) is operated for the US Department of Energy by Argonne National Laboratory and is located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory where most types of American reactor were originally tested. EBR-II is a complete electricity-producing power plant now in its twenty-fourth year of successful operation. During this long history the reactor has had several concurrent missions, such as demonstration of a closed Liquid-Metal Reactor (LMR) fuel cycle (1964-69); as a steady-state irradiation facility for fuels and materials (1970 onwards); for investigating effects of operational transients on fuel elements (from 1981); for research into the inherent safety aspects of metal-fueled LMR's (from 1983); and, most recently, for demonstration of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept using U-Pu-Zr fuels. This paper describes experience gained at EBR-II in defining lifetime limits for LMR core components, particularly fuel elements

  20. Thin Flexible IMM Solar Array, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thin, flexible, and highly efficient solar arrays are needed that package compactly for launch and deploy into large, structurally stable high power generators....

  1. Test of In-core Flux Detectors in KNK II

    CERN Document Server

    Hoppe, P

    1979-01-01

    The development of in-core detectors for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) is still in an early stage, and little operation experience is available. Therefore self-powered neutron and gamma detectors and neutron sensitive ionization chambers -especially developed for LMFBRs- have been tested in the Fast Sodium Cooled Test Reactor KNK II. Seven flux detectors have been installed in the core of KNK II by means of a special test rig. Five of them failed already within the first week during operation in the reactor. Due to measurements of electrical resistances and capacities, sodium penetrating into the detectors or cables probably seems to be the cause. As tests prior to the installation in the core proved the tightness of all detectors, it is suspected that small cracks have developed in the detector casings or in the outer cable sheaths during their exposure to the hot coolant. Two ionization chambers did not show these faults. However, one of them failed because the saturation current plateau disap...

  2. Test of In-core Flux Detectors in KNK II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, P.; Mitzel, F.

    1979-10-01

    The development of in-core detectors for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) is still in an early stage, and little operation experience is available. Therefore self-powered neutron and gamma detectors and neutron sensitive ionization chambers -especially developed for LMFBRs- have been tested in the Fast Sodium Cooled Test Reactor KNK II. Seven flux detectors have been installed in the core of KNK II by means of a special test rig. Five of them failed already within the first week during operation in the reactor. Due to measurements of electrical resistances and capacities, sodium penetrating into the detectors or cables probably seems to be the cause. As tests prior to the installation in the core proved the tightness of all detectors, it is suspected that small cracks have developed in the detector casings or in the outer cable sheaths during their exposure to the hot coolant. Two ionization chambers did not show these faults. However, one of them failed because the saturation current plateau disappeared and the other one's sensitivity decreased by a factor of five during the test period. It is suspected that in both cases changes of the filling gas might be involved

  3. Solar Type II Radio Bursts and IP Type II Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, H. V.; Erickson, W. C.

    2005-01-01

    We have examined radio data from the WAVES experiment on the Wind spacecraft in conjunction with ground-based data in order to investigate the relationship between the shocks responsible for metric type II radio bursts and the shocks in front of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The bow shocks of fast, large CMEs are strong interplanetary (IP) shocks, and the associated radio emissions often consist of single broad bands starting below approx. 4 MHz; such emissions were previously called IP type II events. In contrast, metric type II bursts are usually narrowbanded and display two harmonically related bands. In addition to displaying complete dynamic spectra for a number of events, we also analyze the 135 WAVES 1 - 14 MHz slow-drift time periods in 2001-2003. We find that most of the periods contain multiple phenomena, which we divide into three groups: metric type II extensions, IP type II events, and blobs and bands. About half of the WAVES listings include probable extensions of metric type II radio bursts, but in more than half of these events, there were also other slow-drift features. In the 3 yr study period, there were 31 IP type II events; these were associated with the very fastest CMEs. The most common form of activity in the WAVES events, blobs and bands in the frequency range between 1 and 8 MHz, fall below an envelope consistent with the early signatures of an IP type II event. However, most of this activity lasts only a few tens of minutes, whereas IP type II events last for many hours. In this study we find many examples in the radio data of two shock-like phenomena with different characteristics that occur simultaneously in the metric and decametric/hectometric bands, and no clear example of a metric type II burst that extends continuously down in frequency to become an IP type II event. The simplest interpretation is that metric type II bursts, unlike IP type II events, are not caused by shocks driven in front of CMEs.

  4. Experimental programme and analysis, ZENITH II, Core 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, G.; Sanders, J. E.; Sherwin, J.

    1974-10-15

    The Phase 3 program of reactor physics experiments on the HTR (or Mk 3 GCR) lattices continued during the first half of 1974 with a study of a series of critical builds in Zenith II aimed at testing predictions of shut-down margins in the local criticality-situations arising during power reactor refueling. The paper describes the experimental program and the subsequent theoretical analysis using methods developed in the United Kingdom for calculating low-enriched uranium HTR fuel systems. The importance of improving the accuracy of predictions of shut-down margins arises from the basic requirement that the core in its most reactive condition and with a specified number of absorbers removed from the array must remain sub-critical with a margin adequate to cover the total uncertainty of +/- 1 Nile (that is, 1 % delta-k). The major uncertainty is that in modelling the complex fuel/absorber configuration, and this is the aspect essentially covered in the Zenith II Core 4 studies.

  5. International solar-terrestrial physics program: a plan for the core spaceflight missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This brochure has been prepared to describe the scope of the science problems to be investigated and the mission plan for the core International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program. This information is intended to stimulate discussions and plans for the comprehensive worldwide ISTP Program. The plan for the study of the solar - terrestrial system is included. The Sun, geospace, and Sun-Earth interaction is discussed as is solar dynamics and the origins of solar winds.

  6. Solar photocatalytic removal of Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II): Speciation modeling of metal-citric acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabra, Kavita; Chaudhary, Rubina; Sawhney, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    The present study is targeted on solar photocatalytic removal of metal ions from wastewater. Photoreductive deposition and dark adsorption of metal ions Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II), using solar energy irradiated TiO 2 , has been investigated. Citric acid has been used as a hole scavenger. Modeling of metal species has been performed and speciation is used as a tool for discussing the photodeposition trends. Ninety-seven percent reductive deposition was obtained for copper. The deposition values of other metals were significantly low [nickel (36.4%), zinc (22.2%) and lead (41.4%)], indicating that the photocatalytic treatment process, using solar energy, was more suitable for wastewater containing Cu(II) ions. In absence of citric acid, the decreasing order deposition was Cu(II) > Ni(II) > Pb(II) > Zn(II), which proves the theoretical thermodynamic predictions about the metals

  7. Femtosecond visible/visible and visible/mid-IR pump-probe study of the photosystem II core antenna complex CP47

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.L.; Breton, J.; van Wilderen, L.; Dekker, J.P.; van Grondelle, R.

    2004-01-01

    CP47 is one of the two core antenna proteins of Photosystem II involved in the transfer of solar energy toward the photochemically active reaction center, the D1D2cytb559 complex. We have performed vis/vis and vis/mid-IR pump-probe experiments at room temperature as a first step in linking the

  8. First-Principles Modeling of Core/Shell Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azpiroz, Jon Mikel; Infante, Ivan; De Angelis, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    We report on the density functional theory (DFT) modeling of core/shell quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs), a device architecture that holds great potential in photovoltaics but has not been fully exploited so far. To understand the working mechanisms of this kind of solar cells, we

  9. Evaluation of CCTF Core-II second acceptance Test C2-AC2 (Run 052)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio

    1984-03-01

    In order to investigate the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior in a PWR during the reflood phase of the LOCA, large scale reflooding tests have been conducted at JAERI using the CCTF Core-I and Core-II facilities. This report presents the investigation on the difference in the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior observed between in the CCTF Core-I and Core-II facilities. For this purpose the test data of the second CCTF Core-II acceptance test C2-AC2 (Run 052) were evaluated by using the data of the Test CL-21 (Run 040) in the Core-I test series. The experimental conditions for these two tests were almost identical. Comparing the data of those two tests, the following is obtained. 1. The system behavior observed in the Core-II facility was nearly identical to that observed in the Core-I facility. 2. The core behavior observed in the Core-II facility was also nearly identical to that observed in the Core-I facility except for the top quenching behavior. 3. The differences in the top quenching behavior between the two facilities were as follows: (1) The selective occurrence of top quenching below the open holes of the upper core support plate observed in the Core-I facility was not observed in the Core-II facility. (2) Top quenching tended to occur less in the Core-II facility in the region where the initial average linear power density was over 1.69 kW/m. (author)

  10. Functional and structural analysis of photosystem II core complexes from spinach with high oxygen evolution capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haag, Elisabeth; Irrgang, Klaus-D.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Renger, Gernot

    1990-01-01

    Oxygen-evolving photo system II core complexes were prepared from spinach by solubilizing photosystem II membrane fragments with dodecyl-β-D-maltoside. The core complexes consist of the intrinsic 47-kDa, 43-kDa, D1 and D2 polypeptides, the two subunits of cytochrome b559 and the extrinsic 33-kDa

  11. A Parameter Study for Modeling Mg ii h and k Emission during Solar Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kleint, Lucia, E-mail: frubio@stanford.edu [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210, Windisch (Switzerland)

    2017-06-20

    Solar flares show highly unusual spectra in which the thermodynamic conditions of the solar atmosphere are encoded. Current models are unable to fully reproduce the spectroscopic flare observations, especially the single-peaked spectral profiles of the Mg ii h and k lines. We aim to understand the formation of the chromospheric and optically thick Mg ii h and k lines in flares through radiative transfer calculations. We take a flare atmosphere obtained from a simulation with the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN as input for a radiative transfer modeling with the RH code. By iteratively changing this model atmosphere and varying thermodynamic parameters such as temperature, electron density, and velocity, we study their effects on the emergent intensity spectra. We reproduce the typical single-peaked Mg ii h and k flare spectral shape and approximate the intensity ratios to the subordinate Mg ii lines by increasing either densities, temperatures, or velocities at the line core formation height range. Additionally, by combining unresolved upflows and downflows up to ∼250 km s{sup −1} within one resolution element, we reproduce the widely broadened line wings. While we cannot unambiguously determine which mechanism dominates in flares, future modeling efforts should investigate unresolved components, additional heat dissipation, larger velocities, and higher densities and combine the analysis of multiple spectral lines.

  12. Development of RaRaII solar car. Solar car RaRaII no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, M [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1991-05-31

    A solar car was developed to be able to travel, by utilizing solar energy, as a guiding car for the marathon race in the public road. That car is 210kg in weight, 1 in number of riding persons and 4.8m in smallest rotating radius. Its traveling performance is 44km h in highest speed, 10{degree} in hill-climbing ability and 0.6m s{sup 2} in acceleration. Those principal particulars satisfied the required condition of guiding car for the marathon race. That car was equipped with a polycrystalline silicon type solar cell, 6m{sup 2} in area to generate 870Wp power. A silver oxide-zinc battery, used as a secondary battery to secure traveling in case of rain, is of a performance to travel twice the marathon race road through. To satisfy the public road traveling in safety standard, that car was equipped with head lamps, wiper, direction winkers, rear-view mirrors, etc. As material of the body, aramid fiber and carbon fiber were adopted for securing the rigidity to cover the lightening in weight. That car, as used at an opportunity of intercollegiate marathon relay race, traveled a distance of about 30km which was its entire public road portion of course. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Core/shell colloidal quantum dot exciplex states for the development of highly efficient quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Mora-Seró, Iván; Pan, Zhenxiao; Zhao, Ke; Zhang, Hua; Feng, Yaoyu; Yang, Guang; Zhong, Xinhua; Bisquert, Juan

    2013-10-23

    Searching suitable panchromatic QD sensitizers for expanding the light-harvesting range, accelerating charge separation, and retarding charge recombination is an effective way to improve power conversion efficiency (PCE) of quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). One possible way to obtain a wide absorption range is to use the exciplex state of a type-II core/shell-structured QDs. In addition, this system could also provide a fast charge separation and low charge-recombination rate. Herein, we report on using a CdTe/CdSe type-II core/shell QD sensitizer with an absorption range extending into the infrared region because of its exciplex state, which is covalently linked to TiO2 mesoporous electrodes by dropping a bifunctional linker molecule mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-capped QD aqueous solution onto the film electrode. High loading and a uniform distribution of QD sensitizer throughout the film electrode thickness have been confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental mapping. The accelerated electron injection and retarded charge-recombination pathway in the built CdTe/CdSe QD cells in comparison with reference CdSe QD-based cells have been confirmed by impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence decay, and intensity-modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopy (IMPS/IMVS) analysis. With the combination of the high QD loading and intrinsically superior optoelectronic properties of type-II core/shell QD (wide absorption range, fast charge separation, and slow charge recombination), the resulting CdTe/CdSe QD-based regenerative sandwich solar cells exhibit a record PCE of 6.76% (J(sc) = 19.59 mA cm(-2), V(oc) = 0.606 V, and FF = 0.569) with a mask around the active film under a full 1 sun illumination (simulated AM 1.5), which is the highest reported to date for liquid-junction QDSCs.

  14. Simulating the Mg II NUV Spectra & C II Resonance Lines During Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Graham Stewart; Allred, Joel C.; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Butler, Elizabeth; Kowalski, Adam

    2017-08-01

    The solar chromosphere is the origin of the bulk of the enhanced radiative output during solar flares, and so comprehensive understanding of this region is important if we wish to understand energy transport in solar flares. It is only relatively recently, however, with the launch of IRIS that we have routine spectroscopic flarea observations of the chromsphere and transition region. Since several of the spectral lines observed by IRIS are optically thick, it is necessary to use forward modelling to extract the useful information that these lines carry about the flaring chromosphere and transition region. We present the results of modelling the formation properties Mg II resonance lines & subordinate lines, and the C II resonance lines during solar flares. We focus on understanding their relation to the physical strucutre of the flaring atmosphere, exploiting formation height differences to determine if we can extract information about gradients in the atmosphere. We show the effect of degrading the profiles to the resolution of the IRIS, and that the usual observational techniques used to identify the line centroid do a poor job in the early stages of the flare (partly due to multiple optically thick line components). Finally, we will tentatively comment on the effects that 3D radiation transfer may have on these lines.

  15. Role of 'core' and 'halo' solar electrons in ionization of the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askew, S.D.; Kunc, J.A.; University of Southern California, Los Angeles

    1984-01-01

    The probability of the interstellar wind atoms (H and He) to survive ionization by solar wind electrons is presented. For the first time a dual temperature electron distribution is used to model the effects of ''core'' (10 eV) and ''halo'' (60 eV) solar electrons on the probabilities. Survival probability distributions as a function of heliocentric distance were calculated for variations in the electron temperature, solar radiation force, and the interstellar wind flow velocity. These probabilities are important in determining the radial density distributions of the interstellar atoms. It has been found that the interstellar wind has a distinctively higher probability of surviving ''halo'' rather than ''core'' electron ionization only at heliocentric distances, rho, smaller than about 0.5 a.u. For distances larger than 0.5 a.u., the probabilities of surviving ''halo'' electrons are close to the probabilities of surviving ''core'' electrons. Also, the probabilities for both ''core'' and ''halo'' electrons are relatively insensitive to changes in μsub(proportional to) (interstellar wind velocity at infinity), μ(the solar ratio of radiation to gravitational force) and α (a model parameter for solar electron temperature) for rho > 0.5. For distances smaller than that, the sensitivity increases significantly. (author)

  16. Modeling of the core of Atucha II nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Anibal

    2007-01-01

    This work is part of a Nuclear Engineer degree thesis of the Instituto Balseiro and it is carried out under the development of an Argentinean Nuclear Power Plant Simulator. To obtain the best representation of the reactor physical behavior using the state of the art tools this Simulator should couple a 3D neutronics core calculation code with a thermal-hydraulics system code. Focused in the neutronic nature of this job, using PARCS, we modeled and performed calculations of the nuclear power plant Atucha 2 core. Whenever it is possible, we compare our results against results obtained with PUMA (the official core code for Atucha 2). (author) [es

  17. SOLAR NEUTRINO PHYSICS OSCILLATIONS: SENSITIVITY TO THE ELECTRONIC DENSITY IN THE SUN'S CORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Ilidio [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Turck-Chieze, Sylvaine, E-mail: ilidio.lopes@ist.utl.pt, E-mail: ilopes@uevora.pt, E-mail: sylvaine.turck-chieze@cea.fr [CEA/IRFU/Service d' Astrophysique, CE Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2013-03-01

    Solar neutrinos coming from different nuclear reactions are now detected with high statistics. Consequently, an accurate spectroscopic analysis of the neutrino fluxes arriving on Earth's detectors becomes available, in the context of neutrino oscillations. In this work, we explore the possibility of using this information to infer the radial profile of the electronic density in the solar core. So, we discuss the constraints on the Sun's density and chemical composition that can be determined from solar neutrino observations. This approach constitutes an independent and alternative diagnostic to the helioseismic investigations already done. The direct inversion method, which we propose to obtain the radial solar electronic density profile, is almost independent of the solar model.

  18. Calculated Resonance Line Profiles of [Mg II], [C II], and [Si IV] in the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrett, E.; Landi, E.; McKillop, S.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph space mission, launched 2013 June 27, is intended to study the structure of the solar chromosphere and the transition region between the chromosphere and corona. The spectral lines to be observed include the Mg II k line at 2796.5 Å, the C II 1334.5 Å line, and the Si IV line at 1393.8 Å, which are formed in the middle chromosphere, the upper chromosphere, and the lower transition region, respectively. Here we calculate the profiles of these lines from four models of the solar atmosphere, intended to represent the faint and mean internetwork, a network lane, and bright network. We show how the profiles change from the center of the solar disk toward the limb of the Sun and in response to outflows and inflows. These results are intended to cover the range of expected quiet-Sun observations and assist in their interpretation. We expect that the observations will lead to improvements in the models, which can then be used to estimate the required non-radiative heating in the different regions.

  19. Calculated resonance line profiles of [Mg II], [C II], and [Si IV] in the solar atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avrett, E.; McKillop, S.; Landi, E.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph space mission, launched 2013 June 27, is intended to study the structure of the solar chromosphere and the transition region between the chromosphere and corona. The spectral lines to be observed include the Mg II k line at 2796.5 Å, the C II 1334.5 Å line, and the Si IV line at 1393.8 Å, which are formed in the middle chromosphere, the upper chromosphere, and the lower transition region, respectively. Here we calculate the profiles of these lines from four models of the solar atmosphere, intended to represent the faint and mean internetwork, a network lane, and bright network. We show how the profiles change from the center of the solar disk toward the limb of the Sun and in response to outflows and inflows. These results are intended to cover the range of expected quiet-Sun observations and assist in their interpretation. We expect that the observations will lead to improvements in the models, which can then be used to estimate the required non-radiative heating in the different regions.

  20. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This second horticulture guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in eight sections: (1) Leadership, (2) Supervised Occupational Experience, (3) Plant Propagation, (4) Soil and Plant Growth Media, (5) Fertilizers, (6) Greenhouse, (7) Plant…

  1. Influence of Axisymmetrically Deformed Explosions in Type II Supernovae on the Reproduction of the Solar System Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagataki, Shigehiro

    1999-01-01

    We have tried to reproduce the solar system abundances using the nucleosynthesis products of Type Ia and Type II supernovae. In particular, we examined the effects of axisymmetrically deformed explosions in Type II supernovae. 44Ca and 47,48Ti are enhanced considerably in axisymmetrically deformed explosion models because of the active alpha-rich freezeout. The enhancement of nuclei around A=45 is a welcome result since it solves the problem of the nuclei shortage. Moreover, 59Co, 63,65Cu, and 66Zn are enhanced enough to reproduce the solar system abundances. The enhancement of Cu and Zn means the possibility that these nuclei, which have been said to be produced by the slow process, can be synthesized fairly well during the explosive nucleosynthesis. To discuss their origin quantitatively, the position of the mass cut is a very important parameter that is very difficult to determine numerically at present. We also stress that an axisymmetrically deformed explosion of Type II supernovae of the degree that is considered in this analysis is not excluded by the results of calculations of explosive nucleosynthesis, that is, the nucleosynthesis products are not extremely disturbed and the solar system abundances can be reproduced fairly well by the axisymmetrically deformed explosion models. This conclusion will be good for the theory of core collapse including the rotation of an iron core, magnetic field, and axisymmetrically modified neutrino radiation from a rotating protoneutron star, which possibly can cause an axisymmetrically deformed explosion.

  2. Adaptive Core Simulation Employing Discrete Inverse Theory - Part II: Numerical Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Turinsky, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Use of adaptive simulation is intended to improve the fidelity and robustness of important core attribute predictions such as core power distribution, thermal margins, and core reactivity. Adaptive simulation utilizes a selected set of past and current reactor measurements of reactor observables, i.e., in-core instrumentation readings, to adapt the simulation in a meaningful way. The companion paper, ''Adaptive Core Simulation Employing Discrete Inverse Theory - Part I: Theory,'' describes in detail the theoretical background of the proposed adaptive techniques. This paper, Part II, demonstrates several computational experiments conducted to assess the fidelity and robustness of the proposed techniques. The intent is to check the ability of the adapted core simulator model to predict future core observables that are not included in the adaption or core observables that are recorded at core conditions that differ from those at which adaption is completed. Also, this paper demonstrates successful utilization of an efficient sensitivity analysis approach to calculate the sensitivity information required to perform the adaption for millions of input core parameters. Finally, this paper illustrates a useful application for adaptive simulation - reducing the inconsistencies between two different core simulator code systems, where the multitudes of input data to one code are adjusted to enhance the agreement between both codes for important core attributes, i.e., core reactivity and power distribution. Also demonstrated is the robustness of such an application

  3. ABWR-II Core Design with Spectral Shift Rods for Operation with All Control Rods Withdrawn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaki, Masanao; Aoyama, Motoo; Anegawa, Takafumi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Sakurada, Koichi; Tanabe, Akira

    2004-01-01

    An innovative reactor core concept applying spectral shift rods (SSRs) is proposed to improve the plant economy and the operability of the 1700-MW(electric) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor II (ABWR-II). The SSR is a new type of water rod in which a water level is naturally developed during operation and changed according to the coolant flow rate through the channel. By taking advantage of the large size of the ABWR-II bundle, the enhanced spectral shift operation by eight SSRs allows operation of the ABWR-II with all control rods withdrawn. In addition, the uranium-saving factor of 6 to 7% relative to the reference ABWR-II core with conventional water rods can be expected due to the greater effect of spectral shift. The combination of these advantages means the ABWR-II with SSRs should be an attractive alternative for the next-generation nuclear reactor

  4. Two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behavior in core in SCTF Core-II cold leg injection tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Okubo, Tsutomu; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Adachi, Hiromichi

    1985-07-01

    Major purpose of the Slab Core Test Program is to investigate the two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behavior in the core during the reflood phase in a PWR-LOCA. In order to investigate the effects of radial power profile, three cold leg injection tests with different radial power profiles under the same total heating power and core stored energy were performed by using the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Core-II. It was revealed by comparing these three tests that the heat transfer was enhanced in the higher power bundles and degraded in the lower power bundles in the non-uniform radial power profile tests. The turnaround temperature in the high power bundles were evaluated to be reduced by about 40 to 120 K. On the other hand, a two-dimensional flow in the core was also induced by the non-uniform water accumulation in the upper plenum and the quench was delayed resultantly in the bundles corresponding to the peripheral bundles of a PWR. However, the effect of the non-uniform upper plenum water accumulation on the turnaround temperature was small because the effect dominated after the turnaround of the cladding temperature. Selected data from Tests S2-SH1, S2-SH2 and S2-O6 are also presented in this report. Some data from Tests S2-SH1 and S2-SH2 were compared with TRAC post-test calculations performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. (author)

  5. Reflood behavior at low initial clad temperature in Slab Core Test Facility Core-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Sobajima, Makoto; Abe, Yutaka; Iwamura, Takamichi; Ohnuki, Akira; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio; Okabe, Kazuharu; Adachi, Hiromichi.

    1990-07-01

    In order to study the reflood behavior with low initial clad temperature, a reflood test was performed using the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) with initial clad temperature of 573 K. The test conditions of the test are identical with those of SCTF base case test S2-SH1 (initial clad temperature 1073 K) except the initial clad temperature. Through the comparison of results from these two tests, the following conclusions were obtained. (1) The low initial clad temperature resulted in the low differential pressures through the primary loops due to smaller steam generation in the core. (2) The low initial clad temperature caused the accumulated mass in the core to be increased and the accumulated mass in the downcomer to be decreased in the period of the lower plenum injection with accumulator (before 50s). In the later period of the cold leg injection with LPCI (after 100s), the water accumulation rates in the core and the downcomer were almost the same between both tests. (3) The low initial clad temperature resulted in the increase of the core inlet mass flow rate in the lower plenum injection period. However, the core inlet mass flow rate was almost the same regardless of the initial clad temperature in the later period of the cold leg injection period. (4) The low initial clad temperature resulted in the low turnaround temperature, high temperature rise and fast bottom quench front propagation. (5) In the region apart from the quench front, low initial clad temperature resulted in the lower heat transfer. In the region near the quench front, almost the same heat transfer coefficient was observed between both tests. (6) No flow oscillation with a long period was observed in the SCTF test with low initial clad temperature of 573 K, while it was remarkable in the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) test which was performed with the same initial clad temperature. (J.P.N.)

  6. Significant efficiency enhancement of hybrid solar cells using core-shell nanowire geometry for energy harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shin-Hung; Chang, Hung-Chih; Wang, Hsin-Hua; Chen, Szu-Ying; Lin, Chin-An; Chen, Show-An; Chueh, Yu-Lun; He, Jr-Hau

    2011-12-27

    A novel strategy employing core-shell nanowire arrays (NWAs) consisting of Si/regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) was demonstrated to facilitate efficient light harvesting and exciton dissociation/charge collection for hybrid solar cells (HSCs). We experimentally demonstrate broadband and omnidirectional light-harvesting characteristics of core-shell NWA HSCs due to their subwavelength features, further supported by the simulation based on finite-difference time domain analysis. Meanwhile, core-shell geometry of NWA HSCs guarantees efficient charge separation since the thickness of the P3HT shells is comparable to the exciton diffusion length. Consequently, core-shell HSCs exhibit a 61% improvement of short-circuit current for a conversion efficiency (η) enhancement of 31.1% as compared to the P3HT-infiltrated Si NWA HSCs with layers forming a flat air/polymer cell interface. The improvement of crystal quality of P3HT shells due to the formation of ordering structure at Si interfaces after air mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5G) illumination was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The core-shell geometry with the interfacial improvement by AM 1.5G illumination promotes more efficient exciton dissociation and charge separation, leading to η improvement (∼140.6%) due to the considerable increase in V(oc) from 257 to 346 mV, J(sc) from 11.7 to 18.9 mA/cm(2), and FF from 32.2 to 35.2%, which is not observed in conventional P3HT-infiltrated Si NWA HSCs. The stability of the Si/P3HT core-shell NWA HSCs in air ambient was carefully examined. The core-shell geometry should be applicable to many other material systems of solar cells and thus holds high potential in third-generation solar cells.

  7. THE FORMATION OF IRIS DIAGNOSTICS. II. THE FORMATION OF THE Mg II h and k LINES IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenaarts, J.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Carlsson, M.; De Pontieu, B. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Uitenbroek, H., E-mail: jorritl@astro.uio.no, E-mail: tiago.pereira@astro.uio.no, E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no, E-mail: bdp@lmsal.com, E-mail: huitenbroek@nso.edu [NSO/Sacramento Peak P.O. Box 62 Sunspot, NM 88349-0062 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) small explorer mission will study how the solar atmosphere is energized. IRIS contains an imaging spectrograph that covers the Mg II h and k lines as well as a slit-jaw imager centered at Mg II k. Understanding the observations requires forward modeling of Mg II h and k line formation from three-dimensional (3D) radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) models. This paper is the second in a series where we undertake this modeling. We compute the vertically emergent h and k intensity from a snapshot of a dynamic 3D RMHD model of the solar atmosphere, and investigate which diagnostic information about the atmosphere is contained in the synthetic line profiles. We find that the Doppler shift of the central line depression correlates strongly with the vertical velocity at optical depth unity, which is typically located less than 200 km below the transition region (TR). By combining the Doppler shifts of the h and k lines we can retrieve the sign of the velocity gradient just below the TR. The intensity in the central line depression is anti-correlated with the formation height, especially in subfields of a few square Mm. This intensity could thus be used to measure the spatial variation of the height of the TR. The intensity in the line-core emission peaks correlates with the temperature at its formation height, especially for strong emission peaks. The peaks can thus be exploited as a temperature diagnostic. The wavelength difference between the blue and red peaks provides a diagnostic of the velocity gradients in the upper chromosphere. The intensity ratio of the blue and red peaks correlates strongly with the average velocity in the upper chromosphere. We conclude that the Mg II h and k lines are excellent probes of the very upper chromosphere just below the TR, a height regime that is impossible to probe with other spectral lines. They also provide decent temperature and velocity diagnostics of the middle

  8. Core integrity calculations for Heysham II/Torness AGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, N.; Briody, R.F.; Rossiter, F.

    1982-01-01

    Graphite core components experience applied loads which cause tensile stresses at the fuel brick keyway root. Finite element stress analyses over a range of corrosion profiles have identified a simple ''effective weight loss'' criterion which is directly related to brick failure load. Differential shrinkage rates cause self-stresses to arise which are expected to be tensile at the keyway root at end of life, thus reducing the residual strength of the brick. Finite element methods have been developed for obtaining instantaneous values of self-stress allowing for irradiation creep. These techniques provide the designer with rapid and inexpensive methods for assessing brick stresses with a high degree of confidence. (author)

  9. Design and optimization of Ag-dielectric core-shell nanostructures for silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Xiang Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metal-dielectric core-shell nanostructures have been proposed as a light trapping scheme for enhancing the optical absorption of silicon solar cells. As a potential application of such enhanced effects, the scattering efficiencies of three core-shell structures (Ag@SiO2, Ag@TiO2, and Ag@ZrO2 are discussed using the Mie Scattering theory. For compatibility with experiment results, the core diameter and shell thickness are limited to 100 and 30 nm, respectively, and a weighted scattering efficiency is introduced to evaluate the scattering abilities of different nanoparticles under the solar spectrum AM 1.5. The simulated results indicate that the shell material and thickness are two key parameters affecting the weighted scattering efficiency. The SiO2 is found to be an unsuitable shell medium because of its low refractive index. However, using the high refractive index mediumTiO2 in Ag@TiO2 nanoparticles, only the thicker shell (30 nm is more beneficial for light scattering. The ZrO2 is an intermediate refractive index material, so Ag@ZrO2 nanoparticles are the most effective core-shell nanostructures in these silicon solar cells applications.

  10. Tracking Solar Type II Bursts with Space Based Radio Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Alexander M.; Kasper, Justin C.; Manchester, Ward B.

    2018-06-01

    The Earth’s Ionosphere limits radio measurements on its surface, blocking out any radiation below 10 MHz. Valuable insight into many astrophysical processes could be gained by having a radio interferometer in space to image the low frequency window for the first time. One application is observing type II bursts tracking solar energetic particle acceleration in Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). In this work we create a simulated data processing pipeline for several space based radio interferometer (SBRI) concepts and evaluate their performance in the task of localizing these type II bursts.Traditional radio astronomy software is hard coded to assume an Earth based array. To circumvent this, we manually calculate the antenna separations and insert them along with the simulated visibilities into a CASA MS file for analysis. To create the realest possible virtual input data, we take a 2-temperature MHD simulation of a CME event, superimpose realistic radio emission models from the CME-driven shock front, and propagate the signal through simulated SBRIs. We consider both probabilistic emission models derived from plasma parameters correlated with type II bursts, and analytical emission models using plasma emission wave interaction theory.One proposed SBRI is the pathfinder mission SunRISE, a 6 CubeSat interferometer to circle the Earth in a GEO graveyard orbit. We test simulated trajectories of SunRISE and image what the array recovers, comparing it to the virtual input. An interferometer on the lunar surface would be a stable alternative that avoids noise sources that affect orbiting arrays, namely the phase noise from positional uncertainty and atmospheric 10s-100s kHz noise. Using Digital Elevation Models from laser altimeter data, we test different sets of locations on the lunar surface to find near optimal configurations for tracking type II bursts far from the sun. Custom software is used to model the response of different array configurations over the lunar year

  11. Process Development of Gallium Nitride Phosphide Core-Shell Nanowire Array Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chen

    Dilute Nitride GaNP is a promising materials for opto-electronic applications due to its band gap tunability. The efficiency of GaNxP1-x /GaNyP1-y core-shell nanowire solar cell (NWSC) is expected to reach as high as 44% by 1% N and 9% N in the core and shell, respectively. By developing such high efficiency NWSCs on silicon substrate, a further reduction of the cost of solar photovoltaic can be further reduced to 61$/MWh, which is competitive to levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of fossil fuels. Therefore, a suitable NWSC structure and fabrication process need to be developed to achieve this promising NWSC. This thesis is devoted to the study on the development of fabrication process of GaNxP 1-x/GaNyP1-y core-shell Nanowire solar cell. The thesis is divided into two major parts. In the first parts, previously grown GaP/GaNyP1-y core-shell nanowire samples are used to develop the fabrication process of Gallium Nitride Phosphide nanowire solar cell. The design for nanowire arrays, passivation layer, polymeric filler spacer, transparent col- lecting layer and metal contact are discussed and fabricated. The property of these NWSCs are also characterized to point out the future development of Gal- lium Nitride Phosphide NWSC. In the second part, a nano-hole template made by nanosphere lithography is studied for selective area growth of nanowires to improve the structure of core-shell NWSC. The fabrication process of nano-hole templates and the results are presented. To have a consistent features of nano-hole tem- plate, the Taguchi Method is used to optimize the fabrication process of nano-hole templates.

  12. Extension of the ACE solar panels is tested in SAEF-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Extension of the solar panels is tested on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-II (SAEF-II). Scheduled for launch on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Station on Aug. 25, ACE will study low-energy particles of solar origin and high-energy galactic particles. The collecting power of instruments aboard ACE is 10 to 1,000 times greater than anything previously flown to collect similar data by NASA.

  13. Fluid Core Size of Mars from Detection of the Solar Tide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, C. F.; Konopliv, A. S.; Yuan, D. N.; Standish, E. M.; Folkner, W. M.

    2003-04-01

    The solar tidal deformation of Mars, measured by its k2 potential Love number, has been obtained from an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor radio tracking. The observed k2 of 0.153 +/- 0.017 is large enough to rule out a solid iron core and so indicates that at least the outer part of the core is liquid. The inferred core radius is between 1520 and 1840 kilometers and is independent of many interior properties, although partial melt of the mantle is one factor that could reduce core size. Ice-cap mass changes can be deduced from the seasonal variations in air pressure and the odd gravity harmonic J3, given knowledge of cap mass distribution with latitude. The south cap seasonal mass change is about 30 to 40% larger than that of the north cap.

  14. Two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behavior in core in SCTF Core-II forced feed reflood tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Okubo, Tsutomu; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Adachi, Hiromichi

    1987-01-01

    Major purpose of the Slab Core Test Program is to investigate the two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behavior in the core during the reflood phase of a PWR-LOCA. It was revealed in the previous Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Core-II test results that the heat transfer was enhanced in the higher power bundles and degraded in the lower power bundles in the non-uniform radial power profile tests. In order to separately evaluate the effect of the radial power (Q) distribution itself and the effect of the radial temperature (T) distribution, four tests were performed with steep Q and T, flat Q and T, steep Q and flat T, and flat Q and steep T. Based on the test results, it was concluded that the radial temperature distribution which accompanied the radial power distribution was the dominant factor of the two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behavior in the core during the initial period. Selected data from these four tests are also presented in this report. Some data from Test S2-12 (steep Q, T) were compared with TRAC post-test calculations performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. (author)

  15. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood test C2-4 (Run 62)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Iguchi, Tadashi; Sugimoto, Jun; Akimoto, Hajime; Murao, Yoshio; Okabe, Kazuharu.

    1985-03-01

    This report presents a data evaluation of the CCTF Core-II test C2-4 (Run 62), which was conducted on May 12, 1983. This test was conducted to investigate the reproducibility of tests in the CCTF Core-II test series. Therefore, the initial and boundary conditions of the present test were determined to be the same as those for the previously performed base case test (Test C2-SH1). Comparing the data of the present test with those of Test C2-SH1, the following results are obtained. (1) The initial and boundary conditions for the two tests were nearly identical except the temperature of the core barrel and the lower plenum fluid. The difference in the latter is considered to result in the difference in the core inlet subcooling of about 6 K at most. (2) The system behavior was almost identical. (3) The core cooling behavior was also nearly identical except a little difference in the rod surface temperature in the upper part of the high power region. (4) Taking account that the difference mentioned above in item (3) is small and can be explained qualitatively to be caused by the difference in the core inlet subcooling mentioned above in item (1), it is considered practically that there is the reproducibility of the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior in the CCTF Core-II tests. (author)

  16. Fuel Management Strategies for a Possible Future LEU Core of a TRIGA Mark II Vienna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R.; Villa, M.; Steinhauser, G.; Boeck, H. [Vienna University of Technology-Atominstitut (Austria)

    2011-07-01

    The Vienna University of Technology/Atominstitut (VUT/ATI) operates a TRIGA Mark II research reactor. It is operated with a completely mixed core of three different types of fuel. Due to the US fuel return program, the ATI have to return its High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel latest by 2019. As an alternate, the Low Enrich Uranium (LEU) fuel is under consideration. The detailed results of the core conversion study are presented at the RRFM 2011 conference. This paper describes the burn up calculations of the new fuel to predict the future burn up behavior and core life time. It also develops an effective and optimized fuel management strategy for a possible future operation of the TRIGA Mark II with a LEU core. This work is performed by the combination of MCNP5 and diffusion based neutronics code TRIGLAV. (author)

  17. Transitions to improved core electron heat confinement in JT-II plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Ascasibar, E.; Balbin, R.; Castejon, F.; Hidalgo, C.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Petrov, S.

    2008-01-01

    Transitions to improved core electron heat confinement are triggered by low order rational magnetic surfaces in TJ-II ECH plasmas. Transitions triggered by the rational surface n=4/m=2 show an increase in the ion temperature synchronized with the increase in the electron temperature. SXR measurements demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, the rational surface positioned inside the plasma core region precedes and provides a trigger for the transition. (author)

  18. Mammalian RNA polymerase II core promoters: insights from genome-wide studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandelin, Albin; Carninci, Piero; Lenhard, Boris

    2007-01-01

    The identification and characterization of mammalian core promoters and transcription start sites is a prerequisite to understanding how RNA polymerase II transcription is controlled. New experimental technologies have enabled genome-wide discovery and characterization of core promoters, revealing...... in the mammalian transcriptome and proteome. Promoters can be described by their start site usage distribution, which is coupled to the occurrence of cis-regulatory elements, gene function and evolutionary constraints. A comprehensive survey of mammalian promoters is a major step towards describing...

  19. Multi-crystalline II-VI based multijunction solar cells and modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Groves, James R.; Peters, Craig H.

    2015-06-30

    Multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells and methods for fabrication of same are disclosed herein. A multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cell includes a first photovoltaic sub-cell comprising silicon, a tunnel junction, and a multi-crystalline second photovoltaic sub-cell. A plurality of the multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells can be interconnected to form low cost, high throughput flat panel, low light concentration, and/or medium light concentration photovoltaic modules or devices.

  20. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  1. Adaptive control method for core power control in TRIGA Mark II reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri Minhat, Mohd; Selamat, Hazlina; Subha, Nurul Adilla Mohd

    2018-01-01

    The 1MWth Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) Mark II type has undergone more than 35 years of operation. The existing core power control uses feedback control algorithm (FCA). It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands to meet the safety demand of RTP due to the sensitivity of nuclear research reactor operation. Currently, the system is not satisfied with power tracking performance and can be improved. Therefore, a new design core power control is very important to improve the current performance in tracking and regulate reactor power by control the movement of control rods. In this paper, the adaptive controller and focus on Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) and Self-Tuning Control (STC) were applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, adaptive controller model, and control rods selection programming. The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on point kinetics model, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The adaptive control model was presented using Lyapunov method to ensure stable close loop system and STC Generalised Minimum Variance (GMV) Controller was not necessary to know the exact plant transfer function in designing the core power control. The performance between proposed adaptive control and FCA will be compared via computer simulation and analysed the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  2. Shaping the solar wind electron temperature anisotropy by the interplay of core and suprathermal populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban Hamd, S. M.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Pierrard, V.; Štverák

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of an advanced parametrization of the temperature anisotropy of electrons in the slow solar wind and the electromagnetic instabilities resulting from the interplay of their thermal core and suprathermal halo populations. A large set of observational data (from the Ulysses, Helios and Cluster missions) is used to parametrize these components and establish their correlations. Comparative analysis demonstrates for the first time a particular implication of the suprathermal electrons which are less dense but hotter than thermal electrons. The instabilities are significantly stimulated by the interplay of the core and halo populations, leading to lower thresholds which shape the observed limits of the temperature anisotropy for both the core and halo populations. This double agreement strongly suggests that the selfgenerated instabilities play the major role in constraining the electron anisotropy.

  3. TRIGGERING COLLAPSE OF THE PRESOLAR DENSE CLOUD CORE AND INJECTING SHORT-LIVED RADIOISOTOPES WITH A SHOCK WAVE. II. VARIED SHOCK WAVE AND CLOUD CORE PARAMETERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A., E-mail: boss@dtm.ciw.edu, E-mail: keiser@dtm.ciw.edu [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015-1305 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    A variety of stellar sources have been proposed for the origin of the short-lived radioisotopes that existed at the time of the formation of the earliest solar system solids, including Type II supernovae (SNe), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and super-AGB stars, and Wolf-Rayet star winds. Our previous adaptive mesh hydrodynamics models with the FLASH2.5 code have shown which combinations of shock wave parameters are able to simultaneously trigger the gravitational collapse of a target dense cloud core and inject significant amounts of shock wave gas and dust, showing that thin SN shocks may be uniquely suited for the task. However, recent meteoritical studies have weakened the case for a direct SN injection to the presolar cloud, motivating us to re-examine a wider range of shock wave and cloud core parameters, including rotation, in order to better estimate the injection efficiencies for a variety of stellar sources. We find that SN shocks remain as the most promising stellar source, though planetary nebulae resulting from AGB star evolution cannot be conclusively ruled out. Wolf-Rayet (WR) star winds, however, are likely to lead to cloud core shredding, rather than to collapse. Injection efficiencies can be increased when the cloud is rotating about an axis aligned with the direction of the shock wave, by as much as a factor of {approx}10. The amount of gas and dust accreted from the post-shock wind can exceed that injected from the shock wave, with implications for the isotopic abundances expected for a SN source.

  4. Measuring solar reflectance - Part II: Review of practical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul [Heat Island Group, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    A companion article explored how solar reflectance varies with surface orientation and solar position, and found that clear sky air mass 1 global horizontal (AM1GH) solar reflectance is a preferred quantity for estimating solar heat gain. In this study we show that AM1GH solar reflectance R{sub g,0} can be accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer, or an updated edition of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer (version 6). Of primary concern are errors that result from variations in the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight. Neglecting shadow, background and instrument errors, the conventional pyranometer technique can measure R{sub g,0} to within 0.01 for surface slopes up to 5:12 [23 ], and to within 0.02 for surface slopes up to 12:12 [45 ]. An alternative pyranometer method minimizes shadow errors and can be used to measure R{sub g,0} of a surface as small as 1 m in diameter. The accuracy with which it can measure R{sub g,0} is otherwise comparable to that of the conventional pyranometer technique. A solar spectrophotometer can be used to determine R{sub g,0}{sup *}, a solar reflectance computed by averaging solar spectral reflectance weighted with AM1GH solar spectral irradiance. Neglecting instrument errors, R{sub g,0}{sup *} matches R{sub g,0} to within 0.006. The air mass 1.5 solar reflectance measured with version 5 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer can differ from R{sub g,0}{sup *} by as much as 0.08, but the AM1GH output of version 6 of this instrument matches R{sub g,0}{sup *} to within about 0.01. (author)

  5. Verification of MVP-II and SRAC2006 code to the core physics vera benchmark problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jati Susilo

    2014-01-01

    In this research, verification calculation for VERA core physics benchmark on the Zero Power Physical Test (ZPPT) of the nuclear reactor Watts Bar 1. The reactor is a 1000 MWe class of PWR designed by. Westinghouse, arranged from 193 unit of 17 x 17 fuel assembly consisting 3 type enrichment of UO2 that are 2.1wt%, 2.619wt% and 3.1wt%. Core power factor distribution and k-eff calculation has been done for the first cycle operation of the core at beginning of cycle (BOC) and hot zero power (HZP). In this calculation, MVP-II and CITATION module of SRAC2006 computer code has been used with ENDF/B-VII.0. cross section data library. Calculation result showed that differences value of k-eff for the core at controlled and uncontrolled condition between reference with MVP-II (-0,07% and -0,014%) and SRAC2006 (0,92% and 0,99%) are very small or below 1%. Differences value of radial power peaking factor at controlled and uncontrolled of the core between reference value with MVP-II are 0,38% and 1,53%, even though with SRAC2006 are 1,13% and -2,45%. It can be said that the calculation result by both computer code showing suitability with reference value. In order to determinate of criticality of the core, the calculation result using MVP-II code is more conservative compare with SRAC2006 code. (author)

  6. Interfacial charge separation and recombination in InP and quasi-type II InP/CdS core/shell quantum dot-molecular acceptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaifeng; Song, Nianhui; Liu, Zheng; Zhu, Haiming; Rodríguez-Córdoba, William; Lian, Tianquan

    2013-08-15

    Recent studies of group II-VI colloidal semiconductor heterostuctures, such as CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) or dot-in-rod nanorods, show that type II and quasi-type II band alignment can facilitate electron transfer and slow down charge recombination in QD-molecular electron acceptor complexes. To explore the general applicability of this wave function engineering approach for controlling charge transfer properties, we investigate exciton relaxation and dissociation dynamics in InP (a group III-V semiconductor) and InP/CdS core/shell (a heterostructure beween group III-V and II-VI semiconductors) QDs by transient absorption spectroscopy. We show that InP/CdS QDs exhibit a quasi-type II band alignment with the 1S electron delocalized throughout the core and shell and the 1S hole confined in the InP core. In InP-methylviologen (MV(2+)) complexes, excitons in the QD can be dissociated by ultrafast electron transfer to MV(2+) from the 1S electron level (with an average time constant of 11.4 ps) as well as 1P and higher electron levels (with a time constant of 0.39 ps), which is followed by charge recombination to regenerate the complex in its ground state (with an average time constant of 47.1 ns). In comparison, InP/CdS-MV(2+) complexes show similar ultrafast charge separation and 5-fold slower charge recombination rates, consistent with the quasi-type II band alignment in these heterostructures. This result demonstrates that wave function engineering in nanoheterostructures of group III-V and II-VI semiconductors provides a promising approach for optimizing their light harvesting and charge separation for solar energy conversion applications.

  7. Preface to the SPECIAL ISSUE: Excitonic Solar Cells(II)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun Tian; Meicheng Li; Kaibo Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Among all the excitonic solar cells(ESCs)including dyesensitized solar cells(DSSCs),quantum solar cells(QDSCs),perovskites solar cells(PSCs),and organic photovoltaics(OPVs),PSCs attracted enormous research attention in the past 7 years and attained the highest power conversion efficiency(PCE)of over 20%with the biggest progress,from 3.8%to over 22.1%in 7 years.However,one can easily realize the fact that such a rapid progress achieved in PSCs was made possible is largely based on the fundamental knowledge,experimental skills,and characterization facilities obtained and accumulated through the multi-decade long endeavor in the study of other excitonic solar cells.Even though PSCs have attractedmuch research human resource and funding,the study on other excitonic solar cells has never stopped,and such persistent efforts

  8. Overview of the TITAN-II reversed-field pinch aqueous fusion power core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Creedon, R.L.; Grotz, S.; Cheng, E.T.; Sharafat, S.; Cooke, P.I.H.

    1988-03-01

    TITAN-II is a compact, high power density Reversed-Field Pinch fusion power reactor design based on the aqueous lithium solution fusion power core concept. The selected breeding and structural materials are LiNO/sub 3/ and 9-C low activation ferritic steel, respectively. TITAN-II is a viable alternative to the TITAN-I lithium self-cooled design for the Reversed-Field Pinch reactor to operate at a neutron wall loading of 18 MWm/sup 2/. Submerging the complete fusion power core and the primary loop in a large pool of cool water will minimize the probability of radioactivity release. Since the protection of the large pool integrity is the only requirement for the protection of the public, TITAN-II is a passive safety assurance design. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Overview of the TITAN-II reversed-field pinch aqueous fusion power core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Creedon, R.L.; Cheng, E.T. (General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (USA)); Grotz, S.P.; Sharafat, S.; Cooke, P.I.H. (California Univ., Los Angeles (USA). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Inst. for Plasma and Fusion Research); TITAN Research Group

    1989-04-01

    TITAN-II is a compact, high-power-density Reversed-Field Pinch fusion power reactor design based on the aqueous lithium solution fusion power core concept. The selected breeding and structural materials are LiNO/sub 3/ and 9-C low activation ferritic steel, respectively. TITAN-II is a viable alternative to the TITAN-I lithium self-cooled design for the Reversed-Field Pinch reactor to operate at a neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m/sup 2/. Submerging the complete fusion power core and the primary loop in a large pool of cool water will minimize the probability of radioactivity release. Since the protection of the large pool integrity is the only requirement for the protection of the public, TITAN-II is a level 2 of passive safety assurance design. (orig.).

  10. Calculation analysis of TRIGA MARK II reactor core composed of two types of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravnik, M.

    1988-11-01

    The most important properties of mixed cores are treated for TRIGA MARK II reactor, composed of standard (20% enriched, 8.5w% U content) and FLIP (70% enriched, 8.5w% U content) fuel elements. Large difference in enrichment and presence of burnable poison in FLIP fuel have strong influence on the main core characteristics, such as: fuel temperature coefficient, power defect, Xe and Sm worth, power and flux distributions, etc. They are significantly different for both types of fuel. Optimal loading of mixed cores therefore strongly depends on the loading pattern of both types of fuel elements. Results of systematic calculational analysis of mixed cores are presented. Calculations on the level of fuel element are performed with WIMSD-4 computer code with extended cross-section library. Core calculations are performed with TRIGAP two-group 1-D diffusion code. Results are compared to measurements and physical explanation is provided. Special concern is devoted to realistic mixed cores, for which optimal in-core fuel management is derived. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. On the track of gravity modes: study of the dynamics of the solar core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Savita

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the dynamics of the solar radiative zone through gravity modes. Though the core represents more than 50% of the solar mass, we still do not have an accurate vision of the rotation profile in the very inner part of the Sun. To understand the evolution of stars, we try to put constraints on dynamic processes. Several paths have been followed in this thesis to tackle this issue: solar modeling, the study of a new instrument, observations and inversions of the rotation. The necessity of the detection of gravity modes is driven by the will for a better comprehension of the solar dynamics. With a technological prototype built at the CEA (GOLF-NG), we want to validate a few technical points and prepare the scientific mission which aim will be to detect these gravity modes. We studied first the photodetector and then the whole instrument response. We show the feasibility of the instrument. The observation of the resonance in all the channels proves that it works the way we expected. However, before this mission takes place, the analysis of GOLF data enabled us to detect one gravity-mode candidate as well as the signature of dipole gravity modes. This work benefited from a more theoretical approach on the prediction of gravity-mode frequencies. We show the influence of several physical processes and quantities. Finally, as the dynamical processes in the Sun are not well constrained, we tried to understand the impact of the introduction of one and several gravity modes on the inferred rotation profiles. We also tried to give constraints on the observations so that we could obtain some information on the rotation profile in the core. (author) [fr

  12. Integration of Solar Cells on Top of CMOS Chips - Part II: CIGS Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.; Liu, Wei; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Sun, Yun; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the monolithic integration of deepsubmicrometer complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) microchips with copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells. Solar cells are manufactured directly on unpackaged CMOS chips. The microchips maintain comparable electronic performance,

  13. Oxidation driven ZnS Core-ZnO shell photocatalysts under controlled oxygen atmosphere for improved photocatalytic solar water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Daegil; Kim, Jung Hyeun

    2018-06-01

    Zinc type photocatalysts attract great attentions in solar hydrogen production due to their easy availability and benign environmental characteristics. Spherical ZnS particles are synthesized with a facile hydrothermal method, and they are further used as core materials to introduce ZnO shell layer surrounding the core part by partial oxidation under controlled oxygen contents. The resulting ZnS core-ZnO shell photocatalysts represent the heterostructural type II band alignment. The existence of oxide layer also influences on proton adsorption power with an aid of strong base cites derived from highly electronegative oxygen atoms in ZnO shell layer. Photocatalytic water splitting reaction is performed to evaluate catalyst efficiency under standard one sun condition, and the highest hydrogen evolution rate (1665 μmolg-1h-1) is achieved from the sample oxidized at 16.2 kPa oxygen pressure. This highest hydrogen production rate is achieved in cooperation with increased light absorption and promoted charge separations. Photoluminescence analysis reveals that the improved visible light response is obtained after thermal oxidation process due to the oxygen vacancy states in the ZnO shell layer. Therefore, overall photocatalytic efficiency in solar hydrogen production is enhanced by improved charge separations, crystallinity, and visible light responses from the ZnS core-ZnO shell structures induced by thermal oxidation.

  14. Dynamics of the Solar Chromosphere. II. Ca II H2V and K2V Grains versus Internetwork Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lites, B.W.; Rutten, R.J.; Berger, T.E.

    1998-01-01

    We use the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter at the NSO/Sacramento Peak Vacuum Tower Telescope to search for spatio- temporal correlations between enhanced magnetic fields in the quiet solar internetwork photosphere and the occurrence of Ca II H2v grains in the overlying chromosphere.We address the

  15. Architecture of the RNA polymerase II-Mediator core initiation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaschka, C; Larivière, L; Wenzeck, L; Seizl, M; Hemann, M; Tegunov, D; Petrotchenko, E V; Borchers, C H; Baumeister, W; Herzog, F; Villa, E; Cramer, P

    2015-02-19

    The conserved co-activator complex Mediator enables regulated transcription initiation by RNA polymerase (Pol) II. Here we reconstitute an active 15-subunit core Mediator (cMed) comprising all essential Mediator subunits from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cryo-electron microscopic structure of cMed bound to a core initiation complex was determined at 9.7 Å resolution. cMed binds Pol II around the Rpb4-Rpb7 stalk near the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD). The Mediator head module binds the Pol II dock and the TFIIB ribbon and stabilizes the initiation complex. The Mediator middle module extends to the Pol II foot with a 'plank' that may influence polymerase conformation. The Mediator subunit Med14 forms a 'beam' between the head and middle modules and connects to the tail module that is predicted to bind transcription activators located on upstream DNA. The Mediator 'arm' and 'hook' domains contribute to a 'cradle' that may position the CTD and TFIIH kinase to stimulate Pol II phosphorylation.

  16. The Core Collapse Supernova Rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Galbany, Lluis; Gupta, Ravi R.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-08-26

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10(–)(4)((h/0.7)(3)/(yr Mpc(3))) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  17. Magnesium Hall Thruster for Solar System Exploration, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation being developed in this program is a Mg Hall Effect Thruster system that would open the door for In-Situ Resource Utilization based solar system...

  18. Multijunction Ultralight Solar Cells and Arrays, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a continuing need within NASA for solar cells and arrays with very high specific power densities (1000-5000 kW/kg) for generating power in a new generation...

  19. InN-Based Quantum Dot Solar Cells, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this STTR program is to employ nanostructured materials in an advanced device design to enhance the tolerance of solar cells to extreme environments...

  20. Modular Distributed Concentrator for Solar Furnace, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research proposes to develop the technology needed to implement a solar-fired regolith processing system at a lunar outpost that achieves low mass, high...

  1. Role of Core-collapse Supernovae in Explaining Solar System Abundances of p Nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglio, C.; Rauscher, T.; Heger, A.; Pignatari, M.; West, C.

    2018-02-01

    The production of the heavy stable proton-rich isotopes between 74Se and 196Hg—the p nuclides—is due to the contribution from different nucleosynthesis processes, activated in different types of stars. Whereas these processes have been subject to various studies, their relative contributions to Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) are still a matter of debate. Here we investigate for the first time the nucleosynthesis of p nuclides in GCE by including metallicity and progenitor mass-dependent yields of core-collapse supernovae (ccSNe) into a chemical evolution model. We used a grid of metallicities and progenitor masses from two different sets of stellar yields and followed the contribution of ccSNe to the Galactic abundances as a function of time. In combination with previous studies on p-nucleus production in thermonuclear supernovae (SNIa), and using the same GCE description, this allows us to compare the respective roles of SNeIa and ccSNe in the production of p-nuclei in the Galaxy. The γ process in ccSN is very efficient for a wide range of progenitor masses (13 M ⊙–25 M ⊙) at solar metallicity. Since it is a secondary process with its efficiency depending on the initial abundance of heavy elements, its contribution is strongly reduced below solar metallicity. This makes it challenging to explain the inventory of the p nuclides in the solar system by the contribution from ccSNe alone. In particular, we find that ccSNe contribute less than 10% of the solar p nuclide abundances, with only a few exceptions. Due to the uncertain contribution from other nucleosynthesis sites in ccSNe, such as neutrino winds or α-rich freeze out, we conclude that the light p-nuclides 74Se, 78Kr, 84Sr, and 92Mo may either still be completely or only partially produced in ccSNe. The γ-process accounts for up to twice the relative solar abundances for 74Se in one set of stellar models and 196Hg in the other set. The solar abundance of the heaviest p nucleus 196Hg is

  2. Neutronics analysis of the TRIGA Mark II reactor core and its experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, R.

    2010-01-01

    The neutronics analysis of the current core of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor is performed at the Atominstitute (ATI) of Vienna University of Technology. The current core is a completely mixed core having three different types of fuels i.e. aluminium clad 20 % enriched, stainless steel clad 20 % enriched and SS clad 70 % enriched (FLIP) Fuel Elements (FE(s)). The completely mixed nature and complicated irradiation history of the core makes the reactor physics calculations challenging. This PhD neutronics research is performed by employing the combination of two best and well practiced reactor simulation tools i.e. MCNP (general Monte Carlo N-particle transport code) for static analysis and ORIGEN2 (Oak Ridge Isotop Generation and depletion code) for dynamic analysis of the reactor core. The PhD work is started to develop a MCNP model of the first core configuration (March 1962) employing fresh fuel composition. The neutrons reaction data libraries ENDF/B-VI is applied taking the missing isotope of Samarium from JEFF3.1. The MCNP model of the very first core has been confirmed by three different local experiments performed on the first core configuration. These experiments include the first criticality, reactivity distribution and the neutron flux density distribution experiment. The first criticality experiment verifies the MCNP model that core achieves its criticality on addition of the 57th FE with a reactivity difference of about 9.3 cents. The measured reactivity worths of four FE(s) and a graphite element are taken from the log book and compared with MCNP simulated results. The percent difference between calculations and measurements ranges from 4 to 22 %. The neutron flux density mapping experiment confirms the model completely exhibiting good agreement between simulated and the experimental results. Since its first criticality, some additional 104-type and 110-type (FLIP) FE(s) have been added to keep the reactor into operation. This turns the current

  3. Compact sodium cooled nuclear power plant with fast core (KNK II- Karlsruhe), Safety Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    After the operation of the KNK plant with a thermal core (KNK I), the installation of a fast core (KNK II) had been realized. The planning of the core and the necessary reconstruction work was done by INTERATOM. Owner and customer was the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe (KfK), while the operating company was the Kernkraftwerk-Betriebsgesellschaft mbH (KBG) Karlsruhe. The main goals of the KNK II project and its special experimental test program were to gather experience for the construction, the licensing and operation of future larger plants, to develop and to test fuel and absorber assemblies and to further develop the sodium technology and the associated components. The present safety report consists of three parts. Part 1 contains the description of the nuclear plant. Hereby, the reactor and its components, the handling facilities, the instrumentation with the plant protection, the design of the plant including the reactor core and the nominal operation processes are described. Part 2 contains the safety related investigation and measures. This concerns the reactivity accidents, local cooling perturbations, radiological consequences with the surveillance measures and the justification of the choice of structural materials. Part three finally is the appendix with the figures, showing the different buildings, the reactor and its components, the heat transfer systems and the different auxiliary facilities [de

  4. Metal-core/semiconductor-shell nanocones for broadband solar absorption enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, Jia

    2014-02-12

    Nanostructure-based photovoltaic devices have exhibited several advantages, such as reduced reflection, extraordinary light trapping, and so forth. In particular, semiconductor nanostructures provide optical modes that have strong dependence on the size and geometry. Metallic nanostructures also attract a lot of attention because of the appealing plasmonic effect on the near-field enhancement. In this study, we propose a novel design, the metal-core/semiconductor-shell nanocones with the core radius varying in a linearly gradient style. With a thin layer of semiconductor absorber coated on a metallic cone, such a design can lead to significant and broadband absorption enhancement across the entire visible and near-infrared solar spectrum. As an example of demonstration, a layer of 16 nm thick crystalline silicon (c-Si) coated on a silver nanocone can absorb 27% of standard solar radiation across a broad spectral range of 300-1100 nm, which is equivalent to a 700 nm thick flat c-Si film. Therefore, the absorption enhancement factor approaching the Yablonovitch limit is achieved with this design. The significant absorption enhancement can be ascribed to three types of optical modes, that is, Fabry-Perot modes, plasmonic modes, and hybrid modes that combine the features of the previous two. In addition, the unique nanocone geometry enables the linearly gradient radius of the semiconductor shell, which can support multiple optical resonances, critical for the broadband absorption. Our design may find general usage as elements for the low cost, high efficiency solar conversion and water-splitting devices.

