WorldWideScience

Sample records for coreceptors ccr2b ccr3

  1. Frequency of polymorphisms of genes coding for HIV-1 co-receptors CCR5 and CCR2 in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munerato Patrícia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Entry of human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1 into target cells requires both CD4and one of the chemokine receptors. Viruses predominantly use one, or occasionally both, of the major co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, although other receptors, including CCR2B and CCR3, function as minor co-receptors. A 32-nucleotide deletion (delta32 within the beta-chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5 has been described in subjects who remain uninfected despite extensive exposition to HIV-1. The heterozygous genotype delays disease progression. This allele is common among Caucasians, but has not been found in people of African or Asian ancestry. A more common transition involving a valine to isoleucine switch in transmembrane domain I of CCR2B (64I, with unknown functional consequences, was found to delay disease progression but not to reduce infection risk. As the Brazilian population consists of a mixture of several ethnic groups, we decided to examine the genotype frequency of these polymorphisms in this country. There were 11.5% CCR5 heterozygotes among the HIV-1 infected population and 12.5% among uninfected individuals, similar to data from North America and Western Europe. The prevalence of CCR2-64I homozygotes and heterozygotes was 0.06 and 15.2%, respectively, also similar to what is known for North America and Western Europe.

  2. In vivo evolution of HIV-1 co-receptor usage and sensitivity to chemokine-mediated suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, G; Tresoldi, E; Björndal, A; Fredriksson, R; Colognesi, C; Deng, H K; Malnati, M S; Plebani, A; Siccardi, A G; Littman, D R; Fenyö, E M; Lusso, P

    1997-11-01

    Following the identification of the C-C chemokines RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta as major human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-suppressive factors produced by CD8+ T cells, several chemokine receptors were found to serve as membrane co-receptors for primate immunodeficiency lentiretroviruses. The two most widely used co-receptors thus far recognized, CCR5 and CXCR4, are expressed by both activated T lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes. CCR5, a specific RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1 receptor, is used preferentially by non-MT2-tropic HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains and by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), whereas CXCR4, a receptor for the C-X-C chemokine SDF-1, is used by MT2-tropic HIV-1 and HIV-2, but not by SIV. Other receptors with a more restricted cellular distribution, such as CCR2b, CCR3 and STRL33, can also function as co-receptors for selected viral isolates. The third variable region (V3) of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 has been fingered as a critical determinant of the co-receptor choice. Here, we document a consistent pattern of evolution of viral co-receptor usage and sensitivity to chemokine-mediated suppression in a longitudinal follow-up of children with progressive HIV-1 infection. Viral isolates obtained during the asymptomatic stages generally used only CCR5 as a co-receptor and were inhibited by RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta, but not by SDF-1. By contrast, the majority of the isolates derived after the progression of the disease were resistant to C-C chemokines, having acquired the ability to use CXCR4 and, in some cases, CCR3, while gradually losing CCR5 usage. Surprisingly, most of these isolates were also insensitive to SDF-1, even when used in combination with RANTES. An early acquisition of CXCR4 usage predicted a poor prognosis. In children who progressed to AIDS without a shift to CXCR4 usage, all the sequential isolates were CCR5-dependent but showed a reduced sensitivity to C-C chemokines. Discrete changes in the V3 domain

  3. CCR3 and choroidal neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Li

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly in industrialized countries. The "wet" AMD, characterized by the development of choroidal neovacularization (CNV, could result in rapid and severe loss of central vision. The critical role of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A in CNV development has been established and VEGF-A neutralization has become the standard care for wet AMD. Recently, CCR3 was reported to play an important role in CNV development and that CCR3 targeting was reported to be superior to VEGF-A targeting in CNV suppression. We investigated the role of CCR3 in CNV development using the Matrigel induced CNV and found that in both rats and mice, CNV was well-developed in the control eyes as well as in eyes treated with CCR3 antagonist SB328437 or CCR3 neutralizing antibodies. No statistically significant difference in CNV areas was found between the control and SB328437 or CCR3-ab treated eyes. Immunostaining showed no specific expression of CCR3 in or near CNV. In contrast, both VEGF-A neutralizing antibodies and rapamycin significantly suppressed CNV. These results indicate that CCR3 plays no significant role in CNV development and question the therapeutic approach of CCR3 targeting to suppress CNV. On the other hand, our data support the therapeutic strategies of VEGF-A and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin targeting for CNV.

  4. The rhesus macaque CCR3 chemokine receptor is a cell entry cofactor for HIV-2, but not for HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, N; Tréboute, C; Gomas, E; Ferchal, F; Shacklett, B; Alizon, M

    1998-01-20

    The eotaxin receptor (CCR3) is a CD4-associated coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2). By comparison with other chemokine receptors, such as CCR5 and CXCR4, the primary sequences of human CCR3 and its rhesus macaque homolog were markedly different in their extracellular domains. Human CD4+ cells expressing CCR3 from either human or macaque origin could be infected by HIV-2, with apparently similar efficiency, but only cells expressing human CCR3 could be infected by HIV-1. It suggests that HIV-1 and HIV-2 envelope proteins interact differently with the CCR3 coreceptor HIV-1 could infect cells expressing chimeric human/macaque CCR3 bearing either the first and second, or the third and fourth extracellular domains of human CCR3. As previously observed for CCR5, there seems to be a certain functional redundancy between domains supporting the coreceptor activity of CCR3. In spite of their close genetic relationship to HIV-2, two macaque simian immunodeficiency virus strains were apparently unable to use the CCR3 coreceptor from either human or simian origin.

  5. Common angiotensin receptor blockers may directly modulate the immune system via VDR, PPAR and CCR2b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been indications that common Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs may be exerting anti-inflammatory actions by directly modulating the immune system. We decided to use molecular modelling to rapidly assess which of the potential targets might justify the expense of detailed laboratory validation. We first studied the VDR nuclear receptor, which is activated by the secosteroid hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D. This receptor mediates the expression of regulators as ubiquitous as GnRH (Gonadatrophin hormone releasing hormone and the Parathyroid Hormone (PTH. Additionally we examined Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARgamma, which affects the function of phagocytic cells, and the C-CChemokine Receptor, type 2b, (CCR2b, which recruits monocytes to the site of inflammatory immune challenge. Results Telmisartan was predicted to strongly antagonize (Ki≈0.04nmol the VDR. The ARBs Olmesartan, Irbesartan and Valsartan (Ki≈10 nmol are likely to be useful VDR antagonists at typical in-vivo concentrations. Candesartan (Ki≈30 nmol and Losartan (Ki≈70 nmol may also usefully inhibit the VDR. Telmisartan is a strong modulator of PPARgamma (Ki≈0.3 nmol, while Losartan (Ki≈3 nmol, Irbesartan (Ki≈6 nmol, Olmesartan and Valsartan (Ki≈12 nmol also seem likely to have significant PPAR modulatory activity. Olmesartan andIrbesartan (Ki≈9 nmol additionally act as antagonists of a theoretical modelof CCR2b. Initial validation of this CCR2b model was performed, and a proposed model for the AngiotensinII Type1 receptor (AT2R1 has been presented. Conclusion Molecular modeling has proven valuable to generate testable hypotheses concerning receptor/ligand binding and is an important tool in drug design. ARBs were designed to act as antagonists for AT2R1, and it was not surprising to discover their affinity for the structurally similar CCR2b. However, this study also found evidence that ARBs modulate the

  6. Retinal Inhibition of CCR3 Induces Retinal Cell Death in a Murine Model of Choroidal Neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Wang

    Full Text Available Inhibition of chemokine C-C motif receptor 3 (CCR3 signaling has been considered as treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. However, CCR3 is expressed in neural retina from aged human donor eyes. Therefore, broad CCR3 inhibition may be harmful to the retina. We assessed the effects of CCR3 inhibition on retina and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs that develop into choroidal neovascularization (CNV. In adult murine eyes, CCR3 colocalized with glutamine-synthetase labeled Műller cells. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, CCR3 immunolocalized not only to lectin-stained cells in CNV lesions but also to the retina. Compared to non-lasered controls, CCR3 mRNA was significantly increased in laser-treated retina. An intravitreal injection of a CCR3 inhibitor (CCR3i significantly reduced CNV compared to DMSO or PBS controls. Both CCR3i and a neutralizing antibody to CCR3 increased TUNEL+ retinal cells overlying CNV, compared to controls. There was no difference in cleaved caspase-3 in laser-induced CNV lesions or in overlying retina between CCR3i- or control-treated eyes. Following CCR3i, apoptotic inducible factor (AIF was significantly increased and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2 decreased in the retina; there were no differences in retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. In cultured human Műller cells exposed to eotaxin (CCL11 and VEGF, CCR3i significantly increased TUNEL+ cells and AIF but decreased BCL2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor, without affecting caspase-3 activity or VEGF. CCR3i significantly decreased AIF in RPE/choroids and immunostaining of phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (p-VEGFR2 in CNV with a trend toward reduced VEGF. In cultured CECs treated with CCL11 and/or VEGF, CCR3i decreased p-VEGFR2 and increased BCL2 without increasing TUNEL+ cells and AIF. These findings suggest that inhibition of retinal CCR3 causes retinal cell death and that targeted inhibition of CCR3 in CECs may be a safer if CCR3

  7. Chemokine receptor CCR2b 64I polymorphism and its relation to CD4 T-cell counts and disease progression in a Danish cohort of HIV-infected individuals. Copenhagen AIDS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Iversen, Anton; Benfield, Thomas;

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the recently described mutation in CCR2b named 64I in relation to HIV resistance, CD4 T-cell counts, and disease progression in Danish individuals by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods as well as sequenced full-length CXCR4 and CCR5 genes from HIV......-term nonprogression could not be explained by CXCR4 polymorphism or other polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene than the CCR5delta32 allele. Furthermore, we were not able to detect any significant independent effect of the 64I allele on development to AIDS, overall survival, and annual CD4 T-cell decline in this cohort....

  8. CCR3 is a target for age-related macular degeneration diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsunobu; Baffi, Judit Z; Kleinman, Mark E; Cho, Won Gil; Nozaki, Miho; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Hiroki; Albuquerque, Romulo J C; Dridi, Sami; Saito, Kuniharu; Raisler, Brian J; Budd, Steven J; Geisen, Pete; Munitz, Ariel; Ambati, Balamurali K; Green, Martha G; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Wright, John D; Humbles, Alison A; Gerard, Craig J; Ogura, Yuichiro; Pan, Yuzhen; Smith, Justine R; Grisanti, Salvatore; Hartnett, M Elizabeth; Rothenberg, Marc E; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2009-07-09

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is as prevalent as cancer in industrialized nations. Most blindness in AMD results from invasion of the retina by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV). Here we show that the eosinophil/mast cell chemokine receptor CCR3 is specifically expressed in choroidal neovascular endothelial cells in humans with AMD, and that despite the expression of its ligands eotaxin-1, -2 and -3, neither eosinophils nor mast cells are present in human CNV. Genetic or pharmacological targeting of CCR3 or eotaxins inhibited injury-induced CNV in mice. CNV suppression by CCR3 blockade was due to direct inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, and was uncoupled from inflammation because it occurred in mice lacking eosinophils or mast cells, and was independent of macrophage and neutrophil recruitment. CCR3 blockade was more effective at reducing CNV than vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) neutralization, which is in clinical use at present, and, unlike VEGF-A blockade, is not toxic to the mouse retina. In vivo imaging with CCR3-targeting quantum dots located spontaneous CNV invisible to standard fluorescein angiography in mice before retinal invasion. CCR3 targeting might reduce vision loss due to AMD through early detection and therapeutic angioinhibition.

  9. Roles of RUNX1 and PU.1 in CCR3 Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Su-Kang; Kim, Byung Soo; Hwang, Sae Mi; Lee, Hyune Hwan; Chung, Il Yup

    2016-06-01

    CCR3 is a chemokine receptor that mediates the accumulation of allergic inflammatory cells, including eosinophils and Th2 cells, at inflamed sites. The regulatory sequence of the CCR3 gene, contains two Runt-related transcription factor (RUNX) 1 sites and two PU.1 sites, in addition to a functional GATA site for transactivation of the CCR3 gene. In the present study, we examined the effects of the cis-acting elements of RUNX1 and PU.1 on transcription of the gene in EoL-1 eosinophilic cells and Jurkat T cells, both of which expressed functional surface CCR3 and these two transcription factors. Introduction of RUNX1 siRNA or PU.1 siRNA resulted in a modest decrease in CCR3 reporter activity in both cell types, compared with transfection of GATA-1 siRNA. Cotransfection of the two siRNAs led to inhibition in an additive manner. EMSA analysis showed that RUNX1, in particular, bound to its binding motifs. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that all point mutants lacking RUNX1- and PU.1-binding sites exhibited reduced reporter activities. These results suggest that RUNX1 and PU.1 participate in transcriptional regulation of the CCR3 gene.

  10. Exacerbation of facial motoneuron loss after facial nerve axotomy in CCR3-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A Wainwright

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a neuroprotective mechanism of FMN (facial motoneuron survival after facial nerve axotomy that is dependent on CD4+ Th2 cell interaction with peripheral antigen-presenting cells, as well as CNS (central nervous system-resident microglia. PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is expressed by injured FMN and increases Th2-associated chemokine expression in cultured murine microglia. Collectively, these results suggest a model involving CD4+ Th2 cell migration to the facial motor nucleus after injury via microglial expression of Th2-associated chemokines. However, to respond to Th2-associated chemokines, Th2 cells must express the appropriate Th2-associated chemokine receptors. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Th2-associated chemokine receptors increase in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy at timepoints consistent with significant T-cell infiltration. Microarray analysis of Th2-associated chemokine receptors was followed up with real-time PCR for CCR3, which indicated that facial nerve injury increases CCR3 mRNA levels in mouse facial motor nucleus. Unexpectedly, quantitative- and co-immunofluorescence revealed increased CCR3 expression localizing to FMN in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy. Compared with WT (wild-type, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in CCR3−/− mice. Additionally, compared with WT, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in Rag2−/− (recombination activating gene-2-deficient mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells isolated from CCR3−/− mice, but not in CCR3−/− mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells derived from WT mice. These results provide a basis for further investigation into the co-operation between CD4+ T-cell- and CCR3-mediated neuroprotection after FMN injury.

  11. Exacerbation of Facial Motoneuron Loss after Facial Nerve Axotomy in CCR3-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A Wainwright

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a neuroprotective mechanism of FMN (facial motoneuron survival after facial nerve axotomy that is dependent on CD4+ Th2 cell interaction with peripheral antigen-presenting cells, as well as CNS (central nervous system-resident microglia. PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is expressed by injured FMN and increases Th2-associated chemokine expression in cultured murine microglia. Collectively, these results suggest a model involving CD4+ Th2 cell migration to the facial motor nucleus after injury via microglial expression of Th2-associated chemokines. However, to respond to Th2-associated chemokines, Th2 cells must express the appropriate Th2-associated chemokine receptors. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Th2-associated chemokine receptors increase in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy at timepoints consistent with significant T-cell infiltration. Microarray analysis of Th2-associated chemokine receptors was followed up with real-time PCR for CCR3, which indicated that facial nerve injury increases CCR3 mRNA levels in mouse facial motor nucleus. Unexpectedly, quantitative- and co-immunofluorescence revealed increased CCR3 expression localizing to FMN in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy. Compared with WT (wild-type, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in CCR3–/– mice. Additionally, compared with WT, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in Rag2 –/– (recombination activating gene-2-deficient mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells isolated from CCR3–/– mice, but not in CCR3–/– mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells derived from WT mice. These results provide a basis for further investigation into the co-operation between CD4+ T-cell- and CCR3-mediated neuroprotection after FMN injury.

  12. V3 Recombinants Indicate a Central Role for CCR5 as a Coreceptor in Tissue Infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephen Y.; Speck, Roberto F.; Power, Christopher; Gaffen, Sarah L.; Chesebro, Bruce; Goldsmith, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Binding of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 to both CD4 and one of several chemokine receptors (coreceptors) permits entry of virus into target cells. Infection of tissues may establish latent viral reservoirs as well as cause direct pathologic effects that manifest as clinical disease such as HIV-associated dementia. We sought to identify the critical coreceptors recognized by HIV-1 tissue-derived strains as well as to correlate these coreceptor preferences with site of infection and dementia diagnosis. To reconstitute coreceptor use, we cloned HIV-1 envelope V3 sequences encoding the primary determinants of coreceptor specificity from 13 brain-derived and 6 colon-derived viruses into an isogenic (NL4-3) viral background. All V3 recombinants utilized the chemokine receptor CCR5 uniformly and efficiently as a coreceptor but not CXCR4, BOB/GPR15, or Bonzo/STRL33. Other receptors such as CCR3, CCR8, and US28 were inefficiently and variably used as coreceptors by various envelopes. CCR5 without CD4 present did not allow for detectable infection by any of the tested recombinants. In contrast to the pathogenic switch in coreceptor specificity frequently observed in comparisons of blood-derived viruses early after HIV-1 seroconversion and after onset of AIDS, the characteristics of these V3 recombinants suggest that CCR5 is a primary coreceptor for brain- and colon-derived viruses regardless of tissue source or diagnosis of dementia. Therefore, tissue infection may not depend significantly on viral envelope quasispeciation to broaden coreceptor range but rather selects for CCR5 use throughout disease progression. PMID:9971818

  13. CCR3 is essential for skin eosinophilia and airway hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of allergic skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weilie; Bryce, Paul J; Humbles, Alison A; Laouini, Dhafer; Yalcindag, Ali; Alenius, Harri; Friend, Daniel S; Oettgen, Hans C; Gerard, Craig; Geha, Raif S

    2002-03-01

    The CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) is expressed by eosinophils, mast cells, and Th2 cells. We used CCR3(-/-) mice to assess the role of CCR3 in a murine model of allergic skin inflammation induced by repeated epicutaneous sensitization with ovalbumin (OVA), and characterized by eosinophil skin infiltration, local expression of Th2 cytokines, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to inhaled antigen. Eosinophils and the eosinophil product major basic protein were absent from the skin of sham and OVA-sensitized CCR3(-/-) mice. Mast cell numbers and expression of IL-4 mRNA were normal in skin of CCR3(-/-) mice, suggesting that CCR3 is not important for infiltration of the skin by mast cells and Th2 cells. CCR3(-/-) mice produced normal levels of OVA-specific IgE, and their splenocytes secreted normal amounts of IL-4 and IL-5 following in vitro stimulation with OVA, indicating effective generation of systemic Th2 helper responses. Recruitment of eosinophils to lung parenchyma and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was severely impaired in CCR3(-/-) mice, which failed to develop AHR to methacholine following antigen inhalation. These results suggest that CCR3 plays an essential role in eosinophil recruitment to the skin and the lung and in the development of AHR.

  14. Discovery of CC chemokine receptor-3 (CCR3) antagonists with picomolar potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucca, George V; Kim, Ui Tae; Vargo, Brian J; Duncia, John V; Santella, Joseph B; Gardner, Daniel S; Zheng, Changsheng; Liauw, Ann; Wang, Zhang; Emmett, George; Wacker, Dean A; Welch, Patricia K; Covington, Maryanne; Stowell, Nicole C; Wadman, Eric A; Das, Anuk M; Davies, Paul; Yeleswaram, Swamy; Graden, Danielle M; Solomon, Kimberly A; Newton, Robert C; Trainor, George L; Decicco, Carl P; Ko, Soo S

    2005-03-24

    Starting with our previously described(20) class of CC chemokine receptor-3 (CCR3) antagonist, we improved the potency by replacing the phenyl linker of 1 with a cyclohexyl linker and by replacing the 4-benzylpiperidine with a 3-benzylpiperidine. The resulting compound, 32, is a potent and selective antagonist of CCR3. SAR studies showed that the 3-acetylphenyl urea of 32 could be replaced with heterocyclic ureas or heterocyclic-substituted phenyl ureas and still maintain the potency (inhibition of eotaxin-induced chemotaxis) of this class of compounds in the low-picomolar range (IC(50) = 10-60 pM), representing some of the most potent CCR3 antagonists reported to date. The potency of 32 for mouse CCR3 (chemotaxis IC(50) = 41 nM) and its oral bioavailability in mice (20% F ) were adequate to assess the efficacy in animal models of allergic airway inflammation. Oral administration of 32 reduced eosinophil recruitment into the lungs in a dose-dependent manner in these animal models. On the basis of its overall potency, selectivity, efficacy, and safety profile, the benzenesulfonate salt of 32, designated DPC168, entered phase I clinical trials.

  15. CCR3 is a therapeutic and diagnostic target for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is as prevalent as cancer in industrialized nations. Most blindness in AMD results from invasion of the retina by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). We report that the eosinophil/mast cell chemokine receptor CCR3 is specifically expressed in CNV endothelial cells in humans with AMD, and that, despite the expression of its ligands eotaxin-1, -2, and -3, neither eosinophils nor mast cells are present in human CNV. ...

  16. Stimulation of oral fibroblast chemokine receptors identifies CCR3 and CCR4 as potential wound healing targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskermolen, Jeroen K; Roffel, Sanne; Gibbs, Susan

    2017-11-01

    The focus of this study was to determine which chemokine receptors are present on oral fibroblasts and whether these receptors influence proliferation, migration, and/or the release of wound healing mediators. This information may provide insight into the superior wound healing characteristics of the oral mucosa. The gingiva fibroblasts expressed 12 different chemokine receptors (CCR3, CCR4, CCR6, CCR9, CCR10, CXCR1, CXCR2, CXCR4, CXCR5, CXCR7, CX3CR1, and XCR1), as analyzed by flow cytometry. Fourteen corresponding chemokines (CCL5, CCL15, CCL20, CCL22, CCL25, CCL27, CCL28, CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL11, CXCL12, CXCL13, CX3CL1, and XCL1) were used to study the activation of these receptors on gingiva fibroblasts. Twelve of these fourteen chemokines stimulated gingiva fibroblast migration (all except for CXCL8 and CXCL12). Five of the chemokines stimulated proliferation (CCL5/CCR3, CCL15/CCR3, CCL22/CCR4, CCL28/CCR3/CCR10, and XCL1/XCR1). Furthermore, CCL28/CCR3/CCR10 and CCL22/CCR4 stimulation increased IL-6 secretion and CCL28/CCR3/CCR10 together with CCL27/CCR10 upregulated HGF secretion. Moreover, TIMP-1 secretion was reduced by CCL15/CCR3. In conclusion, this in-vitro study identifies chemokine receptor-ligand pairs which may be used in future targeted wound healing strategies. In particular, we identified the chemokine receptors CCR3 and CCR4, and the mucosa specific chemokine CCL28, as having an predominant role in oral wound healing by increasing human gingiva fibroblast proliferation, migration, and the secretion of IL-6 and HGF and reducing the secretion of TIMP-1. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by wiley periodicals, Inc.

  17. CCR3 monoclonal antibody inhibits airway eosinophilic inflammation and mucus overproduction in a mouse model of asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-hao SHEN; Feng XU; Gen-sheng ZHANG; Shao-bin WANG; Wei-hua XU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effect of a rat anti-mouse CC-chemokine receptor-3 (CCR3) monoclonal antibody (CCR3 mAb) on airway eosinophilia and mucus overproduction in asthmatic mice. Methods: An asthma model was sensitized and challenged by ovalbumin (OVA) in male C57BL/6 mice. Asthmatic mice were given dual administration (intraperitoneal injection and aerosol inhalation) of CCR3 mAb or nonspecific rat IgG (ns-IgG). The number of total and differential inflammatory cells in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was counted. Eosinophils number, the goblet cell percentage (GCP) and airway mucus index (AMI) were measured in the lung tissues. Interleukin (IL)-5 levels in the BALF were examined. The expression of MUC5AC and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA in the lung tissues was detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The results were compared among the groups. Results: CCR3 mAb significantly suppressed the increased eosinophils in the BALF and lung tissues in OVA-challenged mice compared with ns-IgG-treated mice. IL-5 levels in the BALF in CCR3 mAb and ns-IgG administration mice exhibited no obvious changes relative to OVA-challenged asthmatic mice. CCR3 mAb reduced the increased GCP and AMI after OVA challenge and decreased the enhanced expression of MUC5AC and EGFR mRNA in lung tissues in asthmatic animals. Conclusion: CCR3 mAb can significantly inhibit airway eosinophilia and mucus overproduction in asthmatic mice. Blockage of CCR3 may represent a new strategy to asthma therapy.

  18. A polymorphism in CCR1/CCR3 is associated with narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Hiromi; Miyagawa, Taku; Koike, Asako; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Imanishi, Aya; Sagawa, Yohei; Kotorii, Nozomu; Kotorii, Tatayu; Hashizume, Yuji; Ogi, Kimihiro; Hiejima, Hiroshi; Kamei, Yuichi; Hida, Akiko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Imai, Makoto; Fujimura, Yota; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Ikegami, Azusa; Wada, Yamato; Moriya, Shunpei; Furuya, Hirokazu; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kirino, Yohei; Meguro, Akira; Remmers, Elaine F; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Otowa, Takeshi; Miyashita, Akinori; Kashiwase, Koichi; Khor, Seik-Soon; Yamasaki, Maria; Kuwano, Ryozo; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Ishigooka, Jun; Kuroda, Kenji; Kume, Kazuhiko; Chiba, Shigeru; Yamada, Naoto; Okawa, Masako; Hirata, Koichi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Uchimura, Naohisa; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Honda, Yutaka; Mishima, Kazuo; Honda, Makoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2015-10-01

    Etiology of narcolepsy-cataplexy involves multiple genetic and environmental factors. While the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*15:01-DQB1*06:02 haplotype is strongly associated with narcolepsy, it is not sufficient for disease development. To identify additional, non-HLA susceptibility genes, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using Japanese samples. An initial sample set comprising 409 cases and 1562 controls was used for the GWAS of 525,196 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located outside the HLA region. An independent sample set comprising 240 cases and 869 controls was then genotyped at 37 SNPs identified in the GWAS. We found that narcolepsy was associated with a SNP in the promoter region of chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 1 (CCR1) (rs3181077, P=1.6×10(-5), odds ratio [OR]=1.86). This rs3181077 association was replicated with the independent sample set (P=0.032, OR=1.36). We measured mRNA levels of candidate genes in peripheral blood samples of 38 cases and 37 controls. CCR1 and CCR3 mRNA levels were significantly lower in patients than in healthy controls, and CCR1 mRNA levels were associated with rs3181077 genotypes. In vitro chemotaxis assays were also performed to measure monocyte migration. We observed that monocytes from carriers of the rs3181077 risk allele had lower migration indices with a CCR1 ligand. CCR1 and CCR3 are newly discovered susceptibility genes for narcolepsy. These results highlight the potential role of CCR genes in narcolepsy and support the hypothesis that patients with narcolepsy have impaired immune function.

  19. Clinical significance of HIV-1 coreceptor usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusso Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of phenotypically distinct HIV-1 variants with different prevalence during the progression of the disease has been one of the earliest discoveries in HIV-1 biology, but its relevance to AIDS pathogenesis remains only partially understood. The physiological basis for the phenotypic variability of HIV-1 was elucidated with the discovery of distinct coreceptors employed by the virus to infect susceptible cells. The role of the viral phenotype in the variable clinical course and treatment outcome of HIV-1 infection has been extensively investigated over the past two decades. In this review, we summarize the major findings on the clinical significance of the HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

  20. CCR3 expression induced by IL-2 and IL-4 functioning as a death receptor for B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, Tan; Jacobi, Henrik H; Jing, Chen

    2003-01-01

    We report that CCR3 is not expressed on freshly isolated peripheral and germinal B cells, but is up-regulated after stimulation with IL-2 and IL-4 (approximately 98% CCR3(+)). Ligation of CCR3 by eotaxin/chemokine ligand (CCL) 11 induces apoptosis in IL-2- and IL-4-stimulated primary CD19......(+) (approximately 40% apoptotic cells) B cell cultures as well as B cell lines, but has no effect on chemotaxis or cell adhesion. Freshly isolated B cells express low levels of CD95 and CD95 ligand (CD95L) (19 and 21%, respectively). Expression is up-regulated on culture in the presence of a combination of IL-2, IL......-4, and eotaxin/CCL11 (88% CD95 and 84% CD95L). We therefore propose that ligation of such newly induced CCR3 on peripheral and germinal B cells by eotaxin/CCL11 leads to the enhanced levels of CD95 and CD95L expression. Ligation of CD95 by its CD95L expressed on neigboring B cells triggers relevant...

  1. Relationship between expression of chemokine receptors CCR3,CCR5 and CXCR3 on CD4+ T cells and spontaneous abortion in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Pei-juan; LIN Qi-de; BAO Shi-min; ZHAO Ai-min; ZHANG Yu; XIAO Shi-jin

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that local immune cells in the feto-maternal interface are recruited from peripheral blood, and that chemokines and their receptors play an initial and key role in this recruitment process. In this study, we aimed to determine whether spontaneous abortion is associated with the expression of chemokine receptors CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR3 on CD4+ T cells.Methods Peripheral blood, spleen, and thymus were collected from the spontaneous abortion mouse model CBA/J×DBN2 (SA group, n=14), the normal pregnant mouse model CBA/J×BALB/c (NP group, n=13), and normal non-pregnant CBA/J mice (NNP group, n=11). The number of chemokine receptors CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR3 expressed on CD4+ T cells was measured by double-label flow cytometry (FCM) method.Results In peripheral blood, the SA group had significantly lower CCR3 expression (P 0.05). In spleen, the SA group expressed significantly lower CCR3 expression (P 0.05). In thymus, the SA group had significantly lower CCR3 expression (P 0.05). Compared with the NNP group, the SA group had higher CCR3 expression (P 0.05) between the two groups.Conclusion The abnormal expression of CCR3, CCR5 and CXCR3 on CD4+ T cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of spontaneous abortion.

  2. Effect of RNA interference therapy on the mice eosinophils CCR3 gene and granule protein in the murine model of allergic rhinitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Hua Zhu; Bing Liao; Ke Liu; Yue-Hui Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical manifestations of allergic rhinitis mice and the expression changes of the eosinophilsCCR3 and the granule protein mRNA in the bone marrow, peripheral blood and nasal lavage fluid.Methods:Twenty-fourBALB/c mice were randomly divided into the control group,PBS therapy group, siRNA therapy group and theCCR3 siRNA therapy group (n=6).Allergic rhinitis model were sensitized and stimulated by ovalbunfin, andCCR3 siRNA therapy group were administered withCCR3 transnasally before stimulated.The levels of the eosinophilsCCR3,MBP,ECP andEPO in bone marrow, peripheral blood and nasal lavage fluid were detected byRT-PCR.Results:Compared to the control group andCCR3 siRNA therapy group, the nasal mucosa of thePBS therapy group and siRNA therapy group developed epithalaxy, goblet cells hyperplasia, squamous epithelium metaplasia, epithelium necrosis, lamina propria and submucosa gland hyperplasia, vasodilatation, tissue edema, and the characterized eosinophil infiltration.RT-PCR indicated that theCCR3 mRNA,MBP ,ECP andEPO expression in bone marrow, peripheral blood and nasal lavage fluid of theCCR3 siRNA therapy group was lower than thePBS therapy group andsiRNA therapy group(P<0.05).Conclusions:TheRNA interference therapy toCCR3 by local administration pernasal can suppress the process of the development, migration and invasion of the allergic rhinitis eosinophil, thus can reduce the effect of eosinophils and then reduce the inflammation effect of the allergic rhinitis.It may be a new treatment for respiratory tract allergic inflammation.

  3. The amino-terminal domain of the CCR2 chemokine receptor acts as coreceptor for HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade, J M; Llorente, M; Mellado, M; Alcamí, J; Gutiérrez-Ramos, J C; Zaballos, A; Real, G; Martínez-A, C

    1997-08-01

    The chemokines are a homologous serum protein family characterized by their ability to induce activation of integrin adhesion molecules and leukocyte migration. Chemokines interact with their receptors, which are composed of a single-chain, seven-helix, membrane-spanning protein coupled to G proteins. Two CC chemokine receptors, CCR3 and CCR5, as well as the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, have been shown necessary for infection by several HIV-1 virus isolates. We studied the effect of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and of a panel of MCP-1 receptor (CCR2)-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) on the suppression of HIV-1 replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We have compelling evidence that MCP-1 has potent HIV-1 suppressive activity when HIV-1-infected peripheral blood lymphocytes are used as target cells. Furthermore, mAb specific for the MCP-1R CCR2 which recognize the third extracellular CCR2 domain inhibit all MCP-1 activity and also block MCP-1 suppressive activity. Finally, a set of mAb specific for the CCR2 amino-terminal domain, one of which mimics MCP-1 activity, has a potent suppressive effect on HIV-1 replication in M- and T-tropic HIV-1 viral isolates. We conjecture a role for CCR2 as a coreceptor for HIV-1 infection and map the HIV-1 binding site to the amino-terminal part of this receptor. This concurs with results showing that the CCR5 amino terminus is relevant in HIV-1 infection, although chimeric fusion of various extracellular domains shows that other domains are also implicated. We discuss the importance of CCR2 structure relative to its coreceptor role and the role of anti-CCR2 receptor antibodies in the prevention of HIV-1 infection.

  4. CCR3, CCR5, CCR8 and CXCR3 expression in memory T helper cells from allergic rhinitis patients, asymptomatically sensitized and healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Mille; Assing, Kristian; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2006-01-01

    Chemokine receptors have been suggested to be preferentially expressed on CD4+ T cells with CCR3 and CCR8 linked to the T helper (Th) 2 subset and CCR5 and CXCR3 to the Th1 subset, however this remains controversial.......Chemokine receptors have been suggested to be preferentially expressed on CD4+ T cells with CCR3 and CCR8 linked to the T helper (Th) 2 subset and CCR5 and CXCR3 to the Th1 subset, however this remains controversial....

  5. The expression of periphery blood leucocyte CCR3 and CCR5 in the children with Epstein-Barr virus associated infectious mononucleosis%感染EB病毒的传染性单核细胞增多症患儿外周血白细胞CCR3和CCR5的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐铁雄; 高国花; 刘世华

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨感染EB病毒的传染性单核细胞增多症(IM)患儿CCR3和CCR5的表达,以期了解Th1/Th2细胞的分化情况.方法 观察患儿外周血异型淋巴细胞比例,测定患儿的嗜异凝集抗体,用双抗体夹心酶联免疫吸附法(ELISA)测定患儿抗EBV-CA-IgM、抗EBV-CA-IgG及抗EBV-NA-IgG,筛选出符合诊断标准的IM患儿.并用流式细胞检测仪检测淋巴细胞中CCR3和CCR5的表达.结果 IM感染组异型淋巴细胞比例高于对照组(P<0.05).IM感染组CCR3+细胞率高于对照组(P<0.05),CCR5+细胞率低于对照组(P<0.05).CCR3与发热持续时间、异型淋巴细胞百分数呈正相关(P<0.05).CCR5与发热持续时间呈负相关(P<0.05).结论 IM患儿CCR3+表达增高,CCR5+表达降低,存在以Th2细胞优势分化状态为特征的T辅助细胞分化失衡.CCR3和CCR5可以作为判断IM病情轻重的重要参考指标.%Objective To explore the expression of periphery blood leucocyte CCR3 and CCR5 and to comprehend T helper cell in the Children with Epstein-Barr virus associated infectious mononucleosis.Methods We defined the children according to the diagnosis criterion through Paul-Bunnell test inspecting the children's periphery blood unusual lymphocyte and detecting their anti-EBV-CA-IgM, anti-EBV-CA-IgG and anti-EBV-NA-IgG by ELISA and counted the ratio of CCR3 + and CCR5 + cells in lymphocytes with flow cytometry. Results The ratio of unusual lymphocyte in IM was higher than that of the healthy control group (P < O. 05). The ratio of CCR3 + cells in IM group was higher than that of the healthy control group (P < 0.05). The ratio of CCR5 + cells in IM group was significantly lower than that of the healthy control group. CCR3 + had direct interrelation with fever continued time and the ratio of unusual lymphocyte. There was a negative interrelation between CCR5 and fever continued time ( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusions Children infectious of IM expressed higher level of CCR3 + and lower

  6. Novel ligands for the chemokine receptor-3 (CCR3): a receptor-modeling study based on 5D-QSAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedani, Angelo; Dobler, Max; Dollinger, Horst; Hasselbach, Kai-Malte; Birke, Franz; Lill, Markus A

    2005-03-10

    We recently reported the development of a receptor-modeling concept based on 5D-QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationships) and which explicitly allows for the simulation of induced fit. In this account, we report its utilization toward the design of novel compounds able to inhibit the chemokine receptor-3 (CCR3). The study was based on a total of 141 compounds, representing four different substance classes. Using the Quasar software, we built two receptor surrogates that yielded a cross-validated r(2) value of 0.950/0.861 and a predictive r(2) of 0.879/0.798, respectively. The model was then employed to predict the activity of 58 hypothetical compounds featuring two variation patterns: lipophilic substitutions and amphiphilic H-bond acceptors. Eleven of the proposed ligands show a calculated binding affinity lower than any compound within the training set; the most potent candidate molecule is expected to bind at an IC(50) of 0.3 nM.

  7. Understanding the HIV coreceptor switch from a dynamical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamp Christel

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The entry of HIV into its target cells is facilitated by the prior binding to the cell surface molecule CD4 and a secondary coreceptor, mostly the chemokine receptors CCR5 or CXCR4. In early infection CCR5-using viruses (R5 viruses are mostly dominant while a receptor switch towards CXCR4 occurs in about 50% of the infected individuals (X4 viruses which is associated with a progression of the disease. There are many hypotheses regarding the underlying dynamics without yet a conclusive understanding. Results While it is difficult to isolate key factors in vivo we have developed a minimal in silico model based on the approaches of Nowak and May to investigate the conditions under which the receptor switch occurs. The model allows to investigate the evolution of viral strains within a probabilistic framework along the three stages of disease from primary and latent infection to the onset of AIDS with a a sudden increase in viral load which goes along with the impairment of the immune response. The model is specifically applied to investigate the evolution of the viral quasispecies in terms of R5 and X4 viruses which directly translates into the composition of viral load and consequently the question of the coreceptor switch. Conclusion The model can explain the coreceptor switch as a result of a dynamical change in the underlying environmental conditions in the host. The emergence of X4 strains does not necessarily result in the dominance of X4 viruses in viral load which is more likely to occur in the model after some time of chronic infection. A better understanding of the conditions leading to the coreceptor switch is especially of interest as CCR5 blockers have recently been licensed as drugs which suppress R5 viruses but do not seem to necessarily induce a coreceptor switch.

  8. PRO 140--a novel CCR5 co-receptor inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Nadia; Das, Satyajit

    2010-01-01

    Despite an increase in the variety of anti-retroviral agents in the market, there remains a need for novel agents to treat HIV 1 infected individuals, in order to overcome existing problems with adherence, toxicities, drug interactions and viral resistance. In this article, we will describe Pro 140, one of the recently developed class of anti-retroviral agent, the CCR5 co-receptor inhibitor. We will also describe several preclinical and clinical studies that have evaluated the efficacy, tolerability and toxicity profiles of Pro-140. We will also look at how its mechanism of action and mode of delivery may change the way patients take highly active anti-retroviral therapy. There are some promising patents discussed in this short review for the use of PRO 140 as CCR5 co-receptor Inhibitor.

  9. High-level production, solubilization and purification of synthetic human GPCR chemokine receptors CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ren

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors belong to a class of integral membrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs and are responsible for transmitting signals from the extracellular environment. However, the structural changes in the receptor, connecting ligand binding to G-protein activation, remain elusive for most GPCRs due to the difficulty to produce them for structural and functional studies. We here report high-level production in E.coli of 4 human GPCRs, namely chemokine receptors (hCRs CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1 that are directly involved in HIV-1 infection, asthma and cancer metastasis. The synthetic genes of CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1 were synthesized using a two-step assembly/amplification PCR method and inserted into two different kinds of expression systems. After systematic screening of growth conditions and host strains, TB medium was selected for expression of pEXP-hCRs. The low copy number pBAD-DEST49 plasmid, with a moderately strong promoter tightly regulated by L-arabinose, proved helpful for reducing toxicity of expressed membrane proteins. The synthetic Trx-hCR fusion genes in the pBAD-DEST49 vector were expressed at high levels in the Top10 strain. After a systematic screen of 96 detergents, the zwitterionic detergents of the Fos-choline series (FC9-FC16 emerged as the most effective for isolation of the hCRs. The FC14 was selected both for solubilization from bacterial lysates and for stabilization of the Trx-hCRs during purification. Thus, the FC-14 solubilized Trx-hCRs could be purified using size exclusion chromatography as monomers and dimers with the correct apparent MW and their alpha-helical content determined by circular dichroism. The identity of two of the expressed hCRs (CCR3 and CCR5 was confirmed using immunoblots using specific monoclonal antibodies. After optimization of expression systems and detergent-mediated purification procedures, we achieved large-scale, high-level production of 4 human GPCR chemokine receptor in a

  10. High-level production, solubilization and purification of synthetic human GPCR chemokine receptors CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hui; Yu, Daoyong; Ge, Baosheng; Cook, Brian; Xu, Zhinan; Zhang, Shuguang

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine receptors belong to a class of integral membrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and are responsible for transmitting signals from the extracellular environment. However, the structural changes in the receptor, connecting ligand binding to G-protein activation, remain elusive for most GPCRs due to the difficulty to produce them for structural and functional studies. We here report high-level production in E.coli of 4 human GPCRs, namely chemokine receptors (hCRs) CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1 that are directly involved in HIV-1 infection, asthma and cancer metastasis. The synthetic genes of CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1 were synthesized using a two-step assembly/amplification PCR method and inserted into two different kinds of expression systems. After systematic screening of growth conditions and host strains, TB medium was selected for expression of pEXP-hCRs. The low copy number pBAD-DEST49 plasmid, with a moderately strong promoter tightly regulated by L-arabinose, proved helpful for reducing toxicity of expressed membrane proteins. The synthetic Trx-hCR fusion genes in the pBAD-DEST49 vector were expressed at high levels in the Top10 strain. After a systematic screen of 96 detergents, the zwitterionic detergents of the Fos-choline series (FC9-FC16) emerged as the most effective for isolation of the hCRs. The FC14 was selected both for solubilization from bacterial lysates and for stabilization of the Trx-hCRs during purification. Thus, the FC-14 solubilized Trx-hCRs could be purified using size exclusion chromatography as monomers and dimers with the correct apparent MW and their alpha-helical content determined by circular dichroism. The identity of two of the expressed hCRs (CCR3 and CCR5) was confirmed using immunoblots using specific monoclonal antibodies. After optimization of expression systems and detergent-mediated purification procedures, we achieved large-scale, high-level production of 4 human GPCR chemokine receptor in a two

  11. High-Level Production, Solubilization and Purification of Synthetic Human GPCR Chemokine Receptors CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hui; Yu, Daoyong; Ge, Baosheng; Cook, Brian; Xu, Zhinan; Zhang, Shuguang

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine receptors belong to a class of integral membrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and are responsible for transmitting signals from the extracellular environment. However, the structural changes in the receptor, connecting ligand binding to G-protein activation, remain elusive for most GPCRs due to the difficulty to produce them for structural and functional studies. We here report high-level production in E.coli of 4 human GPCRs, namely chemokine receptors (hCRs) CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1 that are directly involved in HIV-1 infection, asthma and cancer metastasis. The synthetic genes of CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4 and CX3CR1 were synthesized using a two-step assembly/amplification PCR method and inserted into two different kinds of expression systems. After systematic screening of growth conditions and host strains, TB medium was selected for expression of pEXP-hCRs. The low copy number pBAD-DEST49 plasmid, with a moderately strong promoter tightly regulated by L-arabinose, proved helpful for reducing toxicity of expressed membrane proteins. The synthetic Trx-hCR fusion genes in the pBAD-DEST49 vector were expressed at high levels in the Top10 strain. After a systematic screen of 96 detergents, the zwitterionic detergents of the Fos-choline series (FC9-FC16) emerged as the most effective for isolation of the hCRs. The FC14 was selected both for solubilization from bacterial lysates and for stabilization of the Trx-hCRs during purification. Thus, the FC-14 solubilized Trx-hCRs could be purified using size exclusion chromatography as monomers and dimers with the correct apparent MW and their alpha-helical content determined by circular dichroism. The identity of two of the expressed hCRs (CCR3 and CCR5) was confirmed using immunoblots using specific monoclonal antibodies. After optimization of expression systems and detergent-mediated purification procedures, we achieved large-scale, high-level production of 4 human GPCR chemokine receptor in a two

  12. Efficient Use of a Crude Drug/Herb Library Reveals Ephedra Herb As a Specific Antagonist for TH2-Specific Chemokine Receptors CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kazuhiko; Koizumi, Keiichi; Fujita, Mitsugu; Morikawa, Toshio; Jo, Michiko; Shibahara, Naotoshi; Saiki, Ikuo; Yoshie, Osamu; Nakayama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors CCR3 and CCR4 are preferentially expressed by TH2 cells, mast cells, and/or eosinophils, all of which are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Therefore, CCR3 and CCR4 have long been highlighted as potent therapeutic targets for allergic diseases. Japanese traditional herbal medicine Kampo consists of multiple crude drugs/herbs, which further consist of numerous chemical substances. Recent studies have demonstrated that such chemical substances appear to promising sources in the development of novel therapeutic agents. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that Kampo-related crude drugs/herbs would contain chemical substances that inhibit the cell migration mediated by CCR3 and/or CCR4. To test this hypothesis, we screened 80 crude drugs/herbs to identify candidate substances using chemotaxis assay. Among those tested, Ephedra Herb inhibited the chemotaxis mediated by both CCR3 and CCR4, Cornus Fruit inhibited that mediated by CCR3, and Rhubarb inhibited that mediated by CCR4. Furthermore, Ephedra Herb specifically inhibited the chemotaxis mediated by not only CCR3 and CCR4 but CCR8, all of which are selectively expressed by TH2 cells. This result led us to speculate that ephedrine, a major component of Ephedra Herb, would play a central role in the inhibitory effects on the chemotaxis mediated by CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8. However, ephedrine exhibited little effects on the chemotaxis. Therefore, we fractionated Ephedra Herb into four subfractions and examined the inhibitory effects of each subfraction. As the results, ethyl acetate-insoluble fraction exhibited the inhibitory effects on chemotaxis and calcium mobilization mediated by CCR3 and CCR4 most significantly. In contrast, chloroform-soluble fraction exhibited a weak inhibitory effect on the chemotaxis mediated by CCR8. Furthermore, maoto, one of the Kampo formulations containing Ephedra Herb, exhibited the inhibitory effects on the chemotaxis mediated by CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8

  13. Chemokine receptor genes CCR3 and CCR9 in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus):Cloning and tissue distribution%大菱鲆趋化因子受体CCR3和CCR9基因的克隆及组织表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟艳青; 刘晓飞; 刘洋; 常亚青; 王秀利; 姜志强

    2013-01-01

    Turbot is an important aquaculture species in the eastern North Atlantic and Mediterranean regions, China, and Korea. Research on the molecular mechanisms of the turbot immune system could contribute to im-proving the economic performance of turbot aquaculture. In this study, we cloned and characterized the full-length cDNA of CCR3 and CCR9 in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus). The full-length cDNAs were obtained by the 5′and 3′-RACE method. The CCR9 cDNA was 1 441 bp in length, consisting of a 59 bp 5′UTR, a 278 bp 3′UTR, and a 1 104 bp ORF encoding a 367 amino acid polypeptide. The CCR3 cDNA was 1 451 bp in length and contained a 92 bp 5′UTR, a 267 bp 3′UTR, and a 1 083 bp ORF encoding 360 amino acids. The TMHMM (TransMembrane prediction using Hidden Markov Models) analysis confirmed that they were seven-transmembrane-spanning pro-teins. A phylogenetic tree based on the amino acid sequences was constructed by the neighbor-joining (NJ) method using Mega4. The results of phylogenetic analysis revealed that turbot CCR3 and CCR9 were more similar to the cDNAs of other teleosts than to each other. The relationships exhibited in the tree are consistent with their evolu-tionary relationships. The CCR9 and CCR3 mRNA expression levels in various tissues was measured by quantita-tive RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Both gene transcripts were expressed in all of the tissues analyzed, with the highest ex-pression being in the spleen, head kidney, and heart. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge results suggest that CCR9 expression in liver was more sensitive than in the other three tissues, while CCR3 expression in spleen and liver was more sensitive than in head kidney or blood. CCR3 and CCR9 expression levels were both high in im-mune-related tissues and after induction by LPS. Our results indicate that both genes play a role in the turbot im-mune system.This work further elucidates the functions of these genes in immune responses, which will help to better understand the

  14. From rigid cyclic templates to conformationally stabilized acyclic scaffolds. Part I: the discovery of CCR3 antagonist development candidate BMS-639623 with picomolar inhibition potency against eosinophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, Joseph B; Gardner, Daniel S; Yao, Wenqing; Shi, Chongsheng; Reddy, Prabhakar; Tebben, Andrew J; DeLucca, George V; Wacker, Dean A; Watson, Paul S; Welch, Patricia K; Wadman, Eric A; Davies, Paul; Solomon, Kimberly A; Graden, Dani M; Yeleswaram, Swamy; Mandlekar, Sandhya; Kariv, Ilona; Decicco, Carl P; Ko, Soo S; Carter, Percy H; Duncia, John V

    2008-01-15

    Conformational analysis of trans-1,2-disubstituted cyclohexane CCR3 antagonist 2 revealed that the cyclohexane linker could be replaced by an acyclic syn-alpha-methyl-beta-hydroxypropyl linker. Synthesis and biological evaluation of mono- and disubstituted propyl linkers support this conformational correlation. It was also found that the alpha-methyl group to the urea lowered protein binding and that the beta-hydroxyl group lowered affinity for CYP2D6. Ab initio calculations show that the alpha-methyl group governs the spatial orientation of three key functionalities within the molecule. alpha-Methyl-beta-hydroxypropyl urea 31 with a chemotaxis IC(50)=38 pM for eosinophils was chosen to enter clinical development for the treatment of asthma.

  15. Plasmodium yoelii 17XL infection up-regulates RANTES, CCR1, CCR3 and CCR5 expression, and induces ultrastructural changes in the cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Shailesh

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria afflicts 300–500 million people causing over 1 million deaths globally per year. The immunopathogenesis of malaria is mediated partly by co mplex cellular and immunomodulator interactions involving co-regulators such as cytokines and adhesion molecules. However, the role of chemokines and their receptors in malaria immunopathology remains unclear. RANTES (Regulated on Activation Normal T-Cell Expressed and Secreted is a chemokine involved in the generation of inflammatory infiltrates. Recent studies indicate that the degradation of cell-cell junctions, blood-brain barrier dysfunction, recruitment of leukocytes and Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes into and occlusion of microvessels relevant to malaria pathogenesis are associated with RANTES expression. Additionally, activated lymphocytes, platelets and endothelial cells release large quantities of RANTES, thus suggesting a unique role for RANTES in the generation and maintenance of the malaria-induced inflammatory response. The hypothesis of this study is that RANTES and its corresponding receptors (CCR1, CCR3 and CCR5 modulate malaria immunopathogenesis. A murine malaria model was utilized to evaluate the role of this chemokine and its receptors in malaria. Methods The alterations in immunomodulator gene expression in brains of Plasmodium yoelii 17XL-infected mice was analysed using cDNA microarray screening, followed by a temporal comparison of mRNA and protein expression of RANTES and its corresponding receptors by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Plasma RANTES levels was determined by ELISA and ultrastructural studies of brain sections from infected and uninfected mice was conducted. Results RANTES (p Conclusion The upregulation of RANTES, CCR1, CCR3, and CCR5 mRNA, and RANTES protein mediate inflammation and cellular degradation in the cerebellum during P. yoelii 17XL malaria.

  16. Lefty blocks a subset of TGFbeta signals by antagonizing EGF-CFC coreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon K Cheng

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of the EGF-CFC family play essential roles in embryonic development and have been implicated in tumorigenesis. The TGFbeta signals Nodal and Vg1/GDF1, but not Activin, require EGF-CFC coreceptors to activate Activin receptors. We report that the TGFbeta signaling antagonist Lefty also acts through an EGF-CFC-dependent mechanism. Lefty inhibits Nodal and Vg1 signaling, but not Activin signaling. Lefty genetically interacts with EGF-CFC proteins and competes with Nodal for binding to these coreceptors. Chimeras between Activin and Nodal or Vg1 identify a 14 amino acid region that confers independence from EGF-CFC coreceptors and resistance to Lefty. These results indicate that coreceptors are targets for both TGFbeta agonists and antagonists and suggest that subtle sequence variations in TGFbeta signals result in greater ligand diversity.

  17. Prediction of co-receptor usage of HIV-1 from genotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nikolaj Dybowski

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 uses for entry into host cells a receptor (CD4 and one of two co-receptors (CCR5 or CXCR4. Recently, a new class of antiretroviral drugs has entered clinical practice that specifically bind to the co-receptor CCR5, and thus inhibit virus entry. Accurate prediction of the co-receptor used by the virus in the patient is important as it allows for personalized selection of effective drugs and prognosis of disease progression. We have investigated whether it is possible to predict co-receptor usage accurately by analyzing the amino acid sequence of the main determinant of co-receptor usage, i.e., the third variable loop V3 of the gp120 protein. We developed a two-level machine learning approach that in the first level considers two different properties important for protein-protein binding derived from structural models of V3 and V3 sequences. The second level combines the two predictions of the first level. The two-level method predicts usage of CXCR4 co-receptor for new V3 sequences within seconds, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.937+/-0.004. Moreover, it is relatively robust against insertions and deletions, which frequently occur in V3. The approach could help clinicians to find optimal personalized treatments, and it offers new insights into the molecular basis of co-receptor usage. For instance, it quantifies the importance for co-receptor usage of a pocket that probably is responsible for binding sulfated tyrosine.

  18. Expression of chemokine receptors CCR3,CCR5 and CXCR3 on CD4+ T cells in CBA/JxDBA/2 mouse model,selectively induced by IL-4 and IL-10,regulates the embryo resorption rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Pei-juan; ZHAO Ai-min; BAO Shi-min; XIAO Shi-jin; XIONG Miao

    2009-01-01

    Background Chemokines and their receptors have been a research focus in transplantation immunology.Chemokines and their receptors play a role in lymphocyte recruitment and differentiation process.This study aimed to observe whether IL-4 and IL-10 may regulate the expression of chemokine receptors CCR3,CCR5 and CXCR3 on CD4+ T cells in CBA/JxDBA/2 mouse model and to explore the role of CCR3,CCR5,CXCR3 in immune tolerance in pregnancy.Methods The mouse model of spontaneous abortion (CBA/JxDBA/2) and the normal pregnant mouse model (CBA/JxBALB/c) were used.CBA/JxDBA/2 mice were injected with IL-4 (CBA/JxDBA/2-1L-4),IL-4 and IL-10 (CBA/JxDBA/2-1L-4+IL-10),or normal saline (CBA/JxDBA/2-NS) as a control.The expression of CCR3,CCR5 and CXCR3 on CD4+ T cells from mouse peripheral blood was measured by the double-labelled FCM method,and the embryo resorption rate was also examined.Results The embryo resorption rate in the CBA/JxDBA/2 group without any treatment was significantly higher than that in the CBA/JxBALB/c group (17.9% vs 3.7%,P<0.01).The embryo resorption rate in the CBA/JxDBA/2 group immunized with IL-4 or IL-4 together with IL-10 was significantly decreased,compared with that in the control and NS groups respectively.CCR3 expression on CD4+ T cells in the CBA/JxDBA/2 group without any treatment was significantly lower than that in the CBA/JxBALB/c group (0.3738±0.3575 vs 1.2190±0.2772,P<0.01 );both CCR5 (3.0900±1.5603 vs 1.2390±0.6361,P <0.01)and CXCR3 (2.4715±0.9074 vs 0.9200±0.5585,P <0.01 ) expressions on CD4+ T cells of the CBA/JxDBA/2 group without any treatment were significantly higher than those of the CBA/JxBALB/c group.Significant up-regulation of CCR3 and down-regulation of CXCR3 were found in the CBA/JxDBA/2 group treated with IL-4 (CCR3:2.0360±0.6944,CXCR3:1.3510±0.5263,P <0.01) or IL-4 and IL-10 (CCR3:1.8160±1.0947,CXCR3:1.0940±0.7168,P<0.01).Because of the CCR5,IL-4 and IL-10 (1.9400±0.8504 vs 3.0900±1.5603,P <0.05),but

  19. Link between Primate Lentiviral Coreceptor Usage and Nef Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Schmökel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVsmm infection of sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys is characterized by stable CD4+ T cell counts despite high plasma levels of CCR5-tropic viruses. However, in rare instances, SIVsmm acquires CXCR4 coreceptor tropism and causes severe CD4+ T cell depletion, albeit without clinical signs of immunodeficiency. Here, we show that CXCR4-tropic SIVsmm strains lost their ability to downmodulate TCR-CD3 by evolving unusual Nef mutations that initially reduced (I132V and subsequently disrupted (I123L and L146F interaction with the CD3 ζ chain. This coevolution of Env and Nef function suggests that CD3 downmodulation is advantageous for viral replication in activated CCR5+ memory T cells, but not in resting naive CXCR4+ T cells that have not yet undergone TCR-CD3-mediated stimulation. This may explain why HIV-1, which generally lacks the CD3 downmodulation function, commonly switches to CXCR4 usage, whereas this is extremely rare for SIV strains that have retained this Nef activity.

  20. Dimerisation of the Drosophila odorant co-receptor Orco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha eMukunda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Odorant receptors (ORs detect volatile molecules and transform this external information into an intracellular signal. Insect ORs are heteromers composed of two seven transmembrane proteins, an odor-specific OrX and a coreceptor (Orco protein. These ORs form ligand gated cation channels that conduct also calcium. The sensitivity of the ORs is regulated by intracellular signaling cascades. Heterologously expressed Orco proteins form also non-selective cation channels that cannot be activated by odors but by synthetic agonists such as VUAA1. The stoichiometry of OR or Orco channels is unknown. In this study we engineered the simplest oligomeric construct, the Orco dimer (Orco di and investigated its functional properties. Two Orco proteins were coupled via a 1-transmembrane protein to grant for proper orientation of both parts. The Orco di construct and Orco wild type proteins were stably expressed in CHO (Chinese Hamster Ovary cells. Their functional properties were investigated and compared by performing calcium imaging and patch clamp experiments. With calcium imaging experiments using allosteric agonist VUAA1 we demonstrate that the Orco di construct - similar to Orco wt - forms functional calcium conducting ion channel. This was supported by patch clamp experiments. The function of Orco di was seen to be modulated by CaM in a similar manner as the function of Orco wt. In addition, Orco di interacts with the OrX protein, Or22a. The properties of this complex are comparable to Or22a/Orco wt couples. Taken together, the properties of the Orco di construct are similar to those of channels formed by Orco wt proteins. Our results are thus compatible with the view that Orco wt channels are dimeric assemblies.

  1. Structural descriptors of gp120 V3 loop for the prediction of HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Sander

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 cell entry commonly uses, in addition to CD4, one of the chemokine receptors CCR5 or CXCR4 as coreceptor. Knowledge of coreceptor usage is critical for monitoring disease progression as well as for supporting therapy with the novel drug class of coreceptor antagonists. Predictive methods for inferring coreceptor usage based on the third hypervariable (V3 loop region of the viral gene coding for the envelope protein gp120 can provide us with these monitoring facilities while avoiding expensive phenotypic tests. All simple heuristics (such as the 11/25 rule as well as statistical learning methods proposed to date predict coreceptor usage based on sequence features of the V3 loop exclusively. Here, we show, based on a recently resolved structure of gp120 with an untruncated V3 loop, that using structural information on the V3 loop in combination with sequence features of V3 variants improves prediction of coreceptor usage. In particular, we propose a distance-based descriptor of the spatial arrangement of physicochemical properties that increases discriminative performance. For a fixed specificity of 0.95, a sensitivity of 0.77 was achieved, improving further to 0.80 when combined with a sequence-based representation using amino acid indicators. This compares favorably with the sensitivities of 0.62 for the traditional 11/25 rule and 0.73 for a prediction based on sequence information as input to a support vector machine and constitutes a statistically significant improvement. A detailed analysis and interpretation of structural features important for classification shows the relevance of several specific hydrogen-bond donor sites and aliphatic side chains to coreceptor specificity towards CCR5 or CXCR4. Furthermore, an analysis of side chain orientation of the specificity-determining residues suggests a major role of one side of the V3 loop in the selection of the coreceptor. The proposed method constitutes the first approach to an improved

  2. Putative cholesterol-binding sites in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovsky, Mikhail A; Lee, Po-Hsien; Ott, Albrecht; Helms, Volkhard

    2013-04-01

    Using molecular docking, we identified a cholesterol-binding site in the groove between transmembrane helices 1 and 7 near the inner membrane-water interface of the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry into cells. In this docking pose, the amino group of lysine K67 establishes a hydrogen bond with the hydroxyl group of cholesterol, whereas tyrosine Y302 stacks with cholesterol by its aromatic side chain, and a number of residues form hydrophobic contacts with cholesterol. Sequence alignment showed that a similar putative cholesterol-binding site is also present in CCR5, another HIV coreceptor. We suggest that the interaction of cholesterol with these putative cholesterol-binding sites in CXCR4 and CCR5 is responsible for the presence of these receptors in lipid rafts, for the effect of cholesterol on their conformational stability and function, and for the role that cell cholesterol plays in the cell entry of HIV strains that use these membrane proteins as coreceptors. We propose that mutations of residues that are involved in cholesterol binding will make CXCR4 and CCR5 insensitive to membrane cholesterol content. Cholesterol-binding sites in HIV coreceptors are potential targets for steroid drugs that bind to CXCR4 and CCR5 with higher binding affinity than cholesterol, but do not stabilize the native conformation of these proteins.

  3. Stalk region of beta-chain enhances the coreceptor function of CD8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jenny S; Wang, Xiaosong; Witte, Torsten; Nie, Linghu; Carvou, Nicolas; Kern, Petra; Chang, Hsiu-Ching

    2003-07-15

    CD8 glycoproteins are expressed as either alphaalpha homodimers or alphabeta heterodimers on the surface of T cells. CD8alphabeta is a more efficient coreceptor than the CD8alphaalpha for peptide Ag recognition by TCR. Each CD8 subunit is composed of four structural domains, namely, Ig-like domain, stalk region, transmembrane region, and cytoplasmic domain. In an attempt to understand why CD8alphabeta is a better coreceptor than CD8alphaalpha, we engineered, expressed, and functionally tested a chimeric CD8alpha protein whose stalk region is replaced with that of CD8beta. We found that the beta stalk region enhances the coreceptor function of chimeric CD8alphaalpha to a level similar to that of CD8alphabeta. Surprisingly, the beta stalk region also restored functional activity to an inactive CD8alpha variant, carrying an Ala mutation at Arg(8) (R8A), to a level similar to that of wild-type CD8alphabeta. Using the R8A variant of CD8alpha, a panel of anti-CD8alpha Abs, and three MHC class I (MHCI) variants differing in key residues known to be involved in CD8alpha interaction, we show that the introduction of the CD8beta stalk leads to a different topology of the CD8alpha-MHCI complex without altering the overall structure of the Ig-like domain of CD8alpha or causing the MHCI to employ different residues to interact with the CD8alpha Ig domain. Our results show that the stalk region of CD8beta is capable of fine-tuning the coreceptor function of CD8 proteins as a coreceptor, possibly due to its distinct protein structure, smaller physical size and the unique glycan adducts associated with this region.

  4. The tight junction protein JAM-A functions as coreceptor for rotavirus entry into MA104 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M; Silva-Ayala, Daniela; Espinoza, Marco A; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-01-15

    Several molecules have been identified as receptors or coreceptors for rotavirus infection, including glycans, integrins, and hsc70. In this work we report that the tight junction proteins JAM-A, occludin, and ZO-1 play an important role during rotavirus entry into MA104 cells. JAM-A was found to function as coreceptor for rotavirus strains RRV, Wa, and UK, but not for rotavirus YM. Reassortant viruses derived from rotaviruses RRV and YM showed that the virus spike protein VP4 determines the use of JAM-A as coreceptor.

  5. High intrapatient HIV-1 evolutionary rate is associated with CCR5-to-CXCR4 coreceptor switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mild, Mattias; Gray, Rebecca R; Kvist, Anders; Lemey, Philippe; Goodenow, Maureen M; Fenyö, Eva Maria; Albert, Jan; Salemi, Marco; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Medstrand, Patrik

    2013-10-01

    In approximately 70% of individuals infected with HIV-1 subtype B, the virus switches coreceptor use from exclusively CCR5 use (R5 virus) to either inclusion of or exclusively CXCR4 use (X4 virus) during infection. This switch is associated with an accelerated loss of CD4(+) T-cells and a faster progression to AIDS. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms responsible for coreceptor switch remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated associations between viral evolutionary rate and selection pressure versus viral coreceptor use and rate of disease progression in eight patients with longitudinally sampled HIV-1 env V1-V3 sequences. By employing a Bayesian hierarchical phylogenetic model, we found that the HIV-1 evolutionary rate was more strongly associated with coreceptor switch than with rate of disease progression in terms of CD4(+)T-cell decline. Phylogenetic analyses showed that X4 variants evolved from R5 populations. In addition, coreceptor switch was associated with higher evolutionary rates on both the synonymous and non-synonymous substitution level, but not with dN/dS ratio rates. Our findings suggest that X4 viruses evolved from pre-existing R5 viral populations and that the evolution of coreceptor switch is governed by high replication rates rather than by selective pressure. Furthermore, the association of viral evolutionary rate was more strongly associated with coreceptor switch than disease progression. This adds to the understanding of the complex virus-host interplay that influences the evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1 coreceptor use.

  6. HIV-1 coreceptor usage prediction without multiple alignments: an application of string kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laviolette François

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infects cells by means of ligand-receptor interactions. This lentivirus uses the CD4 receptor in conjunction with a chemokine coreceptor, either CXCR4 or CCR5, to enter a target cell. HIV-1 is characterized by high sequence variability. Nonetheless, within this extensive variability, certain features must be conserved to define functions and phenotypes. The determination of coreceptor usage of HIV-1, from its protein envelope sequence, falls into a well-studied machine learning problem known as classification. The support vector machine (SVM, with string kernels, has proven to be very efficient for dealing with a wide class of classification problems ranging from text categorization to protein homology detection. In this paper, we investigate how the SVM can predict HIV-1 coreceptor usage when it is equipped with an appropriate string kernel. Results Three string kernels were compared. Accuracies of 96.35% (CCR5 94.80% (CXCR4 and 95.15% (CCR5 and CXCR4 were achieved with the SVM equipped with the distant segments kernel on a test set of 1425 examples with a classifier built on a training set of 1425 examples. Our datasets are built with Los Alamos National Laboratory HIV Databases sequences. A web server is available at http://genome.ulaval.ca/hiv-dskernel. Conclusion We examined string kernels that have been used successfully for protein homology detection and propose a new one that we call the distant segments kernel. We also show how to extract the most relevant features for HIV-1 coreceptor usage. The SVM with the distant segments kernel is currently the best method described.

  7. Identification of RL-TGR, a coreceptor involved in aversive chemical signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Staci P; Haack, Karla K V; Halstead-Nussloch, Gwyneth E; Bernard, Karen F; Hatt, Hanns; Kubanek, Julia; McCarty, Nael A

    2010-07-06

    Chemical signaling plays an important role in predator-prey interactions and feeding dynamics. Like other organisms that are sessile or slow moving, some marine sponges contain aversive compounds that defend these organisms from predation. We sought to identify and characterize a fish chemoreceptor that detects one of these compounds. Using expression cloning in Xenopus oocytes coexpressing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, the beta-2 adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR), and fractions of a zebrafish cDNA library, we isolated a cDNA clone encoding receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)-like triterpene glycoside receptor (RL-TGR), a novel coreceptor involved in signaling in response to triterpene glycosides. This coreceptor appears to be structurally and functionally related to RAMPs, a family of coreceptors that physically associate with and modify the activity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In membranes from formoside-responsive oocytes, RL-TGR was immunoprecipitated in an apparent complex with beta(2)AR. In HEK293 cells, coexpression of beta(2)AR induced the trafficking of RL-TGR from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. These results suggest that RL-TGR in the predatory fish physically associates with the beta(2)AR or another, more physiologically relevant GPCR and modifies its pharmacology to respond to triterpene glycosides found in sponges that serve as a potential food source for the fish. RL-TGR forms a coreceptor that responds to a chemical defense compound in the marine environment, and its discovery might lead the way to the identification of other receptors that mediate chemical defense signaling.

  8. Tyrosine-sulfated V2 peptides inhibit HIV-1 infection via coreceptor mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaello Cimbro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine sulfation is a post-translational modification that facilitates protein-protein interaction. Two sulfated tyrosines (Tys173 and Tys177 were recently identified within the second variable (V2 loop of the major HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, and shown to contribute to stabilizing the intramolecular interaction between V2 and the third variable (V3 loop. Here, we report that tyrosine-sulfated peptides derived from V2 act as structural and functional mimics of the CCR5 N-terminus and potently block HIV-1 infection. Nuclear magnetic and surface plasmon resonance analyses indicate that a tyrosine-sulfated V2 peptide (pV2α-Tys adopts a CCR5-like helical conformation and directly interacts with gp120 in a CD4-dependent fashion, competing with a CCR5 N-terminal peptide. Sulfated V2 mimics, but not their non-sulfated counterparts, inhibit HIV-1 entry and fusion by preventing coreceptor utilization, with the highly conserved C-terminal sulfotyrosine, Tys177, playing a dominant role. Unlike CCR5 N-terminal peptides, V2 mimics inhibit a broad range of HIV-1 strains irrespective of their coreceptor tropism, highlighting the overall structural conservation of the coreceptor-binding site in gp120. These results document the use of receptor mimicry by a retrovirus to occlude a key neutralization target site and provide leads for the design of therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  9. CD8: Adhesion Molecule, Co-Receptor and Immuno-Modulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David K Cole; George F Gao

    2004-01-01

    CD8 is a cell surface glycoprotein found in cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which are important components in cellular immunity, esp. In the immune response to cancer and chronic infections. There are two forms of CD8,either as an αα homodimer or αβ heterodimer. It acts as an "assistant" or co-receptor in the function of cytotoxic T cells where specific immunity is mediated by interaction of specific T cell receptor (αβTCR) and its ligand peptide major histocompatibility complex (pMHC). CD8 also binds to pMHC but away from the interface of pMHC and TCR contact, thereof no influence on the specificity of this interaction. If the TCR and CD8 bind to the same pMHC at the same time, CD8 is defined as a co-receptor, functioning through its signalling via its cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphorylation pathway; if CD8 binds to pMHC independently of the TCR, it is defined as an adhesion molecule. At present, the co-receptor function theory is dominated in the field.Recent study has also shown that murine CD8αα binds to TL antigen, an MHC homologue, therefore acts as an immuno-modulator. In this review, we discuss these current understandings of the three aspects of the CD8 functions and their structural basis.

  10. CD8: Adhesion Molecule, Co-Receptor and Immuno-Modulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DavidKCole; GeorgeFGao

    2004-01-01

    CD8 is a cell surface glycoprotein found in cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which are important components in cellular immunity, esp. in the immune response to cancer and chronic infections. There are two forms of CD8, either as an αα homodimer or αβ heterodimer. It acts as an "assistant" or co-receptor in the function of cytotoxic T cells where specific immunity is mediated by interaction of specific T cell receptor (αβTCR) and its ligand peptide major histocompatibility complex (pMHC). CD8 also binds to pMHC but away from the interface of pMHC and TCR contact, thereof no influence on the specificity of this interaction. If the TCR and CD8 bind to the same pMHC at the same time, CD8 is defined as a co-receptor, functioning through its signalling via its cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphorylation pathway; if CD8 binds to pMHC independently of the TCR, it is defined as an adhesion molecule. At present, the co-receptor function theory is dominated in the field. Recent study has also shown that murine CD8αα binds to TL antigen, an MHC homologue, therefore acts as an immuno-modulator. In this review, we discuss these current understandings of the three aspects of the CD8 functions and their structural basis. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):81-88.

  11. Hepatitis C virus has a genetically determined lymphotropism through co-receptor B7.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Lin; Huang, Jeffrey Y.; Wang, Chun-Hsiang; Tahara, Stanley M; Zhou, Lin; Kondo, Yasuteru; Schechter, Joel; Su, Lishan; Lai, Michael M C.; Wakita, Takaji; Cosset, François-Loïc; Jung, Jae U; Machida, Keigo

    2017-01-01

    B-cell infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been a controversial topic. To examine whether HCV has a genetically determined lymphotropism through a co-receptor specific for the infection by lymphotropic HCV, we established an infectious clone and chimeric virus of hepatotropic and lymphotropic HCV strains derived from an HCV-positive B-cell lymphoma. The viral envelope and 5′-UTR sequences of the lymphotropic HCV strain were responsible for the lymphotropism. Silencing of the virus sensor, RIGI, or overexpression of microRNA-122 promoted persistent viral replication in B cells. By cDNA library screening, we identified an immune cell-specific, co-stimulatory receptor B7.2 (CD86) as a co-receptor of lymphotropic HCV. Infection of B cells by HCV inhibited the recall reaction to antigen stimulation. Together, a co-receptor B7.2 enabled lymphotropic HCV to infect memory B cells, leading to inhibition of memory B-cell function and persistent HCV infection in HCV-infected hosts. PMID:28067225

  12. A novel approach to block HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4 in non-toxic manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Zhou, Jieqiong; Pan, Ji-An; Mabiala, Prudence; Guo, Deyin

    2014-10-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is one of the major coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and considered as an important therapeutic target. Knockdown of CXCR4 by RNA interference has emerged as a promising strategy for combating HIV-1 infection. However, there is a potential drawback to this strategy as undesired side effects may occur due to the loss of natural function of CXCR4. In this study, we developed a novel approach using a single lentiviral vector to express simultaneously CXCR4 dual-shRNAs and an shRNA-resistant CXCR4 mutant possessing the most possible natural functions of CXCR4 and reduced HIV-1 coreceptor activity. Via this approach we achieved the replacement of endogenous CXCR4 by CXCR4 mutant P191A that could compensate the functional loss of endogenous CXCR4 and significant reduction of HIV-1 replication by 59.2 %. Besides, we demonstrated that construction of recombinant lentiviral vector using 2A peptide-based strategy has significant advantages over using additional promoter-based strategy, including increase of lentivirus titer and avoidance of promoter competition. Therefore, the novel approach to block HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4 without impairing its normal function provides a new strategy for CXCR4-targeted therapeutics for HIV-1 infection and potential universal applications to knock down a cellular protein in non-toxic manner.

