WorldWideScience

Sample records for core-collapse supernova explosions

  1. An Integral Condition for Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Jeremiah W

    2015-01-01

    We derive an integral condition for core-collapse supernova explosions and use it to construct a new diagnostic of explodability. The fundamental challenge in core-collapse supernova theory is to explain how a stalled accretion shock revives to explode a star. In this manuscript, we assume that shock revival is initiated by the delayed-neutrino mechanism and derive an integral condition for shock expansion, $v_s > 0$. Assuming that $v_s > 0$ corresponds to explosion, we recast this integral condition as a dimensionless condition for explosion, $\\Psi > 0$. Using 1D simulations, we confirm that $\\Psi = 0$ during the stalled phase and $\\Psi > 0$ during explosion. Having validated the integral condition, we use it to derive a useful explosion diagnostic. First, for a given set of parameters, we find the family of solutions to the steady-state equations, parameterized by shock radius $R_s$, yielding $\\Psi(R_s)$. For any particular solution, $\\Psi(R_s)$ may be negative, zero, or positive, and, since $\\Psi \\propto v...

  2. Massive Computation for Understanding Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Christian D

    2016-01-01

    How do massive stars explode? Progress toward the answer is driven by increases in compute power. Petascale supercomputers are enabling detailed three-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae. These are elucidating the role of fluid instabilities, turbulence, and magnetic field amplification in supernova engines.

  3. Role of Nucleon Strangeness in Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Timothy; Alberg, Mary; Miller, Gerald

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing quest to simulate explosions of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) in hydrodynamical calculations has placed an enormous premium upon the nuclear and hadronic processes integral to the system's evolution (i.e., the microphysics). In this context, modifications to the neutrino-nucleon elastic cross section have been identified as potentially key to ensuring that stalled bounce shocks are sufficiently re-energized to produce the desired explosion. An important source of such corrections can be found in a negative value for the nucleon's strange helicity content Δs , which leads to the enhancement and suppression of the ν - p and ν - n total cross sections, respectively. In this talk, however, I summarize the results of a recent analysis which led to a comparatively small magnitude for the strange helicity (Δs >= - 0 . 1) - a fact which renders nucleon strangeness an unlikely candidate for the decisive missing ingredient necessary in simulations for CCSN explosions. Work supported by DOE Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences program under Award No. DE-FG02-97ER-41014, and NSF Grant No. 1205686.

  4. An Integral Condition for Core-collapse Supernova Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2017-01-01

    We derive an integral condition for core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosions and use it to construct a new diagnostic of explodability. The fundamental challenge in CCSN theory is to explain how a stalled accretion shock revives to explode a star. In this manuscript, we assume that the shock revival is initiated by the delayed-neutrino mechanism and derive an integral condition for spherically symmetric shock expansion, vs > 0. One of the most useful one-dimensional explosion conditions is the neutrino luminosity and mass-accretion rate ({L}ν {--}\\dot{{ M }}) critical curve. Below this curve, steady-state stalled solutions exist, but above this curve, there are no stalled solutions. Burrows & Goshy suggested that the solutions above this curve are dynamic and explosive. In this manuscript, we take one step closer to proving this supposition; we show that all steady solutions above this curve have vs > 0. Assuming that these steady vs > 0 solutions correspond to explosion, we present a new dimensionless integral condition for explosion, Ψ > 0. Ψ roughly describes the balance between pressure and gravity, and we show that this parameter is equivalent to the τ condition used to infer the {L}ν {--}\\dot{{ M }} critical curve. The illuminating difference is that there is a direct relationship between Ψ and vs. Below the critical curve, Ψ may be negative, positive, and zero, which corresponds to receding, expanding, and stalled-shock solutions. At the critical curve, the minimum Ψ solution is zero; above the critical curve, Ψmin > 0, and all steady solutions have vs > 0. Using one-dimensional simulations, we confirm our primary assumptions and verify that Ψmin > 0 is a reliable and accurate explosion diagnostic.

  5. On the Nature of Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Adam; Hayes, John; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1995-09-01

    We investigate in this paper the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism in both one and two dimensions. With a radiation/hydrodynamic code based upon the PPM algorithm, we verify the usefulness of neutrino-driven overturn ("convection") between the shock and the neutrinosphere in igniting the supernova explosion. The two-dimensional simulation of the core of a 15 Msun star that we present here indicates that the breaking of spherical symmetry may be central to the explosion itself and that a multitude of bent and broken fingers is a common feature of the ejecta. As in one dimension, the explosion seems to be a mathematically critical phenomenon, evolving from a steady state to explosion after a critical mass accretion rate through the stalled shock has been reached. In the two-dimensional simulation the preexplosion convective phase lasted ˜30 overturns (˜100 ms) before exploding. The preexplosion steady state in two dimensions is similar to that achieved in one dimension, but in two dimensions, owing to the longer dwell time of matter in the overturning region, the average entropy achieved behind the stalled shock is larger. In addition, the entropy gradient in the convecting region is flatter. These effects, together with the dynamical pressure of the buoyant plumes, serve to increase the steady state shock radius (Rs) over its value in one dimension by 30%-100%. A large Rs enlarges the volume of the gain region, puts shocked matter lower in the gravitational potential well, and lowers the accretion ram pressure at the shock for a given Mdot. The critical condition for explosion is thereby relaxed. Since the "escape" temperature (Tesc) decreases with radius faster than the actual matter temperature (T) behind the shock, a larger Rs puts a larger fraction of the shocked material above its local escape temperature. T > Tesc is the condition for a thermally driven corona to lift off a star. In one, two, or three dimensions, since supernovae are driven by

  6. FINDING THE FIRST COSMIC EXPLOSIONS. II. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalen, Daniel J. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Joggerst, Candace C. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Stiavelli, Massimo [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Heger, Alexander [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Holz, Daniel E. [Enrico Fermi Institute, Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the properties of Population III (Pop III) stars is prerequisite to elucidating the nature of primeval galaxies, the chemical enrichment and reionization of the early intergalactic medium, and the origin of supermassive black holes. While the primordial initial mass function (IMF) remains unknown, recent evidence from numerical simulations and stellar archaeology suggests that some Pop III stars may have had lower masses than previously thought, 15-50 M{sub Sun} in addition to 50-500 M{sub Sun }. The detection of Pop III supernovae (SNe) by JWST, WFIRST, or the TMT could directly probe the primordial IMF for the first time. We present numerical simulations of 15-40 M{sub Sun} Pop III core-collapse SNe performed with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code RAGE. We find that they will be visible in the earliest galaxies out to z {approx} 10-15, tracing their star formation rates and in some cases revealing their positions on the sky. Since the central engines of Pop III and solar-metallicity core-collapse SNe are quite similar, future detection of any Type II SNe by next-generation NIR instruments will in general be limited to this epoch.

  7. Recent Progress on Ascertaining the Core Collapse Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzacappa, Anthony; Lentz, Eric J; Hix, W Raphael; Harris, J Austin; Messer, O E Bronson; Endeve, Eirik; Chertkow, Merek A; Blondin, John M; Marronetti, Pedro; Yakunin, Konstantin N

    2015-01-01

    We have been working within the fundamental paradigm that core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) may be neutrino driven, since the first suggestion of this by Colgate and White nearly five decades ago. Computational models have become increasingly sophisticated, first in one spatial dimension assuming spherical symmetry, then in two spatial dimensions assuming axisymmetry, and now in three spatial dimensions with no imposed symmetries. The increase in the number of spatial dimensions has been accompanied by an increase in the physics included in the models, and an increase in the sophistication with which this physics has been modeled. Computation has played an essential role in the development of CCSN theory, not simply for the obvious reason that such multidimensional, multi-physics, nonlinear events cannot possibly be fully captured analytically, but for its role in discovery. In particular, the discovery of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) through computation about a decade ago has impacted all s...

  8. Explosion Dynamics of Parametrized Spherically Symmetric Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ebinger, Kevin; Fröhlich, Carla; Perego, Albino; Hempel, Matthias; Eichler, Marius; Casanova, Jordi; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method, PUSH, for triggering core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosions of massive stars in spherical symmetry. This method provides a framework to study many important aspects of core collapse supernovae: the effects of the shock passage through the star, explosive supernova nucleosynthesis and the progenitor-remnant connection. Here we give an overview of the method, compare the results to multi-dimensional simulations and investigate the effects of the progenitor and the equation of state on black hole formation.

  9. Neutrino nucleosynthesis in core-collapse Supernova explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieverding A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis (ν process in supernova explosions of massive stars of solar metallicity with initial main sequence masses between 15 and 40 M⊙ has been studied. A new extensive set of neutrino-nucleus cross-sections for all the nuclei included in the reaction network is used and the average neutrino energies are reduced to agree with modern supernova simulations. Despite these changes the ν process is found to contribute still significantly to the production of the nuclei 7Li, 11B, 19F, 138La and 180Ta, even though the total yields for those nuclei are reduced. Furthermore we study in detail contributions of the ν process to the production of radioactive isotopes 26Al, 22Na and confirm the production of 92Nb and 98Tc.

  10. The explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae: progress in supernova theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K; Novak, Jérôme; Oertel, Micaela; Margueron, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; Martin, Noël; Blottiau, Patrick; Peres, Bruno; Durand, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernova remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydr...

  11. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  12. Evolution, Explosion and Nucleosynthesis of Core Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Limongi, M

    2003-01-01

    We present a new set of presupernova evolutions and explosive yields of massive stars of initial solar composition (Y=0.285, Z=0.02) in the mass range 13-35 Msun. All the models have been computed with the latest version (4.97) of the FRANEC code that now includes a nuclear network extending from neutrons to Mo98. The explosive nucleosynthesis has been computed twice: a first one with an hydro code and a second one following the simpler radiation dominated shock approximation (RDA).

  13. Inferring the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism with gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jade; Gossan, Sarah E.; Logue, Joshua; Heng, Ik Siong

    2016-12-01

    A detection of a core-collapse supernova (CCSN) gravitational-wave (GW) signal with an Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector network may allow us to measure astrophysical parameters of the dying massive star. GWs are emitted from deep inside the core, and, as such, they are direct probes of the CCSN explosion mechanism. In this study, we show how we can determine the CCSN explosion mechanism from a GW supernova detection using a combination of principal component analysis and Bayesian model selection. We use simulations of GW signals from CCSN exploding via neutrino-driven convection and rapidly rotating core collapse. Previous studies have shown that the explosion mechanism can be determined using one LIGO detector and simulated Gaussian noise. As real GW detector noise is both nonstationary and non-Gaussian, we use real detector noise from a network of detectors with a sensitivity altered to match the advanced detectors design sensitivity. For the first time, we carry out a careful selection of the number of principal components to enhance our model selection capabilities. We show that with an advanced detector network we can determine if the CCSN explosion mechanism is driven by neutrino convection for sources in our Galaxy and rapidly-rotating core collapse for sources out to the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  14. Heavy Element Nucleosynthesis in the MHD Jet Explosions of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimura, Nobuya; Fujimoto, Shin-ichirou; Kotake, Kei; Yamada, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    For the rst time heavy element nucleosynthesis in the magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) explosions of core-collapse supernovae are investigated using a massive star of 13M. in a main sequence stage. Contrary to the case of the spherical explosion, jet-like explosion due to the combined effects of the rotation and magnetic eld lowers the electron fraction signi cantly inside the layers above the Fe-core. Then, the anisotropic shock waves pass through the oxygen rich layers. As a consequence, we nd that the nucleosynthesis of the r- and p-process proceeds appreciably compared to the models previously considered.

  15. Inferring the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism with gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, Jade; Logue, Joshua; Heng, Ik Siong

    2016-01-01

    A detection of a core-collapse supernova (CCSN) gravitational-wave (GW) signal with an Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector network may allow us to measure astrophysical parameters of the dying massive star. GWs are emitted from deep inside the core and, as such, they are direct probes of the CCSN explosion mechanism. In this study we show how we can determine the CCSN explosion mechanism from a GW supernova detection using a combination of principal component analysis and Bayesian model selection. We use simulations of GW signals from CCSN exploding via neutrino-driven convection and rapidly-rotating core collapse. Previous studies have shown that the explosion mechanism can be determined using one LIGO detector and simulated Gaussian noise. As real GW detector noise is both non-stationary and non-Gaussian we use real detector noise from a network of detectors with a sensitivity altered to match the advanced detectors design sensitivity. For the first time we carry out a careful selection of the number of princi...

  16. Hot third family of compact stars and the possibility of core-collapse supernova explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Matthias; Heinimann, Oliver; Yudin, Andrey; Iosilevskiy, Igor; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2016-11-01

    A phase transition to quark matter can lead to interesting phenomenological consequences in core-collapse supernovae, e.g., triggering an explosion in spherically symmetric models. However, until now, this explosion mechanism was only shown to be working for equations of state that are in contradiction with recent pulsar mass measurements. Here, we identify that this explosion mechanism is related to the existence of a third family of compact stars. For the equations of state investigated, the third family is only pronounced in the hot, early stages of the protocompact star and absent or negligibly small at zero temperature and thus represents a novel kind of third family. This interesting behavior is a result of unusual thermal properties induced by the phase transition, e.g., characterized by a decrease of temperature with increasing density for isentropes, and can be related to a negative slope of the phase transition line in the temperature-pressure phase diagram.

  17. A New Multi-Dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-Collapse Supernovae II. Relativistic Explosion Models of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, B; Marek, A

    2012-01-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the CoCoNuT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the spacetime metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 solar mass progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared to Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated ele...

  18. Constraints on explosive silicon burning in core-collapse supernovae from measured Ni/Fe ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Jerkstrand, A; Magkotsios, G; Sim, S A; Fransson, C; Spyromilio, J; Heger, A; Müller, B; Sollerman, J; Smartt, S J

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of explosive nucleosynthesis yields in core-collapse supernovae provide tests for explosion models. We investigate constraints on explosive conditions derivable from measured amounts of nickel and iron after radioactive decays using nucleosynthesis networks with parameterized thermodynamic trajectories. The Ni/Fe ratio is for most regimes dominated by the production ratio of 58Ni/(54Fe + 56Ni), which tends to grow with higher neutron excess and with higher entropy. For SN 2012ec, a supernova that produced a Ni/Fe ratio of $3.4\\pm1.2$ times solar, we find that burning of a fuel with neutron excess $\\eta \\approx 6\\times 10^{-3}$ is required. Unless the progenitor metallicity is over 5 times solar, the only layer in the progenitor with such a neutron excess is the silicon shell. Supernovae producing large amounts of stable nickel thus suggest that this deep-lying layer can be, at least partially, ejected in the explosion. We find that common spherically symmetric models of $M_{\\rm ZAMS} \\lesssim 13$...

  19. Implications of turbulence for jets in core-collapse supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Gilkis, Avishai

    2014-01-01

    We show that turbulence in core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) which has been shown recently to ease shock revival can also lead to the formation of intermittent thick accretion disks, or accretion belts, around the newly born neutron star (NS). The accretion morphology is such that two low density funnels are formed along the polar directions. The disks then are likely to launch jets with a varying axis direction, i.e., jittering-jets, through the two opposite funnels. The energy contribution of jets in this jittering jets mechanism can result in an explosion energy of E>10^51erg, even without reviving the stalled shock. We strengthen the jittering jets mechanism as a prominent explosion mechanism of CCSNe.

  20. The Role of Waves in the Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossan, Sarah; Fuller, Jim; Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    The core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosion mechanism is not well understood. For garden variety CCSNe, the favored explosion scenario is delayed revival of the stalled shock powered by neutrino-driven convection. Despite huge computational advances, many simulations must use parameterized `light-bulb' models for neutrino heating or mask out inner regions of the proto-neutron star (PNS) for computational efficiency. These approximations can fail to capture hydrodynamical processes in the PNS core where nearly all the binding energy resides, and from which much of the explosion energy may originate. We show that gravity waves excited by core PNS convection may represent a significant heating source for the post-shock region. Using 1D simulations, we calculate the wave heating rate in the post-shock region out to one second after core bounce, showing that wave heating rates in excess of 1051 erg/s may persist for several hundreds of milliseconds, even after neutrino heating rates have decreased. Waves excited by PNS convection may therefore significantly contribute to shock revival and, subsequently, a successful and energetic explosion. We discuss how simulations can miss the effect of waves, and how future simulations can more accurately quantify wave heating rates.

  1. PUSHing Core-Collapse Supernovae to Explosions in Spherical Symmetry: Explodability and Nucleosynthesis Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sanjana; Ebinger, Kevin; Frohlich, Carla; Perego, Albino; Hempel, Matthias; Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2017-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the highly energetic deaths of massive stars. They play a vital role in the synthesis and dissemination of many chemical elements. CCSN nucleosynthesis calculations have previously relied on artificial explosion methods that do not adequately capture the physics of the innermost stellar layers. Multidimensional simulations currently being performed to fully unravel the explosion mechanism of CCSNe are very computationally expensive. The PUSH method, calibrated against SN1987A, provides parametrized spherically symmetric models that follow the consistent evolution of the proto-neutron star as well as the electron fraction of the ejecta. This method is computationally affordable and captures the physics relevant for nucleosynthesis calculations. Here, we present the results of a broad study that investigates the explodability and nucleosynthesis yields of progenitors covering a wide range of ZAMS masses. Comparisons of the predicted explosion properties and yields with observational CCSNe and metal-poor star data will also be presented. The complete set of nucleosynthesis yields will be a valuable input to models of galactic chemical evolution. United States Department of Energy (DOE Grant No. SC0010263).

  2. Two Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions Aided by General Relativity with Multidimensional Neutrino Transport

    CERN Document Server

    O'Connor, Evan

    2015-01-01

    We present results from computational simulations of core-collapse supernovae in {\\tt FLASH} using a newly-implemented multidimensional neutrino transport scheme and a newly-implemented general relativistic (GR) treatment of gravity. For the neutrino transport, we use a two moment method with an analytic closure (so-called M1 transport). This transport is multienergy, multispecies and truly multidimensional since we do not assume the commonly used ray-by-ray approximation. Our GR gravity is implemented in our Newtonian hydrodynamics simulations via an effective relativistic potential that closely reproduces the GR structure of neutron stars and has been shown to match GR simulations of core collapse quite well. In axisymmetry, we simulate core-collapse supernovae with five different progenitor models in both Newtonian and GR gravity. We find that the more compact protoneutron star structure realized in simulations with GR gravity gives higher neutrino luminosities and higher neutrino energies. These differenc...

  3. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. II. RELATIVISTIC EXPLOSION MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas, E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M{sub Sun} progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  4. A Neutrino-Driven Core Collapse Supernova Explosion of a 15 M Star

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, Stephen W; Hix, W Raphael; Messer, O E Bronson; Endeve, Eirik; Blondin, John M; Harris, J Austin; Marronetti, Pedro; Yakunin, Konstantin N; Lingerfelt, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    We present results from an ab initio three-dimensional, multi-physics core collapse supernova simulation for the case of a 15 M progenitor. Our simulation includes multi-frequency neutrino transport with state-of-the-art neutrino interactions in the "ray-by-ray" approximation, and approximate general relativity. Our model exhibits a neutrino-driven explosion. The shock radius begins an outward trajectory at approximately 275 ms after bounce, giving the first indication of a developing explosion in the model. The onset of this shock expansion is delayed relative to our two-dimensional counterpart model, which begins at approximately 200 ms after core bounce. At a time of 441 ms after bounce, the angle-averaged shock radius in our three-dimensional model has reached 751 km. Further quantitative analysis of the outcomes in this model must await further development of the post-bounce dynamics and a simulation that will extend well beyond 1 s after stellar core bounce, based on the results for the same progenitor ...

  5. The Role of Waves in the Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossan, Sarah; Fuller, Jim; Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    The core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosion mechanism is not well understood. For garden variety CCSNe, the favored scenario for explosion is delayed revival of the stalled shock powered by neutrino-driven convection. Despite tremendous computational advances, many simulations must use parameterized ‘light-bulb’ models for neutrino heating or mask out inner regions of the proto-neutron star (PNS) for computational efficiency. These approximations can fail to capture hydrodynamical processes in the core of the PNS where nearly all the binding energy resides, and from which much of the explosion energy may originate. We show that gravity (buoyancy) waves excited by core PNS convection (within the central 20 km of the PNS) may represent a significant heating source for the post-shock region. The gravity waves propagate out of the PNS and transform into acoustic waves before depositing their energy at the shock, converting a small fraction of the PNS binding energy into explosion energy. Using 1D simulations, we calculate the wave heating rate in the post-shock region out to one second after core bounce, showing that wave heating rates in excess of 1051 erg/s may persist for several hundreds of milliseconds, even after neutrino heating rates have declined to smaller values. Waves excited by PNS convection may therefore significantly contribute to shock revival and, subsequently, a successful and energetic explosion. We discuss how simulations can miss the effect of waves (or have not recognized them), and how future simulations can more accurately quantify wave heating rates.

  6. Core-Collapse supernovae and its progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Subhash; Misra, Kuntal

    2016-01-01

    Massive stars unable to sustain gravitational collapse, at the end of nuclear burning stage, turns out into core-collapse supernovae, leaving behind compact objects like neutron stars or black holes. The progenitor properties like mass and metallicity primarily governs the explosion parameters and type of compact remnant. In this contribution we summarize observational study of three Core Collapse type IIP SNe 2012aw, 2013ab and 2013ej, which are rigorously observed from ARIES and other Indian observatories and discuss their progenitor and explosion properties.

  7. Understanding Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, A

    2004-01-01

    I summarize, in the form of an extended abstract, the ongoing efforts at the University of Arizona (and in collaboration) to understand core-collapse supernovae theoretically. Included are short discussions of 1D (SESAME) and 2D (VULCAN/2D) codes and results, as well as discussions of the possible role of rotation. Highlighted are recent developments in multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics and the essential physics of the neutrino-driven mechanism.

  8. Core-Collapse Supernovae: Reflections and Directions

    CERN Document Server

    Janka, H -Thomas; Huedepohl, Lorenz; Marek, Andreas; Mueller, Bernhard; Obergaulinger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among the most fascinating phenomena in astrophysics and provide a formidable challenge for theoretical investigation. They mark the spectacular end of the lives of massive stars and, in an explosive eruption, release as much energy as the sun produces during its whole life. A better understanding of the astrophysical role of supernovae as birth sites of neutron stars, black holes, and heavy chemical elements, and more reliable predictions of the observable signals from stellar death events are tightly linked to the solution of the long-standing puzzle how collapsing stars achieve to explode. In this article our current knowledge of the processes that contribute to the success of the explosion mechanism are concisely reviewed. After a short overview of the sequence of stages of stellar core-collapse events, the general properties of the progenitor-dependent neutrino emission will be briefly described. Applying sophisticated neutrino transport in axisymmetric (2D) simulations with ...

  9. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Baird, Mark [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6173 (United States); Bruenn, Stephen [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Blondin, John [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  10. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Raphael Hix

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carrying 1044 joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  11. Failure of a neutrino-driven explosion after core-collapse may lead to a thermonuclear supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Kushnir, Doron

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that $\\sim10$ seconds after core-collapse of a massive star, a thermonuclear explosion of the outer shells is possible for some (tuned) initial density and composition profiles, assuming the neutrinos failed to explode the star. The explosion may lead to a successful supernova, as first suggested by Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle (1957). We perform a series of one-dimensional (1D) calculations of collapsing massive stars with simplified initial density profiles (similar to the results of stellar evolution calculations) and various compositions (not similar to 1D stellar evolution calculations). We assume that the neutrinos escaped with negligible effect on the outer layers, which inevitably collapse. As the shells collapse, they compress and heat up adiabatically, enhancing the rate of thermonuclear burning. In some cases, where significant shells of mixed helium and oxygen are present with pre-collapsed burning times of $\\lesssim100\\,\\textrm{s}$ ($\\approx10$ times the free-fall time), a ...

  12. R-Process Nucleosynthesis in MHD Jet Explosions of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoaki Saruwatari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the r-process nucleosynthesis during the magnetohydrodynamical (MHD explosion of a supernova in a helium star of 3.3 M⊙, where effects of neutrinos are taken into account using the leakage scheme in the two-dimensional (2D hydrodynamic code. Jet-like explosion due to the combined effects of differential rotation and magnetic field is able to erode the lower electron fraction matter from the inner layers. We find that the ejected material of low electron fraction responsible for the r-process comes out from just outside the neutrino sphere deep inside the Fe-core. It is found that heavy element nucleosynthesis depends on the initial conditions of rotational and magnetic fields. In particular, the third peak of the distribution is significantly overproduced relative to the solar system abundances, which would indicate a possible r-process site owing to MHD jets in supernovae.

  13. Progenitor-dependent Explosion Dynamics in Self-consistent, Axisymmetric Simulations of Neutrino-driven Core-collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Summa, Alexander; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Melson, Tobias; Marek, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    We present self-consistent, axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code for 18 pre-supernova models in the range of 11-28 solar masses, including progenitors recently investigated by other groups. All models develop explosions, but depending on the progenitor structure, they can be divided into two classes. With a steep density decline at the Si/Si-O interface, the arrival of this interface at the shock front leads to a sudden drop of the mass-accretion rate, triggering a rapid approach to explosion. With a more gradually decreasing accretion rate, it takes longer for the neutrino heating to overcome the accretion ram pressure and explosions set in later. Early explosions are facilitated by high mass-accretion rates after bounce and correspondingly high neutrino luminosities combined with a pronounced drop of the accretion rate and ram pressure at the Si/Si-O interface. Because of rapidly shrinking neutron star radii and receding shock fronts after the passage th...

  14. (Extreme) Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mösta, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    In this talk I will present recent progress on modeling core-collapse supernovae with massively parallel simulations on the largest supercomputers available. I will discuss the unique challenges in both input physics and computational modeling that come with a problem involving all four fundamental forces and relativistic effects and will highlight recent breakthroughs overcoming these challenges in full 3D simulations. I will pay particular attention to how these simulations can be used to reveal the engines driving some of the most extreme explosions and conclude by discussing what remains to be done in simulation work to maximize what we can learn from current and future time-domain astronomy transient surveys.

  15. Core Collapse Supernova Models For Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Jordi; Frohlich, C.; Perego, A.; Hempel, M.

    2014-01-01

    Type II supernova explosions are the product of the collapse of massive stars (M > 8-10 Msun), which explode with a kinetic energy release of 1e51 erg. While sophisticated multi-dimensional models can reveal details of the explosion mechanism (role of convection, fluid instabilities, etc.), they are computationally too expensive for nucleosynthesis studies. However, precise nucleosynthesis predictions are needed to understand the supernova contribution to the heavy elements and the abundances observed in metal-poor stars. We have modeled the core collapse, bounce and subsequent explosion of massive stars assuming spherical symmetry with the code Agile-IDSA (Liebendoerfer et al. 2009) combined with a novel method to artificially trigger the explosion (PUSH). The code also includes the Hempel EOS, which uses a modern non-NSE to cover the entire nucleosynthesis duration. In our simulations, based on the neutrino-delayed explosion mechanism, the explosion sets in by depositing a small amount of additional energy (from mu and tau neutrinos) to revive the stalled shock. Our results show that the code Agile-IDSA combined with PUSH is very robust and can successfully reproduce an explosion with a more reliable treatment of the crucial quantities involved in nucleosynthesis (i.e., the electron fraction). Here, we present a detailed isotopic abundance study for a wide variety of progenitors, as well as an analysis of the explosion properties, such as the explosion energies, remnant masses or compactness of the progenitor models.

  16. Progenitor-dependent Explosion Dynamics in Self-consistent, Axisymmetric Simulations of Neutrino-driven Core-collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Alexander; Hanke, Florian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Melson, Tobias; Marek, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    We present self-consistent, axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code for 18 pre-supernova models in the range of 11-28 M ⊙, including progenitors recently investigated by other groups. All models develop explosions, but depending on the progenitor structure, they can be divided into two classes. With a steep density decline at the Si/Si-O interface, the arrival of this interface at the shock front leads to a sudden drop of the mass-accretion rate, triggering a rapid approach to explosion. With a more gradually decreasing accretion rate, it takes longer for the neutrino heating to overcome the accretion ram pressure and explosions set in later. Early explosions are facilitated by high mass-accretion rates after bounce and correspondingly high neutrino luminosities combined with a pronounced drop of the accretion rate and ram pressure at the Si/Si-O interface. Because of rapidly shrinking neutron star radii and receding shock fronts after the passage through their maxima, our models exhibit short advection timescales, which favor the efficient growth of the standing accretion-shock instability. The latter plays a supportive role at least for the initiation of the re-expansion of the stalled shock before runaway. Taking into account the effects of turbulent pressure in the gain layer, we derive a generalized condition for the critical neutrino luminosity that captures the explosion behavior of all models very well. We validate the robustness of our findings by testing the influence of stochasticity, numerical resolution, and approximations in some aspects of the microphysics.

  17. Probing the Core-Collapse Supernova Mechanism with Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, C D

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions must draw on the energy provided by gravitational collapse and transfer the necessary fraction to the kinetic and internal energy of the ejecta. Despite many decades of concerted theoretical effort, the detailed mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions is still unknown, but indications are strong that multi-D processes lie at its heart. This opens up the possibility of probing the supernova mechanism with gravitational waves, carrying direct dynamical information from the supernova engine deep inside a dying massive star. I present a concise overview of the physics and primary multi-D dynamics in neutrino-driven, magnetorotational, and acoustically-driven core-collapse supernova explosion scenarios. Discussing and contrasting estimates for the gravitational-wave emission characteristics of these mechanisms, I argue that their gravitational-wave signatures are clearly distinct and that the observation (or non-observation) of gravitational waves from a ...

  18. THREE-DIMENSIONAL EXPLOSION GEOMETRY OF STRIPPED-ENVELOPE CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. I. SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Iye, Masanori [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Kawabata, Koji S.; Yamanaka, Masayuki [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan); Hattori, Takashi; Aoki, Kentaro; Sasaki, Toshiyuki [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Mazzali, Paolo A. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2 D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken' ichi [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa (Japan); Pian, Elena, E-mail: masaomi.tanaka@nao.ac.jp [Istituto Naz. di Astrofisica-Oss. Astron., Via Tiepolo, 11, 34131 Trieste (Italy)

    2012-07-20

    We study the multi-dimensional geometry of supernova (SN) explosions by means of spectropolarimetric observations of stripped-envelope SNe, i.e., SNe without a hydrogen-rich layer. We perform spectropolarimetric observations of two stripped-envelope SNe, Type Ib SN 2009jf and Type Ic SN 2009mi. Both objects show non-zero polarization at the wavelength of the strong lines. They also show a loop in the Stokes Q - U diagram, which indicates a non-axisymmetric, three-dimensional ion distribution in the ejecta. We show that five out of six stripped-envelope SNe, which have been observed spectropolarimetrically so far, show such a loop. This implies that a three-dimensional geometry is common in stripped-envelope SNe. We find that stronger lines tend to show higher polarization. This effect is not related to the geometry, and must be corrected for to compare the polarization of different lines or different objects. Even after the correction, however, there remains a dispersion of polarization degree among different objects. Such a dispersion might be caused by three-dimensional clumpy ion distributions viewed from different directions.

  19. Three-Dimensional Explosion Geometry of Stripped-Envelope Core-Collapse Supernovae. I. Spectropolarimetric Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Hattori, Takashi; Mazzali, Paolo A; Aoki, Kentaro; Iye, Masanori; Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Pian, Elena; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Yamanaka, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    We study the multi-dimensional geometry of supernova (SN) explosions by means of spectropolarimetric observations of stripped-envelope SNe, i.e., SNe without a H-rich layer. We perform spectropolarimetric observations of 2 stripped-envelope SNe, the Type Ib SN 2009jf and the Type Ic SN 2009mi. Both objects show non-zero polarization at the wavelength of the strong lines. They also show a loop in the Stokes Q-U diagram, which indicates a non-axisymmetric, three-dimensional ion distribution in the ejecta. We show that five out of six stripped-envelope SNe which have been observed spectropolarimetrically so far show such a loop. This implies that a three-dimensional geometry is common in stripped-envelope SNe. We find that stronger lines tend to show higher polarization. This effect is not related to the geometry, and must be corrected to compare the polarization of different lines or different objects. Even after the correction, however, there remains a dispersion of polarization degree among different objects....

  20. Inferring Core-Collapse Supernova Physics with Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Logue, J; Heng, I S; Kalmus, P; Scargill, J

    2012-01-01

    Stellar collapse and the subsequent development of a core-collapse supernova explosion emit bursts of gravitational waves (GWs) that might be detected by the advanced generation of laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatories such as Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, and LCGT. GW bursts from core-collapse supernovae encode information on the intricate multi-dimensional dynamics at work at the core of a dying massive star and may provide direct evidence for the yet uncertain mechanism driving supernovae in massive stars. Recent multi-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae exploding via the neutrino, magnetorotational, and acoustic explosion mechanisms have predicted GW signals which have distinct structure in both the time and frequency domains. Motivated by this, we describe a promising method for determining the most likely explosion mechanism underlying a hypothetical GW signal, based on Principal Component Analysis and Bayesian model selection. Using simulated Advanced LIGO noise and ass...

  1. Fingerprinting Hydrogen in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Sarafina; Parrent, Jerod; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on the mass of remaining hydrogen envelopes for stars massive enough to explode under core collapse. Using the stellar evolution code, MESA, our initial findings suggest that a significant fraction of massive stars with M_ZAMS = 20-60 Msun lose all but 10^-3 Msun -10^-1 Msun as they near eventual core collapse. This result is dependent on the mass-loss prescription, degree of rotation, metallicity, rates of nuclear burning in the core, and the final stellar configuration. Nevertheless, each of our test cases include a few stars that retain trace amounts of surface hydrogen, which would then be detected as faint H in type IIb/Ib/Ic supernova spectra. We also compare our findings to the progenitor candidate identified for iPTF13bvn using the most recent photometric corrections. We agree with the previous conclusion found by Groh et al. (2013) that the progenitor had an initial mass of 32 Msun, but now with an additional condition of 0.06 Msun of hydrogen on its surface just prior to the explosion. We demonstrate through our study that not all Type Ib supernovae are fully devoid of hydrogen at the time of explosion, which has implications for the nature of the progenitor star and thus provides impetus for a revised classification scheme for 'stripped envelope' supernovae. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  2. Three-dimensional Explosion Geometry of Stripped-envelope Core-collapse Supernovae. II. Modeling of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Maeda, Keiichi; Mazzali, Paolo A.; Kawabata, Koji S.; Nomoto, Ken’ichi

    2017-03-01

    We present modeling of line polarization to study the multidimensional geometry of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae (SNe). We demonstrate that a purely axisymmetric, two-dimensional (2D) geometry cannot reproduce a loop in the Stokes Q ‑ U diagram, that is, a variation of the polarization angles along the velocities associated with the absorption lines. On the contrary, three-dimensional (3D) clumpy structures naturally reproduce the loop. The fact that the loop is commonly observed in stripped-envelope SNe suggests that SN ejecta generally have a 3D structure. We study the degree of line polarization as a function of the absorption depth for various 3D clumpy models with different clump sizes and covering factors. A comparison between the calculated and observed degree of line polarization indicates that a typical size of the clump is relatively large, ≳25% of the photospheric radius. Such large-scale clumps are similar to those observed in the SN remnant Cassiopeia A. Given the small size of the observed sample, the covering factor of the clumps is only weakly constrained (∼5%–80%). The presence of a large-scale clumpy structure suggests that the large-scale convection or standing accretion shock instability takes place at the onset of the explosion.

  3. Core-Collapse Supernovae, Neutrinos, and Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, C D; Gossan, S; Abdikamalov, E; Gamma, U C T; Drasco, S

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among the most energetic cosmic cataclysms. They are prodigious emitters of neutrinos and quite likely strong galactic sources of gravitational waves. Observation of both neutrinos and gravitational waves from the next galactic or near extragalactic core-collapse supernova will yield a wealth of information on the explosion mechanism, but also on the structure and angular momentum of the progenitor star, and on aspects of fundamental physics such as the equation of state of nuclear matter at high densities and low entropies. In this contribution to the proceedings of the Neutrino 2012 conference, we summarize recent progress made in the theoretical understanding and modeling of core-collapse supernovae. In this, our emphasis is on multi-dimensional processes involved in the explosion mechanism such as neutrino-driven convection and the standing accretion shock instability. As an example of how supernova neutrinos can be used to probe fundamental physics, we discuss how the rise ti...

  4. Reconstructing core-collapse supernovae waveforms with advanced era interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, Jessica; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Among of the wide range of potentially interesting astrophysical sources for Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo are galactic core-collapse supernovae. Although detectable core-collapse supernovae have a low expected rate (a few per century, or less) these signals would yield a wealth of new physics in the form of many messengers. Of particular interest is the insight into the explosion mechanism driving core-collapse supernovae that can be gleaned from the reconstructed gravitational wave signal. A well-reconstructed waveform will allow us to assess the likelihood of different explosion models, perform model selection, and potentially map unexpected features to new physics. This talk will present a study evaluating the current performance of the reconstruction of core-collapse supernovae gravitational wave signals. We used simulated waveforms modeled after different explosion mechanisms that we first injected into fake strain data re-colored to the expected Advanced LIGO/Virgo noise curves and then reconstructed using the pipelines Coherent Waveburst 2G and BayesWave. We will discuss the impact of these results on our ability to accurately reconstruct core-collapse supernovae signals, and by extension, other potential astrophysical generators of rich, complex waveforms.

  5. Perspectives on Core-Collapse Supernova Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse theory brings together many facets of high-energy and nuclear astrophysics and the numerical arts to present theorists with one of the most important, yet frustrating, astronomical questions: "What is the mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions?" A review of all the physics and the fifty-year history involved would soon bury the reader in minutiae that could easily obscure the essential elements of the phenomenon, as we understand it today. Moreover, much remains to be discovered and explained, and a complicated review of an unresolved subject in flux could grow stale fast. Therefore, in this paper I describe what I think are various important facts and perspectives that may have escaped the attention of those interested in this puzzle. Furthermore, I attempt to describe the modern theory's physical underpinnings and briefly summarize the current state of play. In the process, I identify a few myths (as I see them) that have crept into modern discourse. However, there is much more to do ...

  6. Core collapse supernova remnants with ears

    CERN Document Server

    Grichener, Aldana

    2016-01-01

    We study the morphologies of core collapse supernova remnants (CCSNRs) and find that about third of CCSNRs have two opposite `ears' protruding from their main shell, and that the typical energy that is required to inflate these ears is about 10 percents of the explosion kinetic energy. We argue that these properties are most compatible with the expectation from the explosion jet feedback mechanism (JFM). Based on previous studies of ears in CCSNRs and the similarity of some ears to those found in planetary nebulae, we assume that the ears are inflated by jets that are launched during the explosion, or a short time after it. In the JFM explosion process the last jets' launching episode takes place just after the core has been ejected. These jets expand freely, interact with the exploding gas at some distance from the center, and form the ears. Under simple geometrical assumptions we find that the extra kinetic energy of the ears is in the range of 1 to 10 percents of the explosion energy. As not all of the kin...

  7. The physics of core collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swesty, Frank Douglas

    1993-01-01

    I have developed an equation of state (EOS) for hot, dense matter that is intended specifically for use in radiation hydrodynamic simulations of supernovae, proto-neutron star cooling, and neutron stars. This EOS makes use of an adjustable nucleon-nucleon interaction that allows for the input of various nuclear force parameters that are not well determined by laboratory measurements. Properties of the EOS as a function of these input parameters were studied and comparisons were made to another EOS that is currently used in stellar collapse simulations. Using this EOS I have conducted simulations of core collapse supernovae with several ideas in mind. First, I have attempted to delineate role of the incompressibility of dense matter in supernovae. I have conducted a parameter study in which the compression modulous of bulk nuclear matter was varied and have found some new and surprising results. When the EOS is constrained by the observed mass of 1.44M(solar mass) for one of the components of the binary pulsar system PSR1913+16, the 'stiffness' of the EOS no longer plays a role in the shock dynamics of the supernova. Secondly, I varied the symmetry energy coefficients in the EOS to determine the role of these coefficients in supernovae. I have found that the symmetry energy behavior of the EOS has potentially observable effects and may play an important role in determining the efficacy of the late-time heating mechanism for the explosion and the stability of the post-bounce core against convection. Finally, I have developed an implicit, general relativistic, radiation hydrodynamics algorithm for the numerical simulation of supernovae. By allowing simulation timesteps to exceed the Courant timescale, this algorithm makes practical high resolution simulations of supernovae to late times. I discuss this algorithm and the associated computer code along with code verification tests and an example of a late-time calculation.

  8. A New Multi-Dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code of Core-Collapse Supernovae III. Gravitational Wave Signals from Supernova Explosion Models

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Bernhard; Marek, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the gravitational-wave (GW) signal of the post-bounce evolution of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), employing for the first time relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) explosion models with multi-group, three-flavor neutrino transport based on the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. The waveforms reflect the accelerated mass motions associated with the characteristic evolutionary stages that were also identified in previous works: A quasi-periodic modulation by prompt postshock convection is followed by a phase of relative quiescence before growing amplitudes signal violent hydrodynamical activity due to convection and the standing accretion shock instability during the accretion period of the stalled shock. Finally, a high-frequency, low-amplitude variation from proto-neutron star (PNS) convection below the neutrinosphere appears superimposed on the low-frequency trend associated with the aspherical expansion of the SN shock after the onset of the explosion. Relativistic e...

  9. Ultraviolet observations of core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Tyler Anthony

    Ultraviolet observations of Core Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) have traditionally lagged behind observations in the optical and near-infrared. With the launch of Swift in 2004 this began to change. The systematic study of UV emission from these objects provides information about supernovae temperature, radius, metallicity and luminosity that may be difficult to obtain from the ground - especially at early times where upwards of 80% of the SNe bolometric flux may come from the UV region. We begin with the examination of an extraordinary Type IIn supernova SN 2007pk, which was at the time the earliest observed Type IIn SNe in the UV, and characterize the explosion properties while examining how the early observed UV emission compares with other observed CCSNe at early times. Building upon this we assemble the largest sample of CCSNe in the UV and examine the UV and bolometric characteristics of CCSNe by subtype. Using these bolometric light curves we go on to calculate empirically based bolometric corrections and UV- ux corrections for use by observers when observing filters are limited or UV observations are unable to be obtained. We improve upon this by identifying a small subsample of Type II Plateau SNe which have simultaneous ground based optical - near infrared data, and improve our bolometric light curve calculation method to more accurately determine bolometric light curve, corrections and UV corrections. Finally, we use recent hydrodynamical models to examine the accuracy of current modeling techniques to reproduce Type IIP SNe, the implications of progenitor properties on the light curves of the SNe, and possibility of future diagnostics for progenitor metalicity, radius, and explosion energies from Type IIP light curves and models.

  10. The phase diagram of QCD, third families of proto-compact stars, and the possibility of core-collapse supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Hempel, Matthias; Yudin, Andrey; Iosilevskiy, Igor; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2015-01-01

    A phase transition (PT) to quark matter can lead to interesting phenomenological consequences in core-collapse supernovae, e.g., triggering an explosion in spherically symmetric models. However, until now this explosion mechanism was only shown to be working for equations of state that are in contradiction with recent pulsar mass measurements. Here we identify that this explosion mechanism is related to the existence of a third family of compact stars that is present only in the hot, early stages of their evolution. Its existence is a result of unusual thermal properties of the two-phase coexistence region of the PT, e.g., characterized by a decrease of temperature with increasing density for isentropes, and which can be related to a negative slope of the PT line in the temperature-pressure phase diagram.

  11. Toward a Standard Model of Core Collapse Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Mezzacappa, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the current status of core collapse supernova models and the future developments needed to achieve significant advances in understanding the supernova mechanism and supernova phenomenology, i.e., in developing a supernova standard model.

  12. Computational Models of Stellar Collapse and Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, C D; Burrows, A; Livne, E; O'Connor, E; Löffler, F

    2009-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among Nature's most energetic events. They mark the end of massive star evolution and pollute the interstellar medium with the life-enabling ashes of thermonuclear burning. Despite their importance for the evolution of galaxies and life in the universe, the details of the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism remain in the dark and pose a daunting computational challenge. We outline the multi-dimensional, multi-scale, and multi-physics nature of the core-collapse supernova problem and discuss computational strategies and requirements for its solution. Specifically, we highlight the axisymmetric (2D) radiation-MHD code VULCAN/2D and present results obtained from the first full-2D angle-dependent neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the post-core-bounce supernova evolution. We then go on to discuss the new code Zelmani which is based on the open-source HPC Cactus framework and provides a scalable AMR approach for 3D fully general-relativistic modeling of stellar col...

  13. Neutrino oscillations in core-collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Meng-Ru [TU Darmstadt (Germany); University of Minnesota, MN (United States); Huther, Lutz [TU Darmstadt (Germany); Fischer, Tobias; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel [TU Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Qian, Yong-Zhong [University of Minnesota, MN (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Neutrino oscillations play an important role in determining the spectra of neutrinos emitted from core-collapse supernova and must be considered in the analysis of supernova neutrino detection to understand both the supernova dynamics and the unknown neutrino mass hierarchy. We have studied neutrino oscillations in supernovae using the emission spectra of neutrinos and the dynamically evolving supernova density profile from a state-of-the-art supernova model. We find that in this model, different regions of neutrino oscillations are well separated. Collective neutrino oscillations happen at the innermost part such that the spectra of electron neutrinos and mu/tau neutrinos are partly swapped for the first few seconds in the cooling phase. Then, the high and low MSW resonances that occur after collective oscillations are both adiabatic. Using these results, we find that in this model, neutrino oscillations have little effect on the nucleosynthesis in the neutrino-driven winds. However, the detection of such a signal could possibly allow us to differentiate the neutrino mass hierarchy and to extract the shock revival time.

  14. Sterile neutrino oscillations in core-collapse supernova simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, MacKenzie L; Mathews, Grant; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    We have made core-collapse supernova simulations that allow oscillations between electron neutrinos (or their anti particles) with right-handed sterile neutrinos. We have considered a range of mixing angles and sterile neutrino masses including those consistent with sterile neutrinos as a dark matter candidate. We examine whether such oscillations can impact the core bounce and shock reheating in supernovae. We identify the optimum ranges of mixing angles and masses that can dramatically enhance the supernova explosion by efficiently transporting electron anti-neutrinos from the core to behind the shock where they provide additional heating leading to much larger explosion kinetic energies. We show that an interesting oscillation in the neutrino luminosity develops due to a cycle of depletion of the neutrino density by conversion to sterile neutrinos that shuts off the conversion, followed by a replenished neutrino density as neutrinos transport through the core.

  15. Supernova Seismology: Gravitational Wave Signatures of Rapidly Rotating Core Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GW) generated during a core-collapse supernova open a window into the heart of the explosion. At core bounce, progenitors with rapid core rotation rates exhibit a characteristic GW signal which can be used to constrain the properties of the core of the progenitor star. We investigate the dynamics of rapidly rotating core collapse, focusing on hydrodynamic waves generated by the core bounce and the GW spectrum they produce. The centrifugal distortion of the rapidly rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) leads to the generation of axisymmetric quadrupolar oscillations within the PNS and surrounding envelope. Using linear perturbation theory, we estimate the frequencies, amplitudes, damping times, and GW spectra of the oscillations. Our analysis provides a qualitative explanation for several features of the GW spectrum and shows reasonable agreement with nonlinear hydrodynamic simulations, although a few discrepancies due to non-linear/rotational effects are evident. The dominant early postbounce...

  16. The Multi-Dimensional Character of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Hix, W R; Bruenn, S W; Mezzacappa, A; Messer, O E B; Endeve, E; Blondin, J M; Harris, J A; Marronett, P; Yakunin, K N

    2016-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae, the culmination of massive stellar evolution, are spectacular astronomical events and the principle actors in the story of our elemental origins. Our understanding of these events, while still incomplete, centers around a neutrino-driven central engine that is highly hydrodynamically unstable. Increasingly sophisticated simulations reveal a shock that stalls for hundreds of milliseconds before reviving. Though brought back to life by neutrino heating, the development of the supernova explosion is inextricably linked to multi-dimensional fluid flows. In this paper, the outcomes of three-dimensional simulations that include sophisticated nuclear physics and spectral neutrino transport are juxtaposed to learn about the nature of the three dimensional fluid flow that shapes the explosion. Comparison is also made between the results of simulations in spherical symmetry from several groups, to give ourselves confidence in the understanding derived from this juxtaposition.

  17. A Critique of Core-Collapse Supernova Theory Circa 1997

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, A

    1998-01-01

    There has been a new infusion of ideas in the study of the mechanism and early character of core--collapse supernovae. However, despite recent conceptual and computational progress, fundamental questions remain. Some are summarize herein.

  18. Parametric initial conditions for core-collapse supernova simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Yudai; Müller, Ewald

    2016-08-01

    We investigate a method to construct parametrized progenitor models for core-collapse supernova simulations. Different from all modern core-collapse supernova studies, which rely on progenitor models from stellar evolution calculations, we follow the methodology of Baron & Cooperstein to construct initial models. Choosing parametrized spatial distributions of entropy and electron fraction as a function of mass coordinate and solving the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium, we obtain the initial density structures of our progenitor models. First, we calculate structures with parameters fitting broadly the evolutionary model s11.2 of Woosley et al. (2002). We then demonstrate the reliability of our method by performing general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in spherical symmetry with the isotropic diffusion source approximation to solve the neutrino transport. Our comprehensive parameter study shows that initial models with a small central entropy (≲0.4 kB nucleon-1) can explode even in spherically symmetric simulations. Models with a large entropy (≳6 kB nucleon-1) in the Si/O layer have a rather large explosion energy (˜4 × 1050 erg) at the end of the simulations, which is still rapidly increasing.

  19. Core-collapse explosions of Wolf–Rayet stars and the connection to Type IIb/Ib/Ic supernovae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessart, L.; Hillier, D.J.; Livne, E.; Yoon, S.C.; Woosley, S.E.; Waldman, R.; Langer, N.

    2011-01-01

    We present non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations of supernova (SN) IIb/Ib/Ic spectra and light curves, based on ∼1051 erg pistondriven ejecta, with and without 56Ni, produced from single and binary Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars evolved at solar and sub-solar

  20. Light Curves of Core-Collapse Supernovae with Substantial Mass Loss using the New Open-Source SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC)

    CERN Document Server

    Morozova, V; Renzo, M; Ott, C D; Clausen, D; Couch, S M; Ellis, J; Roberts, L F

    2015-01-01

    We present the SuperNova Explosion Code SNEC, an open-source Lagrangian code for the hydrodynamics and equilibrium-diffusion radiation transport in the expanding envelopes of supernovae. Given a model of a progenitor star, an explosion energy, and an amount and distribution of radioactive nickel, SNEC generates the bolometric light curve, as well as the light curves in different wavelength bands assuming black body emission. As a first application of SNEC, we consider the explosions of a grid of 15 Msun (at zero-age main sequence) stars whose hydrogen envelopes are stripped to different extents and at different points in their evolution. The resulting light curves exhibit plateaus with durations of ~20-100 days if >~1.5-2 Msun of hydrogen-rich material is left and no plateau if less hydrogen-rich material is left. The shorter plateau lengths are unlike the Type IIP supernova light curves typically observed in nature. This suggests that, at least for zero-age main sequence masses <~ 20 Msun, hydrogen mass l...

  1. Colloquium: Perspectives on core-collapse supernova theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Core-collapse theory brings together many facets of high-energy and nuclear astrophysics and the numerical arts to present theorists with one of the most important, yet frustrating, astronomical questions: “What is the mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions?” A review of all the physics and the 50-year history involved would soon bury the reader in minutiae that could easily obscure the essential elements of the phenomenon, as we understand it today. Moreover, much remains to be discovered and explained, and a complicated review of an unresolved subject in flux could grow stale fast. Therefore, this paper describes various important facts and perspectives that may have escaped the attention of those interested in this puzzle. Furthermore, an attempt to describe the modern theory’s physical underpinnings and a brief summary of the current state of play are given. In the process, a few myths that have crept into modern discourse are identified. However, there is much more to do and humility in the face of this age-old challenge is clearly the most prudent stance as its eventual resolution is sought.

  2. Crucial Physical Dependencies of the Core-Collapse Supernova Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C; Skinner, M Aaron; Radice, David

    2016-01-01

    We explore with self-consistent 2D Fornax simulations the dependence of the outcome of collapse on many-body corrections to neutrino-nucleon cross sections, pre-collapse seed perturbations, and inelastic neutrino-electron and neutrino-nucleon scattering. We show here for the first time that modest many-body corrections to neutrino-nucleon scattering, well-motivated by physics, make explosions easier in models of core-collapse supernovae. In this sense, realistic many-body corrections could be important missing pieces of physics needed to ensure robust supernova explosions. In addition, we find that imposed seed perturbations, while not necessarily determinative of explosion, can facilitate it and shorten its post-bounce emergence time. We now find that all our multi-D models with realistic physics explode by the neutrino heating mechanism. Proximity to criticality amplifies the role of even small changes in the neutrino-matter couplings, and such changes can together add to produce dramatic effects. When clos...

  3. Re-research on the size of proto-neutron star in core-collapse supernova

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zhi-Quan; Liu Men-Quan

    2008-01-01

    The electron capture timeseale may be shorter than hydrodynamic timescale in inner iron core of core-collapse supernova according to a recent new idea. Based on the new idea, this paper carries out a numerical simulation on supernova explosion for the progenitor model Wsl5M⊙. The numerical result shows that the size of proto-neutron star has a significant change (decrease about 20%), which may affects the propagation of the shock wave and the final explosion energy.

  4. Nuclear statistical equilibrium at core-collapse supernova

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new improved nuclear partition function is employed to calculate the nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) in core-collapse supernova environment. The results show that the change of nucleus abundance is slight even though the temperature is higher than 1011 K when shock propagates, which indicates that the effect of the nuclear partition function is not so important as shown in the previous calculations, but it can also be considered in detailed simulation if it is sensitive to weak interaction rates in core-collapse supernova.

  5. Nucleosynthesis and Clump Formation in a Core Collapse Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Kifonidis, K; Janka, H T; Müller, E

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional simulations were performed for the first five minutes of the evolution of a core collapse supernova explosion in a 15 solar mass blue supergiant progenitor. The computations start shortly after core bounce and include neutrino-matter interactions by using a light-bulb approximation for the neutrinos, and a treatment of the nucleosynthesis due to explosive silicon and oxygen burning. We find that newly formed iron-group elements are distributed throughout a significant fraction of the stellar helium core by the concerted action of convective and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Fast moving nickel mushrooms with velocities up to 4000 km/s are observed. This offers a natural explanation for the amount of mixing required in light curve and spectral synthesis studies of Type Ib explosions. A continuation of the calculations to later times, however, indicates, that the iron velocities observed in SN 1987 A cannot be reproduced because of a strong deceleration of the clumps during their...

  6. Computational Astrophysics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Core Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, dominating the production of elements between oxygen and iron and likely responsible for half the elements heavier than iron. They result from the death throes of massive stars, beginning with stellar core collapse and the formation of a supernova shock wave that must ultimately disrupt such stars. Past, first-principles models most often led to the frustrating conclusion the shock wave stalls and is not revived, at least given the physics included in the models. However, recent progress in the context of two-dimensional, first-principles supernova models is reversing this trend, giving us hope we are on the right track toward a solution of one of the most important problems in astrophysics. Core collapse supernovae are multi-physics events, involving general relativity, hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics, nuclear burning, and radiation transport in the form of neutrinos, along with a detailed nuclear physics equation of state and neutrino weak interactions. Computationally, simulating these catastrophic stellar events presents an exascale computing challenge. I will discuss past models and milestones in core collapse supernova theory, the state of the art, and future requirements. In this context, I will present the results and plans of the collaboration led by ORNL and the University of Tennessee.

  7. 44Ti and 56Ni in core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Magkotsios, Georgios; Wiescher, Michael; Fryer, Christopher L; Hungerford, Aimee; Young, Patrick; Bennett, Michael; Diehl, Steven; Herwig, Falk; Hirschi, Raphael; Pignatari, Marco; Rockefeller, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the physical conditions where 44Ti and 56Ni are created in core-collapse supernovae. In this preliminary work we use a series of post-processing network calculations with parametrized expansion profiles that are representative of the wide range of temperatures, densities and electron-to-baryon ratios found in 3D supernova simulations. Critical flows that affect the final yields of 44Ti and 56Ni are assessed.

  8. 2D and 3D Core-Collapse Supernovae Simulation Results Obtained with the CHIMERA Code

    CERN Document Server

    Bruenn, S W; Hix, W R; Blondin, J M; Marronetti, P; Messer, O E B; Dirk, C J; Yoshida, S

    2010-01-01

    Much progress in realistic modeling of core-collapse supernovae has occurred recently through the availability of multi-teraflop machines and the increasing sophistication of supernova codes. These improvements are enabling simulations with enough realism that the explosion mechanism, long a mystery, may soon be delineated. We briefly describe the CHIMERA code, a supernova code we have developed to simulate core-collapse supernovae in 1, 2, and 3 spatial dimensions. We then describe the results of an ongoing suite of 2D simulations initiated from a 12, 15, 20, and 25 solar mass progenitor. These have all exhibited explosions and are currently in the expanding phase with the shock at between 5,000 and 20,000 km. We also briefly describe an ongoing simulation in 3 spatial dimensions initiated from the 15 solar mass progenitor.

  9. 2D and 3D core-collapse supernovae simulation results obtained with the CHIMERA code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenn, S W; Marronetti, P; Dirk, C J [Physics Department, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W. Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Mezzacappa, A; Hix, W R [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6354 (United States); Blondin, J M [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Messer, O E B [Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6354 (United States); Yoshida, S, E-mail: bruenn@fau.ed [Max-Planck-Institut fur Gravitationsphysik, Albert Einstein Institut, Golm (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Much progress in realistic modeling of core-collapse supernovae has occurred recently through the availability of multi-teraflop machines and the increasing sophistication of supernova codes. These improvements are enabling simulations with enough realism that the explosion mechanism, long a mystery, may soon be delineated. We briefly describe the CHIMERA code, a supernova code we have developed to simulate core-collapse supernovae in 1, 2, and 3 spatial dimensions. We then describe the results of an ongoing suite of 2D simulations initiated from a 12, 15, 20, and 25 M{sub o-dot} progenitor. These have all exhibited explosions and are currently in the expanding phase with the shock at between 5,000 and 20,000 km. We also briefly describe an ongoing simulation in 3 spatial dimensions initiated from the 15 M{sub o-dot} progenitor.

  10. The Core-collapse rate from the Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bazin, G; Rich, J; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Aubourg, E; Guillou, L Le; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Sullivan, M; Antilogus, P; Arsenijevic, V; Baumont, S; Fabbro, S; Du, J Le; Lidman, C; Mouchet, M; Mourão, A; Walker, E S

    2009-01-01

    We use three years of data from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) to study the general properties of core-collapse and type Ia supernovae. This is the first such study using the "rolling search" technique which guarantees well-sampled SNLS light curves and good efficiency for supernovae brighter than $i^\\prime\\sim24$. Using host photometric redshifts, we measure the supernova absolute magnitude distribution down to luminosities $4.5 {\\rm mag}$ fainter than normal SNIa. Using spectroscopy and light-curve fitting to discriminate against SNIa, we find a sample of 117 core-collapse supernova candidates with redshifts $z<0.4$ (median redshift of 0.29) and measure their rate to be larger than the type Ia supernova rate by a factor $4.5\\pm0.8(stat.) \\pm0.6 (sys.)$. This corresponds to a core-collapse rate at $z=0.3$ of $[1.42\\pm 0.3(stat.) \\pm0.3(sys.)]\\times10^{-4}\\yr^{-1}(h_{70}^{-1}\\Mpc)^{-3}$.

  11. Core Collapse Supernovae%核塌缩超新星

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宗伟

    2004-01-01

    The current study staus for supemnovae,especially for core collapse supernovaeare reviewed in this paper.The definition and classification of supernovae are introdued,inparticular,focused to core collapse supernovae,and analysed their nature in detail.Finally thetheoretical study of supernovae is briefly introduced.%本文综述了超新星,特别是核塌缩超新星的研究现状.文中介绍了超新星的定义和分类,并特别关注核塌缩超新星,对其特性进行了详细分析.最后简要介绍了超新星理论研究的现状.

  12. Parametric initial conditions for core-collapse supernova simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Suwa, Yudai

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a method to construct parametrized progenitor models for core-collapse supernova simulations. Different from all modern core-collapse supernova studies, which rely on progenitor models from stellar evolution calculations, we follow the methodology of Baron & Cooperstein (1990) to construct initial models. Choosing parametrized spatial distributions of entropy and electron fraction as a function of mass coordinate and solving the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium, we obtain the initial density structures of our progenitor models. First, we calculate structures with parameters fitting broadly the evolutionary model s11.2 of Woosley et al. (2002). We then demonstrate the reliability of our method by performing general relativistic hydrodynamic simulations in spherical symmetry with the isotropic diffusion source approximation to solve the neutrino transport. Our comprehensive parameter study shows that initial models with a small central entropy ($\\lesssim 0.4\\,k_B$ nucleon$^{-1}$) can explo...