  5. JOYO MK-II core characteristics database. Update to JFS-3-J3.2R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawachi, Yasushi; Maeda, Shigetaka; Sekine, Takashi

    2003-04-01

    The 'JOYO' MK-II core characteristics database was compiled and published in 1998. Comments and requests from many users led to the creation of a revised edition in 2001. The revisions include changes to the MAGI calculation code system to use the 70 group JFS-3-J3.2 constant set processed from the JENDL-3.2 library. However, after the database was published, it was recently found that there were errors in the process of making the group constant set JFS-3-J3.2, and it was revised at JFS-3-J3.2R. Then, the group constant set was updated at JFS-3-J3.2R in this database. The MK-II core management data nad core characteristics data were recorded on CD-ROM for user convenience. The structure of the database is the same as in the first edition. The 'Configuration Data' include the core arrangement and refueling record for each operational cycle. The 'Subassembly Library Data' include the atomic number density, neutron fluence, burn-up, integral power of 362 driver fuel subassemblies and 69 irradiation test subassemblies. The 'Output Data' contain the calculated neutron flux, gamma flux, power density, linear heat rate, coolant and fuel temperature distribution of all the fuel subassemblies at the beginning and end of each operational cycle. The 'Core Characteristics Data' include the measured excess reactivity, control rod worth calibration curve, and reactivity coefficients of temperature, power and burn-up. The effect of updating the group constant set, the calculation results of excess reactivity decreased by about 0.15Δk/kk', and the effects to other core characteristics were negligible. (author)

  6. The velocities of type II solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlamicha, A.; Karlicky, M.

    1976-01-01

    A list is presented of type II radio bursts identified at Ondrejov between January 1973 and December 1974 in the frequency range of the dynamic spectrum 70 to 810 MHz. The velocities of shock waves in the individual cases of type II bursts are given using the fourfold Newkirk model. Some problems associated with type II radio bursts and with the propagation of the shock wave into the interplanetary space and into the region of the Earth are also discussed. (author)

  7. Core-shell nanophosphor architecture: toward efficient energy transport in inorganic/organic hybrid solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghua; Yuan, Yongbiao; Chen, Zihan; Jin, Xiao; Wei, Tai-huei; Li, Yue; Qin, Yuancheng; Sun, Weifu

    2014-08-13

    In this work, a core-shell nanostructure of samarium phosphates encapsulated into a Eu(3+)-doped silica shell has been successfully fabricated, which has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-resolution TEM. Moreover, we report the energy transfer process from the Sm(3+) to emitters Eu(3+) that widens the light absorption range of the hybrid solar cells (HSCs) and the strong enhancement of the electron-transport of TiO2/poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) bulk heterojunction (BHJ) HSCs by introducing the unique core-shell nanoarchitecture. Furthermore, by applying femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, we successfully obtain the electron transport lifetimes of BHJ systems with or without incorporating the core-shell nanophosphors (NPs). Concrete evidence has been provided that the doping of core-shell NPs improves the efficiency of electron transfers from donor to acceptor, but the hole transport almost remains unchanged. In particular, the hot electron transfer lifetime was shortened from 30.2 to 16.7 ps, i.e., more than 44% faster than pure TiO2 acceptor. Consequently, a notable power conversion efficiency of 3.30% for SmPO4@Eu(3+):SiO2 blended TiO2/P3HT HSCs is achieved at 5 wt % as compared to 1.98% of pure TiO2/P3HT HSCs. This work indicates that the core-shell NPs can efficiently broaden the absorption region, facilitate electron-transport of BHJ, and enhance photovoltaic performance of inorganic/organic HSCs.

  8. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood Test C2-15 (Run 75)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Iguchi, Tadashi; Akimoto, Hajime; Murao, Yoshio

    1992-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation on the CCTF Core-II Test C2-15 (Run 75). The purpose of the test is to investigate whether the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior is different between the CCTF and the FLECHT-SET reflooding tests. For this purpose, test conditions of the present test were set as close as possible to those of concerned FLECHT-SET 2714B experiment, taking account of differences in facility design. Investigating results of both the tests, the following conclusions are obtained: (1) Some discrepancies were observed in the measured test conditions between the two tests. Out of them, difference in the Acc injection duration was large and affected test results, such as the water accumulation in the downcomer and the core and the core cooling, during the initial period. However, this effect was found to become small with time. (2) Taking account of this difference and the difference in the broken cold leg pressure loss coefficient between the two facilities, the overall reflooding behavior is judged to be similar in the two facilities. (3) The CCTF test results showed the core heat transfer enhancement in the higher power region due to its steep radial power distribution, whereas the FLECHT-SET did not due to its rather flat radial power distribution. This enhancement was observed significantly at 1.83 m but was smaller at the higher elevation. (4) The heat transfer was nearly identical between the two tests and an existing correlation could well predict the heat transfer coefficients of both the tests at the location where the heat transfer enhancement mentioned above (3) were small, during the time period when the effect of the difference in the Acc injection mentioned above (1) were small. (5) Therefore, the core cooling is expected to be almost the same in the CCTF and the FLECHT-SET under the same core boundary conditions and core radial power distribution. (author)

  9. Origin and structures of solar eruptions II: Magnetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Cheng, Xin; Ding, MingDe

    2017-07-01

    The topology and dynamics of the three-dimensional magnetic field in the solar atmosphere govern various solar eruptive phenomena and activities, such as flares, coronal mass ejections, and filaments/prominences. We have to observe and model the vector magnetic field to understand the structures and physical mechanisms of these solar activities. Vector magnetic fields on the photosphere are routinely observed via the polarized light, and inferred with the inversion of Stokes profiles. To analyze these vector magnetic fields, we need first to remove the 180° ambiguity of the transverse components and correct the projection effect. Then, the vector magnetic field can be served as the boundary conditions for a force-free field modeling after a proper preprocessing. The photospheric velocity field can also be derived from a time sequence of vector magnetic fields. Three-dimensional magnetic field could be derived and studied with theoretical force-free field models, numerical nonlinear force-free field models, magnetohydrostatic models, and magnetohydrodynamic models. Magnetic energy can be computed with three-dimensional magnetic field models or a time series of vector magnetic field. The magnetic topology is analyzed by pinpointing the positions of magnetic null points, bald patches, and quasi-separatrix layers. As a well conserved physical quantity, magnetic helicity can be computed with various methods, such as the finite volume method, discrete flux tube method, and helicity flux integration method. This quantity serves as a promising parameter characterizing the activity level of solar active regions.

  10. Understanding variability of the Southern Ocean overturning circulation in CORE-II models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, S. M.; Spence, P.; Hogg, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    The current generation of climate models exhibit a large spread in the steady-state and projected Southern Ocean upper and lower overturning circulation, with mechanisms for deep ocean variability remaining less well understood. Here, common Southern Ocean metrics in twelve models from the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiment Phase II (CORE-II) are assessed over a 60 year period. Specifically, stratification, surface buoyancy fluxes, and eddies are linked to the magnitude of the strengthening trend in the upper overturning circulation, and a decreasing trend in the lower overturning circulation across the CORE-II models. The models evolve similarly in the upper 1 km and the deep ocean, with an almost equivalent poleward intensification trend in the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds. However, the models differ substantially in their eddy parameterisation and surface buoyancy fluxes. In general, models with a larger heat-driven water mass transformation where deep waters upwell at the surface ( ∼ 55°S) transport warmer waters into intermediate depths, thus weakening the stratification in the upper 2 km. Models with a weak eddy induced overturning and a warm bias in the intermediate waters are more likely to exhibit larger increases in the upper overturning circulation, and more significant weakening of the lower overturning circulation. We find the opposite holds for a cool model bias in intermediate depths, combined with a more complex 3D eddy parameterisation that acts to reduce isopycnal slope. In summary, the Southern Ocean overturning circulation decadal trends in the coarse resolution CORE-II models are governed by biases in surface buoyancy fluxes and the ocean density field, and the configuration of the eddy parameterisation.

  11. Increasing the neutron flux study for the TRR-II core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-H.; Yang, J.-T.; Chou, Y.-C.

    1999-01-01

    The maximum unperturbed thermal flux of the originally proposed core design, which is a 6x6 square arrangement with power level of 20 MW and has been presented at the 6th Meeting of IGORR, for the TRR-II reactor is about 2.0x10 14 n/cm 2 -sec. However, it is no longer satisfied the user's requirement, that is, it must reach at least 2.5x10 14 n/cm 2 -sec. In order to enhance the thermal neutron flux, one of the most effective ways is to increase the average power density. Therefore, two new designs with more compact cores are then proposed and studied. One is 5x6 rectangular arrangement with power of 20 MW; the other one is 5x5 square arrangement with power of 16 MW. It is for sure that both core designs can satisfy thermal hydraulic safety limits. The designed parameters related to neutronics are listed and compared fundamentally. According to our calculation, although both cores have similar average power density, the results show that the 5x6/20 MW design has the maximum unperturbed thermal flux in the D 2 O region about 2.7x10 14 n/cm 2 -sec, and the 5x5/16 MW design has 2.5x10 14 n/cm 2 -sec. The maximum thermal flux in the neighborhood of the longer side of the 5x6 core is about 7% higher than the one in the neighborhood of any side of the 5x5 core. This 'long-side effect' gives the 5x6/20 MW core design an advantage of the utilization of the thermal neutron flux in the D 2 O region. In addition, the 5x5 core is also more sensitive to the reactivity change on account of in-core irradiation test facilities. Therefore, under overall considerations the 5x6/20 MW core design is chosen for further detailed design. (author)

  12. Solar heating and cooling of mobile homes, Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, A.A.

    1976-12-01

    The specific objectives of the Phase II program were: (1) through system testing, confirm the feasibility of a solar heated and cooled mobile home; (2) update system performance analysis and provide solar heating and cooling computer model verification; (3) evaluate the performance of both an absorption and a Rankine air conditioning system; (4) perform a consumer demand analysis through field survey to ascertain the acceptance of solar energy into the mobile home market; and (5) while at field locations to conduct the consumer demand analysis, gather test data from various U.S. climatic zones. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

  13. High Radiation Resistance Inverted Metamorphic Solar Cell, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation in this SBIR Phase II project is the development of a unique triple junction inverted metamorphic technology (IMM), which will enable the...

  14. UltraSail Solar Sail Flight Experiment, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A team of CU Aerospace, the University of Illinois, and ManTech SRS Technologies proposes Phase II development of a 3 kg CubeSat spacecraft for initial flight test...

  15. Preliminary investigations of a mixed standard-flip core for a TRIGA Mark II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringle, John C.; Johnson, A.G.; Anderson, T.V.

    1974-01-01

    Several years ago it became apparent that due to our rapidly- increasing use rate, we would need a substantial amount of new fuel by late 1974 or early 1975. After investigations and discussions with GA, we decided that FLIP fuel would best meet our requirements for maximum fuel economy and high peak pulsing power. A proposal was submitted to the AEC for fuel assistance, and late in 1973 we were awarded a grant of $61,875. This will allow us to buy 3 FLIP-fueled-follower control rods, 1 instrumented FLIP fuel element, and 26 standard FLIP elements, giving us then a mixed core of approximately one-third FLIP and two-thirds standard elements. License amendments to accommodate this change are rather straightforward; modifications to the Technical Specifications will be somewhat more involved. The largest revisions which we envision are to our Safety Analysis Report. Although a few reactors have operated with a full FLIP core, and a few others have converted to mixed standard-FLIP cores, none of these has a standard Mark II core configuration. Those who have already converted to a mixed core have data and calculations which may be helpful to us, but the extent to which we can use these remains to be seen. The present status of our investigations into the analysis of a mixed standard-FLIP core will be presented. Any problems in calculational methods, finding appropriate data, modifications to Technical Specifications, etc., will be identified, and suggestions and help in these areas will be welcomed. (author)

  16. Preliminary investigations of a mixed standard-flip core for a TRIGA Mark II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringle, John C; Johnson, A G; Anderson, T V [Oregon State University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    Several years ago it became apparent that due to our rapidly- increasing use rate, we would need a substantial amount of new fuel by late 1974 or early 1975. After investigations and discussions with GA, we decided that FLIP fuel would best meet our requirements for maximum fuel economy and high peak pulsing power. A proposal was submitted to the AEC for fuel assistance, and late in 1973 we were awarded a grant of $61,875. This will allow us to buy 3 FLIP-fueled-follower control rods, 1 instrumented FLIP fuel element, and 26 standard FLIP elements, giving us then a mixed core of approximately one-third FLIP and two-thirds standard elements. License amendments to accommodate this change are rather straightforward; modifications to the Technical Specifications will be somewhat more involved. The largest revisions which we envision are to our Safety Analysis Report. Although a few reactors have operated with a full FLIP core, and a few others have converted to mixed standard-FLIP cores, none of these has a standard Mark II core configuration. Those who have already converted to a mixed core have data and calculations which may be helpful to us, but the extent to which we can use these remains to be seen. The present status of our investigations into the analysis of a mixed standard-FLIP core will be presented. Any problems in calculational methods, finding appropriate data, modifications to Technical Specifications, etc., will be identified, and suggestions and help in these areas will be welcomed. (author)

  17. Evaluation report on SCTF Core-II test S2-08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Akira; Iwamura, Takamichi; Abe, Yutaka; Murao, Yoshio; Adachi, Hiromichi.

    1991-01-01

    The present report investigates the effects of the difference of the core inlet subcooling during reflood in a PWR-LOCA on the thermal-hydraulic behaviors including two-dimensional behaviors in the pressure vessel in the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Core-II tests under gravity feed mode. The following test results are examined: Tests S2-02 (Reference test) and Test S2-08 (High subcooling test). The degree of the difference of the subcooling between the two tests was about 20 to 35 K in the LPCI period. The following conclusions were obtained from this study: (1) Higher the subcooling gave larger amount of water accumulation in the core and gave better core cooling. These tendencies were also recognized in comparisons under the same distance from the quench front. Since the same tendencies can be predicted in the analyses with REFLA code because of the lower steam generation rate below quench front in the high subcooling test, the differences in the tests are supposed to be caused by the same reason. (2) Higher the subcooling gave larger amount of water accumulation in upper plenum. The carry-over liquid mass into hot leg became smaller in the later period in the higher subcooling test. These differences for carry-over and de-entrainment characteristics can be explained by the differences of quench velocity and of steam mass flow rate generated in the core. (3) No significant influence of the different degree of the subcooling was observed on the two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behaviors in the pressure vessel. Namely, radial differences of sectional void fraction, heat transfer coefficient and the pressure among bundles at the same elevation were almost the same amount for the two tests. Radial differences of liquid levels in the upper plenum was also almost the same amount for the two tests. (J.P.N.)

  18. MgII Observations Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific goals of our sounding rocket program, the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI). This paper will present a brief description of the optics that were developed to meet SUMI's scientific goals, discuss the spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics of SUMI s optics, describe SUMI's flight which was launched 7/30/2010, and discuss what we have learned from that flight.

  19. Stability Analysis of the EBR-I Mark-II Core Meltdown Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jae-Yong; Kang, Chang Mu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the stability of the EBR-I core meltdown accident using the NuSTAB code. The result of NuSTAB analysis is compared with previous stability analysis by Sandmeier using the root locus method. The Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-1) at Argonne National Laboratory was designed to demonstrate fast reactor breeding and to prove the use of liquid-metal coolant for power production and reached criticality in August 1951. The EBR-I reactor was undergoing a series of physics experiments and the Mark-II core was melted accidentally on Nov. 29, 1955. The experiment was going to increase core temperature to 500C to see if the reactor loses reactivity, and scram when the power reached 1500 kW or doubling of fission rate per second. However the operator scrammed with a slow moving control and missed the shutdown by two seconds and caused the core meltdown. The NuSTAB code has an advantage of analyzing space-dependent fast reactors and predicting regional oscillations compared to the point kinetics. Also, NuSTAB can be useful when the coupled neutronic-thermal-hydraulic codes cannot be used for stability analysis. Future work includes analyses of the PGSFR for various operating conditions as well as further validation of the NuSTAB calculations against SFR stability experiments when such experiments become available.

  20. Measurements of neutron flux distributions in the core of the Ljubljana TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rant, J.; Ravnik, M.; Mele, I.; Dimic, V.

    2008-01-01

    Recently the Ljubljana TRIGA Mark II Reactor has been refurbished and upgraded to pulsed operation. To verify the core design calculations using TRIGAP and PULSTR1 codes and to obtain necessary data for future irradiation and neutron beam experiments, an extensive experimental program of neutron flux mapping and neutron field characterization was carried out. Using the existing neutron measuring thimbles complete axial and radial distributions in two radial directions were determined for two different core configurations. For one core configuration the measurements were also carried out in the pulsed mode. For flux distributions thin Cu (relative measurements) and diluted Au wires (absolute values) were used. For each radial position the cadmium ratio was determined in two axial levels. The core configuration was rather uniform, well defined (fresh fuel of a single type, including fuelled followers) and compact (no irradiation channels or gaps), offering unique opportunity to test the computer codes for TRIGA reactor calculations. The neutron flux measuring procedures and techniques are described and the experimental results are presented. The agreement between the predicted and measured power peaking factors are within the error limits of the measurements (<±5%) and calculations (±10%). Power peaking occurs in the B ring, and in the A ring (centre) there is a significant flux depression. (authors)

  1. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jens; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J; Greene, Jenny E; Blakeslee, John P; Janish, Ryan

    2016-04-21

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day 'dormant' descendants of this population of 'active' black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall--the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600--a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 megaparsecs from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the black hole at the centre of NGC 1600 has a mass of 17 billion solar masses. The spatial distribution of stars near the centre of NGC 1600 is rather diffuse. We find that the region of depleted stellar density in the cores of massive elliptical galaxies extends over the same radius as the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black holes, and interpret this as the dynamical imprint of the black holes.

  2. Impact of Nonfullerene Acceptor Core Structure on the Photophysics and Efficiency of Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Alamoudi, Maha

    2018-03-02

    Small-molecule “nonfullerene” acceptors are promising alternatives to fullerene (PC61/71BM) derivatives often used in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells; yet, the efficiency-limiting processes and their dependence on the acceptor structure are not clearly understood. Here, we investigate the impact of the acceptor core structure (cyclopenta-[2,1-b:3,4-b′]dithiophene (CDT) versus indacenodithiophene (IDTT)) of malononitrile (BM)-terminated acceptors, namely CDTBM and IDTTBM, on the photophysical characteristics of BHJ solar cells. Using PCE10 as donor polymer, the IDTT-based acceptor achieves power conversion efficiencies (8.4%) that are higher than those of the CDT-based acceptor (5.6%) because of a concurrent increase in short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage. Using (ultra)fast transient spectroscopy we demonstrate that reduced geminate recombination in PCE10:IDTTBM blends is the reason for the difference in short-circuit currents. External quantum efficiency measurements indicate that the higher energy of interfacial charge-transfer states observed for the IDTT-based acceptor blends is the origin of the higher open-circuit voltage.

  3. Impact of Nonfullerene Acceptor Core Structure on the Photophysics and Efficiency of Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Alamoudi, Maha; Khan, Jafar Iqbal; Firdaus, Yuliar; Wang, Kai; Andrienko, Denis; Beaujuge, Pierre; Laquai, Fré dé ric

    2018-01-01

    Small-molecule “nonfullerene” acceptors are promising alternatives to fullerene (PC61/71BM) derivatives often used in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells; yet, the efficiency-limiting processes and their dependence on the acceptor structure are not clearly understood. Here, we investigate the impact of the acceptor core structure (cyclopenta-[2,1-b:3,4-b′]dithiophene (CDT) versus indacenodithiophene (IDTT)) of malononitrile (BM)-terminated acceptors, namely CDTBM and IDTTBM, on the photophysical characteristics of BHJ solar cells. Using PCE10 as donor polymer, the IDTT-based acceptor achieves power conversion efficiencies (8.4%) that are higher than those of the CDT-based acceptor (5.6%) because of a concurrent increase in short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage. Using (ultra)fast transient spectroscopy we demonstrate that reduced geminate recombination in PCE10:IDTTBM blends is the reason for the difference in short-circuit currents. External quantum efficiency measurements indicate that the higher energy of interfacial charge-transfer states observed for the IDTT-based acceptor blends is the origin of the higher open-circuit voltage.

  4. Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells: Five Core Technologies for Their Commercialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Geunjin; Kim, Junghwan; Kwon, Sooncheol; Kim, Heejoo; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-09-01

    The past two decades of vigorous interdisciplinary approaches has seen tremendous breakthroughs in both scientific and technological developments of bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells (OSCs) based on nanocomposites of π-conjugated organic semiconductors. Because of their unique functionalities, the OSC field is expected to enable innovative photovoltaic applications that can be difficult to achieve using traditional inorganic solar cells: OSCs are printable, portable, wearable, disposable, biocompatible, and attachable to curved surfaces. The ultimate objective of this field is to develop cost-effective, stable, and high-performance photovoltaic modules fabricated on large-area flexible plastic substrates via high-volume/throughput roll-to-roll printing processing and thus achieve the practical implementation of OSCs. Recently, intensive research efforts into the development of organic materials, processing techniques, interface engineering, and device architectures have led to a remarkable improvement in power conversion efficiencies, exceeding 11%, which has finally brought OSCs close to commercialization. Current research interests are expanding from academic to industrial viewpoints to improve device stability and compatibility with large-scale printing processes, which must be addressed to realize viable applications. Here, both academic and industrial issues are reviewed by highlighting historically monumental research results and recent state-of-the-art progress in OSCs. Moreover, perspectives on five core technologies that affect the realization of the practical use of OSCs are presented, including device efficiency, device stability, flexible and transparent electrodes, module designs, and printing techniques. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Electron internal transport barrier in the core of TJ-II ECH plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, T.; Hidalgo, C. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico. Asociacion EURATOM CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Dreval, N. [and others

    2003-07-01

    The influence of the magnetic topology on the formation of electron internal transport barriers (e-ITB) has been experimentally studied in the stellarator TJ-II. The formation of e-ITBs in electron cyclotron heated plasmas can be triggered by positioning a low order rational surface close to the plasma core region, while in configurations without any low order rational there are no indications of barrier formation within the available heating power. The e-ITB formation is characterized by an increase in the core electron temperature and plasma potential. Positive radial electric field increases in a factor of three in the plasma central region when the e-ITB forms. The results demonstrate that low order rational surfaces modify radial electric fields and electron heat transport. (orig.)

  6. 78 FR 28836 - Arlington Valley Solar Energy II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER13-1430-000] Arlington Valley Solar Energy II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request..., of Arlington Valley Solar Energy II, LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an...

  7. The KNK II instrumentation for global and local supervision of the reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiger, W.O.

    1990-01-01

    After an introduction into the KNK plant itself, their historical development and their present situation, the instrumentation of the global and local supervision of the KNK II-core as well as the main safety-related i- and c-systems are described. Special emphasis is laid on the instrumentation of the reactor protection systems and the shutdown systems. After that some practices are reported about instrumentation behavior and lessons learned from the operation and maintenance of the above mentioned systems. At last follows a short description of the special instrumentation for the detection of failed fuel subassemblies and of the plant data processing system. (orig.)

  8. PWR Core II blanket fuel disposition recommendation of storage option study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dana, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    After review of the options available for current storage of T Plant Fuel the recommended option is wet storage without the use of chillers. A test has been completed that verifies the maximum temperature reached is below the industrial standard for storage of spent fuel. This option will be the least costly and still maintain the fuel in a safe environment. The options that were evaluated included dry storage with and without chillers, and wet storage with and without chillers. Due to the low decay heat of the Shippingport Core II Blanket fuel assemblies the fuel pool temperature will not exceed 100 deg. F

  9. The KNK II instrumentation for global and local supervision of the reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiger, W.O.

    1991-01-01

    After an introduction into the KNK plant itself, their historical development and their present situation, the instrumentation of the global and local supervision of the KNK II-core as well as the main safety-related instrumentation and control systems is described. Special emphasis is laid on the instrumentation of the reactor protection systems and the shut down systems. After that some practices are reported about instrumentation behavior and lessons learned from the operation and maintenance of the above mentioned systems. At last follows a short description of the special instrumentation for the detection of failed fuel subassemblies and of the plant data processing system. (author). 4 refs, 18 tabs

  10. An evaluation of multigroup flux predictions in the EBR-II core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Fanning, T.H.; Finck, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The unique physics characteristics of EBR-II which are difficult to model with conventional neutronic methodologies are identified; the high neutron leakage fraction and importance of neutron reflection cause errors when conventional calculational approximations are utilized. In this paper, various conventional and higher-order group constant evaluations and flux computation methods are compared for a simplified R-Z model of the EBR-II system. Although conventional methods do provide adequate predictions of the flux in the core region, significant mispredictions are observed in the reflector and radial blanket regions. Calculational comparisons indicate that a fine energy group structure is required for accurate predictions of the eigenvalue and flux distribution; greater detail is needed in the iron resonance scattering treatment. Calculational comparisons also indicate that transport theory with detailed anisotropic scattering treatment is required

  11. An evaluation of multigroup flux predictions in the EBR-II core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.N.; Fanning, T.H.; Finck, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    The unique physics characteristics of EBR-II which are difficult to model with conventional neutronic methodologies are identified; the high neutron leakage fraction and importance of neutron reflection cause errors when conventional calculational approximations are utilized. In this paper, various conventional and higher-order group constant evaluations and flux computation methods are compared for a simplified R-Z model of the EBR-II system. Although conventional methods do provide adequate predictions of the flux in the core region, significant mispredictions are observed in the reflector and radial blanket regions. Calculational comparisons indicate that a fine energy group structure is required for accurate predictions of the eigenvalue and flux distribution; greater detail is needed in the iron resonance scattering treatment. Calculational comparisons also indicate that transport theory with detailed anisotropic scattering treatment is required.

  12. An evaluation of multigroup flux predictions in the EBR-II core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.N.; Fanning, T.H.; Finck, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The unique physics characteristics of EBR-II which are difficult to model with conventional neutronic methodologies are identified; the high neutron leakage fraction and importance of neutron reflection cause errors when conventional calculational approximations are utilized. In this paper, various conventional and higher-order group constant evaluations and flux computation methods are compared for a simplified R-Z model of the EBR-II system. Although conventional methods do provide adequate predictions of the flux in the core region, significant mispredictions are observed in the reflector and radial blanket regions. Calculational comparisons indicate that a fine energy group structure is required for accurate predictions of the eigenvalue and flux distribution; greater detail is needed in the iron resonance scattering treatment. Calculational comparisons also indicate that transport theory with detailed anisotropic scattering treatment is required.

  13. (II) complexes as sensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dimethyl-3-propyl-1 H-imidazol-3-ium iodide (DMPII),. 4-tert-butyl-pyridine (TBP) and ... cymene) ruthenium(II) dimer was synthesized according to the reported ... saturated ammonium chloride (200 ml) solution was added to decompose the ...

  14. Slender Ca ii H Fibrils Mapping Magnetic Fields in the Low Solar Chromosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafarzadeh, S.; Rutten, R. J.; Szydlarski, M. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Solanki, S. K.; Wiegelmann, T.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Noort, M. van; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rodríguez, J. Blanco [Grupo de Astronomía y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, E-46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Iniesta, J. C. del Toro; Suárez, D. Orozco [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Knölker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Pillet, V. Martínez [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Schmidt, W., E-mail: shahin.jafarzadeh@astro.uio.no [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstr. 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    A dense forest of slender bright fibrils near a small solar active region is seen in high-quality narrowband Ca ii H images from the SuFI instrument onboard the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. The orientation of these slender Ca ii H fibrils (SCF) overlaps with the magnetic field configuration in the low solar chromosphere derived by magnetostatic extrapolation of the photospheric field observed with Sunrise/IMaX and SDO/HMI. In addition, many observed SCFs are qualitatively aligned with small-scale loops computed from a novel inversion approach based on best-fit numerical MHD simulation. Such loops are organized in canopy-like arches over quiet areas that differ in height depending on the field strength near their roots.

  15. Interstellar communication. II. Application to the solar gravitational lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippke, Michael

    2018-01-01

    We have shown in paper I of this series [1] that interstellar communication to nearby (pc) stars is possible at data rates of bits per second per Watt between a 1 m sized probe and a large receiving telescope (E-ELT, 39 m), when optimizing all parameters such as frequency at 300-400 nm. We now apply our framework of interstellar extinction and quantum state calculations for photon encoding to the solar gravitational lens (SGL), which enlarges the aperture (and thus the photon flux) of the receiving telescope by a factor of >109 . For the first time, we show that the use of the SGL for communication purposes is possible. This was previously unclear because the Einstein ring is placed inside the solar coronal noise, and contributing factors are difficult to determine. We calculate point-spread functions, aperture sizes, heliocentric distance, and optimum communication frequency. The best wavelength for nearby (meter-sized telescopes, an improvement of 107 compared to using the same receiving telescope without the SGL. A 1 m telescope in the SGL can receive data at rates comparable to a km-class "normal" telescope.

  16. A Survey of Ca II H and K Chromospheric Emission in Southern Solar-Type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Todd J.; Soderblom, David R.; Donahue, Robert A.; Baliunas, Sallie L.

    1996-01-01

    More than 800 southern stars within 50 pc have been observed for chromospheric emission in the cores of the Ca II H and K lines. Most of the sample targets were chosen to be G dwarfs on the basis of colors and spectral types. The bimodal distribution in stellar activity first noted in a sample of northern stars by Vaughan and Preston in 1980 is confirmed, and the percentage of active stars, about 30%, is remarkably consistent between the northern and southern surveys. This is especially compelling given that we have used an entirely different instrumental setup and stellar sample than used in the previous study. Comparisons to the Sun, a relatively inactive star, show that most nearby solar-type stars have a similar activity level, and presumably a similar age. We identify two additional subsamples of stars -- a very active group, and a very inactive group. The very active group may be made up of young stars near the Sun, accounting for only a few percent of the sample, and appears to be less than ~0.1 Gyr old. Included in this high-activity tail of the distribution, however, is a subset of very close binaries of the RS CVn or W UMa types. The remaining members of this population may be undetected close binaries or very young single stars. The very inactive group of stars, contributting ~5%--10% to the total sample, may be those caught in a Maunder Minimum type phase. If the observations of the survey stars are considered to be a sequence of snapshots of the Sun during its life, we might expect that the Sun will spend about 10% of the remainder of its main sequence life in a Maunder Minimum phase.

  17. Heysham II/Torness power stations: Seismic qualification of core structures and boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    For the advanced gas cooled reactors at Heysham II and Torness the seismic qualification of the core and support structures and boilers posed special problems. In each case the response was highly non-linear due to impacting. Within the core itself there are many thousands of degrees of freedom each dominated by impacting during the seismic event and these impact forces are transmitted to the support structure. The boilers, although supported and located in the design case by linear systems, have their motion during the seismic event controlled by seismic restraints and other components which introduce substantial impacting during seismic excitation. For both these important components a substantial programme of testing was carried out to validate an analysis approach. This testing and correlation with analysis is described in detail for both components. In the case of the core the qualification was based upon a non-linear code AGRCORE which was specifically developed to handle the large number of impact degrees of freedom for this component. The implementation of this code is also described together with a brief summary of results. The boiler analysis was ultimately carried out using conventional finite difference codes and the implementation of these together with a summary of results is also presented. (author). 13 figs, 1 tab

  18. Xenon oscillation in a large PHWR core (Atucha II type): TRISIC code applicability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solanilla, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    A three dimensional nuclear reactor simulation code (TRISIC) was developed many years ago to design a PHWR (pressurizer heavy water reactors - Atucha type) based in the 'source-sink model' (heterogeneous theory). The limited processor computational performance available at that time was the constraint of the code when a detailed reactor description was necessary. A modern PC (pentium) code version with a full reactor core representation (461 fuel channels) including diagonal control rod banks and flux-reading detectors with theirs tube guide was used in the present paper for simulation of the Xenon transient when a local asymmetric perturbation was produced in a large core (Atucha II type). The results obtained and the computer time required for the 70 hour's simulation with an adequate time step, established the potential of the code to deal with this kind of transients. The paper shows that the method of TRISIC allows to detect and control azimuthal, radial and axial oscillation. This code is a proper way to elaborate a program of control rods movement from the flux reading detectors to damp the oscillation. TRISIC could also be a accurate tool to supervise the full core flux distribution in real time during the operation of the reactor. (author)

  19. Challenges in forming the solar system's giant planet cores via pebble accretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretke, K. A.; Levison, H. F.

    2014-01-01

    Though ∼10 M ⊕ mass rocky/icy cores are commonly held as a prerequisite for the formation of gas giants, theoretical models still struggle to explain how these embryos can form within the lifetimes of gaseous circumstellar disks. In recent years, aerodynamic-aided accretion of 'pebbles', objects ranging from centimeters to meters in size, has been suggested as a potential solution to this long-standing problem. While pebble accretion has been demonstrated to be extremely effective in local simulations that look at the detailed behavior of these pebbles in the vicinity of a single planetary embryo, to date there have been no global simulations demonstrating the effectiveness of pebble accretion in a more complicated, multi-planet environment. Therefore, we have incorporated the aerodynamic-aided accretion physics into LIPAD, a Lagrangian code that can follow the collisional/accretional/dynamical evolution of a protoplanetary system, to investigate how pebble accretion manifests itself in the larger planet formation picture. We find that under generic circumstances, pebble accretion naturally leads to an 'oligarchic' type of growth in which a large number of planetesimals grow to similar-sized planets. In particular, our simulations tend to form hundreds of Mars- and Earth-mass objects between 4 and 10 AU. While merging of some oligarchs may grow massive enough to form giant planet cores, leftover oligarchs lead to planetary systems that cannot be consistent with our own solar system. We investigate various ideas presented in the literature (including evaporation fronts and planet traps) and find that none easily overcome this tendency toward oligarchic growth.

  20. Model of comet comae. II. Effects of solar photodissociative ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, W.F.; Giguere, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements to our computer model of coma plotochemistry are described. These include an expansion of the chemical reactions network and new rate constants that have been measured only recently. Photolytic reactions of additional molecules are incorporated, and photolytic branching ratios are treated in far greater detail than in our previous work. A total of 25 photodissociative ionization (PDI) reactions are now considered (as compared to only 3 PDI reactions previously). Solar PDI of the mother molecule CO 2 is shown to compete effectively with photoionization of CO in the production of observed CO + . The CO + density peak predicted by our improved model, for COP 2 or CO mother molecules, is deep in the inner coma, in better agreement with observation than our old CO 2 model. However, neither CO 2 nor CO mother molecule calculations reproduce the CO + /H 2 O + ratio observed in comet Kohoutek. PDI products of CO 2 , CO, CH 4 , and NH 3 mother molecules fuel a complex chemistry scheme, producing inner coma abundances of CN, C 2 , and C 3 much greater than previously calculated

  1. Whole-core damage analysis of EBR-II driver fuel elements following SHRT program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Koenig, J.F.; Porter, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    In the Shutdown Heat Removal Testing (SHRT) program in EBR-II, fuel element cladding temperatures of some driver subassemblies were predicted to exceed temperatures at which cladding breach may occur. A whole-core thermal analysis of driver subassemblies was performed to determine the cladding temperatures of fuel elemnts, and these temperatures were used for fuel element damage calculation. The accumulated cladding damage of fuel element was found to be very small and fuel element failure resulting from SHRT transients is unlikely. No element breach was noted during the SHRT transients. The reactor was immediately restarted after the most severe SHRT transient had been completed and no driver fuel breach has been noted to date. (orig.)

  2. Safety analysis calculations for a mixed and full FLIP core in a TRIGA Mark II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringle, John C.; Hornyik, K.; Robinson, A.H.; Anderson, T.V.; Johnson, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    The Oregon State TRIGA Reactor will be reloading with FLIP fuel in August 1976. As we are the first Mark II TRIGA with a circular grid pattern and graphite reflector to utilize FLIP fuel, the safety analysis calculations performed at other facilities using FLIP were only of limited use to us. A multigroup, multiregion, one-dimensional diffusion theory code was used to calculate power densities in six different operational cores - mixed to full FLIP. Pulsing characteristics were obtained from a computer code based on point kinetics, with adiabatic heating of the fuel, linear temperature dependence of the specific heat, and prompt fuel temperature feedback coefficient. The results of all pertinent calculations will be presented. (author)

  3. Characteristics of coronal mass ejections associated with solar frontside and backside metric type II bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahler, S.W.; Cliver, E.W.; Sheeley, N.R. Jr.; Howard, R.A.; Koomen, M.J.; Michels, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    We compare fast (v> or =500 km s -1 ) coronal mass ejections (CME's) with reported metric type II bursts to study the properties of CME's associated with coronal shocks. We confirm an earlier report of fast frontside CME's with no associated metric type II bursts and calculate that 33 +- 15% of all fast frontside CME's are not associated with such bursts. Faster CME's are more likely to be associated with type II bursts, as expected from the hypothesis of piston-driven shocks. However, CME brightness and associated peak 3-cm burst intensity are also important factors, as might be inferred from the Wagner and MacQueen (1983) view of type II shocks decoupled from associated CME's. We use the equal visibility of solar frontside and backside CME's to deduce the observability of backside type II bursts. We calculate that 23 +- 7% of all backside type II bursts associated with fast CME's can be observed at the earth and that 13 +- 4% of all type II bursts originate in backside flares. CME speed again is the most important factor in the observability of backside type II bursts

  4. Solar Central Receiver Prototype Heliostat. Volume II. Phase II planning (preliminary)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    A currently planned DOE program will develop and construct a 10 MW/sub e/ Pilot Plant to demonstrate the feasibility and operational characteristics of Solar Central Receiver Power Generation. The field of heliostats is a major element of the Solar Central Receiver Power Generation system. The primary objective of the program described is to establish and verify the manufacturability, performance, durability, and maintenance requirements of the commercial plant heliostat design. End products of the 16 month effort include: (1) design, fabrication, and test of heliostats; (2) preliminary designs of manufacturing, assembly, installation, and maintenance processes for quantity production; (3) detailed design of critical tooling or other special equipment for such processes; (4) refined cost estimates for heliostats and maintenance; and (5) an updated commercial plant heliostat preliminary design. The program management and control system is discussed. (WHK)

  5. Eco-friendly synthesis of core-shell structured (TiO2/Li2CO3) nanomaterials for low cost dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppuchamy, S; Brundha, C

    2016-12-01

    Core-shell structured TiO 2 /Li 2 CO 3 electrode was successfully synthesized by eco-friendly solution growth technique. TiO 2 /Li 2 CO 3 electrodes were characterized using X-ray Diffractometer (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photocurrent-voltage measurements. The synthesized core-shell electrode material was sensitized with tetrabutylammonium cis-di(thiocyanato)-N,N'-bis(4-carboxylato-4'-carboxylic acid-2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenate(II) (N-719). The performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) based on N719 dye modified TiO 2 /Li 2 CO 3 electrodes was investigated. The effect of various shell thickness on the photovoltaic performance of the core-shell structured electrode is also investigated. We found that Li 2 CO 3 shells of all thicknesses perform as inert barriers which improve open-circuit voltage (V oc ) of the DSCs. The energy conversion efficiency was greatly dependent on the thickness of Li 2 CO 3 on TiO 2 film, and the highest efficiency of 3.7% was achieved at the optimum Li 2 CO 3 shell layer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayahsi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  7. JOYO coolant sodium and cover gas purity control database (MK-II core)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kazuhiro; Nemoto, Masaaki

    2000-03-01

    The experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' served as the MK-II irradiation bed core for testing fuel and material for FBR development for 15 years from 1982 to 1997. During the MK-II operation, impurities concentrations in the sodium and the argon gas were determined by 67 samples of primary sodium, 81 samples of secondary sodium, 75 samples of primary argon gas, 89 samples of secondary argon gas (the overflow tank) and 89 samples of secondary argon gas (the dump tank). The sodium and the argon gas purity control data were accumulated from in thirty-one duty operations, thirteen special test operations and eight annual inspections. These purity control results and related plant data were compiled into database, which were recorded on CD-ROM for user convenience. Purity control data include concentration of oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine, iron, nickel and chromium in sodium, concentration of oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, methane and helium in argon gas with the reactor condition. (author)

  8. Spectroscopic properties of reaction center pigments in photosystem II core complexes: revision of the multimer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszewski, Grzegorz; Diner, Bruce A; Schlodder, Eberhard; Renger, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Absorbance difference spectra associated with the light-induced formation of functional states in photosystem II core complexes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (e.g., P(+)Pheo(-),P(+)Q(A)(-),(3)P) are described quantitatively in the framework of exciton theory. In addition, effects are analyzed of site-directed mutations of D1-His(198), the axial ligand of the special-pair chlorophyll P(D1), and D1-Thr(179), an amino-acid residue nearest to the accessory chlorophyll Chl(D1), on the spectral properties of the reaction center pigments. Using pigment transition energies (site energies) determined previously from independent experiments on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes, good agreement between calculated and experimental spectra is obtained. The only difference in site energies of the reaction center pigments in D1-D2-cytb559 and photosystem II core complexes concerns Chl(D1). Compared to isolated reaction centers, the site energy of Chl(D1) is red-shifted by 4 nm and less inhomogeneously distributed in core complexes. The site energies cause primary electron transfer at cryogenic temperatures to be initiated by an excited state that is strongly localized on Chl(D1) rather than from a delocalized state as assumed in the previously described multimer model. This result is consistent with earlier experimental data on special-pair mutants and with our previous calculations on D1-D2-cytb559 complexes. The calculations show that at 5 K the lowest excited state of the reaction center is lower by approximately 10 nm than the low-energy exciton state of the two special-pair chlorophylls P(D1) and P(D2) which form an excitonic dimer. The experimental temperature dependence of the wild-type difference spectra can only be understood in this model if temperature-dependent site energies are assumed for Chl(D1) and P(D1), reducing the above energy gap from 10 to 6 nm upon increasing the temperature from 5 to 300 K. At physiological temperature, there are

  9. New enhancement mechanism of the transitions in the Earth of the solar and atmospheric neutrinos crossing the Earth core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcov, S.T.

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that the ν 2 → ν e and ν μ → ν e (ν e → ν μ(τ) ) transitions respectively of the solar and atmospheric neutrinos in the Earth in the case of ν e - ν μ(τ) mixing in vacuum, are strongly enhanced by a new type of resonance when the neutrinos cross the Earth core. The resonance is operative at small mixing angles but differs from the MSW one. It is in many respects similar to the electron paramagnetic resonance taking place in a specific configuration of two magnetic fields. The conditions for existence of the new resonance include, in particular, specific constraints on the neutrino oscillation lengths in the Earth mantle and in the Earth core, thus the resonance is a 'neutrino oscillation length resonance'. It leads also to enhancement of the ν 2 → ν e and ν e → ν s transitions in the case of ν e - ν s mixing and of the ν-bar s (or ν μ → ν s ) transitions at small mixing angles. The presence of the neutrino oscillation length resonance in the transitions of solar and atmospheric neutrinos traversing the Earth core has important implications for current and future solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments, and more specifically, for the interpretation of the results of the Super-Kamiokande experiment

  10. A First Comparison of Millimeter Continuum and Mg ii Ultraviolet Line Emission from the Solar Chromosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastian, T. S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Chintzoglou, G.; De Pontieu, B.; Schmit, D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Shimojo, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Leenaarts, J. [Institute for Solar Physics, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Loukitcheva, M., E-mail: tbastian@nrao.edu [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    We present joint observations of the Sun by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ). Both millimeter/submillimeter- λ continuum emission and ultraviolet (UV) line emission originate from the solar chromosphere and both have the potential to serve as powerful and complementary diagnostics of physical conditions in this enigmatic region of the solar atmosphere. The observations were made of a solar active region on 2015 December 18 as part of the ALMA science verification effort. A map of the Sun’s continuum emission was obtained by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.25 mm (239 GHz). A contemporaneous map was obtained by IRIS in the Mg ii h doublet line at 2803.5 Å. While a clear correlation between the 1.25 mm brightness temperature T{sub B} and the Mg ii h line radiation temperature T {sub rad} is observed, the slope is <1, perhaps as a result of the fact that these diagnostics are sensitive to different parts of the chromosphere and that the Mg ii h line source function includes a scattering component. There is a significant difference (35%) between the mean T{sub B} (1.25 mm) and mean T {sub rad} (Mg ii). Partitioning the maps into “sunspot,” “quiet areas,” and “plage regions” we find the relation between the IRIS Mg ii h line T {sub rad} and the ALMA T {sub B} region-dependent. We suggest this may be the result of regional dependences of the formation heights of the IRIS and ALMA diagnostics and/or the increased degree of coupling between the UV source function and the local gas temperature in the hotter, denser gas in plage regions.

  11. A First Comparison of Millimeter Continuum and Mg ii Ultraviolet Line Emission from the Solar Chromosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Chintzoglou, G.; De Pontieu, B.; Schmit, D.; Shimojo, M.; Leenaarts, J.; Loukitcheva, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present joint observations of the Sun by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ). Both millimeter/submillimeter- λ continuum emission and ultraviolet (UV) line emission originate from the solar chromosphere and both have the potential to serve as powerful and complementary diagnostics of physical conditions in this enigmatic region of the solar atmosphere. The observations were made of a solar active region on 2015 December 18 as part of the ALMA science verification effort. A map of the Sun’s continuum emission was obtained by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.25 mm (239 GHz). A contemporaneous map was obtained by IRIS in the Mg ii h doublet line at 2803.5 Å. While a clear correlation between the 1.25 mm brightness temperature T_B and the Mg ii h line radiation temperature T _r_a_d is observed, the slope is <1, perhaps as a result of the fact that these diagnostics are sensitive to different parts of the chromosphere and that the Mg ii h line source function includes a scattering component. There is a significant difference (35%) between the mean T_B (1.25 mm) and mean T _r_a_d (Mg ii). Partitioning the maps into “sunspot,” “quiet areas,” and “plage regions” we find the relation between the IRIS Mg ii h line T _r_a_d and the ALMA T _B region-dependent. We suggest this may be the result of regional dependences of the formation heights of the IRIS and ALMA diagnostics and/or the increased degree of coupling between the UV source function and the local gas temperature in the hotter, denser gas in plage regions.

  12. Search for solar axions with the X-ray telescope of the CAST experiment (phase II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordt, Annika

    2009-01-01

    The CAST (CERN Solar Axion Telescope) experiment is searching for solar axions by their conversion into photons inside a transverse magnetic field. So far, no solar axionsignal has been detected, but a new upper limit could be given (CAST Phase I). Since 2005, CAST entered in its second phase where it operates with a buffer gas ( 4 He) in the conversion region to extend the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axionmasses. For the first time it is possible to enter the theoretically favored axion massrange and to give an upper limit for this solar axion mass-range (>0.02 eV). This thesis is about the analysis of the X-ray telescope data Phase II with 4 He inside the magnet. The result for the coupling constant of axions to photons is: g αγγ -10 GeV -1 (95%C.L.) for m a =0.02-0.4 eV. (2) This result is better than any result that has been given before in this mass range for solar axions. (orig.)

  13. Radioimmunoassay of surface antigen and core antibody of hepatitis B virus. Comparison of kits AUSRIA/CORE; AUSRIA II-125 and CORAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kselikova, M; Urbankova, J [Ustav Hematologie a Krevni Transfuze, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1984-08-01

    The sensitivity is compared of determination of surface antigen HBsAg and nuclear antibody HBcAb of the hepatitis B virus using kits for separate (AUSRIA II-125, CORAB) and simultaneous (AUSRIAsup(R)/CORE) determinations of third generation tests in selected samples of medical personnel, HBsAg carriers, patients at a dialysis centre, blood donors and in sera of HBsAg carriers diluted in steps from 4x10/sup -2/ to 4x10/sup -7/. HBsAg is always determined using the RIA technique, HBcAb is determined using the technique of radioimmunoassay with the CORAB kit and with the AUSRIA sup(R)/CORE kit using enzymeimmunoassay. The sensitivity of determination using the AUSRIA sup(R)/CORE kit is at least as good for both investigated indicators of the hepatitis B virus and that obtained using separate determination of HBsAg (AUSRIA II-125) and HBcAb (CORAB), this also using modified photocolorimetric determination. Only one AUSRIA/sup R//CORE kit was available for the investigation and the informative character of the report is emphasized.

  14. 10Be and δ2H in polar ice cores as a probe of the solar variability's influence on climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisbeck, G.M.; Yiou, F.; Jouzel, J.; Domaine Univ., 38 - St-Martin-d'Heres; Petit, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    By using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry, it is now possible to measure detailed profiles of cosmogenic (cosmic ray produced) 10 Be in polar ice cores. Recent work has demonstrated that these profiles contain information on solar activity, via its influence on the intensity of galactic cosmic rays arriving in the Earth's atmosphere. It has been known for some time that, as a result of temperature-dependent fractionation effects, the stable isotope profiles δ 2 O and δ 2 H in polar ice cores contain palaeoclimate information. Thus by comparing the 10 Be and stable isotope profiles in the same ice core, one can test the influence of solar variability on climate, and this independent of possible uncertainties in the absolute chronology of the records. We present here the results of such a comparison for two Antarctic ice cores; one from the South Pole, covering the past ca. 1000 years, and one from Dome C, covering the past ca. 3000 years. (author)

  15. Characterization of β-FeSi II films as a novel solar cell semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, Yasuhiro; Ootsuka, Teruhisa; Otogawa, Naotaka; Abe, Hironori; Nakayama, Yasuhiko; Makita, Yunosuke

    2006-04-01

    β-FeSi II is an attractive semiconductor owing to its extremely high optical absorption coefficient (α>10 5 cm -1), and is expected to be an ideal semiconductor as a thin film solar cell. For solar cell use, to prepare high quality β-FeSi II films holding a desired Fe/Si ratio, we chose two methods; one is a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) method in which Fe and Si were evaporated by using normal Knudsen cells, and occasionally by e-gun for Si. Another one is the facing-target sputtering (FTS) method in which deposition of β-FeSi II films is made on Si substrate that is placed out of gas plasma cloud. In both methods to obtain β-FeSi II films with a tuned Fe/Si ratio, Fe/Si super lattice was fabricated by varying Fe and Si deposition thickness. Results showed significant in- and out-diffusion of host Fe and Si atoms at the interface of Si substrates into β-FeSi II layers. It was experimentally demonstrated that this diffusion can be suppressed by the formation of template layer between the epitaxial β-FeSi II layer and the substrate. The template layer was prepared by reactive deposition epitaxy (RDE) method. By fixing the Fe/Si ratio as precisely as possible at 1/2, systematic doping experiments of acceptor (Ga and B) and donor (As) impurities into β-FeSi II were carried out. Systematical changes of electron and hole carrier concentration in these samples along variation of incorporated impurities were observed through Hall effect measurements. Residual carrier concentrations can be ascribed to not only the remaining undesired impurities contained in source materials but also to a variety of point defects mainly produced by the uncontrolled stoichiometry. A preliminary structure of n-β-FeSi II/p-Si used as a solar cell indicated a conversion efficiency of 3.7%.

  16. Development of a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. 10. Reevaluation of atomic number density of JOYO Mk-II core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numata, Kazuyuki; Sato, Wakaei [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Ishikawa, Makoto; Arii, Yoshio [Nuclear Energy System Incorporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    The material composition of JOYO Mk-II core components in its initial core was reevaluated as a part of the effort for developing a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. The special feature of the reevaluation is to treat the decay of Pu-241 isotope, so that the atomic number densities of Pu-241 and Am-241 in fuel assemblies can be exactly evaluated on the initial critical date, Nov. 22nd, 1982. Further, the atomic number densities of other core components were also evaluated to improve the analytical accuracy. Those include the control rods which were not so strictly evaluated in the past, and the dummy fuels and the neutron sources which were not treated in the analytical model so far. The results of the present reevaluation were as follows: (1) The changes of atomic number densities of the major nuclides such as Pu-239, U-235 and U-238 were about {+-}0.2 to 0.3%. On the other hand, the number density of Pu-241, which was the motivation of the present work, was reduced by 12%. From the fact, the number densities in the past analysis might be based on the isotope measurement of the manufacturing point of time without considering the decay of Pu-241. (2) As the other core components, the number densities of control rods and outer reflector-type A were largely improved. (author)

  17. Impulsiveness and energetics in solar flares with and without type II radio bursts - A comparison of hard X-ray characteristics for over 2500 solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Douglas H.; Nelson, Robert; Kojoian, Gabriel; Seal, James

    1989-01-01

    The hard X-ray characteristics of more than 2500 solar flares are used to study the relative size, impulsiveness, and energetics of flares with and without type II radio bursts. A quantitative definition of the hard X-ray impulsiveness is introduced, which may be applied to a large number of events unambiguously. It is found that the flares with type II bursts are generally not significantly larger, more impulsive, or more energetic than those without type II bursts. Also, no evidence is found to suggest a simple classification of the flares as either 'impulsive' or 'gradual'. Because type II bursts are present even in small flares with relatively unimpulsive energy releases, it is concluded that changes in the ambient conditions of the solar atmosphere causing an unusually low Alfven speed may be important in the generation of the shock wave that produces type II radio bursts.

  18. A CATALOG OF LOW-MASS STAR-FORMING CORES OBSERVED WITH SHARC-II AT 350 μ m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, Akshaya; Arce, Héctor G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Dunham, Michael M.; Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); II, Neal J. Evans [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Merello, Manuel [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Wu, Jingwen, E-mail: mdunham@cfa.harvard.edu [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2016-08-01

    We present a catalog of low-mass dense cores observed with the SHARC-II instrument at 350 μ m. Our observations have an effective angular resolution of 10″, approximately 2.5 times higher than observations at the same wavelength obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory , albeit with lower sensitivity, especially to extended emission. The catalog includes 81 maps covering a total of 164 detected sources. For each detected source, we tabulate basic source properties including position, peak intensity, flux density in fixed apertures, and radius. We examine the uncertainties in the pointing model applied to all SHARC-II data and conservatively find that the model corrections are good to within ∼3″, approximately 1/3 of the SHARC-II beam. We examine the differences between two array scan modes and find that the instrument calibration, beam size, and beam shape are similar between the two modes. We also show that the same flux densities are measured when sources are observed in the two different modes, indicating that there are no systematic effects introduced into our catalog by utilizing two different scan patterns during the course of taking observations. We find a detection rate of 95% for protostellar cores but only 45% for starless cores, and demonstrate the existence of a SHARC-II detection bias against all but the most massive and compact starless cores. Finally, we discuss the improvements in protostellar classification enabled by these 350  μ m observations.

  19. A solar-thermal energy harvesting scheme: enhanced heat capacity of molten HITEC salt mixed with Sn/SiO(x) core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Chung; Chang, Wen-Chih; Hu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Zhiming M; Lu, Ming-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrated enhanced solar-thermal storage by releasing the latent heat of Sn/SiO(x) core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a eutectic salt. The microstructures and chemical compositions of Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs were characterized. In situ heating XRD provides dynamic crystalline information about the Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs during cyclic heating processes. The latent heat of ∼29 J g(-1) for Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs was measured, and 30% enhanced heat capacity was achieved from 1.57 to 2.03 J g(-1) K(-1) for the HITEC solar salt without and with, respectively, a mixture of 5% Sn/SiO(x) core-shell NPs. In addition, an endurance cycle test was performed to prove a stable operation in practical applications. The approach provides a method to enhance energy storage in solar-thermal power plants.

  20. Coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics of high density cores for FRM II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitkreutz, Harald

    2011-03-04

    According to the 'Verwaltungsvereinbarung zwischen Bund und Land vom 30.5.2003' and its updating on 13.11.2010, the Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz, Frm II, has to convert its fuel element to an uranium enrichment which is significantly lower than the current 93%, in case this is economically reasonable and doesn't impact the reactor performance immoderate. In the framework of this conversion, new calculations regarding neutronics and thermal hydraulics for the anticipated core configurations have to be made. The computational power available nowadays allows for detailed 3D calculations, on the neutronic as well as on the thermal hydraulic side. In this context, a new program system, 'X{sup 2}', was developed. It couples the Monte Carlo code McnpX, the computational fluid dynamics code Cfx and the burn-up code sequence MonteBurns. The codes were modified and extended to meet the requirements of the coupled calculation concept. To verify the new program system, highly detailed calculations for the current fuel element were made and compared to simulations and measurements that were performed in the past. The results strengthen the works performed so far and show that the original, conservative approach overestimates all critical thermal hydraulic values. Using the CFD software, effects like the impact of the combs that fix the fuel plates and the pressure drop at the edges of the fuel plates were studied in great detail for the first time. Afterwards, a number of possible new fuel elements with lower enrichment, based on disperse and monolithic UMo (uranium with 8 wt.-% Mo) were analysed. A number of straight-forward conversion scenarios was discussed, showing that a further compaction of the fuel element, an extended cycle length or an increased reactor power is needed to compensate the flux loss, which is caused by the lower enrichment. This flux loss is in excess of 7%. The discussed new fuel elements include a 50

  1. Coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics of high density cores for FRM II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitkreutz, Harald

    2011-01-01

    According to the 'Verwaltungsvereinbarung zwischen Bund und Land vom 30.5.2003' and its updating on 13.11.2010, the Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz, Frm II, has to convert its fuel element to an uranium enrichment which is significantly lower than the current 93%, in case this is economically reasonable and doesn't impact the reactor performance immoderate. In the framework of this conversion, new calculations regarding neutronics and thermal hydraulics for the anticipated core configurations have to be made. The computational power available nowadays allows for detailed 3D calculations, on the neutronic as well as on the thermal hydraulic side. In this context, a new program system, 'X 2 ', was developed. It couples the Monte Carlo code McnpX, the computational fluid dynamics code Cfx and the burn-up code sequence MonteBurns. The codes were modified and extended to meet the requirements of the coupled calculation concept. To verify the new program system, highly detailed calculations for the current fuel element were made and compared to simulations and measurements that were performed in the past. The results strengthen the works performed so far and show that the original, conservative approach overestimates all critical thermal hydraulic values. Using the CFD software, effects like the impact of the combs that fix the fuel plates and the pressure drop at the edges of the fuel plates were studied in great detail for the first time. Afterwards, a number of possible new fuel elements with lower enrichment, based on disperse and monolithic UMo (uranium with 8 wt.-% Mo) were analysed. A number of straight-forward conversion scenarios was discussed, showing that a further compaction of the fuel element, an extended cycle length or an increased reactor power is needed to compensate the flux loss, which is caused by the lower enrichment. This flux loss is in excess of 7%. The discussed new fuel elements include a 50% enriched disperse UMo core with

  2. Core map generation for the ITU TRIGA Mark II research reactor using Genetic Algorithm coupled with Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Türkmen, Mehmet, E-mail: tm@hacettepe.edu.tr [Nuclear Engineering Department, Hacettepe University, Beytepe Campus, Ankara (Turkey); Çolak, Üner [Energy Institute, Istanbul Technical University, Ayazağa Campus, Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Ergün, Şule [Nuclear Engineering Department, Hacettepe University, Beytepe Campus, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Optimum core maps were generated for the ITU TRIGA Mark II Research Reactor. • Calculations were performed using a Monte Carlo based reactor physics code, MCNP. • Single-Objective and Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithms were used for the optimization. • k{sub eff} and ppf{sub max} were considered as the optimization objectives. • The generated core maps were compared with the fresh core map. - Abstract: The main purpose of this study is to present the results of Core Map (CM) generation calculations for the İstanbul Technical University TRIGA Mark II Research Reactor by using Genetic Algorithms (GA) coupled with a Monte Carlo (MC) based-particle transport code. Optimization problems under consideration are: (i) maximization of the core excess reactivity (ρ{sub ex}) using Single-Objective GA when the burned fuel elements with no fresh fuel elements are used, (ii) maximization of the ρ{sub ex} and minimization of maximum power peaking factor (ppf{sub max}) using Multi-Objective GA when the burned fuels with fresh fuels are used. The results were obtained when all the control rods are fully withdrawn. ρ{sub ex} and ppf{sub max} values of the produced best CMs were provided. Core-averaged neutron spectrum, and variation of neutron fluxes with respect to radial distance were presented for the best CMs. The results show that it is possible to find an optimum CM with an excess reactivity of 1.17 when the burned fuels are used. In the case of a mix of burned fuels and fresh fuels, the best pattern has an excess reactivity of 1.19 with a maximum peaking factor of 1.4843. In addition, when compared with the fresh CM, the thermal fluxes of the generated CMs decrease by about 2% while change in the fast fluxes is about 1%.Classification: J. Core physics.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of the core histone doublet and DNA topo II genes of Marseilleviridae: evidence of proto-eukaryotic provenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erives, Albert J

    2017-11-28

    While the genomes of eukaryotes and Archaea both encode the histone-fold domain, only eukaryotes encode the core histone paralogs H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. With DNA, these core histones assemble into the nucleosomal octamer underlying eukaryotic chromatin. Importantly, core histones for H2A and H3 are maintained as neofunctionalized paralogs adapted for general bulk chromatin (canonical H2 and H3) or specialized chromatin (H2A.Z enriched at gene promoters and cenH3s enriched at centromeres). In this context, the identification of core histone-like "doublets" in the cytoplasmic replication factories of the Marseilleviridae (MV) is a novel finding with possible relevance to understanding the origin of eukaryotic chromatin. Here, we analyze and compare the core histone doublet genes from all known MV genomes as well as other MV genes relevant to the origin of the eukaryotic replisome. Using different phylogenetic approaches, we show that MV histone domains encode obligate H2B-H2A and H4-H3 dimers of possible proto-eukaryotic origin. MV core histone moieties form sister clades to each of the four eukaryotic clades of canonical and variant core histones. This suggests that MV core histone moieties diverged prior to eukaryotic neofunctionalizations associated with paired linear chromosomes and variant histone octamer assembly. We also show that MV genomes encode a proto-eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase II enzyme that forms a sister clade to eukaryotes. This is a relevant finding given that DNA topo II influences histone deposition and chromatin compaction and is the second most abundant nuclear protein after histones. The combined domain architecture and phylogenomic analyses presented here suggest that a primitive origin for MV histone genes is a more parsimonious explanation than horizontal gene transfers + gene fusions + sufficient divergence to eliminate relatedness to eukaryotic neofunctionalizations within the H2A and H3 clades without loss of relatedness to each of

  4. Solar radio bursts of spectral type II, coronal shocks, and optical coronal transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, A.; Dryer, M.