  13. Chemical Growth Processes in Titan's Atmosphere: Theoretical Rates and Product Distributions for Reactions between C2H and R1R2C=CR3R4 Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, D. E.; Park, J.-Y.

    2004-11-01

    The ethynyl radical (C2H) can attack unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds with no activation barrier, making such reactions very favorable under the low temperature and pressure conditions in Titan's upper atmosphere, where tholin production generates the satellite's distinctive haze layers. We have used density functional theory to characterize reactions between C2H and R1R2C=CR3R4 species ranging from ethylene to tetramethyl ethylene. Outcomes include multi-channel addition-elimination reactions and H abstraction. We will discuss trends in the reaction rates and product distributions as a function of temperature and pressure. Support for this work by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres program (grant NAG5-12305) is gratefully acknowledged.

  14. The amino-terminal domain of the CCR2 chemokine receptor acts as coreceptor for HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The chemokines are a homologous serum protein family characterized by their ability to induce activation of integrin adhesion molecules and leukocyte migration. Chemokines interact with their receptors, which are composed of a single-chain, seven-helix, membrane-spanning protein coupled to G proteins. Two CC chemokine receptors, CCR3 and CCR5, as well as the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, have been shown necessary for infection by several HIV-1 virus isolates. We studied the effect of the chemokin...

  15. Analysis of physicochemical and structural properties determining HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bozek

    Full Text Available The relationship of HIV tropism with disease progression and the recent development of CCR5-blocking drugs underscore the importance of monitoring virus coreceptor usage. As an alternative to costly phenotypic assays, computational methods aim at predicting virus tropism based on the sequence and structure of the V3 loop of the virus gp120 protein. Here we present a numerical descriptor of the V3 loop encoding its physicochemical and structural properties. The descriptor allows for structure-based prediction of HIV tropism and identification of properties of the V3 loop that are crucial for coreceptor usage. Use of the proposed descriptor for prediction results in a statistically significant improvement over the prediction based solely on V3 sequence with 3 percentage points improvement in AUC and 7 percentage points in sensitivity at the specificity of the 11/25 rule (95%. We additionally assessed the predictive power of the new method on clinically derived 'bulk' sequence data and obtained a statistically significant improvement in AUC of 3 percentage points over sequence-based prediction. Furthermore, we demonstrated the capacity of our method to predict therapy outcome by applying it to 53 samples from patients undergoing Maraviroc therapy. The analysis of structural features of the loop informative of tropism indicates the importance of two loop regions and their physicochemical properties. The regions are located on opposite strands of the loop stem and the respective features are predominantly charge-, hydrophobicity- and structure-related. These regions are in close proximity in the bound conformation of the loop potentially forming a site determinant for the coreceptor binding. The method is available via server under http://structure.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de/.

  16. Use of four next-generation sequencing platforms to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, John; Weber, Jan; Henry, Kenneth; Winner, Dane; Gibson, Richard; Lee, Lawrence; Paxinos, Ellen; Arts, Eric J; Robertson, David L; Mimms, Larry; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 coreceptor tropism assays are required to rule out the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5) viruses prior treatment with CCR5 antagonists. Phenotypic (e.g., Trofile™, Monogram Biosciences) and genotypic (e.g., population sequencing linked to bioinformatic algorithms) assays are the most widely used. Although several next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are available, to date all published deep sequencing HIV-1 tropism studies have used the 454™ Life Sciences/Roche platform. In this study, HIV-1 co-receptor usage was predicted for twelve patients scheduled to start a maraviroc-based antiretroviral regimen. The V3 region of the HIV-1 env gene was sequenced using four NGS platforms: 454™, PacBio® RS (Pacific Biosciences), Illumina®, and Ion Torrent™ (Life Technologies). Cross-platform variation was evaluated, including number of reads, read length and error rates. HIV-1 tropism was inferred using Geno2Pheno, Web PSSM, and the 11/24/25 rule and compared with Trofile™ and virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. Error rates related to insertions/deletions (indels) and nucleotide substitutions introduced by the four NGS platforms were low compared to the actual HIV-1 sequence variation. Each platform detected all major virus variants within the HIV-1 population with similar frequencies. Identification of non-R5 viruses was comparable among the four platforms, with minor differences attributable to the algorithms used to infer HIV-1 tropism. All NGS platforms showed similar concordance with virologic response to the maraviroc-based regimen (75% to 80% range depending on the algorithm used), compared to Trofile (80%) and population sequencing (70%). In conclusion, all four NGS platforms were able to detect minority non-R5 variants at comparable levels suggesting that any NGS-based method can be used to predict HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

  17. Use of four next-generation sequencing platforms to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Archer

    Full Text Available HIV-1 coreceptor tropism assays are required to rule out the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5 viruses prior treatment with CCR5 antagonists. Phenotypic (e.g., Trofile™, Monogram Biosciences and genotypic (e.g., population sequencing linked to bioinformatic algorithms assays are the most widely used. Although several next-generation sequencing (NGS platforms are available, to date all published deep sequencing HIV-1 tropism studies have used the 454™ Life Sciences/Roche platform. In this study, HIV-1 co-receptor usage was predicted for twelve patients scheduled to start a maraviroc-based antiretroviral regimen. The V3 region of the HIV-1 env gene was sequenced using four NGS platforms: 454™, PacBio® RS (Pacific Biosciences, Illumina®, and Ion Torrent™ (Life Technologies. Cross-platform variation was evaluated, including number of reads, read length and error rates. HIV-1 tropism was inferred using Geno2Pheno, Web PSSM, and the 11/24/25 rule and compared with Trofile™ and virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. Error rates related to insertions/deletions (indels and nucleotide substitutions introduced by the four NGS platforms were low compared to the actual HIV-1 sequence variation. Each platform detected all major virus variants within the HIV-1 population with similar frequencies. Identification of non-R5 viruses was comparable among the four platforms, with minor differences attributable to the algorithms used to infer HIV-1 tropism. All NGS platforms showed similar concordance with virologic response to the maraviroc-based regimen (75% to 80% range depending on the algorithm used, compared to Trofile (80% and population sequencing (70%. In conclusion, all four NGS platforms were able to detect minority non-R5 variants at comparable levels suggesting that any NGS-based method can be used to predict HIV-1 coreceptor usage.

  18. Bioinformatics Analysis of the FREM1 Gene—Evolutionary Development of the IL-1R1 Co-Receptor, TILRR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva E. Qwarnstrom

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The TLRs and IL-1 receptors have evolved to coordinate the innate immune response following pathogen invasion. Receptors and signalling intermediates of these systems are generally characterised by a high level of evolutionary conservation. The recently described IL-1R1 co-receptor TILRR is a transcriptional variant of the FREM1 gene. Here we investigate whether innate co-receptor differences between teleosts and mammals extend to the expression of the TILRR isoform of FREM1. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic approaches were used to analyse the genome sequences of FREM1 from eukaryotic organisms including 37 tetrapods and five teleost fish. The TILRR consensus peptide sequence was present in the FREM1 gene of the tetrapods, but not in fish orthologs of FREM1, and neither FREM1 nor TILRR were present in invertebrates. The TILRR gene appears to have arisen via incorporation of adjacent non-coding DNA with a contiguous exonic sequence after the teleost divergence. Comparing co-receptors in other systems, points to their origin during the same stages of evolution. Our results show that modern teleost fish do not possess the IL-1RI co-receptor TILRR, but that this is maintained in tetrapods as early as amphibians. Further, they are consistent with data showing that co-receptors are recent additions to these regulatory systems and suggest this may underlie differences in innate immune responses between mammals and fish.

  19. Covariance of charged amino acids at positions 322 and 440 of HIV-1 Env contributes to coreceptor specificity of subtype B viruses, and can be used to improve the performance of V3 sequence-based coreceptor usage prediction algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran Cashin

    Full Text Available The ability to determine coreceptor usage of patient-derived human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strains is clinically important, particularly for the administration of the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc. The envelope glycoprotein (Env determinants of coreceptor specificity lie primarily within the gp120 V3 loop region, although other Env determinants have been shown to influence gp120-coreceptor interactions. Here, we determined whether conserved amino acid alterations outside the V3 loop that contribute to coreceptor usage exist, and whether these alterations improve the performance of V3 sequence-based coreceptor usage prediction algorithms. We demonstrate a significant covariant association between charged amino acids at position 322 in V3 and position 440 in the C4 Env region that contributes to the specificity of HIV-1 subtype B strains for CCR5 or CXCR4. Specifically, positively charged Lys/Arg at position 322 and negatively charged Asp/Glu at position 440 occurred more frequently in CXCR4-using viruses, whereas negatively charged Asp/Glu at position 322 and positively charged Arg at position 440 occurred more frequently in R5 strains. In the context of CD4-bound gp120, structural models suggest that covariation of amino acids at Env positions 322 and 440 has the potential to alter electrostatic interactions that are formed between gp120 and charged amino acids in the CCR5 N-terminus. We further demonstrate that inclusion of a "440 rule" can improve the sensitivity of several V3 sequence-based genotypic algorithms for predicting coreceptor usage of subtype B HIV-1 strains, without compromising specificity, and significantly improves the AUROC of the geno2pheno algorithm when set to its recommended false positive rate of 5.75%. Together, our results provide further mechanistic insights into the intra-molecular interactions within Env that contribute to coreceptor specificity of subtype B HIV-1 strains, and demonstrate that incorporation

  20. B cell recognition of the conserved HIV-1 co-receptor binding site is altered by endogenous primate CD4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias N E Forsell

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The surface HIV-1 exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds to CD4 on the target cell surface to induce the co-receptor binding site on gp120 as the initial step in the entry process. The binding site is comprised of a highly conserved region on the gp120 core, as well as elements of the third variable region (V3. Antibodies against the co-receptor binding site are abundantly elicited during natural infection of humans, but the mechanism of elicitation has remained undefined. In this study, we investigate the requirements for elicitation of co-receptor binding site antibodies by inoculating rabbits, monkeys and human-CD4 transgenic (huCD4 rabbits with envelope glycoprotein (Env trimers possessing high affinity for primate CD4. A cross-species comparison of the antibody responses showed that similar HIV-1 neutralization breadth was elicited by Env trimers in monkeys relative to wild-type (WT rabbits. In contrast, antibodies against the co-receptor site on gp120 were elicited only in monkeys and huCD4 rabbits, but not in the WT rabbits. This was supported by the detection of high-titer co-receptor antibodies in all sera from a set derived from human volunteers inoculated with recombinant gp120. These findings strongly suggest that complexes between Env and (high-affinity primate CD4 formed in vivo are responsible for the elicitation of the co-receptor-site-directed antibodies. They also imply that the naïve B cell receptor repertoire does not recognize the gp120 co-receptor site in the absence of CD4 and illustrate that conformational stabilization, imparted by primary receptor interaction, can alter the immunogenicity of a type 1 viral membrane protein.

  1. B cell recognition of the conserved HIV-1 co-receptor binding site is altered by endogenous primate CD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsell, Mattias N E; Dey, Barna; Mörner, Andreas; Svehla, Krisha; O'dell, Sijy; Högerkorp, Carl-Magnus; Voss, Gerald; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Shaw, George M; Mascola, John R; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Wyatt, Richard T

    2008-10-03

    The surface HIV-1 exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds to CD4 on the target cell surface to induce the co-receptor binding site on gp120 as the initial step in the entry process. The binding site is comprised of a highly conserved region on the gp120 core, as well as elements of the third variable region (V3). Antibodies against the co-receptor binding site are abundantly elicited during natural infection of humans, but the mechanism of elicitation has remained undefined. In this study, we investigate the requirements for elicitation of co-receptor binding site antibodies by inoculating rabbits, monkeys and human-CD4 transgenic (huCD4) rabbits with envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers possessing high affinity for primate CD4. A cross-species comparison of the antibody responses showed that similar HIV-1 neutralization breadth was elicited by Env trimers in monkeys relative to wild-type (WT) rabbits. In contrast, antibodies against the co-receptor site on gp120 were elicited only in monkeys and huCD4 rabbits, but not in the WT rabbits. This was supported by the detection of high-titer co-receptor antibodies in all sera from a set derived from human volunteers inoculated with recombinant gp120. These findings strongly suggest that complexes between Env and (high-affinity) primate CD4 formed in vivo are responsible for the elicitation of the co-receptor-site-directed antibodies. They also imply that the naïve B cell receptor repertoire does not recognize the gp120 co-receptor site in the absence of CD4 and illustrate that conformational stabilization, imparted by primary receptor interaction, can alter the immunogenicity of a type 1 viral membrane protein.

  2. A Shh coreceptor Cdo is required for efficient cardiomyogenesis of pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Myong-Ho; Leem, Young-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Kang, Kyungjin; Cho, Hana; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2016-04-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling plays an important role for early heart development, such as heart looping and cardiomyogenesis of pluripotent stem cells. A multifunctional receptor Cdo functions as a Shh coreceptor together with Boc and Gas1 to activate Shh signaling and these coreceptors seem to play compensatory roles in early heart development. Thus in this study, we examined the role of Cdo in cardiomyogenesis by utilizing an in vitro differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Here we show that Cdo is required for efficient cardiomyogenesis of pluripotent stem cells by activation of Shh signaling. Cdo is induced concurrently with Shh signaling activation upon induction of cardiomyogenesis of P19 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells. Cdo-depleted P19 EC and Cdo(-/-) mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells display decreased expression of key cardiac regulators, including Gata4, Nkx2.5 and Mef2c and this decrease coincides with reduced Shh signaling activities. Furthermore Cdo deficiency causes a stark reduction in formation of mature contractile cardiomyocytes. This defect in cardiomyogenesis is overcome by reactivation of Shh signaling at the early specification stage of cardiomyogenesis. The Shh agonist treatment restores differentiation capacities of Cdo-deficient ES cells into contractile cardiomyocytes by recovering both the expression of early cardiac regulators and structural genes such as cardiac troponin T and Connexin 43. Therefore Cdo is required for efficient cardiomyogenesis of pluripotent stem cells and an excellent target to improve the differentiation potential of stem cells for generation of transplantable cells to treat cardiomyopathies.

  3. Performance comparison of next-generation sequencing platforms for determining HIV-1 coreceptor use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Stéphanie; Nicot, Florence; Jeanne, Nicolas; Delfour, Olivier; Carcenac, Romain; Lefebvre, Caroline; Cazabat, Michelle; Sauné, Karine; Delobel, Pierre; Izopet, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    The coreceptor used by HIV-1 must be determined before a CCR5 antagonist, part of the arsenal of antiretroviral drugs, is prescribed because viruses that enter cells using the CXCR4 coreceptor are responsible for treatment failure. HIV-1 tropism is also correlated with disease progression and so must be determined for virological studies. Tropism can be determined by next-generation sequencing (NGS), but not all of these new technologies have been fully validated for use in clinical practice. The Illumina NGS technology is used in many laboratories but its ability to predict HIV-1 tropism has not been evaluated while the 454 GS-Junior (Roche) is used for routine diagnosis. The genotypic prediction of HIV-1 tropism is based on sequencing the V3 region and interpreting the results with an appropriate algorithm. We compared the performances of the MiSeq (Illumina) and 454 GS-Junior (Roche) systems with a reference phenotypic assay. We used clinical samples for the NGS tropism predictions and assessed their ability to quantify CXCR4-using variants. The data show that the Illumina platform can be used to detect minor CXCR4-using variants in clinical practice but technical optimization are needed to improve quantification. PMID:28186189

  4. Anti-coreceptor therapy drives selective T cell egress by suppressing inflammation-dependent chemotactic cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Aaron J.; Clark, Matthew; Gojanovich, Gregory; Manzoor, Fatima; Miller, Keith; Kline, Douglas E.; Morillon, Y. Maurice; Wang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    There continues to be a need for immunotherapies to treat type 1 diabetes in the clinic. We previously reported that nondepleting anti-CD4 and -CD8 Ab treatment effectively reverses diabetes in new-onset NOD mice. A key feature of the induction of remission is the egress of the majority of islet-resident T cells. How this occurs is undefined. Herein, the effects of coreceptor therapy on islet T cell retention were investigated. Bivalent Ab binding to CD4 and CD8 blocked TCR signaling and T cell cytokine production, while indirectly downregulating islet chemokine expression. These processes were required for T cell retention, as ectopic IFN-γ or CXCL10 inhibited Ab-mediated T cell purging. Importantly, treatment of humanized mice with nondepleting anti–human CD4 and CD8 Ab similarly reduced tissue-infiltrating human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These findings demonstrate that Ab binding of CD4 and CD8 interrupts a feed-forward circuit by suppressing T cell–produced cytokines needed for expression of chemotactic cues, leading to rapid T cell egress from the islets. Coreceptor therapy therefore offers a robust approach to suppress T cell–mediated pathology by purging T cells in an inflammation-dependent manner.

  5. CCR5, GPR15, and CXCR6 are major coreceptors of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 variants isolated from individuals with and without plasma viremia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Blaak (Hetty); P.H.M. Boers (Patrick); R.A. Gruters (Rob); H. Schuitemaker; M.E. van der Ende (Marchina); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractHuman immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) is generally considered capable of using a broad range of coreceptors. Since HIV-2 variants from individuals with nonprogressive infection were not studied previously, the possibility that broad coreceptor usage is a property of variants associ

  6. R5 to X4 coreceptor switch of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 B' and B'/C recombinant subtype isolates in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yan-fang; ZHANG Xiao-yan; RUAN Yu-hua; ZHANG Yao-xin; SHAO Yi-ming; MA Li-ying; YUAN Lin; WANG Shu-hua; SUN Jian-ping; XU Wei-si; Xu Jian-qing; XING Hui; HONG Kun-xue

    2007-01-01

    @@ The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 play an important role as coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entring into cells.HIV-1 isolates can be distinguished by the chemokine coreceptors. Nonsyncytium inducing (NSI), macrophage tropic viruses utilizing CCR5, are called R5 viruses;syncytium inducing (SI) isolates use CXCR4 and known as X4 viruses.

  7. Expression and significance of chemokine receptors CXCR3, CCR5 and CCR3 in the spleen tissues of rats with cirrhosis and hypersplenism%趋化因子受体蛋白CXCR3、CCR5和CCR3在肝硬化脾功能亢进大鼠脾脏组织中的表达及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎业娟; 吕云福

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expressions of T helper cell 1 (Th1)-associated chemokine receptors CXCR3, CCR5 and T helper cell 2 (Th2)-associated chemokine receptor CCR3 in the spleen tissues of rats with cirrhosis and hypersplenism and probe into the balance between Th1/Th2 lymphocyte subsets.Methods Experimental study was adopted.Forty-six male SD rats were randomized into the hypersplenic group (n =36) and the control group (n =10).In the hypersplenic group, the rats were fed with 40% CCl4 peanut oil solution (3.0 mL/kg, twice per week) and 15% white spirit for 8 weeks to build the hypersplenic model.The rats in the control group received normal feeding.The animal models with cirrhosis and hypersplenism were confirmed by liver function test, routine blood test, HE staining and Masson staining after visual inspection.The expressions of chemokine receptors of CXCR3, CCR5 and CCR3 were detected by immunohistochemical staining and Western blot.Measurement data with normal distribution were presented as x ± s.Comparison between groups was done using the independent sample t test.Results Results of visual inspection: the rats in the hypersplenic group suffered from severe hair-shedding, metal fatigue and inappetence, with hair dimming and inactivity.There were rats dead successively 5 weeks after model establishment and 19 rats finally survived.The rats in the control group had color and gloss hair, with good appetite and spirits.They were active and sensitive to external stimulation.Changes of pathological morphology in liver: in the hypersplenic group, the fibers became denser and disordered, making normal structure of liver tissues destroyed.The hepatic lobules separated by fibrous bundle and proliferative hepatic cell mass were segmented and surrounded by thick fibrous,leading to the formation of pseudolobule.Disorganized hepatocytes suffused adipocytes, the nucleus of heterocysts enlarged or even multinucleated cells appeared.There was no change in the

  8. Do human polyoma viruses and human immunodeficiency virus share common co-receptors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borissov, Kalin; Tsekov, Iliya; Gavazova, Rayna; Kalvatchev, Zlatko; Argirova, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Host and/or viral factors involved in human polyomavirus (HPoV) infection in persons living with HIV remain unknown. A hypothesis is outlined suggesting the importance of the co-receptors CCR5, CCR2, and CXCR4 not only for HIV, but also for HPoV. Functionally capable receptors coded by wild-type (wt) genotypes could facilitate internalization of HPoV in the cell resulting in brain and/or kidney infection/s in HIV infected individuals. Forty-nine Bulgarians with HIV, all treated by HAART, without neurological and/or kidney disorders, were tested for JCV and BKV and genotyped for CCR5 (CCR5del32), CCR2 (CCR2-64I), and CXCR4 (SDF1-3'A). In 27/49 (55.1%) individuals a co-infection with HPoV was identified-BKV in 12/49 (24.5%), JCV-in another 12/49 (24.5%), and both viruses-in 3/49 (6.1%). A high frequency of wt CCR5 was found in patients with HPoV (91.7% for BKV and JCV and in 100% with both viruses). V/V of CCR2 was presented in 75% for BKV and JCV and in 66.7% for BKV plus JCV. SDF1-3'G/G predominated in JCV infected patients (75%), while G/A and A/A genotypes were more frequent in patients with BKV (41.7%). Also, 21/22 (95.4%) persons without HPoV infection were heterozygous for SDF1 and CCR2. The number of individuals bearing wt of all co-receptors in the group of persons not infected with HPoV was lower (P = 0.03) than that with polymorphism/s in one or two genes (SDF1 and CCR2) in the same group. The results suggest a probable role of co-receptors used by HIV to facilitate infection with HPoV.

  9. Appraising the performance of genotyping tools in the prediction of coreceptor tropism in HIV-1 subtype C viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crous Saleema

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection, transmitted viruses generally use the CCR5 chemokine receptor as a coreceptor for host cell entry. In more than 50% of subtype B infections, a switch in coreceptor tropism from CCR5- to CXCR4-use occurs during disease progression. Phenotypic or genotypic approaches can be used to test for the presence of CXCR4-using viral variants in an individual’s viral population that would result in resistance to treatment with CCR5-antagonists. While genotyping approaches for coreceptor-tropism prediction in subtype B are well established and verified, they are less so for subtype C. Methods Here, using a dataset comprising V3 loop sequences from 349 CCR5-using and 56 CXCR4-using HIV-1 subtype C viruses we perform a comparative analysis of the predictive ability of 11 genotypic algorithms in their prediction of coreceptor tropism in subtype C. We calculate the sensitivity and specificity of each of the approaches as well as determining their overall accuracy. By separating the CXCR4-using viruses into CXCR4-exclusive (25 sequences and dual-tropic (31 sequences we evaluate the effect of the possible conflicting signal from dual-tropic viruses on the ability of a of the approaches to correctly predict coreceptor phenotype. Results We determined that geno2pheno with a false positive rate of 5% is the best approach for predicting CXCR4-usage in subtype C sequences with an accuracy of 94% (89% sensitivity and 99% specificity. Contrary to what has been reported for subtype B, the optimal approaches for prediction of CXCR4-usage in sequence from viruses that use CXCR4 exclusively, also perform best at predicting CXCR4-use in dual-tropic viral variants. Conclusions The accuracy of genotyping approaches at correctly predicting the coreceptor usage of V3 sequences from subtype C viruses is very high. We suggest that genotyping approaches can be used to test for coreceptor tropism in HIV-1

  10. Transmembrane protein aptamers that inhibit CCR5 expression and HIV coreceptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheideman, Elizabeth H; Marlatt, Sara A; Xie, Yanhua; Hu, Yani; Sutton, Richard E; DiMaio, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    We have exploited the ability of transmembrane domains to engage in highly specific protein-protein interactions to construct a new class of small proteins that inhibit HIV infection. By screening a library encoding hundreds of thousands of artificial transmembrane proteins with randomized transmembrane domains (termed "traptamers," for transmembrane aptamers), we isolated six 44- or 45-amino-acid proteins with completely different transmembrane sequences that inhibited cell surface and total expression of the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The traptamers inhibited transduction of human T cells by HIV reporter viruses pseudotyped with R5-tropic gp120 envelope proteins but had minimal effects on reporter viruses with X4-tropic gp120. Optimization of two traptamers significantly increased their activity and resulted in greater than 95% inhibition of R5-tropic reporter virus transduction without inhibiting expression of CD4, the primary HIV receptor, or CXCR4, another HIV coreceptor. In addition, traptamers inhibited transduction mediated by a mutant R5-tropic gp120 protein resistant to maraviroc, a small-molecule CCR5 inhibitor, and they dramatically inhibited replication of an R5-tropic laboratory strain of HIV in a multicycle infection assay. Genetic experiments suggested that the active traptamers specifically interacted with the transmembrane domains of CCR5 and that some of the traptamers interacted with different portions of CCR5. Thus, we have constructed multiple proteins not found in nature that interfere with CCR5 expression and inhibit HIV infection. These proteins may be valuable tools to probe the organization of the transmembrane domains of CCR5 and their relationship to its biological activities, and they may serve as starting points to develop new strategies to inhibit HIV infection.

  11. C-terminal tail of FGF19 determines its specificity toward Klotho co-receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinle; Lemon, Bryan; Li, XiaoFan; Gupte, Jamila; Weiszmann, Jennifer; Stevens, Jennitte; Hawkins, Nessa; Shen, Wenyan; Lindberg, Richard; Chen, Jin-Long; Tian, Hui; Li, Yang

    2008-11-28

    FGF19 subfamily proteins (FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23) are unique members of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) that regulate energy, bile acid, glucose, lipid, phosphate, and vitamin D homeostasis in an endocrine fashion. Their activities require the presence of alpha or betaKlotho, two related single-pass transmembrane proteins, as co-receptors in relevant target tissues. We previously showed that FGF19 can bind to both alpha and betaKlotho, whereas FGF21 and FGF23 can bind only to either betaKlotho or alphaKlotho, respectively in vitro. To determine the mechanism regulating the binding and specificity among FGF19 subfamily members to Klotho family proteins, chimeric proteins between FGF19 subfamily members or chimeric proteins between Klotho family members were constructed to probe the interaction between those two families. Our results showed that a chimera of FGF19 with the FGF21 C-terminal tail interacts only with betaKlotho and a chimera with the FGF23 C-terminal tail interacts only with alphaKlotho. FGF signaling assays also reflected the change of specificity we observed for the chimeras. These results identified the C-terminal tail of FGF19 as a region necessary for its recognition of Klotho family proteins. In addition, chimeras between alpha and betaKlotho were also generated to probe the regions in Klotho proteins that are important for signaling by this FGF subfamily. Both FGF23 and FGF21 require intact alpha or betaKlotho for signaling, respectively, whereas FGF19 can signal through a Klotho chimera consisting of the N terminus of alphaKlotho and the C terminus of betaKlotho. Our results provide the first glimpse of the regions that regulate the binding specificity between this unique family of FGFs and their co-receptors.

  12. Complex positive selection pressures drive the evolution of HIV-1 with different co-receptor tropisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 co-receptor tropism is central for understanding the transmission and pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. We performed a genome-wide comparison between the adaptive evolution of R5 and X4 variants from HIV-1 subtypes B and C. The results showed that R5 and X4 variants experienced differential evolutionary patterns and different HIV-1 genes encountered various positive selection pressures, suggesting that complex selection pressures are driving HIV-1 evolution. Compared with other hypervariable regions of Gp120, significantly more positively selected sites were detected in the V3 region of subtype B X4 variants, V2 region of subtype B R5 variants, and V1 and V4 regions of subtype C X4 variants, indicating an association of positive selection with co-receptor recognition/binding. Intriguingly, a significantly higher proportion (33.3% and 55.6%, P<0.05) of positively selected sites were identified in the C3 region than other conserved regions of Gp120 in all the analyzed HIV-1 variants, indicating that the C3 region might be more important to HIV-1 adaptation than previously thought. Approximately half of the positively selected sites identified in the env gene were identical between R5 and X4 variants. There were three common positively selected sites (96, 113 and 281) identified in Gp41 of all X4 and R5 variants from subtypes B and C. These sites might not only suggest a functional importance in viral survival and adaptation, but also imply a potential cross-immunogenicity between HIV-1 R5 and X4 variants, which has important implications for AIDS vaccine development.

  13. Chemokines in the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad D

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In last few years, focus has shifted from cytokines which have pleiotropic biologic properties to chemokines with target cell selective activity. The separation has led frequently espoused proposition that chemokines are involved in the pathogenesis of disease having specific infiltrates and point to possible role in Chronic skin diseases. Depending upon the structure these chemokines are divided into three subfamilies, two major subfamilies: CXC and CC, and one putative subfamily C with only one member known as lymphotactin. A recent insight into chemokine physiology comes from demonstration of interaction between chemokines and their cloned receptors. These chemokine receptors are members of the transmembrane spanning (7-TMS, G-protein- coupled receptor family. So far CXC chemokine receptors and seven CC receptors have been cloned. Recently, the importance of selective chemoattractant activity of chemokines has been overshadowed by chemokine receptors emerging as new targets for anti-HIV therapy as the connection between chemokines and HIV-I had been established. Among the CXC chemokine receptors, CXCR4, and among the CC chemokines receptors, CCRI, CCR2b, CCR3, and CCR5 have been implicated as HIV-1 coreceptors.

  14. A formylpeptide receptor, FPRL1, acts as an efficient coreceptor for primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apichartpiyakul Chatchawann

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 10 members of seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs have been shown to work as coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, HIV type 2 (HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs. As a common feature of HIV/SIV coreceptors, tyrosine residues are present with asparagines, aspartic acids or glutamic acids in the amino-terminal extracellular regions (NTRs. We noticed that a receptor for N-formylpeptides, FPRL1, also contains two tyrosine residues accompanied by glutamic acids in its NTR. It was reported that monocytes expressing CCR5 and FPRL1 in addition to CD4 are activated by treatment with ligands or agonists of FPRL1. Activated monocytes down-modulate CCR5 and become resistant to infection by HIV-1 strains. Thus, FPRL1 plays important roles in protection of monocyptes against HIV-1 infection. However, its own coreceptor activity has not been elucidated yet. In this study, we examined coreceptor activities of FPRL1 for HIV/SIV strains including primary HIV-1 isolates. Results A CD4-transduced human glioma cell line, NP-2/CD4, is strictly resistant to HIV/SIV infection. We have reported that when NP-2/CD4 cells are transduced with a GPCR having coreceptor activity, the cells become susceptible to HIV/SIV strains. When NP-2/CD4 cells were transduced with FPRL1, the resultant NP-2/CD4/FPRL1 cells became markedly susceptible to some laboratory-adapted HIV/SIV strains. We found that FPRL1 is also efficiently used as a coreceptor by primary HIV-1 isolates as well as CCR5 or CXCR4. Amino acid sequences linked to the FPRL1 use could not be detected in the V3 loop of the HIV-1 Env protein. Coreceptor activities of FPRL1 were partially blocked by the forymyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF peptide. Conclusion We conclude that FPRL1 is a novel and efficient coreceptor for HIV/SIV strains. FPRL1 works as a bifunctional factor in HIV-1 infection. Namely, the role of FPRL1 in HIV-1 infection is protective

  15. Functional Mimetics of the HIV-1 CCR5 Co-Receptor Displayed on the Surface of Magnetic Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmina, Alona; Vaknin, Karin; Gdalevsky, Garik; Vyazmensky, Maria; Marks, Robert S; Taube, Ran; Engel, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine G protein coupled receptors, principally CCR5 or CXCR4, function as co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells. Initial binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 subunit to the host CD4 receptor induces a cascade of structural conformational changes that lead to the formation of a high-affinity co-receptor-binding site on gp120. Interaction between gp120 and the co-receptor leads to the exposure of epitopes on the viral gp41 that mediates fusion between viral and cell membranes. Soluble CD4 (sCD4) mimetics can act as an activation-based inhibitor of HIV-1 entry in vitro, as it induces similar structural changes in gp120, leading to increased virus infectivity in the short term but to virus Env inactivation in the long term. Despite promising clinical implications, sCD4 displays low efficiency in vivo, and in multiple HIV strains, it does not inhibit viral infection. This has been attributed to the slow kinetics of the sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and to the failure to obtain sufficient sCD4 mimetic levels in the serum. Here we present uniquely structured CCR5 co-receptor mimetics. We hypothesized that such mimetics will enhance sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and inhibition of HIV entry. Co-receptor mimetics were derived from CCR5 gp120-binding epitopes and functionalized with a palmitoyl group, which mediated their display on the surface of lipid-coated magnetic beads. CCR5-peptidoliposome mimetics bound to soluble gp120 and inhibited HIV-1 infectivity in a sCD4-dependent manner. We concluded that CCR5-peptidoliposomes increase the efficiency of sCD4 to inhibit HIV infection by acting as bait for sCD4-primed virus, catalyzing the premature discharge of its fusion potential.

  16. Functional Mimetics of the HIV-1 CCR5 Co-Receptor Displayed on the Surface of Magnetic Liposomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alona Kuzmina

    Full Text Available Chemokine G protein coupled receptors, principally CCR5 or CXCR4, function as co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells. Initial binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env gp120 subunit to the host CD4 receptor induces a cascade of structural conformational changes that lead to the formation of a high-affinity co-receptor-binding site on gp120. Interaction between gp120 and the co-receptor leads to the exposure of epitopes on the viral gp41 that mediates fusion between viral and cell membranes. Soluble CD4 (sCD4 mimetics can act as an activation-based inhibitor of HIV-1 entry in vitro, as it induces similar structural changes in gp120, leading to increased virus infectivity in the short term but to virus Env inactivation in the long term. Despite promising clinical implications, sCD4 displays low efficiency in vivo, and in multiple HIV strains, it does not inhibit viral infection. This has been attributed to the slow kinetics of the sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and to the failure to obtain sufficient sCD4 mimetic levels in the serum. Here we present uniquely structured CCR5 co-receptor mimetics. We hypothesized that such mimetics will enhance sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and inhibition of HIV entry. Co-receptor mimetics were derived from CCR5 gp120-binding epitopes and functionalized with a palmitoyl group, which mediated their display on the surface of lipid-coated magnetic beads. CCR5-peptidoliposome mimetics bound to soluble gp120 and inhibited HIV-1 infectivity in a sCD4-dependent manner. We concluded that CCR5-peptidoliposomes increase the efficiency of sCD4 to inhibit HIV infection by acting as bait for sCD4-primed virus, catalyzing the premature discharge of its fusion potential.

  17. Viremic Control and Viral Coreceptor Usage in Two HIV-1-Infected Persons Homozygous for CCR5 Δ32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Timothy J.; Hanhauser, Emily; Hu, Zixin; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Noah, Christian; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Pereyra, Florencia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine viral and immune factors involved in transmission and control of HIV-1 infection in persons without functional CCR5 Design Understanding transmission and control of HIV-1 in persons homozygous for CCR5Δ32 is important given efforts to develop HIV-1 curative therapies aimed at modifying or disrupting CCR5 expression. Methods We identified two HIV-infected CCR5Δ32/Δ32 individuals among a cohort of patients with spontaneous control of HIV-1 infection without antiretroviral therapy and determined co-receptor usage of the infecting viruses. We assessed genetic evolution of full-length HIV-1 envelope sequences by single-genome analysis from one participant and his sexual partner, and explored HIV-1 immune responses and HIV-1 mutations following virologic escape and disease progression. Results Both participants experienced viremia of less than 4,000 RNA copies/ml with preserved CD4+ T cell counts off ART for at least 3.3 and 4.6 years after diagnosis, respectively. One participant had phenotypic evidence of X4 virus, had no known favorable HLA alleles, and appeared to be infected by minority X4 virus from a pool that predominately used CCR5 for entry. The second participant had virus that was unable to use CXCR4 for entry in phenotypic assay but was able to engage alternative viral coreceptors (e.g. CXCR6) in vitro. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that individuals may be infected by minority X4 viruses from a population that predominately uses CCR5 for entry, and that viruses may bypass traditional HIV-1 coreceptors (CCR5 and CXCR4) completely by engaging alternative coreceptors to establish and propagate HIV-1 infection. PMID:25730507

  18. Co-receptor tropism prediction among 1045 Indian HIV-1 subtype C sequences: Therapeutic implications for India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuttiatt Vijesh S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding co-receptor tropism of HIV-1 strains circulating in India will provide key analytical leverage for assessing the potential usefulness of newer antiretroviral drugs such as chemokine co-receptor antagonists among Indian HIV-infected populations. The objective of this study was to determine using in silico methods, HIV-1 tropism among a large number of Indian isolates both from primary clinical isolates as well as from database-derived sequences. Results R5-tropism was seen in 96.8% of a total of 1045 HIV-1 subtype C Indian sequences. Co-receptor prediction of 15 primary clinical isolates detected two X4-tropic strains using the C-PSSM matrix. R5-tropic HIV-1 subtype C V3 sequences were conserved to a greater extent than X4-tropic strains. X4-tropic strains were obtained from subjects who had a significantly longer time since HIV diagnosis (96.5 months compared to R5-tropic strains (20.5 months. Conclusions High prevalence of R5 tropism and greater homogeneity of the V3 sequence among HIV-1 subtype C strains in India suggests the potential benefit of CCR5 antagonists as a therapeutic option in India.

  19. Structure of HIV-1 quasi-species as early indicator for switches of co-receptor tropism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Deep sequencing is able to generate a complete picture of the retroviral quasi-species in a patient. We demonstrate that the unprecedented power of deep sequencing in conjunction with computational data analysis has great potential for clinical diagnostics and basic research. Specifically, we analyzed longitudinal deep sequencing data from patients in a study with Vicriviroc, a drug that blocks the HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5. Sequences covered the V3-loop of gp120, known to be the main determinant of co-receptor tropism. First, we evaluated this data with a computational model for the interpretation of V3-sequences with respect to tropism, and we found complete agreement with results from phenotypic assays. Thus, the method could be applied in cases where phenotypic assays fail. Second, computational analysis led to the discovery of a characteristic pattern in the quasi-species that foreshadows switches of co-receptor tropism. This analysis could help to unravel the mechanism of tropism switches, and to predict these switches weeks to months before they can be detected by a phenotypic assay.

  20. Role of HER2/HER3 co-receptor in breast carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Tzong-Der; Lin, Jen-Kun

    2005-12-01

    ErbB receptors are essential mediators of cell proliferation and differentiation. Their aberrant activation is associated with the development and severity of many cancers. Homo- and heterodimerization of ErbB receptors result in a wide variety of cellular signal transduction. Dimerization of human epidermal growth-factor receptor (HER)2 and HER3 occurs frequently and is a preferred heterodimer. The HER2/HER3 dimer constitutes a high affinity co-receptor for heregulin, which is capable of potent mitogenic signaling. HER3 is a kinase-defective protein that is phosphorylated by HER2. Tyrosine phosphorylated HER3 is able to directly couple to phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase, a lipid kinase involved in the proliferation, survival, adhesion and motility of tumor cells. The authors' research provides mechanistic evidence that apigenin induces apoptosis by depleting the HER2 protein and, in turn, suppressing the signaling of the HER2/HER3-phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway. This indicates that inhibition of HER2/HER3 heterodimer function may be an especially effective and unique strategy for blocking the HER2-mediated carcinogenesis of breast cancer cells.

  1. The Shh coreceptor Cdo is required for differentiation of midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yu-Rim; Jeong, Myong-Ho; Leem, Young-Eun; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Bae, Gyu-Un; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2014-09-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is required for numerous developmental processes including specification of ventral cell types in the central nervous system such as midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. The multifunctional coreceptor Cdo increases the signaling activity of Shh which is crucial for development of forebrain and neural tube. In this study, we investigated the role of Cdo in midbrain DA neurogenesis. Cdo and Shh signaling components are induced during neurogenesis of embryonic stem (ES) cells. Cdo(-/-) ES cells show reduced neuronal differentiation accompanied by increased cell death upon neuronal induction. In addition, Cdo(-/-) ES cells form fewer tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2)-positive DA neurons correlating with the decreased expression of key regulators of DA neurogenesis, such as Shh, Neurogenin2, Mash1, Foxa2, Lmx1a, Nurr1 and Pitx3, relative to the Cdo(+/+) ES cells. Consistently, the Cdo(-/-) embryonic midbrain displays a reduction in expression of TH and Nurr1. Furthermore, activation of Shh signaling by treatment with Purmorphamine (Pur) restores the DA neurogenesis of Cdo(-/-) ES cells, suggesting that Cdo is required for the full Shh signaling activation to induce efficient DA neurogenesis.

  2. The role of the alternative coreceptor GPR15 in SIV tropism for human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiene, Miriam; Marzi, Andrea; Urbanczyk, Andreas; Bertram, Stephanie; Fisch, Tanja; Nehlmeier, Inga; Gnirss, Kerstin; Karsten, Christina B; Palesch, David; Münch, Jan; Chiodi, Francesca; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Steffen, Imke

    2012-11-10

    Many SIV isolates can employ the orphan receptor GPR15 as coreceptor for efficient entry into transfected cell lines, but the role of endogenously expressed GPR15 in SIV cell tropism is largely unclear. Here, we show that several human B and T cell lines express GPR15 on the cell surface, including the T/B cell hybrid cell line CEMx174, and that GPR15 expression is essential for SIV infection of CEMx174 cells. In addition, GPR15 expression was detected on subsets of primary human CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD19(+) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), respectively. However, GPR15(+) PBMCs were not efficiently infected by HIV and SIV, including cells from individuals homozygous for the defective Δ32 ccr5 allele. These results suggest that GPR15 is coexpressed with CD4 on PBMCs but that infection of CD4(+), GPR15(+) cells is not responsible for the well documented ability of SIV to infect CCR5(-) blood cells.

  3. Jasmonate perception by inositol-phosphate-potentiated COI1-JAZ co-receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheard, Laura B; Tan, Xu; Mao, Haibin; Withers, John; Ben-Nissan, Gili; Hinds, Thomas R; Kobayashi, Yuichi; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Sharon, Michal; Browse, John; He, Sheng Yang; Rizo, Josep; Howe, Gregg A; Zheng, Ning [Tokyo Inst. Tech.; (UWASH); (MSU); (WIS-I); (WU-MED); (UTSMC)

    2011-11-07

    Jasmonates are a family of plant hormones that regulate plant growth, development and responses to stress. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1) mediates jasmonate signalling by promoting hormone-dependent ubiquitylation and degradation of transcriptional repressor JAZ proteins. Despite its importance, the mechanism of jasmonate perception remains unclear. Here we present structural and pharmacological data to show that the true Arabidopsis jasmonate receptor is a complex of both COI1 and JAZ. COI1 contains an open pocket that recognizes the bioactive hormone (3R,7S)-jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine (JA-Ile) with high specificity. High-affinity hormone binding requires a bipartite JAZ degron sequence consisting of a conserved {alpha}-helix for COI1 docking and a loop region to trap the hormone in its binding pocket. In addition, we identify a third critical component of the jasmonate co-receptor complex, inositol pentakisphosphate, which interacts with both COI1 and JAZ adjacent to the ligand. Our results unravel the mechanism of jasmonate perception and highlight the ability of F-box proteins to evolve as multi-component signalling hubs.

  4. Viral MIPa homologous with human MIP-1a acts on HIV co-receptor CCR5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The function and usage of vMIPa encoded by K6 gene of herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) which has homology with human macrophage protein (MIP) have not been clearly known. In the present note the K6 gene of HHV8 was cloned and transfected into NIH3T3 cells and E. coli cells. Conditional media from the 3T3-transfected cells and K6 product vMIPa from E. coli. Cells were used to perform the experiments of ligand-receptor binding and cellular adhesion with peripheral blood macrophages. The conditional media and the purified vMIPa from E. coli could compete to bind to CCR5 located on macrophages from peripheral blood with I125-hMIP-1a chemokine of human. Cellular adhesion showed that the conditional media from transfected cells and the purified vMIPa did not induce the adhesion of macro-phages from peripheral blood to ICAM-1. In conclusion, vMIPa encoded by K6 gene of HHV8 can bind to CCR5 of peripheral blood macrophage cells and does not induce their adhesion. This suggests that vMIPa enclosed CCR5, also known as HIV co-receptor, may be used to prevent and treat HIV infection.

  5. A PTK7/Ror2 Co-Receptor Complex Affects Xenopus Neural Crest Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Podleschny

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells are a highly migratory pluripotent cell population that generates a wide array of different cell types and failure in their migration can result in severe birth defects and malformation syndromes. Neural crest migration is controlled by various means including chemotaxis, repellent guidance cues and cell-cell interaction. Non-canonical Wnt PCP (planar cell polarity signaling has previously been shown to control cell-contact mediated neural crest cell guidance. PTK7 (protein tyrosine kinase 7 is a transmembrane pseudokinase and a known regulator of Wnt/PCP signaling, which is expressed in Xenopus neural crest cells and required for their migration. PTK7 functions as a Wnt co-receptor; however, it remains unclear by which means PTK7 affects neural crest migration. Expressing fluorescently labeled proteins in Xenopus neural crest cells we find that PTK7 co-localizes with the Ror2 Wnt-receptor. Further, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that PTK7 interacts with Ror2. The PTK7/Ror2 interaction is likely relevant for neural crest migration, because Ror2 expression can rescue the PTK7 loss of function migration defect. Live cell imaging of explanted neural crest cells shows that PTK7 loss of function affects the formation of cell protrusions as well as cell motility. Co-expression of Ror2 can rescue these defects. In vivo analysis demonstrates that a kinase dead Ror2 mutant cannot rescue PTK7 loss of function. Thus, our data suggest that Ror2 can substitute for PTK7 and that the signaling function of its kinase domain is required for this effect.

  6. The odorant receptor co-receptor from the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Immo A; Rodriguez, Stacy D; Drake, Lisa L; Price, David P; Blakely, Brittny N; Hammond, John I; Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Monroy, Erika Y; Maio, William A; Romero, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. has re-emerged as a serious and growing problem in many parts of the world. Presence of resistant bed bugs and the difficulty to eliminate them has renewed interest in alternative control tactics. Similar to other haematophagous arthropods, bed bugs rely on their olfactory system to detect semiochemicals in the environment. Previous studies have morphologically characterized olfactory organs of bed bugs' antenna and have physiologically evaluated the responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) to host-derived chemicals. To date, odorant binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs) associated with these olfaction processes have not been studied in bed bugs. Chemoreception in insects requires formation of heteromeric complexes of ORs and a universal OR coreceptor (Orco). Orco is the constant chain of every odorant receptor in insects and is critical for insect olfaction but does not directly bind to odorants. Orco agonists and antagonists have been suggested as high-value targets for the development of novel insect repellents. In this study, we have performed RNAseq of bed bug sensory organs and identified several odorant receptors as well as Orco. We characterized Orco expression and investigated the effect of chemicals targeting Orco on bed bug behavior and reproduction. We have identified partial cDNAs of six C. lectularius OBPs and 16 ORs. Full length bed bug Orco was cloned and sequenced. Orco is widely expressed in different parts of the bed bug including OR neurons and spermatozoa. Treatment of bed bugs with the agonist VUAA1 changed bed bug pheromone-induced aggregation behavior and inactivated spermatozoa. We have described and characterized for the first time OBPs, ORs and Orco in bed bugs. Given the importance of these molecules in chemoreception of this insect they are interesting targets for the development of novel insect behavior modifiers.

  7. The odorant receptor co-receptor from the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Immo A Hansen

    Full Text Available Recently, the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. has re-emerged as a serious and growing problem in many parts of the world. Presence of resistant bed bugs and the difficulty to eliminate them has renewed interest in alternative control tactics. Similar to other haematophagous arthropods, bed bugs rely on their olfactory system to detect semiochemicals in the environment. Previous studies have morphologically characterized olfactory organs of bed bugs' antenna and have physiologically evaluated the responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs to host-derived chemicals. To date, odorant binding proteins (OBPs and odorant receptors (ORs associated with these olfaction processes have not been studied in bed bugs. Chemoreception in insects requires formation of heteromeric complexes of ORs and a universal OR coreceptor (Orco. Orco is the constant chain of every odorant receptor in insects and is critical for insect olfaction but does not directly bind to odorants. Orco agonists and antagonists have been suggested as high-value targets for the development of novel insect repellents. In this study, we have performed RNAseq of bed bug sensory organs and identified several odorant receptors as well as Orco. We characterized Orco expression and investigated the effect of chemicals targeting Orco on bed bug behavior and reproduction. We have identified partial cDNAs of six C. lectularius OBPs and 16 ORs. Full length bed bug Orco was cloned and sequenced. Orco is widely expressed in different parts of the bed bug including OR neurons and spermatozoa. Treatment of bed bugs with the agonist VUAA1 changed bed bug pheromone-induced aggregation behavior and inactivated spermatozoa. We have described and characterized for the first time OBPs, ORs and Orco in bed bugs. Given the importance of these molecules in chemoreception of this insect they are interesting targets for the development of novel insect behavior modifiers.

  8. HIV-1 resistance conferred by siRNA cosuppression of CXCR4 and CCR5 coreceptors by a bispecific lentiviral vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkina Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs has proved to be a highly effective gene silencing mechanism with great potential for HIV/AIDS gene therapy. Previous work with siRNAs against cellular coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5 had shown that down regulation of these surface molecules could prevent HIV-1 entry and confer viral resistance. Since monospecific siRNAs targeting individual coreceptors are inadequate in protecting against both T cell tropic (X4 and monocyte tropic (R5 viral strains simultaneously, bispecific constructs with dual specificity are required. For effective long range therapy, the bispecific constructs need to be stably transduced into HIV-1 target cells via integrating viral vectors. Results To achieve this goal, lentiviral vectors incorporating both CXCR4 and CCR5 siRNAs of short hairpin design were constructed. The CXCR4 siRNA was driven by a U6 promoter whereas the CCR5 siRNA was driven by an H1 promoter. A CMV promoter driven EGFP reporter gene is also incorporated in the bispecific construct. High efficiency transduction into coreceptor expressing Magi and Ghost cell lines with a concomitant down regulation of respective coreceptors was achieved with lentiviral vectors. When the siRNA expressing transduced cells were challenged with X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1, they demonstrated marked viral resistance. HIV-1 resistance was also observed in bispecific lentiviral vector transduced primary PBMCs. Conclusions Both CXCR4 and CCR5 coreceptors could be simultaneously targeted for down regulation by a single combinatorial lentiviral vector incorporating respective anti-coreceptor siRNAs. Stable down regulation of both the coreceptors protects cells against infection by both X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1. Stable down regulation of cellular molecules that aid in HIV-1 infection will be an effective strategy for long range HIV gene therapy.

  9. Structural dynamics of V3 loop with different electrostatics: implications on co-receptor recognition: a molecular dynamics study of HIV gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramouli, Balasubramanian; Chillemi, Giovanni; Giombini, Emanuela; Capobianchi, Maria R; Rozera, Gabriella; Desideri, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    The HIV's envelope glycoprotein gp120 plays a major role in the entry of the virus into the host cell, through its successive interactions with the cell surface CD4 receptor and a co-receptor (CCR5 or CXCR4). The choice of a specific co-receptor by gp120 has an important consequence on HIV infection and pathogenesis. The third variable region within gp120, the V3 loop, is the principal determinant of the co-receptor usage by gp120. Here, we report the long time molecular dynamics simulations of four gp120 structures, having a V3 loop charge of +3 and +5, from both R5 and X4 specific strains of HIV. The results of the study highlight the properties of the V3 loop that can be critical for dictating the co-receptor recognition and selection in structural context. In detail, we observe that the structural orientation of the V3 loop in the 3D space is modulated by its net charge, whilst its co-receptor choice is likely dictated by a combined effect of both the electrostatics of the loop and its conformational variability at the level of its central crown region.

  10. Genomic Editing of the HIV-1 Coreceptor CCR5 in Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells Using Zinc Finger Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 is a validated target for HIV/AIDS therapy. The apparent elimination of HIV-1 in a patient treated with an allogeneic stem cell transplant homozygous for a naturally occurring CCR5 deletion mutation (CCR5Δ32/Δ32) supports the concept that a single dose of HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem cells can provide disease protection. Given the low frequency of naturally occurring CCR5Δ32/Δ32 donors, we reasoned that engineered autologous CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor ce...

  11. Phenylthiophenecarboxamide antagonists of the olfactory receptor co-receptor subunit from a mosquito.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisi Chen

    Full Text Available Insects detect environmental chemicals using chemosensory receptors, such as the ORs, a family of odorant-gated ion channels. Insect ORs are multimeric complexes of unknown stoichiometry, formed by a common subunit (the odorant receptor co-receptor subunit, Orco and one of many variable subunits that confer odorant specificity. The recent discovery of Orco directed ligands, including both agonists and antagonists, suggests Orco as a promising target for chemical control of insects. In addition to competitively inhibiting OR activation by Orco agonists, several Orco antagonists have been shown to act through a non-competitive mechanism to inhibit OR activation by odorants. We previously identified a series of Orco antagonists, including N-(4-ethylphenyl-2-thiophenecarboxamide (OX1a, previously referred to as OLC20. Here, we explore the chemical space around the OX1a structure to identify more potent Orco antagonists. Cqui\\Orco+Cqui\\Or21, an OR from Culex quinquefasciatus (the Southern House Mosquito that responds to 3-methylindole (skatole and is thought to mediate oviposition behavior, was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and receptor function assayed by two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. 22 structural analogs of OX1a were screened for antagonism of OR activation by an Orco agonist. By varying the moieties decorating the phenyl and thiophene rings, and altering the distance between the rings, we were able to identify antagonists with improved potency. Detailed examination of three of these compounds (N-mesityl-2-thiophenecarboxamide, N-(4-methylbenzyl-2-thiophenecarboxamide and N-(2-ethylphenyl-3-(2-thienyl-2-propenamide demonstrated competitive inhibition of receptor activation by an Orco agonist and non-competitive inhibition of receptor activation by an odorant. The ability to inhibit OR activation by odorants may be a general property of this class of Orco antagonist, suggesting that odorant mediated behaviors can be manipulated

  12. Specificity for a CCR5 Inhibitor Is Conferred by a Single Amino Acid Residue: ROLE OF ILE198.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Gloria; Labrecque, Jean; Metz, Markus; Vaz, Roy; Fricker, Simon P

    2015-04-24

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CCR2b share 89% amino acid homology. CCR5 is a co-receptor for HIV and CCR5 antagonists have been investigated as inhibitors of HIV infection. We describe the use of two CCR5 antagonists, Schering-C (SCH-C), which is specific for CCR5, and TAK-779, a dual inhibitor of CCR5 and CCR2b, to probe the CCR5 inhibitor binding site using CCR5/CCR2b chimeric receptors. Compound inhibition in the different chimeras was assessed by inhibition of chemokine-induced calcium flux. SCH-C inhibited RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted) (CCL5)-mediated calcium flux on CCR5 with an IC50 of 22.8 nM but was inactive against monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2)-mediated calcium flux on CCR2b. However, SCH-C inhibited CCL2-induced calcium flux against a CCR5/CCR2b chimera consisting of transmembrane domains IV-VI of CCR5 with an IC50 of 55 nM. A sequence comparison of CCR5 and CCR2b identified a divergent amino acid sequence located at the junction of transmembrane domain V and second extracellular loop. Transfer of the CCR5 sequence KNFQTLKIV into CCR2b conferred SCH-C inhibition (IC50 of 122 nM) into the predominantly CCR2b chimera. Furthermore, a single substitution, R206I, conferred partial but significant inhibition (IC50 of 1023 nM) by SCH-C. These results show that a limited amino acid sequence is responsible for SCH-C specificity to CCR5, and we propose a model showing the interaction with CCR5 Ile(198).

  13. Cofactors, coreceptors, and new retroviruses. An interview with Robin A Weiss, PhD. Interview by Mark Mascolini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R A

    1995-02-01

    Dr. Robin A. Weiss, Director of Research at the Chester Beatty Laboratories of the Institute of Cancer Research in London, England presents his thoughts on the subjects of cofactors, coreceptors, and new retroviruses in HIV infection. Dr. Weiss responds to questions in the following areas: balancing basic research and clinical trials, the importance of sheer viral load, the importance of pathogenic cofactors in HIV progression, genetic factors and susceptibility to HIV, possible reasons for long-term nonprogression, the importance of immunotherapy, the difficulty in finding a second receptor as a cofactor necessary for disease progression, and whether more human retroviruses are likely to be discovered. Among Weiss' observations are his beliefs that there should be more of a funding shift into basic research, that evidence is getting stronger for the theory that beating back the viral burden as soon as possible forestalls progression, that it appears possible that some people may have a genetic disposition against becoming HIV infected, that it is just as important to find a preinfection vaccine as it is a post-infection vaccine, and his belief that CD26 is not a coreceptor in AIDS progression.

  14. HIV-1 envelope, integrins and co-receptor use in mucosal transmission of HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicala Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is well established that HIV-1 infection typically involves an interaction between the viral envelope protein gp120/41 and the CD4 molecule followed by a second interaction with a chemokine receptor, usually CCR5 or CXCR4. In the early stages of an HIV-1 infection CCR5 using viruses (R5 viruses predominate. In some viral subtypes there is a propensity to switch to CXCR4 usage (X4 viruses. The receptor switch occurs in ~ 40% of the infected individuals and is associated with faster disease progression. This holds for subtypes B and D, but occurs less frequently in subtypes A and C. There are several hypotheses to explain the preferential transmission of R5 viruses and the mechanisms that lead to switching of co-receptor usage; however, there is no definitive explanation for either. One important consideration regarding transmission is that signaling by R5 gp120 may facilitate transmission of R5 viruses by inducing a permissive environment for HIV replication. In the case of sexual transmission, infection by HIV requires the virus to breach the mucosal barrier to gain access to the immune cell targets that it infects; however, the immediate events that follow HIV exposure at genital mucosal sites are not well understood. Upon transmission, the HIV quasispecies that is replicating in an infected donor contracts through a “genetic bottleneck”, and often infection results from a single infectious event. Many details surrounding this initial infection remain unresolved. In mucosal tissues, CD4+ T cells express high levels of CCR5, and a subset of these CD4+/CCR5high cells express the integrin α4β7, the gut homing receptor. CD4+/CCR5high/ α4β7high T cells are highly susceptible to infection by HIV-1 and are ideal targets for an efficient productive infection at the point of transmission. In this context we have demonstrated that the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 binds to α4β7 on CD4+ T cells. On CD4+/CCR5high/ α4β7high T cells,

  15. V3 loop truncations in HIV-1 envelope impart resistance to coreceptor inhibitors and enhanced sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meg M Laakso

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The V1/V2 region and the V3 loop of the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 envelope (Env protein are targets for neutralizing antibodies and also play an important functional role, with the V3 loop largely determining whether a virus uses CCR5 (R5, CXCR4 (X4, or either coreceptor (R5X4 to infect cells. While the sequence of V3 is variable, its length is highly conserved. Structural studies indicate that V3 length may be important for interactions with the extracellular loops of the coreceptor. Consistent with this view, genetic truncation of the V3 loop is typically associated with loss of Env function. We removed approximately one-half of the V3 loop from three different HIV-1 strains, and found that only the Env protein from the R5X4 strain R3A retained some fusion activity. Loss of V1/V2 (DeltaV1/V2 was well tolerated by this virus. Passaging of virus with the truncated V3 loop resulted in the derivation of a virus strain that replicated with wild-type kinetics. This virus, termed TA1, retained the V3 loop truncation and acquired several adaptive changes in gp120 and gp41. TA1 could use CCR5 but not CXCR4 to infect cells, and was extremely sensitive to neutralization by HIV-1 positive human sera, and by antibodies to the CD4 binding site and to CD4-induced epitopes in the bridging sheet region of gp120. In addition, TA1 was completely resistant to CCR5 inhibitors, and was more dependent upon the N-terminal domain of CCR5, a region of the receptor that is thought to contact the bridging sheet of gp120 and the base of the V3 loop, and whose conformation may not be greatly affected by CCR5 inhibitors. These studies suggest that the V3 loop protects HIV from neutralization by antibodies prevalent in infected humans, that CCR5 inhibitors likely act by disrupting interactions between the V3 loop and the coreceptor, and that altered use of CCR5 by HIV-1 associated with increased sensitivity to changes in the N-terminal domain can be linked

  16. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans Containing a Glypican 5 Core and 2-O-Sulfo-iduronic Acid Function as Sonic Hedgehog Co-receptors to Promote Proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witt, R.M.; Hecht, M.L.; Pazyra-Murphy, M.F.; Cohen, S.M.; Noti, C.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Fuller, M.; Chan, J.A.; Hopwood, J.J.; Seeberger, P.H.; Segal, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is crucial for growth, cell fate determination, and axonal guidance in the developing nervous system. Although the receptors Patched (Ptch1) and Smoothened (Smo) are required for Shh signaling, a number of distinct co-receptors contribute to these critical responses to

  17. Strict major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule class-specific binding by co-receptors enforces MHC-restricted αβTCR recognition during T lineage subset commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-long eLi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of co-receptor dependent αβTCR recognition, considerable effort has been spent on elucidating the basis of CD4 and CD8 lineage commitment in the thymus. The latter is responsible for generating mature CD4 helper and CD8αβ cytotoxic T cell subsets. Although CD4+ and CD8+ T cell recognition of peptide antigens is known to be MHC class I- and MHC class II-restricted, respectively, the mechanism of single positive (SP thymocyte lineage commitment from bipotential double positive (DP progenitors is not fully elucidated. Classical models to explain thymic CD4 versus CD8 fate determination have included a stochastic selection model or instructional models. The latter are based either on strength of signal or duration of signal impacting fate. More recently, differential co-receptor gene imprinting has been shown to be involved in expression of transcription factors impacting cytotoxic T cell development. Here, we address commitment from a structural perspective, focusing on the nature of co-receptor binding to MHC molecules. By surveying 58 MHC class II and 224 MHC class I crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB, it becomes clear that CD4 cannot bind to MHC I molecules, nor can CD8αβ or CD8αα bind to MHC II molecules. Given that the co-receptor delivers Lck to phosphorylate exposed CD3 ITAMs within a peptide/MHC (pMHC-ligated TCR complex to initiate cell signaling, this strict co-receptor recognition fosters MHC class-restricted SP thymocyte lineage commitment at the DP stage even though both co-receptors are expressed on a single cell. In short, the binding preference of an αβTCR for a peptide complexed with an MHC molecule dictates which co-receptor subsequently binds, thereby supporting development of that subset lineage. How function within the lineage is linked further to biopotential fate determination is discussed.

  18. 糖皮质激素对支气管哮喘豚鼠模型嗜酸粒细胞趋化因子、CC趋化因子受体3和白介素5作用的实验研究%Effects of glucocorticoid on Eotaxin,CCR3 and interleukin-5 in experimental asthmatic geinea pig models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕丽丽; 朱述阳; 刘平莉; 姚红卫; 夏春伟; 李若然

    2008-01-01

    目的 观察支气管哮喘(简称哮喘)豚鼠外周血、肺和骨髓组织嗜酸粒细胞(EOS)百分比和肺组织嗜酸粒细胞趋化因子(Eotaxin)、CC趋化因子受体3(CCR3)和白介素5(IL-5)的表达及激素对其影响,探讨在气道-骨髓-循环-气道是否存在着调控EOS定向迁移的信号环路及激素干预的机制.方法 健康雄性豚鼠40只,以卵白蛋白(OVA)致敏和激发制作哮喘模型,随机分为正常组(A组)、哮喘组(B组)、地塞米松干预组(C组)和布地奈德干预组(D组),每组10只,在末次激发6 h后处死豚鼠,取豚鼠颈动脉血、骨髓和肺组织,分别制备血涂片、骨髓涂片和肺组织切片;外周血和骨髓涂片用Wright染色,光学显微镜下计数细胞总数和EOS百分比;肺组织切片HE染色,光学显微镜下计数细胞总数和EOS百分比;肺组织切片用Eotaxin、CCR3和IL-5多克隆抗体免疫组织化学染色,光学显微镜下分别计数阳性细胞百分比.结果 豚鼠外周血、骨髓和肺组织中.EOS百分比分别为:A组(1.33±0.52)%、(1.17±0.41)%,(1.67±0.52)%;B组(4.83±0.98)%、(3.17±0.75)%、(4.00±0.89)%;C组(2.68±1.03)%、(1.67±0.82)%、(2.83±0.75)%;D组(2.67±0.52)%、(1.83±0.75)%、(2.67±0.52)%;B组与A、C、D组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),A组与C、D组比较差异有统计学意义,C组与D组比较差异无统计学意义,但C组较D组降低骨髓EOS百分比似乎更明显;豚鼠肺组织Eotaxin、CCR3和IL-5多克隆抗体免疫组织化学染色阳性细胞百分比分别为:A组(2.29±0.35)%、(2.07±0.15)%、(1.92±0.09)%;B组(3.27±0.42)%,(3.66±0.47)%、(3.03±0.33)%;C组(2.80±0.22)%、(2.98±0.45)%、(2.54±0.32)%,D组(2.75±0.31)%、(2.65±0.25)%、(2.32±0.12)%,B组与A、C、D组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),A组与C、D组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),C组与D组比较差异无统计学意义;相关性分析结果提示哮喘豚鼠肺组织中EOS百分比和Eotaxin、CCR3和IL-5

  19. Rational design of micro-RNA-like bifunctional siRNAs targeting HIV and the HIV coreceptor CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Ali; Saetrom, Pål; Zhang, Jane; Alluin, Jessica; Li, Haitang; Snøve, Ola; Aagaard, Lars; Rossi, John J

    2010-04-01

    Small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are distinguished by their modes of action. SiRNAs serve as guides for sequence-specific cleavage of complementary mRNAs and the targets can be in coding or noncoding regions of the target transcripts. MiRNAs inhibit translation via partially complementary base-pairing to 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and are generally ineffective when targeting coding regions of a transcript. In this study, we deliberately designed siRNAs that simultaneously direct cleavage and translational suppression of HIV RNAs, or cleavage of the mRNA encoding the HIV coreceptor CCR5 and suppression of translation of HIV. These bifunctional siRNAs trigger inhibition of HIV infection and replication in cell culture. The design principles have wide applications throughout the genome, as about 90% of genes harbor sites that make the design of bifunctional siRNAs possible.

  20. Genetic predisposition of variants in TLR2 and its co-receptors to severe malaria in Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Subhendu; Kar, Avishek; Tripathy, Sagnika; Mohapatra, Manoj K; Dhangadamajhi, Gunanidhi

    2016-02-01

    Although the role of TLRs signalling in malaria pathogenesis is well established, contribution of individual TLR to clinical outcome of malaria still remains inconclusive. Given the importance of TLR2 and its co-receptors in recognising distinct structural forms of key malaria toxins and mediating innate immune response, it is essential to delineate their genetic contribution. Variants in TLR1 (I602S) and TLR6 (P249S) were genotyped by PCR-RFLP methods, and TLR2 (I/D) was genotyped by PCR in 200 samples each from uncomplicated malaria (UM) and severe malaria (SM). Further, SM was categorised into its sub-clinical groups (CM and NCSM or SOD and MODS) and analysed. The results showed the PP genotype of TLR6 (P249S) to be significantly more common in UM (P malaria.

  1. The endocytosis and signaling of the γδ T cell coreceptor WC1 are regulated by a dileucine motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Haoting; Baldwin, Cynthia L; Telfer, Janice C

    2015-03-01

    WC1 proteins, which are specifically expressed by bovine γδ T cells from a gene array containing 13 members, are part of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich family. WC1 cytoplasmic domains contains multiple tyrosines, one of which is required to be phosphorylated for TCR coreceptor activity, and a dileucine endocytosis motif. Like the TCR coreceptor CD4, WC1 is endocytosed in response to PMA. Because WC1 endocytosis may play a role in the activation of γδ T cells, we examined WC1 endocytosis in the adherent cell 293T and Jurkat T cell lines using a fusion protein of extracellular CD4 and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain of WC1. Individual mutation of the two leucine residues of the endocytic dileucine motif in the WC1 cytoplasmic domain significantly reduced PMA-induced endocytosis in both cell types and enhanced IL-2 production stimulated by cocross-linking of CD3/TCR and CD4/WC1 in Jurkat cells, suggesting that the sustained membrane coligation of CD3/TCR with WC1 caused by a decrease in endocytosis increases T cell activation. Mutation of two serines upstream of the endocytic dileucine motif affected endocytosis only in adherent 293T cells. Although the two upstream serines were not required for WC1 endocytosis in Jurkat cells, the pan-protein kinase C inhibitor Gö6983 blocked endocytosis of CD4/WC1, and mutation of the upstream serines in WC1 inhibited IL-2 production stimulated by cocross-linking of CD3/TCR and CD4/WC1. These studies provide insights into the signaling of WC1 gene arrays that are present in most mammals and play critical roles in γδ T cell responses to bacterial pathogens.

  2. X4-tropic human immunodeficiency virus IIIB utilizes CXCR4 as coreceptor, as distinct from R5X4-tropic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Salequl; Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Adnan, Nihad; Tanaka, Atsushi; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2013-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses initiate infections via CCR5 coreceptors and then change their tropism to C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), this change being associated with rapid disease progression. HIV-1IIIB, a widely described pure X4-tropic strain, is distinct from R5X4-tropic viruses. In this study, the requirement for amino terminal regions (NTRs) of CXCR4 for entry of HIV-1IIIB virus into host cells was examined and compared to that of R5X4-tropic viruses. CXCR4 and its deletion mutant (CXCR4ΔNTR23; first 23 amino acids removed from NTR) were amplified to examine their coreceptor activities. NP-2/CD4/CXCR4 and NP-2/CD4/CXCR4ΔNTR23 cell lines were prepared accordingly. Indirect immune fluorescence assay (IFA), PCR, and reverse transcriptase (RT) activity were used to compare the process of infection of host cells by HIV-1IIIB virus, one R5-tropic and five other R5X4-tropic viruses. All the R5X4-tropic HIVs were found to utilize both CCR5 and CXCR4 but unable to use CXCR4ΔNTR23 as coreceptors. In contrast, X4-tropic HIV-1IIIB was found to preferentially infect through CXCR4ΔNTR23. Viral antigens in infected NP-2/CD4/CXCR4ΔNTR23 cells were detected by IFA and confirmed by detection of proviral DNA and by performing RT assays on the spent cell-supernatants. In dual tropic viruses, deletion of 23 amino acids from NTR abrogates the coreceptor activity of CXCR4. This observation demonstrates that NTR of CXCR4 have an obligatory coreceptor role for dual tropic viruses. However, HIV-1IIIB may have different requirements for NTR than R5X4 viruses or may infect host cells independent of NTR of CXCR4.