  13. Core-Collapse Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts in TMT Era

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. B. Pandey

    2013-06-01

    Study of energetic cosmic explosions as a part of time domain astronomy is one of the key areas that could be pursued with upcoming Giant segmented optical-IR telescopes with a very large photon collecting area applying cutting edge technology. Existing 8–10 m class telescopes have been helpful to improve our knowledge about core-collapse supernovae, gamma-ray bursts and nature of their progenitors and explosion mechanisms. However, many aspects about these energetic cosmic explosions are still not well-understood and require much bigger telescopes and back-end instruments with high precision to address the evolution of massive stars and high-redshift Universe in more detail. In this presentation, possible thrust research areas towards core-collapse supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with the Thirty-Meter Telescope and back-end instruments are presented.

  14. Exploring the Environments of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habergham, Stacey; Anderson, Joe; James, Phil; Lyman, Joe

    2015-06-01

    Despite years of intense research on the exact nature of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), much uncertainty still surrounds the progenitor systems of these explosions. Only the most common subtype (SNIIP) has a known origin, thanks to numerous direct observations of the progenitor stars. However, direct detections are limited by the frequency of nearby events. This led to the analysis of the host galaxies, in the assumption that trends in large samples of events could give indications of the progenitor systems of SNe. Indeed it was these investigations which concluded that CCSNe must originate from young, massive stars, due to their sole presence in star-forming galaxies. Over the past 20 years a new field of research has aimed to straddle these two techniques, looking at the local environment of the progenitor within the host galaxy. This technique is effective out to a larger distance than direct detections ( 80 Mpc), but is limited by the requirement to be able to resolve the regions at the location of, or close to the SN coordinates. These regions are significantly smaller than the entire galaxy but may still contain thousands of stars, if not more. The compromise here is between gathering large enough samples for meaningful statistical analysis, and gathering information on the environment local to the SN. This technique allows statistical constraints to be made on progenitor properties such as mass and metallicity, and this review talk will highlight the progress that has been made in this field, including; differences in the explosion sites of SNe types II and Ibc, the fact that SNe Ic are significantly more associated with host star formation than SNe Ib, and that the interacting SNe IIn do not explode in regions containing the most massive stars.

  15. The Explosive Yields Produced by the First Generation of Core Collapse Supernovae and the Chemical Composition of Extremely Metal Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chieffi, A; Chieffi, Alessandro; Limongi, Marco

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison between an extended set of elemental abundances observed in some of the most metal poor stars presently known and the ejecta produced by a generation of primordial core collapse supernovae. We used five stars which form our initial database and define a "template" ultra metal poor star which is then compared to the theoretical predictions. Our main findings are as follows: a) the fit to [Si/Mg] and [Ca/Mg] of these very metal poor stars seems to favor the presence of a rather large C abundance at the end of the central He burning; in a classical scenario in which the border of the convective core is strictly determined by the Schwarzschild criterion, such a large C abundance would imply a rather low C12(alpha,gamma)O16 reaction rate; b) a low C abundance left by the central He burning would imply a low [Al/Mg] (<-1.2 dex) independently on the initial mass of the exploding star while a rather large C abundance would produce such a low [Al/Mg] only for the most massive stella...

  16. Links between the shock instability in core-collapse supernovae and asymmetric accretions of envelopes

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Yu; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    The explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae has not been fully understood yet but multi-dimensional fluid instabilities such as standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and convection are now believed to be crucial for shock revival. Another multi-dimensional effect that has been recently argued is the asymmetric structures in progenitors, which are induced by violent convections in silicon/oxygen layers that occur before the onset of collapse, as revealed by recent numerical simulations of the last stage of massive star evolutions. Furthermore, it has been also demonstrated numerically that accretions of such non-spherical envelopes could facilitate shock revival. These two multi-dimensional may hence hold a key to successful explosions. In this paper, we performed a linear stability analysis of the standing accretion shock in core-collapse supernovae, taking into account non-spherical, unsteady accretion flows onto the shock to clarify the possible links between the two effects. We found that suc...

  17. General Relativistic Effects in the Core Collapse Supernova Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Bruenn, S W; Mezzacappa, A

    2001-01-01

    We apply our recently developed code for spherically symmetric, fully general relativistic (GR) Lagrangian hydrodynamics and multigroup flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport to examine the effects of GR on the hydrodynamics and transport during collapse, bounce, and the critical shock reheating phase of core collapse supernovae. Comparisons of models computed with GR versus Newtonian hydrodynamics show that collapse to bounce takes slightly less time in the GR limit, and that the shock propagates slightly farther out in radius before receding. After a secondary quasistatic rise in the shock radius, the shock radius declines considerably more rapidly in the GR simulations than in the corresponding Newtonian simulations. During the shock reheating phase, core collapse computed with GR hydrodynamics results in a substantially more compact structure from the center out to the stagnated shock. The inflow speed of material behind the shock is also increased. Comparisons also show that the luminosity and rms ene...

  18. Multimessengers from Core-Collapse Supernovae: Multidimensionality as a Key to Bridge Theory and Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Kotake

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Core-collapse supernovae are dramatic explosions marking the catastrophic end of massive stars. The only means to get direct information about the supernova engine is from observations of neutrinos emitted by the forming neutron star, and through gravitational waves which are produced when the hydrodynamic flow or the neutrino flux is not perfectly spherically symmetric. The multidimensionality of the supernova engine, which breaks the sphericity of the central core such as convection, rotation, magnetic fields, and hydrodynamic instabilities of the supernova shock, is attracting great attention as the most important ingredient to understand the long-veiled explosion mechanism. Based on our recent work, we summarize properties of gravitational waves, neutrinos, and explosive nucleosynthesis obtained in a series of our multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations and discuss how the mystery of the central engines can be unraveled by deciphering these multimessengers produced under the thick veils of massive stars.

  19. The core-collapse supernova rate in Arp 299 revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Cañizales, C.; Mattila, S.; Alberdi, A.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Kankare, E.; Ryder, S. D.

    2011-08-01

    We present a study of the core-collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in nuclei A and B1, of the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) Arp 299, based on ˜11 yr of Very Large Array (VLA) monitoring of their radio emission at 8.4 GHz. Significant variations in the nuclear radio flux density can be used to identify the CCSN activity in the absence of high-resolution very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. In the case of the B1-nucleus, the small variations in its measured diffuse (synchrotron plus free-free) radio emission are below the fluxes expected from radio supernovae (RSNe), thus making it well-suited to detect RSNe through flux density variability. In fact, we find strong evidence for at least three RSNe this way, which results in a lower limit for the CCSN rate (νSN) of >0.28+0.27-0.15 yr-1. This value agrees within the uncertainties with the infrared (IR) luminosity based SN rate estimate, and with previously reported radio estimates. In the A-nucleus, we did not detect any significant variability and found a SN detection threshold luminosity of ≈3.1 × 1028 erg s-1 Hz-1, allowing only the detection of the most luminous RSNe known. Our method is basically blind to normal CCSN explosions occurring within the A-nucleus, which result in too small variations in the nuclear flux density, remaining diluted by the strong diffuse emission of the nucleus itself. Additionally, we have attempted to find near-IR (NIR) counterparts for the earlier reported RSNe in the Arp 299 nucleus A, by comparing NIR adaptive optics images from the Gemini-N Telescope with contemporaneous observations from the European VLBI Network (EVN). However, we were not able to detect NIR counterparts for the reported radio SNe within the innermost regions of nucleus A. While our NIR observations were sensitive to typical CCSNe at ˜300 mas (or 70 pc projected distance) from the centre of the nucleus A, suffering from extinction up to AV˜ 15 mag, they were not sensitive to such highly

  20. New equations of state in core-collapse supernova simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen; Liebendörfer, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    We discuss core-collapse supernova simulations where three new equations of state (EOS) tables are applied for the first time. The spherically symmetric core-collapse model is based on general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics and three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport. The new EOS are calculated with the nuclear statistical equilibrium model of Hempel and Schaffner-Bielich (HS) which includes excluded volume effects and relativistic mean-field (RMF) interactions. Three different RMF parameterizations, TM1, TMA, and FSUgold, are considered. The new EOS tables are available online. We examine the core collapse, bounce, and post-bounce phases and compare with the widely used EOS of H. Shen et al. (1998) and Lattimer and Swesty (1991). As the EOS of H. Shen et al. is also based on TM1, this allows a systematic study of the model description of inhomogeneous nuclear matter, where we find that it is as important as the nuclear interactions. Several new aspects of nuclear physics are investigated: The HS EOS ...

  1. Core Collapse Supernovae Using CHIMERA: Gravitational Radiation from Non-Rotating Progenitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakunin, Konstantin [Florida Atlantic University; Marronetti, Pedro [Florida Atlantic University; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL; Bruenn, S. W. [Florida Atlantic University; Lee, Ching-Tsai [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chertkow, Merek A [ORNL; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University; Lentz, Eric J [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Yoshida, S. [University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

    2011-01-01

    The CHIMERA code is a multi-dimensional multi-physics engine dedicated primarily to the simulation of core collapse supernova explosions. One of the most important aspects of these explosions is their capacity to produce gravitational radiation that is detectable by earth-based laser-interferometric gravitational wave observatories such as LIGO and VIRGO. We present here preliminary gravitational signatures of two-dimensional models with non-rotating progenitors. These simulations exhibit explosions, which are followed for more than half a second after stellar core bounce.

  2. Pasta phases in core-collapse supernova matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Helena; Chiacchiera, Silvia; Providência, Constança

    2016-04-01

    The pasta phase in core-collapse supernova matter (finite temperatures and fixed proton fractions) is studied within relativistic mean field models. Three different calculations are used for comparison, the Thomas-Fermi (TF), the Coexisting Phases (CP) and the Compressible Liquid Drop (CLD) approximations. The effects of including light clusters in nuclear matter and the densities at which the transitions between pasta configurations and to uniform matter occur are also investigated. The free energy and pressure, in the space of particle number densities and temperatures expected to cover the pasta region, are calculated. Finally, a comparison with a finite temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculation is drawn.

  3. Asymmetries in Core Collapse Supernovae Revealed by Maps of Radioactive Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Reynolds, S. P.; Fryer, C. L.; Madsen, K. K.; Wik, D. R.; Zoglauer, A.; Ellinger, C. I.; Alexander, D. M.; An, H.; Barret, D.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Forster, K.; Giommi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Hornstrup, A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kitaguchi, T.; Koglin, J. E.; Mao, P. H.; Miyasaka, H.; Mori, K.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry is required by most numerical simulations of stellar core collapse explosions, however the nature differs significantly among models. The spatial distribution of radioactive Ti-44, synthesized in an exploding star near the boundary between material falling back onto the collapsing core and that ejected into the surrounding medium, directly probes the explosion1asymmetries. Cassiopeia A is a young, nearby, core-collapse remnant from which Ti-44 emission has previously been detected, but not imaged. Asymmetries in the explosion have been indirectly inferred from a high ratio of observed Ti-44 emission to that estimated from (56)Ni9, from optical light echoes, and by jet-like features seen in the X-ray and optical ejecta. Here we report on the spatial maps and spectral properties of Ti-44 in Cassiopeia A. We find the Ti-44 to be distributed non-uniformly in the un-shocked interior of the remnant. This may explain the unexpected lack of correlation between the Ti-44 and iron X-ray emission, the latter only being visible in shock heated material. The observed spatial distribution rules out symmetric explosions even with a high level of convective mixing, as well as highly asymmetric bipolar explosions resulting from a fast rotating progenitor. Instead, these observations provide strong evidence for the development of low-mode convective instabilities in core-collapse supernovae.

  4. Asymmetries in Core-Collapse Supernovae from Maps of Radioactiver 44Ti in Cassiopeia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefenstette, B.W.; Harrison, F. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Reynolds, S. P.; Fryer, C. L.; Madsen, K. K.; Wik, Daniel R.; Zoglauer, A.; Ellinger, C. I.; Alexander, D. M.; An, H.; Barret, D.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Forster, K.; Giommi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Hornstrup, A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kitaguchi, T.; Koglin, J. E.; Mao, P. H.; Miyasaka, H.; Mori, K.; Perri, M.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Puccetti, S.; Rana, V.; Stern, D.; Westergaard, N. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry is required by most numerical simulations of stellar core-collapse explosions, but the form it takes differs significantly among models. The spatial distribution of radioactive 44Ti, synthesized in an exploding star near the boundary between material falling back onto the collapsing core and that ejected into the surroundingmedium1, directly probes the explosion asymmetries. Cassiopeia A is a young2, nearby3, core-collapse4 remnant from which 44Ti emission has previously been detected5-8 but not imaged. Asymmetries in the explosion have been indirectly inferred from a high ratio of observed 44Ti emission to estimated 56Ni emission9, from optical light echoes10, and from jet-like features seen in the X-ray11 and optical12 ejecta. Here we report spatial maps and spectral properties of the 44Ti in Cassiopeia A. This may explain the unexpected lack of correlation between the 44Ti and iron X-ray emission, the latter being visible only in shock-heated material. The observed spatial distribution rules out symmetric explosions even with a high level of convective mixing, as well as highly asymmetric bipolar explosions resulting from a fast-rotating progenitor. Instead, these observations provide strong evidence for the development of low-mode convective instabilities in core-collapse supernovae.

  5. Core-Collapse Supernovae: Modeling between Pragmatism and Perfectionism

    CERN Document Server

    Janka, H T; Kitaura Joyanes, F S; Marek, A; Rampp, M

    2004-01-01

    We briefly summarize recent efforts in Garching for modeling stellar core collapse and post-bounce evolution in one and two dimensions. The transport of neutrinos of all flavors is treated by iteratively solving the coupled system of frequency-dependent moment equations together with a model Boltzmann equation which provides the closure. A variety of progenitor stars, different nuclear equations of state, stellar rotation, and global asymmetries due to large-mode hydrodynamic instabilities have been investigated to ascertain the road to finally successful, convectively supported neutrino-driven explosions.

  6. MHD Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae with Cosmos++

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Shizuka

    2010-01-01

    We performed 2D, axisymmetric, MHD simulations with Cosmos++ in order to examine the growth of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in core--collapse supernovae. We have initialized a non--rotating 15 solar mass progenitor, infused with differential rotation and poloidal magnetic fields. The collapse of the iron core is simulated with the Shen EOS, and the parametric Ye and entropy evolution. The wavelength of the unstable mode in the post--collapse environment is expected to be only ~ 200 m. In order to achieve the fine spatial resolution requirement, we employed remapping technique after the iron core has collapsed and bounced. The MRI unstable region appears near the equator and angular momentum and entropy are transported outward. Higher resolution remap run display more vigorous overturns and stronger transport of angular momentum and entropy. Our results are in agreement with the earlier work by Akiyama et al. (2003) and Obergaulinger et al. (2009).

  7. Distributional Tests for Gravitational Waves from Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanczyk, Marek; LIGO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSN) are spectacular and violent deaths of massive stars. CCSN are some of the most interesting candidates for producing gravitational-waves (GW) transients. Current published results focus on methodologies to detect single GW unmodelled transients. The advantages of these tests are that they do not require a background for which we have an analytical model. Examples of non-parametric tests that will be compared are Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney, chi squared, and asymmetric chi squared. I will present methodological results using publicly released LIGO-S6 data recolored to the design sensitivity of Advanced LIGO and that will be time lagged between interferometers sites so that the resulting coincident events are not GW.

  8. r-Process Nucleosynthesis in Jet-driven Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevi, Goni; Moesta, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    We investigate rapidly rotating, strongly magnetized core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosions as a site for the production of heavy elements through r-process nucleosynthesis. While CCSNe have long been considered a potential astrophysical site of this process explaining the origin of observed abundances for stable nuclei heavier than iron, the neutron-rich conditions necessary have not been robustly produced in simulations. There remain large uncertainties in quantifying the fraction of all core-collapse events that produce r-process material and the quantity of ejected material in a typical explosion.We perform three-dimensional (3D) dynamical-spacetime general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations of jet-driven CCSNe. These simulations are run using the Einstein toolkit, an open-source community-driven numerical relativity and computational relativistic astrophysics code. They include microphysical finite-temperature equation of state effects and employ a leakage scheme that captures the overall energetics and lepton number exchange due to postbounce neutrino emission. The nuclear products of the simulated explosions are then calculated using SkyNet, a self-heating nuclear reaction network. We explore the robustness of r-process production in magnetorotational core-collapse and the properties of the ejected material.

  9. Three-Dimensional Simulations of SASI- and Convection-Dominated Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of dimensionality on the transition to explosion in neutrino-driven core-collapse supernovae. Using parameterized hydrodynamic simulations of the stalled supernova shock in one-, two- (2D), and three spatial dimensions (3D), we systematically probe the extent to which hydrodynamic instabilities alone can tip the balance in favor of explosion. In particular, we focus on systems that are well into the regimes where the Standing Accretion Shock Instability (SASI) or neutrino-driven convection dominate the dynamics, and characterize the difference between them. We find that SASI-dominated models can explode with up to ~20% lower neutrino luminosity in 3D than in 2D, with the magnitude of this difference decreasing with increasing resolution. This improvement in explosion conditions originates in the ability of spiral modes to generate more non-radial kinetic energy than a single sloshing mode, increasing the size of the average shock radius, and hence generating better conditions for the...

  10. Physics of Core-Collapse Supernovae in Three Dimensions: a Sneak Preview

    CERN Document Server

    Janka, H -Thomas; Summa, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Nonspherical mass motions are a generic feature of core-collapse supernovae, and hydrodynamic instabilities play a crucial role for the explosion mechanism. First successful neutrino-driven explosions could be obtained with self-consistent, first-principle simulations in three spatial dimensions (3D). But 3D models tend to be less prone to explosion than corresponding axisymmetric (2D) ones. This has been explained by 3D turbulence leading to energy cascading from large to small spatial scales, inversely to the 2D case, thus disfavoring the growth of buoyant plumes on the largest scales. Unless the inertia to explode simply reflects a lack of sufficient resolution in relevant regions, it suggests that some important aspect may still be missing for robust and sufficiently energetic neutrino-powered explosions. Such deficits could be associated with progenitor properties like rotation, magnetic fields or pre-collapse perturbations, or with microphysics that could lead to an enhancement of neutrino heating behin...

  11. Multidimensional neutrino-transport simulations of the core-collapse supernova central engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Evan; Couch, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) mark the explosive death of a massive star. The explosion itself is triggered by the collapse of the iron core that forms near the end of a massive star's life. The core collapses to nuclear densities where the stiff nuclear equation of state halts the collapse and leads to the formation of the supernova shock. In many cases, this shock will eventually propagate throughout the entire star and produces a bright optical display. However, the path from shock formation to explosion has proven difficult to recreate in simulations. Soon after the shock forms, its outward propagation is stagnated and must be revived in order for the CCSNe to be successful. The leading theory for the mechanism that reenergizes the shock is the deposition of energy by neutrinos. In 1D simulations this mechanism fails. However, there is growing evidence that in 2D and 3D, hydrodynamic instabilities can assist the neutrino heating in reviving the shock. In this talk, I will present new multi-D neutrino-radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of CCSNe performed with the FLASH hydrodynamics package. I will discuss the efficacy of neutrino heating in our simulations and show the impact of the multi-D hydrodynamic instabilities.

  12. The Status of Multi-Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernova Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, B.

    2016-09-01

    Models of neutrino-driven core-collapse supernova explosions have matured considerably in recent years. Explosions of low-mass progenitors can routinely be simulated in 1D, 2D, and 3D. Nucleosynthesis calculations indicate that these supernovae could be contributors of some lighter neutron-rich elements beyond iron. The explosion mechanism of more massive stars remains under investigation, although first 3D models of neutrino-driven explosions employing multi-group neutrino transport have become available. Together with earlier 2D models and more simplified 3D simulations, these have elucidated the interplay between neutrino heating and hydrodynamic instabilities in the post-shock region that is essential for shock revival. However, some physical ingredients may still need to be added/improved before simulations can robustly explain supernova explosions over a wide range of progenitors. Solutions recently suggested in the literature include uncertainties in the neutrino rates, rotation, and seed perturbations from convective shell burning. We review the implications of 3D simulations of shell burning in supernova progenitors for the `perturbations-aided neutrino-driven mechanism,' whose efficacy is illustrated by the first successful multi-group neutrino hydrodynamics simulation of an 18 solar mass progenitor with 3D initial conditions. We conclude with speculations about the impact of 3D effects on the structure of massive stars through convective boundary mixing.

  13. Gray Models of convection in core collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Swesty, F D

    1998-01-01

    One of the major difficulties encountered in modeling core collapse supernovae is obtaining an accurate description of the transport of neutrinos through the collapsed stellar core. The behavior of the neutrino distribution function transitions from an LTE distribution in the center of the core to a non-LTE distribution in the outer regions of the core. One method that has been recently employed in order to model the flow of neutrinos in 2-D models is the gray approximation. This approximation assumes that the neutrino distribution can be described by a function that is parameterized in terms of a neutrino temperature and a neutrino chemical potential. However, these parameters must be assumed. Furthermore, the parameters will also differ between the LTE and NLTE regions. Additionally, within the gray approximation the location at which the neutrino distribution function transitions from LTE to NLTE must be assumed. By considering a series of models where the LTE/NLTE decoupling point is varied we show that t...

  14. Hydrogen-rich supernovae beyond the neutrino-driven core-collapse paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terreran, G.; Pumo, M. L.; Chen, T.-W.; Moriya, T. J.; Taddia, F.; Dessart, L.; Zampieri, L.; Smartt, S. J.; Benetti, S.; Inserra, C.; Cappellaro, E.; Nicholl, M.; Fraser, M.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Udalski, A.; Howell, D. A.; McCully, C.; Valenti, S.; Dimitriadis, G.; Maguire, K.; Sullivan, M.; Smith, K. W.; Yaron, O.; Young, D. R.; Anderson, J. P.; Della Valle, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Gal-Yam, A.; Jerkstrand, A.; Kankare, E.; Pastorello, A.; Sollerman, J.; Turatto, M.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Kozłowski, S.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, D.; Skowron, J.; Soszyński, I.; Szymański, M. K.; Ulaczyk, K.

    2017-10-01

    Type II supernovae are the final stage of massive stars (above 8 M⊙) which retain part of their hydrogen-rich envelope at the moment of explosion. They typically eject up to 15 M⊙ of material, with peak magnitudes of -17.5 mag and energies in the order of 1051 erg, which can be explained by neutrino-driven explosions and neutron star formation. Here, we present our study of OGLE-2014-SN-073, one of the brightest type II supernovae ever discovered, with an unusually broad lightcurve combined with high ejecta velocities. From our hydrodynamical modelling, we infer a remarkable ejecta mass of 60-16+42M⊙ and a relatively high explosion energy of 12 .4-5.9 +13 .0×1 051 erg. We show that this object belongs, along with a very small number of other hydrogen-rich supernovae, to an energy regime that is not explained by standard core-collapse neutrino-driven explosions. We compare the quantities inferred by the hydrodynamical modelling with the expectations of various exploding scenarios and attempt to explain the high energy and luminosity released. We find some qualitative similarities with pair-instability supernovae, although the prompt injection of energy by a magnetar seems to be a viable alternative explanation for such an extreme event.

  15. The Bubble-like Interior of the Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    CERN Document Server

    Milisavljevic, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The death of massive stars is believed to involve aspheric explosions initiated by the collapse of an iron core. The specifics of how these catastrophic explosions proceed remain uncertain due, in part, to limited observational constraints on various processes that can introduce asymmetries deep inside the star. Here we present near-infrared observations of the young Milky Way supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, descendant of a type IIb core-collapse explosion, and a three-dimensional map of its interior, unshocked ejecta. The remnant's interior has a bubble-like morphology that smoothly connects to and helps explain the multi-ringed structures seen in the remnant's bright reverse shocked main shell of expanding debris. This internal structure may have originated from turbulent mixing processes that encouraged the development of outwardly expanding plumes of radioactive 56Ni-rich ejecta. If this is true, substantial amounts of its decay product, 56Fe, may still reside in these interior cavities.

  16. Simulations of stripped core-collapse supernovae in close binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Rimoldi, Alex; Rossi, Elena Maria

    2015-01-01

    We perform smoothed-particle hydrodynamical simulations of the explosion of a helium star in a close binary system, and study the effects of the explosion on the companion star as well as the effect of the presence of the companion on the supernova remnant. By simulating the mechanism of the supernova from just after core bounce until the remnant shell passes the stellar companion, we are able to separate the various effects leading to the final system parameters. In the final system, we measure the mass stripping and ablation from, and the velocity kick imparted to, the companion star, as well as the structure of the supernova shell. The presence of the companion star produces a conical cavity in the expanding supernova remnant, and loss of material from the companion causes the supernova remnant to be more metal-rich on one side and more hydrogen-rich (from the companion material) around the cavity. Following the removal of mass from the companion, we study its subsequent evolution and compare it with a sin...

  17. Multi-dimensional Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations with Neutrino Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Hempel, Matthias; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    We present multi-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulations using the Isotropic Diffusion Source Approximation (IDSA) for the neutrino transport and a modified potential for general relativity in two different supernova codes: FLASH and ELEPHANT. Due to the complexity of the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism, simulations require not only high-performance computers and the exploitation of GPUs, but also sophisticated approximations to capture the essential microphysics. We demonstrate that the IDSA is an elegant and efficient neutrino radiation transfer scheme, which is portable to multiple hydrodynamics codes and fast enough to investigate long-term evolutions in two and three dimensions. Simulations with a 40 solar mass progenitor are presented in both FLASH (1D and 2D) and ELEPHANT (3D) as an extreme test condition. It is found that the black hole formation time is delayed in multiple dimensions and we argue that the strong standing accretion shock instability before black hole formation will lead to strong gravitational waves.

  18. Constraining the supersaturation density equation of state from core-collapse supernova simulations - Excluded volume extension of the baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In this article the role of the supersaturation density equation of state (EOS) is explored in simulations of failed core-collapse supernova explosions. Therefore the nuclear EOS is extended via a one-parameter excluded volume description for baryons, taking into account their finite and increasing volume with increasing density in excess of saturation density. Parameters are selected such that the resulting supernova EOS represent extreme cases, with high pressure variations at supersaturation density which feature extreme stiff and soft EOS variants of the reference case, i.e. without excluded volume corrections. Unlike in the interior of neutron stars with central densities in excess of several times saturation density, central densities of core-collapse supernovae reach only slightly above saturation density. Hence, the impact of the supersaturation density EOS on the supernova dynamics as well as the neutrino signal is found to be negligible. It is mainly determined from the low- and intermediate-density...

  19. The Application of Bayesian Inference to Gravitational Waves from Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossan, Sarah; Ott, Christian; Kalmus, Peter; Logue, Joshua; Heng, Siong

    2013-04-01

    The gravitational wave (GW) signature of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) encodes important information on the supernova explosion mechanism, the workings of which cannot be explored via observations in the electromagnetic spectrum. Recent research has shown that the CCSNe explosion mechanism can be inferred through the application of Bayesian model selection to gravitational wave signals from supernova explosions powered by the neutrino, magnetorotational and acoustic mechanisms. Extending this work, we apply Principal Component Analysis to the GW spectrograms from CCSNe to take into account also the time-frequency evolution of the emitted signals. We do so in the context of Advanced LIGO, to establish if any improvement on distinguishing between various explosion mechanisms can be obtained. Further to this, we consider a five-detector network of interferometers (comprised of the two Advanced LIGO detectors, Advanced Virgo, LIGO India and KAGRA) and generalize the aforementioned analysis for a source of known position but unknown distance, using realistic, re-colored detector data (as opposed to Gaussian noise), in order to make more reliable statements regarding our ability to distinguish between various explosion mechanisms on the basis of their GW signatures.

  20. The Status of Multi-Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernova Models

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, B

    2016-01-01

    Models of core-collapse supernova explosions powered by the neutrino-driven mechanism have matured considerable in recent years. Explosions at the low-mass end of the progenitor spectrum can routinely be simulated in 1D, 2D, and 3D and allow us to study supernova nucleosynthesis based on first-principle models. Results of nucleosynthesis calculations indicate that supernovae of the lowest masses could be important contributors of some lighter n-rich elements beyond iron. The explosion mechanism of more massive stars is still under investigation, although first 3D models of neutrino-driven explosions employing multi-group neutrino transport have recently become available. Together with earlier 2D models and more simplified 3D simulations, these have elucidated the interplay between neutrino heating and hydrodynamic instabilities in the post-shock region that is essential for shock revival. However, some physical ingredients may still need to be added or improved before simulations can robustly explain supernov...

  1. Non-Radial Instabilities and Progenitor Asphericities in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, B

    2014-01-01

    Since core-collapse supernova simulations still struggle to produce robust neutrino-driven explosions in 3D, it has been proposed that asphericities caused by convection in the progenitor might facilitate shock revival by boosting the activity of non-radial hydrodynamic instabilities in the post-shock region. We investigate this scenario in depth using 42 relativistic 2D simulations with multi-group neutrino transport to examine the effects of velocity and density perturbations in the progenitor for different perturbation geometries that obey fundamental physical constraints (like the anelastic condition). As a framework for analysing our results, we introduce semi-empirical scaling laws relating neutrino heating, average turbulent velocities in the gain region, and the shock deformation in the saturation limit of non-radial instabilities. The squared turbulent Mach number, , reflects the violence of aspherical motions in the gain layer, and explosive runaway occurs for ~0.3, corresponding to a reduction of t...

  2. Systematic Features of Axisymmetric Neutrino-Driven Core-Collapse Supernova Models in Multiple Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations employing neutrino transport scheme by the isotropic diffusion source approximation. Studying 101 solar-metallicity progenitors covering zero-age main sequence mass from 10.8 to 75.0 solar masses, we systematically investigate how the differences in the structures of these multiple progenitors impact the hydrodynamics evolution. By following a long-term evolution over 1.0 s after bounce, most of the computed models exhibit neutrino-driven revival of the stalled bounce shock at about 200 - 800 ms postbounce, leading to the possibility of explosion. Pushing the boundaries of expectations in previous one-dimensional studies, our results show that the time of shock revival, evolution of shock radii, and diagnostic explosion energies are tightly correlated with the compactness parameter xi which characterizes the structure of the progenitors. Compared to models with low xi, models with high xi undergo high ram pressure from the accreting ma...

  3. New Nuclear Equation of State for Core-Collapse Supernovae with the Variational Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Togashi H.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the current status of our project to construct a new nuclear equation of state (EOS with the variational method for core-collapse supernova (SN simulations. Starting from the realistic nuclear Hamiltonian, the EOS for uniform nuclear matter is constructed with the cluster variational method: For non-uniform nuclear matter, the EOS is calculated with the Thomas-Fermi method. The obtained thermodynamic quantities of uniform matter are in good agreement with those with more sophisticated Fermi Hypernetted Chain variational calculations, and phase diagrams constructed so far are close to those of the Shen-EOS. The structure of neutron stars calculated with this EOS at zero temperature is consistent with recent observational data, and the maximum mass of the neutron star is slightly larger than that with the Shen-EOS. Using the present EOS of uniform nuclear matter, we also perform the 1D simulation of the core-collapse supernovae by a simplified prescription of adiabatic hydrodynamics. The stellar core with the present EOS is more compact than that with the Shen-EOS, and correspondingly, the explosion energy in this simulation with the present EOS is larger than that with the Shen-EOS.

  4. Exploring the nuclear pasta phase in core-collapse supernova matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Helena; Stone, Jirina R

    2012-10-12

    The core-collapse supernova phenomenon, one of the most explosive events in the Universe, presents a challenge to theoretical astrophysics. Of the large variety of forms of matter present in core-collapse supernova, we focus on the transitional region between homogeneous (uniform) and inhomogeneous (pasta) phases. A three-dimensional, finite temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (3D-SHF)+BCS calculation yields, for the first time fully self-consistently, the critical density and temperature of both the onset of the pasta in inhomogeneous matter, consisting of neutron-rich heavy nuclei and a free neutron and electron gas, and its dissolution to a homogeneous neutron, proton, and electron liquid. We also identify density regions for different pasta formations between the two limits. We employ four different forms of the Skyrme interaction, SkM*, SLy4, NRAPR, and SQMC700 and find subtle variations in the low density and high density transitions into and out of the pasta phase. One new stable pasta shape has been identified, in addition to the classic ones, on the grid of densities and temperatures used in this work. Our results are critically compared to recent calculations of pasta formation in the quantum molecular dynamics approach and Thomas-Fermi and coexisting phase approximations to relativistic mean-field models.

  5. THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATED USING A 15 M{sub ⊙} PROGENITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Harris, J. Austin; Yakunin, Konstantin N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Bruenn, Stephen W. [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6354 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Blondin, John M. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Marronetti, Pedro, E-mail: elentz@utk.edu [Physics Division, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA 22207 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    We have performed ab initio neutrino radiation hydrodynamics simulations in three and two spatial dimensions (3D and 2D) of core-collapse supernovae from the same 15 M{sub ☉} progenitor through 440 ms after core bounce. Both 3D and 2D models achieve explosions; however, the onset of explosion (shock revival) is delayed by ∼100 ms in 3D relative to the 2D counterpart and the growth of the diagnostic explosion energy is slower. This is consistent with previously reported 3D simulations utilizing iron-core progenitors with dense mantles. In the ∼100 ms before the onset of explosion, diagnostics of neutrino heating and turbulent kinetic energy favor earlier explosion in 2D. During the delay, the angular scale of convective plumes reaching the shock surface grows and explosion in 3D is ultimately lead by a single, large-angle plume, giving the expanding shock a directional orientation not dissimilar from those imposed by axial symmetry in 2D simulations. We posit that shock revival and explosion in the 3D simulation may be delayed until sufficiently large plumes form, whereas such plumes form more rapidly in 2D, permitting earlier explosions.

  6. Core collapse supernovae from blue supergiant progenitors : The evolutionary history of SN 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Athira

    2015-08-01

    SN 1987A is historically one of the most remarkable supernova explosions to be seen from Earth. Due to the proximity of its location in the LMC, it remains the most well-studied object outside the solar system. It was also the only supernova whose progenitor was observed prior to its explosion.SN 1987A however, was a unique and enigmatic core collapse supernova. It was the first Type II supernova to have been observed to have exploded while its progenitor was a blue supergiant (BSG). Until then Type II supernovae were expected to originate from explosions of red supergiants (RSGs). A spectacular triple-ring nebula structure, rich in helium and nitrogen, was observed around the remnant, indicating a recent RSG phase before becoming a BSG. Even today it is not entirely understood what the evolutionary history may have been to cause a BSG to explode. The most commonly accepted hypothesis for its origin is the merger of a massive binary star system.An evolutionary scenario for such a binary system, was proposed by Podsiadlowski (1992) (P92). Through SPH simulations of the merger and the stellar evolution of the post-merger remnant, Ivanova & Podsiadlowski (2002) and (2003) (I&M) could successfully obtain the RSG to BSG transition of the progenitor.The aim of the present work is to produce the evolutionary history of the progenitor of SN 1987A and its explosion. We construct our models based on the results of P92 and I&M. Here, the secondary (less massive) star is accreted on the primary, while being simultaneously mixed in its envelope over a period of 100 years. The merged star is evolved until the onset of core collapse. For this work we use the 1-dimensional, implicit, hydrodynamical stellar evolution code, KEPLER. A large parameter space is explored, consisting of primary (16-20 Ms) and secondary masses (5-8 Ms), mixing boundaries, and accreting timescales. Those models whose end states match the observed properties of the progenitor of SN 1987A are exploded. The

  7. Shock-turbulence interaction in core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Zhaksylykov, Azamat; Radice, David; Berdibek, Shapagat

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear shell burning in the final stages of the lives of massive stars is accompanied by strong turbulent convection. The resulting fluctuations aid supernova explosion by amplifying the non-radial flow in the post-shock region. In this work, we investigate the physical mechanism behind this amplification using a linear perturbation theory. We model the shock wave as a one-dimensional planar discontinuity and consider its interaction with vorticity and entropy perturbations in the upstream flow. We find that, as the perturbations cross the shock, their total turbulent kinetic energy is amplified by a factor of ˜2, while the average linear size of turbulent eddies decreases by about the same factor. These values are not sensitive to the parameters of the upstream turbulence and the nuclear dissociation efficiency at the shock. Finally, we discuss the implication of our results for the supernova explosion mechanism. We show that the upstream perturbations can decrease the critical neutrino luminosity for producing explosion by several per cent.

  8. Long gamma-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae have differentenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchter, A.S.; Levan, A.J.; Strolger, L.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Thorsett, S.E.; Bersier, D.; Burud, I.; Castro Ceren, J.M.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Conselice, C.; Dahlen, T.; Ferguson, H.C.; Fynbo,J.P.U.; Garnavich, P.M.; Gibbons, R.A.; Gorosabel, J.; Gull, T.R.; Hjorth, J.; Holland, S.T.; Kouveliotou, C.; Levay, Z.; Livio, M.; Metzger, M.R.; Nugent, P.E.; Petro, L.; Pian, E.; Rhoads, J.E.; Riess,A.G.; Sahu, K.C.; Smette, A.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Woosley, S.E.

    2006-05-01

    When massive stars exhaust their fuel they collapse andoften produce the extraordinarily bright explosions known ascore-collapse supernovae. On occasion, this stellar collapse also powersan even more brilliant relativistic explosion known as a long-durationgamma-ray burst. One would then expect that long gamma-ray bursts andcore-collapse supernovae should be found in similar galacticenvironments. Here we show that this expectation is wrong. We find thatthe long gamma-ray bursts are far more concentrated on the very brightestregions of their host galaxies than are the core-collapse supernovae.Furthermore, the host galaxies of the long gamma-ray bursts aresignificantly fainter and more irregular than the hosts of thecore-collapse supernovae. Together theseresults suggest thatlong-duration gamma-ray bursts are associated with the most massive starsand may be restricted to galaxies of limited chemical evolution. Ourresults directly imply that long gamma-ray bursts are relatively rare ingalaxies such as our own MilkyWay.

  9. Three-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulated using a 15 $M_\\odot$ progenitor

    CERN Document Server

    Lentz, Eric J; Hix, W Raphael; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, O E Bronson; Endeve, Eirik; Blondin, John M; Harris, J Austin; Marronetti, Pedro; Yakunin, Konstantin N

    2015-01-01

    We have performed \\emph{ab initio} neutrino radiation hydrodynamics simulations in three and two spatial dimensions (3D and 2D) of core-collapse supernovae from the same 15 $M_\\odot$ progenitor through 440 ms after core bounce. Both 3D and 2D models achieve explosions, however, the onset of explosion (shock revival) is delayed by $\\sim$100 ms in 3D relative to the 2D counterpart and the growth of the diagnostic explosion energy is slower. This is consistent with previously reported 3D simulations utilizing iron-core progenitors with dense mantles. In the $\\sim$100 ms before the onset of explosion, diagnostics of neutrino heating and turbulent kinetic energy favor earlier explosion in 2D. During the delay, the angular scale of convective plumes reaching the shock surface grows and explosion in 3D is ultimately lead by a single, large-angle plume, giving the expanding shock a directional orientation not dissimilar from those imposed by axial symmetry in 2D simulations. We posit that shock revival and explosion ...

  10. What planetary nebulae can tell us about jets in core collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Bear, Ealeal

    2016-01-01

    We compare the morphology of the core collapse supernova remnant (CCSNR) W49B with the morphology of many planetary nebulae (PNe), and deduce the orientation of the jets that shaped this CCSNR and estimate their energy. We find morphological features shared by some PNe and by the CCSNR W49B that are thought to be shaped by jets, such as a barrel-shaped main body. These morphological similarities are used to deduce that the jets were launched along the symmetry axis of the `barrel', and to speculate that this CCSNR has two opposite lobes (or ears), that are too faint to be observed. The morphological similarities strengthen the suggestion that jets play a central role in the explosion of massive stars.

  11. The Core Collapse Supernova Rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Galbany, Lluis; Gupta, Ravi R.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-08-26

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10(–)(4)((h/0.7)(3)/(yr Mpc(3))) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  12. The core collapse supernova rate from the SDSS-II supernova survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Dilday, Ben [Spokane, WA 99203 (United States); Galbany, Lluis [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Gupta, Ravi R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kessler, R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Marriner, John [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Nichol, Robert C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2FX (United Kingdom); Richmond, Michael [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Sollerman, Jesper, E-mail: cinabro@physics.wayne.edu [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-09-10

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10{sup –4}((h/0.7){sup 3}/(yr Mpc{sup 3})) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  13. Observational upper limits on the gravitational wave production of core collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xing-Jiang; Blair, David

    2010-01-01

    The upper limit on the energy density of a stochastic gravitational wave (GW) background obtained from the two-year science run (S5) of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) is used to constrain the average GW production of core collapse supernovae (ccSNe). We assume that the ccSNe rate tracks the star formation history of the universe and show that the stochastic background energy density depends only weakly on the assumed average source spectrum. Using the ccSNe rate for $z\\leq10$, we scale the generic source spectrum to obtain an observation-based upper limit on the average GW emission. We show that the mean GW production can be constrained within $< (0.49-1.98)\\hspace{1mm} M_{\\odot} c^{2}$ depending on the average source spectrum. While these results are higher than the available energy for explosion in a core collapse event, second and third generation GW detectors will enable tighter constraints to be set on the GW emission from such systems. As experimental limits become str...

  14. INFLUENCE OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY ON NEUTRINO HEATING: A NEW MECHANISM FOR WEAKLY MAGNETIZED CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawai, Hidetomo; Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: hsawai@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-20

    We investigated the impact of magnetorotational instability (MRI) on the dynamics of weakly magnetized, rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae by conducting high-resolution axisymmetric MHD simulations with simplified neutrino transfer. We found that an initially sub-magnetar-class magnetic field is drastically amplified by MRI and substantially affects the dynamics thereafter. Although the magnetic pressure is not strong enough to eject matter, the amplified magnetic field efficiently transfers angular momentum from small to large radii and from higher to lower latitudes, which causes the expansion of the heating region due to the extra centrifugal force. This then enhances the efficiency of neutrino heating and eventually leads to neutrino-driven explosion. This is a new scenario of core-collapse supernovae that has never been demonstrated by past numerical simulations.

  15. Revival of The Stalled Core-Collapse Supernova Shock Triggered by Precollapse Asphericity in the Progenitor Star

    CERN Document Server

    Couch, Sean M

    2013-01-01

    Multi-dimensional simulations of advanced nuclear burning stages of massive stars suggest that the Si/O layers of presupernova stars harbor large deviations from the spherical symmetry typically assumed for presupernova stellar structure. We carry out three-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulations with and without aspherical velocity perturbations to assess their potential impact on the supernova hydrodynamics in the stalled shock phase. Our results show that realistic perturbations can qualitatively alter the postbounce evolution, triggering an explosion in a model that fails to explode without them. This finding underlines the need for a multi-dimensional treatment of the presupernova stage of stellar evolution.

  16. Physics of Core-Collapse Supernovae in Three Dimensions: A Sneak Preview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka, Hans-Thomas; Melson, Tobias; Summa, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Nonspherical mass motions are a generic feature of core-collapse supernovae, and hydrodynamic instabilities play a crucial role in the explosion mechanism. The first successful neutrino-driven explosions could be obtained with self-consistent, first-principles simulations in three spatial dimensions. But three-dimensional (3D) models tend to be less prone to explosion than the corresponding axisymmetric two-dimensional (2D) ones. The reason is that 3D turbulence leads to energy cascading from large to small spatial scales, the inverse of the 2D case, thus disfavoring the growth of buoyant plumes on the largest scales. Unless the inertia to explode simply reflects a lack of sufficient resolution in relevant regions, some important component of robust and sufficiently energetic neutrino-powered explosions may still be missing. Such a deficit could be associated with progenitor properties such as rotation, magnetic fields, or precollapse perturbations, or with microphysics that could cause enhancement of neutrino heating behind the shock. 3D simulations have also revealed new phenomena that are not present in 2D ones, such as spiral modes of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and a stunning dipolar lepton-number emission self-sustained asymmetry (LESA). Both impose time- and direction-dependent variations on the detectable neutrino signal. The understanding of these effects and of their consequences is still in its infancy.

  17. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. IV. The Neutrino Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M ⊙, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, langErang, of \\bar{\

  18. The Core-Collapse Supernova Rate in Arp299 Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Romero-Canizales, Cristina; Alberdi, Antxon; Perez-Torres, Miguel Angel; Kankare, Erkki; Ryder, Stuart D

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the CCSN rate in nuclei A and B1 of the luminous infrared galaxy Arp299, based on 11 years of Very Large Array monitoring of their radio emission at 8.4 GHz. Significant variations in the nuclear radio flux density can be used to identify the CCSN activity in the absence of high-resolution very long baseline interferometry observations. In the case of the B1-nucleus, the small variations in its measured diffuse radio emission are below the fluxes expected from radio supernovae, thus making it well-suited to detect RSNe through flux density variability. In fact, we find strong evidence for at least three RSNe this way, which results in a lower limit for the CCSN rate of 0.28 +/- 0.16 per year. In the A-nucleus, we did not detect any significant variability and found a SN detection threshold luminosity which allows only the detection of the most luminous RSNe known. Our method is basically blind to normal CCSN explosions occurring within the A-nucleus, which result in too small variations ...

  19. Analysis of Gravitational Signals from Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) using MatLab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frere, Noah; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Yakunin, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    When a massive star runs out of fuel, it collapses under its own weight and rebounds in a powerful supernova explosion, sending, among other things, ripples through space-time, known as gravitational waves (GWs). GWs can be detected by earth-based observatories, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). Observers must compare the data from GW detectors with theoretical waveforms in order to confirm that the detection of a GW signal from a particular source has occurred. GW predictions for core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) rely on computer simulations. The UTK/ORNL astrophysics group has performed such simulations. Here, I analyze the resulting waveforms, using Matlab, to generate their Fourier transforms, short-time Fourier transforms, energy spectra, evolution of frequencies, and frequency maxima. One product will be a Matlab interface for analyzing and comparing GW predictions based on data from future simulations. This interface will make it easier to analyze waveforms and to share the results with the GW astrophysics community. Funding provided by Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200, USA.

  20. Tables of Hyperonic Matter Equation of State for Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, C; Tsubakihara, K; Sumiyoshi, K; Yamada, S

    2008-01-01

    We present sets of equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter including hyperons using an SU_f(3) extended relativistic mean field (RMF) model with a wide coverage of density, temperature, and charge fraction for numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae. Coupling constants of Sigma and Xi hyperons with the sigma meson are determined to fit the hyperon potential depths in nuclear matter, U_Sigma(rho_0) ~ +30 MeV and U_Xi(rho_0) ~ -15 MeV, which are suggested from recent analyses of hyperon production reactions. At low densities, the EOS of uniform matter is connected with the EOS by Shen et al., in which formation of finite nuclei is included in the Thomas-Fermi approximation. In the present EOS, the maximum mass of neutron stars decreases from 2.17 M_sun (Ne mu) to 1.63 M_sun (NYe mu) when hyperons are included. Hyperon effects are found to be small in prompt phase of supernova explosions, since the temperature and density do not reach the region of hyperon mixture, where the hyperon fraction is above...

  1. The Evolution and Impacts of Magnetorotational Instability in Magnetized Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Sawai, Hidetomo

    2015-01-01

    We carried out 2D-axisymmetric MHD simulations of core-collapse supernovae for rapidly-rotating magnetized progenitors. By changing both the strength of the magnetic field and the spatial resolution, the evolution of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and its impacts upon the dynamics are investigated. We found that the MRI greatly amplifies the seed magnetic fields in the regime where not the Alfv\\'en mode but the buoyant mode plays a primary role in the exponential growth phase. The MRI indeed has a powerful impact on the supernova dynamics. It makes the shock expansion faster and the explosion more energetic, with some models being accompanied by the collimated-jet formations. These effects, however, are not made by the magnetic pressure except for the collimated-jet formations. The angular momentum transfer induced by the MRI causes the expansion of the heating region, by which the accreting matter gain an additional time to be heated by neutrinos. The MRI also drifts low-$Y_p$ matter from the deep i...

  2. Should One Use the Ray-by-Ray Approximation in Core-collapse Supernova Simulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, M. Aaron; Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-11-01

    We perform the first self-consistent, time-dependent, multi-group calculations in two dimensions (2D) to address the consequences of using the ray-by-ray+ transport simplification in core-collapse supernova simulations. Such a dimensional reduction is employed by many researchers to facilitate their resource-intensive calculations. Our new code (Fornax) implements multi-D transport, and can, by zeroing out transverse flux terms, emulate the ray-by-ray+ scheme. Using the same microphysics, initial models, resolution, and code, we compare the results of simulating 12, 15, 20, and 25 M ⊙ progenitor models using these two transport methods. Our findings call into question the wisdom of the pervasive use of the ray-by-ray+ approach. Employing it leads to maximum post-bounce/pre-explosion shock radii that are almost universally larger by tens of kilometers than those derived using the more accurate scheme, typically leaving the post-bounce matter less bound and artificially more “explodable.” In fact, for our 25 M ⊙ progenitor, the ray-by-ray+ model explodes, while the corresponding multi-D transport model does not. Therefore, in two dimensions, the combination of ray-by-ray+ with the axial sloshing hydrodynamics that is a feature of 2D supernova dynamics can result in quantitatively, and perhaps qualitatively, incorrect results.

  3. Should One Use the Ray-by-Ray Approximation in Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations?

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, M Aaron; Dolence, J C

    2015-01-01

    We perform the first self-consistent, time-dependent, multi-group calculations in two dimensions (2D) to address the consequences of using the ray-by-ray+ transport simplification in core-collapse supernova simulations. Such a dimensional reduction is employed by many researchers to facilitate their resource-intensive calculations. Our new code (F{\\sc{ornax}}) implements multi-D transport, and can, by zeroing out tranverse flux terms, emulate the ray-by-ray+ scheme. This is the only extant supernova code to have such a capability. Using the same microphysics, initial models, resolution, and code, we compare the results of simulating 12-, 15-, 20- and 25-M$_{\\odot}$ progenitor models using these two transport methods. Our findings call into question the wisdom of the pervasive use of the ray-by-ray+ approach. Employing it leads to maximum post-bounce/pre-explosion shock radii that are almost universally larger by many tens to a few hundred kilometers than those derived using the more accurate scheme, leaving t...

  4. THE EVOLUTION AND IMPACTS OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN MAGNETIZED CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawai, Hidetomo [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: hsawai@rist.or.jp [Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    We carried out two-dimensional axisymmetric MHD simulations of core-collapse supernovae for rapidly rotating magnetized progenitors. By changing both the strength of the magnetic field and the spatial resolution, the evolution of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and its impacts upon the dynamics are investigated. We found that the MRI greatly amplifies the seed magnetic fields in the regime where the buoyant mode, not the Alfvén mode, plays a primary role in the exponential growth phase. The MRI indeed has a powerful impact on the supernova dynamics. It makes the shock expansion faster and the explosion more energetic, with some models being accompanied by the collimated jet formations. These effects, however, are not made by the magnetic pressure except for the collimated jet formations. The angular momentum transfer induced by the MRI causes the expansion of the heating region, by which the accreting matter gain additional time to be heated by neutrinos. The MRI also drifts low-Y{sub p} matter from deep inside of the core to the heating region, which makes the net neutrino heating rate larger by the reduction of the cooling due to the electron capture. These two effects enhance the efficiency of the neutrino heating, which is found to be the key to boosting the explosion. Indeed, we found that our models explode far more weakly when the net neutrino heating is switched off. The contribution of the neutrino heating to the explosion energy could reach 60% even in the case of strongest magnetic field in the current simulations.

  5. Light Curves and Spectra from a Unimodal Core-collapse Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Hungerford, Aimee L.; Fryer, Chris L.; Wollaber, Allan B.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Even, Wesley

    2017-08-01

    To assess the effectiveness of optical emission as a probe of spatial asymmetry in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), we apply the radiative transfer software SuperNu to a unimodal CCSN model. The SNSPH radiation hydrodynamics software was used to simulate an asymmetric explosion of a 16 {M}⊙ zero-age main-sequence binary star. The ejecta has 3.36 {M}⊙ with 0.024 {M}⊙ of radioactive 56Ni, with unipolar asymmetry along the z-axis. For 96 discrete angular views, we find a ratio between maximum and minimum peak total luminosities of ˜1.36. The brightest light curves emerge from views orthogonal to the z-axis. Multigroup spectra from UV to IR are obtained. We find a shift in wavelength with viewing angle in a near-IR Ca ii emission feature, consistent with Ca being mostly in the unimode. We compare emission from the gray gamma-ray transfer in SuperNu and from the detailed gamma-ray transfer code Maverick. Relative to the optical light curves, the brightness of the gamma-ray emission is more monotonic with respect to viewing angle. UBVRI broadband light curves are also calculated. Parallel with the unimode, the U and B bands have excess luminosity at ≳ 10 days post-explosion, due to 56Ni on the unimode. We compare our CCSN model with SN 2002ap, which is thought to have a similar ejecta morphology.

  6. The First Five Minutes of a Core Collapse Supernova Multidimensional Hydrodynamic Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kifonidis, K; Janka, H T; Müller, E

    1999-01-01

    We present results of high-resolution two-dimensional simulations which follow the first five minutes of a core collapse supernova explosion in a 15 solar mass blue supergiant progenitor. The computations start shortly after core bounce and include neutrino-matter interactions by using a light-bulb approximation for the neutrinos, and a treatment of the nucleosynthesis due to explosive silicon and oxygen burning. We find that newly formed iron-group elements are distributed throughout a significant fraction of the stellar helium core by the concerted action of convective and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Fast moving nickel mushrooms with velocities up to 4000 km/s are observed. A continuation of the calculations to later times, however, indicates, that the iron velocities observed in SN 1987 A cannot be reproduced due to a strong deceleration of the clumps during their interaction with the dense shell left behind by the shock at the He/H interface. Therefore, we cannot confirm the claim that convective "prem...

  7. Two-Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernova Models with Multi-Dimensional Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Dolence, Joshua C; Zhang, Weiqun

    2014-01-01

    We present new two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric neutrino radiation/hydrodynamic models of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) cores. We use the CASTRO code, which incorporates truly multi-dimensional, multi-group, flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) neutrino transport, including all relevant $\\mathcal{O}(v/c)$ terms. Our main motivation for carrying out this study is to compare with recent 2D models produced by other groups who have obtained explosions for some progenitor stars and with recent 2D VULCAN results that did not incorporate $\\mathcal{O}(v/c)$ terms. We follow the evolution of 12, 15, 20, and 25 solar-mass progenitors to approximately 600 milliseconds after bounce and do not obtain an explosion in any of these models. Though the reason for the qualitative disagreement among the groups engaged in CCSN modeling remains unclear, we speculate that the simplifying ``ray-by-ray' approach employed by all other groups may be compromising their results. We show that ``ray-by-ray' calculations greatly exaggerate the ...

  8. A Systematic Study of Mid-Infrared Emission from Core-Collapse Supernovae with SPIRITS

    CERN Document Server

    Tinyanont, Samaporn; Fox, Ori D; Lau, Ryan; Smith, Nathan; Williams, Robert; Jencson, Jacob; Perley, Daniel; Dykhoff, Devin; Gehrz, Robert; Johansson, Joel; Masci, Frank; Cody, Ann Marie; Prince, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic study of mid-infrared (mid-IR) emission from 141 nearby supernovae (SNe) observed with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on Spitzer.These SNe reside in one of the 190 galaxies within 20 Mpc drawn from the ongoing SPIRITS program. We detect 8 Type Ia SNe and 36 core-collapse SNe. All Type I SNe become undetectable within 3 years of explosion. About 22$\\pm$11% of Type II SNe continue to be detected at late-times. Dust luminosity, temperature, and a lower liit on mass are obtained by fitting the SED using photometry with IRAC bands 1 and 2. The mass estimate does not distinguish between pre-existing and newly produced dust. We observe warm dust masses between $10^{-2}$ and $10^{-6}$ $\\rm M_{\\odot}$ and dust temperatures from 200 K to 1280 K.We present detailed case studies of two extreme Type II-P SNe: SN 2011ja and 2014bi. SN 2011ja was over-luminous ([4.5] = -15.6 mag) at 900 days post-explosion accompanied by the growing dust mass. This suggests either an episode of dust formation or an...

  9. Axisymmetric Ab Initio Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations of 12-25 M_sol Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bruenn, Stephen W; Hix, W Raphael; Lentz, Eric J; Messer, O E Bronson; Lingerfelt, Eric J; Blondin, John M; Endeve, Eirik; Marronetti, Pedro; Yakunin, Konstantin N

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of four ab initio axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations employing detailed spectral neutrino transport computed with our CHIMERA code and initiated from Woosley & Heger (2007) progenitors of mass 12, 15, 20, and 25 M_sol. All four models exhibit shock revival over \\sim 200 ms (leading to the possibility of explosion), driven by neutrino energy deposition. Hydrodynamic instabilities that impart substantial asymmetries to the shock aid these revivals, with convection appearing first in the 12 M_sol model and the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) appearing first in the 25 M_sol model. Three of the models have developed pronounced prolate morphologies (the 20 M_sol model has remained approximately spherical). By 500 ms after bounce the mean shock radii in all four models exceed 3,000 km and the diagnostic explosion energies are 0.33, 0.66, 0.65, and 0.70 Bethe (B = $10^{51}$ ergs) for the 12, 15, 20, and 25 M_sol models, respectively, and are increasing. The three l...

  10. Core-collapse and Type Ia supernovae with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Torres, M A; Beswick, R J; Lundqvist, P; Herrero-Illana, R; Romero-Cañizales, C; Ryder, S; della Valle, M; Conway, J; Marcaide, J M; Mattila, S; Murphy, T; Ros, E

    2014-01-01

    Core-collapse SNe (CCSNe): Systematic searches of radio emission from CCSNe are still lacking, and only targeted searches of radio emission from just some of the optically discovered CCSNe in the local universe have been carried out. Optical searches miss a significant fraction of CCSNe due to dust obscuration; therefore, CCSN radio searches are much more promising for yielding the complete, unobscured star-formation rates in the local universe. The forthcoming SKA yields the possibility to piggyback for free in this area of research by carrying out commensal, wide-field, blind transient survey observations. SKA1-sur should be able to discover several hundreds of CCSNe in just one year, compared to about a dozen CCSNe that the VLASS would be able to detect in one year, at most. SKA, with an expected sensitivity ten times that of SKA1, is expected to detect CCSNe in the local Universe by the thousands. Therefore, commensal SKA observations could easily result in an essentially complete census of all CCSNe in t...

  11. Towards Realistic Progenitors of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Arnett, W David

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamical simulations of progenitor evolution of a 23 solar mass star, close to core collapse (about 1 hour, in 1D), with simultaneously active C, Ne, O, and Si burning shells, are presented and contrasted to existing 1D models (which are forced to be quasi-static). Pronounced asymmetries, and strong dynamical interactions between shells are seen in 2D. Although instigated by turbulence, the dynamic behavior proceeds to sufficiently large amplitudes that it couples to the nuclear burning. Dramatic growth of low order modes is seen, as well as large deviations from spherical symmetry in the burning shells. The vigorous dynamics is more violent than that seen in earlier burning stages in the 3D simulations of a single cell in the oxygen burning shell, or in 2D simulations not including an active Si shell. Linear perturbative analysis does not capture the chaotic behavior of turbulence (e.g., strange attractors such as that discovered by Lorenz), and therefore badly underestimates the v...

  12. Constraining the supersaturation density equation of state from core-collapse supernova simulations? Excluded volume extension of the baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Tobias [University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-03-15

    In this article the role of the supersaturation density equation of state (EOS) is explored in simulations of failed core-collapse supernova explosions. Therefore the nuclear EOS is extended via a one-parameter excluded-volume description for baryons, taking into account their finite and increasing volume with increasing density in excess of saturation density. Parameters are selected such that the resulting supernova EOS represent extreme cases, with high pressure variations at supersaturation density which feature extreme stiff and soft EOS variants of the reference case, i.e. without excluded-volume corrections. Unlike in the interior of neutron stars with central densities in excess of several times saturation density, central densities of core-collapse supernovae reach only slightly above saturation density. Hence, the impact of the supersaturation density EOS on the supernova dynamics as well as the neutrino signal is found to be negligible. It is mainly determined from the low- and intermediate-density domain, which is left unmodified within this generalized excluded volume approach. (orig.)

  13. Axisymmetric Ab Initio Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations of 12--25 Solar Mass Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenn, S. W. [Florida Atlantic University; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Lentz, E. J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Lingerfelt, Eric J [ORNL; Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University; Endeve, Eirik [ORNL; Marronetti, Pedro [Florida Atlantic University; Yakunin, Konstantin [Florida Atlantic University

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of four ab initio axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations employing detailed spectral neutrino transport computed with our CHIMERA code and initiated from Woosley & Heger (2007) progenitors of mass 12, 15, 20, and 25 M_sun. All four models exhibit shock revival over ~ 200 ms (leading to the possibility of explosion), driven by neutrino energy deposition. Hydrodynamic instabilities that impart substantial asymmetries to the shock aid these revivals, with convection appearing first in the 12 solar mass model and the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) appearing first in the 25 solar mass model. Three of the models have developed pronounced prolate morphologies (the 20 solar mass model has remained approximately spherical). By 500 ms after bounce the mean shock radii in all four models exceed 3,000 km and the diagnostic explosion energies are 0.33, 0.66, 0.65, and 0.70 Bethe (B=10^{51} ergs) for the 12, 15, 20, and 25 solar mass models, respectively, and are increasing. The three least massive of our models are already sufficiently energetic to completely unbind the envelopes of their progenitors (i.e., to explode), as evidenced by our best estimate of their explosion energies, which first become positive at 320, 380, and 440 ms after bounce. By 850 ms the 12 solar mass diagnostic explosion energy has saturated at 0.38 B, and our estimate for the final kinetic energy of the ejecta is ~ 0.3 B, which is comparable to observations for lower-mass progenitors.