    1981-01-01

    An examination is presented of the association of solar radio bursts of spectral type II and coronal shocks with solar flare ejecta observed in H-alpha, the green coronal line, and white-light coronagraphs. It is suggested that fast-moving optical coronal transients should for the most part be identified with piston-type phenomena well behind the outward-traveling shock waves that generate type II radio bursts. A general model is presented which relates type II radio bursts and coronal shocks to optically observed ejecta and consists of three main velocity regimes: (1) a quasi-hemispherical shock wave moving outward from the flare at speeds of 1000-2000 km/sec and Alfven Mach number of about 1.5; (2) the velocity of the piston driving the shock, on the order of 0.8 that of the shock; and (3) the regime of the slower-moving H-alpha ejecta, with velocities of 300-500 km/sec.

  5. Interfacial charge separation and photovoltaic efficiency in Fe(ii)-carbene sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Mariachiara; Duchanois, Thibaut; Liu, Li; Monari, Antonio; Assfeld, Xavier; Haacke, Stefan; Gros, Philippe C

    2016-10-12

    The first combined theoretical and photovoltaic characterization of both homoleptic and heteroleptic Fe(ii)-carbene sensitized photoanodes in working dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) has been performed. Three new heteroleptic Fe(ii)-NHC dye sensitizers have been synthesized, characterized and tested. Despite an improved interfacial charge separation in comparison to the homoleptic compounds, the heteroleptic complexes did not show boosted photovoltaic performances. The ab initio quantitative analysis of the interfacial electron and hole transfers and the measured photovoltaic data clearly evidenced fast recombination reactions for heteroleptics, even associated with un unfavorable directional electron flow, and hence slower injection rates, in the case of homoleptics. Notably, quantum mechanics calculations revealed that deprotonation of the not anchored carboxylic function in the homoleptic complex can effectively accelerate the electron injection rate and completely suppress the electron recombination to the oxidized dye. This result suggests that introduction of strong electron-donating substituents on the not-anchored carbene ligand in heteroleptic complexes, in such a way of mimicking the electronic effects of the carboxylate functionality, should yield markedly improved interfacial charge generation properties. The present results, providing for the first time a detailed understanding of the interfacial electron transfers and photovoltaic characterization in Fe(ii)-carbene sensitized solar cells, open the way to a rational molecular engineering of efficient iron-based dyes for photoelectrochemical applications.

  6. Coronal mass ejections, type II radio bursts, and solar energetic particle events in the SOHO era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gopalswamy

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the extensive and uniform data on coronal mass ejections (CMEs, solar energetic particle (SEP events, and type II radio bursts during the SOHO era, we discuss how the CME properties such as speed, width and solar-source longitude decide whether CMEs are associated with type II radio bursts and SEP events. We discuss why some radio-quiet CMEs are associated with small SEP events while some radio-loud CMEs are not associated with SEP events. We conclude that either some fast and wide CMEs do not drive shocks or they drive weak shocks that do not produce significant levels of particle acceleration. We also infer that the Alfvén speed in the corona and near-Sun interplanetary medium ranges from <200 km/s to ~1600 km/s. Radio-quiet fast and wide CMEs are also poor SEP producers and the association rate of type II bursts and SEP events steadily increases with CME speed and width (i.e. energy. If we consider western hemispheric CMEs, the SEP association rate increases linearly from ~30% for 800 km/s CMEs to 100% for ≥1800 km/s. Essentially all type II bursts in the decametre-hectometric (DH wavelength range are associated with SEP events once the source location on the Sun is taken into account. This is a significant result for space weather applications, because if a CME originating from the western hemisphere is accompanied by a DH type II burst, there is a high probability that it will produce an SEP event.

  7. Type II GaSb quantum ring solar cells under concentrated sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Che-Pin; Hsu, Shun-Chieh; Lin, Shih-Yen; Chang, Ching-Wen; Tu, Li-Wei; Chen, Kun-Cheng; Lay, Tsong-Sheng; Lin, Chien-Chung

    2014-03-10

    A type II GaSb quantum ring solar cell is fabricated and measured under the concentrated sunlight. The external quantum efficiency confirms the extended absorption from the quantum rings at long wavelength coinciding with the photoluminescence results. The short-circuit current of the quantum ring devices is 5.1% to 9.9% more than the GaAs reference's under various concentrations. While the quantum ring solar cell does not exceed its GaAs counterpart in efficiency under one-sun, the recovery of the open-circuit voltages at higher concentration helps to reverse the situation. A slightly higher efficiency (10.31% vs. 10.29%) is reported for the quantum ring device against the GaAs one.

  8. High-resolution TEM characterization of ZnO core-shell nanowires for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divitini, G; Ducati, C [Department of Materials Science, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Plank, N O V; Welland, M E [Nanoscience Centre, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, CB3 0FF (United Kingdom); Snaith, H J, E-mail: gd322@cam.ac.u [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Recently ZnO nanowire films have been used in very promising and inexpensive dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). It was found that the performance of the devices can be enhanced by functionalising the nanowires with a thin metal oxide coating. This nm-scale shell is believed to tailor the electronic structure of the nanowire, and help the absorption of the dye. Core-shell ZnO nanowire structures are synthesised at low temperature (below 120{sup 0}C) by consecutive hydrothermal growth steps. Different materials are investigated for the coating, including Mg, Al, Cs and Zr oxides. High resolution TEM is used to characterise the quality of both the nanowire core and the shell, and to monitor the thickness and the degree of crystallisation of the oxide coating. The interface between the nanowire core and the outer shell is investigated in order to understand the adhesion of the coating, and give valuable feedback for the synthesis process. Nanowire films are packaged into dye-sensitised solar cell prototypes; samples coated with ZrO{sub 2} and MgO show the largest enhancement in the photocurrent and open-circuit voltage and look very promising for further improvement.

  9. MIGRATION AND GROWTH OF PROTOPLANETARY EMBRYOS. II. EMERGENCE OF PROTO-GAS-GIANT CORES VERSUS SUPER EARTH PROGENITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Beibei [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Xiaojia [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lin, Douglas N. C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Aarseth, Sverre J., E-mail: bbliu1208@gmail.com [Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 15%-20% of solar type stars contain one or more gas giant planets. According to the core-accretion scenario, the acquisition of their gaseous envelope must be preceded by the formation of super-critical cores with masses 10 times or larger than that of the Earth. It is natural to link the formation probability of gas giant planets with the supply of gases and solids in their natal disks. However, a much richer population of super Earths suggests that (1) there is no shortage of planetary building block material, (2) a gas giant's growth barrier is probably associated with whether it can merge into super-critical cores, and (3) super Earths are probably failed cores that did not attain sufficient mass to initiate efficient accretion of gas before it is severely depleted. Here we construct a model based on the hypothesis that protoplanetary embryos migrated extensively before they were assembled into bona fide planets. We construct a Hermite-Embryo code based on a unified viscous-irradiation disk model and a prescription for the embryo-disk tidal interaction. This code is used to simulate the convergent migration of embryos, and their close encounters and coagulation. Around the progenitors of solar-type stars, the progenitor super-critical-mass cores of gas giant planets primarily form in protostellar disks with relatively high (≳ 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) mass accretion rates, whereas systems of super Earths (failed cores) are more likely to emerge out of natal disks with modest mass accretion rates, due to the mean motion resonance barrier and retention efficiency.

  10. MIGRATION AND GROWTH OF PROTOPLANETARY EMBRYOS. II. EMERGENCE OF PROTO-GAS-GIANT CORES VERSUS SUPER EARTH PROGENITORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Xiaojia; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 15%-20% of solar type stars contain one or more gas giant planets. According to the core-accretion scenario, the acquisition of their gaseous envelope must be preceded by the formation of super-critical cores with masses 10 times or larger than that of the Earth. It is natural to link the formation probability of gas giant planets with the supply of gases and solids in their natal disks. However, a much richer population of super Earths suggests that (1) there is no shortage of planetary building block material, (2) a gas giant's growth barrier is probably associated with whether it can merge into super-critical cores, and (3) super Earths are probably failed cores that did not attain sufficient mass to initiate efficient accretion of gas before it is severely depleted. Here we construct a model based on the hypothesis that protoplanetary embryos migrated extensively before they were assembled into bona fide planets. We construct a Hermite-Embryo code based on a unified viscous-irradiation disk model and a prescription for the embryo-disk tidal interaction. This code is used to simulate the convergent migration of embryos, and their close encounters and coagulation. Around the progenitors of solar-type stars, the progenitor super-critical-mass cores of gas giant planets primarily form in protostellar disks with relatively high (≳ 10 –7 M ☉ yr –1 ) mass accretion rates, whereas systems of super Earths (failed cores) are more likely to emerge out of natal disks with modest mass accretion rates, due to the mean motion resonance barrier and retention efficiency

  11. Dendritic chelating agents. 1. Cu(II) binding to ethylene diamine core poly (amidoamine) denderimers in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diallo, Mamadou S.; Christie, Simone; Swaminathan, Pirabalini; Balogh, Lajos; Shi, XIANGYANG; Um, Wooyong; Papelis, Charalambos; Goddard, William A.; Johnson, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    The overall results of the proton and metal ion binding measurements suggest that the uptake of Cu(II) by EDA core PAMAM dendrimers involves both the dendrimer tertiary amine and terminal groups. However, the extents of protonation of these groups control the ability of the dentrimers to bind Cu(II). Analysis of the EXAFS spectra suggests that Cu(II) forms octahedral complexes involving the tertiary amine groups of Gx-NH2 EDA core PAMAM dendrimers at pH 7.0. The central Cu(II) metal ion of each of these complexes appears to be coordinated to 2-4 dendrimer tertiary amine groups located in the equatorial plane and 2 axial water molecules. Finally, we combine the results of our experiments with literature data to formulate and evaluate a phenomenological model of Cu(II) uptake by Gx-NH2 PAMAM dendrimers in aqueous solutions. At low metal ion-dendrimer loadings, the model provides a good fit of the measured extent of binding of Cu(II) in aqueous solutions of G4-NH2 PAMAM dendrimers at pH 7.0

  12. Molecularly Engineered Ru(II) Sensitizers Compatible with Cobalt(II/III) Redox Mediators for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kuan-Lin; Huckaba, Aron J; Clifford, John N; Yang, Ya-Wen; Yella, Aswani; Palomares, Emilio; Grätzel, Michael; Chi, Yun; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-08-01

    Thiocyanate-free isoquinazolylpyrazolate Ru(II) complexes were synthesized and applied as sensitizers in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Unlike most other successful Ru sensitizers, Co-based electrolytes were used, and resulting record efficiency of 9.53% was obtained under simulated sunlight with an intensity of 100 mW cm(-2). Specifically, dye 51-57dht.1 and an electrolyte based on Co(phen)3 led to measurement of a JSC of 13.89 mA cm(-2), VOC of 900 mV, and FF of 0.762 to yield 9.53% efficiency. The improved device performances were achieved by the inclusion of 2-hexylthiophene units onto the isoquinoline subunits, in addition to lengthening the perfluoroalkyl chain on the pyrazolate chelating group, which worked to increase light absorption and decrease recombination effects when using the Co-based electrolyte. As this study shows, Ru(II) sensitizers bearing sterically demanding ligands can allow successful utilization of important Co electrolytes and high performance.

  13. Improved Rock Core Sample Break-off, Retention and Ejection System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort advances the design of an innovative core sampling and acquisition system with improved core break-off, retention and ejection features. Phase 1...

  14. MAGNETIC DIAGNOSTICS OF THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE WITH THE Mg II h–k LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Pino Alemán, T.; Casini, R. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Manso Sainz, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-10-20

    We investigated the formation of the Mg ii h–k doublet in a weakly magnetized atmosphere (20–100 G) using a newly developed numerical code for polarized radiative transfer in a plane-parallel geometry, which implements a recent formulation of partially coherent scattering by polarized multi-term atoms in arbitrary magnetic-field regimes. Our results confirm the importance of partial redistribution effects in the formation of the Mg ii h and k lines, as pointed out by previous work in the non-magnetic case. We show that the presence of a magnetic field can produce measurable modifications of the broadband linear polarization even for relatively small field strengths (∼10 G), while the circular polarization remains well represented by the classical magnetograph formula. Both these results open an important new window for the weak-field diagnostics of the upper solar atmosphere.

  15. Propagation of interplanetary shock waves by observations of type II solar radio bursts on IMP-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chertok, I.M.; Fomichev, V.V.

    1976-01-01

    A new interpretation of the low frequency type II solar radio bursts of 30 June 1971, and 7-8 August 1972 observed with IMP-6 satellite (Malitson, H.H., Fainberg, J. and Stone, R.G., 1973, Astrophys. Lett., vol. 14, 111; Astrophys. J., vol. 183, L35) is suggested. The analysis is carried out for two models of the electron density distribution in the interplanetary medium taking into account that N approximately 3.5 cm -3 at a distance of 1 a.u. It is assumed that the frequency of the radio emission corresponds to the average electron density behind the shock front which exceeds the undisturbed electron density by the factor of 3. The radio data indicate essential deceleration of the shock waves during propagation from the Sun up to 1 a.u. The characteristics of the shock waves obtained from the type II bursts agree with the results of the in situ observations. (author)

  16. Effect of the shell material and confinement type on the conversion efficiency of core/shell quantum dot nanocrystal solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mehmet

    2018-05-23

    In this study, the effects of the shell material and confinement type on the conversion efficiency of core/shell quantum dot nanocrystal (QDNC) solar cells have been investigated in detail. For this purpose, the conventional, i.e. original, detailed balance model, developed by Shockley and Queisser to calculate an upper limit for the conversion efficiency of silicon p-n junction solar cells, is modified in a simple and effective way to calculate the conversion efficiency of core/shell QDNC solar cells. Since the existing model relies on the gap energy ([Formula: see text]) of the solar cell, it does not make an estimation about the effect of QDNC materials on the efficiency of the solar cells, and gives the same efficiency values for several QDNC solar cells with the same [Formula: see text]. The proposed modification, however, estimates a conversion efficiency in relation to the material properties and also the confinement type of the QDNCs. The results of the modified model show that, in contrast to the original one, the conversion efficiencies of different QDNC solar cells, even if they have the same [Formula: see text], become different depending upon the confinement type and shell material of the core/shell QDNCs, and this is crucial in the design and fabrication of the new generation solar cells to predict the confinement type and also appropriate QDNC materials for better efficiency.

  17. Effect of the shell material and confinement type on the conversion efficiency of core/shell quantum dot nanocrystal solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mehmet

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the effects of the shell material and confinement type on the conversion efficiency of core/shell quantum dot nanocrystal (QDNC) solar cells have been investigated in detail. For this purpose, the conventional, i.e. original, detailed balance model, developed by Shockley and Queisser to calculate an upper limit for the conversion efficiency of silicon p–n junction solar cells, is modified in a simple and effective way to calculate the conversion efficiency of core/shell QDNC solar cells. Since the existing model relies on the gap energy () of the solar cell, it does not make an estimation about the effect of QDNC materials on the efficiency of the solar cells, and gives the same efficiency values for several QDNC solar cells with the same . The proposed modification, however, estimates a conversion efficiency in relation to the material properties and also the confinement type of the QDNCs. The results of the modified model show that, in contrast to the original one, the conversion efficiencies of different QDNC solar cells, even if they have the same , become different depending upon the confinement type and shell material of the core/shell QDNCs, and this is crucial in the design and fabrication of the new generation solar cells to predict the confinement type and also appropriate QDNC materials for better efficiency.

  18. EMBEDDED PROTOSTELLAR DISKS AROUND (SUB-)SOLAR STARS. II. DISK MASSES, SIZES, DENSITIES, TEMPERATURES, AND THE PLANET FORMATION PERSPECTIVE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.

    2011-01-01

    We present basic properties of protostellar disks in the embedded phase of star formation (EPSF), which is difficult to probe observationally using available observational facilities. We use numerical hydrodynamics simulations of cloud core collapse and focus on disks formed around stars in the 0.03-1.0 M sun mass range. Our obtained disk masses scale near-linearly with the stellar mass. The mean and median disk masses in the Class 0 and I phases (M mean d,C0 = 0.12 M sun , M mdn d,C0 = 0.09 M sun and M mean d,CI = 0.18 M sun , M mdn d,CI = 0.15 M sun , respectively) are greater than those inferred from observations by (at least) a factor of 2-3. We demonstrate that this disagreement may (in part) be caused by the optically thick inner regions of protostellar disks, which do not contribute to millimeter dust flux. We find that disk masses and surface densities start to systematically exceed that of the minimum mass solar nebular for objects with stellar mass as low as M * = 0.05-0.1 M sun . Concurrently, disk radii start to grow beyond 100 AU, making gravitational fragmentation in the disk outer regions possible. Large disk masses, surface densities, and sizes suggest that giant planets may start forming as early as in the EPSF, either by means of core accretion (inner disk regions) or direct gravitational instability (outer disk regions), thus breaking a longstanding stereotype that the planet formation process begins in the Class II phase.

  19. Preparation and characterization of core-shell electrodes for application in gel electrolyte-based dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avellaneda, Cesar O.; Goncalves, Agnaldo D.; Benedetti, Joao E.; Nogueira, Ana F.

    2010-01-01

    Core-shell electrodes based on TiO 2 covered with different oxides were prepared and characterized. These electrodes were applied in gel electrolyte-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). The TiO 2 electrodes were prepared from TiO 2 powder (P25 Degussa) and coated with thin layers of Al 2 O 3 , MgO, Nb 2 O 5 , and SrTiO 3 prepared by the sol-gel method. The core-shell electrodes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. J-V curves in the dark and under standard AM 1.5 conditions and photovoltage decay measurements under open-circuit conditions were carried out in order to evaluate the influence of the oxide layer on the charge recombination dynamics and on the device's performance. The results indicated an improvement in the conversion efficiency as a result of an increase in the open circuit voltage. The photovoltage decay curves under open-circuit conditions showed that the core-shell electrodes provide longer electron lifetime values compared to uncoated TiO 2 electrodes, corroborating with a minimization in the recombination losses at the nanoparticle surface/electrolyte interface. This is the first time that a study has been applied to DSSC based on gel polymer electrolyte. The optimum performance was achieved by solar cells based on TiO 2 /MgO core-shell electrodes: fill factor of ∼0.60, short-circuit current density J sc of 12 mA cm -2 , open-circuit voltage V oc of 0.78 V and overall energy conversion efficiency of ∼5% (under illumination of 100 mW cm -2 ).

  20. Probing dark matter with star clusters: a dark matter core in the ultra-faint dwarf Eridanus II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contenta, Filippo; Balbinot, Eduardo; Petts, James A.; Read, Justin I.; Gieles, Mark; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Delorme, Maxime; Gualandris, Alessia

    2018-05-01

    We present a new technique to probe the central dark matter (DM) density profile of galaxies that harnesses both the survival and observed properties of star clusters. As a first application, we apply our method to the `ultra-faint' dwarf Eridanus II (Eri II) that has a lone star cluster ˜45 pc from its centre. Using a grid of collisional N-body simulations, incorporating the effects of stellar evolution, external tides and dynamical friction, we show that a DM core for Eri II naturally reproduces the size and the projected position of its star cluster. By contrast, a dense cusped galaxy requires the cluster to lie implausibly far from the centre of Eri II (>1 kpc), with a high inclination orbit that must be observed at a particular orbital phase. Our results, therefore, favour a DM core. This implies that either a cold DM cusp was `heated up' at the centre of Eri II by bursty star formation or we are seeing an evidence for physics beyond cold DM.

  1. Artificial Photosystem I and II: Highly Selective solar fuels and tandem photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuchen; Castellanos, Ignacio; Cerkovnik, Logan; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Artificial photosynthesis, or generation of solar fuels from CO2/H2O, can provide an important alternative for rising CO2 emission and renewable energy generation. In our recent work, composite photocatalysts (CPCs) made from widebandgap nanotubes and different QDs were used to mimic Photosystem II (PS680) and I (PS700), respectively. By tuning the redox potentials using the size, composition and energy band alignment of QDs, we demonstrate highly selective (>90%) and efficient production of ethane, ethanol and acetaldehyde as solar fuels with different wavelengths of light. We also show that this selectivity is a result of precise energy band alignments (using cationic/anionic doping of nanotubes, QD size etc.), confirmed using measurements of electronic density of states, and alignment of higher redox potentials with hot-carriers can also lead to hot-carrier photocatalysis. This wavelength-selective CPCs can have important implications for inexpensive production of solar fuels including alkanes, alcohols, aldehydes and hydrogen, and making tandem structures (red, green, blue) with three CPCs, allowing almost full visible spectrum (410 ~ 730nm) utilization with different fuels produced simultaneously.

  2. Carrier extraction behaviour in type II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Hiromi; James, Juanita; Carrington, Peter J; Marshall, Andrew R J; Krier, Anthony; Wagener, Magnus C; Botha, Johannes R

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of quantum dot (QD) or quantum ring (QR) nanostructures into GaAs single-junction solar cells has shown enhanced photo-response above the GaAs absorption edge, because of sub-bandgap photon absorption. However, to further improve solar cell performance a better understanding of the mechanisms of photogenerated carrier extraction from QDs and QRs is needed. In this work we have used a direct excitation technique to study type II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells using a 1064 nm infrared laser, which enables us to excite electron–hole pairs directly within the GaSb QRs without exciting the GaAs host material. Temperature and laser intensity dependence of the current–voltage characteristics revealed that the thermionic emission process produced the dominant contribution to the photocurrent and accounts for 98.9% of total photocurrent at 0 V and 300 K. Although the tunnelling process gives only a low contribution to the photocurrent, an enhancement of the tunnelling current was clearly observed when an external electric field was applied. (paper)

  3. Long-term solar activity and terrestrial connections. Part II: at the beckon of the sun?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Diamantides

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The research task described herein aims at the structuring of an analytical tool that traces the time course of geophysical phenomena, regional or global, and compares it to the course of long-term solar conditions, long-term meaning decades or a few centuries. The model is based on the premise that since in a last analysis the preponderance of atmospheric, hydrospheric, and, possibly, some aspects of geospheric phenomena are, or have been, powered by energy issuing from the sun - either now or in the past - the long-term behavior of such phenomena is ultimately "connected" to long-term changes occurring in the sun itself. Accordingly, the proposed research firstly derives and models a stable surrogate pattern for the long-term solar activity, secondly introduces a transfer-function algorithm for modeling the connection between the surrogate and terrestrial phenomena viewed as partners in the connection, and thirdly probes the connection outcome for episodic or unanticipated effects that may arise due to the fact that in the present context, the connection, should it exist, is very likely nonlinear. Part I of the study presents the theory of the concept, while Part II demonstrates the concept's pertinence to a number of terrestrial phenomena.Key words. Solar activity · Kolmogorov algorithm

  4. Long-term solar activity and terrestrial connections. Part II: at the beckon of the sun?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Diamantides

    Full Text Available The research task described herein aims at the structuring of an analytical tool that traces the time course of geophysical phenomena, regional or global, and compares it to the course of long-term solar conditions, long-term meaning decades or a few centuries. The model is based on the premise that since in a last analysis the preponderance of atmospheric, hydrospheric, and, possibly, some aspects of geospheric phenomena are, or have been, powered by energy issuing from the sun - either now or in the past - the long-term behavior of such phenomena is ultimately "connected" to long-term changes occurring in the sun itself. Accordingly, the proposed research firstly derives and models a stable surrogate pattern for the long-term solar activity, secondly introduces a transfer-function algorithm for modeling the connection between the surrogate and terrestrial phenomena viewed as partners in the connection, and thirdly probes the connection outcome for episodic or unanticipated effects that may arise due to the fact that in the present context, the connection, should it exist, is very likely nonlinear. Part I of the study presents the theory of the concept, while Part II demonstrates the concept's pertinence to a number of terrestrial phenomena.

    Key words. Solar activity · Kolmogorov algorithm

  5. Spectropolarimetric Inversions of the Ca II 8542 Å Line in an M-class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Henriques, V. M. J.; Mathioudakis, M.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.; Carlsson, M.

    2018-06-01

    We study the M1.9-class solar flare SOL2015-09-27T10:40 UT using high-resolution full Stokes imaging spectropolarimetry of the Ca II 8542 Å line obtained with the CRISP imaging spectropolarimeter at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. Spectropolarimetric inversions using the non-LTE code NICOLE are used to construct semiempirical models of the flaring atmosphere to investigate the structure and evolution of the flare temperature and magnetic field. A comparison of the temperature stratification in flaring and nonflaring areas reveals strong heating of the flare ribbon during the flare peak. The polarization signals of the ribbon in the chromosphere during the flare maximum become stronger when compared to its surroundings and to pre- and post-flare profiles. Furthermore, a comparison of the response functions to perturbations in the line-of-sight magnetic field and temperature in flaring and nonflaring atmospheres shows that during the flare, the Ca II 8542 Å line is more sensitive to the lower atmosphere where the magnetic field is expected to be stronger. The chromospheric magnetic field was also determined with the weak-field approximation, which led to results similar to those obtained with the NICOLE inversions.

  6. RADIOEMISSÕES SOLARES TIPO II ASSOCIADAS A FLARES E CMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Douglas Cunha-Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Atribuídas a ondas de choque e a ejeções de plasmoide, as emissões solares tipo II são ondaseletromagnéticas geradas a partir de oscilações do plasma coronal. A origem dos choques associados a essasemissões é ainda uma questão em aberto da física solar. Enquanto alguns trabalhos sugerem os flares solarescomo seus acionadores, outros fornecem indícios de serem as ejeções de massa coronal (CMEs sua origemmais provável. Este trabalho apresenta os resultados da análise de duas emissões tipo II, registradas por doisespectrômetros da rede e-CALLISTO (extended-Compound Astronomical Low-cost Low-frequency Instrument forSpectroscopy and Transportable Observatory, os quais operam na faixa de frequências de 45-870 MHz. Oprimeiro evento, observado em 13 de junho de 2010, às 05:38 UT, apresentou uma taxa de deriva em frequênciade -0,2 MHz s-1, correspondente a uma velocidade de choque de 528 km s-1, estando, temporalmente, associadoa uma CME lenta (~320 km s-1 e a um flare solar em raios-X, classe M1.0. O segundo evento, observado em 09de Agosto de 2011, às 08:02 UT, apresentou uma taxa de deriva em frequência de -1,4 MHz s-1, correspondentea uma velocidade de choque de 1375 km s-1, estando, temporalmente, associado a uma CME tipo halo (~1610km s-1 e a um flare solar em raios-X, classe X6.9. Os resultados obtidos, para os parâmetros observacionais dasemissões tipo II e para os parâmetros físicos de suas fontes, são discutidos no contexto de sua relação com seuflares e CMEs associados.

  7. Transitions to improved core electron heat confinement triggered by low order rational magnetic surfaces in the stellarator TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; AscasIbar, E.; BalbIn, R.; Cappa, A.; Castejon, F.; Eguilior, S.; Fernandez, A.; Guasp, J.; Hidalgo, C.; Petrov, S.

    2007-01-01

    Transitions to improved core electron heat confinement are triggered by low order rational magnetic surfaces in TJ-II electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasmas. Experiments are performed changing the magnetic shear around the rational surface n = 3/m = 2 to study its influence on the transition; ECH power modulation is used to look at transport properties. The improvement in the electron heat confinement shows no obvious dependence on the magnetic shear. Transitions triggered by the rational surface n = 4/m = 2 show, in addition, an increase in the ion temperature synchronized with the increase in the electron temperature. Ion temperature changes had not been previously observed either in TJ-II or in any other helical device. SXR measurements demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, the rational surface positioned inside the plasma core region precedes and provides a trigger for the transition

  8. THE HANLE AND ZEEMAN POLARIZATION SIGNALS OF THE SOLAR Ca II 8542 Å LINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Štěpán, Jiri [Astronomical Institute ASCR, Fričova 298, 251 65 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Bueno, Javier Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2016-07-20

    We highlight the main results of a three-dimensional (3D) multilevel radiative transfer investigation about the solar disk-center polarization of the Ca ii 8542 Å line. First, through the use of a 3D model of the solar atmosphere, we investigate the linear polarization that occurs due to the atomic level polarization produced by the absorption and scattering of anisotropic radiation, taking into account the symmetry-breaking effects caused by its thermal, dynamic, and magnetic structure. Second, we study the contribution of the Zeeman effect to the linear and circular polarization. Finally, we show examples of the Stokes profiles produced by the joint action of the atomic level polarization and the Hanle and Zeeman effects. We find that the Zeeman effect tends to dominate the linear polarization signals only in the localized patches of opposite magnetic polarity, where the magnetic field is relatively strong and slightly inclined; outside such very localized patches, the linear polarization is often dominated by the contribution of atomic level polarization. We demonstrate that a correct modeling of this last contribution requires taking into account the symmetry-breaking effects caused by the thermal, dynamic, and magnetic structure of the solar atmosphere, and that in the 3D model used the Hanle effect in forward-scattering geometry (disk-center observation) mainly reduces the polarization corresponding to the zero-field case. We emphasize that, in general, a reliable modeling of the linear polarization in the Ca ii 8542 Å line requires taking into account the joint action of atomic level polarization and the Hanle and Zeeman effects.

  9. Low temperature grown ZnO@TiO{sub 2} core shell nanorod arrays for dye sensitized solar cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Gregory Kia Liang [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology, and Research), 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore); Le, Hong Quang, E-mail: lehq@imre.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology, and Research), 3 Research Link, 117602 Singapore (Singapore); Huang, Tang Jiao; Hui, Benjamin Tan Tiong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE), Faculty of Engineering National University of Singapore (NUS) BLK E3A, #04-10, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore)

    2014-06-01

    High aspect ratio ZnO nanorod arrays were synthesized on fluorine-doped tin oxide glasses via a low temperature solution method. By adjusting the growth condition and adding polyethylenimine, ZnO nanorod arrays with tunable length were successfully achieved. The ZnO@TiO{sub 2} core shells structures were realized by a fast growth method of immersion into a (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}·TiF{sub 6} solution. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray Diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray measurements all confirmed the existence of a titania shell uniformly covering the ZnO nanorod's surface. Results of solar cell testing showed that addition of a TiO{sub 2} shell to the ZnO nanorod significantly increased short circuit current (from 4.2 to 5.2 mA/cm{sup 2}), open circuit voltage (from 0.6 V to 0.8 V) and fill factor (from 42.8% to 73.02%). The overall cell efficiency jumped from 1.1% for bare ZnO nanorod to 3.03% for a ZnO@TiO{sub 2} core shell structured solar cell with a 18–22 nm shell thickness, a nearly threefold increase. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis process of coating TiO{sub 2} shell onto ZnO nanorod core is shown schematically. A thin, uniform, and conformal shell had been grown on the surface of the ZnO core after immersing in the (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}·TiF{sub 6} solution for 5–15 min. - Highlights: • ZnO@TiO{sub 2} core shell nanorod has been grown on FTO substrate using low temperature solution method. • TEM, XRD, EDX results confirmed the existing of titana shell, uniformly covered rod's surface. • TiO{sub 2} shell suppressed recombination, demonstrated significant enhancement in cell's efficiency. • Core shell DSSC's efficiency achieved as high as 3.03%, 3 times higher than that of ZnO nanorods.

  10. YOUNG STARLESS CORES EMBEDDED IN THE MAGNETICALLY DOMINATED PIPE NEBULA. II. EXTENDED DATA SET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Padovani, M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Busquet, G.; Morata, O.; Masqué, J. M.; Estalella, R.; Alves, F. O.; Franco, G. A. P.

    2012-01-01

    The Pipe nebula is a massive, nearby, filamentary dark molecular cloud with a low star formation efficiency threaded by a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to its main axis. It harbors more than a hundred, mostly quiescent, very chemically young starless cores. The cloud is therefore a good laboratory to study the earliest stages of the star formation process. We aim to investigate the primordial conditions and the relation among physical, chemical, and magnetic properties in the evolution of low-mass starless cores. We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to map the 1.2 mm dust continuum emission of five new starless cores, which are in good agreement with previous visual extinction maps. For the sample of nine cores, which includes the four cores studied in a previous work, we derived an A V to N H 2 factor of (1.27 ± 0.12) × 10 –21 mag cm 2 and a background visual extinction of ∼6.7 mag possibly arising from the cloud material. We derived an average core diameter of ∼0.08 pc, density of ∼10 5 cm –3 , and mass of ∼1.7 M ☉ . Several trends seem to exist related to increasing core density: (1) the diameter seems to shrink, (2) the mass seems to increase, and (3) the chemistry tends to be richer. No correlation is found between the direction of the surrounding diffuse medium magnetic field and the projected orientation of the cores, suggesting that large-scale magnetic fields seem to play a secondary role in shaping the cores. We also used the IRAM 30 m telescope to extend the previous molecular survey at 1 and 3 mm of early- and late-time molecules toward the same five new Pipe nebula starless cores, and analyzed the normalized intensities of the detected molecular transitions. We confirmed the chemical differentiation toward the sample and increased the number of molecular transitions of the 'diffuse' (e.g., the 'ubiquitous' CO, C 2 H, and CS), 'oxo-sulfurated' (e.g., SO and CH 3 OH), and 'deuterated' (e.g., N 2 H + , CN, and HCN) starless core groups

  11. Band engineering in core/shell ZnTe/CdSe for photovoltage and efficiency enhancement in exciplex quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Shuang; Shen, Qing; Mora-Seró, Iván; Wang, Jin; Pan, Zhenxiao; Zhao, Ke; Kuga, Yuki; Zhong, Xinhua; Bisquert, Juan

    2015-01-27

    Even though previously reported CdTe/CdSe type-II core/shell QD sensitizers possess intrinsic superior optoelectronic properties (such as wide absorption range, fast charge separation, and slow charge recombination) in serving as light absorbers, the efficiency of the resultant solar cell is still limited by the relatively low photovoltage. To further enhance photovoltage and cell efficiency accordingly, ZnTe/CdSe type-II core/shell QDs with much larger conduction band (CB) offset in comparison with that of CdTe/CdSe (1.22 eV vs 0.27 eV) are adopted as sensitizers in the construction of quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). The augment of band offset produces an increase of the charge accumulation across the QD/TiO2 interface under illumination and induces stronger dipole effects, therefore bringing forward an upward shift of the TiO2 CB edge after sensitization and resulting in enhancement of the photovoltage of the resultant cell devices. The variation of relative chemical capacitance, Cμ, between ZnTe/CdSe and reference CdTe/CdSe cells extracted from impedance spectroscopy (IS) characterization under dark and illumination conditions clearly demonstrates that, under light irradiation conditions, the sensitization of ZnTe/CdSe QDs upshifts the CB edge of TiO2 by the level of ∼ 50 mV related to that in the reference cell and results in the enhancement of V(oc) of the corresponding cell devices. In addition, charge extraction measurements have also confirmed the photovoltage enhancement in the ZnTe/CdSe cell related to reference CdTe/CdSe cell. Furthermore, transient grating (TG) measurements have revealed a faster electron injection rate for the ZnTe/CdSe-based QDSCs in comparison with the CdSe cells. The resultant ZnTe/CdSe QD-based QDSCs exhibit a champion power conversion efficiency of 7.17% and a certified efficiency of 6.82% under AM 1.5 G full one sun illumination, which is, as far as we know, one of the highest efficiencies for liquid-junction QDSCs.

  12. Phosphine-free synthesis and characterization of type-II ZnSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Roghayyeh; Armanmehr, Mohammad Hasan; Abedi, Mohammad; Fateh, Davood Sadeghi; Bahreini, Zaker

    2018-01-01

    A phosphine-free route for synthesis of type-II ZnSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots, using green, low cost and environmentally friendly reagents and phosphine-free solvents such as 1-octadecene (ODE) and liquid paraffin has been reported. Hot-injection technique has been used for the synthesis of ZnSe core quantum dots. The CdS shell quantum dots prepared by reaction of CdO precursor and S powder in 1-octadecene (ODE). The ZnSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots were synthesized via successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique. The characterization of produced quantum dots were performed by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed the formation of type-II ZnSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots with FWHM 32 nm and uniform size distribution.

  13. Seismic responses of N-Reactor core. Independent review of Phase II work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.C.; Lo, T.; Chinn, D.J.; Murray, R.C.; Johnson, J.J.; Maslenikov, O.R.

    1985-08-01

    Seismic response of the N-Reactor core was independently analyzed to validate the results of Impell's analysis. The analysis procedure consists of two major stages: linear soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis of the overall N-Reactor structure complex and nonlinear dynamic analysis of the reactor core. In the SSI analysis, CLASSI computer codes were used to calculate the SSI response of the structures and to generate the input motions for the nonlinear reactor core analysis. In addition, the response was compared to the response from the SASSI analysis under review. The impact of foundation modeling techniques and the effect of soil stiffness variation on SSI response were also investigated. In the core analysis, a nonlinear dynamic analysis model was developed. The stiffness representation of the model was calculated through a finite element analysis of several local core geometries. Finite element analyses were also used to study the block to block interaction characteristics. Using this nonlinear dynamic model along with the basemat time histories generated from CLASSI and SASSI, several dynamic analyses of the core were performed. A series of sensitivity studies was performed to investigate the discretization of the core, the effect of vertical acceleration, the effect of basemat rocking, and modeling assumptions. In general, our independent analysis of core response validates the order of magnitude of the displacement calculated by Impell. 11 refs., 110 figs., 12 tabs

  14. F.B.R. Core mock-up RAPSODIE - II - numerical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, D.; Hammami, L.; Gantenbein, F.

    1990-01-01

    To study the behaviour of LMFBR cores excited by a seism, tests have been performed on the RAPSODIE core mock-up. The aim of this paper is to present the numerical models used to interprete these tests and the comparisons between calculations and experimental results

  15. The electron temperature and anisotropy in the solar wind. Comparison of the core and halo populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pierrard, V.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Štverák, Štěpán; Maksimovic, M.; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 7 (2016), s. 2165-2179 ISSN 0038-0938 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : solar wind * electron velocity distributions * temperature anisotropy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11207-016-0961-7

  16. The Electron Temperature and Anisotropy in the Solar Wind. Comparison of the Core and Halo Populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pierrard, V.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Štverák, Štěpán; Maksimovic, M.; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 7 (2016), s. 2165-2179 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-17490S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar wind * electron velocity distributions * temperature anisotropy Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016

  17. Solution processed bismuth sulfide nanowire array core/silver shuffle shell solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Y.; Bernechea, M.; Maclachlan, A.; Zardetto, V.; Creatore, M.; Haque, S.A.; Konstantatos, G.

    2015-01-01

    Low bandgap inorganic semiconductor nanowires have served as building blocks in solution processed solar cells to improve their power conversion capacity and reduce fabrication cost. In this work, we first reported bismuth sulfide nanowire arrays grown from colloidal seeds on a transparent

  18. Transient behaviour in the plasma core of TJ-II stellarator and its relation with rational surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada, T.; Luna, E. de la; Ascasibar, E; Jimenez, J.A.; Castejon, F.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Sanchez, J.; Tribaldos, V.

    2002-01-01

    A transient behaviour is observed in the plasma core of TJ-II stellarator with fast drops in the electron temperature. Changes in the line-averaged density are observed synchronized with temperature drops. This phenomenon appears in plasmas created and heated using 300 kW of electron cyclotron heating with high power density. The transient behaviour resembles both, the electric pulsation discovered in CHS and the 'electron root' feature reported by the W7-AS team. The flexibility and low magnetic shear of TJ-II have permitted the identification of the plasma current as the control parameter for the appearance of this phenomenon. The results obtained during the magnetic configuration scans carried out in TJ-II points to the hypothesis that the transient behaviour is connected with the presence of a rational surface close to the plasma centre. Equilibrium calculations performed with the VMEC code reinforce this hypothesis. (author)

  19. Evaluation report on CCTF core-II reflood test C2-6 (Run 64)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Iguchi, Tadashi; Sugimoto, Jun; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio; Okabe, Kazuharu.

    1985-03-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of the radial power profile on the system behavior and the core thermal hydraulic behavior during the reflood phase of a PWR LOCA, a test was performed using the Cylindrical Core Test Facility(CCTF) with the flat radial power profile. The test was conducted with the same total core power as that of the steep radial power test C2-5(Run 63). Through the comparisons of the results from these two tests, the following conclusions were obtained: (1) The radial power profile in the core has weak effect on the thermal hydraulic behavior in the primary system except the core. (2) Almost the same differential pressure was observed at various elevations in the periphery of the core regardless of different radial power profile. The result suggests that the core differential pressure is determined mainly by the total power and the total stored energy rather than by the local power and the local stored energy. (3) The test results support the single channel core model with the average power rod used in the reactor safety analysis codes such as REFLA-1DS, WREM for the evaluation of the overall system behavior. (4) In the steep radial power test, the heat transfer coefficient in the central(high power) region was higher than that in the peripheral(low power) region. The tendency was not explained by the estimation with the heat transfer correlation developed by Murao and Sugimoto assuming that the void fraction was uniform in a horizontal cross section. It is necessary to study more the dependency of core heat transfer on the radial power profile in the wide core. (author)

  20. Comparison of Solar Fine Structure Observed Simultaneously in Lyα and Mg II h

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, D.; Sukhorukov, A. V.; De Pontieu, B.; Leenaarts, J.; Bethge, C.; Winebarger, A.; Auchère, F.; Bando, T.; Ishikawa, R.; Kano, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Narukage, N.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2017-10-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP) observed the Sun in H I Lyα during a suborbital rocket flight on 2015 September 3. The Interface Region Imaging Telescope (IRIS) coordinated with the CLASP observations and recorded nearly simultaneous and co-spatial observations in the Mg II h and k lines. The Mg II h and Lyα lines are important transitions, energetically and diagnostically, in the chromosphere. The canonical solar atmosphere model predicts that these lines form in close proximity to each other and so we expect that the line profiles will exhibit similar variability. In this analysis, we present these coordinated observations and discuss how the two profiles compare over a region of quiet Sun at viewing angles that approach the limb. In addition to the observations, we synthesize both line profiles using a 3D radiation-MHD simulation. In the observations, we find that the peak width and the peak intensities are well correlated between the lines. For the simulation, we do not find the same relationship. We have attempted to mitigate the instrumental differences between IRIS and CLASP and to reproduce the instrumental factors in the synthetic profiles. The model indicates that formation heights of the lines differ in a somewhat regular fashion related to magnetic geometry. This variation explains to some degree the lack of correlation, observed and synthesized, between Mg II and Lyα. Our analysis will aid in the definition of future observatories that aim to link dynamics in the chromosphere and transition region.

  1. Comparison of Solar Fine Structure Observed Simultaneously in Ly α and Mg ii h

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmit, D. [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute, 625 2nd Street, Suite 209, Petaluma, CA 94952 (United States); Sukhorukov, A. V.; Leenaarts, J. [Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); De Pontieu, B. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3176 Porter Drive, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Bethge, C.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Auchère, F. [Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS/Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Bâtiment 121, F-91405 Orsay (France); Bando, T.; Kano, R.; Narukage, N. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ishikawa, R. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Bueno, J. Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2017-10-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP) observed the Sun in H i Ly α during a suborbital rocket flight on 2015 September 3. The Interface Region Imaging Telescope ( IRIS ) coordinated with the CLASP observations and recorded nearly simultaneous and co-spatial observations in the Mg ii h and k lines. The Mg ii h and Ly α lines are important transitions, energetically and diagnostically, in the chromosphere. The canonical solar atmosphere model predicts that these lines form in close proximity to each other and so we expect that the line profiles will exhibit similar variability. In this analysis, we present these coordinated observations and discuss how the two profiles compare over a region of quiet Sun at viewing angles that approach the limb. In addition to the observations, we synthesize both line profiles using a 3D radiation-MHD simulation. In the observations, we find that the peak width and the peak intensities are well correlated between the lines. For the simulation, we do not find the same relationship. We have attempted to mitigate the instrumental differences between IRIS and CLASP and to reproduce the instrumental factors in the synthetic profiles. The model indicates that formation heights of the lines differ in a somewhat regular fashion related to magnetic geometry. This variation explains to some degree the lack of correlation, observed and synthesized, between Mg ii and Ly α . Our analysis will aid in the definition of future observatories that aim to link dynamics in the chromosphere and transition region.

  2. Evaluation of the Abbott realtime HCV genotype II RUO (GT II) assay with reference to 5'UTR, core and NS5B sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Melanie A; Lucic, Danijela X; Sears, Mitchell T; Cloherty, Gavin A; Hillyard, David R

    2014-05-01

    HCV genotyping is a critical tool for guiding initiation of therapy and selecting the most appropriate treatment regimen. To evaluate the concordance between the Abbott GT II assay and genotyping by sequencing subregions of the HCV 5'UTR, core and NS5B. The Abbott assay was used to genotype 127 routine patient specimens and 35 patient specimens with unusual subtypes and mixed infection. Abbott results were compared to genotyping by 5'UTR, core and NS5B sequencing. Sequences were genotyped using the NCBI non-redundant database and the online genotyping tool COMET. Among routine specimens, core/NS5B sequencing identified 93 genotype 1s, 13 genotype 2s, 15 genotype 3s, three genotype 4s, two genotype 6s and one recombinant specimen. Genotype calls by 5'UTR, core, NS5B sequencing and the Abbott assay were 97.6% concordant. Core/NS5B sequencing identified two discrepant samples as genotype 6 (subtypes 6l and 6u) while Abbott and 5'UTR sequencing identified these samples as genotype 1 with no subtype. The Abbott assay subtyped 91.4% of genotype 1 specimens. Among the 35 rare specimens, the Abbott assay inaccurately genotyped 3k, 6e, 6o, 6q and one genotype 4 variant; gave indeterminate results for 3g, 3h, 4r, 6m, 6n, and 6q specimens; and agreed with core/NS5B sequencing for mixed specimens. The Abbott assay is an automated HCV genotyping method with improved accuracy over 5'UTR sequencing. Samples identified by the Abbott assay as genotype 1 with no subtype may be rare subtypes of other genotypes and thus require confirmation by another method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood test C2-9 (Run 68)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Iguchi, Tadashi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio; Okabe, Kazuharu; Sugimoto, Jun.

    1987-02-01

    In order to study the LPCI flow rate effect on the core cooling and system behavior, a test was performed with the LPCI flow rate of 0.025 m 3 /s, which corresponds to the flow rate in case of no pump failure in a PWR system. Through the comparisons of test results with those from the reference test with the LPCI flow rate of 0.011 m 3 /s, the following conclusions were obtained: (1) The higher LPCI flow rate resulted in the worse core-cooling in these two tests. The test results show that the lower LPCI flow rate is not necessarily a conservative assumption for the evaluation of the core cooling during the reflood phase of a PWR LOCA. (2) The worse core-cooling in the high LPCI flow rate test is attributed to the lower core-pressure than in the reference test. It is found that the lower core-pressure results from the lower pressure drop through the broken cold leg. (3) It is expected that the current evaluation model(EM) code is still conservative because it usually predicts the low pressure drop through the broken cold leg. (4) The flow oscillation in the cold leg was not significant even in the high LPCI flow rate test before the whole core quench. (author)

  4. Association of solar flares with coronal mass ejections accompanied by Deca-Hectometric type II radio burst for two solar cycles 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharayat, Hema; Prasad, Lalan; Pant, Sumit

    2018-05-01

    The aim of present study is to find the association of solar flares with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) accompanied by Deca-Hectometric (DH) type II radio burst for the period 1997-2014 (solar cycle 23 and ascending phase of solar cycle 24). We have used a statistical analysis and found that 10-20∘ latitudinal belt of northern region and 80-90∘ longitudinal belts of western region of the sun are more effective for flare-CME accompanied by DH type II radio burst events. M-class flares (52%) are in good association with the CMEs accompanied by DH type II radio burst. Further, we have calculated the flare position and found that most frequent flare site is at the center of the CME span. However, the occurrence probability of all flares is maximum outside the CME span. X-class flare associated CMEs have maximum speed than that of M, C, and B-class flare associated CMEs. We have also found a good correlation between flare position and central position angle of CMEs accompanied by DH type II radio burst.

  5. An Efficient Parallel SAT Solver Exploiting Multi-Core Environments, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The hundreds of stream cores in the latest graphics processors (GPUs), and the possibility to execute non-graphics computations on them, open unprecedented levels of...

  6. YOUNG STARLESS CORES EMBEDDED IN THE MAGNETICALLY DOMINATED PIPE NEBULA. II. EXTENDED DATA SET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frau, P.; Girart, J. M.; Padovani, M. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C-5p, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Beltran, M. T.; Sanchez-Monge, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Busquet, G. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Morata, O. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Masque, J. M.; Estalella, R. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (IEEC-UB), Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Alves, F. O. [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Franco, G. A. P. [Departamento de Fisica-ICEx-UFMG, Caixa Postal 702, 30.123-970, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2012-11-01

    The Pipe nebula is a massive, nearby, filamentary dark molecular cloud with a low star formation efficiency threaded by a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to its main axis. It harbors more than a hundred, mostly quiescent, very chemically young starless cores. The cloud is therefore a good laboratory to study the earliest stages of the star formation process. We aim to investigate the primordial conditions and the relation among physical, chemical, and magnetic properties in the evolution of low-mass starless cores. We used the IRAM 30 m telescope to map the 1.2 mm dust continuum emission of five new starless cores, which are in good agreement with previous visual extinction maps. For the sample of nine cores, which includes the four cores studied in a previous work, we derived an A {sub V} to N{sub H{sub 2}} factor of (1.27 {+-} 0.12) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -21} mag cm{sup 2} and a background visual extinction of {approx}6.7 mag possibly arising from the cloud material. We derived an average core diameter of {approx}0.08 pc, density of {approx}10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, and mass of {approx}1.7 M {sub Sun }. Several trends seem to exist related to increasing core density: (1) the diameter seems to shrink, (2) the mass seems to increase, and (3) the chemistry tends to be richer. No correlation is found between the direction of the surrounding diffuse medium magnetic field and the projected orientation of the cores, suggesting that large-scale magnetic fields seem to play a secondary role in shaping the cores. We also used the IRAM 30 m telescope to extend the previous molecular survey at 1 and 3 mm of early- and late-time molecules toward the same five new Pipe nebula starless cores, and analyzed the normalized intensities of the detected molecular transitions. We confirmed the chemical differentiation toward the sample and increased the number of molecular transitions of the 'diffuse' (e.g., the 'ubiquitous' CO, C{sub 2}H, and CS), &apos

  7. Joint Soviet-French studies of the solar corona. II - Photometry of the solar corona on June 30, 1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vsekhsvyatsky, S. K.; Dzyubenko, N. I.; Ivanchuk, V. I.; Popov, O. S.; Rubo, G. A.; Koutchmy, S.; Koutchmy, O.; Shtelmacher, G.

    1981-04-01

    Results are presented of a study of negatives obtained on June 30, 1973 during the total solar eclipse in Africa; the study was part of a joint Soviet-French experiment on white corona dynamics, carried out by expeditions of Kiev University (Atar, Mauritania) and the Paris Astrophysical Institute (Moussoro, Chad). The distribution of total corona brightness up to 4.5 solar radii and its K and F corona components for east and north directions were found on the basis of novel methods of photometry and colorimetry using star images up to 8.5m as the photometry standards. Neither the color effect nor flattening is found in the inner part (less than 2.5 solar radii) of the F corona. Integral corona brightness in the standard zone of 1.03-6.00 solar radii was found to be 0.64 x 10 to the -6th solar-E.

  8. Material correlations and models for the irradiation behavior of fissile and fertile material in SNR-300, Mark-II and KNK II, third core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenneker; Steinmetz; Toebbe

    1986-07-01

    The report contains the material correlations and models used in the fuel pin design code IAMBUS for the irradiation behavior of PuO 2 -UO 2 fissile materials and UO 2 fertile materials of the SNR-300 Mark-II reload and the KNK II third core. They are applicable for pellet densities of more than 90 % of the theoretical density. The presented models of the fuel behavior and the applied material correlations have been derived either from single experiments or from the comparison of theoretically predicted integral fuel behavior with the results of fuel pin irradiation experiments. The material correlations have been examined and extended in the frame of the collaborations INTERATOM/KWU and INTERATOM/KfK. French and British results were included, when available from the European fast reactor knowledge exchange [de

  9. Exploring He II 304 Å Spicules and Macrospicules at the Solar Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, A. C.; Snyder, I. R.; Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a study of He II 304 Ang spicules and macrospiculesobserved at the limb of the Sun in 304 Ang channel image sequences from theAtmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Thesedata have both high spatial (0.6 arcsec pixels) and temporal (12 s) resolution. All of the observed events occurred in quiet or coronal hole regions near the solarpole. He II 304 Ang spicules and macrospicules are both transient jet-likefeatures, with the macrospicules being wider and having taller maximum heights thanthe spicules. We looked for characteristics of the populations of these twophenomena that might indicate whether they have the same initiation mechanisms. Weexamine the maximum heights, time-averaged rise velocities, and lifetimes of about30 spicules and about five macrospicules. For the spicules, these quantities are,respectively, ~10,000----40,000 km, 20---100 km/s, and a few 100--- ~600 sec. Forthe macrospicules the corresponding properties are >~60,000 km, >~55 km/s, andlifetimes of >~1800 sec. Therefore the macrospicules have velocities comparable tothose of the fastest spicules and live longer than the spicules. The leading-edgetrajectories of both the spicules and the macrospicules match well a second-order(``parabolic'') profile, although the acceleration in the fitted profiles is generally weaker than that of solar gravity. The macrospicules also have obviousbrightenings at their bases at their birth, while such brightenings are notapparent for most of the spicules. Our findings are suggestive of the twophenomena possibly having different initiation mechanisms, but this is not yetconclusive. A.C.S. and R.L.M. were supported by funding from the HeliophysicsDivision of NASA's Science Mission Directorate through the Living With a StarTargeted Research and Technology Program, and the Hinode Project. I.R.S. wassupported by NSF's Research Experience for Undergraduates Program.

  10. What can He II 304 Å tell us about transient seismic emission from solar flares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, C.; Donea, A. C.

    2017-10-01

    After neary 20 years since their discovery by Kosovichev and Zharkova, the mechanics of the release of seismic transients into the solar interior from some flares remain a mystery. Seismically emissive flares invariably show the signatures of intense chromosphere heating consistent with pressure variations sufficient to drive seismic transients commensurate with helioseismic observations-under certain conditions. Magnetic observations show the signatures of apparent magnetic changes, suggesting Lorentz-force transients that could likewise drive seismic transients-similarly subject to certain conditions. But, the diagnostic signatures of both of these prospective drivers are apparent over vast regions from which no significant seismic emission emanates. What distinguishes the source regions of transient seismic emission from the much vaster regions that show the signatures of both transient heating and magnetic variations but are acoustically unproductive? Observations of acoustically active flares in He II 304 Å by the Atomospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) offer a promising new resource with which to address this question.

  11. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood test C2-1 (Run 55)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Sugimoto, Jun; Akimoto, Hajime; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio

    1991-10-01

    A high pressure test (0.42 MPa) on the reflood phenomena was performed with the CCTF. The result of the test was compared with the experimental result of the base case test (0.2 MPa). (1) The overall flow characteristics in the high pressure test were qualitatively similar to that of the base case test. Any qualitatively different phenomena were not recognized during reflood phase. This indicates that it is reasonable to utilize the physical reflood model developed from the result of the base case test to the high pressure condition at least up to 0.42 MPa for prediction of reflood behavior of PWRs. (2) On the other hand, following quantitative influence of high pressure on reflood phenomena was observed. The core cooling was better, and the mass flow rate of the steam generated in the core was larger. However, the steam velocity was smaller due to higher density of the steam. Therefore, the steam discharge through loops was easier and hence the so-called steam binding effect was weaker. And, the water accumulation rate in the core was larger. Consequently the core flooding mass flow rate was larger. Since the core cooling was better, the maximum core temperature was lower and the last quenching was earlier. This result was the same as that previously observed in CCTF tests in the scope of the pressure upto 0.3 MPa. (3) The higher pressure leads to the better core cooling, and hence the safety margin increases with the increase in the pressure. (author)

  12. Review of the SIMMER-II analyses of liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor core-disruptive accident fuel escape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVault, G.P.; Bell, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Early fuel removal from the active core of a liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor undergoing a core-disruptive accident may reduce the potential for large energetics resulting from recriticalities. This paper presents a review of analyses with the SIMMER-II computer program of the effectiveness of possible fuel escape paths. Where possible, how SIMMER-II compares with or is validated against experiments that simulated the escape paths also is discussed

  13. NON-EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY OF DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING PRESTELLAR CORES. II. IONIZATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Willacy, Karen; Yorke, Harold W.; Turner, Neal J.

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect that non-equilibrium chemistry in dynamical models of collapsing molecular cloud cores has on measurements of the magnetic field in these cores, the degree of ionization, and the mean molecular weight of ions. We find that OH and CN, usually used in Zeeman observations of the line-of-sight magnetic field, have an abundance that decreases toward the center of the core much faster than the density increases. As a result, Zeeman observations tend to sample the outer layers of the core and consistently underestimate the core magnetic field. The degree of ionization follows a complicated dependence on the number density at central densities up to 10 5 cm –3 for magnetic models and 10 6 cm –3 in non-magnetic models. At higher central densities, the scaling approaches a power law with a slope of –0.6 and a normalization which depends on the cosmic-ray ionization rate ζ and the temperature T as (ζT) 1/2 . The mean molecular weight of ions is systematically lower than the usually assumed value of 20-30, and, at high densities, approaches a value of 3 due to the asymptotic dominance of the H + 3 ion. This significantly lower value implies that ambipolar diffusion operates faster.