  3. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism by single and triplicate HIV-1 RNA and DNA sequencing in patients undergoing successful first-line antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meini, Genny; Rossetti, Barbara; Bianco, Claudia; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Sighinolfi, Laura; Monno, Laura; Castagna, Antonella; Rozera, Gabriella; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Zazzi, Maurizio; De Luca, Andrea; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Armignacco, O.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Castelli, F.; Cauda, R.; Di Perri, G.; Galli, M.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Lazzarin, A.; Perno, C. F.; von Schloesser, F.; Viale, P.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Antinori, A.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Girardi, E.; Lo Caputo, S.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Andreoni, M.; Ammassari, A.; Antinori, A.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cingolani, A.; Cinque, P.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; d'Arminio Monforte, A; De Luca, A.; Di Biagio, A.; Girardi, E.; Gianotti, N.; Gori, A.; Guaraldi, G.; Lapadula, G.; Lichtner, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marchetti, G.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Rusconi, S.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Cicconi, P.; Fanti, I.; Formenti, T.; Galli, L.; Lorenzini, P.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Angarano, G.; Monno, L.; Santoro, C.; Maggiolo, F.; Suardi, C.; Viale, P.; Vanino, E.; Verucchi, G.; Castelli, F.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Minardi, C.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P.E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Mazzotta, F.; Lo Caputo, S.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Bonfanti, P.; Caramma, I.; Castelli, A. P.; Galli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Rizzardini, G.; Puoti, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Piolini, R.; Castagna, A.; Salpietro, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Cicconi, P.; Marchetti, G.; Mussini, C.; Puzzolante, C.; Gori, A.; Lapadula, G.; Abrescia, N.; Chirianni, A.; Guida, M. G.; Gargiulo, M.; Baldelli, F.; Francisci, D.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Cauda, R.; Andreoni, M.; Antinori, A.; Vullo, V.; Cingolani, A.; d'Avino, A.; Ammassari, A.; Gallo, L.; Nicastri, E.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A.; Mura, M. S.; Madeddu, G.; Caramello, P.; Di Perri, G.; Orofino, G. C.; Bonora, S.; Sciandra, M.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Maraviroc has been shown to be effective in patients harbouring CCR5-tropic HIV-1. While this CCR5 antagonist has initially been used in salvage therapy, its excellent safety profile makes it ideal for antiretroviral treatment simplification strategies in patients with suppressed plasma viraemia. The aim of this study was to compare HIV-1 tropism as detected in baseline plasma RNA and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) DNA prior to first-line therapy and to analyse tropism evolution while on successful treatment. Methods HIV-1 tropism was determined using triplicate genotypic testing combined with geno2pheno[coreceptor] analysis at a 10% false positive rate in 42 patients. Paired pre-treatment plasma RNA and PBMC DNA and two subsequent PBMC DNA samples (the first obtained after reaching undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA and the second after at least 2 years of suppression of plasma viraemia) were evaluated. Results Coreceptor tropism was completely concordant in paired pre-treatment RNA and DNA, with 26.2% of HIV-1 sequences predicted to be non-CCR5-tropic. During follow-up, coreceptor tropism switches were detected in 4 (9.5%) patients without any preferential direction. Although false positive rate discrepancies within triplicates were common, the rate of discordance of coreceptor tropism assignment among triplicate results in this mostly CCR5-tropic dataset was only 2.1%, questioning the added value of triplicate testing compared with single testing. Conclusions HIV-1 coreceptor tropism changes during virologically successful first-line treatment are infrequent. HIV-1 DNA analysis may thus support the choice of a CCR5 antagonist in treatment switch strategies; however, maraviroc treatment outcome data are required to confirm this option. PMID:24155059

  4. Cytopathicity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) in Human Lymphoid Tissue Is Coreceptor Dependent and Comparable to That of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Birgit; Penn, Michael L.; Palacios, Emil H.; Grant, Robert M.; Kirchhoff, Frank; Goldsmith, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) is markedly less pathogenic than HIV-1 in vivo. Individuals infected with HIV-2 exhibit a remarkably slow rate of disease development, and these clinical properties have been attributed presumptively to an “attenuated” phenotype of HIV-2 itself. Here, we investigated the impact of coreceptor usage on the cytopathicity of HIV-2 and compared its pathogenic potential with that of HIV-1 in a unique human lymphoid histoculture model. We found that HIV-2 strains, as well as closely related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV), displayed mildly or highly aggressive cytopathic phenotypes depending on their abilities to use the coreceptor CCR5 or CXCR4, respectively. A side-by-side comparison of primary X4 HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains revealed similar, high degrees of cytopathicity induced by both HIV types. Furthermore, we found that HIV-2 coreceptor specificity for CCR5 and CXCR4 determined the target cell population for T-cell depletion in lymphoid tissue. Finally, utilization of the alternate coreceptors BOB and Bonzo did not significantly increase the cytopathic properties of HIV-2. These findings demonstrate that coreceptor preference is a key regulator of target cell specificity and the cytopathic potential of HIV-2, with indistinguishable rules compared with HIV-1. Moreover, HIV-2 strains are not characterized by an intrinsically lower cytopathicity than HIV-1 strains. Therefore, direct cytopathic potential per se does not explain the unique behavior of HIV-2 in people, highlighting that other unknown factors need to be elucidated as the basis for their lesser virulence in vivo. PMID:11000231

  5. Activation and coreceptor expression of T lymphocytes induced by highly active antiretroviral therapy in Chinese HIV/AIDS patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zi-ning; SHANG Hong; JIANG Yong-jun; LIU Jing; DAI Di; DIAO Ying-ying; GENG Wen-qing; JIN Xin; WANG Ya-nan

    2006-01-01

    Background At the end of 2005, 650 000 people lived with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) in (HAART) supported by the "China CARES" program but the immune responses of HAART were seldom reported. This study investigated the effect of HAART on the activation and coreceptor expression of T lymphocytes in Chinese HIV/AIDS patients and evaluated its effect on immune reconstitution.Methods Seventeen HIV/AIDS patients were enrolled and three-color-flow cytometry was used to detect the activation of HLA-DR CD38 and the coreceptor CCR5, CXCR4 expression on T lymphocytes in whole blood samples taken from the patients before and after 3- or 6-month HAART.Results The activation percents of CD4+, CD8+ T lymphocytes were significantly higher before therapy than the normal controls (HLA-DR/CD4: 40.47± 18.85 vs 11.54±4.10; CD38/CD4: 81.34± 10.86 vs 53.34± 11.44;HLA-DR/CD8:63.94±12.71 vs 25.67±9.18; CD38/CD8:86.56±11.41 vs 58.84±6.16, all P<0.01). After 6-month combined antiretroviral treatment, the activation of T lymphocytes in HIV/AIDS patients was significantly decreased (HLA-DR/CD4:28.31 ± 13.48; CD38/CD4:69.88 ± 12.64; HLA-DR/CD8: 46.56±18.64;CD38/CD8: 70.17± 14.54, all P<0.01 compared with the pre-treatment values). Before the treatment, CCR5 expression on CD8+ T lymphocytes was up-regulated while CXCR4 expression on CD8+ T lymphocytes downregulated in HIV/AIDS patients compared with the normal controls (CD8/CCR5:70.9 1± 10.03 vs 52.70 ±7.68; CD8/CXCR4: 24.14± 11.08 vs 50.05± 11.68, all P<0.01). After 6-month HAART, CCR5 expression on CD8+ T lymphocytes significantly decreased (56.35±12.96, P<0.01), while CXCR4 expression on CD8+ T lymphocytes increased (36.95±9.96, P<0.05) compared with the pre-treatment and the normal controls. A significant statistical relationship was observed between the expression of activation markers, CCR5 and the CD4+ T lymphocyte counts after HAART (P<0.05).Conclusions Reduced activation of T lymphocytes

  6. The heparan sulfate co-receptor and the concentration of fibroblast growth factor-2 independently elicit different signalling patterns from the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchesne Laurence

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR interprets concentration gradients of FGF ligands and structural changes in the heparan sulfate (HS co-receptor to generate different cellular responses. However, whether the FGFR generates different signals is not known. Results We have previously shown in rat mammary fibroblasts that in cells deficient in sulfation, and so in HS co-receptor, FGF-2 can only stimulate a transient phosphorylation of p42/44 MAPK and so cannot stimulate DNA synthesis. Here we demonstrate that this is because in the absence of HS, FGF-2 fails to stimulate the phosphorylation of the adaptor FGFR substrate 2 (FRS2. In cells possessing the HS co-receptor, FGF-2 elicits a bell-shaped dose response: optimal concentrations stimulate DNA synthesis, but supramaximal concentrations (≥ 100 ng/mL have little effect. At optimal concentrations (300 pg/mL FGF-2 stimulates a sustained dual phosphorylation of p42/44 MAPK and tyrosine phosphorylation of FRS2. In contrast, 100 ng/mL FGF-2 only stimulates a transient early peak of p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation and fails to stimulate appreciably the phosphorylation of FRS2 on tyrosine. Conclusions These results suggest that the nature of the FGFR signal produced is determined by a combination of the HS co-receptor and the concentration of FGF ligand. Both the phosphorylation of the adaptor FRS2, the kinetics (sustained or transient of phosphorylation of p42/44(MAPK are varied, and so differing cellular responses are produced.

  7. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.; Kiso, M.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in the toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.

  8. South African mutations of the CCR5 coreceptor for HIV modify interaction with chemokines and HIV Envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folefoc, Asongna T; Fromme, Bernhard J; Katz, Arieh A; Flanagan, Colleen A

    2010-08-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is the major coreceptor for HIV-1 and the receptor for CC-chemokines, MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and regulated upon activation normal T-cell-expressed and secreted. Individuals, who are homozygous for the nonfunctional CCR5Delta32 allele, are largely resistant to HIV-1 infection. Four unique mutations that affect the amino acid sequence of CCR5 have been identified in South Africa. We have assessed the effect of these mutations on CCR5 interactions with chemokines and HIV Envelope protein. The LeuPhe mutation did not affect CCR5 expression, chemokine binding, intracellular signaling, or interaction with Envelope. The ArgGln mutant was similar to wild-type CCR5, but ligand-independent intracellular signaling suggests that it is partially constitutively active. The AspVal mutation decreased chemokine-binding affinity, chemokine-stimulated intracellular signaling, and receptor expression. It also decreased HIV Envelope-mediated cell fusion. The ArgStop mutant showed no measurable chemokine binding or signaling and no measurable expression of CCR5 at the cell surface or within the cell. Consistent with lack of cell surface expression, it did not support envelope-mediated cell fusion. These results show that South African CCR5 variants have a range of phenotypes in vitro that may reflect altered chemokine responses and susceptibility to HIV infection in individuals who carry these alleles.

  9. Role of Wnt Co-receptor LRP6 in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinlu; Lu, Wenyan; Chen, Dongquan; Xu, Bo; Li, Yonghe

    2017-03-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) is an essential Wnt co-receptor of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Although studies have shown an increased expression of LRP6 in several types of cancer, its function in tumor development and progression remains to be elucidated. We herein demonstrated that LRP6 expression is up-regulated in human triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients and human TNBC cell lines, and that knockdown of LRP6 expression and treatment of recombinant Mesd protein (a specific inhibitor of LRP6) significantly decreased cell migration and invasion of TNBC MDA-MB-231 and BT549 cells. Interestingly, the effects of LRP6 knockdown and Mesd treatment on TNBC cell migration and invasion were more prominent than on TNBC cell proliferation/viability. Mechanistically, LRP6 knockdown and Mesd treatment inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling and decreased the expression of S100A4, a mediator of cancer metastasis and a specific target of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, in TNBC cells. Together, our data suggest that LRP6 promotes TNBC cell migration and invasion by regulating the expression and function of S100A4 via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. The Wnt Co-Receptor Lrp5 Is Required for Cranial Neural Crest Cell Migration in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Willems

    Full Text Available During vertebrate neurulation, cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, delaminate from the neural plate border, and migrate as separate streams into different cranial regions. There, they differentiate into distinct parts of the craniofacial skeleton. Canonical Wnt signaling has been shown to be essential for this process at different levels but the involved receptors remained unclear. Here we show that the frizzled co-receptor low-density-lipoprotein (LDL receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5 plays a crucial role in CNCC migration and morphogenesis of the cranial skeleton. Early during induction and migration of CNCCs, lrp5 is expressed ubiquitously but later gets restricted to CNCC derivatives in the ventral head region besides different regions in the CNS. A knock-down of lrp5 does not interfere with induction of CNCCs but leads to reduced proliferation of premigratory CNCCs. In addition, cell migration is disrupted as CNCCs are found in clusters at ectopic positions in the dorsomedial neuroepithelium after lrp5 knock-down and transient CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. These migratory defects consequently result in malformations of the craniofacial skeleton. To date, Lrp5 has mainly been associated with bone homeostasis in mammals. Here we show that in zebrafish, lrp5 also controls cell migration during early morphogenetic processes and contributes to shaping the craniofacial skeleton.

  11. Genomic editing of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 in adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells using zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijing; Krymskaya, Ludmila; Wang, Jianbin; Henley, Jill; Rao, Anitha; Cao, Lan-Feng; Tran, Chy-Anh; Torres-Coronado, Monica; Gardner, Agnes; Gonzalez, Nancy; Kim, Kenneth; Liu, Pei-Qi; Hofer, Ursula; Lopez, Evan; Gregory, Philip D; Liu, Qing; Holmes, Michael C; Cannon, Paula M; Zaia, John A; DiGiusto, David L

    2013-06-01

    The HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 is a validated target for HIV/AIDS therapy. The apparent elimination of HIV-1 in a patient treated with an allogeneic stem cell transplant homozygous for a naturally occurring CCR5 deletion mutation (CCR5(Δ32/Δ32)) supports the concept that a single dose of HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem cells can provide disease protection. Given the low frequency of naturally occurring CCR5(Δ32/Δ32) donors, we reasoned that engineered autologous CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) could be used for AIDS therapy. We evaluated disruption of CCR5 gene expression in HSPCs isolated from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-mobilized adult blood using a recombinant adenoviral vector encoding a CCR5-specific pair of zinc finger nucleases (CCR5-ZFN). Our results demonstrate that CCR5-ZFN RNA and protein expression from the adenoviral vector is enhanced by pretreatment of HSPC with protein kinase C (PKC) activators resulting in >25% CCR5 gene disruption and that activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway is responsible for this activity. Importantly, using an optimized dose of PKC activator and adenoviral vector we could generate CCR5-modified HSPCs which engraft in a humanized mouse model (albeit at a reduced level) and support multilineage differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Together, these data establish the basis for improved approaches exploiting adenoviral vector delivery in the modification of HSPCs.

  12. The Wnt Co-Receptor Lrp5 Is Required for Cranial Neural Crest Cell Migration in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Bernd; Tao, Shijie; Yu, Tingsheng; Huysseune, Ann; Witten, Paul Eckhard; Winkler, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    During vertebrate neurulation, cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), delaminate from the neural plate border, and migrate as separate streams into different cranial regions. There, they differentiate into distinct parts of the craniofacial skeleton. Canonical Wnt signaling has been shown to be essential for this process at different levels but the involved receptors remained unclear. Here we show that the frizzled co-receptor low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5) plays a crucial role in CNCC migration and morphogenesis of the cranial skeleton. Early during induction and migration of CNCCs, lrp5 is expressed ubiquitously but later gets restricted to CNCC derivatives in the ventral head region besides different regions in the CNS. A knock-down of lrp5 does not interfere with induction of CNCCs but leads to reduced proliferation of premigratory CNCCs. In addition, cell migration is disrupted as CNCCs are found in clusters at ectopic positions in the dorsomedial neuroepithelium after lrp5 knock-down and transient CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. These migratory defects consequently result in malformations of the craniofacial skeleton. To date, Lrp5 has mainly been associated with bone homeostasis in mammals. Here we show that in zebrafish, lrp5 also controls cell migration during early morphogenetic processes and contributes to shaping the craniofacial skeleton.

  13. Phenotypic Knockout of HIV-1 Chemokine Coreceptor CXCR4 and CCR5 by Intrakines for Blocking HIV-1 Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖; 张岩; 王平忠; 王九平; 黄长形; 孙永涛; 白雪帆

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the phenotypic knockout of HIV-1 chemokine coreceptor CXCR4 and CCR5 by intrakines and its inhibitory effect on HIV-1 infection. Primary human PBLs were transduced with the recombinant vector pLNCX-R-K-S-K(△NGFR), followed by anti-NGFR/anti-IgG-magnetic bead method selection and FCM detection. The transduced PBLs were infected with DP1 HIV-1 virus thereafter envelope-mediated syncytium formation and p24 detection were carried out to study the blockage of HIV-1 infection by co-inactivation of CCR5 and CXCR4. pLNCX-R-K-S-K (△NGFR)-transduced PBILs were isolated with an anti-NGFR/anti-IgG-magnetic bead method. After isolation, about 70% of the PBLs were positive for the NGFR marker. When the transduced PBLs were infected with DP1 HIV-1 virus, envelop-mediated syncytium formation was almost completely inhibited by pLNCX-R-K-S-K(△NGFR) transfection. Also, p24 antigen was very low in the cultures of pLNCX-R-K-S-K (△NGFR) transduced PBLs. pLNCX-R-K-S-K(△NGFR) transduction inhibited the production of DP1 p24 antigen by 15%, 43% and 19% on days 4, 7 and 10 respectively. The lymphocytes with the phenotypic knockout of CCR5 and CXCR4 could protect primary human PBLs from DP1 HIV-1 virus infection.

  14. Drosophila miR-932 modulates hedgehog signaling by targeting its co-receptor Brother of ihog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Wu, Longfei; Hou, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Qinghai; Zhang, Feifei; Ye, Xiaolei; Yang, Yongfei; Lin, Xinhua

    2013-05-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) proteins act as morphogens in a variety of developmental contexts to control cell fates and growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Therefore, secretion, distribution, and reception of Hh proteins must be tightly regulated and deregulation of these processes contributes to numerous human diseases. Brother of ihog (Boi) and its close relative Ihog (Interference hedgehog) are cell surface proteins that act as Hh co-receptors required for Hh signaling response and cell-surface maintenance of Hh protein. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of widely expressed 21-23 nucleotides non-coding RNAs that repress gene function through interactions with target mRNAs. Here, we have identified a novel miRNA, miR-932, as an important regulator for Boi. We show that overexpression of miR-932 in the wing disc can enhance Hh signaling strength, but reduce its signaling range, a phenotype similar to that of boi knockdown. In both in vivo sensor assay and in vitro luciferase assay, miR-932 can suppress Boi by directly binding to its 3'UTR. Meanwhile, down-regulation of miR-932 by sponge elevates the protein level of Boi, confirming that miR-932 is an in vivo regulator of Boi expression. Further, we demonstrate that miR-932 can block Hh signaling when co-expressed with ihog-RNAi. Moreover, we find that other predicted miRNAs of Boi fail to suppress it as strong as miR-932. Taken together, our data demonstrate that miR-932 can modulate Hh activity by specifically targeting Boi in Drosophila, illustrating the important roles of miRNAs in fine regulation of the Hh signaling pathway.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection.

  16. mRNA transfection of a novel TAL effector nuclease (TALEN) facilitates efficient knockout of HIV co-receptor CCR5

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Homozygosity for a natural deletion variant of the HIV-coreceptor molecule CCR5, CCR5Δ32, confers resistance toward HIV infection. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a CCR5Δ32-homozygous donor has resulted in the first cure from HIV (‘Berlin patient’). Based thereon, genetic disruption of CCR5 using designer nucleases was proposed as a promising HIV gene-therapy approach. Here we introduce a novel TAL-effector nuclease, CCR5-Uco-TALEN that can be efficiently delivered into T cells by m...

  17. Accurate and efficient gp120 V3 loop structure based models for the determination of HIV-1 co-receptor usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaisman Iosif I

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 targets human cells expressing both the CD4 receptor, which binds the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120, as well as either the CCR5 (R5 or CXCR4 (X4 co-receptors, which interact primarily with the third hypervariable loop (V3 loop of gp120. Determination of HIV-1 affinity for either the R5 or X4 co-receptor on host cells facilitates the inclusion of co-receptor antagonists as a part of patient treatment strategies. A dataset of 1193 distinct gp120 V3 loop peptide sequences (989 R5-utilizing, 204 X4-capable is utilized to train predictive classifiers based on implementations of random forest, support vector machine, boosted decision tree, and neural network machine learning algorithms. An in silico mutagenesis procedure employing multibody statistical potentials, computational geometry, and threading of variant V3 sequences onto an experimental structure, is used to generate a feature vector representation for each variant whose components measure environmental perturbations at corresponding structural positions. Results Classifier performance is evaluated based on stratified 10-fold cross-validation, stratified dataset splits (2/3 training, 1/3 validation, and leave-one-out cross-validation. Best reported values of sensitivity (85%, specificity (100%, and precision (98% for predicting X4-capable HIV-1 virus, overall accuracy (97%, Matthew's correlation coefficient (89%, balanced error rate (0.08, and ROC area (0.97 all reach critical thresholds, suggesting that the models outperform six other state-of-the-art methods and come closer to competing with phenotype assays. Conclusions The trained classifiers provide instantaneous and reliable predictions regarding HIV-1 co-receptor usage, requiring only translated V3 loop genotypes as input. Furthermore, the novelty of these computational mutagenesis based predictor attributes distinguishes the models as orthogonal and complementary to previous methods that utilize sequence

  18. Aberrantly elevated microRNA-34a in obesity attenuates hepatic responses to FGF19 by targeting a membrane coreceptor β-Klotho

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Ting; Choi, Sung-E; Kim, Dong-hyun; Seok, Sunmi; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, H Eric; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) is the most highly elevated hepatic miR in obese mice and is also substantially elevated in patients who have steatosis, but its role in obesity and metabolic dysfunction remains unclear. After a meal, FGF19 is secreted from the ileum; binds to a hepatic membrane receptor complex, FGF19 receptor 4 and coreceptor β-Klotho (βKL); and mediates postprandial responses under physiological conditions, but hepatic responses to FGF19 signaling were shown to be impaired in patien...

  19. Heavy chain-only IgG2b llama antibody effects near-pan HIV-1 neutralization by recognizing a CD4-induced epitope that includes elements of coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Priyamvada; Luongo, Timothy S; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Matz, Julie; Schmidt, Stephen D; Louder, Mark K; Kessler, Pascal; Yang, Yongping; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Lei; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Martin, Loïc; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D

    2013-09-01

    The conserved HIV-1 site of coreceptor binding is protected from antibody-directed neutralization by conformational and steric restrictions. While inaccessible to most human antibodies, the coreceptor site has been shown to be accessed by antibody fragments. In this study, we used X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and pseudovirus neutralization to characterize the gp120-envelope glycoprotein recognition and HIV-1 neutralization of a heavy chain-only llama antibody, named JM4. We describe full-length IgG2b and IgG3 versions of JM4 that target the coreceptor-binding site and potently neutralize over 95% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Contrary to established trends that show improved access to the coreceptor-binding region by smaller antibody fragments, the single-domain (VHH) version of JM4 neutralized less well than the full-length IgG2b version of JM4. The crystal structure at 2.1-Å resolution of VHH JM4 bound to HIV-1 YU2 gp120 stabilized in the CD4-bound state by the CD4-mimetic miniprotein, M48U1, revealed a JM4 epitope that combined regions of coreceptor recognition (including the gp120 bridging sheet, V3 loop, and β19 strand) with gp120 structural elements involved in recognition of CD4 such as the CD4-binding loop. The structure of JM4 with gp120 thus defines a novel CD4-induced site of vulnerability involving elements of both coreceptor- and CD4-binding sites. The potently neutralizing JM4 IgG2b antibody that targets this newly defined site of vulnerability adds to the expanding repertoire of broadly neutralizing antibodies that effectively neutralize HIV-1 and thereby potentially provides a new template for vaccine development and target for HIV-1 therapy.

  20. HIV-1 co-receptor usage based on V3 loop sequence analysis: preferential suppression of CXCR4 virus post HAART?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yanmei; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhu, Huanzhang; Wu, Hao

    2011-01-01

    Disease progression during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection has been associated with a switch of viral coreceptor usage from CCR5 to CXCR4. The current study investigates the effect of anti retroviral therapy (ART) on the viral tropism in a group of patients based on the V3 loop sequence, in ART naïve patients prior to and 24 weeks after ART. Genomic DNA was extracted from the PBMCs of these patients, and the C2-V5 region of the HIV-1 env genes were cloned and sequenced. The coreceptor usage was predicated based on V3 loop amino acid sequences using Geno2pheno and PSSM programs. Our results indicate that following ART, the plasma viral loads of both CXCR4 and CCR5 viruses were significantly decreased. We observed a relatively higher ratio of R5 than X4 virus after 24 weeks of ART and both the positive charges and the net charges of the V3 regions were decreased significantly (p suppression of X4 virus. These data will help improve prognostic outcomes and help clinicians determine the course of treatment in patients who exhibit virologic failure while taking a CCR5 antagonist.

  1. Resistance to the CCR5 inhibitor 5P12-RANTES requires a difficult evolution from CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Nedellec

    Full Text Available Viral resistance to small molecule allosteric inhibitors of CCR5 is well documented, and involves either selection of preexisting CXCR4-using HIV-1 variants or envelope sequence evolution to use inhibitor-bound CCR5 for entry. Resistance to macromolecular CCR5 inhibitors has been more difficult to demonstrate, although selection of CXCR4-using variants might be expected. We have compared the in vitro selection of HIV-1 CC1/85 variants resistant to either the small molecule inhibitor maraviroc (MVC or the macromolecular inhibitor 5P12-RANTES. High level resistance to MVC was conferred by the same envelope mutations as previously reported after 16-18 weeks of selection by increasing levels of MVC. The MVC-resistant mutants were fully sensitive to inhibition by 5P12-RANTES. By contrast, only transient and low level resistance to 5P12-RANTES was achieved in three sequential selection experiments, and each resulted in a subsequent collapse of virus replication. A fourth round of selection by 5P12-RANTES led, after 36 weeks, to a "resistant" variant that had switched from CCR5 to CXCR4 as a coreceptor. Envelope sequences diverged by 3.8% during selection of the 5P12-RANTES resistant, CXCR4-using variants, with unique and critical substitutions in the V3 region. A subset of viruses recovered from control cultures after 44 weeks of passage in the absence of inhibitors also evolved to use CXCR4, although with fewer and different envelope mutations. Control cultures contained both viruses that evolved to use CXCR4 by deleting four amino acids in V3, and others that maintained entry via CCR5. These results suggest that coreceptor switching may be the only route to resistance for compounds like 5P12-RANTES. This pathway requires more mutations and encounters more fitness obstacles than development of resistance to MVC, confirming the clinical observations that resistance to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors very rarely involves coreceptor switching.

  2. The evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) envelope molecular properties and coreceptor use at all stages of infection in an HIV-1 donor-recipient pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo-Matas, Diana; Rachinger, Andrea; Setiawan, Laurentia C; Boeser-Nunnink, Brigitte D; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Lemey, Philippe; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2012-01-05

    To trace the evolutionary patterns underlying evolution of coreceptor use within a host, we studied an HIV-1 transmission pair involving a donor who exclusively harbored CCR5-using (R5) variants throughout his entire disease course and a recipient who developed CXCR4-using variants. Over time, R5 variants in the donor optimized coreceptor use, which was associated with an increased number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) and elevated V3 charge in the viral envelope. Interestingly, R5 variants that were transmitted to the recipient preserved the viral characteristics of this late stage genotype and phenotype. Following a selective sweep, CXCR4-using variants subsequently emerged in the recipient coinciding with a further increase in the number of PNGS and V3 charge in the envelope of R5 viruses. Although described in a single transmission pair, the transmission and subsequent persistence of R5 variants with late stage characteristics demonstrate the potential for coreceptor use adaptation at the population level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The isolation of novel phage display-derived human recombinant antibodies against CCR5, the major co-receptor of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoni, Moria; Herschhorn, Alon; Britan-Rosich, Yelena; Kotler, Moshe; Benhar, Itai; Hizi, Amnon

    2013-08-01

    Selecting for antibodies against specific cell-surface proteins is a difficult task due to many unrelated proteins that are expressed on the cell surface. Here, we describe a method to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against native cell-surface proteins. We applied this method to isolate antibodies that selectively recognize CCR5, which is the major co-receptor for HIV entry (consequently, playing a pivotal role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis). We employed a phage screening strategy by using cells that co-express GFP and CCR5, along with an excess of control cells that do not express these proteins (and are otherwise identical to the CCR5-expressing cells). These control cells are intended to remove most of the phages that bind the cells nonspecifically; thus leading to an enrichment of the phages presenting anti-CCR5-specific antibodies. Subsequently, the CCR5-presenting cells were quantitatively sorted by flow cytometry, and the bound phages were eluted, amplified, and used for further successive selection rounds. Several different clones of human single-chain Fv antibodies that interact with CCR5-expressing cells were identified. The most specific monoclonal antibody was converted to a full-length IgG and bound the second extracellular loop of CCR5. The experimental approach presented herein for screening for CCR5-specific antibodies can be applicable to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against any cell-surface expressed protein of interest.

  4. Human cytomegalovirus-encoded UL33 and UL78 heteromerize with host CCR5 and CXCR4 impairing their HIV coreceptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadagaki, Kenjiro; Tudor, Daniela; Gbahou, Florence; Tschische, Pia; Waldhoer, Maria; Bomsel, Morgane; Jockers, Ralf; Kamal, Maud

    2012-05-24

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes four 7-transmembrane-spanning (7TM) proteins, US28, US27, UL33, and UL78, which present important sequence homology with human chemokine receptors. Whereas US28 binds a large range of chemokines and disturbs host cell signaling at different levels, the others are orphans with largely unknown functions. Assembly of 2 different 7TM proteins into hetero-oligomeric complexes may profoundly change their respective functional properties. We show that HCMV-encoded UL33 and UL78 form heteromers with CCR5 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors in transfected human embryonic kidney 293T cells and monocytic THP-1 cells. Expression of UL33 and UL78 had pleiotropic, predominantly negative, effects on CCR5 and CXCR4 cell surface expression, ligand-induced internalization, signal transduction, and migration without modifying the chemokine binding properties of CCR5 and CXCR4. Importantly, the coreceptor activity of CCR5 and CXCR4 for HIV was largely impaired in the presence of UL33 and UL78 without affecting expression of the primary HIV entry receptor CD4 and its interaction with CCR5 and CXCR4. Collectively, we identified the first molecular function for the HCMV-encoded orphan UL33 and UL78 7TM proteins, namely the regulation of cellular chemokine receptors through receptor heteromerization.

  5. Toll-like receptor 3 signalling up-regulates expression of the HIV co-receptor G-protein coupled receptor 15 on human CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Kiene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many HIV-2 and SIV isolates, as well as some HIV-1 strains, can use the orphan 7-transmembrane receptor GPR15 as co-receptor for efficient entry into host cells. GPR15 is expressed on central memory and effector memory CD4(+ T cells in healthy individuals and a subset of these cells is susceptible to HIV-1 and SIV infection. However, it has not been determined whether GPR15 expression is altered in the context of HIV-1 infection. RESULTS: Here, we show that GPR15 expression in CD4(+ T cells is markedly up-regulated in some HIV-1 infected individuals compared to the rest of the infected patients and to healthy controls. Infection of the PM1 T cell line with primary HIV-1 isolates was found to up-regulate GPR15 expression on the infected cells, indicating that viral components can induce GPR15 expression. Up-regulation of GPR15 expression on CD4(+ T cells was induced by activation of Toll-like receptor 3 signalling via TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF and was more prominent on gut-homing compared to lymph node-homing CD4(+ T cells. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that infection-induced up-regulation of GPR15 expression could increase susceptibility of CD4(+ T cells to HIV infection and target cell availability in the gut in some infected individuals.

  6. The Drosophila WIF1 homolog Shifted maintains glypican-independent Hedgehog signaling and interacts with the Hedgehog co-receptors Ihog and Boi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanesov, Andrei; Blair, Seth S

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) family proteins are secreted signaling ligands whose short- and long-range activities transform cellular fates in multiple contexts in organisms ranging from metazoans to humans. In the developing Drosophila wing, extracellular Hh binds to cell-bound glypican heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and the secreted protein Shifted (Shf), a member of Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1) family. The glypicans and Shf are required for long-range Hh movement and signaling; it has been proposed that Shf promotes long-range Hh signaling by reinforcing binding between Hh and the glypicans, and that much or all of glypican function in Hh signaling requires Shf. However, we will show here that Shf maintains short-range Hh signaling in the wing via a mechanism that does not require the presence of or binding to the Drosophila glypicans Dally and Dally-like protein. Conversely, we demonstrate interactions between Hh and the glypicans that are maintained, and even strengthened, in the absence of Shf. We present evidence that Shf binds to the CDO/BOC family Hh co-receptors Interference hedgehog (Ihog) and Brother of Ihog, suggesting that Shf regulates short-range Hh signaling through interactions with the receptor complex. In support of a functional interaction between Ihog and members of the Shf/WIF1 family, we show that Ihog can increase the Wnt-inhibitory activity of vertebrate WIF1; this result raises the possibility of interactions between WIF1 and vertebrate CDO/BOC family members.

  7. Co-receptor choice by V alpha14i NKT cells is driven by Th-POK expression rather than avoidance of CD8-mediated negative selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Isaac; Hammond, Kirsten; Sullivan, Barbara A; He, Xi; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Kappes, Dietmar; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2010-05-10

    Mouse natural killer T (NKT) cells with an invariant V alpha14-J alpha18 rearrangement (V alpha14 invariant [V alpha14i] NKT cells) are either CD4(+)CD8(-) or CD4(-)CD8(-). Because transgenic mice with forced CD8 expression in all T cells exhibited a profound NKT cell deficit, the absence of CD8 has been attributed to negative selection. We now present evidence that CD8 does not serve as a coreceptor for CD1d recognition and that the defect in development in CD8 transgene homozygous mice is the result of a reduction in secondary T cell receptor alpha rearrangements. Thymocytes from mice hemizygous for the CD8 transgene have a less severe rearrangement defect and have functional CD8(+) V alpha14i NKT cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transcription factor Th, Poxviruses and Zinc finger, and Krüppel family (Th-POK) is expressed by V alpha14i NKT cells throughout their differentiation and is necessary both to silence CD8 expression and for the functional maturity of V alpha14i NKT cells. We therefore suggest that Th-POK expression is required for the normal development of V alpha14i NKT cells and that the absence of CD8 expression by these cells is a by-product of such expression, as opposed to the result of negative selection of CD8-expressing V alpha14i NKT cells.

  8. Characterization of a novel single-chain bispecific antibody for retargeting of T cells to tumor cells via the TCR co-receptor CD8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Michalk

    Full Text Available There is currently growing interest in retargeting of effector T cells to tumor cells via bispecific antibodies (bsAbs. Usually, bsAbs are directed on the one hand to the CD3 complex of T cells and on the other hand to a molecule expressed on the surface of the target cell. A bsAb-mediated cross-linkage via CD3 leads to an activation of CD8+ T cells and consequently to killing of the target cells. In parallel, CD4+ T cells including TH1, TH2, TH17 cells and even regulatory T cells (Tregs will be activated as well. Cytokines produced by CD4+ T cells can contribute to severe side effects e. g. life-threatening cytokine storms and, thinking of the immunosupressive function of Tregs, can even be counterproductive. Therefore, we asked whether or not it is feasible to limit retargeting to CD8+ T cells e. g. via targeting of the co-receptor CD8 instead of CD3. In order to test for proof of concept, a novel bsAb with specificity for CD8 and a tumor-associated surface antigen was constructed. Interestingly, we found that pre-activated (but not freshly isolated CD8+ T cells can be retargeted via CD8-engaging bsAbs leading to an efficient lysis of target cells.

  9. Neuropilin 1 binds platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-D and is a co-receptor in PDGF-D/PDGF receptor β signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhl, Lars; Folestad, Erika Bergsten; Gladh, Hanna; Wang, Yixin; Moessinger, Christine; Jakobsson, Lars; Eriksson, Ulf

    2017-03-02

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-D is a PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ) specific ligand implicated in a number of pathological conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, but its biological function remains incompletely understood.In this study, we demonstrate that PDGF-D binds directly to NRP1, with the requirement of the C-terminal Arg residue of PDGF-D. Stimulation with PDGF-D, but not PDGF-B, induced PDGFRβ/NRP1 complex formation in fibroblasts. Additionally, PDGF-D induced translocation of NRP1 to cell-cell junctions in endothelial cells, independent of PDGFRβ, altering the availability of NRP1 for VEGF-A/VEGF receptor 2 signaling. PDGF-D showed differential effects on pericyte behavior in ex vivo sprouting assays, compared to PDGF-B. Furthermore, PDGF-D induced PDGFRβ/NRP1 interaction in the trans-configuration between endothelial cells and pericytes.In summary, we show that NRP1 can act as a co-receptor for PDGF-D in PDGFRβ signaling, possibly implicated in intercellular communication in the vascular wall.

  10. The chaperone and potential mannan-binding lectin (MBL) co-receptor calreticulin interacts with MBL through the binding site for MBL-associated serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagh, Rasmus; Duus, Karen; Laursen, Inga; Hansen, Paul R; Mangor, Julie; Thielens, Nicole; Arlaud, Gérard J; Kongerslev, Leif; Højrup, Peter; Houen, Gunnar

    2008-02-01

    The chaperone calreticulin has been suggested to function as a C1q and collectin receptor. The interaction of calreticulin with mannan-binding lectin (MBL) was investigated by solid-phase binding assays. Calreticulin showed saturable and time-dependent binding to recombinant MBL, provided that MBL was immobilized on a solid surface or bound to mannan on a surface. The binding was non-covalent and biphasic with an initial salt-sensitive phase followed by a more stable salt-insensitive interaction. For plasma-derived MBL, known to be complexed with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs), no binding was observed. Interaction of calreticulin with recombinant MBL was fully inhibited by recombinant MASP-2, MASP-3 and MAp19, but not by the MASP-2 D105G and MAp19 Y59A variants characterized by defective MBL binding ability. Furthermore, MBL point mutants with impaired MASP binding showed no interaction with calreticulin. Comparative analysis of MBL with complement component C1q, its counterpart of the classical pathway, revealed that they display similar binding characteristics for calreticulin, providing further indication that calreticulin is a common co-receptor/chaperone for both proteins. In conclusion, the potential MBL co-receptor calreticulin binds to MBL at the MASP binding site and the interaction may involve a conformational change in MBL.

  11. Cellulose acetate phthalate, a common pharmaceutical excipient, inactivates HIV-1 and blocks the coreceptor binding site on the virus envelope glycoprotein gp120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP, a pharmaceutical excipient used for enteric film coating of capsules and tablets, was shown to inhibit infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and several herpesviruses. CAP formulations inactivated HIV-1, herpesvirus types 1 (HSV-1 and 2 (HSV-2 and the major nonviral sexually transmitted disease (STD pathogens and were effective in animal models for vaginal infection by HSV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus. Methods Enzyme-linked immunoassays and flow cytometry were used to demonstrate CAP binding to HIV-1 and to define the binding site on the virus envelope. Results 1 CAP binds to HIV-1 virus particles and to the envelope glycoprotein gp120; 2 this leads to blockade of the gp120 V3 loop and other gp120 sites resulting in diminished reactivity with HIV-1 coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5; 3 CAP binding to HIV-1 virions impairs their infectivity; 4 these findings apply to both HIV-1 IIIB, an X4 virus, and HIV-1 BaL, an R5 virus. Conclusions These results provide support for consideration of CAP as a topical microbicide of choice for prevention of STDs, including HIV-1 infection.

  12. Silencing the Olfactory Co-Receptor RferOrco Reduces the Response to Pheromones in the Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffan, Alan; Antony, Binu; Abdelazim, Mahmoud; Shukla, Paraj; Witjaksono, Witjaksono; Aldosari, Saleh A; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S

    2016-01-01

    The red palm weevil (RPW, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus), one of the most widespread of all invasive insect pest species, is a major cause of severe damage to economically important palm trees. RPW exhibits behaviors very similar to those of its sympatric species, the Asian palm weevil (R. vulneratus), which is restricted geographically to the southern part of Southeast Asia. Although efficient and sustainable control of these pests remains challenging, olfactory-system disruption has been proposed as a promising approach for controlling palm weevils. Here, we report the cloning and sequencing of an olfactory co-receptor (Orco) from R. ferrugineus (RferOrco) and R. vulneratus (RvulOrco) and examine the effects of RferOrco silencing (RNAi) on odorant detection. RferOrco and RvulOrco encoding 482 amino acids showing 99.58% identity. The injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) from RferOrco into R. ferrugineus pupae significantly reduced RferOrco gene expression and led to the failure of odor-stimulus detection, as confirmed through olfactometer and electroantennography (EAG) assays. These results suggest that olfactory-system disruption leading to reduced pheromone detection holds great potential for RPW pest-control strategies.

  13. A conserved aspartic acid is important for agonist (VUAA1 and odorant/tuning receptor-dependent activation of the insect odorant co-receptor (Orco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh N Kumar

    Full Text Available Insect odorant receptors function as heteromeric odorant-gated cation channels comprising a conventional odorant-sensitive tuning receptor, and a conserved co-receptor (Orco. An Orco agonist, VUAA1, is able to activate both heteromeric and homomeric Orco-containing channels. Very little is known about specific residues in Orco that contribute to cation permeability and gating. We investigated the importance of two conserved Asp residues, one in each of transmembrane domains 5 and 7, for channel function by mutagenesis. Drosophila melanogaster Orco and its substitution mutants were expressed in HEK cells and VUAA1-stimulated channel activity was determined by Ca(2+ influx and whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology. Substitution of D466 in transmembrane 7 with amino acids other than glutamic acid resulted in a substantial reduction in channel activity. The D466E Orco substitution mutant was ~2 times more sensitive to VUAA1. The permeability of the D466E Orco mutant to cations was unchanged relative to wild-type Orco. When D466E Orco is co-expressed with a conventional tuning odorant receptor, the heteromeric complex also shows increased sensitivity to an odorant. Thus, the effect of the D466E mutation is not specific to VUAA1 agonism or dependent on homomeric Orco assembly. We suggest the gain-of-activation characteristic of the D466E mutant identifies an amino acid that is likely to be important for activation of both heteromeric and homomeric insect odorant receptor channels.

  14. Frequencies of 32 base pair deletion of the (Delta 32) allele of the CCR5 HIV-1 co-receptor gene in Caucasians: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucotte, Gérard

    2002-05-01

    The CCR5 gene encodes for the co-receptor for the major macrophage-tropics strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and a mutant allele of this gene (Delta 32) provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection by HIV. The frequency of the Delta 32 allele was investigated in 40 populations of 8842 non-infected subjects coming from Europe, the Middle-East and North Africa. A clear north-south decreasing gradient was evident for Delta 32 frequencies, with a significant correlation coefficient (r=0.83). The main frequency value of Delta 32 for Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland (0.134) is significantly (chi(2)=63.818, PVikings might have been instrumental in disseminating the Delta 32 allele during the eighth to the tenth centuries during historical times. Possibly variola virus has discriminated the Delta 32 carriers in Europe since the eighth century AD, explaining the high frequency of the Delta 32 allele in Europe today.

  15. Silencing the Olfactory Co-Receptor RferOrco Reduces the Response to Pheromones in the Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffan, Alan; Abdelazim, Mahmoud; Shukla, Paraj; Witjaksono, Witjaksono; Aldosari, Saleh A.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2016-01-01

    The red palm weevil (RPW, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus), one of the most widespread of all invasive insect pest species, is a major cause of severe damage to economically important palm trees. RPW exhibits behaviors very similar to those of its sympatric species, the Asian palm weevil (R. vulneratus), which is restricted geographically to the southern part of Southeast Asia. Although efficient and sustainable control of these pests remains challenging, olfactory-system disruption has been proposed as a promising approach for controlling palm weevils. Here, we report the cloning and sequencing of an olfactory co-receptor (Orco) from R. ferrugineus (RferOrco) and R. vulneratus (RvulOrco) and examine the effects of RferOrco silencing (RNAi) on odorant detection. RferOrco and RvulOrco encoding 482 amino acids showing 99.58% identity. The injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) from RferOrco into R. ferrugineus pupae significantly reduced RferOrco gene expression and led to the failure of odor-stimulus detection, as confirmed through olfactometer and electroantennography (EAG) assays. These results suggest that olfactory-system disruption leading to reduced pheromone detection holds great potential for RPW pest-control strategies. PMID:27606688

  16. Straightforward selection of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies targeting the conserved CD4 and coreceptor binding sites of HIV-1 gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Julie; Kessler, Pascal; Bouchet, Jérôme; Combes, Olivier; Ramos, Oscar Henrique Pereira; Barin, Francis; Baty, Daniel; Martin, Loïc; Benichou, Serge; Chames, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Few broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting determinants of the HIV-1 surface envelope glycoprotein (gp120) involved in sequential binding to host CD4 and chemokine receptors have been characterized. While these epitopes show low diversity among various isolates, HIV-1 employs many strategies to evade humoral immune response toward these sensitive sites, including a carbohydrate shield, low accessibility to these buried cavities, and conformational masking. Using trimeric gp140, free or bound to a CD4 mimic, as immunogens in llamas, we selected a panel of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) that bind to either the CD4 or the coreceptor binding site (CD4BS and CoRBS, respectively). When analyzed as monomers or as homo- or heteromultimers, the best sdAb candidates could not only neutralize viruses carrying subtype B envelopes, corresponding to the Env molecule used for immunization and selection, but were also efficient in neutralizing a broad panel of envelopes from subtypes A, C, G, CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG, including tier 3 viruses. Interestingly, sdAb multimers exhibited a broader neutralizing activity spectrum than the parental sdAb monomers. The extreme stability and high recombinant production yield combined with their broad neutralization capacity make these sdAbs new potential microbicide candidates for HIV-1 transmission prevention.

  17. A Conserved Aspartic Acid Is Important for Agonist (VUAA1) and Odorant/Tuning Receptor-Dependent Activation of the Insect Odorant Co-Receptor (Orco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Brijesh N.; Taylor, Robert W.; Pask, Gregory M.; Zwiebel, Laurence J.; Newcomb, Richard D.; Christie, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Insect odorant receptors function as heteromeric odorant-gated cation channels comprising a conventional odorant-sensitive tuning receptor, and a conserved co-receptor (Orco). An Orco agonist, VUAA1, is able to activate both heteromeric and homomeric Orco-containing channels. Very little is known about specific residues in Orco that contribute to cation permeability and gating. We investigated the importance of two conserved Asp residues, one in each of transmembrane domains 5 and 7, for channel function by mutagenesis. Drosophila melanogaster Orco and its substitution mutants were expressed in HEK cells and VUAA1-stimulated channel activity was determined by Ca2+ influx and whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology. Substitution of D466 in transmembrane 7 with amino acids other than glutamic acid resulted in a substantial reduction in channel activity. The D466E Orco substitution mutant was ∼2 times more sensitive to VUAA1. The permeability of the D466E Orco mutant to cations was unchanged relative to wild-type Orco. When D466E Orco is co-expressed with a conventional tuning odorant receptor, the heteromeric complex also shows increased sensitivity to an odorant. Thus, the effect of the D466E mutation is not specific to VUAA1 agonism or dependent on homomeric Orco assembly. We suggest the gain-of-activation characteristic of the D466E mutant identifies an amino acid that is likely to be important for activation of both heteromeric and homomeric insect odorant receptor channels. PMID:23894621

  18. The Olfactory Co-receptor Orco from the Migratory Locust (Locusta migratoria and the Desert Locust (Schistocerca gregaria: Identification and Expression pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yang, Jürgen Krieger, Long Zhang, Heinz Breer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In locusts, olfaction plays a crucial role for initiating and controlling behaviours, including food seeking and aggregation with conspecifics, which underlie the agricultural pest capacity of the animals. In this context, the molecular basis of olfaction in these insects is of particular interest. Here, we have identified genes of two orthopteran species, Locusta migratoria and Schistocera gregaria, which encode the olfactory receptor co-receptor (Orco. It was found that the sequences of LmigOrco and SgreOrco share a high degree of identity to each other and also to Orco proteins from different insect orders. The Orco-expressing cells in the antenna of S. gregaria and L. migratoria were visualized by in situ hybridization. Orco expression could be assigned to clusters of cells in sensilla basiconica and few cells in sensilla trichoidea, most likely representing olfactory sensory neurons. No Orco-positive cells were detected in sensilla coeloconica and sensilla chaetica. Orco expression was found already in all nymphal stages and was verified in some other tissues which are equipped with chemosensory hairs (mouthparts, tarsi, wings. Together, the results support the notion for a decisive role of Orco in locust olfaction.

  19. The olfactory co-receptor Orco from the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) and the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria): identification and expression pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Krieger, Jürgen; Zhang, Long; Breer, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    In locusts, olfaction plays a crucial role for initiating and controlling behaviours, including food seeking and aggregation with conspecifics, which underlie the agricultural pest capacity of the animals. In this context, the molecular basis of olfaction in these insects is of particular interest. Here, we have identified genes of two orthopteran species, Locusta migratoria and Schistocera gregaria, which encode the olfactory receptor co-receptor (Orco). It was found that the sequences of LmigOrco and SgreOrco share a high degree of identity to each other and also to Orco proteins from different insect orders. The Orco-expressing cells in the antenna of S. gregaria and L. migratoria were visualized by in situ hybridization. Orco expression could be assigned to clusters of cells in sensilla basiconica and few cells in sensilla trichodea, most likely representing olfactory sensory neurons. No Orco-positive cells were detected in sensilla coeloconica and sensilla chaetica. Orco expression was found already in all nymphal stages and was verified in some other tissues which are equipped with chemosensory hairs (mouthparts, tarsi, wings). Together, the results support the notion for a decisive role of Orco in locust olfaction.

  20. Structure-based stabilization of HIV-1 gp120 enhances humoral immune responses to the induced co-receptor binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Dey

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, possesses conserved binding sites for interaction with the primary virus receptor, CD4, and also for the co-receptor, generally CCR5. Although gp120 is a major target for virus-specific neutralizing antibodies, the gp120 variable elements and its malleable nature contribute to evasion of effective host-neutralizing antibodies. To understand the conformational character and immunogenicity of the gp120 receptor binding sites as potential vaccine targets, we introduced structure-based modifications to stabilize gp120 core proteins (deleted of the gp120 major variable regions into the conformation recognized by both receptors. Thermodynamic analysis of the re-engineered core with selected ligands revealed significant stabilization of the receptor-binding regions. Stabilization of the co-receptor-binding region was associated with a marked increase in on-rate of ligand binding to this site as determined by surface plasmon resonance. Rabbit immunization studies showed that the conformational stabilization of core proteins, along with increased ligand affinity, was associated with strikingly enhanced humoral immune responses against the co-receptor-binding site. These results demonstrate that structure-based approaches can be exploited to stabilize a conformational site in a large functional protein to enhance immunogenic responses specific for that region.

  1. Chemokine receptor CCR2b 64I polymorphism and its relation to CD4 T-cell counts and disease progression in a Danish cohort of HIV-infected individuals. Copenhagen AIDS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Iversen, Anton; Benfield, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    -infected long-term nonprogressors for possible mutations. In total, 215 Danish individuals were analyzed for 64I allele frequency; disease progression was followed in 105 HIV-1-positive homosexual Danish men from their first known positive HIV-1 test result and up to 11 years. In 87 individuals, the CD4 T...

  2. Chemokine co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4-dependent modulation of Kv2.1 channel confers acute neuroprotection to HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Shepherd

    Full Text Available Infection with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 within the brain has long been known to be associated with neurodegeneration and neurocognitive disorder (referred as HAND, a condition characterized in its early stages by declining cognitive function and behavioral disturbances. Mechanistically, the HIV-1 coat glycoprotein 120 (gp120 has been suggested to be a critical factor inducing apoptotic cell death in neurons via the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, upon chronic exposure to the virus. Here we show that acute exposure of neurons to HIV-1 gp120 elicits a homeostatic response, which provides protection against non-apoptotic cell death, involving the major somatodendritic voltage-gated K⁺ (Kv channel Kv2.1 as the key mediator. The Kv2.1 channel has recently been shown to provide homeostatic control of neuronal excitability under conditions of seizures, ischemia and neuromodulation/neuroinflammation. Following acute exposure to gp120, cultured rat hippocampal neurons show rapid dephosphorylation of the Kv2.1 protein, which ultimately leads to changes in specific sub-cellular localization and voltage-dependent channel activation properties of Kv2.1. Such modifications in Kv2.1 are dependent on the activation of the chemokine co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, and subsequent activation of the protein phosphatase calcineurin. This leads to the overall suppression of neuronal excitability and provides neurons with a homeostatic protective mechanism. Specific blockade of calcineurin and Kv2.1 channel activity led to significant enhancement of non-apoptotic neuronal death upon acute gp120 treatment. These observations shed new light on the intrinsic homeostatic mechanisms of neuronal resilience during the acute stages of neuro-HIV infections.

  3. High-affinity binding of southern African HIV type 1 subtype C envelope protein, gp120, to the CCR5 coreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Bernhard J; Coetsee, Marla; Van Der Watt, Pauline; Chan, Mei-Chi; Sperling, Karin M; Katz, Arieh A; Flanagan, Colleen A

    2008-12-01

    HIV-1 subtype C is the fastest spreading subtype worldwide and predominantly uses the CCR5 coreceptor, showing minimal transition to the X4 phenotype. This raises the possibility that envelope proteins of HIV-1 subtype C have structural features that favor interaction with CCR5. Preference for CCR5 could arise from enhanced affinity of HIV-1 subtype C for CCR5. To test this, we have characterized the interaction of gp120 envelope proteins from HIV-1 subtype C clones with CD4 and CCR5. Recombinant gp120 proteins from isolates of HIV-1 subtypes B and C were expressed, purified, and assessed in a CD4 binding assay and a CCR5 chemokine competition binding assay. All gp120 proteins bound to CD4-expressing cells, except one, 97ZA347ts, which had Arg substituted for the Cys239 in the conserved C2 loop. Reconstitution of Cys239, using site-directed mutagenesis, restored CD4 binding, while introducing Arg or Ser into position 239 of the functional Du151 gp120 protein abrogated CD4 binding. This shows that the Cys228-Cys239 disulfide bond of gp120 is required for high-affinity binding to CD4. Recombinant gp120 proteins from two HIV-1 subtype B clones bound CCR5 in the presence of CD4, while gp120 from the X4-tropic, HxB2, clone did not bind CCR5. gp120 from two functional HIV-1 subtype C clones, Du151 and MOLE1, bound CCR5 with high affinity in the presence of CD4 and Du151 showed significant CCR5 binding in the absence of CD4. A gp120 from a nonfunctional subtype C clone had lower affinity for CCR5. These results indicate that HIV-1 subtype C proteins have high affinity for CCR5 with variable dependence on CD4.

  4. Chemokine co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4-dependent modulation of Kv2.1 channel confers acute neuroprotection to HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Andrew J; Loo, Lipin; Mohapatra, Durga P

    2013-01-01

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) within the brain has long been known to be associated with neurodegeneration and neurocognitive disorder (referred as HAND), a condition characterized in its early stages by declining cognitive function and behavioral disturbances. Mechanistically, the HIV-1 coat glycoprotein 120 (gp120) has been suggested to be a critical factor inducing apoptotic cell death in neurons via the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), upon chronic exposure to the virus. Here we show that acute exposure of neurons to HIV-1 gp120 elicits a homeostatic response, which provides protection against non-apoptotic cell death, involving the major somatodendritic voltage-gated K⁺ (Kv) channel Kv2.1 as the key mediator. The Kv2.1 channel has recently been shown to provide homeostatic control of neuronal excitability under conditions of seizures, ischemia and neuromodulation/neuroinflammation. Following acute exposure to gp120, cultured rat hippocampal neurons show rapid dephosphorylation of the Kv2.1 protein, which ultimately leads to changes in specific sub-cellular localization and voltage-dependent channel activation properties of Kv2.1. Such modifications in Kv2.1 are dependent on the activation of the chemokine co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, and subsequent activation of the protein phosphatase calcineurin. This leads to the overall suppression of neuronal excitability and provides neurons with a homeostatic protective mechanism. Specific blockade of calcineurin and Kv2.1 channel activity led to significant enhancement of non-apoptotic neuronal death upon acute gp120 treatment. These observations shed new light on the intrinsic homeostatic mechanisms of neuronal resilience during the acute stages of neuro-HIV infections.

  5. Expression of betaglycan, an inhibin coreceptor, in normal human ovaries and ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors and its regulation in cultured human granulosa-luteal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianqi; Kuulasmaa, Tiina; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Bützow, Ralf; Vänttinen, Teemu; Hydén-Granskog, Christel; Voutilainen, Raimo

    2003-10-01

    Activins and inhibins are often antagonistic in the regulation of ovarian function. TGFbeta type III receptor, betaglycan, has been identified as a coreceptor to enhance the binding of inhibins to activin type II receptor and thus to prevent the binding of activins to their receptor. In this study we characterized the expression and regulation pattern of betaglycan gene in normal ovaries and sex cord-stromal tumors and in cultured human granulosa-luteal cells from women undergoing in vitro fertilization. Expression of betaglycan mRNA was detected by RT-PCR or Northern blotting in normal ovarian granulosa, thecal, and stroma cells as well as in granulosa-luteal cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed positive staining for betaglycan in antral and preovulatory follicular granulosa and thecal cells and in corpora lutea of normal ovaries. Furthermore, betaglycan expression was detected in the vast majority of granulosa cell tumors, thecomas, and fibromas, with weaker staining in granulosa cell tumors compared with fibrothecomas. In cultured granulosa-luteal cells, FSH and LH treatment increased dose-dependently the accumulation of betaglycan mRNA, as did the protein kinase A activator dibutyryl cAMP and the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine. In contrast, the protein kinase C activator 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate had no significant effect on betaglycan mRNA levels. Treatment with prostaglandin E(2) and with its receptor EP2 subtype agonist butaprost increased betaglycan mRNA accumulation and progesterone secretion dose- and time-dependently. In summary, betaglycan gene is expressed in normal human ovarian steroidogenic cells and sex cord-stromal ovarian tumors. The accumulation of its mRNA in cultured granulosa-luteal cells is up-regulated by gonadotropins and prostaglandin E(2), probably via the protein kinase A pathway. The specific expression and regulation pattern of betaglycan gene may be related to the functional antagonism of inhibins to

  6. AMIGO3 is an NgR1/p75 co-receptor signalling axon growth inhibition in the acute phase of adult central nervous system injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubair Ahmed

    Full Text Available Axon regeneration in the injured adult CNS is reportedly inhibited by myelin-derived inhibitory molecules, after binding to a receptor complex comprised of the Nogo-66 receptor (NgR1 and two transmembrane co-receptors p75/TROY and LINGO-1. However, the post-injury expression pattern for LINGO-1 is inconsistent with its proposed function. We demonstrated that AMIGO3 levels were significantly higher acutely than those of LINGO-1 in dorsal column lesions and reduced in models of dorsal root ganglion neuron (DRGN axon regeneration. Similarly, AMIGO3 levels were raised in the retina immediately after optic nerve crush, whilst levels were suppressed in regenerating optic nerves, induced by intravitreal peripheral nerve implantation. AMIGO3 interacted functionally with NgR1-p75/TROY in non-neuronal cells and in brain lysates, mediating RhoA activation in response to CNS myelin. Knockdown of AMIGO3 in myelin-inhibited adult primary DRG and retinal cultures promoted disinhibited neurite growth when cells were stimulated with appropriate neurotrophic factors. These findings demonstrate that AMIGO3 substitutes for LINGO-1 in the NgR1-p75/TROY inhibitory signalling complex and suggests that the NgR1-p75/TROY-AMIGO3 receptor complex mediates myelin-induced inhibition of axon growth acutely in the CNS. Thus, antagonizing AMIGO3 rather than LINGO-1 immediately after CNS injury is likely to be a more effective therapeutic strategy for promoting CNS axon regeneration when combined with neurotrophic factor administration.

  7. mRNA transfection of a novel TAL effector nuclease (TALEN) facilitates efficient knockout of HIV co-receptor CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Ulrike; Machowicz, Rafał; Hauber, Ilona; Horn, Stefan; Abramowski, Pierre; Berdien, Belinda; Hauber, Joachim; Fehse, Boris

    2015-06-23

    Homozygosity for a natural deletion variant of the HIV-coreceptor molecule CCR5, CCR5Δ32, confers resistance toward HIV infection. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a CCR5Δ32-homozygous donor has resulted in the first cure from HIV ('Berlin patient'). Based thereon, genetic disruption of CCR5 using designer nucleases was proposed as a promising HIV gene-therapy approach. Here we introduce a novel TAL-effector nuclease, CCR5-Uco-TALEN that can be efficiently delivered into T cells by mRNA electroporation, a gentle and truly transient gene-transfer technique. CCR5-Uco-TALEN mediated high-rate CCR5 knockout (>90% in PM1 and >50% in primary T cells) combined with low off-target activity, as assessed by flow cytometry, next-generation sequencing and a newly devised, very convenient gene-editing frequency digital-PCR (GEF-dPCR). GEF-dPCR facilitates simultaneous detection of wild-type and gene-edited alleles with remarkable sensitivity and accuracy as shown for the CCR5 on-target and CCR2 off-target loci. CCR5-edited cells were protected from infection with HIV-derived lentiviral vectors, but also with the wild-type CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL strain. Long-term exposure to HIV-1BaL resulted in almost complete suppression of viral replication and selection of CCR5-gene edited T cells. In conclusion, we have developed a novel TALEN for the targeted, high-efficiency knockout of CCR5 and a useful dPCR-based gene-editing detection method.

  8. Suppression of multiclade R5 and X4 human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infections by a coreceptor-based anti-HIV strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Daisuke; Misumi, Shogo; Mukai, Ryouzaburo; Tachibana, Kuniomi; Umeda, Mamoru; Shibata, Hideaki; Takamune, Nobutoki; Shoji, Shozo

    2005-11-01

    A cyclic chimeric dodecapeptide (cCD) mimicking the conformation-specific domains of CCR5 and CXCR4 was prepared in which Gly-Asp links the amino and carboxyl termini of two combined pentapeptides (S169-G173 of CCR5; E179-R183 of CXCR4) derived from human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) coreceptors. The immunization of Balb/c mice with cCD conjugated with a multiple-antigen peptide (cCD-MAP) induced seven cCD-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, CPMAb-I to -VII) that reacted with native CCR5 and CXCR4. Among the tested mAbs, CPMAb-I and -II potently inhibited the infection of both the R5 and X4 laboratory strains. CPMAb-III and -VI were effective against only R5 laboratory strains, and also against some X4 and R5 primary isolates. CPMAb-IV and -V had potent antiviral activities against the R5 and X4 primary isolates. In particular, CPMAb-VII was protective against not only R5 and X4 laboratory strains, but also most of the R5 and X4 primary isolates. Moreover, cCD-MAP immunization also induced antibodies that were effective against R5 and X4 multiclade HIV-1 isolates in vitro in two of three cynomolgus monkeys. Taken together, the results suggest that cCD-MAP is a candidate multiclade immunogen that can be used to block multiclade R5 and X4 HIV-1 infections.

  9. Analysis of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signalling network with heparin as coreceptor: evidence for the expansion of the core FGFR signalling network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruoyan; Rudd, Timothy R; Hughes, Ashley J; Siligardi, Giuliano; Fernig, David G; Yates, Edwin A

    2013-05-01

    The evolution of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-FGF receptor (FGFR) signalling system has closely followed that of multicellular organisms. The abilities of nine FGFs (FGF-1 to FGF-9; examples of FGF subfamilies 1, 4, 7, 8, and 9) and seven FGFRs or isoforms (FGFR1b, FGFR1c, FGFR2b, FGFR2c, FGFR3b, FGFR3c, and FGFR4) to support signalling in the presence of heparin, a proxy for the cellular heparan sulfate coreceptor, were assembled into a network. A connection between two FGFRs was defined as their mutual ability to signal with a particular FGF. The network contained a core of four receptors (FGFR1c, FGFR2c, FGFR3c, and FGFR4) with complete connectivity and high redundancy. Analysis of the wider network indicated that neither FGF-3 nor FGF-7 was well connected to this core of four receptors, and that divergence of a precursor of FGF subgroups 1, 4 and 9 from FGF subgroup 8 may have allowed expansion from a three-member FGFR core signalling system to the four-member core network. This increases by four-fold the number of possible signalling combinations. Synchrotron radiation CD spectra of the FGFs with heparin revealed no overall common structural change, suggesting the existence of distinct heparin-binding sites throughout the FGFs. The approach provides a potential method of identifying agents capable of influencing particular FGF-FGFR combinations, or areas of the signalling network, for experimental or therapeutic purposes.

  10. Inhibition of LPS binding to MD-2 co-receptor for suppressing TLR4-mediated expression of inflammatory cytokine by 1-dehydro-10-gingerdione from dietary ginger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun Hong; Kyeong, Min Sik; Hwang, Yuri [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Shi Yong [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang-Bae [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngsoo, E-mail: youngsoo@chungbuk.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1-Dehydro-10-gingerdione (1D10G) from ginger inhibits LPS binding to MD-2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1D10G suppresses MyD88- or TRIF-dependent signaling in LPS-activated macrophages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1D10G down-regulates the expression of NF-{kappa}B-, AP1- or IRF3-target genes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MD-2 is a molecular target in the anti-inflammatory action of 1D10G. -- Abstract: Myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) is a co-receptor of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) for innate immunity. Here, we delineated a new mechanism of 1-dehydro-10-gingerdione (1D10G), one of pungent isolates from ginger (Zingiber officinale), in the suppression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced gene expression of inflammatory cytokines. 1D10G inhibited LPS binding to MD-2 with higher affinity than gingerol and shogaol from dietary ginger. Moreover, 1D10G down-regulated TLR4-mediated expression of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) or activating protein 1 (AP1)-target genes such as tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-1{beta}, as well as those of interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)-target IFN-{beta} gene and IFN-{gamma} inducible protein 10 (IP-10) in LPS-activated macrophages. Taken together, MD-2 is a molecular target in the anti-inflammatory action of 1D10G.

  11. Aberrantly elevated microRNA-34a in obesity attenuates hepatic responses to FGF19 by targeting a membrane coreceptor β-Klotho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ting; Choi, Sung-E; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Seok, Sunmi; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Xu, H Eric; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2012-10-02

    MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) is the most highly elevated hepatic miR in obese mice and is also substantially elevated in patients who have steatosis, but its role in obesity and metabolic dysfunction remains unclear. After a meal, FGF19 is secreted from the ileum; binds to a hepatic membrane receptor complex, FGF19 receptor 4 and coreceptor β-Klotho (βKL); and mediates postprandial responses under physiological conditions, but hepatic responses to FGF19 signaling were shown to be impaired in patients with steatosis. Here, we show an unexpected functional link between aberrantly elevated miR-34a and impaired βKL/FGF19 signaling in obesity. In vitro studies show that miR-34a down-regulates βKL by binding to the 3' UTR of βKL mRNA. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of miR-34a in mice decreased hepatic βKL levels, impaired FGF19-activated ERK and glycogen synthase kinase signaling, and altered expression of FGF19 metabolic target genes. Consistent with these results, βKL levels were decreased and hepatic responses to FGF19 were severely impaired in dietary obese mice that have elevated miR-34a. Remarkably, in vivo antisense inhibition of miR-34a in obese mice partially restored βKL levels and improved FGF19 target gene expression and metabolic outcomes, including decreased liver fat. Further, anti-miR-34a treatment in primary hepatocytes of obese mice restored FGF19-activated ERK and glycogen synthase kinase signaling in a βKL-dependent manner. These results indicate that aberrantly elevated miR-34a in obesity attenuates hepatic FGF19 signaling by directly targeting βKL. The miR-34a/βKL/FGF19 axis may present unique therapeutic targets for FGF19-related human diseases, including metabolic disorders and cancer.

  12. Unmasking of CD22 Co-receptor on Germinal Center B-cells Occurs by Alternative Mechanisms in Mouse and Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macauley, Matthew S; Kawasaki, Norihito; Peng, Wenjie; Wang, Shui-Hua; He, Yuan; Arlian, Britni M; McBride, Ryan; Kannagi, Reiji; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Paulson, James C

    2015-12-11

    CD22 is an inhibitory B-cell co-receptor whose function is modulated by sialic acid (Sia)-bearing glycan ligands. Glycan remodeling in the germinal center (GC) alters CD22 ligands, with as yet no ascribed biological consequence. Here, we show in both mice and humans that loss of high affinity ligands on GC B-cells unmasks the binding site of CD22 relative to naive and memory B-cells, promoting recognition of trans ligands. The conserved modulation of CD22 ligands on GC B-cells is striking because high affinity glycan ligands of CD22 are species-specific. In both species, the high affinity ligand is based on the sequence Siaα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc, which terminates N-glycans. The human ligand has N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) as the sialic acid, and the high affinity ligand on naive B-cells contains 6-O-sulfate on the GlcNAc. On human GC B-cells, this sulfate modification is lost, giving rise to lower affinity CD22 ligands. Ligands of CD22 on naive murine B-cells do not contain the 6-O-sulfate modification. Instead, the high affinity ligand for mouse CD22 has N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) as the sialic acid, which is replaced on GC B-cells with Neu5Ac. Human naive and memory B-cells express sulfated glycans as high affinity CD22 ligands, which are lost on GC B-cells. In mice, Neu5Gc-containing glycans serve as high affinity CD22 ligands that are replaced by Neu5Ac-containing glycans on GC B-cells. Our results demonstrate that loss of high affinity CD22 ligands on GC B-cells occurs in both mice and humans through alternative mechanisms, unmasking CD22 relative to naive and memory B-cells.

  13. Co-receptor Binding Site Antibodies Enable CD4-Mimetics to Expose Conserved Anti-cluster A ADCC Epitopes on HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Richard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 has evolved a sophisticated strategy to conceal conserved epitopes of its envelope glycoproteins (Env recognized by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC-mediating antibodies. These antibodies, which are present in the sera of most HIV-1-infected individuals, preferentially recognize Env in its CD4-bound conformation. Accordingly, recent studies showed that small CD4-mimetics (CD4mc able to “push” Env into this conformation sensitize HIV-1-infected cells to ADCC mediated by HIV+ sera. Here we test whether CD4mc also expose epitopes recognized by anti-cluster A monoclonal antibodies such as A32, thought to be responsible for the majority of ADCC activity present in HIV+ sera and linked to decreased HIV-1 transmission in the RV144 trial. We made the surprising observation that CD4mc are unable to enhance recognition of HIV-1-infected cells by this family of antibodies in the absence of antibodies such as 17b, which binds a highly conserved CD4-induced epitope overlapping the co-receptor binding site (CoRBS. Our results indicate that CD4mc initially open the trimeric Env enough to allow the binding of CoRBS antibodies but not anti-cluster A antibodies. CoRBS antibody binding further opens the trimeric Env, allowing anti-cluster A antibody interaction and sensitization of infected cells to ADCC. Therefore, ADCC responses mediated by cluster A antibodies in HIV-positive sera involve a sequential opening of the Env trimer on the surface of HIV-1-infected cells. The understanding of the conformational changes required to expose these vulnerable Env epitopes might be important in the design of new strategies aimed at fighting HIV-1.

  14. Improved coreceptor usage prediction and genotypic monitoring of R5-to-X4 transition by motif analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 env V3 loop sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark A; Li, Fu-Sheng; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Nickle, David C; Shriner, Daniel; He, Hong-Xia; McLaughlin, Sherry; Shankarappa, Raj; Margolick, Joseph B; Mullins, James I

    2003-12-01

    Early in infection, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) generally uses the CCR5 chemokine receptor (along with CD4) for cellular entry. In many HIV-1-infected individuals, viral genotypic changes arise that allow the virus to use CXCR4 (either in addition to CCR5 or alone) as an entry coreceptor. This switch has been associated with an acceleration of both CD3(+) T-cell decline and progression to AIDS. While it is well known that the V3 loop of gp120 largely determines coreceptor usage and that positively charged residues in V3 play an important role, the process of genetic change in V3 leading to altered coreceptor usage is not well understood. Further, the methods for biological phenotyping of virus for research or clinical purposes are laborious, depend on sample availability, and present biosafety concerns, so reliable methods for sequence-based "virtual phenotyping" are desirable. We introduce a simple bioinformatic method of scoring V3 amino acid sequences that reliably predicts CXCR4 usage (sensitivity, 84%; specificity, 96%). This score (as determined on the basis of position-specific scoring matrices [PSSM]) can be interpreted as revealing a propensity to use CXCR4 as follows: known R5 viruses had low scores, R5X4 viruses had intermediate scores, and X4 viruses had high scores. Application of the PSSM scoring method to reconstructed virus phylogenies of 11 longitudinally sampled individuals revealed that the development of X4 viruses was generally gradual and involved the accumulation of multiple amino acid changes in V3. We found that X4 viruses were lost in two ways: by the dying off of an established X4 lineage or by mutation back to low-scoring V3 loops.

  15. Regulation of T cell receptor expression in immature CD4+CD8+ thymocytes by p56lck tyrosine kinase: basis for differential signaling by CD4 and CD8 in immature thymocytes expressing both coreceptor molecules

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Signals transduced through the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) are modulated by the src family tyrosine kinase p56lck (lck), which associates in mature T cells with the coreceptor molecules CD4 and CD8. Here we describe a novel function of lck in immature CD4+CD8+ thymocytes, that of regulating TCR expression. Activation of lck in immature CD4+CD8+ thymocytes by intrathymic engagement of CD4 maintains low TCR expression by causing most TCR components to be retained and degraded within the endop...

  16. Mutation of Asp(171) and Asp(262) of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 impairs its coreceptor function for human immunodeficiency virus-1 entry and abrogates the antagonistic activity of AMD3100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatse, S; Princen, K; Gerlach, L O

    2001-01-01

    by substitution of Asp(171) and/or Asp(262) by neutral asparagine residue(s). Both aspartates, but most particularly Asp(262), also proved essential for the anti-HIV-1 activity of AMD3100 against the viruses NL4.3, IIIB, and HE. In contrast, substitution of His(281) by a neutral alanine potentiated...... the antagonistic and antiviral effects of the compound in the different assay systems. Importantly, compared with the wild-type receptor, CXCR4[D262N] was much less effective, whereas CXCR4[D171N,D262N] completely failed as a coreceptor for infection by HIV-1 NL4.3. Thus, the negatively charged aspartate residues...

  17. Role of HIV-1 subtype C envelope V3 to V5 regions in viral entry, coreceptor utilization and replication efficiency in primary T-lymphocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalan Sarla

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several subtypes of HIV-1 circulate in infected people worldwide, including subtype B in the United States and subtype C in Africa and India. To understand the biological properties of HIV-1 subtype C, including cellular tropism, virus entry, replication efficiency and cytopathic effects, we reciprocally inserted our previously characterized envelope V3–V5 regions derived from 9 subtype C infected patients from India into a subtype B molecular clone, pNL4-3. Equal amounts of the chimeric viruses were used to infect T-lymphocyte cell lines (A3.01 and MT-2, coreceptor cell lines (U373-MAGI-CCR5/CXCR4, primary blood T-lymphocytes (PBL and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM. Results We found that subtype C envelope V3–V5 region chimeras failed to replicate in T-lymphocyte cell lines but replicated in PBL and MDM. In addition, these chimeras were able to infect U373MAGI-CD4+-CCR5+ but not U373MAGI-CD4+-CXCR4+ cell line, suggesting CCR5 coreceptor utilization and R5 phenotypes. These subtype C chimeras were unable to induce syncytia in MT-2 cells, indicative of non-syncytium inducing (NSI phenotypes. More importantly, the subtype C envelope chimeras replicated at higher levels in PBL and MDM compared with subtype B chimeras and isolates. Furthermore, the higher levels subtype C chimeras replication in PBL and MDM correlated with increased virus entry in U373MAGI-CD4+-CCR5+. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that the envelope V3 to V5 regions of subtype C contributed to higher levels of HIV-1 replication compared with subtype B chimeras, which may contribute to higher viral loads and faster disease progression in subtype C infected individuals than other subtypes as well as rapid HIV-1 subtype C spread in India.