  14. Two- and three-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae with CHIMERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentz, Eric J [ORNL; Bruenn, S. W. [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; Harris, James A [ORNL; Chertkow, Merek A [ORNL; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University; Marronetti, Pedro [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; Mauney, Christopher M [ORNL; Yakunin, Konstantin [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton

    2012-01-01

    Ascertaining the core-collapse supernova mechanism is a complex, and yet unsolved, problem dependent on the interaction of general relativity, hydrodynamics, neutrino transport, neutrino-matter interactions, and nuclear equations of state and reaction kinetics. Ab initio modeling of core-collapse supernovae and their nucleosynthetic outcomes requires care in the coupling and approximations of the physical components. We have built our multi-physics CHIMERA code for supernova modeling in 1-, 2-, and 3-D, using ray-by-ray neutrino transport, approximate general relativity, and detailed neutrino and nuclear physics. We discuss some early results from our current series of exploding 2D simulations and our work to perform computationally tractable simulations in 3D using the ``Yin--Yang'' grid.

  15. A very faint core-collapse supernova in M85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorello, A; Della Valle, M; Smartt, S J; Zampieri, L; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Mazzali, P A; Patat, F; Spiro, S; Turatto, M; Valenti, S

    2007-10-18

    An anomalous transient in the early Hubble-type (S0) galaxy Messier 85 (M85) in the Virgo cluster was discovered by Kulkarni et al. on 7 January 2006 that had very low luminosity (peak absolute R-band magnitude M(R) of about -12) that was constant over more than 80 days, red colour and narrow spectral lines, which seem inconsistent with those observed in any known class of transient events. Kulkarni et al. suggest an exotic stellar merger as the possible origin. An alternative explanation is that the transient in M85 was a type II-plateau supernova of extremely low luminosity, exploding in a lenticular galaxy with residual star-forming activity. This intriguing transient might be the faintest supernova that has ever been discovered.

  16. Long gamma-ray Bursts and Type Ic Core CollapseSupernovae have Similar Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, P.L.; Kirshner, R.P.; Pahre, M.

    2007-12-04

    When the afterglow fades at the site of a long-duration {gamma}-ray burst (LGRB), Type Ic supernovae (SN Ic) are the only type of core collapse supernova observed. Recent work found that a sample of LGRB had different environments from a collection of core-collapse supernovae identified in a high-redshift sample from colors and light curves. LGRB were in the brightest regions of their hosts, but the core-collapse sample followed the overall distribution of the galaxy light. Here we examine 263 fully spectroscopically-typed supernovae found in nearby (z < 0.06) galaxies for which we have constructed surface photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The distributions of the thermonuclear supernovae (SN Ia) and some varieties of core-collapse supernovae (SN II and SN Ib) follow the galaxy light, but the SN Ic (like LGRB) are much more likely to erupt in the brightest regions of their hosts. The high-redshift hosts of LGRB are overwhelmingly irregulars, without bulges, while many low redshift SN Ic hosts are spirals with small bulges. When we remove the bulge light from our low-redshift sample, the SN Ic and LGRB distributions agree extremely well. If both LGRB and SN Ic stem from very massive stars, then it seems plausible that the conditions necessary for forming SN Ic are also required for LGRB. Additional factors, including metallicity, may determine whether the stellar evolution of a massive star leads to a LGRB with an underlying broad-lined SN Ic, or simply a SN Ic without a {gamma}-ray burst.

  17. Asymmetries in core-collapse supernovae from maps of radioactive 44Ti in Cassiopeia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grefenstette, B W; Harrison, F A; Boggs, S E

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry is required by most numerical simulations of stellar core-collapse explosions, but the form it takes differs significantly among models. The spatial distribution of radioactive (44)Ti, synthesized in an exploding star near the boundary between material falling back onto the collapsing...

  18. SN 2012aa: A transient between Type Ibc core-collapse and superluminous supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R.; Sollerman, J.; Silverman, J. M.; Pastorello, A.; Fransson, C.; Drake, A.; Taddia, F.; Fremling, C.; Kankare, E.; Kumar, B.; Cappellaro, E.; Bose, S.; Benetti, S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Valenti, S.; Nyholm, A.; Ergon, M.; Sutaria, F.; Kumar, B.; Pandey, S. B.; Nicholl, M.; Garcia-Álvarez, D.; Tomasella, L.; Karamehmetoglu, E.; Migotto, K.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Research on supernovae (SNe) over the past decade has confirmed that there is a distinct class of events which are much more luminous (by 2 mag) than canonical core-collapse SNe (CCSNe). These events with visual peak magnitudes ≲-21 are called superluminous SNe (SLSNe). The mechanism that powers the light curves of SLSNe is still not well understood. The proposed scenarios are circumstellar interaction, the emergence of a magnetar after core collapse, or disruption of a massive star through pair production. Aims: There are a few intermediate events which have luminosities between these two classes. They are important for constraining the nature of the progenitors of these two different populations and their environments and powering mechanisms. Here we study one such object, SN 2012aa. Methods: We observed and analysed the evolution of the luminous Type Ic SN 2012aa. The event was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search in an anonymous galaxy (z ≈ 0.08). The optical photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations were conducted over a time span of about 120 days. Results: With an absolute V-band peak of - 20 mag, the SN is an intermediate-luminosity transient between regular SNe Ibc and SLSNe. SN 2012aa also exhibits an unusual secondary bump after the maximum in its light curve. For SN 2012aa, we interpret this as a manifestation of SN-shock interaction with the circumstellar medium (CSM). If we assume a 56Ni-powered ejecta, the quasi-bolometric light curve requires roughly 1.3 M⊙ of 56Ni and an ejected mass of 14M⊙. This also implies a high kinetic energy of the explosion, 5.4 × 1051 erg. On the other hand, the unusually broad light curve along with the secondary peak indicate the possibility of interaction with CSM. The third alternative is the presence of a central engine releasing spin energy that eventually powers the light curve over a long time. The host of SN 2012aa is a star-forming Sa/Sb/Sbc galaxy. Conclusions

  19. Neutrino-Induced Nucleosynthesis in Helium Shells of Early Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Projjwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize our studies on neutrino-driven nucleosynthesis in He shells of early core-collapse supernovae with metallicities of Z ≲ 10−3 Z⊙. We find that for progenitors of ∼ 11–15 M⊙, the neutrons released by 4He(ν¯ee, e+n3H in He shells can be captured to produce nuclei with mass numbers up to A ∼ 200. This mechanism is sensitive to neutrino emission spectra and flavor oscillations. In addition, we find two new primary mechanisms for neutrino-induced production of 9Be in He shells. The first mechanism produces 9Be via 7Li(n,γ8Li(n,γ9Li(e− ν¯ee9Be and relies on a low explosion energy for its survival. The second mechanism operates in progenitors of ∼ 8 M⊙, where 9Be can be produced directly via 7Li(3H, n09Be during the rapid expansion of the shocked Heshell material. The light nuclei 7Li and 3H involved in these mechanisms are produced by neutrino interactions with 4He. We discuss the implications of neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis in He shells for interpreting the elemental abundances in metal-poor stars.

  20. Implications for Post-processing Nucleosynthesis of Core-collapse Supernova Models with Lagrangian Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. Austin; Hix, W. Raphael; Chertkow, Merek A.; Lee, C. T.; Lentz, Eric J.; Messer, O. E. Bronson

    2017-07-01

    We investigate core-collapse supernova (CCSN) nucleosynthesis with self-consistent, axisymmetric (2D) simulations performed using the neutrino hydrodynamics code Chimera. Computational costs have traditionally constrained the evolution of the nuclear composition within multidimensional CCSN models to, at best, a 14-species α-network capable of tracking only (α ,γ ) reactions from 4He to 60Zn. Such a simplified network limits the ability to accurately evolve detailed composition and neutronization or calculate the nuclear energy generation rate. Lagrangian tracer particles are commonly used to extend the nuclear network evolution by incorporating more realistic networks into post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations. However, limitations such as poor spatial resolution of the tracer particles inconsistent thermodynamic evolution, including misestimation of expansion timescales and uncertain determination of the multidimensional mass cut at the end of the simulation impose uncertainties inherent to this approach. We present a detailed analysis of the impact of such uncertainties for four self-consistent axisymmetric CCSN models initiated from solar-metallicity, nonrotating progenitors of 12, 15, 20, and 25 {M}⊙ and evolved with the smaller α-network to more than 1 s after the launch of an explosion.

  1. Shock Revival in Core-Collapse Supernovae: A Phase-Diagram Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gabay, Daniel; Keshet, Uri

    2015-01-01

    We examine the conditions for the revival of the stalled accretion shock in core-collapse supernovae, in the context of the neutrino heating mechanism. We combine one dimensional simulations of the shock revival process with a derivation of a quasi-stationary approximation, which is both accurate and efficient in predicting the flow. In particular, this approach is used to explore how the evolution of the system depends on the shock radius, $R_S$, and velocity, $V_S$ (in addition to other global properties of the system). We do so through a phase space analysis of the shock acceleration, $a_S$, in the $R_S-V_S$ plane, shown to provide quantitative insights into the initiation of runaway expansion and its nature. In the particular case of an initially stationary ($V_S=0,\\;a_S=0$) profile, the prospects for an explosion can be reasonably assessed by the initial signs of the partial derivatives of the shock acceleration, in analogy to a linear damped/anti-damped oscillator. If $\\partial a_S/\\partial R_S0$, runaw...

  2. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Core-Collapse Supernovae: From Shock Revival to Shock Breakout

    CERN Document Server

    Wongwathanarat, Annop; Janka, H -Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present 3D simulations of core-collapse supernovae from blast-wave initiation by the neutrino-driven mechanism to shock breakout from the stellar surface, considering two 15 Msun red supergiants (RSG) and two blue supergiants (BSG) of 15 Msun and 20 Msun. We demonstrate that the metal-rich ejecta in homologous expansion still carry fingerprints of asymmetries at the beginning of the explosion, but the final metal distribution is massively affected by the detailed progenitor structure. The most extended and fastest metal fingers and clumps are correlated with the biggest and fastest-rising plumes of neutrino-heated matter, because these plumes most effectively seed the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the C+O/He and He/H composition-shell interfaces after the passage of the SN shock. The extent of radial mixing, global asymmetry of the metal-rich ejecta, RT-induced fragmentation of initial plumes to smaller-scale fingers, and maximal Ni and minimal H velocities do not only depend on the initi...

  3. The interaction of core-collapse supernova ejecta with a companion star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-Wei; Tauris, T. M.; Röpke, F. K.; Moriya, T. J.; Kruckow, M.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Izzard, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The progenitors of many core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are expected to be in binary systems. After the SN explosion in a binary, the companion star may suffer from mass stripping and be shock heated as a result of the impact of the SN ejecta. If the binary system is disrupted by the SN explosion, the companion star is ejected as a runaway star, and in some cases as a hypervelocity star. Aims: By performing a series of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical simulations of the collision of SN ejecta with the companion star, we investigate how CCSN explosions affect their binary companion. Methods: We use the BEC stellar evolution code to construct the detailed companion structure at the moment of SN explosion. The impact of the SN blast wave on the companion star is followed by means of 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations using the Stellar GADGET code. Results: For main-sequence (MS) companion stars, we find that the amount of removed stellar mass, the resulting impact velocity, and the chemical contamination of the companion that results from the impact of the SN ejecta strongly increases with decreasing binary separation and increasing explosion energy. Their relationship can be approximately fitted by power laws, which is consistent with the results obtained from impact simulations of Type Ia SNe. However, we find that the impact velocity is sensitive to the momentum profile of the outer SN ejecta and, in fact, may decrease with increasing ejecta mass, depending on the modeling of the ejecta. Because most companion stars to Type Ib/c CCSNe are in their MS phase at the moment of the explosion, combined with the strongly decaying impact effects with increasing binary separation, we argue that the majority of these SNe lead to inefficient mass stripping and shock heating of the companion star following the impact of the ejecta. Conclusions: Our simulations show that the impact effects of Type Ib/c SN ejecta on the structure of MS companion

  4. Study of the Ti44(α,p)V47 reaction and implications for core collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margerin, V.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Davinson, T.; Dressler, R.; Fallis, J.; Kankainen, A.; Laird, A. M.; Lotay, G.; Mountford, D. J.; Murphy, C. D.; Seiffert, C.; Schumann, D.; Stowasser, T.; Stora, T.; Wang, C. H.-T.; Woods, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    The underlying physics triggering core collapse supernovae is not fully understood but observations of material ejected during such events helps to solve this puzzle. In particular, several satellite based γ-ray observations of the isotope 44Ti have been reported recently. Conveniently, the amount of this isotope in stellar ejecta is thought to depend critically on the explosion mechanism. The most influential reaction to the amount of 44Ti in supernovae is Ti44(α,p)V47. Here we report on a direct study of this reaction conducted at the REX-ISOLDE facility, CERN. The experiment was performed with a 44Ti beam at E=2.16 MeV/u, corresponding to an energy distribution, for reacting α-particles, centred on E=4.15 with a 1σ width of 0.23 MeV. This is, for the first time, well within the Gamow window for core collapse supernovae. The material from which the 44Ti beam was extracted originates from highly irradiated components of the SINQ spallation neutron source of the Paul Scherrer Institute. No yield above background was observed, enabling an upper limit for the rate of this reaction to be determined. This result is below expectation, suggesting that the Ti44(α,p)V47 reaction proceeds more slowly than previously thought. Implications for astrophysical events, and remnant age, are discussed.

  5. Study of the {sup 44}Ti(α,p){sup 47}V reaction and implications for core collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margerin, V., E-mail: vincent.margerin@ed.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Murphy, A.St.J.; Davinson, T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Dressler, R. [Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 (Switzerland); Fallis, J. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Kankainen, A. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Laird, A.M. [Department of Physics, University of York, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Lotay, G.; Mountford, D.J.; Murphy, C.D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Seiffert, C. [CERN (Organisation Européenne pour la Recherche Nucléaire), CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Schumann, D.; Stowasser, T. [Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 (Switzerland); Stora, T. [CERN (Organisation Européenne pour la Recherche Nucléaire), CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Wang, C.H.-T. [Department of Physics, Aberdeen University, Aberdeen, AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Woods, P.J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-04

    The underlying physics triggering core collapse supernovae is not fully understood but observations of material ejected during such events helps to solve this puzzle. In particular, several satellite based γ-ray observations of the isotope {sup 44}Ti have been reported recently. Conveniently, the amount of this isotope in stellar ejecta is thought to depend critically on the explosion mechanism. The most influential reaction to the amount of {sup 44}Ti in supernovae is {sup 44}Ti(α,p){sup 47}V. Here we report on a direct study of this reaction conducted at the REX-ISOLDE facility, CERN. The experiment was performed with a {sup 44}Ti beam at E{sub lab}=2.16 MeV/u, corresponding to an energy distribution, for reacting α-particles, centred on E{sub cm}=4.15 with a 1σ width of 0.23 MeV. This is, for the first time, well within the Gamow window for core collapse supernovae. The material from which the {sup 44}Ti beam was extracted originates from highly irradiated components of the SINQ spallation neutron source of the Paul Scherrer Institute. No yield above background was observed, enabling an upper limit for the rate of this reaction to be determined. This result is below expectation, suggesting that the {sup 44}Ti(α,p){sup 47}V reaction proceeds more slowly than previously thought. Implications for astrophysical events, and remnant age, are discussed.

  6. Study of the $^{44}$Ti$(\\alpha,p)^{47}$V47 reaction and implications for core collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Margerin, V; Davinson, T; Dressler, R; Fallis, J; Kankainen, A; Laird, A M; Lotay, G; Mountford, D J; Murphy, C D; Seiffert, C; Schumann, D; Stowasser, T; Stora, T; Wang, C H -T; Woods, P J

    2014-01-01

    The underlying physics triggering core collapse supernovae is not fully understood but observations of material ejected during such events helps to solve this puzzle. In particular, several satellite based γ -ray observations of the isotope 44 Ti have been reported recently. Conveniently, the amount of this isotope in stellar ejecta is thought to depend critically on the explosion mechanism. The most influential reaction to the amount of 44 Ti in supernovae is 44 Ti ( α , p ) 47 V. Here we report on a direct study of this reaction conducted at the REX-ISOLDE facility, CERN. The experiment was performed with a 44 Ti beam at E lab = 2 . 16 MeV / u, corresponding to an energy distribution, for reacting α -particles, centred on E cm = 4 . 15 with a 1 σ width of 0.23 MeV. This is, for the first time, well within the Gamow window for core collapse supernovae. The material from which the 44 Ti beam was extracted originates from highly irradiated components of the SINQ spallation neutron source of the Paul Scherr...

  7. On the maximum magnetic field amplification by the magnetorotational instability in core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Rembiasz, Tomasz; Obergaulinger, Martin; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Aloy, Miguel-Ángel; Müller, Ewald

    2016-01-01

    Whether the magnetorotational instability (MRI) can amplify initially weak magnetic fields to dynamically relevant strengths in core collapse supernovae is still a matter of active scientific debate. Recent numerical studies have shown that, in accordance with the parasitic model, given the core collapse supernova conditions, the MRI is terminated by parasitic instabilities of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type that disrupt MRI channel flows and quench further magnetic field growth. However, it remains to be properly assessed by what factor the initial magnetic field can be amplified and how it depends on the initial field strength and the amplitude of the perturbations. Different termination criteria which lead to different estimates of the amplification factor were proposed within the parasitic model. To determine the amplification factor and test which criterion is a better predictor of the MRI termination, we perform three-dimensional shearing-disc and shearing-box simulations of a region close to the surface of a...

  8. DAO spectroscopic classification of AT2016ccm in IC983 as a core-collapse supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balam, D. D.; Graham, M. L.

    2016-05-01

    A spectrum was obtained on UT May 09.36 of AT2016ccm in IC 983 using the 1.82-m Plaskett telescope (National Research Council of Canada) covering the range 365-710 nm (resolution 0.35 nm). Cross-correlation with a template library using SNID (Blondin & Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) shows AT2016ccm to be a core-collapse supernova approximately 1 week post maximum light.

  9. Core-collapse supernova matter: light clusters, pasta phase and phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Pais, Helena; Newton, William G; Stone, Jirina R

    2015-01-01

    The pasta phase in core-collapse supernova matter (finite temperatures and fixed proton fractions) is studied within relativistic mean field models. Two different calculations are used for comparison, the Thomas-Fermi (TF) and the Coexisting Phases (CP) approximations. The effects of including light clusters in nuclear matter and the densities at which the transitions between pasta configurations and to uniform matter occur are also investigated. Finally, a comparison with a finite temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculation is drawn.

  10. Supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Branch, David

    2017-01-01

    Targeting advanced students of astronomy and physics, as well as astronomers and physicists contemplating research on supernovae or related fields, David Branch and J. Craig Wheeler offer a modern account of the nature, causes and consequences of supernovae, as well as of issues that remain to be resolved. Owing especially to (1) the appearance of supernova 1987A in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud, (2) the spectacularly successful use of supernovae as distance indicators for cosmology, (3) the association of some supernovae with the enigmatic cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and (4) the discovery of a class of superluminous supernovae, the pace of supernova research has been increasing sharply. This monograph serves as a broad survey of modern supernova research and a guide to the current literature. The book’s emphasis is on the explosive phases of supernovae. Part 1 is devoted to a survey of the kinds of observations that inform us about supernovae, some basic interpreta tions of such data, and an overview of t...

  11. Application of the nuclear equation of state obtained by the variational method to core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Togashi, H; Sumiyoshi, K; Nakazato, K

    2014-01-01

    The equation of state (EOS) for hot asymmetric nuclear matter which is constructed with the variational method starting from the Argonne v18 and Urbana IX nuclear forces is applied to spherically symmetric core-collapse supernovae (SNe). We first investigate the EOS of isentropic beta-stable SN matter, and find that the matter with the variational EOS is more neutron-rich than that with the Shen EOS. Using the variational EOS for uniform matter supplemented by the Shen EOS of non-uniform matter at low densities, we perform general-relativistic spherically symmetric simulations of core-collapse SNe with and without neutrino transfer, starting from a presupernova model of 15 solar mass. In the adiabatic simulation without neutrino transfer, the explosion is successful, and the explosion energy with the variational EOS is larger than that with the Shen EOS. In the case of the simulation with neutrino transfer, the shock wave stalls and then the explosion fails, as in other spherically symmetric simulations. The ...

  12. A Systematic Study of Mid-Infrared Emission from Core-Collapse Supernovae with SPIRITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinyanont, Samaporn; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Dosovitz Fox, Ori; Lau, Ryan M.; Smith, Nathan; Williams, Robert E.; Jencson, Jacob; Perley, Daniel A.; Dykhoff, Devin; Gehrz, Robert D.; Johansson, Joel; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Masci, Frank J.; Cody, Ann Marie; Prince, Thomas Allen; SPIRITS

    2017-01-01

    Late-time mid-infrared emission from core-collpase supernovae tells stories of circumstellar interaction and dust formation. We present a systematic study of mid-infrared emission from 141 nearby supernovae observed with Spitzer/IRAC as part of the ongoing SPIRITS survey. We detect 8 Type Ia and 36 core-collapse SNe. While all SNe-Ia fade away within 3 years post explosion, about 20% of SNe-II remain detectable. Five SNe-II are detected two decades after discovery (SN 1974E, 1979C, 1980K, 1986J, and 1993J). From the two-band photometry, we can fit for IR luminosity and temperature, and the inferred dust mass assuming that all mid-IR emission comes from an optically thin shell of warm dust. We derive warm dust masses between 10-6 and 10-2 \\msol and dust color temperatures between 200 and 1280 K. This observed warm dust could be pre-existing or newly created. We note that either case represents a lower limit to the dust mass because cooler dust may be present. We present three case studies of extreme SNe. SN 2011ja (II-P) was over-luminous ([4.5] = -15.6 mag) at 900 days post-explosion with increasing hot dust mass, suggesting either an episode of dust formation or intensifying CSM interactions heating up pre-existing dust. SN 2014bi (II-P) showed a factor of 10 decrease in dust mass over one month suggesting either dust destruction or reduced dust heating. The IR luminosity of SN 2014C (Ib) stays constant over 800 days, possibly due to strong CSM interaction with H rich shell, which is rare among stripped-envelope SNe. The observations suggest that this CSM shell originated from an LBV-like eruption roughly 100 years pre-explosion. The observed diversity demonstrates the power of mid-IR observations of a large sample of SNe.

  13. An extremely faint stripped-envelope core-collapse supernova and its implications

    CERN Document Server

    Valenti, Stefano; Cappellaro, Enrico; Benetti, Stefano; Mazzali, Paolo; Manteca, Jose; Taubenberger, Stefan; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Ferrando, Rafael; Harutyunyan, Avet; Hentunen, Veli-Pekka; Nissinen, Markku; Pian, Elena; Turatto, Massimo; Zampieri, Luca; Smartt, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    The final fate of massive stars depends on many factors, including the mass of the helium core, rotation rate, magnetic fields and metallicity. Theory suggests that some massive stars (initially greater than 25-30 solar masses) can die as under-luminous core-collapse supernovae (Ref.1,2,3). The models propose that the core mantle falls back onto the collapsed remnant, mass accretion leads to black hole formation and the remaining envelope including a very small fraction of radioactive elements is ejected with low kinetic energy. An alternative origin for low energy supernovae is the collapse of the oxygen-magnesium-neon core of a relatively low-mass star (7-8 solar masses) through electron capture (Ref 4,5). Only under-luminous type II-plateau (IIP) supernovae have been discovered so far (e.g. Ref. 6), and no weak hydrogen-stripped core-collapse supernova (of type Ib/c) has been detected. Here we show that faint Ib/c Supernovae do exist, and that they have been previously misclassified as peculiar thermonucle...

  14. The Sensitivity of Core-Collapse Supernovae to Nuclear Electron Capture

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Chris; Zegers, Remco G T; Grubb, Thomas; Austin, Sam M

    2015-01-01

    A weak-rate library aimed at investigating the sensitivity of astrophysical environments to variations of electron-capture rates on medium-heavy nuclei has been developed. With this library, the sensitivity of the core-collapse and early post-bounce phases of core-collapse supernovae to nuclear electron-capture is examined by systematically and statistically varying electron-capture rates of individual nuclei. The rates are adjusted by factors consistent with uncertainties indicated by comparing theoretical rates to those deduced from charge-exchange and $\\beta$-decay measurements. To ensure a model independent assessment, sensitivity studies across a comprehensive set of progenitors and equations of state are performed. In our systematic study, we find a +16/-4 % range in the mass of the inner-core at the time of shock formation and a $\\pm$20% range of peak {\

  15. Coherent Network Analysis of Gravitational Waves from Three-Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernova Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hayama, Kazuhiro; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2015-01-01

    Using predictions from three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics simulations of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), we present a coherent network analysis to detection, reconstruction, and the source localization of the gravitational-wave (GW) signals. By combining with the GW spectrogram analysis, we show that several important hydrodynamics features imprinted in the original waveforms persist in the waveforms of the reconstructed signals. The characteristic excess in the GW spectrograms originates not only from rotating core-collapse and bounce, the subsequent ring down of the proto-neutron star (PNS) as previously identified, but also from the formation of magnetohydrodynamics jets and non-axisymmetric instabilities in the vicinity of the PNS. Regarding the GW signals emitted near at the rotating core bounce, the horizon distance, which we set by a SNR exceeding 8, extends up to $\\sim$ 18 kpc for the most rapidly rotating 3D model among the employed waveform libraries. Following the rotating core bounce, the domi...

  16. METAMORPHOSIS OF SN 2014C: DELAYED INTERACTION BETWEEN A HYDROGEN POOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA AND A NEARBY CIRCUMSTELLAR SHELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Kamble, A.; Patnaude, D. J.; Raymond, J. C.; Challis, P.; Drout, M. R.; Grindlay, J. E.; Kirshner, R. P.; Lunnan, R.; Miller, G. F.; Parrent, J. T.; Sanders, N. E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Eldridge, J. J. [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Fong, W. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bietenholz, M. [Hartebeesthoek Radio Observatory, P.O. Box 443, Krugersdorp 1740 (South Africa); Chornock, R. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 251B Clippinger Lab, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Fransson, C. [Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Fesen, R. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Lab, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Mackey, J., E-mail: dmilisav@cfa.harvard.edu [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Auf dem Hgel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); and others

    2015-12-20

    We present optical observations of supernova SN 2014C, which underwent an unprecedented slow metamorphosis from H-poor type Ib to H-rich type IIn over the course of one year. The observed spectroscopic evolution is consistent with the supernova having exploded in a cavity before encountering a massive shell of the progenitor star’s stripped hydrogen envelope. Possible origins for the circumstellar shell include a brief Wolf–Rayet fast wind phase that overtook a slower red supergiant wind, eruptive ejection, or confinement of circumstellar material by external influences of neighboring stars. An extended high velocity Hα absorption feature seen in near-maximum light spectra implies that the progenitor star was not completely stripped of hydrogen at the time of core collapse. Archival pre-explosion Subaru Telescope Suprime-Cam and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images of the region obtained in 2009 show a coincident source that is most likely a compact massive star cluster in NGC 7331 that hosted the progenitor system. By comparing the emission properties of the source with stellar population models that incorporate interacting binary stars we estimate the age of the host cluster to be 30–300 Myr, and favor ages closer to 30 Myr in light of relatively strong Hα emission. SN 2014C is the best observed member of a class of core-collapse supernovae that fill the gap between events that interact strongly with dense, nearby environments immediately after explosion and those that never show signs of interaction. Better understanding of the frequency and nature of this intermediate population can contribute valuable information about the poorly understood final stages of stellar evolution.

  17. Multi-messenger signals of long-term core-collapse supernova simulations : synergetic observation strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Ko; Tanaka, Masaomi; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2016-01-01

    The next Galactic supernova is expected to bring great opportunities for the direct detection of gravitational waves (GW), full flavor neutrinos, and multi-wavelength photons. To maximize the science return from such a rare event, it is essential to have established classes of possible situations and preparations for appropriate observations. To this end, we use a long-term numerical simulation of the core-collapse supernova (CCSN) of a 17 solar-mass red supergiant progenitor to self-consistently model the multi-messenger signals expected in GW, neutrino, and electromagnetic messengers. This supernova model takes into account the formation and evolution of a protoneutron star, neutrino-matter interaction, and neutrino transport, all within a two-dimensional shock hydrodynamics simulation. With this, we separately discuss three situations: (i) a CCSN at the Galactic Center, (ii) an extremely nearby CCSN within hundreds of parsecs, and (iii) a CCSN in nearby galaxies within several Mpc. These distance regimes n...

  18. Density Fluctuation Effects on Collective Neutrino Oscillations in O-Ne-Mg Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, John F; Carlson, Joe; Duan, Huaiyu; Fuller, George M; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of matter density fluctuations on supernova collective neutrino flavor oscillations. In particular, we use full multi-angle, 3-flavor, self-consistent simulations of the evolution of the neutrino flavor field in the envelope of an O-Ne-Mg core collapse supernova at shock break-out (neutrino neutronization burst) to study the effect of the matter density "bump" left by the He-burning shell. We find a seemingly counterintuitive increase in the overall electron neutrino survival probability created by this matter density feature. We discuss this behavior in terms of the interplay between the matter density profile and neutrino collective effects. While our results give new insights into this interplay, they also suggest an immediate consequence for supernova neutrino burst detection: it will be difficult to use a burst signal to extract information on fossil burning shells or other fluctuations of this scale in the matter density profile. Consistent with previous studies, our results al...

  19. Semi-global simulations of the magneto-rotational instability in core collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Obergaulinger, M; Müller, E; Aloy, M A

    2008-01-01

    Possible effects of magnetic fields in core collapse supernovae rely on an efficient amplification of the weak pre-collapse fields. The magneto-rotational instability (MRI) has been suggested to lead to rapid field growth. Although MRI studies exist for accretion discs, the application of their results to core collapse supernovae is inhibited as the physics of supernova cores is substantially different from that of accretion discs. We address the problem of growth and saturation of the MRI by means of semi-global simulations, which combine elements of global and local simulations by taking into account the presence of global background gradients and using a local computational grid. We analyze the dispersion relation of the MRI to identify different regimes of the instability. This analysis is complemented by simulations, where we consider a local computational box rotating at sub-Keplerian velocity, and where we allow for a radial entropy gradient. We identify six regimes of the MRI depending on the ratio of...

  20. Advances in Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Swesty, F D; Myra, Eric S.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss recent advances in the radiative-hydrodynamic modeling of core collapse supernovae in multi-dimensions. A number of earlier attempts at fully radiation-hydrodynamic models utilized either the grey approximation to describe the neutrino distribution or utilized more sophisticated multigroup transport methods restricted to radial rays. In both cases these models have also neglected the O(v/c) terms that couple the radiation and matter strongly in the optically thick regions of the collapsed core. In this paper we present some recent advances that resolve some shortcomings of earlier models.

  1. Light clusters, pasta phases, and phase transitions in core-collapse supernova matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Helena; Chiacchiera, Silvia; Providência, Constança

    2015-05-01

    The pasta phase in core-collapse supernova matter (finite temperatures and fixed proton fractions) is studied within relativistic mean-field models. Three different calculations are used for comparison: the Thomas-Fermi, the coexisting phases, and the compressible liquid drop approximations. The effects of including light clusters in nuclear matter and the densities at which the transitions between pasta configurations and to uniform matter occur are also investigated. The free energy, pressure, entropy, and chemical potentials in the range of particle number densities and temperatures expected to cover the pasta region are calculated. Finally, a comparison with a finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculation is drawn.

  2. Light clusters, pasta phases and phase transitions in core-collapse supernova matter

    CERN Document Server

    Pais, Helena; Providência, Constanca

    2015-01-01

    The pasta phase in core-collapse supernova matter (finite temperatures and fixed proton fractions) is studied within relativistic mean field models. Three different calculations are used for comparison, the Thomas-Fermi (TF), the Coexisting Phases (CP) and the Compressible Liquid Drop (CLD) approximations. The effects of including light clusters in nuclear matter and the densities at which the transitions between pasta configurations and to uniform matter occur are also investigated. The free energy, pressure, entropy and chemical potentials in the range of particle number densities and temperatures expected to cover the pasta region are calculated. Finally, a comparison with a finite temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculation is drawn.

  3. An Investigation of Neutrino-Driven Convection and the Core Collapse Supernova Mechanism Using Multigroup Neutrino Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzacappa, A; Bruenn, S W; Blondin, J M; Guidry, M W; Strayer, M R; Umar, A S

    1996-01-01

    We investigate neutrino-driven convection in core collapse supernovae and its ramifications for the explosion mechanism. We begin with an ``optimistic'' 15 solar mass precollapse model, which is representative of the class of stars with compact iron cores. This model is evolved through core collapse and bounce in one dimension using multigroup (neutrino-energy--dependent) flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) neutrino transport and Lagrangian hydrodynamics, providing realistic initial conditions for the postbounce convection and evolution. Our two-dimensional simulation begins at 106 ms after bounce at a time when there is a well-developed gain region, and proceeds for 400 ms. We couple two-dimensional (PPM) hydrodynamics to one-dimensional MGFLD neutrino transport. At 225 ms after bounce we see large-scale convection behind the shock, characterized by high-entropy, mushroom-like, expanding upflows and dense, low-entropy, finger-like downflows. The upflows reach the shock and distort it from sphericity. The radial c...

  4. Core-Collapse Supernovae as Supercomputing Science: a status report toward 6D simulations with exact Boltzmann neutrino transport in full general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Kotake, Kei; Yamada, Shoichi; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kuroda, Takami; Suwa, Yudai; Nagakura, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    This is a status report on our endeavor to reveal the mechanism of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) by large-scale numerical simulations. Multi-dimensionality of the supernova engine, general relativisitic magnetohydrodynamics, energy and lepton number transport by neutrinos emitted from the forming neutron star as well as nuclear interactions there, are all believed to play crucial roles in repelling infalling matter and producing energetic explosions. These ingredients are nonlinearly coupled with one another in the dynamics of core-collapse, bounce, and shock expansion. Serious quantitative studies of CCSNe hence make extensive numerical computations mandatory. Since neutrinos are neither in thermal nor in chemical equilibrium in general, their distributions in the phase space should be computed. This is a six dimensional (6D) neutrino transport problem and quite a challenge even for those with an access to the most advanced numerical resources such as the "K computer". To tackle this problem, we have emba...

  5. Flavor evolution of the neutronization neutrino burst from an O-Ne-Mg core-collapse supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huaiyu; Fuller, George M; Carlson, J; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2008-01-18

    We present results of 3-neutrino flavor evolution simulations for the neutronization burst from an O-Ne-Mg core-collapse supernova. We find that nonlinear neutrino self-coupling engineers a single spectral feature of stepwise conversion in the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy case and in the normal mass hierarchy case, a superposition of two such features corresponding to the vacuum neutrino mass-squared differences associated with solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillations. These neutrino spectral features offer a unique potential probe of the conditions in the supernova environment and may allow us to distinguish between O-Ne-Mg and Fe core-collapse supernovae.

  6. Multi-dimensional relativistic simulations of core-collapse supernovae with energy-dependent neutrino transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Bernhard

    2009-05-07

    In this thesis, we have presented the first multi-dimensional models of core-collapse supernovae that combine a detailed, up-to-date treatment of neutrino transport, the equation of state, and - in particular - general relativistic gravity. Building on the well-tested neutrino transport code VERTEX and the GR hydrodynamics code CoCoNuT, we developed and implemented a relativistic generalization of a ray-by-ray-plus method for energy-dependent neutrino transport. The result of these effort, the VERTEX-CoCoNuT code, also incorporates a number of improved numerical techniques that have not been used in the code components VERTEX and CoCoNuT before. In order to validate the VERTEX-CoCoNuT code, we conducted several test simulations in spherical symmetry, most notably a comparison with the one-dimensional relativistic supernova code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN and the Newtonian PROMETHEUSVERTEX code. (orig.)

  7. Matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernovae: a search for possible conditions for conveying $^{56}$Ni into high velocity regions

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Masaomi; Ito, Hirotaka; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Tolstov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    We perform two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernova explosions of a 16.3 $M_{\\odot}$ star with a compact hydrogen envelope. Observations of SN 1987A have provided evidence that $^{56}$Ni synthesized by explosive nucleosynthesis is mixed into fast moving matter ($\\gtrsim$ 3,500 km s$^{-1}$) in the exploding star. In order to clarify the key conditions for reproducing such high velocity of $^{56}$Ni, we revisit matter mixing in aspherical core-collapse supernova explosions. Explosions are initiated artificially by injecting thermal and kinetic energies around the interface between the iron core and the silicon-rich layer. Perturbations of 5% or 30% amplitude in the radial velocities are introduced at several points in time. We found that no high velocity $^{56}$Ni can be obtained if we consider bipolar explosions with perturbations (5% amplitude) of pre-supernova origins. If large perturbations (30% amplitude) are introduced or exist due to som...

  8. Asymmetries in core-collapse supernovae from maps of radioactive $^{44}$Ti in CassiopeiaA

    CERN Document Server

    Grefenstette, B W; Boggs, S E; Reynolds, S P; Fryer, C L; Madsen, K K; Wik, D R; Zoglauer, A; Ellinger, C I; Alexander, D M; An, H; Barret, D; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Forster, K; Giommi, P; Hailey, C J; Hornstrup, A; Kaspi, V M; Kitaguchi, T; Koglin, J E; Mao, P H; Miyasaka, H; Mori, K; Perri, M; Pivovaroff, M J; Puccetti, S; Rana, V; Stern, D; Westergaard, N J; Zhang, W W

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry is required by most numerical simulations of stellar core-collapse explosions, but the form it takes differs significantly among models. The spatial distribution of radioactive 44Ti, synthesized in an exploding star near the boundary between material falling back onto the collapsing core and that ejected into the surrounding medium, directly probes the explosion asymmetries. CassiopeiaA is a young, nearby, core-collapse remnant from which 44Ti emission has previously been detected but not imaged. Asymmetries in the explosion have been indirectly inferred from a high ratio of observed 44Ti emission to estimated 56Ni emission, from optical light echoes, and from jet-like features seen in the X-ray and optical ejecta. Here we report spatial maps and spectral properties of the 44Ti in Cassiopeia A. This may explain the unexpected lack of correlation between the 44Ti and iron X-ray emission, the latter being visible only in shock-heated material. The observed spatial distribution rules out symmetric expl...

  9. Spin flip of neutrinos with magnetic moment in core-collapse supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Lychkovskiy, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    Neutrino with magnetic moment can experience a chirality flip while scattering off charged particles. This effect may lead to important consequences for the dynamics and the neutrino signal of the core-collapse supernova. It is known that if neutrino is a Dirac fermion, then nu_L->nu_R transition induced by the chirality flip leads to the emission of sterile right-handed neutrinos. The typical energies of these neutrinos are rather high, E ~ (100-200)MeV. Neutrino spin precession in the magnetic field either inside the collapsing star or in the interstellar space may lead to the backward transition, nu_R->nu_L. Both possibilities are known to be interesting. In the former case high-energy neutrinos can deliver additional energy to the supernova envelope, which can help the supernova to explode. In the latter case high-energy neutrinos may be detected simultaneously with the "normal" supernova neutrino signal, which would be a smoking gun for the Dirac neutrino magnetic moment. We report the results of the cal...

  10. Observational upper limits on the gravitational wave production of core collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xing-Jiang; Howell, E.; Blair, D.

    2010-11-01

    The upper limit on the energy density of a stochastic gravitational wave (GW) background obtained from the 2-yr science run (S5) of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is used to constrain the average GW production of core collapse supernovae (ccSNe). We assume that the ccSNe rate tracks the star formation history of the Universe and show that the stochastic background energy density depends only weakly on the assumed average source spectrum. Using the ccSNe rate for z <= 10, we scale the generic source spectrum to obtain an observation-based upper limit on the average GW emission. We show that the mean energy emitted in GWs can be constrained within < (0.49-1.98)Msolarc2 depending on the average source spectrum. While these results are higher than the total available gravitational energy in a core collapse event, second- and third-generation GW detectors will enable tighter constraints to be set on the GW emission from such systems.

  11. New aspects of the QCD phase transition in proto-neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Matthias; Heinimann, Oliver; Yudin, Andrey; Iosilevskiy, Igor; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Friedrich-Karl, Thielemann

    2017-06-01

    The QCD phase transition from hadronic to deconfined quark matter is found to be a so-called “entropic” phase transition, characterized, e.g., by a negative slope of the phase transition line in the pressure-temperature phase diagram. In a first part of the present proceedings it is discussed that entropic phase transitions lead to unusual thermal properties of the equation of state (EoS). For example one finds a loss of pressure (a “softening”) of the proto-neutron star EoS with increasing entropy. This can lead to a novel, hot third family of compact stars, which exists only in the early proto-neutron star phase. Such a hot third family can trigger explosions of core-collapse supernovae. However, so far this special explosion mechanism was found to be working only for EoSs which are not compatible with the 2 M⊙ constraint for the neutron star maximum mass. In a second part of the proceeding it is discussed which quark matter parameters could be favorable for this explosion mechanism, and have sufficiently high maximum masses at the same time.

  12. A New Multi-Dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-Collapse Supernovae IV. The Neutrino Signal

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, B

    2014-01-01

    Considering general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 solar masses, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the Vertex-CoCoNuT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies of electron antineutrinos and heavy-lepton neutrinos and even their crossing during the accretion phase for stars with M>10 M_sun as observed in previous 1D and 2D simulations with state-of-the-art neutrino transport. We establish a roughly linear scaling of the electron antineutrino mean energy with the proto-neutron star (PNS) mass, which holds in time as well as for different progenitors. Convection inside the PNS affects the neutrino emission on the 10-20% level, and accretion continuing beyond the onset of the explosion prevents the abru...

  13. Massive stars as thermonuclear reactors and their explosions following core collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Alak

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear reactions transform atomic nuclei inside stars. This is the process of stellar nucleosynthesis. The basic concepts of determining nuclear reaction rates inside stars are reviewed. How stars manage to burn their fuel so slowly most of the time are also considered. Stellar thermonuclear reactions involving protons in hydrostatic burning are discussed first. Then I discuss triple alpha reactions in the helium burning stage. Carbon and oxygen survive in red giant stars because of the nuclear structure of oxygen and neon. Further nuclear burning of carbon, neon, oxygen and silicon in quiescent conditions are discussed next. In the subsequent core-collapse phase, neutronization due to electron capture from the top of the Fermi sea in a degenerate core takes place. The expected signal of neutrinos from a nearby supernova is calculated. The supernova often explodes inside a dense circumstellar medium, which is established due to the progenitor star losing its outermost envelope in a stellar wind or mass trans...

  14. Termination of the MRI via parasitic instabilities in core-collapse supernovae: influence of numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Rembiasz, T; Cerdá-Durán, P; Aloy, M Á; Müller, E

    2016-01-01

    We study the influence of numerical methods and grid resolution on the termination of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) by means of parasitic instabilities in three-dimensional shearing-disc simulations reproducing typical conditions found in core-collapse supernovae. Whether or not the MRI is able to amplify weak magnetic fields in this context strongly depends, among other factors, on the amplitude at which its growth terminates. The qualitative results of our study do not depend on the numerical scheme. In all our models, MRI termination is caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, consistent with theoretical predictions. Quantitatively, however, there are differences, but numerical convergence can be achieved even at relatively low grid resolutions if high-order reconstruction methods are used.

  15. Constraints for the Progenitor Masses of 17 Historic Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Benjamin F; Murphy, Jeremiah; Gilbert, Karoline; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Dolphin, Andrew E; Jennings, Zachary G

    2015-01-01

    Using resolved stellar photometry measured from archival HST imaging, we generate color-magnitude diagrams of the stars within 50 pc of the locations of historic core-collapse supernovae that took place in galaxies within 8 Mpc. We fit these color-magnitude distributions with stellar evolution models to determine the best-fit age distribution of the young population. We then translate these age distributions into probability distributions for the progenitor mass of each SNe. The measurements are anchored by the main-sequence stars surrounding the event, making them less sensitive to assumptions about binarity, post-main-sequence evolution, or circumstellar dust. We demonstrate that, in cases where the literature contains masses that have been measured from direct imaging, our measurements are consistent with (but less precise than) these measurements. Using this technique, we constrain the progenitor masses of 17 historic SNe, 11 of which have no previous estimates from direct imaging. Our measurements still ...

  16. Circular polarizations of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae: a clear indication of rapid rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Hayama, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Ko; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    We propose to employ the circular polarization of gravitational waves emitted by core-collapse supernovae as an unequivocal indication of rapid rotation deep in their cores. It has been demonstrated by three dimensional simulations that non-axisymmetric accretion flows may develop spontaneously via hydrodynamical instabilities in the post-bounce cores. It is not surprising then that the gravitational waves emitted by such fluid motions are circularly polarized. We show in this letter that a network of the second generation detectors of gravitational waves worldwide may be able to detect such polarizations up to the opposite side of Galaxy as long as the rotation period is shorter than a few seconds prior to collapse.

  17. Termination of the magnetorotational instability via parasitic instabilities in core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Rembiasz, Tomasz; Cerdá-Durán, Pablo; Müller, Ewald; Aloy, Miguel-Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) can be a powerful mechanism amplifying the magnetic field in core collapse supernovae. However, whether initially weak magnetic fields can be amplified by this instability to dynamically relevant strengths is still a matter of active scientific debate. One of the main uncertainties concerns the process that terminates the growth of the instability. Parasitic instabilities of both Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and tearing-mode type have been suggested to play a crucial role in this process, disrupting MRI channel flows and quenching magnetic field amplification. We performed two-dimensional and three-dimensional sheering-disc simulations of a differentially rotating proto-neutron star layer in non-ideal MHD with unprecedented high numerical resolution. Our simulations show that KH parasitic modes dominate tearing modes in the regime of large hydrodynamic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, as encountered in proto-neutron stars. They also determine the maximum magnetic field stress ac...

  18. Prospects for Gravitational Wave Searches for Core-Collapse Supernovae within the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kiranjyot; Branchesi, Marica; Zanolin, Michele; Szczepanczyk, Marek; LIGO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present an updated estimate of the intrinsic (vs observed) core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) rate within 20 Mpc from Earth, which is roughly the largest distance of interest for the searches for gravitational waves (GWs) from CCSNe with laser interferometers. Recognizing that CCSN galaxy host models are morphologically dependent, we separate the galaxies within 20 Mpc into the local field and Virgo cluster and account for biases, such as galactic plane absorption. The improved estimation of the CCSNe rate within 20 Mpc is 430 +/- 21 CCSNe Century -1 Mpc-1. We also discuss the Feldman-Cousins and GRB methodologies for detecting CCSNe when there are multiple CCSNe optical triggers, as predicted for advanced LIGO data science runs. Illustrative examples of the sensitivity improvement with respect to the single-event current approaches are provided for rapidly rotating semi-analytical models of GW emissions and real (publicly released) LIGO data.

  19. Near Real-time Data Analysis of Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations With Bellerophon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingerfelt, Eric J [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Desai, Sharvari S [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Holt, Chastity A [Appalachian State University; Lentz, Eric J [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of a software system, Bellerophon, built to support a production-level HPC application called CHIMERA, which simulates core-collapse supernova events at the petascale. Developed over the last four years, Bellerophon enables CHIMERA s geographically dispersed team of collaborators to perform data analysis in near real-time. Its n-tier architecture provides an encapsulated, end-to-end software solution that enables the CHIMERA team to quickly and easily access highly customizable animated and static views of results from anywhere in the world via a web-deliverable, cross-platform desktop application. In addition, Bellerophon addresses software engineering tasks for the CHIMERA team by providing an automated mechanism for performing regression testing on a variety of supercomputing platforms. Elements of the team s workflow management needs are met with software tools that dynamically generate code repository statistics, access important online resources, and monitor the current status of several supercomputing resources.

  20. Deciphering Core Collapse Supernovae Is Convection the Key?; 1, prompt convection

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzacappa, A; Bruenn, S W; Blondin, J M; Guidry, M W; Strayer, M R; Umar, A S

    1996-01-01

    We couple two-dimensional hydrodynamics to detailed one-dimensional multigroup flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport to investigate prompt convection in core collapse supernovae. Our initial conditions, time-dependent boundary conditions, and neutrino distributions for computing neutrino heating, cooling, and deleptonization rates are obtained from one-dimensional simulations that implement multigroup flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport and one-dimensional hydrodynamics. The development and evolution of prompt convection and its ramifications for the shock dynamics are investigated for both 15 and 25 solar mass models, representative of the two classes of stars with compact and extended iron cores, respectively. In the absence of neutrino transport, prompt convection develops and dissipates on a time scale $\\sim$15 ms for both models. Prompt convection seeds convection behind the shock, which causes distortions in the shock's sphericity, but on the average, the shock radius is not boosted significan...

  1. Advancing Nucleosynthesis in Self-consistent, Multidimensional Models of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, J Austin; Chertkow, Merek A; Bruenn, Stephen W; Lentz, Eric J; Messer, O E Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Blondin, John M; Marronetti, Pedro; Yakunin, Konstantin N

    2014-01-01

    We investigate core-collapse supernova (CCSN) nucleosynthesis in polar axisymmetric simulations using the multidimensional radiation hydrodynamics code CHIMERA. Computational costs have traditionally constrained the evolution of the nuclear composition in CCSN models to, at best, a 14-species $\\alpha$-network. Such a simplified network limits the ability to accurately evolve detailed composition, neutronization and the nuclear energy generation rate. Lagrangian tracer particles are commonly used to extend the nuclear network evolution by incorporating more realistic networks in post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations. Limitations such as poor spatial resolution of the tracer particles, estimation of the expansion timescales, and determination of the "mass-cut" at the end of the simulation impose uncertainties inherent to this approach. We present a detailed analysis of the impact of these uncertainties on post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations and implications for future models.

  2. Parametric Study of Flow Patterns behind the Standing Accretion Shock Wave for Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Iwakami, Wakana; Yamada, Shoichi

    2013-01-01

    The systematic research of flow patterns behind the accretion shock wave is conducted using three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations for core-collapse supernovae in this study. Changing the accretion rate and neutrino luminosity, the steady solutions of the one-dimensional irrotational accretion flow passing through the spherical shock wave are evolved by imposing a random perturbation with 1% amplitude at the onset of the simulations. Depending on the accretion rate and neutrino luminosity, various flow patterns appear behind the shock wave. We classified them into the three fundamental flow patterns: (1) sloshing motion, (2) spiral motion, (3) multiple high-entropy bubbles, and the two anomalous flow patterns: (4) spiral motion with buoyant bubbles, and (5) spiral motion with pulsating rotational velocity. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant in the higher accretion rate and lower neutrino luminosity, and the generations of multiple buoyant bubbles tend to prevail in the lower accretion ra...

  3. Nuclear structure and the fate of core collapse (Type II) supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, Moshe [LNS at Avery Point, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT 06340-6097 (United States); Wright Lab, Dept. of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8124 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    For a long time Gerry Brown and his collaborator Hans Bethe considered the question of the final fate of a core collapse (Type II) supernova. Recalling ideas from nuclear structure on Kaon condensate and a soft equation of state of the dense nuclear matter they concluded that progenitor stars with mass as low as 17–18M{sub ⊙} (including supernova 1987A) could collapse to a small mass black hole with a mass just beyond 1.5M{sub ⊙}, the upper bound they derive for a neutron star. We discuss another nuclear structure effect that determines the carbon to oxygen ratio (C/O) at the end of helium burning. This ratio also determines the fate of a Type II supernova with a carbon rich progenitor star producing a neutron star and oxygen rich collapsing to a black hole. While the C/O ratio is one of the most important nuclear inputs to stellar evolution it is still not known with sufficient accuracy. We discuss future efforts to measure with gamma-beam and TPC detector of the {sup 12}C(α,γ){sup 16}O reaction that determines the C/O ratio in stellar helium burning.

  4. Multimessenger signals of long-term core-collapse supernova simulations: synergetic observation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Ko; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Tanaka, Masaomi; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2016-09-01

    The next Galactic supernova is expected to bring great opportunities for the direct detection of gravitational waves (GW), full flavour neutrinos, and multiwavelength photons. To maximize the science return from such a rare event, it is essential to have established classes of possible situations and preparations for appropriate observations. To this end, we use a long-term numerical simulation of the core-collapse supernova (CCSN) of a 17 M⊙ red supergiant progenitor to self-consistently model the multimessenger signals expected in GW, neutrino, and electromagnetic messengers. This supernova model takes into account the formation and evolution of a protoneutron star, neutrino-matter interaction, and neutrino transport, all within a two-dimensional shock hydrodynamics simulation. With this, we separately discuss three situations: (i) a CCSN at the Galactic Center, (ii) an extremely nearby CCSN within hundreds of parsecs, and (iii) a CCSN in nearby galaxies within several Mpc. These distance regimes necessitate different strategies for synergistic observations. In a Galactic CCSN, neutrinos provide strategic timing and pointing information. We explore how these in turn deliver an improvement in the sensitivity of GW analyses and help to guarantee observations of early electromagnetic signals. To facilitate the detection of multimessenger signals of CCSNe in extremely nearby and extragalactic distances, we compile a list of nearby red supergiant candidates and a list of nearby galaxies with their expected CCSN rates. By exploring the sequential multimessenger signals of a nearby CCSN, we discuss preparations for maximizing successful studies of such an unprecedented stirring event.

  5. Nuclear Structure and the Fate of Core Collapse (Type II) Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Gai, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    For a long time Gerry Brown and his collaborator Hans Bethe considered the question of the final fate of a core collapse (Type II) supernova. Recalling ideas from nuclear structure on Kaon condensate and a soft equation of state of the dense nuclear matter they concluded that progenitor stars with mass as low a 17-18M$_\\odot$ (including supernova 1987A) could collapse to a small mass black hole with a mass just beyond 1.5M$_\\odot$, the upper bound they derive for a neutron star. We discuss another nuclear structure effect that determines the carbon to oxygen ratio (C/O) at the end of helium burning. This ratio also determines the fate of a Type II supernova with a carbon rich progenitor star producing a neutron star and oxygen rich collapsing to a black hole. While the C/O ratio is one of the most important nuclear input to stellar evolution it is still not known with sufficient accuracy. We discuss future efforts to measure with gamma-beam and TPC detector the 12C(a,g)16O reaction that determines the C/O rat...

  6. Metamorphosis of SN 2014C: Delayed Interaction Between a Hydrogen Poor Core-collapse Supernova and a Nearby Circumstellar Shell

    CERN Document Server

    Milisavljevic, D; Kamble, A; Patnaude, D; Raymond, J; Eldridge, J; Fong, W; Bietenholz, M; Challis, P; Chornock, R; Drout, M; Fransson, C; Fesen, R; Grindlay, J; Kirshner, R; Lunnan, R; Mackey, J; Miller, G; Parrent, J; Sanders, N; Soderberg, A; Zauderer, B

    2015-01-01

    We present optical observations of supernova SN 2014C, which underwent an unprecedented slow metamorphosis from H-poor type Ib to H-rich type IIn over the course of one year. The observed spectroscopic evolution is consistent with the supernova having exploded in a cavity before encountering a massive shell of the progenitor star's stripped hydrogen envelope. Possible origins for the circumstellar shell include a brief Wolf-Rayet fast wind phase that overtook a slower red supergiant wind, eruptive ejection, or confinement of circumstellar material by external influences of neighboring stars. An extended high velocity Halpha absorption feature seen in near-maximum light spectra implies that the progenitor star was not completely stripped of hydrogen at the time of core collapse. Archival pre-explosion Subaru Telescope Suprime-Cam and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 images of the region obtained in 2009 show a coincident source that is most likely a compact massive star cluster in NGC 7331 ...

  7. X-RAY EJECTA KINEMATICS OF THE GALACTIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.0+1.8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, P.O. Box 19059, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Dewey, Daniel [MIT Kavli Institute, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hughes, John P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Mori, Koji [Department of Applied Physics, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen Kibanadai-nishi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Lee, Jae-Joon, E-mail: jayant.bhalerao@mavs.uta.edu [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-10

    We report on the results from the analysis of our 114 ks Chandra High Energy Transmision Grating Spectrometer observation of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8. To probe the three-dimensional structure of the clumpy X-ray emitting ejecta material in this remnant, we measured Doppler shifts in emission lines from metal-rich ejecta knots projected at different radial distances from the expansion center. We estimate radial velocities of ejecta knots in the range of –2300 ≲ v{sub r}  ≲ 1400 km s{sup –1}. The distribution of ejecta knots in velocity versus projected-radius space suggests an expanding ejecta shell with a projected angular thickness of ∼90'' (corresponding to ∼3 pc at d = 6 kpc). Based on this geometrical distribution of the ejecta knots, we estimate the location of the reverse shock approximately at the distance of ∼4 pc from the center of the supernova remnant, putting it in close proximity to the outer boundary of the radio pulsar wind nebula. Based on our observed remnant dynamics and the standard explosion energy of 10{sup 51} erg, we estimate the total ejecta mass to be ≲8 M {sub ☉}, and we propose an upper limit of ≲35 M {sub ☉} on the progenitor's mass.

  8. A new multi-dimensional general relativistic neutrino hydrodynamics code for core-collapse supernovae. IV. The neutrino signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Bernhard [Monash Center for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Building 28, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Janka, Hans-Thomas, E-mail: bernhard.mueller@monash.edu, E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-06-10

    Considering six general relativistic, two-dimensional (2D) supernova (SN) explosion models of progenitor stars between 8.1 and 27 M {sub ☉}, we systematically analyze the properties of the neutrino emission from core collapse and bounce to the post-explosion phase. The models were computed with the VERTEX-COCONUT code, using three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. Our results confirm the close similarity of the mean energies, (E), of ν-bar {sub e} and heavy-lepton neutrinos and even their crossing during the accretion phase for stars with M ≳ 10 M {sub ☉} as observed in previous 1D and 2D simulations with state-of-the-art neutrino transport. We establish a roughly linear scaling of 〈E{sub ν-bar{sub e}}〉 with the proto-neutron star (PNS) mass, which holds in time as well as for different progenitors. Convection inside the PNS affects the neutrino emission on the 10%-20% level, and accretion continuing beyond the onset of the explosion prevents the abrupt drop of the neutrino luminosities seen in artificially exploded 1D models. We demonstrate that a wavelet-based time-frequency analysis of SN neutrino signals in IceCube will offer sensitive diagnostics for the SN core dynamics up to at least ∼10 kpc distance. Strong, narrow-band signal modulations indicate quasi-periodic shock sloshing motions due to the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), and the frequency evolution of such 'SASI neutrino chirps' reveals shock expansion or contraction. The onset of the explosion is accompanied by a shift of the modulation frequency below 40-50 Hz, and post-explosion, episodic accretion downflows will be signaled by activity intervals stretching over an extended frequency range in the wavelet spectrogram.

  9. The Host Galaxies of Fast-Ejecta Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Modjaz, Maryam; Kocevski, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Spectra of broad-lined Type Ic supernovae (SN Ic-BL), the only kind of SN observed at the locations of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), exhibit wide features indicative of high ejecta velocities ((is) approximately 0.1c). We study the host galaxies of a sample of 245 low-redshift (z (is) less than 0.2) core-collapse SN, including 17 SN Ic-BL, discovered by galaxy-untargeted searches, and 15 optically luminous and dust-obscured z (is) less than 1.2 LGRBs. We show that, in comparison with SDSS galaxies having similar stellar masses, the hosts of low-redshift SN Ic- BL and z (is) is less than 1.2 LGRBs have high stellar-mass and star-formation-rate densities. Core-collapse SN having typical ejecta velocities, in contrast, show no preference for such galaxies. Moreover, we find that the hosts of SN Ic-BL, unlike those of SN Ib/Ic and SN II, exhibit high gas velocity dispersions for their stellar masses. The patterns likely reflect variations among star-forming environments, and suggest that LGRBs can be used as probes of conditions in high-redshift galaxies. They may be caused by efficient formation of massive binary progenitors systems in densely star-forming regions, or, less probably, a higher fraction of stars created with the initial masses required for a SN Ic-BL or LGRB. Finally, we show that the preference of SN Ic-BL and LGRBs for galaxies with high stellar-mass and star-formation-rate densities cannot be attributed to a preference for low metal abundances but must reflect the influence of a separate environmental factor.

  10. The Rate of Core Collapse Supernovae to Redshift 2.5 From The CANDELS and CLASH Supernova Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Rodney, Steven A; Graur, Or; Riess, Adam G; McCully, Curtis; Ravindranath, Swara; Mobasher, Bahram; Shahady, A Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) multi-cycle treasury programs with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have provided new opportunities to probe the rate of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) at high redshift, now extending to $z\\approx2.5$. Here we use a sample of approximately 44 CCSNe to determine volumetric rates, $R_{CC}$, in six redshift bins in the range $0.195\\%$ confidence) with SFRs from IR luminous galaxies, or with SFR models that include simple evolution in the initial mass function over time. This scaling factor is expected if the fraction of the IMF contributing to CCSN progenitors is in the 8 to 50 $M_{\\odot}$ range. It is not supportive, however, of an upper mass limit for progenitors at $<20\\,M_{\\odot}$.