  14. [Effect of core: dentin thickness ratio on the flexure strength of IPS Empress II heat-pressed all-ceramic restorative material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-hong; Feng, Hai-lan; Bao, Yi-wang; Qiu, Yan

    2007-02-18

    To evaluate the effect of core:dentin thickness ratio on the flexure strength, fracture mode and origin of bilayered IPS Empress II ceramic composite specimens. IPS Empress II core ceramic, dentin porcelain and bilayered composite specimens with core:dentin thickness ratio of 2:1 and 1:1 were tested in three-point flexure strength. Mean strengths and standard deviations were determined. The optical microscopy was employed for identification of the fracture mode and origin. The flexure strength of dentin porcelain was the smallest(62.7 MPa), and the strength of bilayered composite specimens was smaller than single-layered core ceramic(190.2 MPa). The core: dentin ratio did not influence the strength of bilayered composite specimens. The frequency of occurrence of bilayered specimen delaminations was higher in the group of core: dentin thickness ratio of 1:1 than in the group of 2:1. IPS Empress II core ceramic was significantly stronger than veneering dentin porcelain. Core:dentin thickness ratio could significantly influence the fracture mode and origin, and bilayered IPS Empress II ceramic composite specimens showed little influence in the fracture strength.

  15. Feasibility of monitoring the strength of HTGR core support graphite. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.; Becker, F.L.

    1979-08-01

    The results reported establish the technical feasibility of a method for monitoring the strength of HTGR core support structures in situ. Correlations have been established between the velocity of an ultrasonic pulse and the compressive strength of four different grades of graphite. For some grades of graphite, one or more of the correlations are practically independent of oxidation profile in samples having cylindrical geometry (as in the core support posts). For other grades of graphite, and for other sample geometries, the oxidation-depth profile must be known in order to reliably predict the effect of oxidation on compressive strength

  16. Final Report for Annex II--Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources In Saudi Arabia, 1998-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.; Wilcox, S. M.; Marion, W. F.; Al-Abbadi, N. M.; Mahfoodh, M.; Al-Otaibi, Z.

    2002-04-01

    The Final Report for Annex II - Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources in Saudi Arabia 1998-2000 summarizes the accomplishment of work performed, results achieved, and products produced under Annex II, a project established under the Agreement for Cooperation in the Field of Renewable Energy Research and Development between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United States. The report covers work and accomplishments from January 1998 to December 2000. A previous progress report, Progress Report for Annex II - Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources in Saudi Arabia 1993-1997, NREL/TP-560-29374, summarizes earlier work and technical transfer of information under the project. The work was performed in at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and at selected weather stations of the Saudi Meteorological and Environmental Protection Administration (MEPA).

  17. Improved Solar-Driven Photocatalytic Performance of Highly Crystalline Hydrogenated TiO2 Nanofibers with Core-Shell Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Chung; Chen, Ching-Hsiang; Huang, Wei-Kang; Hsiao, Kai-Chi; Lin, Ting-Han; Chan, Shun-Hsiang; Wu, Po-Yeh; Lu, Chun-Fu; Chang, Yin-Hsuan; Lin, Tz-Feng; Hsu, Kai-Hsiang; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Lee, Kun-Mu; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Kordás, Krisztián; Su, Wei-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogenated titanium dioxide has attracted intensive research interests in pollutant removal applications due to its high photocatalytic activity. Herein, we demonstrate hydrogenated TiO2 nanofibers (H:TiO2 NFs) with a core-shell structure prepared by the hydrothermal synthesis and subsequent heat treatment in hydrogen flow. H:TiO2 NFs has excellent solar light absorption and photogenerated charge formation behavior as confirmed by optical absorbance, photo-Kelvin force probe microscopy and photoinduced charge carrier dynamics analyses. Photodegradation of various organic dyes such as methyl orange, rhodamine 6G and brilliant green is shown to take place with significantly higher rates on our novel catalyst than on pristine TiO2 nanofibers and commercial nanoparticle based photocatalytic materials, which is attributed to surface defects (oxygen vacancy and Ti3+ interstitial defect) on the hydrogen treated surface. We propose three properties/mechanisms responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activity, which are: (1) improved absorbance allowing for increased exciton generation, (2) highly crystalline anatase TiO2 that promotes fast charge transport rate, and (3) decreased charge recombination caused by the nanoscopic Schottky junctions at the interface of pristine core and hydrogenated shell thus promoting long-life surface charges. The developed H:TiO2 NFs can be helpful for future high performance photocatalysts in environmental applications.

  18. Core II Materials for Rural Agriculture Programs. Units E-H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondo, Ron; And Others

    This curriculum guide includes teaching packets for 21 problem areas to be included in a core curriculum for 10th grade students enrolled in a rural agricultural program. Covered in the four units included in this volume are crop science (harvesting farm crops and growing small grains); soil science and conservation of natural resources…

  19. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood test C2-16 (Run 76)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Akimoto, Hajime; Okubo, Tsutomu; Hojo, Tsuneyuki; Murao, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Jun.

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the result of the upper plenum injection (UPI) test C2-16 (Run 76), which was conducted on October 23, 1984, with the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The CCTF is a 1/21.4 scale model of a 1,100 MWe PWR with four loop active components to provide information on the system and core thermo-hydrodynamics during reflood. The objectives of the test are to investigate the reflood phenomena with single failure UPI condition and to investigate the effect of the asymmetry of UPI on the reflood phenomena. The test was performed with an asymmetric UPI condition at the injection rate simulating single failure of LPCI pumps. It was observed that, (1) a UPI test simulating no LPCI pump failure gave the slightly lower peak clad temperature than a UPI test simulating single LPCI pump failure, indicating that single LPCI pump failure assumption is conserrative for UPI condition, and (2) an asymmetric UPI lead to a higher core water accumulation and then a higher heat transfer coefficient, resultantly a lower peak clad temperature than a symmetric UPI, indicating that asymmetric UPI does not lead to a poorer core cooling than symmetric UPI. (author)

  20. Pronounced Effects of a Triazine Core on Photovoltaic Performance-Efficient Organic Solar Cells Enabled by a PDI Trimer-Based Small Molecular Acceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuwei; Xu, Xiaopeng; Yan, He; Wu, Wenlin; Li, Zuojia; Peng, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    A novel-small molecular acceptor with electron-deficient 1,3,5-triazine as the core and perylene diimides as the arms is developed as the acceptor material for efficient bulk heterojunction organic solar cells with an efficiency of 9.15%. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Nonuniform Effect of Carrier Separation Efficiency and Light Absorption in Type-II Perovskite Nanowire Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiping; He, Jialun; Cao, Yiyan; Kong, Lijing; Zheng, Xuanli; Wu, Yaping; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Shuping; Wu, Zhiming; Kang, Junyong

    2017-03-01

    Coaxial structures exhibit great potential for the application of high-efficiency solar cells due to the novel mechanism of radial charge separation. Here, we intensively investigate the nonuniform effect of carrier separation efficiency (CSE) and light absorption in perovskite-based type-II coaxial nanowire solar cells (ZnO/CH3NH3PbI3). Results show that the CSE rapidly decreases along the radial direction in the shell, and the value at the outer side becomes extremely low for the thick shell. Besides, the position of the main light absorption gradually moves to the outer side with the increase of the shell thickness. As a result, the external quantum efficiency shows a positional dependence with a maximal value close to the border of the nanowire. Eventually, in our case, it is found that the maximal power conversion efficiency of the solar cells reduces from 19.5 to 17.9% under the effect of the nonuniformity of CSE and light absorption. This work provides a basis for the design of high-efficiency solar cells, especially type-II nanowire solar cells.

  2. Solid State Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator for 3-, 4- and 6-Junction Solar Cell Arrays, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I was successful in delivering a complete prototype of the proposed innovation, an LED-based, solid state, large area, pulsed, solar simulator (ssLAPSS)....

  3. Novel highly active Pt/graphene catalyst for cathodes of Cu(II/I)-mediated dye-sensitized solar cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Krýsová, Hana; Janda, Pavel; Tarábková, Hana; Saygili, Y.; Freitag, M.; Zakeeruddin, S. M.; Hagfeldt, A.; Grätzel, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 251, OCT 2017 (2017), s. 167-175 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-07724S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 696656 - GrapheneCore1 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : graphene * platinum * cathode catalyst * dye sensitized solar cell * Cu-complexes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  4. Matérn's hard core models of types I and II with arbitrary compact grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiderlen, Markus; Hörig, Mario

    Matérn's classical hard core models can be interpreted as models obtained from a stationary marked Poisson process by dependent thinning. The marks are balls of fixed radius, and a point is retained when its associated ball does not hit any other balls (type I) or when its random birth time is st...... of this model with the process of intact grains of the dead leaves model and the Stienen model leads to analogous results for the latter....

  5. Evaluation report on CCTF core-II reflood test C2 - 8 (Run 67)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Hajime; Iguchi, Tadashi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio; Okabe, Kazuharu; Sugimoto, Jun.

    1987-01-01

    In order to study the system pressure effect of the core cooling and flow behavior during the reflood phase of a PWR LOCA, a test was performed with CCTF under the system pressure pf 0.15 MPa as a counterpart test of the CCTF test C2-1 (system pressure 0.42 MPa) and the CCTF test C2-4 (system pressure 0.20 MPa). Through the comparisons of results from these three tests, the following conclusions were obtained: (1) The higher system pressure resulted in the lower temperature rise, the shorter turnaround time and the shorter quench time as observed in the CCTF Core-I system pressure effect tests. (2) The higher system pressure resulted in higher core water head, higher upper plenum water head, higher mass flow rate through the primary loops. On the other hand, the higher system pressure resulted in lower downcomer water head and lower pressure drop through the primary loops and the broken cold leg. These system pressure effects on the flow behavior in the primary system are almost the same as observed in the system pressure effect tests in the CCTF Core-I test series. (3) Before the mixture level in the upper plenum reached the level of the hot leg nozzle, the loop flow resistance coefficient of the intact loops was nearly constant regardless of the system pressure. After the mixture level reached the level of the hot leg nozzle, the loop flow resistance coefficient was increased due to the water accumulation in the hot leg piping and the inlet plenum of the steam generator in these tests. (J.P.N.)

  6. Evaluation report on CCTF core-II reflood test C2 - 18 (Run 78)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Akimoto, Hajime; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Jun; Hojo, Tsuneyuki.

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the result of the upper plenum injection (UPI) test C2 - 18 (Run 78), which was conducted on November 13, 1984 with the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The CCTF is a 1/21.4 scale model of a 1,100 MWe PWR with four loop active components to provide information on the system and core thermo-hydrodynamics during reflood phase. The objectives of the test are to investigate the refill behavior with UPI condition and to investigate the reflood behavior with UPI Best-Estimate (BE) condition. The test was performed to simulate refill/reflood behavior with UPI and BE conditions (However, the LPCI flow rate was determined based on single failure of LPCI pumps.). The result of the test showed the followings. (1) Little special phenomena were recognized under UPI and BE conditions in comparison with those under UPI and Evaluation-Model (EM) conditions, although certain special phenoma (i.e. significant fluid oscillation) were recognized under Cold-Leg-Injection (CLI) and BE conditions in comparison with those under CLI and EM conditions. (2) Water inventory in lower plenum increased smoothly due to water injected into both upper plenum and cold leg during refill phase, similarly to that in refill-simulation test with CLI condition. Small difference in refill behavior with UPI condition is the existing of steam condensation in upper plenum, resulting in lower steam binding and higher core cooling during early reflood phase. This indicates the conservatism of UPI against CLI during early reflood phase. (3) The good core-cooling capability was confirmed under UPI and BE conditions. (author)

  7. Atlas of fine structures of dynamic spectra of solar type IV-dm and some type II radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slottje, C.

    1982-01-01

    The author presents an atlas of spectral fine structures of solar radio bursts of types IV and II around 1 m wavelength, as obtained with a multichannel spectrograph at Dwingeloo. The structures form largely a collection of observations of these events during late 1968 through 1974, thus covering almost entirely the declining branch of solar cycle 20. The spectrograph has an extra enhanced contrast output with properties quite different from those of the commonly used swept frequency spectrographs. The corresponding instrumental characteristics and effects are discussed. A classification of fine structures and an analysis of their statistical properties and of those of the pertinent radio events are also given. (Auth.)

  8. Reference core design Mark-I and -II of the experimental, multi-purpose, high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Ryuiti; Hirano, Mitsumasa; Aruga, Takeo; Yasukawa, Sigeru

    1977-10-01

    Reactivity worth of the control rods and power distribution in the initial hot-clean core of reference core design Mark-I and -II have been studied. The need for burnable poison was confirmed, because of the limitations in number, diameter and reactivity worth of the control rods due to structures of pressure vessel and fuel element and to safety of the core. While the initial excess reactivity is reduced by use of the burnable poison, the recovery of core reactivity with burnup of the burnable poison requires a complicated withdrawal sequence of the control rods. The radial power gradient in the core is not large, due to orifice control of the coolant helium flow, effectiveness of the reflector in the small core and continuous distribution of burnup in the core by one-batch refuelling scheme. The local peaking factor in unit orifice regions, therefore, is the most important core design. Control of the axial power distribution is necessary to reduce the maximum fuel temperature and the exponential power distribution peaked toward the inlet of the core is most suitable. However, insertion of the control rods from top of the core disturbs the axial power distribution, so this effect must be considered in design of the withdrawal sequence of control rods. Nuclear properties of the core were revealed from results of the study for the initial hot-clean core. (auth.)

  9. Piezo-Phototronic Effect Enhanced Flexible Solar Cells Based on n-ZnO/p-SnS Core-Shell Nanowire Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Laipan; Wang, Longfei; Xue, Fei; Chen, Libo; Fu, Jianqiang; Feng, Xiaolong; Li, Tianfeng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-01-01

    The piezo-phototronic effect is about the enhanced separation, transport, and recombination of the photogenerated carriers using the piezoelectric polarization charges present in piezoelectric-semiconductor materials. Here, it is presented that the piezo-phototronic effect can be effectively applied to improve the relative conversion efficiency of a flexible solar cell based on n-ZnO/p-SnS core-shell nanowire array for 37.3% under a moderate vertical pressure. The performance of the solar cell can be effectively enhanced by a gentle bending of the device, showing its potential for application in curly geometries. This study not only adds further understanding about the concept of increasing solar energy conversion efficiency via piezo-phototronic effect, but also demonstrates the great potential of piezo-phototronic effect in the application of large-scale, flexible, and lightweight nanowire array solar cells.

  10. Safety analysis and optimization of the core fuel reloading for the Moroccan TRIGA Mark-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nacir, B.; Boulaich, Y.; Chakir, E.; El Bardouni, T.; El Bakkari, B.; El Younoussi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Additional fresh fuel elements must be added to the reactor core. • TRIGA reactor could safely operate around 2 MW power with 12% fuel elements. • Thermal–hydraulic parameters were calculated and the safety margins are respected. • The 12% fuel elements will have no influence on the safety of the reactor. - Abstract: The Moroccan TRIGA MARK II reactor core is loaded with 8.5% in weight of uranium standard fuel elements. Additional fresh fuel elements must periodically be added to the core in order to remedy the observed low power and to return to the initial reactivity excess at the End Of Cycle. 12%-uranium fuel elements are available to relatively improve the short fuel lifetime associated with standard TRIGA elements. These elements have the same dimensions as standards elements, but with different uranium weight. The objective in this study is to demonstrate that the Moroccan TRIGA reactor could safely operate, around 2 MW power, with new configurations containing these 12% fuel elements. For this purpose, different safety related thermal–hydraulic parameters have been calculated in order to ensure that the safety margins are largely respected. Therefore, the PARET model for this TRIGA reactor that was previously developed and combined with the MCNP transport code in order to calculate the 3-D temperature distribution in the core and all the most important parameters like the axial distribution of DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) across the hottest channel. The most important conclusion is that the 12% fuel elements utilization will have no influence on the safety of the reactor while working around 2 MW power especially for configurations based on insertions in C and D-rings

  11. Unveiling the Hot Molecular Core in the Ultracompact H II Region with Extended Emission G12.21-0.10

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, E.; Trinidad, M. A.; Porras, A.; Rodríguez-Rico, C.; Araya, E. D.; Kurtz, S.; Hofner, P.; Nigoche-Netro, A.

    2018-04-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the cometary H II region G12.21-0.10 using the VLA and OVRO. Both radio continuum (0.3, 0.7, 2 and 3.6 cm) and spectral lines of H41α, 13CS(2-1) & (1-0), and NH3(2,2) & (4,4) observations are included. We find two 3 mm continuum peaks toward G12.21-0.10; one of them is spatially coincident with the UC H II region, while the other coincides spatially with a molecular clump. We also find that the 0.7, 2 and 3.6 cm continuum and H41α line are only detected toward the UC H II region, while the 13CS, and NH3 are spatially associated with the molecular clump. Based on the morphology, kinetic temperature (≍86 K), volumetric density (≍1.5×106 cm-3) and linear size (≍0.22 pc) of the molecular clump, we suggest this source is consistent with a hot molecular core.

  12. LIDAR TS for ITER core plasma. Part II: simultaneous two wavelength LIDAR TS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowers, C.; Nielsen, P.; Salzmann, H.

    2017-12-01

    We have shown recently, and in more detail at this conference (Salzmann et al) that the LIDAR approach to ITER core TS measurements requires only two mirrors in the inaccessible port plug area of the machine. This leads to simplified and robust alignment, lower risk of mirror damage by plasma contamination and much simpler calibration, compared with the awkward and vulnerable optical geometry of the conventional imaging TS approach, currently under development by ITER. In the present work we have extended the simulation code used previously to include the case of launching two laser pulses, of different wavelengths, simultaneously in LIDAR geometry. The aim of this approach is to broaden the choice of lasers available for the diagnostic. In the simulation code it is assumed that two short duration (300 ps) laser pulses of different wavelengths, from an Nd:YAG laser are launched through the plasma simultaneously. The temperature and density profiles are deduced in the usual way but from the resulting combined scattered signals in the different spectral channels of the single spectrometer. The spectral response and quantum efficiencies of the detectors used in the simulation are taken from catalogue data for commercially available Hamamatsu MCP-PMTs. The response times, gateability and tolerance to stray light levels of this type of photomultiplier have already been demonstrated in the JET LIDAR system and give sufficient spatial resolution to meet the ITER specification. Here we present the new simulation results from the code. They demonstrate that when the detectors are combined with this two laser, LIDAR approach, the full range of the specified ITER core plasma Te and ne can be measured with sufficient accuracy. So, with commercially available detectors and a simple modification of a Nd:YAG laser similar to that currently being used in the design of the conventional ITER core TS design mentioned above, the ITER requirements can be met.

  13. Evaluation report on SCTF Core-II test S2-19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Akira; Iwamura, Takamichi; Iguchi, Tadashi; Abe, Yutaka; Murao, Yoshio; Adachi, Hiromichi.

    1991-03-01

    Experimental studies using Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) have revealed that the heat transfer enhancement in higher power bundles is mainly governed by the radial power ratio in core during the reflood in PWR-LOCA. As a physical mechanism for the heat transfer enhancement, it can be considered from the experimental evidence that the increase of upward steam flow rate in a higher power bundle which is caused by the higher steam production rate in the bundle gives the higher upward liquid flow rate in the bundle and the increase of the liquid flow rate gives the heat transfer enhancement. In order to develop a mechanistic model for the heat transfer enhancement based on this idea, the following relations should be identified quantitatively: (1) Relation between the steam production rate and the upward liquid flow rate, (2) Cross flow rate above the quench front and (3) Relation between the degree of heat transfer enhancement due to radial power ratio and the amount of increase of upward liquid flow rate. In this report, the above relation (3) was investigated experimentally as a step to develop the mechanistic model using the SCTF where the relation between the radial power ratio and the heat transfer enhancement has been made clear quantitatively. The degree of increase of heat transfer between two forced feed tests with the different flow rate in LPCI period was compared with the degree of heat transfer enhancement under a radial power ratio in the previous SCTF tests. The two forced feed tests were performed under the condition without any significant two-dimensional hydraulic behavior in core. The ratio of the mass flow rate between the two tests was about double. (author)

  14. High Efficiency Quantum Dot III-V Multijunction Solar Cell for Space Power, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are proposing to utilize quantum dots to develop a super high-efficiency multijunction III-V solar cell for space. In metamorphic triple junction space solar...

  15. HOT PLASMA FROM SOLAR ACTIVE-REGION CORES: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE HINODE X-RAY TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelz, J. T. [USRA, 7178 Columbia Gateway Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States); Christian, G. M.; Matheny, P. O., E-mail: jschmelz@usra.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    Mechanisms invoked to heat the solar corona to millions of degrees kelvin involve either magnetic waves or magnetic reconnections. Turbulence in the convection zone produces MHD waves, which travel upward and dissipate. Photospheric motions continuously build up magnetic energy, which is released through magnetic reconnection. In this paper, we concentrate on hot non-flaring plasma with temperatures of 5 MK <  T  < 10 MK because it is one of the few observables for which wave and reconnection models make different predictions. Wave models predict no (or little) hot plasma, whereas reconnection models predict it, although in amounts that are challenging to detect with current instrumentation. We used data from the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). We requested a special XRT observing sequence, which cycled through the thickest XRT filter several times per hour so we could average these images and improve the signal-to-noise. We did differential emission measure (DEM) analysis using the time-averaged thick-filter data as well as all available channels from both the XRT and AIA for regions observed on 2014 December 11. Whereas our earlier work was only able to determine that plasma with a temperature greater than 5 MK was present , we are now able to find a well-constrained DEM distribution. We have therefore added a strong observational constraint that must be explained by any viable coronal heating model. Comparing state-of-the-art wave and reconnection model predictions, we can conclude that reconnection is heating the hot plasma in these active regions.

  16. Geomagnetic storm related to intense solar radio burst type II and III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The strong energetic particles ejected during sun's activity will propagate towards earth and contribute to solar radio bursts. These solar radio bursts can be detected using CALLISTO system. The open website of the NASA provides us the data including CALLISTO, TESIS, solar monitor, SOHO and space weather. The type ...

  17. Development of advanced nuclear core analysis system applicable to various reactor types (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Kunio

    2003-03-01

    A 900 group cross section library based on the specification determined last year was produced for 27 nuclei of the fast reactor benchmark problem evaluated in nuclear data file JENDL-3.2. In addition, the new SLAROM code, which has been developed as an advanced detail analysis system, was revised so as to make cell calculations effectively with the above 900 group library. Furthermore, new functions were added to the SLAROM so that the SLAROM evaluates assembly parameters using effective cross sections derived by the SLAROM and produces any condensed effective cross section set for core performance analysis. With the 900 group cross section library and the revised SALROM, three cell calculations for fast and medium neutron speed reactors having different neutron spectrum were performed, and the results were compared with those calculated by the continuos energy Monte Carlo code MVP. By the comparisons, it is concluded that the newly revised SLAROM and a 900 group cross section library give accuracy comparable to MVP for predicting core performances. (author)

  18. Variation of Supergranule Parameters with Solar Cycles: Results from Century-long Kodaikanal Digitized Ca ii K Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Subhamoy; Mandal, Sudip; Banerjee, Dipankar, E-mail: dipu@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India)

    2017-06-01

    The Ca ii K spectroheliograms spanning over a century (1907–2007) from Kodaikanal Solar Observatory, India, have recently been digitized and calibrated. Applying a fully automated algorithm (which includes contrast enhancement and the “Watershed method”) to these data, we have identified the supergranules and calculated the associated parameters, such as scale, circularity, and fractal dimension. We have segregated the quiet and active regions and obtained the supergranule parameters separately for these two domains. In this way, we have isolated the effect of large-scale and small-scale magnetic fields on these structures and find a significantly different behavior of the supergranule parameters over solar cycles. These differences indicate intrinsic changes in the physical mechanism behind the generation and evolution of supergranules in the presence of small-scale and large-scale magnetic fields. This also highlights the need for further studies using solar dynamo theory along with magneto-convection models.

  19. Diffusion effects on the line intensities of He I and He II in the solar transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shine, R.; Gerola, H.; Linsky, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    A heuristic treatment of diffusion in the solar chromosphere-corona transition region is developed. Diffusion becomes increasingly important with steeper temperature gradients, in active and quiet regions relative to coronal holes, and with increasing excitation potential. Numerical calculations are made for the resonance lines of He i and He ii and show that diffusion can enhance these lines. Thus the helium lines may appear relatively weak in coronal holes due to a weakening of the enhancement mechanism. Most transition region lines will be less affected by diffusion than He i or He ii

  20. Highly efficient photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to hydrogen by WO3/BiVO4 core-shell heterojunction nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosar, Sonya; Pihosh, Yuriy; Bekarevich, Raman; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kazoe, Yutaka; Kitamori, Takehiko; Tosa, Masahiro; Tarasov, Alexey B.; Goodilin, Eugene A.; Struk, Yaroslav M.; Kondo, Michio; Turkevych, Ivan

    2018-04-01

    Photocatalytic splitting of water under solar light has proved itself to be a promising approach toward the utilization of solar energy and the generation of environmentally friendly fuel in a form of hydrogen. In this work, we demonstrate highly efficient solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 7.7% by photovoltaic-photoelectrochemical (PV-PEC) device based on hybrid MAPbI3 perovskite PV cell and WO3/BiVO4 core-shell nanorods PEC cell tandem that utilizes spectral splitting approach. Although BiVO4 is characterized by intrinsically high recombination rate of photogenerated carriers, this is not an issue for WO3/BiVO4 core-shell nanorods, where highly conductive WO3 cores are combined with extremely thin absorber BiVO4 shell layer. Since the BiVO4 layer is thinner than the characteristic carrier diffusion length, the photogenerated charge carriers are separated at the WO3/BiVO4 heterojunction before their recombination. Also, such architecture provides sufficient optical thickness even for extremely thin BiVO4 layer due to efficient light trapping in the core-shell WO3/BiVO4 nanorods with high aspect ratio. We also demonstrate that the concept of fill factor can be used to compare I-V characteristics of different photoanodes regarding their optimization for PV/PEC tandem devices.

  1. Observation of solar radio bursts of type II and III at kilometer wavelengths from Prognoz-8 during STIP Interval XII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinter, S.; Kecskemety, K.; Kudela, K.

    1982-04-01

    Type II and type III radio events were observed at low frequencies (2.16 MHz to 114 kHz) by the Prognoz-8 satellite during the period of STIP Interval XII in April and May, 1981, respectively. This review covers briefly a chronology of the sub-megahertz radio events, and where possible their association with both groundbased radio observations and solar flare. (author)

  2. Relative translucency of six all-ceramic systems. Part II: core and veneer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Michael J; Aquilino, Steven A; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Haselton, Debra R; Stanford, Clark M; Vargas, Marcos A

    2002-07-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM All-ceramic core materials with various strengthening compositions have a range of translucencies. It is unknown whether translucency differs when all-ceramic materials are fabricated similarly to the clinical restoration with a veneered core material. This study compared the translucency of 6 all-ceramic materials veneered and glazed at clinically appropriate thicknesses. Core specimens (n = 5 per group) of Empress dentin, Empress 2 dentin, In-Ceram Alumina, In-Ceram Spinell, In-Ceram Zirconia, and Procera AllCeram were fabricated as described in Part I of this study and veneered with their corresponding dentin porcelain to a final thickness of 1.47 +/- 0.01 mm. These specimens were compared with veneered Vitadur Alpha opaque dentin (as a standard), a clear glass disc (positive control), and a high-noble metal-ceramic alloy (Porc. 52 SF) veneered with Vitadur Omega dentin (negative control). Specimen reflectance was measured with an integrating sphere attached to a spectrophotometer across the visible spectrum (380 to 700 nm); 0-degree illumination and diffuse viewing geometry were used. Measurements were repeated after a glazing cycle. Contrast ratios were calculated from the luminous reflectance (Y) of the specimens with a black (Yb) and a white backing (Yw) to give Yb/Yw with CIE illuminant D65 and a 2-degree observer function (0.0 = transparent, 1.0 = opaque). One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple-comparison test were used to analyze the data (P<.05). Significant differences in contrast ratios were found among the ceramic systems tested when they were veneered (P<.0001) and after the glazing cycle (P<.0001). Significant changes in contrast ratios (P<.0001) also were identified when the veneered specimens were glazed. Within the limitations of this study, a range of translucency was identified in the veneered all-ceramic systems tested. Such variability may affect their ability to match natural teeth. The glazing cycle resulted

  3. Assessment of CANDU physics codes using experimental data - II: CANDU core physics measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Jeong, Chang Joon; Choi, Hang Bok

    2001-11-01

    Benchmark calculations of the advanced CANDU reactor analysis tools (WIMS-AECL, SHETAN and RFSP) and the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B have been performed using Wolsong Units 2 and 3 Phase-B measurement data. In this study, the benchmark calculations have been done for the criticality, boron worth, reactivity device worth, reactivity coefficient, and flux scan. For the validation of the WIMS-AECL/SHETANRFSP code system, the lattice parameters of the fuel channel were generated by the WIMS-AECL code, and incremental cross sections of reactivity devices and structural material were generated by the SHETAN code. The results have shown that the criticality is under-predicted by -4 mk. The reactivity device worths are generally consistent with the measured data except for the strong absorbers such as shutoff rod and mechanical control absorber. The heat transport system temperature coefficient and flux distributions are in good agreement with the measured data. However, the moderator temperature coefficient has shown a relatively large error, which could be caused by the incremental cross-section generation methodology for the reactivity device. For the MCNP-4B benchmark calculation, cross section libraries were newly generated from ENDF/B-VI release 3 through the NJOY97.114 data processing system and a three-dimensional full core model was developed. The simulation results have shown that the criticality is estimated within 4 mk and the estimated reactivity worth of the control devices are generally consistent with the measurement data, which implies that the MCNP code is valid for CANDU core analysis. In the future, therefore, the MCNP code could be used as a reference tool to benchmark design and analysis codes for the advanced fuels for which experimental data are not available

  4. Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 Uncertainty Analysis-Exploration of Core Melt Progression Uncertain Parameters-Volume II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brooks, Dusty Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted an uncertainty analysi s (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) accident progression wit h the MELCOR code. Volume I of the 1F1 UA discusses the physical modeling details and time history results of the UA. Volume II of the 1F1 UA discusses the statistical viewpoint. The model used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The goal of this work was to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core damage progression behavior and its effect on key figures - of - merit (e.g., hydrogen production, fraction of intact fuel, vessel lower head failure) and in doing so assess the applicability of traditional sensitivity analysis techniques .

  5. Study and application of ANISN and DOT-II nuclear cores in reactor physics problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Artur Flavio

    1980-01-01

    To solve time-independent neutrons and/or gamma rays transport problems in nuclear reactors, two codes available at IPEN were studied and applied to solve benchmark problems. The ANISN code solves the one-dimensional Boltzmann transport equation for neutrons or gamma rays, in plane, spherical, or cylindrical geometries. The DOT-II code solves the same equation in two-dimensional space for plane, cylindrical and circular geometries. General anisotropic scattering allowed in both codes. Moreover, pointwise convergence criteria, and alternate step function difference equations are also used in order to remove the oscillating flux distributions, sometimes found in discrete ordinates solutions. Basic theories and numerical techniques used in these codes are studied and summarized. Benchmark problems have been solved using these codes. Comparisons of the results show that both codes can be used with confidence in the analysis of nuclear problems. (author)

  6. Efficient simultaneous removal of U(VI) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution using core-shell nZVI@SA/CMC-Ca beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuhong Hu; Xiaoyan Lin; Wenhui Zhao; Ministry of Education, Sichuan; Xuegang Luo

    2018-01-01

    Core-shell nanoscale zero-valent iron@alginate/carboxymethyl cellulose sodium composite loaded with calcium (nZVI@SA/CMC-Ca) beads were synthesized in this study using coaxial electronic injection method. The adsorbent structure was characterized via FT-IR, SEM, EDX and XPS. The adsorption behavior of U(VI) and Cu(II) on core-shell nZVI@SA/CMC-Ca beads was studied under various experimental parameters like pH, contact time and temperature. The isotherm and the kinetic data, pertaining to the adsorption of U(VI) and Cu(II) by core-shell nZVI@SA/CMC-Ca beads obeyed both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms model and the pseudo-second-order kinetics model, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters revealed the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the adsorption. The experiment of regeneration and reusability suggested core-shell nZVI@SA/CMC-Ca bead was a regenerated material. (author)

  7. Electron internal transport barrier formation and dynamics in the plasma core of the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, T [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Krupnik, L [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Dreval, N [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Melnikov, A [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow, Russia (Russian Federation); Khrebtov, S M [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Hidalgo, C [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Milligen, B van [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Castejon, F [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); AscasIbar, E [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion Euratom-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Eliseev, L [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow, Russia (Russian Federation); Chmyga, A A [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Komarov, A D [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Kozachok, A S [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Tereshin, V [Institute of Plasma Physics, NSC ' KIPT' , Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2004-01-01

    The influence of magnetic topology on the formation of electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) has been studied experimentally in electron cyclotron heated plasmas in the stellarator TJ-II. e-ITB formation is characterized by an increase in core electron temperature and plasma potential. The positive radial electric field increases by a factor of 3 in the central plasma region when an e-ITB forms. The experiments reported demonstrate that the formation of an e-ITB depends on the magnetic configuration. Calculations of the modification of the rotational transform due to plasma current lead to the interpretation that the formation of an e-ITB can be triggered by positioning a low order rational surface close to the plasma core region. In configurations without any central low order rational, no barrier is formed for any accessible value of heating power. Different mechanisms associated with neoclassical/turbulent bifurcations and kinetic effects are put forward to explain the impact of magnetic topology on radial electric fields and confinement.

  8. CALTECH CORE-COLLAPSE PROJECT (CCCP) OBSERVATIONS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: EVIDENCE FOR THREE DISTINCT PHOTOMETRIC SUBTYPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Cenko, S. Bradley; Becker, Adam B. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Fox, Derek B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Leonard, Douglas C. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Moon, Dae-Sik [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Sand, David J. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Soderberg, Alicia M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kiewe, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Scheps, Raphael [King' s College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1ST (United Kingdom); Birenbaum, Gali [12 Amos St, Ramat Chen, Ramat Gan 52233 (Israel); Chamudot, Daniel [20 Chen St, Petach Tikvah 49520 (Israel); Zhou, Jonathan, E-mail: iair.arcavi@weizmann.ac.il [101 Dunster Street, Box 398, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    We present R-band light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe) from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). With the exception of interacting (Type IIn) SNe and rare events with long rise times, we find that most light curve shapes belong to one of three apparently distinct classes: plateau, slowly declining, and rapidly declining events. The last class is composed solely of Type IIb SNe which present similar light curve shapes to those of SNe Ib, suggesting, perhaps, similar progenitor channels. We do not find any intermediate light curves, implying that these subclasses are unlikely to reflect variance of continuous parameters, but rather might result from physically distinct progenitor systems, strengthening the suggestion of a binary origin for at least some stripped SNe. We find a large plateau luminosity range for SNe IIP, while the plateau lengths seem rather uniform at approximately 100 days. As analysis of additional CCCP data goes on and larger samples are collected, demographic studies of core-collapse SNe will likely continue to provide new constraints on progenitor scenarios.

  9. SIMMER-II: A computer program for LMFBR disrupted core analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohl, W.R.; Luck, L.B.

    1990-06-01

    SIMMER-2 (Version 12) is a computer program to predict the coupled neutronic and fluid-dynamics behavior of liquid-metal fast reactors during core-disruptive accident transients. The modeling philosophy is based on the use of general, but approximate, physics to represent interactions of accident phenomena and regimes rather than a detailed representation of specialized situations. Reactor neutronic behavior is predicted by solving space (r,z), energy, and time-dependent neutron conservation equations (discrete ordinates transport or diffusion). The neutronics and the fluid dynamics are coupled via temperature- and background-dependent cross sections and the reactor power distribution. The fluid-dynamics calculation solves multicomponent, multiphase, multifield equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation in (r,z) or (x,y) geometry. A structure field with nine density and five energy components; a liquid field with eight density and six energy components; and a vapor field with six density and on energy component are coupled by exchange functions representing a modified-dispersed flow regime with a zero-dimensional intra-cell structure model.

  10. Low-energy absorption and luminescence of higher plant photosystem II core samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Joseph L.; Smith, Paul J.; Pace, Ron J.; Krausz, Elmars

    2007-01-01

    The charge-separating state of PSII has been recently assigned as a homogeneously broadened band peaking at 705 nm. The possibility of observing emission due to luminescence from the charge-separating state was investigated. Emission from the charge-separating state is predicted to be both broad and substantially Stokes shifted. Our PSII cores show an easily observable and broad emission peaking near 735 nm when excited at 707 nm and beyond for temperatures below 100 K as well as the well-known F685 and F695 nm emission when excited at 633 nm. However, the 735 nm emission bears a close correspondence to that previously reported for the light harvesting pigment of photosystem I (PSI), LHCI-730, and we attribute our observed emission to a minor contamination of our sample with this protein. High sensitivity circular dichroism (CD) spectra establish that LHCI and/or PSI contamination of our samples does not contribute significantly to the absorption seen in the 700-730 nm region. Furthermore, systematic illumination-induced absorption changes seen in this region are shown to quantitatively track with charge separation and the subsequent secondary acceptor plastoquinone (Q A ) acceptor anion formation. These results confirm that absorption in the 700-730 nm region is associated with the reaction centre of active PSII

  11. Validation of the REBUS-3/RCT methodologies for EBR-II core-follow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    One of the many tasks to be completed at EBR-2/FCF (Fuel Cycle Facility) regarding fuel cycle closure for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is to develop and install the systems to be used for fissile material accountancy and control. The IFR fuel cycle and pyrometallurgical process scheme determine the degree of actinide of actinide buildup in the reload fuel assemblies. Inventories of curium, americium and neptunium in the fuel will affect the radiation and thermal environmental conditions at the fuel fabrication stations, the chemistry of reprocessing, and the neutronic performance of the core. Thus, it is important that validated calculational tools be put in place for accurately determining isotopic mass and neutronic inputs to FCF for both operational and material control and accountancy purposes. The primary goal of this work is to validate the REBUS-2/RCT codes as tools which can adequately compute the burnup and isotopic distribution in binary- and ternary-fueled Mark-3, Mark-4, and Mark-5 subassemblies. 6 refs

  12. SIMMER-II: A computer program for LMFBR disrupted core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, W.R.; Luck, L.B.

    1990-06-01

    SIMMER-2 (Version 12) is a computer program to predict the coupled neutronic and fluid-dynamics behavior of liquid-metal fast reactors during core-disruptive accident transients. The modeling philosophy is based on the use of general, but approximate, physics to represent interactions of accident phenomena and regimes rather than a detailed representation of specialized situations. Reactor neutronic behavior is predicted by solving space (r,z), energy, and time-dependent neutron conservation equations (discrete ordinates transport or diffusion). The neutronics and the fluid dynamics are coupled via temperature- and background-dependent cross sections and the reactor power distribution. The fluid-dynamics calculation solves multicomponent, multiphase, multifield equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation in (r,z) or (x,y) geometry. A structure field with nine density and five energy components; a liquid field with eight density and six energy components; and a vapor field with six density and on energy component are coupled by exchange functions representing a modified-dispersed flow regime with a zero-dimensional intra-cell structure model

  13. Electricity from photovoltaic solar cells: Flat-Plate Solar Array Project final Report. Volume II: Silicon material

    OpenAIRE

    Lutwack, R.

    1986-01-01

    The Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project, funded by the U.S. Government and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was formed in 1975 to develop the module/array technology needed to attain widespread terrestrial use of photovoltaics by 1985. To accomplish this, the FSA Project established and managed an Industry, University, and Federal Government Team to perform the needed research and development. The goal of the Silicon Material Task, a part of the FSA Project, was to develop and ...

  14. Chlorine-induced assembly of a cationic coordination cage with a μ5-carbonato-bridged Mn(II)24 core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ke-Cai; Jiang, Fei-Long; Gai, Yan-Li; Yuan, Da-Qiang; Han, Dong; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Shu-Quan; Hong, Mao-Chun

    2012-04-27

    Chlorine caged in! The chlorine-induced assembly of six shuttlecock-like tetranuclear Mn(II) building blocks generated in situ based on p-tert-butylthiacalix[4]arene and facial anions gave rise to a novel truncated distorted octahedral cationic coordination cage with a μ(5)-carbonato-bridged Mn(II)(24) core. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood tests C2-AC1 (run 51) and C2-4 (run 62)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Jun; Iguchi, Tadashi; Murao, Yoshio

    1984-02-01

    A reflood test program has been conducted at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using large scale test facilities named Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) and Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF). The present report describes the effect of the initial clad temperature i.e., the initial stored energy on reflood phenomena observed in CCTF Core-II tests C2-ACl and C2-4. The peak clad temperatures of tests C2-ACl and C2-4 were 863 K and 1069 K, respectively at reflood initiation. With higher initial clad temperature, obtained were lower water accumulation in the core and upper plenum, and higher loop mass flow rate in an early reflood transient due to larger heat release of the stored energy in the core. Core inlet flow conditions were only affected shortly after the reflood initiation, causing the suppressed flooding rate and the larger U-tube flow oscillation between the core and the downcomer. In the core, with higher initial clad temperature, slower quench front propagation and higher turnaround temperature were observed. Responses to a higher initial clad temperature were similar to those observed in CCTF Core-I and FLECHT tests. Thus, the lower temperature rise with higher initial clad temperature was experimentally confirmed. The importance of higher flooding rate at initial period was analytically shown for further decreasing the temperature rise. (author)

  16. Intermediate-Sized Conjugated Donor Molecules for Organic Solar Cells: Comparison of Benzodithiophene and Benzobisthiazole-Based Cores

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Siyuan

    2017-09-05

    Two intermediate-sized donor molecules, BBTz-X and BDT-X, have been synthesized by the Stille coupling between 4-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-6-(trimethylstannyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophen-2-yl)-7-(5′-hexyl-[2,2′-bithiophen]-5-yl)-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine and either 4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)-2,6-diiodobenzo[1,2-d:4,5-d′]bis(thiazole) or 2,6-dibromo-4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene, respectively. Both oxidation and reduction potentials for BBTz-X are anodically shifted relative to those for BDT-X, but the oxidation potential is more sensitive to the identity of the core; this is consistent with what is seen for DFT-calculated HOMO and LUMO energies and with a slightly blue-shifted absorption maximum for BBTz-X. Although DFT calculations, along with crystal structures of related compounds, suggest more planar molecular structures for BBTz-X than for BDT-X, film structures and the effects of various annealing processes on these films, as revealed by GIWAXS, are similar. The performance of BDT-X:PC61BM bulk-heterojunction solar cells is more sensitive to annealing conditions than that of BBTz-X:PC61BM cells, but under appropriate conditions, both yield power conversion efficiencies of >7%.

  17. Intermediate-Sized Conjugated Donor Molecules for Organic Solar Cells: Comparison of Benzodithiophene and Benzobisthiazole-Based Cores

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Siyuan; Zhang, Junxiang; Abdelsamie, Maged; Shi, Qinqin; Zhang, Yadong; Parker, Timothy C.; Jucov, Evgheni V.; Timofeeva, Tatiana V.; Amassian, Aram; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Blakey, Simon B.; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R.

    2017-01-01

    Two intermediate-sized donor molecules, BBTz-X and BDT-X, have been synthesized by the Stille coupling between 4-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-6-(trimethylstannyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophen-2-yl)-7-(5′-hexyl-[2,2′-bithiophen]-5-yl)-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine and either 4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)-2,6-diiodobenzo[1,2-d:4,5-d′]bis(thiazole) or 2,6-dibromo-4,8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene, respectively. Both oxidation and reduction potentials for BBTz-X are anodically shifted relative to those for BDT-X, but the oxidation potential is more sensitive to the identity of the core; this is consistent with what is seen for DFT-calculated HOMO and LUMO energies and with a slightly blue-shifted absorption maximum for BBTz-X. Although DFT calculations, along with crystal structures of related compounds, suggest more planar molecular structures for BBTz-X than for BDT-X, film structures and the effects of various annealing processes on these films, as revealed by GIWAXS, are similar. The performance of BDT-X:PC61BM bulk-heterojunction solar cells is more sensitive to annealing conditions than that of BBTz-X:PC61BM cells, but under appropriate conditions, both yield power conversion efficiencies of >7%.

  18. Model Solar Energy Training Program II. Final Report, July 1, 1981-June 30, 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talcott Mountain Science Center, Avon, CT.

    Trained personnel will be needed in the future to install solar energy heating and hot water systems, and public school vocational education teachers will be needed to train these technicians. A project to train high school vocational teachers so that they can teach their students about solar energy concepts, manufacturing techniques, testing, and…

  19. Blue-wing enhancement of the chromospheric Mg II h and k lines in a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tei, Akiko; Sakaue, Takahito; Okamoto, Takenori J.; Kawate, Tomoko; Heinzel, Petr; UeNo, Satoru; Asai, Ayumi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2018-05-01

    We performed coordinated observations of AR 12205, which showed a C-class flare on 2014 November 11, with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the Domeless Solar Telescope (DST) at Hida Observatory. Using spectral data in the Si IV 1403 Å, C II 1335 Å, and Mg II h and k lines from IRIS and the Ca II K, Ca II 8542 Å, and Hα lines from DST, we investigated a moving flare kernel during the flare. In the Mg II h line, the leading edge of the flare kernel showed an intensity enhancement in the blue wing and a smaller intensity of the blue-side peak (h2v) than that of the red-side one (h2r). The blueshift lasted for 9-48 s with a typical speed of 10.1 ± 2.6 km s-1, which was followed by a high intensity and a large redshift with a speed of up to 51 km s-1 detected in the Mg II h line. The large redshift was a common property for all six lines, but the blueshift prior to it was found only in the Mg II lines. Cloud modeling of the Mg II h line suggests that the blue-wing enhancement with such a peak difference could have been caused by a chromospheric-temperature (cool) upflow. We discuss a scenario in which an upflow of cool plasma is lifted up by expanding hot plasma owing to the deep penetration of non-thermal electrons into the chromosphere. Furthermore, we found that the blueshift persisted without any subsequent redshift in the leading edge of the flare kernel during its decaying phase. The cause of such a long-lasting blueshift is also discussed.

  20. Influence of Nonfused Cores on the Photovoltaic Performance of Linear Triphenylamine-Based Hole-Transporting Materials for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yungen; Wang, Zhihui; Liang, Mao; Cheng, Hua; Li, Mengyuan; Liu, Liyuan; Wang, Baiyue; Wu, Jinhua; Prasad Ghimire, Raju; Wang, Xuda; Sun, Zhe; Xue, Song; Qiao, Qiquan

    2018-05-18

    The core plays a crucial role in achieving high performance of linear hole transport materials (HTMs) toward the perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Most studies focused on the development of fused heterocycles as cores for HTMs. Nevertheless, nonfused heterocycles deserve to be studied since they can be easily synthesized. In this work, we reported a series of low-cost triphenylamine HTMs (M101-M106) with different nonfused cores. Results concluded that the introduced core has a significant influence on conductivity, hole mobility, energy level, and solubility of linear HTMs. M103 and M104 with nonfused oligothiophene cores are superior to other HTMs in terms of conductivity, hole mobility, and surface morphology. PSCs based on M104 exhibited the highest power conversion efficiency of 16.50% under AM 1.5 sun, which is comparable to that of spiro-OMeTAD (16.67%) under the same conditions. Importantly, the employment of M104 is highly economical in terms of the cost of synthesis as compared to that of spiro-OMeTAD. This work demonstrated that nonfused heterocycles, such as oligothiophene, are promising cores for high performance of linear HTMs toward PSCs.

  1. Performance analysis of nanodisk and core/shell/shell-nanowire type III-Nitride heterojunction solar cell for efficient energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routray, S. R.; Lenka, T. R.

    2017-11-01

    Now-a-days III-Nitride nanowires with axial (nanodisk) and radial (core/shell/shell-nanowire) junctions are two unique and potential methods for solar energy harvesting adopted by worldwide researchers. In this paper, polarization behavior of GaN/InGaN/GaN junction and its effect on carrier dynamics of nanodisk and CSS-nanowire type solar cells are intensively studied and compared with its planar counterpart by numerical simulations using commercially available Victory TCAD. It is observed that CSS-NW with hexagonal geometrical shapes are robust to detrimental impact of polarization charges and could be good enough to accelerate carrier collection efficiency as compared to nanodisk and planar solar cells. This numerical study provides an innovative aspect of fundamental device physics with respect to polarization charges in CSS-NW and nanodisk type junction towards photovoltaic applications. The internal quantum efficiencies (IQE) are also discussed to evaluate carrier collection mechanisms and recombination losses in each type of junctions of solar cell. Finally, it is interesting to observe a maximum conversion efficiency of 6.46% with 91.6% fill factor from n-GaN/i-In0.1Ga0.9N/p-GaN CSS-nanowire solar cell with an optimized thickness of 180 nm InGaN layer under one Sun AM1.5 illumination.

  2. Towards global consensus on core outcomes for hidradenitis suppurativa research: an update from the HISTORIC consensus meetings I and II*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlacius, L.; Garg, A.; Ingram, J.R.; Villumsen, B.; Riis, P. Theut; Gottlieb, A.B.; Merola, J.F.; Dellavalle, R.; Ardon, C.; Baba, R.; Bechara, F.G.; Cohen, A.D.; Daham, N.; Davis, M.; Emtestam, L.; Fernández-Peñas, P.; Filippelli, M.; Gibbons, A.; Grant, T.; Guilbault, S.; Gulliver, S.; Harris, C; Harvent, C.; Houston, K.; Kirby, J.S.; Matusiak, L.; Mehdizadeh, A.; Mojica, T.; Okun, M.; Orgill, D.; Pallack, L.; Parks-Miller, A.; Prens, E.P.; Randell, S.; Rogers, C.; Rosen, C.F.; Choon, S.E.; van der Zee, H.H.; Christensen, R.; Jemec, G.B.E.

    2018-01-01

    Summary Background A core outcomes set (COS) is an agreed minimum set of outcomes that should be measured and reported in all clinical trials for a specific condition. Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) has no agreed-upon COS. A central aspect in the COS development process is to identify a set of candidate outcome domains from a long list of items. Our long list had been developed from patient interviews, a systematic review of the literature and a healthcare professional survey, and initial votes had been cast in two e-Delphi surveys. In this manuscript, we describe two in-person consensus meetings of Delphi participants designed to ensure an inclusive approach to generation of domains from related items. Objectives To consider which items from a long list of candidate items to exclude and which to cluster into outcome domains. Methods The study used an international and multistakeholder approach, involving patients, dermatologists, surgeons, the pharmaceutical industry and medical regulators. The study format was a combination of formal presentations, small group work based on nominal group theory and a subsequent online confirmation survey. Results Forty-one individuals from 13 countries and four continents participated. Nine items were excluded and there was consensus to propose seven domains: disease course, physical signs, HS-specific quality of life, satisfaction, symptoms, pain and global assessments. Conclusions The HISTORIC consensus meetings I and II will be followed by further e-Delphi rounds to finalize the core domain set, building on the work of the in-person consensus meetings. PMID:29080368

  3. Type II GaSb/GaAs quantum dot/ring stacks with extended photoresponse for efficient solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrington, Peter James, E-mail: p.carrington@lancaster.ac.uk [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Mahajumi, Abu Syed [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Wagener, Magnus C.; Botha, Johannes Reinhardt [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Zhuang Qian; Krier, Anthony [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    We report on the fabrication of GaAs based p-i-n solar cells containing 5 and 10 layers of type II GaSb quantum rings grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Solar cells containing quantum rings show improved efficiency at longer wavelengths into the near-IR extending up to 1500 nm and show enhanced short-circuit current under 1 sun illumination compared to a GaAs control cell. A reduction in the open-circuit voltage is observed due to the build-up of internal strain. The MBE growth, formation and photoluminescence of single and stacked layers of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings are also presented.

  4. Type II GaSb/GaAs quantum dot/ring stacks with extended photoresponse for efficient solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, Peter James; Mahajumi, Abu Syed; Wagener, Magnus C.; Botha, Johannes Reinhardt; Zhuang Qian; Krier, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of GaAs based p–i–n solar cells containing 5 and 10 layers of type II GaSb quantum rings grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Solar cells containing quantum rings show improved efficiency at longer wavelengths into the near-IR extending up to 1500 nm and show enhanced short-circuit current under 1 sun illumination compared to a GaAs control cell. A reduction in the open-circuit voltage is observed due to the build-up of internal strain. The MBE growth, formation and photoluminescence of single and stacked layers of GaSb/GaAs quantum rings are also presented.

  5. KNK II, third core: Design Report of the breeder assemblies NR-230R, NR-231R, NR-233D and NR-234D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricken, E.

    1988-07-01

    The report describes the blanket assemblies of the third core of KNK II and their operational behavior. The assemblies and their individual components are described and the design criteria, design methods and design results are presented. With the help of enveloping proofs the respectation of the design targets up to the foreseen residence time of 720 equivalent full-power days is evidenced [de

  6. Two emissive-magnetic composite platforms for Hg(II) sensing and removal: The combination of magnetic core, silica molecular sieve and rhodamine chemosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hanping; Liu, Zhongshou

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a composite sensing platform for Hg(II) optical sensing and removal was designed and reported. A core-shell structure was adopted, using magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as the core, silica molecular sieve MCM-41 as the shell, respectively. Two rhodamine derivatives were synthesized as chemosensor and covalently immobilized into MCM-41 tunnels. Corresponding composite samples were characterized with SEM/TEM images, XRD analysis, IR spectra, thermogravimetry and N2 adsorption/desorption analysis, which confirmed their core-shell structure. Their emission was increased by Hg(II), showing emission turn on effect. High selectivity, linear working curves and recyclability were obtained from these composite samples.

  7. Solar--geophysical data number 410, October 1978. Part II. (Comprehensive reports). Data for April 1978--March 1978 and miscellanea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, H.E.

    1978-10-01

    This comprehensive report for April 1978, March 1978 and Miscellaneous data provides data on active regions, synoptic solar maps, solar flares, solar radio waves, energetic solar particles and plasma, synoptic chart, abbreviated calendar record, regional flare index, solar x-ray radiation, cosmic rays, energetic solar particles and plasma for March 1978 and solar flares for February 1978

  8. Proceedings of the second workshop on thermal-non-thermal interactions in solar flares [TNT-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, K.J.H.

    1989-09-01

    The Second Workshop on the theme of Thermal-Non-thermal Interactions in Solar Flares (TNT-II) was held at Somerville College, University of Oxford, England, during the week of April 10-14, 1989. The keynote address, gave a view of the problems still outstanding with regard to soft and hard X-ray observations of flares. The gathering broke up into four subgroups. The subjects under discussion were: large-scale magnetic field phenomena, flare dynamics, energy release and deposition, and global energy balance. (author)

  9. Novel Materials that Enhance Efficiency and Radiation Resistance of Solar Cells, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecrafts rely on arrays of solar cells to generate electrical power. It is an on-going challenge to maximize electrical power available to spacecraft while...

  10. Affordable, Lightweight, Compactly Stowable, High Strength / Stiffness Lander Solar Array, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems, Inc. (DSS) has developed a next-generation high performance solar array system specifically for NASA's future Lander and sample return...

  11. High-Performance Elastically Self-Deployed Roll-Out Solar Array (ROSA), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems (DSS) has developed an ultra-lightweight elastically self-deployable roll-out solar array (ROSA) structural platform that when combined with...

  12. Development of Advanced Anti-Reflection Coatings for High Performance Solar Energy Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MicroLink Devices will increase the efficiency of multi-junction solar cells by designing and demonstrating advanced anti-reflection coatings (ARCs) that will...

  13. TRUSSELATOR - On-Orbit Fabrication of High Performance Support Structures for Solar Arrays, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Trusselator technology will enable on-orbit fabrication of support structures for high-power solar arrays and large antennas, achieving order-of-magnitude...

  14. Design and Analysis Tools for Deployable Solar Array Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large, lightweight, deployable solar array structures have been identified as a key enabling technology for NASA with analysis and design of these structures being...

  15. Solar desalination using humidification-dehumidification processes. Part II. An experimental investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nafey, A.S.; Fath, H.E.S.; El-Helaby, S.O.; Soliman, A.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a humidification-dehumidification desalination (HDD) process using solar energy at the weather conditions of Suez City, Egypt, is presented. A test rig is designed and constructed to conduct this investigation under different environmental and operating conditions. The test rig consists of a solar water heater (concentrator solar collector type), solar air heater (flat plate solar collector type), humidifier tower and dehumidifier exchanger. Different variables are examined including the feed water flow rate, the air flow rate, the cooling water flow rate in the dehumidifier and the weather conditions. Comparisons between the experimental results and other published results are presented. It is found that the results of the developed mathematical model by the same authors are in good agreement with the experimental results. The tested results show that the productivity of the system is strongly affected by the saline water temperature at the inlet to the humidifier, dehumidifier cooling water flow rate, air flow rate and solar intensity. The wind speed and ambient temperature variation were found to have a very small effect on the system productivity. A general correlation is developed to predict the unit productivity under different operating conditions. The results of this correlation have a reasonable confidence level (maximum error ±6%)

  16. Solar center-limb variation of the Ca II K line and the Wilson-Bappu effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engvold, O.; Marstad, N.C.

    1983-01-01

    New observations of the quiet Sun Ca II K line center-to-limb (C-L) have been made. The separation of the K 2 intensity peaks, the K 1 intensity minima and the intermediate width W 0 (the Wilson-Bappu width) are presented. It is shown that the C-L variation of all three parameters can be accounted for as a dependence on chromospheric column mass. The corresponding Ca II K line with parameters of 41 late type stars are also shown to vary in accordance with the inferred chromospheric column mass of the stars. The solar C-L and the stellar variation of the widths ΔK 1 and W 0 are found to have nearly indentical factors of proportionality with respect to log (column mass)

  17. A Model for Straight and Helical Solar Jets: II. Parametric Study of the Plasma Beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariat, E.; Dalmasse, K.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Karpen, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Jets are dynamic, impulsive, well-collimated plasma events that develop at many different scales and in different layers of the solar atmosphere. Aims. Jets are believed to be induced by magnetic reconnection, a process central to many astrophysical phenomena. Within the solar atmosphere, jet-like events develop in many different environments, e.g. in the vicinity of active regions as well as in coronal holes, and at various scales, from small photospheric spicules to large coronal jets. In all these events, signatures of helical structure and/or twisting/rotating motions are regularly observed. The present study aims to establish that a single model can generally reproduce the observed properties of these jet-like events. Methods. In this study, using our state-of-the-art numerical solver ARMS, we present a parametric study of a numerical tridimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of solar jet-like events. Within the MHD paradigm, we study the impact of varying the atmospheric plasma beta on the generation and properties of solar-like jets. Results. The parametric study validates our model of jets for plasma beta ranging from 10(sup 3) to 1, typical of the different layers and magnetic environments of the solar atmosphere. Our model of jets can robustly explain the generation of helical solar jet-like events at various beta less than or equal to 1. We show that the plasma beta modifies the morphology of the helical jet, explaining the different observed shapes of jets at different scales and in different layers of the solar atmosphere. Conclusions. Our results allow us to understand the energisation, triggering, and driving processes of jet-like events. Our model allows us to make predictions of the impulsiveness and energetics of jets as determined by the surrounding environment, as well as the morphological properties of the resulting jets.

  18. Ruthenium(ii)-polypyridyl zirconium(iv) metal-organic frameworks as a new class of sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, W A; Haring, A J; Ahrenholtz, S R; Epley, C C; Lin, S Y; Morris, A J

    2016-01-01

    A series of Ru(ii)L 2 L' (L = 2,2'-bipyridyl, L' = 2,2'-bipyridine-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid), RuDCBPY, -containing zirconium(iv) coordination polymer thin films have been prepared as sensitizing materials for solar cell applications. These metal-organic framework (MOF) sensitized solar cells, MOFSCs, each are shown to generate photocurrent in response to simulated 1 sun illumination. Emission lifetime measurements indicate the excited state quenching of RuDCBPY at the MOF-TiO 2 interface is extremely efficient (>90%), presumably due to electron injection into TiO 2 . A mechanism is proposed in which RuDCBPY-centers photo-excited within the MOF-bulk undergo isotropic energy migration up to 25 nm from the point of origin. This work represents the first example in which a MOFSC is directly compared to the constituent dye adsorbed on TiO 2 (DSC). Importantly, the MOFSCs outperformed their RuDCBPY-TiO 2 DSC counterpart under the conditions used here and, thus, are solidified as promising solar cell platforms.