  18. Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum of NY-ESO-1 specific T cells is modulated by the affinity of T cell receptor and by the use of the CD8 co-receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Shepherd, Dawn; Bossi, Giovanna; Wooldridge, Linda; Hutchinson, Sarah L.; Sewell, Andrew K.; Griffiths, Gillian M.; van der Merwe, P. Anton; Jones, E. Yvonne; Galione, Antony; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Although several cancer immunotherapy strategies are currently based on the use of analog peptides and on the modulation of the TCR affinity of adoptively transferred T cells, it remains unclear whether tumor specific T cell activation by strong and weak TCR stimuli evoke different Ca2+ signatures from the Ca2+ intracellular stores and whether the amplitude of Ca2+ release from the ER can be further modulated by co-receptor binding to peptide/MHC complexes (pMHC). We here combined functional, structural and kinetic measurements to correlate the intensity of Ca2+ signals triggered by the stimulation of the 1G4 T cell clone specific to the tumor epitope NY-ESO-1157–165. Two analogs of the NY-ESO-1157–165 peptide, having similar affinity to HLA-A2 molecules, but a six-fold difference in binding affinity for the 1G4 TCR, resulted in different Ca2+ signals and T cell activation. 1G4 stimulation by the stronger stimulus emptied the ER of stored Ca2+, even in the absence of CD8 binding, resulting in sustained Ca2+ influx. In contrast, the weaker stimulus induced only partial emptying of stored Ca2+, resulting in significantly diminished and oscillatory Ca2+ signals, which was enhanced by CD8 binding. Our data define the range of TCR/pMHC affinities required to induce depletion of Ca2+ from intracellular stores and provide insights into the ability of T cells to tailor the use of the CD8 co-receptor to enhance Ca2+ release from the ER. This in turn modulates Ca2+ influx from the extracellular environment, ultimately controlling T cell activation. PMID:20053942

  19. Cloning, Tissue Distribution, and Transmembrane Orientation of the Olfactory Co-Receptor Orco from Two Important Lepidopteran Rice Pests, the Leaffolder (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis) and the Striped Stem Borer (Chilo suppressalis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Su; HUANG Yuan-jie; QIAO Fei; ZHOU Wen-wu; GONG Zhong-jun; CHENG Jia-an; ZHU Zeng-rong

    2013-01-01

    In insects, the sense of smell is mainly mediated by olfactory receptors (Ors). Olfactory co-receptor (Orco), which is co-expressed with the Ors in almost all olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), is demonstrated to be an essential component in the insect olfactory system. It can be potential target for developing novel olfactory-disruption strategy to control insect pests. In this study, two full-length cDNA sequences encoding Orcos (CmedOrco and ChsupOrco) were cloned from two Lepidopteran rice pests, the rice leaffolder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and the rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis. The amino acid sequences of CmedOrco and ChsupOrco showed high similarity to the previously identiifed Orcos from other insect species. Bioinformatic prediction and cellular immunofluorescence indicated that CmedOrco and ChsupOrco were both seven-transmembrane proteins with intracellular N-termini and extracellular C-termini. mRNA expression levels of the two Orcos were much higher in male and female antennae than those in non-olfactory tissues, and the ChsupOrco transcripts reached a peak level in adults compared to other life stages. Our results provide a foundation from which it will be possible to elucidate the roles of Orco in moth olfaction and for the development of environment-friendly management strategies of these two rice insect pests.

  20. Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Interacting Protein Deficiency Uncovers the Role of the Co-receptor CD19 as a Generic Hub for PI3 Kinase Signaling in B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, Selina Jessica; Gasparrini, Francesca; Burbage, Marianne; Aggarwal, Shweta; Frederico, Bruno; Geha, Raif S; Way, Michael; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Batista, Facundo D

    2015-10-20

    Humans with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome display a progressive immunological disorder associated with compromised Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Interacting Protein (WIP) function. Mice deficient in WIP recapitulate such an immunodeficiency that has been attributed to T cell dysfunction; however, any contribution of B cells is as yet undefined. Here we have shown that WIP deficiency resulted in defects in B cell homing, chemotaxis, survival, and differentiation, ultimately leading to diminished germinal center formation and antibody production. Furthermore, in the absence of WIP, several receptors, namely the BCR, BAFFR, CXCR4, CXCR5, CD40, and TLR4, were impaired in promoting CD19 co-receptor activation and subsequent PI3 kinase (PI3K) signaling. The underlying mechanism was due to a distortion in the actin and tetraspanin networks that lead to altered CD19 cell surface dynamics. In conclusion, our findings suggest that, by regulating the cortical actin cytoskeleton, WIP influences the function of CD19 as a general hub for PI3K signaling.

  1. Differential expression of mRNAs encoding the putative inhibin co-receptor (betaglycan) and activin type-I and type-II receptors in preovulatory and prehierarchical follicles of the laying hen ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, T M; Knight, P G; Gladwell, R T

    2006-02-01

    Ovarian follicle development is primarily regulated by an interplay between the pituitary gonadotrophins, LH and FSH, and ovary-derived steroids. Increasing evidence implicates regulatory roles of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) superfamily members, including inhibins and activins. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of mRNAs encoding key receptors of the inhibin/activin system in ovarian follicles ranging from 4 mm in diameter to the dominant F1 follicle (approximately 40 mm). Ovaries were collected (n = 16) from mid-sequence hens maintained on a long-day photoschedule (16 h of light:8 h of darkness). All follicles removed were dissected into individual granulosa and thecal layers. RNA was extracted and cDNA synthesized. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to quantify the expression of mRNA encoding betaglycan, activin receptor (ActR) subtypes (type-I, -IIA and -IIB) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH); receptor expression data were normalized to GAPDH expression. Detectable levels of ActRI, -IIA and -IIB and the inhibin co-receptor (betaglycan) expression were found in all granulosa and thecal layers analysed. Granulosa ActRI mRNA peaked (P II activin receptors and betaglycan on granulosa and thecal cells are consistent with a local auto/paracrine role of inhibins and activins in modulating ovarian follicle development, selection and progression in the domestic fowl.

  2. Generation of lineage-related, mucosally transmissible subtype C R5 simian-human immunodeficiency viruses capable of AIDS development, induction of neurological disease, and coreceptor switching in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wuze; Mumbauer, Alexandra; Gettie, Agegnehu; Seaman, Michael S; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi; Blanchard, James; Westmoreland, Susan; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2013-06-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmissions are initiated with CCR5 (R5)-using viruses across mucosal surfaces, with the majority in regions where HIV type 1 (HIV-1) clade C predominates. Mucosally transmissible, highly replication competent, pathogenic R5 simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) encoding biologically relevant clade C envelopes are therefore needed as challenge viruses in vaccine efficacy studies with nonhuman primates. Here we describe the generation of three lineage-related subtype C SHIVs through four successive rapid transfers in rhesus macaques of SHIVC109F.PB4, a molecular clone expressing the soluble-CD4 (sCD4)-sensitive CCR5-tropic clade C envelope of a recently infected subject in Zambia. The viruses differed in their monkey passage histories and neutralization sensitivities but remained R5 tropic. SHIVC109P3 and SHIVC109P3N were recovered from a passage-3 rapid-progressor animal during chronic infection (24 weeks postinfection [wpi]) and at end-stage disease (34 wpi), respectively, and are classified as tier 1B strains, whereas SHIVC109P4 was recovered from a passage-4 normal-progressor macaque at 22 wpi and is a tier 2 virus, more difficult to neutralize. All three viruses were transmitted efficiently via intrarectal inoculation, reaching peak viral loads of 10(7) to 10(9) RNA copies/ml plasma and establishing viremia at various set points. Notably, one of seven (GC98) and two of six (CL31, FI08) SHIVC109P3- and SHIVC109P3N-infected macaques, respectively, progressed to AIDS, with neuropathologies observed in GC98 and FI08, as well as coreceptor switching in the latter. These findings support the use of these new SHIVC109F.PB4-derived viruses to study the immunopathology of HIV-1 clade C infection and to evaluate envelope-based AIDS vaccines in nonhuman primates.

  3. A Cinnamon-Derived Procyanidin Compound Displays Anti-HIV-1 Activity by Blocking Heparan Sulfate- and Co-Receptor- Binding Sites on gp120 and Reverses T Cell Exhaustion via Impeding Tim-3 and PD-1 Upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Bridgette Janine; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Yousfi, Rahima; Mohan, Viswaraman; Posch, Wilfried; Wilflingseder, Doris; Moog, Christiane; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Clayette, Pascal; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Amongst the many strategies aiming at inhibiting HIV-1 infection, blocking viral entry has been recently recognized as a very promising approach. Using diverse in vitro models and a broad range of HIV-1 primary patient isolates, we report here that IND02, a type A procyanidin polyphenol extracted from cinnamon, that features trimeric and pentameric forms displays an anti-HIV-1 activity against CXCR4 and CCR5 viruses with 1–7 μM ED50 for the trimer. Competition experiments, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding assay, revealed that IND02 inhibited envelope binding to CD4 and heparan sulphate (HS) as well as to an antibody (mAb 17b) directed against the gp120 co-receptor binding site with an IC50 in the low μM range. IND02 has thus the remarkable property of simultaneously blocking gp120 binding to its major host cell surface counterparts. Additionally, the IND02-trimer impeded up-regulation of the inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 on CD4+ and CD8+ cells, thereby demonstrating its beneficial effect by limiting T cell exhaustion. Among naturally derived products significantly inhibiting HIV-1, the IND02-trimer is the first component demonstrating an entry inhibition property through binding to the viral envelope glycoprotein. These data suggest that cinnamon, a widely consumed spice, could represent a novel and promising candidate for a cost-effective, natural entry inhibitor for HIV-1 which can also down-modulate T cell exhaustion markers Tim-3 and PD-1. PMID:27788205

  4. Structural and Functional Analysis of HIV-1 Coreceptors: Roles of Charged Residues and Posttranslational Modifications on Coreceptor Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Peiper. 1997. From malaria to chemokine receptor: the emerging physiologic role of the Duffy blood group antigen. Blood. 89:3077-91. 131. Harouse, f...1983. Tyrosine-O-sulfated proteins of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells and their sulfation by a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase. J Biol Chem. 258:11326

  5. Eotaxin-2, a Novel CC Chemokine that Is Selective for the Chemokine Receptor CCR3, and Acts Like Eotaxin on Human Eosinophil and Basophil Leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Forssmann, Ulf; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia; Loetscher, Pius; Dahinden, Clemens A; Langen, Hanno; Thelen, Marcus; Baggiolini, Marco

    1997-01-01

    A novel human CC chemokine consisting of 78 amino acids and having a molecular mass of 8,778.3 daltons (VVIPSPCCMF FVSKRIPENR VVSYQLSSRS TCLKAGVIFT TKKGQQ SCGD PKQEWVQRYM KNLDAKQKKA SPRARAVA) was isolated together with three minor COOH-terminally truncated variants with 73, 75, and 76 residues. The new chemokine was termed eotaxin-2 because it is functionally very similar to eotaxin. In terms of structure, however, eotaxin and eotaxin-2 are rather distant, they share only 39% identical amino ...

  6. Viral Entry through CXCR4 Is a Pathogenic Factor and Therapeutic Target in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Birgit; Penn, Michael L.; Speck, Roberto F.; Chan, Stephen Y.; De Clercq, Erik; Schols, Dominique; Connor, Ruth I.; Goldsmith, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 function as the principal coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Coreceptor function has also been demonstrated for a variety of related receptors in vitro. The relative contributions of CCR5, CXCR4, and other putative coreceptors to HIV-1 disease in vivo have yet to be defined. In this study, we used sequential primary isolates and recombinant strains of HIV-1 to demonstrate that CXCR4-using (X4) viruses emerging in association with disease progression are highly pathogenic in ex vivo lymphoid tissues compared to CXCR4-independent viruses. Furthermore, synthetic receptor antagonists that specifically block CXCR4-mediated entry dramatically suppressed the depletion of CD4+ T cells by recombinant and clinically derived X4 HIV-1 isolates. Moreover, in vitro specificity for the additional coreceptors CCR3, CCR8, BOB, and Bonzo did not augment cytopathicity or diminish sensitivity toward CXCR4 antagonists in lymphoid tissues. These data provide strong evidence to support the concept that adaptation to CXCR4 specificity in vivo accelerates HIV-1 disease progression. Thus, therapeutic intervention targeting the interaction of HIV-1 gp120 with CXCR4 may be highly valuable for suppressing the pathogenic effects of late-stage viruses. PMID:10590105

  7. The Role of the TGF-β Coreceptor Endoglin in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pérez-Gómez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoglin (CD105 is an auxiliary membrane receptor of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β that interacts with type I and type II TGF-β receptors and modulates TGF-β signaling. Endoglin is overexpressed in the tumor-associated vascular endothelium, where it modulates angiogenesis. This feature makes endoglin a promising target for antiangiogenic cancer therapy. In addition, recent studies on human and experimental models of carcinogenesis point to an important tumor cell–autonomous role of endoglin by regulating proliferation, migration, invasion, and metastasis. These studies suggest that endoglin behaves as a suppressor of malignancy in experimental and human epithelial carcinogenesis, although it can also promote metastasis in other types of cancer. In this review, we evaluate the implication of endoglin in tumor development underlying studies developed in our laboratories in recent years.

  8. Biochemical investigations into the regulation and specificity of SERK co-receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorn, aan den M.

    2014-01-01

    The transduction of extracellular signals to intracellular responses is of vital importance for all living organisms. The perception of signalling molecules outside the cell is often accomplished via ligand binding proteins spanning the plasma membrane, i.e. receptor proteins. In plants, the majorit

  9. TLR2 & Co: a critical analysis of the complex interactions between TLR2 and coreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergenhenegouwen, J. van; Plantinga, T.S.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Netea, M.G.; Folkerts, G.; Kraneveld, A.D.; Garssen, J.; Vos, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    TLRs play a major role in microbe-host interactions and innate immunity. Of the 10 functional TLRs described in humans, TLR2 is unique in its requirement to form heterodimers with TLR1 or TLR6 for the initiation of signaling and cellular activation. The ligand specificity of TLR2 heterodimers has

  10. HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5 and CCR2 mutations among Greeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, A; Papadimitriou, E; Adwan, G; Clewley, J P; Malissiovas, N; Ntoutsos, I; Alexiou, S; Antoniadis, A

    2000-05-01

    The frequency of CCR5 and CCR2 alleles in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative populations of Northern Greece was investigated. The frequency of the CCR5Delta32 allele among the HIV-negative subjects was 0.052, while it was approximately two-fold lower among the seropositives, suggesting that the heterozygous genotype confers a partial resistance to the HIV infection. No significant difference in CCR2 allele frequency between the two groups was observed.

  11. Description of an elasmobranch TCR coreceptor: CD8α from Rhinobatos productus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J.D.; Farrugia, T.J.; Woodson, J.; Laing, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays an essential role for the control and eradication of intracellular pathogens. To learn more about the evolutionary origins of the first signal (Signal 1) for T-cell activation, we cloned CD8α from an elasmobranch, Rhinobatos productus. Similar to full-length CD8α cDNAs from other vertebrates, Rhpr-CD8α (1800 bp) encodes a 219 amino acid open reading frame composed of a signal peptide, an extracellular IgSF V domain and a stalk/hinge region followed by a well-conserved transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail. Overall, the mature Rhpr-CD8α protein (201 aa) displays ~30% amino acid identity with mammalian CD8α including absolute conservation of cysteine residues involved in the IgSf V domain fold and dimerization of CD8αα and CD8αβ. One prominent feature is the absence of the LCK association motif (CXC) that is needed for achieving signal 1 in tetrapods. Both elasmobranch and teleost CD8α protein sequences possess a similar but distinctly different motif (CXH) in the cytoplasmic tail. The overall genomic structure of CD8α has been conserved during the course of vertebrate evolution both for the number of exons and phase of splicing. Finally, quantitative RTPCR demonstrated that elasmobranch CD8α is expressed in lymphoid-rich tissues similar to CD8 in other vertebrates. The results from this study indicate the existence of CD8 prior to the emergence of the gnathostomes (>450 MYA) while providing evidence that the canonical LCK association motif in mammals is likely a derived characteristic of tetrapod CD8α, suggesting potential differences for T-cell education and activation in the various gnathostomes.

  12. Mechanisms of JAK/STAT pathway negative regulation by the short coreceptor Eye Transformer/Latran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Katherine H; Stec, Wojciech; Brown, Stephen; Zeidler, Martin P

    2016-02-01

    Transmembrane receptors interact with extracellular ligands to transduce intracellular signaling cascades, modulate target gene expression, and regulate processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and homeostasis. As a consequence, aberrant signaling events often underlie human disease. Whereas the vertebrate JAK/STAT signaling cascade is transduced via multiple receptor combinations, the Drosophila pathway has only one full-length signaling receptor, Domeless (Dome), and a single negatively acting receptor, Eye Transformer/Latran (Et/Lat). Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying Et/Lat activity. We demonstrate that Et/Lat negatively regulates the JAK/STAT pathway activity and can bind to Dome, thus reducing Dome:Dome homodimerization by creating signaling-incompetent Dome:Et/Lat heterodimers. Surprisingly, we find that Et/Lat is able to bind to both JAK and STAT92E but, despite the presence of putative cytokine-binding motifs, does not detectably interact with pathway ligands. We find that Et/Lat is trafficked through the endocytic machinery for lysosomal degradation but at a much slower rate than Dome, a difference that may enhance its ability to sequester Dome into signaling-incompetent complexes. Our data offer new insights into the molecular mechanism and regulation of Et/Lat in Drosophila that may inform our understanding of how short receptors function in other organisms.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Leukocidin LukED and HIV-1 gp120 Target Different Sequence Determinants on CCR5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayan Tam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Leukocidin ED (LukED is a bicomponent pore-forming toxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus that lyses host cells by targeting the chemokine receptors CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5, CXCR1, CXCR2, and DARC. In addition to its role as a receptor for LukED, CCR5 is the major coreceptor for primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and has been extensively studied. To compare how LukED and HIV-1 target CCR5, we analyzed their respective abilities to use CCR5/CCR2b chimeras to mediate cytotoxicity and virus entry. These analyses showed that the second and third extracellular loops (ECL of CCR5 are necessary and sufficient for LukED to target the receptor and promote cell lysis. In contrast, the second ECL of CCR5 is necessary but not sufficient for HIV-1 infectivity. The analysis of CCR5 point mutations showed that glycine-163 is critical for HIV-1 infectivity, while arginine-274 and aspartic acid-276 are critical for LukED cytotoxicity. Point mutations in ECL2 diminished both HIV-1 infectivity and LukED cytotoxicity. Treatment of cells with LukED did not interfere with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 infectivity, demonstrating that LukED and the viral envelope glycoprotein use nonoverlapping sites on CCR5. Analysis of point mutations in LukE showed that amino acids 64 to 69 in the rim domain are required for CCR5 targeting and cytotoxicity. Taking the results together, this study identified the molecular basis by which LukED targets CCR5, highlighting the divergent molecular interactions evolved by HIV-1 and LukED to interact with CCR5.

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-02-0030 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-02-0030 sp|Q9BDS8|CCR3_MACFA C-C chemokine receptor type 3 (C-C CKR-3) (C...C-CKR-3) (CCR-3) (CCR3) (CKR3) (CD193 antigen) gb|AAK25739.1| chemokine receptor CCR3 [Macaca fascicularis] Q9BDS8 0.0 98% ...

  15. Rational Design of Micro-RNA-like Bifunctional siRNAs Targeting HIV and the HIV Coreceptor CCR5

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are distinguished by their modes of action. SiRNAs serve as guides for sequence-specific cleavage of complementary mRNAs and the targets can be in coding or noncoding regions of the target transcripts. MiRNAs inhibit translation via partially complementary base-pairing to 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) and are generally ineffective when targeting coding regions of a transcript. In this study, we deliberately designed siRNAs that simultan...

  16. Loss-of-Function Mutations in the WNT Co-receptor LRP6 Cause Autosomal-Dominant Oligodontia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massink, Maarten P. G.; Creton, Marijn A.; Spanevello, Francesca; Fennis, Willem M. M.; Cune, Marco S.; Savelberg, Sanne M. C.; Nijman, Isaac J.; Maurice, Madelon M.; van den Boogaard, Marie-Jose H.; van Haaften, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    Tooth agenesis is one of the most common developmental anomalies in man. Oligodontia, a severe form of tooth agenesis, occurs both as an isolated anomaly and as a syndromal feature. We performed exome sequencing on 20 unrelated individuals with apparent non-syndromic oligodontia and failed to detect

  17. Silencing of the olfactory co-receptor gene in Dendroctonus armandi leads to EAG response declining to major host volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ranran; Gao, Guanqun; Chen, Hui

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on homology genes of Orco was utilized to identify DarmOrco, which is essential for olfaction in D. armandi. The results showed that DarmOrco shares significant sequence homology with Orco proteins had known in other insects. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis suggested that DarmOrco was abundantly expressed in adult D. armandi; by contrast, DarmOrco showed trace amounts of expression level in other stages. Of different tissues, DarmOrco expression level was the highest in the antennae. In order to understand the functional significance of Orco, we injected siRNA of DarmOrco into the conjunctivum between the second and third abdominal segments, and evaluated its expression after siRNA injected for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. The results of qRT-PCR demonstrated that the reduction of mRNA expression level was significant (~80%) in DarmOrco siRNA-treated D. armandi than in water-injected and non-injected controls. The electroantennogram responses of females and males to 11 major volatiles of its host, were also reduced (30~68% for females; 16~70% for males) in siRNA-treated D. armandi compared with the controls. These results suggest that DarmOrco is crucial in mediating odorant perception.

  18. Transmembrane recognition of the semaphorin co-receptors neuropilin 1 and plexin A1: coarse-grained simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Aci-Sèche

    Full Text Available The cancer associated class 3 semaphorins require direct binding to neuropilins and association to plexins to trigger cell signaling. Here, we address the role of the transmembrane domains of neuropilin 1 and plexin A1 for the dimerization of the two receptors by characterizing the assembly in lipid bilayers using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. From experimental evidence using a two-hybrid system showing the biochemical association of the two receptors transmembrane domains, we performed molecular simulations in DOPC and POPC demonstrating spontaneously assembly to form homodimers and heterodimers with a very high propensity for right-handed packing of the helices. Inversely, left-handed packing was observed with a very low propensity. This mode of packing was observed uniquely when the plexin A1 transmembrane domain was involved in association. Potential of mean force calculations were used to predict a hierarchy of self-association for the monomers: the two neuropilin 1 transmembrane domains strongly associated, neuropilin 1 and plexin A1 transmembrane domains associated less and the two plexin A1 transmembrane domains weakly but significantly associated. We demonstrated that homodimerization and heterodimerization are driven by GxxxG motifs, and that the sequence context modulates the packing mode of the plexin A1 transmembrane domains. This work presents major advances towards our understanding of membrane signaling platforms assembly through membrane domains and provides exquisite information for the design of antagonist drugs defining a novel class of therapeutic agents.

  19. Transmembrane recognition of the semaphorin co-receptors neuropilin 1 and plexin A1: coarse-grained simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aci-Sèche, Samia; Sawma, Paul; Hubert, Pierre; Sturgis, James N; Bagnard, Dominique; Jacob, Laurent; Genest, Monique; Garnier, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The cancer associated class 3 semaphorins require direct binding to neuropilins and association to plexins to trigger cell signaling. Here, we address the role of the transmembrane domains of neuropilin 1 and plexin A1 for the dimerization of the two receptors by characterizing the assembly in lipid bilayers using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. From experimental evidence using a two-hybrid system showing the biochemical association of the two receptors transmembrane domains, we performed molecular simulations in DOPC and POPC demonstrating spontaneously assembly to form homodimers and heterodimers with a very high propensity for right-handed packing of the helices. Inversely, left-handed packing was observed with a very low propensity. This mode of packing was observed uniquely when the plexin A1 transmembrane domain was involved in association. Potential of mean force calculations were used to predict a hierarchy of self-association for the monomers: the two neuropilin 1 transmembrane domains strongly associated, neuropilin 1 and plexin A1 transmembrane domains associated less and the two plexin A1 transmembrane domains weakly but significantly associated. We demonstrated that homodimerization and heterodimerization are driven by GxxxG motifs, and that the sequence context modulates the packing mode of the plexin A1 transmembrane domains. This work presents major advances towards our understanding of membrane signaling platforms assembly through membrane domains and provides exquisite information for the design of antagonist drugs defining a novel class of therapeutic agents.

  20. Heparan sulfate acts as a bone morphogenetic protein coreceptor by facilitating ligand-induced receptor hetero-oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wan-Jong; Digman, Michelle A; Lander, Arthur D

    2010-11-15

    Cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) not only binds several major classes of growth factors but also sometimes potentiates their activities--an effect usually termed "coreception." A view that coreception is due to the stabilization of growth factor-receptor interactions has emerged primarily from studies of the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). Recent in vivo studies have strongly suggested that HS also plays an important role in regulating signaling by the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Here, we provide evidence that the mechanism of coreception for BMPs is markedly different from that established for FGFs. First, we demonstrate a direct, stimulatory role for cell surface HS in the immediate signaling activities of BMP2 and BMP4, and we provide evidence that HS-BMP interactions are required for this effect. Next, using several independent assays of ligand binding and receptor assembly, including coimmunoprecipitation, cross-linking, and fluorescence fluctuation microscopy, we show that HS does not affect BMP binding to type I receptor subunits but instead enhances the subsequent recruitment of type II receptor subunits to BMP-type I receptor complexes. This suggests a view of HS as a catalyst of the formation of signaling complexes, rather than as a stabilizer of growth factor binding.

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-VPAC-01-1032 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-VPAC-01-1032 sp|O54814|CCR3_RAT RecName: Full=C-C chemokine receptor type 3; Short=C-C CKR-3; Short...=CC-CKR-3; Short=CCR-3; Short=CCR3; Short=CKR3; AltName: CD_antigen=CD193 gb|AAC03337.1| chemokine receptor CCR3 [Rattus norvegicus] O54814 1e-31 52% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-1276 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-1276 sp|Q9BDS8|CCR3_MACFA RecName: Full=C-C chemokine receptor type 3; Short=C-C CKR-3; Short...=CC-CKR-3; Short=CCR-3; Short=CCR3; Short=CKR3; AltName: CD_antigen=CD193 gb|AAK25739.1| chemokine receptor CCR3 [Macaca fascicularis] Q9BDS8 0.0 97% ...

  3. Sensitivity of HIV type 1 primary isolates to human anti-CD40 antibody-mediated suppression is related to coreceptor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayneh, Sisay A; Ellmark, Peter; Karlsson, Ulf; Andersson, Henrik; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Karlsson, Ingrid; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2008-03-01

    The effect of CD40 ligation on infection by HIV-1 primary isolates with different R5 phenotypes was evaluated with a novel set of anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies originating from a human phage display library. Five human monoclonal anti-CD40 antibodies of IgG1 subtype characterized by the ability to activate B cells via CD40 were tested for induction of the CC-chemokines RANTES and MIP-1alpha and inhibition of HIV-1 replication in primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). All activating anti-CD40 antibodies were able to induce CC-chemokines in MDM. We chose the most potent antibody, clone B44, for further experiments. This antibody had a suppressive effect on HIV-1 isolates of the R5 phenotype with limited use of CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptors. In comparison, HIV-1 isolates with broader use of CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptors or with CXCR4 use were less sensitive to anti-CD40-induced suppression. The results indicate that HIV-1 replication is inhibited by human anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies through the mechanism of CC-chemokine induction. This effect is thus restricted to HIV-1 isolates sensitive to inhibition by CC-chemokines.

  4. Cell-based Fluorescence Complementation Reveals a Role for HIV-1 Nef Protein Dimerization in AP-2 Adaptor Recruitment and CD4 Co-receptor Down-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Sherry T; Emert-Sedlak, Lori A; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2017-02-17

    The HIV-1 Nef accessory factor enhances viral infectivity, immune evasion, and AIDS progression. Nef triggers rapid down-regulation of CD4 via the endocytic adaptor protein 2 (AP-2) complex, a process linked to enhanced viral infectivity and immune escape. Here, we describe a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay to visualize the interaction of Nef with AP-2 and CD4 in living cells. Interacting protein pairs were fused to complementary non-fluorescent fragments of YFP and co-expressed in 293T cells. Nef interactions with both CD4 and AP-2 resulted in complementation of YFP and a bright fluorescent signal by confocal microcopy that localized to the cell periphery. Co-expression of the AP-2 α subunit enhanced the Nef·AP-2 σ2 subunit BiFC signal and vice versa, suggesting that the AP-2 α-σ2 hemicomplex interacts cooperatively with Nef. Mutagenesis of Nef amino acids Arg-134, Glu-174, and Asp-175, which stabilize Nef for AP-2 α-σ2 binding in a recent co-crystal structure, substantially reduced AP-2 interaction without affecting CD4 binding. A dimerization-defective mutant of Nef failed to interact with either CD4 or AP-2 in the BiFC assay, indicating that Nef quaternary structure is required for CD4 and AP-2 recruitment as well as CD4 down-regulation. A small molecule previously shown to bind the Nef dimerization interface also reduced Nef interactions with AP-2 and CD4 and restored CD4 expression to the surface of HIV-infected cells. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for previous observations that dimerization-defective Nef mutants fail to down-regulate CD4 and validate the Nef dimerization interface as a target site for antiretroviral drug development. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. The Wnt coreceptor Ryk regulates Wnt/planar cell polarity by modulating the degradation of the core planar cell polarity component Vangl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Philipp; Wang, Qianyi; Wang, Na; Gao, Bo; Schilit, Arielle; Halford, Michael M; Stacker, Steven A; Zhang, Xuemin; Yang, Yingzi

    2012-12-28

    The Wnt signaling pathways control many critical developmental and adult physiological processes. In vertebrates, one fundamentally important function of Wnts is to provide directional information by regulating the evolutionarily conserved planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway during embryonic morphogenesis. However, despite the critical roles of Wnts and PCP in vertebrate development and disease, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying Wnt regulation of PCP. Here, we have found that the receptor-like tyrosine kinase (Ryk), a Wnt5a-binding protein required in axon guidance, regulates PCP signaling. We show that Ryk interacts with Vangl2 genetically and biochemically, and such interaction is potentiated by Wnt5a. Loss of Ryk in a Vangl2(+/-) background results in classic PCP defects, including open neural tube, misalignment of sensory hair cells in the inner ear, and shortened long bones in the limbs. Complete loss of both Ryk and Vangl2 results in more severe phenotypes that resemble the Wnt5a(-/-) mutant in many aspects such as shortened anterior-posterior body axis, limb, and frontonasal process. Our data identify the Wnt5a-binding protein Ryk as a general regulator of the mammalian Wnt/PCP signaling pathway. We show that Ryk transduces Wnt5a signaling by forming a complex with Vangl2 and that Ryk regulates PCP by at least in part promoting Vangl2 stability. As human mutations in WNT5A and VANGL2 are found to cause Robinow syndrome and neural tube defects, respectively, our results further suggest that human mutations in RYK may also be involved in these diseases.

  6. Epigenetic mechanisms, T-cell activation, and CCR5 genetics interact to regulate T-cell expression of CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornalusse, German G; Mummidi, Srinivas; Gaitan, Alvaro A; Jimenez, Fabio; Ramsuran, Veron; Picton, Anabela; Rogers, Kristen; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Avadhanam, Nymisha; Murthy, Krishna K; Martinez, Hernan; Molano Murillo, Angela; Chykarenko, Zoya A; Hutt, Richard; Daskalakis, Demetre; Shostakovich-Koretskaya, Ludmila; Abdool Karim, Salim; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G; Hecht, Frederick; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Clark, Robert A; Okulicz, Jason; Valentine, Fred T; Martinson, Neil; Tiemessen, Caroline Tanya; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Hunt, Peter W; He, Weijing; Ahuja, Sunil K

    2015-08-25

    T-cell expression levels of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) are a critical determinant of HIV/AIDS susceptibility, and manifest wide variations (i) between T-cell subsets and among individuals and (ii) in T-cell activation-induced increases in expression levels. We demonstrate that a unifying mechanism for this variation is differences in constitutive and T-cell activation-induced DNA methylation status of CCR5 cis-regulatory regions (cis-regions). Commencing at an evolutionarily conserved CpG (CpG -41), CCR5 cis-regions manifest lower vs. higher methylation in T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels (memory vs. naïve T cells) and in memory T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels. HIV-related and in vitro induced T-cell activation is associated with demethylation of these cis-regions. CCR5 haplotypes associated with increased vs. decreased gene/surface expression levels and HIV/AIDS susceptibility magnify vs. dampen T-cell activation-associated demethylation. Methylation status of CCR5 intron 2 explains a larger proportion of the variation in CCR5 levels than genotype or T-cell activation. The ancestral, protective CCR5-HHA haplotype bears a polymorphism at CpG -41 that is (i) specific to southern Africa, (ii) abrogates binding of the transcription factor CREB1 to this cis-region, and (iii) exhibits a trend for overrepresentation in persons with reduced susceptibility to HIV and disease progression. Genotypes lacking the CCR5-Δ32 mutation but with hypermethylated cis-regions have CCR5 levels similar to genotypes heterozygous for CCR5-Δ32. In HIV-infected individuals, CCR5 cis-regions remain demethylated, despite restoration of CD4+ counts (≥800 cells per mm(3)) with antiretroviral therapy. Thus, methylation content of CCR5 cis-regions is a central epigenetic determinant of T-cell CCR5 levels, and possibly HIV-related outcomes.

  7. Cloning of rat HIV-1-chemokine coreceptor CKR5 from microglia and upregulation of its mRNA in ischemic and endotoxinemic rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spleiss, O; Gourmala, N; Boddeke, HWGM; Sauter, A; Fiebich, BL; Berger, M; Gebicke-Haerter, PJ

    1998-01-01

    Chemokine receptors play a crucial role in the recruitment of immune cells to sites of inflammation. Although chronic diseases of the brain are often accompanied by inflammatory events, there is presently no information about the occurrence and regulation of these receptors in the central nervous sy

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray structural studies of a high-affinity CD8αα co-receptor to pMHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, David K. [Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Rizkallah, Pierre J., E-mail: p.j.rizkallah@dl.ac.uk [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Sami, Malkit; Lissin, Nikolai M.; Gao, Feng [Avidex Ltd, 57c Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4RX (United Kingdom); Bell, John I. [Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Boulter, Jonathan M. [Medical Biochemistry and Immunology, Henry Wellcome Building, University of Wales College of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN,Wales (United Kingdom); Glick, Meir [Novartis Pharmaceuticals, One Health Plaza, East Hanover, NJ 07936 (United States); Vuidepot, Anne-Lise; Jakobsen, Bent K., E-mail: p.j.rizkallah@dl.ac.uk [Avidex Ltd, 57c Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4RX (United Kingdom); Gao, George F. [Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    A high-affinity mutant CD8 (haCD8) has been developed with the aim of developing a therapeutic immunosuppressor. In order to fully understand the nature of the haCD8 interaction, this protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The class I CD8 positive T-cell response is involved in a number of conditions in which artificial down-regulation and control would be therapeutically beneficial. Such conditions include a number of autoimmune diseases and graft rejection in transplant patients. Although the CD8 T-cell response is dominated by the TCR–pMHC interaction, activation of T cells is in most cases also dependent on a number of associated signalling molecules. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of one such molecule (CD8) to act as an antagonist to T-cell activation if added in soluble form. Therefore, a high-affinity mutant CD8 (haCD8) has been developed with the aim of developing a therapeutic immunosuppressor. In order to fully understand the nature of the haCD8 interaction, this protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Single haCD8 crystals were cryocooled and used for data collection. These crystals belonged to space group P6{sub 4}22 (assumed by similarity to the wild type), with unit-cell parameters a = 101.08, c = 56.54 Å. V{sub M} calculations indicated one molecule per asymmetric unit. A 2 Å data set was collected and the structure is currently being determined using molecular replacement.

  9. Evolution of the CD163 family and its relationship to the bovine gamma delta T cell co-receptor WC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin Cynthia L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR domain is an ancient and conserved protein domain. CD163 and WC1 molecules are classed together as group B SRCR superfamily members, along with Spα, CD5 and CD6, all of which are expressed by immune system cells. There are three known types of CD163 molecules in mammals, CD163A (M130, coded for by CD163, CD163b (M160, coded for by CD163L1 and CD163c-α (CD163L1 or SCART, while their nearest relative, WC1, is encoded by a multigene family so far identified in the artiodactyl species of cattle, sheep, and pigs. Results We annotated the bovine genome and identified genes coding for bovine CD163A and CD163c-α but found no evidence for CD163b. Bovine CD163A is widely expressed in immune cells, whereas CD163c-α transcripts are enriched in the WC1+ γδ T cell population. Phylogenetic analyses of the CD163 family genes and WC1 showed that CD163c-α is most closely related to WC1 and that chicken and platypus have WC1 orthologous genes, previously classified as among their CD163 genes. Conclusion Since it has been shown that WC1 plays an important role in the regulation of γδ T cell responses in cattle, which, like chickens, have a high percentage of γδ T cells in their peripheral blood, CD163c-α may play a similar role, especially in species lacking WC1 genes. Our results suggest that gene duplications resulted in the expansion of CD163c-α-like and WC1-like molecules. This expanded repertoire was retained by species known as "γδ T cell high", but homologous SRCR molecules were maintained by all mammals.

  10. Aberrantly elevated microRNA-34a in obesity attenuates hepatic responses to FGF19 by targeting a membrane coreceptor β-Klotho

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ting Fu; Sung-E Choi; Dong-Hyun Kim; Sunmi Seok; Kelly M. Suino-Powell; H. Eric Xu; Jongsook Kim Kemper

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) is the most highly elevated hepatic miR in obese mice and is also substantially elevated in patients who have steatosis, but its role in obesity and metabolic dysfunction remains unclear...

  11. The chaperone and potential mannan-binding lectin (MBL) co-receptor calreticulin interacts with MBL through the binding site for MBL-associated serine proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Rasmus; Duus, Karen; Laursen, Inga;

    2008-01-01

    was immobilized on a solid surface or bound to mannan on a surface. The binding was non-covalent and biphasic with an initial salt-sensitive phase followed by a more stable salt-insensitive interaction. For plasma-derived MBL, known to be complexed with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs), no binding...... with calreticulin. Comparative analysis of MBL with complement component C1q, its counterpart of the classical pathway, revealed that they display similar binding characteristics for calreticulin, providing further indication that calreticulin is a common co-receptor/chaperone for both proteins. In conclusion...

  12. Identification of the western tarnished plant bug (lygus hesperus) olfactory co-receptor orco: expression profile and confirmation of atypical membrane topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygus hesperus (western tarnished plant bug) is an agronomically important pest species of numerous cropping systems. Similar to other insects, a critical component underlying behaviors is the perception and discrimination of olfactory cues. Consequently, the molecular basis of olfaction in this spe...

  13. Lymphotropic Virions Affect Chemokine Receptor-Mediated Neural Signaling and Apoptosis: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jialin; Ghorpade, Anuja; Niemann, Douglas; Cotter, Robin L.; Thylin, Michael R.; Epstein, Leon; Swartz, Jennifer M.; Shepard, Robin B.; Liu, Xiaojuan; Nukuna, Adeline; Gendelman, Howard E.

    1999-01-01

    Chemokine receptors pivotal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in lymphocytes and macrophages (CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4) are expressed on neural cells (microglia, astrocytes, and/or neurons). It is these cells which are damaged during progressive HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We theorize that viral coreceptors could effect neural cell damage during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) without simultaneously affecting viral replication. To these ends, we studied the ability of diverse viral strains to affect intracellular signaling and apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition of cyclic AMP, activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and apoptosis were induced by diverse HIV-1 strains, principally in neurons. Virions from T-cell-tropic (T-tropic) strains (MN, IIIB, and Lai) produced the most significant alterations in signaling of neurons and astrocytes. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, induced markedly less neural damage than purified virions. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) strains (ADA, JR-FL, Bal, MS-CSF, and DJV) produced the least neural damage, while 89.6, a dual-tropic HIV-1 strain, elicited intermediate neural cell damage. All T-tropic strain-mediated neuronal impairments were blocked by the CXCR4 antibody, 12G5. In contrast, the M-tropic strains were only partially blocked by 12G5. CXCR4-mediated neuronal apoptosis was confirmed in pure populations of rat cerebellar granule neurons and was blocked by HA1004, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C. Taken together, these results suggest that progeny HIV-1 virions can influence neuronal signal transduction and apoptosis. This process occurs, in part, through CXCR4 and is independent of CD4 binding. T-tropic viruses that traffic in and out of the brain during progressive HIV-1 disease may play an important role in HAD neuropathogenesis. PMID:10482576

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-1023 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-1023 sp|P56492|CCR3_CERAE RecName: Full=C-C chemokine receptor type 3; Short=C-C CKR-3; Short...=CC-CKR-3; Short=CCR-3; Short=CCR3; Short=CKR3; AltName: CD_antigen=CD193 emb|CAA74106.1| C-C chemokine receptor-3 [Chlorocebus aethiops] P56492 0.0 91% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-1276 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-1276 sp|P56492|CCR3_CERAE RecName: Full=C-C chemokine receptor type 3; Short=C-C CKR-3; Short...=CC-CKR-3; Short=CCR-3; Short=CCR3; Short=CKR3; AltName: CD_antigen=CD193 emb|CAA74106.1| C-C chemokine receptor-3 [Chlorocebus aethiops] P56492 0.0 96% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-1276 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-1276 sp|P56483|CCR3_MACMU RecName: Full=C-C chemokine receptor type 3; Short=C-C CKR-3; Short...=CC-CKR-3; Short=CCR-3; Short=CCR3; Short=CKR3; AltName: CD_antigen=CD193 gb|AAB70527.1| chemokine receptor [Macaca mulatta] P56483 0.0 98% ...

  17. Apoptosis in human germinal centre B cells by means of CC chemokine receptor 3 expression induced by interleukin-2 and interleukin-4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiu-ping; XIE Luo-kun; ZHANG Li-jun; TAN Jin-quan

    2005-01-01

    Background CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), expressed on some inflammatory cells, is a member of the chemokine receptor family. Its ligand is eotaxin/CCL11. In this research, we studied the expression and function of CCR3 induced by interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) on human germinal centre (GC) B cells.Methods Cells isolated from human tonsils were stimulated with IL-2 or/and IL-4 followed by bonding with eotaxin/CCL11. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CCR3 on GC B cells and apoptosis of GC B cells. Real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern blot assays were used to analyse the CCR3 mRNA expressed in the GC B cells. Chemotaxis and adhesion assays were used to determine the effect of eotaxin/CCL11 ligand bonded to CCR3 on GC B cells.Results There was no CCR3 expression on human freshly isolated GC B cells. The combination IL-2 and IL-4 could upregulate CCR3 mRNA and protein expression on GC B cells. Eotaxin could not induce GC B cell chemotaxis and adhesion but triggered apoptosis of GC B cells.Conclusion IL-2 and IL-4 together induced expression of CCR3 on GC B cells, and the receptor acted as a death receptor.

  18. Eotaxin induces degranulation and chemotaxis of eosinophils through the activation of ERK2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampen, G T; Stafford, S; Adachi, T

    2000-01-01

    Eotaxin and other CC chemokines acting via CC chemokine receptor-3 (CCR3) are believed to play an integral role in the development of eosinophilic inflammation in asthma and allergic inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the intracellular events following agonist binding to CCR3 a...

  19. Detection for mutation of HIV coreceptor CCR5 in Zhuang population from Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China%广西壮族人群HIV协同受体CCR5基因突变的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨海波; 樊晓晖; 陆海融; 赖振屏; 梁纲

    2005-01-01

    目的了解广西壮族人群中HIV协同受体CCR5△32等位基因突变频率和多态性的特点,为评估广西壮族人群对HIV的遗传易感性和艾滋病的防治提供理论依据.方法以152例壮族大学生为研究对象,应用PCR和DNA直接测序等方法检测CCR5及CCR5△32突变体.结果未发现CCR5△32等位基因.结论由于未发现CCR5△32,推测广西壮族人群对HIV-1病毒感染可能具有较大的遗传易感性.

  20. The Interaction between Coreceptor CCR5 / gp120 and Related Peptide Inhibitors%共同受体CCR5与HIV gp120的相互作用及相关肽类抑制剂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成健伟; 戴秋云

    2006-01-01

    存在于巨嗜细胞、树突状细胞等胞膜上的G蛋白偶联受体CCR5作为R5嗜性的HIV-1病毒的主要共同受体,可以和病毒的表面糖蛋白gp120相互作用,并由此决定了病毒的另一表面糖蛋白gp41融合构象的形成以及随后的病毒与细胞的膜融合.CCR5在细胞膜上迅速移动,并与其他分子(如CD4和胆固醇)存在相互作用,加速了与gp120的作用.CCR5的这种中心作用已经使其成为抗HIV-1药物研究的很有吸引力的靶点.目前已发现一系列衍生于CCR5的胞外区的多肽、天然存在的蛋白质以及设计的多肽,可干扰CCR5与gp120之间的相互作用,从而抑制病毒复制.

  1. Mutation of Asp(171) and Asp(262) of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 impairs its coreceptor function for human immunodeficiency virus-1 entry and abrogates the antagonistic activity of AMD3100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatse, S; Princen, K; Gerlach, L O

    2001-01-01

    by substitution of Asp(171) and/or Asp(262) by neutral asparagine residue(s). Both aspartates, but most particularly Asp(262), also proved essential for the anti-HIV-1 activity of AMD3100 against the viruses NL4.3, IIIB, and HE. In contrast, substitution of His(281) by a neutral alanine potentiated...

  2. Human C-C chemokine receptor 3 monoclonal antibody inhibits pulmonary inflammation in allergic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai WANG; Hua-hao SHEN; Wen LI; Hua-qiong HUANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the effect of C-C chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) blockade on pulmonary inflammation and mucus production in allergic mice. Methods:We used the synthetic peptide of the CCR3 NH2-terminal as the immunizing antigen and generated murine monoclonal antibody against the human CCR3. In addition,the generated antibody was administered to mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. The inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage,cytokine levels,pulmonary histopathology,and mucus secretion were examined. Results:The Western blotting analysis indicated that the generated antibody bound to CCR3 specifically. The allergic mice treated with the antihuman CCR3 antibody exhibited a significant reduction of pulmonary inflammation accompanied with the alteration of cytokine. Conclusion:The antibody we generated was specific to CCR3. The inhibition of airway inflammation and mucus overproduction by the antibody suggested that the blockade of CCR3 is an appealing therapeutical target for asthma. The present research may provide an experimental basis for the further study of this agent.

  3. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by a Dual CCR5/CXCR4 Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princen, Katrien; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt; Aquaro, Stefano; De Clercq, Erik; Gerlach, Lars-Ole; Rosenkilde, Mette; Schwartz, Thue W.; Skerlj, Renato; Bridger, Gary; Schols, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Here we report that the N-pyridinylmethyl cyclam analog AMD3451 has antiviral activity against a wide variety of R5, R5/X4, and X4 strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] ranging from 1.2 to 26.5 μM) in various T-cell lines, CCR5- or CXCR4-transfected cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and monocytes/macrophages. AMD3451 also inhibited R5, R5/X4, and X4 HIV-1 primary clinical isolates in PBMCs (IC50, 1.8 to 7.3 μM). A PCR-based viral entry assay revealed that AMD3451 blocks R5 and X4 HIV-1 infection at the virus entry stage. AMD3451 dose-dependently inhibited the intracellular Ca2+ signaling induced by the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in T-lymphocytic cells and in CXCR4-transfected cells, as well as the Ca2+ flux induced by the CCR5 ligands CCL5, CCL3, and CCL4 in CCR5-transfected cells. The compound did not interfere with chemokine-induced Ca2+ signaling through CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR6, CCR9, or CXCR3 and did not induce intracellular Ca2+ signaling by itself at concentrations up to 400 μM. In freshly isolated monocytes, AMD3451 inhibited the Ca2+ flux induced by CXCL12 and CCL4 but not that induced by CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, and CCL7. The CXCL12- and CCL3-induced chemotaxis was also dose-dependently inhibited by AMD3451. Furthermore, AMD3451 inhibited CXCL12- and CCL3L1-induced endocytosis in CXCR4- and CCR5-transfected cells. AMD3451, in contrast to the specific CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, did not inhibit but enhanced the binding of several anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibodies (such as clone 12G5) at the cell surface, pointing to a different interaction with CXCR4. AMD3451 is the first low-molecular-weight anti-HIV agent with selective HIV coreceptor, CCR5 and CXCR4, interaction. PMID:15542651

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-VPAC-01-1032 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-VPAC-01-1032 sp|Q9Z2I3|CCR3_CAVPO RecName: Full=C-C chemokine receptor type 3; Short=C-C CKR-3; Short...=CC-CKR-3; Short=CCR-3; Short=CCR3; Short=CKR3; AltName: CD_antigen=CD193 gb|AAC80428.1| C-C chemokine receptor 3 [Cavia porcellus] Q9Z2I3 8e-32 52% ...

  5. Periprostatic adipocytes act as a driving force for prostate cancer progression in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Victor; Guérard, Adrien; Mazerolles, Catherine; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Toulet, Aurélie; Nieto, Laurence; Zaidi, Falek; Majed, Bilal; Garandeau, David; Socrier, Youri; Golzio, Muriel; Cadoudal, Thomas; Chaoui, Karima; Dray, Cedric; Monsarrat, Bernard; Schiltz, Odile; Wang, Yuan Yuan; Couderc, Bettina; Valet, Philippe; Malavaud, Bernard; Muller, Catherine

    2016-01-12

    Obesity favours the occurrence of locally disseminated prostate cancer in the periprostatic adipose tissue (PPAT) surrounding the prostate gland. Here we show that adipocytes from PPAT support the directed migration of prostate cancer cells and that this event is strongly promoted by obesity. This process is dependent on the secretion of the chemokine CCL7 by adipocytes, which diffuses from PPAT to the peripheral zone of the prostate, stimulating the migration of CCR3 expressing tumour cells. In obesity, higher secretion of CCL7 by adipocytes facilitates extraprostatic extension. The observed increase in migration associated with obesity is totally abrogated when the CCR3/CCL7 axis is inhibited. In human prostate cancer tumours, expression of the CCR3 receptor is associated with the occurrence of aggressive disease with extended local dissemination and a higher risk of biochemical recurrence, highlighting the potential benefit of CCR3 antagonists in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  6. Peran Kemokin dalam Patogenesis Rinitis Alergi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effy Huriyati

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Rinitis alergi merupakan penyakit dengan insiden yang cukup tinggi diseluruh dunia dengan prevalensi yang semakin meningkat setiap tahun. Patogenesis rinitis alergi melibatkan reaksi imun yang cukup komplek. Tujuan: Mengetahui peranan kemotaktik sitokin (Kemokin dalam patogenesis rinitis alergi. Tinjauan pustaka: Kemokin sebagai kemotaktik sitokin berperan dalam semua tahap reaksi alergi. CC kemokin merupakan subfamili kemokin yang berperan dalam reaksi alergi. Kemokin bekerja pada permukaan sel-sel inflamasi berikatan dengan reseptor. CCR3 merupakan reseptor dengan kadar tertinggi yang ditemukan pada permukaan eosinofil dan eotaxin sebagai ligand yang spesifik bagi CCR3. Kesimpulan: Eotaxin dan reseptor CCR3 adalah faktor yang paling menonjol dalam patogenesis rinitis alergi yang melibatkan eosinophilKata kunci: Reaksi alergi, Th2, CC Kemokin, eosinofil, CCR3 AbstractBackground: Allergic rhinitis such a disease with high incidence among the world and its prevalence appears to be increasing every year. The pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis commit complex imunological reaction. Purpose: To know the role of chemotactic cytokine (chemokine in pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis. Literature review: Chemokine as a chemotactics cytokine participate to all allergic reaction stage. CC chemokines were subfamilial chemokines which have role in allergic reaction. They working by binding with receptor on the surface of inflamatory cells. CCR3 is the receptor with the highes level could be found on eosinophil cell membran and eotaxin was the spesific ligand to itt. Conclusion: Eotaxin and CCR3 are the major factor in pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis which is involve eosinophil.Keywords: Allergic reaction, Th2, CC Chemokines, eosinophil, CCR3

  7. Classification of distinct subtypes of peripheral T-cell lymphoma unspecified, identified by chemokine and chemokine receptor expression: Analysis of prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Koichi; Karube, Kennosuke; Kawano, Riko; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Suzumiya, Junji; Kikuchii, Masahiro

    2004-09-01

    WHO classification for malignant lymphoma was recently proposed. However, PTCL is heterogeneous. Chemokines and its receptors are closely associated with the T-cell subtypes. To clarify the T-cell subtype in PTCL, we conducted DNA chips of chemokine, its receptor (R) and cytokines. Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AILD, n=4), anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, n=4), adult T-cell leukemia lymphoma (ATLL, n=7), NK-cell lymphoma (NKL, n=2) and PTCL, unspecified (PTCL-U, n=6) were analyzed using DNA chips. In addition, immunological stainings were performed in 280 cases. In DNA chip, AILD, ALCL, NKL and ATLL showed a tendency for respective clusters, otherwise, PTCL-U clustered with AILD, ALCL and ATLL. From the gene expression profiling, CCR4, CCR3, MIG, CXCR3 and BLC were selected for immunohistochemistry. ATLL (n=48) expressed CCR4. ALCL (n=26) expressed CCR3, NKL (n=20) expressed MIG, and AILD (n=29) expressed CXCR3 and/or BLC. From the expression patterns, PTCL-U (n=134) were classified into three groups; CCR4 type (CCR4(+), n=42), CCR3 type (CCR3(+), n=31) and CXCR3 type (CXCR3(+) BLC(+/-), n=54). The prognosis was poor for ATLL, intermediate for AILD and favorable for ALCL (P=0.0014). Among PTCL-U, CCR4 type, CXCR3 type and CCR3 type had prognoses equivalent to ATLL, AILD and ALCL, respectively (P<0.0001).

  8. The inhibitory effect of CCR5Delta32 protein on cell surface expression of the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 and CXCR4%人PBMCs内表达CCR5Delta32蛋白对HIV-1辅受体抑制作用的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李翠莹; 安群星; 甘新宇

    2010-01-01

    目的:在人PBMCs内表达CCR5Delta32蛋白,研究其对细胞表面HIV-1辅受体CCR5和CXCR4的抑制作用.方法:构建pLenti-CCR5Delta32慢病毒载体,包装后产生重组慢病毒.将其转染PBMCs,Western blot检测目的蛋白的表达.继续培养靶细胞,FACS分析细胞表面CCR5和CXCR4分子的变化.结果:成功构建了pLenti-CCR5Delta32慢病毒载体,包装后产生重组慢病毒.将其转染PBMCs,Western blot检测到目的蛋白的表达.FACS分析表明,靶细胞内目的蛋白的表达对靶细胞表面辅受体CCR5和CXCR4的产生起抑制作用,抑制率在转染后第6天达到高峰(CCR5的抑制率为51.69%,CXCR4的抑制率为61.05%).结论:靶细胞内目的蛋白的成功表达及其对靶细胞表面HIV-1辅受体CCR5和CXCR4产生的抑制作用,为后续的AIDS基因治疗研究奠定了基础.

  9. Guillain-Barré综合征患者B淋巴细胞辅助受体CD l9表达的研究%Expression of CO-receptor CD 1 9 on peripheral B lymphocytes in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁学谦; 朱太卿; 张莉峰; 王慧贞; 王焕荣; 王爱丽; 张东锋

    2011-01-01

    目的 本研究通过检测Guillain-Barre综合征(GBS)患者外周血单个核细胞CD l9蛋白的表达,探讨CD l9与GBS及其严重程度之间的关系.方法 利用流式细胞术检测GBS组(36例)和正常对照组(20例)的CD l9蛋白表达,按病程将GBS组分为急性期亚组与恢复期亚组,并分析与疾病严重程度之间的关系.结果 与正常对照组221±78个比较,GBS组742±128个B细胞数量显著升高,差异有统计学意义(P0.05).与恢复期GBS组87.27±6.04%比较,急性期GBS组81.20+5.25%CD l9+CD20+无明显差异(P>0.05).与轻症GBS组632+68个比较,重症GBS组797+130个B细胞数量无明显差异(P>0.05).与轻症GBS组82.53+5.03%比较,重症GBS组85.84+6.77%CD l9+CD20+无明显差异(P>0.05).结论 CD l9在GBS中表达显著升高,但与病程和病情严重程度无关.%Objective To explore the corlation between the expression of CD19 and the severity of GBS. The expression of CD19 of B lymphocyte in peripheral blood mononuclear cells( PBMNCs )of the disease was tested.Methods GBS group( 36 cases )and healthy controls( HC )group( 20 cases )were investigated. The expression of CD 19 on peirpheral B lymphocytes were examined by flow cytometry. According to course of disease, GBS group was divided into acute subgroup and recovery subgroup. Furthermore, the corelation between the expression of CD 19 and the severity of the disease was analyzed. Results Compared with HC group[ 221 + 78 ], B lymphocyte numbers[ 742 + 128 ]were significantly higher( P < 0. 01 ). Compared with HC group[ 62.21 + 7. 85% ], the CD 19 + CD20+ increased significantly ( P <0.0 1 )in GBS group[ 83.92 +6.23% ]. Compared with recovery subgroup[ 686 + 108 ],B lymphocyte numbers were of no significant differences( P > 0.05 )in the acute subgroup[ 810 + 124 ]. Compared with recovery subgroup[ 87.27 + 6.04% ], the CD19 + CD20 + was of no significant differences( P > 0.05 ) in the acute subgroup[ 81.20 + 5.251% ]. Compared with mild group[ 632 + 68 ], B lymphocyte numbers were of no significant differences ( P >0.05 ) in severe group[ 797 + 130 ]. Compared with mild group[ 82.53 + 5.03% ], the CD 19+ CD20 + was of no significant differences( P > 0.05 )in severe group[ 85.84 + 6.77 % ]. Conclusions CD 19 expression in GBS is significantly increased, but has nothing to do with the the course and severity of the disease.

  10. Building three-dimensional structures of HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 and its interaction with antagonist TAK779 by comparative molecular modeling%HIV-共受体CCR5的三维结构及与其拮抗剂TAK 779相互作用的比较分子模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄小琴; 蒋华良; 罗小民; 陈凯先; 嵇汝运; 曹阳; 裴钢

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism of interaction of CCR5receptor with its antagonist TAK779. METHODS:Comparative molecular modeling has been used to develop the 3D-structural models of CCR5 receptor and its complex with TAK779. Molecular mechanics has been applied to optimize the above molecular models. Quantum mechanics has been utilized to calculate the structural information of TAK779. DOCK4.0 program is employed to dock the TAK779 molecular into the binding site of CCR5 receptor. RESULTS: The 3D-structural model of CCR5 receptor is constructed using the 3D-model of frog rhodopsin as a template. The binding pocket is situated in the transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7,and it is composed of conserved residues of Tyrl08,Glylll, Serll4, Glu283, Gly286, and Cys290, and conservatively varied residues including Thrl05, Leul07,Phell2, Glyll5, Lys197, and Met287. O1, N7, N17,and O19 of TAK779 are the active center of TAK779.The pyran cycle and the aminium group of TAK779 interact with residues in the binding pocket of CCR5 receptor,the other part of TAK779 interacts with residues from the extracellular loops of CCR5. The binding energy of TAK779 with CCR5 is - 51. 606 kcal/mol. CONCLUSION: The model constructed and the interaction mode reported in the present study are useful in further understanding the molecular mechanism of receptor-virus%目的:研究HⅣ-1的共受体CCR5与其拮抗剂TAK779的相互作用机制。方法:用比较分子模拟方法建立CCR5受体的三维结构模型;通过量子化学计算得到TAK779分子的结构参数和最优几何构型;用DOCK4.0程序将TAK779分子对接到CCR5受体的结合位点上。结果:通过分子力学优化得到了CCR5受体的三维结构模型,配体的结合口袋位于第三、五、六、七跨膜区,组成结合口袋的氨基酸残基主要为 Thr105、Leu107、Tyr108、Gly111、Phe112、Ser114、Cly115、Lys197、Glu283、Gly286、Met287、Cys290;TAK779与CCR5受体的相互作用方式为氢键、静电和疏水作用;配体与受体的结合能为-51.606 kcal/mol.结论:上述模型有助于进一步理解膜受体识别HIV-1病毒的分子机制并设计新的HTV-1抑制剂。

  11. 广西仫佬、壮和汉三民族HIV辅助受体CCR5基因多态性研究%A comparative study on the gene-polymorphism of HIV Co-receptor CCR5 based on three nationalities,Mulao, Zhuang, and Han,in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈哲; 樊晓晖; 杨海波; 梁纲; 赖振屏

    2007-01-01

    目的 了解广西仫佬、壮和汉三民族人群中HIV辅助受体CCR5△32和CCR5-894C缺失等位基因突变频率和多态性的特点,为评估这三个民族人群对HIV的遗传易感性和艾滋病的防治提供理论依据.方法 以197例仫佬族,100例壮族和100例汉族为研究对象,应用PCR和DNA测序等方法检测CCR5△32和CCR5-894C缺失突变体.结果 未发现CCR5△32和CCR5-894C缺失突变体,均为野生型.结论 由于未发现CCR5△32和CCR5-894C缺失突变体,推测广西仫佬、壮和汉三民族人群对HIV-1病毒感染可能具有较大的遗传易感性.

  12. Type 1 chemokine receptor expression in Chagas' disease correlates with morbidity in cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Juliana A S; Bahia-Oliveira, Lilian M G; Rocha, Manoel Otávio C; Busek, Solange C U; Teixeira, Mauro M; Silva, João Santana; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2005-12-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors (CKRs) control the migration of leukocytes during the inflammatory process and are important immunological markers of type 1 (CCR5 and CXCR3) and type 2 (CCR3 and CCR4) responses. The coexpression of CKRs (CCR2, CCR3, CCR5, CXCR3, and CXCR4) and intracellular cytokines (interleukin-10 [IL-10], IL-4, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha], and gamma interferon [IFN-gamma]) on T CD4+ and CD8+ peripheral cells from individuals with indeterminate (IND) or cardiac (CARD) clinical forms of Chagas' disease after in vitro stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens, were evaluated in this study. The percentage of T CD4+ and CD8+ cells coexpressing CCR5 and IFN-gamma, CXCR3 and IFN-gamma, and CXCR3 and TNF-alpha were higher in CARD than in IND individuals; on the other hand, the percentage of T CD4+ or CD8+ cells coexpressing CCR3 and IL-10 or coexpressing CCR3 and IL-4 were lower in CARD individuals than in IND individuals. In addition, a significant positive correlation between the expression of CCR5 or CXCR3 and IFN-gamma was observed in CARD individuals contrasting with a significant positive correlation between the expression of CCR3 and IL-4 and of CCR3 and IL-10 in IND patients. These results reinforce the hypothesis that a T. cruzi-exacerbated specific type 1 immune response developed by CARD chagasic patients is associated with the development of heart pathology.

  13. Regulation of cytoskeletal organization by syndecan transmembrane proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    Syndecans, a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, interact with numerous extracellular ligands through specific sequences in their heparan sulfate chains and have been considered to be co-receptors for matrix molecules and growth factors. In addition to their roles as co-receptors, many studies...

  14. Selective suppression of chemokine receptor CXCR3 expression by interferon-beta1a in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Sellebjerg, F

    2002-01-01

    We studied the expression of chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR3 on CD4 and CD8 positive T cells, and on CD14 positive monocytes in blood from 10 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) at initiation of interferon (IFN)-beta treatment, after 1 month and after 3...

  15. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy Suppresses the Early Proinflammatory Immune Response to a Severe Cutaneous Burn Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    markedly reduced in ESWT-treated wounds. Reduced CD14, PGE2s, nitric oxide synthase (NOS-2) and Lipopolysac- charide (LPS)-binding protein transcript...1 promotes expression of IL-1b, MIP-2, MSP, IL-1ra, CCR5 , CCR3, Il-11, CCR4 and CD3Z both in vivo and in vitro (29). Self-resolving inflammation is a

  16. Gene : CBRC-CBRI-05-0188 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0188 pseudo Novel V A Nematode chemoreceptors CCR3_CAVPO 0.96 22% ref|...XP_001673145.1| Hypothetical protein CBG01301 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] emb|CAE58206.1| Hypothetical protein... CBG01301 [Caenorhabditis briggsae] 1e-156 85% MKISFETPQWLINIYHIITLISILINSLGIYLIRFQSGKIDNFKYFLLWFITFIMFFMTQP

  17. Cloning of Encoding Sequences for Chemokine Receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 from a Chinese Lymphocyte cDNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ It has been known recently that cofactors, which belong to the family of seven-transmembrane GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors, are necessary for the entry of HIV-1 into CD4+cells. The CXC chemokine receptor 4(CXCR4) was first found to act as the coreceptor for the infection of T cell line-tropic HIV-1 strains to T helper cells in 1996. Keeping in step with this find the CC chemokine receptor 5(CCR5)was also identified as a coreceptor for macrophage-tropic virus. Both of the coreceptors could be used in basic research and application design for AIDS.

  18. Various domains of the B-cell regulatory molecule CD72 has diverged at different rates in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Cathrine Bie; Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Fredholm, Merete;

    2007-01-01

    We report the cloning of the porcine B-cell co-receptor CD72, as well as genomic mapping and examination of transcription. The B-cell receptor (BCR) complex mediates signalling upon antigen recognition by the membrane bound BCR. Several co-receptors modulate this signal positively or negatively. CD......72 has been shown to be a negatively regulating BCR co-receptor. We isolated and sequenced three porcine CD72 transcript variants. Using a pig radiation hybrid panel we found the porcien CD72 gene to be located on chromosome 1q21-28 in a region syntenic to human chromosome 9. The porcine CD72 gene...

  19. Role for CCR5Δ32 Protein in Resistance to R5, R5X4, and X4 Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Primary CD4+ Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    CCR5Δ32 is a loss-of-function mutation that abolishes cell surface expression of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coreceptor CCR5 and provides genetic resistance to HIV infection and disease progression. Since CXCR4 and other HIV coreceptors also exist, we hypothesized that CCR5Δ32-mediated resistance may be due not only to the loss of CCR5 function but also to a gain-of-function mechanism, specifically the active inhibition of alternative coreceptors by the mutant CCR5Δ32 protein. Here...

  20. Regulation of HIV receptor expression in cervical epithelial cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell mobilisation, in turn enhancing susceptibility to HIV infection.[1]. Although HIV ... kinase (AG1478; 200 nM), extracellular signal-regulated kinase. (ERK1/2) ..... Two distinct CCR5 domains can mediate coreceptor usage by human.

  1. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Ti(C, N)-BASED CERMET%Ti(C,N)基金属陶瓷的力学性能与显微结构的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何林; 黄传真; 刘玉先; 孙静; 刘含莲

    2003-01-01

    热压烧结制备了不同Mo2C和Cr3C2含量的Ti(C0.7N0.3)-(Ni-Co)-Mo2C-Cr3C2金属陶瓷,对其性能测试表明,低Mo2C,Cr3C2含量材料具有良好力学性能.利用透射电镜、能谱分析和扫描电镜对低Mo2C,Cr3C2含量金属陶瓷显微组织进行了分析.研究表明,材料显微组织中没有发现明显可见的环形相,Mo元素富集在硬质相颗粒边缘附近,Cr元素富集在粘结相中.未完全溶解的Cr3C2分布在粘结相内和相界上抑制了裂纹的扩展,断口上沿晶断裂面弯曲不规整以及穿晶解理条纹较多,这是材料具有较高的断裂韧性的原因.

  2. CCL2 nitration is a negative regulator of chemokine-mediated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Catriona E; Thompson, Sarah; O'Boyle, Graeme; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Sheerin, Neil S; Ali, Simi; Kirby, John A

    2017-03-14

    Chemokines promote leukocyte recruitment during inflammation. The oxidative burst is an important effector mechanism, this leads to the generation of reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including peroxynitrite (ONOO). The current study was performed to determine the potential for nitration to alter the chemical and biological properties of the prototypical CC chemokine, CCL2. Immunofluorescence was performed to assess the presence of RNS in kidney biopsies. Co-localisation was observed between RNS-modified tyrosine residues and the chemokine CCL2 in diseased kidneys. Nitration reduced the potential of CCL2 to stimulate monocyte migration in diffusion gradient chemotaxis assays (p nitrated chemokine for its cognate receptor CCR2b. The nitrated chemokine was unable to induce transendothelial monocyte migration in vitro and failed to promote leukocyte recruitment when added to murine air pouches (p nitration reduced heparan sulphate binding by CCL2. Importantly, intravenous administration of nitrated CCL2 also inhibited the normal recruitment of leukocytes to murine air pouches filled with unmodified CCL2. Together these data suggest that nitration of CCL2 during inflammation provides a mechanism to limit and resolve acute inflammation.

  3. Preferential suppression of CXCR4-specific strains of HIV-1 by antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, S; Weiser, B; Anastos, K; Kitchen, C M; Robison, E; Meyer, W A; Sacks, H S; Mathur-Wagh, U; Brunner, C; Burger, H

    2001-02-01

    To initiate infection, HIV-1 requires a primary receptor, CD4, and a secondary receptor, principally the chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4. Coreceptor usage plays a critical role in HIV-1 disease progression. HIV-1 transmitted in vivo generally uses CCR5 (R5), but later CXCR4 (X4) strains may emerge; this shift heralds CD4+ cell depletion and clinical deterioration. We asked whether antiretroviral therapy can shift HIV-1 populations back to R5 viruses after X4 strains have emerged, in part because treatment has been successful in slowing disease progression without uniformly suppressing plasma viremia. We analyzed the coreceptor usage of serial primary isolates from 15 women with advanced disease who demonstrated X4 viruses. Coreceptor usage was determined by using a HOS-CD4+ cell system, biological and molecular cloning, and sequencing the envelope gene V3 region. By constructing a mathematical model to measure the proportion of virus in a specimen using each coreceptor, we demonstrated that the predominant viral population shifted from X4 at baseline to R5 strains after treatment. Multivariate analyses showed that the shift was independent of changes in plasma HIV-1 RNA level and CD4+ cell count. Hence, combination therapy may lead to a change in phenotypic character as well as in the quantity of HIV-1. Shifts in coreceptor usage may thereby contribute to the clinical efficacy of anti-HIV drugs.

  4. Genotypic tropism testing by massively parallel sequencing: qualitative and quantitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiele Bernhard

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inferring viral tropism from genotype is a fast and inexpensive alternative to phenotypic testing. While being highly predictive when performed on clonal samples, sensitivity of predicting CXCR4-using (X4 variants drops substantially in clinical isolates. This is mainly attributed to minor variants not detected by standard bulk-sequencing. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS detects single clones thereby being much more sensitive. Using this technology we wanted to improve genotypic prediction of coreceptor usage. Methods Plasma samples from 55 antiretroviral-treated patients tested for coreceptor usage with the Monogram Trofile Assay were sequenced with standard population-based approaches. Fourteen of these samples were selected for further analysis with MPS. Tropism was predicted from each sequence with geno2pheno[coreceptor]. Results Prediction based on bulk-sequencing yielded 59.1% sensitivity and 90.9% specificity compared to the trofile assay. With MPS, 7600 reads were generated on average per isolate. Minorities of sequences with high confidence in CXCR4-usage were found in all samples, irrespective of phenotype. When using the default false-positive-rate of geno2pheno[coreceptor] (10%, and defining a minority cutoff of 5%, the results were concordant in all but one isolate. Conclusions The combination of MPS and coreceptor usage prediction results in a fast and accurate alternative to phenotypic assays. The detection of X4-viruses in all isolates suggests that coreceptor usage as well as fitness of minorities is important for therapy outcome. The high sensitivity of this technology in combination with a quantitative description of the viral population may allow implementing meaningful cutoffs for predicting response to CCR5-antagonists in the presence of X4-minorities.

  5. Chemokine receptors and their crucial role in human immunodeficiency virus infection: major breakthroughs in HIV research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, T B; Knudsen, T B; Eugen-Olsen, J

    1998-01-01

    Within the last three years, major progress in the understanding of acquired immune deficiency syndrome pathogenesis has been achieved. The discovery that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), in addition to the CD4 receptor, requires the presence of a coreceptor in order to infect cells has led...... to a series of breakthroughs in HIV research and knowledge. These include an increased understanding of viral entry, a connection of viral phenotype to specific coreceptor use, and an unequivocal linkage of a single human gene to host susceptibility. All in all these achievements provide a number of promising...