  11. Exploring the QCD phase transition in core collapse supernova simulations in spherical symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Fischery, T; Hempelz, M; Pagliaraz, G; Schaffner-Bielichz, J; Mezzacappa, A; Thielemanny, F -K; Liebendorfer, M

    2010-01-01

    For finite chemical potential effective models of QCD predict a first order phase transition. In favour for the search of such a phase transition in nature, we construct an equation of state for strange quark matter based on the MIT bag model. We apply this equation of state to highly asymmetric core collapse supernova matter with finite temperatures and large baryon densities. The phase transition is constructed using the general Gibbs conditions, which results in an extended coexistence region between the pure hadronic and pure quark phases in the phase diagram, i.e. the mixed phase. The supernovae are simulated via general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics based on three flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry. During the dynamical evolution temperatures above 10 MeV, baryon densities above nuclear saturation density and a proton-to-baryon ratio below 0.2 are obtained. At these conditions the phase transition is triggered which leads to a significant softening of the EoS for matter in ...

  12. Neutrino-pair emission from nuclear de-excitation in core-collapse supernova simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Tobias; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    We study the impact of neutrino-pair production from the de-excitation of highly excited heavy nuclei on core-collapse supernova simulations, following the evolution up to several 100 ms after core bounce. Our study is based on the AGILE-Boltztran supernova code, which features general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics and accurate three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry. In our simulations the nuclear de-excitation process is described in two different ways. At first we follow the approach proposed by Fuller and Meyer [Astrophys. J. 376,701 (1991)], which is based on strength functions derived in the framework of the nuclear Fermi-gas model of non-interacting nucleons. Secondly, we parametrize the allowed and forbidden strength distributions in accordance with measurements for selected nuclear ground states. We determine the de-excitation strength by applying the Brink hypothesis and detailed balance. For both approaches, we find that nuclear de-excitation has no effect on the supe...

  13. The host galaxies of core-collapse supernovae and gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, K M; Tanvir, N R; Fruchter, A S; Strolger, L -G

    2010-01-01

    We present a comparative study of the galactic and small scale environments of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) and core collapse supernovae (CCSN). We use a sample of 34 GRB hosts at z<1.2, and a comparison sample of 58 supernova hosts located within the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey footprint. We fit template spectra to the available photometric data, which span the range 0.45-24 micron, and extract absolute magnitudes, stellar masses and star formation rates from the resulting fits. Our results broadly corroborate previous findings, but offer significant enhancements in spectral coverage and a factor 2-3 increase in sample size. Specifically, we find that CCSN occur frequently in massive spirals (spiral fraction ~50%). In contrast GRBs occur in small, relatively low mass galaxies with high specific and surface star formation rates, and have a spiral fraction of only ~10%. A comparison of the rest frame absolute magnitudes of the GRB and CCSN sample is less conclusive than found in previous work, suggest...

  14. Proposed searches for candidate sources of gravitational waves in a nearby core-collapse supernova survey

    CERN Document Server

    Heo, Jeon-Eun; Lee, Dae-Sub; Kong, In-Taek; Lee, Sang-Hoon; van Putten, Maurice H P M; Della Valle, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational wave bursts in the formation of neutron stars and black holes in energetic core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are of potential interest to LIGO-Virgo and KAGRA. Events nearby are readily discovered using moderately sized telescopes. CC-SNe are competitive with mergers of neutron stars and black holes, if the fraction producing an energetic output in gravitational waves exceeds about 1\\%. This opportunity motivates the design of a novel Sejong University Core-CollapsE Supernova Survey (SUCCESS), to provide triggers for follow-up searches for gravitational waves. It is based on the 76 cm Sejong University Telescope (SUT) for weekly monitoring of nearby star-forming galaxies, i.e., M51, M81-M82 and Blue Dwarf Galaxies from the Unified Nearby Galaxy Catalog with an expected yield of a few hundred per year. Optical light curves will be resolved for the true time-of-onset for probes of gravitational waves by broadband time-sliced matched filtering.

  15. Directed searches for broadband extended gravitational-wave emission in nearby energetic core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Van Putten, Maurice H P M

    2016-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are factories of neutron stars and stellar mass black holes. Type Ib/c supernovae stand out as potentially originating in relatively compact stellar binaries and their branching ratio of about 1\\% into long gamma-ray bursts. The most energetic events probably derive from central engines harboring rapidly rotating black holes, wherein accretion of fall-back matter down to the Inner Most Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) offers a window to {\\em broadband extended gravitational-wave emission} (BEGE). To search for BEGE, we introduce a butterfly filter in time-frequency space by Time Sliced Matched Filtering. To analyze long epochs of data, we propose using coarse grained searches followed by high resolution searches on events of interest. We illustrate our proposed coarse grained search on two weeks of LIGO S6 data prior to SN 2010br $(z=0.002339)$ using a bank of up to 64 thousand templates of one second duration covering a broad range in chirp frequencies and bandwidth. Correlating events w...

  16. AXISYMMETRIC AB INITIO CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS OF 12-25 M{sub Sun} STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenn, Stephen W.; Yakunin, Konstantin N. [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Lingerfelt, Eric J. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6354 (United States); Lentz, Eric J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Blondin, John M. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Marronetti, Pedro, E-mail: bruenn@fau.edu [Physics Division, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA 22207 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    We present an overview of four ab initio axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations employing detailed spectral neutrino transport computed with our CHIMERA code and initiated from Woosley and Heger progenitors of mass 12, 15, 20, and 25 M{sub Sun }. All four models exhibit shock revival over {approx}200 ms (leading to the possibility of explosion), driven by neutrino energy deposition. Hydrodynamic instabilities that impart substantial asymmetries to the shock aid these revivals, with convection appearing first in the 12 M{sub Sun} model and the standing accretion shock instability appearing first in the 25 M{sub Sun} model. Three of the models have developed pronounced prolate morphologies (the 20 M{sub Sun} model has remained approximately spherical). By 500 ms after bounce the mean shock radii in all four models exceed 3000 km and the diagnostic explosion energies are 0.33, 0.66, 0.65, and 0.70 Bethe (B = 10{sup 51} erg) for the 12, 15, 20, and 25 M{sub Sun} models, respectively, and are increasing. The three least massive of our models are already sufficiently energetic to completely unbind the envelopes of their progenitors (i.e., to explode), as evidenced by our best estimate of their explosion energies, which first become positive at 320, 380, and 440 ms after bounce. By 850 ms the 12 M{sub Sun} diagnostic explosion energy has saturated at 0.38 B, and our estimate for the final kinetic energy of the ejecta is {approx}0.3 B, which is comparable to observations for lower mass progenitors.

  17. Revealing the Detailed Structure of the Galactic Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant G292.0+1.8 with X-Ray Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalerao, Jayant; Park, Sangwook; Schenck, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present our results on the adaptive-mesh mapping of the chemical composition and thermodynamic parameters of the Galactic core-collapse supernova remnant G292.0+1.8 using our deep Chandra observation. Our maps cover the entire supernova remnant and show the detailed spatial distributions of the metal-rich ejecta, circumstellar medium, and the X-ray pulsar wind nebula-dominated regions. Our results suggest radial and azimuthal variations in the ejecta composition and the thermodynamic parameters, underscoring the rich and complex nature of this text book type supernova remnant. Combining our results from this study and our previous work on the ejecta radial velocity distribution (derived from our Chandra HETG data), we discuss the three dimensional structure of the remnant. Some implications on the nature of the progenitor star and explosion scenarios are discussed.

  18. Hans A. Bethe Prize: Neutron Stars and Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimer, James

    2015-04-01

    Core-collapse supernovae lead to the formation of neutron stars, and both are sensitive to the dense matter equation of state. Hans Bethe first recognized that the matter in the collapsing core of a massive star has a relatively low entropy which prevents nuclear dissociation until nuclei merge near the nuclear saturation density. This recognition means that collapse continues until the core exceeds the saturation density. This prediction forms the foundation for modern simulations of supernovae. These supernovae sample matter up to about twice nuclear saturation density, but neutron stars are sensitive to the equation of state both near the saturation density and at several times higher densities. Two important recent developments are the discovery of two-solar mass neutron stars and refined experimental determinations of the behavior of the symmetry energy of nuclear matter near the saturation density. Combined with the assumption of causality, they imply that the radii of observed neutron stars are largely independent of their mass, and that this radius is in the range of 11 to 13 km. These theoretical results are not only consistent with expectations from theoretical studies of pure neutron matter, but also accumulated observations of both bursting and cooling neutron stars. In the near future, new pulsar timing data, which could lead to larger measured masses as well as measurements of moments of inertia, X-ray observations, such as from NICER, of bursting and other sources, and gravitational wave observations of neutron stars in merging compact binaries, will provide important new constraints on neutron stars and the dense matter equation of state. DOE DE-FG02-87ER-40317.

  19. Neutrino-driven Turbulent Convection and Standing Accretion Shock Instability in Three-Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Abdikamalov, E; Radice, D; Roberts, L F; Haas, R; Reisswig, C; Moesta, P; Klion, H; Schnetter, E

    2014-01-01

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments into the nature of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics in the postbounce stalled-shock phase of core-collapse supernovae using 3D general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of a $27$-$M_\\odot$ progenitor star with a neutrino leakage/heating scheme. We vary the strength of neutrino heating and find three cases of 3D dynamics: (1) neutrino-driven convection, (2) initially neutrino-driven convection and subsequent development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), (3) SASI dominated evolution. This confirms previous 3D results of Hanke et al. 2013, ApJ 770, 66 and Couch & Connor 2014, ApJ 785, 123. We carry out simulations with resolutions differing by up to a factor of $\\sim$4 and demonstrate that low resolution is artificially favorable for explosion in the 3D convection-dominated case, since it decreases the efficiency of energy transport to small scales. Low resolution results in higher radial convective fluxes of energy and enthalpy, more ful...

  20. Multi-Dimensional Simulations of Radiative Transfer in Aspherical Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Mazzali, Paolo A; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2008-01-01

    We study optical radiation of aspherical supernovae (SNe) and present an approach to verify the asphericity of SNe with optical observations of extragalactic SNe. For this purpose, we have developed a multi-dimensional Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code, SAMURAI (SupernovA MUlti-dimensional RAdIative transfer code). The code can compute the optical light curve and spectra both at early phases (<~ 40 days after the explosion) and late phases (~ 1 year after the explosion), based on hydrodynamic and nucleosynthetic models. We show that all the optical observations of SN 1998bw (associated with GRB 980425) are consistent with polar-viewed radiation of the aspherical explosion model with kinetic energy 20 x 10^{51} ergs. Properties of off-axis hypernovae are also discussed briefly.

  1. Directed Searches for Broadband Extended Gravitational Wave Emission in Nearby Energetic Core-collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.

    2016-03-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are factories of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes. SNe Ib/c stand out as potentially originating in relatively compact stellar binaries and they have a branching ratio of about 1% into long gamma-ray bursts. The most energetic events probably derive from central engines harboring rapidly rotating black holes, wherein the accretion of fall-back matter down to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) offers a window into broadband extended gravitational wave emission (BEGE). To search for BEGE, we introduce a butterfly filter in time-frequency space by time-sliced matched filtering. To analyze long epochs of data, we propose using coarse-grained searches followed by high-resolution searches on events of interest. We illustrate our proposed coarse-grained search on two weeks of LIGO S6 data prior to SN 2010br (z = 0.002339) using a bank of up to 64,000 templates of one-second duration covering a broad range in chirp frequencies and bandwidth. Correlating events with signal-to-noise ratios > 6 from the LIGO L1 and H1 detectors reduces the total to a few events of interest. Lacking any further properties reflecting a common excitation by broadband gravitational radiation, we disregarded these as spurious. This new pipeline may be used to systematically search for long-duration chirps in nearby CC-SNe from robotic optical transient surveys using embarrassingly parallel computing.

  2. Effects of stellar rotation on star formation rates and comparison to core-collapse supernova rates

    CERN Document Server

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Bothwell, Matt S; Thompson, Todd A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate star formation rate (SFR) calibrations in light of recent developments in the modeling of stellar rotation. Using new published non-rotating and rotating stellar tracks, we study the integrated properties of synthetic stellar populations and find that the UV to SFR calibration for the rotating stellar population is 30% smaller than for the non-rotating stellar population, and 40% smaller for the Halpha to SFR calibration. These reductions translate to smaller SFR estimates made from observed UV and Halpha luminosities. Using the UV and Halpha fluxes of a sample of ~300 local galaxies, we derive a total (i.e., sky-coverage corrected) SFR within 11 Mpc of 120-170 Msun/yr and 80-130 Msun/yr for the non-rotating and rotating estimators, respectively. Independently, the number of core-collapse supernovae discovered in the same volume requires a total SFR of 270^{+110}_{-80} Msun/yr, suggesting a mild tension with the SFR estimates made with rotating calibrations. More generally, when compared with t...

  3. Nuclear equation of state for core-collapse supernova simulations with realistic nuclear forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togashi, H., E-mail: hajime.togashi@riken.jp [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nakazato, K. [Faculty of Arts and Science, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Takehara, Y.; Yamamuro, S.; Suzuki, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Yamazaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Takano, M. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    A new table of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) based on realistic nuclear potentials is constructed for core-collapse supernova numerical simulations. Adopting the EOS of uniform nuclear matter constructed by two of the present authors with the cluster variational method starting from the Argonne v18 and Urbana IX nuclear potentials, the Thomas–Fermi calculation is performed to obtain the minimized free energy of a Wigner–Seitz cell in non-uniform nuclear matter. As a preparation for the Thomas–Fermi calculation, the EOS of uniform nuclear matter is modified so as to remove the effects of deuteron cluster formation in uniform matter at low densities. Mixing of alpha particles is also taken into account following the procedure used by Shen et al. (1998, 2011). The critical densities with respect to the phase transition from non-uniform to uniform phase with the present EOS are slightly higher than those with the Shen EOS at small proton fractions. The critical temperature with respect to the liquid–gas phase transition decreases with the proton fraction in a more gradual manner than in the Shen EOS. Furthermore, the mass and proton numbers of nuclides appearing in non-uniform nuclear matter with small proton fractions are larger than those of the Shen EOS. These results are consequences of the fact that the density derivative coefficient of the symmetry energy of our EOS is smaller than that of the Shen EOS.

  4. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CONVECTION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radice, David; Ott, Christian D. [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abdikamalov, Ernazar [Department of Physics, School of Science and Technology, Nazarbayev University, Astana 010000 (Kazakhstan); Couch, Sean M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Haas, Roland [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Schnetter, Erik, E-mail: dradice@caltech.edu [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2016-03-20

    We present results from high-resolution semiglobal simulations of neutrino-driven convection in core-collapse supernovae. We employ an idealized setup with parameterized neutrino heating/cooling and nuclear dissociation at the shock front. We study the internal dynamics of neutrino-driven convection and its role in redistributing energy and momentum through the gain region. We find that even if buoyant plumes are able to locally transfer heat up to the shock, convection is not able to create a net positive energy flux and overcome the downward transport of energy from the accretion flow. Turbulent convection does, however, provide a significant effective pressure support to the accretion flow as it favors the accumulation of energy, mass, and momentum in the gain region. We derive an approximate equation that is able to explain and predict the shock evolution in terms of integrals of quantities such as the turbulent pressure in the gain region or the effects of nonradial motion of the fluid. We use this relation as a way to quantify the role of turbulence in the dynamics of the accretion shock. Finally, we investigate the effects of grid resolution, which we change by a factor of 20 between the lowest and highest resolution. Our results show that the shallow slopes of the turbulent kinetic energy spectra reported in previous studies are a numerical artifact. Kolmogorov scaling is progressively recovered as the resolution is increased.

  5. SN 2012aa - a transient between Type Ibc core-collapse and superluminous supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, R; Silverman, J M; Pastorello, A; Fransson, C; Drake, A; Taddia, F; Fremling, C; Kankare, E; Kumar, B; Cappellaro, E; Bose, S; Benetti, S; Filippenko, A V; Valenti, S; Nyholm, A; Ergon, M; Sutaria, F; Kumar, B; Pandey, S B; Nicholl, M; Garcia-Alvarez, D; Tomasella, L; Karamehmetoglu, E; Migotto, K

    2016-01-01

    Context: Research on supernovae (SNe) over the past decade has confirmed that there is a distinct class of events which are much more luminous (by $\\sim2$ mag) than canonical core-collapse SNe (CCSNe). These events with visual peak magnitudes $\\lesssim-21$ are called superluminous SNe (SLSNe). Aims: There are a few intermediate events which have luminosities between these two classes. Here we study one such object, SN 2012aa. Methods: The optical photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of the event were conducted over a time span of about 120 days. Results: With V_abs at peak ~-20 mag, the SN is an intermediate-luminosity transient between regular SNe Ibc and SLSNe. It also exhibits an unusual secondary bump after the maximum in its light curve. We interpret this as a manifestation of SN-shock interaction with the CSM. If we would assume a $^{56}$Ni-powered ejecta, the bolometric light curve requires roughly 1.3 M_sun of $^{56}$Ni and an ejected mass of ~14 M_sun. This would also imply a high kin...

  6. Constraints for the progenitor masses of 17 historic core-collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Peterson, Skyler; Gilbert, Karoline; Dalcanton, Julianne J. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Murphy, Jeremiah [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Jennings, Zachary G., E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: peters8@uw.edu, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: jeremiah@physics.fsu.edu, E-mail: kgilbert@stsci.edu, E-mail: dolphin@raytheon.com, E-mail: zgjennin@ucsc.edu [University of California Observatories, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-08-20

    Using resolved stellar photometry measured from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we generate color-magnitude diagrams of the stars within 50 pc of the locations of historic core-collapse supernovae (SNe) that took place in galaxies within 8 Mpc. We fit these color-magnitude distributions with stellar evolution models to determine the best-fit age distribution of the young population. We then translate these age distributions into probability distributions for the progenitor mass of each SN. The measurements are anchored by the main-sequence stars surrounding the event, making them less sensitive to assumptions about binarity, post-main-sequence evolution, or circumstellar dust. We demonstrate that, in cases where the literature contains masses that have been measured from direct imaging, our measurements are consistent with (but less precise than) these measurements. Using this technique, we constrain the progenitor masses of 17 historic SNe, 11 of which have no previous estimates from direct imaging. Our measurements still allow the possibility that all SN progenitor masses are <20 M {sub ☉}. However, the large uncertainties for the highest-mass progenitors also allow the possibility of no upper-mass cutoff.

  7. Core-collapse supernova progenitor constraints using the spatial distributions of massive stars in local galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kangas, T; Mattila, S; Fraser, M; Kankare, E; Izzard, R G; James, P; González-Fernández, C; Maund, J R; Thompson, A

    2016-01-01

    We study the spatial correlations between the H$\\alpha$ emission and different types of massive stars in two local galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Messier 33. We compare these to correlations derived for core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) in the literature to connect CCSNe of different types with the initial masses of their progenitors and to test the validity of progenitor mass estimates which use the pixel statistics method. We obtain samples of evolved massive stars in both galaxies from catalogues with good spatial coverage and/or completeness, and combine them with coordinates of main-sequence stars in the LMC from the SIMBAD database. We calculate the spatial correlation of stars of different classes and spectral types with H$\\alpha$ emission. We also investigate the effects of distance, noise and positional errors on the pixel statistics method. A higher correlation with H$\\alpha$ emission is found to correspond to a shorter stellar lifespan, and we conclude that the method can be used as ...

  8. Effects of the Core-collapse Supernova Ejecta Impact on a Rapidly Rotating Massive Companion Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunhua; Lü, Guoliang; Wang, Zhaojun

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the effects of the core-collapse supernova (CCSN) ejecta on a rapidly rotating and massive companion star. We show that the stripped mass is twice as high as that of a massive but nonrotating companion star. In close binaries with orbital periods of about 1 day, the stripped masses reach up to ∼ 1 {M}ȯ . By simulating the evolutions of the rotational velocities of the massive companion stars based on different stripped masses, we find that the rotational velocity decreases greatly for a stripped mass higher than about 1 {M}ȯ . Of all the known high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), Cygnus X-3 and 1WGA J0648.024418 have the shortest orbital periods, 0.2 and 1.55 days, respectively. The optical counterpart of the former is a Wolf-Rayet star, whereas it is a hot subdwarf for the latter. Applying our model to the two HMXBs, we suggest that the hydrogen-rich envelopes of their optical counterparts may have been stripped by CCSN ejecta.

  9. DIRECTED SEARCHES FOR BROADBAND EXTENDED GRAVITATIONAL WAVE EMISSION IN NEARBY ENERGETIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M., E-mail: mvp@sejong.ac.kr [Room 614, Astronomy and Space Science, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong Gwangin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-10

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are factories of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes. SNe Ib/c stand out as potentially originating in relatively compact stellar binaries and they have a branching ratio of about 1% into long gamma-ray bursts. The most energetic events probably derive from central engines harboring rapidly rotating black holes, wherein the accretion of fall-back matter down to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) offers a window into broadband extended gravitational wave emission (BEGE). To search for BEGE, we introduce a butterfly filter in time–frequency space by time-sliced matched filtering. To analyze long epochs of data, we propose using coarse-grained searches followed by high-resolution searches on events of interest. We illustrate our proposed coarse-grained search on two weeks of LIGO S6 data prior to SN 2010br (z = 0.002339) using a bank of up to 64,000 templates of one-second duration covering a broad range in chirp frequencies and bandwidth. Correlating events with signal-to-noise ratios > 6 from the LIGO L1 and H1 detectors reduces the total to a few events of interest. Lacking any further properties reflecting a common excitation by broadband gravitational radiation, we disregarded these as spurious. This new pipeline may be used to systematically search for long-duration chirps in nearby CC-SNe from robotic optical transient surveys using embarrassingly parallel computing.

  10. Dust Destruction in Fast Shocks of Core-Collapse Supernova Remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, B J; Reynolds, S P; Blair, W P; Ghavamian, P; Hendrick, S P; Long, K S; Points, S; Raymond, J C; Sankrit, R; Smith, R C; Winkler, P F; Williams, Brian J.

    2006-01-01

    We report observations with the MIPS instrument aboard the {\\it Spitzer Space Telescope} (SST) of four supernova remnants (SNRs) believed to be the result of core-collapse SNe: N132D (0525-69.6), N49B (0525-66.0), N23 (0506-68.0), and 0453-68.5. All four of these SNRs were detected in whole at 24 $\\mu$m and in part at 70 $\\mu$m. Comparisons with {\\it Chandra} broadband X-ray images show an association of infrared (IR) emission with the blast wave. We attribute the observed IR emission to dust that has been collisionally heated by electrons and ions in the hot, X-ray emitting plasma, with grain size distributions appropriate for the LMC and the destruction of small grains via sputtering by ions. As with our earlier analysis of Type Ia SNRs, models can reproduce observed 70/24 $\\mu$m ratios only if effects from sputtering are included, destroying small grains. We calculate the mass of dust swept up by the blast wave in these remnants, and we derive a dust-to-gas mass ratio of several times less than the often a...

  11. Measurement of the $^{44}$Ti($\\alpha$,p)$^{47}$V reaction cross section, of relevance to $\\gamma$-ray observation of core collapse supernovae, using reclaimed $^{44}$Ti

    CERN Multimedia

    Despite decades of research, fundamental uncertainties remain in the underlying explosion mechanism of core collapse supernovae. One of the most direct methods that might help resolve this problem is a comparison of the predicted to the observed flux of $\\gamma$-rays due to decay of $^{44}$Ti produced in the explosion, as it is believed this could reveal the location of the mass cut, a key hydrodynamical property of the explosion. Such a study is at present limited by the uncertainty in the $^{44}$Ti($\\alpha$,p)$^{47}$V reaction rate. In this experiment we propose to measure the cross section for this reaction at astrophysically relevant energies. The single previous measurement of this reaction was limited to higher energies due to low beam intensities. Here, a more intense beam will be employed, generated from $^{44}$Ti reclaimed as part of the ERAWAST project at PSI.

  12. First targeted search for gravitational-wave bursts from core-collapse supernovae in data of first-generation laser interferometer detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamaretsos, I.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, K. N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Santamaria, L.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with two core-collapse supernovae observed optically in 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO 600 gravitational-wave observatory. The targeted core-collapse supernovae were selected on the basis of (1) proximity (within approximately 15 Mpc), (2) tightness of observational constraints on the time of core collapse that defines the gravitational-wave search window, and (3) coincident operation of at least two interferometers at the time of core collapse. We find no plausible gravitational-wave candidates. We present the probability of detecting signals from both astrophysically well-motivated and more speculative gravitational-wave emission mechanisms as a function of distance from Earth, and discuss the implications for the detection of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae by the upgraded Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors.

  13. A First Targeted Search for Gravitational-Wave Bursts from Core-Collapse Supernovae in Data of First-Generation Laser Interferometer Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calder'on; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavagli`a, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Del'eglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; D'iaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Girolamo, T; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J -D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; Gonz'alez, G; Castro, J M Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Grado, A; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J -M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jim'enez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; K'ef'elian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Kr'olak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; L"uck, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; na-Sandoval, F Maga; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; M'arka, S; M'arka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, K N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Pereira, R; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; P"urrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosi'nska, D; Rowan, S; R"udiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Santamaria, L; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O E S; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Sch"onbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepa'nczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; T'apai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; T"oyr"a, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifir`o, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vas'uth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicer'e, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; zny, A Zadro; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with a set of two core-collapse supernovae observed between 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO 600 gravitational-wave observatory. The targeted core-collapse supernovae were selected on the basis of (1) proximity (within approximately 15 Mpc), (2) tightness of observational constraints on the time of core collapse that defines the gravitational-wave search window, and (3) coincident operation of at least two interferometers at the time of core collapse. We find no plausible gravitational-wave candidates. We present the probability of detecting signals from both astrophysically well-motivated and more speculative gravitational-wave emission mechanisms as a function of distance from Earth, and discuss the implications for the detection of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae by the upgraded Advanced LIGO and V...

  14. Core-Collapse Supernovae from the Palomar Transient Factory: Indications for a Different Population in Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Arcavi, Iair; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Quimby, Robert M; Ofek, Eran O; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Nugent, Peter E; Cenko, S Bradley; Bloom, Joshua S; Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D Andrew; Poznanski, Dovi; Filippenko, Alexei V; Law, Nicholas; Hook, Isobel; Jonsson, Jakob; Blake, Sarah; Cooke, Jeff; Dekany, Richard; Rahmer, Gustavo; Hale, David; Smith, Roger; Zolkower, Jeff; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Henning, John; Bui, Kahn; McKenna, Dan; Jacobsen, Janet

    2010-01-01

    We use the first compilation of 72 core-collapse supernovae (SNe) from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) to study their observed subtype distribution in dwarf galaxies compared to giant galaxies. The nature of the PTF survey provides a minimally biased sample, rich in SNe from dwarf hosts, with spectroscopic classifications. With 15 events detected in dwarf galaxies, our results are still limited by small-number statistics. However, several interesting trends emerge. We find more core-collapse SNe in dwarf galaxies than expected, with a similar N(Ib/c)/N(II) ratio in dwarf and giant hosts (0.25_{-0.15}^{+0.3} and 0.23_{-0.08}^{+0.11}, respectively), although our uncertainties (1 sigma) are still too large to distinguish between these results and those of previous studies and theoretical predictions. We use detailed subclassifications of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe and find that all Type I core-collapse events occurring in dwarf galaxies are either SNe Ib or broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-BL), while "nor...

  15. Core-collapse supernova progenitor constraints using the spatial distributions of massive stars in local galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, T.; Portinari, L.; Mattila, S.; Fraser, M.; Kankare, E.; Izzard, R. G.; James, P.; González-Fernández, C.; Maund, J. R.; Thompson, A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the spatial correlations between the Hα emission and different types of massive stars in two local galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Messier 33. We compared these to correlations derived for core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) in the literature to connect CCSNe of different types with the initial masses of their progenitors and to test the validity of progenitor mass estimates which use the pixel statistics method. We obtained samples of evolved massive stars in both galaxies from catalogues with good spatial coverage and/or completeness, and combined them with coordinates of main-sequence stars in the LMC from the SIMBAD database. We calculated the spatial correlation of stars of different classes and spectral types with Hα emission. We also investigated the effects of distance, noise and positional errors on the pixel statistics method. A higher correlation with Hα emission is found to correspond to a shorter stellar lifespan, and we conclude that the method can be used as an indicator of the ages, and therefore initial masses, of SN progenitors. We find that the spatial distributions of type II-P SNe and red supergiants of appropriate initial mass (≳9 M⊙) are consistent with each other. We also find the distributions of type Ic SNe and WN stars with initial masses ≳20 M⊙ consistent, while supergiants with initial masses around 15 M⊙ are a better match for type IIb and II-L SNe. The type Ib distribution corresponds to the same stellar types as type II-P, which suggests an origin in interacting binaries. On the other hand, we find that luminous blue variable stars show a much stronger correlation with Hα emission than do type IIn SNe.

  16. On the maximum magnetic field amplification by the magnetorotational instability in core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembiasz, T.; Guilet, J.; Obergaulinger, M.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.

    2016-08-01

    Whether the magnetorotational instability (MRI) can amplify initially weak magnetic fields to dynamically relevant strengths in core-collapse supernovae is still a matter of active scientific debate. Recent numerical studies have shown that the first phase of MRI growth dominated by channel flows is terminated by parasitic instabilities of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type that disrupt MRI channel flows and quench further magnetic field growth. However, it remains to be properly assessed by what factor the initial magnetic field can be amplified and how it depends on the initial field strength and the amplitude of the perturbations. Different termination criteria leading to different estimates of the amplification factor were proposed within the parasitic model. To determine the amplification factor and test which criterion is a better predictor of the MRI termination, we perform three-dimensional shearing-disc and shearing-box simulations of a region close to the surface of a differentially rotating protoneutron star in non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics with two different numerical codes. We find that independently of the initial magnetic field strength, the MRI channel modes can amplify the magnetic field by, at most, a factor of 100. Under the conditions found in protoneutron stars, a more realistic value for the magnetic field amplification is of the order of 10. This severely limits the role of the MRI channel modes as an agent amplifying the magnetic field in protoneutron stars starting from small seed fields. A further amplification should therefore rely on other physical processes, such as for example an MRI-driven turbulent dynamo.

  17. The contribution of young core-collapse supernova remnants to the X-ray emission near quiescent supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Rimoldi, Alex; Costantini, Elisa; Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2015-01-01

    Appreciable star formation, and, therefore, numerous massive stars, are frequently found near supermassive black holes (SMBHs). As a result, core-collapse supernovae in these regions should also be expected. In this paper, we consider the observational consequences of predicting the fate of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the sphere of influence of quiescent SMBHs. We present these results in the context of `autarkic' nuclei, a model that describes quiescent nuclei as steady-state and self-sufficient environments where the SMBH accretes stellar winds with no appreciable inflow of material from beyond the sphere of influence. These regions have properties such as gas density that scale with the mass of the SMBH. Using predictions of the X-ray lifetimes of SNRs originating in the sphere of influence, we make estimates of the number of core collapse SNRs present at a given time. With the knowledge of lifetimes of SNRs and their association with young stars, we predict a number of core-collapse SNRs that grows from ...

  18. Core-collapse Supernovae from the Palomar Transient Factory: Indications for a Different Population in Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Nugent, Peter E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Bloom, Joshua S.; Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D. Andrew; Poznanski, Dovi; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Law, Nicholas; Hook, Isobel; Jönsson, Jakob; Blake, Sarah; Cooke, Jeff; Dekany, Richard; Rahmer, Gustavo; Hale, David; Smith, Roger; Zolkower, Jeff; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Henning, John; Bui, Kahnh; McKenna, Dan; Jacobsen, Janet

    2010-09-01

    We use the first compilation of 72 core-collapse supernovae (SNe) from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) to study their observed subtype distribution in dwarf galaxies compared to giant galaxies. Our sample is the largest single-survey, untargeted, spectroscopically classified, homogeneous collection of core-collapse events ever assembled, spanning a wide host-galaxy luminosity range (down to Mr ≈ -14 mag) and including a substantial fraction (>20%) of dwarf (Mr >= -18 mag) hosts. We find more core-collapse SNe in dwarf galaxies than expected and several interesting trends emerge. We use detailed subclassifications of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe and find that all Type I core-collapse events occurring in dwarf galaxies are either SNe Ib or broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-BL), while "normal" SNe Ic dominate in giant galaxies. We also see a significant excess of SNe IIb in dwarf hosts. We hypothesize that in lower metallicity hosts, metallicity-driven mass loss is reduced, allowing massive stars that would have appeared as "normal" SNe Ic in metal-rich galaxies to retain some He and H, exploding as Ib/IIb events. At the same time, another mechanism allows some stars to undergo extensive stripping and explode as SNe Ic-BL (and presumably also as long-duration gamma-ray bursts). Our results are still limited by small-number statistics, and our measurements of the observed N(Ib/c)/N(II) number ratio in dwarf and giant hosts (0.25+0.3 -0.15 and 0.23+0.11 -0.08, respectively; 1σ uncertainties) are consistent with previous studies and theoretical predictions. As additional PTF data accumulate, more robust statistical analyses will be possible, allowing the evolution of massive stars to be probed via the dwarf-galaxy SN population.

  19. Simulation of the spherically symmetric stellar core collapse, bounce, and postbounce evolution of a star of 13 solar masses with boltzmann neutrino transport, and its implications for the supernova mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, A; Liebendörfer, M; Messer, O E; Hix, W R; Thielemann, F K; Bruenn, S W

    2001-03-05

    With exact three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport, we simulate the stellar core collapse, bounce, and postbounce evolution of a 13M star in spherical symmetry, the Newtonian limit, without invoking convection. In the absence of convection, prior spherically symmetric models, which implemented approximations to Boltzmann transport, failed to produce explosions. We consider exact transport to determine if these failures were due to the transport approximations made and to answer remaining fundamental questions in supernova theory. The model presented here is the first in a sequence of models beginning with different progenitors. In this model, a supernova explosion is not obtained.

  20. A large scale dynamo and magnetoturbulence in rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Mösta, Philipp; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F; Schnetter, Erik; Haas, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is of key importance in many high-energy astrophysical systems, including black-hole accretion disks, protoplanetary disks, neutron stars, and stellar interiors. MHD instabilities can amplify local magnetic field strength over very short time scales, but it is an open question whether this can result in the creation of a large scale ordered and dynamically relevant field. Specifically, the magnetorotational instability (MRI) has been suggested as a mechanism to grow magnetar-strength magnetic field ($\\gtrsim 10^{15}\\, \\mathrm{G}$) and magnetorotationally power the explosion of a rotating massive star. Such stars are progenitor candidates for type Ic-bl hypernova explosions that involve relativistic outflows and make up all supernovae connected to long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We have carried out global 3D general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) turbulence simulations that resolve the fastest growing mode (FGM) of the MRI. We show that MRI-driven MHD turbulence in ...

  1. Primordial Core-Collapse Supernovae and the Chemical Abundances of Metal-Poor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Joggerst, C C; Bell, J; Heger, Alexander; Whalen, Daniel; Woosley, S E

    2009-01-01

    The inclusion of rotationally-induced mixing in stellar evolution can alter the structure and composition of presupernova stars. We survey the effects of progenitor rotation on nucleosynthetic yields in Population III and II supernovae using the new adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code CASTRO. We examine spherical explosions in 15, 25 and 40 solar mass stars at Z = 0 and 10^-4 solar metallicity with three explosion energies and two rotation rates. Rotation in the Z = 0 models resulted in primary nitrogen production and a stronger hydrogen burning shell which led all models to die as red supergiants. On the other hand, the Z=10^-4 solar metallicity models that included rotation ended their lives as compact blue stars. Because of their extended structure, the hydrodynamics favors more mixing and less fallback in the metal free stars than the Z = 10^-4 models. As expected, higher energy explosions produce more enrichment and less fallback than do lower energy explosions, and less massive stars produce more enrich...

  2. A large-scale dynamo and magnetoturbulence in rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mösta, Philipp; Ott, Christian D; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F; Schnetter, Erik; Haas, Roland

    2015-12-17

    Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is important in many high-energy astrophysical systems, where instabilities can amplify the local magnetic field over very short timescales. Specifically, the magnetorotational instability and dynamo action have been suggested as a mechanism for the growth of magnetar-strength magnetic fields (of 10(15) gauss and above) and for powering the explosion of a rotating massive star. Such stars are candidate progenitors of type Ic-bl hypernovae, which make up all supernovae that are connected to long γ-ray bursts. The magnetorotational instability has been studied with local high-resolution shearing-box simulations in three dimensions, and with global two-dimensional simulations, but it is not known whether turbulence driven by this instability can result in the creation of a large-scale, ordered and dynamically relevant field. Here we report results from global, three-dimensional, general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations. We show that hydromagnetic turbulence in rapidly rotating protoneutron stars produces an inverse cascade of energy. We find a large-scale, ordered toroidal field that is consistent with the formation of bipolar magnetorotationally driven outflows. Our results demonstrate that rapidly rotating massive stars are plausible progenitors for both type Ic-bl supernovae and long γ-ray bursts, and provide a viable mechanism for the formation of magnetars. Moreover, our findings suggest that rapidly rotating massive stars might lie behind potentially magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae.

  3. Nucleosynthesis in the Hot Convective Bubble in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruet, J; Woosley, S E; Buras, R; Janka, H; Hoffman, R D

    2004-09-02

    As an explosion develops in the collapsed core of a massive star, neutrino emission drives convection in a hot bubble of radiation, nucleons, and pairs just outside a proto-neutron star. Shortly thereafter, neutrinos drive a wind-like outflow from the neutron star. In both the convective bubble and the early wind, weak interactions temporarily cause a proton excess (Y{sub e} {approx}> 0.50) to develop in the ejected matter. This situation lasts for at least the first second, and the approximately 0.05-0.1 M{sub {circle_dot}} that is ejected has an unusual composition that may be important for nucleosynthesis. Using tracer particles to follow the conditions in a two-dimensional model of a successful supernova explosion calculated by Janka, Buras, and Rampp (2003), they determine the composition of this material. most of it is helium and {sup 56}Ni. The rest is relatively rare species produced by the decay of proton-rich isotopes unstable to positron emission. In the absence of pronounced charged-current neutrino capture, nuclear flow will be held up by long-lived waiting point nuclei in the vicinity of {sup 64}Ge. The resulting abundance pattern can be modestly rich in a few interesting rare isotopes like {sup 45}Sc, {sup 49}Ti, and {sup 64}Zn. The present calculations imply yields that, when compared with the production of major species in the rest of the supernova, are about those needed to account for the solar abundance of {sup 45}Sc and {sup 49}Ti. Since the synthesis will be nearly the same in stars of high and low metallicity, the primary production of these species may have discernible signatures in the abundances of low metallicity stars. They also discuss uncertainties in the nuclear physics and early supernova evolution to which abundances of interesting nuclei are sensitive.

  4. Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-05-09

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and θ{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  5. DAO spectroscopic classification of MASTER OT J140958.91+174549.4 as a core-collapse supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balam, D. D.; Graham, M. L.

    2016-04-01

    A spectrum was obtained on UT April 30.39 of MASTER OT J140958.91+174549.4 (CSS160427:140959+174549) using the 1.82-m Plaskett telescope (National Research Council of Canada) covering the range 365-710 nm (resolution 0.35 nm). Cross-correlation with a template library using SNID (Blondin & Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) shows MASTER OT J140958.91+174549.4 to be a core-collapse supernova near maximum light.

  6. Measuring the Angular Momentum Distribution in Core-Collapse Supernova Progenitors with Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; DeMaio, Alexandra M; Ott, Christian D

    2013-01-01

    The late collapse, core bounce, and the early postbounce phase of rotating core collapse leads to a characteristic gravitational wave (GW) signal. The precise shape of the signal is governed by the interplay of gravity, rotation, nuclear equation of state (EOS), and electron capture during collapse. We explore the dependence of the signal on total angular momentum and its distribution in the progenitor core by means of a large set of axisymmetric general-relativistic core collapse simulations in which we vary the initial angular momentum distribution in the core. Our simulations include a microphysical finite-temperature EOS, an approximate electron capture treatment during collapse, and a neutrino leakage scheme for the postbounce evolution. We find that the precise distribution of angular momentum is relevant only for very rapidly rotating cores with T/|W|>~8% at bounce. We construct a numerical template bank from our baseline set of simulations, and carry out additional simulations to generate trial wavefo...

  7. An Improved Multipole Approximation for Self-gravity and Its Importance for Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Sean M.; Graziani, Carlo; Flocke, Norbert

    2013-12-01

    Self-gravity computation by multipole expansion is a common approach in problems such as core-collapse and Type Ia supernovae, where single large condensations of mass must be treated. The standard formulation of multipole self-gravity in arbitrary coordinate systems suffers from two significant sources of error, which we correct in the formulation presented in this article. The first source of error is due to the numerical approximation that effectively places grid cell mass at the central point of the cell, then computes the gravitational potential at that point, resulting in a convergence failure of the multipole expansion. We describe a new scheme that avoids this problem by computing gravitational potential at cell faces. The second source of error is due to sub-optimal choice of location for the expansion center, which results in angular power at high multipole l values in the gravitational field, requiring a high—and expensive—value of multipole cutoff l max. By introducing a global measure of angular power in the gravitational field, we show that the optimal coordinate for the expansion is the square-density-weighted mean location. We subject our new multipole self-gravity algorithm, implemented in the FLASH simulation framework, to two rigorous test problems: MacLaurin spheroids for which exact analytic solutions are known, and core-collapse supernovae. We show that key observables of the core-collapse simulations, particularly shock expansion, proto-neutron star motion, and momentum conservation, are extremely sensitive to the accuracy of the multipole gravity, and the accuracy of their computation is greatly improved by our reformulated solver.

  8. Methodology of the joint search for Gravitational Wave and Low Energy Neutrino signals from Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casentini, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) have a neutrino (v) signature confirmed by SN 1987A and are potential sources of Gravitational Waves (GWs). vs and GWs coming from these sources will reach the observer almost simultaneously and without significant interaction with interstellar matter. The expected GW signals are in the range of the upcoming advanced detectors for galactic neighborhood events. However, there are still significant uncertainties on the theoretical model of the emission. A joint search of coincident vs and GWs from these sources would bring valuable information from the inner core of the collapsing star and would enhance the detection of the so-called Silent Supernovae. Recently, a project for a joint search involving GW interferometers and v detectors has started. In this paper we discuss about the principal GW theoretical models of emission, and we present a methodological study of the joint search project between GW and v.

  9. Pre-supernova neutrino emissions from ONe cores in the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae: are they distinguishable from those of Fe cores?

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Chinami; Yamada, Shoichi; Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Takashi; Ishidoshiro, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to distinguish two types of progenitors of core collapse supernovae, i.e., one with a core composed mainly of oxygen and neon (abbreviated as ONe core) and the other with an iron core (or Fe core), we calculated the luminosities and spectra of neutrinos emitted from these cores prior to gravitational collapse, taking neutrino oscillation into account. We found that the total energies emitted as $\\bar{\

  10. Fully General Relativistic Simulations of Core-Collapse Supernovae with An Approximate Neutrino Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2012-01-01

    We present results from the first generation of multi-dimensional hydrodynamic core-collapse simulations in full general relativity (GR) that include an approximate treatment of neutrino transport. Using a M1 closure scheme with an analytic variable Eddington factor, we solve the energy-independent set of radiation energy and momentum based on the Thorne's momentum formalism. To simplify the source terms of the transport equations, a methodology of multiflavour neutrino leakage scheme is partly employed. Our newly developed code is designed to evolve the Einstein field equation together with the GR radiation hydrodynamic equations. We follow the dynamics starting from the onset of gravitational core-collapse of a 15 $M_{\\odot}$ star, through bounce, up to about 100 ms postbounce in this study to study how the spacial multi-dimensionality and GR would affect the dynamics in the early postbounce phase. Our 3D results support the anticipation in previous 1D results that the neutrino luminosity and average neutri...

  11. Bayesian parameter estimation of core collapse supernovae using gravitational wave simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Edwards, Matthew C; Christensen, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Using the latest numerical simulations of rotating stellar core collapse, we present a Bayesian framework to extract the physical information encoded in noisy gravitational wave signals. We fit Bayesian principal component regression models with known and unknown signal arrival times to reconstruct gravitational wave signals, and subsequently fit known astrophysical parameters on the posterior means of the principal component coefficients using a linear model. We predict the ratio of rotational kinetic energy to gravitational energy of the inner core at bounce by sampling from the posterior predictive distribution, and find that these predictions are generally very close to the true parameter values, with $90\\%$ credible intervals $\\sim 0.04$ and $\\sim 0.06$ wide for the known and unknown arrival time models respectively. Two supervised machine learning methods are implemented to classify precollapse differential rotation, and we find that these methods discriminate rapidly rotating progenitors particularly w...

  12. A Spitzer Space Telescope Study of SN 2003gd: Still No Direct Evidence that Core-Collapse Supernovae are Major Dust Factories

    CERN Document Server

    Meikle, W P S; Pastorello, A; Gerardy, C L; Kotak, R; Sollerman, J; Van Dyk, S D; Farrah, D; Filippenko, A V; Höflich, P; Lundqvist, P; Pozzo, M; Wheeler, J C

    2007-01-01

    We present a new, detailed analysis of late-time mid-infrared (IR) observations of the Type II-P supernova (SN) 2003gd. At about 16 months after the explosion, the mid-IR flux is consistent with emission from 4 x 10^(-5) M(solar) of newly condensed dust in the ejecta. At 22 months emission from point-like sources close to the SN position was detected at 8 microns and 24 microns. By 42 months the 24 micron flux had faded. Considerations of luminosity and source size rule out the ejecta of SN 2003gd as the main origin of the emission at 22 months. A possible alternative explanation for the emission at this later epoch is an IR echo from pre-existing circumstellar or interstellar dust. We conclude that, contrary to the claim of Sugerman et al. (2006, Science, 313, 196), the mid-IR emission from SN 2003gd does not support the presence of 0.02 M(solar) of newly formed dust in the ejecta. There is, as yet, no direct evidence that core-collapse supernovae are major dust factories.

  13. SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc: Early and late-time behavior consistent with core-collapse Type IIn supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Nathan; Prieto, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The recent supernova (SN) 2009ip had pre-SN eruptions followed by a final explosion in 2012. Its pre-SN observations make 2009ip the best observed SN progenitor in history, but the unprecedented data on the pre-SN activity has fueled debate about the nature of the 2012 explosion, whether it was a true SN or some extreme non-terminal event. In principle, both types of events could power shock interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), but here we argue that only a core-collapse SN provides a self-consistent explanation. Previously, we demonstrated that the light curves of SN 2009ip and another Type IIn, SN 2010mc, were nearly identical. Here we expand that comparison to their spectra as well, demonstrating that they are both consistent with known Type IIn events. The late-time spectra of SN 2009ip resemble those of the super-luminous SN 2006tf, and the underlying broad component in SN 2009ip's spectra resembles Type II-P events. The recent claim that the late-time spectrum of SN 2009ip is returning to its ...

  14. Broadband extended emission in gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Levinson, Amir; Pick, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Black holes in core-collapse of massive stars are expected to surge in mass and angular momentum by hyper-accretion immediately following their formation. We here describe a general framework of extended emission in gravitational waves from non-axisymmetric accretion flows from fallback matter of the progenitor envelope. It shows (a) a maximum efficiency in conversion of accretion energy into gravitational waves at hyper-accretion rates exceeding a critical value set by the ratio of the quadrupole mass inhomogeneity and viscosity with (b) a peak characteristic strain amplitude at the frequency $f_b=\\Omega_b/\\pi$, where $\\Omega_b$ is the Keplerian angular velocity at which viscous torques equal angular momentum loss in gravitational radiation, with $h_{char}\\propto f^{1/6}$ at $ff_b$. Upcoming gravitational wave observations may probe this scaling by extracting broadband spectra using time-sliced matched filtering with chirp templates, recently developed for identifying turbulence in noisy time series.

  15. Core-collapse supernovae as possible counterparts of IceCube neutrino multiplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strotjohann, Nora Linn; Kowalski, Marek; Franckowiak, Anna [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Voge, Markus [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Institut; Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    While an astrophysical neutrino flux has been detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory its sources remain so far unidentified. IceCube's Optical Follow-up Program is designed to search for the counterparts of neutrino multiplets using the full energy range of the IceCube detector down to 100 GeV. Two or more muon neutrinos arriving from the same direction within few seconds can trigger follow-up observations with optical and X-ray telescopes. Since 2010 the Palomar Transient Factory has followed up about 40 such neutrino alerts and detected several supernovae. Many of the detections are however likely random coincidences. In this talk I describe our search for supernovae and the prospects of identifying a supernova as a source of high-energy neutrinos.

  16. Searching for soft relativistic jets in core-collapse supernovae with the IceCube optical follow-up program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Allen, M. M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Benzvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brown, A. M.; Buitink, S.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; de Clercq, C.; Degner, T.; Demirörs, L.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Deyoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, B.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, G.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Marotta, A.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Porrata, R.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schmidt, T.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Stüer, M.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration; Akerlof, C. W.; Pandey, S. B.; Yuan, F.; Zheng, W.; ROTSE Collaboration

    2012-03-01

    Context. Transient neutrino sources such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and supernovae (SNe) are hypothesized to emit bursts of high-energy neutrinos on a time-scale of ≲100 s. While GRB neutrinos would be produced in high relativistic jets, core-collapse SNe might host soft-relativistic jets, which become stalled in the outer layers of the progenitor star leading to an efficient production of high-energy neutrinos. Aims: To increase the sensitivity to these neutrinos and identify their sources, a low-threshold optical follow-up program for neutrino multiplets detected with the IceCube observatory has been implemented. Methods: If a neutrino multiplet, i.e. two or more neutrinos from the same direction within 100 s, is found by IceCube a trigger is sent to the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment, ROTSE. The 4 ROTSE telescopes immediately start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect an optical counterpart to the neutrino events. Results: No statistically significant excess in the rate of neutrino multiplets has been observed and furthermore no coincidence with an optical counterpart was found. Conclusions: The search allows, for the first time, to set stringent limits on current models predicting a high-energy neutrino flux from soft relativistic hadronic jets in core-collapse SNe. We conclude that a sub-population of SNe with typical Lorentz boost factor and jet energy of 10 and 3 × 1051 erg, respectively, does not exceed 4.2% at 90% confidence.

  17. Full Bayesian hierarchical light curve modeling of core-collapse supernova populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Nathan; Betancourt, Michael; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita

    2016-06-01

    While wide field surveys have yielded remarkable quantities of photometry of transient objects, including supernovae, light curves reconstructed from this data suffer from several characteristic problems. Because most transients are discovered near the detection limit, signal to noise is generally poor; because coverage is limited to the observing season, light curves are often incomplete; and because temporal sampling can be uneven across filters, these problems can be exacerbated at any one wavelength. While the prevailing approach of modeling individual light curves independently is successful at recovering inferences for the objects with the highest quality observations, it typically neglects a substantial portion of the data and can introduce systematic biases. Joint modeling of the light curves of transient populations enables direct inference on population-level characteristics as well as superior measurements for individual objects. We present a new hierarchical Bayesian model for supernova light curves, where information inferred from observations of every individual light curve in a sample is partially pooled across objects to constrain population-level hyperparameters. Using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo sampling technique, the model posterior can be explored to enable marginalization over weakly-identified hyperparameters through full Bayesian inference. We demonstrate our technique on the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Type IIP supernova light curve sample published by Sanders et al. (2015), consisting of nearly 20,000 individual photometric observations of more than 70 supernovae in five photometric filters. We discuss the Stan probabilistic programming language used to implement the model, computational challenges, and prospects for future work including generalization to multiple supernova types. We also discuss scientific results from the PS1 dataset including a new relation between the peak magnitude and decline rate of SNe IIP, a new perspective on the

  18. Constraints from $^{26}Al$ Measurements on the Galaxy's Recent Global Star Formation Rate and Core Collapse Supernovae Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Timmes, F X; Hartmann, D H

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-rays from the decay of $^{26}$Al offer a stringent constraint on the Galaxy's global star formation rate over the past million years, supplementing other methods for quantifying the recent Galactic star formation rate, such as equivalent widths of H$\\alpha$ emission. Advantages and disadvantages of using $^{26}$Al gamma-ray measurements as a tracer of the massive star formation rate are analyzed. Estimates of the Galactic $^{26}$Al mass derived from COMPTEL measurements are coupled with a simple, analytical model of the $^{26}$Al injection rate from massive stars and restrict the Galaxy's recent star formation rate to \\hbox{5 $\\pm$ 4 M\\sun yr$^{-1}$}. In addition, we show that the derived $^{26}$Al mass implies a present day \\hbox{Type II + Ib} supernovae rate of 3.4 $\\pm$ 2.8 per century, which seems consistent with other independent estimates of the Galactic core collapse supernova rate. If some independent measure of the massive star initial mass function or star formation rate or \\hbox{Type II + Ib}...

  19. 3D simulations of young core-collapse supernova remnants undergoing efficient particle acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrand, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Within our Galaxy, supernova remnants are believed to be the major sources of cosmic rays up to the "knee". However important questions remain regarding the share of the hadronic and leptonic components, and the fraction of the supernova energy channelled into these components. We address such question by the means of numerical simulations that combine a hydrodynamic treatment of the shock wave with a kinetic treatment of particle acceleration. Performing 3D simulations allows us to produce synthetic projected maps and spectra of the thermal and non-thermal emission, that can be compared with multi-wavelength observations (in radio, X-rays, and gamma-rays). Supernovae come in different types, and although their energy budget is of the same order, their remnants have different properties, and so may contribute in different ways to the pool of Galactic cosmic-rays. Our first simulations were focused on thermonuclear supernovae, like Tycho's SNR, that usually occur in a mostly undisturbed medium. Here we present...

  20. The intermediate r-process in core-collapse supernovae driven by the magneto-rotational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimura, Nobuya; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Yamada, Shoichi; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2016-01-01

    Magneto-rotational supernovae are a possible astrophysical site of r-process nucleosynthesis, however, we have insufficient understanding of the explosion mechanism, especially the enhancement process of magnetic fields. We investigated the nucleosynthetic properties of magneto-rotational supernovae, based on a new explosion mechanism induced by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI). We performed a series of axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations, numerically resolving the MRI, with detailed microphysics including neutrino heating. Explosion models driven by neutrino heating enhanced by the MRI showed mildly neutron-rich ejecta producing weak r-process nuclei $A \\sim 130$, while an explosion model with a significant effect of magnetic fields reproduces a solar-like r-process pattern. More commonly seen abundance patterns in our models are in between the weak and regular r-process, producing lighter and intermediate mass nuclei. This intermediate r-process exhibits a variety of r-process abundance distribu...

  1. Two- and Three-Dimensional Multi-Physics Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae: A Brief Status Report and Summary of Results from the "Oak Ridge" Group

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzacappa, Anthony; Lentz, Eric J; Hix, W Raphael; Messer, O E Bronson; Harris, J Austin; Lingerfelt, Eric J; Endeve, Eirik; Yakunin, Konstantin N; Blondin, John M; Marronetti, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    We summarize the results of core collapse supernova theory from one-, two-, and three-dimensional models and provide a snapshot of the field at this time. We also present results from the "Oak Ridge" group in this context. Studies in both one and two spatial dimensions define the necessary} physics that must be included in core collapse supernova models: a general relativistic treatment of gravity (at least an approximate one), spectral neutrino transport, including relativistic effects such as gravitational redshift, and a complete set of neutrino weak interactions that includes state-of-the-art electron capture on nuclei and energy-exchanging scattering on electrons and nucleons. Whether or not the necessarily approximate treatment of this physics in current models that include it is sufficient remains to be determined in the context of future models that remove the approximations. We summarize the results of the Oak Ridge group's two-dimensional supernova models. In particular, we demonstrate that robust n...

  2. Gravitational waves from braneworld neutrino oscillations at supernova core-collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Cosmologia e Fisica Experimental de Altas Energias]. E-mail: hermanjc@cbpfsul.cat.cbpf.br

    2003-07-01

    In braneworld-like solutions of the hierarchy problem gravitons and right-handed (sterile) neutrinos are in principle the unique non-standard model fields allowed to propagate into the bulk, thus their coupling is naturally expected. Since active-to-sterile neutrino oscillations can take place during the core bounce of a supernova collapse, then gravitational waves must be produced over the oscillation length through anisotropic neutrino flow. Because the oscillation feeds mass-energy up into (or takes it out of) the target species, the large mass-squared difference between species makes a huge amount of energy to be given off as gravity waves, which is larger than from neutrino convection and cooling, or quadrupole moments of neutron star matter. The space-time strain from these bursts would turn them the more sure supernova gravitational-wave signal detectable by inferometers, for distances out to the VIRGO cluster of galaxies. (author)

  3. The interaction of core-collapse supernova ejecta with a companion star

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zheng-Wei; Roepke, Friedrich K; Moriya, Takashi J; Kruckow, Matthias; Stancliffe, Richard J; Izzard, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    The progenitors of many CCSNe are expected to be in binary systems. After the SN explosion, the companion may suffer from mass stripping and be shock heated as a result of the impact of the SN ejecta. If the binary system is disrupted, the companion is ejected as a runaway or hypervelocity star. By performing a series of 3D hydrodynamical simulations of the collision of SN ejecta with the companion star, we investigate how CCSN explosions affect their companions. We use the BEC code to construct the detailed companion structure at the time of SN explosion. The impact of the SN blast wave on the companion is followed by means of 3D SPH simulations using the Stellar GADGET code. For main-sequence (MS) companions, we find that the amount of removed mass, impact velocity, and chemical contamination of the companion that results from the impact of the SN ejecta, strongly increases with decreasing binary separation and increasing explosion energy. Their relationship can be approximately fitted by power laws, which ...

  4. Three-dimensional Hydrodynamic Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations for an $11.2 M_{\\odot}$ Star with Spectral Neutrino Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Takiwaki, Tomoya; Suwa, Yudai

    2011-01-01

    We present numerical results on three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic core-collapse simulations of an $11.2 M_{\\odot}$ star. By comparing one-(1D) and two-dimensional(2D) results with those of 3D, we study how the increasing spacial multi-dimensionality affects the postbounce supernova dynamics. The calculations were performed with an energy-dependent treatment of the neutrino transport that is solved by the isotropic diffusion source approximation scheme. By performing a tracer-particle analysis, we show that the maximum residency time of material in the gain region is shown to be longer for 3D due to non-axisymmetric flow motions than 2D, which is one of advantageous aspects of 3D models to obtain neutrino-driven explosions. Our results show that convective matter motions below the gain radius become much more violent in 3D than 2D, making the neutrino luminosity larger for 3D. Nevertheless the emitted neutrino energies are made smaller due to the enhanced cooling. Our results indicate whether these advantage...

  5. A Comparison of Two- and Three-dimensional Neutrino-hydrodynamics simulations of Core-collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Takiwaki, Tomoya; Suwa, Yudai

    2013-01-01

    We present numerical results on two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic core-collapse simulations of an 11.2$M_\\odot$ star. By changing numerical resolutions and seed perturbations systematically, we study how the postbounce dynamics is different in 2D and 3D. The calculations were performed with an energy-dependent treatment of the neutrino transport based on the isotropic diffusion source approximation scheme, which we have updated to achieve a very high computational efficiency. All the computed models in this work including nine 3D models and fifteen 2D models exhibit the revival of the stalled bounce shock, leading to the possibility of explosion. All of them are driven by the neutrino-heating mechanism, which is fostered by neutrino-driven convection and the standing-accretion-shock instability (SASI). Reflecting the stochastic nature of multi-dimensional (multi-D) neutrino-driven explosions, the blast morphology changes from models to models. However, we find that the final fate of the multi-...

  6. The helical jet of IGR J11014-6103: echoes of a core-collapse supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Pavan, L; Puehlhofer, G; Filipovic, M D; De Horta, A; O'Brien, A; Balbo, M; Walter, R; Bozzo, E; Ferrigno, C; Crawford, E; Stella, L

    2013-01-01

    Jets from rotation-powered pulsars have so far only been observed in systems moving subsonically trough their ambient medium and/or embedded in their progenitor supernova remnant (SNR). Supersonic runaway pulsars are also expected to produce jets, but they have not been confirmed so far. We investigated the nature of the jet-like structure associated to the INTEGRAL source IGR J11014-6103. The source is a neutron star escaping its parent SNR MSH 11-61A supersonically at a velocity exceeding 1000 km/s. We observed IGR J11014-6103 and its jet-like X-ray structure through dedicated high spatial resolution observations in X-rays (Chandra) and radio band (ATCA). Our results show that the feature is a true pulsar's jet. It extends highly collimated over 11pc, displays a clear precession-like modulation, and propagates nearly perpendicular to the system direction of motion, implying that the neutron star's spin axis in IGR J11014-6103 is almost perpendicular to the direction of the kick received during the supernova...