  19. A HIGH-FREQUENCY TYPE II SOLAR RADIO BURST ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2011 FEBRUARY 13 CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, K.-S.; Kim, R.-S. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Whaamdong, Yooseong-ku, Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Gopalswamy, N.; Kwon, R.-Y.; Yashiro, S., E-mail: kscho@kasi.re.kr [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We examine the relationship between the high-frequency (425 MHz) type II radio burst and the associated white-light coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2011 February 13. The radio burst had a drift rate of 2.5 MHz s{sup -1}, indicating a relatively high shock speed. From SDO/AIA observations we find that a loop-like erupting front sweeps across high-density coronal loops near the start time of the burst (17:34:17 UT). The deduced distance of shock formation (0.06 Rs) from the flare center and speed of the shock (1100 km s{sup -1}) using the measured density from SDO/AIA observations are comparable to the height (0.05 Rs, from the solar surface) and speed (700 km s{sup -1}) of the CME leading edge observed by STEREO/EUVI. We conclude that the type II burst originates even in the low corona (<59 Mm or 0.08 Rs, above the solar surface) due to the fast CME shock passing through high-density loops.

  20. Sb₂S₃ surface modification induced remarkable enhancement of TiO₂ core/shell nanowries solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xiuqing, E-mail: xqmeng@semi.ac.cn [Research Center for Light Emitting Diodes (LED), Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China); Wang, Xiaozhou; Zhong, Mianzeng; Wu, Fengmin; Fang, Yunzhang [Research Center for Light Emitting Diodes (LED), Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China)

    2013-05-01

    This study presents the fabrication of a novel dye-sensitized solar cell with Sb₂S₃-modified TiO₂ nanowire (NW) arrays/TiO₂ nanoparticles (NP) (TiO₂(NWs)/TiO₂(NPs)/Sb₂S₃) as the anodes and N719 dye as the sensitizer. A solar conversion efficiency of 4.91% at 1 sun illumination was achieved for the composite cell, which is markedly higher than the efficiency rates obtained using TiO₂ and TiO₂(NWs)/Sb₂S₃/TiO₂(NPs) NW cells, calculated at 2.36% and 3.11%, respectively. The improved efficiency results from the large surface area of the NPs, as well as the expansion of the light absorption region and high absorption coefficient by Sb₂S₃ surface modification. - Graphical abstract: A novel TiO₂(NWs)/TiO₂(NPs)/Sb₂S₃ dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is fabricated, a solar conversion efficiency of 4.91 % at 1 sun illumination is achieved. Highlights: • We fabricate sandwich structured TiO₂ dye-sensitized solar cells. • The anode of the solar cells consist of Sb₂S₃ modified TiO₂ nanowire arrays/TiO₂ nanopartices. • A solar conversion efficiency of 4.91% at 1 sun illumination is achieved. • The high efficiency results from large surface area and expanded light adsorption of the anode.

  1. Design, construction and experimental study of Electric Cum Solar Oven-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandwani, S.S.

    1987-11-01

    As in many developing countries, 35-40% of the population of Costa Rica still use firewood for domestic cooking. Considering the fact that Costa Rica is blessed with good sunshine, good hydroelectric potential, and a good electric network, a hybrid solar oven was thought to be useful. In the present paper the construction and working of a new type of Electric Cum Solar Oven (ECSO) has been described. This oven can be used for cooking and baking any type of meal at any time during the year employing solar and/or electric energy but consuming the minimum quantity of electric energy in case it is required. (author). 9 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  2. Solar-geophysical data number 417, May 1979. Part II. Data for November 1978--October 1978 and miscellanea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, H.E.

    1979-05-01

    This comprehensive report provides data for November 1978 on active regions, synoptic solar maps, solar flares, solar radio emission, energetic solar particles and plasma, and solar x-ray radiation. It also provides synoptic charts, abbreviated calendar record and regional flare index for October 1978. The miscellaneous data includes solar radio emission for January and February 1979 and cosmic rays for February 1979

  3. Solar fusion cross sections II: the pp chain and CNO cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelberger, E G; Bemmerer, D; Bertulani, C A; Chen, J -W; Costantini, H; Couder, M; Cyburt, R; Davids, B; Freedman, S J; Gai, M; Garcia, A; Gazit, D; Gialanella, L; Greife, U; Hass, M; Heeger, K; Haxton, W C; Imbriani, G; Itahashi, T; Junghans, A; Kubodera, K; Langanke, K; Leitner, D; Leitner, M; Marcucci, L E; Motobayashi, T; Mukhamedzhanov, A; Nollett, Kenneth M; Nunes, F M; Park, T -S; Parker, P D; Prati, P; Ramsey-Musolf, M J; Hamish Robertson, R G; Schiavilla, R; Simpson, E C; Snover, K A; Spitaleri, C; Strieder, F; Suemmerer, K; Trautvetter, R E; Tribble, R E; Typel, S; Uberseder, E; Vetter, P; Wiescher, M

    2011-04-01

    The available data on nuclear fusion cross sections important to energy generation in the Sun and other hydrogen-burning stars and to solar neutrino production are summarized and critically evaluated. Recommended values and uncertainties are provided for key cross sections, and a recommended spectrum is given for 8B solar neutrinos. Opportunities for further increasing the precision of key rates are also discussed, including new facilities, new experimental techniques, and improvements in theory. This review, which summarizes the conclusions of a workshop held at the Institute for Nuclear Theory, Seattle, in January 2009, is intended as a 10-year update and supplement to 1998, Rev. Mod. Phys. 70, 1265.

  4. Evidence of significant down-conversion in a Si-based solar cell using CuInS2/ZnS core shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardelis, Spiros; Nassiopoulou, Androula G.

    2014-05-01

    We report on the increase of up to 37.5% in conversion efficiency of a Si-based solar cell after deposition of light-emitting Cd-free, CuInS2/ZnS core shell quantum dots on the active area of the cell due to the combined effect of down-conversion and the anti- reflecting property of the dots. We clearly distinguished the effect of down-conversion from anti-reflection and estimated an enhancement of up to 10.5% in the conversion efficiency due to down-conversion.

  5. Evidence of significant down-conversion in a Si-based solar cell using CuInS2/ZnS core shell quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardelis, Spiros; Nassiopoulou, Androula G.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the increase of up to 37.5% in conversion efficiency of a Si-based solar cell after deposition of light-emitting Cd-free, CuInS 2 /ZnS core shell quantum dots on the active area of the cell due to the combined effect of down-conversion and the anti- reflecting property of the dots. We clearly distinguished the effect of down-conversion from anti-reflection and estimated an enhancement of up to 10.5% in the conversion efficiency due to down-conversion

  6. Fibre structure of decametric type II radio bursts as a manifestation of emission propagation effects in a disturbed near-solar plasma

    OpenAIRE

    A. N. Afanasiev

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the fine structure of solar decametric type II radio bursts in the form of drifting narrowband fibres on the dynamic spectrum. Observations show that this structure appears in those events where there is a coronal mass ejection (CME) traveling in the near-solar space ahead of the shock wave responsible for the radio burst. The diversity in observed morphology of fibres and values of their parameters implies that the fibres may be caused by different formation mechanisms. ...

  7. Optimal Implantation Depth and Adherence to Guidelines on Permanent Pacing to Improve the Results of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With the Medtronic CoreValve System: The CoreValve Prospective, International, Post-Market ADVANCE-II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronio, Anna S; Sinning, Jan-Malte; Van Mieghem, Nicolas; Zucchelli, Giulio; Nickenig, Georg; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Bosmans, Johan; Bedogni, Francesco; Branny, Marian; Stangl, Karl; Kovac, Jan; Schiltgen, Molly; Kraus, Stacia; de Jaegere, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the CoreValve prospective, international, post-market ADVANCE-II study was to define the rates of conduction disturbances and permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the Medtronic CoreValve System (Minneapolis, Minnesota) using optimized implantation techniques and application of international guidelines on cardiac pacing. Conduction disturbances are a frequent complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The rates of PPI in the published reports vary according to bioprosthesis type and the indications for PPI. The primary endpoint was the 30-day incidence of PPI with Class I/II indications when the Medtronic CoreValve System was implanted at an optimal depth (≤6 mm below the aortic annulus). The timing and resolution of all new-onset conduction disturbances were analyzed. A total of 194 patients were treated. The overall rate of PPI for Class I/II indications was 18.2%. An optimal depth was reached in 43.2% of patients, with a nonsignificantly lower incidence of PPI in patients with depths ≤6 mm, compared with those with deeper implants (13.3% vs. 21.1%; p = 0.14). In a paired analysis, new-onset left bundle branch block and first-degree atrioventricular block occurred in 45.4% and 39.0% of patients, respectively, and resolved spontaneously within 30 days in 43.2% and 73.9%, respectively. In patients with new PPI, the rate of intrinsic sinus rhythm increased from 25.9% at 7 days to 59.3% at 30 days (p = 0.004). Optimal Medtronic CoreValve System deployment and adherence to international guidelines on cardiac pacing are associated with a lower rate of new PPI after transcatheter aortic valve replacement, compared with results reported in previous studies. (CoreValve Advance-II Study: Prospective International Post-Market Study [ADVANCE II]; NCT01624870). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on nanoparticle-decorated ZnO/TiO2 core/shell nanorod arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Meili; Huang Changgang; Cao Yongge; Deng Zhonghua; Liu Yuan; Huang Zhi; Huang Jiquan; Huang Qiufeng; Guo Wang; Liang Jingkui; Yu Qingjiang

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) decorated ZnO/TiO 2 core/shell nanorod arrays were fabricated on transparent conductive glass substrates by sequential plasma deposition and post-annealing processes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications. The NPs decorated ZnO/TiO 2 nanorods were composed of single-crystalline ZnO nanorods, homogeneously coated thin TiO 2 shells and entirely covered anatase TiO 2 NPs. The photocurrent density of the composite electrode was largely enhanced due to the enlarged surface area, the dark current was suppressed and the open-circuit voltage was increased because of the energy barrier formed at the interface between the ZnO core and the TiO 2 shell. The increased photocurrent and open-circuit voltage led to an improvement of twice the energy conversion efficiency.

  9. Report on the Dutch expedition to observe the 1973 June 30 solar eclipse. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houtgast, J.; Namba, O.

    1979-01-01

    This paper continues to report the Dutch expedition to Atar, Mauritania, to observe the total solar eclipse of June 30, 1973. The purpose of this expedition was to obtain spectra from the transition region photosphere-chromosphere with high spectral and time resolution. (Auth.)

  10. Electrochemical Properties of Cu(II/I)-Based Redox Mediators for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Saygili, Y.; Freitag, M.; Zakeeruddin, S. M.; Hagfeldt, A.; Grätzel, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 227, FEB 2017 (2017), s. 194-202 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-07724S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Graphene * Dye sensitized solar cell * Cu-complexes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  11. Combined cycle solar central receiver hybrid power system study. Final technical report. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-11-01

    This study develops the conceptual design for a commercial-scale (nominal 100 MWe) central receiver solar/fossil fuel hybrid power system with combined cycle energy conversion. A near-term, metallic heat pipe receiver and an advanced ceramic tube receiver hybrid system are defined through parametric and market potential analyses. Comparative evaluations of the cost of power generation, the fuel displacement potential, and the technological readiness of these two systems indicate that the near-term hybrid system has better potential for commercialization by 1990. Based on the assessment of the conceptual design, major cost and performance improvements are projected for the near-term system. Constraints preventing wide-spread use were not identified. Energy storage is not required for this system and analyses show no economic advantages with energy storage provisions. It is concluded that the solar hybrid system is a cost effective alternative to conventional gas turbines and combined cycle generating plants, and has potential for intermediate-load market penetration at 15% annual fuel escalation rate. Due to their flexibility, simple solar/nonsolar interfacing, and short startup cycles, these hybrid plants have significant operating advantages. Utility company comments suggest that hybrid power systems will precede stand-alone solar plants.

  12. Selective paint coatings for coloured solar absorbers: Polyurethane thickness insensitive spectrally selective (TISS) paints (Part II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orel, B.; Spreizer, H.; Surca Vuk, A.; Fir, M. [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Merlini, D.; Vodlan, M. [Color d.d., Cesta komandanta Staneta 4, SI-1230 Medvode (Slovenia); Koehl, M. [Fraunhofer-Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2007-01-23

    Red, green and blue paints were prepared for use as thickness insensitive spectrally selective (TISS) paint coatings for solar facade absorbers. The paints were composed of a polyurethane resin binder in which various pigments were incorporated in such a way that they formed stable paint dispersions, satisfying stability criteria for facade coatings. A low emittance of the paints was achieved by using low-emittance aluminium flake pigments combined with iron oxide (red coloured paints). Black pigment was added to adjust solar absorptance. Blue and green paints were made by the addition of coloured aluminium flake pigment and the solar absorptance was also adjusted by the addition of black pigment. Efficiency for photo-thermal conversion of solar radiation was assessed by evaluation of the corresponding performance criteria, which enabled the selection of paints whose performance criteria values were higher than 0 (spectrally non-selective black coating). The results confirmed that blue and green paints and to minor extent red ones, combined selectivity with colour. The morphology of the paints was assessed, revealing that the colours originated from the deposition of finely dispersed colour and/or black pigment on the surface of the aluminium flakes during paint preparation. (author)

  13. An Unfused-Core-Based Nonfullerene Acceptor Enables High-Efficiency Organic Solar Cells with Excellent Morphological Stability at High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuixing; Zhan, Lingling; Liu, Feng; Ren, Jie; Shi, Minmin; Li, Chang-Zhi; Russell, Thomas P; Chen, Hongzheng

    2018-02-01

    Most nonfullerene acceptors developed so far for high-performance organic solar cells (OSCs) are designed in planar molecular geometry containing a fused-ring core. In this work, a new nonfullerene acceptor of DF-PCIC is synthesized with an unfused-ring core containing two cyclopentadithiophene (CPDT) moieties and one 2,5-difluorobenzene (DFB) group. A nearly planar geometry is realized through the F···H noncovalent interaction between CPDT and DFB for DF-PCIC. After proper optimizations, the OSCs with DF-PCIC as the acceptor and the polymer PBDB-T as the donor yield the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 10.14% with a high fill factor of 0.72. To the best of our knowledge, this efficiency is among the highest values for the OSCs with nonfullerene acceptors owning unfused-ring cores. Furthermore, no obvious morphological changes are observed for the thermally treated PBDB-T:DF-PCIC blended films, and the relevant devices can keep ≈70% of the original PCEs upon thermal treatment at 180 °C for 12 h. This tolerance of such a high temperature for so long time is rarely reported for fullerene-free OSCs, which might be due to the unique unfused-ring core of DF-PCIC. Therefore, the work provides new idea for the design of new nonfullerene acceptors applicable in commercial OSCs in the future. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Sb2S3 surface modification induced remarkable enhancement of TiO2 core/shell nanowries solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Xiuqing; Wang, Xiaozhou; Zhong, Mianzeng; Wu, Fengmin; Fang, Yunzhang

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the fabrication of a novel dye-sensitized solar cell with Sb 2 S 3 -modified TiO 2 nanowire (NW) arrays/TiO 2 nanoparticles (NP) (TiO 2(NWs) /TiO 2(NPs) /Sb 2 S 3 ) as the anodes and N719 dye as the sensitizer. A solar conversion efficiency of 4.91% at 1 sun illumination was achieved for the composite cell, which is markedly higher than the efficiency rates obtained using TiO 2 and TiO 2(NWs) /Sb 2 S 3 /TiO 2(NPs) NW cells, calculated at 2.36% and 3.11%, respectively. The improved efficiency results from the large surface area of the NPs, as well as the expansion of the light absorption region and high absorption coefficient by Sb 2 S 3 surface modification. - Graphical abstract: A novel TiO 2(NWs) /TiO 2(NPs) /Sb 2 S 3 dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is fabricated, a solar conversion efficiency of 4.91 % at 1 sun illumination is achieved. Highlights: ► We fabricate sandwich structured TiO 2 dye-sensitized solar cells. ► The anode of the solar cells consist of Sb 2 S 3 modified TiO 2 nanowire arrays/TiO 2 nanopartices. ► A solar conversion efficiency of 4.91% at 1 sun illumination is achieved. ► The high efficiency results from large surface area and expanded light adsorption of the anode

  15. Molecular Engineering, Photophysical and Electrochemical Characterizations of Novel Ru(II) and BODIPY Sensitizers for Mesoporous TiO2 Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Hammad Arshad

    precludes coplanarity of the naphthalene moiety, thus decreasing the extracted photocurrent response from solar device. The findings were published in Dyes and Pigments (doi:10.1016/j.dyepig.2014.08.005). For HD-7 and HD-8, intriguing difference caused by structural isomerization based on anthracene and phenanthrene stilbazole type ancillary ligands, respectively in Ru (II) sensitizers was investigated using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. It was found that the excited electrons in HD-7 are prone to ISC (intersystem crossing) much more than that in HD-8 and those triplet electrons are not being injected in TiO2 efficiently as discussed in Chapter 5. To achieve long term stability, we combined the strong electron donor characteristics of carbazole and the hydrophobic nature of long alkyl chains, C7 (HD-14 ), C18 (HD-15) and C2 (NCSU-10), tethered to N-carbazole. HD-15 showed strikingly good long term light soaking stability and maintained up to 98% of initial efficiency value compared to 92% for HD-14 and 78% for NCSU-10, as discussed in Chapter 6. Boron dipyromethene (BODIPY) dyes HB-1, HB-2 and HB-3 were synthesized and fully characterized for dye solar cells. It was found that having long alkyl chains tethered to the donor groups alone are not sufficient for achieving highly efficient photovoltaic response from BODIPY dyes (Chapter 7). Thus, replacement of fluorines from BODIPY core with long alkoxy chains has been suggested for future work.

  16. Detection of local sodium boiling in the nuclear boiling generator in KNK II and in the cores of SNR 300 and SNR 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erhardt, J.; Hoppe, P.

    1977-03-01

    As a basis of a global detection system, the detection of local boiling in sodium cooled reactors via surveillance of the neutron flux background noise is of special importance. With the help of parameter studies it is investigated in the present report, which parts of the core of SNR 300 and SNR 2 could be monitored with such a detection system. As a comparison the detection sensibility of the planned boiling generator in KNK II is determined

  17. NSGA-II Algorithm with a Local Search Strategy for Multiobjective Optimal Design of Dry-Type Air-Core Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengfen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry-type air-core reactor is now widely applied in electrical power distribution systems, for which the optimization design is a crucial issue. In the optimization design problem of dry-type air-core reactor, the objectives of minimizing the production cost and minimizing the operation cost are both important. In this paper, a multiobjective optimal model is established considering simultaneously the two objectives of minimizing the production cost and minimizing the operation cost. To solve the multi-objective optimization problem, a memetic evolutionary algorithm is proposed, which combines elitist nondominated sorting genetic algorithm version II (NSGA-II with a local search strategy based on the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES. NSGA-II can provide decision maker with flexible choices among the different trade-off solutions, while the local-search strategy, which is applied to nondominated individuals randomly selected from the current population in a given generation and quantity, can accelerate the convergence speed. Furthermore, another modification is that an external archive is set in the proposed algorithm for increasing the evolutionary efficiency. The proposed algorithm is tested on a dry-type air-core reactor made of rectangular cross-section litz-wire. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has high efficiency and it converges to a better Pareto front.

  18. Tunable luminescent emission characterization of type-I and type-II systems in CdS-ZnSe core-shell nanoparticles: Raman and photoluminescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ca, Nguyen Xuan; Lien, V T K; Nghia, N X; Chi, T T K; Phan, The-Long

    2015-11-06

    We used wet chemical methods to synthesize core-shell nanocrystalline samples CdS(d)/ZnSe N , where d = 3-6 nm and N = 1-5 are the size of CdS cores and the number of monolayers grown on the cores, respectively. By annealing typical CdS(d)/ZnSe N samples (with d = 3 and 6 nm and N = 2) at 300 °C for various times t an = 10-600 min, we created an intermediate layer composed of Zn1-x Cd x Se and Cd1-x Zn x S alloys with various thicknesses. The formation of core-shell structures and intermediate layers was monitored by Raman scattering and UV-vis absorption spectrometers. Careful photoluminescence studies revealed that the as-prepared CdS(d)/ZnSe N samples with d = 5 nm and N = 2-4, and the annealed samples CdS(3 nm)/ZnSe2 with t an ≤ 60 min and CdS(6 nm)/ZnSe2 with t an ≤ 180 min, show the emission characteristics of type-II systems. Meanwhile, the other samples show the emission characteristics of type-I systems. These results prove that the partial separation of photoexcited carriers between the core and shell is dependent strongly on the engineered core-shell nanostructures, meaning the sizes of the core, shell, and intermediate layers. With the tunable luminescence properties, CdS-ZnSe-based core-shell materials are considered as promising candidates for multiple-exciton generation and single-photon sources.

  19. Solar radiation measurements in forests - II. methods based on the principle of hemispherical photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaci, J.; Kolar, U.; Thormann, J.-J.

    1999-01-01

    The know-how in the field of solar radiation distribution in forests is important for basic ecological investigations and silvicultural practice. Three methods of solar radiation assessment based on hemispherical canopy photography are compared in the present article: a hemispherical photography by means of a fish-eye lens, a horizontoscope and the ALI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer. Experiences, improved methods and a drawing of a horizontoscope stand which was elaborated at the Chair of Silviculture are presented. Fairly good results with some limitations can be achieved with the improved stable horizontoscope in silvicultural work. Hemispherical photography is appropriate for the assessment of light conditions in all stand types and can thus be used in research work. The method has recently been undergoing intensive development. Digitalization of the entire system will speed up standardization. The ALI-2000 instrument is highly suitable for regeneration research in conditions of abundant plant vegetation, in reach sites and modified stands [sl

  20. Graphene Nanoplatelet Cathode for Co(III)/(II) Mediated Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Yum, J. H.; Nazeeruddin, M. K.; Grätzel, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 11 (2011), s. 9171-9178 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : graphene * dye sensitized solar cell * cobalt redox shuttle Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 10.774, year: 2011

  1. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume II. Plant specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, R. E.

    1983-12-31

    The specifications and design criteria for all plant systems and subsystems used in developing the preliminary design of Carrisa Plains 30-MWe Solar Plant are contained in this volume. The specifications have been organized according to plant systems and levels. The levels are arranged in tiers. Starting at the top tier and proceeding down, the specification levels are the plant, system, subsystem, components, and fabrication. A tab number, listed in the index, has been assigned each document to facilitate document location.

  2. SOLAR CYCLE VARIABILITY AND SURFACE DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION FROM Ca II K-LINE TIME SERIES DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Worden, Simon P. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, 94035 (United States); Keil, Stephen L. [National Solar Observatory, P.O. Box 57, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of over 36 yr of time series data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program elucidates 5 components of the variation of the 7 measured chromospheric parameters: (a) the solar cycle (period {approx} 11 yr), (b) quasi-periodic variations (periods {approx} 100 days), (c) a broadband stochastic process (wide range of periods), (d) rotational modulation, and (e) random observational errors, independent of (a)-(d). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these parameters. Time-frequency analysis illuminates periodic and quasi-periodic signals, details of frequency modulation due to differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the rather complex harmonic structure (a) and (b) at timescales in the range {approx}0.1-10 yr. These results using only full-disk data suggest that similar analyses will be useful for detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light curves such as those being produced by NASA's Kepler observatory. Component (c) consists of variations over a range of timescales, in the manner of a 1/f random process with a power-law slope index that varies in a systematic way. A time-dependent Wilson-Bappu effect appears to be present in the solar cycle variations (a), but not in the more rapid variations of the stochastic process (c). Component (d) characterizes differential rotation of the active regions. Component (e) is of course not characteristic of solar variability, but the fact that the observational errors are quite small greatly facilitates the analysis of the other components. The data analyzed in this paper can be found at the National Solar Observatory Web site http://nsosp.nso.edu/cak{sub m}on/, or by file transfer protocol at ftp://ftp.nso.edu/idl/cak.parameters.

  3. A survey on control schemes for distributed solar collector fields. Part II: Advanced control approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, E.F.; Rubio, F.R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Departamento de Ingenieria de Sistemas y Automatica, Camino de Los Descubrimientos s/n, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain); Berenguel, M. [Universidad de Almeria, Departamento de Lenguajes y Computacion, Area de Ingenieria de Sistemas y Automatica, Carretera Sacramento s/n, E-04120 La Canada, Almeria (Spain); Valenzuela, L. [Plataforma Solar de Almeria - CIEMAT, Carretera Senes s/n, P.O. Box 22, E-04200 Tabernas (Almeria) (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    This article presents a survey of the different advanced automatic control techniques that have been applied to control the outlet temperature of solar plants with distributed collectors during the last 25 years. A classification of the modeling and control approaches described in the first part of this survey is used to explain the main features of each strategy. The treated strategies range from classical advanced control strategies to those with few industrial applications. (author)

  4. Designs of solar voltaic cells based on carbon nano-tubes II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yin-Lin; Dai, Jong-Horng; Ou, Kenneth; Reinhardt, Kit; Szu, Harold

    2009-04-01

    Inspired by Asian rice-paddy and Firefighter spiraling steps staircase, we employ a nano-manipulator augmented with CAD as a nano-robot water-buffalo, promised to improve by an order of the magnitude the pioneer work of GE Solar voltaic cell (SVC) made of one Carbon NanoTube (CNT) enjoyed QECNT~5%. Our CNT was made of the semiconductor at NIR wavelength EBG= 1.107 eV which can absorb any photon whose wavelength λ tiny diameter 0.66 nm. It allows us to construct 3D structure, called volume pixel, "voxel," in a much efficient spiraling steps staircase fashion to capture the solar spectral energy spreading naturally by a simple focusing lens without occlusion. For real-estate premium applications, in Space or Ocean, we designed a volume pixel (Voxel) housing a stack of 16 CNTs steps spiraling 22° each like the fire house staircase occupying the height of 16 x dCNT =16 x 0.66nm= 10.56 nm and covering over 360°. The total SVC had the size 2x2 meter2, consisting of 100×100 lenslet array. Each lens was made of Pb-Crown glass which was inexpensive simple spherical lens having the diameter of Dlens=2 cm and F#=0.7. It can focus the sunlight a millionth times stronger in a smallest possible focal spot size, λYellow=0.635 μm< λMax photons <λRed=0.73 μm, where the largest number of solar photons, 68%, according to the Plank radiation spectrum at 6000°K and the Lord Rayleigh diffraction limit. The solar panel seals individually such an array of 3D cavities of SVC enjoying theoretically from the UV 12% (wasted in passing through) visible 68% to the infrared 20% at a total of 16x5%~80% total QECNT per cell. The solar panel is made of light-weight carbon composite tolerating about 20% inactive fill factor and 10% dead pixels.

  5. Comparison of Mg-based multilayers for solar He II radiation at 30.4 nm wavelength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Jingtao; Zhou Sika; Li Haochuan; Huang Qiushi; Wang Zhanshan; Le Guen, Karine; Hu, Min-Hui; Andre, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2010-07-10

    Mg-based multilayers, including SiC/Mg, Co/Mg, B4C/Mg, and Si/Mg, are investigated for solar imaging and a He II calibration lamp at a 30.4 nm wavelength. These multilayers were fabricated by a magnetron sputtering method and characterized by x-ray reflection. The reflectivities of these multilayers were measured by synchrotron radiation. Near-normal-incidence reflectivities of Co/Mg and SiC/Mg multilayer mirrors are as high as 40.3% and 44.6%, respectively, while those of B4C/Mg and Si/Mg mirrors are too low for application. The measured results suggest that SiC/Mg, Co/Mg multilayers are promising for a 30.4 nm wavelength.

  6. High Molar Extinction Coefficient Ru(II-Mixed Ligand Polypyridyl Complexes for Dye Sensitized Solar Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malapaka Chandrasekharam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Two new ruthenium(II mixed ligand terpyridine complexes, “Ru(Htcterpy(NCS(L1 (N(C4H94, mLBD1” and Ru(Htcterpy(NCS(L2(N(C4H94, mLBD2 were synthesized and fully characterized by UV-Vis, emission, cyclic voltammogram, and other spectroscopic means, and the structures of the compounds are confirmed by 1H-NMR, ESI-MASS, and FT-IR spectroscopes. The influence of the substitution of L1 and L2 on solar-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency (η of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was evaluated relative to reference black dye. The dyes showed molar extinction coefficients of 17600 M−1 cm−1 for mLBD1 and 21300 M−1 cm−1 for mLBD2 both at λ maximum of 512 nm, while black dye has shown 8660 M−1 cm−1 at λ maximum of 615 nm. The monochromatic incident photon-to-collected electron conversion efficiencies of 60.71% and 75.89% were obtained for mLBD1 and mLBD2 dyes, respectively. The energy conversion efficiencies of mLBD1 and mLBD2 dyes are 3.15% (SC=11.86 mA/cm2, OC=613 mV, ff=0.4337 and 3.36% (SC=12.71 mA/cm2, OC=655 mV, ff=0.4042, respectively, measured at the AM1.5G conditions, the reference black dye-sensitized solar cell, fabricated and evaluated under identical conditions exhibited η-value of 2.69% (SC=10.95 mA/cm2, OC=655 mV, ff=0.3750.

  7. Versatile ruthenium(II) dye towards blue-light emitter and dye-sensitizer for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, Kassio P. S.; Amaral, Ronaldo C.; Murakami Iha, Neyde Y.; Abreu, Felipe D.; de Carvalho, Idalina M. M.

    2018-06-01

    A versatile Ru(II) complex bearing an anthracene moiety was synthesized in our search for suitable compounds towards efficient molecular devices. The new engineered dye, cis‑[Ru(dcbH2)(NCS)2(mbpy‑anth)] (dcbH2 = 2,2‧‑bipyridyl‑4,4‧‑dicarboxylic acid, mbpy‑anth = 4‑[N‑(2‑anthryl)carbamoyl]‑4‧‑methyl‑2,2‧‑bipyridine), exhibits a blueish emission in a vibronically structured spectrum ascribed to the fluorescence of a 1LCAnth (ligand centered) excited state in the anthracene and has a potential to be exploited in the fields of smart lighting and displays. This complex was also employed in dye-sensitized solar cells with fairly efficient solar energy conversion with the use of self-assembled TiO2 compact layers beneath the TiO2 mesoporous film to prevent meso‑TiO2/dye back reactions. Further photoelectrochemical investigations through incident photon-to-current efficiency and electrochemical impedance spectra showed that the all-nano-TiO2 compact layer acts as contact layers that increase the electron harvesting in the external circuit, enhancing efficiencies up to 50%.

  8. Formation of solar-type stars in spherical symmetry. II. Effects of detailed constitutive relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, K.A.; Newman, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    A time-dependent hydrodynamical calculation of the spherically symmetric self-gravitational collapse and accretion of a homogeneous Jeans unstable 1 M/sub sun/ protostellar cloud has been performed using the detailed equation-of-state tables of Fontaine, Graboske, and Van Horn. It is found that the inner 0.03 M/sub sun/ of the core enters a partially degenerate region during the main accretion phase. A well-pronounced off-center temperature maximum develops under the combined influences of electron degeneracy and pressure ionization. A hydrogen ionization zone within the quasi-hydrostatic core drives core oscillations with typical periods of a few months in the transition phase from the second (final) collpase to the accretion stage. A third collapse does not occur, because of the gradual (''soft'') ionization of hydrogen at high density (rhoapprox. =1 g cm -3 ). Gas opacities were taken from the King IVa tables of Cox and Tabor, and dust opacities from Bertout and Yorke. Energy transport by radiation was treated by solution of the time-dependent moment equations with an Eddington factor f derived from the static transport equation. The diffusion approximation with f=1/3 would offer an adequate description of the protostellar core, but the intensity of the constant luminosity radiation field becomes highly anisotropic in local optically thin regions of the envelope. The degree of anisotropy in optically thick regions is determined by the temperature dependence of the dust opacity and the depletion of matter from the envelope. Near the end of the accretion phase the entire envelope is characterized by complete anisotropy f=1

  9. Type II solar radio bursts, interplanetary shocks, and energetic particle events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cane, H.V.; Stone, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Using the ISEE 3 radio astronomy experiment data we have identified 37 interplanetary type II bursts in the period 1978 September to 1981 December. We lists these events and the associated phenomena. The events are preceded by intense, soft X-ray events with long decay times and type II or type IV bursts, or both, at meter wavelengths. The meter wavelength type II bursts are usually intense and exhibit herringbone structure. The extension of the herringbone structure into the kilometer wavelength range appears as a fast drift radio feature which we refer to as a shock associated radio event. The shock associated event is an important diagnostic for the presence of a strong shock and particle acceleration. The majority of the interplanetary type II bursts are associated with energetic particle events. Our results support other studies which indicate that energetic soalr particles detected at 1 A.U. are generatd by shock acceleration. From a preliminary analysis of the available data there appears to be a high correlation with white light coronal transients. The transients are fast: i.e., velocities greater than 500 km s -1

  10. Solar-geophysical data number 420, August 1979. Part II (Comprehensive reports). Data for February 1979, January 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, H.E.

    1979-08-01

    This comprehensive report provides data for February 1979 on active regions, synoptic solar maps, solar radio emission, energetic solar particles and plasma, and solar x-ray radiation. It also provides synoptic charts and abbreviated calendar record for January 1979. The miscellaneous data include solar radio emission, cosmic rays-April and May 1979, Solar flares-January 1979, and regional flare index - December 1978

  11. An Investigation of the Physical Properties of Erupting Solar Prominences, Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-30

    recently). In addition to the focus difference between channels there is also an overall retraction of the O2 focus westward, and concurrent movement of...clear images. The entire process takes ≈13:50 minutes. In that time the telescope moves ≈4˚ in RA, and the image rotator moves 2˚. Declination movement ...The 1st line is a Si I solar line at 1082.7 nm. The 2nd line is a telluric line formed by water vapor in earth’s atmosphere at 1083.2 nm. This

  12. The influence of shell thickness of Au@TiO2 core-shell nanoparticles on the plasmonic enhancement effect in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Liang; Lin, Fan-Cheng; Yang, Yu-Chen; Huang, Chen-Hsien; Gwo, Shangjr; Huang, Michael H; Huang, Jer-Shing

    2013-09-07

    Plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles (PCSNPs) can function as nanoantennas and improve the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). To achieve maximum enhancement, the morphology of PCSNPs needs to be optimized. Here we precisely control the morphology of Au@TiO2 PCSNPs and systematically study its influence on the plasmonic enhancement effect. The enhancement mechanism was found to vary with the thickness of the TiO2 shell. PCSNPs with a thinner shell mainly enhance the current, whereas particles with a thicker shell improve the voltage. While pronounced plasmonic enhancement was found in the near infrared regime, wavelength-independent enhancement in the visible range was observed and attributed to the plasmonic heating effect. Emission lifetime measurement confirms that N719 molecules neighboring nanoparticles with TiO2 shells exhibit a longer lifetime than those in contact with metal cores. Overall, PCSNPs with a 5 nm shell give the highest efficiency enhancement of 23%. Our work provides a new synthesis route for well-controlled Au@TiO2 core-shell nanoparticles and gains insight into the plasmonic enhancement in DSSCs.

  13. ELECTRON ACCELERATION BY CASCADING RECONNECTION IN THE SOLAR CORONA. II. RESISTIVE ELECTRIC FIELD EFFECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.; Gan, W.; Liu, S. [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Büchner, J.; Bárta, M., E-mail: zhou@mps.mpg.de, E-mail: liusm@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: buechner@mps.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-08-20

    We investigate electron acceleration by electric fields induced by cascading reconnections in current sheets trailing coronal mass ejections via a test particle approach in the framework of the guiding-center approximation. Although the resistive electric field is much weaker than the inductive electric field, the electron acceleration is still dominated by the former. Anomalous resistivity η is switched on only in regions where the current carrier’s drift velocity is large enough. As a consequence, electron acceleration is very sensitive to the spatial distribution of the resistive electric fields, and electrons accelerated in different segments of the current sheet have different characteristics. Due to the geometry of the 2.5-dimensional electromagnetic fields and strong resistive electric field accelerations, accelerated high-energy electrons can be trapped in the corona, precipitating into the chromosphere or escaping into interplanetary space. The trapped and precipitating electrons can reach a few MeV within 1 s and have a very hard energy distribution. Spatial structure of the acceleration sites may also introduce breaks in the electron energy distribution. Most of the interplanetary electrons reach hundreds of keV with a softer distribution. To compare with observations of solar flares and electrons in solar energetic particle events, we derive hard X-ray spectra produced by the trapped and precipitating electrons, fluxes of the precipitating and interplanetary electrons, and electron spatial distributions.

  14. Coloured solar collectors. Phase II : from laboratory samples to collector prototypes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueler, A; Roecker, Ch; Chambrier, E de; Munari Probst, M

    2007-07-01

    This illustrated final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) deals with the second phase of a project concerning the architectural integration of glazed solar collectors into the facades of buildings for heat production. The factors that limit the integration of photovoltaic panels in facades are discussed. The authors state that, for a convincing demonstration, sufficiently large samples and high quality levels are needed. The sol-gel deposition of the multi-layered coatings on A4-sized glass panes demonstrated in the laboratory by EPFL-LESO are discussed. The coatings produced exhibit a coloured reflection in combination with a high solar transmittance, a homogenous appearance, and are free of visible defects. Film hardening by UV exposure is discussed: This should result in the speeding up of the sol-gel process and thus save energy, thereby significantly reducing costs. Collaboration with industry is discussed in which full-scale glass panes are to be coated with novel multiple layers. The novel glazing is to be integrated into first prototype collectors. The manufacturing and test processes for the prototypes manufactured are discussed in detail.

  15. CONSTRAINING THE SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH USING SPLIT-BAND TYPE II RADIO BURST OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, P.; Ramesh, R.; Hariharan, K.; Kathiravan, C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, 2nd Block, Koramangala, Bangalore—560034 (India); Gopalswamy, N., E-mail: kishore@iiap.res.in [Code 671, Solar Physics Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    We report on low-frequency radio (85–35 MHz) spectral observations of four different type II radio bursts, which exhibited fundamental-harmonic emission and split-band structure. Each of the bursts was found to be closely associated with a whitelight coronal mass ejection (CME) close to the Sun. We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength from the split-band characteristics of the bursts, by assuming a model for the coronal electron density distribution. The choice of the model was constrained, based on the following criteria: (1) when the radio burst is observed simultaneously in the upper and lower bands of the fundamental component, the location of the plasma level corresponding to the frequency of the burst in the lower band should be consistent with the deprojected location of the leading edge (LE) of the associated CME; (2) the drift speed of the type II bursts derived from such a model should agree closely with the deprojected speed of the LE of the corresponding CMEs. With the above conditions, we find that: (1) the estimated field strengths are unique to each type II burst, and (2) the radial variation of the field strength in the different events indicate a pattern. It is steepest for the case where the heliocentric distance range over which the associated burst is observed is closest to the Sun, and vice versa.

  16. Piezo-phototronic Effect Enhanced UV/Visible Photodetector Based on Fully Wide Band Gap Type-II ZnO/ZnS Core/Shell Nanowire Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Satish C; Wang, Kai; Ding, Yong; Marmon, Jason K; Bhatt, Manish; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Weilie; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-06-23

    A high-performance broad band UV/visible photodetector has been successfully fabricated on a fully wide bandgap ZnO/ZnS type-II heterojunction core/shell nanowire array. The device can detect photons with energies significantly smaller (2.2 eV) than the band gap of ZnO (3.2 eV) and ZnS (3.7 eV), which is mainly attributed to spatially indirect type-II transition facilitated by the abrupt interface between the ZnO core and ZnS shell. The performance of the device was further enhanced through the piezo-phototronic effect induced lowering of the barrier height to allow charge carrier transport across the ZnO/ZnS interface, resulting in three orders of relative responsivity change measured at three different excitation wavelengths (385, 465, and 520 nm). This work demonstrates a prototype UV/visible photodetector based on the truly wide band gap semiconducting 3D core/shell nanowire array with enhanced performance through the piezo-phototronic effect.

  17. Crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of the family 6 cellobiohydrolase II, Cel6A, from Humicola insolens, at 1.92 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrot, A; Hastrup, S; Schülein, M; Davies, G J

    1999-01-15

    The three-dimensional structure of the catalytic core of the family 6 cellobiohydrolase II, Cel6A (CBH II), from Humicola insolens has been determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 1.92 A. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the homologous Trichoderma reesei CBH II as a search model. The H. insolens enzyme displays a high degree of structural similarity with its T. reesei equivalent. The structure features both O- (alpha-linked mannose) and N-linked glycosylation and a hexa-co-ordinate Mg2+ ion. The active-site residues are located within the enclosed tunnel that is typical for cellobiohydrolase enzymes and which may permit a processive hydrolysis of the cellulose substrate. The close structural similarity between the two enzymes implies that kinetics and chain-end specificity experiments performed on the H. insolens enzyme are likely to be applicable to the homologous T. reesei enzyme. These cast doubt on the description of cellobiohydrolases as exo-enzymes since they demonstrated that Cel6A (CBH II) shows no requirement for non-reducing chain-ends, as had been presumed. There is no crystallographic evidence in the present structure to support a mechanism involving loop opening, yet preliminary modelling experiments suggest that the active-site tunnel of Cel6A (CBH II) is too narrow to permit entry of a fluorescenyl-derivatized substrate, known to be a viable substrate for this enzyme.

  18. Millimeter radiation from a 3D model of the solar atmosphere. II. Chromospheric magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukitcheva, M.; White, S. M.; Solanki, S. K.; Fleishman, G. D.; Carlsson, M.

    2017-05-01

    Aims: We use state-of-the-art, three-dimensional non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the quiet solar atmosphere to carry out detailed tests of chromospheric magnetic field diagnostics from free-free radiation at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths (mm/submm). Methods: The vertical component of the magnetic field was deduced from the mm/submm brightness spectra and the degree of circular polarization synthesized at millimeter frequencies. We used the frequency bands observed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) as a convenient reference. The magnetic field maps obtained describe the longitudinal magnetic field at the effective formation heights of the relevant wavelengths in the solar chromosphere. Results: The comparison of the deduced and model chromospheric magnetic fields at the spatial resolution of both the model and current observations demonstrates a good correlation, but has a tendency to underestimate the model field. The systematic discrepancy of about 10% is probably due to averaging of the restored field over the heights contributing to the radiation, weighted by the strength of the contribution. On the whole, the method of probing the longitudinal component of the magnetic field with free-free emission at mm/submm wavelengths is found to be applicable to measurements of the weak quiet-Sun magnetic fields. However, successful exploitation of this technique requires very accurate measurements of the polarization properties (primary beam and receiver polarization response) of the antennas, which will be the principal factor that determines the level to which chromospheric magnetic fields can be measured. Conclusions: Consequently, high-resolution and high-precision observations of circularly polarized radiation at millimeter wavelengths can be a powerful tool for producing chromospheric longitudinal magnetograms.

  19. Solar dynamics influence on the atmospheric ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogosheva, T.; Grigorieva, V.; Mendeva, B.; Krastev, D.; Petkov, B.

    2007-01-01

    A response of the atmospheric ozone to the solar dynamics has been studied using the total ozone content data, taken from the satellite experiments GOME on ERS-2 and TOMS-EP together with data obtained from the ground-based spectrophotometer Photon operating in Stara Zagora, Bulgaria during the period 1999-2005. We also use data from surface ozone observations performed in Sofia, Bulgaria. The solar activity was characterized by the sunspot daily numbers W, the solar radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7) and the MgII wing-to-core ratio solar index. The impact of the solar activity on the total ozone has been investigated analysing the ozone response to sharp changes of these parameters. Some of the examined cases showed a positive correlation between the ozone and the solar parameters, however, a negative correlation in other cases was found. There were some cases when the sharp increases of the solar activity did not provoke any ozone changes. The solar radiation changes during an eclipse can be considered a particular case of the solar dynamics as this event causes a sharp change of irradiance within a comparatively short time interval. The results of both - the total and surface ozone measurements carried out during the eclipses on 11 August 1999, 31 May 2003 and 29 March 2006 are presented. It was found that the atmospheric ozone behavior shows strong response to the fast solar radiation changes which take place during solar eclipse. (authors)

  20. Low-Temperature Preparation of Amorphous-Shell/Nanocrystalline-Core Nanostructured TiO2 Electrodes for Flexible Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongshe Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An amorphous shell/nanocrystalline core nanostructured TiO2 electrode was prepared at low temperature, in which the mixture of TiO2 powder and TiCl4 aqueous solution was used as the paste for coating a film and in this film amorphous TiO2 resulted from direct hydrolysis of TiCl4 at 100∘C sintering was produced to connect the particles forming a thick crack-free uniform nanostructured TiO2 film (12 μm, and on which a photoelectrochemical solar cell-based was fabricated, generating a short-circuit photocurrent density of 13.58 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage of 0.647 V, and an overall 4.48% light-to-electricity conversion efficiency under 1 sun illumination.

  1. Al@SiO2 Core-Shell Microflakes as Metal-Based Light Scattering Layer in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hui Chien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A metal-based light scattering layer (MLSL for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs is formed from Al@SiO2 core-shell microflakes prepared and coated on a thin porous TiO2 electrode (approximately 4 μm thick. The DSSC corresponding to a TiO2 electrode with an MLSL exhibits a low electron transport resistance in the TiO2/electrolyte interface. Electron collection efficiency is greatly improved. Photovoltaic performance measurements indicate that the power conversion efficiency of the DSSC with the MLSL doubled from 1.37% to 2.96% (for an active area of 0.25 cm2, which is better than the 2.1% achieved by a DSSC with a conventional TiO2-based light scattering layer (TLSL obtained under identical experimental conditions.

  2. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. II. RELATIVISTIC EXPLOSION MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas, E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M{sub Sun} progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  3. Synthesis of optimized indium phosphide/zinc sulfide core/shell nanocrystals and titanium dioxide nanotubes for quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungyong

    Synthesis of InP/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals and TiO 2 nanotubes and the optimization study to couple them together were explored for quantum dot sensitized solar cells. Its intrinsic nontoxicity makes the direct band gap InP/ZnS core/shell be one of the most promising semiconductor nanocrystals for optoelectric applications, with the advantage of tuning the optical absorption range in the desired solar spectrum region. Highly luminescent and monodisperse InP/ZnS nanocrystals were synthesized in a non-coordinating solvent. By varying the synthesis scheme, different size InP/ZnS nanocrystals with emission peaks ranging from 520 nm to 620 nm were grown. For the purpose of ensuring air stability, a ZnS shell was grown. The ZnS shell improves the chemical stability in terms of oxidation prevention. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image shows that the nanocrystals are highly crystalline and monodisperse. Free-standing TiO2 nanotubes were produced by an anodization method using ammonium fluoride. The free-standing nanotubes were formed under the condition that the chemical dissolution speed associated with fluoride concentration was faster than the speed of Ti oxidation. Highly ordered free-standing anatase form TiO2 nanotubes, which are transformed by annealing at the optimized temperature, are expected to be ideal for coupling with the prepared InP/ZnS nanocrystals. Electrophoretic deposition was carried out to couple the InP/ZnS nanocrystals with the TiO2 nanotubes. Under the adjusted applied voltage condition, the current during the electrophoretic deposition decreased continuously with time. The amount of the deposited nanocrystals was estimated by calculation and the evenly deposited nanocrystals on the TiO2 nanotubes were observed by TEM.

  4. Analysis of energy released from core disruptive accident of sodium cooled fast reactor using CDA-ER and VENUS-II codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S. H.; Ha, K. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The fast reactor has a unique feature in that rearranged core materials can produce a large increase in reactivity and recriticality. If such a rearrangement of core materials should occur rapidly, there would be a high rate of reactivity increase producing power excursions. The released energy from such an energetic recriticality might challenge the reactor vessel integrity. An analysis of the hypothetical excursions that result in the disassembly of the reactor plays an important role in a liquid metal fast reactor (LMFR) safety analysis. The analysis of such excursions generally consists of three phases (initial or pre-disassembly phase, disassembly phase, energy-work conversion phase). The first step is referred to as the 'accident initiation' or 'pre-disassembly' phase. In this phase, the accident is traced from some initiating event, such as a coolant pump failure or control rod ejection, up to a prompt critical condition where high temperatures and pressures rapidly develop in the core. Such complex processes as fuel pin failure, sodium voiding, and fuel slumping are treated in this phase. Several computer programs are available for this type of calculation, including SAS4A, MELT-II and FREADM. A number of models have been developed for this type of analysis, including the REXCO and SOCOOL-II computer programs. VENUS-II deals with the second phase (disassembly analysis). Most of the models used in the code have been based on the original work of Bethe and Tait. The disassembly motion is calculated using a set of two-dimensional hydrodynamics equations in the VENUS code. The density changes can be explicitly calculated, which in turn allows the use of a more accurate density dependent equation of state. The main functional parts of the computational model can be summarized as follows: Power and energy (point kinetics), Temperature (energy balance), Internal pressure (equation of state), Material displacement (hydrodynamics), Reactivity

  5. Analysis of energy released from core disruptive accident of sodium cooled fast reactor using CDA-ER and VENUS-II codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S. H.; Ha, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    The fast reactor has a unique feature in that rearranged core materials can produce a large increase in reactivity and recriticality. If such a rearrangement of core materials should occur rapidly, there would be a high rate of reactivity increase producing power excursions. The released energy from such an energetic recriticality might challenge the reactor vessel integrity. An analysis of the hypothetical excursions that result in the disassembly of the reactor plays an important role in a liquid metal fast reactor (LMFR) safety analysis. The analysis of such excursions generally consists of three phases (initial or pre-disassembly phase, disassembly phase, energy-work conversion phase). The first step is referred to as the 'accident initiation' or 'pre-disassembly' phase. In this phase, the accident is traced from some initiating event, such as a coolant pump failure or control rod ejection, up to a prompt critical condition where high temperatures and pressures rapidly develop in the core. Such complex processes as fuel pin failure, sodium voiding, and fuel slumping are treated in this phase. Several computer programs are available for this type of calculation, including SAS4A, MELT-II and FREADM. A number of models have been developed for this type of analysis, including the REXCO and SOCOOL-II computer programs. VENUS-II deals with the second phase (disassembly analysis). Most of the models used in the code have been based on the original work of Bethe and Tait. The disassembly motion is calculated using a set of two-dimensional hydrodynamics equations in the VENUS code. The density changes can be explicitly calculated, which in turn allows the use of a more accurate density dependent equation of state. The main functional parts of the computational model can be summarized as follows: Power and energy (point kinetics), Temperature (energy balance), Internal pressure (equation of state), Material displacement (hydrodynamics), Reactivity feedback (Doppler and

  6. Optimal implantation depth and adherence to guidelines on permanent pacing to improve the results of transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the medtronic corevalve system: The CoreValve prospective, international, post-market ADVANCE-II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Petronio (Anna); J.-M. Sinning (Jan-Malte); N.M. van Mieghem (Nicolas); G. Zucchelli (Giulio); G. Nickenig (Georg); R. Bekeredjian (Raffi); J. Bosmans (Johan); F. Bedogni (Francesco); M. Branny (Marian); K. Stangl (Karl); J. Kovac (Jan); M. Schiltgen (Molly); S. Kraus (Stacia); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives The aim of the CoreValve prospective, international, post-market ADVANCE-II study was to define the rates of conduction disturbances and permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement with the Medtronic CoreValve System (Minneapolis,

  7. Potential effect of CuInS2/ZnS core-shell quantum dots on P3HT/PEDOT:PSS heterostructure based solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Shikha; Giripunje, S. M.

    2018-07-01

    Nanostructured quantum dots (QDs) are quite promising in the solar cell application due to quantum confinement effect. QDs possess multiple exciton generation and large surface area. The environment friendly CuInS2/ZnS core-shell QDs were prepared by solvothermal method. Thus, the 3 nm average sized CuInS2/ZnS QDs were employed in the bulk heterojunction device and the active blend layer consisting of the P3HT and CuInS2/ZnS QDs was investigated. The energy level information of CuInS2/ZnS QDs as an electron acceptor was explored by ultra violet photoelectron spectroscopy. Bulk heterojunction hybrid device of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT: (CuInS2/ZnS QDs)/ZnO/Ag was designed by spin coating approach and its electrical characterization was investigated by solar simulator. Current density - voltage characteristics shows the enhancement in power conversion efficiency with increasing concentration of CuInS2/ZnS QDs in bulk heterojunction device.

  8. Decay heat and activity of the structural materials of the fuel and blanket assemblies of the second and third core of KNK II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterhagen, D.

    1986-06-01

    The decay heat and activity caused by structural materials have been calculated for the fuel assemblies of KNK II (second and third core) with a residence time of 720 equivalent full-power days (efpd) and the blanket assemblies with 1880 efpd. The values are given for the different zones of the assemblies (head, active zone, fission gas plenum, foot and stellite area) for decay times from 1 to 20 years. For decay times beyond 2 years more than 80 % of the decay heat are caused by the Co60-decay, more than 60 % of which result from the stellite in the foot area [de

  9. Catalytic role of Cu(II) in the reduction of Cr(VI) by citric acid under an irradiation of simulated solar light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Jing; Lan, Yeqing

    2015-05-01

    The catalytic role of Cu(II) in the reduction of Cr(VI) by citric acid with simulated solar light was investigated. The results demonstrated that Cu(II) could significantly accelerate Cr(VI) reduction and the reaction obeyed to pseudo zero-order kinetics with respect to Cr(VI). The removal of Cr(VI) was related to the initial concentrations of Cu(II), citric acid, and the types of organic acids. The optimal removal of Cr(VI) was achieved at pH 4, and the rates of Cu(II) photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) by organic acids were in the order: tartaric acid (two α-OH groups, two -COOH groups)>citric acid (one α-OH group, three -COOH groups)>malic acid (one α-OH group, two -COOH groups)>lactic acid (one α-OH group, one -COOH group)≫succinic acid (two -COOH groups), suggesting that the number of α-OH was the key factor for the reaction, followed by the number of -COOH. The formation of Cu(II)-citric acid complex could generate Cu(I) and radicals through a pathway of metal-ligand-electron transfer, promoting the reduction of Cr(VI). This study is helpful to fully understanding the conversion of Cr(VI) in the existence of both organic acids and Cu(II) with solar light in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. On the relevance of chaos for halo stars in the solar neighbourhood II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Nicolas P.; Gómez, Facundo A.; Cincotta, Pablo M.; Giordano, Claudia M.; Grand, Robert J. J.; Marinacci, Federico; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Simpson, Christine M.; Springel, Volker; Frenk, Carlos S.

    2018-05-01

    In a previous paper based on dark matter only simulations we show that, in the approximation of an analytic and static potential describing the strongly triaxial and cuspy shape of Milky Way-sized haloes, diffusion due to chaotic mixing in the neighbourhood of the Sun does not efficiently erase phase space signatures of past accretion events. In this second paper we further explore the effect of chaotic mixing using multicomponent Galactic potential models and solar neighbourhood-like volumes extracted from fully cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, thus naturally accounting for the gravitational potential associated with baryonic components, such as the bulge and disc. Despite the strong change in the global Galactic potentials with respect to those obtained in dark matter only simulations, our results confirm that a large fraction of halo particles evolving on chaotic orbits exhibit their chaotic behaviour after periods of time significantly larger than a Hubble time. In addition, significant diffusion in phase space is not observed on those particles that do exhibit chaotic behaviour within a Hubble time.

  11. Reconstructing solar magnetic fields from historical observations. II. Testing the surface flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, I. O. I.; Virtanen, I. I.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Yeates, A.; Mursula, K.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We aim to use the surface flux transport model to simulate the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field from historical observations. In this work we study the accuracy of the model and its sensitivity to uncertainties in its main parameters and the input data. Methods: We tested the model by running simulations with different values of meridional circulation and supergranular diffusion parameters, and studied how the flux distribution inside active regions and the initial magnetic field affected the simulation. We compared the results to assess how sensitive the simulation is to uncertainties in meridional circulation speed, supergranular diffusion, and input data. We also compared the simulated magnetic field with observations. Results: We find that there is generally good agreement between simulations and observations. Although the model is not capable of replicating fine details of the magnetic field, the long-term evolution of the polar field is very similar in simulations and observations. Simulations typically yield a smoother evolution of polar fields than observations, which often include artificial variations due to observational limitations. We also find that the simulated field is fairly insensitive to uncertainties in model parameters or the input data. Due to the decay term included in the model the effects of the uncertainties are somewhat minor or temporary, lasting typically one solar cycle.

  12. Photocatalytic reactors for treating water pollution with solar illumination. II: a simplified analysis for flow reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagawe, G.; Bahnemann, D. [Inst. fuer Technische Chemie, Univ. Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Brandi, R.J.; Cassano, A.E. [INTEC (Univ. Nacional del Litoral and CONICET), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2003-07-01

    Very frequently outgoing streams of real wastewaters do not have a definite and constant composition. Additionally, when the degradation process makes use of solar irradiation, the photon flux is hardly constant. These two factors strongly militate against the use of very elaborate, exact models for analyzing the performance of the employed reactors. In these cases, approximate methods may be the most practical approach. One possible way is presented in this paper. The observed photonic efficiency concept developed in a previous contribution (sagawe et al., 2002a) is applied to continuous reactors for both steady state and transient operations of photocatalytic reactions applied to wastewaters decontamination processes. For this reactor the local observed photonic efficiency, defined at each reactor longitudinal position, is the convenient property to express the concentration spatial evolution. It is also shown that the description of the reactor performance employing a mass balance can be done in a rather simple way introducing a mass-moving coordinate transformation that remodel the mass inventory and permits working with simpler ordinary differential equations. (orig.)

  13. Tunable silver-shell dielectric core nano-beads array for thin-film solar cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong, E-mail: a0920146302@gmail.com, E-mail: chou.fong@ubd.edu.bn; Lim, Chee Ming [Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Centre for Advanced Material and Energy Sciences (Brunei) (Brunei Darussalam); Chiang, Chien-Ying [National Taipei University of Technology, Department of Electro-Optical Engineering (China); Voo, Nyuk Yoong; Muhammad Idris, Nur Syafi’ie; Chai, Siew Ung [Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Centre for Advanced Material and Energy Sciences (Brunei) (Brunei Darussalam)

    2016-04-15

    The absorbance spectra of thin-film solar cells (TFSCs) can be enhanced by constructing the tunable periodic Ag-shell nano-bead (PASNB) arrays in the active material. In this paper, we investigated a plasmonic thin-film solar cell (TFSC) which composed of the arrays of PASNB deposited onto a crystalline silicon layer. By performing three-dimensional finite element method, we demonstrate that near field coupling among the PASNB arrays results in SPR modes with enhanced absorbance and field intensity. The proposed structure can significantly enhance the plasmonic activity in a wide range of incident light and enlarge working wavelength of absorbance in the range of near-UV, visible and near-infrared. We show that the sensitivity of the PASNB arrays reveals a linear relationship with the thickness of Ag-shell nano-bead (ASNB) for both the anti-bonding and bonding modes in the absorbance spectra. The broadband of absorbance spectra could be expanded as a wide range by varying the thickness of ASNB while the particle size is kept constant. Simulation results suggest this alternative scheme to the design and improvements on plasmonic enhanced TFSCs can be extended to other nanophotonic applications.

  14. Photocapacitance study of type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum ring solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagener, M. C.; Botha, J. R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Carrington, P. J.; Krier, A. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-07

    In this study, the density of states associated with the localization of holes in GaSb/GaAs quantum rings are determined by the energy selective charging of the quantum ring distribution. The authors show, using conventional photocapacitance measurements, that the excess charge accumulated within the type-II nanostructures increases with increasing excitation energies for photon energies above 0.9 eV. Optical excitation between the localized hole states and the conduction band is therefore not limited to the Γ(k = 0) point, with pseudo-monochromatic light charging all states lying within the photon energy selected. The energy distribution of the quantum ring states could consequently be accurately related from the excitation dependence of the integrated photocapacitance. The resulting band of localized hole states is shown to be well described by a narrow distribution centered 407 meV above the GaAs valence band maximum.