  6. Inflammatory Cytokines Induce Expression of Chemokines by Human Retinal Cells: Role in Chemokine Receptor Mediated Age-related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N; Kommineni, Vijay K; Ganjbaksh, Nader; Nagineni, Krishnasai K; Hooks, John J; Detrick, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Chemokine reeptor-3 (CCR-3) was shown to be associated with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a vision threatening retinal disease that affects the aging population world-wide. Retinal pigment epithelium and choroid in the posterior part of the retina are the key tissues targeted in the pathogenesis of CNV in AMD. We used human retinal pigment epithelial (HRPE) and choroidal fibroblast (HCHF) cells, prepared from aged adult human donor eyes, to evaluate the expression of major CCR-3 ligands, CCL-5, CCL -7, CCL-11,CCL-24 and CCL-26. Microarray analysis of gene expression in HRPE cells treated with inflammatory cytokine mix (ICM= IFN-γ+TNF-α+IL-1β) revealed 75 and 23-fold increase in CCL-5 and CCL-7 respectively, but not CCL-11, CCL-24 and CCL-26. Chemokine secretion studies of the production of CCL5 and CCL7 by HRPE corroborated with the gene expression analysis data. When the HRPE cells were treated with either individual cytokines or the ICM, both CCL-5 and CCL-7 were produced in a dose dependent manner. Similar to the gene expression data, the ICM did not enhance HRPE production of CCL-11, CCL-24 and CCL-26. CCL-11 and CCL-26 were increased with IL-4 treatment and this HRPE production was augmented in the presence of TNF-α and IL1β. When HCHF cells were treated with either individual cytokines or the ICM, both CCL-5 and CCL-7 were produced in a dose dependent fashion. IL-4 induced low levels of CCL-11 and CCL-26 in HCHF and this production was significantly enhanced by TNF-α. Under these conditions, neither HRPE nor HCHF were demonstrated to produce CCL-24. These data demonstrate that chronic inflammation triggers CCL-5 and CCL-7 release by HRPE and HCHF and the subsequent interactions with CCR3 may participate in pathologic processes in AMD.

  7. Molecular recognition of CCR5 by an HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2014-01-01

    The binding of protein HIV-1 gp120 to coreceptors CCR5 or CXCR4 is a key step of the HIV-1 entry to the host cell, and is predominantly mediated through the V3 loop fragment of HIV-1 gp120. In the present work, we delineate the molecular recognition of chemokine receptor CCR5 by a dual tropic HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop, using a comprehensive set of computational tools predominantly based on molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. We report, what is to our knowledge, the first complete HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop : CCR5 complex structure, which includes the whole V3 loop and the N-terminus of CCR5, and exhibits exceptional agreement with previous experimental findings. The computationally derived structure sheds light into the functional role of HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop and CCR5 residues associated with the HIV-1 coreceptor activity, and provides insights into the HIV-1 coreceptor selectivity and the blocking mechanism of HIV-1 gp120 by maraviroc. By comparing the binding of the specific dual tropic HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop with CCR5 and CXCR4, we observe that the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop residues 13-21, which include the tip, share nearly identical structural and energetic properties in complex with both coreceptors. This result paves the way for the design of dual CCR5/CXCR4 targeted peptides as novel potential anti-AIDS therapeutics.

  8. Antibody-mediated enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infectivity is determined by the structure of gp120 and depends on modulation of the gp120-CCR5 interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Guillon (Christophe); M. Schutten (Martin); P.H.M. Boers (Patrick); R.A. Gruters (Rob); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this study, we characterized the viral determinants of coreceptor usage in relation to susceptibility to antibody-mediated neutralization or enhancement of infectivity by using chimeras of three highly related human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates of different phenotype

  9. Shedding of klotho by ADAMs in the kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, Ellen P. M.; Pulskens, Wilco P.; van der Hagen, Eline A. E.; Lavrijsen, Marla; Vervloet, Marc G.; van Goor, Harry; Bindels, Rene J. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The anti-aging gene klotho plays an important role in Ca2+ and phosphate homeostasis. Membrane-bound klotho is an essential coreceptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 and can be cleaved by proteases, including a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) 10 and ADAM17. Cleavage of klotho occurs at a s

  10. Shedding of klotho by ADAMs in the kidney.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, E.P.M. van; Pulskens, W.P.C.; Hagen, E.A.E. van der; Lavrijsen, M.; Vervloet, M.G.; Goor, H van; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2015-01-01

    The anti-aging gene klotho plays an important role in Ca(2+) and phosphate homeostasis. Membrane-bound klotho is an essential coreceptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 and can be cleaved by proteases, including a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)10 and ADAM17. Cleavage of klotho occurs at a

  11. Tissue expression and source of circulating αKlotho

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olauson, Hannes; Mencke, Rik; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Larsson, Tobias E

    αKlotho (Klotho), a type I transmembrane protein and a coreceptor for Fibroblast Growth Factor-23, was initially thought to be expressed only in a limited number of tissues, most importantly the kidney, parathyroid gland and choroid plexus. Emerging data may suggest a more ubiquitous Klotho

  12. A library of 7TM receptor C-terminal tails. Interactions with the proposed post-endocytic sorting proteins ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Arne; Søndergaard, Birgitte P; Ersbøll, Bjarne

    2004-01-01

    Adaptor and scaffolding proteins determine the cellular targeting, the spatial, and thereby the functional association of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors with co-receptors, transducers, and downstream effectors and the adaptors determine post-signaling events such as receptor sequ...

  13. CD14 is a key organizer of microglial responses to CNS infection and injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janova, Hana; Boettcher, Chotima; Holtman, Inge R.; Regen, Tommy; van Rossum, Denise; Goetz, Alexander; Ernst, Anne-Sophie; Fritsche, Christin; Gertig, Ulla; Saiepour, Nasrin; Gronke, Konrad; Wrzos, Claudia; Ribes, Sandra; Rolfes, Simone; Weinstein, Jonathan; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Pukrop, Tobias; Kopatz, Jens; Stadelmann, Christine; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Weber, Martin S.; Prinz, Marco; Brueck, Wolfgang; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.; Priller, Josef; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, innate immune cells of the CNS, sense infection and damage through overlapping receptor sets. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 recognizes bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and multiple injury-associated factors. We show that its co-receptor CD14 serves three non-redundant functions in microgli

  14. Heterozygosity for a deletion in the CKR-5 gene leads to prolonged AIDS-free survival and slower CD4 T-cell decline in a cohort of HIV-seropositive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Iversen, Anton; Garred, P;

    1997-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that a homozygous 32 base-pair deletion in the gene encoding CKR-5, a major coreceptor for HIV-1, leads to resistance to infection with HIV-1. We have investigated whether HIV-seropositive individuals who were heterozygous for the CKR-5 deletion had a different course ...

  15. Common promoter deletion is associated with 3.9-fold differential transcription of ovine CCR5 and reduced proviral level of ovine progressive pneumonia virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor that regulates immune cell recruitment in inflammation and serves as a coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A human CCR5 coding deletion (termed delta-32) results in strong resistance to HIV infection, and polymorphisms in CCR5 regulatory regions have been ...

  16. Receptor antibodies as novel therapeutics for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussar, Siegfried; Vienberg, Sara Gry; Kahn, C Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to receptors can block or mimic hormone action. Taking advantage of receptor isoforms, co-receptors, and other receptor modulating proteins, antibodies and other designer ligands can enhance tissue specificity and provide new approaches to the therapy of diabetes and other diseases....

  17. Improved humoral and cellular immune response against the gp120 V3 loop of HIV-1 following genetic immunization with a chimeric DNA vaccine encoding the V3 inserted into the hepatites B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A.; Nielsen, H.V.; Bryder, K.

    1998-01-01

    The gp120-derived V3 loop of HIV-1 is involved in co-receptor interaction, it guides cell tropism, and contains an epitope for antibody neutralization. Thus, HIV-1 V3 is an attractive vaccine candidate. The V3 of the MN strain (MN V3) contains both B- and T-cell epitopes, including a known mouse ...

  18. Mimicking protein-protein interactions through peptide-peptide interactions: HIV-1 gp120 and CXCR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eGross

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We have recently designed a soluble synthetic peptide that functionally mimics the HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4, which is a chemokine receptor that belongs to the family of seven-transmembrane GPCRs. This CXCR4 mimetic peptide, termed CX4-M1, presents the three extracellular loops (ECLs of the receptor. In binding assays involving recombinant proteins, as well as in cellular infection assays, CX4-M1 was found to selectively recognize gp120 from HIV-1 strains that use CXCR4 for cell entry (X4 tropic HIV-1. Furthermore, anti-HIV-1 antibodies modulate this interaction in a molecular mechanism related to that of their impact on the gp120-CXCR4 interaction. We could now show that the selectivity of CX4-M1 pertains not only to gp120 from X4 tropic HIV-1, but also to synthetic peptides presenting the V3 loops of these gp120 proteins. The V3 loop is thought to be an essential part of the coreceptor binding site of gp120 that contacts the second ECL of the coreceptor. We were able to experimentally confirm this notion in binding assays using substitution analogs of CX4-M1 and the V3 loop peptides, respectively, as well as in cellular infection assays. These results indicate that interactions of the HIV-1 Env with coreceptors can be mimicked by synthetic peptides, which may be useful to explore these interactions at the molecular level in more detail.

  19. A Simplified Technique for Evaluating Human "CCR5" Genetic Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falteisek, Lukáš; Cerný, Jan; Janštová, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    To involve students in thinking about the problem of AIDS (which is important in the view of nondecreasing infection rates), we established a practical lab using a simplified adaptation of Thomas's (2004) method to determine the polymorphism of HIV co-receptor CCR5 from students' own epithelial cells. CCR5 is a receptor involved in inflammatory…

  20. Endoglin haploinsufficiency attenuates radiation-induced deterioration of kidney function in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharpfenecker, Marion; Floot, Ben; Russell, Nicola S.; Coppes, Rob P.; Stewart, Fiona A.

    Background and Purpose: Endoglin is a transforming growth receptor beta (TGF-beta) co-receptor, which plays a crucial role in the development of late normal tissue damage. Mice with halved endoglin levels (Eng(+/-) mice) develop less inflammation, vascular damage and fibrosis after kidney

  1. Analysis of odorant receptor protein function in the yellow fever mosquito, aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odorant receptors (ORs) in insects are ligand-gated ion channels comprised of two subunits: a variable receptor and an obligatory co-receptor (Orco). This protein receptor complex of unknown stoichiometry interacts with an odor molecule leading to changes in permeability of the sensory dendrite, th...

  2. Domain Modeling: NP_055061.1 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_055061.1 chr22 THE STRUCTURE OF THE GDNF:CORECEPTOR COMPLEX: INSIGHTS INTO RET S...IGNALLING AND HEPARIN BINDING. p3fubc_ chr22/NP_055061.1/NP_055061.1_apo_1277-1422.pdb p2v5ea_ chr22/NP_055061.1/NP_055061.

  3. MOLECULAR BASIS OF PERIPHERAL OLFACTORY PLASTICITY IN Rhodnius prolixus, A CHAGAS DISEASE VECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Latorre Estivalis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Olfaction is fundamental for most animals and critical for different aspects of triatomine biology, including host-seeking, reproduction, avoidance of predators, and aggregation in shelters. Ethological and physiological aspects of these olfactory-mediated behaviors are well understood, but their molecular bases are still largely unknown. Here we investigated changes in molecular mechanisms at the peripheral olfactory level in response to different physiological and developmental conditions. For this, the antennal expression levels of the odorant (Orco and ionotropic (IR8a, IR25a and IR76b coreceptor genes were determined in Rhodnius prolixus by means of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis. Gene expression changes were analyzed to test the effect of feeding and imaginal molt for both sexes. Moreover, we analyzed whether expression of these genes changed during the early life of adult bugs. Under these conditions bugs display distinct behavioral responses to diverse chemical stimuli. A significantly decreased expression was induced by blood feeding on all coreceptor genes. The expression of all genes was significantly increased following the imaginal molt. These results show that olfactory coreceptor genes have their expression altered as a response to physiological or developmental changes. Our study suggests that olfactory coreceptor genes confer adaptability to the peripheral olfactory function, probably underlying the known plasticity of triatomine olfactory-mediated behavior.

  4. The Plant Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase PSY1R from Head to Toe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oehlenschlæger, Christian Berg

    with a Kd of approximately 17 nM which is physiologically relevant. The activation mechanism of PSY1R was also studied. Full length PSY1R forms homodimers and interacts with members of the SERK co-receptor family in planta. An intact PSY1R C-terminal domain was shown to be required for these interactions...

  5. Shedding of klotho by ADAMs in the kidney.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, E.P.M. van; Pulskens, W.P.C.; Hagen, E.A.E. van der; Lavrijsen, M.; Vervloet, M.G.; Goor, H van; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2015-01-01

    The anti-aging gene klotho plays an important role in Ca(2+) and phosphate homeostasis. Membrane-bound klotho is an essential coreceptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 and can be cleaved by proteases, including a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)10 and ADAM17. Cleavage of klotho occurs at a

  6. Shedding of klotho by ADAMs in the kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, Ellen P. M.; Pulskens, Wilco P.; van der Hagen, Eline A. E.; Lavrijsen, Marla; Vervloet, Marc G.; van Goor, Harry; Bindels, Rene J. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The anti-aging gene klotho plays an important role in Ca2+ and phosphate homeostasis. Membrane-bound klotho is an essential coreceptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 and can be cleaved by proteases, including a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) 10 and ADAM17. Cleavage of klotho occurs at a

  7. Heterozygosity for a deletion in the CKR-5 gene leads to prolonged AIDS-free survival and slower CD4 T-cell decline in a cohort of HIV-seropositive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Iversen, Anton; Garred, P

    1997-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that a homozygous 32 base-pair deletion in the gene encoding CKR-5, a major coreceptor for HIV-1, leads to resistance to infection with HIV-1. We have investigated whether HIV-seropositive individuals who were heterozygous for the CKR-5 deletion had a different course...

  8. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-11-02

    Nov 2, 2005 ... HIV infection of new human target cells is a process involving complex ... Evolution of HIV co-receptor binding can also occur in absence of .... Integration of a DNA copy of the viral genome into the host cell chromosome is ...

  9. A Simplified Technique for Evaluating Human "CCR5" Genetic Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falteisek, Lukáš; Cerný, Jan; Janštová, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    To involve students in thinking about the problem of AIDS (which is important in the view of nondecreasing infection rates), we established a practical lab using a simplified adaptation of Thomas's (2004) method to determine the polymorphism of HIV co-receptor CCR5 from students' own epithelial cells. CCR5 is a receptor involved in…

  10. Scavenger receptor BI boosts hepatocyte permissiveness to Plasmodium infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yalaoui, S.; Huby, T.; Franetich, J.F.; Gego, A.; Rametti, A.; Moreau, M.; Collet, X.; Siau, A.; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Sauerwein, R.W.; Luty, A.J.F.; Vaillant, J.C.; Hannoun, L.; Chapman, J.; Mazier, D.; Froissard, P.

    2008-01-01

    Infection of hepatocytes by Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites requires the host tetraspanin CD81. CD81 is also predicted to be a coreceptor, along with scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), for hepatitis C virus. Using SR-BI-knockout, SR-BI-hypomorphic and SR-BI-transgenic primary hepatocytes, as well as s

  11. The composition of T cell subtypes in duodenal biopsies are altered in coeliac disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagner Steenholt, Janni; Nielsen, Christian; Baudewijn, Leen

    2017-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of Celiac disease (CD) is intraepithelial lymphocytosis in the small intestine. Until now, investigations to characterize the T cell subpopulations within the epithelial layer have not discriminated between the heterodimeric co-receptor molecule, CD8αβ, and the possibly...

  12. Endoglin haploinsufficiency attenuates radiation-induced deterioration of kidney function in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharpfenecker, Marion; Floot, Ben; Russell, Nicola S.; Coppes, Rob P.; Stewart, Fiona A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Endoglin is a transforming growth receptor beta (TGF-beta) co-receptor, which plays a crucial role in the development of late normal tissue damage. Mice with halved endoglin levels (Eng(+/-) mice) develop less inflammation, vascular damage and fibrosis after kidney irradiatio

  13. Biased small-molecule ligands for selective inhibition of HIV-1 cell entry via CCR5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Christian; Spiess, Katja; von Lüttichau, Hans Rudolf;

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of HIV's use of CCR5 as the primary coreceptor in fusion, the focus on developing small-molecule receptor antagonists for inhibition hereof has only resulted in one single drug, Maraviroc. We therefore investigated the possibility of using small-molecule CCR5 agonists as HIV-1...

  14. Feline Lectin Activity Is Critical for the Cellular Entry of Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Regan, Andrew D.; Ousterout, David G.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2010-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis is a lethal disease of felids caused by systemic infection with a feline coronavirus. Here, we report identification and analysis of the feline homologue to the human lectin DC-SIGN and show that it is a coreceptor for virulent strains of serotype 1 and serotype 2 feline coronaviruses.

  15. Feline lectin activity is critical for the cellular entry of feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Andrew D; Ousterout, David G; Whittaker, Gary R

    2010-08-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis is a lethal disease of felids caused by systemic infection with a feline coronavirus. Here, we report identification and analysis of the feline homologue to the human lectin DC-SIGN and show that it is a coreceptor for virulent strains of serotype 1 and serotype 2 feline coronaviruses.

  16. Tyrosine-610 in the receptor kinase BAK1 does not play a major role in brassinosteroid signaling or innate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The plasma membrane-localized BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1) functions as a co-receptor with several receptor kinases including the brassinosteroid (BR) receptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1), which is involved in growth, and the receptors for bacterial flagellin and EF-Tu, FLAGELLIN-SENSING ...

  17. Renal heparan sulfate proteoglycans modulate fibroblast growth factor 2 signaling in experimental chronic transplant dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katta, K.; Boersema, M.; Adepu, S.; Rienstra, H.; Celie, J.W.; Mencke, R.; Molema, G.; Goor, H. van; Berden, J.H.M.; Navis, G.; Hillebrands, J.L.; Born, J. van den

    2013-01-01

    Depending on the glycan structure, proteoglycans can act as coreceptors for growth factors. We hypothesized that proteoglycans and their growth factor ligands orchestrate tissue remodeling in chronic transplant dysfunction. We have previously shown perlecan to be selectively up-regulated in the glom

  18. Basophilenaktivierungstest: Vergleich verschiedener Basophilen-Identifikationsmarker und intrazellulärer Histaminnachweis

    OpenAIRE

    Hann, Rebekka Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Mittels Mehrfarben-Durchflusszytometrie (6 Farben) wurden bei 10 Patienten und 3 Kontrollen mit Gräserpollenallergie Basophilen-Identifikationsmarker untersucht, um die für den Basophilenaktivierungstest geeignetste Färbung herauszufinden. Darüber hinaus wurde eine intrazelluläre Histaminfärbung durchgeführt. Die Verwendung von anti-CCR3-Alexa Fluor 647 und anti-IgE-FITC/anti-CD203c-PE zeigte in der vorliegenden Studie die besten Ergebnisse. Die verwendete Methodik für die intrazelluläre Hist...

  19. High prevalence of CXCR4-using viruses in vertically HIV-1-infected infants in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Samleerat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: Previous studies evaluating the frequency of CXCR4-using strains in HIV-1 vertically infected children restricted mainly to patients infected with subtype B or C strains. However, the coreceptor use by non-B or non-C subtypes remains little known, especially in infants. In this study, we determined the HIV-1 coreceptor usage in infants with vertically-acquired HIV-1 infection in Thailand, where the predominant circulating HIV-1 strains are CRF01_AE and the minority are subtype B. Methods: C2-V3-C3 gp120 was amplified in a triplicate nested-PCR and sequenced. Coreceptor usage was predicted using the geno2pheno [coreceptor] algorithm and analyzed with a false positive rate (FRP of 10%. Summary of results: A total of 255 sequences were obtained from viral isolates of 85 HIV-1-infected infants (34 male and 51 female participating in the National AIDS Program (NAP of the National Health Security Office (NHSO of Thailand. All children were received ARV prophylaxis according to the Thai national guidelines. The median age was 84 days (range: 33–308. Seventy-four children (87.1% were infected with CRF01_AE strain and 11 (12.9% were infected with subtype B strain. Concordance in tropism prediction for the triplicates was observed in all samples. CXCR4 coreceptor-using strains were found in 44.7% (38 of 85 and CCR5 coreceptor-using strains were found in 55.3% (47 of 85. No significant difference in age (p=0.34 and clinical signs of AIDS (p=0.47 were observed between these populations. CCR5Delta32 and CCR5m303 mutation genotypes that may contribute to a selective pressure of viruses to alternatively use CXCR4 as a coreceptor were not found. Conclusions: A high prevalence of HIV-1 CXCR4-using variants was found among HIV-1 vertically infected infants in Thailand, indicating that a direct vertical transmission of CXCR4-using variants or a rapid switch from CCR5-using to CXCR4-using viruses shortly after transmission. These

  20. An expanded model of HIV cell entry phenotype based on multi-parameter single-cell data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozek Katarzyna

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 into the host cell involves interactions between the viral envelope glycoproteins (Env and the cellular receptor CD4 as well as a coreceptor molecule (most importantly CCR5 or CXCR4. Viral preference for a specific coreceptor (tropism is in particular determined by the third variable loop (V3 of the Env glycoprotein gp120. The approval and use of a coreceptor antagonist for antiretroviral therapy make detailed understanding of tropism and its accurate prediction from patient derived virus isolates essential. The aim of the present study is the development of an extended description of the HIV entry phenotype reflecting its co-dependence on several key determinants as the basis for a more accurate prediction of HIV-1 entry phenotype from genotypic data. Results Here, we established a new protocol of quantitation and computational analysis of the dependence of HIV entry efficiency on receptor and coreceptor cell surface levels as well as viral V3 loop sequence and the presence of two prototypic coreceptor antagonists in varying concentrations. Based on data collected at the single-cell level, we constructed regression models of the HIV-1 entry phenotype integrating the measured determinants. We developed a multivariate phenotype descriptor, termed phenotype vector, which facilitates a more detailed characterization of HIV entry phenotypes than currently used binary tropism classifications. For some of the tested virus variants, the multivariant phenotype vector revealed substantial divergences from existing tropism predictions. We also developed methods for computational prediction of the entry phenotypes based on the V3 sequence and performed an extrapolating calculation of the effectiveness of this computational procedure. Conclusions Our study of the HIV cell entry phenotype and the novel multivariate representation developed here contributes to a more detailed

  1. HIV-1 Tropism Dynamics and Phylogenetic Analysis from Longitudinal Ultra-Deep Sequencing Data of CCR5- and CXCR4-Using Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sede, Mariano M.; Moretti, Franco A.; Laufer, Natalia L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Coreceptor switch from CCR5 to CXCR4 is associated with HIV disease progression. The molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying the CCR5 to CXCR4 switch are the focus of intense recent research. We studied the HIV-1 tropism dynamics in relation to coreceptor usage, the nature of quasispecies from ultra deep sequencing (UDPS) data and their phylogenetic relationships. Methods Here, we characterized C2-V3-C3 sequences of HIV obtained from 19 patients followed up for 54 to 114 months using UDPS, with further genotyping and phylogenetic analysis for coreceptor usage. HIV quasispecies diversity and variability as well as HIV plasma viral load were measured longitudinally and their relationship with the HIV coreceptor usage was analyzed. The longitudinal UDPS data were submitted to phylogenetic analysis and sampling times and coreceptor usage were mapped onto the trees obtained. Results Although a temporal viral genetic structuring was evident, the persistence of several viral lineages evolving independently along the infection was statistically supported, indicating a complex scenario for the evolution of viral quasispecies. HIV X4-using variants were present in most of our patients, exhibiting a dissimilar inter- and intra-patient predominance as the component of quasispecies even on antiretroviral therapy. The viral populations from some of the patients studied displayed evidences of the evolution of X4 variants through fitness valleys, whereas for other patients the data favored a gradual mode of emergence. Conclusions CXCR4 usage can emerge independently, in multiple lineages, along the course of HIV infection. The mode of emergence, i.e. gradual or through fitness valleys seems to depend on both virus and patient factors. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that, besides becoming dominant after population-level switches, minor proportions of X4 viruses might exist along the infection, perhaps even at early stages of it. The fate of these minor

  2. CD8 chemokine receptors in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smyth, L J C; Starkey, C; Gordon, F S;

    2008-01-01

    Increased lung CD8 cells and their expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 have been previously reported in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Alterations of CD8-CCR3 and -CCR4 expression and their ligands in COPD patients have not been fully investigated. The objective......, smokers and healthy non-smokers (HNS). CCL5 and CCL11 levels were measured in BAL, and from the supernatants of lung resection explant cultures. CD8-CCR3 and -CCR5 expression (means) were increased in COPD patients (22% and 46% respectively) and smokers (20% and 45%) compared with HNS (3% and 22%); P ....05 for all comparisons. CD3CXCR3 expression was raised in smokers and COPD while CD8CXCR3 and CD3 and CD8 CCR4 expression was similar between groups. CD8CCR5 expression correlated to smoking pack years (r = 0.42, P = 0.01). COPD explants released more CCL5 compared with smokers (P = 0.02), while...

  3. Early inflammatory markers in elicitation of allergic contact dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daraio María

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allergic Contact Dermatitis (ACD is regarded as a T-cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction. We studied the kinetics of the expression of CS-1 fibronectin, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (CCL17/ TARC and different chemokine receptors (CR in skin biopsies from individuals suffering from back problems, with the antigen responsible of their contact dermatitis and an irrelevant antigen. Methods Samples were taken at 2, 10, and 48 hours for histological and immunohistochemical studies using monoclonal antibodies against human CS-1 fibronectin, CCL17, CD3, CD68, CD49d, CXCR3, CCR5, and CCR3. Results At positive antigen stimulated sites there was an early expression of CS-1 fibronectin (2 hours, followed by CCL17 and a later accumulation of alplha4/beta1+ (CD49d, CD3+, CD68+, CXCR3+ and CCR5+ mononuclear cells. At 48 hours, approximately 59 % of infiltrating cells were CXCR3+, 42% CCR5+, and only 14 % CCR3+. Conclusions These results showed for the first time a very early expression of CS-1 fibronectin which preceded production of CCL17 in blood endothelial cells (BCEs from patients' skin with ACD. The role of these molecules in recruitment of monocytes and effector T cells in ACD is discussed.

  4. Immune response CC chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 are associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palchevskiy Vyacheslav

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary sarcoidosis involves an intense leukocyte infiltration of the lung with the formation of non-necrotizing granulomas. CC chemokines (chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2-CCL5 are chemoattractants of mononuclear cells and act through seven transmembrane G-coupled receptors. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results with regard to the associations of these chemokines with sarcoidosis. In an effort to clarify previous discrepancies, we performed the largest observational study to date of CC chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Results BALF chemokine levels from 72 patients affected by pulmonary sarcoidosis were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and compared to 8 healthy volunteers. BALF CCL3 and CCL4 levels from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients were not increased compared to controls. However, CCL2 and CCL5 levels were elevated, and subgroup analysis showed higher levels of both chemokines in all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis. CCL2, CCL5, CC chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1, CCR2 and CCR3 were expressed from mononuclear cells forming the lung granulomas, while CCR5 was only found on mast cells. Conclusions These data suggest that CCL2 and CCL5 are important mediators in recruiting CCR1, CCR2, and CCR3 expressing mononuclear cells as well as CCR5-expressing mast cells during all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  5. Chemokines and chemokine receptors expression in the lesions of patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilka Luisa Diaz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL presents distinct active clinical forms with different grades of severity, known as localised (LCL, intermediate (ICL and diffuse (DCL cutaneous leishmaniasis. LCL and DCL are associated with a polarised T-helper (Th1 and Th2 immune response, respectively, whereas ICL, or chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis, is associated with an exacerbated immune response and a mixed cytokine expression profile. Chemokines and chemokine receptors are involved in cellular migration and are critical in the inflammatory response. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of the chemokines CXCL10, CCL4, CCL8, CCL11 and CXCL8 and the chemokine receptors CCR3, CXCR3, CCR5 and CCR7 in the lesions of patients with different clinical forms of ACL using immunohistochemistry. LCL patients exhibited a high density of CXCL10+, CCL4+ and CCL8+ cells, indicating an important role for these chemokines in the local Th1 immune response and the migration of CXCR3+ cells. LCL patients showed a higher density of CCR7+ cells than ICL or DCL patients, suggesting major dendritic cell (DC migration to lymph nodes. Furthermore, DCL was associated with low expression levels of Th1-associated chemokines and CCL11+ epidermal DCs, which contribute to the recruitment of CCR3+ cells. Our findings also suggest an important role for epidermal cells in the induction of skin immune responses through the production of chemokines, such as CXCL10, by keratinocytes.

  6. Immune response CC Chemokines, CCL2 and CCL5 are associated with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav

    2011-04-04

    Abstract Background Pulmonary sarcoidosis involves an intense leukocyte infiltration of the lung with the formation of non-necrotizing granulomas. CC chemokines (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)-CCL5) are chemoattractants of mononuclear cells and act through seven transmembrane G-coupled receptors. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results with regard to the associations of these chemokines with sarcoidosis. In an effort to clarify previous discrepancies, we performed the largest observational study to date of CC chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Results BALF chemokine levels from 72 patients affected by pulmonary sarcoidosis were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared to 8 healthy volunteers. BALF CCL3 and CCL4 levels from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients were not increased compared to controls. However, CCL2 and CCL5 levels were elevated, and subgroup analysis showed higher levels of both chemokines in all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis. CCL2, CCL5, CC chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1), CCR2 and CCR3 were expressed from mononuclear cells forming the lung granulomas, while CCR5 was only found on mast cells. Conclusions These data suggest that CCL2 and CCL5 are important mediators in recruiting CCR1, CCR2, and CCR3 expressing mononuclear cells as well as CCR5-expressing mast cells during all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  7. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by Brothers of Charity Services South East, Waterford

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav

    2011-04-04

    Abstract Background Pulmonary sarcoidosis involves an intense leukocyte infiltration of the lung with the formation of non-necrotizing granulomas. CC chemokines (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)-CCL5) are chemoattractants of mononuclear cells and act through seven transmembrane G-coupled receptors. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results with regard to the associations of these chemokines with sarcoidosis. In an effort to clarify previous discrepancies, we performed the largest observational study to date of CC chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Results BALF chemokine levels from 72 patients affected by pulmonary sarcoidosis were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared to 8 healthy volunteers. BALF CCL3 and CCL4 levels from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients were not increased compared to controls. However, CCL2 and CCL5 levels were elevated, and subgroup analysis showed higher levels of both chemokines in all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis. CCL2, CCL5, CC chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1), CCR2 and CCR3 were expressed from mononuclear cells forming the lung granulomas, while CCR5 was only found on mast cells. Conclusions These data suggest that CCL2 and CCL5 are important mediators in recruiting CCR1, CCR2, and CCR3 expressing mononuclear cells as well as CCR5-expressing mast cells during all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  8. Insect odorant receptors are molecular targets of the insect repellent DEET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzen, Mathias; Pellegrino, Maurizio; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2008-03-28

    DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide) is the world's most widely used topical insect repellent, with broad effectiveness against most insects. Its mechanism of action and molecular target remain unknown. Here, we show that DEET blocks electrophysiological responses of olfactory sensory neurons to attractive odors in Anopheles gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster. DEET inhibits behavioral attraction to food odors in Drosophila, and this inhibition requires the highly conserved olfactory co-receptor OR83b. DEET inhibits odor-evoked currents mediated by the insect odorant receptor complex, comprising a ligand-binding subunit and OR83b. We conclude that DEET masks host odor by inhibiting subsets of heteromeric insect odorant receptors that require the OR83b co-receptor. The identification of candidate molecular targets for the action of DEET may aid in the design of safer and more effective insect repellents.

  9. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili [Scripps; (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (UCSD)

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  10. HIV and Drug Resistance: Hitting a Moving Target | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior research revealed how HIV-1 makes its destructive entry into the target cell by fusing together the cholesterol-rich lipid bilayer of the viral envelope—made with key glycoproteins gp120 and gp41—and the host cell’s plasma membrane. Cell-viral interactions begin with the binding of gp120 to the CD4 receptor molecule on the target cell, followed by gp120 binding to coreceptors. These coreceptors likely reside in structures called lipid rafts—areas in the cell plasma membrane that are rich in cholesterol, saturated fatty acids, and certain proteins that facilitate the entry of viruses into host cells. Finally, sequences in gp41 trigger the fusion of the viral and cellular lipid bilayers. The lipid rafts are then involved in the production of new viral particles.

  11. HIV-1 CCR5 gene therapy will fail unless it is combined with a suicide gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Aridaman; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-12-17

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has successfully turned Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from a deadly pathogen into a manageable chronic infection. ART is a lifelong therapy which is both expensive and toxic, and HIV can become resistant to it. An alternative to lifelong ART is gene therapy that targets the CCR5 co-receptor and creates a population of genetically modified host cells that are less susceptible to viral infection. With generic mathematical models we show that gene therapy that only targets the CCR5 co-receptor fails to suppress HIV-1 (which is in agreement with current data). We predict that the same gene therapy can be markedly improved if it is combined with a suicide gene that is only expressed upon HIV-1 infection.

  12. Construction and expression of the bicistronic expression vector with RANTES and SDF-1 genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖; 白雪帆; 李谨革; 黄长形; 孙永涛; 聂青和; 王九平

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To construct bicistronic expression vector with RANTES and SDF-1 genes,the ligands of HIV 1 principal coreceptors,and identify its expression.Methods:RANTES-KDEL was amplified from plasmid pCMV-R-K by PCR and cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pCMV-S/K.Gene transfection into HeLa cells was carried out by lipofectin.Indirect immumofluorescence and radioimmunoprecipitation were used to confirm the expression of RANTES and SDF-1.Results:The construction of pCMV-R-K-S-K was confirmed by enzymatic digestion and sequencing.RANTES and SDF-1 were shown expressed in HeLa cells by indirect immumofluorescence and radioimmunoprecipitation.Conclusion:pCMV-R-K-S-K was constructed and expressed in cell line Hela successfully,which will contribute to further study of gene therapy of AIDS by HIV-1 coreceptors knockout.

  13. Multimerization of the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4 is required for its ability to activate protein kinase C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oh, E S; Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    The transmembrane proteoglycan syndecan-4, which is a coreceptor with integrins in cytoskeleton-matrix interactions, appears to be multimerized in vivo. Both purified and recombinant core proteins form sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant oligomers, and we now report that a synthetic peptide correspo......The transmembrane proteoglycan syndecan-4, which is a coreceptor with integrins in cytoskeleton-matrix interactions, appears to be multimerized in vivo. Both purified and recombinant core proteins form sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant oligomers, and we now report that a synthetic peptide...... corresponding to the central region of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain (4V) also oligomerizes. The degree of oligomerization correlates with the previously reported ability to bind protein kinase C (PKC) and regulate its activity. Only multimeric recombinant syndecan-4 core protein, but not the monomeric protein...

  14. Extracellular interactome of the FGF receptor-ligand system: complexities and the relative simplicity of the worm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanska, Urszula M; Fernig, David G; Kinnunen, Tarja

    2009-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) regulate a multitude of biological functions in embryonic development and in adult. A major question is how does one family of growth factors and their receptors control such a variety of functions? Classically, specificity was thought to be imparted by alternative splicing of the FGFRs, resulting in isoforms that bind specifically to a subset of the FGFs, and by different saccharide sequences in the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) co-receptor. A growing number of noncanonical co-receptors such as integrins and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) are now recognized as imparting additional complexity to classic FGFR signaling. This review will discuss the noncanonical FGFR ligands and speculate on the possibility that they provide additional and alternative means to determining the functional specificity of FGFR signaling. We will also discuss how invertebrate models such as C. elegans may advance our understanding of noncanonical FGFR signaling.

  15. The Evolving HIV-1 Epidemic in Warao Amerindians Is Dominated by an Extremely High Frequency of CXCR4-Utilizing Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Héctor R; Bello, Gonzalo; Villalba, Julian A; Sulbaran, Yoneira F; Garzaro, Domingo; Maes, Mailis; Loureiro, Carmen L; de Waard, Jacobus H; Pujol, Flor H

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported a high prevalence of HIV-1 infection in Warao Amerindians from Venezuela due to the rapid spread of a single B subtype strain. In this study we evaluated the coreceptor use of the HIV-1 strains infecting this Amerindian community. Sequences of the HIV-1 V3 loop from 56 plasma samples were genotyped for coreceptor use. An extremely high frequency of CXCR4 strains was found among HIV-1-infecting Waraos (47/49, 96%), compared to HIV-1 strains infecting the non-Amerindian Venezuelan population (35/79, 44%, p HIV-1 transmissions occurred within the very early phase of infection (≤12 months). This is consistent with an initial infection dominated by an X4 strain or a very rapid selection of X4 variants after infection. This Amerindian population also exhibits the highest prevalence of tuberculosis in Venezuela, being synergistically bad prognostic factors for the evolution of morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable population.

  16. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging Reveals that Chemokine-Binding Modulates Heterodimers of CXCR4 and CCR5 Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dimerization has emerged as an important feature of chemokine G-protein-coupled receptors. CXCR4 and CCR5 regulate leukocyte chemotaxis and also serve as a co-receptor for HIV entry. Both receptors are recruited to the immunological synapse during T-cell activation. However, it is not clear whether they form heterodimers and whether ligand binding modulates the dimer formation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a sensitive Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) imaging ...

  17. High prevalence of CXCR4 usage among treatment-naive CRF01_AE and CRF51_01B-infected HIV-1 subjects in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Kah Ying

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggest HIV-1 inter-subtype differences in co-receptor usage. We examined the correlation between HIV-1 subtype and co-receptor usage among treatment-naïve HIV-1 subjects in Singapore. Additionally, we investigated whether the subtype co-receptor association was influenced by stage of infection. Methods V3 sequences of HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 were obtained from 110 HIV treatment-naïve patients and genotypic co-receptor tropism determination was performed using Geno2pheno. Two false-positive rate (FPR cut-offs, 10% and 5.75% were selected for tropism testing. Results Subtype assignment of viral strains from 110 HIV-infected individuals based on partial sequencing of HIV-1 pol, gp120 and gp41 were as follows: 27 subtype B, 64 CRF01_AE, 10 CRF51_01B, and 9 other subtypes. At FPR=10%, 10 (100% CRF51_01B-infected subjects and 26 (40.6% CRF01_AE-infected subjects had CXCR4-using virus, compared to 7 (25.9% subtype B subjects and 1 (11.1% CRF33_01B-infected subject (P P Conclusion CRF51_01B and CRF01_AE-infected individuals have higher prevalence of CXCR4-usage compared to subtype B infected individuals. Further studies examining these differences could help optimise the use of CCR5-antagonist in populations with these subtypes, and increase our understanding of HIV-1 biology.

  18. Molecular recognition of CCR5 by an HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phanourios Tamamis

    Full Text Available The binding of protein HIV-1 gp120 to coreceptors CCR5 or CXCR4 is a key step of the HIV-1 entry to the host cell, and is predominantly mediated through the V3 loop fragment of HIV-1 gp120. In the present work, we delineate the molecular recognition of chemokine receptor CCR5 by a dual tropic HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop, using a comprehensive set of computational tools predominantly based on molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. We report, what is to our knowledge, the first complete HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop : CCR5 complex structure, which includes the whole V3 loop and the N-terminus of CCR5, and exhibits exceptional agreement with previous experimental findings. The computationally derived structure sheds light into the functional role of HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop and CCR5 residues associated with the HIV-1 coreceptor activity, and provides insights into the HIV-1 coreceptor selectivity and the blocking mechanism of HIV-1 gp120 by maraviroc. By comparing the binding of the specific dual tropic HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop with CCR5 and CXCR4, we observe that the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop residues 13-21, which include the tip, share nearly identical structural and energetic properties in complex with both coreceptors. This result paves the way for the design of dual CCR5/CXCR4 targeted peptides as novel potential anti-AIDS therapeutics.

  19. PREVELENCE OF HIV-1 CCRS TROPISM (GENOTYPIC ASSAY: JAIPUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: HIV most commonly uses CCR5 and/or CXCR4 as a co-receptor to enter its target cells. Several chemokine receptors can function as viral co-receptors, but CCR5 is likely the most physiologically important co receptor during natural infection. C-C chemokine receptor type 5, also known as CCR5 or CD195, is a protein on the surface of white blood cells that is involved in the immune system as it acts as a receptor for chemokines. This is the process by which T cells are attracted to specific tissue and organ targets. Most forms of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, initially use CCR5 to enter and infect host cells. We studied the prevalence of CCR5 tropism HIV1 amongst HIV positive patients attending Mahatma Gandhi hospital Jaipur. STUDY DESIGN: This was epidemiological, cross-sectional, and non-interventional study between March and April 2014 in HIV positive patients in Jaipur. METHODS: Co-receptor tropism assay was done in total nine patients who were HIV positive attending Mahatma Gandhi Hospital Dermatology &Venereology of Mahatma Gandhi Hospital OPD in one month duration time. Total nine patients were studied, seven patients were already on ART(anti-retroviral treatment and two patients were not taking any treatment as their CD4 count were above 500 cells/ULwith low viral load. Co-Receptor tropism assay (genetic assay CCR5 (with the help of Emcure pharmaceuticals was done in all of them. RESULT: Only one patient had FPR below 15 %, rest 8 patients had FPR above 15%.The study showed that the prevalence of CCR5 positivity was 88.8%, whereas CXCR4 prevalence was only 11.1%.

  20. Essential and separable roles for Syndecan-3 and Syndecan-4 in skeletal muscle development and regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelison, D.D.W.; Wilcox-Adelman, Sarah A.; Goetinck, Paul F.; Rauvala, Heikki; Rapraeger, Alan C.; Olwin, Bradley B.

    2004-01-01

    Syndecan-3 and syndecan-4 function as coreceptors for tyrosine kinases and in cell adhesion. Syndecan-3-/- mice exhibit a novel form of muscular dystrophy characterized by impaired locomotion, fibrosis, and hyperplasia of myonuclei and satellite cells. Explanted syndecan-3-/- satellite cells mislocalize MyoD, differentiate aberrantly, and exhibit a general increase in overall tyrosine phosphorylation. Following induced regeneration, the hyperplastic phenotype is recapitulated. While there are...

  1. Complexity and dynamics of HIV-1 chemokine receptor usage in a multidrug-resistant adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavarelli, Mariangela; Mainetti, Lara; Pignataro, Angela Rosa; Bigoloni, Alba; Tolazzi, Monica; Galli, Andrea; Nozza, Silvia; Castagna, Antonella; Sampaolo, Michela; Boeri, Enzo; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2014-12-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is licensed in clinical practice for patients with R5 virus and virological failure; however, in anecdotal reports, dual/mixed viruses were also inhibited. We retrospectively evaluated the evolution of HIV-1 coreceptor tropism in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of an infected adolescent with a CCR5/CXCR4 Trofile profile who experienced an important but temporary immunological and virological response during a 16-month period of MVC-based therapy. Coreceptor usage of biological viral clones isolated from PBMCs was investigated in U87.CD4 cells expressing wild-type or chimeric CCR5 and CXCR4. Plasma and PBMC-derived viral clones were sequenced to predict coreceptor tropism using the geno2pheno algorithm from the V3 envelope sequence and pol gene-resistant mutations. From start to 8.5 months of MVC treatment only R5X4 viral clones were observed, whereas at 16 months the phenotype enlarged to also include R5 and X4 clones. Chimeric receptor usage suggested the preferential usage of the CXCR4 coreceptor by the R5X4 biological clones. According to phenotypic data, R5 viruses were susceptible, whereas R5X4 and X4 viruses were resistant to RANTES and MVC in vitro. Clones at 16 months, but not at baseline, showed an amino acidic resistance pattern in protease and reverse transcription genes, which, however, did not drive their tropisms. The geno2pheno algorithm predicted at baseline R5 viruses in plasma, and from 5.5 months throughout follow-up only CXCR4-using viruses. An extended methodological approach is needed to unravel the complexity of the phenotype and variation of viruses resident in the different compartments of an infected individual. The accurate evaluation of the proportion of residual R5 viruses may guide therapeutic intervention in highly experienced patients with limited therapeutic options.

  2. Sustained Small Interfering RNA-Mediated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Inhibition in Primary Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can induce potent gene silencing by degradation of cognate mRNA. However, in dividing cells, the silencing lasts only 3 to 7 days, presumably because of siRNA dilution with cell division. Here, we investigated if sustained siRNA-mediated silencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is possible in terminally differentiated macrophages, which constitute an important reservoir of HIV in vivo. CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor...

  3. The composition of T cell subtypes in duodenal biopsies are altered in coeliac disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vagner Steenholt, Janni; Nielsen, Christian; Baudewijn, Leen; Nielsen , Anne Staal; Rasmussen, Karina Søndergård; Hardee J Sabir; Barington, Torben; Husby, Steffen; Toft-Hansen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of Celiac disease (CD) is intraepithelial lymphocytosis in the small intestine. Until now, investigations to characterize the T cell subpopulations within the epithelial layer have not discriminated between the heterodimeric co-receptor molecule, CD8αβ, and the possibly immunoregulatory CD8αα homodimer molecule. Besides TCRαβ+ CD4+ cells, no other phenotypes have been shown to be gluten-reactive. Using flow cytometry on lymphocytes from duodenal biopsies, we determined th...

  4. HIV-1 target cells in the CNS

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Sarah B.; Arrildt, Kathryn T.; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system (CNS) is typically limited by the availability of target cells. HIV-1 variants that are transmitted and dominate the early stages of infection almost exclusively use the CCR5 coreceptor and are well adapted to entering, and thus infecting, cells expressing high CD4 densities similar to those found on CD4+ T cells. While the “immune privileged” CNS is largely devoid of CD4+ T cells, macrophage and microglia are abundant throughout ...

  5. Chemokines, lymphocytes, and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farber J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are members of a family of more than 30 human cytokines whose best-described activities are as chemotactic factors for leukocytes and that are presumed to be important in leukocyte recruitment and trafficking. While many chemokines can act on lymphocytes, the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology are poorly understood. The recent discoveries that chemokines can suppress infection by HIV-1 and that chemokine receptors serve, along with CD4, as obligate co-receptors for HIV-1 entry have lent urgency to studies on the relationships between chemokines and lymphocytes. My laboratory has characterized Mig and Crg-2/IP-10, chemokines that are induced by IFN-g and that specifically target lymphocytes, particularly activated T cells. We have demonstrated that the genes for these chemokines are widely expressed during experimental infections in mice with protozoan and viral pathogens, but that the patterns of mig and crg-2 expression differed, suggesting non-redundant roles in vivo. Our related studies to identify new chemokine receptors from activated lymphocytes resulted in the cloning of STRL22 and STRL33. We and others have shown that STRL22 is a receptor for the CC chemokine MIP-3a, and STRL22 has been re-named CCR6. Although STRL33 remains an orphan receptor, we have shown that it can function as a co-receptor for HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, and that it is active with a broader range of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins than the major co-receptors described to date. The ability of STRL33 to function with a wide variety of envelope glycoproteins may become particularly important if therapies are instituted to block other specific co-receptors. We presume that investigations into the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology will provide information important for understanding the pathogenesis of AIDS and for manipulating immune and inflammatory responses for clinical benefit

  6. Skeletal (stromal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Zaher, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal (marrow stromal) stem cells (BMSCs) are a group of multipotent cells that reside in the bone marrow stroma and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Studying signaling pathways that regulate BMSC differentiation into osteoblastic cells is a strategy....../preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk1/Pref-1), the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5 and intracellular kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stem Cells and Bone....

  7. A cytosolic juxtamembrane interface modulates plexin A3 oligomerization and signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Barton

    Full Text Available Plexins (plxns are transmembrane (TM receptors involved in the guidance of vascular, lymphatic vessel, and neuron growth as well as cancer metastasis. Plxn signaling results in cytosolic GTPase-activating protein activity, and previous research implicates dimerization as important for activation of plxn signaling. Purified, soluble plxn extracellular and cytosolic domains exhibit only weak homomeric interactions, suggesting a role for the plxn TM and juxtamembrane regions in homooligomerization. In this study, we consider a heptad repeat in the Danio rerio PlxnA3 cytosolic juxtamembrane domain (JM for its ability to influence PlxnA3 homooligomerization in TM-domain containing constructs. Site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with the AraTM assay and bioluminescent energy transfer (BRET² suggest an interface involving a JM heptad repeat, in particular residue M1281, regulates PlxnA3 homomeric interactions when examined in constructs containing an ectodomain, TM and JM domain. In the presence of a neuropilin-2a co-receptor and semaphorin 3F ligand, disruption to PlxnA3 homodimerization caused by an M1281F mutation is eliminated, suggesting destabilization of the PlxnA3 homodimer in the JM is not sufficient to disrupt co-receptor complex formation. In contrast, enhanced homodimerization of PlxnA3 caused by mutation M1281L remains even in the presence of ligand semaphorin 3F and co-receptor neuropilin-2a. Consistent with this pattern of PlxnA3 dimerization in the presence of ligand and co-receptor, destabilizing mutations to PlxnA3 homodimerization (M1281F are able to rescue motor patterning defects in sidetracked zebrafish embryos, whereas mutations that enhance PlxnA3 homodimerization (M1281L are not. Collectively, our results indicate the JM heptad repeat, in particular residue M1281, forms a switchable interface that modulates both PlxnA3 homomeric interactions and signal transduction.

  8. Effects of Opiates and HIV Proteins on Neurons: The Role of Ferritin Heavy Chain and a Potential for Synergism

    OpenAIRE

    Festa, Lindsay; Meucci, Olimpia

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and its associated proteins can have a profound impact on the central nervous system. Co-morbid abuse of opiates, such as morphine and heroin, is often associated with rapid disease progression and greater neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms by which HIV proteins and opiates cause neuronal damage on their own and together are unclear. The emergence of ferritin heavy chain (FHC) as a negative regulator of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, a co-receptor f...

  9. Association between Serum Atypical Fibroblast Growth Factors 21 and 19 and Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisi, Anna; Ceccarelli, Sara; Panera, Nadia; Prono, Federica; Petrini, Stefania; De Stefanis, Cristiano; Pezzullo, Marco; Tozzi, Alberto; Villani, Alberto; Bedogni, Giorgio; Nobili, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Atypical fibroblast growth factors (FGF) 21 and 19 play a central role in energy metabolism through the mediation of Klotho coreceptor. Contradictory findings are available about the association of FGF21 and FGF19 with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in humans. We investigated the association of serum FGF21, FGF19 and liver Klotho coreceptor with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis in children with NAFLD. Serum FGF21 and FGF19 were measured in 84 children with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 23 controls (CTRL). The hepatic expression of Klotho coreceptor was measured in 7 CTRL, 9 patients with NASH (NASH+) and 11 patients without NASH (NASH-). FGF21 and FGF19 showed a tendency to decrease from CTRL (median FGF21 = 196 pg/mL; median FGF19 = 201 pg/mL) to NASH- (FGF21 = 89 pg/mL; FGF19 = 81 pg/mL) to NASH+ patients (FGF21 = 54 pg/mL; FGF19 = 41 pg/mL) (p<0.001 for all comparisons) and were inversely associated with the probability of NASH and fibrosis in children with NAFLD. The hepatic expression of Klotho coreceptor was inversely associated with NASH (R(2) = 0.87, p<0.0001) and directly associated with serum FGF21 (R(2) = 0.57, p<0.0001) and FGF19 (R(2) = 0.67, p<0.0001). In conclusion, serum FGF19 and FGF21 and hepatic Klotho expression are inversely associated with hepatic damage in children with NAFLD and these findings may have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of NAFLD progression.

  10. Structural Basis of the CD8[alpha beta]/MHC Class I Interaction: Focused Recognition Orients CD8[beta] to a T Cell Proximal Position[superscript 1,2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rui; Natarajan, Kannan; Margulies, David H.; (NIH)

    2009-09-18

    In the immune system, B cells, dendritic cells, NK cells, and T lymphocytes all respond to signals received via ligand binding to receptors and coreceptors. Although the specificity of T cell recognition is determined by the interaction of T cell receptors with MHC/peptide complexes, the development of T cells in the thymus and their sensitivity to Ag are also dependent on coreceptor molecules CD8 (for MHC class I (MHCI)) and CD4 (for MHCII). The CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer is a potent coreceptor for T cell activation, but efforts to understand its function fully have been hampered by ignorance of the structural details of its interactions with MHCI. In this study we describe the structure of CD8{alpha}{beta} in complex with the murine MHCI molecule H-2D{sup d} at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The focus of the CD8{alpha}{beta} interaction is the acidic loop (residues 222-228) of the {alpha}3 domain of H-2D{sup d}. The {beta} subunit occupies a T cell membrane proximal position, defining the relative positions of the CD8{alpha} and CD8{beta} subunits. Unlike the CD8{alpha}{alpha} homodimer, CD8{alpha}{beta} does not contact the MHCI {alpha}{sub 2}- or {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin domains. Movements of the CD8{alpha} CDR2 and CD8{beta} CDR1 and CDR2 loops as well as the flexibility of the H-2D{sup d} CD loop facilitate the monovalent interaction. The structure resolves inconclusive data on the topology of the CD8{alpha}{beta}/MHCI interaction, indicates that CD8{beta} is crucial in orienting the CD8{alpha}{beta} heterodimer, provides a framework for understanding the mechanistic role of CD8{alpha}{beta} in lymphoid cell signaling, and offers a tangible context for design of structurally altered coreceptors for tumor and viral immunotherapy.

  11. Association between Serum Atypical Fibroblast Growth Factors 21 and 19 and Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Alisi

    Full Text Available Atypical fibroblast growth factors (FGF 21 and 19 play a central role in energy metabolism through the mediation of Klotho coreceptor. Contradictory findings are available about the association of FGF21 and FGF19 with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD in humans. We investigated the association of serum FGF21, FGF19 and liver Klotho coreceptor with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and fibrosis in children with NAFLD. Serum FGF21 and FGF19 were measured in 84 children with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 23 controls (CTRL. The hepatic expression of Klotho coreceptor was measured in 7 CTRL, 9 patients with NASH (NASH+ and 11 patients without NASH (NASH-. FGF21 and FGF19 showed a tendency to decrease from CTRL (median FGF21 = 196 pg/mL; median FGF19 = 201 pg/mL to NASH- (FGF21 = 89 pg/mL; FGF19 = 81 pg/mL to NASH+ patients (FGF21 = 54 pg/mL; FGF19 = 41 pg/mL (p<0.001 for all comparisons and were inversely associated with the probability of NASH and fibrosis in children with NAFLD. The hepatic expression of Klotho coreceptor was inversely associated with NASH (R(2 = 0.87, p<0.0001 and directly associated with serum FGF21 (R(2 = 0.57, p<0.0001 and FGF19 (R(2 = 0.67, p<0.0001. In conclusion, serum FGF19 and FGF21 and hepatic Klotho expression are inversely associated with hepatic damage in children with NAFLD and these findings may have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of NAFLD progression.

  12. Cubilin expression is monoallelic and epigenetically augmented via PPARs

    OpenAIRE

    Aseem, Obaidullah; Barth, Jeremy L.; Klatt, Sandra C.; Smith, Brian T; Argraves, W Scott

    2013-01-01

    Background Cubilin is an endocytic receptor that is necessary for renal and intestinal absorption of a range of ligands. Endocytosis mediated by cubilin and its co-receptor megalin is the principal mechanism for proximal tubule reabsorption of proteins from the glomerular filtrate. Cubilin is also required for intestinal endocytosis of intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complex. Despite its importance, little is known about the regulation of cubilin expression. Results Here we show that cubilin exp...

  13. Glycosaminoglycan Biosynthesis in Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Filipek-Górniok, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are composed of highly sulfated glycosaminoglycans chains (GAGs) attached to specific core proteins. They are present in extracellular matrices, on the cell surface and in storage granules of hematopoietic cells. Heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) GAGs play indispensable roles in a wide range of biological processes, where they can serve as protein carriers, be involved in growth factor or morphogen gradient formation and act as co-receptors in s...

  14. Mechanism of hmnan immunodeficiency virus type I entry into the target cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the recent advances of the research on the mechanism of HIV-1 infection, a novel model to elucidate the mechanism of HIV entry into the target cells is proposed and the perspective about the putative receptor is discussed in this review. Understanding of the crystal structure of HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41 and the functions of HIV-1 receptor, co-receptor and the putative receptor will lead to developing effective HIV vaccine and anti-HIVdrugs.

  15. Structure and Function of CC-Chemokine Receptor 5 Homologues Derived from Representative Primate Species and Subspecies of the Taxonomic Suborders Prosimii and Anthropoidea

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    A chemokine receptor from the seven-transmembrane-domain G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily is an essential coreceptor for the cellular entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains. To investigate nonhuman primate CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) homologue structure and function, we amplified CCR5 DNA sequences from peripheral blood cells obtained from 24 representative species and subspecies of the primate suborders Prosimii (family L...

  16. Reconstructing the dynamics of HIV evolution within hosts from serial deep sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Art F Y Poon

    Full Text Available At the early stage of infection, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 predominantly uses the CCR5 coreceptor for host cell entry. The subsequent emergence of HIV variants that use the CXCR4 coreceptor in roughly half of all infections is associated with an accelerated decline of CD4+ T-cells and rate of progression to AIDS. The presence of a 'fitness valley' separating CCR5- and CXCR4-using genotypes is postulated to be a biological determinant of whether the HIV coreceptor switch occurs. Using phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolutionary dynamics of HIV within hosts enables us to discriminate between competing models of this process. We have developed a phylogenetic pipeline for the molecular clock analysis, ancestral reconstruction, and visualization of deep sequence data. These data were generated by next-generation sequencing of HIV RNA extracted from longitudinal serum samples (median 7 time points from 8 untreated subjects with chronic HIV infections (Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV-1 infection and AIDS. We used the known dates of sampling to directly estimate rates of evolution and to map ancestral mutations to a reconstructed timeline in units of days. HIV coreceptor usage was predicted from reconstructed ancestral sequences using the geno2pheno algorithm. We determined that the first mutations contributing to CXCR4 use emerged about 16 (per subject range 4 to 30 months before the earliest predicted CXCR4-using ancestor, which preceded the first positive cell-based assay of CXCR4 usage by 10 (range 5 to 25 months. CXCR4 usage arose in multiple lineages within 5 of 8 subjects, and ancestral lineages following alternate mutational pathways before going extinct were common. We observed highly patient-specific distributions and time-scales of mutation accumulation, implying that the role of a fitness valley is contingent on the genotype of the transmitted variant.

  17. Reconstructing the dynamics of HIV evolution within hosts from serial deep sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Art F Y; Swenson, Luke C; Bunnik, Evelien M; Edo-Matas, Diana; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Harrigan, P Richard

    2012-01-01

    At the early stage of infection, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 predominantly uses the CCR5 coreceptor for host cell entry. The subsequent emergence of HIV variants that use the CXCR4 coreceptor in roughly half of all infections is associated with an accelerated decline of CD4+ T-cells and rate of progression to AIDS. The presence of a 'fitness valley' separating CCR5- and CXCR4-using genotypes is postulated to be a biological determinant of whether the HIV coreceptor switch occurs. Using phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolutionary dynamics of HIV within hosts enables us to discriminate between competing models of this process. We have developed a phylogenetic pipeline for the molecular clock analysis, ancestral reconstruction, and visualization of deep sequence data. These data were generated by next-generation sequencing of HIV RNA extracted from longitudinal serum samples (median 7 time points) from 8 untreated subjects with chronic HIV infections (Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV-1 infection and AIDS). We used the known dates of sampling to directly estimate rates of evolution and to map ancestral mutations to a reconstructed timeline in units of days. HIV coreceptor usage was predicted from reconstructed ancestral sequences using the geno2pheno algorithm. We determined that the first mutations contributing to CXCR4 use emerged about 16 (per subject range 4 to 30) months before the earliest predicted CXCR4-using ancestor, which preceded the first positive cell-based assay of CXCR4 usage by 10 (range 5 to 25) months. CXCR4 usage arose in multiple lineages within 5 of 8 subjects, and ancestral lineages following alternate mutational pathways before going extinct were common. We observed highly patient-specific distributions and time-scales of mutation accumulation, implying that the role of a fitness valley is contingent on the genotype of the transmitted variant.

  18. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  19. A Functional Polymorphism in B and T Lymphocyte Attenuator Is Associated with Susceptibility to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie Oki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory coreceptors are thought to play important roles in maintaining immunological homeostasis, and a defect in the negative signals from inhibitory coreceptors may lead to the development of autoimmune diseases. We have recently identified B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA, a new inhibitory coreceptor expressed on immune cells, and we suggest that BTLA may be involved in the development of autoimmune diseases using BTLA-deficient mice. However, the role of BTLA in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases in humans remains unknown. We, therefore, examined the possible association between BTLA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, and Sjögren's syndrome (SS by conducting a case-control genetic association study. We found that 590C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP of BTLA gene was significantly associated with susceptibility to RA, but not to SLE or SS. Furthermore, RA patients bearing this 590C SNP developed the disease significantly earlier than the patients without this allele. We also found that BTLA with 590C allele lacked the inhibitory activity on concanavalin A- and anti-CD3 Ab-induced IL-2 production in Jurkat T cells. These results suggest that BTLA is an RA-susceptibility gene and is involved in the protection from autoimmunity in humans.

  20. Temporal protein expression pattern in intracellular signalling cascade during T-cell activation: A computational study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Piyali Ganguli; Saikat Chowdhury; Rupa Bhowmick; Ram Rup Sarkar

    2015-10-01

    Various T-cell co-receptor molecules and calcium channel CRAC play a pivotal role in the maintenance of cell’s functional responses by regulating the production of effector molecules (mostly cytokines) that aids in immune clearance and also maintaining the cell in a functionally active state. Any defect in these co-receptor signalling pathways may lead to an altered expression pattern of the effector molecules. To study the propagation of such defects with time and their effect on the intracellular protein expression patterns, a comprehensive and largest pathway map of T-cell activation network is reconstructed manually. The entire pathway reactions are then translated using logical equations and simulated using the published time series microarray expression data as inputs. After validating the model, the effect of in silico knock down of co-receptor molecules on the expression patterns of their downstream proteins is studied and simultaneously the changes in the phenotypic behaviours of the T-cell population are predicted, which shows significant variations among the proteins expression and the signalling routes through which the response is propagated in the cytoplasm. This integrative computational approach serves as a valuable technique to study the changes in protein expression patterns and helps to predict variations in the cellular behaviour.

  1. Targeting CXCR4 in HIV Cell-Entry Inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Schwartz, T W; Rosenkilde, M M

    2010-01-01

    CXCR4 and CCR5 constitute the two major coreceptors for HIV-1 entry into host cells. In the course of an HIV-infection, a coreceptor switch takes place in approximately half of the patients - from R5 HIV-1 (CCR5 utilizing) strains to X4 HIV-1 (CXCR4 utilizing) strains. Treatment of HIV......-infected individuals with CXCR4 antagonists delays the onset of AIDS by preventing the CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor switch. In addition to the endogenous CXCR4 and CCR5 ligands, other chemokines, for example the human herpesvirus 8 encoded CC-chemokine, vCCL2, and modifications hereof, have proven efficient HIV-1 cell...... no oral bioavailability. The hunt for orally active small-molecule CXCR4 antagonists led to the development of monocyclam-based compounds, and recently to the non-cyclam antagonist AMD070, which is orally active and currently in Phase II clinical trial as anti-HIV treatment. Current review provides...

  2. Cis and trans RET signaling control the survival and central projection growth of rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Michael S; Vysochan, Anna; Paixão, Sόnia; Niu, Jingwen; Klein, Rüdiger; Savitt, Joseph M; Luo, Wenqin

    2015-04-02

    RET can be activated in cis or trans by its co-receptors and ligands in vitro, but the physiological roles of trans signaling are unclear. Rapidly adapting (RA) mechanoreceptors in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) express Ret and the co-receptor Gfrα2 and depend on Ret for survival and central projection growth. Here, we show that Ret and Gfrα2 null mice display comparable early central projection deficits, but Gfrα2 null RA mechanoreceptors recover later. Loss of Gfrα1, the co-receptor implicated in activating RET in trans, causes no significant central projection or cell survival deficit, but Gfrα1;Gfrα2 double nulls phenocopy Ret nulls. Finally, we demonstrate that GFRα1 produced by neighboring DRG neurons activates RET in RA mechanoreceptors. Taken together, our results suggest that trans and cis RET signaling could function in the same developmental process and that the availability of both forms of activation likely enhances but not diversifies outcomes of RET signaling.

  3. CD43 REGULATES THE THRESHOLD FOR T CELL ACTIVATION BY TARGETING CBL FUNCTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Lilia, B. Mérida; del Rio, Roxana; Nora, A. Fierro; Cruz-Muñoz, Mario E.; Olivares, Norma; Melchy, Erika; Igras, Vivian; Georg, A. Holländer; Steven, J. Burakoff; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY T cell (TC) activation requires the coordinated signaling of the T cell receptor (TCR) and co-receptor molecules, allowing TCs to respond to lower degrees of TCR occupancy. Co-receptor molecules set the threshold for TC activation by controlling different regulatory signaling loops. The Cbl family members prevent undesired activation of TCs by regulating TCR signals. In this report we show that TC pre-stimulation by the CD43 co-receptor molecule before TCR engagement inhibits TCR-dependent c-Cbl tyrosine phosphorylation, c-Cbl interaction with the adapter molecule Crk-L and promotes Cbl-b degradation in a PKCθ–dependent manner. Consequently, the prolonged tyrosine phosphorylation and delayed degradation of ZAP-70 and of the ζ chain lead to enhanced MAPK activation and robust TC response. These data indicates that CD43-mediated signals lower the threshold for TC activation by restricting the c-Cbl and Cbl-b inhibitory effects on TCR signaling. In addition to the strength and duration of intracellular signals, our data underscore temporality with which certain molecules are engaged as yet another mechanism to fine tune TC signal quality, and ultimately immune function. PMID:21905200

  4. Single-molecule analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120-receptor interactions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Melissa I; Panorchan, Porntula; Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Tseng, Yiider; Wirtz, Denis

    2005-12-01

    A quantitative description of the binding interactions between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 envelope glycoproteins and their host cell surface receptors remains incomplete. Here, we introduce a single-molecule analysis that directly probes the binding interactions between an individual viral subunit gp120 and a single receptor CD4 and/or chemokine coreceptor CCR5 in living cells. This analysis differentiates single-molecule binding from multimolecule avidity and shows that, while the presence of CD4 is required for gp120 binding to CCR5, the force required to rupture a single gp120-coreceptor bond is significantly higher and its lifetime is much longer than those of a single gp120-receptor bond. The lifetimes of these bonds are themselves shorter than those of the P-selectin/PSGL-1 bond involved in leukocyte attachment to the endothelium bonds during an inflammation response. These results suggest an amended model of HIV entry in which, immediately after the association of gp120 to its receptor, gp120 seeks its coreceptor to rapidly form a new bond. This "bond transfer" occurs only if CCR5 is in close proximity to CD4 and CD4 is still attached to gp120. The analysis presented here may serve as a general framework to study mechanisms of receptor-mediated interactions between viral envelope proteins and host cell receptors at the single-molecule level in living cells.

  5. Structure of the Dual-Mode Wnt Regulator Kremen1 and Insight into Ternary Complex Formation with LRP6 and Dickkopf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebisch, Matthias; Jackson, Verity A; Zhao, Yuguang; Jones, E Yvonne

    2016-09-01

    Kremen 1 and 2 have been identified as co-receptors for Dickkopf (Dkk) proteins, hallmark secreted antagonists of canonical Wnt signaling. We present here three crystal structures of the ectodomain of human Kremen1 (KRM1ECD) at resolutions between 1.9 and 3.2 Å. KRM1ECD emerges as a rigid molecule with tight interactions stabilizing a triangular arrangement of its Kringle, WSC, and CUB structural domains. The structures reveal an unpredicted homology of the WSC domain to hepatocyte growth factor. We further report the general architecture of the ternary complex formed by the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5/6, Dkk, and Krm, determined from a low-resolution complex crystal structure between β-propeller/EGF repeats (PE) 3 and 4 of the Wnt co-receptor LRP6 (LRP6PE3PE4), the cysteine-rich domain 2 (CRD2) of DKK1, and KRM1ECD. DKK1CRD2 is sandwiched between LRP6PE3 and KRM1Kringle-WSC. Modeling studies supported by surface plasmon resonance suggest a direct interaction site between Krm1CUB and Lrp6PE2.

  6. Chemokine signaling involving chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 plays a role in descending pain facilitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Guo; Hu Wang; Shiping Zou; Ronald Dubner; Ke Ren

    2012-01-01

    Objective Despite accumulating evidence on a role of immune cells and their associated chemicals in mechanisms of pain,few studies have addressed the potential role of chemokines in the descending facilitation of persistent pain.The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) (commonly known as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) signaling in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM),a pivotal structure in brainstem pain modulatory circuitry,is involved in descending pain facilitation in rats.Methods An L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) was produced in rats under pentobarbital anesthesia.Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression levels of CCL2 and CCL2 receptor (CCR2),and examine their distributions compared with the neuronal marker NeuN as well as glial markers glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP,astroglial) and CD11b (microglial),respectively.Results SNL induced an increase in CCL2 expression in the RVM,and this returned to the control level at 4 weeks after injury.The induced CCL2 colocalized with NeuN,but not with GFAP and CD11b.CCR2 was also upregulated by SNL in the RVM,and this increase lasted for at least 4 weeks.CCR2 was colocalized with CD1 1b but not GFAP.Few RVM neurons also exhibited CCR2 staining.Neutralizing CCL2 with an anti-CCL2 antibody (0.2-20 ng) or injecting RS-102895 (0.1-10 pmol),a CCR2b chemokine receptor antagonist,into the RVM on day 1 after SNL,significantly attenuated the established thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity.In addition,injection of recombinant rat CCL2 (0.03-3pmol) into the RVM induced dose-dependent hyperalgesia,which was prevented by pretreatment with RS-102895 (10pmol).Interleukin-1β (IL-1β),a potent inducer of neuronal CCL2,was also selectively upregulated in RVM reactive astrocytes.Injection of IL-1β (120 fmol) into the RVM induced behavioral hyperalgesia,which was blocked by RS-102895(10 pmol).However,an IL-1 receptor antagonist (3

  7. 愛滋病毒的輔助受體CCR5和CXCR4%The Role of Chemokine Receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 in HIV-1 Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周燁; 樂影穎; Pablo IRIBARREN; 龔望華; 張廈; 王吉民

    2004-01-01

    化學趨化因子介導白細胞遷移,淋巴器官生成、炎症、過敏、動脈粥樣硬化以及惡性腫瘤生長轉移等多種病理生理過程.這些因子結合位於細胞表面的島苷蛋白耦聯受體,從而促進細胞遊走並活化.近年來,化學趨化因子及其受體受到生物醫學界高度重視,原因之一是有些受體被人類免疫缺陷(愛滋)病毒利用作為侵襲細胞的關鍵性輔助受體.在這些受體中,CXCR4和CCR5分別被噬淋巴細胞病毒株或噬巨噬特異細胞病毒株所識別利用.為此,這些受體的配體由於能夠與病毒競爭受體結合位點,成為人體内天然的抗病毒蛋白.生物醫學界和製藥業也正在研究開發能特異地抑制這些受體的分子作為新一代抗人類免疫缺陷病毒的藥物.%Chemokines are key mediators of a variety of pathophysiological responses, including leukocyte trafficking, lymphoid tissue organogenesis, inflammation, allergy, atherosclerosis and malignancy.Chemokines bind and activate a group of G protein-coupled receptors, which, upon ligand binding, transmit a cascade of signaling events culminating in cell migration and activation. For the past few years, chemokines and their receptors have received particular attention due to the discoveries that some of the chemokine receptors are utilized by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as coreceptors for cellular entry. Although a number of chemokine and orphan receptors also exhibit coreceptor activity for different strains of HIV-1, CXCR4 and CCR5 are the two essential coreceptors for T-cell line tropic (X4) and macrophage tropic (R5) viruses, respectively.Consequently, chemokine ligands for CXCR4 or CCR5 are potent host-derived anti-HIV-1 agents based on their competitive receptor binding activity and down-regulation of the viral coreceptors. It is recognized that agents targeting HIV-1 coreceptors may have important therapeutic potential.