  7. The Intermediate r-process in Core-collapse Supernovae Driven by the Magneto-rotational Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, N.; Sawai, H.; Takiwaki, T.; Yamada, S.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated r-process nucleosynthesis in magneto-rotational supernovae, based on a new explosion mechanism induced by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI). A series of axisymmetric magneto-hydrodynamical simulations with detailed microphysics including neutrino heating is performed, numerically resolving the MRI. Neutrino-heating dominated explosions, enhanced by magnetic fields, showed mildly neutron-rich ejecta producing nuclei up to A∼ 130 (i.e., the weak r-process), while explosion models with stronger magnetic fields reproduce a solar-like r-process pattern. More commonly seen abundance patterns in our models are in between the weak and regular r-process, producing lighter and intermediate-mass nuclei. These intermediate r-processes exhibit a variety of abundance distributions, compatible with several abundance patterns in r-process-enhanced metal-poor stars. The amount of Eu ejecta ∼ {10}-5 {M}ȯ in magnetically driven jets agrees with predicted values in the chemical evolution of early galaxies. In contrast, neutrino-heating dominated explosions have a significant amount of Fe ({}56{{Ni}}) and Zn, comparable to regular supernovae and hypernovae, respectively. These results indicate magneto-rotational supernovae can produce a wide range of heavy nuclei from iron-group to r-process elements, depending on the explosion dynamics.

  8. Searching for soft relativistic jets in Core-collapse Supernovae with the IceCube Optical Follow-up Program

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Allen, M M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Degner, T; Demirörs, L; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, B; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Kampert, K -H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stössl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Stüer, M; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Akerlof, C W; Pandey, S B; Yuan, F; Zheng, W

    2011-01-01

    Context. Transient neutrino sources such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are hypothesized to emit bursts of high-energy neutrinos on a time-scale of \\lesssim 100 s. While GRB neutrinos would be produced in high relativistic jets, core-collapse SNe might host soft-relativistic jets, which become stalled in the outer layers of the progenitor star leading to an efficient production of high-energy neutrinos. Aims. To increase the sensitivity to these neutrinos and identify their sources, a low-threshold optical follow-up program for neutrino multiplets detected with the IceCube observatory has been implemented. Methods. If a neutrino multiplet, i.e. two or more neutrinos from the same direction within 100 s, is found by IceCube a trigger is sent to the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment, ROTSE. The 4 ROTSE telescopes immediately start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect an optical counterpart to the neutrino events. Results. No statistically si...

  9. An Improved Multipole Approximation for Self-Gravity and Its Importance for Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Couch, Sean M; Flocke, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Self-gravity computation by multipole expansion is a common approach in problems such as core-collapse and Type Ia supernovae, where single large condensations of mass must be treated. The standard formulation of multipole self-gravity suffers from two significant sources of error, which we correct in the formulation presented in this article. The first source of error is due to the numerical approximation that effectively places grid cell mass at the central point of the cell, then computes the gravitational potential at that point, resulting in a convergence failure of the multipole expansion. We describe a new scheme that avoids this problem by computing gravitational potential at cell faces. The second source of error is due to sub-optimal choice of location for the expansion center, which results in angular power at high multipole $l$ values in the gravitational field, requiring a high --- and expensive --- value of multipole cutoff \\lmax. By introducing a global measure of angular power in the gravitati...

  10. Two-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations with Spectral Neutrino Transport II. Models for Different Progenitor Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, R; Rampp, M; Kifonidis, K

    2005-01-01

    1D and 2D supernova simulations for stars between 11 and 25 solar masses are presented, making use of the Prometheus/Vertex neutrino-hydrodynamics code, which employs a full spectral treatment of the neutrino transport. Multi-dimensional transport aspects are treated by the ``ray-by-ray plus'' approximation described in Paper I. Our set of models includes a 2D calculation for a 15 solar mass star whose iron core is assumed to rotate rigidly with an angular frequency of 0.5 rad/s before collapse. No important differences were found depending on whether random seed perturbations for triggering convection are included already during core collapse, or whether they are imposed on a 1D collapse model shortly after bounce. Convection below the neutrinosphere sets in about 40 ms p.b. at a density above 10**12 g/cm^3 in all 2D models, and encompasses a layer of growing mass as time goes on. It leads to a more extended proto-neutron star structure with accelerated lepton number and energy loss and significantly higher ...

  11. THE DOUBLE PULSAR: EVIDENCE FOR NEUTRON STAR FORMATION WITHOUT AN IRON CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdman, R. D.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A. G. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Breton, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Freire, P. C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Possenti, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Manchester, R. N., E-mail: ferdman@jb.man.ac.uk [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2013-04-10

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B is a double neutron star binary, with a 2.4 hr orbital period, which has allowed measurement of relativistic orbital perturbations to high precision. The low mass of the second-formed neutron star, as well as the low system eccentricity and proper motion, point to a different evolutionary scenario compared to most other known double neutron star systems. We describe analysis of the pulse profile shape over 6 years of observations and present the resulting constraints on the system geometry. We find the recycled pulsar in this system, PSR J0737-3039A, to be a near-orthogonal rotator with an average separation between its spin and magnetic axes of 90 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign {+-} 5 Degree-Sign . Furthermore, we find a mean 95% upper limit on the misalignment between its spin and orbital angular momentum axes of 3. Degree-Sign 2, assuming that the observed emission comes from both magnetic poles. This tight constraint lends credence to the idea that the supernova that formed the second pulsar was relatively symmetric, possibly involving electron capture onto an O-Ne-Mg core.

  12. The early UV/Optical emission form core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Rabinak, Itay

    2010-01-01

    We derive a simple approximate model describing the early, hours to days, UV/optical supernova emission, which is produced by the expansion of the outer <~0.01 solar mass part of the shock-heated envelope, and precedes the optical emission driven by radioactive decay. Our model includes an approximate description of the time dependence of the opacity (due mainly to recombination), and of the deviation of the emitted spectrum from a black body spectrum. We show that the characteristics of the early UV/O emission constrain the radius of the progenitor star, its envelope composition, and the ratio of the ejecta energy to its mass, E/M. For He envelopes, neglecting the effect of recombination may lead to an over estimate of progenitor radius by more than an order of magnitude. We also show that the relative extinction at different wavelengths may be inferred from the light-curves at these wave-lengths, removing the uncertainty in the estimate of progenitor radius due to reddening (but not the uncertainty in E/...

  13. The double pulsar: evidence for neutron star formation without an iron core-collapse supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Ferdman, R D; Kramer, M; Breton, R P; McLaughlin, M A; Freire, P C C; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; Kaspi, V M; Manchester, R N; Lyne, A G

    2013-01-01

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B is a double neutron star binary, with a 2.4-hour orbital period, which has allowed measurement of relativistic orbital perturbations to high precision. The low mass of the second-formed neutron star, as well as the low system eccentricity and proper motion, point to a different evolutionary scenario compared to most other known double neutron star systems. We describe analysis of the pulse profile shape over 6 years of observations, and present the resulting constraints on the system geometry. We find the recycled pulsar in this system, PSR J0737-3039A, to be a near-orthogonal rotator, with an average separation between its spin and magnetic axes of 90 +/- 11 +/- 5 deg. Furthermore, we find a mean 95% upper limit on the misalignment between its spin and orbital angular momentum axes of 3.2 deg, assuming that the observed emission comes from both magnetic poles. This tight constraint lends credence to the idea that the supernova that formed the second pulsar was relat...

  14. A Spallation Model for 44Ti production in Core Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyed, Amir; Leahy, Denis; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2012-01-01

    Current cc-SN models predict overproduction of 44Ti compared to observations. We present a model for an alternative channel where a cc-SN explosion is followed by a neutron star detonation (Quark Nova or QN), resulting in a spallation reaction of SN ejecta that produces 44Ti. We can achieve a 44Ti production of ~ 10^-4 Msun with our model under the right time delay between the QN and the SN. Our model also produces unique signals not found in standard, cc-SN nucleosynthesis models. Some of these unique signals include a significantly large production of 7Be and 22Na. We discuss some of these signals by analyzing the late time light curve and gamma spectroscopy of our model.

  15. SUPERNOVA NEUTRINO LIGHT CURVES AND SPECTRA FOR VARIOUS PROGENITOR STARS: FROM CORE COLLAPSE TO PROTO-NEUTRON STAR COOLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazato, Ken' ichiro; Suzuki, Hideyuki [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke [Numazu Collage of Technology, 3600 Ooka, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Totani, Tomonori [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kita-shirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Umeda, Hideyuki [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: nakazato@rs.tus.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    We present a new series of supernova neutrino light curves and spectra calculated by numerical simulations for a variety of progenitor stellar masses (13-50 M {sub Sun }) and metallicities (Z = 0.02 and 0.004), which would be useful for a broad range of supernova neutrino studies, e.g., simulations of future neutrino burst detection by underground detectors or theoretical predictions for the relic supernova neutrino background. To follow the evolution from the onset of collapse to 20 s after the core bounce, we combine the results of neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations for the early phase and quasi-static evolutionary calculations of neutrino diffusion for the late phase, with different values of shock revival time as a parameter that should depend on the still unknown explosion mechanism. We describe the calculation methods and basic results, including the dependence on progenitor models and the shock revival time. The neutrino data are publicly available electronically.

  16. Sidereal time analysis as a tool for detection of gravitational and neutrino signals from the core-collapse SN explosions in the inhomogeneous Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshev, Yu. V.; Paturel, G.; Sokolov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    The core-collapse supernova explosion produces both neutrino and gravitational wave (tensor-transversal plus possible scalar-longitudinal) bursts. In the case of GW detectors, which have low angular resolution, the method of sidereal time analysis of output signals was applied for extraction of GW signals from high level noise. This method was suggested by Joseph Weber in 1970 for analysis of signals from his bar detector and later was developed for existing bar and interferometric GW detectors. The same sidereal time approach can be also used for low energy neutrino detectors which have many years of observational time (e.g. Super-Kamiokande, LVD, Baksan). This method is based on: 1) difference between sidereal and mean solar time (which help to delete noises related to day-night solar time), 2) directivity diagram (antenna pattern) of a detector (which chooses a particular sky region in a particular sidereal time), and 3) known position on the sky of spatial inhomogeneities of GW and neutrino sources in the Local Universe (distances less than 100 Mpc), such as the Galactic plane, the Galaxy center, closest galaxies, the Virgo galaxy cluster, the Super-galactic plane, the Great Attractor.

  17. Neutrino oscillations in magnetically driven supernova explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoe, Shio; Kotake, Kei [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Takiwaki, Tomoya, E-mail: shio.k@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: takiwaki.tomoya@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: kkotake@th.nao.ac.jp [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2009-09-01

    We investigate neutrino oscillations from core-collapse supernovae that produce magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) explosions. By calculating numerically the flavor conversion of neutrinos in the highly non-spherical envelope, we study how the explosion anisotropy has impacts on the emergent neutrino spectra through the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effect. In the case of the inverted mass hierarchy with a relatively large θ{sub 13} (sin{sup 2} 2θ{sub 13} ∼> 10{sup −3}), we show that survival probabilities of ν-bar {sub e} and ν{sub e} seen from the rotational axis of the MHD supernovae (i.e., polar direction), can be significantly different from those along the equatorial direction. The event numbers of ν-bar {sub e} observed from the polar direction are predicted to show steepest decrease, reflecting the passage of the magneto-driven shock to the so-called high-resonance regions. Furthermore we point out that such a shock effect, depending on the original neutrino spectra, appears also for the low-resonance regions, which could lead to a noticeable decrease in the ν{sub e} signals. This reflects a unique nature of the magnetic explosion featuring a very early shock-arrival to the resonance regions, which is in sharp contrast to the neutrino-driven delayed supernova models. Our results suggest that the two features in the ν-bar {sub e} and ν{sub e} signals, if visible to the Super-Kamiokande for a Galactic supernova, could mark an observational signature of the magnetically driven explosions, presumably linked to the formation of magnetars and/or long-duration gamma-ray bursts.

  18. Multi-Angle Simulation of Flavor Evolution in the Neutrino Neutronization Burst From an O-Ne-Mg Core-Collapse Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, John F; Carlson, Joe; Duan, Huaiyu; Qian, Yong-Zong

    2010-01-01

    We report results of the first 3-by-3 "multi-angle" simulation of the evolution of neutrino flavor in the core collapse supernova environment. In particular, we follow neutrino flavor transformation in the neutronization neutrino burst of an O-Ne-Mg core collapse event. Though in qualitative sense our results are consistent with those obtained in 3-by-3 single-angle simulations, at least in terms of neutrino mass hierarchy dependence, performing multi-angle calculations is found to reduce the adiabaticity of flavor evolution in the normal neutrino mass hierarchy, resulting in lower swap energies. Our simulations also show that current uncertainties in the measured mass-squared and mixing angle parameters translate into uncertainties in neutrino swap energies. Our results show that at low theta-13 it may be difficult to resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy in the O-Ne-Mg neutronization neutrino burst.

  19. THE FINAL FATE OF STARS THAT IGNITE NEON AND OXYGEN OFF-CENTER: ELECTRON CAPTURE OR IRON CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Samuel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Hirschi, Raphael [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Building, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Nomoto, Ken' ichi, E-mail: swjones@uvic.ca [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-12-20

    In the ONeMg cores of 8.8-9.5 M {sub ☉} stars, neon and oxygen burning is ignited off-center. Whether or not the neon-oxygen flame propagates to the center is critical for determining whether these stars undergo Fe core collapse or electron-capture-induced ONeMg core collapse. We present more details of stars that ignite neon and oxygen burning off-center. The neon flame is established in a manner similar to the carbon flame of super-AGB stars, albeit with a narrower flame width. The criteria for establishing a flame can be met if the strict Schwarzschild criterion for convective instability is adopted. Mixing across the interface of the convective shell disrupts the conditions for the propagation of the burning front, and instead the shell burns as a series of inward-moving flashes. While this may not directly affect whether or not the burning will reach the center (as in super-AGB stars), the core is allowed to contract between each shell flash. Reduction of the electron fraction in the shell reduces the Chandrasekhar mass and the center reaches the threshold density for the URCA process to activate and steer the remaining evolution of the core. This highlights the importance of a more accurate treatment of mixing in the stellar interior for yet another important question in stellar astrophysics—determining the properties of stellar evolution and supernova progenitors at the boundary between electron capture supernova and iron core-collapse supernova.

  20. The nuclear starburst in Arp 299-A: From the 5.0 GHz VLBI radio light-curves to its core-collapse supernova rate

    CERN Document Server

    Bondi, M; Herrero-Illana, R; Alberdi, A

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear region of the Luminous Infra-red Galaxy Arp 299-A hosts a recent ($\\simeq 10$ Myr), intense burst of massive star formation which is expected to lead to numerous core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). Previous VLBI observations, carried out with the EVN at 5.0 GHz and with the VLBA at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz, resulted in the detection of a large number of compact, bright, non-thermal sources in a region $\\lsim$150 pc in size. We aim at establishing the nature of all non-thermal, compact components in Arp 299-A, as well as estimating its core-collapse supernova rate. We use multi-epoch European VLBI Network (EVN) observations taken at 5.0 GHz to image with milliarcsecond resolution the compact radio sources in the nuclear region of Arp 299-A. We also use one single-epoch 5.0 GHz Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) observation to image the extended emission in which the compact radio sources --traced by our EVN observations-- are embedded. Twenty-six compact sources are detected, 8 of them...

  1. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic core-collapse supernova simulations with spectral neutrino transport. I. Numerical method and results for a 15 M_sun star

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, R; Janka, H T; Kifonidis, K

    2005-01-01

    Supernova models with a full spectral treatment of the neutrino transport are presented, employing the Prometheus/Vertex neutrino-hydrodynamics code with a ``ray-by-ray plus'' approximation for treating two- (or three-) dimensional problems. The method is described in detail and critically assessed with respect to its capabilities, limitations, and inaccuracies in the context of supernova simulations. In this first paper of a series, 1D and 2D core-collapse calculations for a (nonrotating) 15 M_sun star are discussed, uncertainties in the treatment of the equation of state -- numerical and physical -- are tested, Newtonian results are compared with simulations using a general relativistic potential, bremsstrahlung and interactions of neutrinos of different flavors are investigated, and the standard approximation in neutrino-nucleon interactions with zero energy transfer is replaced by rates that include corrections due to nucleon recoil, thermal motions, weak magnetism, and nucleon correlations. Models with t...

  2. Alfven Wave-Driven Supernova Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T K; Yamada, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the role of Alfven waves in the core-collapse supernova (SN) explosion. We assume that Alfven waves are generated by convections inside a proto-neutron star (PNS) and emitted from its surface. Then these waves propagate outwards and dissipate via nonlinear processes and heat up matter around a stalled prompt shock. To quantitatively assess the importance of this process for revival of the stalled shock, we perform 1D time-dependent hydrodynamical simulations, taking into account the heating via the dissipation of Alfven waves. We show that the shock revival occurs if the surface field strength is larger than ~2x10^{15}G and if the amplitude of velocity fluctuation at the PNS surface is larger than ~ 20% of the local sound speed. Interestingly, the Alfven wave mechanism is self-regulating in the sense that the explosion energy is not very sensitive to the surface field strength and initial amplitude of Alfven waves as long as they are larger than the threshold values given above. It should be em...

  3. Measuring the Properties of Dark Energy with Photometrically Classified Pan-STARRS Supernovae. I. Systematic Uncertainty from Core-collapse Supernova Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. O.; Scolnic, D. M.; Riess, A. G.; Kessler, R.; Rest, A.; Kirshner, R. P.; Berger, E.; Ortega, C. A.; Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Challis, P. J.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Metcalfe, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2017-07-01

    The Pan-STARRS (PS1) Medium Deep Survey discovered over 5000 likely supernovae (SNe) but obtained spectral classifications for just 10% of its SN candidates. We measured spectroscopic host galaxy redshifts for 3147 of these likely SNe and estimate that ˜1000 are Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) with light-curve quality sufficient for a cosmological analysis. We use these data with simulations to determine the impact of core-collapse SN (CC SN) contamination on measurements of the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. Using the method of Bayesian Estimation Applied to Multiple Species (BEAMS), distances to SNe Ia and the contaminating CC SN distribution are simultaneously determined. We test light-curve-based SN classification priors for BEAMS as well as a new classification method that relies upon host galaxy spectra and the association of SN type with host type. By testing several SN classification methods and CC SN parameterizations on large SN simulations, we estimate that CC SN contamination gives a systematic error on w ({σ }w{CC}) of 0.014, 29% of the statistical uncertainty. Our best method gives {σ }w{CC}=0.004, just 8% of the statistical uncertainty, but could be affected by incomplete knowledge of the CC SN distribution. This method determines the SALT2 color and shape coefficients, α and β, with ˜3% bias. However, we find that some variants require α and β to be fixed to known values for BEAMS to yield accurate measurements of w. Finally, the inferred abundance of bright CC SNe in our sample is greater than expected based on measured CC SN rates and luminosity functions.

  4. Asphericity in supernova explosions from late-time spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keiichi; Kawabata, Koji; Mazzali, Paolo A; Tanaka, Masaomi; Valenti, Stefano; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Hattori, Takashi; Deng, Jinsong; Pian, Elena; Taubenberger, Stefan; Iye, Masanori; Matheson, Thomas; Filippenko, Alexei V; Aoki, Kentaro; Kosugi, George; Ohyama, Youichi; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Takata, Tadafumi

    2008-02-29

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) are the explosions that announce the death of massive stars. Some CC-SNe are linked to long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and are highly aspherical. One important question is to what extent asphericity is common to all CC-SNe. Here we present late-time spectra for a number of CC-SNe from stripped-envelope stars and use them to explore any asphericity generated in the inner part of the exploding star, near the site of collapse. A range of oxygen emission-line profiles is observed, including a high incidence of double-peaked profiles, a distinct signature of an aspherical explosion. Our results suggest that all CC-SNe from stripped-envelope stars are aspherical explosions and that SNe accompanied by GRBs exhibit the highest degree of asphericity.

  5. Accelerating Our Understanding of Supernova Explosion Mechanism via Simulations and Visualizations with GenASiS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budiardja, R. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cardall, Christian Y [ORNL; Endeve, Eirik [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among the most powerful explosions in the Universe, releasing about 1053 erg of energy on timescales of a few tens of seconds. These explosion events are also responsible for the production and dissemination of most of the heavy elements, making life as we know it possible. Yet exactly how they work is still unresolved. One reason for this is the sheer complexity and cost of a self-consistent, multi-physics, and multi-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulation, which is impractical, and often impossible, even on the largest supercomputers we have available today. To advance our understanding we instead must often use simplified models, teasing out the most important ingredients for successful explosions, while helping us to interpret results from higher fidelity multi-physics models. In this paper we investigate the role of instabilities in the core-collapse supernova environment. We present here simulation and visualization results produced by our code GenASiS.

  6. Accelerating Our Understanding of Supernova Explosion Mechanism via Simulations and Visualizations with GenASiS

    CERN Document Server

    Budiardja, Reuben D; Endeve, Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among the most powerful explosions in the Universe, releasing about $10^{53}~\\mbox{erg}$ of energy on timescales of a few tens of seconds. These explosion events are also responsible for the production and dissemination of most of the heavy elements, making life as we know it possible. Yet exactly how they work is still unresolved. One reason for this is the sheer complexity and cost of a self-consistent, multi-physics, and multi-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulation, which is impractical, and often impossible, even on the largest supercomputers we have available today. To advance our understanding we instead must often use simplified models, teasing out the most important ingredients for successful explosions, while helping us to interpret results from higher fidelity multi-physics models. In this paper we investigate the role of instabilities in the core-collapse supernova environment. We present here simulation and visualization results produced by our code GenASiS.

  7. NEW EQUATIONS OF STATE BASED ON THE LIQUID DROP MODEL OF HEAVY NUCLEI AND QUANTUM APPROACH TO LIGHT NUCLEI FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Suzuki, Hideyuki, E-mail: furusawa@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Yamazaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at subnuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. A model free energy is constructed, based on the relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with the proton number up to {approx}1000. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the liquid drop model to all nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the new liquid drop model so that the temperature dependences of bulk energies could be taken into account. Furthermore, we extend the region in the nuclear chart, in which shell effects are included, by using theoretical mass data in addition to experimental ones. We also adopt a quantum-theoretical mass evaluation of light nuclei, which incorporates the Pauli- and self-energy shifts that are not included in the ordinary liquid drop model. The pasta phases for heavy nuclei are taken into account in the same way as in the previous model. We find that the abundances of heavy nuclei are modified by the shell effects of nuclei and temperature dependence of bulk energies. These changes may have an important effect on the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. The abundances of light nuclei are also modified by the new mass evaluation, which may affect the heating and cooling rates of supernova cores and shocked envelopes.

  8. Anisotropies in the Neutrino Fluxes and Heating Profiles in Two-dimensional, Time-dependent, Multi-group Radiation Hydrodynamics Simulations of Rotating Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Walder, R; Ott, C D; Livne, E; Jarrah, M

    2004-01-01

    Using the 2D multi-group, flux-limited diffusion version of the code VULCAN/2D, that also incorporates rotation, we have calculated the collapse, bounce, shock formation, and early post-bounce evolutionary phases of a core-collapse supernova for a variety of initial rotation rates. This is the first series of such multi-group calculations undertaken in supernova theory with fully multi-D tools. We find that though rotation generates pole-to-equator angular anisotropies in the neutrino radiation fields, the magnitude of the asymmetries is not as large as previously estimated. Moreover, we find that the radiation field is always more spherically symmetric than the matter distribution, with its plumes and convective eddies. We present the dependence of the angular anisotropy of the neutrino fields on neutrino species, neutrino energy, and initial rotation rate. Only for our most rapidly rotating model do we start to see qualitatively different hydrodynamics, but for the lower rates consistent with the pre-collap...

  9. Abundances in the Ejecta of Core Collapse Supernova Remnants, G350.1-0.3 and G349.7+0.2

    CERN Document Server

    Yasumi, Masato; Nakashima, Shinya; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Sugawara, Ryusuke; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Tanaka, Takaaki; Koyama, Katsuji

    2014-01-01

    We present Suzaku results of the two Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs), G350.1-0.3 and G349.7+0.2. We find Al and Ni K alpha lines from both the SNRs for the first time, in addition to previously detected K-shell lines of Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca and Fe. The spectra are well described by two optically thin thermal plasmas: a low-temperature (low-kT) plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium and a high-temperature (high-kT) plasma in non-equilibrium ionization. Since the low-kT plasma has solar metal abundances, it is thought to be of interstellar medium origin. The high-kT plasma has super-solar abundances, hence it is likely to be of ejecta origin. The abundance patterns of the ejecta components are similar to those of core-collapse supernovae with the progenitor mass of ~15-25 M_solar for G350.1-0.3 and ~35-40 M_solar for G349.7+0.2. We find extremely high abundances of Ni compared to Fe (Z_Ni/Z_Fe ~8). Based on the measured column densities between the SNRs and the near sky background, we propose that G350.1-...

  10. Evidence for Nearby Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Benítez, N; Canelles, M; Benitez, Narciso; Maiz-Apellaniz, Jesus; Canelles, Matilde

    2002-01-01

    Supernova explosions are one of the most energetic--and potentially lethal--phenomena in the Universe. Scientists have speculated for decades about the possible consequences for life on Earth of a nearby supernova, but plausible candidates for such an event were lacking. Here we show that the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, a group of young stars currently located at~130 parsecs from the Sun, has generated 20 SN explosions during the last 11 Myr, some of them probably as close as 40 pc to our planet. We find that the deposition on Earth of 60Fe atoms produced by these explosions can explain the recent measurements of an excess of this isotope in deep ocean crust samples. We propose that ~2 Myr ago, one of the SNe exploded close enough to Earth to seriously damage the ozone layer, provoking or contributing to the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary marine extinction.

  11. Supernova explosions in magnetized, primordial dark matter halos

    CERN Document Server

    Seifried, D; Schleicher, D

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of high resolution simulations studying the effect of supernova explosions on magnetized, primordial halos. We focus on the evolution of an initially small-scale magnetic field formed during the collapse of the halo. We vary the degree of magnetization, the halo mass, and the amount of explosion energy in order to account for expected variations as well as to infer systematical dependencies of the results on initial conditions. Our simulations suggest that core collapse supernovae with an explosion energy of 10^51 erg and more violent pair instability supernovae with 10^53 erg are able to disrupt halos with masses up to a few 10^6 and 10^7 M_sun, respectively. The peak of the magnetic field spectra shows a continuous shift towards smaller k-values, i.e. larger length scales, over time reaching values as low as k = 4. On small scales the magnetic energy decreases at the cost of the energy on large scales resulting in well-ordered magnetic field with strengths up to about 10^-8 G depending on t...

  12. Two-dimensional, Time-dependent, Multi-group, Multi-angle Radiation Hydrodynamics Test Simulation in the Core-Collapse Supernova Context

    CERN Document Server

    Livne, E; Walder, R; Lichtenstadt, I; Thompson, T A; Livne, Eli; Burrows, Adam; Walder, Rolf; Lichtenstadt, Itamar; Thompson, Todd A.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a time-dependent, multi-energy-group, and multi-angle (S$_n$) Boltzmann transport scheme for radiation hydrodynamics simulations, in one and two spatial dimensions. The implicit transport is coupled to both 1D (spherically-symmetric) and 2D (axially-symmetric) versions of the explicit Newtonian hydrodynamics code VULCAN. The 2D variant, VULCAN/2D, can be operated in general structured or unstructured grids and though the code can address many problems in astrophysics it was constructed specifically to study the core-collapse supernova problem. Furthermore, VULCAN/2D can simulate the radiation/hydrodynamic evolution of differentially rotating bodies. We summarize the equations solved and methods incorporated into the algorithm and present results of a time-dependent 2D test calculation. A more complete description of the algorithm is postponed to another paper. We highlight a 2D test run that follows for 22 milliseconds the immediate post-bounce evolution of a collapsed core. We present the r...

  13. The nuclear starburst in Arp 299-A: from the 5.0 GHz VLBI radio light-curves to its core-collapse supernova rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondi, M.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Alberdi, A.

    2012-03-01

    Context. The nuclear region of the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) Arp 299-A hosts a recent ( ≃ 10 Myr) intense burst of massive star formation that is expected to lead to numerous core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). Previous VLBI observations, carried out with the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5.0 GHz and with the VLBA at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz, resulted in the detection of many compact, bright, non-thermal sources in a region ≲ 150 pc in size. Aims: We aim to establish the nature of all non-thermal compact components in Arp 299-A, as well as to estimate its core-collapse supernova rate. While the majority of the compact components are expected to be young radio supernovae (RSNe) and supernova remnants (SNRs), a definitive classification is still lacking. Yet, this is very relevant for eventually establishing the CCSN rate, as well as the star formation rate, for this galaxy. Methods: We used multi-epoch EVN observations taken at 5.0 GHz to image the compact radio sources in the nuclear region of Arp 299-A with milliarcsecond resolution. We also used one single-epoch 5.0 GHz Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) observation to image the extended emission in which these compact radio sources are embedded. Results: We present the first 5.0 GHz radio light-curve (spanning ~2.5 yr) of all compact components in the nuclear starburst of Arp 299-A. Twenty-six compact sources are detected, eight of which are new objects. The properties of all detected objects are consistent with them being a mixed population of CCSNe and SNRs. We find clear evidence for at least two new CCSNe, implying a lower limit to the CCSN rate of νSN ≳ 0.80 SN/yr, indicating that the bulk of the current star formation in Arp 299-A is taking place in the innermost ~150 pc.A few more objects show variability consistent with them being recently exploded SNe, but only future observations will clarify this point. Our MERLIN observations trace a region of diffuse extended emission that

  14. Chaos and Turbulent Nucleosynthesis Prior to a Supernova Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Arnett, W David; Viallet, Maxime

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D), time dependent numerical simulations, of flow of matter in stars, now have sufficient resolution to be fully turbulent. The late stages of the evolution of massive stars, leading up to core collapse to a neutron star (or black hole), and often to supernova explosion and nucleosynthesis, are strongly convective because of vigorous neutrino cooling and nuclear heating. Unlike models based on current stellar evolutionary practice, these simulations show a chaotic dynamics characteristic of highly turbulent flow. Theoretical analysis of this flow, both in the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) framework and by simple dynamic models, show an encouraging consistency with the numerical results. It may now be possible to develop physically realistic and robust procedures for convection and mixing which (unlike 3D numerical simulation) may be applied throughout the long life times of stars. In addition, a new picture of the presupernova stages is emerging which is more dynamic and interesti...

  15. Impacts of Collective Neutrino Oscillations on Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Suwa, Yudai; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Sato, Katsuhiko

    2011-01-01

    By performing a series of one- and two-dimensional (1-, 2D) hydrodynamic simulations with spectral neutrino transport, we study possible impacts of collective neutrino oscillations on the dynamics of core-collapse supernovae. To model the spectral swapping which is one of the possible outcome of the collective neutrino oscillations, we parametrize the onset time when the spectral swap begins, the radius where the spectral swap occurs, and the threshold energy above which the spectral interchange between heavy-lepton neutrinos and electron/anti-electron neutrinos takes place, respectively. By doing so, we systematically study how the neutrino heating enhanced by the spectral swapping could affect the shock evolution as well as the matter ejection. We also investigate the progenitor dependence using a suite of progenitor models (13, 15, 20, and 25 $M_\\odot$). We find that there is a critical heating rate induced by the spectral swapping to trigger explosions, which significantly differs between the progenitors....

  16. A new equation of state for core-collapse supernovae based on realistic nuclear forces and including a full nuclear ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, S.; Togashi, H.; Nagakura, H.; Sumiyoshi, K.; Yamada, S.; Suzuki, H.; Takano, M.

    2017-09-01

    We have constructed a nuclear equation of state (EOS) that includes a full nuclear ensemble for use in core-collapse supernova simulations. It is based on the EOS for uniform nuclear matter that two of the authors derived recently, applying a variational method to realistic two- and three-body nuclear forces. We have extended the liquid drop model of heavy nuclei, utilizing the mass formula that accounts for the dependences of bulk, surface, Coulomb and shell energies on density and/or temperature. As for light nuclei, we employ a quantum-theoretical mass evaluation, which incorporates the Pauli- and self-energy shifts. In addition to realistic nuclear forces, the inclusion of in-medium effects on the full ensemble of nuclei makes the new EOS one of the most realistic EOSs, which covers a wide range of density, temperature and proton fraction that supernova simulations normally encounter. We make comparisons with the FYSS EOS, which is based on the same formulation for the nuclear ensemble but adopts the relativistic mean field theory with the TM1 parameter set for uniform nuclear matter. The new EOS is softer than the FYSS EOS around and above nuclear saturation densities. We find that neutron-rich nuclei with small mass numbers are more abundant in the new EOS than in the FYSS EOS because of the larger saturation densities and smaller symmetry energy of nuclei in the former. We apply the two EOSs to 1D supernova simulations and find that the new EOS gives lower electron fractions and higher temperatures in the collapse phase owing to the smaller symmetry energy. As a result, the inner core has smaller masses for the new EOS. It is more compact, on the other hand, due to the softness of the new EOS and bounces at higher densities. It turns out that the shock wave generated by core bounce is a bit stronger initially in the simulation with the new EOS. The ensuing outward propagations of the shock wave in the outer core are very similar in the two simulations, which

  17. Nucleosynthesis from Supernovae as a Function of Explosion Energy from NuGrid

    CERN Document Server

    Fryer, Christopher L; Bennett, Michael; Diehl, Steven; Herwig, Falk; Hirschi, Raphael; Hungerford, Aimee; Pignatari, Marco; Magkotsios, Georgios; Rockefeller, Gabriel; Timmes, Francis X

    2008-01-01

    We review some of the uncertainties in calculating nucleosynthetic yields, focusing on the explosion mechanism. Current yield calculations tend to either use a piston, energy injection, or enhancement of neutrino opacities to drive an explosion. We show that the energy injection, or more accurately, an entropy injection mechanism is best-suited to mimic our current understanding of the convection-enhanced supernova engine. The enhanced neutrino-opacity technique is in qualitative disagreement with simulations of core-collapse supernovae and will likely produce errors in the yields. But piston-driven explosions are the most discrepant. Piston-driven explosion severely underestimate the amount of fallback, leading to order-of-magnitude errors in the yields of heavy elements. To obtain yields accurate to the factor of a few level, we must use entropy or energy injection and this has become the NuGrid collaboration approach.

  18. Observations and Theory of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, J C

    2003-01-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the observations of supernovae and the theory of their explosion mechanisms. Journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: observations of the spectra, spectropolarimetry, and light curves of supernovae of various types, theory of thermonuclear explosions, core collapse, and radioactive decay, applications to cosmology, and possible connections to gamma-ray bursts.

  19. The Young Core-Collapse Supernova Remnant G11.2-0.3: An Asymmetric Circumstellar Medium and a Variable Pulsar Wind Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Moseby, A.; Reynolds, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    G11.2-0.3 is a young supernova remnant (SNR) that has been suggested to be associated with a historical supernova of 386 AD. In addition to a bright radio and X-ray shell, it contains a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and a 65 ms pulsar. We present first results from new deep (about 400 ks in duration) Chandra observations from 2013 May and September. Ahead of the main shell, there are a number of outlying X-ray protrusions surrounded by bow shocks, presumably produced by dense ejecta knots. Pronounced spectral variations are seen in thermal X-ray spectra of the main shell, indicating the presence of shocks with a wide range in shock speeds and large spatial variations in intervening absorption. A band of soft X-ray emission is clearly seen at the remnant's center. We interpret this band as a result of the interaction of supernova ejecta with the strongly asymmetric wind produced by a red supergiant SN progenitor shortly before its explosion. We study interstellar absorption in the central region of the remnant, finding high absorption everywhere. This rules out the association of G11.2-0.3 with SN 386. The PWN is dominated by a bright "jet" whose spatial morphology is markedly different between our May and September observations.

  20. Mass extinctions and supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Korschinek, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    A nearby supernova (SN) explosion could have negatively influenced life on Earth, maybe even been responsible for mass extinctions. Mass extinction poses a significant extinction of numerous species on Earth, as recorded in the paleontologic, paleoclimatic, and geological record of our planet. Depending on the distance between the Sun and the SN, different types of threats have to be considered, such as ozone depletion on Earth, causing increased exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet radiation, or the direct exposure of lethal x-rays. Another indirect effect is cloud formation, induced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere which result in a drop in the Earth's temperature, causing major glaciations of the Earth. The discovery of highly intensive gamma ray bursts (GRBs), which could be connected to SNe, initiated further discussions on possible life-threatening events in Earth's history. The probability that GRBs hit the Earth is very low. Nevertheless, a past interaction of Earth with GRBs and/or SNe cannot be exclude...

  1. Neutrinos from Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, S; Choubey, Sandhya; Kar, Kamales

    2002-01-01

    In this review, the effect of flavor oscillations on the neutrinos released during supernova explosion after core collapse is described. In some scenarios there are large enhancement of the number of events compared to the no oscillation case. Various other features associated with supernova neutrinos are also discussed.

  2. Explosions inside Ejecta and Most Luminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Blinnikov, S I

    2008-01-01

    The extremely luminous supernova SN2006gy is explained in the same way as other SNIIn events: light is produced by a radiative shock propagating in a dense circumstellar envelope formed by a previous weak explosion. The problems in the theory and observations of multiple-explosion SNe IIn are briefly reviewed.

  3. Asymmetric Explosions of Thermonuclear Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ghezzi, C R; Horváth, J E

    2004-01-01

    A type Ia supernova explosion starts in a white dwarf as a laminar deflagration at the center of the star and soon several hydrodynamic instabilities (in particular, the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability) begin to act. In previous work (Ghezzi, de Gouveia Dal Pino, & Horvath 2001), we addressed the propagation of an initially laminar thermonuclear flame in presence of a magnetic field assumed to be dipolar. We were able to show that, within the framework of a fractal model for the flame velocity, the front is affected by the field through the quenching of the R-T instability growth in the direction perpendicular to the field lines. As a consequence, an asymmetry develops between the magnetic polar and the equatorial axis that gives a prolate shape to the burning front. We have here computed numerically the total integrated asymmetry as the flame front propagates outward through the expanding shells of decreasing density of the magnetized white dwarf progenitor, for several chemical compositions, and found...

  4. The final fate of stars that ignite neon and oxygen off-center: electron capture or iron core-collapse supernova?

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Samuel; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-01-01

    In the ONeMg cores of $8.8-9.5~{\\rm M}_\\odot$ stars, neon and oxygen burning is ignited off-center. Whether the neon-oxygen flame propagates to the center is critical to determine whether these stars undergo Fe core collapse or electron capture induced ONeMg core collapse. We present more details of stars that ignite neon and oxygen burning off-center. The neon flame is established in a similar manner to the carbon flame of super-AGB stars, albeit with a narrower flame width. The criteria for establishing a flame are able to be met if the strict Schwarzschild criterion for convective instability is adopted. Mixing across the interface of the convective shell disrupts the conditions for the propagation of the burning front and instead the shell burns as a series of inward-moving flashes. While this may not directly affect whether the burning will reach the center (as in super-AGB stars), the core is allowed to contract between each shell flash. Reduction of the electron fraction in the shell reduces the Chandr...

  5. Chaos and turbulent nucleosynthesis prior to a supernova explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. D. Arnett

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D, time dependent numerical simulations of flow of matter in stars, now have sufficient resolution to be fully turbulent. The late stages of the evolution of massive stars, leading up to core collapse to a neutron star (or black hole, and often to supernova explosion and nucleosynthesis, are strongly convective because of vigorous neutrino cooling and nuclear heating. Unlike models based on current stellar evolutionary practice, these simulations show a chaotic dynamics characteristic of highly turbulent flow. Theoretical analysis of this flow, both in the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS framework and by simple dynamic models, show an encouraging consistency with the numerical results. It may now be possible to develop physically realistic and robust procedures for convection and mixing which (unlike 3D numerical simulation may be applied throughout the long life times of stars. In addition, a new picture of the presupernova stages is emerging which is more dynamic and interesting (i.e., predictive of new and newly observed phenomena than our previous one.

  6. An Emerging Coherent Picture of Red Supergiant Supernova Explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Poznanski, Dovi

    2013-01-01

    Three lines of evidence indicate that in the most common type of core collapse supernovae, the energy deposited in the ejecta by the exploding core is approximately proportional to the progenitor mass cubed. This results stems from an observed uniformity of light curve plateau duration, a correlation between mass and ejecta velocity, and the known correlation between luminosity and velocity. This result ties in analytical and numerical models together with observations, providing us with clue...

  7. New equations of state based on liquid drop model of heavy nuclei and quantum approach to light nuclei for core-collapse supernova simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    We construct new equations of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The abundance of various nuclei is obtained together with thermodynamic quantities. A model free energy is constructed, based on the relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with the proton number up to ~ 1000. The formulation is an extension of the previous model, in which we adopted the liquid drop model to all nuclei under the nuclear statistical equilibrium. We reformulate the new liquid drop model so that the temperature dependences of bulk energies could be taken into account. Furthermore, we extend the region in the nuclear chart, in which shell affects are included, by using theoretical mass data in addition to experimental ones. We also adopt a quantum theoretical mass evaluation of light nuclei, which incorporates the Pauli- and self-energy shifts that are not included in the ordinary liquid drop model. The pasta phases for heavy nucle...

  8. Slowly fading super-luminous supernovae that are not pair-instability explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Inserra, C.; McCrum, M.; Kotak, R.; Fraser, M.; Wright, D.; Chen, T.-W.; Smith, K.; Young, D. R.; Sim, S. A.; Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Bresolin, F.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Tonry, J. L.; Huber, M. E.; Rest, A.; Pastorello, A.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S.; Mattila, S.; Kankare, E.; Kangas, T.; Leloudas, G.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Narayan, G.; Stubbs, C. W.; Foley, R. J.; Lunnan, R.; Soderberg, A.; Sanders, N.; Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Kirshner, R. P.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Taubenberger, S.; Botticella, M. T.; Gezari, S.; Urata, Y.; Rodney, S.; Riess, A. G.; Scolnic, D.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K.; Flewelling, H. A.; Magnier, E. A.; Kaiser, N.; Metcalfe, N.; Morgan, J.; Price, P. A.; Sweeney, W.; Waters, C.

    2013-10-01

    Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 1044 ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of `pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-130 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of 56Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to 56Fe via 56Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6 × 10-6 times that of the core-collapse rate.

  9. Slowly fading super-luminous supernovae that are not pair-instability explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, M; Smartt, S J; Jerkstrand, A; Inserra, C; McCrum, M; Kotak, R; Fraser, M; Wright, D; Chen, T-W; Smith, K; Young, D R; Sim, S A; Valenti, S; Howell, D A; Bresolin, F; Kudritzki, R P; Tonry, J L; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Pastorello, A; Tomasella, L; Cappellaro, E; Benetti, S; Mattila, S; Kankare, E; Kangas, T; Leloudas, G; Sollerman, J; Taddia, F; Berger, E; Chornock, R; Narayan, G; Stubbs, C W; Foley, R J; Lunnan, R; Soderberg, A; Sanders, N; Milisavljevic, D; Margutti, R; Kirshner, R P; Elias-Rosa, N; Morales-Garoffolo, A; Taubenberger, S; Botticella, M T; Gezari, S; Urata, Y; Rodney, S; Riess, A G; Scolnic, D; Wood-Vasey, W M; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K; Flewelling, H A; Magnier, E A; Kaiser, N; Metcalfe, N; Morgan, J; Price, P A; Sweeney, W; Waters, C

    2013-10-17

    Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10(44) ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-130 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of (56)Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to (56)Fe via (56)Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae that show relatively fast rise times and blue colours, which are incompatible with pair-instability models. Their late-time light-curve and spectral similarities to supernova 2007bi call the nature of that event into question. Our early spectra closely resemble typical fast-declining super-luminous supernovae, which are not powered by radioactivity. Modelling our observations with 10-16 solar masses of magnetar-energized ejecta demonstrates the possibility of a common explosion mechanism. The lack of unambiguous nearby pair-instability events suggests that their local rate of occurrence is less than 6 × 10(-6) times that of the core-collapse rate.

  10. Neutrino oscillations in MHD supernova explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoe, S; Kotake, K [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Takiwaki, T, E-mail: shio.k@nao.ac.j [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the neutrino oscillations numerically in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) explosion models to see how asphericity has impacts on neutrino spectra. Magneto-driven explosions are one of the most attracting scenarios for producing large scale departures from spherical symmetric geometry, that are reported by many observational data. We find that the event rates at Super-Kamiokande (SK) seen from the polar direction (e.g., the rotational axis of the supernovae) decrease when the shock wave is propagating through H-resonance. In addition, we find that L-resonance in this situation becomes non-adiabatic, and the effect of L-resonance appears in the neutrino signal, because the MHD shock can propagate to the stellar surface without shock-stall after core bounce, and the shock reaches the L-resonance at earlier stage than the conventional spherical supernova explosion models. Our results suggest that we may obtain the observational signatures of the two resonances in SK for Galactic supernova.

  11. Type Ia Supernova Explosion: Gravitationally Confined Detonation

    CERN Document Server

    Plewa, T; Lamb, D

    2004-01-01

    We present a new mechanism for Type Ia supernova explosions in massive white dwarfs. The proposed scenario follows from relaxing the assumption of symmetry in the model and involves a detonation created in an unconfined environment. The explosion begins with an essentially central ignition of stellar material initiating a deflagration. This deflagration results in the formation of a buoyantly-driven bubble of hot material that reaches the stellar surface at supersonic speeds. The bubble breakout forms a strong pressure wave that laterally accelerates fuel-rich outer stellar layers. This material, confined by gravity to the white dwarf, races along the stellar surface and is focused at the location opposite to the point of the bubble breakout. These streams of nuclear fuel carry enough mass and energy to trigger a detonation just above the stellar surface. The flow conditions at that moment support a detonation that will incinerate the white dwarf and result in an energetic explosion. The stellar expansion fol...

  12. Phases of a Type Ia supernova explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Niemeyer, J C

    1998-01-01

    In the framework of the Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf model for Type Ia supernovae, various stages of the explosion are described in terms of the burning regimes of the thermonuclear flame front. In the early flamelet regime following the ``smoldering'' phase prior to the explosion, the flame is sufficiently thin and fast to remain laminar on small scales. As the white dwarf density declines, the thermal flame structure becomes subject to penetration by turbulent eddies, and it enters the ``distributed burning'' regime. A specific control parameter for this transition is proposed. Furthermore, we outline an argument for the coincidence of the transition between burning regimes with the onset of a deflagration-detonation-transition (DDT) in the late phase of the explosion.

  13. Updates of the nuclear equation of state for core-collapse supernovae and neutron Stars: effects of 3-body forces, QCD, and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mathews, G J; Olson, J P; Suh, I-S; Kajino, T; Maruyama, T; Hidaka, J; Ryu, C-Y; Cheoun, M-K; Lan, N Q

    2013-01-01

    We summarize several new developments in the nuclear equation of state for supernova simulations and neutron stars. We discuss an updated and improved Notre-Dame-Livermore Equation of State (NDL EoS) for use in supernovae simulations. This Eos contains many updates. Among them are the effects of 3- body nuclear forces at high densities and the possible transition to a QCD chiral and/or super-conducting color phase at densities. We also consider the neutron star equation of state and neutrino transport in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We study a new quantum hadrodynamic (QHD) equation of state for neutron stars (with and without hyperons) in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The parameters are constrained by deduced masses and radii. The calculated adiabatic index for these magnetized neutron stars exhibit rapid changes with density. This may provide a mechanism for star-quakes and flares in magnetars. We also investigate the strong magnetic field effects on the moments of inertia and spin down...

  14. Type Ia supernovae: explosions and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang Eitel

    2011-08-01

    Supernovae are the brightest explosions in the universe. Supernovae in our Galaxy, rare and happening only every few centuries, have probably been observed since the beginnings of mankind. At first they were interpreted as religious omens but in the last half millennium they have increasingly been used to study the cosmos and our place in it. Tycho Brahe deduced from his observations of the famous supernova in 1572, that the stars, in contrast to the widely believe Aristotelian doctrine, were not immutable. More than 400 years after Tycho made his paradigm changing discovery using SN 1572, and some 60 years after supernovae had been identified as distant dying stars, two teams changed the view of the world again using supernovae. The found that the Universe was accelerating in its expansion, a conclusion that could most easily be explained if more than 70% of the Universe was some previously un-identified form of matter now often referred to as `Dark Energy'. Beyond their prominent role as tools to gauge our place in the Universe, supernovae themselves have been studied well over the past 75 years. We now know that there are two main physical causes of these cataclysmic events. One of these channels is the collapse of the core of a massive star. The observationally motivated classes Type II, Type Ib and Type Ic have been attributed to these events. This thesis, however is dedicated to the second group of supernovae, the thermonuclear explosions of degenerate carbon and oxygen rich material and lacking hydrogen - called Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). White dwarf stars are formed at the end of a typical star's life when nuclear burning ceases in the core, the outer envelope is ejected, with the degenerate core typically cooling for eternity. Theory predicts that such stars will self ignite when close to 1.38 Msun (called the Chandrasekhar Mass). Most stars however leave white dwarfs with 0.6 Msun, and no star leaves a remnant as heavy as 1.38 M! sun, which suggests

  15. A new multi-dimensional general relativistic neutrino hydrodynamics code for core-collapse supernovae. I. Method and code tests in spherical symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, B; Dimmelmeier, H

    2010-01-01

    We present a new general relativistic (GR) code for hydrodynamic supernova simulations with neutrino transport in spherical and azimuthal symmetry (1D/2D). The code is a combination of the CoCoNuT hydro module, which is a Riemann-solver based, high-resolution shock-capturing method, and the three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport scheme VERTEX. VERTEX integrates the neutrino moment equations with a variable Eddington factor closure computed from a model Boltzmann equation and uses the ray-by-ray plus approximation in 2D, assuming the neutrino distribution to be axially symmetric around the radial direction, and thus the neutrino flux to be radial. Our spacetime treatment employs the ADM 3+1 formalism with the conformal flatness condition for the spatial three-metric. This approach is exact in 1D and has been shown to yield very accurate results also for rotational stellar collapse. We introduce new formulations of the energy equation to improve total energy conservation in relativistic and Newtonian...

  16. Chiral transport of neutrinos in supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamoto Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional neutrino transport theory for core-collapse supernovae misses one key property of neutrinos: the left-handedness. The chirality of neutrinos modifies the hydrodynamic behavior at the macroscopic scale and leads to topological transport phenomena. We argue that such transport phenomena should play important roles in the evolution of core-collapse supernovae, and, in particular, lead to a tendency toward the inverse energy cascade from small to larger scales, which may be relevant to the origin of the supernova explosion.

  17. Chiral transport of neutrinos in supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The conventional neutrino transport theory for core-collapse supernovae misses one key property of neutrinos: the left-handedness. The chirality of neutrinos modifies the hydrodynamic behavior at the macroscopic scale and leads to topological transport phenomena. We argue that such transport phenomena should play important roles in the evolution of core-collapse supernovae, and, in particular, lead to a tendency toward the inverse energy cascade from small to larger scales, which may be relevant to the origin of the supernova explosion.

  18. Neutrino scattering and flavor transformation in supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, John F; Friedland, Alexander; Fuller, George M; Vlasenko, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    We argue that the small fraction of neutrinos that undergo direction-changing scattering outside of the neutrinosphere could have significant influence on neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernova environments. We show that the standard treatment for collective neutrino flavor transformation is adequate at late times, but could be inadequate in the crucial shock revival/explosion epoch of core-collapse supernovae, where the potentials that govern neutrino flavor evolution are affected by the scattered neutrinos. Taking account of this effect, and the way it couples to entropy and composition, will require a new paradigm in supernova modeling.

  19. Constraining Explosion Type of Young Supernova Remnants Using 24 Micron Emission Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Charee L; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Stassun, Keivan G; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2013-01-01

    Determination of the explosion type of supernova remnants (SNRs) can be challenging, as SNRs are hundreds to thousands of years old and supernovae (SNe) are classified based on spectral properties days after explosion. Previous studies of thermal X-ray emission from Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) SNRs have shown that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) SNRs have statistically different symmetries, and thus these sources can be typed based on their X-ray morphologies. In this paper, we extend the same technique, a multipole expansion technique using power ratios, to infrared (IR) images of SNRs to test whether they can be typed using the symmetry of their warm dust emission as well. We analyzed archival Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) 24 micron observations of the previously used X-ray sample, and we find that the two classes of SNRs separate according to their IR morphologies. The Type Ia SNRs are statistically more circular and mirror symmetric than the CC SNRs, likely due ...

  20. X-Ray Studies of Supernova Remnants: A Different View of Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent data sets accumulated on young, ejecta dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I will review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first...

  1. How supernova explosions power galactic winds

    CERN Document Server

    Creasey, Peter; Bower, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Feedback from supernovae is an essential aspect of galaxy formation. In order to improve subgrid models of feedback we perform a series of numerical experiments to investigate how supernova explosions power galactic winds. We use the Flash hydrodynamic code to model a simplified ISM, including gravity, hydrodynamics, radiative cooling above 10,000 K, and star formation that reproduces the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. By simulating a small patch of the ISM in a tall box perpendicular to the disk, we obtain sub-parsec resolution allowing us to resolve individual supernova events and we investigate how the wind properties depend on those of the ISM and the galaxy. We find that outflows are more efficient in disks with lower surface densities or gas fractions. A simple model in which the warm cloudy medium is the barrier that limits the expansion of blast waves reproduces the scaling of outflow properties with disk parameters at high star formation rates. The scaling we find sets the investigation of galaxy winds ...

  2. Short-term effects of supernova explosions on radiocarbon production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povinec, P. (Komenskeho Univ., Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Prirodovedecka Fakulta)

    1980-01-01

    The short-term increase in cosmic ray intensity caused by a supernova gamma-ray burst as well as the long-term increase resulting from corpuscular particles accelerated during the supernova explosion may be investigated by cosmogenic radiocarbon. It is shown that o.alactic supernovae exploding at distances up to 1 kpc from the Earth could cause a measurable increase in radiocarbon concentration in the past. Radiocarbon measurements for the period of the Tycho de Brahe supernova showed negative results.

  3. Constraining supernova progenitors: an integral field spectroscopic survey of the explosion sites

    CERN Document Server

    Kuncarayakti, H; Anderson, J P; Arimoto, N; Doi, M; Galbany, L; Hamuy, M; Hashiba, Y; Kruehler, T; Maeda, K; Morokuma, T; Usuda, T

    2014-01-01

    We describe a survey of nearby core-collapse supernova (SN) explosion sites using integral field spectroscopy (IFS) technique, which is an extension of the work described in Kuncarayakti et al. (2013, AJ, 146, 30/31) . The project aims to constrain the SN progenitor properties based on the study of the SN immediate environment. The stellar populations present at the SN explosion sites are studied by means of integral field spectroscopy, which enables the acquisition of both spatial and spectral information of the object simultaneously. The spectrum of the SN parent stellar population gives the estimate of its age and metallicity. With this information, the initial mass and metallicity of the once coeval SN progenitor star are derived. While the survey is mostly done in optical, additionally the utilization of near-infrared integral field spectroscopy assisted with adaptive optics (AO) enables us to examine the explosion sites in high spatial details, down to a few parsecs. This work is being carried out using...

  4. THE ENGINES BEHIND SUPERNOVAE AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRYER, CHRISTOPHER LEE [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-23

    The authors review the different engines behind supernova (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), focusing on those engines driving explosions in massive stars: core-collapse SNe and long-duration GRBs. Convection and rotation play important roles in the engines of both these explosions. They outline the basic physics and discuss the wide variety of ways scientists have proposed that this physics can affect the supernova explosion mechanism, concluding with a review of the current status in these fields.

  5. Impact of Supernova Explosions on Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Scannapieco, C; White, S D M; Springel, V

    2006-01-01

    We study the effects of Supernova (SN) feedback on the formation of disc galaxies. For that purpose we run simulations using the extended version of the code GADGET-2 which includes a treatment of chemical and energy feedback by SN explosions. We found that our model succeeds in setting a self-regulated star formation process since an important fraction of the cold gas from the center of the haloes is efficiently heated up and transported outwards. The impact of SN feedback on galactic systems is also found to depend on virial mass: smaller systems are more strongly affected with star formation histories in which several starbursts can develop. Our implementation of SN feedback is also successful in producing violent outflows of chemical enriched material.

  6. Observation and interpretation of type IIb supernova explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Garoffolo, Antonia

    2016-03-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CC-SNe) explosions represent the final demise of massive stars. Among the various types, there is a group of relatively infrequent CC-SNe termed type IIb, which appear to be hybrids between normal type II SNe (those characterised by H emission) and type Ib (those that lack H features in their spectra but exhibit prominent HeI lines). The nature of the stellar progenitors leading to type IIb SNe is currently unknown, although two channels are contemplated: single massive stars that have lost part of their outer envelope as a consequence of stellar winds, and massive stars that shed mass by Roche-Lobe overflow to a companion. The latter is in fact the favoured scenario for most of the objects observed up to now. In the majority of cases, when there are no direct progenitor detections, some hints about type IIb SN progenitors (e.g., initial mass) can be derived indirectly from the objects' light curves (LCs) and spectra. Motivated by the relatively few well-sampled observational datasets that exist up to date for type IIb SNe and the unknowns on their progenitors, we carried out extensive observations (mainly in the optical domain) for the young type IIb SNe 2011fu and 2013df. Both these SNe are particularly interesting because they show a first LC peak caused by shock breakout, followed by a secondary 56Ni-decay-powered maximum. The analysis of the data for SNe 2011fu and 2013df points to precursors that seem to have been stars with large radii (of the order of 100 RSun), with low mass hydrogen envelopes (tenths of MSun), and relatively low initial masses (12-18 MSun), which could have formed part of interacting binary systems. The nature of a third SN IIb candidate, OGLE-2013-SN-100, proved to be enigmatic. OGLE-2013-SN-100, shows a first peak in the LC, and other characteristics somewhat similar to those of type IIb SNe. However, after a deeper analysis, we conclude OGLE-2013-SN-100 is likely not a SN of type IIb. We provide an alternative

  7. Typing Supernova Remnants Using X-ray Line Emission Morphologies

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Laura A; Badenes, Carles; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Jeltema, Tesla E; Pooley, David A

    2009-01-01

    We present a new observational method to type the explosions of young supernova remnants (SNRs). By measuring the morphology of the Chandra X-ray line emission in seventeen Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs with a multipole expansion analysis (using power ratios), we find that the core-collapse SNRs are statistically more asymmetric than the Type Ia SNRs. We show that the two classes of supernovae can be separated naturally using this technique because X-ray line morphologies reflect the distinct explosion mechanisms and structure of the circumstellar material. These findings are consistent with recent spectropolarimetry results showing that core-collapse SNe are intrinsically more asymmetric.

  8. The Three Dimensional Evolution to Core Collapse of a Massive Star

    CERN Document Server

    Couch, Sean M; Arnett, W David; Timmes, F X

    2015-01-01

    We present the first three dimensional (3D) simulation of the final minutes of iron core growth in a massive star, up to and including the point of core gravitational instability and collapse. We self-consistently capture the development of strong convection driven by violent Si burning in the shell surrounding the iron core. This convective burning builds the iron core to its critical (Chandrasekhar) mass and collapse ensues, driven by electron capture and photodisintegration. The non-spherical structure and motion (turbulent fluctuations) generated by 3D convection is substantial at the point of collapse. We examine the impact of such physically-realistic 3D initial conditions on the core-collapse supernova mechanism using 3D simulations including multispecies neutrino leakage. We conclude that non-spherical progenitor structure should not be ignored, and has a significant and favorable impact on the likelihood for neutrino-driven explosions.

  9. Modeling SNR Cassiopeia A from the Supernova Explosion to its Current Age: The role of post-explosion anisotropies of ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, S; Pumo, M L; Bocchino, F

    2016-01-01

    The remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) have complex morphologies that may reflect asymmetries and structures developed during the progenitor SN explosion. Here we investigate how the morphology of the SNR Cassiopeia A (Cas A) reflects the characteristics of the progenitor SN with the aim to derive the energies and masses of the post-explosion anisotropies responsible for the observed spatial distribution of Fe and Si/S. We model the evolution of Cas A from the immediate aftermath of the progenitor SN to the three-dimensional interaction of the remnant with the surrounding medium. The post-explosion structure of the ejecta is described by small-scale clumping of material and larger-scale anisotropies. The hydrodynamic multi-species simulations consider an appropriate post-explosion isotopic composition of the ejecta. The observed average expansion rate and shock velocities can be well reproduced by models with ejecta mass $M_{\\rm ej}\\approx 4M_{\\odot}$ and explosion energy $E_{\\rm SN}\\approx 2.3\\times ...

  10. Neutron Star Kicks by the Gravitational Tug-boat Mechanism in Asymmetric Supernova Explosions: Progenitor and Explosion Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Asymmetric mass ejection in the early phase of supernova (SN) explosions can impart a kick velocity to the new-born neutron star (NS). For neutrino-driven explosions the NS acceleration has been shown to be mainly caused by the gravitational attraction of the anisotropically expelled inner ejecta, while hydrodynamic forces contribute on a subdominant level, and asymmetric neutrino emission plays only a secondary role. Two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations have demonstrated that this gravitational tug-boat mechanism can explain the observed space velocities of young NSs up to more than 1000 km s‑1. Here, we discuss how the NS kick depends on the energy, ejecta mass, and asymmetry of the SN explosion, and what role the compactness of the pre-collapse stellar core plays for the momentum transfer to the NS. We also provide simple analytic expressions for the NS velocity in terms of these quantities. Referring to results of hydrodynamic simulations in the literature, we argue why, within the discussed scenario of NS acceleration, electron-capture SNe, low-mass Fe-core SNe, and ultra-stripped SNe can be expected to have considerably lower intrinsic NS kicks than core-collapse SNe of massive stellar cores. Our basic arguments also remain valid if progenitor stars possess large-scale asymmetries in their convective silicon and oxygen burning layers. Possible scenarios for spin-kick alignment are sketched. Much of our discussion stays on a conceptual and qualitative level, and more work is necessary on the numerical modeling side to determine the dependences of involved parameters, whose prescriptions will be needed for recipes that can be used to better describe NS kicks in binary evolution and population synthesis studies.