  15. Ruthenium(II)-tris-bipyridine and titaniumdioxide - photocatalysts for solar induced water remediation; Ruthenium(II)-tris-bipyridin und Titandioxid - Photokatalysatoren zum solarinduzierten Abbau von Schadstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossmann, S [Lehrstuhl fuer Umweltmesstechnik, Engler-Bunte-Inst., Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany)

    1997-01-01

    The photophysical and photochemical properties of photocatalysts capable of working under solar-light-irradiation are of great interest. An especially promising application is the development of low-cost `Advanced Oxidation Procedures` (AOP). The aim of this endeavor is the detoxification of hazardous chemicals in wastewaters, which cannot be treated by conventional techniques. The mineralization of the most (highly) toxic chemicals to CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and simple inorganic compounds is favored by thermodynamics, however various difficulties such as kinetic barriers and hindered diffusion exist in systems for heterogeneous photocatalysis. In that respect, Ruthenium(II)-tris-bipyridine ([Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+}) and TiO{sub 2} - codoped photocatalysts offer several advantages. The photoreactive centers consist of supramolecular units of [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} and TiO{sub 2} - nanocrystals. Pollutants, such as our model compound 2,4-Dimethylaniline, diffuse through the framework of zeolite Y and undergo oxidative degradation at the reactive centers of the photocatalysts in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Under the aspect of application, the size of the zeolite Y-particles (diameter: 1x10{sup -6} m in average) permits their easy handling in filtration and recyling operations. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die photophysikalischen und -chemischen Eigenschaften von Katalysatoren, die das Licht der Sonne als kostenguenstige Energiequelle ausnutzen, treten immer staerker in den Vordergrund des Interesses. Dies gilt vor allem fuer ihren Einsatz in `Advanced Oxidation Technologies` (AOT`s) zur Entgiftung toxischer Substanzen im Abwasser. Die Mineralisation der meisten (hoch)giftigen Chemikalien zu CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O und einfachen anorganischen Verbindungen ist zwar thermodynamisch beguenstigt, es treten jedoch sowohl kinetische Hemmschwellen als auch Diffusionshindernisse in der heterogenen Photokatalyse auf. Ruthenium(II)-tris-bipyridin ([Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+}) und TiO{sub 2

  16. Stellar mass spectrum within massive collapsing clumps. II. Thermodynamics and tidal forces of the first Larson core. A robust mechanism for the peak of the IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Context. Understanding the origin of the initial mass function (IMF) of stars is a major problem for the star formation process and beyond. Aim. We investigate the dependence of the peak of the IMF on the physics of the so-called first Larson core, which corresponds to the point where the dust becomes opaque to its own radiation. Methods: We performed numerical simulations of collapsing clouds of 1000 M⊙ for various gas equations of state (eos), paying great attention to the numerical resolution and convergence. The initial conditions of these numerical experiments are varied in the companion paper. We also develop analytical models that we compare to our numerical results. Results: When an isothermal eos is used, we show that the peak of the IMF shifts to lower masses with improved numerical resolution. When an adiabatic eos is employed, numerical convergence is obtained. The peak position varies with the eos, and using an analytical model to infer the mass of the first Larson core, we find that the peak position is about ten times its value. By analyzing the stability of nonlinear density fluctuations in the vicinity of a point mass and then summing over a reasonable density distribution, we find that tidal forces exert a strong stabilizing effect and likely lead to a preferential mass several times higher than that of the first Larson core. Conclusions: We propose that in a sufficiently massive and cold cloud, the peak of the IMF is determined by the thermodynamics of the high-density adiabatic gas as well as the stabilizing influence of tidal forces. The resulting characteristic mass is about ten times the mass of the first Larson core, which altogether leads to a few tenths of solar masses. Since these processes are not related to the large-scale physical conditions and to the environment, our results suggest a possible explanation for the apparent universality of the peak of the IMF.

  17. Multireversible redox processes in pentanuclear bis(triple-helical) manganese complexes featuring an oxo-centered triangular {Mn(II)2Mn(III)(μ3-O)}5+ or {Mn(II)Mn(III)2(μ3-O)}6+ core wrapped by two {Mn(II)2(bpp)3}-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, Sophie; Rich, Jordi; Sens, Cristina; Stoll, Thibaut; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Llobet, Antoni; Rodriguez, Montserrat; Romero, Isabel; Clérac, Rodolphe; Mathonière, Corine; Duboc, Carole; Deronzier, Alain; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle

    2011-09-05

    A new pentanuclear bis(triple-helical) manganese complex has been isolated and characterized by X-ray diffraction in two oxidation states: [{Mn(II)(μ-bpp)(3)}(2)Mn(II)(2)Mn(III)(μ-O)](3+) (1(3+)) and [{Mn(II)(μ-bpp)(3)}(2)Mn(II)Mn(III)(2)(μ-O)](4+) (1(4+)). The structure consists of a central {Mn(3)(μ(3)-O)} core of Mn(II)(2)Mn(III) (1(3+)) or Mn(II)Mn(III)(2) ions (1(4+)) which is connected to two apical Mn(II) ions through six bpp(-) ligands. Both cations have a triple-stranded helicate configuration, and a pair of enantiomers is present in each crystal. The redox properties of 1(3+) have been investigated in CH(3)CN. A series of five distinct and reversible one-electron waves is observed in the -1.0 and +1.50 V potential range, assigned to the Mn(II)(4)Mn(III)/Mn(II)(5), Mn(II)(3)Mn(III)(2)/Mn(II)(4)Mn(III), Mn(II)(2)Mn(III)(3)/Mn(II)(3)Mn(III)(2), Mn(II)Mn(III)(4)/Mn(II)(2)Mn(III)(3), and Mn(III)(5)/Mn(II)Mn(III)(4) redox couples. The two first oxidation processes leading to Mn(II)(3)Mn(III)(2) (1(4+)) and Mn(II)(2)Mn(III)(3) (1(5+)) are related to the oxidation of the Mn(II) ions of the central core and the two higher oxidation waves, close in potential, are thus assigned to the oxidation of the two apical Mn(II) ions. The 1(4+) and 1(5+) oxidized species and the reduced Mn(4)(II) (1(2+)) species are quantitatively generated by bulk electrolyses demonstrating the high stability of the pentanuclear structure in four oxidation states (1(2+) to 1(5+)). The spectroscopic characteristics (X-band electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR, and UV-visible) of these species are also described as well as the magnetic properties of 1(3+) and 1(4+) in solid state. The powder X- and Q-band EPR signature of 1(3+) corresponds to an S = 5/2 spin state characterized by a small zero-field splitting parameter (|D| = 0.071 cm(-1)) attributed to the two apical Mn(II) ions. At 40 K, the magnetic behavior is consistent for 1(3+) with two apical S = 5/2 {Mn(II)(bpp)(3)}(-) and one S

  18. Refactoring the six-gene photosystem II core in the chloroplast of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimpel, Javier A.; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Scranton, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    production, particularly under specific environmental conditions. PSII is a complex multisubunit enzyme with strong interdependence among its components. In this work, we have deleted the six core genes of PSII in the eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and refactored them in a single DNA construct...

  19. Evaluation report on CCTF Core-II reflood test second shakedown test, C2-SH2 (Run 54)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Tadashi; Sugimoto, Jun; Akimoto, Hajime; Okubo, Tsutomu; Murao, Yoshio

    1985-03-01

    A low power test (the initial averaged linear power density = 1.18 kW/m) and the base case test (1.4 kW/m) were performed with the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, in order to study the effect of the power on the reflood phenomena. The former linear power density corresponds nearly to the scaled linear power density based on the current safety evaluation criterio. During the early period of the reflood ( 200s) the heat transfer coefficient became higher and resultantly the quench front advanced faster in the low power test. The core flooding rate was nearly identical between both tests, independently of the different power. The insensitiveness of the power to the core flooding rate was also observed in FLECHT-SET performed in the USA. A significatn large differential pressure oscillation at ECC ports was experienced in the low power test, and it may be important for the long term core cooling although it has not been taken note on the previous studies. (author)

  20. Investigating the Theoretical Structure of the DAS-II Core Battery at School Age Using Bayesian Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Stefan C.; Golay, Philippe; McGill, Ryan J.; Canivez, Gary L.

    2018-01-01

    Bayesian structural equation modeling (BSEM) was used to investigate the latent structure of the Differential Ability Scales-Second Edition core battery using the standardization sample normative data for ages 7-17. Results revealed plausibility of a three-factor model, consistent with publisher theory, expressed as either a higher-order (HO) or a…

  1. Effect of steam corrosion on HTGR core support post strength loss. Part II. Consequences of steam generator tube rupture event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichner, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    To perform the assessment, a series of eight tube-rupture events of varying severity and probability were postulated. Case 1 pertains to the situation where the moisture detection, loop isolation, and dump procedures function as planned; the remaining seven cases suppose various defects in the moisture detection system, the core auxiliary coolant system, and the integrity of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Core post burnoffs beneath three typical fuel zones were estimated for each postulated event from the determined impurity compositions and core post temperature history. Two separate corrosion rate expressions were assumed, as deemed most appropriate of those published for the high-oxidant level typical in tube rupture events. It was found that the nominal core post beneath the highest power factor fuel zone would lose from 0.02 to 2.5 percent of their strength, depending on an assumed corrosion rate equation and the severity of the event. The effect of hot streaking during cooldown was determined by using preliminary estimates of its magnitude. It was found that localized strength loss beneath the highest power factor zone ranges from 0.23 to 12 percent, assuming reasonably probable hot-streaking circumstances. The combined worst case, hot streaking typical for a load-following transient and most severe accident sequence, yields an estimated strength loss of from 25 to 33 percent for localized regions beneath the highest power factor zones

  2. Accurate pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC class II binding affinity with improved binding core identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    with known binding registers, the new method NetMHCIIpan-3.1 significantly outperformed the earlier 3.0 version. We illustrate the impact of accurate binding core identification for the interpretation of T cell cross-reactivity using tetramer double staining with a CMV epitope and its variants mapped...

  3. Structural and magnetic characterization of three tetranuclear Cu(II) complexes with face-sharing-dicubane/double-open-cubane like core framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Aparup; Bertolasi, Valerio; Figuerola, Albert; Manna, Subal Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Three novel tetranuclear copper(II) complexes namely [Cu 4 (L 1 ) 4 ]∙2(dmf) (1), [Cu 4 (L 1 ) 4 ] (2) and [Cu 4 (L 2 ) 2 (HL 2 ) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ]∙2(ClO 4 )·6(H 2 O) (3) (H 2 L 1 , (E)−2-((1-hydroxybutan-2-ylimino)methyl)phenol; H 2 L 2 , (E)−2-((1-hydroxybutan-2-ylimino)methyl)−6-methoxyphenol)) were synthesized from the self-assembly of copper(II) perchlorate and the tridentate Schiff base ligands. The structural determination reveals that crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group C2/c, whereas both the and crystallize in the triclinic system with space group P-1. and possess face-sharing dicubane core, on the other hand complex 3 has double open cubane core structure. The copper(II) ions in the cubane core are in distorted square planar geometries, and weak π…π and C–H…π interactions lead to formation of a 2D supramolecular architecture for and . At room temperature and , exhibit fluorescence with a quantum yield (Φ s ) of 0.47, 0.49 and 0.38, respectively. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements in the range 2–300 K indicate an overall weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling in all complexes. The PHI program was used to study their magnetic behaviour. In agreement with their face-sharing dicubane structure, a Hamiltonian of the type H =– J 1 (S 1 S 2 +S 1 S 2’ +S 1' S 2 +S 1' S 2’ ) – J 2 S 1 S 1’ , where S 1 = S 1’ = S 2 = S 2’ = S Cu =1/2, was used for studying and . Simulations performed suggest magnetic exchange constants with values close to J 1 =−20 cm −1 and J 2 =0 cm -1 for these complexes. On the other hand, the spin Hamiltonian H =– J 1 (S 1 S 4 +S 2 S 3 ) – J 2 (S 1 S 3 +S 2 S 4 ) – J 3 S 1 S 2 , where S 1 = S 2 = S 3 = S 4 = S Cu =1/2, was used to study the magnetic behaviour of the double open cubane core of and a good agreement between the experimental and simulated results was found by using the parameters g 1 = g 2 =2.20, g 3 = g 4 =2.18, J 1 =−36 cm -1 , J 2

  4. A MULTI-SITE CAMPAIGN TO MEASURE SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS IN PROCYON. II. MODE FREQUENCIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedding, Timothy R.; Bruntt, Hans; Kiss, Laszlo L.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Campante, Tiago L.; Appourchaux, Thierry; Bonanno, Alfio; Chaplin, William J.; Garcia, Rafael A.; Martic, Milena; Mosser, Benoit; Butler, R. Paul; O'Toole, Simon J.; Kambe, Eiji; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Ando, Hiroyasu; Sato, Bun'ei; Hartmann, Michael; Hatzes, Artie

    2010-01-01

    We have analyzed data from a multi-site campaign to observe oscillations in the F5 star Procyon. The data consist of high-precision velocities that we obtained over more than three weeks with 11 telescopes. A new method for adjusting the data weights allows us to suppress the sidelobes in the power spectrum. Stacking the power spectrum in a so-called echelle diagram reveals two clear ridges, which we identify with even and odd values of the angular degree (l = 0 and 2, and l = 1 and 3, respectively). We interpret a strong, narrow peak at 446 μHz that lies close to the l = 1 ridge as a mode with mixed character. We show that the frequencies of the ridge centroids and their separations are useful diagnostics for asteroseismology. In particular, variations in the large separation appear to indicate a glitch in the sound-speed profile at an acoustic depth of ∼1000 s. We list frequencies for 55 modes extracted from the data spanning 20 radial orders, a range comparable to the best solar data, which will provide valuable constraints for theoretical models. A preliminary comparison with published models shows that the offset between observed and calculated frequencies for the radial modes is very different for Procyon than for the Sun and other cool stars. We find the mean lifetime of the modes in Procyon to be 1.29 +0.55 -0.49 days, which is significantly shorter than the 2-4 days seen in the Sun.

  5. THE TOPOLOGICAL CHANGES OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS. II. THE RECLOSING OF AN OPENED FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, B. C.; Janse, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    This is a study of the spontaneous formation of current sheets responding to the closing of an opened magnetic field by resistive reconnection in an electrically, highly conducting atmosphere outside a unit sphere. Pairs of initial-final equilibrium states are calculated explicitly, taking the field to be composed of three systems of untwisted flux in both states. In the initial state, two of the three flux systems are closed potential fields whereas the third system contains an equilibrium current sheet that keeps the potential fields on its two sides globally open. The final state is an everywhere potential field, with all three flux systems closed, produced by the resistive dissipation of the current sheet in the initial state. The unit sphere is taken to be a rigid, perfectly conducting wall during reconnection, so that the normal flux distribution is unchanged on the unit sphere. Field solutions subject to this unchanging boundary condition are obtained with and without the assumption of axisymmetry. The mathematical model has been designed to show that the topological changes produced by the current-sheet dissipation are simple under axisymmetry but radically different in the absence of axisymmetry, a fundamental point established in the first paper of this series. In the general case, the topological changes imply that other current sheets must have formed. Some of these current sheets form on the separatrix flux surfaces of the multipolar field. Others form throughout the closed-flux systems induced by volumetric changes. The opening and reclosing of magnetic fields during a solar coronal mass ejection may produce a multitude of current sheets not previously anticipated in the current understanding of this phenomenon. Basic to this study is a general topological property of magnetic flux tubes treated separately in the Appendix.

  6. Characterization of the low-temperature triplet state of chlorophyll in photosystem II core complexes: Application of phosphorescence measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabelin, Alexey A; Neverov, Konstantin V; Krasnovsky, Alexander A; Shkuropatova, Valentina A; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; Shkuropatov, Anatoly Ya

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorescence measurements at 77 K and light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy at 95 K were applied to study of the triplet state of chlorophyll a ((3)Chl) in photosystem II (PSII) core complexes isolated from spinach. Using both methods, (3)Chl was observed in the core preparations with doubly reduced primary quinone acceptor QA. The spectral parameters of Chl phosphorescence resemble those in the isolated PSII reaction centers (RCs). The main spectral maximum and the lifetime of the phosphorescence corresponded to 955±1 nm and of 1.65±0.05 ms respectively; in the excitation spectrum, the absorption maxima of all core complex pigments (Chl, pheophytin a (Pheo), and β-carotene) were observed. The differential signal at 1667(-)/1628(+)cm(-1) reflecting a downshift of the stretching frequency of the 13(1)-keto C=O group of Chl was found to dominate in the triplet-minus-singlet FTIR difference spectrum of core complexes. Based on FTIR results and literature data, it is proposed that (3)Chl is mostly localized on the accessory chlorophyll that is in triplet equilibrium with P680. Analysis of the data suggests that the Chl triplet state responsible for the phosphorescence and the FTIR difference spectrum is mainly generated due to charge recombination in the reaction center radical pair P680(+)PheoD1(-), and the energy and temporal parameters of this triplet state as well as the molecular environment and interactions of the triplet-bearing Chl molecule are similar in the PSII core complexes and isolated PSII RCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Inhibitory Core of the Myostatin Prodomain: Its Interaction with Both Type I and II Membrane Receptors, and Potential to Treat Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Yutaka; Takayama, Kentaro; Nishimatsu, Shin-ichiro; Okada, Tadashi; Fujino, Masahiro; Fukai, Yuta; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Hagiwara, Hiroki; Itoh, Fumiko; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Hayashi, Yoshio; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin, a muscle-specific transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. The N-terminal prodomain of myostatin noncovalently binds to and suppresses the C-terminal mature domain (ligand) as an inactive circulating complex. However, which region of the myostatin prodomain is required to inhibit the biological activity of myostatin has remained unknown. We identified a 29-amino acid region that inhibited myostatin-induced transcriptional activity by 79% compared with the full-length prodomain. This inhibitory core resides near the N-terminus of the prodomain and includes an α-helix that is evolutionarily conserved among other TGF-β family members, but suppresses activation of myostatin and growth and differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) that share identical membrane receptors. Interestingly, the inhibitory core co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated with not only the ligand, but also its type I and type II membrane receptors. Deletion of the inhibitory core in the full-length prodomain removed all capacity for suppression of myostatin. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the inhibitory core (p29) ameliorates impaired myoblast differentiation induced by myostatin and GDF11, but not activin or TGF-β1. Moreover, intramuscular injection of p29 alleviated muscle atrophy and decreased the absolute force in caveolin 3-deficient limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C model mice. The injection suppressed activation of myostatin signaling and restored the decreased numbers of muscle precursor cells caused by caveolin 3 deficiency. Our findings indicate a novel concept for this newly identified inhibitory core of the prodomain of myostatin: that it not only suppresses the ligand, but also prevents two distinct membrane receptors from binding to the ligand. This study provides a strong rationale for the use of p29 in the amelioration of skeletal muscle atrophy in various clinical settings.

  8. The zonal tidal effect on the variation in the rotation rate of the Earth with a fluid core II. Numerical calculation and comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han-Wei; Zheng, Yong; Du, Lan; Pan, Guan-Song

    The tidal variation in Earth rotation rate is a periodical response to solar-lunar tide generating potential (TGP). Some theoretical formulae are given here based on Doodson development of TGP including the variations in Earth rotation rate, LOD and UT1. Finally the zonal tidal effect on the variation in the fluid core Earth rotation rate is calculated according to the formula deduced by Xi Qinwen (1995). The calculation shows that the results in this paper are well consistent with the ones in IERS (96), which indicates the correctness of the theoretical formula we deduced. It is also shown that the effects from the high frequency parts are relatively small, within the observing precision so far; relatively large effects due to the lower parts, which should be able to be seperated from the observed data, are actually difficult to make because of the influence from some non-tidal factors as well as short time span data.

  9. 200W Deep Space CubeSat Composite Beam Roll-Up Solar Array (COBRA), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solar arrays that have very high specific power (W/kg) and compact stowed volume (W/m3), while still providing shielding to the solar cell, are an enabling...

  10. Multi-Use Solar Thermal System for Oxygen Production from Lunar Regolith [7227-570], Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop an innovative solar thermal system for oxygen production from lunar regolith. In this system solar radiation is collected by the concentrator...

  11. Engineered Photosystem II reaction centers optimize photochemistry versus photoprotection at different solar intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyard, David J; Gimpel, Javier; Ananyev, Gennady M; Mayfield, Stephen P; Dismukes, G Charles

    2014-03-12

    The D1 protein of Photosystem II (PSII) provides most of the ligating amino acid residues for the Mn4CaO5 water-oxidizing complex (WOC) and half of the reaction center cofactors, and it is present as two isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. These isoforms, D1:1 and D1:2, confer functional advantages for photosynthetic growth at low and high light intensities, respectively. D1:1, D1:2, and seven point mutations in the D1:2 background that are native to D1:1 were expressed in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We used these nine strains to show that those strains that confer a higher yield of PSII charge separation under light-limiting conditions (where charge recombination is significant) have less efficient photochemical turnover, measured in terms of both a lower WOC turnover probability and a longer WOC cycle period. Conversely, these same strains under light saturation (where charge recombination does not compete) confer a correspondingly faster O2 evolution rate and greater protection against photoinhibition. Taken together, the data clearly establish that PSII primary charge separation is a trade-off between photochemical productivity (water oxidation and plastoquinone reduction) and charge recombination (photoprotection). These trade-offs add up to a significant growth advantage for the two natural isoforms. These insights provide fundamental design principles for engineering of PSII reaction centers with optimal photochemical efficiencies for growth at low versus high light intensities.

  12. Colours of minor bodies in the outer solar system. II. A statistical analysis revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainaut, O. R.; Boehnhardt, H.; Protopapa, S.

    2012-10-01

    We present an update of the visible and near-infrared colour database of Minor Bodies in the Outer Solar System (MBOSSes), which now includes over 2000 measurement epochs of 555 objects, extracted from over 100 articles. The list is fairly complete as of December 2011. The database is now large enough to enable any dataset with a large dispersion to be safely identified and rejected from the analysis. The selection method used is quite insensitive to individual outliers. Most of the rejected datasets were observed during the early days of MBOSS photometry. The individual measurements are combined in a way that avoids possible rotational artifacts. The spectral gradient over the visible range is derived from the colours, as well as the R absolute magnitude M(1,1). The average colours, absolute magnitude, and spectral gradient are listed for each object, as well as the physico-dynamical classes using a classification adapted from Gladman and collaborators. Colour-colour diagrams, histograms, and various other plots are presented to illustrate and investigate class characteristics and trends with other parameters, whose significances are evaluated using standard statistical tests. Except for a small discrepancy for the J-H colour, the largest objects, with M(1,1) < 5, are indistinguishable from the smaller ones. The larger ones are slightly bluer than the smaller ones in J-H. Short-period comets, Plutinos and other resonant objects, hot classical disk objects, scattered disk objects and detached disk objects have similar properties in the visible, while the cold classical disk objects and the Jupiter Trojans form two separate groups of their spectral properties in the visible wavelength range. The well-known colour bimodality of Centaurs is confirmed. The hot classical disk objects with large inclinations, or large orbital excitations are found to be bluer than the others, confirming a previously known result. Additionally, the hot classical disk objects with a

  13. Structural and magnetic characterization of three tetranuclear Cu(II) complexes with face-sharing-dicubane/double-open-cubane like core framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Aparup; Bertolasi, Valerio; Figuerola, Albert; Manna, Subal Chandra

    2017-05-01

    Three novel tetranuclear copper(II) complexes namely [Cu4(L1)4]•2(dmf) (1), [Cu4(L1)4] (2) and [Cu4(L2)2(HL2)2(H2O)2]•2(ClO4)·6(H2O) (3) (H2L1, (E)-2-((1-hydroxybutan-2-ylimino)methyl)phenol; H2L2, (E)-2-((1-hydroxybutan-2-ylimino)methyl)-6-methoxyphenol)) were synthesized from the self-assembly of copper(II) perchlorate and the tridentate Schiff base ligands. The structural determination reveals that complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group C2/c, whereas both the complexes 2 and 3 crystallize in the triclinic system with space group P-1. Complexes 1 and 2 possess face-sharing dicubane core, on the other hand complex 3 has double open cubane core structure. The copper(II) ions in the cubane core are in distorted square planar geometries, and weak π…π and C-H…π interactions lead to formation of a 2D supramolecular architecture for complexes 1 and 2. At room temperature complexes 1, 2 and 3, exhibit fluorescence with a quantum yield (Φs) of 0.47, 0.49 and 0.38, respectively. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements in the range 2-300 K indicate an overall weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling in all complexes. The PHI program was used to study their magnetic behaviour. In agreement with their face-sharing dicubane structure, a Hamiltonian of the type H =- J1(S1S2+S1S2'+S1'S2+S1'S2') - J2S1S1', where S1 = S1' = S2 = S2' = SCu =1/2, was used for studying complexes 1 and 2. Simulations performed suggest magnetic exchange constants with values close to J1 =-20 cm-1 and J2 =0 cm-1 for these complexes. On the other hand, the spin Hamiltonian H =- J1(S1S4+S2S3) - J2(S1S3+S2S4) - J3S1S2, where S1 = S2 = S3 = S4 = SCu =1/2, was used to study the magnetic behaviour of the double open cubane core of complex 3 and a good agreement between the experimental and simulated results was found by using the parameters g1 = g2 =2.20, g3 = g4 =2.18, J1 =-36 cm-1, J2 =-44 cm-1 and J3 =0 cm-1.

  14. Effect of correlation in the 3d/sup n/ core on the resonance transition in Cu II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, C.F.; Glass, R.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary report is presented on the effect of correlation in the 3d/sup n/ core on the 3d 10 1 S → 3d 9 4p 1 P f value by use of the multiconfiguration (MC) Hartree-Fock procedure. A common orbital basis was used for correlation in the core, with virtual orbitals determined variationally for the initial state. Three different approximations were used: a single-configuration approximation for both initial and final state, a MC approximation for 3d 10 correlation in the initial state and a single configuration for the final state, and MC approximations for both initial and final states. Some preliminary f values for the 3d 10 1 S → 3d 9 4p 1 P transition are tabulated. Comparison of calculated with experimental values indicates that correlation in the 3d 9 core of the final state is needed to obtain the correct transition energy to bring the length and velocity forms into good agreement with themselves and experiment, and that the multiplet strength for the transition is not greatly affected by correlation. 1 table

  15. Search for solar axions with the X-ray telescope of the CAST experiment (phase II); Suche nach solaren Axionen mit dem Roentgenteleskop des CAST-Experiments (Phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordt, Annika

    2009-10-14

    The CAST (CERN Solar Axion Telescope) experiment is searching for solar axions by their conversion into photons inside a transverse magnetic field. So far, no solar axionsignal has been detected, but a new upper limit could be given (CAST Phase I). Since 2005, CAST entered in its second phase where it operates with a buffer gas ({sup 4}He) in the conversion region to extend the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axionmasses. For the first time it is possible to enter the theoretically favored axion massrange and to give an upper limit for this solar axion mass-range (>0.02 eV). This thesis is about the analysis of the X-ray telescope data Phase II with {sup 4}He inside the magnet. The result for the coupling constant of axions to photons is: g{sub {alpha}}{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}<1.6-6.0 x 10{sup -10} GeV{sup -1} (95%C.L.) for m{sub a}=0.02-0.4 eV. (2) This result is better than any result that has been given before in this mass range for solar axions. (orig.)

  16. Preparation of Vertically Aligned ZnO/TiO2 Core-Shell Composites for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Chuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertically aligned ZnO/TiO2 (VA-ZnO/TiO2 core-shell composites deposited on ZnO-seeded indium tin oxide (ITO glasses have been synthesized by a chemical bath deposition approach for growing one-dimensional ZnO structure followed by a spin procedure for coating TiO2 on the surface of ZnO structure. The influences of the cycles of spin coating of TiO2 (CSCT on the properties of VA-ZnO/TiO2 and performances of the assembled DSSCs were studied. The power conversion efficiency of the VA-ZnO/TiO2-based DSSC measured under illumination of 100 mW/cm2 and AM 1.5 can reach 0.81%, representing 93% improvement when compared with that of the pristine VA-ZnO electrode (0.42%. The intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS were applied to study the kinetics and interfacial transfer of the photogenerated electrons. Both the photocurrent and power conversion efficiency correlate well with the steady state electron density. Enlargement in surface area and dye adsorption, suppression of dissolution of Zn2+, diminishment in electron recombination, and fast transfer of injected electrons from excited dyes to TiO2 conduction bands arising from coating TiO2 on VA-ZnO are regarded as the predominant causes for this improvement.

  17. Core-shell designs of photoluminescent nanodiamonds with porous silica coatings for bioimaging and drug delivery II: application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Neeraj; Näreoja, Tuomas; von Haartman, Eva; Karaman, Didem Şen; Jiang, Hua; Koho, Sami; Dolenko, Tatiana A; Hänninen, Pekka E; Vlasov, Denis I; Ralchenko, Victor G; Hosomi, Satoru; Vlasov, Igor I; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Rosenholm, Jessica M

    2013-05-07

    Recent advances within materials science and its interdisciplinary applications in biomedicine have emphasized the potential of using a single multifunctional composite material for concurrent drug delivery and biomedical imaging. Here we present a novel composite material consisting of a photoluminescent nanodiamond (ND) core with a porous silica (SiO2) shell. This novel multifunctional probe serves as an alternative nanomaterial to address the existing problems with delivery and subsequent tracing of the particles. Whereas the unique optical properties of ND allows for long-term live cell imaging and tracking of cellular processes, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have proven to be efficient drug carriers. The advantages of both ND and MSNs were hereby integrated in the new composite material, ND@MSN. The optical properties provided by the ND core rendered the nanocomposite suitable for microscopy imaging in fluorescence and reflectance mode, as well as super-resolution microscopy as a STED label; whereas the porous silica coating provided efficient intracellular delivery capacity, especially in surface-functionalized form. This study serves as a demonstration how this novel nanomaterial can be exploited for both bioimaging and drug delivery for future theranostic applications.

  18. Ab initio effective core potentials including relativistic effects. II. Potential energy curves for Xe2, Xe+2, and Xe*2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermler, W.C.; Lee, Y.S.; Pitzer, K.S.; Winter, N.W.

    1978-01-01

    Potential energy curves for the ground 1 Σ + /sub g/ state of Xe 2 , the first four states of the Xe + 2 ions, and the eight Xe* 2 excimer states corresponding to the addition of a 6ssigma/sub g/ Rydberg electron to these ion cores have been computed using averaged relativistic effective core potentials (AREP) and the self-consistent field approximation for the valence electrons. The calculations were carried out using the LS-coupling scheme with the effects of spin--orbit coupling included in the resulting potential energy curves using an empirical procedure. A comparison of nonrelativistic and averaged relativistic EP's and subsequent molecular calculations indicates that relativistic effects arising from the mass--velocity and Darwin terms are not important for these properties of Xe 2 molecules. Spectroscopic constants for Xe + 2 are in good agreement with all electron CI calculations suggesting that the computed values for Xe* 2 excimers should be reliable. The lifetime for the O/sub u/ + state of the Xe 2 * is computed to be 5.6 nsec which is in the range of the experimentally determined values

  19. Composition and strain effects in Type I and Type II heterostructure ZnSe/Cd(Zn)S and ZnSe/Cd1-xZnxS core/shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheshlaghi, Negar; Pisheh, Hadi Sedaghat; Ünlü, Hilmi

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the effect of ternary shell alloy composition on the bandgap and diameter of core of ZnSe / Cd1 - x Znx S heterostructure core/shell quantum dots, which were synthesized by using a simple colloidal technique. Characterization by using the x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopic techniques indicate that (i) there is a transition of ZnSe / Cd0.6 Zn0.4 S Type-I heterostructure (electrons and holes tend to localize in core) to ZnSe / Cd0.75 Zn0.25 S quasi-Type-II heterostructures (holes tend to localized in the core and electrons are delocalized) and (ii) then after large red shift and Stock-shift in PL emission spectra but not a distinct absorption peak in UV spectra become noticeable in ZnSe/Cd0.75Zn0.25 S quasi-Type II and ZnSe/CdS Type II heterostructures (electrons are localized in core and holes are localized in shell). Furthermore, the increase of Cd:S ratio in shell alloy composition shifts the XRD peaks to lower 2θ degrees which corresponds to tensile strain in the ZnSe core. Finally, the hydrostatic interfacial strain has effect on the squeezing or stretching the capped core: A decrease of compressive force on core from ZnSe/ZnS to tensile force in ZnSe/CdS with increase in Cd:S ratio indicates that transition of compressive strain to tensile strain takes place with the transition from Type-I to II heterostructure.

  20. γ-Sultam-cored N,N-ligands in the ruthenium(ii)-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of aryl ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Slavko; Modec, Barbara; Stephan, Michel; Mohar, Barbara

    2016-02-14

    The synthesis of new enantiopure syn- and anti-3-(α-aminobenzyl)-benzo-γ-sultam ligands 6 and their application in the ruthenium(ii)-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of ketones using formic acid/triethylamine is described. In particular, benzo-fused cyclic ketones afforded excellent enantioselectivities in reasonable time employing a low loading of the syn ligand-containing catalyst. A never-before-seen dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) during reduction of a γ-keto carboxylic ester (S7) derivative of 1-indanone is realized leading as well to excellent induction.

  1. Highly efficient and stable cyclometalated ruthenium(II) complexes as sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jian-Feng; Liu, Jun-Min; Su, Pei-Yang; Chen, Yi-Fan; Shen, Yong; Xiao, Li-Min; Kuang, Dai-Bin; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Four novel thiocyanate-free cyclometalated ruthenium sensitizer were conveniently synthesized. • The D-CF 3 -sensitized DSSCs show higher efficiency compared to N719 based cells. • The DSSCs based on D-CF 3 and D-bisCF 3 sensitizers exhibit excellent long-term stability. • The diverse cyclometalated Ru complexes can be developed as high-performance sensitizers for use in DSSC. - Abstract: Four novel thiocyanate-free cyclometallted Ru(II) complexes, D-bisCF 3 , D-CF 3 , D-OMe, and D-DPA, with two 4,4′-dicarboxylic acid-2,2′-bipyridine together with a functionalized phenylpyridine ancillary ligand, have been designed and synthesized. The effect of different substituents (R = bisCF 3 , CF 3 , OMe, and DPA) on the ancillary C^N ligand on the photophysical properties and photovoltaic performance is investigated. Under standard global AM 1.5 solar conditions, the device based on D-CF 3 sensitizer gives a higher conversion efficiency of 8.74% than those based on D-bisCF 3 , D-OMe, and D-DPA, which can be ascribed to its broad range of visible light absorption, appropriate localization of the frontier orbitals, weak hydrogen bonds between -CF 3 and -OH groups at the TiO 2 surface, moderate dye loading on TiO 2 , and high charge collection efficiency. Moreover, the D-bisCF 3 and D-CF 3 based DSSCs exhibit good stability under 100 mW cm −2 light soaking at 60 °C for 400 h

  2. Providing all global energy with wind, water, and solar power, Part II: Reliability, system and transmission costs, and policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delucchi, Mark A.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2011-01-01

    This is Part II of two papers evaluating the feasibility of providing all energy for all purposes (electric power, transportation, and heating/cooling), everywhere in the world, from wind, water, and the sun (WWS). In Part I, we described the prominent renewable energy plans that have been proposed and discussed the characteristics of WWS energy systems, the global demand for and availability of WWS energy, quantities and areas required for WWS infrastructure, and supplies of critical materials. Here, we discuss methods of addressing the variability of WWS energy to ensure that power supply reliably matches demand (including interconnecting geographically dispersed resources, using hydroelectricity, using demand-response management, storing electric power on site, over-sizing peak generation capacity and producing hydrogen with the excess, storing electric power in vehicle batteries, and forecasting weather to project energy supplies), the economics of WWS generation and transmission, the economics of WWS use in transportation, and policy measures needed to enhance the viability of a WWS system. We find that the cost of energy in a 100% WWS will be similar to the cost today. We conclude that barriers to a 100% conversion to WWS power worldwide are primarily social and political, not technological or even economic. - Research highlights: → We evaluate the feasibility of global energy supply from wind, water, and solar energy. → WWS energy can be supplied reliably and economically to all energy-use sectors. → The social cost of WWS energy generally is less than the cost of fossil-fuel energy. → Barriers to 100% WWS power worldwide are socio-political, not techno-economic.

  3. An estimation of impact of anthropogenic aerosols in atmosphere of Tirana on solar insolation. Part II: Modification of solar energy potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzra, Urim, E-mail: rimibuzra@yahoo.com; Berberi, Pellumb; Mitrushi, Driada; Muda, Valbona [Department of Engineering Physics, FIMIF, PUT, Tirana (Albania); Halili, Daniela [Department of physics, FNS, AXHU, Elbasan (Albania); Berdufi, Irma [Institute of Nuclear Physics, INP, TU, Tirana (Albania)

    2016-03-25

    Change of irradiative properties of the atmosphere during clear days is an indicator, among others, of existence of atmospheric aerosols and can be used as an indicator for assessment both air pollution and local modifications of solar energy potentials. The main objective of this study is estimation of influence of anthropogenic aerosols on solar energy falling in a horizontal surface during a cloudless day. We have analyzed and quantified the effect of aerosols on reducing the amount of solar energy that falls on the horizontal ground surface in cloudless sky conditions, estimating temporal evolution, both in daily and hour scale, considering also, side effects caused by relative humidity of the air wind speed and geometric factor. As an indicator of concentration of aerosols in atmosphere, we agreed to use the attenuation of solar radiation after the last rainy day. All data were corrected by factors such as, variations of relative humidity, wind speed and daily change of incident angle of solar radiation. We studied the change of solar insolation in three sites with different traffic intensity, one in city of Shkodra and two in city of Tirana. Fifteen days after last rainy day, approximate time needed to achieve saturation, the insolation drops only 3.1% in the city of Shkodra, while in two sites in city of Tirana are 8.5 % and 18.4%. These data show that reduction of solar insolation is closely related with anthropogenic activity, mainly traffic around the site of the meteorological station. The day to day difference tends to decrease with increasing of number of days passed from the last rainy day, which is an evidence of a trend toward a dynamic equilibrium between decantation process of aerosols during the night and their generation during the day.

  4. ELCOS: the PSI code system for LWR core analysis. Part II: user's manual for the fuel assembly code BOXER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paratte, J.M.; Grimm, P.; Hollard, J.M.

    1996-02-01

    ELCOS is a flexible code system for the stationary simulation of light water reactor cores. It consists of the four computer codes ETOBOX, BOXER, CORCOD and SILWER. The user's manual of the second one is presented here. BOXER calculates the neutronics in cartesian geometry. The code can roughly be divided into four stages: - organisation: choice of the modules, file manipulations, reading and checking of input data, - fine group fluxes and condensation: one-dimensional calculation of fluxes and computation of the group constants of homogeneous materials and cells, - two-dimensional calculations: geometrically detailed simulation of the configuration in few energy groups, - burnup: evolution of the nuclide densities as a function of time. This manual shows all input commands which can be used while running the different modules of BOXER. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  5. GENOVA: a generalized perturbation theory program for various applications to CANDU core physics analysis (II) - a user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Heon; Choi, Hang Bok

    2001-03-01

    A user's guide for GENOVA, a GENeralized perturbation theory (GPT)-based Optimization and uncertainty analysis program for Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) physics VAriables, was prepared. The program was developed under the framework of CANDU physics design and analysis code RFSP. The generalized perturbation method was implemented in GENOVA to estimate the zone controller unit (ZCU) level upon refueling operation and calculate various sensitivity coefficients for fuel management study and uncertainty analyses, respectively. This documentation contains descriptions and directions of four major modules of GENOVA such as ADJOINT, GADJINT, PERTURB, and PERTXS so that it can be used as a practical guide for GENOVA users. This documentation includes sample inputs for the ZCU level estimation and sensitivity coefficient calculation, which are the main application of GENOVA. The GENOVA can be used as a supplementary tool of the current CANDU physics design code for advanced CANDU core analysis and fuel development

  6. A direct measurement of g-factors in II-VI and III-V core-shell nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradkin, L.; Langof, L.; Lifshitz, E.; Gaponik, N.; Rogach, A.; Eychmüller, A.; Weller, H.; Micic, O. I.; Nozik, A. J.

    2005-02-01

    This study describes a direct measurement of spectroscopic g-factors of photo-generated carriers in InP/ZnS and HgTe/Hg xCd 1-xTe(S) core-shell nanocrystals. The g-factor of trapped electrons and their spin-lattice versus radiative relaxation ratio ( T1/ τ) were measured by the use of continuous-wave and time-resolved optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) spectroscopy. The g-factors of excitons and donor-hole pairs were derived by the use of field-induced circular-polarized photoluminescence (CP-PL) spectroscopy. The combined information enabled to determine the g-factors of the individual band-edge electrons and holes. The results suggested an increase of the g-factor of the exciton and conduction electron with a decrease of the nanocrystal size.

  7. The accretion of solar material onto white dwarfs: No mixing with core material implies that the mass of the white dwarf is increasing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumner Starrfield

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cataclysmic Variables (CVs are close binary star systems with one component a white dwarf (WD and the other a larger cooler star that fills its Roche Lobe. The cooler star is losing mass through the inner Lagrangian point of the binary and some unknown fraction of this material is accreted by the WD. One consequence of the WDs accreting material, is the possibility that they are growing in mass and will eventually reach the Chandrasekhar Limit. This evolution could result in a Supernova Ia (SN Ia explosion and is designated the Single Degenerate Progenitor (SD scenario. This paper is concerned with the SD scenario for SN Ia progenitors. One problem with the single degenerate scenario is that it is generally assumed that the accreting material mixes with WD core material at some time during the accretion phase of evolution and, since the typical WD has a carbon-oxygen CO core, the mixing results in large amounts of carbon and oxygen being brought up into the accreted layers. The presence of enriched carbon causes enhanced nuclear fusion and a Classical Nova explosion. Both observations and theoretical studies of these explosions imply that more mass is ejected than is accreted. Thus, the WD in a Classical Nova system is losing mass and cannot be a SN Ia progenitor. However, the composition in the nuclear burning region is important and, in new calculations reported here, the consequences to the WD of no mixing of accreted material with core material have been investigated so that the material involved in the explosion has only a Solar composition. WDs with a large range in initial masses and mass accretion rates have been evolved. I find that once sufficient material has been accreted, nuclear burning occurs in all evolutionary sequences and continues until a thermonuclear runaway (TNR occurs and the WD either ejects a small amount of material or its radius grows to about 1012 cm and the evolution is ended. In all cases where mass ejection occurs

  8. Synthesis of ZnO-TiO{sub 2} core-shell long nanowire arrays and their application on dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Yamin [Department of Physics, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Ji Xiaoxu [School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang 473003 (China); Duan Jinxia; Zhu Jianhui; Jiang Jian; Ding Hao; Meng Gaoxiang; Ding Ruimin; Liu Jinping [Department of Physics, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Hu Anzheng [School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, College of Xiangfan, Xiangfan 441813 (China); Huang Xintang, E-mail: xthuang@phy.ccnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Long ZnO nanowire arrays (NAs) grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glasses have been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method without refreshing the reaction solution and applied as the precursor. By adjusting growth conditions, ZnO NAs with tunable lengths can be achieved. A nanocomposite made of ZnO nanowire core and TiO{sub 2} shell was further realized by a novel 'fast-dip-coating' method conducted in a Ti(OC{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}-dissolved ethanol solution. The formed ZnO-TiO{sub 2} core-shell NAs on FTO substrates were applied as electrodes for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). It is found that both the TiO{sub 2} coating and NAs length play important roles in the enhancement of photoelectric conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSSCs. When the length of ZnO-TiO{sub 2} NAs reaches up to 14 {mu}m, the electrode can exhibit a maximum PCE as high as 3.80%, which is 2.6 times higher than that of pure ZnO NAs. - Graphical abstract: ZnO nanowire arrays in the length of 14 {mu}m have been successfully synthesized on the FTO substrate and coated with a thin shell of TiO{sub 2}; the ZnO-TiO{sub 2} electrodes applied in DSSCs exhibit great photoelectric conversion efficiency as high as 3.80%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long ZnO nanowire arrays have been synthesized by using hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A TiO{sub 2} shell outside of ZnO nanowire is introduced by a fast dip-coating method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO and ZnO-TiO{sub 2} core-shell nanowires are applied as the electrodes for DSSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The maximum conversion efficiency of ZnO-TiO{sub 2} electrode reaches to 3.80%.

  9. Core/Shell Structured TiO2/CdS Electrode to Enhance the Light Stability of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Insung; Baek, Minki; Yong, Kijung

    2015-12-23

    In this work, enhanced light stability of perovskite solar cell (PSC) achieved by the introduction of a core/shell-structured CdS/TiO2 electrode and the related mechanism are reported. By a simple solution-based process (SILAR), a uniform CdS shell was coated onto the surface of a TiO2 layer, suppressing the activation of intrinsic trap sites originating from the oxygen vacancies of the TiO2 layer. As a result, the proposed CdS-PSC exhibited highly improved light stability, maintaining nearly 80% of the initial efficiency after 12 h of full sunlight illumination. From the X-ray diffraction analyses, it is suggested that the degradation of the efficiency of PSC during illumination occurs regardless of the decomposition of the perovskite absorber. Considering the light-soaking profiles of the encapsulated cells and the OCVD characteristics, it is likely that the CdS shell had efficiently suppressed the undesirable electron kinetics, such as trapping at the surface defects of the TiO2 and preventing the resultant charge losses by recombination. This study suggests that further complementary research on various effective methods for passivation of the TiO2 layer would be highly meaningful, leading to insight into the fabrication of PSCs stable to UV-light for a long time.

  10. Comprehensive investigation of core-shell dimer nanoparticles size, distance and thicknesses on performance of a hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarzadeh, Hamid

    2018-03-01

    Significant performance enhancement in an ultrathin perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) solar cell is done using plasmonic embedded core–shell dimer nanoparticles. Three-dimensional finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used. A perovskite absorber with a volume of 400 × 400 × 200 nm3 is considered. At first, a cell with one embedded nanoparticle is simulated. Absorptance of CH3NH3PbI3 absorber and gold nanoparticle are obtained. An optimization is done. Then a cell with embedded dimer nanoparticles is evaluated. The results show higher photocurrent enhancement for that in compared to a cell with one embedded nanoparticle. To further photocurrent enhancement, gold-SiO2 core–shell nanoparticles are used. Photocurrents of 23.37 mA cm‑2, 23.3 mA cm‑2, 22.5 mA cm‑2 and 21.47 mA cm‑2 are obtained for a cell with two embedded core–shell nanoparticles with core radius of 60 nm and shell thickness of 2 nm, 5 nm, 10 nm and 20 nm, respectively. It is important to mention that the photocurrent is 17.9 mA cm‑2 for reference cell and 19.8 mA cm‑2 for a cell with one embedded nanoparticle. Higher photocurrent is due to the near-field plasmonic effect.

  11. Iron(III) species formed during iron(II) oxidation and iron-core formation in bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, C.; Treffry, A.; Mackey, J.; Williams, J.M.; Andrews, S.C.; Guest, J.R.; Harrison, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation and storage of Fe(III) in the bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli (EcBFR). Using Moessbauer spectroscopy to examine the initial oxidation of iron by EcBFR it is confirmed that this ferritin exhibits 'ferroxidase' activity and is shown that dimeric and monomeric iron species are produced as intermediates. The characteristics of ferroxidase activity in EcBFR is compare d with those of human H-chain ferritin (HuHF) and discuss the different Moessbauer parameters of their dimeric iron with reference to the structures of their di-metal sites. In addition, it is presented preliminary findings suggesting that after an initial 'burst', the rate of oxidation is greatly reduced, possibly due to blockage of the ferroxidase centre by bound iron. A new component, not found in HuHF and probably representing a small cluster of Fe(III) atoms, is reported

  12. High performance of PbSe/PbS core/shell quantum dot heterojunction solar cells: short circuit current enhancement without the loss of open circuit voltage by shell thickness control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyekyoung; Song, Jung Hoon; Jang, Jihoon; Mai, Xuan Dung; Kim, Sungwoo; Jeong, Sohee

    2015-11-07

    We fabricated heterojunction solar cells with PbSe/PbS core shell quantum dots and studied the precisely controlled PbS shell thickness dependency in terms of optical properties, electronic structure, and solar cell performances. When the PbS shell thickness increases, the short circuit current density (JSC) increases from 6.4 to 11.8 mA cm(-2) and the fill factor (FF) enhances from 30 to 49% while the open circuit voltage (VOC) remains unchanged at 0.46 V even with the decreased effective band gap. We found that the Fermi level and the valence band maximum level remain unchanged in both the PbSe core and PbSe/PbS core/shell with a less than 1 nm thick PbS shell as probed via ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The PbS shell reduces their surface trap density as confirmed by relative quantum yield measurements. Consequently, PbS shell formation on the PbSe core mitigates the trade-off relationship between the open circuit voltage and the short circuit current density. Finally, under the optimized conditions, the PbSe core with a 0.9 nm thick shell yielded a power conversion efficiency of 6.5% under AM 1.5.

  13. A Long-Term Dissipation of the EUV He ii (30.4 nm) Segmentation in Full-Disk Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didkovsky, Leonid

    2018-06-01

    Some quiet-Sun days observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) during the time interval in 2010 - 2017 were used to continue our previous analyses reported by Didkovsky and Gurman ( Solar Phys. 289, 153, 2014a) and Didkovsky, Wieman, and Korogodina ( Solar Phys. 292, 32, 2017). The analysis consists of determining and comparing spatial spectral ratios (spectral densities over some time interval) from spatial (segmentation-cell length) power spectra. The ratios were compared using modeled compatible spatial frequencies for spectra from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on-board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and from AIA images. With the new AIA data added to the EIT data we analyzed previously, the whole time interval from 1996 to 2017 reported here is approximately the length of two "standard" solar cycles (SC). The spectral ratios of segmentation-cell dimension structures show a significant and steady increase with no detected indication of SC-related returns to the values that characterize the SC minima. This increase in spatial power at high spatial frequencies is interpreted as a dissipation of medium-size EUV network structures to smaller-size structures in the transition region. Each of the latest ratio changes for 2010 through 2017 spectra calculated for a number of consecutive short-term intervals has been converted into monthly mean ratio (MMR) changes. The MMR values demonstrate variable sign and magnitudes, thus confirming the solar nature of the changes. These changes do not follow a "typical" trend of instrumental degradation or a long-term activity profile from the He ii (30.4 nm) irradiance measured by the Extreme ultraviolet Spectrophotometer (ESP) either. The ESP is a channel of the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board SDO.

  14. The Fornax Cluster VLT Spectroscopic Survey II - Planetary Nebulae kinematics within 200 kpc of the cluster core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiniello, C.; Napolitano, N. R.; Arnaboldi, M.; Tortora, C.; Coccato, L.; Capaccioli, M.; Gerhard, O.; Iodice, E.; Spavone, M.; Cantiello, M.; Peletier, R.; Paolillo, M.; Schipani, P.

    2018-06-01

    We present the largest and most spatially extended planetary nebulae (PNe) catalogue ever obtained for the Fornax cluster. We measured velocities of 1452 PNe out to 200 kpc in the cluster core using a counter-dispersed slitless spectroscopic technique with data from FORS2 on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). With such an extended spatial coverage, we can study separately the stellar haloes of some of the cluster main galaxies and the intracluster light. In this second paper of the Fornax Cluster VLT Spectroscopic Survey, we identify and classify the emission-line sources, describe the method to select PNe, and calculate their coordinates and velocities from the dispersed slitless images. From the PN 2D velocity map, we identify stellar streams that are possibly tracing the gravitational interaction of NGC 1399 with NGC 1404 and NGC 1387. We also present the velocity dispersion profile out to ˜200 kpc radii, which shows signatures of a superposition of the bright central galaxy and the cluster potential, with the latter clearly dominating the regions outside R ˜ 1000 arcsec (˜100 kpc).

  15. INFERENCE OF HEATING PROPERTIES FROM “HOT” NON-FLARING PLASMAS IN ACTIVE REGION CORES. II. NANOFLARE TRAINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, W. T.; Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Cargill, P. J., E-mail: will.t.barnes@rice.edu, E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.uk [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-20

    Despite its prediction over two decades ago, the detection of faint, high-temperature (“hot”) emission due to nanoflare heating in non-flaring active region cores has proved challenging. Using an efficient two-fluid hydrodynamic model, this paper investigates the properties of the emission expected from repeating nanoflares (a nanoflare train) of varying frequency as well as the separate heating of electrons and ions. If the emission measure distribution (EM(T)) peaks at T = T{sub m} , we find that EM(T{sub m}) is independent of details of the nanoflare train, and EM(T) above and below T{sub m} reflects different aspects of the heating. Below T{sub m} , the main influence is the relationship of the waiting time between successive nanoflares to the nanoflare energy. Above T{sub m}, power-law nanoflare distributions lead to an extensive plasma population not present in a mono-energetic train. Furthermore, in some cases, characteristic features are present in EM(T). Such details may be detectable given adequate spectral resolution and a good knowledge of the relevant atomic physics. In the absence of such resolution we propose some metrics that can be used to infer the presence of “hot” plasma.

  16. Search for neutrino events in the Kamiokande-II detector in correlation with the solar-flare activity in March 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, K.S.; Kajita, T.; Kifune, T.

    1989-12-01

    A search has been made for neutrino events (E v > or approx. 50 MeV) in the Kamiokande-II water Cherenkov detector in correlation with the great solar-flare activity observed in March 1989. No evidence was obtained for such a correlation. Upper limits are separately given for the optical importance 4, 3, and 2 flares for both time-integrated and time-averaged solar-flare ν e fluxes at E v = 50 MeV and 100 MeV. At E v = 100 MeV, the 90% confidence-level upper limit for the time-integrated ν e flux per importance 4 (3) flare is 3.5 x 10 7 (1.4x10 7 ) cm -2 . Even the upper limit for the importance 4 flare is considerably lower than the ν e flux at the corresponding energy needed to explain the excess neutrino captures reported in some of the 37 Cl experimental runs when large solar flares occurred. A search has also been made for low-energy events (recoil e +- energy > or approx. 10 MeV) in correlation with importance ≥ 2 flares and with the solar proton flux ≥ 10 MeV). Again, no significant signal has been observed. (author)

  17. Structural and magnetic characterization of three tetranuclear Cu(II) complexes with face-sharing-dicubane/double-open-cubane like core framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Aparup [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721102, West Bengal (India); Bertolasi, Valerio [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Centro di Strutturistica Diffrattometrica, Università di Ferrara, Via L. Borsari, 46, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Figuerola, Albert [Departament de Química Inorgànica i Orgànica (Secció de Química Inorgànica) and Institut de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (IN2UB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Manna, Subal Chandra, E-mail: scmanna@mail.vidyasagar.ac.in [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721102, West Bengal (India)

    2017-05-15

    Three novel tetranuclear copper(II) complexes namely [Cu{sub 4}(L{sup 1}){sub 4}]∙2(dmf) (1), [Cu{sub 4}(L{sup 1}){sub 4}] (2) and [Cu{sub 4}(L{sup 2}){sub 2}(HL{sup 2}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]∙2(ClO{sub 4})·6(H{sub 2}O) (3) (H{sub 2}L{sup 1}, (E)−2-((1-hydroxybutan-2-ylimino)methyl)phenol; H{sub 2}L{sup 2}, (E)−2-((1-hydroxybutan-2-ylimino)methyl)−6-methoxyphenol)) were synthesized from the self-assembly of copper(II) perchlorate and the tridentate Schiff base ligands. The structural determination reveals that crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group C2/c, whereas both the and crystallize in the triclinic system with space group P-1. and possess face-sharing dicubane core, on the other hand complex 3 has double open cubane core structure. The copper(II) ions in the cubane core are in distorted square planar geometries, and weak π…π and C–H…π interactions lead to formation of a 2D supramolecular architecture for and . At room temperature and , exhibit fluorescence with a quantum yield (Φ{sub s}) of 0.47, 0.49 and 0.38, respectively. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements in the range 2–300 K indicate an overall weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling in all complexes. The PHI program was used to study their magnetic behaviour. In agreement with their face-sharing dicubane structure, a Hamiltonian of the type H =– J{sub 1}(S{sub 1}S{sub 2}+S{sub 1}S{sub 2’}+S{sub 1'}S{sub 2}+S{sub 1'}S{sub 2’}) – J{sub 2}S{sub 1}S{sub 1’}, where S{sub 1} = S{sub 1’} = S{sub 2} = S{sub 2’} = S{sub Cu} =1/2, was used for studying and . Simulations performed suggest magnetic exchange constants with values close to J{sub 1} =−20 cm{sup −1} and J{sub 2} =0 cm{sup -1} for these complexes. On the other hand, the spin Hamiltonian H =– J{sub 1}(S{sub 1}S{sub 4}+S{sub 2}S{sub 3}) – J{sub 2}(S{sub 1}S{sub 3}+S{sub 2}S{sub 4}) – J{sub 3}S{sub 1}S{sub 2}, where S{sub 1} = S{sub 2} = S{sub 3} = S{sub 4

  18. Solar flares associated coronal mass ejection accompanied with DH type II radio burst in relation with interplanetary magnetic field, geomagnetic storms and cosmic ray intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Harish; Bhatt, Beena

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we have selected 114 flare-CME events accompanied with Deca-hectometric (DH) type II radio burst chosen from 1996 to 2008 (i.e., solar cycle 23). Statistical analyses are performed to examine the relationship of flare-CME events accompanied with DH type II radio burst with Interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF), Geomagnetic storms (GSs) and Cosmic Ray Intensity (CRI). The collected sample events are divided into two groups. In the first group, we considered 43 events which lie under the CME span and the second group consists of 71 events which are outside the CME span. Our analysis indicates that flare-CME accompanied with DH type II radio burst is inconsistent with CSHKP flare-CME model. We apply the Chree analysis by the superposed epoch method to both set of data to find the geo-effectiveness. We observed different fluctuations in IMF for arising and decay phase of solar cycle in both the cases. Maximum decrease in Dst during arising and decay phase of solar cycle is different for both the cases. It is noted that when flare lie outside the CME span CRI shows comparatively more variation than the flare lie under the CME span. Furthermore, we found that flare lying under the CME span is more geo effective than the flare outside of CME span. We noticed that the time leg between IMF Peak value and GSs, IMF and CRI is on average one day for both the cases. Also, the time leg between CRI and GSs is on average 0 to 1 day for both the cases. In case flare lie under the CME span we observed high correlation (0.64) between CRI and Dst whereas when flare lie outside the CME span a weak correlation (0.47) exists. Thus, flare position with respect to CME span play a key role for geo-effectiveness of CME.

  19. Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 2. System performance and supporting studies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas, is presented. System performance analysis and evaluation are described. Feedback of completed performance analyses on current system design and operating philosophy is discussed. The basic computer simulation techniques and assumptions are described and the resulting energy displacement analysis is presented. Supporting technical studies are presented. These include health and safety and reliability assessments; solar collector component evaluation; weather analysis; and a review of selected trade studies which address significant design alternatives. Additional supporting studies which are generally specific to the installation site are reported. These include solar availability analysis; energy load measurements; environmental impact assessment; life cycle cost and economic analysis; heat transfer fluid testing; meteorological/solar station planning; and information dissemination. (WHK)

  20. CuInGaAlSe2 Solar Absorbers On Flexible High-Temperature Substrates, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ITN Energy Systems (ITN) proposes to take the next step in spacecraft solar array development, building upon previous development and new findings to make the...

  1. Management of stage I and II A/B avascular necrosis of femoral head with core decompression autologous cancellous bone grafting and platelet rich plasma factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Avascular necrosis (AVN of the femoral head is a progressive disease that generally affects patients in the third through fifth decades of life; if left untreated, it leads to complete deterioration of the hip joint. Treatments range from simple decompression of the femoral head, to bone grafting of the involved area, or by using a vascularized fibular graft with varying degree of success. In most instances, the disease progresses further causing secondary arthritis. We present a study of management of early stage AVN (stage I and II A/B of Ficat Arlet classification with core decompression autologous cancellous bone grafting along with platelet rich plasma. Aims: To evaluate the results of the above modality in the management of AVN of the hip. Settings and Design: This prospective study of 30 cases was done during the period of 2011-2013. Materials and Methods: Patients with stage I and II A/B were treated with the above modality and were followed up for 1-year. The results were evaluated on the basis of progression or remission of the disease by radiographic studies, preoperative and postoperative Harris hip score (HHS, age and sex distribution. Statistical Analysis Used: Primer software for calculating the statistical data was used and paired t-test was applied to all the data. Results: Show males were more affected than females and average age group of presentation in stage I and II was 29 years (22-55. The most common cause was idiopathic followed by steroid use. Average preoperative HHS was 56.80 and postoperative HHS was 79.73. 60% (18 showed remission of the disease (radiographically compared to preoperative stage at 1-year follow-up, in 30% (9 disease did not progress further and 10% (3 progressed and required arthroplasty. Conclusion: Management of stage I and II A/B AVN of femur showed good satisfactory results in terms of disease remission and prevention of the further progress of the disease by the above method at 1

  2. Towards the Development of Functionalized PolypyridineLigands for Ru(II Complexes as Photosensitizers inDye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale O. Adeloye

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A number of novel ruthenium(II polypyridine complexes have been designedand synthesized for use as photosensitizers in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs due totheir rich photophysical properties such as intense absorption, long-lived lifetimes, highemission quantum yields and unique redox characteristics. Many of these complexesexhibit photophysical behavior that can be readily controlled through a careful choice ofligands and/or substituents. With this perspective, we review the design and general syntheticmethods of some polypyridine ligands based on bipyridine, phenanthroline, terpyridine andquaterpyridine with/without anchoring groups with a view to correlate functionality ofligand structures with the observed photophysical, electroredox and power conversionefficiency of some examples of Ru(II polypyridyl complexes that have been reported andparticularly used in the DSSCs applications. The main interest, however, is focused onshowing the development of new polypyridine ligand materials containing long-rangeelectron transfer motifs such as the alkenyl, alkynyl and polyaromatic donor functionalities.