  8. The effects of Maraviroc on liver fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Ortega Gonzalez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The fibrogenesis analysis in quimeric CCR1 and CCR5 mice revealed that CCR5 mediates its pro-fibrogenic effects in hepatic cells and promoting stellate cells. The blockage of co-receptors could preserve the progression of hepatic fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Objective: To evaluate the beneficial effects on hepatic fibrosis in HIV/HCV co-infected patients that are on antiretroviral therapy (ART with CCR5 co-receptor antagonists. Method and materials: A multicentre, retrospective pilot study of the evaluation of hepatic fibrosis at mid- and long-term by non-invasive methods in a HIV/HCV co-infected patients cohort in the Valencian Community (Spain that received ART with a CCR5 co-receptor antagonist. The cut-off points of serum marker tests of hepatic fibrosis were: AST to Platelet Ratio Index (APRI1.5 F2; >2 Cirrhosis and Forns Index6.9>F2 fibrosis. Inclusion criteria was established for HIV/HCV co-infected patients on ART with CCR5 co-receptor antagonists that had no previous history of interferon and ribavirin treatment or those who were null-responders and received CCR5 co-receptor antagonist treatment in the previous year. Patients with HBV infection were excluded. Results: A total of 71 male patients (69% were reported. A CD4 nadir 350 cells/uL. According to genotypes, 50% were G-1a, 14% G-1b, 11% G-3 and 25% G-4. The median duration of treatment with Maraviroc (MVC was the following: 45% took it over a year, 41% over two years and 14% over three years. Before starting treatment with MVC, we observed an initial fibrosis of F0–F1 in 49% of patients, F2–F3 in 24% and F4 in 27%. The medium follow-up was of 18.45 months. Progression to a higher fibrosis level was observed in five patients, 11 patients improved at least one stage and the others were stable over time. There were 38 patients taking MVC over two years, 27 patients in this group (59.38% did not modify their fibrosis, 3 patients (11% progressed and 8 (29

  9. Effect of lysine to arginine mutagenesis in the V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120 on viral entry efficiency and neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Birco; Schreiber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by an ongoing replication leading to T-lymphocyte decline which is paralleled by the switch from CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor usage. To predict coreceptor usage, several computer algorithms using gp120 V3 loop sequence data have been developed. In these algorithms an occupation of the V3 positions 11 and 25, by one of the amino acids lysine (K) or arginine (R), is an indicator for CXCR4 usage. Amino acids R and K dominate at these two positions, but can also be identified at positions 9 and 10. Generally, CXCR4-viruses possess V3 sequences, with an overall positive charge higher than the V3 sequences of R5-viruses. The net charge is calculated by subtracting the number of negatively charged amino acids (D, aspartic acid and E, glutamic acid) from the number of positively charged ones (K and R). In contrast to D and E, which are very similar in their polar and acidic properties, the characteristics of the R guanidinium group differ significantly from the K ammonium group. However, in coreceptor predictive computer algorithms R and K are both equally rated. The study was conducted to analyze differences in infectivity and coreceptor usage because of R-to-K mutations at the V3 positions 9, 10 and 11. V3 loop mutants with all possible RRR-to-KKK triplets were constructed and analyzed for coreceptor usage, infectivity and neutralization by SDF-1α and RANTES. Virus mutants R9R10R11 showed the highest infectivity rates, and were inhibited more efficiently in contrast to the K9K10K11 viruses. They also showed higher efficiency in a virus-gp120 paired infection assay. Especially V3 loop position 9 was relevant for a switch to higher infectivity when occupied by R. Thus, K-to-R exchanges play a role for enhanced viral entry efficiency and should therefore be considered when the viral phenotype is predicted based on V3 sequence data.

  10. Effect of lysine to arginine mutagenesis in the V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120 on viral entry efficiency and neutralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birco Schwalbe

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection is characterized by an ongoing replication leading to T-lymphocyte decline which is paralleled by the switch from CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor usage. To predict coreceptor usage, several computer algorithms using gp120 V3 loop sequence data have been developed. In these algorithms an occupation of the V3 positions 11 and 25, by one of the amino acids lysine (K or arginine (R, is an indicator for CXCR4 usage. Amino acids R and K dominate at these two positions, but can also be identified at positions 9 and 10. Generally, CXCR4-viruses possess V3 sequences, with an overall positive charge higher than the V3 sequences of R5-viruses. The net charge is calculated by subtracting the number of negatively charged amino acids (D, aspartic acid and E, glutamic acid from the number of positively charged ones (K and R. In contrast to D and E, which are very similar in their polar and acidic properties, the characteristics of the R guanidinium group differ significantly from the K ammonium group. However, in coreceptor predictive computer algorithms R and K are both equally rated. The study was conducted to analyze differences in infectivity and coreceptor usage because of R-to-K mutations at the V3 positions 9, 10 and 11. V3 loop mutants with all possible RRR-to-KKK triplets were constructed and analyzed for coreceptor usage, infectivity and neutralization by SDF-1α and RANTES. Virus mutants R9R10R11 showed the highest infectivity rates, and were inhibited more efficiently in contrast to the K9K10K11 viruses. They also showed higher efficiency in a virus-gp120 paired infection assay. Especially V3 loop position 9 was relevant for a switch to higher infectivity when occupied by R. Thus, K-to-R exchanges play a role for enhanced viral entry efficiency and should therefore be considered when the viral phenotype is predicted based on V3 sequence data.

  11. Clustering of HIV-1 Subtypes Based on gp120 V3 Loop electrostatic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López de Victoria Aliana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The V3 loop of the glycoprotein gp120 of HIV-1 plays an important role in viral entry into cells by utilizing as coreceptor CCR5 or CXCR4, and is implicated in the phenotypic tropisms of HIV viruses. It has been hypothesized that the interaction between the V3 loop and CCR5 or CXCR4 is mediated by electrostatics. We have performed hierarchical clustering analysis of the spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials and charges of V3 loop structures containing consensus sequences of HIV-1 subtypes. Results Although the majority of consensus sequences have a net charge of +3, the spatial distribution of their electrostatic potentials and charges may be a discriminating factor for binding and infectivity. This is demonstrated by the formation of several small subclusters, within major clusters, which indicates common origin but distinct spatial details of electrostatic properties. Some of this information may be present, in a coarse manner, in clustering of sequences, but the spatial details are largely lost. We show the effect of ionic strength on clustering of electrostatic potentials, information that is not present in clustering of charges or sequences. We also make correlations between clustering of electrostatic potentials and net charge, coreceptor selectivity, global prevalence, and geographic distribution. Finally, we interpret coreceptor selectivity based on the N6X7T8|S8X9 sequence glycosylation motif, the specific positive charge location according to the 11/24/25 rule, and the overall charge and electrostatic potential distribution. Conclusions We propose that in addition to the sequence and the net charge of the V3 loop of each subtype, the spatial distributions of electrostatic potentials and charges may also be important factors for receptor recognition and binding and subsequent viral entry into cells. This implies that the overall electrostatic potential is responsible for long-range recognition of the V3

  12. Contribution of intrinsic reactivity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins to CD4-independent infection and global inhibitor sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillel Haim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 enters cells following sequential activation of the high-potential-energy viral envelope glycoprotein trimer by target cell CD4 and coreceptor. HIV-1 variants differ in their requirements for CD4; viruses that can infect coreceptor-expressing cells that lack CD4 have been generated in the laboratory. These CD4-independent HIV-1 variants are sensitive to neutralization by multiple antibodies that recognize different envelope glycoprotein epitopes. The mechanisms underlying CD4 independence, global sensitivity to neutralization and the association between them are still unclear. By studying HIV-1 variants that differ in requirements for CD4, we investigated the contribution of CD4 binding to virus entry. CD4 engagement exposes the coreceptor-binding site and increases the "intrinsic reactivity" of the envelope glycoproteins; intrinsic reactivity describes the propensity of the envelope glycoproteins to negotiate transitions to lower-energy states upon stimulation. Coreceptor-binding site exposure and increased intrinsic reactivity promote formation/exposure of the HR1 coiled coil on the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein and allow virus entry upon coreceptor binding. Intrinsic reactivity also dictates the global sensitivity of HIV-1 to perturbations such as exposure to cold and the binding of antibodies and small molecules. Accordingly, CD4 independence of HIV-1 was accompanied by increased susceptibility to inactivation by these factors. We investigated the role of intrinsic reactivity in determining the sensitivity of primary HIV-1 isolates to inhibition. Relative to the more common neutralization-resistant ("Tier 2-like" viruses, globally sensitive ("Tier 1" viruses exhibited increased intrinsic reactivity, i.e., were inactivated more efficiently by cold exposure or by a given level of antibody binding to the envelope glycoprotein trimer. Virus sensitivity to neutralization was dictated both by the efficiency of

  13. Aberrant expression of regulatory cytokine IL-35 and pattern recognition receptor NOD2 in patients with allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chun Kwok; Leung, Ting Fan; Chu, Ida Miu Ting; Dong, Jie; Lam, Yvonne Yi On; Lam, Christopher Wai Kei

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the plasma concentration of the novel regulatory cytokine IL-35 and intracytosolic pattern recognition receptors nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors in granulocytes and explored their potential implication in disease severity monitoring of allergic asthma. The expression of circulating IL-35 and other pro-inflammatory mediators in asthmatic patients or control subjects were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The intracellular expressions of NOD1 and NOD2 in CCR3+ granulocytes were assessed using flow cytometry. Plasma concentrations of IL-35, IL-17A, basophil activation marker basogranulin, and eosinophilic airway inflammation biomarker periostin were significantly elevated in allergic asthmatic patients compared to non-atopic control subjects (all probability (p) IL-35 concentration in asthmatic patients (all p IL-35 and periostin with disease severity score in asthmatic patients (both p IL-35 (p IL-35 may serve as a potential surrogate biomarker for disease severity of allergic asthma.

  14. Surface profiling of normally responding and nonreleasing basophils by flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kistrup, Kasper; Poulsen, Lars Kærgaard; Jensen, Bettina Margrethe

    Background Human basophils are granulocytes with the capacity to play important roles in allergy for example by releasing histamine when activated by cross-linking of their high affinity IgE receptors (Fc¿RI). However, not all individuals have basophils responding with a histamine release after......c, C3aR, C5aR CCR3, FPR1, ST2, CRTH2 on anti-IgE respondsive and nonreleasing basophils by flow cytometry, thereby generating a surface profile of the two phenotypes. Methods Fresh buffy coat blood (histamine release and nonreleases were defined as having...... a maximum release basophils, defined as FceRIa+CD3-CD14-CD19-CD56-,were analysed for surface expression of relevant markers. All samples were compensated and analysed in logicle display. All gates...

  15. DFT and post-DFT studies of metallic MXY3-type compounds for low temperature TE applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, M.; Saifullah; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Rashid; Shafiq, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, thermoelectric properties of carbon and nitrogen based twenty metallic antiperovskites MXY3 (M=Al, Ga, Ir, Mg, Pd, Pt, Rh; X=C, N; Y=Mn, Ni, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe) using ab-initio density functional theory and post-DFT Boltzmann's techniques are investigated. The electronic properties of these compounds are also discussed. We find high values of Seebeck coefficient and small values of electronic thermal conductivity for AlCTi3, AlNSc3, AlCNi3, AlNTi3, GaCCr3 and MgCNi3 between -0.25 and 0.25 eV chemical potential. These results show high dimensionless figure of merit in metallic materials and therefore, we predict these materials can be potential candidates for low temperature thermoelectric applications.

  16. IMPACT OF SOME CYTOKINES TO EFFICIENCY OF INFERTILITY TREATMENT BY MEANS OF IN VITRO FERTILIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O. Motovilova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Present study defines clinical, hormonal and immunological factors allowing to predict outcomes of IVF cycles in patients with combined forms of infertility at their reproductive age. Indices of gonadotrophic ovarian stimulation in IVF cycles in patients of reproductive age with combined forms of infertility depend on their age and cytokine contents in follicular fluid. Effectiveness of gonadotropin-induced ovarian stimulation is inversely dependent on the patients’ age, its increase is related to increased contents of pro-inflammatory cytokines in follicular fluid and increased expression of CCR1, along with decreased expression of CCR3 chemokine receptors in endometrium. Effectiveness of gonadotropin-induced ovarian stimulation depends on concentration of cytokines in the follicular fluid, which is argued by presence of a significant direct correlation between the number of growing follicles, oocytes and local contents of IL-10, IL-15, eotaxin, MIP-1β, RANTES, TNFα, IFNγ, and GMCSF. Free testosterone levels show a positive correlation with numbers of oocytes obtained from the ovarian punctate, and CXCR2 and CCR3 expression in endometrium, as well as a negative correlation was found with IL-4 contents in follicular fluid. In patients with negative IVF cycle outcomes, levels of IL-13 in follicular fluid upon ovarian stimulation proved to be twofold higher than those in patients with successful pregnancy after IVF. Prognosis for pregnancy in a cycle of treatment in patients with combined forms of infertility of reproductive age is determined by a patients’ story, and a variety of clinical, hormonal and embryological factors which can increase predictive accuracy of the IVF outcomes. To determine a probability of successful pregnancy after IVF cycle, an appropriate prognostic index is recommended, with a sensitivity levels of 93% and specificity of 89%.

  17. Study of astragaloside on infiltration of eosinophils in mouse model of allergic asthma%黄芪甲苷对哮喘小鼠嗜酸性粒细胞浸润的影响及机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡萃; 董竞成; 杜文静; 弓唯一; 刘宝君; 吴金峰; 曹玉雪

    2013-01-01

    目的:观察黄芪甲苷对哮喘小鼠嗜酸性粒细胞浸润的影响,并初步探讨其机制.方法:用卵蛋白(OVA)致敏和激发建立哮喘小鼠模型,予黄芪甲苷腹腔注射后,观察小鼠行为学、肺组织病理学评分及肺泡灌洗液(BALF)中嗜酸性粒细胞计数的改变;用Luminex 200检测小鼠血清中RANTES、MCP-3及eotaxin 3种趋化因子及IL-3、IL-4、IL-5、IL-6、IL-10、GM-CSF、IFN-γ和TNF-α8种相关炎性细胞因子的水平;用RT-PCR观察小鼠肺组织中相关趋化因子受体CCR3、CCR5 mRNA表达的变化;用western blot检测小鼠肺组织中CCR3、CCR5及NF-κB p65蛋白的表达.结果:黄芪甲苷可使哮喘小鼠BALF中EOS的数量明显减少,改善哮喘小鼠的症状,减轻哮喘小鼠的肺组织炎症损伤;黄芪甲苷治疗后,哮喘小鼠血清中TNF-α、IFN-γ、IL-6、GM-CSF、IL-5等细胞因子及趋化因子eotaxin的浓度有下降的趋势,哮喘小鼠肺组织中CCR3 mRNA的表达下降,同时,还可抑制哮喘小鼠肺组织中CCR3和NF-κB p65蛋白的表达.结论:黄芪甲苷可抑制哮喘小鼠气道中嗜酸性粒细胞的浸润,此作用与其降低趋化因子、趋化因子受体的表达及相关炎性细胞因子的水平有关.%Objective:To observe the effect of astragaloside Ⅳ on infiltration of eosinophils in mouse model of allergic asthma,and to explore its possible mechanism.Methods:Using OVA sensitization and challenge to establish the mouse models of asthma and then treated intraperitoneally with astragaloside before each challenge.Observations of clinical symptoms,pulmonary histopathology and inflammatory scores.The levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were measured by Luminex 200.Realtime-PCR and western blotting were also performed to analyze the effects of astragaloside on chemokine receptors expressions.The expressions of NF-κB p65 protein in the lung of mice were tested by western blotting.Results:Compared to the asthmatic model group

  18. Net positive charge of HIV-1 CRF01_AE V3 sequence regulates viral sensitivity to humoral immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Naganawa

    Full Text Available The third variable region (V3 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 envelope gp120 subunit participates in determination of viral infection coreceptor tropism and host humoral immune responses. Positive charge of the V3 plays a key role in determining viral coreceptor tropism. Here, we examined by bioinformatics, experimental, and protein modelling approaches whether the net positive charge of V3 sequence regulates viral sensitivity to humoral immunity. We chose HIV-1 CRF01_AE strain as a model virus to address the question. Diversity analyses using CRF01_AE V3 sequences from 37 countries during 1984 and 2005 (n = 1361 revealed that reduction in the V3's net positive charge makes V3 less variable due to limited positive selection. Consistently, neutralization assay using CRF01_AE V3 recombinant viruses (n = 30 showed that the reduction in the V3's net positive charge rendered HIV-1 less sensitive to neutralization by the blood anti-V3 antibodies. The especially neutralization resistant V3 sequences were the particular subset of the CCR5-tropic V3 sequences with net positive charges of +2 to +4. Molecular dynamics simulation of the gp120 monomers showed that the V3's net positive charge regulates the V3 configuration. This and reported gp120 structural data predict a less-exposed V3 with a reduced net positive charge in the native gp120 trimer context. Taken together, these data suggest a key role of the V3's net positive charge in the immunological escape and coreceptor tropism evolution of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in vivo. The findings have molecular implications for the adaptive evolution and vaccine design of HIV-1.

  19. Cannabinoid receptor 2-mediated attenuation of CXCR4-tropic HIV infection in primary CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Maria Costantino

    Full Text Available Agents that activate cannabinoid receptor pathways have been tested as treatments for cachexia, nausea or neuropathic pain in HIV-1/AIDS patients. The cannabinoid receptors (CB(1R and CB(2R and the HIV-1 co-receptors, CCR5 and CXCR4, all signal via Gαi-coupled pathways. We hypothesized that drugs targeting cannabinoid receptors modulate chemokine co-receptor function and regulate HIV-1 infectivity. We found that agonism of CB(2R, but not CB(1R, reduced infection in primary CD4+ T cells following cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission of CXCR4-tropic virus. As this change in viral permissiveness was most pronounced in unstimulated T cells, we investigated the effect of CB(2R agonism on to CXCR4-induced signaling following binding of chemokine or virus to the co-receptor. We found that CB(2R agonism decreased CXCR4-activation mediated G-protein activity and MAPK phosphorylation. Furthermore, CB(2R agonism altered the cytoskeletal architecture of resting CD4+ T cells by decreasing F-actin levels. Our findings suggest that CB(2R activation in CD4+ T cells can inhibit actin reorganization and impair productive infection following cell-free or cell-associated viral acquisition of CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 in resting cells. Therefore, the clinical use of CB(2R agonists in the treatment of AIDS symptoms may also exert beneficial adjunctive antiviral effects against CXCR4-tropic viruses in late stages of HIV-1 infection.

  20. The epithelial αvβ3-integrin boosts the MYD88-dependent TLR2 signaling in response to viral and bacterial components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Gianni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available TLR2 is a cell surface receptor which elicits an immediate response to a wide repertoire of bacteria and viruses. Its response is usually thought to be proinflammatory rather than an antiviral. In monocytic cells TLR2 cooperates with coreceptors, e.g. CD14, CD36 and αMβ2-integrin. In an earlier work we showed that αvβ3-integrin acts in concert with TLR2 to elicit an innate response to HSV, and to lipopolysaccharide. This response is characterized by production of IFN-α and -β, a specific set of cytokines, and NF-κB activation. We investigated the basis of the cooperation between αvβ3-integrin and TLR2. We report that β3-integrin participates by signaling through Y residues located in the C-tail, known to be involved in signaling activity. αvβ3-integrin boosts the MYD88-dependent TLR2 signaling and IRAK4 phosphorylation in 293T and in epithelial, keratinocytic and neuronal cell lines. The replication of ICP0minus HSV is greatly enhanced by DN versions of MYD88, of Akt - a hub of this pathway, or by β3integrin-silencing. αvβ3-integrin enables the recruitment of TLR2, MAL, MYD88 at lipid rafts, the platforms from where the signaling starts. The PAMP of the HSV-induced innate response is the gH/gL virion glycoprotein, which interacts with αvβ3-integrin and TLR2 independently one of the other, and cross-links the two receptors. Given the preferential distribution of αvβ3-integrin to epithelial cells, we propose that αvβ3-integrin serves as coreceptor of TLR2 in these cells. The results open the possibility that TLR2 makes use of coreceptors in a variety of cells to broaden its spectrum of activity and tissue specificity.

  1. Mycobacterium avium complex augments macrophage HIV-1 production and increases CCR5 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, S M; Greenwell-Wild, T; Peng, G; Hale-Donze, H; Doherty, T M; Mizel, D; Orenstein, J M

    1998-10-13

    Infection with HIV-1 results in pronounced immune suppression and susceptibility to opportunistic infections (OI). Reciprocally, OI augment HIV-1 replication. As we have shown for Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and Pneumocystis carinii, macrophages infected with opportunistic pathogens and within lymphoid tissues containing OI, exhibit striking levels of viral replication. To explore potential underlying mechanisms for increased HIV-1 replication associated with coinfection, blood monocytes were exposed to MAC antigens (MAg) or viable MAC and their levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and HIV-1 coreceptors monitored. MAC enhanced TNFalpha production in vitro, consistent with its expression in coinfected lymph nodes. Using a polyclonal antibody to the CCR5 coreceptor that mediates viral entry of macrophage tropic HIV-1, a subset of unstimulated monocytes was shown to be CCR5-positive by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. After stimulation with MAg or infection with MAC, CCR5 expression was increased at both the mRNA level and on the cell surface. Up-regulation of CCR5 by MAC was not paralleled by an increase in the T cell tropic coreceptor, CXCR4. Increases in NF-kappaB, TNFalpha, and CCR5 were consistent with the enhanced production of HIV-1 in MAg-treated adherent macrophage cultures as measured by HIV-1 p24 levels. Increased CCR5 was also detected in coinfected lymph nodes as compared with tissues with only HIV-1. The increased production of TNFalpha, together with elevated expression of CCR5, provide potential mechanisms for enhanced infection and replication of HIV-1 by macrophages in OI-infected cells and tissues. Consequently, treating OI may inhibit not only the OI-induced pathology, but also limit the viral burden.

  2. Decreased HIV diversity after allogeneic stem cell transplantation of an HIV-1 infected patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thielen Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 coreceptor use and viral evolution were analyzed in blood samples from an HIV-1 infected patient undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT. Coreceptor use was predicted in silico from sequence data obtained from the third variable loop region of the viral envelope gene with two software tools. Viral diversity and evolution was evaluated on the same samples by Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood methods. In addition, phenotypic analysis was done by comparison of viral growth in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in a CCR5 (R5-deficient T-cell line which was controlled by a reporter assay confirming viral tropism. In silico coreceptor predictions did not match experimental determinations that showed a consistent R5 tropism. Anti-HIV directed antibodies could be detected before and after the SCT. These preexisting antibodies did not prevent viral rebound after the interruption of antiretroviral therapy during the SCT. Eventually, transplantation and readministration of anti-retroviral drugs lead to sustained increase in CD4 counts and decreased viral load to undetectable levels. Unexpectedly, viral diversity decreased after successful SCT. Our data evidence that only R5-tropic virus was found in the patient before and after transplantation. Therefore, blocking CCR5 receptor during stem cell transplantation might have had beneficial effects and this might apply to more patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Furthermore, we revealed a scenario of HIV-1 dynamic different from the commonly described ones. Analysis of viral evolution shows the decrease of viral diversity even during episodes with bursts in viral load.

  3. Differences in allergen-induced T cell activation between allergic asthma and rhinitis: Role of CD28, ICOS and CTLA-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacoeuille Yannick

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Th2 cell activation and T regulatory cell (Treg deficiency are key features of allergy. This applies for asthma and rhinitis. However with a same atopic background, some patients will develop rhinitis and asthma, whereas others will display rhinitis only. Co-receptors are pivotal in determining the type of T cell activation, but their role in allergic asthma and rhinitis has not been explored. Our objective was to assess whether allergen-induced T cell activation differs from allergic rhinitis to allergic rhinitis with asthma, and explore the role of ICOS, CD28 and CTLA-4. Methods T cell co-receptor and cytokine expressions were assessed by flow cytometry in PBMC from 18 house dust mite (HDM allergic rhinitics (R, 18 HDM allergic rhinitics and asthmatics (AR, 13 non allergic asthmatics (A and 20 controls, with or without anti-co-receptors antibodies. Results In asthmatics (A+AR, a constitutive decrease of CTLA-4+ and of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells was found, with an increase of IFN-γ+ cells. In allergic subjects (R + AR, allergen stimulation induced CD28 together with IL-4 and IL-13, and decreased the proportion of CTLA-4+, IL-10+ and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells. Anti-ICOS and anti-CD28 antibodies blocked allergen-induced IL-4 and IL-13. IL-13 production also involved CTLA-4. Conclusions T cell activation differs between allergic rhinitis and asthma. In asthma, a constitutive, co-receptor independent, Th1 activation and Treg deficiency is found. In allergic rhinitis, an allergen-induced Treg cell deficiency is seen, as well as an ICOS-, CD28- and CTLA-4-dependent Th2 activation. Allergic asthmatics display both characteristics.

  4. Biological properties of HIV-1 subtype B' isolates from infected Chinese blood donors at different disease stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Shen, Chengli; Wu, Hao; Caruso, Lori; Ratner, Deena; Rodriguez, Milka; Chen, Xinyue; Gupta, Phalguni

    2009-02-05

    Unsanitary blood/plasma collecting activities in central China during the 1990's caused a high prevalence of blood-borne HIV-1 infection. Although the genetic characterization of the proviral DNA of HIV-1 circulating in the infected former blood donors (FBDs) has been reported, there is little information about the biological characteristics of virus isolates in these FBDs. In this study, we have examined the biologic properties of HIV-1 isolates from AIDS patients and long-term non-progressors (LTNP) of FBDs. Our results indicate that the growth properties, co-receptor usage and syncitium inducing capabilities of the HIV-1 isolates are associated with the disease status of patients. The virus isolates from LTNPs replicated slower, used the CCR5 co-receptor and were of non-syncytium inducing phenotype. In contrast, HIV-1 isolates from AIDS patients showed high replication kinetics, used both CCR5 and CXCR4 co-receptors and induced syncytium formation. A higher level of cytopathicity was also detected in syncytium inducing virus compared to non-syncytium inducing isolates irrespective of patients' disease statuses. Although there was no significant differences in the binding and penetration of the target cells between the isolates from LTNPs and those from AIDS patients, viral DNA synthesis of viral isolates from LTNPs was much slower than the DNA synthesized by the isolates from AIDS patients, indicating a restriction at a post-entry step. Analysis of deduced amino acid sequences in C2-V5 regions of these isolates has provided a molecular basis for further identification of viral phenotypes of HIV-1 subtype B'. This study has provided valuable information on the biological properties of circulating HIV-1 strains among Chinese FBDs to better understand their viral characteristics and design more appropriate vaccine candidates for FBDs.

  5. Monitoring Early Fusion Dynamics of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 at Single-Molecule Resolution ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Sean X.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Wirtz, Denis

    2008-01-01

    The fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to host cells is a dynamic process governed by the interaction between glycoproteins on the viral envelope and the major receptor, CD4, and coreceptor on the surface of the cell. How these receptors organize at the virion-cell interface to promote a fusion-competent site is not well understood. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy, we map the tensile strengths, lifetimes, and energy barriers of individual intermolecular bonds between CCR5-tropic HIV-1 gp120 and its receptors CD4 and CCR5 or CXCR4 as a function of the interaction time with the cell. According to the Bell model, at short times of contact between cell and virion, the gp120-CD4 bond is able to withstand forces up to 35 pN and has an initial lifetime of 0.27 s and an intermolecular length of interaction of 0.34 nm. The initial bond also has an energy barrier of 6.7 kBT (where kB is Boltzmann's constant and T is absolute temperature). However, within 0.3 s, individual gp120-CD4 bonds undergo rapid destabilization accompanied by a shortened lifetime and a lowered tensile strength. This destabilization is significantly enhanced by the coreceptor CCR5, not by CXCR4 or fusion inhibitors, which suggests that it is directly related to a conformational change in the gp120-CD4 bond. These measurements highlight the instability and low tensile strength of gp120-receptor bonds, uncover a synergistic role for CCR5 in the progression of the gp120-CD4 bond, and suggest that the cell-virus adhesion complex is functionally arranged about a long-lived gp120-coreceptor bond. PMID:18480458

  6. Monitoring early fusion dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 at single-molecule resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Sean X; Siliciano, Robert F; Wirtz, Denis

    2008-07-01

    The fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to host cells is a dynamic process governed by the interaction between glycoproteins on the viral envelope and the major receptor, CD4, and coreceptor on the surface of the cell. How these receptors organize at the virion-cell interface to promote a fusion-competent site is not well understood. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy, we map the tensile strengths, lifetimes, and energy barriers of individual intermolecular bonds between CCR5-tropic HIV-1 gp120 and its receptors CD4 and CCR5 or CXCR4 as a function of the interaction time with the cell. According to the Bell model, at short times of contact between cell and virion, the gp120-CD4 bond is able to withstand forces up to 35 pN and has an initial lifetime of 0.27 s and an intermolecular length of interaction of 0.34 nm. The initial bond also has an energy barrier of 6.7 k(B)T (where k(B) is Boltzmann's constant and T is absolute temperature). However, within 0.3 s, individual gp120-CD4 bonds undergo rapid destabilization accompanied by a shortened lifetime and a lowered tensile strength. This destabilization is significantly enhanced by the coreceptor CCR5, not by CXCR4 or fusion inhibitors, which suggests that it is directly related to a conformational change in the gp120-CD4 bond. These measurements highlight the instability and low tensile strength of gp120-receptor bonds, uncover a synergistic role for CCR5 in the progression of the gp120-CD4 bond, and suggest that the cell-virus adhesion complex is functionally arranged about a long-lived gp120-coreceptor bond.

  7. Study of structure function correlation of chemokine receptor CXCR4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hong; Stephen C PEIPER; ZHU Xi-hua

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlation between structure domains and functions of chemokine receptor CXCR4. Methods: After the establishment of wild type chemokine receptor CXCR4 and CXCR2 expressing cell lines, 5 CXCR4/CXCR2 chimeras, 2 CXCR4 mutants were stably expressed on CHO cell line.Binding activities of all variants with the ligand, recombinant human SDF-1β, signal transduction ability after stimulation and their function as coreceptor for HIV-1 were studied with ligand-binding assay, Cytosensor/microphysiometry and cell-cell reporter gene fusion assay. Results: Among all 7 changed CXCR4 receptors, 3 chimeras (2444a, 4442, 4122), and 1 mutant (CXCR4-Tr) bond with SDF-1β in varying degrees, of which only 2444a totally and CXCR4-Tr partially maintain signaling. All changed receptors except for 4222 could act as coreceptors for HIV-1(LAI) in varying degrees. Conclusion: Several structure domains of CXCR4 are involved in the binding with SDF-1β, among which, N-terminal extracellular domain has high affinity of binding with SDF-1β, and the 3rd extracellular loop contributes to the binding, too. Although the C-terminal intracellular domain has no association with the maintenance of the overall structure of the receptor and ligand binding capability, the signaling is decreased when this domain is truncated. For CXCR4 signaling, not only is the conserved motif DRY box needed, but also the characterized conformation of the whole molecule must be formed when activation is required. There are some overlaps between SDF-1β binding domains and coreceptor function domains in molecular structure of CXCR4.

  8. Functional relevance of the switch of VEGF receptors/co-receptors during peritoneal dialysis-induced mesothelial to mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Pérez-Lozano

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is up-regulated during mesothelial to mesenchymal transition (MMT and has been associated with peritoneal membrane dysfunction in peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. It has been shown that normal and malignant mesothelial cells (MCs express VEGF receptors (VEGFRs and co-receptors and that VEGF is an autocrine growth factor for mesothelioma. Hence, we evaluated the expression patterns and the functional relevance of the VEGF/VEGFRs/co-receptors axis during the mesenchymal conversion of MCs induced by peritoneal dialysis. Omentum-derived MCs treated with TGF-β1 plus IL-1β (in vitro MMT and PD effluent-derived MCs with non-epithelioid phenotype (ex vivo MMT showed down-regulated expression of the two main receptors Flt-1/VEGFR-1 and KDR/VEGFR-2, whereas the co-receptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp-1 was up-regulated. The expression of the Nrp-1 ligand semaphorin-3A (Sema-3A, a functional VEGF competitor, was repressed throughout the MMT process. These expression pattern changes were accompanied by a reduction of the proliferation capacity and by a parallel induction of the invasive capacity of MCs that had undergone an in vitro or ex vivo MMT. Treatment with neutralizing anti-VEGF or anti-Nrp-1 antibodies showed that these molecules played a relevant role in cellular proliferation only in naïve omentum-derived MCs. Conversely, treatment with these blocking antibodies, as well as with recombinant Sema-3A, indicated that the switched VEGF/VEGFRs/co-receptors axis drove the enhanced invasion capacity of MCs undergoing MMT. In conclusion, the expression patterns of VEGFRs and co-receptors change in MCs during MMT, which in turn would determine their behaviour in terms of proliferation and invasion in response to VEGF.

  9. Association of Neutralization Sensitivity of HIV- 1 Primary Isolates With Biological Properties of Isolates From HIV-1 Infected Chinese Individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FA-XIN HEI; HAI-LI TANG; KUN-XUE HONG; JIAN-PING CHEN; HONG PENG; LIN YUAN; JIANG-QING XU; YI-MING SHAO

    2005-01-01

    Objective Although HIV-1 infection is prevalent in many regions in China, it remains largely unknown on the biological characteristics of dominant circulating isolates. This study was designed to isolate the circulating viral strains from different prevalent regions and to characterize their biological properties and neutralization sensitivity. Methods Primary viruses were isolated from fresh PBMCs using the traditional co-culture method and their capacity of inducing syncytium was tested in MT-2 cells. Meanwhile, their coreceptor usage was determined with two cell lines: Magi and GHOST (3) stably expressing CD4 and the chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4. Furthermore, the sensitivity of these viruses to neutralization by HIV-1-infected patients' plasma which were highly active to neutralize SF33 strain, was quantified in GHOST cell-based neutralization assay. Results Six primary viral strains were isolated from 4 separated regions. Isolates LTG0213,LTG0214 and XVS032691 induced syncytia in MT-2 cells, and used CXCR4 as coreceptor. Isolates XJN0021, XJN0091, or SHXDC0041 did not induce syncytia, and used CCR5 as coreceptor. Overall neutralization sensitivity differed among four representative strains: HIV-1 XVS032691>LTG0214>XJN0091≈SHXDC0041. Conclusion The neutralization sensitivity of HIV isolates is linked with the phenotype of isolates, in which syncytium-inducing (SI) or CXCR4-tropic (X4) viruses are more easily neutralized than non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) or CCR5-tropic (R5) viruses. The genetic subtypes based on the phylogeny of env sequences are not classical neutralization serotypes.

  10. Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    amino acid sequence of guinea pig tumor-secreted vascular permeability factor. Cancer Res. 50, 1774–1778 (1990). 4. Senger, D. R. et al. Tumor cells...factors that function in the developing nervous system22,23. NRPs primarily func- tion as co-receptors because they lack an intrinsic sig- nalling...mediated regulation of stem cell fate. High Alt. Med. Biol. 13, 162–168 (2012). 104. Shibuya, M. Vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor system

  11. CCR5 Expression Levels Influence NFAT Translocation, IL-2 Production, and Subsequent Signaling Events during T Lymphocyte Activation1

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Ligands of CCR5, the major coreceptor of HIV-1, costimulate T lymphocyte activation. However, the full impact of CCR5 expression on T cell responses remains unknown. Here, we show that compared with CCR5+/+, T cells from CCR5−/− mice secrete lower amounts of IL-2, and a similar phenotype is observed in humans who lack CCR5 expression (CCR5-Δ32/Δ32 homozygotes) as well as after Ab-mediated blockade of CCR5 in human T cells genetically intact for CCR5 expression. Conversely, overexpression of C...

  12. The CCR5 receptor acts as an alloantigen in CCR5Δ32 homozygous individuals: Identification of chemokineand HIV-1-blocking human antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major coreceptor for infection by macrophage-tropic R5 HIV-1. A 32-bp deletion in the gene coding for CCR5 (CCR5Δ32) occurs with a frequency of 10% in the Caucasian population and results in a receptor protein that is truncated and not expressed at the cell surface. CCR5Δ32 homozygous individuals are apparently normal but resistant to infection with R5 HIV-1. In two individuals homozygous for CCR5Δ32, who had been repeatedly exposed to CCR5-expressing blood ...

  13. CCR5 Gene Disruption via Lentiviral Vectors Expressing Cas9 and Single Guided RNA Renders Cells Resistant to HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, is a major target for drug and genetic intervention against HIV-1. Genetic intervention strategies have knocked down CCR5 expression levels by shRNA or disrupted the CCR5 gene using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) or Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN). In the present study, we silenced CCR5 via CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) and single guided RNAs (sgRNAs). We constructed lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs. We show that a...

  14. A Comparative Docking Study of Anibamine as the First Natural Product CCR5 Antagonist in CCR5 Homology Models

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Anibamine, a novel pyridine quaternary alkaloid recently isolated from Aniba sp., has been found to effectively bind to the chemokine receptor CCR5 with an IC50 at 1 μM in competition with 125I-gp120, an HIV viral envelope protein binding to CCR5 with high affinity. Since CCR5, a G-protein-coupled receptor, is an essential co-receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) entry to host cells, a CCR5 antagonist that inhibits the cellular entry of HIV-1 provides a new therapy choi...

  15. Analysis of the subunit stoichiometries in viral entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Magnus

    Full Text Available Virions of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infect cells by first attaching with their surface spikes to the CD4 receptor on target cells. This leads to conformational changes in the viral spikes, enabling the virus to engage a coreceptor, commonly CCR5 or CXCR4, and consecutively to insert the fusion peptide into the cellular membrane. Finally, the viral and the cellular membranes fuse. The HIV spike is a trimer consisting of three identical heterodimers composed of the gp120 and gp41 envelope proteins. Each of the gp120 proteins in the trimer is capable of attaching to the CD4 receptor and the coreceptor, and each of the three gp41 units harbors a fusion domain. It is still under debate how many of the envelope subunits within a given trimer have to bind to the CD4 receptors and to the coreceptors, and how many gp41 protein fusion domains are required for fusion. These numbers are referred to as subunit stoichiometries. We present a mathematical framework for estimating these parameters individually by analyzing infectivity assays with pseudotyped viruses. We find that the number of spikes that are engaged in mediating cell entry and the distribution of the spike number play important roles for the estimation of the subunit stoichiometries. Our model framework also shows why it is important to subdivide the question of the number of functional subunits within one trimer into the three different subunit stoichiometries. In a second step, we extend our models to study whether the subunits within one trimer cooperate during receptor binding and fusion. As an example for how our models can be applied, we reanalyze a data set on subunit stoichiometries. We find that two envelope proteins have to engage with CD4-receptors and coreceptors and that two fusion proteins must be revealed within one trimer for viral entry. Our study is motivated by the mechanism of HIV entry but the experimental technique and the model framework can be extended to

  16. HIV-1 exploits CCR5 conformational heterogeneity to escape inhibition by chemokines.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    International audience; CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and the coreceptor for R5 HIV-1 entry into CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Chemokines exert anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro, both by displacing the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 from binding to CCR5 and by promoting CCR5 endocytosis, suggesting that they play a protective role in HIV infection. However, we showed here that different CCR5 conformations at the cell surface are differentially engaged by chemokines and gp1...

  17. Natural killer cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are an important source of CC-chemokines and suppress HIV-1 entry and replication in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted), which are the natural ligands of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5, inhibit replication of MT-2- negative strains of HIV-1 by interfering with the ability of these strains to utilize CCR5 as a coreceptor for entry in CD4(+) cells. The present study investigates the capacity of natural killer (NK) cells isolated from HIV-infected individuals to produce CC-chemokines...

  18. HIV Vaccine Trial Exploits a Dual and Central Role for Innate Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Limited understanding of correlates of protection from HIV transmission hinders development of an efficacious vaccine. D. J. M. Lewis and colleagues (J. Virol. 88:11648–11657, 2014, doi:10.1128/JVI.01621-14) now report that vaginal immunization with an HIVgp140 vaccine linked to the 70-kDa heat shock protein downregulated the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coreceptor CCR5 (chemokine [C-C motif] receptor 5) and increased expression of the HIV resistance factor APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B...

  19. The role of the N-terminal segment of CCR5 in HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and the mechanism of virus adaptation to CCR5 lacking this segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabat David

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env induces membrane fusion as a result of sequential binding to CD4 and chemokine receptors (CCR5 or CXCR4. The critical determinants of CCR5 coreceptor function are the N-terminal domain (Nt and the second extracellular loop. However, mutations in gp120 adapt HIV-1 to grow on cells expressing the N-terminally truncated CCR5(Δ18 (Platt et al., J. Virol. 2005, 79: 4357–68. Results We have functionally characterized the adapted Env (designated Env(NYP using a quantitative cell-cell fusion assay. The rate of fusion with target cells expressing wild-type CCR5 and the resistance to fusion inhibitors was virtually identical for wild-type Env and Env(NYP, implying that the coreceptor affinity had not increased as a result of adaptation. In contrast, Env(NYP-induced fusion with cells expressing CCR5(Δ18 occurred at a slower rate and was extremely sensitive to the CCR5 binding inhibitor, Sch-C. Resistance to Sch-C drastically increased after pre-incubation of Env(NYP- and CCR5(Δ18-expressing cells at a temperature that was not permissive to fusion. This indicates that ternary Env(NYP-CD4-CCR5(Δ18 complexes accumulate at sub-threshold temperature and that low-affinity interactions with the truncated coreceptor are sufficient for triggering conformational changes in the gp41 of Env(NYP but not in wild-type Env. We also demonstrated that the ability of CCR5(Δ18 to support fusion and infection mediated by wild-type Env can be partially reconstituted in the presence of a synthetic sulfated peptide corresponding to the CCR5 Nt. Pre-incubation of wild-type Env- and CCR5(Δ18-expressing cells with the sulfated peptide at sub-threshold temperature markedly increased the efficiency of fusion. Conclusion We propose that, upon binding the Nt region of CCR5, wild-type Env acquires the ability to productively engage the extracellular loop(s of CCR5 – an event that triggers gp41 refolding and membrane merger

  20. Tryptophan dendrimers that inhibit HIV replication, prevent virus entry and bind to the HIV envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Colomer, Ignacio; Quesada, Ernesto; Mathys, Leen; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Camarasa, María-José; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Balzarini, Jan; San-Félix, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Dendrimers containing from 9 to 18 tryptophan residues at the peryphery have been efficiently synthesized and tested against HIV replication. These compounds inhibit an early step of the replicative cycle of HIV, presumably virus entry into its target cell. Our data suggest that HIV inhibition can be achieved by the preferred interaction of the compounds herein described with glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 of the HIV envelope preventing interaction between HIV and the (co)receptors present on the host cells. The results obtained so far indicate that 9 tryptophan residues on the periphery are sufficient for efficient gp120/gp41 binding and anti-HIV activity.

  1. Antigen-driven C–C Chemokine-mediated HIV-1 Suppression by CD4+ T Cells from Exposed Uninfected Individuals Expressing the Wild-type CCR-5 Allele

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Despite repeated exposure to HIV-1, certain individuals remain persistently uninfected. Such exposed uninfected (EU) people show evidence of HIV-1–specific T cell immunity and, in rare cases, selective resistance to infection by macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. The latter has been associated with a 32–base pair deletion in the C–C chemokine receptor gene CCR-5, the major coreceptor of macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. We have undertaken an analysis of the HIV-specific T cell responses in...

  2. Quantitation of Circulating Neuropilin-1 in Human, Monkey, Mouse, and Rat Sera by ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanmei; Meng, Y Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) is a single spanning transmembrane glycoprotein that acts as a co-receptor for class 3 semaphorins and vascular endothelial growth factors. Naturally occurring soluble NRP1 isoforms containing partial extracellular domain (ECD) have been reported. In addition to soluble NRP1, full-length NRP1 ECD has also been identified in human and animal sera. Here, we describe primate and rodent NRP1 ELISAs that measure total circulating NRP1 including soluble NPR1 and NRP1 ECD in human, monkey, mouse, and rat sera.

  3. Chemokine receptor polymorphism and autologous neutralizing antibody response in long-term HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Joost, Mette; Gram, G J;

    1998-01-01

    samples. Finally, late virus isolates from individuals with SPI generally remained sensitive to neutralization by early serum samples. Virus phenotype (SI/NSI) and CCR5 genotype was determined for all individuals. Neither showed significant correlation with SPI. However, all SPI individuals who were...... heterozygous for the CCR5 deletion were infected with virus of NSI phenotype. In contrast, all RPI individuals who were heterozygous for the CCR5 deletion were infected with virus of SI phenotype (p = .028). Thus, a beneficial effect of having a partly nonfunctional CCR5 coreceptor may depend on the viral SI...

  4. CCR5 Expression Levels in HIV-Uninfected Women Receiving Hormonal Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciaranghella, Gaia; Wang, Cuiwei; Hu, Haihong; Anastos, Kathryn; Merhi, Zaher; Nowicki, Marek; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Cohen, Mardge; Golub, Elizabeth T; Watts, D Heather; Alter, Galit; Young, Mary A; Tsibris, Athe M N

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity increases as receptor/coreceptor expression levels increase. We determined peripheral CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 expression levels in HIV-uninfected women who used depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA; n = 32), the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (LNG-IUD; n = 27), oral contraceptive pills (n = 32), or no hormonal contraception (n = 33). The use of LNG-IUD increased the proportion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that expressed CCR5; increases in the magnitude of T-cell subset CCR5 expression were observed with DMPA and LNG-IUD use (P CCR5 expression.

  5. Longitudinal Analysis of CCR5 and CXCR4 Usage in a Cohort of Antiretroviral Therapy-Naïve Subjects with Progressive HIV-1 Subtype C Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Martin Roelsgaard; Cashin, Kieran; Roche, Michael;

    2013-01-01

    -HIV infection. Nor do we completely understand the molecular determinants of coreceptor switching by C-HIV variants. Here, we characterized a panel of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) (n = 300) cloned sequentially from plasma of 21 antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve subjects who experienced progression from...... and replacement of the V3 "Gly-Pro-Gly" crown with a "Gly-Arg-Gly" motif, but that the accumulation of additional gp120 "scaffold" mutations was required for these V3 loop changes to confer functional effects. In this context, either of the V3 loop changes could confer possible transitional R5X4 phenotypes...

  6. Endocytic receptor LRP2/megalin-of holoprosencephaly and renal Fanconi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willnow, Thomas E; Christ, Annabel

    2017-08-01

    Megalin (or LRP2) is an endocytic receptor that plays a central role in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. Loss of this receptor in congenital or acquired diseases results in multiple organ dysfunctions, including forebrain malformation (holoprosencephaly) and renal reabsorption defects (renal Fanconi syndrome). Here, we describe current concepts of the mode of receptor action that include co-receptors and a repertoire of different ligands, and we discuss how these interactions govern functional integrity of the kidney and the brain, and cause disease when defective.

  7. Candidate pheromone receptors of codling moth Cydia pomonella respond to pheromones and kairomones

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Maria Cattaneo; Francisco Gonzalez; Bengtsson, Jonas M.; Corey, Elizabeth A.; Emmanuelle Jacquin-Joly; Nicolas Montagné; Umberto Salvagnin; Walker, William B.; Peter Witzgall; Gianfranco Anfora; Yuriy V. Bobkov

    2017-01-01

    Olfaction plays a dominant role in the mate-finding and host selection behaviours of the codling moth (Cydia pomonella), an important pest of apple, pear and walnut orchards worldwide. Antennal transcriptome analysis revealed a number of abundantly expressed genes related to the moth olfactory system, including those encoding the olfactory receptors (ORs) CpomOR1, CpomOR3 and CpomOR6a, which belong to the pheromone receptor (PR) lineage, and the co-receptor (CpomOrco). Using heterologous expr...

  8. Solution structure of a syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain and its interaction with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, D; Oh, E S; Woods, A

    1998-01-01

    Syndecan-4, a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is a coreceptor with integrins in cell adhesion. It has been suggested to form a ternary signaling complex with protein kinase Calpha and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Syndecans each have a unique, central, and variable (V......) region in their cytoplasmic domains, and that of syndecan-4 is critical to its interaction with protein kinase C and PIP2. Two oligopeptides corresponding to the variable region (4V) and whole domain (4L) of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain were synthesized for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Data...

  9. A Polymorphism in the Regulatory Region of the CC-Chemokine Receptor 5 Gene Influences Perinatal Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 to African-American Infants

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    There are natural mutations in the coding and noncoding regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CC-chemokine coreceptor 5 (CCR5) and in the related CCR2 protein (the CCR2-64I mutation). Individuals homozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 allele, which prevents CCR5 expression, strongly resist HIV-1 infection. Several genetic polymorphisms have been identified within the CCR5 5′ regulatory region, some of which influence the rate of disease progression in adult AIDS study cohorts. We ge...

  10. HEK293T Cells Are Heterozygous for CCR5 Delta 32 Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and a co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the target CD4+ cells. CCR5 delta 32 deletion is a loss-of-function mutation, resistant to HIV-1 infection. We tried to induce the CCR5 delta 32 mutation harnessing the genome editing technique, CRISPR-Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, CRISPR and CRISPR associated protein 9, Cas9) in the commonly used cell line human embryonic kidney HEK 293T cells. Surprisingly, ...

  11. More about the Viking hypothesis of origin of the delta32 mutation in the CCR5 gene conferring resistance to HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucotte, Gérard; Dieterlen, Florent

    2003-11-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 constitutes the major coreceptor for the HIV-1, because a mutant allele of the CCR5 gene named delta32 was shown to provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection. In the present study the frequency of the delta32 allele was collected in 36 European populations and in Cyprus, and the highest allele frequencies were found in Nordic countries. We constructed an allele map of delta32 frequencies in Europe; the map is in accordance to the Vikings hypothesis of the origin of the mutation and his dissemination during the eighth to the tenth centuries.

  12. Stable gene transfer of CCR5 and CXCR4 siRNAs by sleeping beauty transposon system to confer HIV-1 resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkina Ramesh

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thus far gene therapy strategies for HIV/AIDS have used either conventional retroviral vectors or lentiviral vectors for gene transfer. Although highly efficient, their use poses a certain degree of risk in terms of viral mediated oncogenesis. Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon system offers a non-viral method of gene transfer to avoid this possible risk. With respect to conferring HIV resistance, stable knock down of HIV-1 coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 by the use of lentiviral vector delivered siRNAs has proved to be a promising strategy to protect cells from HIV-1 infection. In the current studies our aim is to evaluate the utility of SB system for stable gene transfer of CCR5 and CXCR4 siRNA genes to derive HIV resistant cells as a first step towards using this system for gene therapy. Results Two well characterized siRNAs against the HIV-1 coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 were chosen based on their previous efficacy for the SB transposon gene delivery. The siRNA transgenes were incorporated individually into a modified SB transfer plasmid containing a FACS sortable red fluorescence protein (RFP reporter and a drug selectable neomycin resistance gene. Gene transfer was achieved by co-delivery with a construct expressing a hyperactive transposase (HSB5 into the GHOST-R3/X4/R5 cell line, which expresses the major HIV receptor CD4 and and the co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4. SB constructs expressing CCR5 or CXCR4 siRNAs were also transfected into MAGI-CCR5 or MAGI-CXCR4 cell lines, respectively. Near complete downregulation of CCR5 and CXCR4 surface expression was observed in transfected cells. During viral challenge with X4-tropic (NL4.3 or R5-tropic (BaL HIV-1 strains, the respective transposed cells showed marked viral resistance. Conclusion SB transposon system can be used to deliver siRNA genes for stable gene transfer. The siRNA genes against HIV-1 coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are able to downregulate the respective cell surface proteins

  13. Syndecans as receptors and organizers of the extracellular matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Gopal, Sandeep; Couchman, John

    2009-01-01

    and signalling molecules, such as protein kinases. Some aspects of syndecan signalling are understood but much remains to be learned. The functions of syndecans in regulating cell adhesion and extracellular matrix assembly are described here. Evidence from null mice suggests that syndecans have roles......, the collagens and glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix are prominent. Frequently, they do so in conjunction with other receptors, most notably the integrins. For this reason, they are often referred to as "co-receptors". However, just as with integrins, syndecans can interact with actin-associated proteins...

  14. [Valuation the tropism of the region V3 of the HIV for sequence. Clinic and therapeutic importance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto Vela, M del Carmen

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the VIH is studied, with special mention of the curl V3 of the gp120, given your capacity of union to the coreceptors of the lymphocyte TCD4. Due to the existence of a new antirretroviral antagonist of the vinestocks R5, carried out a sequence of V3 for the application of algorithms of interpretation of the results that were allowing us your use in clinic. There was demonstrated that of seven used algorithms, the use of four with them provides a better prediction that when an only one is in use system.

  15. Methamphetamine Enhances HIV-1 Infectivity in Monocyte Derived Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The US is currently experiencing an epidemic of methamphetamine (Meth) use as a recreational drug. Recent studies also show a high prevalence of HIV-1 infection among Meth users. We report that Meth enhances HIV-1 infectivity of dendritic cells as measured by multinuclear activation of a galactosidase indicator (MAGI) cell assay, p24 assay, and LTR-RU5 amplification. Meth induces increased HIV-1 infection in association with an increase in the HIV-1 coreceptors, CXCR4 and CCR5, and infection ...

  16. Mutations at the CXCR4 interaction sites for AMD3100 influence anti-CXCR4 antibody binding and HIV-1 entry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatse, Sigrid; Princen, Katrien; Vermeire, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    different anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibodies as well as the infectivity of diverse human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains and clinical isolates. Mutation of Asp(262) strongly decreased the coreceptor efficiency of CXCR4 for wild-type but not for AMD3100-resistant HIV-1 NL4.3. Thus, resistance...... of HIV-1 NL4.3 to AMD3100 is associated with a decreased dependence of the viral gp120 on Asp(262) of CXCR4, pointing to a different mode of interaction of wild-type versus AMD3100-resistant virus with CXCR4....

  17. The G-quadruplex-forming aptamer AS1411 potently inhibits HIV-1 attachment to the host cell

    OpenAIRE

    Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Lago, Sara; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    AS1411 is a G-rich aptamer that forms a stable G-quadruplex structure and displays antineoplastic properties both in vitro and in vivo. This oligonucleotide has undergone phase 2 clinical trials. The major molecular target of AS1411 is nucleolin (NCL), a multifunctional nucleolar protein also present in the cell membrane where it selectively mediates the binding and uptake of AS1411. Cell-surface NCL has been recognised as a low-affinity co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HI...

  18. Role of FGF19 induced FGFR4 activation in the regulation of glucose homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xinle; Li, Yang

    2009-01-01

    FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23 form a unique subfamily of fibroblast growth factors. Because they contain intra-molecular disulfide bonds and show reduced affinity toward heparan sulfate located in the extracellular space, it is thought that, in contrast to other FGFs, they function as endocrine hormones. FGF23 and its co-receptor αKlotho are involved in the control of aging, but it is not known if the same holds true for FGF19, which can also signal through αKlotho. However, considerable evidence s...

  19. FGF19 Regulates Cell Proliferation, Glucose and Bile Acid Metabolism via FGFR4-Dependent and Independent Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Ai-Luen Wu; Sally Coulter; Christopher Liddle; Anne Wong; Jeffrey Eastham-Anderson; French, Dorothy M.; Peterson, Andrew S.; Junichiro Sonoda

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a hormone-like protein that regulates carbohydrate, lipid and bile acid metabolism. At supra-physiological doses, FGF19 also increases hepatocyte proliferation and induces hepatocellular carcinogenesis in mice. Much of FGF19 activity is attributed to the activation of the liver enriched FGF Receptor 4 (FGFR4), although FGF19 can activate other FGFRs in vitro in the presence of the coreceptor βKlotho (KLB). In this report, we investigate the role of FGFR4...

  20. A novel peptide that inhibits HIV-1 entry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yong; HUANG Xiaoxing; WANG Qiong; YANG Yaling; TIAN Po; ZHANG Wentao

    2004-01-01

    @@ The global epidemic of HIV infection, the cause of AIDS, has created an urgent need for novel classes of antiretroviral agent. Besides reverse transcriptase and protease, the viral entry process provides new anti-HIV-1 targets. A new generation of antiviral drugs intended to block HIV entry into host cells is now under develop- ment[1]. These compounds are generally referred to as fusion or entry inhibitor. Several HIV-1 entry inhibitors that target CD4-gp120 interactions, co-receptor function, and gp41-mediated membrane fusion are in different stages of clinical development[2].

  1. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Rabi, S. Alireza; Nedellec, Rebecca; Daniels, Brian R.; Mullins, James I.; Mosier, Donald E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones to tensile strengths of the individual Env-receptor bonds of Env proteins obtained from a HIV-1 infected patient prior to and during coreceptor switching. The results suggest that the genetic determinants of viral entry were predominantly enriched in the C3, HR1 and CD regions rather than V3. Env proteins can better mediate entry into cells after coreceptor switch; this effective entry capacity does not correlate with the bond strengths between viral Env and cellular receptors.

  2. Down-regulation of cell surface CXCR4 by HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vigh Sandor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4, a member of the G-protein-coupled chemokine receptor family, can serve as a co-receptor along with CD4 for entry into the cell of T-cell tropic X4 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strains. Productive infection of T-lymphoblastoid cells by X4 HIV-1 markedly reduces cell-surface expression of CD4, but whether or not the co-receptor CXCR4 is down-regulated has not been conclusively determined. Results Infection of human T-lymphoblastoid cell line RH9 with HIV-1 resulted in down-regulation of cell surface CXCR4 expression. Down-regulation of surface CXCR4 correlated temporally with the increase in HIV-1 protein expression. CXCR4 was concentrated in intracellular compartments in H9 cells after HIV-1 infection. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies showed that CXCR4 and HIV-1 glycoproteins were co-localized in HIV infected cells. Inducible expression of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins also resulted in down-regulation of CXCR4 from the cell surface. Conclusion These results indicated that cell surface CXCR4 was reduced in HIV-1 infected cells, whereas expression of another membrane antigen, CD3, was unaffected. CXCR4 down-regulation may be due to intracellular sequestering of HIV glycoprotein/CXCR4 complexes.

  3. A Wnt-Frz/Ror-Dsh pathway regulates neurite outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Song

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges to understand the organization of the nervous system has been to determine how axon guidance molecules govern axon outgrowth. Through an unbiased genetic screen, we identified a conserved Wnt pathway which is crucial for anterior-posterior (A/P outgrowth of neurites from RME head motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans. The pathway is composed of the Wnt ligand CWN-2, the Frizzled receptors CFZ-2 and MIG-1, the co-receptor CAM-1/Ror, and the downstream component Dishevelled/DSH-1. Among these, CWN-2 acts as a local attractive cue for neurite outgrowth, and its activity can be partially substituted with other Wnts, suggesting that spatial distribution plays a role in the functional specificity of Wnts. As a co-receptor, CAM-1 functions cell-autonomously in neurons and, together with CFZ-2 and MIG-1, transmits the Wnt signal to downstream effectors. Yeast two-hybrid screening identified DSH-1 as a binding partner for CAM-1, indicating that CAM-1 could facilitate CWN-2/Wnt signaling by its physical association with DSH-1. Our study reveals an important role of a Wnt-Frz/Ror-Dsh pathway in regulating neurite A/P outgrowth.

  4. Shh-proteoglycan interactions regulate maturation of olfactory glomerular circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Laura; Witt, Rochelle M; Galligan, Meghan; Greer, Paul L; Eisner, Adriana; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Datta, Sandeep R; Segal, Rosalind A

    2014-12-01

    The olfactory system relies on precise circuitry connecting olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and appropriate relay and processing neurons of the olfactory bulb (OB). In mammals, the exact correspondence between specific olfactory receptor types and individual glomeruli enables a spatially precise map of glomerular activation that corresponds to distinct odors. However, the mechanisms that govern the establishment and maintenance of the glomerular circuitry are largely unknown. Here we show that high levels of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling at multiple sites enable refinement and maintenance of olfactory glomerular circuitry. Mice expressing a mutant version of Shh (Shh(Ala/Ala)), with impaired binding to proteoglycan co-receptors, exhibit disproportionately small olfactory bulbs containing fewer glomeruli. Notably, in mutant animals the correspondence between individual glomeruli and specific olfactory receptors is lost, as olfactory sensory neurons expressing different olfactory receptors converge on the same glomeruli. These deficits arise at late stages in post-natal development and continue into adulthood, indicating impaired pruning of erroneous connections within the olfactory bulb. In addition, mature Shh(Ala/Ala) mice exhibit decreased proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ), with particular reduction in neurogenesis of calbindin-expressing periglomerular cells. Thus, Shh interactions with proteoglycan co-receptors function at multiple locations to regulate neurogenesis and precise olfactory connectivity, thereby promoting functional neuronal circuitry.

  5. Replication-Competent Rhabdoviruses with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coats and Green Fluorescent Protein: Entry by a pH-Independent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boritz, Eli; Gerlach, Jennifer; Johnson, J. Erik; Rose, John K.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a replication-competent, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in which the gene encoding the single transmembrane glycoprotein (G) was deleted and replaced by an env-G hybrid gene encoding the extracellular and transmembrane domains of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope protein fused to the cytoplasmic domain of VSV G. An additional gene encoding a green fluorescent protein was added to permit rapid detection of infection. This novel surrogate virus infected and propagated on cells expressing the HIV receptor CD4 and coreceptor CXCR4. Infection was blocked by SDF-1, the ligand for CXCR4, by antibody to CD4 and by HIV-neutralizing antibody. This virus, unlike VSV, entered cells by a pH-independent pathway and thus supports a pH-independent pathway of HIV entry. Additional recombinants carrying hybrid env-G genes derived from R5 or X4R5 HIV strains also showed the coreceptor specificities of the HIV strains from which they were derived. These surrogate viruses provide a simple and rapid assay for HIV-neutralizing antibodies as well as a rapid screen for molecules that would interfere with any stage of HIV binding or entry. The viruses might also be useful as HIV vaccines. Our results suggest wide applications of other surrogate viruses based on VSV. PMID:10400792

  6. In vivo emergence of HIV-1 highly sensitive to neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlén M I Aasa-Chapman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rapid and continual viral escape from neutralizing antibodies is well documented in HIV-1 infection. Here we report in vivo emergence of viruses with heightened sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies, sometimes paralleling the development of neutralization escape. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sequential viral envs were amplified from seven HIV-1 infected men monitored from seroconversion up to 5 years after infection. Env-recombinant infectious molecular clones were generated and tested for coreceptor use, macrophage tropism and neutralization sensitivity to homologous and heterologous serum, soluble CD4 and monoclonal antibodies IgG1b12, 2G12 and 17b. We found that HIV-1 evolves sensitivity to contemporaneous neutralizing antibodies during infection. Neutralization sensitive viruses grow out even when potent autologous neutralizing antibodies are present in patient serum. Increased sensitivity to neutralization was associated with susceptibility of the CD4 binding site or epitopes induced after CD4 binding, and mediated by complex envelope determinants including V3 and V4 residues. The development of neutralization sensitive viruses occurred without clinical progression, coreceptor switch or change in tropism for primary macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that an interplay of selective forces for greater virus replication efficiency without the need to resist neutralizing antibodies in a compartment protected from immune surveillance may explain the temporal course described here for the in vivo emergence of HIV-1 isolates with high sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies.

  7. A time lag insensitive approach for estimating HIV-1 transmission direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Ge, Meng; Pan, Xian-Ming

    2012-05-15

    Identifying the direction of transmission in transmission pairs is important both for forensic investigations and for the monitoring of HIV epidemics, however, reliable methods are not yet available due to the long time lag between infection and sampling in most real cases. Based on bottleneck effect and coreceptor switching, we aimed at identifying an estimator from sequences of viral gp120 proteins to determine transmission direction between transmission pairs. The estimator should be changed with HIV transmission but was independent of disease progression in an individual. Here, we present a novel and reliable approach for identifying transmission direction. We derived a set of conserved patterns, called common patterns, from the sequences of viruses, which differed in their coreceptor usage. The number of unique common patterns in viral sequences decreased with transmission but remained almost constant with the progress of disease in an individual. We used this number as an estimator to determine transmission direction in 73 transmission pairs for which the transmission direction was already known. Our method predicted transmission direction with an accuracy of up to 94.5%. Of greater importance, our approach was not influenced by time lags between infection and sampling, and even transmission direction for transmission pairs with long time lags ranging from 2 years to more than 18 years were correctly determined. Our approach for accurately determining transmission direction between transmission pairs is irrespective of the time lag between infection and sampling, which means a promising applications prospect.

  8. Resolving Early Signaling Events in T-Cell Activation Leading to IL-2 and FOXP3 Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P. Perley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Signal intensity and feedback regulation are known to be major factors in the signaling events stemming from the T-cell receptor (TCR and its various coreceptors, but the exact nature of these relationships remains in question. We present a mathematical model of the complex signaling network involved in T-cell activation with cross-talk between the Erk, calcium, PKC and mTOR signaling pathways. The model parameters are adjusted to fit new and published data on TCR trafficking, Zap70, calcium, Erk and Isignaling. The regulation of the early signaling events by phosphatases, CD45 and SHP1, and the TCR dynamics are critical to determining the behavior of the model. Additional model corroboration is provided through quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data collected under different stimulating and knockout conditions. The resulting model is analyzed to investigate how signal intensity and feedback regulation affect TCR- and coreceptor-mediated signal transduction and their downstream transcriptional profiles to predict the outcome for a variety of stimulatory and knockdown experiments. Analysis of the model shows that: (1 SHP1 negative feedback is necessary for preventing hyperactivity in TCR signaling; (2 CD45 is required for TCR signaling, but also partially suppresses it at high expression levels; and (3 elevated FOXP3 and reduced IL-2 signaling, an expression profile often associated with T regulatory cells (Tregs, is observed when the system is subjected to weak TCR and CD28 costimulation or a severe reduction in CD45 activity.

  9. Genotyping of the CCR5 chemokine receptor by isothermal NASBA amplification and differential probe hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, J W; Tetali, S; Lee, E M; Shurtliff, R N; Wang, X P; Pahwa, S; Kaplan, M H; Ginocchio, C C

    1999-11-01

    The human CCR5 chemokine receptor functions as a coreceptor with CD4 for infection by macrophage-tropic isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A mutated CCR5 allele which encodes a protein that does not function as a coreceptor for HIV-1 has been identified. Thus, expression of the wild-type and/or mutation allele is relevant to determining the infectability of patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and affects disease progression in vivo. We developed a qualitative CCR5 genotyping assay using NASBA, an isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology. The method involves three enzymes and two oligonucleotides and targets the CCR5 mRNA, which is expressed in PBMC at a copy number higher than 2, the number of copies of DNA present encoding the gene. The single oligonucleotide set amplifies both alleles, and genotyping is achieved by separate hybridizations of wild-type- and mutation-specific probes directly to the single-stranded RNA amplification product. Assay sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated with RNAs produced in vitro from plasmid clones bearing the DNA encoding each allele. No detectable cross-reactivity between wild-type and mutation probes was found, and 50 copies of each allele were readily detectable. Analysis of patient samples found that 20% were heterozygous and 1% were homozygous for the CCR5 mutation. Thus, NASBA is a sensitive and specific means of rapidly determining CCR5 genotype and provides several technical advantages over alternative assay systems.

  10. Signature motif-guided identification of receptors for peptide hormones essential for root meristem growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wen; Liu, Li; Wang, Jizong; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Heqiao; Tang, Jiao; Lin, Guangzhong; Wang, Yichuan; Wen, Xing; Li, Wenyang; Han, Zhifu; Guo, Hongwei; Chai, Jijie

    2016-06-01

    Peptide-mediated cell-to-cell signaling has crucial roles in coordination and definition of cellular functions in plants. Peptide-receptor matching is important for understanding the mechanisms underlying peptide-mediated signaling. Here we report the structure-guided identification of root meristem growth factor (RGF) receptors important for plant development. An assay based on a signature ligand recognition motif (Arg-x-Arg) conserved in a subfamily of leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RKs) identified the functionally uncharacterized LRR-RK At4g26540 as a receptor of RGF1 (RGFR1). We further solved the crystal structure of RGF1 in complex with the LRR domain of RGFR1 at a resolution of 2.6 Å, which reveals that the Arg-x-Gly-Gly (RxGG) motif is responsible for specific recognition of the sulfate group of RGF1 by RGFR1. Based on the RxGG motif, we identified additional four RGFRs. Participation of the five RGFRs in RGF-induced signaling is supported by biochemical and genetic data. We also offer evidence showing that SERKs function as co-receptors for RGFs. Taken together, our study identifies RGF receptors and co-receptors that can link RGF signals with their downstream components and provides a proof of principle for structure-based matching of LRR-RKs with their peptide ligands.

  11. Up-Regulation of CCR5 and CXCR4 Expression on Human Monocytes by Interferon Gamma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆韵; 刘祖强; 陈应华

    2003-01-01

    Chemokine receptors, mainly CCR5 and CXCR4, have been proved to be the important coreceptors in HIV-1 entry.HIV-1 disease progression is, in general, characterized by an initial predominance of CCR5 using macrophage tropic, non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) isolates, switching later to CXCR4 using T-cell tropic, syncytium-inducing (SI) isolates.How this shift occurs and how the shift can be controlled are still unclear.Since patients with rapid decline of T cell counts have constantly high levels of IFN-γ in the sera and lymphoid nodes, we investigated the influence of this cytokine on the expression of the HIV-1 coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 on the cell surfaces of human monocytic cell line U937 and promonocyte NB4.IFN-γ could intensively enhance the expression of both, while a low level of CCR5 expression was detected in two cell lines before stimulation.The results of semiquantitative RT-PCR also confirm the up-regulation.As the newly generated X4-strains have been demonstrated to be insensitive to chemokine in some reports, IFN-γ may play an important role in selecting CXCR4-used strains.

  12. RET Recognition of GDNF-GFRα1 Ligand by a Composite Binding Site Promotes Membrane-Proximal Self-Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry M. Goodman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The RET receptor tyrosine kinase is essential to vertebrate development and implicated in multiple human diseases. RET binds a cell surface bipartite ligand comprising a GDNF family ligand and a GFRα coreceptor, resulting in RET transmembrane signaling. We present a hybrid structural model, derived from electron microscopy (EM and low-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS data, of the RET extracellular domain (RETECD, GDNF, and GFRα1 ternary complex, defining the basis for ligand recognition. RETECD envelopes the dimeric ligand complex through a composite binding site comprising four discrete contact sites. The GFRα1-mediated contacts are crucial, particularly close to the invariant RET calcium-binding site, whereas few direct contacts are made by GDNF, explaining how distinct ligand/coreceptor pairs are accommodated. The RETECD cysteine-rich domain (CRD contacts both ligand components and makes homotypic membrane-proximal interactions occluding three different antibody epitopes. Coupling of these CRD-mediated interactions suggests models for ligand-induced RET activation and ligand-independent oncogenic deregulation.

  13. CD81 is a central regulator of cellular events required for hepatitis C virus infection of human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzoli, Michela; Bianchi, Alessia; Filippini, Sara; Weiner, Amy; Zhu, Qing; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Crotta, Stefania

    2008-09-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is still a major public health problem, and the events leading to hepatocyte infection are not yet fully understood. Combining confocal microscopy with biochemical analysis and studies of infection requirements using pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs, we show here that engagement of CD81 activates the Rho GTPase family members Rac, Rho, and Cdc42 and that the block of these signaling pathways drastically reduces HCV infectivity. Activation of Rho GTPases mediates actin-dependent relocalization of the HCV E2/CD81 complex to cell-cell contact areas where CD81 comes into contact with the tight-junction proteins occludin, ZO-1, and claudin-1, which was recently described as an HCV coreceptor. Finally, we show that CD81 engagement activates the Raf/MEK/ERK signaling cascade and that this pathway affects postentry events of the virus life cycle. In conclusion, we describe a range of cellular events that are manipulated by HCV to coordinate interactions with its multiple coreceptors and to establish productive infections and find that CD81 is a central regulator of these events.

  14. Structural basis for iron piracy by pathogenic Neisseria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Easley, Nicole C; Oke, Muse; Mizuno, Naoko; Gumbart, James; Boura, Evzen; Steere, Ashley N; Zak, Olga; Aisen, Philip; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Evans, Robert W; Gorringe, Andrew R; Mason, Anne B; Steven, Alasdair C; Buchanan, Susan K

    2012-02-12

    Neisseria are obligate human pathogens causing bacterial meningitis, septicaemia and gonorrhoea. Neisseria require iron for survival and can extract it directly from human transferrin for transport across the outer membrane. The transport system consists of TbpA, an integral outer membrane protein, and TbpB, a co-receptor attached to the cell surface; both proteins are potentially important vaccine and therapeutic targets. Two key questions driving Neisseria research are how human transferrin is specifically targeted, and how the bacteria liberate iron from transferrin at neutral pH. To address these questions, we solved crystal structures of the TbpA-transferrin complex and of the corresponding co-receptor TbpB. We characterized the TbpB-transferrin complex by small-angle X-ray scattering and the TbpA-TbpB-transferrin complex by electron microscopy. Our studies provide a rational basis for the specificity of TbpA for human transferrin, show how TbpA promotes iron release from transferrin, and elucidate how TbpB facilitates this process.

  15. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Rabi, S Alireza; Nedellec, Rebecca; Daniels, Brian R; Mullins, James I; Mosier, Donald E; Siliciano, Robert F; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-22

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones to tensile strengths of the individual Env-receptor bonds of Env proteins obtained from a HIV-1 infected patient prior to and during coreceptor switching. The results suggest that the genetic determinants of viral entry were predominantly enriched in the C3, HR1 and CD regions rather than V3. Env proteins can better mediate entry into cells after coreceptor switch; this effective entry capacity does not correlate with the bond strengths between viral Env and cellular receptors.

  16. Anti-Mullerian hormone recruits BMPR-IA in immature granulosa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauriane Sèdes

    Full Text Available Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH is a member of the TGF-β superfamily secreted by the gonads of both sexes. This hormone is primarily known for its role in the regression of the Müllerian ducts in male fetuses. In females, AMH is expressed in granulosa cells of developing follicles. Like other members of the TGF-β superfamily, AMH transduces its signal through two transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors including a well characterized type II receptor, AMHR-II. The complete signalling pathway of AMH involving Smads proteins and the type I receptor is well known in the Müllerian duct and in Sertoli and Leydig cells but not in granulosa cells. In addition, few AMH target genes have been identified in these cells. Finally, while several co-receptors have been reported for members of the TGF-β superfamily, none have been described for AMH. Here, we have shown that none of the Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs co-receptors, Repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs, were essential for AMH signalling. We also demonstrated that the main Smad proteins used by AMH in granulosa cells were Smad 1 and Smad 5. Like for the other AMH target cells, the most important type I receptor for AMH in these cells was BMPR-IA. Finally, we have identified a new AMH target gene, Id3, which could be involved in the effects of AMH on the differentiation of granulosa cells and its other target cells.