  11. Research Performance Progress Report: Diverging Supernova Explosion Experiments on NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plewa, Tomasz [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2016-10-25

    The aim of this project was to design a series of blast-wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments of this kind are relevant to mixing in core-collapse supernovae (ccSNe) and have the potential to address previously unanswered questions in high-energy density physics (HEDP) and astrophysics. The unmatched laser power of the NIF laser offers a unique chance to observe and study “new physics” like the mass extensions observed in HEDP RT experiments performed on the Omega laser [1], which might be linked to self-generated magnetic fields [2] and so far could not be reproduced by numerical simulations. Moreover, NIF is currently the only facility that offers the possibility to execute a diverging RT experiment, which would allow to observe processes such as inter-shell penetration via turbulent mixing and shock-proximity effects (distortion of the shock by RT spikes).

  12. Thermonuclear supernova explosions and their remnants: the case of Tycho

    CERN Document Server

    Badenes, C; Borkowski, K J; Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2003-01-01

    We propose to use the thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants (SNRs) originated in Type Ia supernovae (SNe) to extract relevant information concerning the explosion mechanism. We will focus on the differences between numerical 1D and 3D explosion calculations, and the impact that these differences could have on young SNRs. We use the remnant of the Tycho supernova (SN 1572) as a test case to compare with our predictions, discussing the observational features that allow to accept or discard a given model.

  13. Radioactive Iron Rain: Evidence of a Nearby Supernova Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    A very close supernova explosion could have caused a mass extinction of life in Earth. In 1996, Brian Fields, the late Dave Schramm and the speaker proposed looking for unstable isotopes such as Iron 60 that could have been deposited by a recent nearby supernova explosion. A group from the Technical University of Munich has discovered Iron 60 in deep-ocean sediments and ferromanganese crusts due to one or more supernovae that exploded O(100) parsecs away about 2.5 million years ago. These results have recently been confirmed by a group from the Australian National University, and the Munich group has also discovered supernova Iron 60 in lunar rock samples. This talk will discuss the interpretation of these results in terms of supernova models, and the possible implications for life on Earth.

  14. Spectropolarimetry of the Type Ib Supernova iPTF 13bvn: Revealing the complex explosion geometry of a stripped-envelope core-collapse supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Reilly, Emma; Baade, Dietrich; Wheeler, J Craig; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Patat, Ferdinando; Höflich, Peter; Spyromilio, Jason; Wang, Lifan; Zelaya, Paula

    2015-01-01

    We present six epochs of spectropolarimetric observations and one epoch of spectroscopy of the Type Ib SN iPTF 13bvn. The epochs of these observations correspond to $-$10 to $+$61 days with respect to the {\\it r}-band light curve maximum. The continuum is intrinsically polarised to the $0.2-0.4\\%$ level throughout the observations, implying asphericities of $\\sim10\\%$ in the shape of the photosphere. We observe significant line polarisation associated with the spectral features of Ca II IR3, He I/Na I D, He I {\\lambda}{\\lambda}6678, 7065, Fe II {\\lambda}4924 and O I {\\lambda}7774. We propose that an absorption feature at $\\sim 6200\\mathrm{\\AA}$, usually identified as Si II $\\lambda 6355$, is most likely to be high velocity $\\mathrm{H\\alpha}$ at $-16,400$ $\\mathrm{km \\; s^{-1}}$. Two distinctly polarised components, separated in velocity, are detected for both He I/Na I D and Ca II IR3, indicating the presence of two discrete line forming regions in the ejecta in both radial velocity space and in the plane of ...

  15. Multivariate Regression Analysis of Gravitational Waves from Rotating Core Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, William J; Ott, Christian D

    2014-01-01

    We present a new multivariate regression model for analysis and parameter estimation of gravitational waves observed from well but not perfectly modeled sources such as core-collapse supernovae. Our approach is based on a principal component decomposition of simulated waveform catalogs. Instead of reconstructing waveforms by direct linear combination of physically meaningless principal components, we solve via least squares for the relationship that encodes the connection between chosen physical parameters and the principal component basis. Although our approach is linear, the waveforms' parameter dependence may be non-linear. For the case of gravitational waves from rotating core collapse, we show, using statistical hypothesis testing, that our method is capable of identifying the most important physical parameters that govern waveform morphology in the presence of simulated detector noise. We also demonstrate our method's ability to predict waveforms from a principal component basis given a set of physical ...

  16. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: A different view of supernova explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent data sets accumulated on young, ejecta dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints o...

  17. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: a different view of supernova explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-04-20

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research.

  18. Explosive nucleosynthesis in the neutrino-driven aspherical supernova explosion of a non-rotating 15$M_{\\odot}$ star with solar metallicity

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Ono, Masaomi; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2011-01-01

    We investigate explosive nucleosynthesis in a non-rotating 15$M_\\odot$ star with solar metallicity that explodes by a neutrino-heating supernova (SN) mechanism aided by both standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and convection. To trigger explosions in our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we approximate the neutrino transport with a simple light-bulb scheme and systematically change the neutrino fluxes emitted from the protoneutron star. By a post-processing calculation, we evaluate abundances and masses of the SN ejecta for nuclei with the mass number $\\le 70$ employing a large nuclear reaction network. Aspherical abundance distributions, which are observed in nearby core-collapse SN remnants, are obtained for the non-rotating spherically-symmetric progenitor, due to the growth of low-mode SASI. Abundance pattern of the supernova ejecta is similar to that of the solar system for models whose masses ranges $(0.4-0.5) \\Ms$ of the ejecta from the inner region ($\\le 10,000\\km$) of the precollapse ...

  19. A Simple Approach to the Supernova Progenitor-Explosion Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, B; Liptai, D; Cameron, J B

    2016-01-01

    We present a new approach to understand the landscape of supernova explosion energies, ejected nickel masses, and neutron star birth masses. In contrast to other recent parametric approaches, our model predicts the properties of neutrino-driven explosions based on the pre-collapse stellar structure without the need for hydrodynamic simulations. The model is based on physically motivated scaling laws and simple differential equations describing the shock propagation, the contraction of the neutron star, the neutrino emission, the heating conditions, and the explosion energetics. Using model parameters compatible with multi-D simulations and a fine grid of thousands of supernova progenitors, we obtain a variegated landscape of neutron star and black hole formation similar to other parameterised approaches and find good agreement with semi-empirical measures for the "explodability" of massive stars. Our predicted explosion properties largely conform to observed correlations between the nickel mass and explosion ...

  20. Supernova neutrino oscillations: What do we understand?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dighe, Amol, E-mail: amol@theory.tifr.res.i [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2010-01-01

    We summarize our current understanding of the neutrino flavor conversions inside a core collapse supernova, clarifying the important role played by the 'collective effects' in determining flavor conversion probabilities. The potentially observable {nu}{sub e} and {nu}-bar {sub e} spectra may help us identify the neutrino mixing scenario, distinguish between primary flux models, and learn more about the supernova explosion.

  1. Supernova shock breakout from a red supergiant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawinski, Kevin; Justham, Stephen; Wolf, Christian; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Steenbrugge, Katrien C; Bell, Tony; Röser, Hermann-Josef; Walker, Emma S; Astier, Pierre; Balam, Dave; Balland, Christophe; Carlberg, Ray; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominique; Guy, Julien; Hardin, Delphine; Hook, Isobel; Howell, D Andrew; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris; Regnault, Nicolas; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2008-07-11

    Massive stars undergo a violent death when the supply of nuclear fuel in their cores is exhausted, resulting in a catastrophic "core-collapse" supernova. Such events are usually only detected at least a few days after the star has exploded. Observations of the supernova SNLS-04D2dc with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer space telescope reveal a radiative precursor from the supernova shock before the shock reached the surface of the star and show the initial expansion of the star at the beginning of the explosion. Theoretical models of the ultraviolet light curve confirm that the progenitor was a red supergiant, as expected for this type of supernova. These observations provide a way to probe the physics of core-collapse supernovae and the internal structures of their progenitor stars.

  2. Polarisation Spectral Synthesis For Type Ia Supernova Explosion Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Mattia

    2017-02-01

    Despite their relevance across a broad range of astrophysical research topics, Type Ia supernova explosions are still poorly understood and answers to the questions of when, why and how these events are triggered remain unclear. In this respect, polarisation offers a unique opportunity to discriminate between the variety of possible scenarios. The observational evidence that Type Ia supernovae are associated with rather low polarisation signals (smaller than a few per cent) places strong constraints for models and calls for modest asphericities in the progenitor system and/or explosion mechanism.The goal of this thesis is to assess the validity of contemporary Type Ia supernova explosion models by testing whether their predicted polarisation signatures can account for the small signals usually observed. To this end, we have implemented and tested an innovative Monte Carlo scheme in the radiative transfer code artis. Compared to previous Monte Carlo approaches, this technique produces synthetic observables (light curves, flux and polarisation spectra) with a substantial reduction in the Monte Carlo noise and therefore in the required computing time. This improvement is particularly crucial for our study as we aim to extract very weak polarisation signals, comparable to those detected in Type Ia supernovae. We have also demonstrated the applicability of this method to other classes of supernovae via a preliminary study of the first spectropolarimetry observations of superluminous supernovae.Using this scheme, we have calculated synthetic spectropolarimetry for three multi-dimensional explosion models recently proposed as promising candidates to explain Type Ia supernovae. Our findings highlight the power of spectropolarimetry in testing and discriminating between different scenarios. While all the three models predict light curves and flux spectra that are similar to each others and reproduce those observed in Type Ia supernovae comparably well, polarisation does

  3. Supernova Neutrino Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil-Botella, Ines, E-mail: ines.gil@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Basic Research Department, Avenida Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-25

    The neutrino burst from a core collapse supernova can provide information about the explosion mechanism and the mechanisms of proto neutron star cooling but also about the intrinsic properties of the neutrino such as flavor oscillations. One important question is to understand to which extend can the supernova and the neutrino physics be decoupled in the observation of a single supernova. The possibility to probe the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the type of mass hierarchy from the detection of supernova neutrinos with liquid argon detectors is discussed in this paper. Moreover, a quantitatively study about the possibility to constrain the supernova parameters is presented. A very massive liquid argon detector ({approx} 100 kton) is needed to perform accurate measurements of these parameters. Finally the possible detection of the diffuse supernova neutrino background in liquid argon detectors is also described.

  4. A simple approach to the supernova progenitor-explosion connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bernhard; Heger, Alexander; Liptai, David; Cameron, Joshua B.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new approach to understand the landscape of supernova explosion energies, ejected nickel masses, and neutron star birth masses. In contrast to other recent parametric approaches, our model predicts the properties of neutrino-driven explosions based on the pre-collapse stellar structure without the need for hydrodynamic simulations. The model is based on physically motivated scaling laws and simple differential equations describing the shock propagation, the contraction of the neutron star, the neutrino emission, the heating conditions, and the explosion energetics. Using model parameters compatible with multi-D simulations and a fine grid of thousands of supernova progenitors, we obtain a variegated landscape of neutron star and black hole formation similar to other parametrized approaches and find good agreement with semi-empirical measures for the `explodability' of massive stars. Our predicted explosion properties largely conform to observed correlations between the nickel mass and explosion energy. Accounting for the coexistence of outflows and downflows during the explosion phase, we naturally obtain a positive correlation between explosion energy and ejecta mass. These correlations are relatively robust against parameter variations, but our results suggest that there is considerable leeway in parametric models to widen or narrow the mass ranges for black hole and neutron star formation and to scale explosion energies up or down. Our model is currently limited to an all-or-nothing treatment of fallback and there remain some minor discrepancies between model predictions and observational constraints.

  5. Gravitational-Wave Bursts Induced by Neutrino Oscillations: The Origin of Asymmetry in Supernovae Explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Cuesta, Herman J. Mosquera

    1999-01-01

    If neutrino flavor changes really exist, to say: $\\mu$-neutrino oscillating into a sterile neutrino, then, it can be expected that due to neutrino oscillations and non-spherical distortion of the resonance surface induced by the magnetic field, some asymmetric emission of sterile neutrinos can occur during the protoneutron star formation at the onset of a supernova core-collapse. Assuming no strong suppression of the oscillations, the non-spherical huge neutrino energies released, ($\\sim 10^{...

  6. Supernova 2007bi as a pair-instability explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A; Mazzali, P; Ofek, E O; Nugent, P E; Kulkarni, S R; Kasliwal, M M; Quimby, R M; Filippenko, A V; Cenko, S B; Chornock, R; Waldman, R; Kasen, D; Sullivan, M; Beshore, E C; Drake, A J; Thomas, R C; Bloom, J S; Poznanski, D; Miller, A A; Foley, R J; Silverman, J M; Arcavi, I; Ellis, R S; Deng, J

    2009-12-03

    Stars with initial masses such that 10M[symbol: see text] supernova. By contrast, extremely massive stars with M(initial) >or= 140M[symbol: see text] (if such exist) develop oxygen cores with masses, M(core), that exceed 50M[symbol: see text], where high temperatures are reached at relatively low densities. Conversion of energetic, pressure-supporting photons into electron-positron pairs occurs before oxygen ignition and leads to a violent contraction which triggers a nuclear explosion that unbinds the star in a pair-instability supernova. Transitional objects with 100M[symbol: see text] supernovae following violent mass ejections, perhaps as a result of brief episodes of pair instability, and may already have been identified. Here we report observations of supernova SN 2007bi, a luminous, slowly evolving object located within a dwarf galaxy. We estimate the exploding core mass to be M(core) approximately 100M[symbol: see text], in which case theory unambiguously predicts a pair-instability supernova. We show that >3M[symbol: see text] of radioactive (56)Ni was synthesized during the explosion and that our observations are well fitted by models of pair-instability supernovae. This indicates that nearby dwarf galaxies probably host extremely massive stars, above the apparent Galactic stellar mass limit, which perhaps result from processes similar to those that created the first stars in the Universe.

  7. Nonspherical supernova remnants. IV - Sequential explosions in OB associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Rozyczka, M.

    1987-01-01

    Multisupernova remnants, driven by sequential supernova explosions in OB associations, are modelled by means of two-dimensional hydrodynamical calculations. It is shown that due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability the remnants quickly evolve into highly irregular structures. A critical evaluation of the multisupernova model as an explanation for supershells is given.

  8. The Role of Nucleon Strangeness in Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, T J; Miller, Gerald A

    2016-01-01

    Recent hydrodynamical simulations of supernova (SN) evolution have highlighted the importance of a thorough control over microscopic physics responsible for such internal processes as neutrino heating. In particular, it has been suggested that modifications to the neutrino-nucleon elastic cross section can potentially play a crucial role in producing successful supernova explosions. One possible source of such corrections can be found in a nonzero value for the nucleon's strange helicity content $\\Delta s$. In the present analysis, however, we show that theoretical and experimental progress over the past decade has suggested a comparatively small magnitude for $\\Delta s$, such that its sole effect is not sufficient to provide the physics leading to supernova explosions.

  9. Finding the First Cosmic Explosions. III. Pair-Pulsational Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Daniel J; Even, Wesley; Woosley, S E; Heger, Alexander; Stiavelli, Massimo; Fryer, Chris L

    2013-01-01

    Population III supernovae have been the focus of growing attention because of their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that can be seen at the edge of the observable universe. But until now pair-pulsation supernovae, in which explosive thermonuclear burning in massive stars fails to unbind them but can eject their outer layers into space, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the earliest redshifts. These shells can later collide and, like Type IIn supernovae, produce superluminous events in the UV at high redshifts that could be detected in the near infrared today. We present numerical simulations of a 110 M$_{\\odot}$ pair-pulsation explosion done with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code RAGE. We find that collisions between consecutive pair pulsations are visible in the near infrared out to z $\\sim$ 15 - 20 and can probe the earliest stellar populations at cosmic dawn.

  10. Blue straggler formation at core collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2016-01-01

    Among the most striking feature of blue straggler stars (BSS) is the presence of multiple sequences of BSSs in the colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of several globular clusters. It is often envisaged that such a multiple BSS sequence would arise due a recent core collapse of the host cluster, triggering a number of stellar collisions and binary mass transfers simultaneously over a brief episode of time. Here we examine this scenario using direct N-body computations of moderately massive star clusters (of order 10^4 Msun ). As a preliminary attempt, these models are initiated with approx. 8-10 Gyr old stellar population and King profiles of high concentrations, being "tuned" to undergo core collapse quickly. BSSs are indeed found to form in a "burst" at the onset of the core collapse and several of such BS-bursts occur during the post-core-collapse phase. In those models that include a few percent primordial binaries, both collisional and binary BSSs form after the onset of the (near) core-collapse. However, t...

  11. The Nature of Gamma Ray Burst Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Cano, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are among the brightest and most energetic physical processes in the universe. It is known that core-collapse SNe arise from the gravitational collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars (the progen- itors of nearby core-collapse SNe have been imaged and unambiguously identified). It is also believed that the progenitors of long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs) are massive stars, mainly due to the occurrence and detection of very energetic core-collap...

  12. Supernova Shock Breakout from a Red Supergiant

    CERN Document Server

    Schawinski, Kevin; Wolf, Christian; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Steenbrugge, Katrien C; Bell, Tony; Roeser, Hermann-Josef; Walker, Emma; Astier, Pierre; Balam, Dave; Balland, Christophe; Basa, Stephane; Carlberg, Ray; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominque; Guy, Julien; Hardin, Delphine; Hook, Isobel; Howell, Andy; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris; Regnault, Nicolas; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2008-01-01

    Massive stars undergo a violent death when the supply of nuclear fuel in their cores is exhausted, resulting in a catastrophic `core-collapse' supernova. Such events are usually detected long after the star has exploded. Here we report the first detection of the radiative precursor from a supernova shock before it has reached the surface of a star followed by the initial expansion of the star at the beginning of the explosion. Theoretical models of the ultraviolet light curve show that the progenitor was a red supergiant, as expected for this type of supernova. These observations provide a promising and novel way to probe the physics of core-collapse supernovae and the internal structures of their progenitors.

  13. Modification of magicity towards the dripline and its impact on electron-capture rates for stellar core-collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, Ad R; Oertel, M

    2015-01-01

    The importance of microphysical inputs from laboratory nuclear experiments and theoretical nuclear structure calculations in the understanding of the core collapse dynamics, and the subsequent supernova explosion, is largely recognized in the recent literature. In this work, we analyze the impact of the masses of very neutron rich nuclei on the matter composition during collapse, and the corresponding electron capture rate. To this aim, we introduce an empirical modification of the popular Duflo-Zuker mass model to account for possible shell quenching far from stability, and study the effect of the quenching on the average electron capture rate. We show that the preeminence of the $N=50$ and $N=82$ closed shells in the collapse dynamics is considerably decreased if the shell gaps are reduced in the region of $^{78}$Ni and beyond. As a consequence, local modifications of the overall electron capture rate up to 30\\% can be expected, with integrated values strongly dependent on the stiffness of magicity quenchin...

  14. Supernova Remnant Evolution: from explosion to dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Leahy, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Here is considered the full evolution of a spherical supernova remnant. We start by calculating the early time ejecta dominated stage and continue through the different phases of interaction with the circumstellar medium, and end with the dissipation and merger phase. The physical connection between the phases reveals new results. One is that the blast wave radius during the adiabatic phase is significantly smaller than it would be, if one does notaccount for the blast wave interaction with the ejecta.

  15. THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL EVOLUTION TO CORE COLLAPSE OF A MASSIVE STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couch, Sean M. [TAPIR, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil [Flash Center for Computational Science, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Arnett, W. David [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Timmes, F. X., E-mail: smc@tapir.caltech.edu [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    We present the first three-dimensional (3D) simulation of the final minutes of iron core growth in a massive star, up to and including the point of core gravitational instability and collapse. We capture the development of strong convection driven by violent Si burning in the shell surrounding the iron core. This convective burning builds the iron core to its critical mass and collapse ensues, driven by electron capture and photodisintegration. The non-spherical structure and motion generated by 3D convection is substantial at the point of collapse, with convective speeds of several hundreds of km s{sup −1}. We examine the impact of such physically realistic 3D initial conditions on the core-collapse supernova mechanism using 3D simulations including multispecies neutrino leakage and find that the enhanced post-shock turbulence resulting from 3D progenitor structure aids successful explosions. We conclude that non-spherical progenitor structure should not be ignored, and should have a significant and favorable impact on the likelihood for neutrino-driven explosions. In order to make simulating the 3D collapse of an iron core feasible, we were forced to make approximations to the nuclear network making this effort only a first step toward accurate, self-consistent 3D stellar evolution models of the end states of massive stars.

  16. Type Ia supernova explosion mechanism and implications for cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, K.

    Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) are believed to be thermonuclear explosions of a white dwarf, and are one of the most mature cosmological standardized candles. However, the explosion mechanism has not yet been fully clarified. Furthermore, they show observational diversities which may be a consequence of either the diversity in the explosion physics and/or surrounding environments, an issue yet to be clarified. In this paper, it is argued that an asymmetry in the explosion is likely a generic feature, and that the diversity arising from various viewing angles can be an origin of observational diversities of SNe Ia seen in their spectral features (suspected possible biases in cosmology) and colors (related to the extinction estimate in cosmology). These findings indicate that at least a part of observational diversities are intrinsic, rather than caused by environment effects, and open up a possibility of using SNe Ia as more precise distance indicators than currently employed.

  17. Light-curve Analysis of Ordinary Type IIP Supernovae Based on Neutrino-driven Explosion Simulations in Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utrobin, V. P.; Wongwathanarat, A.; Janka, H.-Th.; Müller, E.

    2017-09-01

    Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe IIP) are the most numerous subclass of core-collapse SNe originating from massive stars. In the framework of the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, we study the properties of the SN outburst for a red supergiant progenitor model and compare the corresponding light curves with observations of the ordinary Type IIP SN 1999em. Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of (parametrically triggered) neutrino-driven explosions are performed with the (explicit, finite-volume, Eulerian, multifluid hydrodynamics) code Prometheus, using a presupernova model of a 15 M ⊙ star as initial data. On approaching homologous expansion, the hydrodynamic and composition variables of the 3D models are mapped to a spherically symmetric configuration, and the simulations are continued with the (implicit, Lagrangian, radiation hydrodynamics) code Crab to follow the evolution of the blast wave during the SN outburst. Our 3D neutrino-driven explosion model with an explosion energy of about 0.5× {10}51 erg produces 56Ni in rough agreement with the amount deduced from fitting the radioactively powered light-curve tail of SN 1999em. The considered presupernova model, 3D explosion simulations, and light-curve calculations can explain the basic observational features of SN 1999em, except for those connected to the presupernova structure of the outer stellar layers. Our 3D simulations show that the distribution of 56Ni-rich matter in velocity space is asymmetric with a strong dipole component that is consistent with the observations of SN 1999em. The monotonic decline in luminosity from the plateau to the radioactive tail in ordinary SNe IIP is a manifestation of the intense turbulent mixing at the He/H composition interface.

  18. Could a nearby supernova explosion have caused a mass extinction?

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    1995-01-01

    We examine the possibility that a nearby supernova explosion could have caused one or more of the mass extinctions identified by palaeontologists. We discuss the likely rate of such events in the light of the recent identification of Geminga as a supernova remnant less than 100 pc away and the discovery of a millisecond pulsar about 150 pc away, and observations of SN 1987A. The fluxes of $\\gamma$ radiation and charged cosmic rays on the Earth are estimated, and their effects on the Earth's ozone layer discussed. A supernova explosion of the order of 10 pc away could be expected every few hundred million years, and could destroy the ozone layer for hundreds of years, letting in potentially lethal solar ultraviolet radiation. In addition to effects on land ecology, this could entail mass destruction of plankton and reef communities, with disastrous consequences for marine life as well. A supernova extinction should be distinguishable from a meteorite impact such as the one that presumably killed the dinosaurs.

  19. 3-D Explosions: A Meditation on Rotation (and Magnetic Fields)

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, J C

    2004-01-01

    This is the text of an introduction to a workshop on asymmetric explosions held in Austin in June, 2003. The great progress in supernova research over thirty-odd years is briefly reviewed. The context in which the meeting was called is then summarized. The theoretical success of the intrinsically multidimensional delayed detonation paradigm in explaining the nature of Type Ia supernovae coupled with new techniques of observations in the near IR and with spectropolarimetry promise great advances in understanding binary progenitors, the explosion physics, and the ever more accurate application to cosmology. Spectropolarimetry has also revealed the strongly asymmetric nature of core collapse and given valuable perspectives on the supernova - gamma-ray burst connection. The capability of the magneto-rotational instability to rapidly create strong toroidal magnetic fields in the core collapse ambiance is outlined. This physics may be the precursor to driving MHD jets that play a role in asymmetric supernovae. Welc...

  20. CFC+: Improved dynamics and gravitational waveforms from relativistic core collapse simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Cerdá-Durán, P; Dimmelmeier, H; Font, J A; Ibáñez, J M; Müller, E; Schäfer, G

    2004-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae are a promising source of detectable gravitational waves. Most of the existing (multidimensional) numerical simulations of core collapse in general relativity have been done using approximations of the Einstein field equations. As recently shown by Dimmelmeier et al (2002a,b), one of the most interesting such approximation is the so-called conformal flatness condition (CFC) of Isenberg, Wilson and Mathews. Building on this previous work we present here new results from numerical simulations of relativistic rotational core collapse in axisymmetry, aiming at improving the dynamics and the gravitational waveforms. The computer code used for these simulations evolves the coupled system of metric and fluid equations using the 3+1 formalism, specialized to a new framework for the gravitational field equations which we call CFC+. In this approach we add new degrees of freedom to the original CFC equations, which extend them by terms of second post-Newtonian order. The corrections for CFC+ ar...

  1. Inside the supernova a powerful convective engine

    CERN Document Server

    Herant, M; Hix, W R; Fryer, C F; Colgate, S A; Marc Herant; Willy Benz; Chris F Fryer; Stirling Colgate

    1994-01-01

    We present an extensive study of the inception of supernova explosions by following the evolution of the cores of two massive stars (15 Msun and 25 Msun) in two dimensions. Our calculations begin at the onset of core collapse and stop several 100 ms after the bounce, at which time successful explosions of the appropriate magnitude have been obtained. (...) Guided by our numerical results, we have developed a paradigm for the supernova explosion mechanism. We view a supernova as an open cycle thermodynamic engine in which a reservoir of low-entropy matter (the envelope) is thermally coupled and physically connected to a hot bath (the protoneutron star) by a neutrino flux, and by hydrodynamic instabilities. (...) In essence, a Carnot cycle is established in which convection allows out-of-equilibrium heat transfer mediated by neutrinos to drive low entropy matter to higher entropy and therefore extracts mechanical energy from the heat generated by gravitational collapse. We argue that supernova explosions are ne...

  2. SUPERNOVA 1987A: CELEBRATING A SILVER JUBILEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Panagia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The story of the SN 1987A explosion is briefly reviewed. Although this supernova was somewhat peculiar, the study of SN 1987A has clarified quite a number of important aspects of the nature and the properties of supernovae, such as the confirmation of the core collapse of a massive star as the cause of the explosion, as well the confirmation that the decays 56Ni–56Co–56Fe at early times and 44Ti–44Sc at late times, are the main sources of the energy radiated by the ejecta. Still we have not been able to ascertain whether the progenitor was a single star or a binary system, nor have we been able to detect the stellar remnant, a neutron star that should be produced in the core collapse process.

  3. Effects of Dimensionality on Pair-Instability Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Gilmer, Matthew S; Hirschi, Raphael; Fröhlich, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Since the emergence of the new class of extremely bright transients, super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe), three main mechanisms to power their light curves (LCs) have been discussed. They are the spin-down of a magnetar, interaction with circumstellar material, and the decay of large amounts of radioactive nickel in pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). Given the high degree of diversity seen within the class, it is possible that all three mechanisms are at work. PISN models can be self- consistently simulated from the main sequence phase of very massive stars (VMS) through to their explosion. These models robustly predict large amounts of radioactive nickel and thus very luminous SN events. However, PISN model LCs evolve more slowly than even the slowest evolving SLSNe. Multidimensional effects on the ejecta structure, specifically the mixing of radioactive nickel out to large radii, could alleviate this discrepancy with observation. Here we explore the multidimensional effects on the LC evolution by simulating...

  4. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of the low-luminosity, broad-lined Ic supernova iPTF15dld

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pian, E.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.

    2017-01-01

    Core-collapse stripped-envelope supernova (SN) explosions reflect the diversity of physical parameters and evolutionary paths of their massive star progenitors. We have observed the Type Ic SN iPTF15dld (z = 0.047), reported by the Palomar Transient Factory. Spectra were taken starting 20 rest...

  5. Using the X-ray Morphologies of Young Supernova Remnants to Constrain Explosion Type, Ejecta Distribution, and Chemical Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Laura A; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Badenes, Carles; Pooley, David

    2010-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are a complex class of sources, and their heterogeneous nature has hindered the characterization of their general observational properties. To overcome this challenge, we use statistical tools to analyze the Chandra X-ray images of Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs. We apply two techniques, a power-ratio method (a multipole expansion) and wavelet-transform analysis, to measure the global and local morphological properties of the X-ray line and thermal emission in twenty-four SNRs. We find that Type Ia SNRs have statistically more spherical and mirror symmetric thermal X-ray emission than core-collapse (CC) SNRs. The ability to type SNRs based on thermal emission morphology alone enables, for the first time, the typing of SNRs with weak X-ray lines or with low-resolution spectra. We identify one source, SNR G344.7-0.1, as originating from a CC explosion that was previously unknown, and we confirm the tentative Type Ia classifications of G337.2-0.7 and G272.2-3.2. Although the g...

  6. Spectropolarimetry of SN 2011dh in M51: geometric insights on a Type IIb supernova progenitor and explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Mauerhan, Jon C; Leonard, Douglas C; Smith, Paul S; Filippenko, Alexei V; Smith, Nathan; Hoffman, Jennifer L; Huk, Leah; Clubb, Kelsey I; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Cenko, S Bradley; Milne, Peter; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi

    2015-01-01

    We present seven epochs of spectropolarimetry of the Type IIb supernova (SN) 2011dh in M51, spanning 86 days of its evolution. The first epoch was obtained 9 days after the explosion, when the photosphere was still in the depleted hydrogen layer of the stripped-envelope progenitor. Continuum polarization is securely detected at the level of P~0.5% through day 14 and appears to diminish by day 30, which is different from the prevailing trends suggested by studies of other core-collapse SNe. Time-variable modulations in P and position angle are detected across P-Cygni line features. H-alpha and HeI polarization peak after 30 days and exhibit position angles roughly aligned with the earlier continuum, while OI and CaII appear to be geometrically distinct. We discuss several possibilities to explain the evolution of the continuum and line polarization, including the potential effects of a tidally deformed progenitor star, aspherical radioactive heating by fast-rising plumes of Ni-56 from the core, oblique shock b...

  7. Investigations of supernovae and supernova remnants in the era of SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lingzhi; Zhu, Hui; Tian, Wenwu; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Two main physical mechanisms are used to explain supernova explosions: thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf(Type Ia) and core collapse of a massive star (Type II and Type Ib/Ic). Type Ia supernovae serve as distance indicators that led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe. The exact nature of their progenitor systems however remain unclear. Radio emission from the interaction between the explosion shock front and its surrounding CSM or ISM provides an important probe into the progenitor star's last evolutionary stage. No radio emission has yet been detected from Type Ia supernovae by current telescopes. The SKA will hopefully detect radio emission from Type Ia supernovae due to its much better sensitivity and resolution. There is a 'supernovae rate problem' for the core collapse supernovae because the optically dim ones are missed due to being intrinsically faint and/or due to dust obscuration. A number of dust-enshrouded optically hidden supernovae should be discovered via SKA1-...

  8. 44Ti gamma-ray emission lines from SN1987A reveal an asymmetric explosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boggs, S. E.; Harrison, F. A.; Miyasaka, H.

    2015-01-01

    In core-collapse supernovae, titanium-44 (44Ti) is produced in the innermost ejecta, in the layer of material directly on top of the newly formed compact object. As such, it provides a direct probe of the supernova engine. Observations of supernova 1987A (SN1987A) have resolved the 67.87- and 78........32–kilo–electron volt emission lines from decay of 44Ti produced in the supernova explosion. These lines are narrow and redshifted with a Doppler velocity of ~700 kilometers per second, direct evidence of large-scale asymmetry in the explosion....

  9. Ti-44 Gamma-Ray Emission Lines from SN1987A Reveal an Asymmetric Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, S. E.; Harrison, F. A.; Miyasaka, H.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Zoglauer, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Reynolds, S. P.; Alexander, D. M.; An, H.; Barret, D.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Forster, K.; Giommi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Hornstrup, A.; Kitaguchi, T.; Koglin, J. E.; Madsen, K. K.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    In core-collapse supernovae, titanium-44 (Ti-44) is produced in the innermost ejecta, in the layer of material directly on top of the newly formed compact object. As such, it provides a direct probe of the supernova engine. Observations of supernova 1987A (SN1987A) have resolved the 67.87- and 78.32-kilo-electron volt emission lines from decay of Ti-44 produced in the supernova explosion. These lines are narrow and redshifted with a Doppler velocity of 700 kilometers per second, direct evidence of large-scale asymmetry in the explosion.

  10. Polarization spectral synthesis for Type Ia supernova explosion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, M.; Sim, S. A.; Kromer, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a Monte Carlo radiative transfer technique for calculating synthetic spectropolarimetry for multidimensional supernova explosion models. The approach utilizes `virtual-packets' that are generated during the propagation of the Monte Carlo quanta and used to compute synthetic observables for specific observer orientations. Compared to extracting synthetic observables by direct binning of emergent Monte Carlo quanta, this virtual-packet approach leads to a substantial reduction in the Monte Carlo noise. This is not only vital for calculating synthetic spectropolarimetry (since the degree of polarization is typically very small) but also useful for calculations of light curves and spectra. We first validate our approach via application of an idealized test code to simple geometries. We then describe its implementation in the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code ARTIS and present test calculations for simple models for Type Ia supernovae. Specifically, we use the well-known one-dimensional W7 model to verify that our scheme can accurately recover zero polarization from a spherical model, and to demonstrate the reduction in Monte Carlo noise compared to a simple packet-binning approach. To investigate the impact of aspherical ejecta on the polarization spectra, we then use ARTIS to calculate synthetic observables for prolate and oblate ellipsoidal models with Type Ia supernova compositions.

  11. Supernova explosions and the birth of neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Janka, H -Th; Müller, B; Scheck, L

    2007-01-01

    We report here on recent progress in understanding the birth conditions of neutron stars and the way how supernovae explode. More sophisticated numerical models have led to the discovery of new phenomena in the supernova core, for example a generic hydrodynamic instability of the stagnant supernova shock against low-mode nonradial deformation and the excitation of gravity-wave activity in the surface and core of the nascent neutron star. Both can have supportive or decisive influence on the inauguration of the explosion, the former by improving the conditions for energy deposition by neutrino heating in the postshock gas, the latter by supplying the developing blast with a flux of acoustic power that adds to the energy transfer by neutrinos. While recent two-dimensional models suggest that the neutrino-driven mechanism may be viable for stars from about 8 solar masses to at least 15 solar masses, acoustic energy input has been advocated as an alternative if neutrino heating fails. Magnetohydrodynamic effects ...

  12. An extremely luminous X-ray outburst at the birth of a supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, A M; Berger, E; Page, K L; Schady, P; Parrent, J; Pooley, D; Wang, X-Y; Ofek, E O; Cucchiara, A; Rau, A; Waxman, E; Simon, J D; Bock, D C-J; Milne, P A; Page, M J; Barentine, J C; Barthelmy, S D; Beardmore, A P; Bietenholz, M F; Brown, P; Burrows, A; Burrows, D N; Bryngelson, G; Byrngelson, G; Cenko, S B; Chandra, P; Cummings, J R; Fox, D B; Gal-Yam, A; Gehrels, N; Immler, S; Kasliwal, M; Kong, A K H; Krimm, H A; Kulkarni, S R; Maccarone, T J; Mészáros, P; Nakar, E; O'Brien, P T; Overzier, R A; de Pasquale, M; Racusin, J; Rea, N; York, D G

    2008-05-22

    Massive stars end their short lives in spectacular explosions--supernovae--that synthesize new elements and drive galaxy evolution. Historically, supernovae were discovered mainly through their 'delayed' optical light (some days after the burst of neutrinos that marks the actual event), preventing observations in the first moments following the explosion. As a result, the progenitors of some supernovae and the events leading up to their violent demise remain intensely debated. Here we report the serendipitous discovery of a supernova at the time of the explosion, marked by an extremely luminous X-ray outburst. We attribute the outburst to the 'break-out' of the supernova shock wave from the progenitor star, and show that the inferred rate of such events agrees with that of all core-collapse supernovae. We predict that future wide-field X-ray surveys will catch each year hundreds of supernovae in the act of exploding.

  13. Astronomers Make "Movie" of Radio Images Showing Supernova Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-01

    - dispersed radio telescopes has existed for only a few years. Supernova 1993J was the first one that was both close enough and had radio emission strong enough to enable scientists to make such detailed images. While the circular images show that the explosion debris is expanding symmetrically, the radio emission is stronger on one side of the shell. The explanation for this is unclear. Some astronomers have suggested that the stronger emission could result from the debris interacting with a companion star orbiting the one that exploded. The researchers believe that their sequence of images, with the stronger emission persisting for months after the explosion, makes the companion-star hypothesis unlikely. Previous radio observations of older and larger supernova shells have revealed protrusions within the shell. The latest images, however, show no such protrusions. This places limits on theories of how the protrusions form. In addition, the new images show that Supernova 1993J's debris shell has shown no signs yet of slowing due to interaction with material surrounding it. The material from the star's explosion is moving at nearly 10,000 miles per second, according to the researchers. At that speed, the material would travel the distance from the Earth to Saturn in one day. When the angular expansion rate of the supernova debris measured by the radio observatories is combined with the expansion speed of the same debris, measured by optical astronomers, it is possible to obtain an accurate value of the distance to M81. The value determined, 11 million light-years, is similar to that obtained by other, independent, means. This is important, as astronomers continue to seek more accurate distances to celestial objects to better gauge the actual size of the Universe. In addition to the VLA and several antennas of the VLBA, the scientists used German and Italian radio telescopes, as well as NASA facilities in California and Spain.

  14. A solar-type star polluted by calcium-rich supernova ejecta inside the supernova remnant RCW 86

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Langer, Norbert; Fossati, Luca; Bock, Douglas C.-J.; Castro, Norberto; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Greiner, Jochen; Johnston, Simon; Rau, Arne; Tauris, Thomas M.

    2017-06-01

    When a massive star in a binary system explodes as a supernova, its companion star may be polluted with heavy elements from the supernova ejecta. Such pollution has been detected in a handful of post-supernova binaries 1 , but none of them is associated with a supernova remnant. We report the discovery of a binary G star strongly polluted with calcium and other elements at the position of the candidate neutron star [GV2003] N within the young galactic supernova remnant RCW 86. Our discovery suggests that the progenitor of the supernova that produced RCW 86 could have been a moving star, which exploded near the edge of its wind bubble and lost most of its initial mass because of common-envelope evolution shortly before core collapse, and that the supernova explosion might belong to the class of calcium-rich supernovae — faint and fast transients 2,3 , the origin of which is strongly debated 4-6 .

  15. Supernova neutrino detection in LAr TPCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil-Botella, Ines, E-mail: ines.gil@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Basic Research Department, Avenida Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-10

    The neutrino burst from a core collapse supernova can provide information about the explosion mechanism and the mechanisms of proto neutron star cooling but also about the intrinsic properties of the neutrino such as flavor oscillations. One important question is to understand to which extent can the supernova and the neutrino physics be decoupled in the observation of a single supernova. The possibility to probe the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the type of mass hierarchy from the detection of supernova neutrinos with liquid argon detectors is summarized in this paper. Moreover, a quantitative study about the possibility to constrain the supernova parameters is presented. A very massive liquid argon detector ({approx} 100 kton) is needed to perform accurate measurements of these parameters. In addition, these detectors could also provide information on the {nu}{sub e} component of the diffuse supernova neutrino background.

  16. Pre-explosion companion stars in Type Iax supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zheng-Wei; Abate, Carlo; Wang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Type Iax supernovae (SNe Iax) are proposed as one new sub-class of SNe Ia since they present sufficiently distinct observational properties from the bulk of SNe Ia. SNe Iax are the most common of all types of peculiar SNe by both number and rate, with an estimated rate of occurrence of about 5-30% of the total SN Ia rate. However, the progenitor systems of SNe Iax are still uncertain. Analyzing pre-explosion images at SN Iax positions provides a direct way to place strong constraints on the nature of progenitor systems of SNe Iax. In this work, we predict pre-explosion properties of binary companion stars in a variety of potential progenitor systems by performing detailed binary evolution calculations with the one-dimensional stellar evolution code STARS. This will be helpful for constraining progenitor systems of SNe Iax from their pre-explosion observations. With our binary evolution calculations, it is found that the non-degenerate helium (He) companion star to both a massive C/O WD (> 1.1 solar mass) and ...

  17. Rapidly Decaying Supernova 2010X: A Candidate ".Ia" Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Kasliwal, Mansi M; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Quimby, Robert M; Ofek, Eran O; Nugent, Peter; Poznanski, Dovi; Jacobsen, Janet; Sternberg, Assaf; Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D Andrew; Sullivan, Mark; Rich, Douglas J; Burke, Paul F; MD, Joseph Brimacombe MB ChB FRCA; Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert; Bildsten, Lars; Shen, Ken; Cenko, S Bradley; Bloom, Joshua S; Hsiao, Eric; Law, Nicholas M; Gehrels, Neil; Immler, Stefan; Dekany, Richard; Rahmer, Gustavo; Hale, David; Smith, Roger; Zolkower, Jeff; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Henning, John; Bui, Kahnh; McKenna, Dan

    2010-01-01

    We present the discovery, photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of SN 2010X (PTF 10bhp). This supernova decays exponentially with tau_d=5 days, and rivals the current recordholder in speed, SN 2002bj. SN 2010X peaks at M_r=-17mag and has mean velocities of 10,000 km/s. Our light curve modeling suggests a radioactivity powered event and an ejecta mass of 0.16 Msun. If powered by Nickel, we show that the Nickel mass must be very small (0.02 Msun) and that the supernova quickly becomes optically thin to gamma-rays. Our spectral modeling suggests that SN 2010X and SN 2002bj have similar chemical compositions and that one of Aluminum or Helium is present. If Aluminum is present, we speculate that this may be an accretion induced collapse of an O-Ne-Mg white dwarf. If Helium is present, all observables of SN 2010X are consistent with being a thermonuclear Helium shell detonation on a white dwarf, a ".Ia" explosion. With the 1-day dynamic-cadence experiment on the Palomar Transient Factory, we expect ...

  18. Rapidly Decaying Supernova 2010X: A Candidate ".Ia" Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Quimby, Robert M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Nugent, Peter; Poznanski, Dovi; Jacobsen, Janet; Sternberg, Assaf; Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D. Andrew; Sullivan, Mark; Rich, Douglas J.; Burke, Paul F.; Brimacombe, Joseph; Milisavljevic, Dan; Fesen, Robert; Bildsten, Lars; Shen, Ken; Cenko, S. Bradley; Bloom, Joshua S.; Hsiao, Eric; Law, Nicholas M.; Gehrels, Neil; Immler, Stefan; Dekany, Richard; Rahmer, Gustavo; Hale, David; Smith, Roger; Zolkower, Jeff; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Henning, John; Bui, Kahnh; McKenna, Dan

    2010-11-01

    We present the discovery, photometric, and spectroscopic follow-up observations of SN 2010X (PTF 10bhp). This supernova decays exponentially with τ d = 5 days and rivals the current recordholder in speed, SN 2002bj. SN 2010X peaks at M r = -17 mag and has mean velocities of 10,000 km s-1. Our light curve modeling suggests a radioactivity-powered event and an ejecta mass of 0.16 M sun. If powered by Nickel, we show that the Nickel mass must be very small (≈0.02 M sun) and that the supernova quickly becomes optically thin to γ-rays. Our spectral modeling suggests that SN 2010X and SN 2002bj have similar chemical compositions and that one of aluminum or helium is present. If aluminum is present, we speculate that this may be an accretion-induced collapse of an O-Ne-Mg white dwarf. If helium is present, all observables of SN 2010X are consistent with being a thermonuclear helium shell detonation on a white dwarf, a ".Ia" explosion. With the 1 day dynamic-cadence experiment on the Palomar Transient Factory, we expect to annually discover a few such events.

  19. Collective Oscillations and Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Kamales; Chakraborty, Sovan; Choubey, Sandhya

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernova explosions give rise to the emission of a huge flux of neutrinos of all flavors. In this article we describe the phenomenon neutrino-neutrino interaction of these weakly interacting particles at the very high density central region of the stellar core giving rise to non-linear collective oscillations in both the neutrino and antineutrino sectors. The effect of the collective oscillations on the Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background is elaborated with emphasis on its future detection and the connection of that to neutrino mass hierarchy.

  20. Cosmic Explosions Rapporteur Summary of the 10th Maryland Astrophysics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, J C

    1999-01-01

    This meeting covered the range of cosmic explosions from solar flares to gamma-ray bursts. A common theme is the role of rotation and magnetic fields. A rigorous examination is underway to characterize systematic effects that might alter the Type Ia supernova results suggesting an accelerating Universe. The discovery of the central point of X-ray emission in Cas A by CXO should give new insight into the core collapse problem in general and the nature of the still undetected compact remnant in SN 1987A in particular. Jets were described from protostars to microquasars to blazars to gamma-ray bursts. Polarization studies of core-collapse supernovae lead to the conclusion that core collapse is not merely asymmetric, but strongly bi-polar. To account for normal core-collapse supernovae, the explosion must be jet-like in routine circumstances, that is, in the formation of neutron stars, not only for black holes. Given the observed asymmetries, estimates of explosion energies based on spherically-symmetric models m...

  1. Pre-explosive observational properties of Type Ia supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornambé, A.; Piersanti, L.

    2013-05-01

    several million years) to attain the explosion after the above mentioned conditions cease to keep stable the WD. Therefore, it is practically impossible to detect the trace of the exploding WD companion in recent pre-explosion frames of even very near Type Ia supernova events.

  2. Core-Collapse Astrophysics with a Five-Megaton Neutrino Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kistler, Matthew D; Ando, Shin'ichiro; Beacom, John F; Suzuki, Yoichiro

    2008-01-01

    The legacy of solar neutrinos suggests that large neutrino detectors should be sited underground. However, to instead go underwater bypasses the need to move mountains, allowing much larger contained water Cherenkov detectors. Reaching a scale of ~5 Megatons, the size of the proposed Deep-TITAND, would permit observations of "mini-bursts" of neutrinos from supernovae in the nearby universe on a yearly basis. Importantly, these mini-bursts would be detected over backgrounds without the need for optical evidence of the supernova, guaranteeing the beginning of time-domain MeV neutrino astronomy. The ability to identify, to the second, every core collapse would allow a continuous "death watch" of all stars within ~5 Mpc, making previously-impossible tasks practical. These include the abilities to promptly detect otherwise-invisible prompt black hole formation, provide advance warning for supernova shock-breakout searches, define tight time windows for gravitational-wave searches, and identify "supernova impostors...

  3. Theoretical models for supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1981-09-21

    The results of recent numerical simulations of supernova explosions are presented and a variety of topics discussed. Particular emphasis is given to (i) the nucleosynthesis expected from intermediate mass (10sub solar less than or equal to M less than or equal to 100 Msub solar) Type II supernovae and detonating white dwarf models for Type I supernovae, (ii) a realistic estimate of the ..gamma..-line fluxes expected from this nucleosynthesis, (iii) the continued evolution, in one and two dimensions, of intermediate mass stars wherein iron core collapse does not lead to a strong, mass-ejecting shock wave, and (iv) the evolution and explosion of vary massive stars (M greater than or equal to 100 Msub solar of both Population I and III. In one dimension, nuclear burning following a failed core bounce does not appear likely to lead to a supernova explosion although, in two dimensions, a combination of rotation and nuclear burning may do so. Near solar proportions of elements from neon to calcium and very brilliant optical displays may be created by hypernovae, the explosions of stars in the mass range 100 M/sub solar/ to 300 M/sub solar/. Above approx. 300 M/sub solar/ a black hole is created by stellar collapse following carbon ignition. Still more massive stars may be copious producers of /sup 4/He and /sup 14/N prior to their collapse on the pair instability.

  4. Explosions of O-Ne-Mg Cores, the Crab Supernova, and Subluminous Type II-P Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kitaura, F S; Hillebrandt, W

    2005-01-01

    We present results of simulations of stellar collapse and explosions in spherical symmetry for progenitor stars in the 8-10 solar mass range with an O-Ne-Mg core. The simulations were continued until nearly one second after core bounce and were performed with the Prometheus/Vertex code with a variable Eddington factor solver for the neutrino transport, including a state-of-the-art treatment of neutrino-matter interactions. Particular effort was made to implement nuclear burning and electron capture rates with sufficient accuracy to ensure a smooth continuation, without transients, from the progenitor evolution to core collapse. Using two different nuclear equations of state (EoSs), a soft version of the Lattimer & Swesty EoS and the significantly stiffer Wolff & Hillebrandt EoS, we found no prompt explosions, but instead delayed explosions, powered by neutrino heating and the neutrino-driven baryonic wind which sets in about 200 ms after bounce. The models eject little nickel ( 0.46, which suggests a ...

  5. An Emerging Coherent Picture of Red Supergiant Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Poznanski, Dovi

    2013-01-01

    A large fraction of supernovae (SNe) arise from the core collapse of red supergiant stars. By comparing the ejecta velocities of a large sample of such SNe with initial stellar masses derived from pre-explosion images of the progenitor star, I find that there is a significant and approximately linear relation between initial mass and ejecta velocity, which in turn implies that the energy released during core collapse and captured by the ejecta depends strongly on this mass as E is proportional to M^3. This correlation naturally explains why most such SNe have almost identical "plateau-phase" durations in their light curves, and places an important constraint on the elusive physics of core collapse.

  6. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  7. Effect of Rotation in Cloud Core Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuribe, T.

    The collapse of rotating clouds is investigated.At first, isothermal collapse of an initially uniform-density, uniform-rotating, molecular cloud core with pressure and self-gravity is investigated to determine the conditions under which a cloud is unstable to fragmentation. A semianalytic model for the collapse of rotating spheroids is developed with the method of characteristics for inwardly propagating rarefaction waves. Three-dimensional self-gravitating hydrodynamical calculations are performed for the initially uniform-density rigid-rotating sphere. Both investigations show that the criterion for fragmentation is modified from the one in the literature if the property of the non-homologous collapse is taken into account. It is shown that the central flatness, that is, the axial ratio of the isodensity contour in the central region, is a good indicator for the fate of the cloud. We derive the criterion for the fragmentation considering the evolution of the flatness of the central core. If the central flatness becomes greater than the critical value ˜ 4π, a collapsing cloud with moderate perturbations is unstable for fragmentation, while if the central flatness stays smaller than the critical value, it does not fragment at least before adiabatic core formation. Warm clouds (α0 ≳ 0.5) are not expected to fragment before adiabatic core formation almost independent of the initial rotation (β0) and the properties of the initial perturbation. The effect of the initial density central concentration is also investigated. If it exists, distortion or flattening of a cloud core is suppressed even if α0 ≲ 0.5 in small rotation cases due to stronger nonhomologous property of the collapse. We conclude that the binary fragmentation is difficult during isothermal stage if a core collapse had started from near spherical configurations with moderate thermal energy or small rotation. We suggest that the close binary fragmentation may be possible in the nonisothermal

  8. Neutrino-driven convection versus advection in core collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Foglizzo, T; Janka, H T

    2005-01-01

    A toy model is analyzed in order to evaluate the linear stability of the gain region immediately behind a stalled accretion shock, after core bounce. This model demonstrates that a negative entropy gradient is not sufficient to warrant linear instability. The stability criterion is governed by the ratio "chi" of the advection time through the gain region divided by the local timescale of buoyancy. The gain region is linearly stable if chi>3. For chi>3, perturbations are unstable in a limited range of horizontal wavelengths centered around twice the vertical size H of the gain region. The threshold horizontal wavenumbers k_{min} and k_{max} follow simple scaling laws such that Hk_{min}\\propto 1/chi and Hk_{max}\\propto chi. These scaling laws are understood as the consequence of a vortical-acoustic cycle within the gain region, fed by the Rayleigh-Taylor growth of vorticity perturbations during advection. The stability of short wavelength perturbations is compared to the "ablative stabilization" of accelerated ...

  9. TYPE Iax SUPERNOVAE: A NEW CLASS OF STELLAR EXPLOSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, P. J.; Chornock, R.; Marion, G. H.; Kirshner, R. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ganeshalingam, M.; Li, W.; Silverman, J. M.; Filippenko, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Morrell, N. I.; Phillips, M. M. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, La Serena (Chile); Pignata, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Stritzinger, M. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Wang, X. [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Anderson, J. P.; Hamuy, M. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Freedman, W. L.; Persson, S. E. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Jha, S. W.; McCully, C., E-mail: rfoley@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); and others

    2013-04-10

    We describe observed properties of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe Iax), consisting of SNe observationally similar to its prototypical member, SN 2002cx. The class currently has 25 members, and we present optical photometry and/or optical spectroscopy for most of them. SNe Iax are spectroscopically similar to SNe Ia, but have lower maximum-light velocities (2000 {approx}< |v| {approx}< 8000 km s{sup -1}), typically lower peak magnitudes (-14.2 {>=} M{sub V,{sub peak}} {approx}> -18.9 mag), and most have hot photospheres. Relative to SNe Ia, SNe Iax have low luminosities for their light-curve shape. There is a correlation between luminosity and light-curve shape, similar to that of SNe Ia, but offset from that of SNe Ia and with larger scatter. Despite a host-galaxy morphology distribution that is highly skewed to late-type galaxies without any SNe Iax discovered in elliptical galaxies, there are several indications that the progenitor stars are white dwarfs (WDs): evidence of C/O burning in their maximum-light spectra, low (typically {approx}0.5 M{sub Sun }) ejecta masses, strong Fe lines in their late-time spectra, a lack of X-ray detections, and deep limits on massive stars and star formation at the SN sites. However, two SNe Iax show strong He lines in their spectra. The progenitor system and explosion model that best fits all of the data is a binary system of a C/O WD that accretes matter from a He star and has a deflagration. At least some of the time, this explosion will not disrupt the WD. The small number of SNe in this class prohibit a detailed analysis of the homogeneity and heterogeneity of the entire class. We estimate that in a given volume there are 31{sup +17}{sub -13} SNe Iax for every 100 SNe Ia, and for every 1 M{sub Sun} of iron generated by SNe Ia at z = 0, SNe Iax generate {approx}0.036 M{sub Sun }. Being the largest class of peculiar SNe, thousands of SNe Iax will be discovered by LSST. Future detailed observations of SNe Iax should

  10. Explosion of red-supergiant stars: Influence of the atmospheric structure on shock breakout and early-time supernova radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc; John Hillier, D.; Audit, Edouard

    2017-09-01

    Early-time observations of Type II supernovae (SNe) 2013cu and 2013fs have revealed an interaction of ejecta with material near the star surface. Unlike Type IIn SN 2010jl, which interacts with a dense wind for 1 yr, the interaction ebbs after 2-3 d, suggesting a dense and compact circumstellar envelope. Here, we use multi-group radiation hydrodynamics and non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium radiative transfer to explore the properties of red-supergiant (RSG) star explosions embedded in a variety of dense envelopes. We consider the cases of an extended static atmosphere or a steady-state wind, adopting a range of mass loss rates. The shock breakout signal, luminosity and color evolution up to 10 d, and ejecta dynamics are strongly influenced by the properties of this nearby environment. This compromises the use of early-time observations to constrain R⋆. For dense circumstellar envelopes, the time-integrated luminosity over the first 10-15 d can be boosted by a factor of a few. The presence of narrow lines for 2-3 d in 2013fs and 2013cu require a cocoon of material of 0.01 M⊙ out to 5-10 R⋆. Spectral lines evolve from electron scattering to Doppler broadened with a growing blueshift of their emission peaks. Recent studies propose a super-wind phase with a mass loss rate from 0.001 up to 1 M⊙ yr-1 in the last months or years of the life of a RSG, although there is no observational constraint that this external material is a steady-state outflow. Alternatively, observations may be explained by the explosion of a RSG star inside its complex atmosphere. Indeed, spatially resolved observations reveal that RSG stars have extended atmospheres, with the presence of downflows and upflows out to several R⋆, even in a standard RSG such as Betelgeuse. Mass loading in the region intermediate between star and wind can accommodate the 0.01 M⊙ needed to explain the observations of 2013fs. Signatures of interaction in early-time spectra of RSG star explosions may

  11. Critical Resolution and Physical Dependenices of Supernovae: Stars in Heat and Under Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanyan, David; Burrows, Adam Seth

    2017-01-01

    For over five decades, the mechanism of explosion in core-collapse supernova continues to remain one of the last untoppled bastions in astrophysics, presenting both a technical and physical problem.Motivated by advances in computation and nuclear physics and the resilience of the core-collapse problem, collaborators Adam Burrows (Princeton), Joshua Dolence (LANL), and Aaron Skinner (LNL) have developed FORNAX - a highly parallelizable multidimensional supernova simulation code featuring an explicit hydrodynamic and radiation-transfer solver.We present the results (Vartanyan et. al 2016, Burrows et. al 2016, both in preparation) of a sequence of two-dimensional axisymmetric simulations of core-collapse supernovae using FORNAX, probing both progenitor mass dependence and the effect of physical inputs in explosiveness in our study on the revival of the stalled shock via the neutrino heating mechanism. We also performed a resolution study, testing spatial and energy group resolutions as well as compilation flags. We illustrate that, when the protoneutron star bounded by a stalled shock is close to the critical explosion condition (Burrows & Goshy 1993), small changes of order 10% in neutrino energies and luminosities can result in explosion, and that these effects couple nonlinearly.We show that many-body medium effects due to neutrino-nucleon scattering as well as inelastic neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering are strongly favorable to earlier and more vigorous explosions by depositing energy in the gain region. Additionally, we probe the effects of a ray-by-ray+ transport solver (which does not include transverse velocity terms) employed by many groups and confirm that it artificially accelerates explosion (see also Skinner et. al 2016).In the coming year, we are gearing up for the first set of 3D simulations yet performed in the context of core-collapse supernovae employing 20 energy groups, and one of the most complete nuclear physics modules in the

  12. The Frequency of Supernovae in the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinder, Jens

    Supernovae are cosmic explosions of cataclysmic proportion that signify the death of a star. While being interesting phenomena in their own right, their brightness also make them excellent probes of the early universe. Depending on the type of the progenitor star and the origin of the explosion different subjects can be investigated. In this dissertation the work I have done on the detection, characterisation and rate measurements of supernovae in the Stockholm VIMOS Supernova Search is presented. We have discovered 16 supernovae that exploded billions of years ago (or, equivalently, at high redshift, z). The observed brightness and colour evolution have been used to classify the supernovae into either thermonuclear (type Ia) or core collapse (type II) supernovae. The accuracy of the classification code is high, only about 5% of the supernovae are mistyped, similar to other codes of the same kind. By comparing the observed frequency of supernovae to simulations the underlying supernova rate at these high redshifts have been measured. The main result reported in this thesis is that the core collapse supernova rate at high redshift matches the rates estimated from looking at the star formation history of the universe, and agree well with previous studies. The rate of Ia supernovae at high redshift have been investigated by several projects, our results show a somewhat higher rate of Ia supernovae than expected. Proper estimates of the systematic errors of rate measurements are found to be very important. Furthermore, by using novel techniques for reducing and stacking images, we have obtained a galaxy sample containing approximately 50,000 galaxies. Photometric redshifts have been obtained for most of the galaxies, the resulting accuracy below z=1 is on the order of 10%. The galaxy sample has also been used to find high redshift sources, so called Lyman Break Galaxies, at z=3-5.

  13. Do electron-capture supernovae make neutron stars? First multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the oxygen deflagration

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Samuel; Pakmor, Ruediger; Seitenzahl, Ivo R; Ohlmann, Sebastian T; Edelmann, Philipp V F

    2016-01-01

    In the classical picture, electron-capture supernovae and the accretion-induced collapse of oxygen-neon white dwarfs undergo an oxygen deflagration phase before gravitational collapse produces a neutron star. Such core collapse events are postulated to explain several astronomical phenomena. In this work, the oxygen deflagration phase is simulated for the first time using multidimensional hydrodynamics. By simulating the oxygen deflagration with multidimensional hydrodynamics and a level-set based flame approach, new insights can be gained into the explosive deaths of 8--10 solar-mass stars and oxygen-neon white dwarfs accreting material from a binary companion star. The main aim is to determine whether these events are thermonuclear or core-collapse supernova explosions, and hence whether neutron stars are formed by such phenomena. The oxygen deflagration is simulated in oxygen-neon cores with three different central ignition densities. The intermediate density case is perhaps the most realistic based on rec...