  3. N -annulated perylene as an efficient electron donor for porphyrin-based dyes: Enhanced light-harvesting ability and high-efficiency Co(II/III)-based dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Jie

    2014-01-08

    Porphyrin-based dyes recently have become good candidates for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). However, the bottleneck is how to further improve their light-harvesting ability. In this work, N-annulated perylene (NP) was used to functionalize the Zn-porphyrin, and four "push-pull"-type NP-substituted and fused porphyrin dyes with intense absorption in the visible and even in the near-infrared (NIR) region were synthesized. Co(II/III)-based DSC device characterizations revealed that dyes WW-5 and WW-6, in which an ethynylene spacer is incorporated between the NP and porphyrin core, showed pantochromatic photon-to-current conversion efficiency action spectra in the visible and NIR region, with a further red-shift of about 90 and 60 nm, respectively, compared to the benchmark molecule YD2-o-C8. As a result, the short-circuit current density was largely increased, and the devices displayed power conversion efficiencies as high as 10.3% and 10.5%, respectively, which is comparable to that of the YD2-o-C8 cell (η = 10.5%) under the same conditions. On the other hand, the dye WW-3 in which the NP unit is directly attached to the porphyrin core showed a moderate power conversion efficiency (η = 5.6%) due to the inefficient π-conjugation, and the NP-fused dye WW-4 exhibited even poorer performance due to its low-lying LUMO energy level and nondisjointed HOMO/LUMO profile. Our detailed physical measurements (optical and electrochemical), density functional theory calculations, and photovoltaic characterizations disclosed that the energy level alignment, the molecular orbital profile, and dye aggregation all played very important roles on the interface electron transfer and charge recombination kinetics. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  4. Sun and solar flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna-Lawlor, S. (Saint Patrick' s Coll., Maynooth (Ireland))

    1982-07-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: the sun's core (thermonuclear reactions, energy transfer from core through radiation zone, convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere and corona); the photosphere (convection, granulation, sunspots, magnetic fields, solar cycle, rotation of the sun); solar variability and paleoclimatic records (correlation of low solar activity with increased /sup 14/C production in atmosphere); the chromosphere and corona (turbulence, temperature, coronal streamers, energy transfer); solar flares (cosmic rays, aurorae, spectra, velocity of flares, prominences, mechanisms of flares); the solar wind.

  5. Fibre structure of decametric type II radio bursts as a manifestation of emission propagation effects in a disturbed near-solar plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Afanasiev

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the fine structure of solar decametric type II radio bursts in the form of drifting narrowband fibres on the dynamic spectrum. Observations show that this structure appears in those events where there is a coronal mass ejection (CME traveling in the near-solar space ahead of the shock wave responsible for the radio burst. The diversity in observed morphology of fibres and values of their parameters implies that the fibres may be caused by different formation mechanisms. The burst emission propagates through extremely inhomogeneous plasma of the CME, so one possible mechanism can be related to radio propagation effects. I suggest that the fibres in some events represent traces of radio emission caustics, which are formed due to regular refraction of radio waves on the large-scale inhomogeneous structure of the CME front. To support this hypothesis, I have modeled the propagation of radio waves through inhomogeneous plasma of the CME, taking into consideration the presence of electron density fluctuations in it. The calculations, which are based on the Monte Carlo technique, indicate that, in particular, the emission of the fibres should be harmonic. Moreover, the mechanism under consideration suggests that in solar observations from two different points in space, the observed sets of fibres can be shifted in frequency with respect to one another or can have a different structure. This potentially can be used for identifying fibres caused by the propagation effects.

  6. Electronic optimization of heteroleptic Ru(II) bipyridine complexes by remote substituents: synthesis, characterization, and application to dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Won-Sik; Han, Jung-Kyu; Kim, Hyun-Young; Choi, Mi Jin; Kang, Yong-Soo; Pac, Chyongjin; Kang, Sang Ook

    2011-04-18

    We prepared a series of new heteroleptic ruthenium(II) complexes, Ru(NCS)(2)LL' (3a-3e), where L is 4,4'-di(hydroxycarbonyl)-2,2'-bipyridine and L' is 4,4'-di(p-X-phenyl)-2,2'-pyridine (X = CN (a), F (b), H (c), OMe (d), and NMe(2) (e)), in an attempt to explore the structure-activity relationships in their photophysical and electrochemical behavior and in their performance in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). When substituent X is changed from electron-donating NMe(2) to electron-withdrawing CN, the absorption and emission maxima reveal systematic bathochromic shifts. The redox potentials of these dyes are also significantly influenced by X. The electronic properties of the dyes were theoretically analyzed using density functional theory calculations; the results show good correlations with the experimental results. The solar-cell performance of DSSCs based on dye-grafted nanocrystalline TiO(2) using 3a-3e and standard N3 (bis[(4,4'-carboxy-2,2'-bipyridine)(thiocyanato)]ruthenium(II)) were compared, revealing substantial dependences on the dye structures, particularly on the remote substituent X. The 3d-based device showed the best performance: η = 8.30%, J(SC) = 16.0 mA·cm(-2), V(OC) = 717 mV, and ff = 0.72. These values are better than N3-based device.

  7. Tetranuclear copper(II) complexes bridged by alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate and incorporation of sugar acids through the Cu4 core structural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Merii; Sah, Ajay Kumar; Tanase, Tomoaki; Mikuriya, Masahiro

    2006-08-21

    Tetranuclear copper(II) complexes containing alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate (alpha-D-Glc-1P), [Cu4(mu-OH){mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(bpy)4(H2O)2]X3 [X = NO3 (1a), Cl (1b), Br (1c)], and [Cu4(mu-OH){mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(phen)4(H2O)2](NO3)3 (2) were prepared by reacting the copper(II) salt with Na2[alpha-D-Glc-1P] in the presence of diimine ancillary ligands, and the structure of 2 was characterized by X-ray crystallography to comprise four {Cu(phen)}2+ fragments connected by the two sugar phosphate dianions in 1,3-O,O' and 1,1-O mu4-bridging fashion as well as a mu-hydroxo anion. The crystal structure of 2 involves two chemically independent complex cations in which the C2 enantiomeric structure for the trapezoidal tetracopper(II) framework is switched according to the orientation of the alpha-D-glucopyranosyl moieties. Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility data of 1a indicated that antiferromagnetic spin coupling is operative between the two metal ions joined by the hydroxo bridge (J = -52 cm(-1)) while antiferromagnetic interaction through the Cu-O-Cu sugar phosphate bridges is weak (J = -13 cm(-1)). Complex 1a readily reacted with carboxylic acids to afford the tetranuclear copper(II) complexes, [Cu4{mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(mu-CA)2(bpy)4](NO3)2 [CA = CH3COO (3), o-C6H4(COO)(COOH) (4)]. Reactions with m-phenylenediacetic acid [m-C6H4(CH2COOH)2] also gave the discrete tetracopper(II) cationic complex [Cu4{mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(mu-m-C6H4(CH2COO)(CH2COOH))2(bpy)4](NO3)2 (5a) as well as the cluster polymer formulated as {[Cu4{mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(mu-m-C6H4(CH2COO)2)(bpy)4](NO3)2}n (5b). The tetracopper structure of 1a is converted into a symmetrical rectangular core in complexes 3, 4, and 5b, where the hydroxo bridge is dissociated and, instead, two carboxylate anions bridge another pair of Cu(II) ions in a 1,1-O monodentate fashion. The similar reactions were applied to incorporate sugar acids onto the tetranuclear copper(II) centers. Reactions of 1a with delta

  8. Stronger enhancer II/core promoter activities of hepatitis B virus isolates of B2 subgenotype than those of C2 subgenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yanli; Zhou, Xueshi; Jia, Haodi; Chen, Chaoyang; Zhao, Weifeng; Zhang, Jiming; Tong, Shuping

    2016-07-27

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C causes prolonged chronic infection and increased risk for liver cancer than genotype B. Our previous work revealed lower replication capacity of wild-type genotype C2 than B2 isolates. HBV DNA replication is driven by pregenomic RNA, which is controlled by core promoter (CP) and further augmented by enhancer I (ENI) and enhancer II (ENII). DNA fragments covering these regulatory elements were amplified from B2 and C2 isolates to generate luciferase reporter constructs. As ENII is fully embedded in CP, we inserted HBV DNA fragments in the sense orientation to determine their combined activities, and in the antisense orientation to measure enhancer activities alone. Genotype B2 isolates displayed higher ENI+ENII+CP, ENII+CP, and ENII activities, but not ENI or ENI+ENII activity, than C2 isolates. The higher ENII+CP activity was partly attributable to 4 positions displaying genotype-specific variability. Exchanging CP region was sufficient to revert the replication phenotypes of several B2 and C2 clones tested. These results suggest that a weaker ENII and/or CP at least partly accounts for the lower replication capacities of wild-type C2 isolates, which could drive the subsequent acquisition of CP mutations. Such mutations increase genome replication and are implicated in liver cancer development.

  9. Studies on II-VI and III-V semiconductor nanostructures. Introduction of the core/shell/shell structure and development of CdSe nanocrystals in an automatized procedure; Untersuchungen an II-VI und III-V Halbleiternanostrukturen. Einfuehrung der Core/shell/shell-Struktur und Darstellung von CdSe-Nanokristallen in einem automatisierten Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekis, I.

    2005-11-15

    The work in this dissertation is focused on the development and characterization of fluorescent II-VI and III-V-Nanomaterials. Highly luminescent and photostable Nanocrystals with narrow size distributions were prepared. It was shown that nearly monodisperse CdSe-Nanocrystals could be prepared from Cd(Ac){sub 2} and TOPSe in a mixture of TOPO/TOP/HDA/TDPA. Nearly monodisperse CdSe/CdS-Core/shell-Nanocrystals have been prepared in a one-pot-synthesis by injection of H{sub 2}S-Gas into a freshly prepared crude solution of CdSe. The passivation of the CdSe-core with an inorganic shell of CdS resulted in the drastic improvement of the photoluminescence-efficiency of the colloidal solution. Reproducible room-temperature quantum yields reached up to a value of 85%. Photostability investigations have proved the enhanced stability of CdSe/CdS-Nanocrystals compared to CdSe-Nanocrystals under illumination with UV-Light. A novel type of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal structure has been developed, consisting of a CdSe core and two anorganic shells. Highly fluorescent and nearly monodisperse CdSe/CdS/ZnS- and CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS-Core/shell/shell-nanocrystals have been prepared via organometallic- and acetate-precursors. The Core/she ll/shell particles reached reproducible room-temperature quantum yields up to 85%. Photostability investigations among CdSe-core, CdSe/CdS-Core/shell- and CdSe/CdS/ZnS- Core/shell/-shell-nanocrystals under illumination with UV-light have proved the highest photostability of the Core/shell/shell-particles. The photostabilities of CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS-and CdSe/ZnS-nanocrystals were compared under illumination with intense laser-beam in air. Another part of this work focused on the development of an automated synthesis procedure of CdSe-nanocrystals by constructing and implementing a flow-reactor system. The size and structure of prepared nanocrystals depended considerably on the Cd:Se-precursorratio and the flow-rate. The preparation of CdSe using Cd(Ac)2

  10. Optically Transparent Cathode for Co(III/II) Mediated Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on Graphene Oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Yum, J. H.; Graetzel, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 12 (2012), s. 6998-7005 ISSN 1944-8244 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : graphene oxide * reduced graphene oxide * dye-sensitized solar cell Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 5.008, year: 2012

  11. Large-Area, Multi-Junction, Epitaxial Lift-Off Solar Cells with Backside Contacts, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II program we propose to develop a manufacturable production process to introduce backside contacts to MicroLink Devices? large-area, multi-junction...

  12. Preliminary results from the oribiting solar observatory 8: Velocities in the solar chromosphere observed in the Si II lambda1816 line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipman, E.G.; Bruner, E.C. Jr.; Shine, R.A.; Lites, B.W.; Rottman, G.J.; Athay, R.G.; White, O.R.

    1976-01-01

    The University of Colorado instrument on OSO-8 was used to measure repeated line profiles of the Si II lambda1816 line over quiet and active areas of approximately 20'' by 5'' during entire orbits of 60 minutes. Velocity oscillations with periods near 300 s are observed in approximately half of the time series, and periods near 180 s are sometimes observed. Periodic intensity variations are also observed at both of these periods. For both periods, the intensity leads the velocity in phase by approximately 30degree

  13. Green synthesis of the reduced graphene oxide–CuI quasi-shell–core nanocomposite: A highly efficient and stable solar-light-induced catalyst for organic dye degradation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jiha; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Islam, M. Jahurul [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Institute for Functional Materials, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Bora [Department of Chemistry, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Sang Hoon [Department of Chemistry, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Kyu, E-mail: tkkim@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Institute for Functional Materials, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Green synthesis of RGO–CuI quasi-shell–core nanocomposites without any surfactant. • Promising candidates as solar light active photocatalyst for dye degradation. • Significant improvement of the photocatalytic activity in RGO wrapped composites. • The best photocatalytic activity to RhB has been attained for CuI–RGO (2 mg mL{sup −1}). - Abstract: Surfactant-free, reduced graphene oxide (RGO)–CuI quasi-shell−core nanocomposites were successfully synthesized using ultra-sonication assisted chemical method at room temperature. The morphologies, structures and optical properties of the CuI and CuI–RGO nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Morphological and structural analyses indicated that the CuI–RGO core–shell nanocomposites comprise single-crystalline face-centered cubic phase CuI nanostructures, coated with a thin RGO quasi-shell. Photocatalysis experiments revealed that the as-synthesized CuI–RGO nanocomposites exhibit remarkably enhanced photocatalytic activities and stabilities for photo degradation of Rhodamine-B (RhB) organic dye under simulated solar light irradiation. The photo degradation ability is strongly affected by the concentration of RGO in the nanocomposites; the highest photodegradation rate was obtained at a graphene loading content of 2 mg mL{sup −1} nanocomposite. The remarkable photocatalytic performance of the CuI–RGO nanocomposites mainly originates from their unique adsorption and electron-accepting and electron-transporting properties of RGO. The present work provides a novel green synthetic route to producing CuI–RGO nanocomposites without toxic solvents or reducing agents, thereby providing highly efficient and stable solar light

  14. Green synthesis of the reduced graphene oxide–CuI quasi-shell–core nanocomposite: A highly efficient and stable solar-light-induced catalyst for organic dye degradation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jiha; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Islam, M. Jahurul; Seo, Bora; Joo, Sang Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Green synthesis of RGO–CuI quasi-shell–core nanocomposites without any surfactant. • Promising candidates as solar light active photocatalyst for dye degradation. • Significant improvement of the photocatalytic activity in RGO wrapped composites. • The best photocatalytic activity to RhB has been attained for CuI–RGO (2 mg mL −1 ). - Abstract: Surfactant-free, reduced graphene oxide (RGO)–CuI quasi-shell−core nanocomposites were successfully synthesized using ultra-sonication assisted chemical method at room temperature. The morphologies, structures and optical properties of the CuI and CuI–RGO nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Morphological and structural analyses indicated that the CuI–RGO core–shell nanocomposites comprise single-crystalline face-centered cubic phase CuI nanostructures, coated with a thin RGO quasi-shell. Photocatalysis experiments revealed that the as-synthesized CuI–RGO nanocomposites exhibit remarkably enhanced photocatalytic activities and stabilities for photo degradation of Rhodamine-B (RhB) organic dye under simulated solar light irradiation. The photo degradation ability is strongly affected by the concentration of RGO in the nanocomposites; the highest photodegradation rate was obtained at a graphene loading content of 2 mg mL −1 nanocomposite. The remarkable photocatalytic performance of the CuI–RGO nanocomposites mainly originates from their unique adsorption and electron-accepting and electron-transporting properties of RGO. The present work provides a novel green synthetic route to producing CuI–RGO nanocomposites without toxic solvents or reducing agents, thereby providing highly efficient and stable solar light-induced RGO

  15. Willow Park II Community Center. Design report for the passive solar commercial buildings design assistance and demonstration program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-15

    The design process for a passive solar community center in Texas is documented. Weather data are given. Energy analysis for early drawings is performed using the ENERGYLOOK program and the results shown graphically. Energy consumption and cost data are given. The design evolution is then traced and the performance of alternative designs compared. Design indicators for best strategies and concepts are discussed and the final design is presented. Energy consumption and cost are given, along with incremental passive solar design costs. A schematic review meeting report and life cycle value tables are included. Overviews, unavailable information, incremental passive design costs, performance comparison of alternatives, and architectural compatibility are discussed for each step in the design process. (LEW)

  16. Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind. II - Gas dynamics in a nonradial open field region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind in the nonradial open field region is numerically investigated, taking into account the thermal and dynamical coupling between the chromosphere and the corona. A realistic steady solar wind is constructed which passes through the inner X-type critical point in the rapidly diverging region. The wind speed shows a local maximum at the middle, O-type, critical point. The wind's density and pressure distributions decrease abruptly in the rapidly diverging region of the flow tube. The transient behavior of the wind following flare energy deposition includes ascending and descending conduction fronts. Thermal instability occurs in the lower corona, and ascending material flows out through the throat after the flare energy input ceases. A local density distribution peak is generated at the shock front due to the pressure deficit just behind the shock front.

  17. GaAsSb/InAs/(In)GaAs type II quantum dots for solar cell applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vyskočil, Jan; Hospodková, Alice; Petříček, Otto; Pangrác, Jiří; Zíková, Markéta; Oswald, Jiří; Vetushka, Aliaksi

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 464, Apr (2017), s. 64-68 ISSN 0022-0248 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-21285P; GA MŠk LO1603 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : InAs * GaAsSb * InGaAs * quantum dot * solar cells Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.751, year: 2016

  18. High Performance Computing Application: Solar Dynamo Model Project II, Corona and Heliosphere Component Initialization, Integration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-24

    distribution at this level replaced a constant temperature assumption, and density was calculated locally through a balance of radiation loss, thermal...G. References Altschuler, M. D., and G. Newkirk, Jr. (1969), Magnetic fields and the structure of the solar corona. I: Methods of calculating ...Weather, 11, 17-33, doi:10.1029/2012SW000853. Nakamizo, A., T. Tanaka, Y. Kubo , S. Kamei, H. Shimazu, and H. Shinagawa (2009), Development of the

  19. SIXTEEN YEARS OF ULYSSES INTERSTELLAR DUST MEASUREMENTS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM. II. FLUCTUATIONS IN THE DUST FLOW FROM THE DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strub, Peter; Krüger, Harald; Sterken, Veerle J.

    2015-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft provided the first opportunity to identify and study interstellar dust (ISD) in situ in the solar system between 1992 and 2007. Here we present the first comprehensive analysis of the ISD component in the entire Ulysses dust data set. We analyzed several parameters of the ISD flow in a time-resolved fashion: flux, flow direction, mass index, and flow width. The general picture is in agreement with a time-dependent focusing/defocusing of the charged dust particles due to long-term variations of the solar magnetic field throughout a solar magnetic cycle of 22 years. In addition, we confirm a shift in dust direction of 50° ± 7° in 2005, along with a steep, size-dependent increase in flux by a factor of 4 within 8 months. To date, this is difficult to interpret and has to be examined in more detail by new dynamical simulations. This work is part of a series of three papers. This paper concentrates on the time-dependent flux and direction of the ISD. In a companion paper we analyze the overall mass distribution of the ISD measured by Ulysses, and a third paper discusses the results of modeling the flow of the ISD as seen by Ulysses

  20. SIXTEEN YEARS OF ULYSSES INTERSTELLAR DUST MEASUREMENTS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM. II. FLUCTUATIONS IN THE DUST FLOW FROM THE DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strub, Peter; Krüger, Harald [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Sterken, Veerle J., E-mail: krueger@mps.mpg.de [International Space Science Institute, Hallerstrasse 6, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-10-20

    The Ulysses spacecraft provided the first opportunity to identify and study interstellar dust (ISD) in situ in the solar system between 1992 and 2007. Here we present the first comprehensive analysis of the ISD component in the entire Ulysses dust data set. We analyzed several parameters of the ISD flow in a time-resolved fashion: flux, flow direction, mass index, and flow width. The general picture is in agreement with a time-dependent focusing/defocusing of the charged dust particles due to long-term variations of the solar magnetic field throughout a solar magnetic cycle of 22 years. In addition, we confirm a shift in dust direction of 50° ± 7° in 2005, along with a steep, size-dependent increase in flux by a factor of 4 within 8 months. To date, this is difficult to interpret and has to be examined in more detail by new dynamical simulations. This work is part of a series of three papers. This paper concentrates on the time-dependent flux and direction of the ISD. In a companion paper we analyze the overall mass distribution of the ISD measured by Ulysses, and a third paper discusses the results of modeling the flow of the ISD as seen by Ulysses.

  1. Hot prominence detected in the core of a coronal mass ejection. II. Analysis of the C III line detected by SOHO/UVCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jejčič, S.; Susino, R.; Heinzel, P.; Dzifčáková, E.; Bemporad, A.; Anzer, U.

    2017-11-01

    Context. We study the physics of erupting prominences in the core of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and present a continuation of a previous analysis. Aims: We determine the kinetic temperature and microturbulent velocity of an erupting prominence embedded in the core of a CME that occurred on August 2, 2000 using the Ultraviolet Coronagraph and Spectrometer observations (UVCS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) simultaneously in the hydrogen Lα and C III lines. We develop the non-LTE (departures from the local thermodynamic equilibrium - LTE) spectral diagnostics based on Lα and Lβ measured integrated intensities to derive other physical quantities of the hot erupting prominence. Based on this, we synthesize the C III line intensity to compare it with observations. Methods: Our method is based on non-LTE modeling of eruptive prominences. We used a general non-LTE radiative-transfer code only for optically thin prominence points because optically thick points do not allow the direct determination of the kinetic temperature and microturbulence from the line profiles. The input parameters of the code were the kinetic temperature and microturbulent velocity derived from the Lα and C III line widths, as well as the integrated intensity of the Lα and Lβ lines. The code runs in three loops to compute the radial flow velocity, electron density, and effective thickness as the best fit to the Lα and Lβ integrated intensities within the accuracy defined by the absolute radiometric calibration of UVCS data. Results: We analyzed 39 observational points along the whole erupting prominence because for these points we found a solution for the kinetic temperature and microturbulent velocity. For these points we ran the non-LTE code to determine best-fit models. All models with τ0(Lα) ≤ 0.3 and τ0(C III) ≤ 0.3 were analyzed further, for which we computed the integrated intensity of the C III line using a two-level atom. The best agreement between

  2. Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

    1980-07-01

    This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

  3. Calculation and analysis of a HTR-pebble-bed reference core in the low enriched (U, Pu)- and (U, Th)-cycle with the new modular programme system DRACULA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, K.

    1975-12-01

    A short description of the programme system is given. Investigations are undertaken on the burn-up and temperature dependence of the resonance adsorption and the flux lowering in a fuel ball as well as the influence of the heterogeneous fuel distribution in a ball-shaped fuel element on the neutron spectrum. The feedback of these effects on the burn-up behaviour is analysed in the subsequent calculations of the above-mentioned reference cores. Beyond this a comparison of the DRAKULA II results with the VSOP calculations for these reference cores is performed and discussed. Especially the new graphical plotting possibility has to be mentioned for the burn-up and load condition of individual fuel element balls during their flow through the core in addition with the netto balance of the isotope vector at their removal from the reactor. (orig.) [de

  4. 77 FR 48138 - Topaz Solar Farms LLC; High Plains Ranch II, LLC; Bethel Wind Energy LLC; Rippey Wind Energy LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... Ranch II, LLC; Bethel Wind Energy LLC; Rippey Wind Energy LLC; Pacific Wind, LLC; Colorado Highlands Wind, LLC; Shooting Star Wind Project, LLC; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator or... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket Nos. EG12-63-000; EG12-64-000...

  5. H and K (Ca II) emissions as observed in coronal spectrum in the July 20, 1963 solar eclipse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallini, F.; Righini, A.

    1975-01-01

    From a detailed analysis of a coronal spectrum taken from a DC-8 jet airplane during the Eclipse of 20 July, 1963 a rough model of a coronal cold region (T approximately 10 5 K) has been obtained. The model explains the presence of the abnormal H and K (Ca II) emissions and the large amount of F corona present in the spectrum. (Auth.)

  6. Observational study on the fine structure and dynamics of a solar jet. II. Energy release process revealed by spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaue, Takahito; Tei, Akiko; Asai, Ayumi; Ueno, Satoru; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2018-01-01

    We report on a solar jet phenomenon associated with the C5.4 class flare on 2014 November 11. The data of the jet was provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) aboard Hinode, and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and Domeless Solar Telescope (DST) at Hida Observatory, Kyoto University. These plentiful data enabled us to present this series of papers to discuss all the processes of the observed phenomena, including energy storage, event trigger, and energy release. In this paper, we focus on the energy release process of the observed jet, and mainly describe our spectral analysis on the Hα data of DST to investigate the internal structure of the Hα jet and its temporal evolution. This analysis reveals that in the physical quantity distributions of the Hα jet, such as line-of-sight velocity and optical thickness, there is a significant gradient in the direction crossing the jet. We interpret this internal structure as the consequence of the migration of the energy release site, based on the idea of ubiquitous reconnection. Moreover, by measuring the horizontal flow of the fine structures in the jet, we succeeded in deriving the three-dimensional velocity field and the line-of-sight acceleration field of the Hα jet. The analysis result indicates that part of the ejecta in the Hα jet experienced additional acceleration after it had been ejected from the lower atmosphere. This secondary acceleration was found to occur in the vicinity of the intersection between the trajectories of the Hα jet and the X-ray jet observed by Hinode/XRT. We propose that a fundamental cause of this phenomenon is magnetic reconnection involving the plasmoid in the observed jet.

  7. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume II. System description and system analysis. CDRL item 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    Honeywell conducted a parametric analysis of the 10-MW(e) solar pilot plant requirements and expected performance and established an optimum system design. The main analytical simulation tools were the optical (ray trace) and the dynamic simulation models. These are described in detail in Books 2 and 3 of this volume under separate cover. In making design decisions, available performance and cost data were used to provide a design reflecting the overall requirements and economics of a commercial-scale plant. This volume contains a description of this analysis/design process and resultant system/subsystem design and performance.

  8. Solar Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Water Using a Dual Bed Photosystem - Phase I Final Report and Phase II Proposal; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clovis A. Linkous; Darlene K. Slattery

    2000-01-01

    In this work we are attempting to perform the highly efficient storage of solar energy in the form of H(sub 2) via photocatalytic decomposition of water. While it has been demonstrated that H(sub 2) and O(sub 2) can be evolved from a single vessel containing a single suspended photocatalyst (Sayama 1994; 1997), we are attempting to perform net water-splitting by using two photocatalysts immobilized in separate containers, or beds. A schematic showing how the device would work is shown

  9. Three-dimensional electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells: synthesis of indium-tin-oxide nanowire arrays and ITO/TiO2 core-shell nanowire arrays by electrophoretic deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H-W; Ting, C-F; Hung, M-K; Chiou, C-H; Liu, Y-L; Liu Zongwen; Ratinac, Kyle R; Ringer, Simon P

    2009-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) show promise as a cheaper alternative to silicon-based photovoltaics for specialized applications, provided conversion efficiency can be maximized and production costs minimized. This study demonstrates that arrays of nanowires can be formed by wet-chemical methods for use as three-dimensional (3D) electrodes in DSSCs, thereby improving photoelectric conversion efficiency. Two approaches were employed to create the arrays of ITO (indium-tin-oxide) nanowires or arrays of ITO/TiO 2 core-shell nanowires; both methods were based on electrophoretic deposition (EPD) within a polycarbonate template. The 3D electrodes for solar cells were constructed by using a doctor-blade for coating TiO 2 layers onto the ITO or ITO/TiO 2 nanowire arrays. A photoelectric conversion efficiency as high as 4.3% was achieved in the DSSCs made from ITO nanowires; this performance was better than that of ITO/TiO 2 core-shell nanowires or pristine TiO 2 films. Cyclic voltammetry confirmed that the reaction current was significantly enhanced when a 3D ITO-nanowire electrode was used. Better separation of charge carriers and improved charge transport, due to the enlarged interfacial area, are thought to be the major advantages of using 3D nanowire electrodes for the optimization of DSSCs.

  10. Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 1. System criteria and design description. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1979-01-01

    This volume documents the preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas. Current system, subsystem, and component designs are described and additional studies which support selection among significant design alternatives are presented. Overall system requirements which form the system design basis are presented. These include program objectives; performance and output load requirements; industrial, statutory, and regulatory standards; and site interface requirements. Material in this section will continue to be issued separately in the Systems Requirements Document and maintained current through revision throughout future phases of the project. Overall system design and detailed subsystem design descriptions are provided. Consideration of operation and maintenance is reflected in discussion of each subsystem design as well as in an integrated overall discussion. Included are the solar collector subsystem; the thermal storage subsystem, the power conversion sybsystem (including electrical generation and distribution); the heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystems; overall instrumentation and control; and the STES building and physical plant. The design of several subsystems has progressed beyond the preliminary stage; descriptions for such subsystems are therefore provided in more detail than others to provide complete documentation of the work performed. In some cases, preliminary design parameters require specific verificaton in the definitive design phase and are identified in the text. Subsystem descriptions will continue to be issued and revised separately to maintain accuracy during future phases of the project. (WHK)

  11. Core/shell structured NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+/Gd+3 nanorods with Au nanoparticles or shells for flexible amorphous silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z Q; Li, X D; Liu, Q Q; Chen, X H; Sun, Z; Huang, S M; Liu, C; Ye, X J

    2012-01-01

    A simple approach for preparing near-infrared (NIR) to visible upconversion (UC) NaYF 4 :Yb/Er/Gd nanorods in combination with gold nanostructures has been reported. The grown UC nanomaterials with Au nanostructures have been applied to flexible amorphous silicon solar cells on the steel substrates to investigate their responses to sub-bandgap infrared irradiation. Photocurrent–voltage measurements were performed on the solar cells. It was demonstrated that UC of NIR light led to a 16-fold to 72-fold improvement of the short-circuit current under 980 nm illumination compared to a cell without upconverters. A maximum current of 1.16 mA was obtained for the cell using UC nanorods coated with Au nanoparticles under 980 nm laser illumination. This result corresponds to an external quantum efficiency of 0.14% of the solar cell. Mechanisms of erbium luminescence in the grown UC nanorods were analyzed and discussed. (paper)

  12. Solar Design Workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franta, G.; Baylin, F.; Crowther, R.; Dubin, F.; Grace, A., Griffith, J.W.; Holtz, M.; Kutscher, C.; Nordham, D.; Selkowitz, S.; Villecco, M.

    1981-06-01

    This Solar Design Workbook presents solar building design applications for commercial buildir^s. The book is divided into four sections. The first section describes the variety of solar applications in buildings including conservation aspects, solar fundamentals, passive systems, active systems, daylighting, and other solar options. Solar system design evaluation techniques including considerations for building energy requirements, passive systems, active systems, and economics are presented in Section II. The third section attempts to assist the designer in the building design process for energy conservation and solar applications including options and considerations for pre-design, design, and post-design phases. The information required for the solar design proee^ has not been fully developed at this time. Therefore, Section III is incomplete, but an overview of the considerations with some of the design proces elements is presented. Section IV illustrates ease studies that utilize solar applications in the building design.

  13. The solar elemental abundances problem: Large enhancements in photoionization and bound-free opacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, A.; Nahar, S.

    2016-05-01

    Aimed at solving the outstanding problem of solar opacity and radiation transport, we report substantial photoabsorption in the high-energy regime due to atomic core photo-excitations not heretofore considered. In an extensive R-Matrix calculations of unprecedented complexity for an important iron ion Fe XVII, with a wave function expansion of 99 Fe XVIII core states from n current opacity models, and ii) demonstrate convergence with respect to successive core excitations. These findings may explain the ``higher-than-predicted'' monochromatic iron opacity measured recently at the Sandia Z-pinch fusion device at solar interior conditions. The findings will also impact the total atomic photoabsorption and radiation transport in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, such as UV emission from host stars of extra-solar planets. Support: NSF, DOE, Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, OH.

  14. Interplanetary radio storms. II - Emission levels and solar wind speed in the range 0.05-0.8 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougeret, J.-L.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Storms of interplanetary type III radio bursts (IP storms) are commonly observed in the interplanetary medium by the ISEE-3 radio instrument. This instrument has the capability of accurately determining the arrival direction of the radio emission. At each observing frequency, the storm radio sources are tracked as they cross the line-of-sight to the sun. Using a simple model, the emission levels are determined at a number of radio frequencies for four separate storms. The IP storm radiation is found to occur in regions of enhanced density at levels of 0.05 to 0.8 AU. The density in these enhancements falls off faster than R(-2). The solar wind speed in the storm region is also measured. The analysis is consistent with steady conditions in the storm region during a few days around the III storm burst radio emission at the harmonic of the local plasma frequency.

  15. KINEMATICAL AND CHEMICAL VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF THE GALACTIC THICK DISK. II. A LACK OF DARK MATTER IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moni Bidin, C.; Smith, R.; Carraro, G.; Méndez, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    We estimated the dynamical surface mass density Σ at the solar position between Z = 1.5 and 4 kpc from the Galactic plane, as inferred from the kinematics of thick disk stars. The formulation is exact within the limit of validity of a few basic assumptions. The resulting trend of Σ(Z) matches the expectations of visible mass alone, and no dark component is required to account for the observations. We extrapolate a dark matter (DM) density in the solar neighborhood of 0 ± 1 mM ☉ pc –3 , and all the current models of a spherical DM halo are excluded at a confidence level higher than 4σ. A detailed analysis reveals that a small amount of DM is allowed in the volume under study by the change of some input parameter or hypothesis, but not enough to match the expectations of the models, except under an exotic combination of non-standard assumptions. Identical results are obtained when repeating the calculation with kinematical measurements available in the literature. We demonstrate that a DM halo would be detected by our method, and therefore the results have no straightforward interpretation. Only the presence of a highly prolate (flattening q > 2) DM halo can be reconciled with the observations, but this is highly unlikely in ΛCDM models. The results challenge the current understanding of the spatial distribution and nature of the Galactic DM. In particular, our results may indicate that any direct DM detection experiment is doomed to fail if the local density of the target particles is negligible.

  16. A Thermodynamic History of the Solar Constitution — II: The Theory of a Gaseous Sun and Jeans' Failed Liquid Alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the development of solar theory is followed from the concept that the Sun was an ethereal nuclear body with a partially condensed photosphere to the creation of a fully gaseous object. An overview will be presented of the liquid Sun. A powerful lineage has brought us the gaseous Sun and two of its main authors were the direct sci- entific descendants of Gustav Robert Kirchhoff: Franz Arthur Friedrich Schuster and Arthur Stanley Eddington. It will be discovered that the seminal ideas of Father Secchi and Herv ́ e Faye were not abandoned by astronomy until the beginning of 20th century. The central role of carbon in early solar physics will also be highlighted by revisit- ing George Johnstone Stoney. The evolution of the gaseous models will be outlined, along with the contributions of Johann Karl Friedrich Z ̈ ollner, James Clerk Maxwell, Jonathan Homer Lane, August Ritter, William Thomson, William Huggins, William Edward Wilson, George Francis FitzGerald, Jacob Robert Emden, Frank Washington Very, Karl Schwarzschild, and Edward Arthur Milne. Finally, with the aid of Edward Arthur Milne, the work of James Hopwood Jeans, the last modern advocate of a liquid Sun, will be rediscovered. Jeans was a staunch advocate of the condensed phase, but deprived of a proper building block, he would eventually abandon his non-gaseous stars. For his part, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar would spend nine years of his life studying homogeneous liquid masses. These were precisely the kind of objects which Jeans had considered for his liquid stars.

  17. A COUPLED 2 × 2D BABCOCK–LEIGHTON SOLAR DYNAMO MODEL. II. REFERENCE DYNAMO SOLUTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemerle, Alexandre; Charbonneau, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we complete the presentation of a new hybrid 2 × 2D flux transport dynamo (FTD) model of the solar cycle based on the Babcock–Leighton mechanism of poloidal magnetic field regeneration via the surface decay of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). This hybrid model is constructed by allowing the surface flux transport (SFT) simulation described in Lemerle et al. to provide the poloidal source term to an axisymmetric FTD simulation defined in a meridional plane, which in turn generates the BMRs required by the SFT. A key aspect of this coupling is the definition of an emergence function describing the probability of BMR emergence as a function of the spatial distribution of the internal axisymmetric magnetic field. We use a genetic algorithm to calibrate this function, together with other model parameters, against observed cycle 21 emergence data. We present a reference dynamo solution reproducing many solar cycle characteristics, including good hemispheric coupling, phase relationship between the surface dipole and the BMR-generating internal field, and correlation between dipole strength at cycle maximum and peak amplitude of the next cycle. The saturation of the cycle amplitude takes place through the quenching of the BMR tilt as a function of the internal field. The observed statistical scatter about the mean BMR tilt, built into the model, acts as a source of stochasticity which dominates amplitude fluctuations. The model thus can produce Dalton-like epochs of strongly suppressed cycle amplitude lasting a few cycles and can even shut off entirely following an unfavorable sequence of emergence events.

  18. KINEMATICAL AND CHEMICAL VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF THE GALACTIC THICK DISK. II. A LACK OF DARK MATTER IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moni Bidin, C.; Smith, R. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile); Carraro, G. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Mendez, R. A., E-mail: cmbidin@astro-udec.cl [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-05-20

    We estimated the dynamical surface mass density {Sigma} at the solar position between Z = 1.5 and 4 kpc from the Galactic plane, as inferred from the kinematics of thick disk stars. The formulation is exact within the limit of validity of a few basic assumptions. The resulting trend of {Sigma}(Z) matches the expectations of visible mass alone, and no dark component is required to account for the observations. We extrapolate a dark matter (DM) density in the solar neighborhood of 0 {+-} 1 mM{sub Sun} pc{sup -3}, and all the current models of a spherical DM halo are excluded at a confidence level higher than 4{sigma}. A detailed analysis reveals that a small amount of DM is allowed in the volume under study by the change of some input parameter or hypothesis, but not enough to match the expectations of the models, except under an exotic combination of non-standard assumptions. Identical results are obtained when repeating the calculation with kinematical measurements available in the literature. We demonstrate that a DM halo would be detected by our method, and therefore the results have no straightforward interpretation. Only the presence of a highly prolate (flattening q > 2) DM halo can be reconciled with the observations, but this is highly unlikely in {Lambda}CDM models. The results challenge the current understanding of the spatial distribution and nature of the Galactic DM. In particular, our results may indicate that any direct DM detection experiment is doomed to fail if the local density of the target particles is negligible.

  19. A COUPLED 2 × 2D BABCOCK–LEIGHTON SOLAR DYNAMO MODEL. II. REFERENCE DYNAMO SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemerle, Alexandre; Charbonneau, Paul, E-mail: lemerle@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca [Département de physique, Université de Montréal, 2900 Boulevard Édouard-Montpetit, Montréal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2017-01-10

    In this paper we complete the presentation of a new hybrid 2 × 2D flux transport dynamo (FTD) model of the solar cycle based on the Babcock–Leighton mechanism of poloidal magnetic field regeneration via the surface decay of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). This hybrid model is constructed by allowing the surface flux transport (SFT) simulation described in Lemerle et al. to provide the poloidal source term to an axisymmetric FTD simulation defined in a meridional plane, which in turn generates the BMRs required by the SFT. A key aspect of this coupling is the definition of an emergence function describing the probability of BMR emergence as a function of the spatial distribution of the internal axisymmetric magnetic field. We use a genetic algorithm to calibrate this function, together with other model parameters, against observed cycle 21 emergence data. We present a reference dynamo solution reproducing many solar cycle characteristics, including good hemispheric coupling, phase relationship between the surface dipole and the BMR-generating internal field, and correlation between dipole strength at cycle maximum and peak amplitude of the next cycle. The saturation of the cycle amplitude takes place through the quenching of the BMR tilt as a function of the internal field. The observed statistical scatter about the mean BMR tilt, built into the model, acts as a source of stochasticity which dominates amplitude fluctuations. The model thus can produce Dalton-like epochs of strongly suppressed cycle amplitude lasting a few cycles and can even shut off entirely following an unfavorable sequence of emergence events.

  20. Highly efficient perovskite solar cells based on a nanostructured WO3-TiO2 core-shell electron transporting material

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid; Swain, Bhabani Sankar; Kirmani, Ahmad R.; Amassian, Aram

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, only mesoporous TiO2 and ZnO were successfully demonstrated as electron transport layers (ETL) alongside the reports of ZrO2 and Al2O3 as scaffold materials in organometal halide perovskite solar cells, largely owing to ease of processing and to high power conversion efficiency. In this article, we explore tungsten trioxide (WO3)-based nanostructured and porous ETL materials directly grown hydrothermally with different morphologies such as nanoparticles, nanorods and nanosheet arrays. The nanostructure morphology strongly influences the photocurrent and efficiency in organometal halide perovskite solar cells. We find that the perovskite solar cells based on WO3 nanosheet arrays yield significantly enhanced photovoltaic performance as compared to nanoparticles and nanorod arrays due to good perovskite absorber infiltration in the porous scaffold and more rapid carrier transport. We further demonstrate that treating the WO3 nanostructures with an aqueous solution of TiCl4 reduces charge recombination at the perovskite/WO3 interface, resulting in the highest power conversion efficiency of 11.24% for devices based on WO3 nanosheet arrays. The successful demonstration of alternative ETL materials and nanostructures based on WO3 will open up new opportunities in the development of highly efficient perovskite solar cells. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  1. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  2. FLARE-GENERATED SHOCK WAVE PROPAGATION THROUGH SOLAR CORONAL ARCADE LOOPS AND AN ASSOCIATED TYPE II RADIO BURST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Cho, Kyung-Suk [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Innes, D. E., E-mail: pankaj@kasi.re.kr [Max-Planck Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents multiwavelength observations of a flare-generated type II radio burst. The kinematics of the shock derived from the type II burst closely match a fast extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave seen propagating through coronal arcade loops. The EUV wave was closely associated with an impulsive M1.0 flare without a related coronal mass ejection, and was triggered at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops in active region NOAA 12035. It was initially observed in the 335 Å images from the Atmospheric Image Assembly with a speed of ∼800 km s{sup −1} and it accelerated to ∼1490 km s{sup −1} after passing through the arcade loops. A fan–spine magnetic topology was revealed at the flare site. A small, confined filament eruption (∼340 km s{sup −1}) was also observed moving in the opposite direction to the EUV wave. We suggest that breakout reconnection in the fan–spine topology triggered the flare and associated EUV wave that propagated as a fast shock through the arcade loops.

  3. FLARE-GENERATED SHOCK WAVE PROPAGATION THROUGH SOLAR CORONAL ARCADE LOOPS AND AN ASSOCIATED TYPE II RADIO BURST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Innes, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents multiwavelength observations of a flare-generated type II radio burst. The kinematics of the shock derived from the type II burst closely match a fast extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave seen propagating through coronal arcade loops. The EUV wave was closely associated with an impulsive M1.0 flare without a related coronal mass ejection, and was triggered at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops in active region NOAA 12035. It was initially observed in the 335 Å images from the Atmospheric Image Assembly with a speed of ∼800 km s −1 and it accelerated to ∼1490 km s −1 after passing through the arcade loops. A fan–spine magnetic topology was revealed at the flare site. A small, confined filament eruption (∼340 km s −1 ) was also observed moving in the opposite direction to the EUV wave. We suggest that breakout reconnection in the fan–spine topology triggered the flare and associated EUV wave that propagated as a fast shock through the arcade loops.

  4. EMERGENCE OF GRANULAR-SIZED MAGNETIC BUBBLES THROUGH THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE. II. NON-LTE CHROMOSPHERIC DIAGNOSTICS AND INVERSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Jaime de la Cruz [Institute for Solar Physics, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Albanova University Center, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Hansteen, Viggo; Ortiz, Ada [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Bellot-Rubio, Luis, E-mail: jaime@astro.su.se [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

    2015-09-10

    Magnetic flux emergence into the outer layers of the Sun is a fundamental mechanism for releasing energy into the chromosphere and the corona. In this paper, we study the emergence of granular-sized flux concentrations and the structuring of the corresponding physical parameters and atmospheric diagnostics in the upper photosphere and in the chromosphere. We make use of a realistic 3D MHD simulation of the outer layers of the Sun to study the formation of the Ca ii 8542 line. We also derive semi-empirical 3D models from non-LTE inversions of our observations. These models contain information on the line-of-sight stratifications of temperature, velocity, and the magnetic field. Our analysis explains the peculiar Ca ii 8542 Å profiles observed in the flux emerging region. Additionally, we derive detailed temperature and velocity maps describing the ascent of a magnetic bubble from the photosphere to the chromosphere. The inversions suggest that, in active regions, granular-sized bubbles emerge up to the lower chromosphere where the existing large-scale field hinders their ascent. We report hints of heating when the field reaches the chromosphere.

  5. ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} core/shell nanorods array as excellent anti-reflection layers on silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lung, Chun-Ming; Wang, Wei-Cheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Ching-Hsiang [Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Liang-Yih, E-mail: sampras@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Miin-Jang, E-mail: mjchen@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2016-09-01

    A simple, low-temperature hydrothermal method and atomic layer deposition (ALD) were used to fabricate ZnO nanostructures as subwavelength-structure antireflection layers (SWS ARLs) on Si solar cells. ZnO seed layers with wafer-scale uniformity were prepared, and ALD was used to reproduce two types of ZnO-based structures, nanorod arrays (NRAs) and nanotip arrays (NTAs). The study examined diammonium phosphate concentrations during growth, conducted simulations based on three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain and reflection analyses, performed X-ray diffractometer, field-emission scanning electron microscope, and high-resolution transmission electron microscope characterizations, measured total reflectance spectra by using a spectrophotometer with integrated spheres, and ran solar simulations to determine the efficiency of the Si solar cells. Coating the ZnO NTAs on the Si solar cells yielded a low total reflectance over a broad band range and produced omnidirectional light scattering on the cells, causing incident light to have a shallow penetration depth near the p–n junction and leading to an increase in short current density ({sub Jsc}). Coating the ZnO NTAs with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shell induced continuous variation in the refractive index, further decreasing the total reflectance to approximately 5.5%, and protected the ZnO NTAs from the harmful acidic environment. Significantly increasing the J{sub sc} and η levels of the Si solar cells, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}@ZnO-NTA antireflection structure produced a high efficiency of 17.79%. Its superior performance, including low and wideband reflectance, a low process temperature, and a significant increase in efficiency, indicates the potential of this antireflective structure for enhancing solar cell efficiency in photovoltaic devices. - Highlights: • ZnO nanotip arrays were synthesized by hydrothermal methods as antireflection layer. • The total reflectance is low around 7.8% from 400 nm to 1000

  6. Acid-base properties of the N3 ruthenium(II) solar cell sensitizer: a combined experimental and computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzoli, Giuliano; Lobello, Maria Grazia; Carlotti, Benedetta; Elisei, Fausto; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad K; Vitillaro, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Filippo

    2012-10-14

    We report a combined spectro-photometric and computational investigation of the acid-base equilibria of the N3 solar cell sensitizer [Ru(dcbpyH(2))(2)(NCS)(2)] (dcbpyH(2) = 4,4'-dicarboxyl-2,2' bipyridine) in aqueous/ethanol solutions. The absorption spectra of N3 recorded at various pH values were analyzed by Single Value Decomposition techniques, followed by Global Fitting procedures, allowing us to identify four separate acid-base equilibria and their corresponding ground state pK(a) values. DFT/TDDFT calculations were performed for the N3 dye in solution, investigating the possible relevant species obtained by sequential deprotonation of the four dye carboxylic groups. TDDFT excited state calculations provided UV-vis absorption spectra which nicely agree with the experimental spectral shapes at various pH values. The calculated pK(a) values are also in good agreement with experimental data, within <1 pK(a) unit. Based on the calculated energy differences a tentative assignment of the N3 deprotonation pathway is reported.

  7. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF THE λ ORIONIS CLUSTER. II. DISKS AROUND SOLAR-TYPE AND LOW-MASS STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, Jesus; Morales-Calderon, Maria; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, L.; Muzerolle, J.; Gutermuth, R.; Luhman, K. L.; Stauffer, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present IRAC/MIPS Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the solar-type and the low-mass stellar population of the young (∼5 Myr) λ Orionis cluster. Combining optical and Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry, we identify 436 stars as probable members of the cluster. Given the distance (450 pc) and the age of the cluster, our sample ranges in mass from 2 M sun to objects below the substellar limit. With the addition of the Spitzer mid-infrared data, we have identified 49 stars bearing disks in the stellar cluster. Using spectral energy distribution slopes, we place objects in several classes: non-excess stars (diskless), stars with optically thick disks, stars with 'evolved disks' (with smaller excesses than optically thick disk systems), and 'transitional disk' candidates (in which the inner disk is partially or fully cleared). The disk fraction depends on the stellar mass, ranging from ∼6% for K-type stars (R C - J C - J>4). We confirm the dependence of disk fraction on stellar mass in this age range found in other studies. Regarding clustering levels, the overall fraction of disks in the λ Orionis cluster is similar to those reported in other stellar groups with ages normally quoted as ∼5 Myr.

  8. FY 1977 Annual report on Sunshine Project results. Research and development of photovoltaic power generation systems. (Research and development of solar cells of II-VI group compound semiconductor); 1977 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. II-VI zoku kagobutsu handotai taiyo denchi no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-03-31

    This project is aimed at establishment of techniques for pollution-free production of II-VI group compound semiconductor type solar cells. The research items are (1) measures against aging, (2) methods for production of II-VI group compound semiconductors and for forming their joints, and (3) method for assembling solar cell devices.For the item (1), the aging tests are conducted for sintered film type CdS/CdTe solar cells. The C electrode is found to be less aged than the others. The aging tests for the CdS/Cu{sub 2}S cells indicate that it takes 10 years or longer for the performance to be halved under commercial conditions. For the item (2), the sintered film type CdS/CdTe solar cells can be produced by a mass-producible process of screen printing and belt furnace. This production method is promising for producing the solar cells at low cost. For the item (3), it is found that series resistance of the solar cell devices increases as the assembly area increases, resulting in decreased conversion efficiency. The divided structure of the CdTe layer is desired to avoid the above problem. Dividing each unit device increases intrinsic conversion efficiency, but decreases effective power generation area ratio. It is therefore necessary to improve printing precision. (NEDO)

  9. Vertical propagation of waves in the solar atmosphere. II. Phase delays in the quiet chromosphere and cell-network distinctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lites, B.W.; Chipman, E.G.; White, O.R.

    1982-01-01

    The differences in the phase of the velocity oscillations between a pair of chromospheric Ca II lines was measured using the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Sacramento Peak Observatory. The observed phase differences indicate that the acoustic modes are trapped or envanescent, rather than propagating in the chromosphere. We find systematic distinctions in the phase delays between quiet network and cell interior regions for both intensity and velocity oscillations in photospheric and chromospheric lines. The theory of linear perturbations in a isothermal atmosphere is invoked to interpret these differences. From this analysis we find that one or more of the following explanations is possible. (1) the radiative damping is more effective in the network than in the cell interior; (2) the network features exclude oscillations of large horizontal wavenumber; or (3) the scale height of the chromosphere is larger in the network than in the cell interior

  10. Eosin-Y sensitized core-shell TiO2-ZnO nano-structured photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, V S; Palai, Akshaya K; Mohanty, Smita; Nayak, Sanjay K

    2018-06-01

    In the current investigation, TiO 2 and TiO 2 -ZnO (core-shell) spherical nanoparticles were synthesized by simple combined hydrolysis and refluxing method. A TiO 2 core nanomaterial on the shell material of ZnO was synthesized by utilizing variable ratios of ZnO. The structural characterization of TiO 2 -ZnO core/shell nanoparticles were done by XRD analysis. The spherical structured morphology of the TiO 2 -ZnO has been confirmed through field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. The UV-visible spectra of TiO 2 -ZnO nanostructures were also compared with the pristine TiO 2 to investigate the shift of wavelength. The TiO 2 -ZnO core/shell nanoparticles at the interface efficiently collect the photogenarated electrons from ZnO and also ZnO act a barrier for reduced charge recombination of electrolyte and dye-nanoparticles interface. This combination improved the light absorption which induced the charge transfer ability and dye loading capacity of core-shell nanoparticles. An enhancement in the short circuit current (J sc ) from 1.67 mA/cm 2 to 2.1 mA/cm 2 has been observed for TiO 2 -ZnObased photoanode (with platinum free counter electrode), promises an improvement in the energy conversion efficiency by 57% in comparison with that of the DSSCs based on the pristine TiO 2 . Henceforth, TiO 2 -ZnO photoelectrode in ZnO will effectively act as barrier at the interface of TiO 2 -ZnO and TiO 2 , ensuring the potential for DSSC application. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of SFR reactor safety issues: Part II: Analysis results of ULOF transients imposed on a variety of different innovative core designs with SAS-SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruessmann, R., E-mail: regina.kruessmann@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Ponomarev, A.; Pfrang, W.; Struwe, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Champigny, J.; Carluec, B. [AREVA, 10, rue J. Récamier, 69456 Lyon Cedex 06 (France); Schmitt, D.; Verwaerde, D. [EDF R& D, 1 avenue du général de Gaulle, 92140 Clamart (France)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Comparison of different core designs for a sodium-cooled fast reactor. • Safety assessment with the code system SAS-SFR. • Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) scenario. • Sodium boiling and core melting cannot be avoided. • A net negative Na void effect provides more grace time prior to local SA destruction. - Abstract: In the framework of cooperation agreements between KIT-INR and AREVA SAS NP as well as between KIT-INR and EDF R&D in the years 2008–2013, the evaluation of severe transient behavior in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) was investigated. In Part I of this contribution, the efficiency of newly conceived prevention and mitigation measures was investigated for unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF), unprotected loss-of-heat-sink (ULOHS) and the unprotected transient-overpower (UTOP) transients. In this second part, consequence analyses were performed for the initiation phase of different unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) scenarios imposed on a variety of different core design options of SFRs. The code system SAS-SFR was used for this purpose. Results of analyses for cases postulating unavailability of prevention measures as shut-down systems, passive and/or active additional devices show that entering into an energetic power excursion as a consequence of the initiation phase of a ULOF cannot be avoided for those core designs with a cumulative void reactivity feedback larger than zero. However, even for core designs aiming at values of the void reactivity less than zero it is difficult to find system design characteristics which prevent the transient entering into partial core destruction. Further studies of the transient core and system behavior would require codes dedicated to specific aspects of transition phase analyses and of in-vessel material relocation analyses.

  12. The sun and solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenna-Lawlor, S.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: the sun's core (thermonuclear reactions, energy transfer from core through radiation zone, convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere and corona); the photosphere (convection, granulation, sunspots, magnetic fields, solar cycle, rotation of the sun); solar variability and paleoclimatic records (correlation of low solar activity with increased 14 C production in atmosphere); the chromosphere and corona (turbulence, temperature, coronal streamers, energy transfer); solar flares (cosmic rays, aurorae, spectra, velocity of flares, prominences, mechanisms of flares); the solar wind. (U.K.)

  13. A spectroscopic survey of the youngest field stars in the solar neighborhood . II. The optically faint sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, A.; Guillout, P.; Klutsch, A.; Ferrero, R. Freire; Marilli, E.; Biazzo, K.; Gandolfi, D.; Montes, D.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Star formation in the solar neighborhood is mainly traced by young stars in open clusters, associations, and in the field, which can be identified, for example, by their X-ray emission. The determination of stellar parameters for the optical counterparts of X-ray sources is crucial for a full characterization of these stars. Aims: This work extends the spectroscopic study of the RasTyc sample, obtained by the cross-correlation of the Tycho and ROSAT All-Sky Survey catalogs, to stars fainter than V = 9.5 mag and aims to identify sparse populations of young stars in the solar neighborhood. Methods: We acquired 625 high-resolution spectra for 443 presumably young stars with four different instruments in the northern hemisphere. The radial and rotational velocity (vsini) of our targets were measured by means of the cross-correlation technique, which is also helpful to discover single-lined (SB1), double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2), and multiple systems. We used the code ROTFIT to perform an MK spectral classification and to determine the atmospheric parameters (Teff, logg, [Fe/H]) and vsini of the single stars and SB1 systems. For these objects, we used the spectral subtraction of slowly rotating templates to measure the equivalent widths of the Hα and Li I 6708 Å lines, which enabled us to derive their chromospheric activity level and lithium abundance. We made use of Gaia DR1 parallaxes and proper motions to locate the targets in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram and to compute the space velocity components of the youngest objects. Results: We find a remarkable percentage (at least 35%) of binaries and multiple systems. On the basis of the lithium abundance, the sample of single stars and SB1 systems appears to be mostly ( 60%) composed of stars younger than the members of the UMa cluster. The remaining sources are in the age range between the UMa and Hyades clusters ( 20%) or older ( 20%). In total, we identify 42 very young (PMS-like) stars

  14. Applicability of PRISM PRA Methodology to the Level II Probabilistic Safety Analysis of KALIMER-600 (I) (Core Damage Event Tree Analysis Part)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. Y.; Kim, T. W.; Ha, K. S.; Lee, B. Y.

    2009-03-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing liquid metal reactor (LMR) design technologies under a National Nuclear R and D Program. Nevertheless, there is no experience of the PSA domestically for a fast reactor with the metal fuel. Therefore, the objective of this study is to establish the methodologies of risk assessment for the reference design of KALIMER-600 reactor. An applicability of the PSA of the PRISM plant to the KALIMER-600 has been studied. The study is confined to a core damage event tree analysis which is a part of a level 2 PSA. Assuming that the accident types, which can be developed from level 1 PSA, are same as the PRISM PRA, core damage categories are defined and core damage event trees are developed for the KALIMER-600 reactor. Fission product release fractions of the core damage categories and branch probabilities of the core damage event trees are referred from the PRISM PRA temporarily. Plant specific data will be used during the detail analysis

  15. SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF LARGE GRADUAL SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS. II. SYSTEMATIC Q/M DEPENDENCE OF HEAVY ION SPECTRAL BREAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.; Ebert, R. W.; Schwadron, N. A. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Mason, G. M. [Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); McComas, D. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Li, G. [The Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35756 (United States); Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smith, C. W., E-mail: mdesai@swri.edu [University of New Hampshire, 8 College Road, Durham NH 03824 (United States)

    2016-09-10

    We fit ∼0.1–500 MeV nucleon{sup −1} H–Fe spectra in 46 large solar energetic particle (SEP) events with the double power-law Band function to obtain a normalization constant, low- and high-energy parameters γ {sub a} and γ {sub b}, and break energy E {sub B}, and derive the low-energy spectral slope γ {sub 1}. We find that: (1) γ {sub a}, γ {sub 1}, and γ {sub b} are species-independent and the spectra steepen with increasing energy; (2) E {sub B} decreases systematically with decreasing Q/M scaling as (Q/M){sup α}; (3) α varies between ∼0.2–3 and is well correlated with the ∼0.16–0.23 MeV nucleon{sup −1} Fe/O; (4) in most events, α < 1.4, γ {sub b}– γ {sub a} > 3, and O E {sub B} increases with γ {sub b}– γ {sub a}; and (5) in many extreme events (associated with faster coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and GLEs), Fe/O and {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are enriched, α ≥ 1.4, γ {sub b}– γ {sub a} < 3, and E {sub B} decreases with γ {sub b}– γ {sub a}. The species-independence of γ {sub a}, γ {sub 1}, and γ {sub b} and the Q/M dependence of E {sub B} within an event and the α values suggest that double power-law SEP spectra occur due to diffusive acceleration by near-Sun CME shocks rather than scattering in interplanetary turbulence. Using γ {sub 1}, we infer that the average compression ratio for 33 near-Sun CME shocks is 2.49 ± 0.08. In most events, the Q/M dependence of E {sub B} is consistent with the equal diffusion coefficient condition and the variability in α is driven by differences in the near-shock wave intensity spectra, which are flatter than the Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum but weaker than the spectra for extreme events. In contrast, in extreme events, enhanced wave power enables faster CME shocks to accelerate impulsive suprathermal ions more efficiently than ambient coronal ions.