  17. Cubilin and amnionless mediate protein reabsorption in Drosophila nephrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fujian; Zhao, Ying; Chao, Yufang; Muir, Katherine; Han, Zhe

    2013-02-01

    The insect nephrocyte and the mammalian glomerular podocyte are similar with regard to filtration, but it remains unclear whether there is an organ or cell type in flies that reabsorbs proteins. Here, we show that the Drosophila nephrocyte has molecular, structural, and functional similarities to the renal proximal tubule cell. We screened for genes required for nephrocyte function and identified two Drosophila genes encoding orthologs of mammalian cubilin and amnionless (AMN), two major receptors for protein reabsorption in the proximal tubule. In Drosophila, expression of dCubilin and dAMN is specific to nephrocytes, where they function as co-receptors for protein uptake. Targeted expression of human AMN in Drosophila nephrocytes was sufficient to rescue defective protein uptake induced by dAMN knockdown, suggesting evolutionary conservation of Cubilin/AMN co-receptors function from flies to humans. Furthermore, we found that Cubilin/AMN-mediated protein reabsorption is required for the maintenance of nephrocyte ultrastructure and fly survival under conditions of toxic stress. In conclusion, the insect nephrocyte combines filtration with protein reabsorption, using evolutionarily conserved genes and subcellular structures, suggesting that it can serve as a simplified model for both podocytes and the renal proximal tubule.

  18. Identification of putative chemosensory receptor genes from yellow peach moth Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenée) antennae transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xing; Zhang, Tiantao; Wang, Zhenying; He, Kanglai; Bai, Shuxiong

    2016-01-01

    The yellow peach moth, Conogethes punctiferalis, is an extremely important polyphagous insect in Asia. The chemosensory systems of moth play an important role in detecting food, oviposition sites and mate attraction. Several antennal chemosensory receptors are involved in odor detection. Our study aims to identify chemosensory receptor genes for potential applications in behavioral responses of yellow peach moth. By transcriptomic analysis of male and female antennae, 83 candidate chemosensory receptors, including 62 odorant receptors, 11 ionotropic receptors and 10 gustatory receptors were identified. Through Blast and sequence alignment, the highly conserved co-receptor Orco was annotated, eight unigenes clustered into pheromone receptors, and two clustered as sugar receptor. Among the IRs, one unigenes was similar with co-receptors IR25a. Expression levels of 50 odorant receptors were further evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR in antennae. All the ORs tested were detected in antennae and some of which were associated with sex-biased expression. The chemosensory receptors identified in C. punctiferalis provide a foundational resource for further analysis on olfaction for behavior. The expression profiles of ORs in antennae indicated variant functions in olfactory recognition, and our results provided the possibility for the potential application of semiochemical to control this pest moth. PMID:27659493

  19. Selective Loss of Innate CD4+ Vα24 Natural Killer T Cells in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Johan K.; Fast, Noam M.; Palacios, Emil H.; Fennelly, Glenn; Dobroszycki, Joanna; Palumbo, Paul; Wiznia, Andrew; Grant, Robert M.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Rosenberg, Michael G.; Nixon, Douglas F.

    2002-01-01

    Vα24 natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate immune cells involved in regulation of immune tolerance, autoimmunity, and tumor immunity. However, the effect of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection on these cells is unknown. Here, we report that the Vα24 NKT cells can be subdivided into CD4+ or CD4− subsets that differ in their expression of the homing receptors CD62L and CD11a. Furthermore, both CD4+ and CD4− NKT cells frequently express both CXCR4 and CCR5 HIV coreceptors. We find that the numbers of NKT cells are reduced in HIV-infected subjects with uncontrolled viremia and marked CD4+ T-cell depletion. The number of CD4+ NKT cells is inversely correlated with HIV load, indicating depletion of this subset. In contrast, CD4− NKT-cell numbers are unaffected in subjects with high viral loads. HIV infection experiments in vitro show preferential depletion of CD4+ NKT cells relative to regular CD4+ T cells, in particular with virus that uses the CCR5 coreceptor. Thus, HIV infection causes a selective loss of CD4+ lymph node homing (CD62L+) NKT cells, with consequent skewing of the NKT-cell compartment to a predominantly CD4− CD62L− phenotype. These data indicate that the key immunoregulatory NKT-cell compartment is compromised in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:12097565

  20. Functional olfactory sensory neurons housed in olfactory sensilla on the ovipositor of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Felix Klinner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory systems evolved to detect and identify volatile chemical cues, in many cases across great distances. However, the precision of copulatory and oviposition behaviors suggest that they may be guided by olfactory cues detected by sensory systems located on or near the ovipositor. Here we present evidence of a small number of functional olfactory sensilla on the ovipositor of the hawkmoth Manduca sexta. Gene expression analysis of isolated ovipositor tissue indicated active transcription of gustatory and both classes of olfactory receptor genes. Expression of the olfactory co-receptor ORCo and the antennal ionotropic co-receptors IR8a and IR25a suggests that functional olfactory proteins may be present in the sensory structures located on the ovipositor. Scanning electron microscopy identified five to nine porous sensilla on each of the anal papillae of the ovipositor. Furthermore, HRP immunostaining indicated that these sensilla are innervated by the dendrite-like structures from multiple neurons. Finally, we functionally characterized neural responses in these sensilla using single sensillum recordings. Stimulation with a panel of 142 monomolecular odorants revealed that these sensilla indeed house functional olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs. While it remains to be determined what role these chemosensory sensilla play in odor and gustatory guided behaviors, our data clearly demonstrate an olfactory function for neurons present in M. sexta ovipositor sensilla.

  1. Wnt signaling in the murine diastema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Ohazama, Atsushi; Choi, Hong Y.; Herz, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The correct number and shape of teeth are critical factors for an aesthetic and functional dentition. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating tooth number and shape are therefore important in orthodontics. Mice have only one incisor and three molars in each jaw quadrant that are divided by a tooth-less region, the diastema. Although mice lost teeth in the diastema during evolution, the remnants of the evolutionary lost teeth are observed as transient epithelial buds in the wild-type diastema during early stages of development. Shh and Fgf signaling pathways that are essential for tooth development have been shown to be repressed in the diastema. It remains unclear however how Wnt signaling, that is also required for tooth development, is regulated in the diastema. In this study we found that in the embryonic diastema, Wnt5a expression was observed in mesenchyme, whereas Wnt4 and Wnt10b were expressed in epithelium. The expression of Wnt6 and Wnt11 was found in both tissues. The Wnt co-receptor, Lrp6, was weakly expressed in the diastema overlapping with weak Lrp4 expression, a co-receptor that inhibits Wnt signaling. Secreted Wnt inihibitors Dkk1, Dkk2, and Dkk3 were also expressed in the diastema. Lrp4 mutant mice develop supernumerary teeth in the diastema that is accompanied by upregulation of Wnt signaling and Lrp6 expression. Wnt signaling is thus usually attenuated in the diastema by these secreted and membrane bound Wnt inhibitors. PMID:21531785

  2. Frizzled7: A Promising Achilles’ Heel for Targeting the Wnt Receptor Complex to Treat Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Phesse

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Frizzled7 is arguably the most studied member of the Frizzled family, which are the cognate Wnt receptors. Frizzled7 is highly conserved through evolution, from Hydra through to humans, and is expressed in diverse organisms, tissues and human disease contexts. Frizzled receptors can homo- or hetero-polymerise and associate with several co-receptors to transmit Wnt signalling. Notably, Frizzled7 can transmit signalling via multiple Wnt transduction pathways and bind to several different Wnt ligands, Frizzled receptors and co-receptors. These promiscuous binding and functional properties are thought to underlie the pivotal role Frizzled7 plays in embryonic developmental and stem cell function. Recent studies have identified that Frizzled7 is upregulated in diverse human cancers, and promotes proliferation, progression and invasion, and orchestrates cellular transitions that underscore cancer metastasis. Importantly, Frizzled7 is able to regulate Wnt signalling activity even in cancer cells which have mutations to down-stream signal transducers. In this review we discuss the various aspects of Frizzled7 signalling and function, and the implications these have for therapeutic targeting of Frizzled7 in cancer.

  3. Different HIV-1 env frames: gp120 and ASP (antisense protein) biosynthesis, and theirs co-variation tropic amino acid signatures in X4- and R5-viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimonte, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Antisense protein (ASP) is the new actor of viral life of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) although proposed above 20 years ago. The asp ORF is into complementary strand of the gp120/gp41 junction of env gene. The ASP biological role remains little known. Knowing the Env markers of viral tropism, a dataset of sequences (660 strains) was used to analyze the hypothetical ASP involvement in CCR5 (R5) and/or CXCR4 (X4) co-receptor interaction. Preliminarily, prevalence of ASP and gp120V3 mutations was performed; following association among mutations were elaborate. The classical V3 tropic-signatures were confirmed, and 36 R5- and 22 X4-tropic ASP mutations were found. Moreover, by analyzing the ASP sequences, 36 out of 179 amino acid positions significantly associated with different co-receptor usage were found. Several statistically significant associations between gp120V3 and ASP mutations were observed. The dendrogram showed the existence of a cluster associated with R5-usage and a large cluster associated with X4-usage. These results show that gp120V3 and specific amino acid changes in ASP are associated together with CXCR4 and/or CCR5-usage. These findings implement previous observations on unclear ASP functions. J. Med. Virol. 89:112-122, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Understanding Factors That Modulate the Establishment of HIV Latency in Resting CD4+ T-Cells In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny L Anderson

    Full Text Available Developing robust in vitro models of HIV latency is needed to better understand how latency is established, maintained and reversed. In this study, we examined the effects of donor variability, HIV titre and co-receptor usage on establishing HIV latency in vitro using two models of HIV latency. Using the CCL19 model of HIV latency, we found that in up to 50% of donors, CCL19 enhanced latent infection of resting CD4+ T-cells by CXCR4-tropic HIV in the presence of low dose IL-2. Increasing the infectious titre of CXCR4-tropic HIV increased both productive and latent infection of resting CD4+ T-cells. In a different model where myeloid dendritic cells (mDC were co-cultured with resting CD4+ T-cells, we observed a higher frequency of latently infected cells in vitro than CCL19-treated or unstimulated CD4+ T-cells in the presence of low dose IL-2. In the DC-T-cell model, latency was established with both CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic virus but higher titres of CCR5-tropic virus was required in most donors. The establishment of latency in vitro through direct infection of resting CD4+ T-cells is significantly enhanced by CCL19 and mDC, but the efficiency is dependent on virus titre, co-receptor usage and there is significant donor variability.

  5. Crystal structure of a complete ternary complex of T-cell receptor, peptide-MHC, and CD4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yiyuan; Wang, Xin Xiang; Mariuzza, Roy A [Maryland

    2012-07-11

    Adaptive immunity depends on specific recognition by a T-cell receptor (TCR) of an antigenic peptide bound to a major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecule on an antigen-presenting cell (APC). In addition, T-cell activation generally requires binding of this same pMHC to a CD4 or CD8 coreceptor. Here, we report the structure of a complete TCR-pMHC-CD4 ternary complex involving a human autoimmune TCR, a myelin-derived self-peptide bound to HLA-DR4, and CD4. The complex resembles a pointed arch in which TCR and CD4 are each tilted ~65° relative to the T-cell membrane. By precluding direct contacts between TCR and CD4, the structure explains how TCR and CD4 on the T cell can simultaneously, yet independently, engage the same pMHC on the APC. The structure, in conjunction with previous mutagenesis data, places TCR-associated CD3εγ and CD3εδ subunits, which transmit activation signals to the T cell, inside the TCR-pMHC-CD4 arch, facing CD4. By establishing anchor points for TCR and CD4 on the T-cell membrane, the complex provides a basis for understanding how the CD4 coreceptor focuses TCR on MHC to guide TCR docking on pMHC during thymic T-cell selection.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Using drug from mathematical perceptive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Amar Nath; Saha, Shubhankar; Roy, Priti Kumar

    2015-11-12

    Entry of acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus into the host immune cell involves the participation of various components of host and viral cell unit. These components may be categorized as attachment of the viral surface envelope protein subunit, gp120, to the CD4(+) receptor and chemokine coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4, present on T cell surface. The viral fusion protein, gp41, the second cleaved subunit of Env undergoes reconfiguration and the membrane fusion reaction itself. Since the CD4(+) T cell population is actively involved; the ultimate outcome of human immunodeficiency virus infection is total collapse of the host immune system. Mathematical modeling of the stages in viral membrane protein-host cell receptor-coreceptor interaction and the effect of antibody vaccine on the viral entry into the susceptible host cell has been carried out using as impulsive differential equations. We have studied the effect of antibody vaccination and determined analytically the threshold value of drug dosage and dosing interval for optimum levels of infection. We have also investigated the effect of perfect adherence of drug dose on the immune cell count in extreme cases and observed that systematic drug dosage of the immune cells leads to longer and improved lives.

  7. Inhibition of HIV type 1 infection with a RANTES-IgG3 fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challita-Eid, P M; Klimatcheva, E; Day, B T; Evans, T; Dreyer, K; Rimel, B J; Rosenblatt, J D; Planelles, V

    1998-12-20

    The natural ligands for the chemokine receptors CCR5 (RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta) and CXCR4 (SDF-1) can act as potent inhibitors of infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at the level of viral entry. Unlike antibody-mediated inhibition, chemokine-mediated inhibition is broadly effective. Different HIV-1 strains can utilize the same coreceptor(s) for viral entry and, therefore, can be blocked by the same chemokine(s). HIV-1 strains that are highly resistant to neutralization by V3-specific antibodies are sensitive to inhibition by chemokines. Therefore, the use of chemokine-derived molecules constitutes a potential therapeutic approach to prevent infection by HIV-1. We have generated a fusion protein between RANTES and human IgG3 (RANTES-IgG3). The effectiveness of RANTES-IgG3 inhibition of infection by HIV-1 was similar to that of rRANTES. Inhibition of HIV-1 by RANTES-IgG3 was specific for CCR5-dependent but not CXCR4-dependent HIV-1 isolates. Fusion of a chemokine to an IgG moiety offers two desirable properties with respect to the recombinant chemokine alone. First, IgG fusion proteins have extended half-lives in vivo. Second, molecules with IgG heavy chain moieties may be able to cross the placenta and potentially induce fetal protection.

  8. Cord blood Vα24-Vβ11 natural killer T cells display a Th2-chemokine receptor profile and cytokine responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Harner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fetal immune system is characterized by a Th2 bias but it is unclear how the Th2 predominance is established. Natural killer T (NKT cells are a rare subset of T cells with immune regulatory functions and are already activated in utero. To test the hypothesis that NKT cells are part of the regulatory network that sets the fetal Th2 predominance, percentages of Vα24(+Vβ11(+ NKT cells expressing Th1/Th2-related chemokine receptors (CKR were assessed in cord blood. Furthermore, IL-4 and IFN-γ secreting NKT cells were quantified within the single CKR(+ subsets. RESULTS: Cord blood NKT cells expressed the Th2-related CCR4 and CCR8 at significantly higher frequencies compared to peripheral blood NKT cells from adults, while CXCR3(+ and CCR5(+ cord blood NKT cells (Th1-related were present at lower percentages. Within CD4(negCD8(neg (DN NKT cells, the frequency of IL-4 producing NKT cells was significantly higher in cord blood, while frequencies of IFN-γ secreting DN NKT cells tended to be lower. A further subanalysis showed that the higher percentage of IL-4 secreting DN NKT cells was restricted to CCR3(+, CCR4(+, CCR5(+, CCR6(+, CCR7(+, CCR8(+ and CXCR4(+ DN subsets in cord blood. This resulted in significantly decreased IFN-γ /IL-4 ratios of CCR3(+, CCR6(+ and CCR8(+ cord blood DN NKT cells. Sequencing of VA24AJ18 T cell receptor (TCR transcripts in sorted cord blood Vα24Vβ11 cells confirmed the invariant TCR alpha-chain ruling out the possibility that these cells represent an unusual subset of conventional T cells. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the heterogeneity of cord blood NKT cells, we observed a clear Th2-bias at the phenotypic and functional level which was mainly found in the DN subset. Therefore, we speculate that NKT cells are important for the initiation and control of the fetal Th2 environment which is needed to maintain tolerance towards self-antigens as well as non-inherited maternal antigens.

  9. Characterisation of SNP haplotype structure in chemokine and chemokine receptor genes using CEPH pedigrees and statistical estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Vanessa J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chemokine signals and their cell-surface receptors are important modulators of HIV-1 disease and cancer. To aid future case/control association studies, aim to further characterise the haplotype structure of variation in chemokine and chemokine receptor genes. To perform haplotype analysis in a population-based association study, haplotypes must be determined by estimation, in the absence of family information or laboratory methods to establish phase. Here, test the accuracy of estimates of haplotype frequency and linkage disequilibrium by comparing estimated haplotypes generated with the expectation maximisation (EM algorithm to haplotypes determined from Centre d'Etude Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH pedigree data. To do this, they have characterised haplotypes comprising alleles at 11 biallelic loci in four chemokine receptor genes (CCR3, CCR2, CCR5 and CCRL2, which span 150 kb on chromosome 3p21, and haplotyes of nine biallelic loci in six chemokine genes [MCP-1(CCL2, Eotaxin(CCL11, RANTES(CCL5, MPIF-1(CCL23, PARC(CCL18 and MIP-1α(CCL3 ] on chromosome 17q11-12. Forty multi-generation CEPH families, totalling 489 individuals, were genotyped by the TaqMan 5'-nuclease assay. Phased haplotypes and haplotypes estimated from unphased genotypes were compared in 103 grandparents who were assumed to have mated at random. For the 3p21 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data, haplotypes determined by pedigree analysis and haplotypes generated by the EM algorithm were nearly identical. Linkage disequilibrium, measured by the D' statistic, was nearly maximal across the 150 kb region, with complete disequilibrium maintained at the extremes between CCR3-Y17Y and CCRL2-1243V. D'-values calculated from estimated haplotypes on 3p21 had high concordance with pairwise comparisons between pedigree-phased chromosomes. Conversely, there was less agreement between analyses of haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium using estimated haplotypes when

  10. Evidence of positive selection at codon sites localized in extracellular domains of mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metzger Kelsey J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CC chemokine receptor proteins (CCR1 through CCR10 are seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors whose signaling pathways are known for their important roles coordinating immune system responses through targeted trafficking of white blood cells. In addition, some of these receptors have been identified as fusion proteins for viral pathogens: for example, HIV-1 strains utilize CCR5, CCR2 and CCR3 proteins to obtain cellular entry in humans. The extracellular domains of these receptor proteins are involved in ligand-binding specificity as well as pathogen recognition interactions. In mammals, the majority of chemokine receptor genes are clustered together; in humans, seven of the ten genes are clustered in the 3p21-24 chromosome region. Gene conversion events, or exchange of DNA sequence between genes, have been reported in chemokine receptor paralogs in various mammalian lineages, especially between the cytogenetically closely located pairs CCR2/5 and CCR1/3. Datasets of mammalian orthologs for each gene were analyzed separately to minimize the potential confounding impact of analyzing highly similar sequences resulting from gene conversion events. Molecular evolution approaches and the software package Phylogenetic Analyses by Maximum Likelihood (PAML were utilized to investigate the signature of selection that has acted on the mammalian CC chemokine receptor (CCR gene family. The results of neutral vs. adaptive evolution (positive selection hypothesis testing using Site Models are reported. In general, positive selection is defined by a ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide changes (dN/dS, or ω >1. Results Of the ten mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor sequence datasets analyzed, only CCR2 and CCR3 contain amino acid codon sites that exhibit evidence of positive selection using site based hypothesis testing in PAML. Nineteen of the twenty codon sites putatively indentified as likely to be under positive

  11. Effects of anti-inflammatory and Rehmanniae radix pharmacopuncture on atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Yook, Tae-Han

    2013-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by pruritic and erythematous skin lesions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the suppressive effects of anti-inflammatory and Rehmanniae radix pharmacopuncture on the development of AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. The AD was induced on the mice's back skin by using biostir AD. The experimental groups were divided into three groups, PPI (anti-inflammatory pharmacopuncture), PPII (Rehmanniae radix pharmacopuncture, hydrodistillation extraction) and PPIII (Rehmanniae radix pharmacopuncture, MeOH extraction). All mice were treated using a 1-mL syringe to inject 0.1 mL of pharmacopuncture at right and left acupoints (BL13) on alternate days. In the control group, normal saline was used instead of pharmacopuncture. The following factors were investigated: (1) optical observations made with a handscope and clinical skin scores were evaluated; (2) tissue (general/immune) mast cells and CCR3(+) eosinophils, as well as vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and epidermal growth factor immunoreactive changes were evaluated; (3) CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in the spleen were immunohistochemically examined; and, (4) the serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E level and lymphokines [interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4] were measured. In the PPI and the PPIII groups, the clinical skin score, total number of mast cells, CCR3(+) eosinophils immunoreaction, and total serum IgE, IL-2, and IL-4 levels were lower than the control group. The PPI and the PPIII groups also showed strong immunohistochemical reactions for vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor. The PPI group particularly showed a very strong immunohistochemical reaction for epidermal growth factor. All groups showed strong immune activity for CD8(+). The PPIII group showed strong immunity for both CD4(+) and CD8(+). From the above results, Rehmanniae radix pharmacopuncture (MeOH extraction) and anti

  12. Role of SPI-1 secreted effectors in acute bovine response to Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium: a systems biology analysis approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara D Lawhon

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium causes enterocolitis with diarrhea and polymorphonuclear cell (PMN influx into the intestinal mucosa in humans and calves. The Salmonella Type III Secretion System (T3SS encoded at Pathogenicity Island I translocates Salmonella effector proteins SipA, SopA, SopB, SopD, and SopE2 into epithelial cells and is required for induction of diarrhea. These effector proteins act together to induce intestinal fluid secretion and transcription of C-X-C chemokines, recruiting PMNs to the infection site. While individual molecular interactions of the effectors with cultured host cells have been characterized, their combined role in intestinal fluid secretion and inflammation is less understood. We hypothesized that comparison of the bovine intestinal mucosal response to wild type Salmonella and a SipA, SopABDE2 effector mutant relative to uninfected bovine ileum would reveal heretofore unidentified diarrhea-associated host cellular pathways. To determine the coordinated effects of these virulence factors, a bovine ligated ileal loop model was used to measure responses to wild type S. Typhimurium (WT and a ΔsipA, sopABDE2 mutant (MUT across 12 hours of infection using a bovine microarray. Data were analyzed using standard microarray analysis and a dynamic bayesian network modeling approach (DBN. Both analytical methods confirmed increased expression of immune response genes to Salmonella infection and novel gene expression. Gene expression changes mapped to 219 molecular interaction pathways and 1620 gene ontology groups. Bayesian network modeling identified effects of infection on several interrelated signaling pathways including MAPK, Phosphatidylinositol, mTOR, Calcium, Toll-like Receptor, CCR3, Wnt, TGF-β, and Regulation of Actin Cytoskeleton and Apoptosis that were used to model of host-pathogen interactions. Comparison of WT and MUT demonstrated significantly different patterns of host response

  13. mRNA Expression of Chemokine Receptors on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Correlation with Clinical Features in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-mei Li; Zhi-qiang Chen; Xu Yao; Ai-zhen Yang; An-sheng Li; Dong-ming Liu; Juan-qin Gong

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expressions of chemokine receptors and interleukin (1L) receptors on the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and their correlations with clinical features as well as SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI).Methods The mRNA expressions of ehemokine receptors and IL receptors on PBMCs of 93 SLE patients and 30 healthy controls were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, including CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCRS, CCR6, CCR8, CXCR3, CXCRS, CX3CR1, XCR1, IL-4R, and IL-10R. The clinical features of SLE patients were recorded. The correlations of chemokine receptors and IL receptors mRNA expressions with clinical features as well as SLEDAI were assayed using linear regression analysis.Results The level of CCR5 mRNA in SLE patients (including active and inactive SLE) was signifi-cantly higher than that in healthy controls (P0.05). CX3CR1 mRNA expression significantly increased from healthy control to inactive SLE to active SLE in sequence. The others (except for CCR8, CXCR3, and IL-10R) in active SLE patients were significantly higher than those in both inactive SLE patients and healthy controls (all P<0.05). There were positive correlations between SLEDAI and CCR2 (r=0.424, t=4.313, P<0.001), CCR3 (r=0.518, t=5.410, P<0.001), CCR4 (r=0.376, t=3.851, P<0.001), CCR6 (r=0.457, t=4.513, P<0.001), CXCR5 (r=0.455, t=4.629, P<0.001), CX3CR1 (r=0.445, t=4.523, P<0.001), as well as XCR1 (r=0.540, t=5.445, P<0.001). And CCR5 mRNA expression level was positively correlated with IL-4R mRNA (r=0.313, t=2.353, P<0.05). The patients with myositis and cutaneous vasculitis simultaneously showed lower levels of CCR5 and CX3CR1, and CCR5 expression was negatively correlated with the scores of SLEDAI in SLE cases accompanied by photosensitivity (r=0.426, t=-2.155, P<0.05).Conclusion Increased expressions of CCR5 and CX3CR1 on PBMCs may be indicators in clinical survey for SLE.

  14. Productive infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by feline immunodeficiency virus: implications for vector development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J; Power, C

    1999-03-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 10(1.3) to 10(2.1) 50% tissue culture infective doses/10(6) cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy.

  15. Anti-Inflammatory and Immune-Regulatory Effects of Subcutaneous Perillae fructus Extract Injections on OVA-Induced Asthma in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Kyoung Yim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Perillae fructus (perilla seed is a traditional medicinal herb used to treat bronchial asthma in Oriental medical clinics. ST36 is one of the most widely used acupuncture points, particularly for immune system regulation. Injection of an herbal extract into an acupuncture point (herbal acupuncture is a therapeutic technique combining both acupuncture and herbal treatment. Perillae fructus extract was injected subcutaneously (Perillae fructus herbal acupuncture; PF-HA at acupoint ST36 of OVA-induced asthmatic mice. The lung weight, bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF cell count, the number of CCR3+, CD11b+, CD4+ and CD3e+/CD69+ cells in the lung, and the level of IgE, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 in BALF and serum were then measured. RT-PCR was used to measure the mRNA expression of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and TNF-α in the lung. Lung sections were analyzed histologically. PF-HA significantly reduced lung weight, the number of inflammatory cells in the lung and BALF, the levels of IgE and Th2 cytokines in BALF and serum, mRNA expression of Th2 cytokines in the lung, and pathological changes in lung tissue. Our results suggest that PF-HA may have an anti-inflammatory and immune-regulatory effect on bronchial allergic asthma by restoring the Th1/Th2 imbalance in the immune system and suppressing eosinophilic inflammation in airways.

  16. An extra-ribosomal function of ribosomal protein L13a in macrophage resolves inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Darshana; Basu, Abhijit; Baldwin, William; Kondratov, Roman V; Barik, Sailen; Mazumder, Barsanjit

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is an obligatory attempt of the immune system to protect the host from infections. However, unregulated synthesis of pro-inflammatory products can have detrimental effects. Although mechanisms that lead to inflammation are well appreciated, those that restrain it are not adequately understood. Creating macrophage-specific L13a-knockout (KO) mice here we report that depletion of ribosomal protein L13a abrogates the endogenous translation control of several chemokines in macrophages. Upon LPS-induced endotoxemia these animals displayed symptoms of severe inflammation caused by widespread infiltration of macrophages in major organs causing tissue injury and reduced survival rates. Macrophages from these KO animals show unregulated expression of several chemokines e.g. CXCL13, CCL22, CCL8 and CCR3. These macrophages failed to show L13a-dependent RNA binding complex formation on target mRNAs. In addition, increased polyribosomal abundance of these mRNAs shows a defect in translation control in the macrophages. Thus, our studies provide the first evidence of an essential extra-ribosomal function of ribosomal protein L13a in resolving physiological inflammation in a mammalian host. PMID:23460747

  17. The role of the eosinophil-selective chemokine, eotaxin, in allergic and non-allergic airways inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conroy Dolores M

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood eosinophilia and tissue infiltration by eosinophils are frequently observed in allergic inflammation and parasitic infections. This selective accumulation of eosinophils suggested the existence of endogenous eosinophil-selective chemoattractants. We have recently discovered a novel eosinophil-selective chemoattractant which we called eotaxin in an animal model of allergic airways disease. Eotaxin is generated in both allergic and non-allergic bronchopulmonary inflammation. The early increase in eotaxin paralled eosinophil infiltration in the lung tissue in both models. An antibody to IL-5 suppressed lung eosinophilia, correlating with an inhibition of eosinophil release from bone marrow, without affecting eotaxin generation. This suggests that endogenous IL-5 is important for eosinophil migration but does not appear to be a stimulus for eotaxin production. Constitutive levels of eotaxin observed in guinea-pig lung may be responsible for the basal lung eosinophilia observed in this species. Allergen-induced eotaxin was present mainly in the epithelium and alveolar macrophages, as detected by immunostaining. In contrast there was no upregulation of eotaxin by the epithelial cells following the injection of Sephadex beads and the alveolar macrophage and mononuclear cells surrounding the granuloma were the predominant positive staining cells. Eotaxin and related chemokines acting through the CCR3 receptor may play a major role in eosinophil recruitment in allergic inflammation and parasitic diseases and thus offer an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

  18. [Variations in a 24-year period of colorectal and gastric cancer in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Trujillo, José Luis; Vargas, Florencia; Torres Villalobos, Gonzalo; Milke, Pilar; Villalobos Pérez, José de Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer (CG) and colorectal cancer (CCR) are the two most common neoplasms of the digestive system in the world. We performed a study to determine incidence and relation between CG and CCR in five hospitals in Mexico City. Patients with admitted diagnosis of CG and CCR at Hospital General de Mexico, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Hospital Español de México, Centro Médico Nacional "20 de Noviembre" from the Instituto de Salud y Seguridad Social para Trabajadores del Estado, and Hospital Central Militar from January 1978 to December 2001 were studied. A total of 7,136 patients were studied. (CG 3,830, CCR 3,306). At Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición "Salvador Zubirán" CG was the most common digestive neoplasm; from 1999, ratio was inverted to Hospital General de México, from the beginning and until 1984, ratio was > 2, and later had an average of 1.31. For Hospital Español, ratio always was Hospital Central Militar ratio was constant, > CG. At the beginning, was global behavior > CG, ratio seemed to invert, but since 1998 CG/CCR ratio was hospitals.

  19. CCL5 and CCR5 interaction promotes cell motility in human osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Wei Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteosarcoma is characterized by a high malignant and metastatic potential. CCL5 (previously called RANTES was originally recognized as a product of activated T cells, and plays a crucial role in the migration and metastasis of human cancer cells. It has been reported that the effect of CCL5 is mediated via CCR receptors. However, the effect of CCL5 on migration activity and integrin expression in human osteosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we found that CCL5 increased the migration and expression of αvβ3 integrin in human osteosarcoma cells. Stimulation of cells with CCL5 increased CCR5 but not CCR1 and CCR3 expression. CCR5 mAb, inhibitor, and siRNA reduced the CCL5-enhanced the migration and integrin up-regulation of osteosarcoma cells. Activations of MEK, ERK, and NF-κB pathways after CCL5 treatment were demonstrated, and CCL5-induced expression of integrin and migration activity was inhibited by the specific inhibitor and mutant of MEK, ERK, and NF-κB cascades. In addition, over-expression of CCL5 shRNA inhibited the migratory ability and integrin expression in osteosarcoma cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CCL5 and CCR5 interaction acts through MEK, ERK, which in turn activates NF-κB, resulting in the activations of αvβ3 integrin and contributing the migration of human osteosarcoma cells.

  20. A role for MCP-1/CCR2 in interstitial lung disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhardt Dietrich

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial lung diseases (ILD are chronic inflammatory disorders leading to pulmonary fibrosis. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 promotes collagen synthesis and deletion of the MCP-1 receptor CCR2 protects from pulmonary fibrosis in ILD mouse models. We hypothesized that pulmonary MCP-1 and CCR2+ T cells accumulate in pediatric ILD and are related to disease severity. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was obtained from 25 children with ILD and 10 healthy children. Levels of pulmonary MCP-1 and Th1/Th2-associated cytokines were quantified at the protein and the mRNA levels. Pulmonary CCR2+, CCR4+, CCR3+, CCR5+ and CXCR3+ T cells were quantified by flow-cytometry. Results CCR2+ T cells and MCP-1 levels were significantly elevated in children with ILD and correlated with forced vital capacity, total lung capacity and ILD disease severity scores. Children with lung fibrosis had significantly higher MCP-1 levels and CCR2+ T cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared to non-fibrotic children. Conclusion The results indicate that pulmonary CCR2+ T cells and MCP-1 contribute to the pathogenesis of pediatric ILD and might provide a novel target for therapeutic strategies.

  1. Preparation and identification of Per a 5 as a novel American cockroach allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ji-Fu; Yang, Haiwei; Li, Dongning; Gao, Peisong; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) from various arthropods can elicit allergic reactions. In the present study, Per a 5, a GST, was cloned from American cockroach (CR) and expressed in both baculovirus-infected insect cell (iPer a 5) and E. coli expression (bPer a 5) systems. The secondary structures were predicted to be 45.93 and 8.69% of α-helix β-sheets in iPer a 5 and 42.54 and 8.49% of α-helix and β-sheets in bPer a 5, respectively. It is found that 4 out of 16 (25%) sera from American CR allergy patients reacted to both bPer a 9 and iPer a 9 as assessed by ELISA and Western blotting analysis, confirming that Per a 5 is not a major allergen of American CR. Induction of upregulated expression of CD63 and CCR3 on passively sensitized human basophils (sera from American CR allergy patients) by approximately up to 4.5- and 3.2-fold indicates that iPer a 5 and bPer a 5 are functionally active. Recombinant Per a 5 (rPer a 5) should be a useful tool for studying and understanding the role of Per a 5 in CR allergy.

  2. Gene transcription in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from disparate populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Lizabeth; Miles, A. Keith; Waters, Shannon C.; Meyerson, Randi; Rode, Karyn D.; Atwood, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    Polar bears in the Beaufort (SB) and Chukchi (CS) Seas experience different environments due primarily to a longer history of sea ice loss in the Beaufort Sea. Ecological differences have been identified as a possible reason for the generally poorer body condition and reproduction of Beaufort polar bears compared to those from the Chukchi, but the influence of exposure to other stressors remains unknown. We use molecular technology, quantitative PCR, to identify gene transcription differences among polar bears from the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas as well as captive healthy polar bears. We identified significant transcriptional differences among a priori groups (i.e., captive bears, SB 2012, SB 2013, CS 2013) for ten of the 14 genes of interest (i.e., CaM, HSP70, CCR3, TGFβ, COX2, THRα, T-bet, Gata3, CD69, and IL17); transcription levels of DRβ, IL1β, AHR, and Mx1 did not differ among groups. Multivariate analysis also demonstrated separation among the groups of polar bears. Specifically, we detected transcript profiles consistent with immune function impairment in polar bears from the Beaufort Sea, when compared with Chukchi and captive polar bears. Although there is no strong indication of differential exposure to contaminants or pathogens between CS and SB bears, there are clearly differences in important transcriptional responses between populations. Further investigation is warranted to refine interpretation of potential effects of described stress-related conditions for the SB population.

  3. Co-existence of Echinococcus granulosus infection and cancer metastasis in the liver correlates with reduced Th1 immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhan, N; Esendagli, G; Ozkayar, O; Tunali, G; Sokmensuer, C; Abbasoglu, O

    2015-01-01

    A possible relationship between cancer and Echinococcus granulosus infection has been postulated. As T cells are critical players in immune responses against both infections and malignancies, in an experimental model of secondary echinococcosis and breast cancer, this study aims to observe the progression of cancer and to determine the characters of T-cell responses. 4T1 breast tumour cells were subcutaneously injected into mammary region, whereas protoscoleces were intraperitoneally inoculated into the mice. Hydatid cysts, tumours and metastases were determined with macroscopic and histopathological evaluation. T cells found in spleen, liver and tumour were characterised by flow cytometric analysis of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25, CCR5, CCR3, IL-4 and IFN-γ. In the mice inoculated both with protoscoleces and with breast tumour cells, increased frequency of cancer metastasis was observed in the liver. The amount of CD4(+) T cells was increased in the liver and in the spleen of mice infected with E. granulosus. However, co-existence of echinococcosis and metastatic lesions in the liver was associated with significant reduction in the IFN-γ(+) and CCR5(+) Th1 cells and increase in the CD25(+) T cells. Our results may indicate an immunological link between cystic echinococcosis and cancer that allows tumour metastasis to flourish in the liver.

  4. Effect of the Content of Mo2 C on the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Ti(C,N) Based Cermet%Mo2C含量对Ti(C,N)基陶瓷力学性能和显微结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何林; 黄传真; 黄勤; 宋世学; 王随莲; 艾兴

    2003-01-01

    采用热压烧结工艺制备了添加微量Cr3C2的Ti(C0.5N0.5)-(Ni-Co)-Mo2C-Cr3C2系Ti(C,N)基金属陶瓷.分析三种不同Mo2C含量材料的力学性能、断口形貌和磨削表面压痕裂纹扩展情况,研究表明:材料的断裂均以沿晶断裂为主;材料的抗弯强度与Rim相有关,8wt%Mo2C含量的金属陶瓷Rim相厚度适中,抗弯强度高;1.6wt%Mo2C含量的金属陶瓷的扩展裂纹短,裂纹扩展发生偏转,断裂韧性高.

  5. Possible Roles of CC- and CXC-Chemokines in Regulating Bovine Endometrial Function during Early Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Sakumoto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the possible roles of chemokines in regulating bovine endometrial function during early pregnancy. The expression of six chemokines, including CCL2, CCL8, CCL11, CCL14, CCL16, and CXCL10, was higher in the endometrium at 15 and 18 days of pregnancy than at the same days in non-pregnant animals. Immunohistochemical staining showed that chemokine receptors (CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, and CXCR3 were expressed in the epithelial cells and glandular epithelial cells of the bovine endometrium as well as in the fetal trophoblast obtained from a cow on day 18 of pregnancy. The addition of interferon-τ (IFNT to an endometrial tissue culture system increased CCL8 and CXCL10 expression in the tissues, but did not affect CCL2, CCL11, and CCL16 expression. CCL14 expression by these tissues was inhibited by IFNT. CCL16, but not other chemokines, clearly stimulated interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15 and myxovirus-resistance gene 1 (MX1 expression in these tissues. Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 expression decreased after stimulation with CCL8 and CCL14, and oxytocin receptor (OTR expression was decreased by CCL2, CCL8, CCL14, and CXCL10. Collectively, the expression of chemokine genes is increased in the endometrium during early pregnancy. These genes may contribute to the regulation of endometrial function by inhibiting COX2 and OTR expression, subsequently decreasing prostaglandin production and preventing luteolysis in cows.

  6. Alterations in junctional proteins, inflammatory mediators and extracellular matrix molecules in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange M; Al-Tawil, Youhanna; Gyftopoulos, Alex A; Brown, Karen L; Hansen, Molly; Butcher, Kathy F; Eidelwein, Alexandra P; Noel, Robert A; Rabon, Edd; Posta, Allison; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2013-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an inflammatory atopic disease of the esophagus, causes massive eosinophil infiltration, basal cell hyperplasia, and sub-epithelial fibrosis. To elucidate cellular and molecular factors involved in esophageal tissue damage and remodeling, we examined pinch biopsies from EoE and normal pediatric patients. An inflammation gene array confirmed that eotaxin-3, its receptor CCR3 and interleukins IL-13 and IL-5 were upregulated. An extracellular matrix (ECM) gene array revealed upregulation of CD44 & CD54, and of ECM proteases (ADAMTS1 & MMP14). A cytokine antibody array showed a marked decrease in IL-1α and IL-1 receptor antagonist and an increase in eotaxin-2 and epidermal growth factor. Western analysis indicated reduced expression of intercellular junction proteins, E-cadherin and claudin-1 and increased expression of occludin and vimentin. We have identified a number of novel genes and proteins whose expression is altered in EoE. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the disease.

  7. Effect of pretreatment with different concertrations of morphine, fentanyl and tramadol on the differentiation of human helper T cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanning Qian; Wenjie Jin; Ping Chen; Ling Wang; Huijuan Wang; Yuke Tian; Xuejun Zhou

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and compare theeffects of different concentrations of morphine, fentanyl and tramadol on the differentiation of human adult helper T cells in vitro. Methods: Twenty out-patients without immune disease were selected and their peripheral blood was collected. Then the whole blood of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were pretreated with different concentration of morphine, fentanyl and tramadol for 24 h. The level of CD4+ IFN-γ+ IL-2+/CD4+ IL-4+ IL-10+ was analyzed by three-color flow cytometry, and the CD4 + CCR5 + and CD4 + CCR3 + cells were counted to observe the imbalance of Th2/Th2. Results:The number of Th2 increased significantly and the ratio of Th2/Th2 decreased dramatically compared with the control group, and there was a dose-dependent fashion in all drugs. Conclusion: Morphine, fentanyl and tramadol can direct Th0 cells toward Th2 differentiation,especially morphine and fentanyl.

  8. The near vacuum hohlraum campaign at the NIF: A new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Turnbull, D.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ho, D.; Ross, J. S.; Khan, S.; Pak, A.; Dewald, E.; Benedetti, L. R.; Nagel, S.; Biener, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Yeamans, C.; Michel, P.; Schneider, M.; Kozioziemski, B.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Haan, S.; Izumi, N.; Hatarik, R.; Sterne, P.; Celliers, P.; Ralph, J.; Rygg, R.; Strozzi, D.; Kilkenny, J.; Rosenberg, M.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sio, H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Frenje, J.; Petrasso, R.; Zylstra, A.; Town, R.; Hurricane, O.; Nikroo, A.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    The near vacuum campaign on the National Ignition Facility has concentrated its efforts over the last year on finding the optimum target geometry to drive a symmetric implosion at high convergence ratio (30×). As the hohlraum walls are not tamped with gas, the hohlraum is filling with gold plasma and the challenge resides in depositing enough energy in the hohlraum before it fills up. Hohlraum filling is believed to cause symmetry swings late in the pulse that are detrimental to the symmetry of the hot spot at high convergence. This paper describes a series of experiments carried out to examine the effect of increasing the distance between the hohlraum wall and the capsule (case to capsule ratio) on the symmetry of the hot spot. These experiments have shown that smaller Case to Capsule Ratio (CCR of 2.87 and 3.1) resulted in oblate implosions that could not be tuned round. Larger CCR (3.4) led to a prolate implosion at convergence 30× implying that inner beam propagation at large CCR is not impeded by the expanding hohlraum plasma. A Case to Capsule ratio of 3.4 is a promising geometry to design a round implosion but in a smaller hohlraum where the hohlraum losses are lower, enabling a wider cone fraction range to adjust symmetry.

  9. The near vacuum hohlraum campaign at the NIF: A new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Turnbull, D.; Ho, D.; Ross, J. S.; Khan, S.; Pak, A.; Dewald, E.; Benedetti, L. R.; Nagel, S.; Biener, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Yeamans, C.; Michel, P.; Schneider, M.; Kozioziemski, B.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2016-05-15

    The near vacuum campaign on the National Ignition Facility has concentrated its efforts over the last year on finding the optimum target geometry to drive a symmetric implosion at high convergence ratio (30×). As the hohlraum walls are not tamped with gas, the hohlraum is filling with gold plasma and the challenge resides in depositing enough energy in the hohlraum before it fills up. Hohlraum filling is believed to cause symmetry swings late in the pulse that are detrimental to the symmetry of the hot spot at high convergence. This paper describes a series of experiments carried out to examine the effect of increasing the distance between the hohlraum wall and the capsule (case to capsule ratio) on the symmetry of the hot spot. These experiments have shown that smaller Case to Capsule Ratio (CCR of 2.87 and 3.1) resulted in oblate implosions that could not be tuned round. Larger CCR (3.4) led to a prolate implosion at convergence 30× implying that inner beam propagation at large CCR is not impeded by the expanding hohlraum plasma. A Case to Capsule ratio of 3.4 is a promising geometry to design a round implosion but in a smaller hohlraum where the hohlraum losses are lower, enabling a wider cone fraction range to adjust symmetry.

  10. Evolution of CCL11: genetic characterization in lagomorphs and evidence of positive and purifying selection in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Fabiana; Abrantes, Joana; Esteves, Pedro J

    2016-07-01

    The interactions between chemokines and their receptors are crucial for differentiation and activation of inflammatory cells. CC chemokine ligand 11 (CCL11) binds to CCR3 and to CCR5 that in leporids underwent gene conversion with CCR2. Here, we genetically characterized CCL11 in lagomorphs (leporids and pikas). All lagomorphs have a potentially functional CCL11, and the Pygmy rabbit has a mutation in the stop codon that leads to a longer protein. Other mammals also have mutations at the stop codon that result in proteins with different lengths. By employing maximum likelihood methods, we observed that, in mammals, CCL11 exhibits both signatures of purifying and positive selection. Signatures of purifying selection were detected in sites important for receptor binding and activation. Of the three sites detected as under positive selection, two were located close to the stop codon. Our results suggest that CCL11 is functional in all lagomorphs, and that the signatures of purifying and positive selection in mammalian CCL11 probably reflect the protein's biological roles. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Development of a rapid cell-fusion-based phenotypic HIV-1 tropism assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phairote Teeranaipong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A dual split reporter protein system (DSP, recombining Renilla luciferase (RL and green fluorescent protein (GFP split into two different constructs (DSP1–7 and DSP8–11, was adapted to create a novel rapid phenotypic tropism assay (PTA for HIV-1 infection (DSP-Pheno. Methods: DSP1–7 was stably expressed in the glioma-derived NP-2 cell lines, which expressed CD4/CXCR4 (N4X4 or CD4/CCR5 (N4R5, respectively. An expression vector with DSP8–11 (pRE11 was constructed. The HIV-1 envelope genes were subcloned in pRE11 (pRE11-env and transfected into 293FT cells. Transfected 293FT cells were incubated with the indicator cell lines independently. In developing the assay, we selected the DSP1–7-positive clones that showed the highest GFP activity after complementation with DSP8–11. These cell lines, designated N4R5-DSP1–7, N4X4-DSP1–7 were used for subsequent assays. Results: The env gene from the reference strains (BaL for R5 virus, NL4-3 for X4 virus, SF2 for dual tropic virus subcloned in pRE11 and tested, was concordant with the expected co-receptor usage. Assay results were available in two ways (RL or GFP. The assay sensitivity by RL activity was comparable with those of the published phenotypic assays using pseudovirus. The shortest turnaround time was 5 days after obtaining the patient's plasma. All clinical samples gave positive RL signals on R5 indicator cells in the fusion assay. Median RLU value of the low CD4 group was significantly higher on X4 indicator cells and suggested the presence of more dual or X4 tropic viruses in this group of patients. Comparison of representative samples with Geno2Pheno [co-receptor] assay was concordant. Conclusions: A new cell-fusion-based, high-throughput PTA for HIV-1, which would be suitable for in-house studies, was developed. Equipped with two-way reporter system, RL and GFP, DSP-Pheno is a sensitive test with short turnaround time. Although maintenance of cell lines and

  12. Evolution of SIV toward RANTES resistance in macaques rapidly progressing to AIDS upon coinfection with HHV-6A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallo Robert C

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progression to AIDS is often associated with the evolution of HIV-1 toward increased virulence and/or pathogenicity. Evidence suggests that a virulence factor for HIV-1 is resistance to CCR5-binding chemokines, most notably RANTES, which are believed to play a role in HIV-1 control in vivo. HIV-1 can achieve RANTES resistance either by phenotypic switching from an exclusive CCR5 usage to an expanded coreceptor specificity, or by the acquisition of alternative modalities of CCR5 usage. An infectious agent that might promote the evolution of HIV-1 toward RANTES resistance is human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A, which is frequently reactivated in HIV-1-infected patients and is a potent RANTES inducer in lymphoid tissue. Results SIV isolates obtained from pig-tailed macaques (M. nemestrina after approximately one year of single infection with SIVsmE660 or dual infection with SIVsmE660 and HHV-6AGS were characterized for their growth capacity and sensitivity to HHV-6A- and RANTES-mediated inhibition in human or macaque lymphoid tissues ex vivo. Four out of 4 HHV-6A-coinfected macaques, all of which progressed to full-blown AIDS within 2 years of infection, were found to harbor SIV variants with a reduced sensitivity to both HHV-6A and RANTES, despite maintaining an exclusive CCR5 coreceptor specificity; viruses derived from two of these animals replicated even more vigorously in the presence of exogenous HHV-6A or RANTES. The SIV variants that emerged in HHV-6A-coinfected macaques showed an overall reduced ex vivo replication capacity that was partially reversed upon addition of exogenous RANTES, associated with suppressed IL-2 and enhanced IFN-γ production. In contrast, SIV isolates obtained from two singly-infected macaques, none of which progressed to AIDS, maintained HHV-6A/RANTES sensitivity, whereas the only AIDS progressor among singly-infected macaques developed an SIV variant with partial HHV-6A/RANTES resistance and increased

  13. Complementation of diverse HIV-1 Env defects through cooperative subunit interactions: a general property of the functional trimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salzwedel Karl

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 Env glycoprotein mediates virus entry by catalyzing direct fusion between the virion membrane and the target cell plasma membrane. Env is composed of two subunits: gp120, which binds to CD4 and the coreceptor, and gp41, which is triggered upon coreceptor binding to promote the membrane fusion reaction. Env on the surface of infected cells is a trimer consisting of three gp120/gp41 homo-dimeric protomers. An emerging question concerns cooperative interactions between the protomers in the trimer, and possible implications for Env function. Results We extended studies on cooperative subunit interactions within the HIV-1 Env trimer, using analysis of functional complementation between coexpressed inactive variants harboring different functional deficiencies. In assays of Env-mediated cell fusion, complementation was observed between variants with a wide range of defects in both the gp120 and gp41 subunits. The former included gp120 subunits mutated in the CD4 binding site or incapable of coreceptor interaction due either to mismatched specificity or V3 loop mutation. Defective gp41 variants included point mutations at different residues within the fusion peptide or heptad repeat regions, as well as constructs with modifications or deletions of the membrane proximal tryptophan-rich region or the transmembrane domain. Complementation required the defective variants to be coexpressed in the same cell. The observed complementation activities were highly dependent on the assay system. The most robust activities were obtained with a vaccinia virus-based expression and reporter gene activation assay for cell fusion. In an alternative system involving Env expression from integrated provirus, complementation was detected in cell fusion assays, but not in virus particle entry assays. Conclusion Our results indicate that Env function does not require every subunit in the trimer to be competent for all essential activities. Through

  14. Severe anaemia is not associated with HIV-1 env gene characteristics in Malawian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kachala David

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaemia is the most common haematological complication of HIV and associated with a high morbidity and a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of HIV-associated anaemia is poorly understood and may include a direct effect of HIV on erythropoiesis. In vitro studies have suggested that specific HIV strains, like X4 that uses the CXCR4 co-receptor present on erythroid precursors, are associated with diminished erythropoiesis. This co-receptor affinity is determined by changes in the hypervariable loop of the HIV-1 envelope genome. In a previous case-control study we observed an association between HIV and severe anaemia in Malawian children that could not be fully explained by secondary infections and micronutrient deficiencies alone. We therefore explored the possibility that alterations in the V1-V2-V3 fragment of HIV-1 were associated with severe anaemia. Methods Using peripheral blood nucleic acid isolates of HIV-infected children identified in the previous studied we assessed if variability of the V1-V2-V3 region of HIV and the occurrence of X4 strains were more common in HIV-infected children with (cases, n = 29 and without severe anaemia (controls, n = 30. For 15 cases bone marrow isolates were available to compare against peripheral blood. All children were followed for 18 months after recruitment. Results Phylogenetic analysis showed that HIV-1 subtype C was present in all but one child. All V1-V2-V3 characteristics tested: V3 charge, V1-V2 length and potential glycosylation sites, were not found to be different between cases and controls. Using a computer model (C-PSSM four children (7.8% were identified to have an X4 strain. This prevalence was not different between study groups (p = 1.00. The V3 loop characteristics for bone marrow and peripheral blood isolates in the case group were identical. None of the children identified as having an X4 strain developed a (new episode of severe anaemia during follow up. Conclusion

  15. Massively parallel pyrosequencing highlights minority variants in the HIV-1 env quasispecies deriving from lymphomonocyte sub-populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chillemi Giovanni

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus-associated cell membrane proteins acquired by HIV-1 during budding may give information on the cellular source of circulating virions. In the present study, by applying immunosorting of the virus and of the cells with antibodies targeting monocyte (CD36 and lymphocyte (CD26 markers, it was possible to directly compare HIV-1 quasispecies archived in circulating monocytes and T lymphocytes with that present in plasma virions originated from the same cell types. Five chronically HIV-1 infected patients who underwent therapy interruption after prolonged HAART were enrolled in the study. The analysis was performed by the powerful technology of ultra-deep pyrosequencing after PCR amplification of part of the env gene, coding for the viral glycoprotein (gp 120, encompassing the tropism-related V3 loop region. V3 amino acid sequences were used to establish heterogeneity parameters, to build phylogenetic trees and to predict co-receptor usage. Results The heterogeneity of proviral and viral genomes derived from monocytes was higher than that of T-lymphocyte origin. Both monocytes and T lymphocytes might contribute to virus rebounding in the circulation after therapy interruptions, but other virus sources might also be involved. In addition, both proviral and circulating viral sequences from monocytes and T lymphocytes were predictive of a predominant R5 coreceptor usage. However, minor variants, segregating from the most frequent quasispecies variants, were present. In particular, in proviral genomes harboured by monocytes, minority variant clusters with a predicted X4 phenotype were found. Conclusion This study provided the first direct comparison between the HIV-1 quasispecies archived as provirus in circulating monocytes and T lymphocytes with that of plasma virions replicating in the same cell types. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing generated data with some order of magnitude higher than any previously obtained with conventional

  16. Frequent substitution polymorphisms in African green monkey CCR5 cluster at critical sites for infections by simian immunodeficiency virus SIVagm, implying ancient virus-host coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhmann, S E; Madani, N; Diop, O M; Platt, E J; Morvan, J; Müller-Trutwin, M C; Barré-Sinoussi, F; Kabat, D

    2001-09-01

    In contrast to humans, several primate species are believed to have harbored simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) since ancient times. In particular, the geographically dispersed species of African green monkeys (AGMs) are all infected with highly diversified SIVagm viruses at high prevalences (greater than 50% of sexually mature individuals) without evident diseases, implying that the progenitor monkeys were infected prior to their dispersal. If this is correct, AGMs would be expected to have accumulated frequent resistance-conferring polymorphisms in host genes that are important for SIV replication. Accordingly, we analyzed the coding sequences of the CCR5 coreceptors from 26 AGMs (52 alleles) in distinct populations of the four species. These samples contained 29 nonsynonymous coding changes and only 15 synonymous nucleotide substitutions, implying intense functional selection. Moreover, 24 of the resulting amino acid substitutions were tightly clustered in the CCR5 amino terminus (D13N in the vervets and Y14N in the tantalus species) or in the first extracellular loop (Q93R and Q93K in all species). The Y14N substitution was extremely frequent in the 12 wild-born African tantalus, with 7 monkeys being homozygous for this substitution and 4 being heterozygous. Although two of these heterozygotes and the only wild-type homozygote were naturally infected with SIVagm, none of the Y14N homozygotes were naturally infected. A focal infectivity assay for SIVagm indicated that all five tested SIVagms efficiently use CCR5 as a coreceptor and that they also use CXCR6 (STRL33/Bonzo) and GPR15 (BOB) with lower efficiencies but not CXCR4. Interestingly, the D13N, Y14N, Q93R, and Q93K substitutions in AGM CCR5 all strongly inhibited infections by the SIVagm isolates in vitro. The Y14N substitution eliminates a tyrosine sulfation site that is important for infections and results in partial N-linked glycosylation (i.e., 60% efficiency) at this position. Nevertheless, the CCR

  17. Craniopharyngiomas express embryonic stem cell markers (SOX2, OCT4, KLF4, and SOX9) as pituitary stem cells but do not coexpress RET/GFRA3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Saez, Carmen; Diaz-Rodriguez, Esther; Perez-Romero, Sihara; Senra, Ana; Dieguez, Carlos; Japon, Miguel A; Alvarez, Clara V

    2012-01-01

    Adult stem cells maintain some markers expressed by embryonic stem cells and express other specific markers depending on the organ where they reside. Recently, stem/progenitor cells in the rodent and human pituitary have been characterized as expressing GFRA2/RET, PROP1, and stem cell markers such as SOX2 and OCT4 (GPS cells). Our objective was to detect other specific markers of the pituitary stem cells and to investigate whether craniopharyngiomas (CRF), a tumor potentially derived from Rathke's pouch remnants, express similar markers as normal pituitary stem cells. We conducted mRNA and Western blot studies in pituitary extracts, and immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence on sections from normal rat and human pituitaries and 20 CRF (18 adamantinomatous and two papillary). Normal pituitary GPS stem cells localized in the marginal zone (MZ) express three key embryonic stem cell markers, SOX2, OCT4, and KLF4, in addition to SOX9 and PROP1 and β-catenin overexpression. They express the RET receptor and its GFRA2 coreceptor but also express the coreceptor GFRA3 that could be detected in the MZ of paraffin pituitary sections. CRF maintain the expression of SOX2, OCT4, KLF4, SOX9, and β-catenin. However, RET and GFRA3 expression was altered in CRF. In 25% (five of 20), both RET and GFRA3 were detected but not colocalized in the same cells. The other 75% (15 of 20) lose the expression of RET, GFRA3, or both proteins simultaneously. Human pituitary adult stem/progenitor cells (GPS) located in the MZ are characterized by expression of embryonic stem cell markers SOX2, OCT4, and KLF4 plus the specific pituitary embryonic factor PROP1 and the RET system. Redundancy in RET coreceptor expression (GFRA2 and GFRA3) suggest an important systematic function in their physiological behavior. CRF share the stem cell markers suggesting a common origin with GPS. However, the lack of expression of the RET/GFRA system could be related to the cell mislocation and deregulated

  18. Gas1 is present in germinal niches of developing dentate gyrus and cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estudillo, E; Zavala, P; Pérez-Sánchez, G; Ayala-Sarmiento, A E; Segovia, J

    2016-05-01

    Gas1 is a pleiotropic protein that inhibits cell growth when overexpressed in tumors but during development, it acts as a co-receptor for sonic hedgehog to promote the proliferation and survival of various growing organs and systems. This protein has been extensively studied during development in the cerebellum. However, in other structures of the central nervous system, information concerning Gas1 is limited to in situ hybridization studies. We investigate the pattern of Gas1 expression during various developmental stages of the cortex and dentate gyrus of the mouse brain. The levels of Gas1 decrease in the developing brain and the protein is mainly found in progenitor cells during the development of the cortex and dentate gyrus.

  19. CCR5 as a natural and modulated target for inhibition of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Bryan P; Boyd, Maureen P; Impey, Helen; Breton, Louis R; Bartlett, Jeffrey S; Symonds, Geoff P; Hütter, Gero

    2013-12-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of target cells requires CD4 and a co-receptor, predominantly the chemokine receptor CCR5. CCR5-delta32 homozygosity results in a truncated protein providing natural protection against HIV infection-this without detrimental effects to the host-and transplantation of CCR5-delta32 stem cells in a patient with HIV ("Berlin patient") achieved viral eradication. As a more feasible approach gene-modification strategies are being developed to engineer cellular resistance to HIV using autologous cells. We have developed a dual therapeutic anti-HIV lentiviral vector (LVsh5/C46) that down-regulates CCR5 and inhibits HIV-1 fusion via cell surface expression of the gp41-derived peptide, C46. This construct, effective against multiple strains of both R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1, is being tested in Phase I/II trials by engineering HIV-resistant hematopoietic cells.

  20. Chemokine control of HIV-1 infection: Beyond a binding competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yuntao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent paper by Cameron et al. demonstrated that certain chemokines such as CCL19 activate cofilin and actin dynamics, promoting HIV nuclear localization and integration into resting CD4 T cells. Apparently, these chomokines synergize with the viral envelope protein, triggering cofilin and actin dynamics necessary for the establishment of viral latency. This study opens a new avenue for understanding chemokine interaction with HIV. Traditionally, chemokine control of HIV infection focuses on competitive binding and down-modulation of the corecptors, particularly CCR5. This new study suggests that a diverse group of chemokines may also affect HIV infection through synergistic or antagonistic interaction with the viral coreceptor signaling pathways.

  1. Lead Screening for CXCR4 of the Human HIV Infection Receptor Inhibited by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Chieh Hung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS is a serious worldwide disease caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. Recent research has pointed out that the G protein-coupled chemokine receptor CXCR4 and the coreceptor C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5 are important targets for HIV infection. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM database has been screened for candidate compounds by simulating molecular docking and molecular dynamics against HIV. Saussureamine C, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, and diiodotyrosine are selected based on the highest docking score. The molecular dynamics is helpful in the analysis and detection of protein-ligand interactions. According to the analysis of docking poses, hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bond variations, and the comparison of the effect on CXCR4 and CCR5, these results indicate Saussureamine C may have better effect on these two receptors. But for some considerations, diiodotyrosine could make the largest variation and may have some efficacy contrary to expectations.

  2. Organization of cellular receptors into a nanoscale junction during HIV-1 adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence M Dobrowsky

    Full Text Available The fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 with its host cell is the target for new antiretroviral therapies. Viral particles interact with the flexible plasma membrane via viral surface protein gp120 which binds its primary cellular receptor CD4 and subsequently the coreceptor CCR5. However, whether and how these receptors become organized at the adhesive junction between cell and virion are unknown. Here, stochastic modeling predicts that, regarding binding to gp120, cellular receptors CD4 and CCR5 form an organized, ring-like, nanoscale structure beneath the virion, which locally deforms the plasma membrane. This organized adhesive junction between cell and virion, which we name the viral junction, is reminiscent of the well-characterized immunological synapse, albeit at much smaller length scales. The formation of an organized viral junction under multiple physiopathologically relevant conditions may represent a novel intermediate step in productive infection.

  3. High level expression, purification and characterization of recombinant CCR5 as a vaccine candidate against HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kongtian; Xue, Xiaochang; Li, Meng; Qin, Xin; Zhang, Cun; Li, Weina; Hao, Qiang; Wang, Zenglu; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi

    2013-06-01

    Cysteine-cysteine chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is an important co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and CCR5 neutralizing agents have proven efficient in patients suffering from HIV infection. Here, we expressed and purified various CCR5 vaccines named rCCR5, PADRE-rCCR5, GST-C1 and GST-C2 composed of different epitopes of CCR5. Results showed that vaccines containing multiple epitopes (rCCR5 and PADRE-rCCR5) induced stronger immune responses than single-epitope ones (GST-C1 and GST-C2). In addition, the elicited antibodies can specifically bind CCR5(+) U937 but not CCR5(-) Wish cells. These results demonstrate that the CCR5 vaccines are useful for further research, especially for the in vitro preclinical evaluation of their potential as biological CCR5 neutralizing agents.

  4. HIV vaccine trial exploits a dual and central role for innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Deborah Heydenburg; Richert-Spuhler, Laura E; Klatt, Nichole R

    2014-10-01

    Limited understanding of correlates of protection from HIV transmission hinders development of an efficacious vaccine. D. J. M. Lewis and colleagues (J. Virol. 88:11648-11657, 2014, doi:10.1128/JVI.01621-14) now report that vaginal immunization with an HIVgp140 vaccine linked to the 70-kDa heat shock protein downregulated the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coreceptor CCR5 (chemokine [C-C motif] receptor 5) and increased expression of the HIV resistance factor APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3G), in women. These effects correlated with HIV suppression ex vivo. Thus, vaccine-induced innate responses not only facilitate adaptive immunity-they may prove to be critical for preventing HIV transmission.

  5. Wnt Signaling Is Required for Long-Term Memory Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Tan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wnt signaling regulates synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis in the adult nervous system, suggesting a potential role in behavioral processes. Here, we probed the requirement for Wnt signaling during olfactory memory formation in Drosophila using an inducible RNAi approach. Interfering with β-catenin expression in adult mushroom body neurons specifically impaired long-term memory (LTM without altering short-term memory. The impairment was reversible, being rescued by expression of a wild-type β-catenin transgene, and correlated with disruption of a cellular LTM trace. Inhibition of wingless, a Wnt ligand, and arrow, a Wnt coreceptor, also impaired LTM. Wingless expression in wild-type flies was transiently elevated in the brain after LTM conditioning. Thus, inhibiting three key components of the Wnt signaling pathway in adult mushroom bodies impairs LTM, indicating that this pathway mechanistically underlies this specific form of memory.

  6. [Phosphate sensing and parathyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Masahide; Suzuki, Taihei

    2012-10-01

    In the latter 1990s, phosphate, as well as calcium, has been shown to have a direct action on parathyroid function. Since then although many researchers have tried to detect the phosphate sensor in parathyroid gland, none has found it yet. In 2000s, the importance of FGF23 was revealed in patients with autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets and then investigating the role of FGF23 in mineral metabolism has spread. FGF23 target organs comprise those that express coreceptor Klotho, such as kidney and parathyroid glands. While associations of calcium sensing receptor or vitamin D receptor with parathyroid function have been mainly investigated for parathyroid dysfunction, many efforts recently have made to study the effects of FGF23 on parathyroid glands.

  7. Low prevalence of antibodies and other plasma factors binding to CC chemokines and IL-2 in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Svenson, M; Larsen, Carsten Schade;

    2000-01-01

    Neutralizing cytokine antibodies are found in healthy and diseased individuals, including patients treated with recombinant cytokines. Identification of CCR-5 as co-receptor for HIV has focused interest on CC chemokines and their potential therapeutic use. Chemokine-binding components in plasma...... of HIV-infected patients were therefore assessed by radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay. IgG from 4/505 HIV patients and 9/2000 healthy controls (p>0.05) bound rMIP-1alpha and rMIP-1beta, but not rRANTES. No other plasma factors bound the chemokines. The antibodies inhibited receptor binding of both...... chemokines. There was no association between presence of antibodies and disease stage or HIV progression rate. Three of 11 patients treated with rIL-2 developed IgG antibodies suppressing cellular binding and growth promotion of rIL-2. Hence, circulating factors, including antibodies MIP-1alpha/MIP-1beta...

  8. A library of 7TM receptor C-terminal tails - Interactions with the proposed post-endocytic sorting proteins ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, A.; Sondergaard, B.P.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2004-01-01

    -coupled receptor-associated sorting protein bound 23 of the 59 tail proteins. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the binding kinetics of selected hits from the glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments, i.e. the tails of the virally encoded receptor US28 and the delta-opioid receptor, confirmed......Adaptor and scaffolding proteins determine the cellular targeting, the spatial, and thereby the functional association of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors with co-receptors, transducers, and downstream effectors and the adaptors determine post-signaling events such as receptor...... sequestration through interactions, mainly with the C-terminal intracellular tails of the receptors. A library of tails from 59 representative members of the super family of seven-transmembrane receptors was probed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins for interactions with four different adaptor...

  9. Fell-Muir Lecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, John R.; Gopal, Sandeep; Lim, Hooi Ching

    2015-01-01

    , therefore, have a long evolutionary history, indicative of important roles. However, these roles have been elusive. The knockout in the worm has a developmental neuronal phenotype, while knockouts of the syndecans in the mouse are mild and mostly limited to post-natal rather than developmental effects....... Moreover, their association with high-affinity receptors, such as integrins, growth factor receptors, frizzled and slit/robo, have led to the notion that syndecans are coreceptors, with minor roles. Given that their heparan sulphate chains can gather many different protein ligands, this gave credence......, it is likely that syndecans are important receptors in their own right. Here, an overview of syndecan structure and function is provided, with some prospects for the future....

  10. Development and characterization of hepatitis C virus genotype 1-7 cell culture systems: role of CD81 and scavenger receptor class B type I and effect of antiviral drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Scheel, Troels K H; Jensen, Tanja B

    2009-01-01

    Six major hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes and numerous subtypes have been described, and recently a seventh major genotype was discovered. Genotypes show significant molecular and clinical differences, such as differential response to combination therapy with interferon-alpha and ribavirin...... against the putative coreceptors CD81 and scavenger receptor class B type I in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, neutralizing antibodies in selected chronic phase HCV sera had differential effects against genotype 1-7 viruses. Conclusion: We completed and characterized a panel of JFH1-based cell culture...... systems of all seven major HCV genotypes and important subtypes and used these viruses in comparative studies of antivirals, HCV receptor interaction, and neutralizing antibodies....

  11. Quantifying CD4/CCR5 Usage Efficiency of HIV-1 Env Using the Affinofile System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas E; Lee, Benhur

    2016-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into target cells involves the interaction of the HIV envelope (Env) with both a primary receptor (CD4) and a coreceptor (CXCR4 or CCR5). The relative efficiency with which a particular Env uses these receptors is a major component of cellular tropism in the context of entry and is related to a variety of pathological Env phenotypes (Chikere et al. Virology 435:81-91, 2013). The protocols outlined in this chapter describe the use of the Affinofile system, a 293-based dual-inducible cell line that expresses up to 25 distinct combinations of CD4 and CCR5, as well as the associated Viral Entry Receptor Sensitivity Assay (VERSA) metrics used to summarize the CD4/CCR5-dependent infectivity results. This system allows for high-resolution profiling of CD4 and CCR5 usage efficiency in the context of unique viral phenotypes.

  12. Conserved Structural Elements in the V3 Crown of HIV-1 gp120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, X.; Burke, V; Totrov, M; Williams, C; Cardozo, T; Gorny, M; Zolla-Pazner, S; Kong, X

    2010-01-01

    Binding of the third variable region (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cell-surface coreceptors CCR5 or CXCR4 during viral entry suggests that there are conserved structural elements in this sequence-variable region. These conserved elements could serve as epitopes to be targeted by a vaccine against HIV-1. Here we perform a systematic structural analysis of representative human anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies in complex with V3 peptides, revealing that the crown of V3 has four conserved structural elements: an arch, a band, a hydrophobic core and the peptide backbone. These are either unaffected by or are subject to minimal sequence variation. As these regions are targeted by cross-clade neutralizing human antibodies, they provide a blueprint for the design of vaccine immunogens that could elicit broadly cross-reactive protective antibodies.

  13. Detergent-solubilized Patched purified from Sf9 cells fails to interact strongly with cognate Hedgehog or Ihog homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Thomas E; McCabe, Jacqueline M; Leahy, Daniel J

    2014-12-01

    Patched (Ptc) is a twelve-pass transmembrane protein that functions as a receptor for the Hedgehog (Hh) family of morphogens. In addition to Ptc, several accessory proteins including the CDO/Ihog family of co-receptors are necessary for proper Hh signaling. Structures of Hh proteins bound to members of the CDO/Ihog family are known, but the nature of the full Hh receptor complex is not well understood. We have expressed the Drosophila Patched and Mouse Patched-1 proteins in Sf9 cells and find that Sonic Hedgehog will bind to Mouse Patched-1 in isolated Sf9 cell membranes but that purified, detergent-solubilized Ptc proteins do not interact strongly with cognate Hh and CDO/Ihog homologs. These results may reflect a nonnative conformation of detergent-solubilized Ptc or that an additional factor or factors lost during purification are required for high-affinity Ptc binding to Hh.

  14. The Shh receptor Boc promotes progression of early medulloblastoma to advanced tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mille, Frédéric; Tamayo-Orrego, Lukas; Lévesque, Martin; Remke, Marc; Korshunov, Andrey; Cardin, Julie; Bouchard, Nicolas; Izzi, Luisa; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A; Taylor, Michael D; Pfister, Stefan M; Charron, Frédéric

    2014-10-13

    During cerebellar development, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling drives the proliferation of granule cell precursors (GCPs). Aberrant activation of Shh signaling causes overproliferation of GCPs, leading to medulloblastoma. Although the Shh-binding protein Boc associates with the Shh receptor Ptch1 to mediate Shh signaling, whether Boc plays a role in medulloblastoma is unknown. Here, we show that BOC is upregulated in medulloblastomas and induces GCP proliferation. Conversely, Boc inactivation reduces proliferation and progression of early medulloblastomas to advanced tumors. Mechanistically, we find that Boc, through elevated Shh signaling, promotes high levels of DNA damage, an effect mediated by CyclinD1. High DNA damage in the presence of Boc increases the incidence of Ptch1 loss of heterozygosity, an important event in the progression from early to advanced medulloblastoma. Together, our results indicate that DNA damage promoted by Boc leads to the demise of its own coreceptor, Ptch1, and consequently medulloblastoma progression.

  15. Discoidin domain receptor 1 is activated independently of beta(1) integrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, W; Brakebusch, C; Fässler, R

    2000-01-01

    Various types of collagen have been identified as potential ligands for the two mammalian discoidin domain receptor (DDR) tyrosine kinases, DDR1 and DDR2. It is presently unclear whether collagen-induced DDR receptor activation, which occurs with very slow kinetics, involves additional proteins...... with kinase activity or membrane-anchored proteins serving as coreceptors. In particular, the role of the collagen-binding integrins alpha(1)beta(1) or alpha(2)beta(1) in the DDR activation process is undefined. Here, we provide three lines of evidence suggesting that DDR1 signaling is distinct from integrin...... activation. First we demonstrate that the enzymatic activity of DDR1 is essential for receptor tyrosine phosphorylation. Collagen-induced DDR receptor autophosphorylation can be blocked either by a dominant negative mutant or by a preparation of recombinant extracellular domain. Second, we show DDR1 signals...