  14. Integral field spectroscopy of supernova explosion sites: constraining mass and metallicity of the progenitors - I. Type Ib and Ic supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Aldering, Greg; Arimoto, Nobuo; Maeda, Keiichi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Pereira, Rui; Usuda, Tomonori; Hashiba, Yasuhito

    2013-01-01

    Integral field spectroscopy of 11 type-Ib/c supernova explosion sites in nearby galaxies has been obtained using UH88/SNIFS and Gemini-N/GMOS. The use of integral field spectroscopy enables us to obtain both spatial and spectral information of the explosion site, allowing the identification of the parent stellar population of the supernova progenitor star. The spectrum of the parent population provides metallicity determination via strong-line method and age estimation obtained via comparison with simple stellar population (SSP) models. We adopt this information as the metallicity and age of the supernova progenitor, under the assumption that it was coeval with the parent stellar population. The age of the star corresponds to its lifetime, which in turn gives the estimate of its initial mass. With this method we were able to determine both the metallicity and initial (ZAMS) mass of the progenitor stars of the type Ib and Ic supernovae. We found that on average SN Ic explosion sites are more metal-rich and you...

  15. The Early Evolution of Primordial Pair-Instability Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Joggerst, C C

    2010-01-01

    The observational signatures of the first cosmic explosions and their chemical imprint on second-generation stars both crucially depend on how heavy elements mix within the star at the earliest stages of the blast. We present numerical simulations of the early evolution of Population III pair-instability supernovae with the new adaptive mesh refinement code CASTRO. In stark contrast to 15 - 40 Msun core-collapse primordial supernovae, we find no mixing in most 150 - 250 Msun pair-instability supernovae out to times well after breakout from the surface of the star. This may be the key to determining the mass of the progenitor of a primeval supernova, because vigorous mixing will cause emission lines from heavy metals such as Fe and Ni to appear much sooner in the light curves of core-collapse supernovae than in those of pair-instability explosions. Our results also imply that unlike low-mass Pop III supernovae, whose collective metal yields can be directly compared to the chemical abundances of extremely metal...

  16. Expected impact from weak reactions with light nuclei in corecollapse supernova simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the role of light nuclear clusters in simulations of core-collapse supernovae. Expressions for the reaction rates are developed for a large selection of charged current absorption and scattering processes with light clusters. Medium modifications are taken into account at the mean-field level. We explore the possible impact on the supernova dynamics and the neutrino signal during the mass accretion phase prior to the possible explosion onset as well as during the subsequent protoneutron star deleptnoization after the explosion onset has been launched.

  17. The differing locations of massive stellar explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Fruchter, A S; Burud, I; Castro-Tirado, A J; Cerón, J M C; Conselice, C J; Dahlen, T; Ferguson, H C; Fynbo, J P U; Garnavich, P M; Gibbons, R A; Gorosabel, J; Gull, T R; Hjorth, J; Holland, S T; Kouveliotou, C; Levan, A J; Levay, Z; Livio, M; Metzger, M R; Nugent, P; Petro, L; Pian, E; Rhoads, J E; Riess, A G; Sahu, K C; Smette, A; Strolger, L; Tanvir, N R; Thorsett, S E; Vreeswijk, P M; Wijers, R A M J; Woosley, S E

    2006-01-01

    When massive stars exhaust their fuel they collapse and often produce the extraordinarily bright explosions known as core-collapse supernovae. On occasion, this stellar collapse also powers an even more brilliant relativistic explosion known as a long-duration gamma-ray burst. One would then expect that gamma-ray bursts and supernovae should be found in similar environments. Here we show that this expectation is wrong. Using Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the host galaxies of long-duration gamma-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae, we find that the gamma-ray bursts are far more concentrated on the very brightest regions of their hosts than are the supernovae. Furthermore, the host galaxies of the gamma-ray bursts are significantly fainter and more irregular than the hosts of the supernovae. Together these results suggest that long-duration gamma-ray bursts are associated with the very most massive stars and may be restricted to galaxies of limited chemical evolution. Our results directly imply that lon...

  18. Uniform Contribution of Supernova Explosions to the Chemical Enrichment of Abell 3112 out to R200

    CERN Document Server

    Ezer, Cemile; Ercan, E Nihal; Smith, Randall K; Bautz, Mark W; Loewenstein, Mike; McDonald, Mike; Miller, Eric D

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the metals residing in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters records all the information on a cluster's nucleosynthesis and chemical enrichment history. We present measurements from deep Suzaku and Chandra observations of the cool-core galaxy cluster Abell 3112 out its virial radius (~1470 kpc). We find that the ratio of the observed supernova type Ia explosions to the total supernova explosions have a uniform distribution at a level of 12-16% out to the cluster's virial radius. The non-varying supernova enrichment suggests that the ICM was enriched by metals at an early stage before the cluster itself was formed. We also find that the 2D delayed detonations models CDDT produce significantly worse fits to the X-ray spectra compared to simple 1D W7 models. This may indicate that CDDT explosions are not a dominant process of enriching the ICM.

  19. Lightcurves of thermonuclear supernovae as a probe of the explosion mechanism and their use in cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Blinnikov, S I

    2002-01-01

    Thermonuclear supernovae are valuable for cosmology but their physics is not yet fully understood. Modeling the development and propagation of nuclear flame is complicated by numerous instabilities. The predictions of supernova light curves still involve some simplifying assumptions, but one can use the comparison of the computed fluxes with observations to constrain the explosion mechanism. In spite of great progress in recent years, a number of issues remains unsolved both in flame physics and light curve modeling.

  20. The most powerful explosions in the Universe: genesis and evolution of Supernova and Gamma-Ray Burst Italian programs at ESO

    CERN Document Server

    Pian, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The Italian communities engaged in Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) and supernova research have been using actively the ESO telescopes and have contributed to improve and refine the observing techniques and even to guide the characteristics and performances of the instruments that were developed. Members of these two communities have recently found ground for a close collaboration on the powerful supernovae that underlie some GRBs. I will review the programs that have led to some important discoveries and milestones on thermonuclear and core-collapse supernovae and on GRBs.

  1. Possibility of Systematic Study of Supernova Explosions by Nuclear Imaging Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Takada, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    An all-sky monitor with nuclear imaging spectroscopy is a promising tool for the systematic study of supernova explosions. In particular, progenitor scenarios of type-Ia supernovae, which are not yet well understood, can be resolved using light curves in the nuclear gamma-ray band. Here we report an expected result of an all-sky monitor with imaging spectroscopy using electron-tracking Compton camera, which will enable us to observe nuclear gamma-ray lines from type-Ia supernovae.

  2. The Nature of Gamma Ray Burst Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are among the brightest and most energetic physical processes in the universe. It is known that core-collapse SNe arise from the gravitational collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars (the progen- itors of nearby core-collapse SNe have been imaged and unambiguously identified). It is also believed that the progenitors of long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs) are massive stars, mainly due to the occurrence and detection of very energetic core-collapse su- pernovae that happen both temporally and spatially coincident with most L-GRBs. However many outstanding questions regarding the nature of these events exist: How massive are the progenitors? What evolutionary stage are they at when they explode? Do they exist as single stars or in binary systems (or both, and to what fractions)? The work presented in this thesis attempts to further our understanding at the types of progenitors that give rise to long-duration GRB supernovae (GRB-SNe). This work is based on optical ...

  3. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts Powered by Hot Neutrino-Cooled Coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Socrates, Aristotle

    2005-01-01

    Cosmological explosions such as core-collapse supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to be powered by the rapid conversion of roughly a solar mass' worth of gravitational binding energy into a comparatively small amount of outgoing observable kinetic energy. A fractional absorption of the emitted neutrinos, the particles which carry away the binding energy, by the expelled matter is a widely discussed mechanism for powering such explosions. Previous work addressing neutrino emission from core-collapse like environments assumes that the outgoing neutrino spectrum closely resembles a black body whose effective temperature is determined by both the rate of energy release and the surface area of the entire body. Unfortunately, this assumption minimizes the net efficiency for both neutrino-driven explosion mechanisms. Motivated by this fact, we qualitatively outline a scenario where a hot corona deforms the neutrino spectrum away from that of a cool thermal emitter. Our primary result is that in ...

  4. Collapsars Gamma-Ray Bursts and Explosions in "Failed Supernovae"

    CERN Document Server

    MacFadyen, A I

    1999-01-01

    Using a two-dimensional hydrodynamics code (PROMETHEUS), we study the continued evolution of rotating massive helium stars whose iron core collapse does not produce a successful outgoing shock, but instead forms a black hole. We study the formation of a disk, the associated flow patterns, and the accretion rate for disk viscosity parameter, alpha ~ 0.001 and 0.1. For the standard 14 solar mass model the average accretion rate for 15 s is 0.07 solar masses per second and the total energy deposited along the rotational axes by neutrino annihilation is (1 - 14) x 10**51 erg, depending upon the evolution of the Kerr parameter and uncertain neutrino efficiencies. Simulated deposition of this energy in the polar regions results in strong relativistic outflow - jets beamed to about 1.5% of the sky. The jets remain highly focused, and are capable of penetrating the star in 5 - 10 s. After the jet breaks through the surface of the star, highly relativistic flow can commence. Because of the sensitivity of the mass ejec...

  5. In Context: Host Environments of Thermonuclear and Core-Collapse SN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    My thesis has used the uniform photometry and spectroscopy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to analyze the environments of nearby (z candles. Analysis of explosion environments is also a useful tool to understand how the properties of massive stars affect their pre-SN mass loss and influence the characteristics of the explosion. I present strong trends in the optical colors, surface brightnesses, and gas-phase metallicities of the galaxy environments of the most populous spectroscopic types of core-collapse explosions. I find that the progenitors of broad-lined SN Ic, the SN linked to coincident gamma-ray bursts, and SN IIb, whose progenitors retain only a thin hydrogen envelope, explode in exceptionally blue, low-metallicity environments.

  6. Mass-loss histories of Type IIn supernova progenitors within decades before their explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Moriya, Takashi J; Taddia, Francesco; Sollerman, Jesper; Blinnikov, Sergei I; Sorokina, Elena I

    2014-01-01

    We present results of a systematic study of the mass-loss properties of Type IIn supernova progenitors within decades before their explosion. We apply an analytic light curve model to 11 Type IIn supernova bolometric light curves to derive the circumstellar medium properties. We reconstruct the mass-loss histories based on the estimated circumstellar medium properties. The estimated mass-loss rates are mostly higher than 1e-3 Msun/yr and they are consistent with those obtained by other methods. The mass-loss rates are often found to be constantly high within decades before their explosion. This indicates that there exists some mechanism to sustain the high mass-loss rates of Type IIn supernova progenitors for at least decades before their explosion. Thus, the shorter eruptive mass loss events observed in some Type IIn supernova progenitors are not always responsible for creating their dense circumstellar media. In addition, we find that Type IIn supernova progenitors may tend to increase their mass-loss rates...

  7. The Shape of Superluminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What causes the tremendous explosions of superluminous supernovae? New observations reveal the geometry of one such explosion, SN 2015bn, providing clues as to its source.A New Class of ExplosionsImage of a type Ia supernova in the galaxy NGC 4526. [NASA/ESA]Supernovae are powerful explosions that can briefly outshine the galaxies that host them. There are several different classifications of supernovae, each with a different physical source such as thermonuclear instability in a white dwarf, caused by accretion of too much mass, or the exhaustion of fuel in the core of a massive star, leading to the cores collapse and expulsion of its outer layers.In recent years, however, weve detected another type of supernovae, referred to as superluminous supernovae. These particularly energetic explosions last longer months instead of weeks and are brighter at their peaks than normal supernovae by factors of tens to hundreds.The physical cause of these unusual explosions is still a topic of debate. Recently, however, a team of scientists led by Cosimo Inserra (Queens University Belfast) has obtained new observations of a superluminous supernova that might help address this question.The flux and the polarization level (black lines) along the dominant axis of SN 2015bn, 24 days before peak flux (left) and 28 days after peak flux (right). Blue lines show the authors best-fitting model. [Inserra et al. 2016]Probing GeometryInserra and collaborators obtained two sets of observations of SN 2015bn one roughly a month before and one a month after the superluminous supernovas peak brightness using a spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope in Chile. These observations mark the first spectropolarimetric data for a superluminous supernova.Spectropolarimetry is the practice of obtaining information about the polarization of radiation from an objects spectrum. Polarization carries information about broken spatial symmetries in the object: only if the object is perfectly symmetric can it

  8. Fast evolving pair-instability supernova models: evolution, explosion, light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Hirschi, Raphael; Frohlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan T; Noebauer, Ulrich M; van Rossum, Daniel R; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley P; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2016-01-01

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 and 250 solar masses) at relatively high metallicity (Z=0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce r...

  9. Fast evolving pair-instability supernova models: evolution, explosion, light curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Fröhlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley P.; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2017-01-01

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered, the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISNe), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study, we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light-curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z = 0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light-curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  10. Fast evolving pair-instability supernova models: Evolution, explosion, light curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Fröhlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley P.; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2016-10-01

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 M⊙ and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z = 0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  11. The explosion sites of nearby supernovae seen with integral field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo

    Integral field spectroscopy of nearby supernova sites within ~30 Mpc have been obtained using multiple IFU spectrographs in Hawaii and Chile. This technique enables both spatial and spectral information of the explosion sites to be acquired simultaneously, thus providing the identification of the parent stellar population of the supernova progenitor and the estimates for its physical parameters including age and metallicity via the spectrum. While this work has mainly been done in the optical wavelengths using instruments such as VIMOS, GMOS, and MUSE, a near-infrared approach has also been carried out using the AO-assisted SINFONI. By studying the supernova parent stellar population, we aim to characterize the mass and metallicity of the progenitors of different types of supernovae.

  12. Three-dimensional Boltzmann-Hydro code for core-collapse in massive stars I. special relativistic treatments

    CERN Document Server

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel numerical method for solving multi-dimensional, special relativistic Boltzmann equations for neutrinos coupled to hydrodynamics equations. It is meant to be applied to simulations of core-collapse supernovae. We handle special relativity in a non-conventional way, taking account of all orders of v/c. Consistent treatment of advection and collision terms in the Boltzmann equations is the source of difficulties, which we overcome by employing two different energy grids: Lagrangian remapped and laboratory fixed grids. We conduct a series of basic tests and perform a one-dimensional simulation of core-collapse, bounce and shock-stall for a 15M_{sun} progenitor model with a minimum but essential set of microphysics. We demonstrate in the latter simulation that our new code is capable of handling all phases in core-collapse supernova. For comparison, a non-relativistic simulation is also conducted with the same code, and we show that they produce qualitatively wrong results in neutrino transfer. ...

  13. A faint type of supernova from a white dwarf with a helium-rich companion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, H B; Gal-Yam, A; Mazzali, P A; Arnett, D; Kagan, D; Filippenko, A V; Li, W; Arcavi, I; Cenko, S B; Fox, D B; Leonard, D C; Moon, D-S; Sand, D J; Soderberg, A M; Anderson, J P; James, P A; Foley, R J; Ganeshalingam, M; Ofek, E O; Bildsten, L; Nelemans, G; Shen, K J; Weinberg, N N; Metzger, B D; Piro, A L; Quataert, E; Kiewe, M; Poznanski, D

    2010-05-20

    Supernovae are thought to arise from two different physical processes. The cores of massive, short-lived stars undergo gravitational core collapse and typically eject a few solar masses during their explosion. These are thought to appear as type Ib/c and type II supernovae, and are associated with young stellar populations. In contrast, the thermonuclear detonation of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, whose mass approaches the Chandrasekhar limit, is thought to produce type Ia supernovae. Such supernovae are observed in both young and old stellar environments. Here we report a faint type Ib supernova, SN 2005E, in the halo of the nearby isolated galaxy, NGC 1032. The 'old' environment near the supernova location, and the very low derived ejected mass ( approximately 0.3 solar masses), argue strongly against a core-collapse origin. Spectroscopic observations and analysis reveal high ejecta velocities, dominated by helium-burning products, probably excluding this as a subluminous or a regular type Ia supernova. We conclude that it arises from a low-mass, old progenitor, likely to have been a helium-accreting white dwarf in a binary. The ejecta contain more calcium than observed in other types of supernovae and probably large amounts of radioactive (44)Ti.

  14. Pair Instability Supernovae of Very Massive Population III Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan; Almgren, Ann; Whalen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Numerical studies of primordial star formation suggest that the first stars in the universe may have been very massive. Stellar models indicate that non-rotating Population III stars with initial masses of 140-260 Msun die as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We present new two-dimensional simulations of primordial pair-instability supernovae done with the CASTRO code. Our simulations begin at earlier times than previous multidimensional models, at the onset of core collapse, to capture any dynamical instabilities that may be seeded by collapse and explosive burning. Such instabilities could enhance explosive yields by mixing hot ash with fuel, thereby accelerating nuclear burning, and affect the spectra of the supernova by dredging up heavy elements from greater depths in the star at early times. Our grid of models includes both blue supergiants and red supergiants over the range in progenitor mass expected for these events. We find that fluid instabilities driven by oxygen and helium burning ari...

  15. 3-D explosions: a meditation on rotation (and magnetic fields)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J. C.

    This is the text of an introduction to a workshop on asymmetric explosions held in Austin in June, 2003. The great progress in supernova research over thirty-odd years is briefly reviewed. The context in which the meeting was called is then summarized. The theoretical success of the intrinsically multidimensional delayed detonation paradigm in explaining the nature of Type Ia supernovae coupled with new techniques of observations in the near IR and with spectropolarimetry promise great advances in understanding binary progenitors, the explosion physics, and the ever more accurate application to cosmology. Spectropolarimetry has also revealed the strongly asymmetric nature of core collapse and given valuable perspectives on the supernova - gamma-ray burst connection. The capability of the magneto-rotational instability to rapidly create strong toroidal magnetic fields in the core collapse ambiance is outlined. This physics may be the precursor to driving MHD jets that play a role in asymmetric supernovae. Welcome to the brave new world of three-dimensional explosions!

  16. An outburst from a massive star 40 days before a supernova explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E O; Sullivan, M; Cenko, S B; Kasliwal, M M; Gal-Yam, A; Kulkarni, S R; Arcavi, I; Bildsten, L; Bloom, J S; Horesh, A; Howell, D A; Filippenko, A V; Laher, R; Murray, D; Nakar, E; Nugent, P E; Silverman, J M; Shaviv, N J; Surace, J; Yaron, O

    2013-02-07

    Some observations suggest that very massive stars experience extreme mass-loss episodes shortly before they explode as supernovae, as do several models. Establishing a causal connection between these mass-loss episodes and the final explosion would provide a novel way to study pre-supernova massive-star evolution. Here we report observations of a mass-loss event detected 40 days before the explosion of the type IIn supernova SN 2010mc (also known as PTF 10tel). Our photometric and spectroscopic data suggest that this event is a result of an energetic outburst, radiating at least 6 × 10(47) erg of energy and releasing about 10(-2) solar masses of material at typical velocities of 2,000 km s(-1). The temporal proximity of the mass-loss outburst and the supernova explosion implies a causal connection between them. Moreover, we find that the outburst luminosity and velocity are consistent with the predictions of the wave-driven pulsation model, and disfavour alternative suggestions.

  17. Rotation and Magnetic Fields in Supernovae and Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J. Craig

    2005-10-01

    Spectropolarimetry of core collapse supernovae has shown that they are asymmetric and often, but not universally, bi-polar; in some the dominant axes associated with hydrogen, oxygen, and calcium are oriented substantially differently. Jet-induced supernova models give a typical jet/torus structure that is reminiscent of some objects like the Crab nebula, SN 1987A and perhaps Cas A. Jets, in turn, may arise from the intrinsic rotation and magnetic fields that are expected to accompany core collapse. We summarize the potential importance of the magneto-rotational instability for the core collapse problem, stress the non- monotonic response of the final rotation and magnetic field to the initial iron core rotation, and the potential role of non-axisymmetric instabilities in the new-born neutron star. We sketch some of the effects that large magnetic fields, ˜10^15 - 10^17 G, may have on the physics at core bounce and in the subsequent cooling, de-leptonization phase. Production and dissipation of MHD waves in this strongly differentially rotating environment may affect the success of the supernova explosion, the nature of the compact remnant -- neutron star or black hole, pulsar or magnetar -- and whether the outcome is a normal supernova or a gamma-ray burst. In collaboration with Shizuka Akiyama, University of Texas at Austin.

  18. Prospects of the search for neutrino bursts from Supernovae with Baksan Large Volume Scintillation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Petkov, V B

    2015-01-01

    Observing a high-statistics neutrino signal from the supernova explosions in the Galaxy is a major goal of low-energy neutrino astronomy. The prospects for detecting all flavors of neutrinos and antineutrinos from the core-collapse supernova (ccSN) in operating and forthcoming large liquid scintillation detectors (LLSD) are widely discussed now. One of proposed LLSD is Baksan Large Volume Scintillation Detector (BLVSD). This detector will be installed at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory (BNO) of the Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, at a depth of 4800 m.w.e. Low-energy neutrino astronomy is one of the main lines of research of the BLVSD.

  19. Probing Dark Energy via Neutrino and Supernova Observatories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Lawrence; Hall, Lawrence J.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Papucci, Michele; Perez, Gilad

    2006-07-10

    A novel method for extracting cosmological evolution parameters is proposed, using a probe other than light: future observations of the diffuse anti-neutrino flux emitted from core-collapse supernovae (SNe), combined with the SN rate extracted from future SN surveys. The relic SN neutrino differential flux can be extracted by using future neutrino detectors such as Gadolinium-enriched, megaton, water detectors or 100-kiloton detectors of liquid Argon or liquid scintillator. The core-collapse SN rate can be reconstructed from direct observation of SN explosions using future precision observatories. Our method, by itself, cannot compete with the accuracy of the optical-based measurements but may serve as an important consistency check as well as a source of complementary information. The proposal does not require construction of a dedicated experiment, but rather relies on future experiments proposed for other purposes.

  20. Extreme explosions supernovae, hypernovae, magnetars, and other unusual cosmic blasts

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, David S

    2013-01-01

    What happens at the end of the life of massive stars? At one time we thought all these stars followed similar evolutionary paths. However, new discoveries have shown that things are not quite that simple. This book focuses on the extreme -the most intense, brilliant and peculiar- of astronomical explosions. It features highly significant observational finds that push the frontiers of astronomy and astrophysics, particularly as before these objects were only predicted in theory.  This book is for those who want the latest information and ideas about the most dramatic and unusual explosions dete

  1. Preparing for an explosion: Hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulence in presupernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Nathan; Arnett, W. David, E-mail: nathans@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: darnett@as.arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Both observations and numerical simulations are discordant with predictions of conventional stellar evolution codes for the latest stages of a massive star's life before core collapse. The most dramatic example of this disconnect is in the eruptive mass loss occurring in the decade preceding Type IIn supernovae. We outline the key empirical evidence that indicates severe pre-supernova instability in massive stars, and we suggest that the chief reason that these outbursts are absent in stellar evolution models may lie in the treatment of turbulent convection in these codes. The mixing length theory that is used ignores (1) finite amplitude fluctuations in velocity and temperature and (2) their nonlinear interaction with nuclear burning. Including these fluctuations is likely to give rise to hydrodynamic instabilities in the latest burning sequences, which prompts us to discuss a number of far-reaching implications for the fates of massive stars. In particular, we explore connections to enhanced pre-supernova mass loss, unsteady nuclear burning and consequent eruptions, swelling of the stellar radius that may trigger violent interactions with a companion star, and potential modifications to the core structure that could dramatically alter calculations of the core-collapse explosion mechanism itself. These modifications may also impact detailed nucleosynthesis and measured isotopic anomalies in meteorites, as well as the interpretation of young core-collapse supernova remnants. Understanding these critical instabilities in the final stages of evolution may make possible the development of an early warning system for impending core collapse, if we can identify their asteroseismological or eruptive signatures.

  2. More Supernova Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    SEP 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE More Supernova Surprises 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...PERSPECTIVES More Supernova Surprises ASTRONOMY J. Martin Laming Spectroscopic observations of the supernova SN1987A are providing a new window into high...a core-collapse supernova ) have stretched and motivated research that has expanded our knowledge of astrophysics. The brightest such event in

  3. Impact of New Gamow-Teller Strengths on Explosive Type Ia Supernova Nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Kanji; Kajino, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Toshio; Hidaka, Jun; Honma, Michio; Iwamoto, Koichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental results have confirmed a possible reduction in the GT$_+$ strengths of pf-shell nuclei. These proton-rich nuclei are of relevance in the deflagration and explosive burning phases of Type Ia supernovae. While prior GT strengths result in nucleosynthesis predictions with a lower-than-expected electron fraction, a reduction in the GT$_+$ strength can result in an slightly increased electron fraction compared to previous shell model predictions, though the enhancement is not as large as previous enhancements in going from rates computed by Fuller, Fowler, and Newman based on an independent particle model. A shell model parametrization has been developed which more closely matches experimental GT strengths. The resultant electron-capture rates are used in nucleosynthesis calculations for carbon deflagration and explosion phases of Type Ia supernovae, and the final mass fractions are compared to those obtained using more commonly-used rates.

  4. Type Iax Supernovae: A New Class of Stellar Explosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, P. J.; Chornock, R.

    2013-01-01

    We describe observed properties of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe Iax), consisting of SNe observationally similar to its prototypical member, SN 2002cx. The class currently has 25 members, and we present optical photometry and/or optical spectroscopy for most of them. SNe Iax are spectrosc......We describe observed properties of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe Iax), consisting of SNe observationally similar to its prototypical member, SN 2002cx. The class currently has 25 members, and we present optical photometry and/or optical spectroscopy for most of them. SNe Iax...... are spectroscopically similar to SNe Ia, but have lower maximum-light velocities (2000 M_V,peak > -18.9 mag), and most have hot photospheres. Relative to SNe Ia, SNe Iax have low luminosities for their light-curve shape. There is a correlation between...... luminosity and light-curve shape, similar to that of SNe Ia, but offset from that of SNe Ia and with larger scatter. Despite a host-galaxy morphology distribution that is highly skewed to late-type galaxies without any SNe Iax discovered in elliptical galaxies, there are several indications...

  5. Supernova 2007bi as a pair-instability explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, A; Ofek, E O; Nugent, P E; Kulkarni, S R; Kasliwal, M M; Quimby, R M; Filippenko, A V; Cenko, S B; Chornock, R; Waldman, R; Kasen, D; Sullivan, M; Beshore, E C; Drake, A J; Thomas, R C; Bloom, J S; Poznanski, D; Miller, A A; Foley, R J; Silverman, J M; Arcavi, I; Ellis, R S; Deng, J

    2010-01-01

    Stars with initial masses 10 M_{solar} 140 M_{solar}), if such exist, have oxygen cores which exceed M_{core} = 50 M_{solar}. There, high temperatures are reached at relatively low densities. Conversion of energetic, pressure-supporting photons into electron-positron pairs occurs prior to oxygen ignition, and leads to a violent contraction that triggers a catastrophic nuclear explosion. Tremendous energies (>~ 10^{52} erg) are released, completely unbinding the star in a pair-instability SN (PISN), with no compact remnant. Transitional objects with 100 M_{solar} 3 M_{solar} of ra dioactive 56Ni were synthesized, and that our observations are well fit by PISN models. A PISN explosion in the local Universe indicates that nearby dwarf galaxies probably host extremely massive stars, above the apparent Galactic limit, perhaps resulting from star formation processes similar to those that created the first stars in the Universe.

  6. Type Iax Supernovae: A New Class of Stellar Explosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Challis, P. J.; Chornock, R.

    2013-01-01

    are spectroscopically similar to SNe Ia, but have lower maximum-light velocities (2000 M_V,peak > -18.9 mag), and most have hot photospheres. Relative to SNe Ia, SNe Iax have low luminosities for their light-curve shape. There is a correlation between...... luminosity and light-curve shape, similar to that of SNe Ia, but offset from that of SNe Ia and with larger scatter. Despite a host-galaxy morphology distribution that is highly skewed to late-type galaxies without any SNe Iax discovered in elliptical galaxies, there are several indications...... in their spectra. The progenitor system and explosion model that best fits all of the data is a binary system of a C/O WD that accretes matter from a He star and has a significant deflagration. At least some of the time, this explosion will not disrupt the WD. We estimate that in a given volume there are 31^+17...

  7. Spectrum of the Supernova Relic Neutrino Background and Metallicity Evolution of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nakazato, Ken'ichiro; Niino, Yuu; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of the supernova relic neutrino (SRN) background from past stellar collapses including black hole formation (failed supernovae) is calculated. The redshift dependence of the black hole formation rate is considered on the basis of the metallicity evolution of galaxies. Assuming the mass and metallicity ranges of failed supernova progenitors, their contribution to SRNs is quantitatively estimated for the first time. Using this model, the dependences of SRNs on the cosmic star formation rate density, shock revival time and equation of state are investigated. The shock revival time is introduced as a parameter that should depend on the still unknown explosion mechanism of core collapse supernovae. The dependence on equation of state is considered for failed supernovae, whose collapse dynamics and neutrino emission are certainly affected. It is found that the low-energy spectrum of SRNs is mainly determined by the cosmic star formation rate density. These low-energy events will be observed in the Supe...

  8. Tycho Brahe's 1572 supernova as a standard type Ia explosion revealed from its light echo spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Oliver; Usuda, Tomonori; Hattori, Takashi; Goto, Miwa; Birkmann, Stephan; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2008-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars in close binary systems. They play an important role as cosmological distance indicators and have led to the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Among the most important unsolved questions are how the explosion actually proceeds and whether accretion occurs from a companion or via the merging of two white dwarfs. Tycho Brahe's supernova of 1572 (SN 1572) is thought to be one of the best candidates for a SN Ia in the Milky Way. The proximity of the SN 1572 remnant has allowed detailed studies, such as the possible identification of the binary companion, and provides a unique opportunity to test theories of the explosion mechanism and the nature of the progenitor. The determination of the yet unknown exact spectroscopic type of SN 1572 is crucial to relate these results to the diverse population of SNe Ia. Here we report an optical spectrum of Tycho Brahe's supernova near maximum brightness, obtained from a scatter...

  9. Pre-Explosive Observational Properties of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Tornambé, A; 10.1093/mnras/stt295

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary path of rotating CO WDs directly accreting CO-rich matter is followed up to few seconds before the explosive breakout in the framework of the Double Degenerate rotationally-driven accretion scenario. We find that the evolutionary properties depend only on the actual mass of the accreting WD and not on the previous history. We determine the expected frequency and amplitude of the gravitational wave emission, which occurs during the mass transfer process and acts as a self-tuning mechanism of the accretion process itself. The gravitational signal related to Galactic sources can be easily detected with the next generation of space-born interferometers and can provide notable constraints to the progenitor model. The expected statistical distribution of pre-explosive objects in the Galaxy is provided also in the effective temperature-apparent bolometric magnitude diagrams which can be used to identify merged DD systems via UV surveys. We emphasize that the thermonuclear explosion occurs owing to t...

  10. Type Ibn Supernovae Show Photometric Homogeneity and Spectral Diversity at Maximum Light

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Arcavi, Iair; Valenti, Stefano; McCully, Curtis; Howell, D. Andrew; Johansson, Joel; Sollerman, Jesper; Pastorello, Andrea; Benetti, Stefano; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey; Corsi, Alessandra; Duggan, Gina; Elias-Rosa, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Type Ibn supernovae (SNe) are a small yet intriguing class of explosions whose spectra are characterized by low-velocity helium emission lines with little to no evidence for hydrogen. The prevailing theory has been that these are the core-collapse explosions of very massive stars embedded in helium-rich circumstellar material (CSM). We report optical observations of six new SNe Ibn: PTF11rfh, PTF12ldy, iPTF14aki, iPTF15ul, SN 2015G, and iPTF15akq. This brings the sample size of such objects i...

  11. Slowly fading super-luminous supernovae that are not pair-instability explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholl, M; Jerkstrand, A; Inserra, C; McCrum, M; Kotak, R; Fraser, M; Wright, D; Chen, T -W; Smith, K; Young, D R; Sim, S A; Valenti, S; Howell, D A; Bresolin, F; Kudritzki, R P; Tonry, J L; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Pastorello, A; Tomasella, L; Cappellaro, E; Benetti, S; Mattila, S; Kankare, E; Kangas, T; Leloudas, G; Sollerman, J; Taddia, F; Berger, E; Chornock, R; Narayan, G; Stubbs, C W; Foley, R J; Lunnan, R; Soderberg, A; Sanders, N; Milisavljevic, D; Margutti, R; Kirshner, R P; Elias-Rosa, N; Morales-Garoffolo, A; Taubenberger, S; Botticella, M T; Gezari, S; Urata, Y; Rodney, S; Riess, A G; Scolnic, D; Wood-Vasey, W M; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K; Flewelling, H A; Magnier, E A; Kaiser, N; Metcalfe, N; Morgan, J; Price, P A; Sweeney, W; Waters, C

    2013-01-01

    Super-luminous supernovae that radiate more than 10^44 ergs per second at their peak luminosity have recently been discovered in faint galaxies at redshifts of 0.1-4. Some evolve slowly, resembling models of 'pair-instability' supernovae. Such models involve stars with original masses 140-260 times that of the Sun that now have carbon-oxygen cores of 65-30 solar masses. In these stars, the photons that prevent gravitational collapse are converted to electron-positron pairs, causing rapid contraction and thermonuclear explosions. Many solar masses of 56Ni are synthesized; this isotope decays to 56Fe via 56Co, powering bright light curves. Such massive progenitors are expected to have formed from metal-poor gas in the early Universe. Recently, supernova 2007bi in a galaxy at redshift 0.127 (about 12 billion years after the Big Bang) with a metallicity one-third that of the Sun was observed to look like a fading pair-instability supernova. Here we report observations of two slow-to-fade super-luminous supernovae...

  12. Photometric Identification of Young Stripped-Core Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Poznanski, Dovi; Maoz, Dan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Foley, Ryan J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method designed to identify the spectral type of young (less than ~30 days after explosion) and nearby (z < ~0.05) supernovae (SNe) using their broad-band colors. In particular, we show that stripped-core SNe (i.e., hydrogen deficient core-collapse events, spectroscopically defined as SNe Ib and SNe Ic, including broad-lined SN 1998bw-like events) can be clearly distinguished from other types of SNe. Using the full census of nearby SNe discovered during the year 2002, we estimate...

  13. The Crab nebula and the class of Type IIn-P supernovae caused by sub-energetic electron-capture explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    What sort of supernova (SN) gave rise to the Crab nebula? While there are several indications that the Crab arose from a sub-energetic explosion of an 8-10 M⊙ progenitor star, this would appear to conflict with the high luminosity indicated by historical observations. This paper shows that several well-known observed properties of the Crab and SN 1054 are well matched by a particular breed of Type IIn SN. The Crab's properties are best suited to the Type IIn-P subclass (Type IIn spectra with plateau light curves), exemplified by SNe 1994W, 2009kn and 2011ht. These events probably arise from relatively low energy (1050 erg) explosions with low 56Ni yield that may result from electron-capture SN (ecSN) explosions, but their high visual-wavelength luminosity and Type IIn spectra are dominated by shock interaction with dense circumstellar material (CSM) rather than the usual recombination photosphere. In this interaction, a large fraction of the 1050 erg of the total kinetic energy can be converted to visual-wavelength luminosity. After about 120 d, nearly all of the mass outside the neutron star in the CSM and ejecta ends up in a slowly expanding (1000-1500 km s-1) thin dense shell, which is then accelerated and fragmented by the growing pulsar wind nebula in the subsequent 1000 yr, producing the complex network of filaments seen today. There is no need to invoke the extended, invisible fast SN envelope hypothesized to reside outside the Crab. As differentiated from a normal SN II-P, SNe IIn-P provide a much better explanation for several observed features of the Crab: (1) no blast wave outside the Crab nebula filaments, (2) no rapidly expanding SN envelope outside the filaments, (3) a total mass of ˜5 M⊙ swept up in a thin slow shell, (4) a low kinetic energy of the Crab at least an order of magnitude below a normal core-collapse SN, (5) a high peak luminosity (-18 mag) despite the low kinetic energy, (6) chemical abundances consistent with an 8-10 M⊙ star and

  14. Neutrinos from failed supernovae at future water and liquid argon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Keehn, James G

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the diffuse flux of electron neutrinos and antineutrinos from cosmological failed supernovae, stars that collapse directly into a black hole, with no explosion. This flux has a hotter energy spectrum compared to regular, neutron-star forming collapses, and therefore it dominates the total diffuse flux from core collapses above 20-45 MeV of neutrino energy. Reflecting the features of the originally emitted neutrinos, the flux of nu_e and anti-nu_e at Earth is larger for larger survival probability of these species, and for stiffer equations of state of nuclear matter. In the energy window 19-29 MeV, the flux from failed supernovae is susbtantial, ranging from 7% to a dominant fraction of the total flux from all core collapses. It can be as large as phi = 0.38 s^{-1} cm^{-2} for anti-nu_e (phi = 0.28 s^{-1} cm^{-2} for nue), normalized to a local rate of core collapses of R_{cc}(0)=10^{-4} yr^{-1} Mpc^{-3}. In 5 years, a 0.45 Mt water Cherenkov detector should see 5-65 events from failed supernovae, ...

  15. Type Iax Supernovae: A New Class of Stellar Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Ryan J; Chornock, R; Ganeshalingam, M; Li, W; Marion, G H; Morrell, N I; Pignata, G; Stritzinger, M D; Silverman, J M; Wang, X; Anderson, J P; Filippenko, A V; Freedman, W L; Hamuy, M; Jha, S W; Kirshner, R P; McCully, C; Persson, S E; Phillips, M M; Reichart, D E; Soderberg, A M

    2012-01-01

    We describe observed properties of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe Iax), consisting of SNe observationally similar to its prototypical member, SN 2002cx. The class currently has 25 members, and we present optical photometry and/or optical spectroscopy for most of them. SNe Iax are spectroscopically similar to SNe Ia, but have lower maximum-light velocities (2000 M_V,peak > -18.9 mag), and most have hot photospheres. Relative to SNe Ia, SNe Iax have low luminosities for their light-curve shape. There is a correlation between luminosity and light-curve shape, similar to that of SNe Ia, but offset from that of SNe Ia and with larger scatter. Despite a host-galaxy morphology distribution that is highly skewed to late-type galaxies without any SNe Iax discovered in elliptical galaxies, there are several indications that the progenitor stars are white dwarfs (WDs): evidence of C/O burning in their maximum-light spectra, low ejecta masses, strong Fe lines in their late-time spectra, a lack of X-ray detections...

  16. Thermal X-ray emission from shocked ejecta in Type Ia Supernova Remnants. Prospects for explosion mechanism identification

    CERN Document Server

    Badenes, C; Borkowski, K J; Dominguez, I; Badenes, Carles; Bravo, Eduardo; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Dominguez, Inmaculada

    2003-01-01

    The explosion mechanism behind Type Ia supernovae is a matter of continuing debate. The diverse attempts to identify or at least constrain the physical processes involved in the explosion have been only partially successful so far. In this paper we propose to use the thermal X-ray emission from young supernova remnants originated in Type Ia events to extract relevant information concerning the explosions themselves. We have produced a grid of thermonuclear supernova models representative of the paradigms currently under debate: pure deflagrations, delayed detonations, pulsating delayed detonations and sub-Chandrasekhar explosions, using their density and chemical composition profiles to simulate the interaction with the surrounding ambient medium and the ensuing plasma heating, non-equilibrium ionization and thermal X-ray emission of the ejecta. Key observational parameters such as electron temperatures, emission measures and ionization time scales are presented and discussed. We find that not only is it poss...

  17. Ionized gas velocity dispersion and multiple supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Vasiliev, Evgenii O; Shchekinov, Yuri A

    2014-01-01

    Using 3D numerical simulations we study the evolution of the H$\\alpha$ intensity and velocity dispersion for single and multiple supenova (SN) explosions. We find that the $I_{\\rm H\\alpha}-\\sigma$ diagram obtained for simulated gas flows is similar in shape to that observed in dwarf galaxies. We conclude that colliding SN shells with significant difference in age are resposible for high velocity dispersion that reaches values high as $\\simgt 100$kms$^{-1}$. Such a high velocity dispersion could be hardly got for a single SN remnant. Peaks of velocity dispersion on the $I_{\\rm H\\alpha}-\\sigma$ diagram may correspond to several stand-alone or merged SN remnants with moderately different ages. The procedure of the spatial resolution degrading in the H$\\alpha$ intensity and velocity dispersion maps makes the simulated $I_{\\rm H\\alpha}-\\sigma$ diagrams close to those observed in dwarf galaxies not only in shape, but also quantitatively.

  18. THE IMPACT OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS ON HELIUM COMPANIONS IN THE CHANDRASEKHAR-MASS EXPLOSION SCENARIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zhengwei; Wang, B.; Han, Z. W. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Pakmor, R. [Heidelberger Institut fuer Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Seitenzahl, I. R.; Hillebrandt, W.; Kromer, M.; Edelmann, P.; Taubenberger, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Roepke, F. K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Maeda, K., E-mail: zwliu@ynao.ac.cn [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli-IPMU), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study (TODIAS), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    In the version of the single-degenerate scenario of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) studied here, a carbon-oxygen white dwarf explodes close to the Chandrasekhar limit after accreting material from a non-degenerate helium (He) companion star. In the present study, we employ the STELLAR GADGET code to perform three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the interaction of the SN Ia ejecta with the He companion star taking into account its orbital motion and spin. It is found that only 2%-5% of the initial companion mass is stripped off from the outer layers of He companion stars due to the supernova (SN) impact. The dependence of the unbound mass (or the kick velocity) on the orbital separation can be fitted to a good approximation by a power law for a given companion model. After the SN impact, the outer layers of a He donor star are significantly enriched with heavy elements from the low-expansion-velocity tail of SN Ia ejecta. The total mass of accumulated SN-ejecta material on the companion surface reaches about {approx}> 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} for different companion models. This enrichment with heavy elements provides a potential way to observationally identify the surviving companion star in SN remnants. Finally, by artificially adjusting the explosion energy of the W7 explosion model, we find that the total accumulation of SN ejecta on the companion surface is also dependent on the explosion energy with a power-law relation to a good approximation.

  19. Neutrino-Nucleus Reaction Cross Sections for Light Element Synthesis in Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, T; Chiba, S; Kajino, T; Yokomakura, H; Kimura, K; Takamura, A; Hartmann, D H

    2008-01-01

    The neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections of 4He and 12C are evaluated using new shell model Hamiltonians. Branching ratios of various decay channels are calculated to evaluate the yields of Li, Be, and B produced through the nu-process in supernova explosions. The new cross sections enhance the yields of 7Li and 11B produced during the supernova explosion of a 16.2 M_odot star model compared to the case using the conventional cross sections by about 10%. On the other hand, the yield of 10B decreases by a factor of two. The yields of 6Li, 9Be, and the radioactive nucleus 10Be are found at a level of 10^{-11} M_odot. The temperature of nu_{mu,tau}- and bar{nu}_{mu,tau}-neutrinos inferred from the supernova contribution of 11B in Galactic chemical evolution models is constrained to the 4.3 MeV to 6.5 MeV range. The increase in the 7Li and 11B yields due to neutrino oscillations is demonstrated with the new cross sections.

  20. Finding the First Cosmic Explosions. IV. 90 - 140 M$_{\\odot}$ Pair-Instability Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Smidt, Joseph; Chatzopoulos, E; Wiggins, Brandon K; Chen, Ke-Jung; Kozyreva, Alexandra; Even, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    Population III stars that die as pair-instability supernovae are usually thought to fall in the mass range of 140 - 260 M$_{\\odot}$. But several lines of work have now shown that rotation can build up the He cores needed to encounter the pair instability at stellar masses as low as 90 $_{\\odot}$. Depending on the slope of the initial mass function of Population III stars, there could be 4 - 5 times as many stars from 90 - 140 $_{\\odot}$ in the primordial universe than in the usually accepted range. We present numerical simulations of the pair-instability explosions of such stars performed with the MESA, FLASH and RAGE codes. We find that they will be visible to supernova factories such as Pan-STARRS and LSST in the optical out to z $\\sim$ 1 - 2 and to JWST and the 30 m-class telescopes in the NIR out to $z \\sim$ 7 - 10. Such explosions will thus probe the stellar populations of the first galaxies and cosmic star formation rates in the era of cosmological reionization. These supernovae are also easily distingu...

  1. Neutron star kicks by the gravitational tug-boat mechanism in asymmetric supernova explosions: progenitor and explosion dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Janka, H -Th

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric mass ejection in the early phase of supernova (SN) explosions can impart a kick velocity to the new-born neutron star (NS). For neutrino-driven explosions the NS acceleration was shown to be mainly caused by the gravitational attraction of the anisotropically expelled inner ejecta, while hydrodynamic forces contribute on a subdominant level, and asymmetric neutrino emission plays only a secondary role. Two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations demonstrated that this gravitational tug-boat mechanism can explain the observed space velocities of young NSs up to more than 1000 km/s. Here, we discuss how the NS kick depends on the energy, ejecta mass, and asymmetry of the SN explosion, and which role the compactness of the pre-collapse stellar core plays for the momentum transfer to the NS. We also provide simple analytic expressions for the NS velocity in terms of these quantities. Referring to results of hydrodynamic simulations in the literature, we argue why within the discussed scenario o...

  2. Evidence from stable isotopes and (10)Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W C

    2016-11-22

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived (10)Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  3. Evidence from stable isotopes and 10Be for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W. C.

    2016-11-01

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived 10Be can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  4. Evidence from stable isotopes and Be-10 for solar system formation triggered by a low-mass supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Heger, Alexander; Haxton, W C

    2016-01-01

    About 4.6 billion years ago, some event disturbed a cloud of gas and dust, triggering the gravitational collapse that led to the formation of the solar system. A core-collapse supernova, whose shock wave is capable of compressing such a cloud, is an obvious candidate for the initiating event. This hypothesis can be tested because supernovae also produce telltale patterns of short-lived radionuclides, which would be preserved today as isotopic anomalies. Previous studies of the forensic evidence have been inconclusive, finding a pattern of isotopes differing from that produced in conventional supernova models. Here we argue that these difficulties either do not arise or are mitigated if the initiating supernova was a special type, low in mass and explosion energy. Key to our conclusion is the demonstration that short-lived Be-10 can be readily synthesized in such supernovae by neutrino interactions, while anomalies in stable isotopes are suppressed.

  5. Supernova Neutrinos - MeV Messengers of the Extreme

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    A core-collapse supernova is a nearly perfect neutrino bomb. While capable of outshining its entire host galaxy, this stunning light show represents just a small portion of the explosion.  Indeed, each such cataclysmic event typically radiates two orders of magnitude more energy as low-energy neutrinos than it does as electromagnetic radiation or as kinetic shockwaves. Consequently, MeV-scale neutrinos are made in huge numbers as the star is dying, and because these ghostly subatomic particles interact so rarely with normal matter they easily escape the fireball, providing a window into one of the most violent and interesting volumes in space: the heart of a stellar collapse. This talk will cover some of the history of neutrinos and supernovas, as well as how we are preparing new technology and partnerships to observe the next spectacular explosion in all its multimessenger glory.

  6. X- and Gamma-ray Studies of Cas A: Exposing Core Collapse to the Core

    CERN Document Server

    Vink, J S

    2004-01-01

    In this review of X-ray and gamma-ray observations of Cas A, evidence is discussed that Cas A was a Type Ib supernova of a Wolf-Rayet star with a main sequence mass between 22-25 Msun, that exploded after stellar wind loss had reduced its mass to ~6 Msun. The observed kinematics and the high Ti-44 yield indicate that the supernova explosion was probably assymetric, with a kinetic energy of ~2x10^51 erg.

  7. Effect of Quark Strong Interaction in Phase Transition on Supernova Explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAI Xiang-Jun; LUO Zhi-Quan; LIU Jing-Jing; LIU Hong-Lin

    2008-01-01

    The effect of quark interactions perturbatively to order αc on the conversion, from quark matter to strange quark matter, is studied systematically based on a recent set of current quark masses. The process has a significant effect on increasing the core temperature, the neutrino abundance and the neutrino energies even if there is no quark interaction. Furthermore, with the switch of the strong interaction among quarks, these quantities will increase respectively to some further extents with αc increase. Taking αc = 0.47 as an example, the temperature, the neutrino abundance and the total neutrino energies are further raised by about 10%, 7%, and 20% respectively, which is weakly dependent on the initial temperature. Combining the effect of the current quark mass and the effect of the quark strong interaction, the results of the conversions will greatly enhance the probability of success for a supernova explosion and deeply influence the dynamics of the supernova evolution.

  8. Neutrinos from Type Ia Supernovae I: The Deflagration-To-Detonation Transition Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Warren P; Kneller, James P; Scholberg, Kate; Seitenzahl, Ivo R

    2016-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the neutrinos detected from the next core-collapse supernova in the Galaxy have the potential to reveal important information about the dynamics of the explosion and the nucleosynthesis conditions as well as allowing us to probe the properties of the neutrino itself. The neutrinos emitted from thermonuclear - Type Ia - supernovae also possess the same potential, although these supernovae are dimmer neutrino sources. For the first time, we calculate the time, energy, line of sight and neutrino-flavor-dependent features of the neutrino signal expected from a three-dimensional delayed-detonation explosion simulation, where a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) triggers the complete disruption of a near-Chandrasekhar mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf. We also calculate the neutrino flavor evolution along eight lines of sight through the simulation as a function of time and energy using an exact 3-flavor transformation code. We identify a characteristic spectral peak at $\\sim ...

  9. Stellar Forensics VI: A post-explosion view of the progenitor of SN 2012aw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maund, Justyn

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have used high spatial resolution HST observations of supernova (SN) sites to directly identify the progenitors of core-collapse SNe in pre-explosion images. These studies have set constraints about the nature of massive stars and their evolution just prior to explosion. Now, at late-times when the SNe have faded sufficiently, it is possible to return to the sites of these core-collapse SNe to search for clues about the nature of their progenitors.We request time to conduct deep, late-time, high-resolution imaging with ACS/WFC of the site of the core-collapse SN 2012aw. We aim to: 1) Confirm our original identification, made in pre-explosion images, by confirming that the progenitor is now missing; 2) Apply image subtraction techniques for this late-time imaging with our pre-explosion images to determine accurate photometry of the progenitor to constrain the temperature and luminosity. HST provides the unique combination of high-resolution optical imaging at very faintmagnitudes that will facilitate this study.

  10. Integral field spectroscopy of supernova explosion sites: constraining mass and metallicity of the progenitors -- II. Type II-P and II-L supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Aldering, Greg; Arimoto, Nobuo; Maeda, Keiichi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Pereira, Rui; Usuda, Tomonori; Hashiba, Yasuhito

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen explosion sites of type II-P and II-L supernovae in nearby galaxies have been observed using integral field spectroscopy, enabling both spatial and spectral study of the explosion sites. We used the properties of the parent stellar population of the coeval supernova progenitor star to derive its metallicity and initial mass (c.f. Paper I). The spectrum of the parent stellar population yields the estimates of metallicity via strong-line method, and age via comparison with simple stellar population (SSP) models. These metallicity and age parameters are adopted for the progenitor star. Age, or lifetime of the star, was used to derive initial (ZAMS) mass of the star by comparing with stellar evolution models. With this technique, we were able to determine metallicity and initial mass of the SN progenitors in our sample. Our result indicates that some type-II supernova progenitors may have been stars with mass comparable to SN Ib/c progenitors.

  11. The explosion of supernova 2011fe in the frame of the core-degenerate scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Soker, Noam; Althaus, Leandro G

    2013-01-01

    We argue that the properties of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) SN 2011fe can be best explained within the frame of the core-degenerate (CD) scenario. In the CD scenario a white dwarf (WD) merges with the core of an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star and forms a rapidly rotating WD, with a mass close to and above the critical mass for explosion. Rapid rotation prevents immediate collapse and/or explosion. Spinning down over a time of 0-10 Gyr brings the WD to explosion. A very long delayed explosion to post-crystallization phase, which lasts for ~2 Gyr leads to the formation of a highly carbon-enriched outer layer. This can account for the carbon-rich composition of the fastest-moving ejecta of SN 2011fe. In reaching the conclusion that the CD scenario best explains the observed properties of SN 2011fe we consider both its specific properties, like a very compact exploding object and carbon rich composition of the fastest-moving ejecta, and the general properties of SNe Ia.

  12. A binary scenario for the pre-explosion outburst of the supernova 2010mc

    CERN Document Server

    Soker, Noam

    2013-01-01

    I raise the possibility that the pre-explosion outburst (PEO) of the type IIn supernova 2010mc (PTF 10tel) was energized by mass accretion onto an O main-sequence stellar companion. According to this suggestion the SN progenitor suffered a rapid expansion within months before explosion. The expansion was driven by leakage of energy from the core where vigorous oxygen nuclear burning takes place within a year prior to explosion. This expansion triggered mass transfer onto the secondary star. Most of the extra energy of the outburst comes from the accretion of ~0.1Mo onto the secondary star. As well, the gas outflowing at v~2000 km/s was launched from the accreting secondary star, most likely in a bipolar outflow. The binary model can account for the slower circumstellar medium that was ejected at earlier times, and explain the red-shifted peak of the Halpha emission at 5.8 days past explosion. I compare some properties of the PEO of SN 2010mc to those of other stellar eruptions, such as the stellar merger even...

  13. The High-Metallicity Explosion Environment of the Relativistic Supernova 2009bb

    CERN Document Server

    Levesque, E M; Foley, R J; Berger, E; Kewley, L J; Chakraborty, S; Ray, A; Torres, M A P; Challis, P; Kirshner, R P; Barthelmy, S D; Bietenholz, M F; Chandra, P; Chaplin, V; Chevalier, R A; Chugai, N; Connaughton, V; Copete, A; Fox, O; Fransson, C; Grindlay, J E; Hamuy, M A; Milne, P A; Pignata, G; Stritzinger, M D; Wieringa, M H

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the environment of the nearby (d ~ 40Mpc) broad-lined Type Ic supernova SN 2009bb. This event was observed to produce a relativistic outflow likely powered by a central accreting compact object. While such a phenomenon was previously observed only in long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), no LGRB was detected in association with SN 2009bb. Using an optical spectrum of the SN 2009bb explosion site, we determine a variety of ISM properties for the host environment, including metallicity, young stellar population age, and star formation rate. We compare the SN explosion site properties to observations of LGRB and broad-lined SN Ic host environments on optical emission line ratio diagnostic diagrams. Based on these analyses, we find that the SN 2009bb explosion site has a very high metallicity of ~2x solar, in agreement with other broad-lined SN Ic host environments and at odds with the low-redshift LGRB host environments and recently proposed maximum metallicity limits for relativistic explosions...

  14. A Comprehensive Investigation Into Modeling Supernovae Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Desmond

    Supernovae are a rich source of information. By studying their light curves and spectra we gain insights into stellar evolution, the nature of the progenitor star, surface abundances at the time of the explosion, whether previous mass-loss episodes have occurred, the physics of the explosion including the amount and type of elements synthesized, and whether the explosion has produced significant mixing between shells of different chemical composition. To maximize the information that can be gleaned from observations of supernovae it is essential that we have the necessary spectroscopic tools. To this end, we are developing a code, CMFGEN, capable of modeling supernova light curves and spectra. The code is currently being used, to study core-collapse supernovae as well as those arising from the nuclear detonation of a White Dwarf star. We wish to extend CMFGEN's capabilities by developing a procedure to handle non-monotonic velocity flows so that we can treat shock breakout and the interaction of supernova ejecta with circumstellar material. We will also investigate magnetar-powered SNe, and explore the connection between Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae and those supernovae associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursters. Through detailed studies of individual supernova, and through the construction of model grids, we are able to infer deficiencies in our modeling, in our atomic data, and in the progenitor models, and hence make refinements so that we can improve our understanding of all SNe classes. Previous (IUE), current (HST, Chandra, GALEX), and future NASA missions (James Webb Telescope) do/will provide a wealth of data on supernovae. The proposed research is related to strategic subgoal 3D: "Discover the origin, structure, evolution, and destiny of the universe, and search for Earth-like planets." Supernovae are inherently coupled to the evolution of the universe and life: They can trigger star formation and they provide the raw materials (e.g., oxygen

  15. An Extremely Luminous X-ray Outburst Marking the Birth of a Normal Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Soderberg, A M; Page, K; Schady, P; Parrent, J; Pooley, D; Wang, X -Y; Ofek, E; Cucchiara, A; Rau, A; Waxman, E; Simón, J; Bock, D; Milne, P; Page, M; Barthelmy, S; Beardmore, A; Bietenholz, M; Brown, P; Burrows, A; Burrows, D N; Byrngelson, G; Cenko, S B; Chandra, P; Cummings, J; Fox, D B; Gal-Yam, A; Gehrels, N; Immler, S; Kasliwal, M; Kong, A; Krimm, H; Kulkarni, S R; Mészáros, P; Nakar, E; O'Brien, P; de Pasquale, M; Racusin, J; Rea, N

    2008-01-01

    The most massive stars in the universe end their lives in luminous supernova explosions that lead to the formation of neutron stars and black holes and impact star formation and galaxy evolution. For nearly a century, supernovae have been discovered solely through their bright optical emission, delaying initial observations to several days after the explosion. As a result, the details of the core collapse explosion mechanism, as well as the nature of some supernova progenitors, remain a matter of intense debate. Here we report our serendipitous discovery of a normal type Ibc supernova at the time of explosion, marked by an extremely luminous X-ray outburst. We interpret the outburst as the break-out of the supernova shock through a dense wind surrounding the compact (radius of ~10^11 cm) progenitor star. This conclusion is supported by our extensive radio and ultraviolet/optical observations from 0.1 to 30 days post-explosion. Equally important, the inferred rate of X-ray outbursts agrees with the core-collap...

  16. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Huaiyu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-06-24

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  17. SUPERNOVA 2003ie WAS LIKELY A FAINT TYPE IIP EVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sergeev, Sergey G., E-mail: iair.arcavi@weizmann.ac.il [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, P/O Nauchny, Crimea 98409 (Ukraine)

    2013-04-15

    We present new photometric observations of supernova (SN) 2003ie starting one month before discovery, obtained serendipitously while observing its host galaxy. With only a weak upper limit derived on the mass of its progenitor (<25 M{sub Sun }) from previous pre-explosion studies, this event could be a potential exception to the ''red supergiant (RSG) problem'' (the lack of high-mass RSGs exploding as Type IIP SNe). However, this is true only if SN2003ie was a Type IIP event, something which has never been determined. Using recently derived core-collapse SN light-curve templates, as well as by comparison to other known SNe, we find that SN2003ie was indeed a likely Type IIP event. However, with a plateau magnitude of {approx} - 15.5 mag, it is found to be a member of the faint Type IIP class. Previous members of this class have been shown to arise from relatively low-mass progenitors (<12 M{sub Sun }). It therefore seems unlikely that this SN had a massive RSG progenitor. The use of core-collapse SN light-curve templates is shown to be helpful in classifying SNe with sparse coverage. These templates are likely to become more robust as large homogeneous samples of core-collapse events are collected.

  18. Supernova 1987A: a Template to Link Supernovae to their Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, S; Pumo, M L; Bocchino, F

    2015-01-01

    The emission of supernova remnants reflects the properties of both the progenitor supernovae and the surrounding environment. The complex morphology of the remnants, however, hampers the disentanglement of the two contributions. Here we aim at identifying the imprint of SN 1987A on the X-ray emission of its remnant and at constraining the structure of the environment surrounding the supernova. We performed high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations describing SN 1987A soon after the core-collapse and the following three-dimensional expansion of its remnant between days 1 and 15000 after the supernova. We demonstrated that the physical model reproducing the main observables of SN 1987A during the first 250 days of evolution reproduces also the X-ray emission of the subsequent expanding remnant, thus bridging the gap between supernovae and supernova remnants. By comparing model results with observations, we constrained the explosion energy in the range $1.2-1.4\\times 10^{51}$~erg and the envelope mass in the rang...

  19. The nature of blast-wave-driven interfacial instabilities - important implications for modeling supernovae explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Aaron

    2004-11-01

    In this talk we discuss the nature of late-time, broad-banded instability development at an interface when a strong blast wave travels from a heavier to lighter fluid, as is the case in a supernova explosion. After a short period of Richtmyer-Meshkov growth, the interface is unstable via the Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism, which rapidly becomes the dominant energy source for growth. This situation is distinct from the classical case in two important ways, both of which can be understood in terms of a bubble merger model we have developed for blast-wave-driven systems. Rather than the constant acceleration feeding the instability to spawn ever larger scales and accelerate the growth, the decaying acceleration in the blast-wave case leads to a decay in the RT growth rate, and a freezing in of a preferred largest scale, which is dependent on the precise details of the system. In the language of bubble-merger models, this can be understood in terms of the time for the generation of the next largest scale being longer than the lifetime of the blast wave. Secondly, the continual expansion behind the blast front precludes the emergence of a self-similar regime, independent of the initial conditions, in the planar case. Self-similarity may be recovered in diverging systems but may be difficult to observe in reality because of rather restrictive conditions that must be met. These observations are borne out by hi-resolution numerical simulations using the higher order Godunov AMR hydrocode Raptor in 2 and 3D, and explain other simulations of instability growth in supernovae explosions; the initial "interfacial" structure is likely very important in determining the late-time growth. The model predictions are also consistent with numerous images of natural and manmade explosions.