  16. Solar cells. Danish strategy for research, development, demonstration and distribution. Part 2 - Background paper; Solceller. Dansk strategi for forskning, udvikling, demonstration og udbredelse. Del II - Baggrundsnotat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    The background paper to the strategy for Danish R and D within the solar cell field describes the background and references for solar cell technology and its development, both nationally and internationally. Especially, the potentials for use of solar cells in Denmark together with the primary Danish actors and strongholds are presented.

  17. Solar reflection panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diver, Jr., Richard B.; Grossman, James W [Albuquerque, NM; Reshetnik, Michael [Boulder, CO

    2006-07-18

    A solar collector comprising a glass mirror, and a composite panel, wherein the back of the mirror is affixed to a front surface of the composite panel. The composite panel comprises a front sheet affixed to a surface of a core material, preferably a core material comprising a honeycomb structure, and a back sheet affixed to an opposite surface of the core material. The invention may further comprise a sealing strip, preferably comprising EPDM, positioned between the glass mirror and the front surface of the composite panel. The invention also is of methods of making such solar collectors.

  18. Code assessment and modelling for Design Basis Accident analysis of the European Sodium Fast Reactor design. Part II: Optimised core and representative transients analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, A., E-mail: aulach@iqn.upv.es [JRC-IET European Commission, Westerduinweg 3, PO BOX 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Schikorr, M. [KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Mikityuk, K. [PSI, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ammirabile, L. [JRC-IET European Commission, Westerduinweg 3, PO BOX 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Bandini, G. [ENEA, Via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Darmet, G.; Schmitt, D. [EDF, 1 Avenue du Général de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Dufour, Ph.; Tosello, A. [CEA, St. Paul lez Durance, 13108 Cadarache (France); Gallego, E.; Jimenez, G. [UPM, José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Bubelis, E.; Ponomarev, A.; Kruessmann, R.; Struwe, D. [KIT, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Stempniewicz, M. [NRG, Utrechtseweg 310, P.O. Box-9034, 6800 ES Arnhem (Netherlands)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Benchmarked models have been applied for the analysis of DBA transients of the ESFR design. • Two system codes are able to simulate the behavior of the system beyond sodium boiling. • The optimization of the core design and its influence in the transients’ evolution is described. • The analysis has identified peak values and grace times for the protection system design. - Abstract: The new reactor concepts proposed in the Generation IV International Forum require the development and validation of computational tools able to assess their safety performance. In the first part of this paper the models of the ESFR design developed by several organisations in the framework of the CP-ESFR project were presented and their reliability validated via a benchmarking exercise. This second part of the paper includes the application of those tools for the analysis of design basis accident (DBC) scenarios of the reference design. Further, this paper also introduces the main features of the core optimisation process carried out within the project with the objective to enhance the core safety performance through the reduction of the positive coolant density reactivity effect. The influence of this optimised core design on the reactor safety performance during the previously analysed transients is also discussed. The conclusion provides an overview of the work performed by the partners involved in the project towards the development and enhancement of computational tools specifically tailored to the evaluation of the safety performance of the Generation IV innovative nuclear reactor designs.

  19. Code assessment and modelling for Design Basis Accident analysis of the European Sodium Fast Reactor design. Part II: Optimised core and representative transients analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, A.; Schikorr, M.; Mikityuk, K.; Ammirabile, L.; Bandini, G.; Darmet, G.; Schmitt, D.; Dufour, Ph.; Tosello, A.; Gallego, E.; Jimenez, G.; Bubelis, E.; Ponomarev, A.; Kruessmann, R.; Struwe, D.; Stempniewicz, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Benchmarked models have been applied for the analysis of DBA transients of the ESFR design. • Two system codes are able to simulate the behavior of the system beyond sodium boiling. • The optimization of the core design and its influence in the transients’ evolution is described. • The analysis has identified peak values and grace times for the protection system design. - Abstract: The new reactor concepts proposed in the Generation IV International Forum require the development and validation of computational tools able to assess their safety performance. In the first part of this paper the models of the ESFR design developed by several organisations in the framework of the CP-ESFR project were presented and their reliability validated via a benchmarking exercise. This second part of the paper includes the application of those tools for the analysis of design basis accident (DBC) scenarios of the reference design. Further, this paper also introduces the main features of the core optimisation process carried out within the project with the objective to enhance the core safety performance through the reduction of the positive coolant density reactivity effect. The influence of this optimised core design on the reactor safety performance during the previously analysed transients is also discussed. The conclusion provides an overview of the work performed by the partners involved in the project towards the development and enhancement of computational tools specifically tailored to the evaluation of the safety performance of the Generation IV innovative nuclear reactor designs

  20. Ex-vessel boiling experiments: laboratory- and reactor-scale testing of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention. Pt. II. Reactor-scale boiling experiments of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.H.; Slezak, S.E.; Pasedag, W.F.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., p.77-88 (1997). This paper summarizes the results of a reactor-scale ex-vessel boiling experiment for assessing the flooded cavity design of the heavy water new production reactor. The simulated reactor vessel has a cylindrical diameter of 3.7 m and a torispherical bottom head. Boiling outside the reactor vessel was found to be subcooled nucleate boiling. The subcooling mainly results from the gravity head, which in turn results from flooding the side of the reactor vessel. The boiling process exhibits a cyclic pattern with four distinct phases: direct liquid-solid contact, bubble nucleation and growth, coalescence, and vapor mass dispersion. The results show that, under prototypic heat load and heat flux distributions, the flooded cavity will be effective for in-vessel core retention in the heavy water new production reactor. The results also demonstrate that the heat dissipation requirement for in-vessel core retention, for the central region of the lower head of an AP-600 advanced light water reactor, can be met with the flooded cavity design. (orig.)

  1. Simple and efficient synthesis of copper(II)-modified uniform magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 core/shell microspheres for immobilization of cellulase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Kuo; Hou, Xiao-Cheng; Huang, Fang-Zhi; Li, Chuan-Hao; Kang, Wen-Juan; Xie, An-Jian; Shen, Yu-Hua

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we reported a simple and efficient protocol for preparation of Cu2+-modified magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 core/shell microspheres for immobilization of cellulase. The uniform magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 core/shell microspheres with a thin shell of 20 nm were synthesized through a solvothermal method followed by a sol-gel process. An amino-terminated silane coupling agent of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTS) was then grafted on them for capturing Cu2+ ions. The reaction process is very simple, efficient, and economical. Noticeably, the content of Cu2+ ions on the magnetic core/shell microspheres can reach 4.6 Wt%, endowing them possess as high immobilization capacity as 225.5 mg/g for cellulase. And the immobilized cellulase can be retained over 90 % on the magnetic microspheres after six cycles. Meanwhile, the magnetic microspheres decorated with Cu2+ ions show a superparamagnetic character with a high magnetic saturation of 58.5 emu/g at room temperature, suggesting conveniently and rapidly recycle the enzyme from solution. This facile, recyclable, high immobilization capacity and activity strategy may find potential applications in enzyme catalytic reactions with low cost.

  2. Simple and efficient synthesis of copper(II)-modified uniform magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 core/shell microspheres for immobilization of cellulase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shi-Kuo; Hou, Xiao-Cheng; Huang, Fang-Zhi; Li, Chuan-Hao; Kang, Wen-Juan; Xie, An-Jian; Shen, Yu-Hua

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we reported a simple and efficient protocol for preparation of Cu 2+ -modified magnetic Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 core/shell microspheres for immobilization of cellulase. The uniform magnetic Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 core/shell microspheres with a thin shell of 20 nm were synthesized through a solvothermal method followed by a sol–gel process. An amino-terminated silane coupling agent of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTS) was then grafted on them for capturing Cu 2+ ions. The reaction process is very simple, efficient, and economical. Noticeably, the content of Cu 2+ ions on the magnetic core/shell microspheres can reach 4.6 Wt%, endowing them possess as high immobilization capacity as 225.5 mg/g for cellulase. And the immobilized cellulase can be retained over 90 % on the magnetic microspheres after six cycles. Meanwhile, the magnetic microspheres decorated with Cu 2+ ions show a superparamagnetic character with a high magnetic saturation of 58.5 emu/g at room temperature, suggesting conveniently and rapidly recycle the enzyme from solution. This facile, recyclable, high immobilization capacity and activity strategy may find potential applications in enzyme catalytic reactions with low cost

  3. Approximate Cores of a General Class of Economies. Part II. Set-Up Costs and Firm Formation in Coalition Production Economies,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    r AAI1Z 608 YALE UNIV NEW HAVEN CT C OWLES FOUNDATION FOR RESEARC --ETC F/G 513 APPROXIMATE CORES 6F A GENERAL CLASS OF ECONOMIES. PART It. SET--ETC(U...theoretic models of the economy in strategic form are institutional. Markets and firms and even money are assumed to exist. Cooperative game theory can be...groups. Alternatively we can define firms and firms- in-being, specify the manner of trade in the markets , define what is meant by entry and exit and

  4. Solar Indices - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  5. Solar Indices - Solar Ultraviolet

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  6. Solar Indices - Solar Corona

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  7. Solar Indices - Solar Irradiance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  8. ELCOS: the PSI code system for LWR core analysis. Part II: user`s manual for the fuel assembly code BOXER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paratte, J.M.; Grimm, P.; Hollard, J.M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-02-01

    ELCOS is a flexible code system for the stationary simulation of light water reactor cores. It consists of the four computer codes ETOBOX, BOXER, CORCOD and SILWER. The user`s manual of the second one is presented here. BOXER calculates the neutronics in cartesian geometry. The code can roughly be divided into four stages: - organisation: choice of the modules, file manipulations, reading and checking of input data, - fine group fluxes and condensation: one-dimensional calculation of fluxes and computation of the group constants of homogeneous materials and cells, - two-dimensional calculations: geometrically detailed simulation of the configuration in few energy groups, - burnup: evolution of the nuclide densities as a function of time. This manual shows all input commands which can be used while running the different modules of BOXER. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  9. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  10. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  11. Preparation of graphene quantum dots based core-satellite hybrid spheres and their use as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for visual determination of mercury(II) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, Mengjuan; Wang, Chengquan; Qian, Jing; Wang, Kan; Yang, Zhenting; Liu, Qian; Mao, Hanping; Wang, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We herein proposed a simple and effective strategy for preparing graphene quantum dots (GQDs)-based core-satellite hybrid spheres and further explored the feasibility of using such spheres as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for the visual determination of Hg 2+ . The red-emitting CdTe QDs were firstly entrapped in the silica nanosphere to reduce their toxicity and improve their photo and chemical stabilities, thus providing a built-in correction for environmental effects, while the GQDs possessing good biocompatibility and low toxicity were electrostatic self-assembly on the silica surface acting as reaction sites. Upon exposure to the increasing contents of Hg 2+ , the blue fluorescence of GQDs can be gradually quenched presumably due to facilitating nonradiative electron/hole recombination annihilation. With the embedded CdTe QDs as the internal standard, the variations of the tested solution display continuous fluorescence color changes from blue to red, which can be easily observed by the naked eye without any sophisticated instrumentations and specially equipped laboratories. This sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg 2+ in a broad linear range of 10 nM–22 μM with a low detection limit of 3.3 nM (S/N = 3), much lower than the allowable Hg 2+ contents in drinking water set by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This prototype ratiometric probe is of good simplicity, low toxicity, excellent stabilities, and thus potentially attractive for Hg 2+ quantification related biological systems. - Highlights: • A facile strategy for preparing GQDs based core-satellite hybrid spheres was reported. • Such spheres can be used as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for Hg 2+ detection. • The Hg 2+ content can be easily distinguished by the naked eye. • The sensor shows high sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg 2+ detection. • The ratiometric probe is of good simplicity, low toxicity, and excellent stability

  12. Results from SAGE II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nico, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first nine runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 66 -13 +18 (stat) -7 +5 (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result of 73 -16 +18 (stat) -7 5 (sys) SNU, the capture rate is 69 -11 +11 (stat) -7 +5 (sys) SNU. This represents only 52%--56% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models

  13. Schumpeter's core works revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    2012-01-01

    This paper organises Schumpeter’s core books in three groups: the programmatic duology,the evolutionaryeconomic duology,and the socioeconomic synthesis. By analysing these groups and their interconnections from the viewpoint of modern evolutionaryeconomics,the paper summarises resolved problems a...... and points at remaining challenges. Its analyses are based on distinctions between microevolution and macroevolution, between economic evolution and socioeconomic coevolution, and between Schumpeter’s three major evolutionary models (called Mark I, Mark II and Mark III)....

  14. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume II, Book 2. Central receiver optical model users manual. CDRL item 2. [HELIAKI code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    HELIAKI is a FORTRAN computer program which simulates the optical/thermal performance of a central receiver solar thermal power plant for the dynamic conversion of solar-generated heat to electricity. The solar power plant which this program simulates consists of a field of individual sun tracking mirror units, or heliostats, redirecting sunlight into a cavity, called the receiver, mounted atop a tower. The program calculates the power retained by that cavity receiver at any point in time or the energy into the receiver over a year's time using a Monte Carlo ray trace technique to solve the multiple integral equations. An artist's concept of this plant is shown.

  15. Preparation of graphene quantum dots based core-satellite hybrid spheres and their use as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for visual determination of mercury(II) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Mengjuan [Key Laboratory of Modern Agriculture Equipment and Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Chengquan [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Qian, Jing, E-mail: qianj@ujs.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Agriculture Equipment and Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Kan; Yang, Zhenting; Liu, Qian; Mao, Hanping [Key Laboratory of Modern Agriculture Equipment and Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Kun, E-mail: wangkun@ujs.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Agriculture Equipment and Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-08-12

    We herein proposed a simple and effective strategy for preparing graphene quantum dots (GQDs)-based core-satellite hybrid spheres and further explored the feasibility of using such spheres as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for the visual determination of Hg{sup 2+}. The red-emitting CdTe QDs were firstly entrapped in the silica nanosphere to reduce their toxicity and improve their photo and chemical stabilities, thus providing a built-in correction for environmental effects, while the GQDs possessing good biocompatibility and low toxicity were electrostatic self-assembly on the silica surface acting as reaction sites. Upon exposure to the increasing contents of Hg{sup 2+}, the blue fluorescence of GQDs can be gradually quenched presumably due to facilitating nonradiative electron/hole recombination annihilation. With the embedded CdTe QDs as the internal standard, the variations of the tested solution display continuous fluorescence color changes from blue to red, which can be easily observed by the naked eye without any sophisticated instrumentations and specially equipped laboratories. This sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg{sup 2+} in a broad linear range of 10 nM–22 μM with a low detection limit of 3.3 nM (S/N = 3), much lower than the allowable Hg{sup 2+} contents in drinking water set by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This prototype ratiometric probe is of good simplicity, low toxicity, excellent stabilities, and thus potentially attractive for Hg{sup 2+} quantification related biological systems. - Highlights: • A facile strategy for preparing GQDs based core-satellite hybrid spheres was reported. • Such spheres can be used as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for Hg{sup 2+} detection. • The Hg{sup 2+} content can be easily distinguished by the naked eye. • The sensor shows high sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg{sup 2+} detection. • The ratiometric probe is of good simplicity, low toxicity, and

  16. Core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, N G; Edel' man, Ya A

    1981-02-15

    A core lifter is suggested which contains a housing, core-clamping elements installed in the housing depressions in the form of semirings with projections on the outer surface restricting the rotation of the semirings in the housing depressions. In order to improve the strength and reliability of the core lifter, the semirings have a variable transverse section formed from the outside by the surface of the rotation body of the inner arc of the semiring aroung the rotation axis and from the inner a cylindrical surface which is concentric to the outer arc of the semiring. The core-clamping elements made in this manner have the possibility of freely rotating in the housing depressions under their own weight and from contact with the core sample. These semirings do not have weakened sections, have sufficient strength, are inserted into the limited ring section of the housing of the core lifter without reduction in its through opening and this improve the reliability of the core lifter in operation.

  17. Theoretical models for Type I and Type II supernova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recent theoretical progress in understanding the origin and nature of Type I and Type II supernovae is discussed. New Type II presupernova models characterized by a variety of iron core masses at the time of collapse are presented and the sensitivity to the reaction rate 12 C(α,γ) 16 O explained. Stars heavier than about 20 M/sub solar/ must explode by a ''delayed'' mechanism not directly related to the hydrodynamical core bounce and a subset is likely to leave black hole remnants. The isotopic nucleosynthesis expected from these massive stellar explosions is in striking agreement with the sun. Type I supernovae result when an accreting white dwarf undergoes a thermonuclear explosion. The critical role of the velocity of the deflagration front in determining the light curve, spectrum, and, especially, isotopic nucleosynthesis in these models is explored. 76 refs., 8 figs

  18. Three-dimensional Boltzmann-Hydro Code for Core-collapse in Massive Stars. II. The Implementation of Moving-mesh for Neutron Star Kicks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagakura, Hiroki [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Iwakami, Wakana [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Furusawa, Shun [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronimical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Matsufuru, Hideo [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 308-0801 (Japan); Imakura, Akira [University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    We present a newly developed moving-mesh technique for the multi-dimensional Boltzmann-Hydro code for the simulation of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). What makes this technique different from others is the fact that it treats not only hydrodynamics but also neutrino transfer in the language of the 3 + 1 formalism of general relativity (GR), making use of the shift vector to specify the time evolution of the coordinate system. This means that the transport part of our code is essentially general relativistic, although in this paper it is applied only to the moving curvilinear coordinates in the flat Minknowski spacetime, since the gravity part is still Newtonian. The numerical aspect of the implementation is also described in detail. Employing the axisymmetric two-dimensional version of the code, we conduct two test computations: oscillations and runaways of proto-neutron star (PNS). We show that our new method works fine, tracking the motions of PNS correctly. We believe that this is a major advancement toward the realistic simulation of CCSNe.

  19. Constraints on the stress state of the San Andreas fault with analysis based on core and cuttings from SAFOD drilling phases I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, David A.; Tembe, Cheryl; Wong, Teng-fong

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of field data has led different investigators to conclude that the San Andreas Fault (SAF) has either anomalously low frictional sliding strength (m 0.6). Arguments for the apparent weakness of the SAF generally hinge on conceptual models involving intrinsically weak gouge or elevated pore pressure within the fault zone. Some models assert that weak gouge and/or high pore pressure exist under static conditions while others consider strength loss or fluid pressure increase due to rapid coseismic fault slip. The present paper is composed of three parts. First, we develop generalized equations, based on and consistent with the Rice (1992) fault zone model to relate stress orientation and magnitude to depth-dependent coefficient of friction and pore pressure. Second, we present temperature- and pressure-dependent friction measurements from wet illite-rich fault gouge extracted from San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) phase 1 core samples and from weak minerals associated with the San Andreas Fault. Third, we reevaluate the state of stress on the San Andreas Fault in light of new constraints imposed by SAFOD borehole data. Pure talc (m0.1) had the lowest strength considered and was sufficiently weak to satisfy weak fault heat flow and stress orientation constraints with hydrostatic pore pressure. Other fault gouges showed a systematic increase in strength with increasing temperature and pressure. In this case, heat flow and stress orientation constraints would require elevated pore pressure and, in some cases, fault zone pore pressure in excess of vertical stress.

  20. Three-dimensional Boltzmann-Hydro Code for Core-collapse in Massive Stars. II. The Implementation of Moving-mesh for Neutron Star Kicks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Iwakami, Wakana; Furusawa, Shun; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi; Matsufuru, Hideo; Imakura, Akira

    2017-01-01

    We present a newly developed moving-mesh technique for the multi-dimensional Boltzmann-Hydro code for the simulation of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). What makes this technique different from others is the fact that it treats not only hydrodynamics but also neutrino transfer in the language of the 3 + 1 formalism of general relativity (GR), making use of the shift vector to specify the time evolution of the coordinate system. This means that the transport part of our code is essentially general relativistic, although in this paper it is applied only to the moving curvilinear coordinates in the flat Minknowski spacetime, since the gravity part is still Newtonian. The numerical aspect of the implementation is also described in detail. Employing the axisymmetric two-dimensional version of the code, we conduct two test computations: oscillations and runaways of proto-neutron star (PNS). We show that our new method works fine, tracking the motions of PNS correctly. We believe that this is a major advancement toward the realistic simulation of CCSNe.

  1. Cascading electron and hole transfer dynamics in a CdS/CdTe core-shell sensitized with bromo-pyrogallol red (Br-PGR): slow charge recombination in type II regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Partha; Debnath, Tushar; Chopra, Uday; Ghosh, Hirendra Nath

    2015-02-14

    Ultrafast cascading hole and electron transfer dynamics have been demonstrated in a CdS/CdTe type II core-shell sensitized with Br-PGR using transient absorption spectroscopy and the charge recombination dynamics have been compared with those of CdS/Br-PGR composite materials. Steady state optical absorption studies suggest that Br-PGR forms strong charge transfer (CT) complexes with both the CdS QD and CdS/CdTe core-shell. Hole transfer from the photo-excited QD and QD core-shell to Br-PGR was confirmed by both steady state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. Charge separation was also confirmed by detecting electrons in the conduction band of the QD and the cation radical of Br-PGR as measured from femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Charge separation in the CdS/Br-PGR composite materials was found to take place in three different pathways, by transferring the photo-excited hole of CdS to Br-PGR, electron injection from the photo-excited Br-PGR to the CdS QD, and direct electron transfer from the HOMO of Br-PGR to the conduction band of the CdS QD. However, in the CdS/CdTe/Br-PGR system hole transfer from the photo-excited CdS to Br-PGR and electron injection from the photo-excited Br-PGR to CdS take place after cascading through the CdTe shell QD. Charge separation also takes place via direct electron transfer from the Br-PGR HOMO to the conduction band of CdS/CdTe. Charge recombination (CR) dynamics between the electron in the conduction band of the CdS QD and the Br-PGR cation radical were determined by monitoring the bleach recovery kinetics. The CR dynamics were found to be much slower in the CdS/CdTe/Br-PGR system than in the CdS/Br-PGR system. The formation of the strong CT complex and the separation of charges cascading through the CdTe shell help to slow down charge recombination in the type II regime.

  2. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  3. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  4. Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 2. Conceptual design, Sections 5 and 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains the detailed conceptual design and cost/performance estimates and an assessment of the commercial scale solar central receiver hybrid power system. (WHK)

  5. Solar building

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Luxin

    2014-01-01

    In my thesis I describe the utilization of solar energy and solar energy with building integration. In introduction it is also mentioned how the solar building works, trying to make more people understand and accept the solar building. The thesis introduces different types of solar heat collectors. I compared the difference two operation modes of solar water heating system and created examples of solar water system selection. I also introduced other solar building applications. It is conv...

  6. How grain boundaries affect the efficiency of poly-CdTe solar-cells: A fundamental atomic-scale study of grain boundary dislocation cores using CdTe bi-crystal thin films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klie, Robert [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-10-25

    It is now widely accepted that grain boundaries in poly-crystalline CdTe thin film devices have a detrimental effect on the minority carrier lifetimes, the open circuit voltage and therefore the overall solar-cell performance. The goal of this project was to develop a fundamental understanding of the role of grain boundaries in CdTe on the carrier life-time, open-circuit voltage, Voc, and the diffusion of impurities. To achieve this goal, i) CdTe bi-crystals were fabricated with various misorientation angels, ii) the atomic- and electronic structures of the grain boundaries were characterized using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and iii) first-principles density functional theory modeling was performed on the structures determined by STEM to predict the grain boundary potential. The transport properties and minority carrier lifetimes of the bi-crystal grain boundaries were measured using a variety of approaches, including TRPL, and provided feedback to the characterization and modeling effort about the effectiveness of the proposed models.

  7. Solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role solar energy may have in the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include the solar resource, solar architecture including passive solar design and solar collectors, solar-thermal concentrating systems including parabolic troughs and dishes and central receivers, photovoltaic cells including photovoltaic systems for home use, and environmental, health and safety issues

  8. Comparison of the histology of (I) fresh, (II) solar dried and (III) solar dried/steam distilled ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) rhizome tissue prior to the extraction of its pungent principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balladin, D.A.; Headley, O. [University of the West Indies, Bridgetown (Barbados). Centre for Resource Management and Environmental Studies; Chang-yen, I.; Duncan, E.J. [University of the West Indies, (Trinidad and Tobago). Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Sciences; McGaw, D.R. [University of the West Indies, (Trinidad and Tobago). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-06-01

    The histological analysis of the rhizome cells of West Indian ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe), has revealed some information about the cell`s design. Comparisons have shown that the oleoresin (pungent principles - gingerols and shogaols) were not observable in cell sections of the fresh ginger rhizomes. However, the number of the oleoresin organelles increased in the order of solar dried and solar dried/steam distilled ginger rhizomes, the latter having a high oleoresin extraction yield with acetone of 8.0 g per 100 g ginger rhizome (dry wt.). (author)

  9. On p-mode oscillations in stars from 1 solar mass to 2 solar masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audard, N.; Provost, J.

    1994-06-01

    The structure of stars more massive than about 1.2 solar masses is characterized by a convective core. We have studied the evolution with age and mass of acoustic frequencies of high radical order n and low degree l for models of stars of 1, 1.5 and 2 solar masses. Using a polynomial approximation for the frequency, the p-mode spectrum can be characterized by derived global asteroseismic coefficients, i.e. the mean separation nu0 is approximately equal to nun, l - nun - 1, l and the small frequency separation Delta nu0, 2 is approximately equal to nun, l = 0 - nun - 1, l = 2. The diagram (nu0, delta nu0, 2/nu0) plotted along the evolutionary tracks would help to separate the effects of age and mass. We study the sensitivity of these coefficients and other observable quantities, like the radius and luminosity, to stellar parameters in the vicinity of 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses; this sensitivity substantially depends on the stellar mass and must be taken into account for asteroseismic calibration of stellar clusters. Considering finally some rapid variations of the internal structure, we show that the second frequency difference delta2 nu = nu(subn, l) - 2 nun - 1, l + nun - 2, l exponent gamma in the He II ionization zone.

  10. Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 1. Conceptual design, Sections 1 through 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume presents in detail the market analysis, parametric analysis, and the selection process for the preferred system. (WHK)

  11. Meteoroid Measurements in the Deep Space Cruising and the Jupiter Trojan Rendezvous Phases of the Solar Power Sail Mission by the Arrayed Large-Area Dust Detectors in INterplanetary Space (ALADDIN)-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, H.; Hirai, T.; Arai, K.; Fujii, M.

    2017-12-01

    The PVDF thin films have been long, space-proven instruments for hypervelocity impact detection in the diverse regions of the Solar System from orbits of Venus by IKAROS and of Pluto by New Horizons. In particular, light weight but large area membranes of a solar sail spacecraft is an ideal location for such detectors to be deployed for detecting statistically enough nubers of so large micrometeoroids that are sensitive to mean motion resonances and other gravitational effects of flux enhancements and voids with planets. The IKAROS spacecraft first detected in situ dust flux enhancement and gap region within the Earth's circumsolar dust ring as well as those of Venus by 0.54 m^2 detection area of ALADDIN sensors on the slar sail membrane. Advancing this heritage, the Solar Power Sail membrane will carry 0.4+ m^2 ALADDIN-II PVDF sensors with improved impact signal prosessng units to detect both hyperveloity dust impacts in the interplanetary space cruising phase and slow dust impacts bound to the Jupiter Trojan region in its rendezvours phase.

  12. PROBABLE IDENTIFICATION OF THE ON-DISK COUNTERPART OF SPICULES IN HINODE Ca II H OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wijn, A. G., E-mail: dwijn@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

    2012-09-20

    I present a study of high-resolution time series of Ca II H images and Fe I 630.15 nm spectra taken with the Solar Optical Telescope on the Hinode spacecraft. There is excellent correspondence between the Ca II H and the Fe I line core intensity, except tenuous emission around the network field concentrations in the former that is absent in the latter. Analysis of on-disk observations and a comparison with limb observations suggests that this 'network haze' corresponds to spicules, and likely to type-II spicules in particular. They are known to appear in emission in on-disk broadband Ca II H diagnostics and the network haze is strongest in those areas where features similar to type-II spicules are produced in simulations.

  13. Solar neutrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, D [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Coll. of General Education

    1975-01-01

    The measurement of solar neutrino was performed by using the reaction /sup 37/cl+..nu..sub(e)..-->../sup 37/Ar+e/sup -/ by Davis et al. The argon gas produced through the above mentioned reaction in a tank containing 610 ton of C/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/ was collected and measured. The rate of production of /sup 37/Ar was 0.13+-0.20/day, and the net production rate by the solar neutrino was 0.06+-0.20/day, being corrected for background. This value corresponds to 0.5+-1.0 SNU. Theoretical calculation with the model of spherically symmetric solar development gave an expected value of 5.6 SNU, which is in contradiction with the experimental value. Reason of this discrepancy was considered. The possibility of decay of neutrino to the other particles with weak interaction is very slight. Various models of the sun were investigated, but the results were still inconsistent with the experiment. The mixing of matters in the sun may cause the reduction of neutrino. If He gas comes to the center of the sun by mixing, the reaction, /sup 3/He+/sup 3/He, progresses excessively at the center, and it produces the expansion of the core of the sun. Then, the temperature drops and the neutrino is reduced. Various models which can explain the neutrino of less than ISNU have been presented. However, other theory says that the reduction of neutrino is not expected even if the mixing is considered. A problem concerning the mixing is whether the thermal instability which causes the mixing exists. (Kato, T.).

  14. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  15. The effect of solar irradiated Vibrio cholera on the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by the JAWS II dendritic cell line in vitro

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ssemakalu, CC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available 70, IL-15, MIP-1a, MIP-1ß, MIP-2, RANTES, TNF-a, IL-23 and IL-27. Results showed that solar irradiated cultures of V. cholerae induced dendritic cells to secrete significant (p<0.05) levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in comparison...

  16. Core rotational dynamics and geological events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greff-Lefftz; Legros

    1999-11-26

    A study of Earth's fluid core oscillations induced by lunar-solar tidal forces, together with tidal secular deceleration of Earth's axial rotation, shows that the rotational eigenfrequency of the fluid core and some solar tidal waves were in resonance around 3.0 x 10(9), 1.8 x 10(9), and 3 x 10(8) years ago. The associated viscomagnetic frictional power at the core boundaries may be converted into heat and would destabilize the D" thermal layer, leading to the generation of deep-mantle plumes, and would also increase the temperature at the fluid core boundaries, perturbing the core dynamo process. Such phenomena could account for large-scale episodes of continental crust formation, the generation of flood basalts, and abrupt changes in geomagnetic reversal frequency.

  17. Understanding Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hix, W. R.; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, M.; Messer, O. E. B.; Mezzacappa, A.; Lee, C.-T.; Bruenn, S. W.; Blondin, J. M.; Marronetti, P.

    2010-03-01

    Our understanding of core-collapse supernovae continues to improve as better microphysics is included in increasingly realistic neutrino-radiationhydrodynamic simulations. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors between 12 and 25 solar mass, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progresses on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  18. Novel point mutations and mutational complexes in the enhancer II, core promoter and precore regions of hepatitis B virus genotype D1 associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anis; Al Balwi, Mohammed A; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Hajeer, Ali; Sanai, Faisal M; Al Abdulkarim, Ibrahim; Al Ayyar, Latifah; Badri, Motasim; Saudi, Dib; Tamimi, Waleed; Mizokami, Masashi; Al Knawy, Bandar

    2013-12-15

    In this study, a cohort of 182 patients [55 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 127 non-HCC] infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Saudi Arabia was investigated to study the relationship between sequence variation in the enhancer II (EnhII), basal core promoter (BCP) and precore regions of HBV genotype D (HBV/D) and the risk of HCC. HBV genotypes were determined by sequencing analysis and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Variations in the EnhII, BCP and precore regions were compared between 107 non-HCC and 45 HCC patients infected with HBV/D, followed by age-matched analysis of 40 cases versus equal number of controls. Age and male gender were significantly associated with HCC (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.03, respectively). Serological markers such as aspartate aminotransferase, albumin and anti-HBe were significantly associated with HCC (p = 0.0001 for all), whereas HBeAg positivity was associated with non-HCC (p = 0.0001). The most prevalent HBV genotype was HBV/D (94%), followed by HBV/E (4%), HBV/A (1.6%) and HBV/C (0.5%). For HBV/D1, genomic mutations associated with HCC were T1673/G1679, G1727, C1741, C1761, A1757/T1764/G1766, T1773, T1773/G1775 and C1909. Age- and gender-adjusted stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated that mutations G1727 [odds ratio (OR) = 18.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.8-118.4; p = 0.002], A1757/T1764/G1766 (OR = 4.7; 95% CI = 1.3-17.2; p = 0.01) and T1773 (OR = 14.06; 95% CI = 2.3-84.8; p = 0.004) are independent predictors of HCC development. These results implicate novel individual and combination patterns of mutations in the X/precore region of HBV/D1 as predictors of HCC. Risk stratification based on these mutation complexes would be useful in determining high-risk patients and improving diagnostic and treatment strategies for HBV/D1. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  19. Solar Features - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A solar flare is a short-lived sudden increase in the intensity of radiation emitted in the neighborhood of sunspots. For many years it was best monitored in the...

  20. Solar storms; Tormentas solares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collaboration: Pereira Cuesta, S.; Pereira Pagan, B.

    2016-08-01

    Solar storms begin with an explosion, or solar flare, on the surface of the sun. The X-rays and extreme ultraviolet radiation from the flare reach the Earths orbit minutes later-travelling at light speed. The ionization of upper layers of our atmosphere could cause radio blackouts and satellite navigation errors (GPS). Soon after, a wave of energetic particles, electrons and protons accelerated by the explosion crosses the orbit of the Earth, and can cause real and significant damage. (Author)

  1. Chromospheric Variability: Analysis of 36 years of Time Series from the National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak Ca II K-line Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Keil, Stephen L.; Worden, Simon P.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of more than 36 years of time series of seven parameters measured in the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program elucidates five elucidates five components of the variation: (1) the solar cycle (period approx. 11 years), (2) quasi-periodic variations (periods approx 100 days), (3) a broad band stochastic process (wide range of periods), (4) rotational modulation, and (5) random observational errors. Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of the chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis illuminates periodic and quasi periodic signals, details of frequency modulation due to differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the rather complex harmonic structure (1) and (2) at time scales in the range approx 0.1 - 10 years. These results using only full-disk data further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced by NASA's Kepler observatory. Component (3) consists of variations over a range of timescales, in the manner of a 1/f random noise process. A timedependent Wilson-Bappu effect appears to be present in the solar cycle variations (1), but not in the stochastic process (3). Component (4) characterizes differential rotation of the active regions, and (5) is of course not characteristic of solar variability, but the fact that the observational errors are quite small greatly facilitates the analysis of the other components. The recent data suggest that the current cycle is starting late and may be relatively weak. The data analyzed in this paper can be found at the National Solar Observatory web site http://nsosp.nso.edu/cak_mon/, or by file transfer protocol at ftp://ftp.nso.edu/idl/cak.parameters.

  2. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance – Part II: Development of an accelerated aging method for roofing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleiman, Mohamad [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kirchstetter, Thomas W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Berdahl, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gilbert, Haley E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Quelen, Sarah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Marlot, Lea [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Preble, Chelsea V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Sharon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Montalbano, Amandine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rosseler, Olivier [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Akbari, Hashem [Concordia Univ., Montreal (Canada); Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Destaillats, Hugo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-09

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products₋single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles₋and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. In conclusion, this accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  3. Performance evaluation of solar heating system with thermal core type soil heat storage. Part 5. Performance prediction and evaluation of the system considered of the weather condition; Taiyonetsu riyo netsu kakushiki dojo chikunetsu system no seino hyoka. 5. Kisho joken wo koryoshita system no seino yosoku to hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, N [Nishimatsu Construction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Y [Kogakuin University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    The paper studied a solar heating system with thermal core type soil heat storage (combining a thermal core composing of a water tank and an underground pebble tank and the soil around the heat storage tank and also using solar energy). Solar energy is stored by temperature level in the high temperature water tank, the low temperature pebble heat storage tank and the soil around the heat storage tank. Heat is recovered according to temperature as direct ventilation space heating (utilization of pebble tank air), floor heating (utilization of hot water of the heat storage water tank) and heat pump heat source (utilization of pebble tank air). A study was made of performance and regional effectiveness of the system under different weather conditions. A study was also made of effects of the water tank for short term heat storage by changing the water volume. Using the same structure, etc. for the system, the system was evaluated using weather data of Sapporo, Tokyo and Kagoshima. In terms of efficiency of the system, the system structure was found to be most suitable for weather conditions in Tokyo. However, the air heat source heat pump which cannot be usually used in the cold area has come to be used. Such effect except efficiency is also considered, and the amount of performance to be targeted in each region changes. 2 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  4. THE SUPERNOVA TRIGGERED FORMATION AND ENRICHMENT OF OUR SOLAR SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritschneder, M.; Lin, D. N. C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Hai Dian, 100871 Beijing (China); Murray, S. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Yin, Q.-Z. [Department of Geology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Gong, M.-N., E-mail: gritschneder@pku.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Hai Dian, 100084 Beijing (China)

    2012-01-20

    We investigate the enrichment of the pre-solar cloud core with short-lived radionuclides, especially {sup 26}Al. The homogeneity and the surprisingly small spread in the ratio {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al observed in the overwhelming majority of calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions in a vast variety of primitive chondritic meteorites places strong constraints on the formation of the solar system. Freshly synthesized radioactive {sup 26}Al has to be included and well mixed within 20 kyr. After discussing various scenarios including X-winds, asymptotic giant branch stars, and Wolf-Rayet stars, we come to the conclusion that triggering the collapse of a cold cloud core by a nearby supernova (SN) is the most promising scenario. We then narrow down the vast parameter space by considering the pre-explosion survivability of such a clump as well as the cross-section necessary for sufficient enrichment. We employ numerical simulations to address the mixing of the radioactively enriched SN gas with the pre-existing gas and the forced collapse within 20 kyr. We show that a cold clump of 10 M{sub Sun} at a distance of 5 pc can be sufficiently enriched in {sup 26}Al and triggered into collapse fast enough-within 18 kyr after encountering the SN shock-for a range of different metallicities and progenitor masses, even if the enriched material is assumed to be distributed homogeneously in the entire SN bubble. In summary, we envision an environment for the birthplace of the solar system 4.567 Gyr ago similar to the situation of the pillars in M16 nowadays, where molecular cloud cores adjacent to an H II region will be hit by an SN explosion in the future. We show that the triggered collapse and formation of the solar system as well as the required enrichment with radioactive {sup 26}Al are possible in this scenario.

  5. In-core flow rate distribution measurement test of the JOYO irradiation core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toshihiro; Isozaki, Kazunori; Suzuki, Soju

    1996-01-01

    A flow rate distribution measurement test was carried out for the JOYO irradiation core (the MK-II core) after the 29th duty cycle operation. The main object of the test is to confirm the proper flow rate distribution at the final phase of the MK-II core. The each flow rate at the outlet of subassemblies was measured by the permanent magnetic flowmeter inserted avail of fuel exchange hole in the rotating plug. This is third test in the MK-II core, after 10 years absence from the final test (1985). Total of 550 subassemblies were exchanged and accumulated reactor operation time reached up to 38,000 hours from the previous test. As a conclusion, it confirmed that the flow rate distribution has been kept suitable in the final phase of the MK-II core. (author)

  6. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...

  7. Dye Sensitized Solar Cell, DSSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsatorn Amornpitoksuk

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A dye sensitized solar cell is a new type of solar cell. The operating system of this solar cell type is similar to plant’s photosynthesis process. The sensitizer is available for absorption light and transfer electrons to nanocrystalline metal oxide semiconductor. The ruthenium(II complexes with polypyridyl ligands are usually used as the sensitizers in solar cell. At the present time, the complex of [Ru(2,2',2'’-(COOH3- terpy(NCS3] is the most efficient sensitizer. The total photon to current conversion efficiency was approximately 10% at AM = 1.5.

  8. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere II. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The K-corona, a significant portion of the solar atmosphere, displays a continuous spectrum which closely parallels photospheric emission, though without the presence of overlying Fraunhofer lines. The E-corona exists in the same region and is characterized by weak emission lines from highly ionized atoms. For instance, the famous green emission line from coronium (FeXIV is part of the E-corona. The F-corona exists beyond the K/E-corona and, like the photospheric spectrum, is characterized by Fraunhofer lines. The F-corona represents photospheric light scattered by dust particles in the interplanetary medium. Within the gaseous models of the Sun, the K-corona is viewed as photospheric radiation which has been scattered by relativistic electrons. This scattering is thought to broaden the Fraunhofer lines of the solar spectrum such that they can no longer be detected in the K-corona. Thus, the gaseous models of the Sun account for the appearance of the K-corona by distorting photospheric light, since they are unable to have recourse to condensed matter to directly produce such radiation. Conversely, it is now advanced that the continuous emission of the K-corona and associated emission lines from the E-corona must be interpreted as manifestations of the same phenomenon: condensed matter exists in the corona. It is well-known that the Sun expels large amounts of material from its surface in the form of flares and coronal mass ejections. Given a liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun, it is logical to assume that such matter, which exists in the condensed state on the solar surface, continues to manifest its nature once expelled into the corona. Therefore, the continuous spectrum of the K-corona provides the twenty-seventh line of evidence that the Sun is composed of condensed matter.

  9. GaAsSb-capped InAs QD type-II solar cell structures improvement by composition profiling of layers surrounding QD

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hospodková, Alice; Vyskočil, Jan; Zíková, Markéta; Oswald, Jiří; Pangrác, Jiří; Petříček, Otto

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku 025502. ISSN 2053-1591 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-21285P; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1603 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : GaAsSb * InAs * InGaAs * quantum dot * solar cells * MOVPE Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.068, year: 2016

  10. Solar Wind Implantation into Lunar Regolith II: Monte Carlo Simulations of Hydrogen Retention in a Surface with Defects and the Hydrogen (H, H2) Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, O. J.; Farrell, W. M.; Killen, R. M.; Hurley, D. M.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the near-infrared observations of the OH veneer on the lunar surface by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) have been refined to constrain the OH content to 500-750 parts per million (ppm). The observations indicate diurnal variations in OH up to 200 ppm possibly linked to warmer surface temperatures at low latitude. We examine the M3 observations using a statistical mechanics approach to model the diffusion of implanted H in the lunar regolith. We present results from Monte Carlo simulations of the diffusion of implanted solar wind H atoms and the subsequently derived H and H2 exospheres.

  11. Rotational studies of late-type stars. II. Ages of solar-type stars and the rotational history of the sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soderblom, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    In the first part of this investigation, age indicators for solar-type stars are discussed. A Li abundance-age calibration is derived; it indicates that 1 M/sub sun/ stars have lost as much as 80% of their initial Li before reaching the main sequence. The e-folding time for Li depletion on the main sequence is 1 1/4 Gyr. The distribution of Li abundances for 1 M/sub sun/ stars is consistent with a uniform initial Li abundance for all stars

  12. Solar Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  13. Solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  14. Solar Combisystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thür, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    This note first introduces what is a solar combisystem, the structure how a solar combisystem is build up and what are criteria’s to evaluate a solar combisystem concept. Further on the main components of a solar combisystem, the main characteristics and possible advantages and disadvantages...... compared to each other are described. It is not the goal of this note to explain the technical details how to design all components of a solar combisystem. This is done during other lectures of the solar course and in other basic courses as well. This note tries to explain how a solar combisystem...

  15. Solar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The solar collectors shown are elements of domestic solar hot water systems produced by Solar One Ltd., Virginia Beach, Virginia. Design of these systems benefited from technical expertise provided Solar One by NASA's Langley Research Center. The company obtained a NASA technical support package describing the d e sign and operation of solar heating equipment in NASA's Tech House, a demonstration project in which aerospace and commercial building technology are combined in an energy- efficient home. Solar One received further assistance through personal contact with Langley solar experts. The company reports that the technical information provided by NASA influenced Solar One's panel design, its selection of a long-life panel coating which increases solar collection efficiency, and the method adopted for protecting solar collectors from freezing conditions.

  16. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. II. CMEs, Shock Waves, and Drifting Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Chertok, I. M.; Slemzin, V. A.; Filippov, B. P.; Egorov, Y. I.; Fainshtein, V. G.; Afanasyev, A. N.; Prestage, N. P.; Temmer, M.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our study (Grechnev et al., 2013, doi:10.1007/s11207-013-0316-6; Paper I) on the 18 November 2003 geoffective event. To understand possible impact on geospace of coronal transients observed on that day, we investigated their properties from solar near-surface manifestations in extreme ultraviolet, LASCO white-light images, and dynamic radio spectra. We reconcile near-surface activity with the expansion of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and determine their orientation relative to the earthward direction. The kinematic measurements, dynamic radio spectra, and microwave and X-ray light curves all contribute to the overall picture of the complex event and confirm an additional eruption at 08:07 - 08:20 UT close to the solar disk center presumed in Paper I. Unusual characteristics of the ejection appear to match those expected for a source of the 20 November superstorm but make its detection in LASCO images hopeless. On the other hand, none of the CMEs observed by LASCO seem to be a promising candidate for a source of the superstorm being able to produce, at most, a glancing blow on the Earth's magnetosphere. Our analysis confirms free propagation of shock waves revealed in the event and reconciles their kinematics with "EUV waves" and dynamic radio spectra up to decameters.

  17. Solar radiophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, D.J.; Labrum, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book treats all aspects of solar radioastronomy at metre wavelengths, particularly work carried out on the Australian radioheliograph at Culgoora, with which most of the authors have been associated in one way or another. After an introductory section on historical aspects, the solar atmosphere, solar flares, and coronal radio emission, the book deals with instrumentation, theory, and details of observations and interpretations of the various aspects of metrewave solar radioastronomy, including burst types, solar storms, and the quiet sun. (U.K.)

  18. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  19. Advanced Solar Panel Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, E. L.; Linder, E. B.

    1995-01-01

    Solar panel designs that utilize new high-efficiency solar cells and lightweight rigid panel technologies are described. The resulting designs increase the specific power (W/kg) achievable in the near-term and are well suited to meet the demands of higher performance small satellites (smallsats). Advanced solar panel designs have been developed and demonstrated on two NASA SBIR contracts at Applied Solar. The first used 19% efficient, large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells with a lightweight rigid graphite epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A 1,445 sq cm coupon was fabricated and tested to demonstrate 60 W/kg with a high potential of achieving 80 W/kg. The second panel design used new 22% efficiency, dual-junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with a lightweight aluminum core/graphite fiber mesh facesheet substrate. A 1,445 sq cm coupon was fabricated and tested to demonstrate 105 W/kg with the potential of achieving 115 W/kg.

  20. First results from SAGE II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.

    1994-01-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76 -18 +21 (stat) -7 +5 (sys) SNU. combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74 -12 +13 (stat) -7 +5 (sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models

  1. First results from SAGE II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.; Gusev, A.O.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Knodel, T.V.; Knyshenko, I.I.; Kornoukhov, V.N.; Mirmov, I.N.; Pshukov, A.M.; Shalagin, A.M.; Shikhin, A.A.; Timofeyev, P.V.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Vermul, V.M.; Zatsepin, G.T.; Bowles, T.J.; Nico, J.S.; Teasdale, W.A.; Wark, D.L.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Cleveland, B.T.; Daily, T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.; Wildenhain, P.W.; Elliott, S.R.; Cherry, M.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76 +21 -18 (stat) +5 -7 (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74 +13 -12 (stat) +5 -7 (sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  2. Full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion via photonic nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianglei; Xuan, Yimin

    2017-10-12

    Volumetric solar thermal conversion is an emerging technique for a plethora of applications such as solar thermal power generation, desalination, and solar water splitting. However, achieving broadband solar thermal absorption via dilute nanofluids is still a daunting challenge. In this work, full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion is demonstrated over a thin layer of the proposed 'photonic nanofluids'. The underlying mechanism is found to be the photonic superposition of core resonances, shell plasmons, and core-shell resonances at different wavelengths, whose coexistence is enabled by the broken symmetry of specially designed composite nanoparticles, i.e., Janus nanoparticles. The solar thermal conversion efficiency can be improved by 10.8% compared with core-shell nanofluids. The extinction coefficient of Janus dimers with various configurations is also investigated to unveil the effects of particle couplings. This work provides the possibility to achieve full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion, and may have potential applications in efficient solar energy harvesting and utilization.

  3. First Solar and Stellar Paintings in the Epipaleolithic and Neolithic Rock Art of the Iberian Peninsula (II): new Shelters and Ceramic Pieces decorated with Astral Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintano, J. F.

    2009-08-01

    This paper is a continuation of the research into the astronomical reasons behind prehistoric rock and mobiliary art in the Iberian Peninsula, the first part of which was presented in the previous SEAC Congress celebrated in 2007 in Klaipeda (Lithuania). It proposes that all heavenly objects painted as rock art and on ceramic pieces be given the name of astraliformes [=solar and stellar paintings]. The six astraliformes from the two shelters visited, and the ceramic pieces on which astraliformes appear in the Prehistoric Museum of Granada are presented. Astraliformes appear in schematic art in a sudden manner and on a large scale, and are included in the panel because of their function as a means of regulating and promoting the agrarian cycle.

  4. Line formation in the solar chromosphere. II - An optically thick region of the chromosphere-corona transition region observed with OSO 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lites, B. W.; Hansen, E. R.; Shine, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The University of Colorado ultraviolet spectrometer aboard the Orbiting Solar Observatory 8(OSO 8) has measured self-reversed profiles of the resonance line of C IV lamda 1548.2 at the limb passage of an active region. The degree of the self-reversal together with the absolute intensity of the line profile determine the electron density in the active region at 10 to the 10th/cu cm at temperatures where the C IV line is formed. The nonthermal component of the broadening velocity is no more than 14km/s, and the physical thickness of an equivalent plane-parallel slab in hydrostatic equilibrium that would give rise to the observed line profiles is about 430 km.

  5. Solar--geophysical data number 381. Part II. (Comprehensive reports). Data for November 1975-October 1975 and miscellanea. Explanation of data reports issued as number 378 (supplement) February 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leighton, H.I.

    1976-05-01

    This is part two (comprehensive reports) of a two part report on Solar--Geophysical Data. Included in this report are data for the months of October and November. The data recorded include solar flares, solar radio waves, energetic solar particles and plasma, and magnetograms of geomagnetic storms

  6. Solar neutrino detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miramonti, Lino

    2009-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  7. Core power capability verification for PWR NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian Chunyu; Liu Changwen; Zhang Hong; Liang Wei

    2002-01-01

    The Principle and methodology of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant core power capability verification for reload are introduced. The radial and axial power distributions of normal operation (category I or condition I) and abnormal operation (category II or condition II) are simulated by using neutronics calculation code. The linear power density margin and DNBR margin for both categories, which reflect core safety, are analyzed from the point view of reactor physics and T/H, and thus category I operating domain and category II protection set point are verified. Besides, the verification results of reference NPP are also given

  8. Solar System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisdom, Jack

    2002-01-01

    In these 18 years, the research has touched every major dynamical problem in the solar system, including: the effect of chaotic zones on the distribution of asteroids, the delivery of meteorites along chaotic pathways, the chaotic motion of Pluto, the chaotic motion of the outer planets and that of the whole solar system, the delivery of short period comets from the Kuiper belt, the tidal evolution of the Uranian arid Galilean satellites, the chaotic tumbling of Hyperion and other irregular satellites, the large chaotic variations of the obliquity of Mars, the evolution of the Earth-Moon system, and the resonant core- mantle dynamics of Earth and Venus. It has introduced new analytical and numerical tools that are in widespread use. Today, nearly every long-term integration of our solar system, its subsystems, and other solar systems uses algorithms that was invented. This research has all been primarily Supported by this sequence of PGG NASA grants. During this period published major investigations of tidal evolution of the Earth-Moon system and of the passage of the Earth and Venus through non-linear core-mantle resonances were completed. It has published a major innovation in symplectic algorithms: the symplectic corrector. A paper was completed on non-perturbative hydrostatic equilibrium.

  9. Central receiver solar thermal power system. Phase 1. CDRL item 2; Pilot Plant preliminary design report. Volume II. System decription and system analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

    1977-10-01

    An active system analysis and integration effort has been maintained. These activities have included the transformation of initial program requirements into a preliminary system design, the evolution of subsystem requirements which lay the foundation for subsystem design and test activity, and the overseeing of the final preliminary design effort to ensure that the subsystems are operationally compatible and capable of producing electricity at the lowest possible cost per unit of energy. Volume II of the Preliminary Design Report presents the results of the overall system effort that went on during this contract. The effort is assumed to include not only the total system definition and design but also all subsystem interactions.

  10. CO-ANALYSIS OF SOLAR MICROWAVE AND HARD X-RAY SPECTRAL EVOLUTIONS. II. IN THREE SOURCES OF A FLARING LOOP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Guangli; Li Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Based on the spatially resolvable data of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Nobeyama Radio Heliograph (NoRH), co-analysis of solar hard X-ray and microwave spectral evolution is performed in three separate sources located in one looptop (LT) and two footpoints (FPs) of a huge flaring loop in the 2003 October 24 flare. The RHESSI image spectral evolution in 10-100 keV is always fitted by the well-known soft-hard-soft (SHS) pattern in the three sources. When the total energy is divided into four intervals similar to the Yohkoh/Hard X-ray Telescope, i.e., 12.5-32.5 keV, 32.5-52.5 keV, 52.5-72.5 keV, and 72.5-97.5 keV, the SHS pattern in lower energies is converted gradually to the hard-soft-hard (HSH) pattern in higher energies in all three sources. However, the break energy in the LT and the northeast FP (∼32.5 keV) is evidently smaller than that in the southwest FP (∼72.5 keV). Regarding microwave spectral evolution of the NoRH data, the well-known soft-hard-harder pattern appeared in the southwest FP, while the HSH pattern coexisted in the LT and the northeast FP. The different features of the hard X-ray and microwave spectral evolutions in the three sources may be explained by the loop-loop interaction with another huge loop in the LT and with a compact loop in the northeast FP, where the trapping effect is much stronger than that in the southwest FP. The comparison between the LT and FP spectral indices suggests that the radiation mechanism of X-rays may be quite different in different energy intervals and sources. The calculated electron spectral indices from the predicted mechanisms of X-rays gradually become closer to those from the microwave data with increasing X-ray energies.

  11. A uranium core for the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouat, S.

    2003-01-01

    According to the theory of M. Herndon, a US independent geophysicist, the center of the Earth's core should be made of a uranium sphere of about 8 km of diameter. This natural reactor, or 'geo-reactor', should be at the origin of the internal heat and of the magnetic field of the Earth. M. Herndon has extended his theory to the other planets of the solar system. This theory contradicts the one adopted since the 1940's by the community of geophysicists and which involves a crystallized iron and nickel internal core inside a liquid iron external core. Herndon's theory can explain also the geomagnetic field reversals. (J.S.)

  12. Solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruisheer, N.

    1992-01-01

    In five brief articles product information is given on solar energy applications with special attention to the Netherlands. After an introduction on solar energy availability in the Netherlands the developments in solar boiler techniques are dealt with. Solar water heaters have advantages for the environment, and government subsidies stimulate different uses of such water heaters. Also the developments of solar cells show good prospects, not only for developing countries, but also for the industrialized countries. In brief the developments in solar energy storage and the connection of solar equipment to the grid are discussed. Finally attention is paid to the applications of passive solar energy in the housing construction, the use of transparent thermal insulation and the developments of translucent materials. 18 figs., 18 ills

  13. Solar Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar photographic and illustrated datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide....

  14. Solar Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar feature datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide.

  15. Solar Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  16. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  17. Climatic Changes on Tibetan Plateau Based on Ice Core Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, T.

    2008-12-01

    Climatic changes have been reconstructed for the Tibetan Plateau based on ice core records. The Guliya ice core on the Tibetan Plateau presents climatic changes in the past 100,000 years, thus is comparative with that from Vostok ice core in Antarctica and GISP2 record in Arctic. These three records share an important common feature, i.e., our climate is not stable. It is also evident that the major patterns of climatic changes are similar on the earth. Why does climatic change over the earth follow a same pattern? It might be attributed to solar radiation. We found that the cold periods correspond to low insolation periods, and warm periods to high insolation periods. We found abrupt climatic change in the ice core climatic records, which presented dramatic temperature variation of as much as 10 °C in 50 or 60 years. Our major challenge in the study of both climate and environment is that greenhouse gases such as CO2, CH4 are possibly amplifying global warming, though at what degree remains unclear. One of the ways to understand the role of greenhouse gases is to reconstruct the past greenhouse gases recorded in ice. In 1997, we drilled an ice core from 7100 m a.s.l. in the Himalayas to reconstruct methane record. Based on the record, we found seasonal cycles in methane variation. In particular, the methane concentration is high in summer, suggestiing active methane emission from wet land in summer. Based on the seasonal cycle, we can reconstruct the methane fluctuation history in the past 500 years. The most prominent feature of the methane record in the Himalayan ice core is the abrupt increase since 1850 A.D.. This is closely related to the industrial revolution worldwide. We can also observe sudden decrease in methane concentration during the World War I and World War II. It implies that the industrial revolution has dominated the atmospheric greenhouse gas emission for about 100 years. Besides, the average methane concentration in the Himalayan ice core is

  18. Solar Special

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Roekel, A.; Osborne, J.; Schroeter, S.; De Jong, R.; De Saint Jacob, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Solar power is growing much faster than most policymakers and analysts realise. As costs come down and feed-in tariffs go up across Europe, a number of countries have started in pursuit of market leader Germany. But in Germany criticism is growing of the multi-billion-euro support schemes that keep the solar industry booming. In this section of the magazine several articles are dedicated to developments in solar energy in Europe. The first article is an overview story on the strong growing global market for solar cells, mainly thanks to subsidy schemes. The second article is on the position of foreign companies in the solar market in Italy. Article number three is dedicated to the conditions for solar technology companies to establish themselves in the German state of Saxony. Also the fifth article deals with the development of solar cells in Saxony: scientists, plant manufacturers and module producers in Saxony are working on new technologies that can be used to produce solar electricity cost-effectively. The goal is to bring the price down to match that of conventionally generated electricity within the next few years. The sixth article deals with the the solar power market in Belgium, which may be overheated or 'oversubsidized'. Article seven is on France, which used to be a pioneer in solar technology, but now produces only a fraction of the solar output of market leader Germany. However, new attractive feed-in-tariffs are changing the solar landscape drastically

  19. Side core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A

    1982-01-01

    A side core lifter is proposed which contains a housing with guide slits and a removable core lifter with side projections on the support section connected to the core receiver. In order to preserve the structure of the rock in the core sample by means of guaranteeing rectilinear movement of the core lifter in the rock, the support and core receiver sections are hinged. The device is equipped with a spring for angular shift in the core-reception part.

  20. A Series of Supramolecular Complexes for Solar Energy Conversion via Water Reduction to Produce Hydrogen: An Excited State Kinetic Analysis of Ru(II,Rh(III,Ru(II Photoinitiated Electron Collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamindri M. Arachchige

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-metal supramolecular complexes have been designed that photochemically absorb solar light, undergo photoinitiated electron collection and reduce water to produce hydrogen fuel using low energy visible light. This manuscript describes these systems with an analysis of the photophysics of a series of six supramolecular complexes, [{(TL2Ru(dpp}2RhX2](PF65 with TL = bpy, phen or Ph2phen with X = Cl or Br. The process of light conversion to a fuel requires a system to perform a number of complicated steps including the absorption of light, the generation of charge separation on a molecular level, the reduction by one and then two electrons and the interaction with the water substrate to produce hydrogen. The manuscript explores the rate of intramolecular electron transfer, rate of quenching of the supramolecules by the DMA electron donor, rate of reduction of the complex by DMA from the 3MLCT excited state, as well as overall rate of reduction of the complex via visible light excitation. Probing a series of complexes in detail exploring the variation of rates of important reactions as a function of sub-unit modification provides insight into the role of each process in the overall efficiency of water reduction to produce hydrogen. The kinetic analysis shows that the complexes display different rates of excited state reactions that vary with TL and halide. The role of the MLCT excited state is elucidated by this kinetic study which shows that the 3MLCT state and not the 3MMCT is likely that key contributor to the photoreduction of these complexes. The kinetic analysis of the excited state dynamics and reactions of the complexes are important as this class of supramolecules behaves as photoinitiated electron collectors and photocatalysts for the reduction of water to hydrogen.