  16. Sonic hedgehog regulates its own receptor on postcrossing commissural axons in a glypican1-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nicole H; Stoeckli, Esther T

    2013-08-07

    Upon reaching their intermediate target, the floorplate, commissural axons acquire responsiveness to repulsive guidance cues, allowing the axons to exit the midline and adopt a contralateral, longitudinal trajectory. The molecular mechanisms that regulate this switch from attraction to repulsion remain poorly defined. Here, we show that the heparan sulfate proteoglycan Glypican1 (GPC1) is required as a coreceptor for the Shh-dependent induction of Hedgehog-interacting protein (Hhip) in commissural neurons. In turn, Hhip is required for postcrossing axons to respond to a repulsive anteroposterior Shh gradient. Thus, Shh is a cue with dual function. In precrossing axons it acts as an attractive guidance molecule in a transcription-independent manner. At the same time, Shh binds to GPC1 to induce the expression of its own receptor, Hhip, which mediates the repulsive response of postcrossing axons to Shh. Our study characterizes a molecular mechanism by which navigating axons switch their responsiveness at intermediate targets.

  17. Cripto/GRP78 modulation of the TGF-β pathway in development and oncogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter C.; Vale, Wylie

    2013-01-01

    Cripto is a small, GPI-anchored signaling protein that regulates cellular survival, proliferation, differentiation and migration during normal developmental processes and tumorigenesis. Cripto functions as an obligatory co-receptor for the TGF-β ligands Nodal, GDF1 and GDF3 but attenuates signaling of others such as activin-A, activin-B and TGF-β1. Soluble, secreted forms of Cripto also activate Src, ras/raf/MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways via a mechanism that remains largely obscure. This review describes the biological roles and signaling mechanisms of Cripto, highlighting our identification of Glucose Regulated Protein 78 (GRP78) as a cell surface receptor/co-factor required for Cripto signaling via both TGF-β and Src/MAPK/PI3K pathways. We discuss emerging evidence indicating that Cripto/GRP78 signaling regulates normal somatic stem cells and their tumorigenic counterparts. PMID:22306319

  18. SMM-chemokines: a class of unnatural synthetic molecules as chemical probes of chemokine receptor biology and leads for therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Choi, Won-Tak; Dong, Chang-Zhi; Madani, Navid; Tian, Shaomin; Liu, Dongxiang; Wang, Youli; Pesavento, James; Wang, Jun; Fan, Xuejun; Yuan, Jian; Fritzsche, Wayne R; An, Jing; Sodroski, Joseph G; Richman, Douglas D; Huang, Ziwei

    2006-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes. To develop natural chemokines into receptor probes and inhibitors of pathological processes, the lack of chemokine-receptor selectivity must be overcome. Here, we apply chemical synthesis and the concept of modular modifications to generate unnatural synthetically and modularly modified (SMM)-chemokines that have high receptor selectivity and affinity, and reduced toxicity. A proof of the concept was shown by transforming the nonselective viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II into new analogs with enhanced selectivity and potency for CXCR4 or CCR5, two principal coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 entry. These new analogs provided insights into receptor binding and signaling mechanisms and acted as potent HIV-1 inhibitors. These results support the concept of SMM-chemokines for studying and controlling the function of other chemokine receptors.

  19. The multifunction of CLAVATA2 in plant development and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Pan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The CLAVATA2 (CLV2 gene encodes a leucine-rich repeat (LRR receptor-like protein (RLP, a class of cell surface receptors that lacks a cytoplasmic kinase domain. As such, CLV2 is capable of functioning in concert with additional receptor(s, possibly receptor-like kinase(s, to activate cellular responses upon ligand perception. Accumulating data indicate that CLV2 is implicated in distinct biological processes including plant growth and development as well as innate immunity to microbe and nematode infections. This article focuses on recent advances in our understanding of multiple signaling pathways mediated by multifunctional CLV2 that modulate various physiological processes. The challenges and future perspectives of elucidating the specificity of CLV2-mediated signaling pathways and identifying potential co-receptors and putative ligands for CLV2 are also discussed.

  20. The CCL3L1-CCR5 genotype influences the development of AIDS, but not HIV susceptibility or the response to HAART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stanton, Jennifer [NORTHWESTERN UNIV; Kim, Eun - Young [NORTHWESTERN UNIV; Kunstman, Kevin [NORTHWESTERN UNIV; Phair, John [NORTHWESTERN UNIV; Jacobson, Lisa P [JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV; Wolinsky, Steven M [NORTHWESTERN UNIV

    2008-01-01

    A selective advantage against infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS is associated with differences in the genes relevant to immunity and virus replication. The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), the principal coreceptor for HIV, and its chemokine ligands, including CCL3L1, influences the CD4+ target cells susceptibility to infection. The CCL3L1 gene is in a region of segmental duplication on the q-arm of human chromosome 17. Increased numbers of CCL3L1 gene copies that affect the gene expression phenotype might have substantial protective effects. Here we show that the population-specific CCL3L1 gene copy number and the CCR5 {Delta}32 protein-inactivating deletion that categorizes the CCL3L1-CCR5 genotype do not influence HIV/AIDS susceptibility or the robustness of immune recovery after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

  1. αβ T cell receptor germline CDR regions moderate contact with MHC ligands and regulate peptide cross-reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaf, Meriem; Holland, Stephan J; Bartok, Istvan; Dyson, Julian

    2016-10-24

    αβ T cells respond to peptide epitopes presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. The role of T cell receptor (TCR) germline complementarity determining regions (CDR1 and 2) in MHC restriction is not well understood. Here, we examine T cell development, MHC restriction and antigen recognition where germline CDR loop structure has been modified by multiple glycine/alanine substitutions. Surprisingly, loss of germline structure increases TCR engagement with MHC ligands leading to excessive loss of immature thymocytes. MHC restriction is, however, strictly maintained. The peripheral T cell repertoire is affected similarly, exhibiting elevated cross-reactivity to foreign peptides. Our findings are consistent with germline TCR structure optimising T cell cross-reactivity and immunity by moderating engagement with MHC ligands. This strategy may operate alongside co-receptor imposed MHC restriction, freeing germline TCR structure to adopt this novel role in the TCR-MHC interface.

  2. Distribution of the CCR5 gene 32-basepair deletion in West Europe. A hypothesis about the possible dispersion of the mutation by the Vikings in historical times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucotte, G

    2001-09-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 constitutes the major coreceptor for the macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. A mutant allele of the CCR5 gene named Delta32 was shown to provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection by HIV. The frequency of the Delta32 allele was collected in 7328 noninfected unrelated individuals from 31 different European populations, and in Cyprus, Turkey, Daghestan, and North-Africa. The Delta32 allele was found in all populations studied, with a mean frequency of about 8.0%. A north to south gradient correlating latitude with Delta32 allelic frequencies was found (r = 0.795, p Vikings during the eighth to the tenth centuries, because the most elevated values of this variant are actually found in their actual populations, and because they raided during the corresponding period in most European countries.

  3. Drogas anti-VIH: passado, presente e perspectivas futuras Drugs anti-HIV: past, present and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinícius Nora de Souza

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently available anti-HIV drugs can be classified into three categories: nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs and protease inhibitors (PIs. In addition to the reverse transcriptase (RT and protease reaction, various other events in the HIV replicative cycle can be considered as potential targets for chemotherapeutic intervention: (1 viral adsorption, through binding to the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120; (2 viral entry, through blockage of the viral coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5; (3 virus-cell fusion, through binding to the viral envelope glycoprotein gp 41; (4 viral assembly and disassembly through NCp7 zinc finger-targeted agents; (5 proviral DNA integration, through integrase inhibitors and (6 viral mRNA transcription, through inhibitors of the transcription (transactivation process. Also, various new NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs have been developed, possessing different improved characteristics.

  4. Down-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR5 by activation of chemotactic formyl peptide receptor in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, W; Li, B; Wetzel, M A; Rogers, T J; Henderson, E E; Su, S B; Gong, W; Le, Y; Sargeant, R; Dimitrov, D S; Oppenheim, J J; Wang, J M

    2000-10-15

    Interactions between cell surface receptors are important regulatory elements in the complex host responses to infections. In this study, it is shown that a classic chemotactic factor, the bacterial chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenyl-alanine (fMLF), rapidly induced a protein-kinase-C-mediated serine phosphorylation and down-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR5, which serves as a major human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 coreceptor. The fMLF binding to its receptor, formyl peptide receptor (FPR), resulted in significant attenuation of cell responses to CCR5 ligands and in inhibition of HIV-1-envelope-glycoprotein-mediated fusion and infection of cells expressing CD4, CCR5, and FPR. The finding that the expression and function of CCR5 can be regulated by peptides that use an unrelated receptor may provide a novel approach to the design of anti-inflamatory and antiretroviral agents. (Blood. 2000;96:2887-2894)

  5. Commitment to the CD4 lineage mediated by extracellular signal-related kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase and lck signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, L L; Hedrick, S M

    1999-12-15

    The development of T cells results in a concordance between the specificity of the TCR for MHC class I and class II molecules and the expression of CD8 and CD4 coreceptors. Based on analogy to simple metazoan models of organ development and lineage commitment, we sought to determine whether extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway signaling acts as an inductive signal for the CD4 lineage. Here, we show that, by altering the intracellular signaling involving the Erk/MAP kinase pathway, T cells with specificity for MHC class I can be diverted to express CD4, and, conversely, T cells with specificity for MHC class II can be diverted to express CD8. Furthermore, we find that activation of the src-family tyrosine kinase, p56lck is an upstream mediator of lineage commitment. These results suggest a simple mechanism for lineage commitment in T cell development.

  6. Direct Modulation of Heterotrimeric G Protein-coupled Signaling by a Receptor Kinase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Urano, Daisuke; Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Clouse, Steven D; Jones, Alan M

    2016-07-01

    Plants and some protists have heterotrimeric G protein complexes that activate spontaneously without canonical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In Arabidopsis, the sole 7-transmembrane regulator of G protein signaling 1 (AtRGS1) modulates the G protein complex by keeping it in the resting state (GDP-bound). However, it remains unknown how a myriad of biological responses is achieved with a single G protein modulator. We propose that in complete contrast to G protein activation in animals, plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs), not GPCRs, provide this discrimination through phosphorylation of AtRGS1 in a ligand-dependent manner. G protein signaling is directly activated by the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide 22 through its LRR RLK, FLS2, and co-receptor BAK1.

  7. BAK1 Directly Regulates Brassinosteroid Perception and BRI1 Activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai He; Shengbao Xu; Jia Li

    2013-01-01

    Plants utilize plasma membrane-localized receptor-like kinases (RLKs) to sense extracellular signals to coordinate growth, development, and innate immune responses. BAK1 regulates multiple signaling pathways acting as a co-receptor of several distinct ligand-binding RLKs. It has been debated whether BAK1 serves as an essential regulatory component or only a signal amplifier without pathway specificity. This issue has been clarified recently. Genetic and structural analyses indicated that BAK1 and its homologs play indispensible roles in mediating brassinosteroid (BR) signaling pathway by directly perceiving the ligand BR and activating the receptor of BR, BRI1. The mechanism revealed by these studies now serves as a paradigm for how a pair of RLKs can function together in ligand binding and subsequent initiation of signaling.

  8. SorLA Controls Neurotrophic Activity by Sorting of GDNF and Its Receptors GFRα1 and RET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Simon; Lume, Maria; Olsen, Ditte;

    2013-01-01

    Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that has reached clinical trials for Parkinson's disease. GDNF binds to its coreceptor GFRα1 and signals through the transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase RET, or RET independently through NCAM or syndecan-3....... Whereas the GDNF signaling cascades are well described, cellular turnover and trafficking of GDNF and its receptors remain poorly characterized. Here, we find that SorLA acts as sorting receptor for the GDNF/GFRα1 complex, directing it from the cell surface to endosomes. Through this mechanism, GDNF...... is targeted to lysosomes and degraded while GFRα1 recycles, creating an efficient GDNF clearance pathway. The SorLA/GFRα1 complex further targets RET for endocytosis but not for degradation, affecting GDNF-induced neurotrophic activities. SorLA-deficient mice display elevated GDNF levels, altered dopaminergic...

  9. Direct binding of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain to the catalytic domain of protein kinase C alpha (PKC alpha) increases focal adhesion localization of PKC alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Ssang-Taek; Longley, Robert L; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    Syndecan-4 is a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan that acts as a coreceptor with integrins in focal adhesion formation. The central region of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain (4V; LGKKPIYKK) binds phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and together they regulate protein kinase C alpha (PKC...... alpha) activity. Syndecan 4V peptide directly potentiates PKC alpha activity, leading to "superactivation" of the enzyme, apparently through an interaction with its catalytic domain. We now have performed yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays to determine the interaction sites between 4V and PKC...... alpha. Full-length PKC alpha weakly interacted with 4V by yeast two-hybrid assays, but PKC alpha constructs that lack the pseudosubstrate region or constructs of the whole catalytic domain interacted more strongly. A mutated 4V sequence (4V(YF): LGKKPIFKK) did not interact with PKC alpha, indicating...

  10. An Engineered orco Mutation Produces Aberrant Social Behavior and Defective Neural Development in Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hua; Opachaloemphan, Comzit; Mancini, Giacomo; Yang, Huan; Gallitto, Matthew; Mlejnek, Jakub; Leibholz, Alexandra; Haight, Kevin; Ghaninia, Majid; Huo, Lucy; Perry, Michael; Slone, Jesse; Zhou, Xiaofan; Traficante, Maria; Penick, Clint A; Dolezal, Kelly; Gokhale, Kaustubh; Stevens, Kelsey; Fetter-Pruneda, Ingrid; Bonasio, Roberto; Zwiebel, Laurence J; Berger, Shelley L; Liebig, Jürgen; Reinberg, Danny; Desplan, Claude

    2017-08-10

    Ants exhibit cooperative behaviors and advanced forms of sociality that depend on pheromone-mediated communication. Odorant receptor neurons (ORNs) express specific odorant receptors (ORs) encoded by a dramatically expanded gene family in ants. In most eusocial insects, only the queen can transmit genetic information, restricting genetic studies. In contrast, workers in Harpegnathos saltator ants can be converted into gamergates (pseudoqueens) that can found entire colonies. This feature facilitated CRISPR-Cas9 generation of germline mutations in orco, the gene that encodes the obligate co-receptor of all ORs. orco mutations should significantly impact olfaction. We demonstrate striking functions of Orco in odorant perception, reproductive physiology, and social behavior plasticity. Surprisingly, unlike in other insects, loss of OR functionality also dramatically impairs development of the antennal lobe to which ORNs project. Therefore, the development of genetics in Harpegnathos establishes this ant species as a model organism to study the complexity of eusociality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of opiates and HIV proteins on neurons: the role of ferritin heavy chain and a potential for synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, Lindsay; Meucci, Olimpia

    2012-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and its associated proteins can have a profound impact on the central nervous system. Co-morbid abuse of opiates, such as morphine and heroin, is often associated with rapid disease progression and greater neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms by which HIV proteins and opiates cause neuronal damage on their own and together are unclear. The emergence of ferritin heavy chain (FHC) as a negative regulator of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, a co-receptor for HIV, may prove to be important in elucidating the interaction between HIV proteins and opiates. This review summarizes our current knowledge of central nervous system damage inflicted by HIV and opiates, as well as the regulation of CXCR4 by opiate-induced changes in FHC protein levels. We propose that HIV proteins and opiates exhibit an additive or synergistic effect on FHC/CXCR4, thereby decreasing neuronal signaling and function.

  12. Low prevalence of antibodies and other plasma factors binding to CC chemokines and IL-2 in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Svenson, M; Schade Larsen, C

    2000-01-01

    chemokines. There was no association between presence of antibodies and disease stage or HIV progression rate. Three of 11 patients treated with rIL-2 developed IgG antibodies suppressing cellular binding and growth promotion of rIL-2. Hence, circulating factors, including antibodies MIP-1alpha/MIP-1beta......Neutralizing cytokine antibodies are found in healthy and diseased individuals, including patients treated with recombinant cytokines. Identification of CCR-5 as co-receptor for HIV has focused interest on CC chemokines and their potential therapeutic use. Chemokine-binding components in plasma...... of HIV-infected patients were therefore assessed by radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay. IgG from 4/505 HIV patients and 9/2000 healthy controls (p>0.05) bound rMIP-1alpha and rMIP-1beta, but not rRANTES. No other plasma factors bound the chemokines. The antibodies inhibited receptor binding of both...

  13. EGFR and EphA2 are host factors for hepatitis C virus entry and possible targets for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupberger, Joachim; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Xiao, Fei; Thumann, Christine; Fofana, Isabel; Zona, Laetitia; Davis, Christopher; Mee, Christopher J; Turek, Marine; Gorke, Sebastian; Royer, Cathy; Fischer, Benoit; Zahid, Muhammad N; Lavillette, Dimitri; Fresquet, Judith; Cosset, François-Loïc; Rothenberg, S Michael; Pietschmann, Thomas; Patel, Arvind H; Pessaux, Patrick; Doffoël, Michel; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Poch, Olivier; McKeating, Jane A; Brino, Laurent; Baumert, Thomas F

    2011-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease, but therapeutic options are limited and there are no prevention strategies. Viral entry is the first step of infection and requires the cooperative interaction of several host cell factors. Using a functional RNAi kinase screen, we identified epidermal growth factor receptor and ephrin receptor A2 as host cofactors for HCV entry. Blocking receptor kinase activity by approved inhibitors broadly impaired infection by all major HCV genotypes and viral escape variants in cell culture and in a human liver chimeric mouse model in vivo. The identified receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) mediate HCV entry by regulating CD81-claudin-1 co-receptor associations and viral glycoprotein-dependent membrane fusion. These results identify RTKs as previously unknown HCV entry cofactors and show that tyrosine kinase inhibitors have substantial antiviral activity. Inhibition of RTK function may constitute a new approach for prevention and treatment of HCV infection.

  14. HRas signal transduction promotes hepatitis C virus cell entry by triggering assembly of the host tetraspanin receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zona, Laetitia; Lupberger, Joachim; Sidahmed-Adrar, Nazha; Thumann, Christine; Harris, Helen J; Barnes, Amy; Florentin, Jonathan; Tawar, Rajiv G; Xiao, Fei; Turek, Marine; Durand, Sarah C; Duong, François H T; Heim, Markus H; Cosset, François-Loïc; Hirsch, Ivan; Samuel, Didier; Brino, Laurent; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Le Naour, François; McKeating, Jane A; Baumert, Thomas F

    2013-03-13

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry is dependent on coreceptor complex formation between the tetraspanin superfamily member CD81 and the tight junction protein claudin-1 (CLDN1) on the host cell membrane. The receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR acts as a cofactor for HCV entry by promoting CD81-CLDN1 complex formation via unknown mechanisms. We identify the GTPase HRas, activated downstream of EGFR signaling, as a key host signal transducer for EGFR-mediated HCV entry. Proteomic analysis revealed that HRas associates with tetraspanin CD81, CLDN1, and the previously unrecognized HCV entry cofactors integrin β1 and Ras-related protein Rap2B in hepatocyte membranes. HRas signaling is required for lateral membrane diffusion of CD81, which enables tetraspanin receptor complex assembly. HRas was also found to be relevant for entry of other viruses, including influenza. Our data demonstrate that viruses exploit HRas signaling for cellular entry by compartmentalization of entry factors and receptor trafficking.

  15. Organization of cellular receptors into a nanoscale junction during HIV-1 adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M; Daniels, Brian R; Siliciano, Robert F; Sun, Sean X; Wirtz, Denis

    2010-07-15

    The fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with its host cell is the target for new antiretroviral therapies. Viral particles interact with the flexible plasma membrane via viral surface protein gp120 which binds its primary cellular receptor CD4 and subsequently the coreceptor CCR5. However, whether and how these receptors become organized at the adhesive junction between cell and virion are unknown. Here, stochastic modeling predicts that, regarding binding to gp120, cellular receptors CD4 and CCR5 form an organized, ring-like, nanoscale structure beneath the virion, which locally deforms the plasma membrane. This organized adhesive junction between cell and virion, which we name the viral junction, is reminiscent of the well-characterized immunological synapse, albeit at much smaller length scales. The formation of an organized viral junction under multiple physiopathologically relevant conditions may represent a novel intermediate step in productive infection.

  16. The TNF receptor and Ig superfamily members form an integrated signaling circuit controlling dendritic cell homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Trez, Carl; Ware, Carl F.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) constitute the most potent antigen presenting cells of the immune system, playing a key role bridging innate and adaptive immune responses. Specialized DC subsets differ depending on their origin, tissue location and the influence of trophic factors, the latter remain to be fully understood. Stromal cell and myeloid-associated Lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) signaling is required for the local proliferation of lymphoid tissue DC. This review focuses the LTβR signaling cascade as a crucial positive trophic signal in the homeostasis of DC subsets. The noncanonical coreceptor pathway comprised of the Immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily member, B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and TNFR superfamily member, Herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) counter regulates the trophic signaling by LTβR. Together both pathways form an integrated signaling circuit achieving homeostasis of DC subsets. PMID:18511331

  17. Cross-talk between insulin and Wnt signaling in preadipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palsgaard, Jane; Emanuelli, Brice; Winnay, Jonathon N;

    2012-01-01

    Disturbed Wnt signaling has been implicated in numerous diseases, including type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. In the present study, we have investigated cross-talk between insulin and Wnt signaling pathways using preadipocytes with and without knockdown of the Wnt co-receptors LRP5...... and LRP6 and with and without knock-out of insulin and IGF-1 receptors. We find that Wnt stimulation leads to phosphorylation of insulin signaling key mediators, including Akt, GSK3β, and ERK1/2, although with a lower fold stimulation and slower time course than observed for insulin. These Wnt effects...... are insulin/IGF-1 receptor-dependent and are lost in insulin/IGF-1 receptor double knock-out cells. Conversely, in LRP5 knockdown preadipocytes, insulin-induced phosphorylation of IRS1, Akt, GSK3β, and ERK1/2 is highly reduced. This effect is specific to insulin, as compared with IGF-1, stimulation...

  18. Heritable genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 induces anosmia in a crop pest moth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroumpa, Fotini A; Monsempes, Christelle; François, Marie-Christine; de Cian, Anne; Royer, Corinne; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2016-07-12

    Lepidoptera suffer critical lack of genetic tools and heritable genome edition has been achieved only in a few model species. Here we demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is highly efficient for genome editing in a non-model crop pest Lepidoptera, the noctuid moth Spodoptera littoralis. We knocked-out the olfactory receptor co-receptor Orco gene to investigate its function in Lepidoptera olfaction. We find that 89.6% of the injected individuals carried Orco mutations, 70% of which transmitted them to the next generation. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Orco knockout caused defects in plant odor and sex pheromone olfactory detection in homozygous individuals. Our work genetically defines Orco as an essential OR partner for both host and mate detection in Lepidoptera, and demonstrates that CRISPR/Cas9 is a simple and highly efficient genome editing technique in noctuid pests opening new routes for gene function analysis and the development of novel pest control strategies.

  19. Impaired selection of IgA and intestinal dysbiosis associated with PD-1-deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruya, Mikako; Kawamoto, Shimpei; Kato, Lucia M; Fagarasan, Sidonia

    2013-01-01

    A major function of immunoglobulin A (IgA) is to maintain balanced bacterial communities in the gut. We have previously shown that diversification of IgA upon somatic hypermutation (SHM) is critical for IgA function yet the principles governing the selection of IgA in the gut have remained elusive. Here we discuss recent progress in understanding this process as revealed by our studies in mice that lack the inhibitory co-receptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). We found that PD-1 affects the dynamics of germinal center (GC) B cells by controlling the number and the nature of T helper cells in the Peyer's patches (PPs). Deregulation of the T cell compartment impacts the selection of IgA plasma cells leading to gut dysbiosis. When the PD-1-dependent checkpoint is missing, gut bacteria go beyond the mucosal barrier and induce systemic GCs that can generate antibodies with auto-reactive properties.

  20. Role of FGF19 induced FGFR4 activation in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinle; Li, Yang

    2009-12-09

    FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23 form a unique subfamily of fibroblast growth factors. Because they contain intra-molecular disulfide bonds and show reduced affinity toward heparan sulfate located in the extracellular space, it is thought that, in contrast to other FGFs, they function as endocrine hormones. FGF23 and its co-receptor alphaKlotho are involved in the control of aging, but it is not known if the same holds true for FGF19, which can also signal through alphaKlotho. However, considerable evidence supports a role for FGF19 in controlling various aspects of metabolism. We have recently fully characterized FGF19/FGFR/co-factor interactions and signaling, and in the current manuscript discuss the contribution of the FGF19/FGFR4 axis to bile acid and glucose regulation.

  1. Exome Sequencing Reveals Cubilin Mutation as a Single-Gene Cause of Proteinuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A.; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M.; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H.; Yilmaz, Engin

    2011-01-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency, and proteinuria occurs in 50% of cases since cubilin is coreceptor for both the intestinal vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex and the tubular reabsorption of protein in the proximal tubule. In summary, we report successful use of exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing to identify a rare, single-gene cause of nephropathy. PMID:21903995

  2. Exome sequencing reveals cubilin mutation as a single-gene cause of proteinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H; Yilmaz, Engin; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2011-10-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B(12) deficiency, and proteinuria occurs in 50% of cases since cubilin is coreceptor for both the intestinal vitamin B(12)-intrinsic factor complex and the tubular reabsorption of protein in the proximal tubule. In summary, we report successful use of exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing to identify a rare, single-gene cause of nephropathy.

  3. Unc5B associates with LARG to mediate the action of repulsive guidance molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Katsuhiko; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Inagaki, Shinobu; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2009-03-09

    Neuronal axons are guided by attractive and repulsive cues in their local environment. Because the repulsive guidance molecule A (RGMa) was originally identified as an axon repellent in the visual system, diverse functions in the developing and adult central nervous system have been ascribed to it. RGMa binding to its receptor neogenin induces RhoA activation, leading to inhibitory/repulsive behavior and collapse of the neuronal growth cone. However, the precise mechanisms that regulate RhoA activation are poorly understood. In this study, we show that Unc5B, a member of the netrin receptor family, interacts with neogenin as a coreceptor for RGMa. Moreover, leukemia-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) associates with Unc5B to transduce the RhoA signal. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is involved in RGMa-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of LARG as well as RhoA activation. These findings uncover the molecular basis for diverse functions mediated by RGMa.

  4. Evidence for Pro-angiogenic Functions of VEGF-Ax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong; Zhong, Cuiling; Nudleman, Eric; Ferrara, Napoleone

    2016-09-22

    The VEGF-A isoforms play a crucial role in vascular development, and the VEGF signaling pathway is a clinically validated therapeutic target for several pathological conditions. Alternative mRNA splicing leads to the generation of multiple VEGF-A isoforms, including VEGF165. A recent study reported the presence of another isoform, VEGF-Ax, arising from programmed readthrough translation. Compared to VEGF165, VEGF-Ax has a 22-amino-acid extension in the COOH terminus and has been reported to function as a negative regulator of VEGF signaling in endothelial cells, with potent anti-angiogenic effects. Here, we show that, contrary to the earlier report, VEGF-Ax stimulates endothelial cell mitogenesis, angiogenesis, as well as vascular permeability. Accordingly, VEGF-Ax induces phosphorylation of key tyrosine residues in VEGFR-2. Notably, VEGF-Ax was less potent than VEGF165, consistent with its impaired binding to the VEGF co-receptor neuropilin-1.

  5. Organization of olfactory centres in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabinina, Olena; Task, Darya; Marr, Elizabeth; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Alford, Robert; O'Brochta, David A.; Potter, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors for multiple infectious human diseases and use a variety of sensory cues (olfactory, temperature, humidity and visual) to locate a human host. A comprehensive understanding of the circuitry underlying sensory signalling in the mosquito brain is lacking. Here we used the Q-system of binary gene expression to develop transgenic lines of Anopheles gambiae in which olfactory receptor neurons expressing the odorant receptor co-receptor (Orco) gene are labelled with GFP. These neurons project from the antennae and maxillary palps to the antennal lobe (AL) and from the labella on the proboscis to the suboesophageal zone (SEZ), suggesting integration of olfactory and gustatory signals occurs in this brain region. We present detailed anatomical maps of olfactory innervations in the AL and the SEZ, identifying glomeruli that may respond to human body odours or carbon dioxide. Our results pave the way for anatomical and functional neurogenetic studies of sensory processing in mosquitoes. PMID:27694947

  6. Negative immune checkpoints on T lymphocytes and their relevance to cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śledzińska, Anna; Menger, Laurie; Bergerhoff, Katharina; Peggs, Karl S; Quezada, Sergio A

    2015-12-01

    The term 'inhibitory checkpoint' refers to the broad spectrum of co-receptors expressed by T cells that negatively regulate T cell activation thus playing a crucial role in maintaining peripheral self-tolerance. Co-inhibitory receptor ligands are highly expressed by a variety of malignancies allowing evasion of anti-tumour immunity. Recent studies demonstrate that manipulation of these co-inhibitory pathways can remove the immunological brakes that impede endogenous immune responses against tumours. Antibodies that block the interactions between co-inhibitory receptors and their ligands have delivered very promising clinical responses, as has been shown by recent successful trials targeting the CTLA-4 and PD-1 pathways. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of action and expression pattern of co-inhibitory receptors on different T cells subsets, emphasising differences between CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. We also summarise recent clinical findings utilising immune checkpoint blockade.

  7. Structure-function Aspects of Extracellular Leucine-rich Repeat-containing Cell Surface Receptors in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhang; Bart PHJ Thomma

    2013-01-01

    Plants exploit several types of cell surface receptors for perception of extracellular signals, of which the extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR)-containing receptors form the major class. Although the function of most plant eLRR receptors remains unclear, an increasing number of these receptors are shown to play roles in innate immunity and a wide variety of developmental processes. Recent efforts using domain swaps, gene shuffling analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, interaction studies, and crystallographic analyses resulted in the current knowledge on ligand binding and the mechanism of activation of plant eLRR receptors. This review provides an overview of eLRR receptor research, specifically summarizing the recent understanding of interactions among plant eLRR receptors, their co-receptors and corresponding ligands. The functions of distinct eLRR receptor domains, and their role in structure, ligand perception and multimeric complex formation are discussed.

  8. A Review of Electroanalytical Techniques for Determination of Anti-HIV Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burçin Bozal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Until now after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV was discovered as the then tentative aetiological agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, exactly 25 anti-HIV compounds have been formally approved for clinical use in the treatment of AIDS. These compounds fall into six categories: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs: zidovudine, didanosine, zalcitabine, lamivudine, abacavir, stavudine, and emtricitabine, nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs: tenofovir, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs: efavirenz, nevirapine, delavirdine, and etravirine, protease inhibitors (PIs: ritonavir, indinavir, saquinavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, lopinavir, fosamprenavir, atazanavir, tipranavir and darunavir, fusion inhibitors (FIs: enfuvirtide, coreceptor inhibitors (CRIs: maraviroc, and integrase inhibitors (INIs: raltegravir. The present paper submitted the use of various electroanalytical techniques for the determination of anti-HIV drugs. This paper covers the time period from 1990 to 2010 including voltammetric techniques that were reported. Presented application concerns analysis of anti-HIV drugs from pharmaceutical dosage forms and biological samples.

  9. Anti-HIV drugs: 25 compounds approved within 25 years after the discovery of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2009-04-01

    In 2008, 25 years after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was discovered as the then tentative aetiological agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), exactly 25 anti-HIV compounds have been formally approved for clinical use in the treatment of AIDS. These compounds fall into six categories: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs: zidovudine, didanosine, zalcitabine, stavudine, lamivudine, abacavir and emtricitabine); nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs: tenofovir); non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs: nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz and etravirine); protease inhibitors (PIs: saquinavir, ritonavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, lopinavir, atazanavir, fosamprenavir, tipranavir and darunavir); cell entry inhibitors [fusion inhibitors (FIs: enfuvirtide) and co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs: maraviroc)]; and integrase inhibitors (INIs: raltegravir). These compounds should be used in drug combination regimens to achieve the highest possible benefit, tolerability and compliance and to diminish the risk of resistance development.

  10. Antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one.

  11. Molecular identification and characterization of the Orco orthologue of Spodoptera litura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Nan Wu; Xi Chen; Yong-Jun Du; Jing-Jiang Zhou; Qi-Chuan ZhuGe

    2013-01-01

    A highly conserved and broadly expressed receptor protein Orco (olfactory coreceptor) is crucial for insect olfaction,and an orthologue of Orco has been identified in several insect species.Here we report the identification and characterization of Orco from Spodoptera litura.The protein displays high primary amino acid sequence conservation with other previously identified Orco orthologues.Bioinformatic analysis revealed that it has common features with other members of the Orco subfamily:seven-transmembrane domains with intracellular N-terminus and extracellular C-terminus.The transcript was detected in abundance in the chemosensory organs of the antennae of both male and female adults by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis,and was localized at the bases of all categories of olfactory sensilla through in situ hybridization.

  12. Extensive HIV-1 intra-host recombination is common in tissues with abnormal histopathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna L Lamers

    Full Text Available There is evidence that immune-activated macrophages infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV are associated with tissue damage and serve as a long-lived viral reservoir during therapy. In this study, we analyzed 780 HIV genetic sequences generated from 53 tissues displaying normal and abnormal histopathology. We found up to 50% of the sequences from abnormal lymphoid and macrophage rich non-lymphoid tissues were intra-host viral recombinants. The presence of extensive recombination, especially in non-lymphoid tissues, implies that HIV-1 infected macrophages may significantly contribute to the generation of elusive viral genotypes in vivo. Because recombination has been implicated in immune evasion, the acquisition of drug-resistance mutations, and alterations of viral co-receptor usage, any attempt towards the successful eradication of HIV-1 requires therapeutic approaches targeting tissue macrophages.

  13. EGFR and EphA2 are host factors for hepatitis C virus entry and possible targets for antiviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupberger, Joachim; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Xiao, Fei; Thumann, Christine; Fofana, Isabel; Zona, Laetitia; Davis, Christopher; Mee, Christopher J.; Turek, Marine; Gorke, Sebastian; Royer, Cathy; Fischer, Benoit; Zahid, Muhammad N.; Lavillette, Dimitri; Fresquet, Judith; Cosset, François-Loïc; Rothenberg, S Michael; Pietschmann, Thomas; Patel, Arvind H.; Pessaux, Patrick; Doffoël, Michel; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Poch, Olivier; Mckeating, Jane A.; Brino, Laurent; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease. Therapeutic options are limited and preventive strategies are absent. Entry is the first step of infection and requires the cooperative interaction of several host cell factors. Using a functional RNAi kinase screen we identified epidermal growth factor receptor and ephrin receptor A2 as host co-factors for HCV entry. Blocking of kinase function by approved inhibitors broadly inhibited HCV infection of all major HCV genotypes and viral escape variants in cell culture and an animal model in vivo. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) mediate HCV entry by regulating CD81-claudin-1 co-receptor associations and membrane fusion. These results identify RTKs as novel HCV entry co-factors and uncover that kinase inhibitors have significant antiviral activity. Inhibition of RTK function may constitute a novel approach for prevention and treatment of HCV infection. PMID:21516087

  14. Force measurements of TCR/pMHC recognition at T cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Henri Puech

    Full Text Available The rupture forces and adhesion frequencies of single recognition complexes between an affinity selected peptide/MHC complex and a TCR at a murine hybridoma surface were measured using Atomic Force Microscopy. When the CD8 coreceptor is absent, the adhesion frequency depends on the nature of the peptide but the rupture force does not. When CD8 is present, no effect of the nature of the peptide is observed. CD8 is proposed to act as a time and distance lock, enabling the shorter TCR molecule to bridge the pMHC and have time to finely read the peptide. Ultimately, such experiments could help the dissection of the sequential steps by which the TCR reads the peptide/MHC complex in order to control T cell activation.

  15. Similarity of recombinant human perlecan domain 1 by alternative expression systems bioactive heterogenous recombinant human perlecan D1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellis, April L; Pan, Wensheng; Yang, Guang

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans are diverse components of certain proteoglycans and are known to interact with growth factors as a co-receptor necessary to induce signalling and growth factor activity. In this report we characterize heterogeneously glycosylated recombinant human...... perlecan domain 1 (HSPG2 abbreviated as rhPln.D1) synthesized in either HEK 293 cells or HUVECs by transient gene delivery using either adenoviral or expression plasmid technology. RESULTS: By SDS-PAGE analysis following anion exchange chromatography, the recombinant proteoglycans appeared to possess...... glycosaminoglycan chains ranging, in total, from 6 kDa to >90 kDa per recombinant. Immunoblot analysis of enzyme-digested high Mr rhPln.D1 demonstrated that the rhPln.D1 was synthesized as either a chondroitin sulfate or heparan sulfate proteoglycan, in an approximately 2:1 ratio, with negligible hybrids. Secondary...

  16. Extracellular ATP acts on P2Y2 purinergic receptors to facilitate HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séror, Claire; Melki, Marie-Thérèse; Subra, Frédéric; Raza, Syed Qasim; Bras, Marlène; Saïdi, Héla; Nardacci, Roberta; Voisin, Laurent; Paoletti, Audrey; Law, Frédéric; Martins, Isabelle; Amendola, Alessandra; Abdul-Sater, Ali A; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Delelis, Olivier; Niedergang, Florence; Thierry, Sylvain; Said-Sadier, Najwane; Lamaze, Christophe; Métivier, Didier; Estaquier, Jérome; Fimia, Gian Maria; Falasca, Laura; Casetti, Rita; Modjtahedi, Nazanine; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Ojcius, David M; Piacentini, Mauro; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Kroemer, Guido; Perfettini, Jean-Luc

    2011-08-29

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can activate purinergic receptors of the plasma membrane and modulate multiple cellular functions. We report that ATP is released from HIV-1 target cells through pannexin-1 channels upon interaction between the HIV-1 envelope protein and specific target cell receptors. Extracellular ATP then acts on purinergic receptors, including P2Y2, to activate proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) kinase and transient plasma membrane depolarization, which in turn stimulate fusion between Env-expressing membranes and membranes containing CD4 plus appropriate chemokine co-receptors. Inhibition of any of the constituents of this cascade (pannexin-1, ATP, P2Y2, and Pyk2) impairs the replication of HIV-1 mutant viruses that are resistant to conventional antiretroviral agents. Altogether, our results reveal a novel signaling pathway involved in the early steps of HIV-1 infection that may be targeted with new therapeutic approaches. © 2011 Séror et al.

  17. The role of CC chemokine receptor 5 in antiviral immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andreasen, Susanne Ørding

    2002-01-01

    The CC chemokine receptor CCR5 is an important coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and there is a major thrust to develop anti-CCR5-based therapies for HIV-1. However, it is not known whether CCR5 is critical for a normal antiviral T-cell response. This study investigated the immune...... response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking CCR5 (CCR5(-/-) mice). This infection is a classical model for studying antiviral immunity, and influx of CCR5-expressing CD8(+) T cells and macrophages is essential for both virus control and associated immunopathology. Results showed...... influence of CCR5 was found, not even when viral peptide was used as local trigger instead of live virus. Finally, long-term CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune surveillance was efficiently sustained in CCR5(-/-) mice. Taken together, these results indicate that expression of CCR5 is not critical for T cell...

  18. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface: versatile coordinators of cellular functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tumova, S; Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2000-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are complex molecules composed of a core protein with covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. While the protein part determines localization of the proteoglycan on the cell surfaces or in the extracellular matrix, the glycosaminoglycan component, heparan sulfate......, mediates interactions with a variety of extracellular ligands such as growth factors and adhesion molecules. Through these interactions, heparan sulfate proteoglycans participate in many events during cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation. We are determining the multitude...... of proteoglycan functions, as their intricate roles in many pathways are revealed. They act as coreceptors for growth factors, participate in signalling during cell adhesion, modulate the activity of a broad range of molecules, and partake in many developmental and pathological processes, including tumorigenesis...

  19. Shedding of cell membrane-bound proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Eon Jeong; Park, Pyong Woo

    2012-01-01

    Membrane-bound proteoglycans function primarily as coreceptors for many glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding ligands at the cell surface. The majority of membrane-bound proteoglycans can also function as soluble autocrine or paracrine effectors as their extracellular domains, replete with all GAG chains, are enzymatically cleaved and released from the cell surface by ectodomain shedding. In particular, the ectodomain shedding of syndecans, a major family of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, is an important posttranslational mechanism that modulates diverse pathophysiological processes. Syndecan shedding is a tightly controlled process that regulates the onset, progression, and resolution of various infectious and noninfectious inflammatory diseases. This review describes methods to induce and measure the shedding of cell membrane-bound proteoglycans, focusing on syndecan shedding as a prototypic example.

  20. Role of Abl kinase and the Wave2 signaling complex in HIV-1 entry at a post-hemifusion step.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Harmon

    Full Text Available Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 commences with binding of the envelope glycoprotein (Env to the receptor CD4, and one of two coreceptors, CXCR4 or CCR5. Env-mediated signaling through coreceptor results in Galphaq-mediated Rac activation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangements necessary for fusion. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs activate Rac and regulate its downstream protein effectors. In this study we show that Env-induced Rac activation is mediated by the Rac GEF Tiam-1, which associates with the adaptor protein IRSp53 to link Rac to the Wave2 complex. Rac and the tyrosine kinase Abl then activate the Wave2 complex and promote Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization. Env-mediated cell-cell fusion, virus-cell fusion and HIV-1 infection are dependent on Tiam-1, Abl, IRSp53, Wave2, and Arp3 as shown by attenuation of fusion and infection in cells expressing siRNA targeted to these signaling components. HIV-1 Env-dependent cell-cell fusion, virus-cell fusion and infection were also inhibited by Abl kinase inhibitors, imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib. Treatment of cells with Abl kinase inhibitors did not affect cell viability or surface expression of CD4 and CCR5. Similar results with inhibitors and siRNAs were obtained when Env-dependent cell-cell fusion, virus-cell fusion or infection was measured, and when cell lines or primary cells were the target. Using membrane curving agents and fluorescence microscopy, we showed that inhibition of Abl kinase activity arrests fusion at the hemifusion (lipid mixing step, suggesting a role for Abl-mediated actin remodeling in pore formation and expansion. These results suggest a potential utility of Abl kinase inhibitors to treat HIV-1 infected patients.

  1. Peptides from second extracellular loop of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) inhibit diverse strains of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogo-Isonagie, Cajetan; Lam, Son; Gustchina, Elena; Acharya, Priyamvada; Yang, Yongping; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Clore, G Marius; Kwong, Peter D; Bewley, Carole A

    2012-04-27

    To initiate HIV entry, the HIV envelope protein gp120 must engage its primary receptor CD4 and a coreceptor CCR5 or CXCR4. In the absence of a high resolution structure of a gp120-coreceptor complex, biochemical studies of CCR5 have revealed the importance of its N terminus and second extracellular loop (ECL2) in binding gp120 and mediating viral entry. Using a panel of synthetic CCR5 ECL2-derived peptides, we show that the C-terminal portion of ECL2 (2C, comprising amino acids Cys-178 to Lys-191) inhibit HIV-1 entry of both CCR5- and CXCR4-using isolates at low micromolar concentrations. In functional viral assays, these peptides inhibited HIV-1 entry in a CD4-independent manner. Neutralization assays designed to measure the effects of CCR5 ECL2 peptides when combined with either with the small molecule CD4 mimetic NBD-556, soluble CD4, or the CCR5 N terminus showed additive inhibition for each, indicating that ECL2 binds gp120 at a site distinct from that of N terminus and acts independently of CD4. Using saturation transfer difference NMR, we determined the region of CCR5 ECL2 used for binding gp120, showed that it can bind to gp120 from both R5 and X4 isolates, and demonstrated that the peptide interacts with a CD4-gp120 complex in a similar manner as to gp120 alone. As the CCR5 N terminus-gp120 interactions are dependent on CD4 activation, our data suggest that gp120 has separate binding sites for the CCR5 N terminus and ECL2, the ECL2 binding site is present prior to CD4 engagement, and it is conserved across CCR5- and CXCR4-using strains. These peptides may serve as a starting point for the design of inhibitors with broad spectrum anti-HIV activity.

  2. A maraviroc-resistant HIV-1 with narrow cross-resistance to other CCR5 antagonists depends on both N-terminal and extracellular loop domains of drug-bound CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, John C; Wilen, Craig B; Didigu, Chukwuka A; Sinha, Rohini; Harrison, Jessamina E; Agrawal-Gamse, Caroline; Henning, Elizabeth A; Bushman, Frederick D; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G; Doms, Robert W

    2010-10-01

    CCR5 antagonists inhibit HIV entry by binding to a coreceptor and inducing changes in the extracellular loops (ECLs) of CCR5. In this study, we analyzed viruses from 11 treatment-experienced patients who experienced virologic failure on treatment regimens containing the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc (MVC). Viruses from one patient developed high-level resistance to MVC during the course of treatment. Although resistance to one CCR5 antagonist is often associated with broad cross-resistance to other agents, these viruses remained sensitive to most other CCR5 antagonists, including vicriviroc and aplaviroc. MVC resistance was dependent upon mutations within the V3 loop of the viral envelope (Env) protein and was modulated by additional mutations in the V4 loop. Deep sequencing of pretreatment plasma viral RNA indicated that resistance appears to have occurred by evolution of drug-bound CCR5 use, despite the presence of viral sequences predictive of CXCR4 use. Envs obtained from this patient before and during MVC treatment were able to infect cells expressing very low CCR5 levels, indicating highly efficient use of a coreceptor. In contrast to previous reports in which CCR5 antagonist-resistant viruses interact predominantly with the N terminus of CCR5, these MVC-resistant Envs were also dependent upon the drug-modified ECLs of CCR5 for entry. Our results suggest a model of CCR5 cross-resistance whereby viruses that predominantly utilize the N terminus are broadly cross-resistant to multiple CCR5 antagonists, whereas viruses that require both the N terminus and antagonist-specific ECL changes demonstrate a narrow cross-resistance profile.

  3. Suppression of HIV replication in vitro by CpG and CpG conjugated to the non toxic B subunit of cholera toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowroozalizadeh, Salma; Jansson, Marianne; Adamsson, Jenni; Lindblad, Marianne; Fenyö, Eva-Maria; Holmgren, Jan; Harandi, Ali M

    2008-05-01

    Administration of oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing CpG motifs generates a rapid and potent response of CC-chemokines, known as ligands of the HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5, in the murine female genital tract. The present study explored the potential HIV inhibitory activities of different human CpG prototypes either alone or conjugated to the non-toxic subunit of cholera toxin (CTB). Results showed that in vitro replication of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 can be suppressed by different human CpG prototypes. Importantly, the conjugation of CpG ODN to CTB (CTB-CpG) enhanced the antiviral activity of CpG against primary HIV-1 isolates of both R5 and X4 phenotypes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as well as U87.CD4 co-receptor indicator cells. CTB-CpGs triggered higher amounts of MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta in PBMC than the corresponding CpG ODNs, which may explain the superior antiviral effect of CTB-CpG against R5 virus in PBMC. Incubation of PBMC with CpG ODN and CTB-CpG did not alter surface expression of HIV-1 receptors indicating that the observed anti-HIV-1 effect is not mediated through down regulation of HIV-1 receptors on target cells. Further, the enhanced antiviral effect of CTB-CpG was dependent on the presence of phosphorothioate backbone in the ODN, whereas the presence of CpG motif in ODNs was dispensable. These results have implications for the development of novel intervention strategies to prevent HIV infection.

  4. Role of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans in infection of human adenovirus serotype 3 and 35.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Tuve

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Species B human adenoviruses (Ads are increasingly associated with outbreaks of acute respiratory disease in U.S. military personnel and civil population. The initial interaction of Ads with cellular attachment receptors on host cells is via Ad fiber knob protein. Our previous studies showed that one species B Ad receptor is the complement receptor CD46 that is used by serotypes 11, 16, 21, 35, and 50 but not by serotypes 3, 7, and 14. In this study, we attempted to identify yet-unknown species B cellular receptors. For this purpose we used recombinant Ad3 and Ad35 fiber knobs in high-throughput receptor screening methods including mass spectrometry analysis and glycan arrays. Surprisingly, we found that the main interacting surface molecules of Ad3 fiber knob are cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. We subsequently found that HSPGs acted as low-affinity co-receptors for Ad3 but did not represent the main receptor of this serotype. Our study also revealed a new CD46-independent infection pathway of Ad35. This Ad35 infection mechanism is mediated by cellular HSPGs. The interaction of Ad35 with HSPGs is not via fiber knob, whereas Ad3 interacts with HSPGs via fiber knob. Both Ad3 and Ad35 interacted specifically with the sulfated regions within HSPGs that have also been implicated in binding physiologic ligands. In conclusion, our findings show that Ad3 and Ad35 directly utilize HSPGs as co-receptors for infection. Our data suggest that adenoviruses evolved to simulate the presence of physiologic HSPG ligands in order to increase infection.

  5. Anti-HIV-1 activity of anionic polymers: a comparative study of candidate microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP in soluble form blocks coreceptor binding sites on the virus envelope glycoprotein gp120 and elicits gp41 six-helix bundle formation, processes involved in virus inactivation. CAP is not soluble at pH Methods Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA were used to (1 study HIV-1 IIIB and BaL binding to micronized CAP; (2 detect virus disintegration; and (3 measure gp41 six-helix bundle formation. Cells containing integrated HIV-1 LTR linked to the β-gal gene and expressing CD4 and coreceptors CXCR4 or CCR5 were used to measure virus infectivity. Results 1 HIV-1 IIIB and BaL, respectively, effectively bound to micronized CAP. 2 The interaction between HIV-1 and micronized CAP led to: (a gp41 six-helix bundle formation; (b virus disintegration and shedding of envelope glycoproteins; and (c rapid loss of infectivity. Polymers other than CAP, except Carbomer 974P, elicited gp41 six-helix bundle formation in HIV-1 IIIB but only poly(napthalene sulfonate, in addition to CAP, had this effect on HIV-1 BaL. These polymers differed with respect to their virucidal activities, the differences being more pronounced for HIV-1 BaL. Conclusions Micronized CAP is the only candidate topical microbicide with the capacity to remove rapidly by adsorption from physiological fluids HIV-1 of both the X4 and R5 biotypes and is likely to prevent virus contact with target cells. The interaction between micronized CAP and HIV-1 leads to rapid virus inactivation. Among other anionic polymers, cellulose sulfate, BufferGel and aryl sulfonates appear most effective in this respect.

  6. CCR5 susceptibility to ligand-mediated down-modulation differs between human T lymphocytes and myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, James M; Kasprowicz, Richard; Hartley, Oliver; Signoret, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on leukocytes and a coreceptor used by HIV-1 to enter CD4(+) T lymphocytes and macrophages. Stimulation of CCR5 by chemokines triggers internalization of chemokine-bound CCR5 molecules in a process called down-modulation, which contributes to the anti-HIV activity of chemokines. Recent studies have shown that CCR5 conformational heterogeneity influences chemokine-CCR5 interactions and HIV-1 entry in transfected cells or activated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. However, the effect of CCR5 conformations on other cell types and on the process of down-modulation remains unclear. We used mAbs, some already shown to detect distinct CCR5 conformations, to compare the behavior of CCR5 on in vitro generated human T cell blasts, monocytes and MDMs and CHO-CCR5 transfectants. All human cells express distinct antigenic forms of CCR5 not detected on CHO-CCR5 cells. The recognizable populations of CCR5 receptors exhibit different patterns of down-modulation on T lymphocytes compared with myeloid cells. On T cell blasts, CCR5 is recognized by all antibodies and undergoes rapid chemokine-mediated internalization, whereas on monocytes and MDMs, a pool of CCR5 molecules is recognized by a subset of antibodies and is not removed from the cell surface. We demonstrate that this cell surface-retained form of CCR5 responds to prolonged treatment with more-potent chemokine analogs and acts as an HIV-1 coreceptor. Our findings indicate that the regulation of CCR5 is highly specific to cell type and provide a potential explanation for the observation that native chemokines are less-effective HIV-entry inhibitors on macrophages compared with T lymphocytes.

  7. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Blythe D; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Rawlings, David J

    2015-09-30

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP-modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34(+) cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties.

  8. The evolutionary analysis of emerging low frequency HIV-1 CXCR4 using variants through time--an ultra-deep approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Archer

    Full Text Available Large-scale parallel pyrosequencing produces unprecedented quantities of sequence data. However, when generated from viral populations current mapping software is inadequate for dealing with the high levels of variation present, resulting in the potential for biased data loss. In order to apply the 454 Life Sciences' pyrosequencing system to the study of viral populations, we have developed software for the processing of highly variable sequence data. Here we demonstrate our software by analyzing two temporally sampled HIV-1 intra-patient datasets from a clinical study of maraviroc. This drug binds the CCR5 coreceptor, thus preventing HIV-1 infection of the cell. The objective is to determine viral tropism (CCR5 versus CXCR4 usage and track the evolution of minority CXCR4-using variants that may limit the response to a maraviroc-containing treatment regimen. Five time points (two prior to treatment were available from each patient. We first quantify the effects of divergence on initial read k-mer mapping and demonstrate the importance of utilizing population-specific template sequences in relation to the analysis of next-generation sequence data. Then, in conjunction with coreceptor prediction algorithms that infer HIV tropism, our software was used to quantify the viral population structure pre- and post-treatment. In both cases, low frequency CXCR4-using variants (2.5-15% were detected prior to treatment. Following phylogenetic inference, these variants were observed to exist as distinct lineages that were maintained through time. Our analysis, thus confirms the role of pre-existing CXCR4-using virus in the emergence of maraviroc-insensitive HIV. The software will have utility for the study of intra-host viral diversity and evolution of other fast evolving viruses, and is available from http://www.bioinf.manchester.ac.uk/segminator/.

  9. Specialized filopodia direct long-range transport of SHH during vertebrate tissue patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Timothy A; Llagostera, Esther; Barna, Maria

    2013-05-30

    The ability of signalling proteins to traverse tissues containing tightly packed cells is of fundamental importance for cell specification and tissue development; however, how this is achieved at a cellular level remains poorly understood. For more than a century, the vertebrate limb bud has served as a model for studying cell signalling during embryonic development. Here we optimize single-cell real-time imaging to delineate the cellular mechanisms for how signalling proteins, such as sonic hedgehog (SHH), that possess membrane-bound covalent lipid modifications traverse long distances within the vertebrate limb bud in vivo. By directly imaging SHH ligand production under native regulatory control in chick (Gallus gallus) embryos, our findings show that SHH is unexpectedly produced in the form of a particle that remains associated with the cell via long cytoplasmic extensions that span several cell diameters. We show that these cellular extensions are a specialized class of actin-based filopodia with novel cytoskeletal features that have not been previously described. Notably, particles containing SHH travel along these extensions with a net anterograde movement within the field of SHH cell signalling. We further show that in SHH-responding cells, specific subsets of SHH co-receptors, including cell adhesion molecule downregulated by oncogenes (CDO) and brother of CDO (BOC), actively distribute and co-localize in specific micro-domains within filopodial extensions, far from the cell body. Stabilized interactions are formed between filopodia containing SHH ligand and those containing co-receptors over a long range. These results suggest that contact-mediated release propagated by specialized filopodia contributes to the delivery of SHH at a distance. Together, these studies identify an important mode of communication between cells that considerably extends our understanding of ligand movement and reception during vertebrate tissue patterning.

  10. Characterization of a peptide domain within the GB virus C NS5A phosphoprotein that inhibits HIV replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: GBV-C infection is associated with prolonged survival in HIV-infected people and GBV-C inhibits HIV replication in co-infection models. Expression of the GBV-C nonstructural phosphoprotein 5A (NS5A decreases surface levels of the HIV co-receptor CXCR4, induces the release of SDF-1 and inhibits HIV replication in Jurkat CD4+ T cell lines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Jurkat cell lines stably expressing NS5A protein and peptides were generated and HIV replication in these cell lines assessed. HIV replication was significantly inhibited in all cell lines expressing NS5A amino acids 152-165. Substitution of an either alanine or glycine for the serine at position 158 (S158A or S158G resulted in a significant decrease in the HIV inhibitory effect. In contrast, substituting a phosphomimetic amino acid (glutamic acid; S158E inhibited HIV as well as the parent peptide. HIV inhibition was associated with lower levels of surface expression of the HIV co-receptor CXCR4 and increased release of the CXCR4 ligand, SDF-1 compared to control cells. Incubation of CD4+ T cell lines with synthetic peptides containing amino acids 152-167 or the S158E mutant peptide prior to HIV infection resulted in HIV replication inhibition compared to control peptides. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Expression of GBV-C NS5A amino acids 152-165 are sufficient to inhibit HIV replication in vitro, and the serine at position 158 appears important for this effect through either phosphorylation or structural changes in this peptide. The addition of synthetic peptides containing 152-167 or the S158E substitution to Jurkat cells resulted in HIV replication inhibition in vitro. These data suggest that GBV-C peptides or a peptide mimetic may offer a novel, cellular-based approach to antiretroviral therapy.

  11. Class 3 semaphorins induce F-actin reorganization in human dendritic cells: Role in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, Sabrina; Wong, Bin Sheng; Latinovic, Olga; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Stamatos, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Class 3 semaphorins (Semas) are soluble proteins that are well recognized for their role in guiding axonal migration during neuronal development. In the immune system, Sema3A has been shown to influence murine dendritic cell (DC) migration by signaling through a neuropilin (NRP)-1/plexin-A1 coreceptor axis. Potential roles for class 3 Semas in human DCs have yet to be described. We tested the hypothesis that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, each with a unique NRP-1 and/or NRP-2 binding specificity, influence human DC migration. In this report, we find that although NRP-1 and NRP-2 are expressed in human immature DCs (imDCs), NRP-2 expression increases as cells mature further, whereas expression of NRP-1 declines dramatically. Elevated levels of RNA encoding plexin-A1 and -A3 are present in both imDCs and mature DC (mDCs), supporting the relevance of Sema/NRP/plexin signaling pathways in these cells. Sema3A, -3C, and -3F bind to human DCs, with Sema3F binding predominantly through NRP-2. The binding of these Semas leads to reorganization of actin filaments at the plasma membrane and increased transwell migration in the absence or presence of chemokine CCL19. Microfluidic chamber assays failed to demonstrate consistent changes in speed of Sema3C-treated DCs, suggesting increased cell deformability as a possible explanation for enhanced transwell migration. Although monocytes express RNA encoding Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, only RNA encoding Sema3C increases robustly during DC differentiation. These data suggest that Sema3A, -3C, and -3F, likely with coreceptors NRP-1, NRP-2, and plexin-A1 and/or -A3, promote migration and possibly other activities of human DCs during innate and adaptive immune responses.

  12. HIV-1 envelope subregion length variation during disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel E Curlin

    Full Text Available The V3 loop of the HIV-1 Env protein is the primary determinant of viral coreceptor usage, whereas the V1V2 loop region is thought to influence coreceptor binding and participate in shielding of neutralization-sensitive regions of the Env glycoprotein gp120 from antibody responses. The functional properties and antigenicity of V1V2 are influenced by changes in amino acid sequence, sequence length and patterns of N-linked glycosylation. However, how these polymorphisms relate to HIV pathogenesis is not fully understood. We examined 5185 HIV-1 gp120 nucleotide sequence fragments and clinical data from 154 individuals (152 were infected with HIV-1 Subtype B. Sequences were aligned, translated, manually edited and separated into V1V2, C2, V3, C3, V4, C4 and V5 subregions. V1-V5 and subregion lengths were calculated, and potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNLGS counted. Loop lengths and PNLGS were examined as a function of time since infection, CD4 count, viral load, and calendar year in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. V1V2 length and PNLGS increased significantly through chronic infection before declining in late-stage infection. In cross-sectional analyses, V1V2 length also increased by calendar year between 1984 and 2004 in subjects with early and mid-stage illness. Our observations suggest that there is little selection for loop length at the time of transmission; following infection, HIV-1 adapts to host immune responses through increased V1V2 length and/or addition of carbohydrate moieties at N-linked glycosylation sites. V1V2 shortening during early and late-stage infection may reflect ineffective host immunity. Transmission from donors with chronic illness may have caused the modest increase in V1V2 length observed during the course of the pandemic.

  13. Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cells transplantation and genetic modification of CCR5 m303/m303 mutant patient for HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Abdolreza; Farshbaf, Alieh; Erfanmanesh, Maryam

    2015-03-01

    HIV and AIDS is one of the biggest challenges all over the world. There are an approximately 34 million people living with the virus, and a large number of them become infected each year. Although there are some antiviral drugs for HIV viral load reduction, they are not sufficient. There is no cure for AIDS. Nowadays natural resistance or immunity has absorbed attentions. Because in some HIV positive patients progression trend is slow or even they indicate resistance to AIDS. One of the most interesting approaches in this category is CCR5 gene. CCR5 is a main cc-chemokine co-receptor that facilitates HIV-1 entry to macrophage and CD4(+) T cells. To now, many polymorphisms have been known by CCR5 gene that produces a truncated protein with no function. So, HIV-1 could not entry to immune-cells and the body resistant to HIV/AIDS. Δ32/Δ32 and m303/m303 homozygotes are example of mutations that could create this resistance mechanism. There is a new treatment, such as Hematopoietic Stem Cell transplantation (HSCT) in Berlin and Boston patients for Δ32/Δ32 mutation. It could eliminate co-receptor antagonist and highly-active-anti retroviral therapy (HAART) drugs problems such as toxicity, low safety and side-effects. Now there, the aim of this hypothesis will be evaluation of a new mutation CCR5 m303/m303 as autologous HSCT. This novel hypothesis indicates that autologous HSCT for m303/m303 could be effective treatment for anyone HIV/AIDS affected patient worldwide.

  14. Structural mechanism of trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E H Tran

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection begins with the binding of trimeric viral envelope glycoproteins (Env to CD4 and a co-receptor on target T-cells. Understanding how these ligands influence the structure of Env is of fundamental interest for HIV vaccine development. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we describe the contrasting structural outcomes of trimeric Env binding to soluble CD4, to the broadly neutralizing, CD4-binding site antibodies VRC01, VRC03 and b12, or to the monoclonal antibody 17b, a co-receptor mimic. Binding of trimeric HIV-1 BaL Env to either soluble CD4 or 17b alone, is sufficient to trigger formation of the open quaternary conformation of Env. In contrast, VRC01 locks Env in the closed state, while b12 binding requires a partial opening in the quaternary structure of trimeric Env. Our results show that, despite general similarities in regions of the HIV-1 gp120 polypeptide that contact CD4, VRC01, VRC03 and b12, there are important differences in quaternary structures of the complexes these ligands form on native trimeric Env, and potentially explain differences in the neutralizing breadth and potency of antibodies with similar specificities. From cryo-electron microscopic analysis at ∼9 Å resolution of a cleaved, soluble version of trimeric Env, we show that a structural signature of the open Env conformation is a three-helix motif composed of α-helical segments derived from highly conserved, non-glycosylated N-terminal regions of the gp41 trimer. The three N-terminal gp41 helices in this novel, activated Env conformation are held apart by their interactions with the rest of Env, and are less compactly packed than in the post-fusion, six-helix bundle state. These findings suggest a new structural template for designing immunogens that can elicit antibodies targeting HIV at a vulnerable, pre-entry stage.

  15. CRF19_cpx is an Evolutionary fit HIV-1 Variant Strongly Associated With Rapid Progression to AIDS in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Vivian; Khouri, Ricardo; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeissel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Pineda-Peña, Andrea-Clemencia; Theys, Kristof; Megens, Sarah; Moutschen, Michel; Pfeifer, Nico; Van Weyenbergh, Johan; Pérez, Ana B; Pérez, Jorge; Pérez, Lissette; Van Laethem, Kristel; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke

    2015-03-01

    Clinicians reported an increasing trend of rapid progression (RP) (AIDS within 3 years of infection) in Cuba. Recently infected patients were prospectively sampled, 52 RP at AIDS diagnosis (AIDS-RP) and 21 without AIDS in the same time frame (non-AIDS). 22 patients were sampled at AIDS diagnosis (chronic-AIDS) retrospectively assessed as > 3 years infected. Clinical, demographic, virological, epidemiological and immunological data were collected. Pol and env sequences were used for subtyping, transmission cluster analysis, and prediction of resistance, co-receptor use and evolutionary fitness. Host, immunological and viral predictors of RP were explored through data mining. Subtyping revealed 26 subtype B strains, 6 C, 6 CRF18_cpx, 9 CRF19_cpx, 29 BG-recombinants and other subtypes/URFs. All patients infected with CRF19 belonged to the AIDS-RP group. Data mining identified CRF19, oral candidiasis and RANTES levels as the strongest predictors of AIDS-RP. CRF19 was more frequently predicted to use the CXCR4 co-receptor, had higher fitness scores in the protease region, and patients had higher viral load at diagnosis. CRF19 is a recombinant of subtype D (C-part of Gag, PR, RT and nef), subtype A (N-part of Gag, Integrase, Env) and subtype G (Vif, Vpr, Vpu and C-part of Env). Since subtypes D and A have been associated with respectively faster and slower disease progression, our findings might indicate a fit PR driving high viral load, which in combination with co-infections may boost RANTES levels and thus CXCR4 use, potentially explaining the fast progression. We propose that CRF19 is evolutionary very fit and causing rapid progression to AIDS in many newly infected patients in Cuba.

  16. Tenascin-C is an innate broad-spectrum, HIV-1–neutralizing protein in breast milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Genevieve G.; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Amos, Joshua D.; Ho, Carrie; Kunz, Erika L.; Anasti, Kara; Stamper, Lisa W.; Liebl, Brooke E.; Barbas, Kimberly H.; Ohashi, Tomoo; Moseley, Martin Arthur; Liao, Hua-Xin; Erickson, Harold P.; Alam, S. Munir; Permar, Sallie R.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving an AIDS-free generation will require elimination of postnatal transmission of HIV-1 while maintaining the nutritional and immunologic benefits of breastfeeding for infants in developing regions. Maternal/infant antiretroviral prophylaxis can reduce postnatal HIV-1 transmission, yet toxicities and the development of drug-resistant viral strains may limit the effectiveness of this strategy. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, greater than 90% of infants exposed to HIV-1 via breastfeeding remain uninfected, despite daily mucosal exposure to the virus for up to 2 y. Moreover, milk of uninfected women inherently neutralizes HIV-1 and prevents virus transmission in animal models, yet the factor(s) responsible for this anti-HIV activity is not well-defined. In this report, we identify a primary HIV-1–neutralizing protein in breast milk, Tenascin-C (TNC). TNC is an extracellular matrix protein important in fetal development and wound healing, yet its antimicrobial properties have not previously been established. Purified TNC captured and neutralized multiclade chronic and transmitted/founder HIV-1 variants, and depletion of TNC abolished the HIV-1–neutralizing activity of milk. TNC bound the HIV-1 Envelope protein at a site that is induced upon engagement of its primary receptor, CD4, and is blocked by V3 loop- (19B and F39F) and chemokine coreceptor binding site-directed (17B) monoclonal antibodies. Our results demonstrate the ability of an innate mucosal host protein found in milk to neutralize HIV-1 via binding to the chemokine coreceptor site, potentially explaining why the majority of HIV-1–exposed breastfed infants are protected against mucosal HIV-1 transmission. PMID:24145401

  17. Synaptic roles for phosphomannomutase type 2 in a new Drosophila congenital disorder of glycosylation disease model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M. Parkinson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs constitute a rapidly growing family of human diseases resulting from heritable mutations in genes driving the production and modification of glycoproteins. The resulting symptomatic hypoglycosylation causes multisystemic defects that include severe neurological impairments, revealing a particularly critical requirement for tightly regulated glycosylation in the nervous system. The most common CDG, CDG-Ia (PMM2-CDG, arises from phosphomannomutase type 2 (PMM2 mutations. Here, we report the generation and characterization of the first Drosophila CDG-Ia model. CRISPR-generated pmm2-null Drosophila mutants display severely disrupted glycosylation and early lethality, whereas RNAi-targeted knockdown of neuronal PMM2 results in a strong shift in the abundance of pauci-mannose glycan, progressive incoordination and later lethality, closely paralleling human CDG-Ia symptoms of shortened lifespan, movement impairments and defective neural development. Analyses of the well-characterized Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ reveal synaptic glycosylation loss accompanied by defects in both structural architecture and functional neurotransmission. NMJ synaptogenesis is driven by intercellular signals that traverse an extracellular synaptomatrix and are co-regulated by glycosylation and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. Specifically, trans-synaptic signaling by the Wnt protein Wingless (Wg depends on the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG co-receptor Dally-like protein (Dlp, which is regulated by synaptic MMP activity. Loss of synaptic MMP2, Wg ligand, Dlp co-receptor and downstream trans-synaptic signaling occurs with PMM2 knockdown. Taken together, this Drosophila CDG disease model provides a new avenue for the dissection of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurological impairments and is a means by which to discover and test novel therapeutic treatment strategies.

  18. Elicitation of neutralizing antibodies directed against CD4-induced epitope(s using a CD4 mimetic cross-linked to a HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antu K Dey

    Full Text Available The identification of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env structures that can generate broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs is pivotal to the development of a successful vaccine against HIV-1 aimed at eliciting effective humoral immune responses. To that end, the production of novel Env structure(s that might induce BNAbs by presentation of conserved epitopes, which are otherwise occluded, is critical. Here, we focus on a structure that stabilizes Env in a conformation representative of its primary (CD4 receptor-bound state, thereby exposing highly conserved "CD4 induced" (CD4i epitope(s known to be important for co-receptor binding and subsequent virus infection. A CD4-mimetic miniprotein, miniCD4 (M64U1-SH, was produced and covalently complexed to recombinant, trimeric gp140 envelope glycoprotein (gp140 using site-specific disulfide linkages. The resulting gp140-miniCD4 (gp140-S-S-M64U1 complex was recognized by CD4i antibodies and the HIV-1 co-receptor, CCR5. The gp140-miniCD4 complex elicited the highest titers of CD4i binding antibodies as well as enhanced neutralizing antibodies against Tier 1 viruses as compared to gp140 protein alone following immunization of rabbits. Neutralization against HIV-2(7312/V434M and additional serum mapping confirm the specific elicitation of antibodies directed to the CD4i epitope(s. These results demonstrate the utility of structure-based approach in improving immunogenic response against specific region, such as the CD4i epitope(s here, and its potential role in vaccine application.

  19. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in HIV infection: Role in pathogenesis and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are known to function as regulatory molecules in leukocyte maturation, traffic, homing of lymphocytes and in the development of lymphoid tissues. Besides these functions in the immune system, certain chemokines and their receptors are involved in HIV pathogenesis. In order to infect a target cell, the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 has to interact with the cellular receptor CD-4 and co-receptor, CC or CXC chemokine receptors. Genetic findings have yielded major insights into the in vivo roles of individual co-receptors and their ligands in providing resistance to HIV infection. Mutations in chemokine receptor genes are associated with protection against HIV infections and also involved in delayed progression to AIDS in infected individuals. Blocking of chemokine receptors interrupts HIV infection in vitro and this offers new options for therapeutic strategies. Approaches have been made to study the CCR-5 inhibitors as antiviral therapies and possibly as components of a topical microbicide to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission. Immune strategies aimed at generating anti-CCR-5 antibodies at the level of the genital mucosa might be feasible and represent a strategy to induce mucosal HIV- protective immunity. It also remains to be seen how these types of agents will act in synergy with existing HIV-1 targeted anti viral, or those currently in developments. Beyond providing new perspectives in fundamental aspects of the HIV-1 transmission and pathogenesis, chemokines and their receptors suggest new areas for developing novel therapeutic and preventive strategies against HIV infections. Studies in this review were identified through a search for relevant literature in the pubmed database of the national library of medicine. In this review, some developments in chemokine research with particular focus on their roles in HIV pathogenesis, resistance and therapeutic applications have been discussed.

  20. Mutational analysis of sclerostin shows importance of the flexible loop and the cystine-knot for Wnt-signaling inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschert, Verena; van Dinther, Maarten; Weidauer, Stella; van Pee, Katharina; Muth, Eva-Maria; Ten Dijke, Peter; Mueller, Thomas D

    2013-01-01

    The cystine-knot containing protein Sclerostin is an important negative regulator of bone growth and therefore represents a promising therapeutic target. It exerts its biological task by inhibiting the Wnt (wingless and int1) signaling pathway, which participates in bone formation by promoting the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts. The core structure of Sclerostin consists of three loops with the first and third loop (Finger 1 and Finger 2) forming a structured β-sheet and the second loop being unstructured and highly flexible. Biochemical data showed that the flexible loop is important for binding of Sclerostin to Wnt co-receptors of the low-density lipoprotein related-protein family (LRP), by interacting with the Wnt co-receptors LRP5 or -6 it inhibits Wnt signaling. To further examine the structural requirements for Wnt inhibition, we performed an extensive mutational study within all three loops of the Sclerostin core domain involving single and multiple mutations as well as truncation of important regions. By this approach we could confirm the importance of the second loop and especially of amino acids Asn92 and Ile94 for binding to LRP6. Based on a Sclerostin variant found in a Turkish family suffering from Sclerosteosis we generated a Sclerostin mutant with cysteines 84 and 142 exchanged thereby removing the third disulfide bond of the cystine-knot. This mutant binds to LRP6 with reduced binding affinity and also exhibits a strongly reduced inhibitory activity against Wnt1 thereby showing that also elements outside the flexible loop are important for inhibition of Wnt by Sclerostin. Additionally, we examined the effect of the mutations on the inhibition of two different Wnt proteins, Wnt3a and Wnt1. We could detect clear differences in the inhibition of these proteins, suggesting that the mechanism by which Sclerostin antagonizes Wnt1 and Wnt3a is fundamentally different.