  20. A new type of stellar explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Perets, H B; Mazzali, P; Arnett, D; Kagan, D; Filippenko, A V; Li, W; Cenko, S B; Fox, D B; Leonard, D C; Moon, D -S; Sand, D J; Soderberg, A M; Foley, R J; Ganeshalingam, M; Anderson, J P; James, P A; Ofek, E O; Bildsten, L; Nelemans, G; Shen, K J; Weinberg, N N; Metzger, B D; Piro, A L; Quataert, E; Kiewe, M; Poznanski, D

    2009-01-01

    The explosive deaths of stars (supernovae; SNe) are generally explained by two physical processes. Young massive stars (more than eight solar masses, M_Sun) undergo gravitational core-collapse and appear as type Ib/c and II SNe. Type Ia SNe result from thermonuclear explosions of older, Chandrasekhar-mass carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (WDs). Even the most underluminous SNe Ia eject ~1 M_Sun of C/O burning products. Here we report our discovery of the faint type Ib SN 2005E in the halo of the nearby isolated galaxy, NGC 1032. The lack of any trace of recent star formation near the SN location, and the very low ejected mass we find (~0.3 M_Sun) argues strongly against a core-collapse origin of this event. Our spectroscopic observations and the derived nucleosynthetic output show that the SN ejecta is dominated by helium-burning products, indicating that SN 2005E was neither a subluminous nor a regular SNe Ia. We have therefore found a new type of stellar explosion, arising from a low-mass, old stellar system. The ...

  1. The Peculiar Type Ib Supernova 2006jc: A WC Star Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Tominaga, N; Suzuki, T; Tanaka, M; Nomoto, K; Maeda, K; Chieffi, A; Tornambé, A; Minezaki, T; Yoshii, Y; Sakon, I; Wada, T; Ohyama, Y; Tanabé, T; Kaneda, H; Onaka, T; Nozawa, T; Kozasa, T; Kawabata, K S; Anupama, G C; Sahu, D K; Gurugubelli, U K; Prabhu, T P; Deng, J

    2007-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for Type Ib supernova (SN) 2006jc associated with a luminous blue variable (LBV)-like event. We calculate the presupernova evolution of the progenitor star, hydrodynamics and nucleosynthesis of the SN explosion, and the SN bolometric light curve (LC). The observed bolometic LC is constructed by integrating the UV, optical, near-infrared (NIR), and mid-infrared (MIR) fluxes. The progenitor is assumed to be as massive as $40\\Msun$ on the zero-age. The star undergoes extensive mass loss to reduce its mass down to as small as $6.9\\Msun$, thus becoming a WC Wolf-Rayet star at the presupernova stage. The WC star model has a thick carbon-rich layer, in which amorphous carbon grains can be formed during the explosion. This could explain the brightening in the NIR flux and the observed dust feature in MIR. The typical main-sequence mass of a WC Wolf-Rayet star and thus the progenitor of SN 2006jc is more massive than $40\\Msun$. We suggest that the explosions of stars more massive than $4...

  2. Stochasticity and efficiency of convection-dominated vs. SASI-dominated supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Cardall, Christian Y

    2015-01-01

    We present an initial report on 160 simulations of a highly simplified model of the post-bounce supernova environment in three spatial dimensions (3D). We set different values of a parameter characterizing the impact of nuclear dissociation at the stalled shock in order to regulate the post-shock fluid velocity, thereby determining the relative importance of convection and the stationary accretion shock instability (SASI). While our convection-dominated runs comport with the paradigmatic notion of a `critical neutrino luminosity' for explosion at a given mass accretion rate (albeit with a nontrivial spread in explosion times just above threshold), the outcomes of our SASI-dominated runs are much more stochastic: a sharp threshold critical luminosity is `smeared out' into a rising probability of explosion over a $\\sim 20\\%$ range of luminosity. We also find that the SASI-dominated models are able to explode with 3 to 4 times less efficient neutrino heating, indicating that progenitor properties, and fluid and ...

  3. Neutrino-driven explosions of ultra-stripped type Ic supernovae generating binary neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Suwa, Yudai; Shibata, Masaru; Umeda, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koh

    2015-01-01

    We study explosion characteristics of ultra-stripped supernovae (SNe), which are candidates of SNe generating binary neutron stars (NSs). As a first step, we perform stellar evolutionary simulations of bare carbon-oxygen cores of mass from 1.45 to 2.0 $M_\\odot$ until the iron cores become unstable and start collapsing. We then perform axisymmetric hydrodynamics simulations with spectral neutrino transport using these stellar evolution outcomes as initial conditions. All models exhibit successful explosions driven by neutrino heating. The diagnostic explosion energy, ejecta mass, Ni mass, and NS mass are typically $\\sim 10^{50}$ erg, $\\sim 0.1 M_\\odot$, $\\sim 0.01M_\\odot$, and $\\approx 1.3 M_\\odot$, which are compatible with observations of rapidly-evolving and luminous transient such as SN 2005ek. We also find that the ultra-stripped SN is a candidate for producing the secondary low-mass NS in the observed compact binary NSs like PSR J0737-3039.

  4. Type Ia Supernova Explosions from Hybrid Carbon-Oxygen-Neon White Dwarf Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Willcox, Donald E; Calder, Alan C; Denissenkov, Pavel A; Herwig, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by recent results in stellar evolution that predict the existence of hybrid white dwarf (WD) stars with a C-O core inside an O-Ne shell, we simulate thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae from these hybrid progenitors. We use the FLASH code to perform multidimensional simulations in the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) explosion paradigm. Our hybrid progenitor models were produced with the MESA stellar evolution code and include the effects of the Urca process, and we map the progenitor model to the FLASH grid. We performed a suite of DDT simulations over a range of ignition conditions consistent with the progenitor's thermal and convective structure assuming multiple ignition points. To compare the results from these hybrid WD stars to previous results from C-O white dwarfs, we construct a set of C-O WD models with similar properties and similarly simulate a suite of explosions. We find that despite significant variability within each suite, trends distinguishing the explosions are apparent ...

  5. A new baryonic equation of state at sub-nuclear densities for core-collapse simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki [Department of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Department of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan) and Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Yamazaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2012-11-12

    We construct a new equation of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The formulation is based on the nuclear statistical equilibrium description and the liquid drop approximation of nuclei. The model free energy to minimize is calculated by using relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with atomic number up to {approx} 1000. We have also taken into account the pasta phase. We find that the free energy and other thermodynamical quantities are not very different from those given in the standard EOSs that adopt the single nucleus approximation. On the other hand, the average mass is systematically different, which may have an important effect to the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. It is also interesting that the root mean square of the mass number is not very different from the average mass number, since the former is important for the evaluation of coherent scattering rates on nuclei but has been unavailable so far.

  6. Results From Core-Collapse Simulations with Multi-Dimensional, Multi-Angle Neutrino Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Timothy D; Ott, Christian D

    2010-01-01

    We present new results from the only 2D multi-group, multi-angle calculations of core-collapse supernova evolution. The first set of results from these calculations was published in Ott et al. (2008). We have followed a nonrotating and a rapidly rotating 20 solar mass model for ~400 ms after bounce. We show that the radiation fields vary much less with angle than the matter quantities in the region of net neutrino heating. This obtains because most neutrinos are emitted from inner radiative regions and because the specific intensity is an integral over sources from many angles at depth. The latter effect can only be captured by multi-angle transport. We then compute the phase relationship between dipolar oscillations in the shock radius and in matter and radiation quantities throughout the postshock region. We demonstrate a connection between variations in neutrino flux and the hydrodynamical shock oscillations, and use a variant of the Rayleigh test to estimate the detectability of these neutrino fluctuation...

  7. Self-refraction of supernova neutrinos: mixed spectra and three-flavor instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Alexander

    2010-05-14

    Neutrinos in a core-collapse supernova undergo coherent flavor transformations in their own background. We explore this phenomenon during the cooling stage of the explosion. Our three-flavor calculations reveal qualitatively new effects compared to a two-flavor analysis. These effects are especially clearly seen for the inverted mass hierarchy: we find a different pattern of spectral "swaps" in the neutrino spectrum and a novel "mixed" spectrum for the antineutrinos. A brief discussion of the relevant physics is presented, including the instability of the two-flavor evolution trajectory, the three-flavor pattern of spectral "swaps," and partial nonadiabaticity of the evolution.

  8. Detectability of gravitational effects of supernova neutrino emission through pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    Olum, Ken D

    2013-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae emit on the order of 3x10^53 ergs in high-energy neutrinos over a time of order 10 seconds, and so decrease their mass by about 0.2 solar mass. If the explosion is nearly spherically symmetric, there will be little gravitational wave emission. Nevertheless, the sudden decrease of mass of the progenitor may cause a change in the gravitational time delay of signals from a nearby pulsar. We calculate the change in arrival times as successive pulses pass through the neutrino shell at different times, and find that the effect may be detectable in ideal circumstances.

  9. Asymmetric core-collapse of rapidly-rotating massive star

    CERN Document Server

    Gilkis, Avishai

    2016-01-01

    Non-axisymmetric features are found in the core-collapse of a rapidly-rotating massive star, which may have important implications for magnetic field amplification and production of a bipolar outflow that can explode the star, as well as for r-process nucleosynthesis and natal kicks. The collapse of an evolved rapidly-rotating massive star is followed in three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using the FLASH code with neutrino leakage. A rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) forms with a non-zero linear velocity. This process might contribute to the natal kick of the remnant compact object. The PNS is surrounded by a turbulent medium, where high shearing is likely to amplify magnetic fields, which in turn can drive a bipolar outflow. Neutron-rich material in the PNS vicinity may induce strong r-process nucleosynthesis. The rapidly-rotating PNS possesses a rotational energy of E>10foe, some of which may possibly be deposited later on in the SN ejecta through a magnetar spin down process. These processes may be...

  10. Type Ia Supernovae Selection and Forecast of Cosmology Constraints for the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Gjergo, Eda; Cunningham, John D; Kuhlmann, Steve; Biswas, Rahul; Kovacs, Eve; Bernstein, Joseph P; Spinka, Harold

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a study of selection criteria to identify Type Ia supernovae photometrically in a simulated mixed sample of Type Ia supernovae and core collapse supernovae. The simulated sample is a mockup of the expected results of the Dark Energy Survey. Fits to the MLCS2k2 and SALT2 Type Ia supernova models are compared and used to help separate the Type Ia supernovae from the core collapse sample. The Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit (modified to include core collapse supernovae systematics) is used to discriminate among the various selection criteria. This study of varying selection cuts for Type Ia supernova candidates is the first to evaluate core collapse contamination using the Figure of Merit. Different factors that contribute to the Figure of Merit are detailed. With our analysis methods, both SALT2 and MLCS2k2 Figures of Merit improve with tighter selection cuts and higher purities, peaking at 98% purity.

  11. A Subgrid-scale Model for Deflagration-to-Detonation Transitions in Type Ia Supernova Explosion Simulations - Numerical implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F; Roepke, F K

    2013-01-01

    A promising model for normal Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions are delayed detonations of Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs, in which the burning starts out as a subsonic deflagration and turns at a later phase of the explosion into a supersonic detonation. The mechanism of the underlying deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) is unknown in detail, but necessary conditions have been determined recently. The region of detonation initiation cannot be spatially resolved in multi-dimensional full-star simulations of the explosion. We develop a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for DDTs in thermonuclear supernova simulations that is consistent with the currently known constraints. The probability for a DDT to occur is calculated from the distribution of turbulent velocities measured on the grid scale in the vicinity of the flame and the fractal flame surface area that satisfies further physical constraints, such as fuel fraction and fuel density. The implementation of our DDT criterion provides a solid basis for sim...

  12. A possible mechanism for over luminous type Ia supernovae explosions inspired by dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, Zhenzhen; Wen, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter is believed to be a major component of our universe. In this paper we propose a new mechanism based on dark matter inspired super-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf to explain the recent observation of super luminous type Ia supernovae explosions. Our calculation shows when a white dwarf accretes enough dark matter, due to the Pauli exclusive principle between fermionic dark matter particles, the mass of corresponding dark white dwarf (which means the white dwarf mixed with dark matters) can significantly exceeds the Chandrasekhar limit. Moreover, we investigate some physical observable quantities, such as the redshift and moment of inertia of the dark white dwarf and found that these quantities are sensitive to the dark matter particle's distributions and thus can be potentially used to probe the relevant information of dark matter particles in the future.

  13. Lightcurves of Type Ia Supernovae from Near the Time of Explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, A; Stubbs, C W; Challis, P; Wood-Vasey, M; Blondin, S; Huber, M E; Cook, K; Nikolaev, S; Rest, A; Smith, R C; Olsen, K; Suntzeff, N B; Aguilera, C; Prieto, J L; Becker, A; Miceli, A; Miknaitis, G; Clocchiatti, A; Minniti, D; Morelli, L; Welch, D

    2006-08-30

    We present a set of 11 type Ia supernova (SN Ia) lightcurves with dense, pre-maximum sampling. These supernovae (SNe), in galaxies behind the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), were discovered by the SuperMACHO survey. The SNe span a redshift range of z = 0.11-0.35. Our lightcurves contain some of the earliest pre-maximum observations of SNe Ia to date. We also give a functional model that describes the SN Ia lightcurve shape (in our V R-band). Our function uses the ''expanding fireball'' model of Goldhaber et al. (1998) to describe the rising lightcurve immediately after explosion but constrains it to smoothly join the remainder of the lightcurve. We fit this model to a composite observed V R-band lightcurve of three SNe between redshifts of 0.135 to 0.165. These SNe have not been K-corrected or adjusted to account for reddening. In this redshift range, the observed V R-band most closely matches the rest frame V-band. Using the best fit to our functional description of the lightcurve, we find the time between explosion and observed V R-band maximum to be 19.2 {+-} 1.3-1.6 {+-} 0.07(red.) rest-frame days for a SN Ia with a V R-band {Delta}m{sub -10} of 0.52. For the redshifts sampled, the observed V R-band time-of-maximum brightness should be the same as the rest-frame V -band maximum to within 1.1 rest-frame days.

  14. The Oxygen Features in Type Ia Supernovae and the Implications for the Nature of Thermonuclear Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xulin; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Lifan; Sai, Hanna; Zhang, Jujia; Zhang, Tianmeng; Huang, Fang; Rui, Liming

    2016-01-01

    The absorption feature O I 7773 is an important spectral indicator for type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) that can be used to trace the unburned material at outer layers of the exploding white dwarf. In this work, we use a large sample of SNe~Ia to examine this absorption at early phases (i.e., -13 days explosive oxygen burning occurs at the outermost layer of supernova and difference in burning there could lead to the observed diversity, which are in ...

  15. The interplay between chemistry and nucleation in the formation of carbonaceous dust in supernova ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Lazzati, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are considered to be important contributors to the primitive dust enrichment of the interstellar medium in the high-redshift universe. Theoretical models of dust formation in stellar explosions have so far provided controversial results and a generally poor fit to the observations of dust formation in local supernovae. We present a new methodology for the calculation of carbonaceous dust formation in young supernova remnants. Our new technique uses both the nucleation theory and a chemical reaction network to allow us to compute the dust growth beyond the molecular level as well as to consider chemical erosion of the forming grains. We find that carbonaceous dust forms efficiently in the core of the ejecta, but takes several years to condensate, longer than previously estimated. It forms unevenly and remains concentrated in the inner part of the remnant. These results support the role of core-collapse supernovae as dust factories and provide new insight on the observations of SN 1987A...

  16. Spectropolarimetry of stripped-envelope supernovae: observations and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaomi

    2017-09-01

    Spectropolarimetry is one of the most powerful methods to study the multi-dimensional geometry of supernovae (SNe). We present a brief summary of the spectropolarimetric observations of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe. Observations indicate that stripped-envelope SNe generally have a non-axisymmetric ion distribution in the ejecta. Three-dimensional clumpy geometry nicely explains the observed properties. A typical size of the clumps deduced from observations is relatively large: http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xlink:href="RSTA20160273IM1"/>25% of the photosphere. Such a large-scale clumpy structure is similar to that observed in Cassiopeia A, and suggests that large-scale convection or standing accretion shock instability takes place at the onset of the explosion. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'.

  17. An extremely prolific supernova factory in the buried nucleus of the starburst galaxy IC 694

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Torres, M A; Alberdi, A; Polatidis, A

    2009-01-01

    Context. The central kiloparsec of many local Luminous Infra-red Galaxies are known to host intense bursts of massive star formation, leading to numerous explosions of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). However, the dust-enshrouded regions where those supernovae explode prevent their detection at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. Aims. We investigate the nuclear region of the starbust galaxy IC 694 (=Arp 299-A) at radio wavelengths, aimed at discovering recently exploded CCSNe, to determine their rate of explosion, which carries crucial information on star formation rates, the initial mass function and starburst scenarios at work. Methods. We use the electronic European VLBI Network to image with milliarcsecond resolution the 5.0 GHz compact radio emission of the inner 150 pc of IC 694. Results. Our observations reveal the presence of a rich cluster of 26 compact radio emitting sources in the central 150 pc of its nuclear starburst region. The large brightness temperatures observed for the compact sources...

  18. The energy and momentum input of supernova explosions in structured and ionised molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Walch, S K

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the early impact of single and binary supernova (SN) explosions on dense gas clouds with three-dimensional, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulations. The effect of cloud structure, radiative cooling, and ionising radiation from the progenitor stars on the net input of kinetic energy, f_kin=E_kin/E_SN, thermal energy, f_therm=E_therm/E_SN, and gas momentum f_P=P/P_SN to the interstellar medium (ISM) is tested. For clouds with n=100 cm^{-3}, the momentum generating Sedov and pressure-driven snowplough phases are terminated early (~ 0.01 Myr) and radiative cooling limits the coupling to f_therm ~ 0.01, f_kin ~ 0.05, and f_P ~ 9, significantly lower than for the case without cooling. For pre-ionised clouds these numbers are only increased by ~ 50%, independent of the cloud structure. This only suffices to accelerate ~ 5% of the cloud to radial velocities >30km/s. A second SN might further enhance the coupling efficiencies if delayed past the Sedov phase of the first explosion. Such very low coupli...

  19. Collapse Velocity and Prompt Explosion for the Presupernova Model Ws15M⊙

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Quan Luo; Men-Quan Liu; Qiu-He Peng; Zuo-Heng Xie

    2006-01-01

    For the presupernova model Ws15M⊙, we re-calculate the electron capture (EC) timescale and hydrodynamical (HD) timescale. We found that the EC timescale can be smaller than the HD timescale in the inner region of the collapse iron core at the moment immediately before the shock wave bounce. The change in these two timescales at the late stage of core collapse is expected to affect the collapse velocity. If the late-time collapse velocity is artificially increased by a small quantity, then prompt explosion of the supernova may happen. Further calculations are still needed to check the plausibility of the acceleration mechanism caused by the faster EC process.

  20. Supernova deleptonization asymmetry: Impact on self-induced flavor conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Sovan; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Mueller, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    During the accretion phase of a core-collapse supernova (SN), the deleptonization flux has recently been found to develop a global dipole pattern (LESA---Lepton Emission Self-sustained Asymmetry). The $\

  1. The Blast-Wave-Driven Instability as a Vehicle for Understanding Supernova Explosion Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, A R

    2008-05-27

    Blast-wave-driven instabilities play a rich and varied role throughout the evolution of supernovae from explosion to remnant, but interpreting their role is difficult due to the enormous complexity of the stellar systems. We consider the simpler and fundamental hydrodynamic instability problem of a material interface between two constant-density fluids perturbed from spherical and driven by a divergent central Taylor-Sedov blast wave. The existence of unified solutions at high Mach number and small density ratio suggests that general conclusions can be drawn about the likely asymptotic structure of the mixing zone. To this end we apply buoyancy-drag and bubble merger models modified to include the effects of divergence and radial velocity gradients. In general, these effects preclude the true self-similar evolution of classical Raleigh-Taylor, but can be incorporated into a quasi-self-similar growth picture. Loss of memory of initial conditions can occur in the quasi-self-similar model, but requires initial mode numbers higher than those predicted for pre-explosion interfaces in Type II SNe, suggesting that their late-time structure is likely strongly influenced by details of the initial perturbations. Where low-modes are dominant, as in the Type Ia Tycho remnant, they result from initial perturbations rather than generation from smaller scales. Therefore, structure observed now contains direct information about the explosion process. When large-amplitude modes are present in the initial conditions, the contribution to the perturbation growth from the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is significant or dominant compared to Rayleigh-Taylor. Such Richtmyer-Meshkov growth can yield proximity of the forward shock to the growing spikes and structure that strongly resembles that observed in the Tycho. Laser-driven high-energy-density laboratory experiments offer a promising avenue for testing model and simulation descriptions of blast-wave-driven instabilities and making

  2. Supernova remnants: the X-ray perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jacco

    2012-12-01

    -ray observatories. In discussing the results of the last 15 years I have chosen to discuss a few topics that are of particular interest. These include the properties of Type Ia supernova remnants, which appear to be regularly shaped and have stratified ejecta, in contrast to core collapse supernova remnants, which have patchy ejecta distributions. For core collapse supernova remnants I discuss the spatial distribution of fresh nucleosynthesis products, but also their properties in connection to the neutron stars they contain. For the mature supernova remnants I focus on the prototypal supernova remnants Vela and the Cygnus Loop. And I discuss the interesting class of mixed-morphology remnants. Many of these mature supernova remnants contain still plasma with enhanced ejecta abundances. Over the last five years it has also become clear that many mixed-morphology remnants contain plasma that is overionized. This is in contrast to most other supernova remnants, which contain underionized plasmas. This text ends with a review of X-ray synchrotron radiation from shock regions, which has made it clear that some form of magnetic-field amplification is operating near shocks, and is an indication of efficient cosmic-ray acceleration.

  3. Asymmetric supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Akiyama, Shizuka

    2010-03-01

    Spectropolarimetry of core collapse supernovae has shown that they are asymmetric and often, but not universally, bi-polar. Jet-induced supernova models give a typical jet/torus structure that is reminiscent of some objects like the Crab nebula, SN 1987A and Cas A. Asymmetry in the strength of polar jets is a plausible mechanism to produce substantial pulsar "kick" velocities. Jets may arise from the intrinsic rotation and magnetic fields that are expected to accompany core collapse. We summarize the potential importance of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) for the core collapse problem in the context of the non-monotonic behavior expected: increasing centrifugal support will lead to a maximum rotation and magnetic field production as a function of the initial rotation of the iron core. Non-axisymmetric instabilities are predicted for differentially rotating proto-neutron stars with values of the ratio of rotational kinetic energy to binding energy, T/∣ W∣≳0.01. The non-axisymmetric instabilities are likely to drive magnetosonic waves into the surrounding time-dependent density structure. These waves represent a mechanism of the dissipation of the rotational energy of the proto-neutron star, and the outward deposition of this energy may play a role in the supernova explosion process. The phase of deleptonization and contraction of the proto-neutron star lasting several seconds is likely to be an important phase of magnetic non-axisymmetric evolution. In the special circumstance that the proto-neutron star is born sufficiently rapidly rotating that it is subject to bar-mode instabilities on secular timescales, a possible outcome is that the deleptonizing neutron star will evolve along the locus T/∣ W∣˜0.14 releasing a significant fraction of its binding energy as MHD power sufficient to account for a GRB. This power will be provided over an extended time, 10 s, that is strongly reminiscent of the timescale of long GRBs and is also comparable to the

  4. Exact and approximate expressions of energy generation rates and their impact on the explosion properties of Pair Instability Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Yamada, Shoichi

    2015-01-01

    Energetics of nuclear reaction is fundamentally important to understand the mechanism of pair instability supernovae (PISNe). Based on the hydrodynamic equations and thermodynamic relations, we derive exact expressions for energy conservation suitable to be solved in simulation. We also show that some formulae commonly used in the literature are obtained as approximations of the exact expressions. We simulate the evolution of very massive stars of ~100-320 Msun with zero- and 1/10 Zsun, and calculate further explosions as PISNe, applying each of the exact and approximate formulae. The calculations demonstrate that the explosion properties of PISN, such as the mass range, the 56Ni yield, and the explosion energy, are significantly affected by applying the different energy generation rates. We discuss how these results affect the estimate of the PISN detection rate, which depends on the theoretical predictions of such explosion properties.

  5. The Nonlinear Evolution of Massive Stellar Core Collapses That ``Fizzle''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, James N.; Pickett, Brian K.; Durisen, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    Core collapse in a massive rotating star may pause before nuclear density is reached, if the core contains total angular momentum J>~1049 g cm2 s-1. In such aborted or ``fizzled'' collapses, temporary equilibrium objects form that, although rapidly rotating, are secularly and dynamically stable because of the high electron fraction per baryon Ye>0.3 and the high entropy per baryon Sb/k~1-2 of the core material at neutrino trapping. These fizzled collapses are called ``fizzlers.'' In the absence of prolonged infall from the surrounding star, the evolution of fizzlers is driven by deleptonization, which causes them to contract and spin up until they either become stable neutron stars or reach the dynamic instability point for barlike modes. The barlike instability case is of current interest because the bars would be sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. In this paper, we use linear and nonlinear techniques, including three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, to study the behavior of fizzlers that have deleptonized to the point of reaching dynamic bar instability. The simulations show that the GW emission produced by bar-unstable fizzlers has rms strain amplitude r15h=10-23 to 10-22 for an observer on the rotation axis, with wave frequency of roughly 60-600 Hz. Here h is the strain and r15= (r/15 Mpc) is the distance to the fizzler in units of 15 Mpc. If the bars that form by dynamic instability can maintain GW emission at this level for 100 periods or more, they may be detectable by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory at the distance of the Virgo Cluster. They would be detectable as burst sources, defined as sources that persist for ~10 cycles or less, if they occurred in the Local Group of galaxies. The long-term behavior of the bars is the crucial issue for the detection of fizzler events. The bars present at the end of our simulations are dynamically stable but will evolve on longer timescales because of a variety of effects, such as

  6. Jittering-jets explosion triggered by the standing accretion shock instability

    CERN Document Server

    Papish, Oded; Soker, Noam

    2015-01-01

    We show that the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) that has been used to ease the shock revival in core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) neutrino-driven explosion models, might play a much more decisive role in supplying the stochastic angular momentum required to trigger an explosion with jittering jets. To play a minor role in neutrino-based explosion models, the kinetic energy of the gas inside the stalled shock associated with the transverse (non-radial) motion should be about more than ten percent of the energy of the accreted gas. We find that this implies a stochastic angular momentum that can reach about five percent of the Keplerian specific angular momentum around the newly born neutron star. Such an accretion flow leaves an open conical region along the poles with an average opening angle of about 5 degrees. The outflow from the open polar region powers an explosion according to the jittering-jets model.

  7. Radio Detection of Supernova 2004ip in the Circumnuclear Region of the Luminous Infrared Galaxy IRAS 18293-3413

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Torres, M A; Alberdi, A; Colina, L; Torrelles, J M; Väisänen, P; Panagia, N; Wilson, A

    2007-01-01

    We report a radio detection of supernova SN 2004ip in the circumnuclear region of the luminous infrared galaxy IRAS 18293-3413, using Very Large Array (VLA) observations at 8.4 GHz on 11 June 2007. SN 2004ip had been previously discovered at near-infrared wavelengths using adaptive optics observations, but its nature (core-collapse or thermonuclear) could not be definitely established. Our radio detection, about three years after the explosion of the supernova, indicates a prominent interaction of the ejecta of SN 2004ip with the circumstellar medium, confirming that the supernova was a core-collapse event (probably Type II), and thus strongly suggesting that its progenitor was a massive star with a significant mass-loss prior to its explosion. SN 2004ip has a 8.4 GHz luminosity of 3.5E27 erg/s/Hz, about twice as bright as SN 2000ft in NGC 7469 at a similar age, and given its projected distance to the nucleus (~500 pc), is one of the closest of all known radio SNe to a galaxy nucleus, and one of the brightest...

  8. The soft and hard X-rays thermal emission from star cluster winds with a supernova explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Castellanos-Ramirez, A; Esquivel, A; Toledo-Roy, J C; Olivares, J; Velazquez, P F

    2015-01-01

    Massive young star clusters contain dozens or hundreds of massive stars that inject mechanical energy in the form of winds and supernova explosions, producing an outflow which expands into their surrounding medium, shocking it and forming structures called superbubbles. The regions of shocked material can have temperatures in excess of 10$^6$ K, and emit mainly in thermal X-rays (soft and hard). This X-ray emission is strongly affected by the action of thermal conduction, as well as by the metallicity of the material injected by the massive stars. We present three-dimensional numerical simulations exploring these two effects, metallicity of the stellar winds and supernova explosions, as well as thermal conduction.

  9. Spectral modeling of nebular-phase supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Jerkstrand, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Massive stars live fast and die young. They shine furiously for a few million years, during which time they synthesize most of the heavy elements in the universe in their cores. They end by blowing themselves up in a powerful explosion known as a supernova. During this process, the core collapses to a neutron star or a black hole, while the outer layers are expelled with velocities of thousands of kilometers per second. The resulting fireworks often outshine the entire host galaxy for many weeks. The explosion energy is eventually radiated away, but powering of the newborn nebula continues by radioactive isotopes synthesized in the explosion. The ejecta are now quite transparent, and we can see the material produced in the deep interiors of the star. To interpret the observations, detailed spectral modeling is needed. This thesis aims to develop and apply state-of-the-art computational tools for interpreting and modeling supernova observations in the nebular phase. This requires calculation of the physical co...

  10. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of SN 1987A from the supernova explosion till the Athena era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    The proximity of SN 1987A and the wealth of observations collected at all wavelenght bands since its outburst allow us to study in details the evolution of a supernova remnant (SNR) from the immediate aftermath of the SN explosion till its expansion through the highly inhomogeneous circumstellar medium (CSM). We investigate the interaction between SN 1987A and the surrounding CSM through three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling. The aim is to determine the contribution of shocked ejecta and shocked CSM to the detected X-ray flux and to derive the density structure of the inhomogeneous CSM and clues on the early structure of ejecta. We show that the physical model reproducing the main observables of SN 1987A reproduces also the X-ray emission of the subsequent expanding remnant, thus bridging the gap between supernovae and supernova remnants. By comparing model results with observations, we constrain the explosion energy in the range 1.2 - 1.4 × 10^(51) erg and the envelope mass in the range 15 - 17 M_{⊙}) . We find that the shape of X-ray lightcurves and spectra at early epochs (environment, and to constrain the pre-supernova structure of the nebula. Finally the remnant evolution is followed for 40 years, providing predictions on the future of SN 1987A until the adventof Athena.

  11. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Balantekin, A. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kusakabe, M. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pehlivan, Y. [Mimar Sinan GSÜ, Department of Physics, Şişli, İstanbul 34380 (Turkey); Suzuki, T. [Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-06-24

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  12. [O I] λλ6300, 6364 IN THE NEBULAR SPECTRUM OF A SUBLUMINOUS TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubenberger, S.; Kromer, M.; Hillebrandt, W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Pakmor, R. [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Pignata, G. [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Maeda, K. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Hachinger, S. [Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Emil-Fischer-Str. 31, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Leibundgut, B. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    In this Letter, a late-phase spectrum of SN 2010lp, a subluminous Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), is presented and analyzed. As in 1991bg-like SNe Ia at comparable epochs, the spectrum is characterized by relatively broad [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission lines. However, instead of narrow [Fe III] and [Co III] lines that dominate the emission from the innermost regions of 1991bg-like supernovae (SNe), SN 2010lp shows [O I] λλ6300, 6364 emission, usually associated with core-collapse SNe and never previously observed in a subluminous thermonuclear explosion. The [O I] feature has a complex profile with two strong, narrow emission peaks. This suggests that oxygen is distributed in a non-spherical region close to the center of the ejecta, severely challenging most thermonuclear explosion models discussed in the literature. We conclude that, given these constraints, violent mergers are presently the most promising scenario to explain SN 2010lp.

  13. Neutrino event counts from Type Ia supernova models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Gautam; Scholberg, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae (SNe) are widely known to be among the universe's primary neutrino factories, releasing ˜99% of their energy, or ˜1053 ergs, in the form of the tiny leptons. On the other hand, less than 4% of the energy of Type Ia SNe is released via neutrinos, hence making Ia SNe impossible to detect (through neutrino observations) at typical supernova distances. For this reason, neutrino signatures from these explosions have very rarely been modeled. We ran time-sliced fluences from non-oscillation pure deflagration and delayed detonation (DDT) Ia models by Odrzywolek and Plewa (2011) through SNOwGLoBES, a software that calculates event rates and other observed quantities of supernova neutrinos in various detectors. We determined Ia neutrino event rates in Hyper-K, a proposed water Cherenkov detector, JUNO, a scintillator detector under construction, and DUNE, a proposed argon detector, and identified criteria to distinguish between the two models (pure deflagration and DDT) based on data from a real supernova (statistically represented by a Poisson distribution around the expected result). We found that up to distances of 8.00, 1.54, and 2.37 kpc (subject to change based on oscillation effects and modified detector efficiencies), we can discern the explosion mechanism with ≥90% confidence in Hyper-K, JUNO, and DUNE, respectively, thus learning more about Ia progenitors.

  14. Very Low Energy Supernovae from Neutrino Mass Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The continuing difficulty of achieving a reliable explosion in simulations of core-collapse supernovae, especially for more massive stars, has led to speculation concerning the observable transients that might be produced if such a supernova fails. Even if a prompt outgoing shock fails to form in a collapsing presupernova star, one must still consider the hydrodynamic response of the star to the abrupt loss of mass via neutrinos as the core forms a protoneutron star. Following a suggestion by Nadezhin (1980), we calculate the hydrodynamical responses of typical supernova progenitor stars to the rapid loss of approximately 0.2 to 0.5 M_sun of gravitational mass from their centers. In a red supergiant star, a very weak supernova with total kinetic energy ~ 10^47 erg results. The binding energy of a large fraction of the hydrogen envelope before the explosion is of the same order and, depending upon assumptions regarding the neutrino loss rates, most of it is ejected. Ejection speeds are ~ 100 km/s and luminosit...

  15. p-process nucleosynthesis via proton-capture reactions in thermonuclear supernovae explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Anne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Model calculations within the framework of the so-called γ process show an underproduction of the p nucleus with the highest isotopic abundace 92Mo. This discrepancy can be narrowed by taking into account the alternative production site of a type Ia supernova explosion. Here, the nucleus 92Mo can be produced by a sequence of proton-capture reactions. The amount of 92Mo nuclei produced via this reaction chain is most sensitive to the reactions 90Zr(p,γ and 91Nb(p,γ. Both rates have to be investigated experimentally to study the impact of this nucleosynthesis aspect on the long-standing 92Mo-problem. We have already measured the proton-capture reaction on 90Zr using high-resolution in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy. In this contribution, we will present our preliminary results of the total cross sections as well as the partial cross sections. Furthermore, we plan to measure the 91Nb(p,γ reaction soon. Due to the radioactive target material, the 91Nb nuclei have to be produced prior to the experiment. The current status of this production will be presented in this contribution.

  16. Type Ia Supernovae: Can Coriolis Force Break the Symmetry of the Gravitational Confined Detonation Explosion Mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Senz, D.; Cabezón, R. M.; Domínguez, I.; Thielemann, F. K.

    2016-03-01

    Currently the number of models aimed at explaining the phenomena of type Ia supernovae is high and distinguishing between them is a must. In this work we explore the influence of rotation on the evolution of the nuclear flame that drives the explosion in the so-called gravitational confined detonation models. Assuming that the flame starts in a pointlike region slightly above the center of the white dwarf (WD) and adding a moderate amount of angular velocity to the star we follow the evolution of the deflagration using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We find that the results are very dependent on the angle between the rotational axis and the line connecting the initial bubble of burned material with the center of the WD at the moment of ignition. The impact of rotation is larger for angles close to 90° because the Coriolis force on a floating element of fluid is maximum and its principal effect is to break the symmetry of the deflagration. Such symmetry breaking weakens the convergence of the nuclear flame at the antipodes of the initial ignition volume, changing the environmental conditions around the convergence region with respect to non-rotating models. These changes seem to disfavor the emergence of a detonation in the compressed volume at the antipodes and may compromise the viability of the so-called gravitational confined detonation mechanism.

  17. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: CAN CORIOLIS FORCE BREAK THE SYMMETRY OF THE GRAVITATIONAL CONFINED DETONATION EXPLOSION MECHANISM?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Senz, D. [Departament de Física, UPC, Comte d’Urgell 187, E-08036 Barcelona (Spain); Cabezón, R. M.; Thielemann, F. K. [Departement Physik, Universität Basel. Klingelbergstrasse, 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Domínguez, I., E-mail: domingo.garcia@upc.edu, E-mail: ruben.cabezon@unibas.ch [Departamento de Física, Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2016-03-10

    Currently the number of models aimed at explaining the phenomena of type Ia supernovae is high and distinguishing between them is a must. In this work we explore the influence of rotation on the evolution of the nuclear flame that drives the explosion in the so-called gravitational confined detonation models. Assuming that the flame starts in a pointlike region slightly above the center of the white dwarf (WD) and adding a moderate amount of angular velocity to the star we follow the evolution of the deflagration using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We find that the results are very dependent on the angle between the rotational axis and the line connecting the initial bubble of burned material with the center of the WD at the moment of ignition. The impact of rotation is larger for angles close to 90° because the Coriolis force on a floating element of fluid is maximum and its principal effect is to break the symmetry of the deflagration. Such symmetry breaking weakens the convergence of the nuclear flame at the antipodes of the initial ignition volume, changing the environmental conditions around the convergence region with respect to non-rotating models. These changes seem to disfavor the emergence of a detonation in the compressed volume at the antipodes and may compromise the viability of the so-called gravitational confined detonation mechanism.

  18. A relativistic neutron fireball from a supernova explosion as a possible source of chiral influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, G A; Saito, T; Tsarev, V A; Uryson, A V

    2007-06-01

    We elaborate on a previously proposed idea that polarized electrons produced from neutrons, released in a supernova (SN) explosion, can cause chiral dissymmetry of molecules in interstellar gas-dust clouds. A specific physical mechanism of a relativistic neutron fireball with Lorentz factor of the order of 100 is assumed for propelling a great number of free neutrons outside the dense SN shell. A relativistic chiral electron-proton plasma, produced from neutron decays, is slowed down owing to collective effects in the interstellar plasma. As collective effects do not involve the particle spin, the electrons can carry their helicities to the cloud. The estimates show high chiral efficiency of such electrons. In addition to this mechanism, production of circularly polarized ultraviolet photons through polarized-electron bremsstrahlung at an early stage of the fireball evolution is considered. It is shown that these photons can escape from the fireball plasma. However, for an average density of neutrals in the interstellar medium of the order of 0.2 cm(-3) and at distances of the order of 10 pc from the SN, these photons will be absorbed with a factor of about 10(-7) due to the photoeffect. In this case, their chiral efficiency will be about five orders of magnitude less than that for polarized electrons.

  19. A New Estimation of Mass Accumulation Efficiency in Helium Shell Flashes toward Type Ia Supernova Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, M

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated the mass accumulation efficiency during helium shell flashes to examine whether or not a carbon-oxygen white dwarf (C+O WD) grows up to the Chandrasekhar mass limit to ignite a Type Ia supernova explosion. It has been frequently argued that luminous super-soft X-ray sources and symbiotic stars are progenitors of SNe Ia. In such systems, a C+O WD accretes hydrogen-rich matter from a companion and burns hydrogen steadily on its surface. The WD develops a helium layer underneath the hydrogen-rich envelope and undergoes periodic helium shell flashes. Using OPAL opacity, we have reanalyzed a full cycle of helium shell flashes on a 1.3 M_ødot C+O WD and confirmed that the helium envelope of the WD expands to blow a strong wind. A part of the accumulated matter is lost by the wind. The mass accumulation efficiency is estimated as \\eta_{He} = -0.175 (\\log accretion rate \\dot M is in units of M_ødot yr^{-1}. In relatively high mass accretion rates as expected in recent SN Ia progenitor models, the...

  20. Type Ia Supernovae: Can Coriolis force break the symmetry of the gravitational confined detonation explosion mechanism?

    CERN Document Server

    García-Senz, D; Domínguez, I; Thielemann, F K

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays the number of models aimed at explaining the Type Ia supernova phenomenon is high and discriminating between them is a must-do. In this work we explore the influence of rotation in the evolution of the nuclear flame which drives the explosion in the so called gravitational confined detonation models. Assuming that the flame starts in a point-like region slightly above the center of the white dwarf (WD) and adding a moderate amount of angular velocity to the star we follow the evolution of the deflagration using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We find that the results are very dependent on the angle between the rotational axis and the line connecting the initial bubble of burned material with the center of the white dwarf at the moment of the ignition. The impact of rotation is larger for angles close to 90{\\deg} because the Coriolis force on a floating element of fluid is maximum, and its principal effect is to break the symmetry of the deflagration. Such symmetry breaking weakens the converg...

  1. Extreme Supernova Models for the Super-luminous Transient ASASSN-15lh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Wheeler, J. C.; Vinko, J.; Nagy, A. P.; Wiggins, B. K.; Even, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    The recent discovery of the unprecedentedly super-luminous transient ASASSN-15lh (or SN 2015L) with its UV-bright secondary peak challenges all the power-input models that have been proposed for super-luminous supernovae. Here we examine some of the few viable interpretations of ASASSN-15lh in the context of a stellar explosion, involving combinations of one or more power inputs. We model the light curve of ASASSN-15lh with a hybrid model that includes contributions from magnetar spin-down energy and hydrogen-poor circumstellar interaction. We also investigate models of pure circumstellar interaction with a massive hydrogen-deficient shell and discuss the lack of interaction features in the observed spectra. We find that, as a supernova, ASASSN-15lh can be best modeled by the energetic core-collapse of an ˜40 M ⊙ star interacting with a hydrogen-poor shell of ˜20 M ⊙. The circumstellar shell and progenitor mass are consistent with a rapidly rotating pulsational pair-instability supernova progenitor as required for strong interaction following the final supernova explosion. Additional energy injection by a magnetar with an initial period of 1-2 ms and magnetic field of 0.1-1 × 1014 G may supply the excess luminosity required to overcome the deficit in single-component models, but this requires more fine-tuning and extreme parameters for the magnetar, as well as the assumption of efficient conversion of magnetar energy into radiation. We thus favor a single-input model where the reverse shock formed in a strong SN ejecta-circumstellar matter interaction following a very powerful core-collapse SN explosion can supply the luminosity needed to reproduce the late-time UV-bright plateau.

  2. Progenitor-Explosion Connection and Remnant Birth Masses for Neutrino-Driven Supernovae of Iron-Core Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Ugliano, Marcella; Marek, Andreas; Arcones, Almudena

    2012-01-01

    We perform hydrodynamic supernova simulations in spherical symmetry for over 100 single stars of solar metallicity to explore the progenitor-explosion and progenitor-remnant connections established by the neutrino-driven mechanism. We use an approximative treatment of neutrino transport and replace the high-density interior of the neutron star (NS) by an inner boundary condition based on an analytic proto-NS core-cooling model, whose free parameters are chosen such that explosion energy, nickel production, and energy release by the compact remnant of progenitors around 20 solar masses are compatible with Supernova 1987A. Thus we are able to simulate the accretion phase, initiation of the explosion, subsequent neutrino-driven wind phase for 15-20 s, and the further evolution of the blast wave for hours to days until fallback is completed. Our results challenge long-standing paradigms. We find that remnant mass, launch time, and properties of the explosion depend strongly on the stellar structure and exhibit la...

  3. A mildly relativistic radio jet from the otherwise normal type Ic supernova 2007gr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paragi, Z; Taylor, G B; Kouveliotou, C; Granot, J; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Bietenholz, M; van der Horst, A J; Pidopryhora, Y; van Langevelde, H J; Garrett, M A; Szomoru, A; Argo, M K; Bourke, S; Paczyński, B

    2010-01-28

    The class of type Ic supernovae have drawn increasing attention since 1998 owing to their sparse association (only four so far) with long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although both phenomena originate from the core collapse of a massive star, supernovae emit mostly at optical wavelengths, whereas GRBs emit mostly in soft gamma-rays or hard X-rays. Though the GRB central engine generates ultra-relativistic jets, which beam the early emission into a narrow cone, no relativistic outflows have hitherto been found in type Ib/c supernovae explosions, despite theoretical expectations and searches. Here we report radio (interferometric) observations that reveal a mildly relativistic expansion in a nearby type Ic supernova, SN 2007gr. Using two observational epochs 60 days apart, we detect expansion of the source and establish a conservative lower limit for the average apparent expansion velocity of 0.6c. Independently, a second mildly relativistic supernova has been reported. Contrary to the radio data, optical observations of SN 2007gr indicate a typical type Ic supernova with ejecta velocities approximately 6,000 km s(-1), much lower than in GRB-associated supernovae. We conclude that in SN 2007gr a small fraction of the ejecta produced a low-energy mildly relativistic bipolar radio jet, while the bulk of the ejecta were slower and, as shown by optical spectropolarimetry, mildly aspherical.

  4. Time-Dependent Collective Neutrino Oscillations in Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbar, Sajad; Duan, Huaiyu

    2015-10-01

    Neutrinos can experience self-induced flavor conversion in core-collapse supernovae due to neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. Previously a stationary supernova model, the so called ``neutrino bulb model,'' was used exclusively to study collective neutrino oscillations in the core-collapse supernova. We show that even a small time-dependent perturbation in neutrino fluxes on the surface of the proto-neutron star can lead to fast varying collective oscillations at large radii. This result calls for time-dependent supernova models for the study of collective neutrino oscillations. This work was supported by DOE EPSCoR Grant DE-SC0008142 at UNM.

  5. Interacting supernovae and supernova impostors. LSQ13zm: an outburst heralds the death of a massive star

    CERN Document Server

    Tartaglia, L; Sullivan, M; Baltay, C; Rabinowitz, D; Nugent, P; Drake, A J; Djorgovski, S G; Gal-Yam, A; Fabrika, S; Barsukova, E A; Goranskij, V P; Valeev, A F; Fatkhullin, T; Schulze, S; Mehner, A; Bauer, F E; Taubenberger, S; Nordin, J; Valenti, S; Howell, D A; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Fasano, G; Elias-Rosa, N; Barbieri, M; Bettoni, D; Harutyunyan, A; Kangas, T; Kankare, E; Martin, J C; Mattila, S; Morales-Garoffolo, A; Ochner, P; Rebbapragada, Umaa D; Terreran, G; Tomasella, L; Turatto, M; Verroi, E; Woźniak, P R

    2016-01-01

    We report photometric and spectroscopic observations of the optical transient LSQ13zm. Historical data reveal the presence of an eruptive episode (that we label as `2013a') followed by a much brighter outburst (`2013b') three weeks later, that we argue to be the genuine supernova explosion. This sequence of events closely resemble those observed for SN2010mc and (in 2012) SN2009ip. The absolute magnitude reached by LSQ13zm during 2013a ($M_R=-14.87\\pm0.25\\,\\rm{mag}$) is comparable with those of supernova impostors, while that of the 2013b event ($M_R=-18.46\\pm0.21\\,\\rm{mag}$) is consistent with those of interacting supernovae. Our spectra reveal the presence of a dense and structured circumstellar medium, probably produced through numerous pre-supernova mass-loss events. In addition, we find evidence for high-velocity ejecta, with a fraction of gas expelled at more than 20000\\kms. The spectra of LSQ13zm show remarkable similarity with those of well-studied core-collapse supernovae. From the analysis of the av...

  6. Resolved Host Studies of Stellar Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Levesque, Emily M

    2016-01-01

    The host galaxies of nearby (z<0.3) core-collapse supernovae and long-duration gamma-ray bursts offer an excellent means of probing the environments and populations that produce these events' varied massive progenitors. These same young stellar progenitors make LGRBs and SNe valuable and potentially powerful tracers of star formation, metallicity, the IMF, and the end phases of stellar evolution. However, properly utilizing these progenitors as tools requires a thorough understanding of their formation and, consequently, the physical properties of their parent host environments. This review looks at some of the recent work on LGRB and SN hosts with resolved environments that allows us to probe the precise explosion sites and surrounding environments of these events in incredible detail.

  7. Search for isotopic signatures of a supernova explosion close to the solar system in marine sediments; Recherche de signatures isotopiques dans les sediments marins de l'explosion d'une supernova proche du systeme solaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitoussi, Caroline [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, (CSNSM) IN2P3/CNRS, Campus d' Orsay, Bat 108, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2006-06-15

    The recent observation of a {sup 60}Fe peak in a deep-sea ferro-manganese crust has been interpreted as due to a supernova explosion relatively close to the solar system 2.8 {+-} 0.4 Myr ago. To confirm this interpretation with better time-resolved measurements, and the simultaneous access, on the same sample, to other isotopes and geochemical phases, marine sediments seem to be a tool of choice. The objective of this work was to search for isotopic anomalies which would be characteristic for residues of this supernova. More specifically, {sup 129}I, {sup 60}Fe, and {sup 26}Al have been investigated, being measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Quantifying these nuclides' fluxes would help constrain stellar nucleosynthesis models. These residues are isotopes initially produced during hydrostatic and/or explosive nucleosynthesis. The physical conditions during the explosion (temperature, neutron density) are such that supernovae are thought to be good candidates for the astrophysical site of the r-process. The {sup 129}I study showed that measurement of pre-anthropogenic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios need a very strict control of the various potential {sup 129}I sources, especially when working with small quantities (micrograms) of iodine. This study revealed that the expected pre-anthropogenic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio for pre-nuclear samples in the marine environment shows a large discrepancy between theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al measurements allow us to conclude that, in the authigenic phase of the marine sediments, there is no {sup 60}Fe anomaly in the time interval defined by the signal found on the Fe-Mn crust (from 2.4 to 3.2 Myr), and no {sup 26}Al anomaly from 2.6 to 3.2 Myr. (author)

  8. The Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background

    CERN Document Server

    Beacom, John F

    2010-01-01

    The Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background (DSNB) is the weak glow of MeV neutrinos and antineutrinos from distant core-collapse supernovae. The DSNB has not been detected yet, but the Super-Kamiokande (SK) 2003 upper limit on the electron antineutrino flux is close to predictions, now quite precise, based on astrophysical data. If SK is modified with dissolved gadolinium to reduce detector backgrounds and increase the energy range for analysis, then it should detect the DSNB at a rate of a few events per year, providing a new probe of supernova neutrino emission and the cosmic core-collapse rate. If the DSNB is not detected, then new physics will be required. Neutrino astronomy, while uniquely powerful, has proven extremely difficult -- only the Sun and the nearby Supernova 1987A have been detected to date -- so the promise of detecting new sources soon is exciting indeed.

  9. The Physics Of Supernova Neutrino Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Kneller, James P

    2015-01-01

    On February 23, 1987 we collected 24 neutrinos from the explosion of a blue super-giant star in the Large Magellanic Cloud confirming the basic paradigm of core-collapse supernova. During the many years we have been waiting for a repeat of that momentous day, the number and size of neutrino detectors around the world has grown considerably. If the neutrinos from the next supernova in our Galaxy arrive tomorrow we shall collect upwards of tens of thousands of events and next generation detectors will increase the amount of data we collect by more than an order of magnitude. But it is also now apparent that the message is much more complex than previously thought because many time, energy and neutrino flavor dependent features are imprinted upon the signal either at emission or by the passage through the outer layers of the star. These features arise due to the explosion dynamics, the physics of nuclei at high temperatures and densities, and the properties of neutrinos. In this proceedings I will present some a...

  10. Towards generating a new supernova equation of state: A systematic analysis of cold hybrid stars

    CERN Document Server

    Heinimann, Oliver; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2016-01-01

    The hadron-quark phase transition in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) has the potential to trigger explosions in otherwise non-exploding models. However, those hybrid supernova equations of state (EOS) shown to trigger an explosion do not support the observational 2 M_sun neutron star maximum mass constraint. In this work, we analyze cold hybrid stars by the means of a systematic parameter scan for the phase transition properties, with the aim to develop a new hybrid supernova EOS. The hadronic phase is described with the state-of-the-art supernova EOS HS(DD2), and quark matter by an EOS with a constant speed of sound ("CSS"). We find promising cases which meet the 2 M_sun criterion and are interesting for CCSN explosions. We show that the very simple CSS EOS is transferable into the well known thermodynamic bag model, important for future application in CCSN simulations. In the second part, the occurrence of reconfinement and multiple phase transitions is discussed. In the last part, the influence of hyperon...

  11. Rapidly evolving faint transients from stripped-envelope electron-capture supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Eldridge, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the expected rates and bolometric light-curve properties of stripped-envelope electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe) using stellar models from the Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis code. We find that 0.8 per cent (Z = 0.020) and 1.2 per cent (Z = 0.004) of core-collapse supernovae are stripped-envelope ECSNe. Their typical ejecta masses are estimated to be about 0.3 M⊙(Z = 0.020) and 0.6 M⊙ (Z = 0.004). Assuming ECSN explosion properties from numerical explosion simulations, an explosion energy of 1.5 × 1050 erg and a 56Ni mass of 2.5 × 10-3 M⊙, we find that stripped-envelope ECSNe have a typical rise time of around 7 d (Z = 0.020) or 13 d (Z = 0.004) and peak luminosity of around 1041 ergs-1 (-13.8 mag, Z = 0.020) or 7 × 1040 erg s-1 (-13.4 mag, Z = 0.004). Their typical ejecta velocities are around 7000 km s-1 (Z = 0.020) or 5000 km s-1 (Z = 0.004). Thus, stripped-envelope ECSNe are observed as rapidly evolving faint transients with relatively small velocities. SN 2008ha-like supernovae, which are the faintest kind of SN 2002cx-like (also known as Type Iax) supernovae, may be related to stripped-envelope ECSNe.

  12. Supernova constraints on neutrino oscillation and EoS for proto-neutron star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-05-02

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We here discuss how to determine the neutrino temperatures and propose a method to determine still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and θ{sub 13}, simultaneously. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13} with isotopic ratios of the light elements discovered in presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show that our method suggests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  13. Supernovae neutrino pasta interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zidu; Horowitz, Charles; Caplan, Matthew; Berry, Donald; Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    In core-collapse supernovae, the neutron rich matter is believed to have complex structures, such as spherical, slablike, and rodlike shapes. They are collectively called ``nuclear pasta''. Supernovae neutrinos may scatter coherently on the ``nuclear pasta'' since the wavelength of the supernovae neutrinos are comparable to the nuclear pasta scale. Consequently, the neutrino pasta scattering is important to understand the neutrino opacity in the supernovae. In this work we simulated the ``nuclear pasta'' at different temperatures and densities using our semi-classical molecular dynamics and calculated the corresponding static structure factor that describes ν-pasta scattering. We found the neutrino opacities are greatly modified when the ``pasta'' exist and may have influence on the supernovae neutrino flux and average energy. Our neutrino-pasta scattering effect can finally be involved in the current supernovae simulations and we present preliminary proto neutron star cooling simulations including our pasta opacities.

  14. Stellar electron capture rates on neutron-rich nuclei and their impact on core-collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, Ad R; Oertel, M

    2016-01-01

    During the late stages of gravitational core-collapse of massive stars, extreme isospin asymmetries are reached within the core. Due to the lack of microscopic calculations of electron capture (EC) rates for all relevant nuclei, in general simple analytic parameterizations are employed. We study here several extensions of these parameterizations, allowing for a temperature, electron density and isospin dependence as well as for odd-even effects. The latter extra degrees of freedom considerably improve the agreement with large scale microscopic rate calculations. We find, in particular, that the isospin dependence leads to a significant reduction of the global EC rates during core collapse with respect to fiducial results, where rates optimized on calculations of stable $fp$-shell nuclei are used. Our results indicate that systematic microscopic calculations and experimental measurements in the $N\\approx 50$ neutron rich region are desirable for realistic simulations of the core-collapse.

  15. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, Wesley Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dolence, Joshua C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  16. Convective Properties of Rotating Two-Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernova Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Arnett, W David; Timmes, F X

    2016-01-01

    We explore the effects of rotation on convective carbon, oxygen, and silicon shell burning during the late stages of evolution in a 20Msun star. Using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) we construct 1D stellar models both with no rotation and with an initial rigid rotation of 50% of critical. At different points during the evolution, we map the 1D models into 2D and follow the multidimensional evolution using the FLASH compressible hydrodynamics code for many convective turnover times until a quasi-steady state is reached. We characterize the strength and scale of convective motions via decomposition of the momentum density into vector spherical harmonics. We find that rotation influences the total power in solenoidal modes, with a slightly larger impact for carbon and oxygen shell burning than for silicon shell burning. Including rotation in one-dimensional (1D) stellar evolution models alters the structure of the star in a manner that has a significant impact on the character of mult...

  17. Phase transitions in Core-Collapse Supernova Matter at sub-saturation densities

    CERN Document Server

    Pais, Helena; Stone, Jirina R

    2014-01-01

    We perform a three-dimensional, finite temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock study of inhomogeneous nuclear matter to determine the critical density and temperature for the phase transition between the pasta phase and homogeneous matter and its properties. We employ four different parametrizations of the Skyrme nuclear energy-density functional, SkM$^*$, SLy4, NRAPR and SQMC700, which span a range of saturation-density symmetry energy behaviours constrained by a variety of nuclear experimental probes. For each of these interactions we calculate free energy, pressure, entropy and chemical potentials in the range of particle number densities where the nuclear pasta phases are expected to exist, 0.02 - 0.12 fm$^{-3}$, temperatures 2 - 8 MeV and a proton fraction of 0.3. We find unambiguous evidence for a first-order phase transition to uniform matter, unsoftened by the presence of the pasta phases. No conclusive signs of first-order phase transition between the pasta phases is observed, and it is argued that the therm...

  18. General-Relativistic Simulations of Three-Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, C D; Moesta, P; Haas, R; Drasco, S; O'Connor, E; Reisswig, C; Meakin, C; Schnetter, E

    2012-01-01

    We study the three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics of the post-core-bounce phase of the collapse of a 27 solar-mass star and pay special attention to the development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and neutrino-driven convection. To this end, we perform 3D general-relativistic simulations with a 3-species neutrino leakage scheme with neutrino heating. Unlike "light-bulb" heating/cooling schemes, the leakage scheme captures the essential aspects of neutrino cooling, heating, and lepton number exchange as predicted by radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The 27 solar-mass progenitor was studied in 2D by B. Mueller et al. (2012; arXiv:1205.7078), who observed strong growth of the SASI while neutrino-driven convection was suppressed. In our 3D simulations, neutrino-driven convection grows from numerical perturbations imposed by our Cartesian grid. It becomes the dominant instability and leads to large-scale non-oscillatory deformations of the shock front. These will result in strongly aspherical...

  19. r-Process enrichment by magnetorotational core-collapse supernovae in the early dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    One of the hottest open issues in chemical evolution of $r$-process elements is fast enrichment in the early Universe. Clear evidence for it is seen in stellar abundances of extremely metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo. On the other hand, small-mass galaxies are the ideal testbed to follow the evolutionary features of r-process enrichment, given the potential rarity of production events yielding heavy r-process elements. Their occurrences become countable and thus an enrichment path due to each event can be found in the stellar abundances. We examine the chemical feature of Eu abundance at an early stage of [Fe/H] $\\lesssim -2$ in the Draco and Sculptor dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. Accordingly we constrain the properties of the Eu production in the early dSphs. We find that the Draco dSph experienced a few Eu production events while Eu enrichment took place more continuously in the Sculptor dSph due to its larger stellar mass. The event rate of Eu production is estimated to be about one per $100-200$ ...

  20. Prospects for true calorimetry on Kerr black holes in core-collapse supernovae and mergers

    CERN Document Server

    van Putten, Maurice H P M; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Masa-Katsu, Fujimoto; Della Valle, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Observational evidence for black hole spin down has been found in the normalized light curves of long GRBs in the BATSE catalogue. Over the duration $T_{90}$ of the burst, matter swept up by the central black hole is susceptible to non-axisymmetries producing gravitational radiation with a negative chirp. A time sliced matched filtering method is introduced to capture phase-coherence on intermediate timescales, $\\tau$, here tested by injection of templates into experimental strain noise, $h_n(t)$. For TAMA 300, $h_n(f)\\simeq 10^{-21}$ Hz$^{-\\frac{1}{2}}$ at $f=1$ kHz gives a sensitivity distance for a reasonably accurate extraction of the trajectory in the time frequency domain of about $D\\simeq 0.07-0.10$ Mpc for spin fown of black holes of mass $M=10-12M_\\odot$ with $\\tau=1$ s. Extrapolation to advanced detectors implies $D\\simeq 35-50$ Mpc for $h_n(f)\\simeq 2\\times 10^{-24}$ Hz$^{-\\frac{1}{2}}$ around 1 kHz, which will open a new window to rigorous calorimetry on Kerr black holes.